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Sample records for surface anticoagulant glycoprotein

  1. Glycoprotein on cell surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, T.

    1975-01-01

    There are conjugated polysaccharides in cell membranes and outside of animal cells, and they play important role in the control of cell behavior. In this paper, the studies on the glycoprotein on cell surfaces are reported. It was found that the glycoprotein on cell surfaces have both N-glycoside type and O-glycoside type saccharic chains. Therefore it can be concluded that the basic structure of the saccharic chains in the glycoprotein on cell surfaces is similar to that of blood serum and body fluid. The main glycoprotein in the membranes of red blood corpuscles has been studied most in detail, and it also has both types of saccharic chains. The glycoprotein in liver cell membranes was found to have only the saccharic chains of acid type and to be in different pattern from that in endoplasmic reticula and nuclear membranes, which also has the saccharic chains of neutral type. The structure of the saccharic chains of H-2 antigen, i.e. the peculiar glycoprotein on the surfaces of lymph system cells, has been studied, and it is similar to the saccharic chains of glycoprotein in blood serum. The saccharic chain structures of H-2 antigen and TL antigen are different. TL, H-2 (D), Lna and H-2 (K) are the glycoprotein on cell surfaces, and are independent molecules. The analysis of the saccharic chain patterns on cell surfaces was carried out, and it was shown that the acid type saccharic chains were similar to those of ordinary glycoprotein, because the enzyme of pneumococci hydrolyzed most of the acid type saccharic chains. The change of the saccharic chain patterns of glycoprotein on cell surfaces owing to canceration and multiplication is complex matter. (Kako, I.)

  2. Beta2-glycoprotein I dependent anticardiolipin antibodies and lupus anticoagulant in patients with recurrent pregnancy loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The present study was aimed to define the incidence of antiphospholipid antibodies of different types lupus anticoagulant (LAC, venereal disease research laboratory test (VDRL and Beta2-glycoprotein I dependent anticardiolipin antibodies Beta2 I aCL in our cohort of population experiencing recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL from Andhra Pradesh, South India. SETTING AND DESIGN: A referral case-control study at a tertiary centre over a period of 5 years. PARTICIPANTS: 150 couples experiencing 3 or more recurrent pregnancy losses with similar number of matched controls. MATERIAL AND METHODS: LAC activity was measured by the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT according to the method of Proctor and Rapaport with relevant modifications. VDRL analysis was performed by the kit method supplied by Ranbaxy Diagnostics Limited and Beta2 Glycoprotein I dependent anticardiolipin antibodies were estimated by ELISA kit (ORGen Tech, GmbH, Germany with human Beta2 Glycoprotein I as co-factor. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Statistical analysis was performed using Student′s t test. RESULTS: LAC activity was found positive in 11 women (10.28%. The mean +/- SE Beta2 I aCL concentration in the study group was 14.53 (micro/ml +/- 1.79 (range 0 to 90.4 micro/ml which was higher than the control group with a mean +/- SE of 7.26 (micro/ml +/- 0.40 (range 0 to 18 u/ml. The binding of the antibodies to the antigen was observed in 40.24% (n=33 of the cases compared to 6.09% (n=5 in controls. VDRL test was positive in 7(2.34% individuals (3 couples and 1 male partner and none among controls. CONCLUSIONS: The present study indicates the importance of antiphospholipid antibodies in women experiencing RPL and suggests the usefulness of screening for these antibodies as a mandatory routine for instituting efficient therapeutic regimens for a successful outcome of pregnancy.

  3. Involvement of Leishmania donovani major surface glycoprotein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The major surface glycoprotein gp63 of the kinetoplastid protozoal parasite Leishmania is implicated as a ligand mediating uptake of the parasite into, and survival within, the host macrophage. By expressing gp63 antisense RNA from an episomal vector in L. donovani promastigotes, gp63-deficient transfectants were ...

  4. Anti beta 2glycoprotein I antibodies and lupus anticoagulant in patients with recurrent pregnancy loss: prevalence and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, M; Aoki, K; Matsuura, E; Sasa, H; Yagami, Y

    1996-12-01

    Anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) were found to recognize beta 2glycoprotein I (beta 2GPI) structure altered by its interaction with an oxygen modified solid phase surface by gamma-ray radiation. Lupus anticoagulant (LA) has been reported to comprise anti prothrombin antibodies, anti factor X antibodies and anti beta 2GPI antibodies. The present study focuses on the possible association between antibodies against the altered beta 2GPI structure (anti beta 2GPI antibodies) and LA in patients with recurrent pregnancy loss. Moreover, the clinical significance of both subgroups of so-called antiphospholipid antibodies were investigated to cast light on the controversy of whether aCL and LA are risk factors for pregnancy losses. One hundred and ninety five women with a history of two or more unexplained consecutive miscarriages and 100 control pregnant women were tested. Lupus anticoagulant was detected by the dilute phospholipid activated partial thromboplastin time. Anti beta 2GPI antibodies were measured by the ELISA method using commercially oxygenated microtiter plates. Twenty two (11.3%) and 19 (9.7%) of the 195 recurrent aborters were, respectively, positive for LA and anti beta 2GPI antibodies. Seven (3.6%) of the aborters had both of them. None of the control pregnant women had LA. Three of the control pregnant women had anti beta 2GPI antibodies. Nine (40.9%) of 22 aborters with positive-LA had a history of miscarriages in the second trimester as compared to 8 (4.6%) of 173 aborters with negative-LA. (P = 0.000007, Odds ratio = 14.3). None of the 12 aborters with anti beta 2GPI antibodies but no LA had a history of second trimester-fetal loss. These results support the hypothesis that aCL and LA define two distinct but partly related populations and that aCL include two subtypes of antibodies, with and without LA activity. LA and anti beta 2GPI antibodies appear to be associated with pregnancy loss, with LA being linked not only to abortions in the first

  5. Patient-derived monoclonal antibodies directed towards beta2 glycoprotein-1 display lupus anticoagulant activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dienava-Verdoold, I.; Boon-Spijker, M. G.; de Groot, P. G.; Brinkman, H. J. M.; Voorberg, J.; Mertens, K.; Derksen, R. H. W. M.; de Laat, B.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) display a heterogeneous population of antibodies with beta(2) glycoprotein-1 (β(2)GP1) as the major antigen. We isolated and characterized human mAbs directed against β(2)GP1 from the immune repertoire of APS patients. Variable heavy chain repertoires

  6. Multiple genes encode the major surface glycoprotein of Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Powell, F; Edman, J C

    1993-01-01

    hydrophobic region at the carboxyl terminus. The presence of multiple related msg genes encoding the major surface glycoprotein of P. carinii suggests that antigenic variation is a possible mechanism for evading host defenses. Further characterization of this family of genes should allow the development......The major surface antigen of Pneumocystis carinii, a life-threatening opportunistic pathogen in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, is an abundant glycoprotein that functions in host-organism interactions. A monoclonal antibody to this antigen is protective in animals, and thus...... blot studies using chromosomal or restricted DNA, the major surface glycoproteins are the products of a multicopy family of genes. The predicted protein has an M(r) of approximately 123,000, is relatively rich in cysteine residues (5.5%) that are very strongly conserved, and contains a well conserved...

  7. Multiple genes encode the major surface glycoprotein of Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Powell, F; Edman, J C

    1993-01-01

    this antigen is a good candidate for development as a vaccine to prevent or control P. carinii infection. We have cloned and sequenced seven related but unique genes encoding the major surface glycoprotein of rat P. carinii. Partial amino acid sequencing confirmed the identity of these genes. Based on Southern...... blot studies using chromosomal or restricted DNA, the major surface glycoproteins are the products of a multicopy family of genes. The predicted protein has an M(r) of approximately 123,000, is relatively rich in cysteine residues (5.5%) that are very strongly conserved, and contains a well conserved...

  8. Multiple genes encode the major surface glycoprotein of Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Powell, F; Edman, J C

    1993-01-01

    The major surface antigen of Pneumocystis carinii, a life-threatening opportunistic pathogen in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, is an abundant glycoprotein that functions in host-organism interactions. A monoclonal antibody to this antigen is protective in animals, and thus...... hydrophobic region at the carboxyl terminus. The presence of multiple related msg genes encoding the major surface glycoprotein of P. carinii suggests that antigenic variation is a possible mechanism for evading host defenses. Further characterization of this family of genes should allow the development...... of novel approaches to the control of this pathogen....

  9. Structures and Functions of Pestivirus Glycoproteins: Not Simply Surface Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fun-In; Deng, Ming-Chung; Huang, Yu-Liang; Chang, Chia-Yi

    2015-06-29

    Pestiviruses, which include economically important animal pathogens such as bovine viral diarrhea virus and classical swine fever virus, possess three envelope glycoproteins, namely Erns, E1, and E2. This article discusses the structures and functions of these glycoproteins and their effects on viral pathogenicity in cells in culture and in animal hosts. E2 is the most important structural protein as it interacts with cell surface receptors that determine cell tropism and induces neutralizing antibody and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses. All three glycoproteins are involved in virus attachment and entry into target cells. E1-E2 heterodimers are essential for viral entry and infectivity. Erns is unique because it possesses intrinsic ribonuclease (RNase) activity that can inhibit the production of type I interferons and assist in the development of persistent infections. These glycoproteins are localized to the virion surface; however, variations in amino acids and antigenic structures, disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, and RNase activity can ultimately affect the virulence of pestiviruses in animals. Along with mutations that are driven by selection pressure, antigenic differences in glycoproteins influence the efficacy of vaccines and determine the appropriateness of the vaccines that are currently being used in the field.

  10. Structures and Functions of Pestivirus Glycoproteins: Not Simply Surface Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fun-In Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pestiviruses, which include economically important animal pathogens such as bovine viral diarrhea virus and classical swine fever virus, possess three envelope glycoproteins, namely Erns, E1, and E2. This article discusses the structures and functions of these glycoproteins and their effects on viral pathogenicity in cells in culture and in animal hosts. E2 is the most important structural protein as it interacts with cell surface receptors that determine cell tropism and induces neutralizing antibody and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses. All three glycoproteins are involved in virus attachment and entry into target cells. E1-E2 heterodimers are essential for viral entry and infectivity. Erns is unique because it possesses intrinsic ribonuclease (RNase activity that can inhibit the production of type I interferons and assist in the development of persistent infections. These glycoproteins are localized to the virion surface; however, variations in amino acids and antigenic structures, disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, and RNase activity can ultimately affect the virulence of pestiviruses in animals. Along with mutations that are driven by selection pressure, antigenic differences in glycoproteins influence the efficacy of vaccines and determine the appropriateness of the vaccines that are currently being used in the field.

  11. Systemic alteration of cell-surface and secreted glycoprotein expression in malignant breast cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Timpe, Leslie C; Yen, Roger; Haste, Nicole V; Litsakos-Cheung, Christina; Yen, Ten-Yang; Macher, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer cell lines express fewer transmembrane and secreted glycoproteins than nonmalignant ones. The objective of these experiments was to characterize the changes in the expression of several hundred glycoproteins quantitatively. Secreted and cell-surface glycoproteins were isolated using a glycoprotein capture protocol and then identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Glycoproteins expressed by a group of cell lines originating from malignant tumors of the breast were compared with th...

  12. A variant surface glycoprotein of Trypanosoma brucei is synthesized with a hydrophobic carboxy-terminal extension from purified glycoprotein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Boothroyd; G.A.M. Cross; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); P. Borst (Piet)

    1980-01-01

    textabstractSequential expression of variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs) enables the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei to evade the immune response of its mammalian hosts. Studies of several VSGs, which have been isolated as soluble molecules following disruption of cells in the absence of

  13. Antifreeze Glycoproteins Alter the Molecular Scale Surface Morphology of Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepeda, Salvador; Orme, Christine A.; Qiu, Roger; Yeh, Yin

    2003-03-01

    Trematomas borchgrevinki live in the harsh super-cooled waters of the Antarctic. Critical to their survival are antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) that further suppress the freezing temperature of their blood serum in addition to the colligative action of salts found in the ocean. These proteins also modify ice crystal growth habits as well as inhibit recrystallization in polycrystalline ice. To date many other types of antifreeze proteins have been identified in cold weather insects, plants, and other fish, but the exact mechanism is not entirely understood. The mechanism is non-colligative since only a few mg/ml are required for ice crystal growth inhibition and a non-equilibrium melting/freezing point hysteresis is observed. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can yield a wealth of surface information that can reveal molecular scale information of biomineralization processes. We use AFM to directly probe the surface of ice crystals grown from the vapor in the pure phase and in the presence of growth inhibitors/modifiers, AFGPs. Results show that the AFGPs heavily pin the surface of ice.

  14. Anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies are associated with pregnancy loss in women with the lupus anticoagulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Thomas; Zoghlami, Claudia; Kurz, Christine; Rumpold, Helmut; Quehenberger, Peter; Panzer, Simon; Pabinger, Ingrid

    2006-05-01

    The presence of lupus anticoagulant (LA) predisposes to fetal loss and to venous and arterial thrombosis; however, a subgroup of women is unaffected by pregnancy loss. Currently, no predictive markers are available for the identification of women positive for LA at increased risk for pregnancy loss. It was the aim of our study to investigate whether increased anti-beta2-GPI-antibodies predict pregnancy loss in women positive for LA. We performed a cross-sectional study in a cohort of 39 women with persistent LA, who had in total 111 pregnancies. Fifteen women had exclusively normal pregnancies (30 pregnancies) and 24 women had pregnancy losses (81 pregnancies). Anti-beta2-GPI-antibodies were determined using a semiquantitative enzyme linked immunoassay (QUANTA Lite beta2 GPI IgG and IgM; Inova Diagnostics). Increased levels of anti-beta2-GPI antibodies were significantly associated with pregnancy loss [odds ratio (OR) 9.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-56.4]. This risk was even higher in the subgroup of women (n = 16) with more than two miscarriages or fetal loss after the first trimester [OR 13.1, 95% CI 1.4-126.3]. There was no significant association between anticardiolipin antibodies and pregnancy loss [OR 3.5, 95% CI 0.7-17.6]. The co-existence of anti-beta2-GPI and anticardiolipin antibodies was also predictive for pregnancy loss [OR 6.1, 95% CI 1.3-29.7]. Interestingly, the prevalence of thrombosis was similar between women with normal pregnancy (87%) and those with pregnancy loss (75%). We conclude that increased levels of anti-beta2-GPI antibodies are predictive for pregnancy loss among women positive for LA, and that prophylactic treatment should be considered in these women even without a history of previous pregnancy loss.

  15. Systemic alteration of cell-surface and secreted glycoprotein expression in malignant breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpe, Leslie C; Yen, Roger; Haste, Nicole V; Litsakos-Cheung, Christina; Yen, Ten-Yang; Macher, Bruce A

    2013-11-01

    Breast cancer cell lines express fewer transmembrane and secreted glycoproteins than nonmalignant ones. The objective of these experiments was to characterize the changes in the expression of several hundred glycoproteins quantitatively. Secreted and cell-surface glycoproteins were isolated using a glycoprotein capture protocol and then identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Glycoproteins expressed by a group of cell lines originating from malignant tumors of the breast were compared with those expressed by a nonmalignant set. The average number of spectral counts (proportional to relative protein abundance) and the total number of glycopeptides in the malignant samples were reduced to about two-thirds of the level in the nonmalignant samples. Most glycoproteins were expressed at a different level in the malignant samples, with nearly as many increasing as decreasing. The glycoproteins with reduced expression accounted for a larger change in spectral counts, and hence for the net loss of spectral counts in the malignant lines. Similar results were found when the glycoproteins were studied via identified glycosylation sites only, or through identified sites together with non-glycopeptides. The overall reduction is largely due to the loss of integrins, laminins and other proteins that form or interact with the basement membrane.

  16. Prevalence and clinical associations of lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies, and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Kwang-Sook; Kim, Kyung-Eun; Kim, Jeong Man; Han, Jin-Yeong; Chung, Won-Tae; Kim, Kyeong-Hee

    2010-02-01

    The presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) is associated with the clinical features of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), which comprises venous and arterial thrombosis and pregnancy loss, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The prevalence of aPLs has been reported to be different in patient populations affected by either of these conditions. We performed a retrospective study to evaluate the prevalence and clinical associations of aPLs, including lupus anticoagulant (LAC), anticardiolipin (aCL), and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies (anti-beta2-GPI) in a cohort of Korean patients with SLE. This study included samples from 88 SLE patients for whom aPL testing had been advised between June 2006 and July 2009 at the Dong-A University Hospital. Serum and plasma samples were tested for LAC, aCL (IgG, IgM), and anti-beta2-GPI (IgG, IgM) antibodies. Clinical data from patients were obtained from a review of medical records. LAC was the most common (34.1% of total patients, 30/88) antibody, followed by IgM aCL (31.8%, 28/88), IgG aCL (18.2%, 16/88), and IgM and IgG anti-beta2-GPI (both 5.7%, 5/88 each). Positivity for LAC was strongly associated with venous/arterial thrombosis (P=0.002). LAC was the most common antibody detected in Korean SLE patients and is shown to have a significant association with the presence of venous/arterial thrombosis. The measurement of LAC may be clinically useful in identifying patients with SLE who are at a high risk for venous/arterial thrombosis.

  17. Anticoagulation and endothelial cell behaviors of heparin-loaded graphene oxide coating on titanium surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Chang-Jiang, E-mail: panchangjiang@hyit.edu.cn [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Interventional Medical Devices, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huai' an 223003 (China); Pang, Li-Qun [Department of General Surgery, Huai' an First People' s Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Huai' an 223300 (China); Gao, Fei [Zhejiang Zylox Medical Devices Co., Ltd., Hangzhou 310000 (China); Wang, Ya-Nan; Liu, Tao; Ye, Wei; Hou, Yan-Hua [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Interventional Medical Devices, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huai' an 223003 (China)

    2016-06-01

    Owing to its unique physical and chemical properties, graphene oxide (GO) has attracted tremendous interest in many fields including biomaterials and biomedicine. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the endothelial cell behaviors and anticoagulation of heparin-loaded GO coating on the titanium surface. To this end, the titanium surface was firstly covered by the polydopamine coating followed by the deposition of the GO coating. Heparin was finally loaded on the GO coating to improve the blood compatibility. The results of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that the heparin-loaded GO coating was successfully created on the titanium surface. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicated that a relative uniform GO coating consisting of multilayer GO sheets was formed on the substrate. The hydrophilicity of the titanium surface was enhanced after the deposition of GO and further improved significantly by the loading heparin. The GO coating can enhance the endothelial cell adhesion and proliferation as compared with polydopamine coating and the blank titanium. Loading heparin on the GO coating can significantly reduce the platelet adhesion and prolong the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) while not influence the endothelial cell adhesion and proliferation. Therefore, the heparin-loaded GO coating can simultaneously enhance the cytocompatibility to endothelial cells and blood compatibility of biomaterials. Because the polydopamine coating can be easily prepared on most of biomaterials including polymer, ceramics and metal, thus the approach of the present study may open up a new window of promising an effective and efficient way to promote endothelialization and improve the blood compatibility of blood-contact biomedical devices such as intravascular stents. - Highlights: • Heparin-loaded graphene oxide coating was

  18. Enhancing anticoagulation and endothelial cell proliferation of titanium surface by sequential immobilization of poly(ethylene glycol) and collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Chang-Jiang; Hou, Yan-Hua; Ding, Hong-Yan; Dong, Yun-Xiao

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and collagen I were sequentially immobilized on the titanium surface to simultaneously improve the anticoagulation and endothelial cell proliferation. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed that PEG and collagen I were successfully immobilized on the titanium surface. Water contact angle results suggested the excellent hydrophilic surface after the immobilization. The anticoagulation experiments demonstrated that the immobilized PEG and collagen I on the titanium surface could not only obviously prevent platelet adhesion and aggregation but also prolong activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), leading to the improved blood compatibility. Furthermore, immobilization of collagen to the end of PEG chain did not abate the anticoagulation. As compared to those on the pristine and PEG-modified titanium surfaces, endothelial cells exhibited improved proliferative profiles on the surface modified by the sequential immobilization of PEG and collagen in terms of CCK-8 assay, implying that the modified titanium may promote endothelialization without abating the blood compatibility. Our method may be used to modify the surface of blood-contacting biomaterials such as titanium to promote endothelialization and improve the anticoagulation, it may be helpful for development of the biomedical devices such as coronary stents, where endothelializaton and excellent anticoagulation are required.

  19. The promoter for a variant surface glycoprotein gene expression site in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomerdijk, J. C.; Ouellette, M.; ten Asbroek, A. L.; Kieft, R.; Bommer, A. M.; Clayton, C. E.; Borst, P.

    1990-01-01

    The variant-specific surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene 221 of Trypanosoma brucei is transcribed as part of a 60 kb expression site (ES). We have identified the promoter controlling this multigene transcription unit by the use of 221 chromosome-enriched DNA libraries and VSG gene 221 expression site

  20. Extracellular matrix inspired surface functionalization with heparin, fibronectin and VEGF provides an anticoagulant and endothelialization supporting microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xue [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Chinese Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu (China); Liu, Tao [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Chinese Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Interventional Medical Devices, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huai’an (China); Chen, Yuan [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Chinese Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu (China); Zhang, Kun [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Chinese Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu (China); School of Life Science, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Maitz, Manfred F. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Chinese Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu (China); Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden, Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Hohe Str. 06, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Pan, Changjiang [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Interventional Medical Devices, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huai’an (China); Chen, Junying, E-mail: chenjy@263.net [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Chinese Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu (China); Huang, Nan [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Chinese Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu (China)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Surface modification with fibronectin, heparin and VEGF could selectively anticoagulant and promote endothelialization. • The bioactivity of biomolecules was more efficiently maintained via specific intermolecular interaction. • Poly-l-lysine interlayer was more feasible and the degradation product had no harm to human body. - Abstract: The biocompatibility of currently used coronary artery stent is still far from perfect, which closely related to insufficient endothelialization and thrombus formation. In this study, heparin, fibronectin and VEGF were immobilized on Ti surface to construct a multifunctional microenvironment with favorable properties to inhibit thrombosis formation and promote endothelialization simultaneously. The microenvironment on Ti surface was characterized in detail and demonstrated that the Hep/Fn/VEGF biofunctional coating was constructed successfully on Ti surface. The influence of surface properties such as chemical composition, roughness, hydrophilicity, and binding density of biomolecules on the performances of hemocompatibility and cytocompatibility was evaluated and discussed. Modified surface significantly enhanced the AT III binding density and prolonged the clotting time. In vitro platelet adhesion and activation assays further proved that the modified surface presented favorable anti-coagulant property. In addition, the proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) on the Hep/Fn/VEGF biofunctional coating was significantly promoted. In conclusion, the Hep/Fn/VEGF biofunctional coating was successfully constructed with desirable anticoagulant and endothelialization supporting properties. This work may provide a promising approach for biofunctional surface modification of coronary artery stent to acquire a desired multifunctional microenvironment.

  1. Extracellular matrix inspired surface functionalization with heparin, fibronectin and VEGF provides an anticoagulant and endothelialization supporting microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xue; Liu, Tao; Chen, Yuan; Zhang, Kun; Maitz, Manfred F.; Pan, Changjiang; Chen, Junying; Huang, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Surface modification with fibronectin, heparin and VEGF could selectively anticoagulant and promote endothelialization. • The bioactivity of biomolecules was more efficiently maintained via specific intermolecular interaction. • Poly-l-lysine interlayer was more feasible and the degradation product had no harm to human body. - Abstract: The biocompatibility of currently used coronary artery stent is still far from perfect, which closely related to insufficient endothelialization and thrombus formation. In this study, heparin, fibronectin and VEGF were immobilized on Ti surface to construct a multifunctional microenvironment with favorable properties to inhibit thrombosis formation and promote endothelialization simultaneously. The microenvironment on Ti surface was characterized in detail and demonstrated that the Hep/Fn/VEGF biofunctional coating was constructed successfully on Ti surface. The influence of surface properties such as chemical composition, roughness, hydrophilicity, and binding density of biomolecules on the performances of hemocompatibility and cytocompatibility was evaluated and discussed. Modified surface significantly enhanced the AT III binding density and prolonged the clotting time. In vitro platelet adhesion and activation assays further proved that the modified surface presented favorable anti-coagulant property. In addition, the proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) on the Hep/Fn/VEGF biofunctional coating was significantly promoted. In conclusion, the Hep/Fn/VEGF biofunctional coating was successfully constructed with desirable anticoagulant and endothelialization supporting properties. This work may provide a promising approach for biofunctional surface modification of coronary artery stent to acquire a desired multifunctional microenvironment

  2. A Novel Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensors with Special Boronic Acid Derivative to Detect Glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We proposed and demonstrated a novel tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR label-free biosensor via a special boronic acid derivative to detect glycoprotein with high sensitivity and selectivity. TFBG, as an effective sensing element for optical sensing in near-infrared wavelengths, possess the unique capability of easily exciting the SPR effect on fiber surface which coated with a nano-scale metal layer. SPR properties can be accurately detected by measuring the variation of transmitted spectra at optical communication wavelengths. In our experiment, a 10° TFBG coated with a 50 nm gold film was manufactured to stimulate SPR on a sensor surface. To detect glycoprotein selectively, the sensor was immobilized using designed phenylboronic acid as the recognition molecule, which can covalently bond with 1,2- or 1,3-diols to form five- or six-membered cyclic complexes for attaching diol-containing biomolecules and proteins. The phenylboronic acid was synthetized with long alkyl groups offering more flexible space, which was able to improve the capability of binding glycoprotein. The proposed TFBG-SPR sensors exhibit good selectivity and repeatability with a protein concentration sensitivity up to 2.867 dB/ (mg/mL and a limit of detection (LOD of 15.56 nM.

  3. An international multicentre-laboratory evaluation of a new assay to detect specifically lupus anticoagulants dependent on the presence of anti-beta2-glycoprotein autoantibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de laat, B.; Derksen, R. H. W. M.; Reber, G.; Musial, J.; Swadzba, J.; Bozic, B.; Cucnik, S.; Regnault, V.; Forastiero, R.; Woodhams, B. J.; de Groot, Ph. G.

    Background: Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is diagnosed by the simultaneous presence of vascular thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity and detection of antiphospholipid antibodies in plasma. Objectives: We have shown that prolongation of clotting time by anti-beta2-glycoprotein I (beta2GPI)

  4. Defining the antibody cross-reactome directed against the influenza virus surface glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbagauer, Raffael; Choi, Angela; Hirsh, Ariana; Margine, Irina; Iida, Sayaka; Barrera, Aldo; Ferres, Marcela; Albrecht, Randy A; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Bouvier, Nicole M; Ito, Kimihito; Medina, Rafael A; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian

    2017-04-01

    Infection with influenza virus induces antibodies to the viral surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, and these responses can be broadly protective. To assess the breadth and magnitude of antibody responses, we sequentially infected mice, guinea pigs and ferrets with divergent H1N1 or H3N2 subtypes of influenza virus. We measured antibody responses by ELISA of an extensive panel of recombinant glycoproteins representing the viral diversity in nature. Guinea pigs developed high titers of broadly cross-reactive antibodies; mice and ferrets exhibited narrower humoral responses. Then, we compared antibody responses after infection of humans with influenza virus H1N1 or H3N2 and found markedly broad responses and cogent evidence for 'original antigenic sin'. This work will inform the design of universal vaccines against influenza virus and can guide pandemic-preparedness efforts directed against emerging influenza viruses.

  5. Defining the antibody cross-reactome against the influenza virus surface glycoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbagauer, Raffael; Choi, Angela; Hirsh, Ariana; Margine, Irina; Iida, Sayaka; Barrera, Aldo; Ferres, Marcela; Albrecht, Randy A.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Bouvier, Nicole M.; Ito, Kimihito; Medina, Rafael A.; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Summary Influenza virus infections induce antibodies against the viral surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, and these responses can be broadly protective. To test the breadth and magnitude of antibody responses, mice, guinea pigs and ferrets were sequentially infected with divergent H1N1 or H3N2 viruses. Antibody responses were measured by ELISA against an extensive panel of recombinant glycoproteins representing the viral diversity in nature. Guinea pigs developed high titers of broadly cross-reactive antibodies; mice and ferrets exhibited narrower humoral responses. Then, we compared antibody responses after H1N1 or H3N2 infections in humans and found markedly broad responses and cogent evidence for original antigenic sin. This work will inform universal influenza vaccine design and can guide pandemic preparedness efforts against emerging influenza viruses. PMID:28192418

  6. Manipulating the surface active and anticoagulant properties of heparin through amphiphilic molecular constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Rosita Candida

    Cardiovascular devices implanted within the vasculature are subjected to non-specific adsorption of plasma proteins. This initiates the blood coagulation cascade and platelet adhesion and activation, leading to thrombus formation. In this thesis Heparin Alkyl Diblock (HAD) surfactants were developed to improve the blood compatibility of cardiovascular biomaterials. The material designs involved using heparin, a natural anticoagulant, to inhibit coagulation pathway enzymes and mimic the cell glycocalyx to provide a repulsive force field to inhibit non-specific protein adsorption. Type AB linear (HAD Cn, n = 6,10,12,18) and branched (HAD nx 18, n = 2,3,4) heparin surfactants were synthesized by end point coupling primary and secondary alkyl amines to heparin via reductive amination. Surfactant yields (83--4%) and anticoagulant activity (149.8 +/- 3.7--39.6 +/- 0.6 IU/mg) decreased with increased branching and hydrocarbon number. Surfactant adsorption, self assembly and molecular packing of HAD surfactants at the air/liquid and liquid/solid interface were a function of the number of hydrocarbons in the surfactant alkyl segment and the presence or absence of an ionic liquid phase. Increased molecular packing was observed at the air/PBS and PBS/graphite interface, relative to aqueous interfaces, resulting from buffer cations shielding heparin's negatively charged sulfate and carboxyl groups. At the PBS/graphite interface, the surfactant's apparent heparin head group cross section decreased in diameter (1.84 to 1.05 nm) and increased in tilt angle (75.7 to 81.9°) with increasing alkyl carbon number (n = 6 to 18). The heparin head group reached a minimum diameter, equivalent to the surfactant's diameter at the air/PBS interface (0.57 nm) just prior to 36 hydrocarbons in the surfactant. For surfactants with 36 to 78 hydrocarbons, the surfactant's heparin head group oriented normal to the graphite surface and alkyl overlap or interdigitation increased (0.02 to 0.59 nm

  7. Fasciola hepatica Surface Tegument: Glycoproteins at the Interface of Parasite and Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravidà, Alessandra; Cwiklinski, Krystyna; Aldridge, Allison M; Clarke, Paul; Thompson, Roisin; Gerlach, Jared Q; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Hokke, Cornelis H; Dalton, John P; O'Neill, Sandra M

    2016-10-01

    Fasciola hepatica, commonly known as liver fluke, is a trematode that causes Fasciolosis in ruminants and humans. The outer tegumental coat of F. hepatica (FhTeg) is a complex metabolically active biological matrix that is continually exposed to the host immune system and therefore makes a good vaccine target. F. hepatica tegumental coat is highly glycosylated and helminth-derived immunogenic oligosaccharide motifs and glycoproteins are currently being investigated as novel vaccine candidates. This report presents the first systematic characterization of FhTeg glycosylation using lectin microarrays to characterize carbohydrates motifs present, and lectin histochemistry to localize these on the F. hepatica tegument. We discovered that FhTeg glycoproteins are predominantly oligomannose oligosaccharides that are expressed on the spines, suckers and tegumental coat of F. hepatica and lectin blot analysis confirmed the abundance of N- glycosylated proteins. Although some oligosaccharides are widely distributed on the fluke surface other subsets are restricted to distinct anatomical regions. We selectively enriched for FhTeg mannosylated glycoprotein subsets using lectin affinity chromatography and identified 369 proteins by mass spectrometric analysis. Among these proteins are a number of potential vaccine candidates with known immune modulatory properties including proteases, protease inhibitors, paramyosin, Venom Allergen-like II, Enolase and two proteins, nardilysin and TRIL, that have not been previously associated with F. hepatica Furthermore, we provide a comprehensive insight regarding the putative glycosylation of FhTeg components that could highlight the importance of further studies examining glycoconjugates in host-parasite interactions in the context of F. hepatica infection and the development of an effective vaccine. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Fasciola hepatica Surface Tegument: Glycoproteins at the Interface of Parasite and Host*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravidà, Alessandra; Cwiklinski, Krystyna; Aldridge, Allison M.; Clarke, Paul; Thompson, Roisin; Gerlach, Jared Q.; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Dalton, John P.; O'Neill, Sandra M.

    2016-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica, commonly known as liver fluke, is a trematode that causes Fasciolosis in ruminants and humans. The outer tegumental coat of F. hepatica (FhTeg) is a complex metabolically active biological matrix that is continually exposed to the host immune system and therefore makes a good vaccine target. F. hepatica tegumental coat is highly glycosylated and helminth-derived immunogenic oligosaccharide motifs and glycoproteins are currently being investigated as novel vaccine candidates. This report presents the first systematic characterization of FhTeg glycosylation using lectin microarrays to characterize carbohydrates motifs present, and lectin histochemistry to localize these on the F. hepatica tegument. We discovered that FhTeg glycoproteins are predominantly oligomannose oligosaccharides that are expressed on the spines, suckers and tegumental coat of F. hepatica and lectin blot analysis confirmed the abundance of N- glycosylated proteins. Although some oligosaccharides are widely distributed on the fluke surface other subsets are restricted to distinct anatomical regions. We selectively enriched for FhTeg mannosylated glycoprotein subsets using lectin affinity chromatography and identified 369 proteins by mass spectrometric analysis. Among these proteins are a number of potential vaccine candidates with known immune modulatory properties including proteases, protease inhibitors, paramyosin, Venom Allergen-like II, Enolase and two proteins, nardilysin and TRIL, that have not been previously associated with F. hepatica. Furthermore, we provide a comprehensive insight regarding the putative glycosylation of FhTeg components that could highlight the importance of further studies examining glycoconjugates in host-parasite interactions in the context of F. hepatica infection and the development of an effective vaccine. PMID:27466253

  9. The macrophage CD163 surface glycoprotein is an erythroblast adhesion receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabriek, Babs O; Polfliet, Machteld M J; Vloet, Rianka P M

    2007-01-01

    on the surface of macrophages in erythroblastic islands, in erythroblast binding. In particular, the monoclonal antibody ED2 was found to inhibit erythroblast binding to bone marrow macrophages. Here, we identify the ED2 antigen as the rat CD163 surface glycoprotein, a member of the group B scavenger receptor...... cysteine-rich (SRCR) family that has previously been shown to function as a receptor for hemoglobin-haptoglobin (Hb-Hp) complexes and is believed to contribute to the clearance of free hemoglobin. CD163 transfectants and recombinant protein containing the extracellular domain of CD163 supported...... the adhesion of erythroblastic cells. Furthermore, we identified a 13-amino acid motif (CD163p2) corresponding to a putative interaction site within the second scavenger receptor domain of CD163 that could mediate erythroblast binding. Finally, CD163p2 promoted erythroid expansion in vitro, suggesting...

  10. Surface (glyco-)proteins: primary structure and crystallization under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, H.; Akca, E.; Schultz, N.; Karbach, G.; Schlott, B.; Debaerdemaeker, T.; De Clercq, J.-P.; König, H.

    2001-08-01

    The Archaea comprise microorganisms that live under environmental extremes, like high temperature, low pH value or high salt concentration. Their cells are often covered by a single layer of (glyco)protein subunits (S-layer) in hexagonal arrangement. In order to get further hints about the molecular mechanisms of protein stabilization we compared the primary and secondary structures of archaeal S-layer (glyco)proteins. We found an increase of charged amino acids in the S-layer proteins of the extreme thermophilic species compared to their mesophilic counterparts. Our data and those of other authors suggest that ionic interactions, e.g., salt bridges seem to be played a major role in protein stabilization at high temperatures. Despite the differences in the growth optima and the predominance of some amino acids the primary structures of S-layers revealed also a significant degree of identity between phylogenetically related archaea. These obervations indicate that protein sequences of S-layers have been conserved during the evolution from extremely thermophilic to mesophilic life. To support these findings the three-dimensional structure of the S-layer proteins has to be elucidated. Recently, we described the first successful crystallization of an extreme thermophilic surface(glyco)protein under microgravity conditions.

  11. Mapping of surface glycoproteins of Trypanosoma cruzi by two-dimensional electrophoresis. A correlation with the cell invasion capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, N W; Katzin, A M; Colli, W

    1984-05-02

    The cell-surface iodinatable proteins of Trypanosoma cruzi have been analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under equilibrium conditions. Antigenic polypeptides were characterized after immunoprecipitation and glycoproteins were identified by means of lectin-affinity chromatography. Two glycoproteins, with affinity for concanavalin A, were found to be common to both infective (trypomastigote) and non-infective (epimastigote) forms: protein 1 (90 kDa, pI 5.5-6.5) and protein 2 (80 kDa, pI 5.3-6.3). In epimastigotes a specific concanavalin-A-binding surface glycoprotein (70 kDa, pI 5.5) was identified. Trypomastigote forms, on the other hand, presented several specific iodinatable surface components: glycoproteins 3(85 kDa, pI 5.5), 4 (85 kDa, pI 5.0), 6 (100 kDa, pI 6.5), 7 (120 kDa, pI 6.3), 8 (68 kDa, pI 6.7) and several minor high-molecular-mass acid proteins, all containing glucose and/or mannose, and glycoprotein 5 (85 kDa, pI 6.3-7.5), containing N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (Tc-85). Proteins 1, 2 and 5 were the only ones which gave clear evidence of charge heterogeneity. Most of the surface proteins of trypomastigote forms, the exception being proteins 3, 4 and 8, were removed by treatment with trypsin. This proteolytic treatment results in 90% inhibition of the in vitro vertebrate-cell-invasion capacity of the parasites. Upon reincubation in culture medium for 4 h, the trypsin-removed glycoproteins are again detected, an observation that correlates well with the recovery of the cell-penetration capacity observed in the same period.

  12. Variability and Immunogenicity of Caprine Arthritis-Encephalitis Virus Surface Glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valas, S.; Benoit, C.; Baudry, C.; Perrin, G.; Mamoun, R. Z.

    2000-01-01

    The complete surface glycoprotein (SU) nucleotide sequences of three French isolates of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) were determined and compared with those of previously described isolates: three American isolates and one French isolate. Phylogenetic analyses revealed the existence of four distinct and roughly equidistant evolutionary CAEV subtypes. Four conserved and five variable domains were identified in the SU. The fine specificities of antibodies produced against these domains during natural infection were examined using a pepscan analysis. Nine immunogenic segments were delineated throughout the conserved and variable domains of SU, two of them corresponding to conserved immunodominant epitopes. Antigenic determinants which may be involved in the immunopathogenic process induced by CAEV were identified. These results also provide sensitive and specific antigen peptides for the serological detection and differentiation of CAEV and visna/maedi virus infections. PMID:10846103

  13. Anticoagulant Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte

    Although sewer rat control is carried out in more than 80 % of all Danish municipalities, with usage of large amounts of anticoagulant rodenticides, knowledge on anticoagulant resistance among rats living in the sewers is limited. As rat problems in urban areas are believed to be related to sewer...... problems (70-90 % in UK and DK) unawareness of resistance amongst these populations of Brown rats may constitute a future control problem and knowledge on this issue has become crucial. Rats were captured in sewers from seven different locations in the suburban area of Copenhagen. Locations was chosen...... to represent different sewer rat management strategies i) no anticoagulants for approx. 20 years ii) no anticoagulants for the last 5 years and iii) continuous control for many years. Animals were tested for resistance to bromadiolone by Blood-Clotting Response test, as bromadiolone is the most frequently used...

  14. Analysis of Structures and Epitopes of Surface Antigen Glycoproteins Expressed in Bradyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Cong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite capable of infecting humans and animals. Surface antigen glycoproteins, SAG2C, -2D, -2X, and -2Y, are expressed on the surface of bradyzoites. These antigens have been shown to protect bradyzoites against immune responses during chronic infections. We studied structures of SAG2C, -2D, -2X, and -2Y proteins using bioinformatics methods. The protein sequence alignment was performed by T-Coffee method. Secondary structural and functional domains were predicted using software PSIPRED v3.0 and SMART software, and 3D models of proteins were constructed and compared using the I-TASSER server, VMD, and SWISS-spdbv. Our results showed that SAG2C, -2D, -2X, and -2Y are highly homologous proteins. They share the same conserved peptides and HLA-I restricted epitopes. The similarity in structure and domains indicated putative common functions that might stimulate similar immune response in hosts. The conserved peptides and HLA-restricted epitopes could provide important insights on vaccine study and the diagnosis of this disease.

  15. Crystal Structure of West Nile Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Reveals Viral Surface Epitopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanai,R.; Kar, K.; Anthony, K.; Gould, L.; Ledizet, M.; Fikrig, E.; Marasco, W.; Koski, R.; Modis, Y.

    2006-01-01

    West Nile virus, a member of the Flavivirus genus, causes fever that can progress to life-threatening encephalitis. The major envelope glycoprotein, E, of these viruses mediates viral attachment and entry by membrane fusion. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment of West Nile virus E. The structure adopts the same overall fold as that of the E proteins from dengue and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. The conformation of domain II is different from that in other prefusion E structures, however, and resembles the conformation of domain II in postfusion E structures. The epitopes of neutralizing West Nile virus-specific antibodies map to a region of domain III that is exposed on the viral surface and has been implicated in receptor binding. In contrast, we show that certain recombinant therapeutic antibodies, which cross-neutralize West Nile and dengue viruses, bind a peptide from domain I that is exposed only during the membrane fusion transition. By revealing the details of the molecular landscape of the West Nile virus surface, our structure will assist the design of antiviral vaccines and therapeutics.

  16. Glucocorticoid-regulated and constitutive trafficking of proteolytically processed cell surface-associated glycoproteins in wild type and variant rat hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amacher, S.L.; Goodman, L.J.; Bravo, D.A.; Wong, K.Y.; Goldfine, I.D.; Hawley, D.M.; Firestone, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    Glucocorticoids regulate the trafficking of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) glycoproteins to the cell surface in the rat hepatoma cell line M1.54, but not in the immunoselected sorting variant CR4. To compare the localization of MMTV glycoproteins to another proteolytically processed glycoprotein, both wild type M1.54 cells and variant CR4 cells were transfected with a human insulin receptor (hIR) expression vector, pRSVhIR. The production of cell surface hIR was monitored in dexamethasone-treated and -untreated wild type M1.54 and variant CR4 cells by indirect immunofluorescence, direct plasma membrane immunoprecipitation, and by [125I] insulin binding. In both wild type and variant rat hepatoma cells, hIR were localized at the cell surface in the presence or in the absence of 1 microM dexamethasone. In contrast, the glucocorticoid-regulated trafficking of cell surface MMTV glycoproteins occurred only in wild type M1.54 cells. We conclude that the hIR, which undergoes posttranslational processing reactions similar to MMTV glycoproteins, does not require glucocorticoids to be transported to the plasma membrane and is representative of a subset of cell surface glycoproteins whose trafficking is constitutive in rat hepatoma cells. Thus, MMTV glycoproteins and hIR provide specific cell surface markers to characterize the glucocorticoid-regulated and constitutive sorting pathways

  17. Cell Surface Glycoprotein of Reactive Stromal Fibroblasts as a Potential Antibody Target in Human Epithelial Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Old, Lloyd J.; Rettig, Wolfgang J.

    1990-09-01

    The F19 antigen is a cell surface glycoprotein (M_r, 95,000) of human sarcomas and proliferating, cultured fibroblasts that is absent from resting fibroblasts in normal adult tissues. Normal and malignant epithelial cells are also F19^-. The present immunohistochemical study describes induction of F19 in the reactive mesenchyme of epithelial tumors. F19^+ fibroblasts were found in primary and metastatic carcinomas, including colorectal (18 of 18 cases studied), breast (14/14), ovarian (21/21), bladder (9/10), and lung carcinomas (13/13). In contrast, the stroma of benign colorectal adenomas, fibrocystic disease and fibroadenomas of breast, benign prostate hyperplasia, in situ bladder carcinomas, and benign ovarian tumors showed no or only moderate numbers of F19^+ fibroblasts. Analysis of dermal incision wounds revealed that F19 is strongly induced during scar formation. Comparison of F19 with the extracellular matrix protein tenascin, a putative marker of tumor mesenchyme, showed a cellular staining pattern for F19 vs. the extracellular matrix pattern for tenascin and widespread expression of tenascin in F19^- normal tissues and benign tumors. Our results suggest that the F19^+ phenotype correlates with specialized fibroblast functions in wound healing and malignant tumor growth. Because of its abundance in tumor mesenchyme, F19 may serve as a target for antibodies labeled with radioisotopes or toxic agents, or inflammatogenic antibodies, in carcinoma patients.

  18. A combination of "thiol-ene" click chemistry and surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization: Fabrication of boronic acid functionalized magnetic graphene oxide composite for enrichment of glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jie; He, Xiwen; Chen, Langxing; Zhang, Yukui

    2018-04-01

    An efficient glycoproteins enrichment platform is one of vital preprocessing steps in biomarker research and in particular glycoproteomics. In this work, a well-defined boronic acid functionalized magnetic graphene oxide nanocomposite (Fe 3 O 4 -GO@PAAPBA) was synthesized for the selective enrichment of glycoproteins from complex biological samples via a novel strategy based on the "thiol-ene" click chemistry and surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). The initiator of ATRP was anchored to the surface of substrate through "thiol-ene" click reaction. The product Fe 3 O 4 -GO@PAAPBA was successfully synthesized in following SI-ATRP. The Fe 3 O 4 -GO@PAAPBA nanocomposite was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and thermogravimetric analysis. The adsorption capacity of Fe 3 O 4 -GO@PAAPBA towards ovalbumin (OVA) and transferrin (Trf) is 471mgg -1 and 450mgg -1 , respectively. The nanocomposite also featured good selectivity to glycoproteins in the mixture of glycoproteins and non-glycoproteins at alkaline (pH 9.0) and physiological conditions (pH 7.4). Furthermore, it can be applied to extract glycoproteins directly from egg white samples. These results have indicated that Fe 3 O 4 -GO@PAAPBA was a potential affinity material in glycoprotein analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Role played by exosporium glycoproteins in the surface properties of Bacillus cereus spores and in their adhesion to stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequette, Yannick; Garénaux, Estelle; Tauveron, Grégoire; Dumez, Sylvain; Perchat, Stéphane; Slomianny, Christian; Lereclus, Didier; Guérardel, Yann; Faille, Christine

    2011-07-01

    Bacillus cereus spores are surrounded by a loose-fitting layer called the exosporium, whose distal part is mainly formed from glycoproteins. The role played by the exosporium glycoproteins of B. cereus ATCC 14579 (BclA and ExsH) was investigated by considering hydrophobicity and charge, as well as the properties of spore adhesion to stainless steel. The absence of BclA increased both the isoelectric point (IEP) and hydrophobicity of whole spores while simultaneously reducing the interaction between spores and stainless steel. However, neither the hydrophobicity nor the charge associated with BclA could explain the differences in the adhesion properties. Conversely, ExsH, another exosporium glycoprotein, did not play a significant role in spore surface properties. The monosaccharide analysis of B. cereus ATCC 14579 showed different glycosylation patterns on ExsH and BclA. Moreover, two specific glycosyl residues, namely, 2-O-methyl-rhamnose (2-Me-Rha) and 2,4-O-methyl-rhamnose (2,4-Me-Rha), were attached to BclA, in addition to the glycosyl residues already reported in B. anthracis.

  20. The adsorption and lubrication behavior of synovial fluid proteins and glycoproteins on the bearing-surface materials of hip replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roba, Marcella; Naka, Marco; Gautier, Emanuel; Spencer, Nicholas D; Crockett, Rowena

    2009-04-01

    The selectivity of synovial fluid protein adsorption onto ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and alumina (Al(2)O(3)), and in particular the ability of glycoproteins to adsorb in the presence of all the other synovial fluid proteins, was investigated by means of fluorescence microscopy and gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The non-specific nature of protein adsorption from synovial fluid indicated that the lubrication of artificial hip-joint materials may not be attributable to a single protein as has been frequently suggested. The friction behavior of polyethylene (PE) sliding against Al(2)O(3) in solutions of bovine serum albumin (BSA), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) was investigated by means of colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. BSA was shown to be a poorer boundary lubricant than the phosphate buffered saline used as a control. This was attributed to denaturation of the BSA upon adsorption, which provided a high-shear-strength layer at the interface, impairing the lubrication. Interestingly, both the glycoproteins AGP and A1AT, despite their low concentrations, improved lubrication. The lubricating properties of AGP and A1AT were attributed to adsorption via the hydrophobic backbone, allowing the hydrophilic carbohydrate moieties to be exposed to the aqueous solution, thus providing a low-shear-strength fluid film that lubricated the system. The amount of glycoprotein adsorbed on hydrophobic surfaces was determined by means of optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS), allowing conclusions to be drawn about the conformation of the glycan residues following adsorption.

  1. Dimers of beta 2-glycoprotein I mimic the in vitro effects of beta 2-glycoprotein I-anti-beta 2-glycoprotein I antibody complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutters, B. C.; Meijers, J. C.; Derksen, R. H.; Arnout, J.; de Groot, P. G.

    2001-01-01

    Anti-beta(2)-glycoprotein I antibodies are thought to cause lupus anticoagulant activity by forming bivalent complexes with beta(2)-glycoprotein I (beta(2)GPI). To test this hypothesis, chimeric fusion proteins were constructed of the dimerization domain (apple 4) of factor XI and beta(2)GPI. Both a

  2. Bactericidal action of a glycoprotein from the body surface mucus of giant African snail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka-Fuchino, H; Watanabe, Y; Hirakawa, C; Tamiya, T; Matsumoto, J J; Tsuchiya, T

    1992-04-01

    1. Bactericidal action of a glycoprotein, Achacin, purified from the giant African snail, Achatina fulica Férussac, has been studied. 2. Achacin kills both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, but only in their growing states. 3. Achacin does not have any bacteriolytic activity. 4. The strain which has no cell wall is a little more sensitive than the native strain and the cell membrane-damaged strain. 5. Achacin was observed on the cytoplasmic membrane and on the cell wall of treated Escherichia coli by immunoelectron microscopy. 6. Achacin attacks the cytoplasmic membrane of the cell.

  3. Human platelet glycoprotein Ia. One component is only expressed on the surface of activated platelets and may be a granule constituent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienz, D.; Clemetson, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    Glycoprotein Ia (GP Ia) is a relatively minor component of human blood platelets thought to be a receptor involved in collagen-induced platelet activation. However, some difficulties exist with the definition of this glycoprotein. The expression of GP Ia on resting (prostacyclin analogue-treated) and thrombin-activated platelets was compared by surface labeling with 125 I-lactoperoxidase. Intact platelets or platelets solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate were labeled with periodate/[ 3 H]NaBH 4 . Analysis on two-dimensional isoelectric focusing/sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels showed that GP Ia is very poorly labeled in resting platelets. After activation a new spot (GP Ia*) appears with the same relative molecular mass as GP Ia under reducing conditions. GP Ia and Ia* can be clearly separated by two-dimensional nonreduced/reduced gel electrophoresis. Therefore, two glycoproteins which have been termed GP Ia exist in platelets with similar molecular weight and pI under reducing conditions. One of these (GP Ia*) is only surface-labeled when platelets are activated, indicating that it is only exposed on the surface of activated platelets. Supernatant from activated platelets contains this glycoprotein as well as other granule components. This glycoprotein is missing in platelets from two patients with collagen-response defects

  4. Association between Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association between Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge, Anticoagulation Control, and Demographic Characteristics of Patients Attending an Anticoagulation Clinic in Saudi Arabia: A Cross-Sectional Prospective Evaluation.

  5. Meta-analysis of a polymorphic surface glycoprotein of the parasitic protozoa Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, G

    2009-12-01

    Due to its extensive polymorphism, a partial sequence of the Cryptosporidium surface glycoprotein gene gp60 has been frequently used as a genetic marker. I explored the global diversity of this protein, and compared its sequence diversity in Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis. In marked contrast to the geographical partition of C. parvum and C. hominis multi-locus genotypes, gp60 allelic groups showed no evidence of segregating in space, or of differing with respect to geographical diversity. Globally, genetic diversity of C. hominis gp60 exceeded that of C. parvum. Within C. parvum, gp60 alleles originating from human isolates were more diverse than those infecting ruminants. Phylogenetic analysis grouped gp60 sequences into a small number of relatively homogenous allelic groups, with only a small number of alleles having evolved independently. With the notable exception of a group of alleles restricted to humans, C. parvum alleles are found in ruminants and humans.

  6. Analysis of cosmid clones of nuclear DNA from Trypanosome brucei shows that the genes for variant surface glycoproteins are clustered in the genome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Valerio (Dinko); T. de Lange; P. Borst (Piet); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); L.H.T. van der Ploeg

    1982-01-01

    textabstractTrypanosoma brucei contains more than a hundred genes coding for the different variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs). Activation of some of these genes involves the duplication of the gene (the basic copy or BC) and transposition of the duplicate to an expression site (yielding the

  7. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood clots - lupus anticoagulants; DVT - anticoagulants ... Most often, lupus anticoagulants and aPL are found in people with diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Lupus anticoagulants and ...

  8. Genetic structure and expression of the surface glycoprotein GP82, the main adhesin of Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Paulo Roberto Ceridorio; Cordero, Esteban Mauricio; Gentil, Luciana Girotto; Bayer-Santos, Ethel; da Silveira, José Franco

    2013-01-01

    T. cruzi improves the likelihood of invading or adapting to the host through its capacity to present a large repertoire of surface molecules. The metacyclic stage-specific surface glycoprotein GP82 has been implicated in host cell invasion. GP82 is encoded by multiple genes from the trans-sialidase superfamily. GP82 shows a modular organization, with some variation of N-terminal region flanking a conserved central core where the binding sites to the mammalian cell and gastric mucin are located. The function of GP82 as adhesin in host cell invasion process could expose the protein to an intense conservative and selective pressure. GP82 is a GPI-anchored surface protein, synthesized as a 70 kDa precursor devoid of N-linked sugars. GPI-minus variants accumulate in the ER indicating that GPI anchor acts as a forward transport signal for progressing along the secretory pathway as suggested for T. cruzi mucins. It has been demonstrated that the expression of GP82 is constitutive and may be regulated at post-transcriptional level, for instance, at translational level and/or mRNA stabilization. GP82 mRNAs are mobilized to polysomes and consequently translated, but only in metacyclic trypomastigotes. Analysis of transgenic parasites indicates that the mechanism regulating GP82 expression involves multiple elements in the 3'UTR.

  9. Functional Interplay Between Murine Leukemia Virus Glycogag, Serinc5, and Surface Glycoprotein Governs Virus Entry, with Opposite Effects on Gammaretroviral and Ebolavirus Glycoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadvinder S. Ahi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Gammaretroviruses, such as murine leukemia viruses (MLVs, encode, in addition to the canonical Gag, Pol, and Env proteins that will form progeny virus particles, a protein called “glycogag” (glycosylated Gag. MLV glycogag contains the entire Gag sequence plus an 88-residue N-terminal extension. It has recently been reported that glycogag, like the Nef protein of HIV-1, counteracts the antiviral effects of the cellular protein Serinc5. We have found, in agreement with prior work, that glycogag strongly enhances the infectivity of MLVs with some Env proteins but not those with others. In contrast, however, glycogag was detrimental to MLVs carrying Ebolavirus glycoprotein. Glycogag could be replaced, with respect to viral infectivity, by the unrelated S2 protein of equine infectious anemia virus. We devised an assay for viral entry in which virus particles deliver the Cre recombinase into cells, leading to the expression of a reporter. Data from this assay showed that both the positive and the negative effects of glycogag and S2 upon MLV infectivity are exerted at the level of virus entry. Moreover, transfection of the virus-producing cells with a Serinc5 expression plasmid reduced the infectivity and entry capability of MLV carrying xenotropic MLV Env, particularly in the absence of glycogag. Conversely, Serinc5 expression abrogated the negative effects of glycogag upon the infectivity and entry capability of MLV carrying Ebolavirus glycoprotein. As Serinc5 may influence cellular phospholipid metabolism, it seems possible that all of these effects on virus entry derive from changes in the lipid composition of viral membranes.

  10. The PSA-2 glycoprotein complex of Leishmania major is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked promastigote surface antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, P J; Spithill, T W; Handman, E

    1989-12-15

    Polyclonal rabbit antiserum to the Triton X-114 phase material of Leishmania major, which comprises the surface and internal integral membrane proteins of the parasite, was used to screen a lambda gt11 genomic expression library. A recombinant clone producing a Mr 123,000 beta-galactosidase fusion protein was isolated. Antibodies affinity-purified on this fusion protein recognized a complex of three surface-oriented proteins of promastigotes of L. major of Mr 94,000, 90,000, and 80,000 that we have termed the promastigote surface Ag 2 (PSA-2) complex. The DNA sequence of the insert in this clone predicted the 3' end of an open reading frame encoding a hydrophobic C-terminus. The inferred C-terminal sequence was suggestive of a glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol membrane anchoring mechanism. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C treatment of the native PSA-2 proteins caused a shift in their electrophoretic mobility with an apparent reduction in the molecular weight of the PSA-2 complex. After phospholipase C treatment these proteins also displayed the cryptic cross-reacting determinant recognized by antibodies to the Trypanosoma brucei variant surface Ag. Moreover, PSA-2, which previously partitioned in the detergent phase after Triton X-114 phase separation, became water-soluble after phospholipase C treatment. Immunoprecipitation of the PSA-2 proteins with sera directed to lectin-binding proteins indicated that these polypeptides may be differentially glycosylated. Finally, these PSA-2 proteins were recognized by sera from some patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  11. Selective interaction of heparin with the variable region 3 within surface glycoprotein of laboratory-adapted feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiong-Ying; Fink, Elizabeth; Grant, Chris K; Elder, John H

    2014-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) can act as binding receptors for certain laboratory-adapted (TCA) strains of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Heparin, a soluble heparin sulfate (HS), can inhibit TCA HIV and FIV entry mediated by HSPG interaction in vitro. In the present study, we further determined the selective interaction of heparin with the V3 loop of TCA of FIV. Our current results indicate that heparin selectively inhibits infection by TCA strains, but not for field isolates (FS). Heparin also specifically interferes with TCA surface glycoprotein (SU) binding to CXCR4, by interactions with HSPG binding sites on the V3 loop of the FIV envelope protein. Peptides representing either the N- or C-terminal side of the V3 loop and containing HSPG binding sites were able to compete away the heparin block of TCA SU binding to CXCR4. Heparin does not interfere with the interaction of SU with anti-V3 antibodies that target the CXCR4 binding region or with the interaction between FS FIV and anti-V3 antibodies since FS SU has no HSPG binding sites within the HSPG binding region. Our data show that heparin blocks TCA FIV infection or entry not only through its competition of HSPG on the cell surface interaction with SU, but also by its interference with CXCR4 binding to SU. These studies aid in the design and development of heparin derivatives or analogues that can inhibit steps in virus infection and are informative regarding the HSPG/SU interaction.

  12. Selective interaction of heparin with the variable region 3 within surface glycoprotein of laboratory-adapted feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong-Ying Hu

    Full Text Available Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG can act as binding receptors for certain laboratory-adapted (TCA strains of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Heparin, a soluble heparin sulfate (HS, can inhibit TCA HIV and FIV entry mediated by HSPG interaction in vitro. In the present study, we further determined the selective interaction of heparin with the V3 loop of TCA of FIV. Our current results indicate that heparin selectively inhibits infection by TCA strains, but not for field isolates (FS. Heparin also specifically interferes with TCA surface glycoprotein (SU binding to CXCR4, by interactions with HSPG binding sites on the V3 loop of the FIV envelope protein. Peptides representing either the N- or C-terminal side of the V3 loop and containing HSPG binding sites were able to compete away the heparin block of TCA SU binding to CXCR4. Heparin does not interfere with the interaction of SU with anti-V3 antibodies that target the CXCR4 binding region or with the interaction between FS FIV and anti-V3 antibodies since FS SU has no HSPG binding sites within the HSPG binding region. Our data show that heparin blocks TCA FIV infection or entry not only through its competition of HSPG on the cell surface interaction with SU, but also by its interference with CXCR4 binding to SU. These studies aid in the design and development of heparin derivatives or analogues that can inhibit steps in virus infection and are informative regarding the HSPG/SU interaction.

  13. CD150 is a member of a family of genes that encode glycoproteins on the surface of hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N; Morra, M; Wu, C; Gullo, C; Howie, D; Coyle, T; Engel, P; Terhorst, C

    2001-07-01

    Human CD150 (SLAM) is a glycoprotein expressed on the surface of T, B, natural killer, and dendritic cells. The extracellular domain of CD150 is the receptor for measles virus and CD150 acts as a co-activator on T and B cells. We characterized the mouse and human CD150 genes, each of which comprises seven exons spanning approximately 32 kb. Mouse CD150 mRNA was detected in T cells and in most thymocyte subsets, except CD4-8- cells. Surprisingly, the CD4-8- thymocytes of CD3gammadeltanull mice, but not of Ragnull or severe combined immunodeficiency mice, expressed CD150. Whereas high levels of CD150 were found in Th1 cells, only small amounts were detectable in Th2 cells. CD150 expression was up-regulated upon in vitro activation of mouse T cells by anti-CD3. The complete mouse CD150 gene is highly homologous to its human orthologue in terms of nucleotide sequences and intron/exon organization. The human genomic sequences indicate that all isoforms detected so far have arisen from alternative splicing events. As judged by fluorescence in situ hybridization, mouse CD150 mapped to Chromosome (Chr) 1, band 1H2.2-2.3, and human CD150 was found on Chr 1q22. Human and mouse CD150 share sequence homologies with six other genes, five of which - CD84, CD229 (Ly-9), CD244 (2B4), CD48, and 19A - are localized in a 250-kb segment in close proximity to the human gene. Their location and their sequence similarities strongly suggest that the CD150 family of cell surface receptors arose via successive duplications of a common ancestral gene.

  14. NMR detection and characterization of sialylated glycoproteins and cell surface polysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barb, Adam W. [University of Georgia, Complex Carbohydrate Research Center (United States); Freedberg, Daron I.; Battistel, Marcos D. [Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Laboratory of Bacterial Polysaccharides (United States); Prestegard, James H., E-mail: jpresteg@ccrc.uga.edu [University of Georgia, Complex Carbohydrate Research Center (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Few solution NMR pulse sequences exist that are explicitly designed to characterize carbohydrates (glycans). This is despite the essential role carbohydrate motifs play in cell-cell communication, microbial pathogenesis, autoimmune disease progression and cancer metastasis, and despite that fact that glycans, often shed to extra-cellular fluids, can be diagnostic of disease. Here we present a suite of two dimensional coherence experiments to measure three different correlations (H3-C2, H3-C1, and C1-C2) on sialic acids, a group of nine-carbon carbohydrates found on eukaryotic cell surfaces that often play a key role in disease processes. The chemical shifts of the H3, C2, and C1 nuclei of sialic acids are sensitive to carbohydrate linkage, linkage conformation, and ionization state of the C1 carboxylate. The experiments reported include rigorous filter elements to enable detection and characterization of isotopically labeled sialic acids with high sensitivity in living cells and crude isolates with minimal interference from unwanted signals arising from the {approx}1% {sup 13}C-natural abundance of cellular metabolites. Application is illustrated with detection of sialic acids on living cells, in unpurified mixtures, and at the terminus of the N-glycan on the 55 kDa immunoglobulin G Fc.

  15. NMR detection and characterization of sialylated glycoproteins and cell surface polysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barb, Adam W.; Freedberg, Darón I.; Battistel, Marcos D.; Prestegard, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Few solution NMR pulse sequences exist that are explicitly designed to characterize carbohydrates (glycans). This is despite the essential role carbohydrate motifs play in cell–cell communication, microbial pathogenesis, autoimmune disease progression and cancer metastasis, and despite that fact that glycans, often shed to extra-cellular fluids, can be diagnostic of disease. Here we present a suite of two dimensional coherence experiments to measure three different correlations (H3–C2, H3–C1, and C1–C2) on sialic acids, a group of nine-carbon carbohydrates found on eukaryotic cell surfaces that often play a key role in disease processes. The chemical shifts of the H3, C2, and C1 nuclei of sialic acids are sensitive to carbohydrate linkage, linkage conformation, and ionization state of the C1 carboxylate. The experiments reported include rigorous filter elements to enable detection and characterization of isotopically labeled sialic acids with high sensitivity in living cells and crude isolates with minimal interference from unwanted signals arising from the ∼1% 13 C-natural abundance of cellular metabolites. Application is illustrated with detection of sialic acids on living cells, in unpurified mixtures, and at the terminus of the N-glycan on the 55 kDa immunoglobulin G Fc.

  16. Surface glycoprotein PSA (GP46) expression during short- and long-term culture of Leishmania chagasi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beetham, Jeffrey K; Donelson, John E; Dahlin, Rebecca R

    2003-10-01

    The mRNAs encoding promastigote surface antigen (PSA) of Leishmania chagasi have previously been shown to increase about 30-fold as in vitro cultured parasites progress from logarithmic to stationary phase, growth phases that are, respectively associated with parasites having low and high infectivity to mammals. Experiments reported here establish by western blot analysis that PSA proteins of 44 and 66 kDa also increase about 30-fold as parasite cultures reach stationary phase. Serial passage of parasite cultures resulted in a progressive reduction in PSA protein and RNA abundance to levels less than 3% that of cultures newly-initiated with parasites derived from a parasitized rodent. Loss of PSA mRNA abundance in serially passaged cells was not due to reduced PSA gene transcription rates, as determined by nuclear run-on assays. Neither was the loss associated with a marked decrease in PSA mRNA stability. Analysis of PSA RNA stability in the presence of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of transcription elongation, failed to detect a difference in fully processed cytosolic PSA mRNA stability regardless of the number of times a culture was passaged or the growth phase of the culture. Based on the lack of detectable difference in (cytosolic) mature PSA mRNA stability during promastigote development, the data indirectly suggest that the regulated expression of PSA in cells from low-passage cultures and the loss of PSA expression in high-passage cultures may be mediated by nuclear events that occur after transcription of the PSA genes and before arrival of the mature mRNAs in the cytoplasm.

  17. Roll-to-roll, shrink-induced superhydrophobic surfaces for antibacterial applications, enhanced point-of-care detection, and blood anticoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokes, Jolie McLane

    Superhydrophobic (SH) surfaces are desirable because of their unique anti-wetting behavior. Fluid prefers to bead up (contact angle >150°) and roll off (contact angle hysteresis micro- and nanostructure features trap air pockets. Fluid only adheres to the peaks of the structures, causing minimal adhesion to the surface. Here, shrink-induced SH plastics are fabricated for a plethora of applications, including antibacterial applications, enhanced point-of-care (POC) detection, and reduced blood coagulation. Additionally, these purely structural SH surfaces are achieved in a roll-to-roll (R2R) platform for scalable manufacturing. Because their self-cleaning and water resistant properties, structurally modified SH surfaces prohibit bacterial growth and obviate bacterial chemical resistance. Antibacterial properties are demonstrated in a variety of SH plastics by preventing gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterial growth >150x compared to flat when fluid is rinsed and >20x without rinsing. Therefore, a robust and stable means to prevent bacteria growth is possible. Next, protein in urine is detected using a simple colorimetric output by evaporating droplets on a SH surface. Contrary to evaporation on a flat surface, evaporation on a SH surface allows fluid to dramatically concentrate because the weak adhesion constantly decreases the footprint area. On a SH surface, molecules in solution are confined to a footprint area 8.5x smaller than the original. By concentrating molecules, greater than 160x improvements in detection sensitivity are achieved compared to controls. Utility is demonstrated by detecting protein in urine in the pre-eclampsia range (150-300microgmL -1) for pregnant women. Further, SH surfaces repel bodily fluids including blood, urine, and saliva. Importantly, the surfaces minimize blood adhesion, leading to reduced blood coagulation without the need for anticoagulants. SH surfaces have >4200x and >28x reduction of blood residue area and

  18. Microfilament association of ASGP-2, the concanavalin A-binding glycoprotein of the cell-surface sialomucin complex of 13762 rat mammary ascites tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanderpuye, L.A.; Carraway, C.A.C.; Carraway, K.L. (Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, FL (USA))

    1988-10-01

    Microfilament-associated proteins and membrane-microfilament interactions are being investigated in microvilli isolated from 13762 rat mammary ascites tumor cells. Phalloidin shift analyses on velocity sedimentation gradients of Triton X-100 extracts of ({sup 3}H)-glucosamine-labeled microvilli identified a 120-kDa cell-surface glycoprotein associated with the microvillar microfilament core. The identification was verified by concanavalin A (Con A) blots of one- and two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis gels of sedimented microfilament cores. By 2D-electrophoresis and lectin analyses the 120-kDa protein appeared to be a fraction of ASGP-2, the major Con A-binding glycoprotein of the sialomucin complex of the 13762 cells. This identity was confirmed by immunoblot analyses using immunoblot-purified anti-ASGP-2 from anti-membrane serum prepared against microvillar membranes. Proteolysis of the microvilli with subtilisin or trypsin resulted in an increase in the amount of ASGP-2 associated with the microfilament cores. Proteolysis of isolated microvillar membranes, which contain actin but not microfilaments, also increased the association of ASGP-2 with a Triton-insoluble, actin-containing membrane fraction. Since the Triton-insoluble membrane residue is enriched in actin-containing transmembrane complex, which contains a different glycoprotein, the authors suggest that the ASGP-2 is binding indirectly via this complex to the microfilament core in the intact microvilli.

  19. Role Played by Exosporium Glycoproteins in the Surface Properties of Bacillus cereus Spores and in Their Adhesion to Stainless Steel ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequette, Yannick; Garénaux, Estelle; Tauveron, Grégoire; Dumez, Sylvain; Perchat, Stéphane; Slomianny, Christian; Lereclus, Didier; Guérardel, Yann; Faille, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus cereus spores are surrounded by a loose-fitting layer called the exosporium, whose distal part is mainly formed from glycoproteins. The role played by the exosporium glycoproteins of B. cereus ATCC 14579 (BclA and ExsH) was investigated by considering hydrophobicity and charge, as well as the properties of spore adhesion to stainless steel. The absence of BclA increased both the isoelectric point (IEP) and hydrophobicity of whole spores while simultaneously reducing the interaction between spores and stainless steel. However, neither the hydrophobicity nor the charge associated with BclA could explain the differences in the adhesion properties. Conversely, ExsH, another exosporium glycoprotein, did not play a significant role in spore surface properties. The monosaccharide analysis of B. cereus ATCC 14579 showed different glycosylation patterns on ExsH and BclA. Moreover, two specific glycosyl residues, namely, 2-O-methyl-rhamnose (2-Me-Rha) and 2,4-O-methyl-rhamnose (2,4-Me-Rha), were attached to BclA, in addition to the glycosyl residues already reported in B. anthracis. PMID:21622795

  20. Flow cytometric analysis of platelet cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 and surface glycoproteins in patients with immune thrombocytopenia and healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubak, Peter; Kristensen, Steen D; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2017-06-01

    Immature platelets may contain more platelet enzymes such as cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 than mature platelets. Patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) have a higher fraction of immature platelets and can therefore be utilized as a biological model for investigating COX-1 and COX-2 platelet expression. The aims were to develop flow cytometric assays for platelet COX-1 and COX-2 and to investigate the COX-1 and COX-2 platelet expression, platelet turnover, and platelet glycoproteins in ITP patients (n = 10) compared with healthy individuals (n = 30). Platelet count and platelet turnover parameters (mean platelet volume (MPV), immature platelet fraction (IPF), and immature platelet count (IPC)) were measured by flow cytometry (Sysmex XE-5000). Platelet COX-1, COX-2, and the glycoproteins (GP)IIb, IX, Ib, Ia, and IIIa were all analyzed by flow cytometry (Navios) and expressed as median fluorescence intensity. COX analyses were performed in both whole blood and platelet rich plasma (PRP), whereas platelet glycoproteins were analyzed in whole blood only. ITP patients had significantly lower platelet count (55 × 10 9 /L) than healthy individuals (240 × 10 9 /L, p platelet count and IPC (both p-values Platelet COX-1 expression was higher in ITP patients than healthy individuals using whole blood (p COX-1 platelet turnover and COX-1 expression (all p-values platelet turnover and COX-1 and COX-2 expressions (all p-values platelet turnover in ITP patients (all p-values 0.14, rho = 0.11-0.28). In conclusion, ITP patients expressed higher COX-1 and platelet glycoprotein levels than healthy individuals. COX-1 and platelet glycoproteins demonstrated positive correlations with platelet turnover in ITP patients. In healthy individuals, COX-1 and COX-2 expression correlated positively with platelet turnover. PRP was more sensitive compared with whole blood as regards determination of COX. Therefore, PRP is the recommended matrix for investigating COX-1 and COX-2 in

  1. EMA: a developmentally regulated cell-surface glycoprotein of CNS neurons that is concentrated at the leading edge of growth cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, N L; Parkinson, D; Wayne, D B; Heuser, J E; Pearlman, A L

    1992-08-01

    To identify cell-surface molecules that mediate interactions between neurons and their environment during neural development, we used monoclonal antibody techniques to define a developmentally regulated antigen in the central nervous system of the mouse. The antibody we produced (2A1) immunolabels cells throughout the central nervous system; we analyzed its distribution in the developing cerebral cortex, where it is expressed on cells very soon after they complete mitosis and leave the periventricular proliferative zone. Expression continues into adult life. The antibody also labels the epithelium of the choroid plexus and the renal proximal tubules, but does not label neurons of the peripheral nervous system in the dorsal root ganglia. In dissociated cell culture of embryonic cerebral cortex, 2A1 labels the surface of neurons but not glia. Immunolabeling of neurons in tissue culture is particularly prominent on the edge of growth cones, including filopodia and the leading edge of lamellipodia, when observed with either immunofluorescence or freeze-etch immunoelectron microscopy. Immunopurification with 2A1 of a CHAPS-extracted membrane preparation from brains of neonatal mice produces a broad (32-36 kD) electrophoretic band and a less prominent 70 kD band that are sensitive to N-glycosidase but not endoglycosidase H. Thus the 2A1 antibody recognizes a developmentally regulated, neuronal cell surface glycoprotein (or glycoproteins) with complex N-linked oligosaccharide side chains. We have termed the glycoprotein antigen EMA because of its prominence on the edge membrane of growth cones. EMA is similar to the M6 antigen (Lagenaur et al: J. Neurobiol. 23:71-88, 1992) in apparent molecular weight, distribution in tissue sections, and immunoreactivity on Western blots, suggesting that the two antigens are similar or identical. Expression of EMA is a very early manifestation of neuronal differentiation; its distribution on growth cones suggests a role in mediating the

  2. THE ROLE OF P-GLYCOPROTEIN IN RATIONAL PHARMACOTHERAPY IN CARDIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Shulkin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the analysis of published data the role of P-glycoprotein, carrier protein, in rational pharmacotherapy in cardiology was shown on the example of its substrates – digoxin, antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants. Determination of C3435T polymorphism of multidrug resistance gene (MDR1, encoding P-glycoprotein, in pharmacotherapy with digoxin, antiplatelet drugs (clopidogrel tikagrelol, prasugrel and anticoagulants (dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, edoxaban is not feasible in routine practice. Drug in- teractions have clinical implications for the efficacy and safety of pharmacotherapy in coadministration of these drugs with P-glycoprotein substrates, inducers and inhibitors.

  3. THE ROLE OF P-GLYCOPROTEIN IN RATIONAL PHARMACOTHERAPY IN CARDIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Shulkin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the analysis of published data the role of P-glycoprotein, carrier protein, in rational pharmacotherapy in cardiology was shown on the example of its substrates – digoxin, antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants. Determination of C3435T polymorphism of multidrug resistance gene (MDR1, encoding P-glycoprotein, in pharmacotherapy with digoxin, antiplatelet drugs (clopidogrel tikagrelol, prasugrel and anticoagulants (dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, edoxaban is not feasible in routine practice. Drug in- teractions have clinical implications for the efficacy and safety of pharmacotherapy in coadministration of these drugs with P-glycoprotein substrates, inducers and inhibitors.

  4. Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Drugs in Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altenburg, Alexander; Haage, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    In treating peripheral arterial disease, a profound knowledge of antiplatelet and anticoagulative drug therapy is helpful to assure a positive clinical outcome and to anticipate and avoid complications. Side effects and drug interactions may have fatal consequences for the patient, so interventionalists should be aware of these risks and able to control them. Aspirin remains the first-line agent for antiplatelet monotherapy, with clopidogrel added where dual antiplatelet therapy is required. In case of suspected antiplatelet drug resistance, the dose of clopidogrel may be doubled; prasugrel or ticagrelor may be used alternatively. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (abciximab or eptifibatide) may help in cases of hypercoagulability or acute embolic complications. Desmopressin, tranexamic acid, or platelet infusions may be used to decrease antiplatelet drug effects in case of bleeding. Intraprocedurally, anticoagulant therapy treatment with unfractionated heparin (UFH) still is the means of choice, although low molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) are suitable, particularly for postinterventional treatment. Adaption of LMWH dose is often required in renal insufficiency, which is frequently found in elderly patients. Protamine sulphate is an effective antagonist for UFH; however, this effect is less for LMWH. Newer antithrombotic drugs, such as direct thrombin inhibitors or factor X inhibitors, have limited importance in periprocedural treatment, with the exception of treating patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Nevertheless, knowing pharmacologic properties of the newer drugs facilitate correct bridging of patients treated with such drugs. This article provides a comprehensive overview of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs for use before, during, and after interventional radiological procedures.

  5. Anticoagulant effect of marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Wijesekara, Isuru

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been developed in the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries to isolate natural anticoagulant compounds from marine resources. Among marine resources, marine algae are valuable sources of novel bioactive compounds with anticoagulant effect. Phlorotannins and sulfated polysaccharides such as fucoidans in brown algae, carrageenans in red algae, and ulvans in green algae have been recognized as potential anticoagulant agents. Therefore, marine algae-derived phlorotannins and SPs have great potential for developing as anticoagulant drugs in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical areas. This chapter focuses on the potential anticoagulant agents in marine algae and presents an overview of their anticoagulant effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. lupus anticoagulants: pathophysiology, clinical

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-11-02

    Nov 2, 2003 ... report. East Afr. Med. J. 1998; 75:619-620. procainamide induced lupus anticoagulant. Acta Haematol. 13. Mateo, 1., Oliver, A., Borell, M. et al. Laboratory evaluation 1989; 82:50-52. and clinical characteristics of 2, 132 consecutive unselected 29. Rai, R., Cohen H., Dave M., and Regan, L. Randomised.

  7. Individual contributions of the human metapneumovirus F, G, and SH surface glycoproteins to the induction of neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skiadopoulos, Mario H.; Biacchesi, Stephane; Buchholz, Ursula J.; Amaro-Carambot, Emerito; Surman, Sonja R.; Collins, Peter L.; Murphy, Brian R.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the individual contributions of the three surface glycoproteins of human metapneumovirus (HMPV), namely the fusion F, attachment G, and small hydrophobic SH proteins, to the induction of serum HMPV-binding antibodies, serum HMPV-neutralizing antibodies, and protective immunity. Using reverse genetics, each HMPV protein was expressed individually from an added gene in recombinant human parainfluenza virus type 1 (rHPIV1) and used to infect hamsters once or twice by the intranasal route. The F protein was highly immunogenic and protective, whereas G and SH were only weakly or negligibly immunogenic and protective, respectively. Thus, in contrast to other paramyxoviruses, the HMPV attachment G protein is not a major neutralization or protective antigen. Also, although the SH protein of HMPV is a virion protein that is much larger than its counterparts in previously studied paramyxoviruses, it does not appear to be a significant neutralization or protective antigen

  8. Chimeric human parainfluenza virus bearing the Ebola virus glycoprotein as the sole surface protein is immunogenic and highly protective against Ebola virus challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukreyev, Alexander; Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Zhang Liqun; Yang Lijuan; Ward, Jerrold M.; Dorward, David W.; Pickles, Raymond J.; Murphy, Brian R.; Feldmann, Heinz; Collins, Peter L.

    2009-01-01

    We generated a new live-attenuated vaccine against Ebola virus (EBOV) based on a chimeric virus HPIV3/ΔF-HN/EboGP that contains the EBOV glycoprotein (GP) as the sole transmembrane envelope protein combined with the internal proteins of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3). Electron microscopy analysis of the virus particles showed that they have an envelope and surface spikes resembling those of EBOV and a particle size and shape resembling those of HPIV3. When HPIV3/ΔF-HN/EboGP was inoculated via apical surface of an in vitro model of human ciliated airway epithelium, the virus was released from the apical surface; when applied to basolateral surface, the virus infected basolateral cells but did not spread through the tissue. Following intranasal (IN) inoculation of guinea pigs, scattered infected cells were detected in the lungs by immunohistochemistry, but infectious HPIV3/ΔF-HN/EboGP could not be recovered from the lungs, blood, or other tissues. Despite the attenuation, the virus was highly immunogenic, and a single IN dose completely protected the animals against a highly lethal intraperitoneal challenge of guinea pig-adapted EBOV

  9. Co-expression of foreign proteins tethered to HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein on the cell surface by introducing an intervening second membrane-spanning domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyun Wang

    Full Text Available The envelope glycoprotein (Env of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1 mediates membrane fusion. To analyze the mechanism of HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion, it is desirable to determine the expression level of Env on the cell surface. However, the quantification of Env by immunological staining is often hampered by the diversity of HIV-1 Env and limited availability of universal antibodies that recognize different Envs with equal efficiency. To overcome this problem, here we linked a tag protein called HaloTag at the C-terminus of HIV-1 Env. To relocate HaloTag to the cell surface, we introduced a second membrane-spanning domain (MSD between Env and HaloTag. The MSD of transmembrane protease serine 11D, a type II transmembrane protein, successfully relocated HaloTag to the cell surface. The surface level of Env can be estimated indirectly by staining HaloTag with a specific membrane-impermeable fluorescent ligand. This tagging did not compromise the fusogenicity of Env drastically. Furthermore, fusogenicity of Env was preserved even after the labeling with the ligands. We have also found that an additional foreign peptide or protein such as C34 or neutralizing single-chain variable fragment (scFv can be linked to the C-terminus of the HaloTag protein. Using these constructs, we were able to determine the required length of C34 and critical residues of neutralizing scFv for blocking membrane fusion, respectively.

  10. The glycoprotein of measles virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anttonen, O.; Jokinen, M.; Salmi, A.; Vainionpaeae, R.; Gahmberg, C.G.

    1980-01-01

    Measles virus was propagated in VERO cells and purified from the culture supernatants by two successive tartrate-density-gradient centrifugations. Surface carbohydrates were labelled both in vitro and in vivo with 3 H after treatment with galactose oxidase/NaB 3 H 4 or with [ 3 H]glucosamine. The major labelled glycoprotein in measles virions had a mol.wt. of 79000. After labelling with periodate/NaB 3 H 4 , which would result in specific labelling of sialic acid residues, the 79000-mol.wt. glycoprotein was very weakly labelled. This suggested that there is no or a very low amount of sialic acid in the virions. Further analysis of the glycoprotein showed that galactose is the terminal carbohydrate unit in the oligosaccharide, and the molecular weight of the glycopeptide obtained after Pronase digestion is about 3000. The oligosaccharide is attached to the polypeptide through an alkali-stable bond, indicating a N-glycosidic asparagine linkage. (author)

  11. Role of the serine-rich surface glycoprotein Srr1 of Streptococcus agalactiae in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Seong Seo

    Full Text Available The binding of bacteria to fibrinogen and platelets are important events in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. Srr1 is a serine-rich repeat glycoprotein of Streptococcus agalactiae that binds directly to the Aα chain of human fibrinogen. To assess the impact of Srr1 on the pathogenesis of endocarditis due to S. agalactiae, we first examined the binding of this organism to immobilized human platelets. Strains expressing Srr1 had significantly higher levels of binding to human platelets in vitro, as compared with isogenic Δsrr1 mutants. In addition, platelet binding was inhibited by pretreatment with anti-fibrinogen IgG or purified Srr1 binding region. To assess the contribution of Srr1 to pathogenicity, we compared the relative virulence of S. agalactiae NCTC 10/84 strain and its Δsrr1 mutant in a rat model of endocarditis, where animals were co-infected with the WT and the mutant strains at a 1:1 ratio. At 72 h post-infection, bacterial densities (CFU/g of the WT strain within vegetations, kidneys, and spleens were significantly higher, as compared with the Δsrr1 mutant. These results indicate that Srr1 contributes to the pathogenesis of endocarditis due to S. agalactiae, at least in part through its role in fibrinogen-mediated platelet binding.

  12. New Trends in Anticoagulation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Margaret; Wakam, Glenn; Wakefield, Thomas; Obi, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    Anticoagulation pharmacy has been dramatically altered with US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of 5 direct oral anticoagulants, 1 novel reversal agent and, a second designated for fast-track approval. Trial data surrounding current trends in anticoagulant choice for VTE, reversal, and bridging are constantly redefining practice. Extended therapy for unprovoked VTE has expanded to include low-dose direct oral anticoagulants, aspirin, and the use of the HERDOO2 system to identify women who can stop anticoagulant therapy without increased risk of recurrent VTE. Trends in thromboprophylaxis include extended duration low-dose direct oral anticoagulants to prevent VTE in high-risk patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Chronic kidney disease and anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sciascia, Savino; Radin, Massimo; Schreiber, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Anticoagulation in patients with impaired kidney function can be challenging since drugs' pharmacokinetics and bioavailability are altered in this setting. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) treated with conventional anticoagulant agents [vitamin K antagonist (VKA), low-molecular weight...... are eliminated via the kidneys pose additional challenges. More recently, two classes of direct oral anticoagulant agents (DOACs) have been investigated for the prevention and management of venous thromboembolic events: the direct factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, and the direct thrombin...

  14. Characterization and endocytic internalization of Epith-2 cell surface glycoprotein during the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in sea urchin embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio eWakayama

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial cells of the sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus embryo express an Epith-2, uncharacterized glycoprotein, on the lateral surface. Here, we describe internalization of Epith-2 during mesenchyme formation through the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Epith-2 was first expressed on the entire egg surface soon after fertilization and on the blastomeres until the 4-cell stage, but was localized to the lateral surface of epithelial cells at and after the 16-cell stage throughout the later developmental period. However, primary (PMC and secondary mesenchyme cells (SMC that ingress by EMT lost Epith-2 from their cell surface by endocytosis during dissociation from the epithelium, which was associated with the appearance of cytoplasmic Epith-2 dots. The cytoplasmic Epith-2 retained a similar relative molecular mass to that of the cell surface immediately after ingression through the early period of the spreading to single cells. Then, Epith-2 was completely lost from the cytoplasm. Tyrosine residues of Epith-2 were phosphorylated. The endocytic retraction of Epith-2 was inhibited by herbimycin A (HA, a protein tyrosine kinase (PTK inhibitor, and suramin, a growth factor receptor (GFR inhibitor, suggesting the involvement of the GFR/PTK (GP signaling pathway. These two GP inhibitors also inhibited PMC and SMC spreading to individual cells after ingression, but the dissociation of PMC and SMC from the epithelium was not inhibited. In suramin-treated embryos, dissociated mesenchyme cells migrated partially by retaining their epithelial morphology. In HA-treated embryos, no mesenchyme cells migrated. Thus, the EMT occurs in relation to internalization of Epith-2 from presumptive PMC and SMC.

  15. Native immunogold labeling of cell surface proteins and viral glycoproteins for cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hong; Strauss, Joshua D; Ke, Zunlong; Alonas, Eric; Dillard, Rebecca S; Hampton, Cheri M; Lamb, Kristen M; Hammonds, Jason E; Santangelo, Philip J; Spearman, Paul W; Wright, Elizabeth R

    2015-10-01

    Numerous methods have been developed for immunogold labeling of thick, cryo-preserved biological specimens. However, most of the methods are permutations of chemical fixation and sample sectioning, which select and isolate the immunolabeled region of interest. We describe a method for combining immunogold labeling with cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) of the surface proteins of intact mammalian cells or the surface glycoproteins of assembling and budding viruses in the context of virus-infected mammalian cells cultured on EM grids. In this method, the cells were maintained in culture media at physiologically relevant temperatures while sequentially incubated with the primary and secondary antibodies. Subsequently, the immunogold-labeled specimens were vitrified and observed under cryo-conditions in the transmission electron microscope. Cryo-EM and cryo-ET examination of the immunogold-labeled cells revealed the association of immunogold particles with the target antigens. Additionally, the cellular structure was unaltered by pre-immunolabeling chemical fixation and retained well-preserved plasma membranes, cytoskeletal elements, and macromolecular complexes. We think this technique will be of interest to cell biologists for cryo-EM and conventional studies of native cells and pathogen-infected cells. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Herpes simplex viruses lacking glycoprotein D are unable to inhibit virus penetration: quantitative evidence for virus-specific cell surface receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.C.; Ligas, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein D (gD) plays an essential role in the entry of virus into cells. HSV mutants unable to express gD were constructed. The mutants can be propagated on VD60 cells, which supply the viruses with gD; however, virus particles lacking gD were produced in mutant-infected Vero cells. Virus particles with or without gD adsorbed to a large number of sites on the cell surface; however, virions lacking gD did not enter cells. Cells pretreated with UV-inactivated virions containing gD were resistant to infection with HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. In contrast, cell pretreated with UV-inactivated virions lacking gD could be infected with HSV-1 and HSV-2. If infectious HSV-1 was added prior to UV-inactivated virus particles containing gD, the infectious virus entered cells and replicated. Therefore, virus particles containing gD appear to block specific cell surface receptors which are very limited in number. Particles lacking gD are presumably unable to interact with these receptors, suggesting that gD is an essential receptor-binding polypeptide

  17. Phage Display Breast Carcinoma cDNA Libraries: Isolation of Clones Which Specifically Bind to Membrane Glycoproteins, Mucins, and Endothelial Cell Surface

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yamamoto, Fumiichiro

    2000-01-01

    .... Using blood- group H-expressing glycoprotein fraction as bait, we observed enrichment of phage clones expressing sequences from galectin-3, a lectin with an affinity with the blood-group substance...

  18. Coagulation assays and anticoagulant monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Dorothy M Adcock

    2012-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy, including conventional agents and a variety of new oral, fast-acting drugs, is prescribed for millions of patients annually. Each anticoagulant varies in its effect on routine and specialty coagulation assays and each drug may require distinct laboratory assay(s) to measure drug concentration or activity. This review provides an overview of the assorted assays that can measure anticoagulant drug concentration or activity and includes key assay interferences. The effect of these conventional and new anticoagulant agents on specialty coagulation assays used to evaluate for bleeding or clotting disorders, and whether this impact is physiological or factitious, is included. Also provided is a short review of superwarfarin poisoning and features distinguishing this from warfarin overdose. Knowledge of clinically significant pearls and pitfalls pertinent to coagulation assays in relation to anticoagulant therapy are important to optimize patient care.

  19. Direct oral anticoagulants: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco Moreno, Ana Isabel; Martín Díaz, Rosa María; García Navarro, María José

    2017-12-30

    Vitamin K antagonists were the only choice for chronic oral anticoagulation for more than half a century. Over the past few years, direct oral anticoagulants have emerged, including one direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran etexilate) and three factor Xa inhibitors (apixaban, edoxaban and rivaroxaban). In randomised controlled trials comparing direct oral anticoagulants with traditional vitamin K antagonists, the direct oral anticoagulants all showed a favourable benefit-risk balance in their safety and efficacy profile, in prevention of thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation and in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and acute coronary syndrome. In 2008, dabigatran was the first direct oral anticoagulant approved by the European Medicine Agency. Subsequently, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban were also authorised. This article reviews the evidence related to the use of these drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Expression of the glycoprotein of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) on the surface of the fish cell line RTG-P1 induces type 1 interferon expression in neighbouring cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acosta, F.; Collet, B.; Lorenzen, Niels

    2006-01-01

    In the present study using a luciferase/Mx promoter reporter system, it was shown that the rainbow trout gonad cell line (RTG-P1), a fibroblastic cell line, produces IFN when transfected with a plasmid encoding the glycoprotein of VHSV but not with plasmid vector alone. Only a small percentage...... of the cells expressed the G protein on the surface membrane as indicated by immunostaining of transfected cells. When transfection was performed in the presence of monoclonal antibodies (Mab) to the glycoprotein, the production of interferon mRNA transcripts was reduced by over 50%. This indicates...... that the surface expression of G protein was the major mechanism of interferon induction and that most of the interferon was being expressed by cells neighbouring the transfected cells. Crown...

  1. Fine definition of the CXCR4-binding region on the V3 loop of feline immunodeficiency virus surface glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong-Ying Hu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is shared by primary and laboratory-adapted strains of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV for viral entry. Our previous studies implicated a contiguous nine-amino-acid region of the V3 loop of the FIV envelope surface as important in CXCR4 binding and virus entry. The binding is specific for CXCR4 since it can be inhibited by AMD3100, a selective CXCR4 inhibitor. Additional site-directed mutagenesis was used to further reveal the key residues. Binding studies indicated that basic residues R395, K397, R399 as well as N398 are critical for CXCR4 binding. The effect of other amino acid residues on receptor binding depends on the type of amino acid residue substituted. The binding study results were confirmed on human CXCR4-expressing SupT1 cells and correlated with entry efficiency using a virus entry assay. Amino acid residues critical for CXCR4 are not critical for interactions with the primary binding receptor CD134, which has an equivalent role as CD4 for HIV-1 binding. The ELISA results show that W394 and W400 are crucial for the recognition by neutralizing anti-V3 antibodies. Since certain strains of HIV-1 also use CXCR4 as the entry receptor, the findings make the feline model attractive for development of broad-based entry antagonists and for study of the molecular mechanism of receptor/virus interactions.

  2. A Study of Anti Beta-2 Glycoprotein I and Anti-Prothrombin Antibodies in Patients with Unexplained Recurrent Pregnancy Losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Angad; Nangia, Anita; Sharma, Sunita; Puri, Manju

    2016-06-01

    To compare the levels of IgG and IgM anti beta-2 glycoprotein I antibodies and IgG and IgM anti prothrombin antibodies among women with unexplained recurrent pregnancy losses and women with at least 2 live issues. To compare the prevalence of newer anti beta-2 glycoprotein I & anti prothrombin antibodies with conventional Lupus anticoagulant & anticardiolipin antibodies. 50 women with recurrent pregnancy losses & 50 matched controls were evaluated for the presence of: Lupus anticoagulant-screened by LA sensitive aPTT& DRVV and confirmatory Staclot Assay. ELISA kits were used for detecting IgG & IgM anticardiolipin, anti beta-2 glycoprotein I & anti prothrombin antibodies. 11/50 (22 %) women in study group and none in control group had circulating antiphospholipid antibodies. 2 cases (4 %) had lupus anticoagulant. 1 case (2 %) had anticardiolipin antibody & 6 cases (12 %) were positive for anti beta-2 Glycoprotein I antibody (p value = 0.027). 3 cases (6 %) had anti prothrombin antibody. All were mutually exclusive except for one. Women with recurrent pregnancy losses should be tested for anti beta-2 Glycoprotein I antibodies & anti prothrombin antibodies in addition to conventional lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies. This approach can decrease the incidence of SNAP (seronegative antiphospholipid syndrome) cases while establishing the true prevalence of antiphospholipid syndrome.

  3. Use of synthetic peptides to represent surface-exposed epitopes defined by neutralizing dengue complex- and flavivirus group-reactive monoclonal antibodies on the native dengue type-2 virus envelope glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconar, Andrew K I

    2008-07-01

    The reactions of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that defined dengue virus (DENV) complex, flavivirus subgroup or group neutralizing epitopes were tested against synthetic peptide sequences from domains I, II and III of the envelope (E) glycoproteins of different DENV-2 genotypes/strains. The DENV complex-reactive mAb identified the surface-exposed 304-GKFKV/IVKEIA-313 peptides and the DENV complex-conserved 393-KKGSSIGQ/KM-401 peptides in domain III, which were located adjacently in the native glycoprotein. Both flavivirus group-reactive mAbs reacted most strongly with fusion sequence peptides from domain II when they contained a cysteine (C) by glycine (G) substitution (underlined) (101-WGNGGGLFG-109) to represent the native rotated C side chain. The 393-401 sequence represents a newly identified epitope, present as a highly flexible coil located between the 385 and 393 cell-binding sequence and the 401 and 413 sequence involved in the E glycoprotein homo-trimer formation. The 101-109 sequence containing 105-C by G substitution and the 393-401 sequence are good candidates for diagnostic assays and cross-protection experiments.

  4. Anticoagulation Considerations for Travel to High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2015-09-01

    DeLoughery, Thomas G. Anticoagulation considerations for travel to high altitude. High Alt Med Biol 16:181-185, 2015.-An increasing percentage of the population are on anticoagulation medicine for clinical reasons ranging from stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation to long term prevention of deep venous thrombosis. In recent years, several new direct oral anticoagulants have entered the market. The key questions that should be kept in mind when approaching a potential traveler on anticoagulation are: 1) why is the patient on anticoagulation? 2) do they need to stay on anticoagulation? 3) what are the choices for their anticoagulation? 4) will there be any drug interactions with medications needed for travel? and 5) how will they monitor their anticoagulation while traveling? Knowing the answers to these questions then can allow for proper counseling and planning for the anticoagulated traveler's trip.

  5. Does plasmin have anticoagulant activity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Hoover-Plow

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Jane Hoover-PlowJoseph J Jacobs Center for Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, Departments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Molecular Cardiology, Lerner Research Institute Cleveland Clinic, Ohio, USAAbstract: The coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways regulate hemostasis and thrombosis, and an imbalance in these pathways may result in pathologic hemophilia or thrombosis. The plasminogen system is the primary proteolytic pathway for fibrinolysis, but also has important proteolytic functions in cell migration, extracellular matrix degradation, metalloproteinase activation, and hormone processing. Several studies have demonstrated plasmin cleavage and inactivation of several coagulation factors, suggesting plasmin may be not only be the primary fibrinolytic enzyme, but may have anticoagulant properties as well. The objective of this review is to examine both in vitro and in vivo evidence for plasmin inactivation of coagulation, and to consider whether plasmin may act as a physiological regulator of coagulation. While several studies have demonstrated strong evidence for plasmin cleavage and inactivation of coagulation factors FV, FVIII, FIX, and FX in vitro, in vivo evidence is lacking for a physiologic role for plasmin as an anticoagulant. However, inactivation of coagulation factors by plasmin may be useful as a localized anticoagulant therapy or as a combined thrombolytic and anticoagulant therapy.Keywords: thrombosis, anticoagulant, cardiovascular disease, plasminogen’s protease, blood

  6. Tailoring the surface properties of polypropylene films through cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) assisted polymerization and immobilization of biomolecules for enhancement of anti-coagulation activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navaneetha Pandiyaraj, K., E-mail: dr.knpr@gmail.com [Surface Engineering Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sri Shakthi Institute of Engineering and Technology, L& T By Pass, Chinniyam Palayam (Post), Coimbatore 641062 (India); Ram Kumar, M.C.; Arun Kumar, A. [Surface Engineering Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sri Shakthi Institute of Engineering and Technology, L& T By Pass, Chinniyam Palayam (Post), Coimbatore 641062 (India); Padmanabhan, P.V.A. [PSN College of Engineering and Technology, Tirunelveli 627 152 (India); Deshmukh, R.R. [Department of Physics, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India); Bah, M.; Ismat Shah, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, 208 Dupont Hall, Newark (United States); Su, Pi-Guey [Department of Chemistry, Chinese Culture University, Taipei 111, Taiwan (China); Halleluyah, M.; Halim, A.S. [School of Medical Sciences, Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan (Malaysia)

    2016-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Developed low cost cold atmospheric plasma reactor for plasma polymerization technique. • Surface of the PP film was modified by grafting of AAc and PEG by CAPP polymerization. • Biomolecules of chitosan, insulin and heparin were immobilized on surface of PEG-AAc grafted PP films. • The surface modified PP films were characterized by various techniques. • The plasma polymerized and immobilized film reveals substantial blood compatibility. - Abstract: Enhancement of anti-thrombogenic properties of polypropylene (PP) to avert the adsorption of plasma proteins (fibrinogen and albumin), adhesion and activation of the platelets are very important for vast biomedical applications. The cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) assisted polymerization has potential to create the specific functional groups such as O−C=O, C=O, C−N and S−S. on the surface of polymeric films using selective precursor in vapour phase to enhance anti-thrombogenic properties. Such functionalized polymeric surfaces would be suitable for various biomedical applications especially to improve the blood compatibility. The eventual aspiration of the present investigation is to develop the biofunctional coating onto the surface of PP films using acrylic acid (AAc) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a precursor in a vapour phase by incorporating specific functional groups for immobilization of biomolecules such as heparin (HEP), chitosan (CHI) and insulin (INS) on the surface of plasma modified PP films. The surface properties such as hydrophilicity, chemical composition, surface topography of the surface modified PP films were analyzed by contact angle (CA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Furthermore the anti-thrombogenic properties of the surface modified PP films were studied by in vitro tests which include platelet adhesion and protein adsorption analysis. It was

  7. Tailoring the surface properties of polypropylene films through cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) assisted polymerization and immobilization of biomolecules for enhancement of anti-coagulation activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navaneetha Pandiyaraj, K.; Ram Kumar, M.C.; Arun Kumar, A.; Padmanabhan, P.V.A.; Deshmukh, R.R.; Bah, M.; Ismat Shah, S.; Su, Pi-Guey; Halleluyah, M.; Halim, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Developed low cost cold atmospheric plasma reactor for plasma polymerization technique. • Surface of the PP film was modified by grafting of AAc and PEG by CAPP polymerization. • Biomolecules of chitosan, insulin and heparin were immobilized on surface of PEG-AAc grafted PP films. • The surface modified PP films were characterized by various techniques. • The plasma polymerized and immobilized film reveals substantial blood compatibility. - Abstract: Enhancement of anti-thrombogenic properties of polypropylene (PP) to avert the adsorption of plasma proteins (fibrinogen and albumin), adhesion and activation of the platelets are very important for vast biomedical applications. The cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) assisted polymerization has potential to create the specific functional groups such as O−C=O, C=O, C−N and S−S. on the surface of polymeric films using selective precursor in vapour phase to enhance anti-thrombogenic properties. Such functionalized polymeric surfaces would be suitable for various biomedical applications especially to improve the blood compatibility. The eventual aspiration of the present investigation is to develop the biofunctional coating onto the surface of PP films using acrylic acid (AAc) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a precursor in a vapour phase by incorporating specific functional groups for immobilization of biomolecules such as heparin (HEP), chitosan (CHI) and insulin (INS) on the surface of plasma modified PP films. The surface properties such as hydrophilicity, chemical composition, surface topography of the surface modified PP films were analyzed by contact angle (CA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Furthermore the anti-thrombogenic properties of the surface modified PP films were studied by in vitro tests which include platelet adhesion and protein adsorption analysis. It was

  8. Domains of BclA, the major surface glycoprotein of the B. cereus exosporium: glycosylation patterns and role in spore surface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequette, Yannick; Garénaux, Estelle; Combrouse, Typhaine; Dias, Thays Del Lima; Ronse, Annette; Slomianny, Christian; Trivelli, Xavier; Guerardel, Yann; Faille, Christine

    2011-08-01

    The role of the BclA domains of B. cereus ATCC 14579 was investigated in order to understand the phenomena involved in the interfacial processes occurring between spores and inert surfaces. This was done by (i) creating deletions in the collagen-like region (CLR) and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of BclA, (ii) building BclA proteins with various lengths in the CLR and (iii) modifying the hydrophobic upper surface in the CTD. First, it was demonstrated that the CLR was substituted by three residues already reported in the CLR of B. anthracis, viz. rhamnose, 3-O-methyl-rhamnose, and GalNH(2) residues, while the CTD was also substituted by two additional glycosyl residues, viz. 2-O-methyl-rhamnose and 2,4-O-methyl-rhamnose. Regarding the properties of the spores, both CLR and CTD contributed to the adhesion of the spores, which was estimated by measuring the resistance to detachment of spores adhered to stainless steel plates). CLR and CTD also impacted the hydrophobic character and isoelectric point of the spores. It was then shown that the resistance to detachment of the spores was not affected by the physicochemical properties, but by the CLR length and the presence of hydrophobic amino acids on the CTD.

  9. Tailoring the surface properties of polypropylene films through cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) assisted polymerization and immobilization of biomolecules for enhancement of anti-coagulation activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaneetha Pandiyaraj, K.; Ram Kumar, M. C.; Arun Kumar, A.; Padmanabhan, P. V. A.; Deshmukh, R. R.; Bah, M.; Ismat Shah, S.; Su, Pi-Guey; Halleluyah, M.; Halim, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Enhancement of anti-thrombogenic properties of polypropylene (PP) to avert the adsorption of plasma proteins (fibrinogen and albumin), adhesion and activation of the platelets are very important for vast biomedical applications. The cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) assisted polymerization has potential to create the specific functional groups such as Osbnd Cdbnd O, Cdbnd O, Csbnd N and Ssbnd S. on the surface of polymeric films using selective precursor in vapour phase to enhance anti-thrombogenic properties. Such functionalized polymeric surfaces would be suitable for various biomedical applications especially to improve the blood compatibility. The eventual aspiration of the present investigation is to develop the biofunctional coating onto the surface of PP films using acrylic acid (AAc) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a precursor in a vapour phase by incorporating specific functional groups for immobilization of biomolecules such as heparin (HEP), chitosan (CHI) and insulin (INS) on the surface of plasma modified PP films. The surface properties such as hydrophilicity, chemical composition, surface topography of the surface modified PP films were analyzed by contact angle (CA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Furthermore the anti-thrombogenic properties of the surface modified PP films were studied by in vitro tests which include platelet adhesion and protein adsorption analysis. It was found that the anti-thrombogenic properties of the PP films are effectively controlled by the CAPP grafting of AAc and PEG followed by immobilization of biomolecules of heparin, chitosan and insulin. The grafting and immobilization was confirmed by FTIR and XPS through the recognition of specific functional groups such as COOH, Csbnd O, Ssbnd S and Csbnd N. on the surface of PP film. Furthermore, the surface morphology and hydrophilic nature of the PP films also tailored

  10. Heparin mimetics with anticoagulant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahain, Abdullah Al; Ignjatovic, Vera; Monagle, Paul; Tsanaktsidis, John; Ferro, Vito

    2018-02-15

    Heparin, a sulfated polysaccharide belonging to the glycosaminoglycan family, has been widely used as an anticoagulant drug for decades and remains the most commonly used parenteral anticoagulant in adults and children. However, heparin has important clinical limitations and is derived from animal sources which pose significant safety and supply problems. The ever growing shortage of the raw material for heparin manufacturing may become a very significant issue in the future. These global limitations have prompted much research, especially following the recent well-publicized contamination scandal, into the development of alternative anticoagulants derived from non-animal and/or totally synthetic sources that mimic the structural features and properties of heparin. Such compounds, termed heparin mimetics, are also needed as anticoagulant materials for use in biomedical applications (e.g., stents, grafts, implants etc.). This review encompasses the development of heparin mimetics of various structural classes, including synthetic polymers and non-carbohydrate small molecules as well as sulfated oligo- and polysaccharides, and fondaparinux derivatives and conjugates, with a focus on developments in the past 10 years. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Biosynthesis, Trafficking, and Incorporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checkley, Mary Ann; Luttge, Benjamin G.; Freed, Eric O.

    2011-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoproteins play an essential role in the virus replication cycle by mediating the fusion between viral and cellular membranes during the entry process. The Env glycoproteins are synthesized as a polyprotein precursor, gp160, that is cleaved by cellular proteases to the mature surface glycoprotein gp120 and the transmembrane glycoprotein gp41. During virus assembly the gp120/gp41 complex is incorporated as heterotrimeric spikes into the lipid bilayer of nascent virions. These gp120/gp41 complexes then initiate the infection process by binding receptor and co-receptor on the surface of target cells. Much is currently known about the HIV-1 Env glycoprotein trafficking pathway and the structure of gp120 and the extracellular domain of gp41. However, the mechanism by which the Env glycoprotein complex is incorporated into virus particles remains incompletely understood. Genetic data support a major role for the cytoplasmic tail of gp41 and the matrix domain of Gag in Env glycoprotein incorporation. Still to be defined are the identities of host cell factors that may promote Env incorporation, and the role of specific membrane microdomains in this process. Here we review our current understanding of HIV-1 Env glycoprotein trafficking and incorporation into virions. PMID:21762802

  12. TROPHOBLASTIC β1 – GLYCOPROTEIN SYNTHESIS IN SEROPOSITIVE PREGNANT WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. Bogdanovich

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The level of trophoblastic β1 – glycoprotein (SP–1 was determined in the blood sera of 200 healthy pregnant women and 184 women with threatened abortions in term till 20 weeks of pregnancy. In group of women experiencing recurrent abortions in 38 % cases antibodies to chorionic gonadotropin, in 39,5 % cases antibodies to phospholipids, in 25,5 % – antibodies to tireoglobulin were revealed in significant amounts. In 20,65 % lupus anticoagulant was found. The majority of women in this group had changes in homeostasis. The presence of autoantibodies during pregnancy is the unfavourable factor in the development of placental insufficiency. This is proved by the decreased secretion of trophoblastic β1 – glycoprotein – a marker of the fetal part of placenta. (Med. Immunol., 2005, vol.7, № 1, pp. 85588

  13. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Michael; Cupo, Albert; Dean, Hansi; Hoffenberg, Simon; King, C. Richter; Klasse, P. J.; Marozsan, Andre; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ward, Andrew; Wilson, Ian; Julien, Jean-Philippe

    2017-08-22

    The present application relates to novel HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, which may be utilized as HIV-1 vaccine immunogens, and antigens for crystallization, electron microscopy and other biophysical, biochemical and immunological studies for the identification of broad neutralizing antibodies. The present invention encompasses the preparation and purification of immunogenic compositions, which are formulated into the vaccines of the present invention.

  14. Glycoprotein and proteoglycan techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeley, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this book is to describe techniques which can be used to answer some of the basic questions about glycosylated proteins. Methods are discussed for isolation, compositional analysis, and for determination of the primary structure of carbohydrate units and the nature of protein-carbohydrate linkages of glycoproteins and proteoglycans. High resolution NMR is considered, as well as radioactive labelling techniques. (Auth.)

  15. Transitions of care in anticoagulated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michota F

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Franklin Michota Department of Hospital Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Anticoagulation is an effective therapeutic means of reducing thrombotic risk in patients with various conditions, including atrial fibrillation, mechanical heart valves, and major surgery. By its nature, anticoagulation increases the risk of bleeding; this risk is particularly high during transitions of care. Established anticoagulants are not ideal, due to requirements for parenteral administration, narrow therapeutic indices, and/or a need for frequent therapeutic monitoring. The development of effective oral anticoagulants that are administered as a fixed dose, have low potential for drug-drug and drug-food interactions, do not require regular anticoagulation monitoring, and are suitable for both inpatient and outpatient use is to be welcomed. Three new oral anticoagulants, the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate, and the factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, have been approved in the US for reducing the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation; rivaroxaban is also approved for prophylaxis and treatment of deep vein thrombosis, which may lead to pulmonary embolism in patients undergoing knee or hip replacement surgery. This review examines current options for anticoagulant therapy, with a focus on maintaining efficacy and safety during transitions of care. The characteristics of dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are discussed in the context of traditional anticoagulant therapy. Keywords: hemorrhagic events, oral anticoagulation, parenteral anticoagulation, stroke, transitions of care

  16. Oral anticoagulation in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altirriba, J; Aparicio, P

    2017-06-01

    Oral anticoagulant therapy is currently widespread in the population and primary care plays an important role in its control in Spain. Younger populations, such as those in prisons, often require this treatment for reasons other than atrial fibrillation, often in relation to valvular or congenital or acquired hypercoagulability situations. The possibility of obtaining the INR by portable coagulometers has allowed primary care physicians to tackle the indication of this therapy and the control of these patients in coordination with haematology services. The emergence of new therapeutic alternatives (Dabigatran, Rivaroxaban, Apixaban and Edoxaban, the so called "ACOD") has permitted the expansion of options for oral anticoagulation in some cases, since they do not require systematic monitoring of their effect and interact with far fewer drugs than their predecessors, although there are still restrictions by the health authorities on their widespread use. This article reviews the different indications of oral anticoagulant therapy according to the new recommendations as well as the clinical scenarios in which it should be used.

  17. Anticoagulant rodenticides and wildlife: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, Nico W.; Elliott, John E.; Shore, Richard F.; Rattner, Barnett A.; van den Brink, Nico W.; Elliott, John E.; Shore, Richard F.; Rattner, Barnett A.

    2018-01-01

    Rodents have interacted with people since the beginning of systematic food storage by humans in the early Neolithic era. Such interactions have had adverse outcomes such as threats to human health, spoiling and consumption of food sources, damage to human infrastructure and detrimental effects on indigenous island wildlife (through inadvertent anthropogenic assisted introductions). These socio/economic and environmental impacts illustrate the clear need to control populations of commensal rodents. Different methods have been applied historically but the main means of control in the last decades is through the application of rodenticides, mainly anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) that inhibit blood clotting. The so-called First Generation Anticoagulant Rodenticides (FGARs) proved highly effective but rodents increasingly developed resistance. This led to a demand for more effective alternative compounds and paved the way to the development of Second Generation Anticoagulant Rodenticides (SGARs). These were more acutely toxic and persistent, making them more effective but also increasing the risks of exposure of non-target species and secondary poisoning of predatory species. SGARs often fail the environmental thresholds of different regulatory frameworks because of these negative side-effects, but their use is still permitted because of the overwhelming societal needs for rodent control and the lack of effective alternatives. This book provides a state-of-the-art overview of the scientific advancements in assessment of environmental exposure, effects and risks of currently used ARs. This is discussed in relation to the societal needs for rodent control, including risk mitigation and development of alternatives.

  18. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell-surface glycoprotein apa as a potential adhesin to colonize target cells via the innate immune system pulmonary C-type lectin surfactant protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragas, Aude; Roussel, Lucie; Puzo, Germain; Rivière, Michel

    2007-02-23

    Tuberculosis is still a major health problem, and understanding the mechanism by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) invades and colonizes its host target cells remains an important issue for the control of infection. The innate immune system C-type lectins (C-TLs), including the human pulmonary surfactant protein A (PSP-A), have been recently identified as determinant players in the early recognition of the invading pathogen and in mounting the host defense response. Although the antigenic lipoglycan mannosylated lipoarabinomannan is currently considered to be the major C-TL target on the mycobacterial surface, the recognition by some C-TLs of the only mycobacterial species composing the "Mtb complex" indicates that mannosylated lipoarabinomannan cannot account alone for this specificity. Thus, we searched for the mycobacterial molecules targeted by human PSP-A, focusing our attention on the Mtb surface glycoproteins. We developed an original functional proteomic approach based on a lectin blot assay using crude human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as a source of physiological PSP-A. Combined with selective cell-surface protein extraction and mass spectrometry peptide mapping, this strategy allowed us to identify the Apa (alanine- and proline-rich antigenic) glycoprotein as new potential target for PSP-A. This result was supported by direct binding of PSP-A to purified Apa. Moreover, EDTA addition or deglycosylation of purified Apa samples completely abolished the interaction, demonstrating that the interaction is calcium- and mannose-dependent, as expected. Finally, we provide convincing evidence that Apa, formerly considered as mainly secreted, is associated with the cell wall for a sufficiently long time to aid in the attachment of PSP-A. Because, to date, Apa seems to be restricted to the Mtb complex strains, we propose that it may account for the selective recognition of those strains by PSP-A and other immune system C-TLs containing homologous functional

  19. Managing reversal of direct oral anticoagulants in emergency situations Anticoagulation Education Task Force White Paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ageno, Walter; Büller, Harry R.; Falanga, Anna; Hacke, Werner; Hendriks, Jeroen; Lobban, Trudie; Merino, Jose; Milojevic, Ivan S.; Moya, Francisco; van der Worp, H. Bart; Randall, Gary; Tsioufis, Konstantinos; Verhamme, Peter; Camm, A. John

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the mechanisms by which anticoagulants confer therapeutic benefit also increase the risk of bleeding. As such, reversal strategies

  20. Direct oral anticoagulants and venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Franchini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE, consisting of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a major clinical concern associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The cornerstone of management of VTE is anticoagulation, and traditional anticoagulants include parenteral heparins and oral vitamin K antagonists. Recently, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed and licensed, including direct factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban and thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran etexilate. This narrative review focusses on the characteristics of these direct anticoagulants and the main results of published clinical studies on their use in the prevention and treatment of VTE.

  1. Detection of glycoproteins in the Acanthamoeba plasma membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paatero, G.I.L. (Abo Akademi (Finland)); Gahmberg, C.G. (Univ. of Helsinki (Finland))

    1988-11-01

    In the present study the authors have shown that glycoproteins are present in the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii by utilizing different radioactive labeling techniques. Plasma membrane proteins in the amoeba were iodinated by {sup 125}I-lactoperoxidase labeling and the solubilized radiolabeled glycoproteins were separated by lectin-Sepharose affinity chromatography followed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The periodate/NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} and galactose oxidase/NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} labeling techniques were used for labeling of surface carbohydrates in the amoeba. Several surface-labeled glycoproteins were observed in addition to a diffusely labeled region with M{sub r} of 55,000-75,000 seen on electrophoresis, which could represent glycolipids. The presence of glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii was confirmed by metabolic labeling with ({sup 35}S)methionine followed by lectin-Sepharose affinity chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

  2. Detection of glycoproteins in the Acanthamoeba plasma membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paatero, G.I.L.; Gahmberg, C.G.

    1988-01-01

    In the present study the authors have shown that glycoproteins are present in the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii by utilizing different radioactive labeling techniques. Plasma membrane proteins in the amoeba were iodinated by 125 I-lactoperoxidase labeling and the solubilized radiolabeled glycoproteins were separated by lectin-Sepharose affinity chromatography followed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The periodate/NaB 3 H 4 and galactose oxidase/NaB 3 H 4 labeling techniques were used for labeling of surface carbohydrates in the amoeba. Several surface-labeled glycoproteins were observed in addition to a diffusely labeled region with M r of 55,000-75,000 seen on electrophoresis, which could represent glycolipids. The presence of glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii was confirmed by metabolic labeling with [ 35 S]methionine followed by lectin-Sepharose affinity chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

  3. ["Lupus anticoagulant" in immune hyperthyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, G; Alexopoulos, A; Hasler, K; Kerp, L

    1990-10-05

    A 56-year-old woman with autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Basedow) whose blood coagulation had at first been normal developed prolonged partial thromboplastin time (PTT) of 48 s and a fall in prothrombin time (Quick value) to 52%. At the same time, total activity of factor VIII was reduced to 18% and factor IX to 16%. These values not having changed after the addition of normal plasma, it is assumed that an acquired inhibitor of plasmatic coagulation was responsible. Such inhibitors were first described in lupus erythematodes and therefore called lupus anticoagulant, but later also demonstrated in other autoimmune diseases.

  4. Anticoagulant Control Results among Patients with Mechanical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patients with mechanical heart valves receive life long, oral anticoagulant therapy to prevent thromboembolic complications, but this treatment is associated with an increased risk of bleeding (1). However no study in Tanzania has been done to review the adequacy of anticoagulation monitoring and risk factors ...

  5. Isolation and characterization of anticoagulant compound from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GIS

    2013-10-02

    Oct 2, 2013 ... The structural characterization of anticoagulant GAG was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Among the marine bivalve, D. faba purified showed more anticoagulant activity than that of crude sample. The results of this study suggest that the GAG from D. faba could be an alternative.

  6. Anticoagulant activity of ginger ( Zingiber officinale Rosc ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Herbal medicines with anticoagulant therapeutic claims could serve as veritable sources of new oral anticoagulant drugs with possible wider safety margins than the currently available ones. Objectives: This work was aimed at evaluating a Ginger Rhizome Methanolic Extract in vivo in rats for its potential ...

  7. Anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they last a long time. You participate in sports or other activities that put you at risk for bleeding or bruising. What are the side effects? Sometimes a medicine causes unwanted effects. These are ...

  8. Anticoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be hazardous. These medicines include most antibiotics, several pain medicines (e.g., non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and medications for acid reflux such as cimetidine (Tagamet). If you're taking warfarin and start a new prescription or over-the-counter medication, check with ...

  9. HEEADSSS assessment for adolescents requiring anticoagulation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sophie; Mertyn, Eliza; Alhucema, Paulina; Monagle, Paul; Newall, Fiona

    2012-05-01

    The care of adolescents with complex chronic illness needs to be developmentally appropriate to encourage adherence, knowledge retention and self-management. There has been an increase in the number of adolescents requiring long-term or lifelong anticoagulation therapy, related to either an underlying illness or idiopathic deep vein thrombosis. The burden of anticoagulant therapy, the associated risks and the required lifestyle changes can significantly impact on psychosocial well-being in the adolescent patient. This review identifies issues pertinent to adolescent anticoagulation management and discusses strategies to support optimal management. The HEEADSSS (Home, Education and employment, Eating, Activities with peers, Drugs, Sexual activity, Suicide and depression, and Safety) framework was used to provide guidance in undertaking a psychosocial assessment of adolescents requiring anticoagulant therapy in conjunction with a structured education strategy. Adolescent anticoagulant management strategies employing developmentally appropriate assessment and education will likely result in improved therapeutic outcomes for the patient and potentially facilitate transition to adult-based care.

  10. The envelope glycoprotein of human endogenous retrovirus type W uses a divergent family of amino acid transporters/cell surface receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavillette, Dimitri; Marin, Mariana; Ruggieri, Alessia; Mallet, François; Cosset, François-Loïc; Kabat, David

    2002-07-01

    The human endogenous retrovirus type W (HERV-W) family includes proviruses with intact protein-coding regions that appear to be under selection pressure, suggesting that some HERV-W proviruses may remain active in higher primates. The envelope glycoprotein (Env) encoded by HERV-W is highly fusogenic, is naturally expressed in human placental syncytiatrophoblasts, and has been reported to function as a superantigen in lymphocyte cultures. Recent evidence suggested that HERV-W Env can mediate syncytium formation by interacting with the human sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter type 2 (hASCT2; gene name, SLC1A5) (J.-L. Blond, D. Lavillette, V. Cheynet, O. Bouton, G. Oriol, S. Chapel-Fernandez, B. Mandrand, F. Mallet, and F.-L. Cosset, J. Virol. 74:3321-3329, 2000) and that it can pseudotype human immunodeficiency virus cores (D. S. An, Y. Xie, and I. S. Y. Chen, J. Virol. 75:3488-3489, 2001). By using cell-cell fusion and pseudotype virion infection assays, we found that HERV-W Env efficiently uses both hASCT2 and the related transporter hASCT1 (gene name, SLC1A4) as receptors. In addition, although HERV-W Env mediates only slight syncytium formation or infection of mouse cells, it utilizes the mouse transporters mASCT1 and mASCT2 when their sites for N-linked glycosylation are eliminated by mutagenesis. Consistent with their role as a battlefield in host-virus coevolution, the viral recognition regions in ASCT1 and ASCT2 of humans and mice are highly divergent compared with other regions of these proteins, and their ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide sequence changes are extremely large. The recognition of ASCT1 and ASCT2 despite this divergence of their sequences strongly suggests that the use of both receptors has been highly advantageous for survival and evolution of the HERV-W family of retroviruses.

  11. Fasciola hepatica Surface Coat Glycoproteins Contain Mannosylated and Phosphorylated N-glycans and Exhibit Immune Modulatory Properties Independent of the Mannose Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ravidà

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fascioliasis, caused by the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica, is a neglected tropical disease infecting over 1 million individuals annually with 17 million people at risk of infection. Like other helminths, F. hepatica employs mechanisms of immune suppression in order to evade its host immune system. In this study the N-glycosylation of F. hepatica's tegumental coat (FhTeg and its carbohydrate-dependent interactions with bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs were investigated. Mass spectrometric analysis demonstrated that FhTeg N-glycans comprised mainly of oligomannose and to a lesser extent truncated and complex type glycans, including a phosphorylated subset. The interaction of FhTeg with the mannose receptor (MR was investigated. Binding of FhTeg to MR-transfected CHO cells and BMDCs was blocked when pre-incubated with mannan. We further elucidated the role played by MR in the immunomodulatory mechanism of FhTeg and demonstrated that while FhTeg's binding was significantly reduced in BMDCs generated from MR knockout mice, the absence of MR did not alter FhTeg's ability to induce SOCS3 or suppress cytokine secretion from LPS activated BMDCs. A panel of negatively charged monosaccharides (i.e. GlcNAc-4P, Man-6P and GalNAc-4S were used in an attempt to inhibit the immunoregulatory properties of phosphorylated oligosaccharides. Notably, GalNAc-4S, a known inhibitor of the Cys-domain of MR, efficiently suppressed FhTeg binding to BMDCs and inhibited the expression of suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS 3, a negative regulator the TLR and STAT3 pathway. We conclude that F. hepatica contains high levels of mannose residues and phosphorylated glycoproteins that are crucial in modulating its host's immune system, however the role played by MR appears to be limited to the initial binding event suggesting that other C-type lectin receptors are involved in the immunomodulatory mechanism of FhTeg.

  12. Binding of alphaherpesvirus glycoprotein H to surface α4β1-integrins activates calcium-signaling pathways and induces phosphatidylserine exposure on the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Walid; Gramatica, Andrea; Herrmann, Andreas; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2015-10-20

    Intracellular signaling connected to integrin activation is known to induce cytoplasmic Ca(2+) release, which in turn mediates a number of downstream signals. The cellular entry pathways of two closely related alphaherpesviruses, equine herpesviruses 1 and 4 (EHV-1 and EHV-4), are differentially regulated with respect to the requirement of interaction of glycoprotein H (gH) with α4β1-integrins. We show here that binding of EHV-1, but not EHV-4, to target cells resulted in a rapid and significant increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. EHV-1 expressing EHV-4 gH (gH4) in lieu of authentic gH1 failed to induce Ca(2+) release, while EHV-4 with gH1 triggered significant Ca(2+) release. Blocking the interaction between gH1 and α4β1-integrins, inhibiting phospholipase C (PLC) activation, or blocking binding of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) to its receptor on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) abrogated Ca(2+) release. Interestingly, phosphatidylserine (PS) was exposed on the plasma membrane in response to cytosolic calcium increase after EHV-1 binding through a scramblase-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of both Ca(2+) release from the ER and scramblase activation blocked PS scrambling and redirected virus entry to the endocytic pathway, indicating that PS may play a role in facilitating virus entry directly at the plasma membrane. Herpesviruses are a large family of enveloped viruses that infect a wide range of hosts, causing a variety of diseases. These viruses have developed a number of strategies for successful entry into different cell types. We and others have shown that alphaherpesviruses, including EHV-1 and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), can route their entry pathway and do so by manipulation of cell signaling cascades to ensure viral genome delivery to nuclei. We show here that the interaction between EHV-1 gH and cellular α4β1-integrins is necessary to induce emptying of ER calcium stores, which induces phosphatidylserine exposure on the plasma membrane

  13. The glycoprotein Ib-IX-V complex contributes to tissue factor-independent thrombin generation by recombinant factor VIIa on the activated platelet surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeterings, Cees; de Groot, Philip G.; Adelmeijer, Jelle; Lisman, Ton

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) is able to activate factor X on an activated platelet, in a tissue factor-independent manner. We hypothesized that, besides the anionic surface, a receptor on the activated platelet surface is involved in this process. Here, we

  14. A Study of Anti Beta-2 Glycoprotein I and Anti-Prothrombin Antibodies in Patients with Unexplained Recurrent Pregnancy Losses

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Angad; Nangia, Anita; Sharma, Sunita; Puri, Manju

    2015-01-01

    To compare the levels of IgG and IgM anti beta-2 glycoprotein I��antibodies and��IgG and IgM anti prothrombin antibodies among women with unexplained recurrent pregnancy losses and women with at least 2 live issues. To compare the prevalence of newer anti beta-2 glycoprotein I & anti prothrombin antibodies with conventional Lupus anticoagulant & anticardiolipin antibodies. 50 women with recurrent pregnancy losses & 50 matched controls were evaluated for the presence of: Lupus anticoagulant���...

  15. Combined administration of antibiotics and direct oral anticoagulants: a renewed indication for laboratory monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

    2014-10-01

    The recent development and marketing of novel direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) represents a paradigm shift in the management of patients requiring long-term anticoagulation. The advantages of these compounds over traditional therapy with vitamin K antagonists include a reportedly lower risk of severe hemorrhages and the limited need for laboratory measurements. However, there are several scenarios in which testing should be applied. The potential for drug-to-drug interaction is one plausible but currently underrecognized indication for laboratory assessment of the anticoagulant effect of DOACs. In particular, substantial concern has been raised during Phase I studies regarding the potential interaction of these drugs with some antibiotics, especially those that interplay with permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) and cytochrome 3A4 (CYP3A4). A specific electronic search on clinical trials published so far confirms that clarithromycin and rifampicin significantly impair the bioavailability of dabigatran, whereas clarithromycin, erythromycin, fluconazole, and ketoconazole alter the metabolism of rivaroxaban in vivo. Because of their more recent development, no published data were found for apixaban and edoxaban, or for potential interactions of DOACs with other and widely used antibiotics. It is noteworthy, however, that an online resource based on Food and Drug Administration and social media information, reports several hemorrhagic and thrombotic events in patients simultaneously taking dabigatran and some commonly used antibiotics such as amoxicillin, cephalosporin, and metronidazole. According to these reports, the administration of antibiotics in patients undergoing therapy with DOACs would seem to require accurate evaluation as to whether dose adjustments (personalized or antibiotic class driven) of the anticoagulant drug may be advisable. This might be facilitated by direct laboratory assessments of their anticoagulant effect ex vivo. Thieme Medical Publishers

  16. [Factors influenceing the activity of oral anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Caamaño, A; Díaz Barreiro, L A

    1976-01-01

    Anticoagulants are drugs capable to retard or even cancell the process of blood coagulation. They are many factors who influences the intensity and duration of oral anticoagulant acitivity, such as drugs, body constitution, physical agents, diseases, etc. The oral anticoagulants interacts with other drugs at differents levels: at the gut, at the plasma, modiffing the protein binding or the metabolism of such drugs, at the enzimatic induction or inhibition, or at unknown places with many other drugs. These paper deals with the description of such interactions.

  17. Replacement of the V3 domain in the surface subunit of the feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein with the equivalent region of a T cell-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 results in a chimeric surface protein that efficiently binds to CXCR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Silvia A; Falcón, Juan I; Affranchino, José L

    2014-03-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and the T cell-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) share the use of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 for cell entry. To study this process further we developed a cell surface binding assay based on the expression of a soluble version of the FIV SU C-terminally tagged with the influenza virus hemagglutinin epitope (HA). The specificity of the assay was demonstrated by the following evidence: (1) the SU-HA protein bound to HeLa cells that express CXCR4 but not to MDCK cells that lack this chemokine receptor; and (2) binding of the SU-HA to HeLa cells was blocked by incubation with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 as well as with the anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibody (MAb) 12G5. Deletion of the V3 region from the FIV SU glycoprotein abolished its ability to bind CXCR4-expressing cells. Remarkably, substitution of the V3 domain of the FIV SU by the equivalent region of the HIV-1 NL4-3 isolate resulted in efficient cell surface binding of the chimeric SU protein to CXCR4. Moreover, transfection of MDCK cells with a plasmid encoding human CXCR4 allowed the association of the chimeric SU-HA glycoprotein to the transfected cells. Interestingly, while cell binding of the chimeric FIV-HIV SU was inhibited by an anti-HIV-1 V3 MAb, its association with CXCR4 was found to be resistant to AMD3100. Of note, the chimeric FIV-HIV Env glycoprotein was capable of promoting CXCR4-dependent cell-to-cell fusion.

  18. Kinetic analysis of synthetic analogues of linear-epitope peptides of glycoprotein D of herpes simplex virus type 1 by surface plasmon resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lasonder, E; Schellekens, GA; Koedijk, DGAM; Damhof, RA; WellingWester, S; Feijlbrief, M; Scheffer, AJ; Welling, GW

    1996-01-01

    The interaction between mAb A16 and glycoprorein D (gD) of herpes simplex virus type 1 was analyzed by studying the kinetics of binding with a surface-plasmon-resonance biosensor. mAb A16 belongs to group VII antibodies, which recognize residues 11-19 of gD. In a previous study, three critical

  19. Overview of a pharmacist anticoagulation certificate program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Julienne K; Edwards, Rebecca; Brewer, Andrew; Miller, Cathey; Bray, Bryan; Groce, James B

    2017-07-01

    To describe the design of an ongoing anticoagulation certificate program and annual renewal update for pharmacists. Components of the anticoagulation certificate program include home study, pre- and posttest, live sessions, case discussions with evaluation and presentation, an implementation plan, and survey information (program evaluation and use in practice). Clinical reasoning skills were assessed through case work-up and evaluation prior to live presentation. An annual renewal program requires pharmacists to complete home study and case evaluations. A total of 361 pharmacists completed the anticoagulation certificate program between 2002 and 2015. Most (62%) practiced in ambulatory care and 38% in inpatient care settings (8% in both). In the past four years, 71% were working in or starting anticoagulation clinics in ambulatory and inpatient settings. In their evaluations of the program, an average of 90% of participants agreed or strongly agreed the lecture material was relevant and objectives were met. Pharmacists are able to apply knowledge and skills in management of anticoagulation. This structured practice-based continuing education program was intended to enhance pharmacy practice and has achieved that goal. The certificate program in anticoagulation was relevant to pharmacists who attended the program. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV isolated from the ISA disease outbreaks in Chile diverged from ISAV isolates from Norway around 1996 and was disseminated around 2005, based on surface glycoprotein gene sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisperger Angelica

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA virus (ISAV is a pathogen of marine-farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar; a disease first diagnosed in Norway in 1984. For over 25 years ISAV has caused major disease outbreaks in the Northern hemisphere, and remains an emerging fish pathogen because of the asymptomatic infections in marine wild fish and the potential for emergence of new epidemic strains. ISAV belongs to the family Orthomyxoviridae, together with influenza viruses but is sufficiently different to be assigned to its own genus, Isavirus. The Isavirus genome consists of eight single-stranded RNA species, and the virions have two surface glycoproteins; fusion (F protein encoded on segment 5 and haemagglutinin-esterase (HE protein encoded on segment 6. However, comparision between different ISAV isolates is complicated because there is presently no universally accepted nomenclature system for designation of genetic relatedness between ISAV isolates. The first outbreak of ISA in marine-farmed Atlantic salmon in the Southern hemisphere occurred in Chile starting in June 2007. In order to describe the molecular characteristics of the virus so as to understand its origins, how ISAV isolates are maintained and spread, and their virulence characteristics, we conducted a study where the viral sequences were directly amplified, cloned and sequenced from tissue samples collected from several ISA-affected fish on the different fish farms with confirmed or suspected ISA outbreaks in Chile. This paper describes the genetic characterization of a large number of ISAV strains associated with extensive outbreaks in Chile starting in June 2007, and their phylogenetic relationships with selected European and North American isolates that are representative of the genetic diversity of ISAV. Results RT-PCR for ISAV F and HE glycoprotein genes was performed directly on tissue samples collected from ISA-affected fish on different farms among 14 fish

  1. Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) isolated from the ISA disease outbreaks in Chile diverged from ISAV isolates from Norway around 1996 and was disseminated around 2005, based on surface glycoprotein gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibenge, Frederick S B; Godoy, Marcos G; Wang, Yingwei; Kibenge, Molly J T; Gherardelli, Valentina; Mansilla, Soledad; Lisperger, Angelica; Jarpa, Miguel; Larroquete, Geraldine; Avendaño, Fernando; Lara, Marcela; Gallardo, Alicia

    2009-06-26

    Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus (ISAV) is a pathogen of marine-farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar); a disease first diagnosed in Norway in 1984. For over 25 years ISAV has caused major disease outbreaks in the Northern hemisphere, and remains an emerging fish pathogen because of the asymptomatic infections in marine wild fish and the potential for emergence of new epidemic strains. ISAV belongs to the family Orthomyxoviridae, together with influenza viruses but is sufficiently different to be assigned to its own genus, Isavirus. The Isavirus genome consists of eight single-stranded RNA species, and the virions have two surface glycoproteins; fusion (F) protein encoded on segment 5 and haemagglutinin-esterase (HE) protein encoded on segment 6. However, comparison between different ISAV isolates is complicated because there is presently no universally accepted nomenclature system for designation of genetic relatedness between ISAV isolates. The first outbreak of ISA in marine-farmed Atlantic salmon in the Southern hemisphere occurred in Chile starting in June 2007. In order to describe the molecular characteristics of the virus so as to understand its origins, how ISAV isolates are maintained and spread, and their virulence characteristics, we conducted a study where the viral sequences were directly amplified, cloned and sequenced from tissue samples collected from several ISA-affected fish on the different fish farms with confirmed or suspected ISA outbreaks in Chile. This paper describes the genetic characterization of a large number of ISAV strains associated with extensive outbreaks in Chile starting in June 2007, and their phylogenetic relationships with selected European and North American isolates that are representative of the genetic diversity of ISAV. RT-PCR for ISAV F and HE glycoprotein genes was performed directly on tissue samples collected from ISA-affected fish on different farms among 14 fish companies in Chile during the ISA outbreaks that

  2. Podoplanin - a small glycoprotein with many faces

    OpenAIRE

    Ugorski, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr; Suchanski, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Podoplanin is a small membrane glycoprotein with a large number of O-glycoside chains and therefore it belongs to mucin-type proteins. It can be found on the surface of many types of normal cells originating from various germ layers. It is present primarily on the endothelium of lymphatic vessels, type I pneumocytes and glomerular podocytes. Increased levels of podoplanin or its neo-expression have been found in numerous types of human carcinomas, but it is especially common in squamous cell ...

  3. APOLLO I: Anticoagulation control in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Costa, Luís; Moreira, Sónia; Azevedo, Cristiana; Azevedo, Pedro; Castro, Elisabete; Sousa, Hélder; Melo, Miguel

    2015-05-01

    Anticoagulation control as assessed by time in therapeutic range (TTR) correlates positively with the safety and efficacy of thromboprophylaxis in atrial fibrillation. We set out to assess TTR in our unit and to investigate determinants of better control. This was a case series study of atrial fibrillation patients anticoagulated with warfarin or acenocoumarol at the Family Health Unit of Fânzeres. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected and TTR was calculated by the Rosendaal method, based on international normalized ratio tests performed in external laboratories in the preceding six months. SPSS 21.0 was used for the statistical analysis, with descriptive statistics, Spearman's correlation, and the Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Of the 106 eligible patients, 70% participated in the study. Median TTR was 65.3% (P25=48.3%, P75=86.8%). We found a positive association between this variable and duration of atrial fibrillation (ρ=0.477, p0.05). Median TTR in our unit is similar to that in southern European countries and close to the good control threshold (70%) proposed by the European Society of Cardiology. The duration of atrial fibrillation and of anticoagulation explains only a small part of the measure's variability. Other determinants of anticoagulation control must be investigated in future studies and comparative studies should be carried out in family health units monitoring anticoagulation on the premises. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. The interaction of protein S with the phospholipid surface is essential for the activated protein C-independent activity of protein S

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijnen, M.; Stam, J. G.; van't Veer, C.; Meijers, J. C.; Reitsma, P. H.; Bertina, R. M.; Bouma, B. N.

    1996-01-01

    Protein S is a vitamin-K dependent glycoprotein involved in the regulation of the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C (APC). Recent data showed a direct anticoagulant role of protein S independent of APC, as demonstrated by the inhibition of prothrombinase and tenase activity both in

  5. [A new deal with new anticoagulants?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godier, A; Samama, C-M

    2010-06-01

    The anticoagulant market has been very active recently with the development of new compounds including injectable anti-Xa such as fondaparinux, already available, and idraparinux, already replaced by its new biotynilateed form, and new oral drugs which can be divided into anti-IIa with dabigatran already available, and anti-Xa, such as the recently marketed rivaroxaban and apixaban still in the development stage. Others are coming forward. The competition is strong and the place for each drug remains to be determined. This review discusses these new anticoagulants in terms of efficacy and tolerance based on data in the literature. These recent reports mainly concern prophylaxis for orthopedic surgery but also consider treatment of deep venous thrombosis. The results of studies in heart patients have raised much curiosity since they will be determinant in the future use of innovating compounds, which could replace current oral anticoagulants. This will be upcoming but not yet for tomorrow.

  6. Reversal of target-specific oral anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, D.M.; Cuker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOACs) provide safe and effective anticoagulation for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis in a variety of clinical settings by interfering with the activity of thrombin (dabigatran) or factor Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban, betrixaban). Although TSOACs have practical advantages over vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), there are currently no antidotes to reverse their anticoagulant effect. Herein we summarize the available evidence for TSOAC reversal using nonspecific and specific reversal agents. We discuss important limitations of existing evidence, which is derived from studies in human volunteers, animal models and in vitro experiments. Studies evaluating the safety and efficacy of reversal agents on clinical outcomes such as bleeding and mortality in patients with TSOAC-associated bleeding are needed. PMID:24880102

  7. Anti-beta2 glycoprotein 1 and the anti-phospholipid syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keane, Pearse A

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: To describe a patient who presented with bilateral retinal vascular occlusion and the use of anti-beta2 glycoprotein 1 (GPI) antibody testing in the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome. DESIGN: Observational case report. METHODS: Hematological investigations were performed on a 49-year-old man who presented with rapid onset of bilateral severe central retinal vein occlusion. RESULTS: Lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibody testing was negative. Markedly raised titers of anti-beta2 GPI antibodies were detected on two separate occasions. CONCLUSIONS: The raised titers of anti-beta2 GPI antibodies were considered to strongly suggest an underlying diagnosis of the antiphospholipid syndrome.

  8. Processing of virus-specific glycoproteins of varicella zoster virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namazue, J.; Campo-Vera, H.; Kitamura, K.; Okuno, T.; Yamanishi, K.

    1985-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to varicella zoster virus (VZV) glycoproteins were used to study the processing of three glycoproteins with molecular weights of 83K-94K (gp 2), 64K (gp 3), and 55K (gp 5). Immunoprecipitation experiments performed with VZV-infected cells, pulse labeled with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine in the presence of tunicamycin, suggest that O-linked oligosaccharide is present on the glycoprotein of gp 2. Use of the enzyme endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H revealed that the fully processed form of gp 3 had high-mannose type and that of gp 5 had only complex type of N-linked oligosaccharides. Experiments with monensin suggest that the precursor form (116K) of gp 3 is cleaved during the processing from Golgi apparatus to cell surface membrane. The extension of O-linked oligosaccharide chain and the complex type of N-linked oligosaccharide chains also occurs during this processing.

  9. Processing of virus-specific glycoproteins of varicella zoster virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namazue, J.; Campo-Vera, H.; Kitamura, K.; Okuno, T.; Yamanishi, K.

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to varicella zoster virus (VZV) glycoproteins were used to study the processing of three glycoproteins with molecular weights of 83K-94K (gp 2), 64K (gp 3), and 55K (gp 5). Immunoprecipitation experiments performed with VZV-infected cells, pulse labeled with [ 3 H]glucosamine in the presence of tunicamycin, suggest that O-linked oligosaccharide is present on the glycoprotein of gp 2. Use of the enzyme endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H revealed that the fully processed form of gp 3 had high-mannose type and that of gp 5 had only complex type of N-linked oligosaccharides. Experiments with monensin suggest that the precursor form (116K) of gp 3 is cleaved during the processing from Golgi apparatus to cell surface membrane. The extension of O-linked oligosaccharide chain and the complex type of N-linked oligosaccharide chains also occurs during this processing

  10. Citrate Anticoagulation during Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Davide; Panicali, Laura; Facchini, Maria Grazia; Mancini, Elena

    2017-01-01

    During extracorporeal dialysis, some anticoagulation strategy is necessary to prevent the coagulation of blood. Heparin has historically been used as an anticoagulant because of its efficacy combined with low cost. However, a variable incidence of hemorrhagic complications (5-30%) has been documented in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) with heparin as an anticoagulant. Citrate has anticoagulation properties secondary to its ability to chelate calcium, which is necessary for the coagulation cascade. Citrate may thus be used in a regional anticoagulation (RCA), limited to the extracorporeal circuit of CRRT, to avoid systemic anticoagulation. Recent meta-analysis confirmed the advantage of RCA over heparin in terms of incidence of bleeding during CRRT. Moreover, an increase in filter lifespan is documented, with a secondary advantage in reaching the prescribed dialysis dose. In our experience, we could confirm this positive effect. In fact, with a progressive increase in the proportion of CRRT with citrate as RCA, we obtained a reduction in the number of filters used for every 72 h of treatment (from 2.4 in 2011 to 1.3 in 2015), and most importantly, a reduction in the difference between the prescribed and delivered dialysis doses (from 22 to 7%). Citrate has an intense effect on the acid-base balance as well, if fully metabolized through the Krebs cycle, due to the production of bicarbonate. Even more severely ill patients, such as those with liver dysfunction, may be treated with RCA without severe complications, because modern machines for CRRT are equipped with simple systems that are able to manage the citrate infusion and control the calcium levels, with minimal risks of metabolic derangements. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after taking anticoagulation medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel P. Hammar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 64-year-old man with extensive diffuse acute lung hemorrhage, presumably as a result of anticoagulation therapy. We evaluated reports in the literature concerning acute exacerbation (acute lung injury of unknown cause in UIP and other forms of fibrotic interstitial pneumonias. We also evaluated autopsy tissue in this case in order to determine the cause of death in this 64-year-old man, who was initially thought to have an asbestos-related disease. Based on the autopsy findings, this man died as a result of anticoagulation therapy; specifically, the use of Xarelto® (rivaroxaban.

  12. Current State of Anticoagulants to Treat Deep Venous Thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Vo, Timothy; Vazquez, Sara; Rondina, Matthew T.

    2014-01-01

    Anticoagulation remains the cornerstone of treatment in patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT). While parenteral anticoagulants and oral vitamin K antagonists (e.g. warfarin) have been used for many decades, the recent development of novel oral anticoagulants have provided clinicians with an expanding set of therapeutic options for DVT. This review summarizes the pharmacology and clinical trial results of these new oral anticoagulants. Several practical considerations to the use of these or...

  13. Is there an alternative to systemic anticoagulation, as related to interventional biomedical devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Gemma; Kidane, Asmeret G; Punshon, Geoffrey; Kannan, Ruben Y; Hamilton, George; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2006-03-01

    To reduce the toxic effects, related clinical problems and complications such as bleeding disorders associated with systemic anticoagulation, it has been hypothesized that by coating the surfaces of medical devices, such as stents, bypass grafts, extracorporeal circuits, guide wires and catheters, there will be a significant reduction in the requirement for systemic anticoagulation or, ideally, it will no longer be necessary. However, current coating processes, even covalent ones, still result in leaching followed by reduced functionality. Alternative anticoagulants and related antiplatelet agents have been used for improvement in terms of reduced restenosis, intimal hyperphasia and device failure. This review focuses on existing heparinization processes, their application in clinical devices and the updated list of alternatives to heparinization in order to obtain a broad overview, it then highlights, in particular, the future possibilities of using heparin and related moieties to tissue engineer scaffolds.

  14. Sulfonation of papain-treated chitosan and its mechanism for anticoagulant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwan, Jiraporn; Zhang, Zhenqing; Li, Boyangzi; Vongchan, Preeyanat; Meepowpan, Puttinan; Zhang, Fuming; Mousa, Shaker A; Mousa, Shaymaa; Premanode, Bhusana; Kongtawelert, Prachya; Linhardt, Robert J

    2009-07-06

    The novel low-molecular-weight chitosan polysulfate (MW 5120-26,200 Da) was prepared using the depolymerization of chitosan with papain (EC. 3.4.22.2). The sulfonation of depolymerized products was performed using chlorosulfonic acid in N,N-dimethylformamide under semi-heterogeneous conditions. The structures of the products were characterized by FTIR, (13)C NMR, and (1)H NMR (1D, 2D NMR) spectroscopy. The present study sheds light on the mechanism of anticoagulant activity of chitosan polysulfate. Anticoagulant activity was investigated by an activated partial thromboplastin assay, a thrombin time assay, a prothrombin time assay, and thrombelastography. Surface plasmon resonance also provided valuable data for understanding the relationship between the molecular binding of sulfated chitosan to two important blood clotting regulators, antithrombin III and heparin cofactor II. These results show that the principal mechanism by which this chitosan polysulfate exhibits anticoagulant activity is mediated through heparin cofactor II and is dependent on polysaccharide molecular weight.

  15. Release of cell coat glycoproteins from the human blood lymphocytes after UV irradiation (254 nm)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artsishevskaya, R.A.; Mironova, A.P.; Samojlova, K.A. (AN SSSR, Leningrad. Inst. Tsitologii)

    1984-01-01

    Irradiation of the human peripheric blood lymphocytes by UV rays (254 nm) in nonlethal doses is accompanied by the decrease (8-13%) of sorption by them of man's life time of alcyane blue dya which selectively is bound by glycoproteins, glycolipides and acid mucopolysaccharides of cellular surface. As simultaneously the yield from substance cells by some properties similar to glycoproteins is intensified by 9-15%, an assumption is made that from the surface of UV-irradiated lymphocites glycoproteins are disorbed. This effect is discussed in connection with possible primary mechanisms of medical-sanitation effect of UV irradiation.

  16. The pharmacology of recombinant hirudin, a new anticoagulant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new anticoagulant, recombinant hirudin, was given to healthy volunteers (5 per test dose) in single .intravenous doses of 0,01, 0,02, 0,04, 0,07 and 0,1 mg/kg to study its anticoagulant effects, how it was tolerated and its pharmacokinetics. Hirudin proved to be a potent anticoagulant with important effects on thrombin ...

  17. Anticoagulant Medicine: Potential for Drug-Food Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medications Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions Make an Appointment Ask a Question Refer Patient ... Jewish Health wants you to be aware these drug-food interactions when taking anticoagulant medicine. Ask your health care ...

  18. Involvement of Leishmania donovani major surface glycoprotein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    plasmid pGEX-gp63 or control vector was introduced into Escherichia coli ... (B) Map of pGP63-2′; coding region inverted. (C) Map of pRH2; ... Control hybridizations showed that β-tubulin and other unrelated. mRNAs are expressed normally in the vector controls and the antisense transfectants (figure 2B). Western blot ...

  19. Improving the quality of oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadisseur, Alain Peter Anton

    2006-01-01

    Oral anticoagulant therapy has changed little since the development of the coumarin drugs after the Second World War. The basic nature of the therapy, i.e. the balancing between thrombosis and haemorrhage, makes it a therapy difficult to manage. Add to this the many influences from co-morbidity,

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Guideline for Prophylactic Anticoagulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    situation. It is hoped that this will lead to improved anticoagulation practice in this country, which we believe will directly benefit patient outcome. S Afr Med J 2004; 94: 691-695. • Certain thrombophilic states (antithrombin/protein C/ protein S deficiency, antiphospholipid syndrome). • Inflammatory bowel disease. • Pregnancy.

  1. Anticoagulant property of sulphated polysaccharides extracted from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The marine brown algae: Sargassum tenerrimum, Sargassum wightii, Turbinaria conoides, Turbinaria ornata and Padina tetrastromatica were collected from Mandapam Island, India. The crude sulphated polysaccharides (SPS) were extracted using hot water and examined for anticoagulation activity. The sugar, sulphate ...

  2. Periprocedural reversal and bridging of anticoagulant treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, M.; Eerenberg, E.; Kamphuisen, P.W.

    2011-01-01

    Anticoagulants are effective agents in reducing the risk of thromboembolism but the most important adverse effect of these agents is the occurrence of bleeding. Bleeding complications may occur spontaneously but the risk of bleeding is particularly increased in case of trauma or around invasive

  3. Anticoagulation duration in heterozygous factor V Leiden: a decision analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Anna K; Smith, Kenneth J; Ragni, Margaret V

    2013-01-01

    Current anticoagulation guidelines suggest that optimal anticoagulation duration for unprovoked venous thromboembolism is determined by an individual risk assessment, balancing risks of anticoagulation bleeding with venous thromboembolism recurrence. Among individuals heterozygous for the factor V Leiden mutation, while venous thromboembolism recurrence risk is greater, the risk for bleeding is recognized to be lower, suggesting longer duration anticoagulation could be considered. The objective of this study was to compare standard vs. lifelong anticoagulation in 20-year-old factor V Leiden heterozygotes with unprovoked venous thromboembolism. A Markov state-transition model was used, incorporating risks of major, minor, and fatal anticoagulation bleeding, bleeding and thromboembolism morbidity and mortality, and quality of life utilities. Model parameter values favoring lifelong anticoagulation in factor V Leiden heterozygotes were determined in sensitivity analyses. Outcomes were in quality-adjusted life years, discounted at 3% per year. In general population groups with odds ratios for venous thromboembolism recurrence and anticoagulation bleeding of 1.0, a short-term anticoagulation strategy gained 0.09 quality-adjusted life years more than a lifelong anticoagulation strategy. By contrast, in factor V Leiden heterozygotes, lifetime anticoagulation was favored if their relative risk of venous thromboembolism was greater than 1.07 or their relative risk for bleeding was less than 0.91. Results were relatively insensitive to individual variation in other parameter values. Lifelong anticoagulation may benefit individuals heterozygous for factor V Leiden and previous idiopathic venous thromboembolism. Studies assessing bleeding risk with anticoagulation in factor V Leiden heterozygotes and the costs of indefinite anticoagulation are needed to determine if lifelong anticoagulation is the optimal strategy. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Recent Progress in Electrochemical Biosensors for Glycoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uichi Akiba

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This review provides an overview of recent progress in the development of electrochemical biosensors for glycoproteins. Electrochemical glycoprotein sensors are constructed by combining metal and carbon electrodes with glycoprotein-selective binding elements including antibodies, lectin, phenylboronic acid and molecularly imprinted polymers. A recent trend in the preparation of glycoprotein sensors is the successful use of nanomaterials such as graphene, carbon nanotube, and metal nanoparticles. These nanomaterials are extremely useful for improving the sensitivity of glycoprotein sensors. This review focuses mainly on the protocols for the preparation of glycoprotein sensors and the materials used. Recent improvements in glycoprotein sensors are discussed by grouping the sensors into several categories based on the materials used as recognition elements.

  5. The place of new oral anticoagulants in travel medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringwald, Juergen; Grauer, Martin; Eckstein, Reinhold; Jelinek, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    New oral anticoagulants are increasingly used instead of vitamin K antagonists or low molecular weight heparins. Hence, more individuals treated with new oral anticoagulants will seek travel medicine advice. Travel medicine experts should therefore become familiar with new oral anticoagulants and with their impact and role in travel medicine. This review summarizes pharmacological characteristics and approved indications of dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban, and highlights their relevance for travellers on permanent oral anticoagulation and for the prophylaxis of travellers' thrombosis. Compared to vitamin K antagonists, the new oral anticoagulants have many advantages: they do not have interactions with food, they have lower potential for drug-drug interactions and do not require regularly performed laboratory tests. The oral administration, obviating the need to carry needles and syringes during travel may give the new oral anticoagulants a further advantage over low molecular weight heparins. Clinical experience with the new oral anticoagulants, however, is still rather limited and there is concern regarding the clinical management of patients treated with new oral anticoagulants who suffer from severe bleeding or who need urgent invasive procedures. Overall, it remains an individual decision based on a risk/benefit analysis as to whether or not patients on long-term treatment with vitamin K antagonists should be switched to new oral anticoagulants for intended travel. Further caution is also indicated so that the availability of orally administered new anticoagulants should not lead to undifferentiated and unjustified prescription of anticoagulants for the prophylaxis of traveller's thrombosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Monitoring Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: Measuring Coagulant Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attermann, Jorn

    daily anticoagulant therapy. The therapy necessitates close monitoring of coagulant activity, since excess doses of anticoagulant medicine may lead to life-threatening bleedings. Traditionally, patients on OAT are required to pay regular visits to a physician, who decides on drug dosage adjustments....... There is general agreement that the quality of the therapy is too low, and often unexpected fluctuations in the coagulant activity are seen. Recently, OAT based on patient self-management has become a realistic alternative by the availability of small portable whole blood coagulometers. An important part...... of the new concept is the training and continuous support and monitoring of the patients, and a center with these purposes has been established at Skejby Sygehus. The main instrument for monitoring the coagulant activity is the prothrombin time (PT). This is the time until clotting can be observed...

  7. Anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Nørager, B

    2015-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population. One of the major challenges in the care of these patients is to prevent thromboembolic episodes. Despite relative young age and no typical cardiovascular risk factors, this cohort has a high prevalence of thrombotic events....... Furthermore, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding how to prevent thromboembolic events with anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature pertaining to anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease and hence enable....... It is difficult to use treatment algorithms from the general adult population with acquired heart disease in this heterogeneous population due to special conditions such as myocardial scarring after previous surgery, atypical atrial flutter, prothrombotic conditions and the presence of interatrial shunts...

  8. Frontiers of anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takeshi

    2011-07-01

    In the management of atrial fibrillation (AF), stroke prevention has been proved to play a pivotal role in addition to therapy for concomitant diseases. And, hitherto, anticoagulation by warfarin has been the only effective choice that is known to decrease the stroke rate with ∼70% risk reduction. Although the evidence has been rigid, there are many barriers not to make warfarin therapy pervasive. However, the principle of "KISS (keep it short and simple)" seems to alter our situations. Changing the complex pharmacology with warfarin into the simple pharmacology with new anticoagulants would lead us to a new paradigm, where the old book is now rewritten by a new language. Copyright © 2011 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Anticoagulation in acute ischemic stroke: A systematic search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayara L. Froio

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Stroke is one of the most important diseases worldwide. Several clinical scenarios demand full dose of anticoagulants primary to stroke etiology or to the treatment of comorbidity. However, controversy exists over many issues regarding anticoagulation treatment in stroke such as time for initiation, efficacy according to stroke etiology, the ideal dose of anticoagulants, and whether novel anticoagulants should be used. Method: Computerized search for clinical trials and randomized controlled clinical trials was done to the present date at Medline, Scielo, Embase, PsychInfo, and Cochrane Library using MeSH terms and the keywords stroke, ischemic stroke, anticoagulation, anticoagulants, heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, warfarin, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban. The PRISMA statement was used to evaluate clinical trials. Results: Fourteen clinical trials were selected based on inclusion criteria. No evidence was found supporting the early use of heparin, heparinoids or low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH early after stroke. No consistent evidence for the use of warfarin and the newer oral anticoagulants were found. Argatroban was the only anticoagulant with significant positive results early after large-artery ischemic stroke. Conclusion: The ideal time for initiating anticoagulation remains undefined, requiring further investigation. Early anticoagulation for ischemic stroke is not recommended, with few exceptions, such as that of argatroban.

  10. Mechanism for maturation-related reorganization of flavivirus glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plevka, Pavel; Battisti, Anthony J; Sheng, Ju; Rossmann, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    Flaviviruses, such as dengue, West Nile, and yellow fever viruses, assemble as fusion-incompetent particles and subsequently undergo a large reorganization of their glycoprotein envelope resulting in formation of mature infectious virions. Here we used a combination of three-dimensional cryo-electron tomography and two-dimensional image analysis to study pleomorphic maturation intermediates of dengue virus 2. Icosahedral symmetries of immature and mature regions within one particle were mismatched relative to each other. Furthermore, the orientation of the two regions relative to each other differed among particles. Therefore, there cannot be a specific pathway determining the maturation of all particles. Instead, the region with mature structure expands when glycoproteins on its boundary acquire suitable orientation and conformation to allow them to become a stable part of the mature region. This type of maturation is possible because the envelope glycoproteins are anchored to the phospholipid bilayer that is a part of flavivirus virions and are thus restricted to movement on the two-dimensional surface of the particle. Therefore, compounds that limit movement of the glycoproteins within the virus membrane might be used as inhibitors of flavivirus maturation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. New oral anticoagulants--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanima, Waleed; Atar, Dan; Sandset, Per Morten

    2013-10-01

    Dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban are three new oral anticoagulants that have recently been approved in Norway. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the mechanisms of action, the most important indications and practical advice on the use of these drugs. The review is based on published phase 3 studies, a literature search in PubMed and the authors' clinical experience. Indications for use of the new anticoagulants include thromboprophylaxis after total hip and knee replacement surgery (all three), prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (all three), treatment of acute venous thrombosis and secondary prophylaxis after venous thrombosis (currently only rivaroxaban). For the aforementioned indications, these drugs have proven to be non-inferior to standard established anticoagulation therapy. For atrial fibrillation, all three drugs have also shown a lower incidence of intracranial bleeding compared with standard treatment. It is important to limit the use of these drugs to approved indications, to select patients who show good compliance, to rule out contraindications and to identify drug interactions. Monitoring of coagulation is not required, but patients should be followed up regularly to detect conditions that may lead to changes in the expected efficacy or safety.

  12. Proteolytic Processing of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Precursor Decreases Conformational Flexibility

    OpenAIRE

    Haim, Hillel; Salas, Ignacio; Sodroski, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The mature envelope glycoprotein (Env) spike on the surface of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions is derived by proteolytic cleavage of a trimeric gp160 glycoprotein precursor. Remarkably, proteolytic processing of the HIV-1 Env precursor results in changes in Env antigenicity that resemble those associated with glutaraldehyde fixation. Apparently, proteolytic processing of the HIV-1 Env precursor decreases conformational flexibility of the Env trimeric complex, differentiall...

  13. Laboratory Assessment of the Anticoagulant Activity of Direct Oral Anticoagulants: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Bethany T; Cuker, Adam; Siegal, Deborah M; Crowther, Mark; Garcia, David A

    2017-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are the treatment of choice for most patients with atrial fibrillation and/or noncancer-associated venous thromboembolic disease. Although routine monitoring of these agents is not required, assessment of anticoagulant effect may be desirable in special situations. The objective of this review was to summarize systematically evidence regarding laboratory assessment of the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were searched for studies reporting relationships between drug levels and coagulation assay results. We identified 109 eligible studies: 35 for dabigatran, 50 for rivaroxaban, 11 for apixaban, and 13 for edoxaban. The performance of standard anticoagulation tests varied across DOACs and reagents; most assays, showed insufficient correlation to provide a reliable assessment of DOAC effects. Dilute thrombin time (TT) assays demonstrated linear correlation (r 2  = 0.67-0.99) across a range of expected concentrations of dabigatran, as did ecarin-based assays. Calibrated anti-Xa assays demonstrated linear correlation (r 2  = 0.78-1.00) across a wide range of concentrations for rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. An ideal test, offering both accuracy and precision for measurement of any DOAC is not widely available. We recommend a dilute TT or ecarin-based assay for assessment of the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran and anti-Xa assays with drug-specific calibrators for direct Xa inhibitors. In the absence of these tests, TT or APTT is recommended over PT/INR for assessment of dabigatran, and PT/INR is recommended over APTT for detection of factor Xa inhibitors. Time since last dose, the presence or absence of drug interactions, and renal and hepatic function should impact clinical estimates of anticoagulant effect in a patient for whom laboratory test results are not available. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier

  14. Use of anticoagulants in elderly patients: practical recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helia Robert-Ebadi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Helia Robert-Ebadi, Grégoire Le Gal, Marc RighiniDivision of Angiology and Hemostasis (HRE, MR, Department of Internal Medicine, Geneva University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland, and Department of Internal Medicine and Chest Diseases, EA 3878 (GETBO, Brest University Hospital, Brest, France (GLGAbstract: Elderly people represent a patient population at high thromboembolic risk, but also at high hemorrhagic risk. There is a general tendency among physicians to underuse anticoagulants in the elderly, probably both because of underestimation of thromboembolic risk and overestimation of bleeding risk. The main indications for anticoagulation are venous thromboembolism (VTE prophylaxis in medical and surgical settings, VTE treatment, atrial fibrillation (AF and valvular heart disease. Available anticoagulants for VTE prophylaxis and initial treatment of VTE are low molecular weight heparins (LMWH, unfractionated heparin (UFH or synthetic anti-factor Xa pentasaccharide fondaparinux. For long-term anticoagulation vitamin K antagonists (VKA are the first choice and only available oral anticoagulants nowadays. Assessing the benefit-risk ratio of anticoagulation is one of the most challenging issues in the individual elderly patient, patients at highest hemorrhagic risk often being those who would have the greatest benefit from anticoagulants. Some specific considerations are of utmost importance when using anticoagulants in the elderly to maximize safety of these treatments, including decreased renal function, co-morbidities and risk of falls, altered pharmacodynamics of anticoagulants especially VKAs, association with antiplatelet agents, patient education. Newer anticoagulants that are currently under study could simplify the management and increase the safety of anticoagulation in the future.Keywords: anticoagulation, elderly patients, venous thromboembolism, hemorrhagic risk, atrial fibrillation, thrombin inhibitors, factor Xa

  15. Citrate anticoagulation in the ICU: the Leeds experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumper, Charlotte

    2016-09-08

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is widely used in the management of critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. It requires effective anticoagulation of the extracorporeal blood circuit. Although heparin is the most commonly prescribed anticoagulant, there are issues associated with heparin, and there has been increasing interest in regional citrate anticoagulation as an alternative. In 2013, The Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust switched from heparin to citrate anticoagulant for CRRT in intensive care units (ICUs) across the Trust. This article examines the reasons for the switch, the implementation of citrate and the impact of this quality-improvement project in terms of patient outcome data and feedback from the ICU nursing team.

  16. The mythology of anticoagulation therapy interruption for dental surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Continuous anticoagulation therapy is used to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and other embolic complications. When patients receiving anticoagulation therapy undergo dental surgery, a decision must be made about whether to continue anticoagulation therapy and risk bleeding complications or briefly interrupt anticoagulation therapy and increase the risk of developing embolic complications. Results from decades of studies of thousands of dental patients receiving anticoagulation therapy reveal that bleeding complications requiring more than local measures for hemostasis have been rare and never fatal. However, embolic complications (some of which were fatal and others possibly permanently debilitating) sometimes have occurred in patients whose anticoagulation therapy was interrupted for dental procedures. Although there is now virtually universal consensus among national medical and dental groups and other experts that anticoagulation therapy should not be interrupted for most dental surgery, there are still some arguments made supporting anticoagulation therapy interruption. An analysis of these arguments shows them to be based on a collection of myths and half-truths rather than on logical scientific conclusions. The time has come to stop anticoagulation therapy interruption for dental procedures. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The European Heart Rhythm Association Practical Guide on the Use of New Oral Anticoagulants in Patients with Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation – A Brief Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhof, Paulus

    2013-01-01

    New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are an alternative to vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) in the prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has produced a practical guide to detail the use of NOACs in clinical practice. The guide includes a practical start-up and follow-up scheme, emphasising the importance of strict adherence to the regimen – the anticoagulant effect drops rapidly after 12–24 hours. There is also guidance on how to measure the anticoagulant effect of NOACs, switching between anticoagulant regimes and dealing with dosing errors. Physicians will have to consider the pharmacokinetic effect of drugs and co-morbidities when prescribing NOACs – plasma levels of NOACs may be affected by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrates, as well as cytochrome P450 (CYP3A4) inducers or inhibitors. In patients with chronic kidney disease, reduced doses of NOACs may be indicated. Guidance is also given on the management of bleeding complications, and the cessation and reinitiation of NOACs in patients undergoing surgical interventions. Finally, the use of NOACs in specific clinical situations is considered; these include patients with AF and coronary artery disease (CAD), patients presenting with acute stroke while taking NOACs and patients with cancer. PMID:26835051

  18. The European Heart Rhythm Association Practical Guide on the Use of New Oral Anticoagulants in Patients with Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation - A Brief Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhof, Paulus

    2013-11-01

    New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are an alternative to vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) in the prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has produced a practical guide to detail the use of NOACs in clinical practice. The guide includes a practical start-up and follow-up scheme, emphasising the importance of strict adherence to the regimen - the anticoagulant effect drops rapidly after 12-24 hours. There is also guidance on how to measure the anticoagulant effect of NOACs, switching between anticoagulant regimes and dealing with dosing errors. Physicians will have to consider the pharmacokinetic effect of drugs and co-morbidities when prescribing NOACs - plasma levels of NOACs may be affected by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrates, as well as cytochrome P450 (CYP3A4) inducers or inhibitors. In patients with chronic kidney disease, reduced doses of NOACs may be indicated. Guidance is also given on the management of bleeding complications, and the cessation and reinitiation of NOACs in patients undergoing surgical interventions. Finally, the use of NOACs in specific clinical situations is considered; these include patients with AF and coronary artery disease (CAD), patients presenting with acute stroke while taking NOACs and patients with cancer.

  19. PHARMACOGENETIC ASPECTS OF NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kryukov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to assess the effect of genetic factors on the pharmacokinetic parameters of new oral anticoagulants. The review presents data from studies investigating the effect of gene polymorphisms that encode biotransformation enzymes and transporter proteins of new oral anticoagulants on the pharmacokinetics of these drugs. RE-LY study showed a 15% decrease in trough dabigatran concentration and 27% lower risk of bleeding in carriers of CES1 gene rs2244613 polymorphism, there was also a tendency to reduce the risk of major bleeding. Further study of CES1 gene rs8192935 polymorphism showed a 3% decrease in trough dabigatran concentration in heterozygotes and 11% in homozygotes. There was found a 2% and 3% decrease in trough concentrations in hetero- and homozygotes for the minor allele of CES1 gene rs2244613 polymorphism, respectively. There was no significant effect of ABCB1 gene rs2032582 and rs1045642 polymorphisms on dabigatran pharmacokinetics. It is known the case of gastrointestinal bleeding in the carrier of allelic variants of ABCB1 gene rs2032582 and rs1045642 polymorphisms. However, there was no significant effect of genotype on rivaroxaban pharmacokinetics in the study involving the carriers of ABCB1 gene rs2032582 and rs1045642 polymorphisms. ABCB1 gene rs4148738 polymorphism was associated with higher apixaban peak concentration. But groups of patients with acute cardioembolic stroke showed no statistically significant difference of apixaban peak concentration depending on ABCB1 gene rs1045642 polymorphism genotype. ABCB1 gene rs1045642 and SLCO1B1 gene rs4149056 polymorphisms have no effect on edoxaban pharmacokinetics. Elevation of edoxaban metabolite concentration in carriers of SLCO1B1 gene allelic variants was not clinically significant because the proportion of metabolite is about 10% of the concentration of the main substance. It is necessary to provide large population studies with control of treatment

  20. The Role of Anticoagulation Clinics in the Era of New Oral Anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Testa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulation Clinics (ACs are services specialized in management of patients on anticoagulant treatment. At present, ACs manage patients chiefly on antivitamin K antagonists (AVKs, but patient population has already changed in the last few years, because of an increase of treatments with other anticoagulant drugs, which require different management systems. The strong increase in the number of patients at AC, mainly on long-term treatment, has determined the development of web management, through telemedicine systems, improving the quality of life and maintaining the same clinical quality levels. New oral anticoagulants (NOAs have shown to be as effective as AVK antagonists in stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for treatment of venous thromboembolism in addition to VTE prophylaxis in orthopaedic surgery, when administered at a fixed dose, but patient adherence and compliance are crucial for good quality treatment. At present, lacking data from the real world, an oversimplification of treatment with NOAs could cause unjustified risks for patients and also a possible future underuse of good drugs. For these reasons the vigilance must be high and ACs can have a crucial role in defining which is the best management for NOA patients and how to do it, as it happened for AVKs.

  1. Isolation of glycoproteins from brown algae.

    OpenAIRE

    Surendraraj, Alagarsamy; Farvin Koduvayur Habeebullah , Sabeena; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel process for the isolation of unique anti-oxidative glycoproteins from the pH precipitated fractions of enzymatic extracts of brown algae. Two brown seaweeds viz, Fucus serratus and Fucus vesiculosus were hydrolysed by using 3 enzymes viz, Alcalase, Viscozyme and Termamyl and the glycoproteins were isolated from these enzyme extracts.

  2. MONITORING OF ANTICOAGULATION IN APROTININ-TREATED PATIENTS DURING HEART OPERATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TABUCHI, N; NJO, TL; TIGCHELAAR, [No Value; HUYZEN, RJ; BOONSTRA, PW; VANOEVEREN, W

    Since aprotinin has become extensively used during cardiopulmonary bypass the maintenance of safe anticoagulation is a concern. Aprotinin affects anticoagulation measurement by the activated clotting time. Therefore, a reliable new measurement is needed to monitor anticoagulation during

  3. Tailoring of TiO2films by H2SO4treatment and UV irradiation to improve anticoagulant ability and endothelial cell compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yuzhen; Li, Linhua; Chen, Jiang; Yang, Ping; Zhao, Ansha; Sun, Hong; Huang, Nan

    2017-07-01

    Surfaces with dual functions that simultaneously exhibit good anticoagulant ability and endothelial cell (EC) compatibility are desirable for blood contact materials. However, these dual functions have rarely been achieved by inorganic materials. In this study, titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) films were treated by sulphuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation successively (TiO 2 H 2 SO 4 -UV), resulting in good anticoagulant ability and EC compatibility simultaneously. We found that UV irradiation improved the anticoagulant ability of TiO 2 films significantly while enhancing EC compatibility, though not significantly. The enhanced anticoagulant ability could be related to the oxidation of surface-adsorbed hydrocarbons and increased hydrophilicity. The H 2 SO 4 treatment improved the anticoagulant ability of TiO 2 films slightly, while UV irradiation improved the anticoagulant ability strongly. The enhanced EC compatibility could be related to the increased surface roughness and positive charges on the surface of the TiO 2 films. Furthermore, the time-dependent degradation of the enhanced EC compatibility and anticoagulant ability of TiO 2 H 2 SO 4 -UV was observed. In summary, TiO 2 H 2 SO 4 -UV expressed both excellent anticoagulant ability and good EC compatibility at the same time, which could be desirable for blood contact materials. However, the compatibility of TiO 2 H 2 SO 4 -UV with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and macrophages was also improved. More effort is still needed to selectively improve EC compatibility on TiO 2 films for better re-endothelialization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Presynaptic neurones may contribute a unique glycoprotein to the extracellular matrix at the synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroni, Pico; Carlson, Steven S.; Schweitzer, Erik; Kelly, Regis B.

    1985-04-01

    As the extracellular matrix at the original site of a neuromuscular junction seems to play a major part in the specificity of synaptic regeneration1-5, considerable attention has been paid to unique molecules localized to this region6-11. Here we describe an extracellular matrix glycoprotein of the elasmobranch electric organ that is localized near the nerve endings. By immunological criteria, it is synthesized in the cell bodies, transported down the axons and is related to a glycoprotein in the synaptic vesicles of the neurones that innervate the electric organ. It is apparently specific for these neurones, as it cannot be detected elsewhere in the nervous system of the fish. Therefore, neurones seem to contribute unique extracellular matrix glycoproteins to the synaptic region. Synaptic vesicles could be involved in transporting these glycoproteins to or from the nerve terminal surface.

  5. An Antithrombin-Heparin Complex Increases the Anticoagulant Activity of Fibrin Clots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley J. Smith

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Clotting blood contains fibrin-bound thrombin, which is a major source of procoagulant activity leading to clot extension and further activation of coagulation. When bound to fibrin, thrombin is protected from inhibition by antithrombin (AT + heparin but is neutralized when AT and heparin are covalently linked (ATH. Here, we report the surprising observation that, rather than yielding an inert complex, thrombin-ATH formation converts clots into anticoagulant surfaces that effectively catalyze inhibition of thrombin in the surrounding environment.

  6. Vitamin K requirement in Danish anticoagulant-resistant Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette D.; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Nielsen, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, Denmark, anticoagulant rodenticide resistance, vitamin K requirement......Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, Denmark, anticoagulant rodenticide resistance, vitamin K requirement...

  7. The pharmacology of recombinant hirudin, a new anticoagulant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-09-01

    Sep 1, 1990 ... The pharmacology of recombinant hirudin, a new anticoagulant. B. H. MEYER, H. G. LUUS, F. O. MULLER, P. N. BADENHORST, H.-J. ROTHIG. Summary. A new anticoagulant, recombinant hirudin, was given to hea"hy volunteers (5 per test dose) in single .intravenous doses of 0,01, 0,02, 0,04, 0,07 and 0 ...

  8. MRI screening for chronic anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eFisher

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulation is highly effective in preventing stroke due to atrial fibrillation, but numerous studies have demonstrated low utilization of anticoagulation for these patients. Assessment of clinicians’ attitudes on this topic indicate that fear of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH, rather than appreciation of anticoagulant benefits, largely drives clinical decision-making for treatment with anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation. Risk stratification strategies have been used for anticoagulation benefits and hemorrhage risk, but ICH is not specifically addressed in the commonly used hemorrhage risk stratification systems. Cerebral microbleeds are cerebral microscopic hemorrhages demonstrable by brain MRI, indicative of prior microhemorrhages, and predictive of future risk of ICH. Prevalence of cerebral microbleeds increases with age; and cross-sectional and limited prospective studies generally indicate that microbleeds confer substantial risk of ICH in patients treated with chronic anticoagulation. MRI thus is a readily available and appealing modality that can directly assess risk of future ICH in patients receiving anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation. Incorporation of MRI into routine practice is, however, fraught with difficulties, including the uncertain relationship between number and location of microbleeds and ICH risk, as well as cost-effectiveness of MRI. A proposed algorithm is provided, and relevant advantages and disadvantages are discussed. At present, MRI screening appears most appropriate for a subset of atrial fibrillation patients, such as those with intermediate stroke risk, and may provide reassurance for clinicians whose concerns for ICH tend to outweigh benefits of anticoagulation.

  9. Utilization of oral anticoagulation in a teaching hospital in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mean age of the patients was 53.4 years and more females than males were on anticoagulation and monitoring (F14:M12). The most common indications for anticoagulation include deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism, congestive heart failure with atrial fibrillation and mitral valve disease with atrial fibrillation.

  10. Atrial Fibrillation in Embolic Stroke: Anticoagulant Therapy at UNTH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The decision to commence anticoagulation in a patient with embolic stroke and atrial fibrillation (AF) is often a difficult one for many clinicians. The result can have significant impact on the patient. This study was therefore undertaken to review the use of anticoagulation in embolic stroke in the setting of atrial ...

  11. [Therapeutic equivalence of the new oral anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Villar, A; Nacle López, I; Barbero Hernández, M J; Lizan Tudela, L

    2015-10-01

    In an attempt to minimize the economic impact due to the incorporation of innovative drugs, health authorities have promoted and supported the evaluation and market positioning of drugs, as equivalent therapeutic alternatives. This issue has recently gained importance, possibly due to the current economic crisis. The equivalent therapeutic alternatives are justified by the need to compete on price, and by the authorities recommendation to establish therapeutic equivalence, price and financing of medicinal products at the same time. The establishment of the new oral anticoagulants and the equivalent therapeutic alternatives is a problematic issue if it is based on the absence of direct comparisons between different drugs and the questionable methodology used in the current indirect comparisons. Currently, it is difficult to determine when a new oral anticoagulant is more recommendable than others, but efforts are being made in order to propose alternatives for the decision based on patient characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning in animals of Apulia and Basilicata, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscarella, Marilena; Armentano, Antonio; Iammarino, Marco; Palermo, Carmen; Amorena, Michele

    2016-06-30

    This study evaluates the presence of anticoagulant rodenticides in animals with a diagnosis of suspected poisoning and in bait samples. The survey was carried out from 2010 to 2012, in 2 regions of South Italy (Puglia and Basilicata) on 300 organs of animals and 90 suspected bait samples. The qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted using an analytical method based on high‑performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorimetric detection (FLD) for the simultaneous determination of 8 anticoagulant rodenticides (bromadiolone, brodifacoum, coumachlor, coumafuryl, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, flocoumafen, and warfarin). The presence of anticoagulant rodenticides was detected in 33 organs of animals (11% of the total) and 6 bait samples (7% of the total). The most commonly detected compound was coumachlor (47% of 39 positive samples) followed by bromadiolone (24%), and brodifacoum (11%). The species mostly involved in anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning were dogs and cats. This study emphasizes the relevance of the determinations of anticoagulant rodenticides in cases of suspected poisoning in veterinary practice.

  13. Effects of computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Corell, Pernille; Madsen, Poul

    2012-01-01

    : Patients randomized to computer-assisted anticoagulation and the CoaguChek® system reached the therapeutic target range after 8 days compared to 14 days by prescriptions from physicians (p = 0.04). Time spent in the therapeutic target range did not differ between groups. The median INR value measured...... prescribed by physicians, and the total time spent within the therapeutic target range was similar. Thus computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy may reduce the cost of anticoagulation therapy without lowering the quality. INR values measured by CoaguChek® were reliable compared to measurements......UNLABELLED: BACKGROUND: Computer-assistance and self-monitoring lower the cost and may improve the quality of anticoagulation therapy. The main purpose of this clinical investigation was to use computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy to improve the time to reach and the time spent within...

  14. Anticoagulant-free Genius haemodialysis using low molecular weight heparin-coated circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Rolf Dario; Müller, Ute; Lanzmich, Regina; Groeger, Christian; Floege, Jürgen

    2006-04-01

    Regional citrate anticoagulation or saline flushes are often used in haemodialysis patients at high risk of bleeding. In an alternative approach we evaluated the effects of covalent circuit coating with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) for intermittent haemodialysis. In vitro, we compared the thrombogenicity of an uncoated polyvinylchloride (PVC) tubing set with LMWH-coated tubing (AOThel) and a reference tubing with end-point attached heparin coating (Carmeda Bioactive surface) under dynamic blood contact. In vivo, five chronic haemodialysis patients were studied using the Genius dialysis system and F60S filters. Each patient underwent three dialysis sessions separated by a standard haemodialysis each: (1) standard dialysis (uncoated circuit and regular dalteparin dosage), (2) dialysis with LMWH-coated circuit and regular dalteparin dosage and (3) dialysis with a completely LMWH-coated circuit without anticoagulant use. In vitro, both coated tubings showed significantly reduced thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complex levels compared with PVC. The reference coating (Carmeda) released substantial antifactor Xa (antiXa) activity into the plasma. The LMWH coating (AOThel) released low antiXa activity only during the initial rinsing. In vivo, all dialysis sessions were well tolerated and completed without major clotting. Antithrombin levels and platelet counts were similar in all groups. P-selectin and D-dimer levels increased similarly in all groups. TAT levels were comparable in all groups during the first 3 h and significantly increased in the anticoagulant-free group after the fourth hour. LMWH surface coating reduces thrombogenicity in vitro without releasing significant amounts of heparin from the surface. In vivo, anticoagulant-free haemodialysis using a completely LMWH-coated circuit is feasible and safe in stable chronic dialysis patients with normal coagulation.

  15. Acupuncture safety in patients receiving anticoagulants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcculloch, Michael; Nachat, Arian; Schwartz, Jonathan; Casella-Gordon, Vicki; Cook, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Theoretically, acupuncture in anticoagulated patients could increase bleeding risk. However, precise estimates of bleeding complication rates from acupuncture in anticoagulated patients have not been systematically examined. To critically evaluate evidence for safety of acupuncture in anticoagulated patients. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database, and Google Scholar. Of 39 potentially relevant citations, 11 met inclusion criteria: 2 randomized trials, 4 case series, and 5 case reports. Seven provided reporting quality sufficient to assess acupuncture safety in 384 anticoagulated patients (3974 treatments). Minor-moderate bleeding related to acupuncture in an anticoagulated patient occurred in one case: a large hip hematoma, managed with vitamin K reversal and warfarin discontinuation following reevaluation of its medical justification. Blood-spot bleeding, typical for any needling/injection and controlled with pressure/cotton, occurred in 51 (14.6%) of 350 treatments among a case series of 229 patients. Bleeding deemed unrelated to acupuncture during anticoagulation, and more likely resulting from inappropriately deep needling damaging tissue or from complex anticoagulation regimens, occurred in 5 patients. No bleeding was reported in 2 studies (74 anticoagulated patients): 1 case report and 1 randomized trial prospectively monitoring acupuncture-associated bleeding as an explicit end point. Altogether, 1 moderate bleeding event occurred in 3974 treatments (0.003%). Acupuncture appears to be safe in anticoagulated patients, assuming appropriate needling location and depth. The observed 0.003% complication rate is lower than the previously reported 12.3% following hip/knee replacement in a randomized trial of 27,360 anticoagulated patients, and 6% following acupuncture in a prospective study of 229,230 all-type patients. Prospective trials would help confirm our findings.

  16. Glycoprotein fucosylation is increased in seminal plasma of subfertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Olejnik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fucose, the monosaccharide frequent in N- and O-glycans, is a part of Lewis-type antigens that are known to mediate direct sperm binding to the zona pellucida. Such interaction was found to be inhibited in vitroby fucose-containing oligo- and polysaccharides, as well as neoglycoproteins. The objective of this study was to screen seminal plasma proteins of infertile/subfertile men for the content and density of fucosylated glycoepitopes, and compare them to samples of fertile normozoospermic subjects. Seminal proteins were separated in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and blotted onto nitrocellulose membrane and probed with fucose-specific Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL. Twelve electrophoretic bands were selected for quantitative densitometric analysis. It was found that the content, and especially the density of fucosylated glycans, were higher in glycoproteins present in seminal plasma of subfertile men. No profound differences in fucosylation density were found among the groups of normozoospermic, oligozoospermic, asthenozoospermic, and oligoasthenozoospermic subfertile men. According to the antibody probing, AAL-reactive bands can be attributed to male reproductive tract glycoproteins, including prostate-specific antigen, prostatic acid phosphatase, glycodelin and chorionic gonadotropin. Fibronectin, α1 -acid glycoprotein, α1 -antitrypsin, immunoglobulin G and antithrombin III may also contribute to this high fucosylation. It is suggested that the abundant fucosylated glycans in the sperm environment could interfere with the sperm surface and disturb the normal course of the fertilization cascade.

  17. Comparison of glycoprotein expression between ovarian and colon adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multhaupt, H A; Arenas-Elliott, C P; Warhol, M J

    1999-10-01

    Tumor-associated antigens may be expressed as surface glycoproteins. These molecules undergo qualitative and quantitative modifications during cell differentiation and malignant transformation. During malignant transformation, incomplete glycosylation is common, and certain glycosylation pathways are preferred. These antigens might help distinguish between ovarian and colonic adenocarcinomas in the primary and metastatic lesions. Different cytokeratins have been proposed as relatively organ-specific antigens. We used monoclonal antibodies against T1, Tn, sialosyl-Tn, B72.3, CA125, carcinoembryonic antigen, and cytokeratins 7 and 20 to detect tumor-associated glycoproteins and keratin proteins in ovarian and colonic carcinomas. CA125, carcinoembryonic antigen, and cytokeratins 7 and 20 can distinguish between colonic and serous or endometrioid adenocarcinomas of the ovary in both primary and metastatic lesions. Mucinous ovarian adenocarcinomas differed in that they express carcinoembryonic antigen and cytokeratins 7 and 20 and weakly express CA125. The other glycoprotein antigens were equally expressed by ovarian and colonic adenocarcinomas and therefore were of no use in distinguishing between these 2 entities. A panel of monoclonal antibodies against cytokeratins 7 and 20 antigens, CA125, and carcinoembryonic antigen is useful in differentiating serous and endometrioid adenocarcinomas of the ovary from colonic adenocarcinomas. Mucinous ovarian adenocarcinomas cannot be distinguished from colonic adenocarcinomas using immunohistochemistry.

  18. New oral anticoagulants: key messages for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Giorgi-Pierfranceschi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available New oral anticoagulants are an effective and safe alternative to vitamin K antagonists in many fields of clinical practice. The use of the direct inhibitors of activated Factor II (dabigatran and activated Factor X (apixaban and rivaroxaban, both in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF and those with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE, is of great interest for internal medicine physicians. This paper aims to give practical guidance on management (starting therapy, follow up and bleeding complications of patients treated with dabigatran, rivaroxaban or apixaban for NVAF or acute VTE providing practical tables concerning the phases of therapy, management of complications, drug interaction and dose adjustment if renal impairment occurs.

  19. Initiation of anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlund, A.; Staerk, L.; Fosbøl, E. L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation (AF) is increasing rapidly. We compared characteristics of AF patients initiated on NOACs versus vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). Methods: Using Danish nationwide registry data, we...... identified AF patients initiating either a VKA or a NOAC from 22 August 2011 until 30 September 2016. We compared patient characteristics including age, gender, comorbidities, concomitant pharmacotherapy and CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED scores in patients initiated on a VKA, dabigatran, rivaroxaban or apixaban....... Differences were examined using multivariable logistic regression models. Results: The study population comprised 51 981 AF patients of whom 19 989 (38.5%) were initiated on a VKA, 13 242 (25.5%) on dabigatran, 8475 (16.3%) on rivaroxaban and 10 275 (19.8%) on apixaban. Those patients initiated on apixaban...

  20. Physical Properties of the Glycoprotein Mucin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Garrett; Davis, William; Superfine, Richard; Boucher, Richard

    2003-03-01

    Epithelial cell surfaces are covered by a protective gel known as mucus. The physiological function of this gel depends on its rheological properties, and these properties are largely derived from the secreted glycoprotein mucin. The genetic disease Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is characterized by the adhesion of thick, viscous mucus on these tissues. In the lungs, this results in the interruption of mucus transport thus compromising the first line of defense against pathogens in these tissues. In order to restore the flow of tracheobronchial mucus out of the body, knowledge of the molecular and physical properties of mucin and mucin solutions would be greatly beneficial. The present model for these molecules is that of a long linear strand consisting of highly glycosylated regions linked by cystein-rich globular regions. It is thought that the globular regions may interact either through intermolecular disulfide bonds or through hydrophobic interactions. It has also been speculated that the glycosylated regions may have lectin-like interactions. In the present work, single mucin molecules were imaged at high resolution using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Phase mode imaging was used to map the interactions between functionalized AFM tips and the molecular topography. Additionally, using force-distance curves with the AFM, the adhesion between mucin bound tips and cell surface glycocalyx and glycocalyx-like model surfaces, was measured. And, finally, the viscoelastic properties of mucin solutions were measured using the recently developed technique, single particle tracking microrheology. A model is being developed that will incorporate the properties of mucins beginning at the single molecule and ending with the bulk viscoelastic properties.

  1. Thrombin-Inhibiting Anticoagulant Liposomes: Development and Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endreas, Wegderes; Brüßler, Jana; Vornicescu, Doru; Keusgen, Michael; Bakowsky, Udo; Steinmetzer, Torsten

    2016-02-04

    Many peptides and peptidomimetic drugs suffer from rapid clearance in vivo; this can be reduced by increasing their size through oligomerization or covalent conjugation with polymers. As proof of principle, an alternative strategy for drug oligomerization is described, in which peptidomimetic thrombin inhibitors are incorporated into the liposome surface. For this purpose, the inhibitor moieties were covalently coupled to a palmitic acid residue through a short bifunctionalized ethylene glycol spacer. These molecules were directly added to the lipid mixture used for liposome preparation. The obtained liposomes possess strong thrombin inhibitory potency in enzyme kinetic measurements and anticoagulant activity in plasma. Their strong potency and positive ζ potential indicate that large amounts of the benzamidine-derived inhibitors are located on the surface of the liposomes. This concept should be applicable to other drug molecules that suffer from rapid elimination and allow covalent modification with a suitable fatty acid residue. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A New Route of Fucoidan Immobilization on Low Density Polyethylene and Its Blood Compatibility and Anticoagulation Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Ozaltin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Beside biomaterials’ bulk properties, their surface properties are equally important to control interfacial biocompatibility. However, due to the inadequate interaction with tissue, they may cause foreign body reaction. Moreover, surface induced thrombosis can occur when biomaterials are used for blood containing applications. Surface modification of the biomaterials can bring enhanced surface properties in biomedical applications. Sulfated polysaccharide coatings can be used to avoid surface induced thrombosis which may cause vascular occlusion (blocking the blood flow by blood clot, which results in serious health problems. Naturally occurring heparin is one of the sulfated polysaccharides most commonly used as an anticoagulant, but its long term usage causes hemorrhage. Marine sourced sulfated polysaccharide fucoidan is an alternative anticoagulant without the hemorrhage drawback. Heparin and fucoidan immobilization onto a low density polyethylene surface after functionalization by plasma has been studied. Surface energy was demonstrated by water contact angle test and chemical characterizations were carried out by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface morphology was monitored by scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. Finally, their anticoagulation activity was examined for prothrombin time (PT, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT, and thrombin time (TT.

  3. Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX and Malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    whether adjunct anti-GP Ib-IX therapy could benefit the breast cancer patient with malignant disease. Body Below we list the 3 Specific Aims from our...Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX and Malignancy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jerry Ware, Ph.D...AND SUBTITLE Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX and Malignancy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0576 5c

  4. Hemorrhagic stroke and oral anticoagulants: What is to be done?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Domashenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic stroke (HS is associated with high mortality and disability rates. Due to the introduction of the current guidelines for the prevention of systemic thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillations and to an increase in the number of older patients, there has been a rise in the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH associated with the use of oral anticoagulants. The paper discusses medical treatment in patients with HS during therapy with vitamin K antagonists (warfarin and novel oral anticoagulants (dabigatran. rivaroxaban, apixaban, as well as an anticoagulant resumption policy after prior ICH in patients at high risk for thromboembolic events.

  5. Glycoprotein Ib and glycoprotein IX in human platelets are acylated with palmitic acid through thioester linkages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muszbek, L.; Laposata, M.

    1989-01-01

    The glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX complex is a major component of the platelet membrane which mediates adhesion of platelets to exposed subendothelium. GP Ib is a heterodimer with a large alpha chain (Mr = 135,000-145,000) and small beta chain (Mr = 22,000-27,000) linked by a disulfide bond(s). GP Ib is bound in a noncovalent 1:1 complex with GP IX (Mr = 17,000-22,000). We labeled isolated human platelets with [3H] palmitate or surface-labeled platelet membrane glycoproteins with sodium periodate-[3H]sodium borohydride and immunoprecipitated the GP Ib-IX complex from radiolabeled platelet lysates using a mouse monoclonal antibody (SZ.1) which recognizes the intact complex. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitates from [3H]palmitate-labeled platelets revealed two radiolabeled bands under reducing conditions at 24 and 19 kDa and two bands under nonreducing conditions at 170 and 19 kDa. As demonstrated by the parallel analysis of immunoprecipitates from periodate-[3H]sodium borohydride-labeled platelets, the [3H]palmitate-labeled bands obtained under reducing conditions corresponded to GP Ib beta and GP IX and the ones obtained under nonreducing conditions to intact GP Ib and GP IX, respectively. Using alkaline methanolysis followed by high pressure liquid chromatography analysis of the methanolysis products, we demonstrated that the radioactivity associated with the GP Ib-IX complex from [3H]palmitate-labeled platelets was, in fact, covalently bound [3H]palmitate in ester linkage to protein. The protein-fatty acid linkage was also disrupted by hydroxylamine at neutral pH. Thus, this study demonstrates that GP Ib beta and GP IX in human platelets are both fatty acid-acylated with palmitate through thioester linkages

  6. How to manage new oral anticoagulants in case of surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Imberti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available When a patient receiving new oral anticoagulants (NOACs requires an invasive procedure, the consequences of bleeding if anticoagulation is continued and the risk of thrombosis if it is omitted need to be carefully considered. In addition to the bleeding risk of the procedure, it is of paramount importance to evaluate the renal function, especially for dabigatran that is eliminated predominantly via the renal pathway. NOAC therapy should be stopped for at least 24 h before the intervention, and a longer interruption should be considered in cases of high bleeding risk procedures and/or renal failure. A base-line assessment of coagulation should be performed and intervention should be postponed (if possible if high levels of anticoagulation parameters are found. In the post-surgical period, if oral anticoagulant therapy cannot be re-started, patients should temporarily receive low molecular weight heparins and re-start NOACs as soon as possible.

  7. Do we have to anticoagulated patients with cerebral venous thrombosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feher, G; Illes, Z; Hargroves, D

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare form of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Although anticoagulation is recommended for the initial and long term treatment with regards to thrombotic risks for patients with CVT, the role of anticogalution has not been fully elucidated. The aim...... of our literature based review was collect articles showing the benefit of anticoagulation in CVT and gathering the data of follow-up studies focusing on the recurrence of CVT and other thrombotic events. RESULTS: We have identified 15 follow-up studies studies with 2422 patients . The mean duration...... of follow up was 37,9 months. Death occured in 6,5% and 76,4 % of the patients had favourable outcome. 85,5 % received initial anticoagulation with ultrafractionated or low molecular weight heparin and 82,1 % received long-term anticoagulation. Recurent CVT occured in 3,7% and other thrombotic event occured...

  8. [Management of new oral anticoagulants in gastrointestinal bleeding and endoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Molino, Fátima; Gonzalez, Isabel; Saperas, Esteve

    2015-10-01

    New oral direct anticoagulants agents are alternatives to warfarin for long-term anticoagulation in a growing number of patients that require long-term anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. These new agents with predictable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics profiles offer a favorable global safety profile, but increased gastrointestinal bleeding compared to the vitamin K antagonists. Many gastroenterologists are unfamiliar and may be wary of these newer drugs, since Clinical experience is limited and no specific antidote is available to reverse their anticoagulant effect. In this article the risk of these new agents and, how to manage these agents in both the presence of acute gastrointestinal bleeding and in patients undergoing endoscopic procedures is reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  9. Generic switching of warfarin and risk of excessive anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Rathe, Jette; Stage, Tore Bjerregaard

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Generic switching of warfarin was recently repealed in Denmark, as adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports suggested risk of excessive anticoagulation following switches from branded to generic warfarin. We investigated this putative association in a formalized pharmacoepidemiological analys...

  10. Utilization of Oral Anticoagulation in a Teaching Hospital in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    : Anticoagulation, Barriers, Nigeria, .... Cardiovascular disease (thromboembolic stroke). 2/26 (7.7). Heart valve replacement. 2/26 (7.7) ... accounts for approximately 2% of the reported hemorrhagic complications of warfarin therapy and is ...

  11. Extractions without eliminating anticoagulant treatment : a literature review.

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Cabrera, Manuel Alejandro; Barona Dorado, Cristina; Leco Berrocal, María Isabel; Gómez Moreno, Gerardo; Martínez González, José María

    2011-01-01

    To establish whether there is a high enough risk of bleeding in patients who take oral anticoagulants, such that it would justify not using oral anticoagulants when performing a dental extraction, as well as if the reason for and anatomical location of the extraction increases such risk. Study We performed a bibliographic search in order to carry out a meta-analytic study using descriptive statistics. We compiled a sample of 1194 patients from the articles selected. Of these patients, a total...

  12. [Risk and benefit of oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotova, I V; Zateĭshchikov, D A

    2011-01-01

    Thromboembolism is the main cause of death and disability of patients with atrial fibrillation. Indirect anticoagulants are effective means of primary and secondary prevention of thromboembolic complications. However in a number of patients risk associated with therapy with indirect anticoagulants might exceed potential benefit. The principle problem requiring solution in a patient with atrial fibrillation is individual comparative assessment of risk of development of thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications. Modern stratification scales which allow solving this problem are considered in this review.

  13. Lupus Anticoagulant and Anticardiolipin Antibodies in Unexplained Fetal Losses

    OpenAIRE

    ALPER, Gülinnaz

    2014-01-01

    Lupus anticoagulant (LA) and anti-cardiolipin antibodies (ACAs) are acquired antiphospholipid antibodies (APAs), which are considered to be important markers for pregnancy losses and intrauterine fetal demise. LA and ACAs have anticoagulant effects in vitro and thrombotic effects in vivo and are considered to be the cause of recur-rent pregnancy losses (RPLs), resulting from placental vascular thrombosis and infarction. The aim of this study was to identify the most sensitive and specific met...

  14. Utility of post-procedural anticoagulation after primary PCI for STEMI: insights from a pooled analysis of the HORIZONS-AMI and EUROMAX trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrocq, Gregory; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Van't Hof, Arnoud; Zeymer, Uwe; Mehran, Roxana; Hamm, Christian W; Bernstein, Debra; Prats, Jayne; Deliargyris, Efthymios N; Stone, Gregg W

    2017-10-01

    Many sites routinely continue anticoagulation after primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), despite an unclear benefit-risk ratio. We evaluated the impact of this strategy on 30-day outcomes from a pooled patient-level database of two large primary percutaneous coronary intervention trials. EUROMAX and HORIZONS-AMI were both multicentre, international randomised trials comparing bivalirudin to heparin with or without glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors in patients with STEMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Outcomes at 30 days were analysed according to the use of post-procedural anticoagulation (unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparins or fondaparinux) outside of the catheterisation laboratory. Among 5239 patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention, 2153 (41.1%) received post-procedural anticoagulation. After adjusting for differences in baseline variables, there were no differences in the 30-day rates of adverse ischaemic events between patients without versus with post-procedural anticoagulation: adjusted odds ratio for major adverse cardiac events 0.80; 95% confidence interval 0.60-1.07; P=0.14; adjusted odds ratio for stent thrombosis 0.82; 95% confidence interval 0.55-1.24; P=0.35; adjusted odds ratio for death 1.07; 95% confidence interval 0.69-1.66; P=0.77. Conversely, protocol-defined major bleeding was decreased without post-procedural anticoagulation: adjusted odds ratio 0.74; 95% confidence interval 0.58-0.94; P=0.01. Similar results were observed for Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction major and minor bleeding. In this large STEMI database, a substantial proportion of primary percutaneous coronary intervention patients received post-procedural anticoagulation, which in turn was associated with higher bleeding rates without any reduction in ischaemic events. Therefore, routine post-procedural anticoagulation after primary percutaneous

  15. Characterization of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Recombinants That Express and Incorporate High Levels of Hepatitis C Virus Glycoproteins

    OpenAIRE

    Buonocore, Linda; Blight, Keril J.; Rice, Charles M.; Rose, John K.

    2002-01-01

    We generated recombinant vesicular stomatitis viruses (VSV) expressing genes encoding hybrid proteins consisting of the extracellular domains of hepatitis C virus (HCV) glycoproteins fused at different positions to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the VSV G glycoprotein (E1G and E2G). We show that these chimeric proteins are transported to the cell surface and incorporated into VSV virions efficiently. We also generated VSV recombinants in which the gene encoding the VSV G protein...

  16. Adherence to a new oral anticoagulant treatment prescription: dabigatran etexilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Bellamy

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available L Bellamy1, N Rosencher1, BI Eriksson21Anaesthesiology Department, Hôpital Cochin (AP-HP, René Descartes University, Paris 75014 France; 2Orthopaedic Department, University Hospital Sahlgrenska/Ostra, Gothenburg, SwedenAbstract: The recent development of new oral anticoagulants, of which dabigatran etexilate is currently at the most advanced stage of development, is the greatest advance in the provision of convenient anticoagulation therapy for many years. A new oral anticoagulation treatment, dabigatran etexilate, is already on the market in Europe. The main interest probably will be to improve the prescription and the adherence to an effective thromboprophylaxis in medical conditions such as atrial fibrillation without bleeding side effects, without the need for monitoring coagulation, and without drug and food interactions such as vitamin K anticoagulant (VKA treatment. Dabigatran is particularly interesting for extended thromboprophylaxis after major orthopedic surgery in order to avoid daily injection for a month. However, oral long-term treatments such as VKA are not systematically associated with a higher compliance level than injected treatments such as low-molecular-weight heparins. Indeed, adherence to an oral treatment, instead of the usual daily injection in major orthopedic surgery, is complex, and based not only on the frequency of dosing but also on patient motivation, understanding, and socio-economic status. New oral anticoagulants may be useful in this way but education and detection of risk factors of nonadherence to treatment are still essential.Keywords: oral anticoagulant, adherence, compliance, education, dabigatran

  17. [Progress of anticoagulation therapy in atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Olmedo, Miguel; Suárez Fernández, Carmen

    2015-08-07

    Atrial fibrillation is currently a very prevalent disease and it represents one of the most common causes of disabling stroke. Antithrombotic therapies have reduced the incidence of this complication although they pose many limitations and difficulties. As a result, a large number of high risk patients do not receive an appropriate treatment. In recent years, four new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) with relevant advantages in comparison to vitaminK antagonists have been released. Four large phaseiii clinical trials have demonstrated that NOAC are at least as safe and efficacious as warfarin in stroke prevention in non-valve atrial fibrillation patients with moderate-high thrombotic risk, being their main advantage the reduction in intracranial hemorrhage. The arrival of these drugs has caused great expectations in the management of these patients but also new doubts. Lacking data in some subgroups of frail patients, the absence of specific antidotes available and specially their high cost represent nowadays the main limitations for their generalization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Novel oral anticoagulants in acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costopoulos, Charis; Niespialowska-Steuden, Maria; Kukreja, Neville; Gorog, Diana A

    2013-09-10

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with a prevalence that has now reached pandemic levels as a consequence of the rapid modernization of the developing world. Its presentation as an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a frequent reason for hospital admission and of profound implications for personal, societal and global health. Despite improvements in the management of ACS with anti-platelet and anticoagulant therapy and revascularization techniques, many patients continue to suffer recurrent ischemic events. The need to reduce future cardiovascular events has led to the development of novel therapies to prevent coronary thrombosis, targeting thrombin-mediated pathways. These include direct Xa inhibitors (apixaban, rivaroxaban and darexaban), direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran) and PAR 1 antagonists (vorapaxar and atopaxar). This article critically reviews the comparative mechanisms of action, the risks and benefits, together with the clinical evidence base for the use of these novel oral agents in the management of ACS patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Glycoprotein biosynthesis by human normal platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, P.; Bello, O.; Apitz-Castro, R.

    1987-01-01

    Incorporation of radioactive Man, Gal, Fuc, Glc-N, and NANA into washed human normal platelets and endogenous glycoproteins has been found. Both parameters were time dependent. Analysis of hydrolyzed labeled glycoproteins by paper chromatography revealed that the radioactive monosaccharide incubated with the platelets had not been converted into other sugars. Acid hydrolysis demonstrates the presence of a glycosidic linkage. All the effort directed to the demonstration of the existence of a lipid-sugar intermediate in intact human platelets yielded negative results for Man and Glc-N used as precursors. The incorporation of these sugars into glycoproteins is insensitive to bacitracin, suggesting no involvement of lipid-linked saccharides in the synthesis of glycoproteins in human blood platelets. The absence of inhibition of the glycosylation process in the presence of cycloheximide suggests that the sugars are added to proteins present in the intact platelets. These results support the contention that glycoprotein biosynthesis in human blood platelets observed under our experimental conditions is effected through direct sugar nucleotide glycosylation

  20. The bacteria binding glycoprotein salivary agglutinin (SAG/gp340) activates complement via the lectin pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leito, Jelani T. D.; Ligtenberg, Antoon J. M.; van Houdt, Michel; van den Berg, Timo K.; Wouters, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Salivary agglutinin (SAG), also known as gp-340 and Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1, is a glycoprotein that is present in tears, lung fluid and mucosal surfaces along the gastrointestinal tract. It is encoded by the Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1 gene, a member of the Scavenger Receptor

  1. Guidelines for cloning, expression, purification and functional characterization of primary HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benureau, Yann; Colin, Philippe; Staropoli, Isabelle; Gonzalez, Nuria; Garcia-Perez, Javier; Alcami, Jose; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lagane, Bernard

    2016-10-01

    The trimeric HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoproteins gp120 and gp41 mediate virus entry into target cells by engaging CD4 and the coreceptors CCR5 or CXCR4 at the cell surface and driving membrane fusion. Receptor/gp120 interactions regulate the virus life cycle, HIV infection transmission and pathogenesis. Env is also the target of neutralizing antibodies. Efforts have thus been made to produce soluble HIV-1 glycoproteins to develop vaccines and study the role and mechanisms of HIV/receptor interactions. However, production and purification of Env glycoproteins and their functional assessment has to cope with multiple obstacles. These include difficulties in amplifying and cloning env sequences and setting up receptor binding assays that are suitable for studies on large collections of glycoproteins, flexible enough to adapt to Env and receptor structural heterogeneities, and allow recapitulating the receptor binding properties of virion-associated Env trimers. Here we identify these difficulties and present protocols to produce primary gp120 and determination of their binding properties to receptors. The receptor binding assays confirmed that the produced glycoproteins are competent for binding CD4 and undergo proper CD4-induced conformational changes required for interaction with CCR5. These assays may help elucidate the role of gp120/receptor interactions in the pathophysiology of HIV infection and develop HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Idarucizumab for Reversing Dabigatran-Induced Anticoagulation: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Nathan; Morrill, Amanda M; Willett, Kristine C

    2016-05-12

    The approval of the oral direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate, gave patients an alternative to oral anticoagulation with warfarin. Like all anticoagulants, the primary adverse event (AE) associated with dabigatran is bleeding. Until the FDA approval of idarucizumab, there had been no reversal agent for dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in patients with life-threatening or uncontrollable bleeding, or those requiring emergent procedures. The primary purpose of this review is to summarize the safety and efficacy of idarucizumab, a monoclonal antibody fragment, and its use as a reversal agent for dabigatran. A literature search was conducted through MEDLINE (1946 to November week 1 2015) and Embase (1980-2015 week 46) using the search term idarucizumab. Clinicaltrials.gov was consulted for a comprehensive list of ongoing and completed studies. Additional studies were identified through bibliographical citations. Clinical trials in animals and humans published in English evaluating the safety and efficacy of idarucizumab for reversal of anticoagulant treatment with dabigatran were included for review. Idarucizumab has been shown to significantly reverse the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran in both healthy volunteers and patients requiring a reversal agent because of either overt bleeding or an emergency surgery or invasive procedure. The most common AEs were headache, nasopharyngitis, back pain, skin irritation, hypokalemia, delirium, constipation, pyrexia, and pneumonia. Deaths reported in idarucizumab studies were attributed to either the index event or a preexisting comorbidity. Most adverse effects were minor, but 21 serious AEs have been reported in the published data including thrombotic events. Given the increased use of direct oral anticoagulants, such as dabigatran, a need for specific reversal agents exists. Idarucizumab has been shown to be safe and effective in the reversal of dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in patients requiring emergent

  3. Anticoagulant rodenticides and wildlife: Concluding remarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, Nico W.; Elliott, John E.; Shore, Richard F.; Rattner, Barnett A.

    2018-01-01

    Rodents are known to affect human society globally in various adverse ways, resulting in a widespread demand for their continuous control. Anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) have been, and currently remain, the cornerstone of rodent control throughout the world. Although alternative control methods exist, they are generally less effective. ARs work by affecting vitamin K metabolism, thereby preventing the activation of blood clotting factors and eventual coagulopathy. Since ARs are non-selective, their undoubted benefits for rodent control have to be balanced against the environmental risks that these compounds pose. Although they have been used for decades, pharmacokinetic and toxicokinetic data are mainly available for laboratory mammals and have concentrated on acute effects. Limited information is available on chronic exposure scenarios and for wildlife species. Important gaps exist in our understanding of the large inter- and intra-species differences in sensitivity to ARs, especially for non-target species, and in our knowledge about the occurrence and importance of sub-lethal effects in wildlife. It is clear that mere presence of AR residues in the body tissues may not indicate the occurrence of effects, although unequivocal assessment of effects under field conditions is difficult. Ante-mortem symptoms, like lethargy, subdued behaviour and unresponsiveness are generally not very specific as is true for more generic post-mortem observations (e.g. pallor of the mucous membranes or occurrence of haemorrhages). It is only by combining ante or post-mortem data with information on exposure that effects in the field may be confirmed. We do know however that a wide variety of non-target species are directly exposed to ARs. Secondary exposure in predators is also widespread although there is limited information on whether this exposure causes actual effects. Exposure is driven by ecological factors and is context specific with respect to spatial habitat configuration

  4. Engineered CHO cells for production of diverse, homogeneous glycoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhang; Wang, Shengjun; Halim, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Production of glycoprotein therapeutics in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells is limited by the cells' generic capacity for N-glycosylation, and production of glycoproteins with desirable homogeneous glycoforms remains a challenge. We conducted a comprehensive knockout screen of glycosyltransferase...

  5. A hybrid monolithic column based on boronate-functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets for online specific enrichment of glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chanyuan; Chen, Xiaoman; Du, Zhuo; Li, Gongke; Xiao, Xiaohua; Cai, Zongwei

    2017-05-19

    A hybrid monolithic column based on aminophenylboronic acid (APBA)-functionalized graphene oxide (GO) has been developed and used for selective enrichment of glycoproteins. The APBA/GO composites were homogeneously incorporated into a polymer monolithic column with the help of oligomer matrix and followed by in situ polymerization. The effect of dispersion of APBA/GO composites in the polymerization mixture on the performance of the monolithic column was explored in detail. The presence of graphene oxide not only enlarged the BET surface area from 6.3m 2 /g to 169.4m 2 /g, but also provided abundant boronic acid moieties for glycoprotein extraction, which improved the enrichment selectivity and efficiency for glycoproteins. The APBA/GO hybrid monolithic column was incorporated into a sequential injection system, which facilitated online extraction of proteins. Combining the superior properties of extraordinary surface area of GO and the affinity interaction of APBA to glycoproteins, the APBA/GO hybrid monolithic column showed higher enrichment factors for glycoproteins than other proteins without cis-diol-containing groups. Also, under comparable or even shorter processing time and without the addition of any organic solvent, it showed higher binding capacity toward glycoproteins compared with the conventional boronate affinity monolithic column. The practical applicability of this system was demonstrated by processing of egg white samples for extraction of ovalbumin and ovotransferrin, and satisfactory results were obtained by assay with SDS-PAGE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Extractions without eliminating anticoagulant treatment: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cabrera, Manuel-Alejandro; Barona-Dorado, Cristina; Leco-Berrocal, Isabel; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Martínez-González, José-Maria

    2011-09-01

    To establish whether there is a high enough risk of bleeding in patients who take oral anticoagulants, such that it would justify not using oral anticoagulants when performing a dental extraction, as well as if the reason for and anatomical location of the extraction increases such risk. We performed a bibliographic search in order to carry out a meta-analytic study using descriptive statistics. We compiled a sample of 1194 patients from the articles selected. Of these patients, a total of 2392 simple, serial surgical extractions were performed; none of the patients interrupted their anticoagulant treatment with warfarin sodium. Of the sample, 83 patients presented a certain degree of bleeding; in 77 of such cases, the bleeding was controlled with local hemostasis, whereas 6 patients required their dose of oral anticoagulants to be adjusted. There was a higher incidence of bleeding in patients presenting a periodontal pathology, compared to deep caries and pericoronitis. Patients being treated with oral anticoagulants represent a risk that we should be aware of, but local hemostasis has proven to be effective when performing extractions, provided that the INR value is less than 4. There is an increased incidence of bleeding in patients with periodontal problems, due to the greater presence of inflammation in the soft tissues. If the extraction is performed in the maxilla, the incidence of hemorrhagic complications is slightly higher than in the mandible, although this difference is considered to be insignificant.

  7. Adherence to oral anticoagulant therapy in secondary stroke prevention – impact of the novel oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luger S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Luger,1 Carina Hohmann,2 Daniela Niemann,1 Peter Kraft,3 Ignaz Gunreben,3 Tobias Neumann-Haefelin,2 Christoph Kleinschnitz,3 Helmuth Steinmetz,1 Christian Foerch,1 Waltraud Pfeilschifter1 1Department of Neurology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, 2Department of Neurology, Klinikum Fulda gAG, Fulda, 3Department of Neurology, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany Background: Oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT potently prevents strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation. Vitamin K antagonists (VKA have been the standard of care for long-term OAT for decades, but non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC have recently been approved for this indication, and raised many questions, among them their influence on medication adherence. We assessed adherence to VKA and NOAC in secondary stroke prevention. Methods: All patients treated from October 2011 to September 2012 for ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack with a subsequent indication for OAT, at three academic hospitals were entered into a prospective registry, and baseline data and antithrombotic treatment at discharge were recorded. At the 1-year follow-up, we assessed the adherence to different OAT strategies and patients’ adherence to their respective OAT. We noted OAT changes, reasons to change treatment, and factors that influence persistence to the prescribed OAT. Results: In patients discharged on OAT, we achieved a fatality corrected response rate of 73.3% (n=209. A total of 92% of these patients received OAT at the 1-year follow-up. We observed good adherence to both VKA and NOAC (VKA, 80.9%; NOAC, 74.8%; P=0.243 with a statistically nonsignificant tendency toward a weaker adherence to dabigatran. Disability at 1-year follow-up was an independent predictor of lower adherence to any OAT after multivariate analysis, whereas the choice of OAT did not have a relevant influence. Conclusion: One-year adherence to OAT after stroke is strong (>90% and patients

  8. Isolation of glycoproteins from brown algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel process for the isolation of unique anti-oxidative glycoproteins from the pH precipitated fractions of enzymatic extracts of brown algae. Two brown seaweeds viz, Fucus serratus and Fucus vesiculosus were hydrolysed by using 3 enzymes viz, Alcalase, Viscozyme...

  9. Efficiency of three anti-coagulant rodenticides on commensal rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, M W; Kamilia; Allam, A M; Soliman, M I

    2007-08-01

    Susceptibiliy level to bromadilone, difencoum and coumtertraly anticoagulants were studied in different species of Norway rat Rattus norvegicus and roof rat Rattus rattus trapped from El-Qualyobia Governorate in which the anticoagulant rodenticides were used to control rodents for long periods in some rural regions at Qualyobia. Complete mortality was showed for both species and sex within a standard feeding period (6 days) indicated to be susceptible to the three anticoagulant rodenticides. The bait eaten and corresponding active ingredient showed a noticeable more intake for R. rattus than R. norvegicus for the three compounds. The time to death showed highest mean values for R. rattus comparison to R. norvegicus. Difencoum recorded highest values of time to death compare with bromadilone and coumatetralyl.

  10. Extended anticoagulation in venous thromboembolism disease. In favour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Capitan, M C

    Venous thromboembolism disease can be considered a chronic disease because, after the first episode, there is a life-long risk of recurrence. Recurrence is a severe complication. Anticoagulation is effective while it is maintained, but when it is discontinued, the risk of new thrombotic events persists indefinitely. Clinical practice guidelines offer specific recommendations on the treatment duration for patients with provoked or recurrent disease but are not specific for those with a first unprovoked episode. The decision should be made after a careful individual assessment of the risk-benefit of anticoagulation. This article reviews the evidence in favour of extending the anticoagulation and the current therapeutic options. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  11. [Tranexamic acid gel in patients treated with oral anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripollés-de Ramón, Jorge; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bravo-Llatas, Carmen; Bascones-Martínez, Antonio

    2014-12-09

    Patients treated with oral anticoagulants have increased susceptibility to bleeding, and therefore any surgical medical procedure and especially oral surgery requires a therapeutic approach that minimizes bleeding effects in these patients. The working hypothesis was based on studies of local application of tranexamic acid after maxillofacial interventions as effective therapeutic alternative for the prevention and control of bleeding. The aim was to assess the effectiveness of the application of a gel solution tranexamic acid after tooth extraction in anticoagulated patients in terms of healing time and degree of healing. The results indicate that application of tranexamic acid gel is very effective for consistency and maintenance in the place of action and shows its efficacy as a procoagulant material. The application of a gel solution of tranexamic acid in oral anticoagulants patients ameliorates healing time and the bleeding time within the first 48-72 h. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. [Novel anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumhäkel, M; Schirmer, S H; Böhm, M

    2010-11-01

    The most frequent cardiac arrhythmia and main cause for cardio-embolic stroke is atrial fibrillation. Prophylaxis for thrombembolic events is performed regarding individual risk of patients with either ASS or vitamin-K-antagonists. Efficacy and safety of oral anticoagulation is limited by a narrow therapeutical range as well as by inter- and intraindividual variability of INR-values due to genetic disposition, differences in alimentation, dosage errors, rare control of INR-levels and drug-interactions. New oral anticoagulants with different mechanisms of action may be a promising therapeutic option in future. This review addresses the new anticoagulants Apixaban, Rivaroxban and Dabigatranetexilat with the design and as available the results of the corresponding phase-III-trials in atrial fibrillation (ARISTOTLE, ROCKET-AF, RE-LY). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Management of Periprocedural Anticoagulation: A Survey of Contemporary Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaker, Greg C; Theriot, Paul; Binder, Lea G; Dobesh, Paul P; Cuker, Adam; Doherty, John U

    2016-07-12

    Interruption of oral anticoagulation (AC) for surgery or an invasive procedure is a complicated process. Practice guidelines provide only general recommendations, and care of such patients occurs across multiple specialties. The availability of direct oral anticoagulants further complicates decision making and guidance here is limited. To evaluate current practice patterns in the United States for bridging AC, a survey was developed by the American College of Cardiology Anticoagulation Work Group. The goal of the survey was to assess how general and subspecialty cardiologists, internists, gastroenterologists, and orthopedic surgeons currently manage patients who receive AC and undergo surgery or an invasive procedure. The survey was completed by 945 physicians involved in the periprocedural management of AC. The results provide a template for educational and research projects geared toward the development of clinical pathways and point-of-care tools to improve this area of health care. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanical Prosthetic Valves and Pregnancy: A therapeutic dilemma of anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Panduranga

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Choosing the best anticoagulant therapy for a pregnant patient with a mechanical prosthetic valve is controversial and the published international guidelines contain no clear-cut consensus on the best approach. This is due to the fact that there is presently no anticoagulant which can reliably decrease thromboembolic events while avoiding damage to the fetus. Current treatments include either continuing oral warfarin or substituting warfarin for subcutaneous unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH in the first trimester (6–12 weeks or at any point throughout the pregnancy. However, LMWH, while widely-prescribed, requires close monitoring of the blood anti-factor Xa levels. Unfortunately, facilities for such monitoring are not universally available, such as within hospitals in developing countries. This review evaluates the leading international guidelines concerning anticoagulant therapy in pregnant patients with mechanical prosthetic valves as well as proposing a simplified guideline which may be more relevant to hospitals in this region.

  15. Differences in patient outcomes and chronic care management of oral anticoagulant therapy: an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drewes, H.W.; Lambooij, M.S.; Baan, C.A.; Meijboom, B.R.; Graafmans, W.C.; Westert, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The oral anticoagulant therapy - provided to prevent thrombosis - is known to be associated with substantial avoidable hospitalization. Improving the quality of the oral anticoagulant therapy could avoid drug related hospitalizations. Therefore, this study compared the patient outcomes

  16. Differences in patient outcomes and chronic care management of oral anticoagulant therapy : An explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drewes, H.W.; Lambooij, M.; Baan, C.A.; Meijboom, B.R.; Graafmans, W.C.; Westert, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Background The oral anticoagulant therapy - provided to prevent thrombosis - is known to be associated with substantial avoidable hospitalization. Improving the quality of the oral anticoagulant therapy could avoid drug related hospitalizations. Therefore, this study compared the patient outcomes

  17. Anticoagulation activity of salivary gland extract of oriental blackfly Simulium indicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhalaxmi Borah

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that the mode of action of the anticoagulant(s is mainly on the inhibition of thrombin and factor Xa along with other target factors of the coagulation cascade.

  18. A comparative assessment of efficacy of three anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renapurkar, D M

    1982-01-01

    Results are presented of feeding tests carried out with three common anticoagulant rodenticides viz., coumatetralyl, fumarin and warfarin on three common species of commensal rodents i.e., Rattus rattus, Rattus norvegicus and Bandicota bengalensis. All three species of rodents were susceptible to anticoagulant rodenticides. However, the action of these compounds in B. bengalensis was comparatively slow. Coumatetralyl was found to be the most effective rodenticide followed by fumarin and warfarin. Liquid baits of these compounds are more effective in comparison to food baits.

  19. Inhibition of warfarin anticoagulation associated with chelation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebe, Heidi Braun; Gregory, Philip J

    2002-08-01

    Chelation therapy originally was administered exclusively to patients with heavy metal poisoning. Now some physicians are administering this therapy for numerous conditions, most commonly coronary heart disease. A 64-year-old man experienced impaired warfarin anticoagulation after undergoing chelation therapy His international normalized ratio (INR) fell from 2.6 the day before to 1.6 the day after therapy was administered. Whether chelation therapy decreases the effectiveness of warfarin anticoagulation is uncertain. However, because of this potential interaction, clinicians should consider increased INR monitoring in patients undergoing chelation therapy.

  20. Novel oral anticoagulants in the treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feher, G; Illes, Z; Komoly, S

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke with extremely diverse clinical features, predisposing factors, brain imaging findings, and outcome. Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of CVT management, however, it is not supported by high-quality evicence. Novel oral anticoagulants...... (NOACs) have been extensively studied in patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE) and non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). The aim of our work to review the available evidence for NOACs in the treatment of CVT. Based on our literature search there is insufficient evidence...... to support the use of NOACs in CVT, although case series with rivaroxaban and dabigatran have showed promising results....

  1. Direct anticoagulants and nursing: an approach from patient's safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Ruiz, Adolfo; Romero-Arana, Adolfo; Gómez-Salgado, Juan

    In recent years, a new line of treatment for the prevention of stroke in non-valvular atrial fibrillation, the so-called direct anticoagulants or new anticoagulants has appeared. The proper management and follow-up of these patients is essential to minimize their side effects and ensure patient safety. In this article, a description of these drugs is given, analyzing their characteristics, functioning and interactions together with the most habitual nursing interventions, as well as a reflection on the implications for the practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. New oral anticoagulants in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmar Vega, Lara; de Francisco, A L M; Bada da Silva, Jairo; Galván Espinoza, Luis; Fernández Fresnedo, Gema

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) develop bleeding and thrombotic tendencies, so the indication of anticoagulation at the onset of atrial fibrillation (AF) is complex. AF is the most common chronic cardiac arrhythmia, and thromboembolism and ischemic stroke in particular are major complications. In recent years, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed, and they have shown superiority over the classical AVK in preventing stroke, systemic embolism and bleeding risk, constituting an effective alternative to those resources. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Fibrinolytic and anticoagulative activities from the earthworm Eisenia foetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrzenjak, T; Popović, M; Bozić, T; Grdisa, M; Kobrehel, D; Tiska-Rudman, L

    1998-04-01

    Biologically active glycolipoprotein complex (G-90) isolated from whole earthworm tissue extract shows anticoagulative and fibrinolytic activities. We isolated two tyrosine like serine peptidases with molecular masses of 34 kDa (P I) and 23 kDa (P II), respectively. P I peptidase is autocatalytically degraded to P II. Both peptidases exhibit fibrinolytic and anticoagulative activities. The activity of P I is much higher. P I in concentration of 10(5) ng ml-1 of plasma shortened the physiological time of fibrin clot lysis by 54% and completely inhibited blood clotting at a concentration of 10(3) ng ml-1 of venous blood.

  4. Regulatory, legislative, and policy updates with anticoagulant use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanikos, John; Buckley, Leo F; Aldemerdash, Ahmed; Terry, Kimberly J; Piazza, Gregory; Connors, Jean M; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2015-04-01

    Thromboembolism afflicts millions of patients annually in the United States and is associated with a significant cost burden. Recent advances in oral anticoagulation have provided clinicians with more options for management of these diseases. Accordingly, regulatory, legislative, and policy-making organizations have intervened with the aim of improving patient outcomes, ensuring patient safety, and reducing costs. There have been a number of recent developments in surveillance, litigation, and regulatory oversight that clinicians should recognize. In this review article we summarize key updates related to the management of anticoagulant therapy as it relates to thrombosis prevention and treatment.

  5. Anticoagulant therapy duration. In favour of short-term courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto Rodríguez, J A; Ramírez Luna, J C

    In recent years, we have observed a tendency to extend anticoagulant therapy for patients with venous thromboembolism disease (VTE). This practice exposes patients to a greater risk of severe and fatal haemorrhage, which, in certain conditions, outweighs the benefits related to the reduction in disease recurrence. This review examines the evidence in favour of reducing anticoagulant therapy as much as possible, especially for patients with VTE "caused" by temporary risk factors, with isolated deep vein thrombosis and with unprovoked VTE and a high risk of haemorrhage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  6. Secretion of hepatitis C virus envelope glycoproteins depends on assembly of apolipoprotein B positive lipoproteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinca Icard

    Full Text Available The density of circulating hepatitis C virus (HCV particles in the blood of chronically infected patients is very heterogeneous. The very low density of some particles has been attributed to an association of the virus with apolipoprotein B (apoB positive and triglyceride rich lipoproteins (TRL likely resulting in hybrid lipoproteins known as lipo-viro-particles (LVP containing the viral envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2, capsid and viral RNA. The specific infectivity of these particles has been shown to be higher than the infectivity of particles of higher density. The nature of the association of HCV particles with lipoproteins remains elusive and the role of apolipoproteins in the synthesis and assembly of the viral particles is unknown. The human intestinal Caco-2 cell line differentiates in vitro into polarized and apoB secreting cells during asymmetric culture on porous filters. By using this cell culture system, cells stably expressing E1 and E2 secreted the glycoproteins into the basal culture medium after one week of differentiation concomitantly with TRL secretion. Secreted glycoproteins were only detected in apoB containing density fractions. The E1-E2 and apoB containing particles were unique complexes bearing the envelope glycoproteins at their surface since apoB could be co-immunoprecipitated with E2-specific antibodies. Envelope protein secretion was reduced by inhibiting the lipidation of apoB with an inhibitor of the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein. HCV glycoproteins were similarly secreted in association with TRL from the human liver cell line HepG2 but not by Huh-7 and Huh-7.5 hepatoma cells that proved deficient for lipoprotein assembly. These data indicate that HCV envelope glycoproteins have the intrinsic capacity to utilize apoB synthesis and lipoprotein assembly machinery even in the absence of the other HCV proteins. A model for LVP assembly is proposed.

  7. An unusual dependence of human herpesvirus-8 glycoproteins-induced cell-to-cell fusion on heparan sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Vaibhav; Darmani, Nissar A.; Thrush, Gerald R.; Shukla, Deepak

    2009-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is known to interact with cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) for entry into a target cell. Here we investigated the role of HS during HHV-8 glycoproteins-induced cell fusion. Interestingly, the observed fusion demonstrated an unusual dependence on HS as evident from following lines of evidence: (1) a significant reduction in cell-to-cell fusion occurred when target cells were treated with heparinase; (2) in a competition assay, when the effector cells expressing HHV-8 glycoproteins were challenged with soluble HS, cell-to-cell fusion was reduced; and, (3) co-expression of HHV-8 glycoproteins gH-gL on target cells resulted in inhibition of cell surface HS expression. Taken together, our results indicate that cell surface HS can play an additional role during HHV-8 pathogenesis.

  8. eEF-2 Phosphorylation Down-Regulates P-Glycoprotein Over-Expression in Rat Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Hua Tang

    Full Text Available We investigated whether glutamate, NMDA receptors, and eukaryote elongation factor-2 kinase (eEF-2K/eEF-2 regulate P-glycoprotein expression, and the effects of the eEF-2K inhibitor NH125 on the expression of P-glycoprotein in rat brain microvessel endothelial cells (RBMECs.Cortex was obtained from newborn Wistar rat brains. After surface vessels and meninges were removed, the pellet containing microvessels was resuspended and incubated at 37°C in culture medium. Cell viability was assessed by the MTT assay. RBMECs were identified by immunohistochemistry with anti-vWF. P-glycoprotein, phospho-eEF-2, and eEF-2 expression were determined by western blot analysis. Mdr1a gene expression was analyzed by RT-PCR.Mdr1a mRNA, P-glycoprotein and phospho-eEF-2 expression increased in L-glutamate stimulated RBMECs. P-glycoprotein and phospho-eEF-2 expression were down-regulated after NH125 treatment in L-glutamate stimulated RBMECs.eEF-2K/eEF-2 should have played an important role in the regulation of P-glycoprotein expression in RBMECs. eEF-2K inhibitor NH125 could serve as an efficacious anti-multidrug resistant agent.

  9. Bleeding in patients using new anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents: Risk factors and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, M.M.; Eerenberg, E.; Löwenberg, E.; Kamphuisen, P.W.

    2010-01-01

    The most important adverse effect of antithrombotic treatment is the occurrence of bleeding. in case of serious or even life-threatening bleeding in a patient who uses anticoagulant agents or when patient on anticoagulants needs to undergo an urgent invasive procedure, anticoagulant treatment can be

  10. Anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity in six dogs presenting for ocular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Angela N; Allbaugh, Rachel A; Tofflemire, Kyle L; Ben-Shlomo, Gil; Whitley, David; Paulsen, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    To describe cases of suspected anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity manifesting with predominantly ocular signs. Six canine cases that presented to veterinary referral hospitals for ocular abnormalities and were diagnosed with suspected or confirmed anticoagulant rodenticide ingestion were reviewed for commonalities in presentation and outcome. Five dogs had unilateral ocular signs and one dog had bilateral manifestations. Signs included subconjunctival hemorrhage, exophthalmos, and commonly orbital pain without other significant physical examination findings. Prothrombin time was measured in 5 of 6 dogs and was prolonged in all. Partial thromboplastin time was measured in 4 of 6 dogs and was prolonged in all. Complete blood cell count and serum chemistry profiles demonstrated mild, if any, abnormalities. Five dogs had known anticoagulant rodenticide exposure, and rodenticide ingestion was suspected in 1 additional case based on clinical signs, clinical pathologic abnormalities, and response to treatment. Five of 6 cases were hospitalized overnight for plasma transfusions along with oral or injectable vitamin K1 , and all dogs were treated with oral vitamin K1 for 30 days. All dogs experienced complete resolution of clinical signs within 6 weeks of initiating treatment. Anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity can present with predominantly ocular manifestations. Rodenticide ingestion should be considered in dogs with unilateral or bilateral subconjunctival hemorrhage, exophthalmos, and orbital pain. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  11. Prevalence of Lupus Anticoagulant in Women with Spontaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... Presence of lupus anticoagulant (LA), one of the antiphospholipid antibodies, has been associated with SA in many ... (a hexagonal-phase phospholipid) test and calculated Rosner index for prolonged. KCT were used for the ... marker for APL syndrome, the demonstration that β2-GPI can bind to anionic ...

  12. Citrate Anticoagulation for CRRT in Children: Comparison with Heparin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nicole Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional anticoagulation with citrate is an alternative to heparin in continuous renal replacement therapies, which may prolong circuit lifetime and decrease hemorrhagic complications. A retrospective comparative cohort study based on a prospective observational registry was conducted including critically ill children undergoing CRRT. Efficacy, measured as circuit survival, and secondary effects of heparin and citrate were compared. 12 patients on CRRT with citrate anticoagulation and 24 patients with heparin anticoagulation were analyzed. Median citrate dose was 2.6 mmol/L. Median calcium dose was 0.16 mEq/kg/h. Median heparin dose was 15 UI/kg/h. Median circuit survival was 48 hours with citrate and 31 hours with heparin (P=0.028. 66.6% of patients treated with citrate developed mild metabolic alkalosis, which was directly related to citrate dose. There were no cases of citrate intoxication: median total calcium/ionic calcium index (CaT/I of 2.16 and a maximum CaT/I of 2.33, without metabolic acidosis. In the citrate group, 45.5% of patients developed hypochloremia and 27.3% hypomagnesemia. In the heparin group, 27.8% developed hypophosphatemia. Three patients were moved from heparin to citrate to control postoperatory bleeding. In conclusion citrate is a safe and effective anticoagulation method for CRRT in children and it achieves longer circuit survival than heparin.

  13. Anticoagulant activity of a natural protein purified from Hypomesus olidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Mengxing; Wang, Liyan; Liu, Xuejun

    2017-05-01

    A novel anticoagulant protein (E-II-1) was separated and purified from Hypomesus olidus, a unique freshwater fish in northern China. E-II-1 had a molecular mass of approximately 40 kDa with no subunits. The high content of hydrophobic amino acids and negatively charged amino acids in E-II-1 demonstrated that the amino acid compositions might contribute to the anticoagulant activity. E-II-1 contained α-helices 16.75%, β-sheets 42.67%, β-turn 25.58% and random coil 15.00%. In vitro blood coagulation time assay, E-II-1 significantly prolonged the activated partial thrombin time in a dose-dependent manner. Results indicated that E-II-1 acted as anticoagulants through the endogenous pathway with an inhibition of FXa. The specific activity of E-II-1 was 103.50 U/mg at a concentration of 1.00 mg/mL. Therefore, E-II-1 might be one of the promising anticoagulants originated from natural food sources with more safety and less side effects.

  14. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callonnec, F.; Gerardin, E.; Thiebot, J. [Department of Radiology, Rouen University Hospital, 1 rue de Germont, F-76031 Rouen cedex (France); Marie, J.P.; Andrieu Guitrancourt, J. [Department of Otolaryngology, Rouen University Hospital (France); Marsot-Dupuch, K. [Department of Radiology, St. Antoine, Paris University Hospital (France)

    1999-06-01

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan`s disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.) With 2 figs., 11 refs.

  15. Vitamin K and stability of oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombouts, Eva Karolien

    2011-01-01

    One of the causes of unstable anticoagulation is a variable vitamin K intake. The main objective of this thesis was to test the hypothesis that the INR is particularly sensitive to changes in vitamin K intake when vitamin K status is low, and that patients with a low vitamin K intake would therefore

  16. Synthesis and anticoagulant activity of the quaternary ammonium chitosan sulfates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lihong; Wu, Penghui; Zhang, Jinrong; Gao, Song; Wang, Libo; Li, Mingjia; Sha, Mingming; Xie, Weiguo; Nie, Min

    2012-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium chitosan sulfates with diverse degrees of substitution (DS) ascribed to sulfate groups between 0.52 and 1.55 were synthesized by reacting quaternary ammonium chitosan with an uncommon sulfating agent (N(SO(3)Na)(3)) that was prepared from sodium bisulfite (NaHSO(3)) through reaction with sodium nitrite (NaNO(2)) in the aqueous system homogeneous. The structures of the derivatives were characterized by FTIR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR. The factors affecting DS of quaternary ammonium chitosan sulfates which included the molar ratio of NaNO(2) to quaternary ammonium chitosan, sulfated temperature, sulfated time and pH of sulfated reaction solution were investigated in detail. Its anticoagulation activity in vitro was determined by an activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) assay, a thrombin time (TT) assay and a prothrombin time (PT) assay. Results of anticoagulation assays showed quaternary ammonium chitosan sulfates significantly prolonged APTT and TT, but not PT, and demonstrated that the introduction of sulfate groups into the quaternary ammonium chitosan structure improved its anticoagulant activity obviously. The study showed its anticoagulant properties strongly depended on its DS, concentration and molecular weight. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevalence of Lupus Anticoagulant in Women with Spontaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Spontaneous abortion (SA) is a common complication of pregnancy. Presence of lupus anticoagulant (LA), one of the antiphospholipid antibodies, has been associated with SA in many studies, especially in Caucasians. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of LA in women with SA in ABUTH, ...

  18. Challenges in management of Warfarin anti-coagulation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Challenges in management of Warfarin anti-coagulation in advanced HIV/AIDS patients with venous thrombotic events - A case series from a research clinic in rural Kericho, Kenya. ... VTE was diagnosed 52 (1-469) days after ART initiation, and 81.8% of cases were outpatients at presentation. All patients received at least ...

  19. pattern of anticoagulation control after heart valve surgery at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-07-07

    Jul 7, 2000 ... Regular attendance by the patients, supplemented by a system of quality control anticaogulation are the prerequisites of such a service. In some centres where such quality control systems are in place, levels of adequate. INR control maintained up to 80% of the patients attending the anticoagulation clinic ...

  20. Perioperative anticoagulation for children with prosthetic mechanical valves

    OpenAIRE

    Grech, Victor E.; Rees, Philip G.

    2000-01-01

    The insertion of a mechanical heart valve predisposes to thrombosis and embolism, and for this reason, individuals with mechanical valves who undergo dental/surgical procedures must take special precautions. In this article, we illustrate a protocol for anticoagulation during such procedures in individuals with mechanical valves.

  1. Anticoagulant drugs increase natural killer cell activity in lung cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bobek, M.; Boubelík, Michael; Fišerová, Anna; Luptovcová, Martina; Vannucci, Luca; Kacprzak, G.; Kolodzej, J.; Majewski, A.M.; Hoffman, R. M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2005), s. 215-223 ISSN 0169-5002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : anticoagulant drugs * lung cancer * NK cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.172, year: 2005

  2. New developments in parenteral anticoagulation for arterial and venous thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Es, Nick; Bleker, Suzanne M.; Büller, Harry R.; Coppens, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of heparin and low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) are well documented in venous and arterial thromboembolism. Several drawbacks of heparins have inspired the development of newer parenteral anticoagulants for specific indications, including heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

  3. Antithrombotic/anticoagulant and anticancer activities of selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nine plants available in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa were tested for antithrombotic and/or anticoagulant activity. Organic (methanol) and aqueous (distilled water) extractions were performed on the various plant parts. The thrombin assay and clotting time assays (thrombin-induced and CaCl2-induced) were ...

  4. Standardisation of the Laboratory Control of Anticoagulant Therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-09-11

    Sep 11, 1974 ... Anticoagulant therapy with the coumarin group of drugs has been used in clinical practice for more than a quarter of a century. The most widely used form of laboratory control of the treatment is the Quick one-stage prothrom·- bin time. I. This simple test proved to be satisfactory in most cases, but discrepant ...

  5. Risk of bleeding after dentoalveolar surgery in patients taking anticoagulants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekema, Ferdinand I.; van Minnen, Baucke; Jansma, Johan; Bos, Rudolf R. M.

    To avoid increasing the risk of thromboembolic events, it is recommended that treatment with anticoagulants should be continued during dentoalveolar operations. We have evaluated the incidence of bleeding after dentoalveolar operations in a prospective study of 206 patients, 103 who were, and 103

  6. Platelet Glycoprotein lb-1X and Malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    therapy could benefit the breast cancer patient with malignant disease. Body Below we list the 3 Specific Aims from our original submission (blue font...Muller WJ and Pollard JW. Progression to malignancy in the polyoma middle T oncoprotein mouse breast cancer model provides a reliable model for human...08-1-0576 TITLE: Platelet Glycoprotein lb-1X and Malignancy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Jerry Ware

  7. Platelet Glycoprotein lb-1X and Malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    independent of pregnancy makes this a useful model to study spontaneous metastasis [26]. To complete this aim, we obtained a mouse colony from Dr. Sandra...mice initiates the spontaneous development of a mammary adenocarcinoma by the age of 8- 10 weeks without pregnancy or any other stimuli. To examine if...patient with systemic lupus erythematosus. Am J Hematol 2001; 67:262-67. 20. Arthur JF, Dunkley S and Andrews RK. Platelet glycoprotein VI-related

  8. Characterization of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 envelope glycoproteins: Dimerization of the glycoprotein precursor during processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, M.A.; Krust, B.; Laurent, A.G.; Montagnier, L.; Hovanessian, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    For glycoproteins with apparent molecular weights of 300,000, 140,000, 125,000, and 36,000 (gp300, gp140, gp125, and gp36) were detectable in human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2)-infected cells. They have identical isoelectric points, suggesting that gp300 might be a dimeric form of the immature precursor, gp140. The purified gp300 can be dissociated in a slightly acidic buffer to give rise to monomers of 140,000 molecular weight. Such dissociated monomers and the purified gp140 showed identical patterns of polypeptides after partial proteolysis with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that gp300 is formed after synthesis of gp140 and before the detection of the mature external envelope glycoprotein, gp125. These results were confirmed by using various inhibitors of glycosylation and inhibitors of trimming enzymes. Dimer formation of the envelope glycoprotein precursor was also observed in cells infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a virus closely related to HIV-2. On the other hand, the envelope glycoprotein precursor of HIV-1 did not form a dimer during its processing. Therefore, dimer formation seems to be a specific property of HIV-2 and SIV envelope gene expression. Such transient dimerization of the glycoprotein precursor might be required for its efficient transport to the Golgi apparatus and for its processing

  9. Primary care monitoring of patients under oral anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnelo, Pedro; Alexandra, Denise; Matias, Sara

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of new oral anticoagulants that do not require regular laboratory control but are significantly more expensive, there has been renewed interest in the quality of the classic agents and the monitoring of patients taking them. We set out to analyze time in therapeutic range of patients under oral anticoagulation monitored in our health unit, to determine whether primary care monitoring is comparable to that in anticoagulation clinics. At the same time, we aimed to ascertain whether there was any association between the dosing method (unit protocol vs. computer-assisted) and the time in therapeutic range achieved.Methods We analyzed all INR values determined in our health unit during the first six months of 2012, using Excel 2007 and SPSS version 17.0, and applying the Student's t test for a level of significance of 0.05. All INR assessments during the first six months of 2012 were recorded, a total of 320 tests; mean patient age was 69.9±11.25 years, 63% male. Dose adjustments were made according to the unit protocol in 77% of cases. Atrial fibrillation was the most prevalent indication. Most values (65.3%) were within the target therapeutic range; 24.1% were subtherapeutic and 10.6% supratherapeutic. Computer-assisted dosing achieved better control than the protocol (72.5% vs. 62.9%), without statistical significance. Primary care monitoring of oral anticoagulation appears to be comparable to that in anticoagulation clinics, while affording better access and cost reductions. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Adverse effects of anticoagulation treatment: clinically significant upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skok

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the last years, the use of oral anticoagulant treatment has increased dramatically, principally for the prevention of venous thrombosis and thrombembolic events. This treatment is demanding, especially among the elderly with concommitant diseases and different medication. Aim of the study to evaluate the rate of serious complications, clinically significant hemorrhage from upper gastointestinal tract in patients treated with oral antiocoagulants in a prospective cohort study.Patients and methods: Included were patients admitted to our institution between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2003 due to gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Emergency endoscopy and laboratory testing was performed in all patients.Results: 6416 patients were investigated: 2452 women (38.2 % and 3964 men (61.8 %, mean age 59.1 years, SD 17.2. Among our patients, 55 % were aged over 60 years. In 86.4 % of patients the source of bleeding was confirmed in the upper gastrointestinal tract. In the last week prior to bleeding, 20.4 % (1309/6416 of all patients were regularly taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anticoagulant therapy or antiplatelet agents in single daily doses at least. 6.3 % of patients (82/1309 with abundant hemorrhage from upper gastrointestinal tract were using oral anticoagulant therapy and had INR > 5 at admission, 25.6 % of them had INR > 10. The mortality of patients using oral anticoagulants and INR > 5 was 17.1 %.Conclusions: Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a serious complication of different medications, particularly in elderly patients. Safe use of anticoagulant therapy is based on careful selection of patients and correct intake of the prescribed drugs.

  11. THE ANTICOAGULANT AND ANTILYMPHOMA PROPERTIES OF ARSENIC AZOPROTEINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, J. D.; Kidd, John G.

    1964-01-01

    Experiments given in this paper have shown that 4-arsonophenylazoproteins possess marked anticoagulant activity both in vivo and in vitro. Mice and rabbits given moderate amounts of the arsenic azoprotein, for example, often bled to death from injuries that proved trivial in control animals, and their blood remained liquid during many hours' postmortem even when left in contact with transected tissues, fibrinolysis having no part in the outcome. So, too, the addition of minute amounts of 4-arsonophenylazoprotein to plasma procured from citrated rabbit or human blood greatly prolonged the time required for clotting after recalcification. Other arsenic-containing compounds,—for example, those in which arsenic See PDF for Structure was joined to amino acids or peptides through the azo linkage, or to proteins through couplings other than the azo linkage,—were largely devoid of anticoagulant and antilymphoma effects. The findings as a whole show clearly that the structural requirements for anticoagulant and antilymphoma effects are: (a) possession of negatively charged arsonic or arsinoso groups, (b) large molecular size (protein), and (c) linkage of arsenic-containing groups to protein through the azo bond. Two acidic azoproteins that were devoid of arsenic,—namely 4-carboxyphenylazoprotein and 4-sulfonophenylazoprotein,—were also found to have marked anticoagulant effects in vitro, but they had no inhibitory action against cells of Lymphoma 6C3HED in vivo, even when they were given to mice in maximum tolerated amounts. The essential part played by arsenic in the antilymphoma activity of arsenic azoproteins was further emphasized by the action of dimercaprol (BAL) in preventing the antilymphoma effects of 4-arsonophenylazoprotein on Lymphoma 6C3HED cells in vivo. In an associated paper the anticoagulant and antilymphoma effects of 4-arsonophenylazoproteins are studied further, and consideration is given to the ways in which these effects may be brought about

  12. Human Milk Glycoproteins Protect Infants Against Human Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Breastfeeding protects the neonate against pathogen infection. Major mechanisms of protection include human milk glycoconjugates functioning as soluble receptor mimetics that inhibit pathogen binding to the mucosal cell surface, prebiotic stimulation of gut colonization by favorable microbiota, immunomodulation, and as a substrate for bacterial fermentation products in the gut. Human milk proteins are predominantly glycosylated, and some biological functions of these human milk glycoproteins (HMGPs) have been reported. HMGPs range in size from 14 kDa to 2,000 kDa and include mucins, secretory immunoglobulin A, bile salt-stimulated lipase, lactoferrin, butyrophilin, lactadherin, leptin, and adiponectin. This review summarizes known biological roles of HMGPs that may contribute to the ability of human milk to protect neonates from disease. PMID:23697737

  13. Characterization of the Outer Domain of the gp120 Glycoprotein from Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinzhen; Tomov, Vesko; Kurteva, Svetla; Wang, Liping; Ren, Xinping; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Sodroski, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    The core of the gp120 glycoprotein from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is comprised of three major structural domains: the outer domain, the inner domain, and the bridging sheet. The outer domain is exposed on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer and contains binding surfaces for neutralizing antibodies such as 2G12, immunoglobulin G1b12, and anti-V3 antibodies. We expressed the outer domain of HIV-1YU2 gp120 as an independent protein, termed OD1. OD1 efficiently bound 2G12 and a large number of anti-V3 antibodies, indicating its structural integrity. Immunochemical studies with OD1 indicated that antibody responses against the outer domain of the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein are rare in HIV-1-infected human sera that potently neutralize the virus. Surprisingly, such outer-domain-directed antibody responses are commonly elicited by immunization with recombinant monomeric gp120. Immunization with soluble, stabilized HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimers elicited antibody responses that more closely resembled those in the sera of HIV-1-infected individuals. These results underscore the qualitatively different humoral immune responses elicited during natural infection and after gp120 vaccination and help to explain the failure of gp120 as an effective vaccine. PMID:15542649

  14. Structure of a trimeric variant of the Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backovic, Marija [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Longnecker, Richard [Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Jardetzky, Theodore S [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2009-03-16

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a herpesvirus that is associated with development of malignancies of lymphoid tissue. EBV infections are life-long and occur in >90% of the population. Herpesviruses enter host cells in a process that involves fusion of viral and cellular membranes. The fusion apparatus is comprised of envelope glycoprotein B (gB) and a heterodimeric complex made of glycoproteins H and L. Glycoprotein B is the most conserved envelope glycoprotein in human herpesviruses, and the structure of gB from Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is available. Here, we report the crystal structure of the secreted EBV gB ectodomain, which forms 16-nm long spike-like trimers, structurally homologous to the postfusion trimers of the fusion protein G of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Comparative structural analyses of EBV gB and VSV G, which has been solved in its pre and postfusion states, shed light on gB residues that may be involved in conformational changes and membrane fusion. Also, the EBV gB structure reveals that, despite the high sequence conservation of gB in herpesviruses, the relative orientations of individual domains, the surface charge distributions, and the structural details of EBV gB differ from the HSV-1 protein, indicating regions and residues that may have important roles in virus-specific entry.

  15. Splice variation in the cytoplasmic domains of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein affects its cellular localisation and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Louise H; Traherne, James A; Plotnek, Gemma; Ward, Rosemary; Trowsdale, John

    2007-09-01

    Although myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein is a candidate autoantigen in multiple sclerosis, its function remains unknown. In humans, mRNA expressed by the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein gene is alternatively spliced resulting in at least nine unique protein isoforms. In this study, we investigated the sub-cellular localisation and membrane trafficking of six isoforms by cloning them into mammalian expression vectors. Confocal microscopy revealed that these protein products are expressed in different cellular compartments. While two full-length isoforms (25.6 and 25.1) are expressed at the cell surface, three alternatively spliced forms (22.7, 21.0 and 20.5) have a more intracellular distribution, localising to the endoplasmic reticulum and/or endosomes. Isoform 16.3, which lacks a transmembrane domain, is secreted. A switch in the sub-cellular localisation of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein may have profound effects on receptor:ligand interactions and consequently the function of the protein. The structural features of the alternative isoforms and their differential, sub-cellular expression patterns could dictate the exposure of major immunogenic determinants within the central nervous system. Our findings highlight myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein splicing as a factor that could be critical to the phenotypic expression of multiple sclerosis.

  16. Oral Anticoagulant Use After Bariatric Surgery: A Literature Review and Clinical Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Karlyn A; Lee, Craig R; Farrell, Timothy M; Moll, Stephan

    2017-05-01

    Bariatric surgery may alter the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or elimination (disposition) of orally administered drugs via changes to the gastrointestinal tract anatomy, body weight, and adipose tissue composition. As some patients who have undergone bariatric surgery will need therapeutic anticoagulation for various indications, appropriate knowledge is needed regarding anticoagulant drug disposition and resulting efficacy and safety in this population. We review general considerations about oral drug disposition in patients after bariatric surgery, as well as existing literature on oral anticoagulation after bariatric surgery. Overall, available evidence on therapeutic anticoagulation is very limited, and individual drug studies are necessary to learn how to safely and effectively use the direct oral anticoagulants. Given the sparsity of currently available data, it appears most prudent to use warfarin with international normalized ratio monitoring, and not direct oral anticoagulants, when full-dose anticoagulation is needed after bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Analgesic effects of glycoproteins from Panax ginseng root in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Yinghong; Xu, Hong; Luo, Haoming; Jiang, Ruizhi

    2013-07-30

    The root of Panax ginseng C.A. Mey has various beneficial pharmacological effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the analgesic activities of glycoproteins from the root of Panax ginseng C.A. Mey in mice. Glycoproteins were isolated and purified from the root of Panax ginseng C.A. Mey. Physicochemical properties and molecular mass were determined by chemical assay and HPLC. Acetic acid-induced writhing and hot-plate tests were employed to study the analgesic effect of glycoproteins and compared with that of aspirin or morphine. The locomotor activity was tested in mice by using actophometer. Four glycoproteins were obtained. The glycoproteins which protein content was the highest (73.04%) displayed dose-dependent analgesic effect. In writhing test, the glycoproteins significantly inhibited writhes (Pginseng C.A. Mey exhibited significant analgesic activities and the proteins were the active site, providing evidence for its pharmacal use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Chemical and Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of Glycoproteins for Deciphering Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lai-Xi; Amin, Mohammed N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Glycoproteins are an important class of biomolecules involved in a number of biological recognition processes. However, natural and recombinant glycoproteins are usually produced as mixtures of glycoforms that differ in the structures of the pendent glycans, which are difficult to separate in pure glycoforms. As a result, synthetic homogeneous glycopeptides and glycoproteins have become indispensable probes for detailed structural and functional studies. A number of elegant chemical and biological strategies have been developed for synthetic construction of tailor-made, full-size glycoproteins to address specific biological problems. In this review, we highlight recent advances in chemical and chemoenzymatic synthesis of homogeneous glycoproteins. Selected examples are given to demonstrate the applications of tailor-made, glycan-defined glycoproteins for deciphering glycosylation functions. PMID:24439206

  19. Antiplatelet and anticoagulation for patients with prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massel, David R; Little, Stephen H

    2013-07-09

    Patients with prosthetic heart valves are at increased risk for valve thrombosis and arterial thromboembolism. Oral anticoagulation alone, or the addition of antiplatelet drugs, has been used to minimise this risk. An important issue is the effectiveness and safety of the latter strategy. This is an update of our previous review; the goal was to create a valid synthesis of all available, methodologically sound data to further assess the safety and efficacy of combined oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy versus oral anticoagulant monotherapy in patients with prosthetic heart valves. We updated the previous searches from 2003 and 2010 on 16 January 2013 and searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) on The Cochrane Library (2012, Issue 12), MEDLINE (OVID, 1946 to January Week 1 2013), and EMBASE (OVID, 1980 to 2013 Week 02). We have also looked at reference lists of individual reports, review articles, meta-analyses, and consensus statements. We included reports published in any language or in abstract form. All reports of randomised controlled trials comparing standard-dose oral anticoagulation to standard-dose oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy in patients with one or more prosthetic heart valves. Two review authors independently performed the search strategy, assessed trials for inclusion and study quality, and extracted data. We collected adverse effects information from the trials. One new study has been identified and included in this update. In total, 13 studies involving 4122 participants were included in this review update. Years of publication ranged from 1971 to 2011. Compared with anticoagulation alone, the addition of an antiplatelet agent reduced the risk of thromboembolic events (odds ratio (OR) 0.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.32 to 0.59; P heart valves. The risk of major bleeding is increased with antiplatelet therapy. These results apply to patients with mechanical prosthetic valves or those with

  20. Expression and cellular trafficking of GP82 and GP90 glycoproteins during Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer-Santos, Ethel; Cunha-e-Silva, Narcisa Leal; Yoshida, Nobuko; Franco da Silveira, Jos?

    2013-01-01

    Background: the transformation of noninfective epimastigotes into infective metacyclic trypomastigotes (metacyclogenesis) is a fundamental step in the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, comprising several morphological and biochemical changes. GP82 and GP90 are glycoproteins expressed at the surface of metacyclic trypomastigote, with opposite roles in mammalian cell invasion. GP82 is an adhesin that promotes cell invasion, while GP90 acts as a negative regulator of parasite internalization. Our...

  1. Mechanism of Binding to Ebola Virus Glycoprotein by the ZMapp, ZMAb, and MB-003 Cocktail Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Edgar; Bryan, Christopher; Fong, Rachel H.; Barnes, Trevor; Pfaff, Jennifer M.; Mabila, Manu; Rucker, Joseph B.; Doranz, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    Cocktails of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that target the surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus (EBOV) are effective in nonhuman primate models and have been used under emergency compassionate-treatment protocols in human patients. However, the amino acids that form the detailed binding epitopes for the MAbs in the ZMapp, ZMAb, and the related MB-003 cocktails have yet to be identified. Other binding properties that define how each MAb functionally interacts with GP—such as affinity, epito...

  2. Oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoo, Keitaro; Lane, Deirdre A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2014-09-01

    The availability of 4 non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs), that is, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, has changed the landscape of stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. This review article provides an overview of the 4 phase III studies that have compared these NOACs, examining major outcomes of efficacy and safety. A range of practical questions relating to the NOACs have emerged, including topics such as patient selection, treating patients with renal impairment, treating elderly patients, and combining anticoagulant therapy with antiplatelet drugs. We also address the interaction of various patient characteristics with the treatments and suggest the features can assist the physician in the choice of a particular NOAC for a particular patient(s). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Recent developments in the use of oral anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    For many years, vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparins, low-molecular-weight heparins and a pentasaccharide were the only anticoagulant drugs available for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after surgery. However, their benefits were associated with disadvantages, such as their sub......For many years, vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparins, low-molecular-weight heparins and a pentasaccharide were the only anticoagulant drugs available for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after surgery. However, their benefits were associated with disadvantages......, such as their subcutaneous route of administration or the need for coagulation monitoring. Research was challenged to develop new drugs that would simplify thromboprophylaxis while showing equivalent or better efficacy. Rivaroxaban and dabigatran are now available in some countries for the prevention of venous...

  4. Direct Oral Anticoagulants: An Overview for the Interventional Radiologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Pradesh, E-mail: pradeshkumar@doctors.org.uk; Ravi, Rajeev, E-mail: rajeev.ravi@aintree.nhs.uk; Sundar, Gaurav, E-mail: gaurav.sundar@aintree.nhs.uk [Aintree University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Shiach, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.shiach@aintree.nhs.uk [Aintree University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Haematology Department (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have emerged as a good alternative for the treatment of thromboembolic diseases, and their use in clinical practice is increasing rapidly. The DOACs act by blocking the activity of one single step in the coagulation cascade. These drugs act downstream in the common pathway of the coagulation cascade by directly antagonising the action of thrombin or factor Xa. The development of DOACs represents a paradigm shift from the oral vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin. This article aims to describe the properties of the currently available DOACs including pharmacology and dosing. We also address the strategies for periprocedural management and reversal of anticoagulation of patients treated with these agents.

  5. Anticoagulant activity of Moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) tentacle extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Akriti; Biswas, Sumit; Sarkar, Angshuman; Chakrabarty, Dibakar

    2012-10-01

    Moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) tentacle extract was studied for its anticoagulant activity in vitro. The Jellyfish Tentacle Extract (JFTE) showed very strong fibrinogenolytic activity by cleaving Aα and Bβ chain of fibrinogen molecule. The fibrinogenolytic activity was found to be stronger than some snake venom derived anticoagulants. JFTE also completely liquefied fibrin clots in 24 h. JFTE was found to contain both high and low molecular weight proteins/peptides. The fibrinogenolysis appears to be caused by high molecular weight fractions of the extract. It has been also noted that PMSF significantly reduced fibrinogenolytic activity and heating totally abolished it. Autolytic degradation of the high molecular weight protein was also noted. Autolysis slowed down, but did not abolish the fibrinogenolytic activity of the extract. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy in two centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Hanna; Grove, E; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard

    Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy in two centers: 11.000 patient-years of follow-up H Nilsson1,2,3, EL Grove2, TB Larsen3, M Maegaard1, TD Christensen1 1Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery & Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus; 2Department...... of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus; 3Department of Cardiology, Aalborg Hospital & Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark haana_86@hotmail.com Objectives: Patient-self-management (PSM) of oral anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists have...... clinical practice. Materials and methods: A case-series study including all patients who had passed an exam in PSM in the period 1995-2012 at Aarhus University Hospital or Aalborg University Hospital, including 2200 patients and 11000 patient-years in total. The effectiveness was measured using...

  7. Net clinical benefit of combination anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy versus anticoagulation alone in atrial fibrillation patients: Results from the amadeus trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lane, Deirdre; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Minini, Pascal; De Peuter, Olaf R.; Buller, Harry R.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: To compare the effect of combination anticoagulant and antiplatelet (AP) therapy with anticoagulation alone on stroke and bleeding risk in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients and examine predictors of clinically relevant bleeding. Methods: Post-hoc analysis of 4576 AF patients [mean (SD)

  8. Conservatively managed pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werder, Gabriel M.; Razdan, Rahul S.; Gagliardi, Joseph A.; Chaddha, Shashi K.B.

    2008-01-01

    We present a case of pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated and hypertensive 56-year-old Hispanic male. At presentation, the patient's international normalized ratio (INR) was 10.51 and his blood pressure was 200/130 mmHg. His presenting symptoms included acute onset of headache, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, vertigo, and visual disturbance. Neuroimaging demonstrated hemorrhage into a morphologically normal pineal gland. Under conservative management, the patient experienced gradual resolution of all symptoms excluding the disturbance of upward gaze

  9. Patients' preferences in anticoagulant therapy: discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafzadeh, Mehdi; Gagne, Joshua J; Choudhry, Niteesh K; Polinski, Jennifer M; Avorn, Jerry; Schneeweiss, Sebastian S

    2014-11-01

    With proliferating treatment options for anticoagulant therapy, physicians and patients must choose among them based on their benefits and risks. Using a Discrete Choice Experiment, we elicited patients' relative preferences for specific benefits and risks of anticoagulant therapy. We selected a sample of US patients with cardiovascular disease from an online panel and elicited their preferences for benefits and risks of anticoagulant therapy: nonfatal stroke, nonfatal myocardial infarction, cardiovascular death, minor bleeding, major bleeding, bleeding death, and need for monitoring. These attributes were used to design scenarios describing hypothetical treatments that were labeled as new drug, old drug, or no drug. Latent class analysis was used to identify groups of patients with similar preferences. A total of 341 patients completed all Discrete Choice Experiment questions. On average, patients valued a 1% increased risk of a fatal bleeding event the same as a 2% increase in nonfatal myocardial infarction, a 3% increase in nonfatal stroke, a 3% increase in cardiovascular death, a 6% increase in major bleeding, and a 16% increase in minor bleeding. The odds of choosing no drug or old drug versus new drug were 0.72 (95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.84) and 0.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.81-0.93), respectively. Previous stroke or myocardial infarction was associated with membership in the class with larger negative preferences for these outcomes. Patients' preferences for various outcomes of anticoagulant therapy vary and depend on their previous experiences with myocardial infarction or stroke. Incorporating these preferences into benefit risk calculation and treatment decisions can enhance patient-centered care. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. In-vitro anticoagulant activity of fucoidan derivatives from brown seaweed Laminaria japonica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Quanbin; Zhang, Zhongshan; Hou, Yun; Zhang, Hong

    2011-05-01

    Fucoidan, a group of sulfated heteropolysaccharides, was extracted from Laminaria japonica, an important economic alga species in China. The anticoagulant activity of fucoidan and its derivatives (including sulfated, phosphorylated, and aminated fucoidan) was examined using in-vitro anticoagulant systems. The correlation between chemical variations within the fucoidan group and anticoagulant activity was determined. The in-vitro anticoagulant properties of fucoidan and its derivatives were determined by measuring activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), and thrombin time (TT). The results indicate anticoagulant activity in all samples using APTT and TT assays; however, only the fucoidan derivatives affected the PT assay. Thus, the fucoidan derivatives were able to inhibit both intrinsic and extrinsic blood coagulants. Fucoidan (FPS) and its derivatives presented better anticoagulant activity than low molecular weight fucoidan (DFPS) and its derivatives, suggesting that molecular weight and proper conformation are contributing factors for anticoagulant activity of polysaccharides. Amino groups have a positive charge and can thus change the charge density of fucoidan. Accordingly, among the tested samples, aminated fucoidan (NF) was the most active reflecting the importance of charge density for anticoagulant activity. Available data obtained using in-vitro models suggest that the sulfate content, sulfate/total-sugar ratio, molecular weight, and the substituted group of fucoidan are important factors for anticoagulant activity but that the influence of sulfate, phosphate and amino groups on anticoagulant activity was different.

  11. Synthesis of Structures Related to Antifreeze Glycoproteins

    OpenAIRE

    Fyrner, Timmy

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, synthesis of structures related to antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) are presented. Synthetic routes to a protected carbohydrate derivative, 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-benzyl-β-galactopyranosyl-(1→3)-2-deoxy-2-azido-4,6-di-O-benzyl-β-D-thio-1-galactopyranoside, and a tBu-Ala-Thr-Ala-Fmoc tripeptide, are described. These compounds are meant to be used in the assembly of AFGPs and analogues thereof. A Gal-GlcN disaccharide was synthesized via glycosylation between the donor, bromo-2-O-benzo...

  12. Glycoprotein component of plant cell walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.B.; Chen, J.A.; Varner, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The primary wall surrounding most dicotyledonous plant cells contains a hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) component named extensin. A small group of glycopeptides solubilized from isolated cell walls by proteolysis contained a repeated pentapeptide glycosylated by tri- and tetraarabinosides linked to hydroxyproline and, by galactose, linked to serine. Recently, two complementary approaches to this problem have provided results which greatly increase the understanding of wall extensin. In this paper the authors describe what is known about the structure of soluble extensin secreted into the walls of the carrot root cells

  13. The Purification of a Blood Group A Glycoprotein: An Affinity Chromatography Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelrich, J.; Pouplana, R.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a purification process through affinity chromatography necessary to obtain specific blood group glycoproteins from erythrocytic membranes. Discusses the preparation of erythrocytic membranes, extraction of glycoprotein from membranes, affinity chromatography purification, determination of glycoproteins, and results. (CW)

  14. A single amino acid substitution in the transmembrane envelope glycoprotein of feline immunodeficiency virus alters cellular tropism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Vahlenkamp, T.W.; Verschoor, E.J.; Schuurman, N.M.P.; Vliet, A.L.W. van; Egberink, H.F.; Ronde, A. de

    1997-01-01

    The cellular tropism of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is affected by changes in variable region 3 (V3) of the surface (SU) envelope glycoprotein (Verschoor, E. J., et al., J. Virol. 69:4752- 4757, 1995). By using high-dose DNA transfection, an FIV molecular clone with a non-CRFK-tropic V3

  15. New Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC and Their Use Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Schwarb

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ideal anticoagulant is oral, has a wide therapeutic range, predictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, a rapid onset of action, an available antidote, minimal side effects and minimal interactions with other drugs or food. With the development of the novel direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC, we now have an alternative to the traditional vitamin K antagonists (VKA for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis. DOACs have limited monitoring requirements and very predictable pharmacokinetic profiles. They were shown to be non-inferior or superior to VKA in the prophylaxis or treatment of thromboembolic events. Particularly in terms of safety they were associated with less major bleeding, including intracranial bleeding, thus providing a superior benefit for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. Despite these advantages, there are remaining limitations with DOACs: their dependence on renal and hepatic function for clearance and the lack of an approved reversal agent, whereas such antidotes are successively being made available. DOACs do not need regular monitoring to assess the treatment effect but, on the other hand, they interact with other drugs and interfere with functional coagulation assays. From a practical point of view, the properties of oral administration, simple dosing without monitoring, a short half-life allowing for the possibility of uncomplicated switching or bridging, and proven safety overwhelm the disadvantages, making them an attractive option for short- or long-term anticoagulation.

  16. Spontaneous pharyngo-laryngeal hematoma and anticoagulation. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleny CASASOLA-GIRÓN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objective: Spontaneous pharyngeal-laryngeal hematoma shows the importance of a complete ENT examination in the face of symptoms of banal appearance and a correct history that, in the case reported, unveiled the therapeutic use of anticoagulants. Case description: A 55 year old woman comes to emergency because of unexplained dysphagia. The inspection shows the presence of a hematoma in the pharyngeal-laryngeal region that, after the anticoagulant therapy was reversed, evolved favorably with conservative treatment. Discussion: In this case, apart from medical management performed by the hematology department, we focus our therapeutic approach in the protection of the airway and the prevention of a possible massive bleeding. Determining which patients require endotracheal intubation or tracheostomy and hemostatic surgery is the key to treatment. Conclusions: The anticoagulant therapy involves several complications that ENT specialists must consider in the face of clinical symptoms of dysphagia, dysphonia, dyspnea or signs of bleeding and they must know the possibilities of performance depending on the severity of each case.

  17. Anticoagulant and antimicrobial finishing of non-woven polypropylene textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degoutin, S; Jimenez, M; Casetta, M; Bellayer, S; Chai, F; Blanchemain, N; Neut, C; Kacem, I; Traisnel, M; Martel, B

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this work is to prepare non-woven polypropylene (PP) textile functionalized with bioactive molecules in order to improve its anticoagulation and antibacterial properties. This paper describes the optimization of the grafting process of acrylic acid (AA) on low-pressure cold-plasma pre-activated PP, the characterization of the modified substrates and the effect of these modifications on the in vitro biological response towards cells. Then, the immobilization of gentamicin (aminoglycoside antibiotic) and heparin (anticoagulation agent) has been carried out on the grafted samples by either ionic interactions or covalent linkages. Their bioactivity has been investigated and related to the nature of their interactions with the substrate. For gentamicin-immobilized AA-grafted samples, an inhibition radius and a reduction of 99% of the adhesion of Escherichia coli have been observed when gentamicin was linked by ionic interactions, allowing the release of the antibiotic. By contrast, for heparin-immobilized AA-grafted PP samples, a strong increase of the anticoagulant effect up to 35 min has been highlighted when heparin was covalently bonded on the substrate, by contact with the blood drop.

  18. [Oral anticoagulants and medicinal plants. An emerging interaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argento, A; Tiraferri, E; Marzaloni, M

    2000-01-01

    The consumption of herbal medicines is increasing steadily throughout the world, although to our knowledge there are neither studies on their effectiveness nor controls over the quality and safety of these preparations. Considered "food integrators", these preparations are marketed without restriction. It is a common notion that natural therapy has neither side nor toxic effects: allergic reactions, direct toxic effects or those due to contamination, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and heavy metal toxicity have been reported as adverse events caused by herbs. Rather than replacing traditional therapy, most herbal medical treatment is used in conjunction with it. Also, the attending physician is generally not informed that the patient is using herbs. Because Passionflower, hydroalcoholic extracts, Juniper and Verbena officinalis supply variable quantities of vitamin K, they can lessen the effect of oral anticoagulant therapy. Ganoderma Japonicum, Papaw, Salvia miltiorrhiza, Ginseng, Devil's claw, Garlic, Quinine, Ginkgo, Ginger, Red Clover and Horse-Chestnut reinforce warfarin action by heterogeneous mechanisms. They should thus not be used in patients on oral anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet therapy. The scientific community must take into account the adverse events caused by interaction between herbal medicine and conventional therapy, and patients must be informed of the dangers of these preparations. If a bleeding event occurs or the quality of anticoagulant therapy is poor, the clinician should consider the possibility of interaction between conventional therapy and herbal medicine that the patient has neglected to mention he is taking.

  19. Exploring potential anticoagulant drug formulations using thrombin generation test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Zavyalova

    2016-03-01

    The thrombin generation test was used to assess the whole coagulation cascade in normal and factor-deficient human blood plasma. Potential therapeutic windows were estimated for coagulation factors, ranking them as targets for anticoagulant drugs. Thrombin and factor Xa have been revealed as the most promising targets, which fully agrees with the current drug development strategy. Inhibitors of factors Va and VIIa are expected to have narrow therapeutic windows. Inhibitors of factors VIIIa and IXa are expected to have a moderate anticoagulant effect. Factors XI and XII are poor targets for anticoagulant drugs. Compared with plasma that is deficient in factor II, the thrombin inhibitors bivalirudin and aptamer HD1 had increased activity. Both inhibitors were tested in deficient plasma providing a model of potential drug combination. The most promising combinations were anti-thrombin with anti-V/Va and also anti-thrombin with anti-IX/IXa. Each combination had an incremental dose-effect dependence that is promising from the standpoint of the therapeutic window.

  20. Electroconvulsive therapy and anticoagulation after pulmonary embolism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Lazaro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is considered the most effective treatment for catatonia regardless its underlying condition. The rigid fixed posture and immobility observed in catatonia may lead to several clinical complications, of which, pulmonary embolism (PE is one of the most severe. The rapid improvement of the psychiatric condition in catatonia-related PE is essential, since immobility favors the occurrence of new thromboembolic events and further complications. In that scenario, ECT should be considered, based on a risk-benefit analysis, aiming at the faster resolution of the catatonia. Methods Case report and literature review. Results A 66-years-old woman admitted to the psychiatric ward with catatonia due to a depressive episode presented bilateral PE. Clinically stable, but still severely depressed after a trial of antidepressants, she was treated with ECT in the course of full anticoagulation with enoxaparin. After five ECT sessions, her mood was significantly better and she was walking and eating spontaneously. She did not present complications related either to PE or to anticoagulation. After the eighth ECT session, she evolved with hypomania, which was managed with oral medication adjustments. The patient was completely euthymic at discharge. Conclusion The case we presented provides further evidence to the anecdotal case reports on the safety of ECT in the course of concomitant full anticoagulant therapy after PE, and illustrates how, with the proper precautions, the benefits of ECT in such condition might outweigh its risks.

  1. Personalized prophylactic anticoagulation decision analysis in patients with membranous nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taewoo; Biddle, Andrea K.; Lionaki, Sofia; Derebail, Vimal K.; Barbour, Sean J.; Tannous, Sameer; Hladunewich, Michelle A.; Hu, Yichun; Poulton, Caroline J.; Mahoney, Shannon L.; Jennette, J. Charles; Hogan, Susan L.; Falk, Ronald J.; Cattran, Daniel C.; Reich, Heather N.; Nachman, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    Primary membranous nephropathy is associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolic events, which are inversely correlated with serum albumin levels. To evaluate the potential benefit of prophylactic anticoagulation (venous thromboembolic events prevented) relative to the risk (major bleeds), we constructed a Markov decision model. The venous thromboembolic event risk according to serum albumin was obtained from an inception cohort of 898 patients with primary membranous nephropathy. Risk estimates of hemorrhage were obtained from a systematic literature review. Benefit-to-risk ratios were predicted according to bleeding risk and serum albumin. This ratio increased with worsening hypoalbuminemia from 4.5:1 for an albumin under 3 g/dl to 13.1:1 for an albumin under 2 g/dl in patients at low bleeding risk. Patients at intermediate bleeding risk with an albumin under 2 g/dl have a moderately favorable benefit-to-risk ratio (under 5:1). Patients at high bleeding risk are unlikely to benefit from prophylactic anticoagulation regardless of albuminemia. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis, to account for uncertainty in risk estimates, confirmed these trends. From these data, we constructed a tool to estimate the likelihood of benefit based on an individual’s bleeding risk profile, serum albumin level, and acceptable benefit-to-risk ratio (http://www.gntools.com). This tool provides an approach to the decision of prophylactic anticoagulation personalized to the individual’s needs and adaptable to dynamic changes in health status and risk profile. PMID:24336031

  2. Selection of an aptamer antidote to the anticoagulant drug bivalirudin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Martin

    Full Text Available Adverse drug reactions, including severe patient bleeding, may occur following the administration of anticoagulant drugs. Bivalirudin is a synthetic anticoagulant drug sometimes employed as a substitute for heparin, a commonly used anticoagulant that can cause a condition called heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT. Although bivalrudin has the advantage of not causing HIT, a major concern is lack of an antidote for this drug. In contrast, medical professionals can quickly reverse the effects of heparin using protamine. This report details the selection of an aptamer to bivalirudin that functions as an antidote in buffer. This was accomplished by immobilizing the drug on a monolithic column to partition binding sequences from nonbinding sequences using a low-pressure chromatography system and salt gradient elution. The elution profile of binding sequences was compared to that of a blank column (no drug, and fractions with a chromatographic difference were analyzed via real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction and used for further selection. Sequences were identified by 454 sequencing and demonstrated low micromolar dissociation constants through fluorescence anisotropy after only two rounds of selection. One aptamer, JPB5, displayed a dose-dependent reduction of the clotting time in buffer, with a 20 µM aptamer achieving a nearly complete antidote effect. This work is expected to result in a superior safety profile for bivalirudin, resulting in enhanced patient care.

  3. Optimal Anticoagulation for Pregnant Women with Mechanical Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Rohan; Silversides, Candice K; McLintock, Claire

    2016-10-01

    The prothrombotic state of pregnancy increases the risk of thromboembolic complications and death in women with mechanical heart valves (MHVs). Although it is accepted that these women must be on therapeutic anticoagulation throughout pregnancy, competing maternal and fetal risks, as well as the lack of high-quality data from prospective studies, make the choice of the optimal method of anticoagulation challenging. Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) are associated with fewer maternal complications, but conversely also the lowest live birth rates as well as warfarin-related embryopathy and fetopathy. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) does not cross the placenta and is associated with fewer fetal risks but more maternal complications. Sequential treatment involving VKAs in the second and third trimesters and either low-molecular-weight or unfractionated heparin in the first trimester, although appealing is still associated with maternal complications, especially around the time of bridging. As absolute equipoise of maternal versus fetal wellbeing is unlikely, patient preferences should be considered in decision making. A multidisciplinary team including hematologists, cardiologists, obstetric physicians, and high-risk obstetricians with expertise in the management of pregnant women with cardiac disease is required to optimize outcomes. Prospective studies are needed to determine the anticoagulant regimen for women with MHVs that provides optimal and acceptable maternal and fetal outcomes. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Anticoagulant and antimicrobial finishing of non-woven polypropylene textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degoutin, S; Jimenez, M; Casetta, M; Bellayer, S; Chai, F; Blanchemain, N; Neut, C; Kacem, I; Traisnel, M; Martel, B

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to prepare non-woven polypropylene (PP) textile functionalized with bioactive molecules in order to improve its anticoagulation and antibacterial properties. This paper describes the optimization of the grafting process of acrylic acid (AA) on low-pressure cold-plasma pre-activated PP, the characterization of the modified substrates and the effect of these modifications on the in vitro biological response towards cells. Then, the immobilization of gentamicin (aminoglycoside antibiotic) and heparin (anticoagulation agent) has been carried out on the grafted samples by either ionic interactions or covalent linkages. Their bioactivity has been investigated and related to the nature of their interactions with the substrate. For gentamicin-immobilized AA-grafted samples, an inhibition radius and a reduction of 99% of the adhesion of Escherichia coli have been observed when gentamicin was linked by ionic interactions, allowing the release of the antibiotic. By contrast, for heparin-immobilized AA-grafted PP samples, a strong increase of the anticoagulant effect up to 35 min has been highlighted when heparin was covalently bonded on the substrate, by contact with the blood drop. (paper)

  5. Structure of an HIV gp120 envelope glycoprotein in complex with the CD4 receptor and a neutralizing human antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Kwong, Peter D.; Wyatt, Richard; Robinson, James; Sweet, Raymond W.; Sodroski, Joseph; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    1998-01-01

    The entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) into cells requires the sequential interaction of the viral exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, with the CD4 glycoprotein and a chemokine receptor on the cell surface. These interactions initiate a fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. Although gpl20 can elicit virus-neutralizing antibodies, HIV eludes the immune system. We have solved the X-ray crystal structure at 2.5 Å resolution of an HIV-1 gp120 core complexed with a two-domain fra...

  6. Effects of L-arginine immobilization on the anticoagulant activity and hemolytic property of polyethylene terephthalate films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yun; Yang Yun; Wu Feng

    2010-01-01

    Surface modification of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films was performed with L-arginine (L-Arg) to gain an improved anticoagulant surface. The surface chemistry changes of modified films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The in vitro anticoagulant activities of the surface-modified PET films were evaluated by blood clotting test, hemolytic test, and the measurement of clotting time including plasma recalcification time (PRT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and prothrombin time (PT). The data of blood coagulation index (BCI) for L-arginine modified PET films (PET-Arg) was larger than that for PET at the same blood-sample contact time. The hemolysis ratio for PET-Arg was less than that for PET and within the accepted standard for biomaterials. The PRT and APTT for PET-Arg were significantly prolonged by 189 s and 25 s, respectively, compared to those for the unmodified PET. All results suggested that the currently described modification method could be a possible candidate to create antithrombogenic PET surfaces which would be useful for further medical applications.

  7. Effects of L-arginine immobilization on the anticoagulant activity and hemolytic property of polyethylene terephthalate films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yun, E-mail: liuy@tgrc.org [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Yang Yun [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wu Feng [Research Centre of Blood, College of Medicine, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710065 (China)

    2010-04-01

    Surface modification of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films was performed with L-arginine (L-Arg) to gain an improved anticoagulant surface. The surface chemistry changes of modified films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The in vitro anticoagulant activities of the surface-modified PET films were evaluated by blood clotting test, hemolytic test, and the measurement of clotting time including plasma recalcification time (PRT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and prothrombin time (PT). The data of blood coagulation index (BCI) for L-arginine modified PET films (PET-Arg) was larger than that for PET at the same blood-sample contact time. The hemolysis ratio for PET-Arg was less than that for PET and within the accepted standard for biomaterials. The PRT and APTT for PET-Arg were significantly prolonged by 189 s and 25 s, respectively, compared to those for the unmodified PET. All results suggested that the currently described modification method could be a possible candidate to create antithrombogenic PET surfaces which would be useful for further medical applications.

  8. Underuse of Anticoagulation in Older Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and CHADS2 Score ≥ 2: Are We Doing Better Since the Marketing of Direct Oral Anticoagulants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrard, Séverine; Vandenabeele, Caroline; Marien, Sophie; Boland, Benoit; Dalleur, Olivia

    2017-11-01

    Our objectives were to (1) describe the evolution of the underuse of anticoagulants in older people with atrial fibrillation (AF) and a CHADS 2 score ≥ 2 since direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) were introduced to the market and (2) describe factors associated with this underuse. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study including geriatric patients admitted during the pre-DOAC (2008-2011) and post-DOAC (2013-2015) periods in an academic hospital in Belgium. Five inclusion criteria were met: age ≥ 75 years, diagnosis of AF, indication for anticoagulation (CHADS 2 score ≥ 2), risk of functional decline (Identification of Seniors At Risk [ISAR] score ≥ 2), and comprehensive geriatric assessment. The use of anticoagulants and antiplatelets at home before admission was recorded. Risks of stroke and bleeding were calculated using CHADS 2 and HEMORR 2 HAGES scores, respectively. Three different logistic regression models were performed to describe the evolution of and factors associated with the underuse of anticoagulants after DOAC marketing. Anticoagulant underuse, present in 209 of 614 (34%) geriatric patients with AF, was lower in patients with a history of stroke (28.5%) or congestive heart failure (26.9%) but higher in those receiving antiplatelets (56.2%) and in older individuals. Anticoagulant underuse decreased significantly from the pre-DOAC (37.3%) to the post-DOAC (29.7%) era, as shown by two analyses using propensity scores. In older patients with AF, anticoagulant underuse was mainly associated with antiplatelet use. Anticoagulant underuse and antiplatelet use have both decreased since DOAC marketing. Underuse of anticoagulants was still a concern for three in ten geriatric patients with AF at high risk of stroke (CHADS 2 score ≥ 2).

  9. A kinetic description of antifreeze glycoprotein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, T S; Osuga, D T; Yeh, Y; Feeney, R E

    1986-05-15

    The antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGP) of polar fish have the ability to depress the freezing temperature of water approximately 500 times the amount expected based on the number of AFGP molecules in solution; yet AFGP solutions have a purely colligative melting point depression. The difference of solution melting and freezing temperatures is the antifreeze activity of AFGP. One characteristic of AFGP activity that requires further examination is the effect of concentration on antifreeze activity, especially whether the activity saturates at high concentrations or the measured activity increases ad infinitum. This study first surveys the activity of the various antifreeze components from both Pagothenia borchgrevinki and the Arg-containing antifreeze glycoprotein from Eleginus gracilis (EgAF). It was found that all AFGP components examined have a plateau in activity at high concentration, but the actual value of the plateau activity differs between the different length AFGP components and between AFGP and EgAF. While the low molecular weight components of both AFGP and EgAF lose activity at deep supercooling, at high concentration activity is restored. The activity data is then shown to fit a reversible kinetic model of AFGP activity, and the coefficients obtained are used to compare the activity differences between AFGP components and between AFGP and EgAF. The model is also shown to describe the activity of the antifreeze protein of the fish Pseudopleuronectes americanus and the thermal hysteresis protein of the insect, Tenebrio molitor.

  10. Annotating Human P-Glycoprotein Bioassay Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdrazil, Barbara; Pinto, Marta; Vasanthanathan, Poongavanam; Williams, Antony J; Balderud, Linda Zander; Engkvist, Ola; Chichester, Christine; Hersey, Anne; Overington, John P; Ecker, Gerhard F

    2012-08-01

    Huge amounts of small compound bioactivity data have been entering the public domain as a consequence of open innovation initiatives. It is now the time to carefully analyse existing bioassay data and give it a systematic structure. Our study aims to annotate prominent in vitro assays used for the determination of bioactivities of human P-glycoprotein inhibitors and substrates as they are represented in the ChEMBL and TP-search open source databases. Furthermore, the ability of data, determined in different assays, to be combined with each other is explored. As a result of this study, it is suggested that for inhibitors of human P-glycoprotein it is possible to combine data coming from the same assay type, if the cell lines used are also identical and the fluorescent or radiolabeled substrate have overlapping binding sites. In addition, it demonstrates that there is a need for larger chemical diverse datasets that have been measured in a panel of different assays. This would certainly alleviate the search for other inter-correlations between bioactivity data yielded by different assay setups.

  11. Ammonia transport in the kidney by Rhesus glycoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlander, Jill W.

    2014-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism is a fundamental element of acid-base homeostasis, comprising a major component of both basal and physiologically altered renal net acid excretion. Over the past several years, a fundamental change in our understanding of the mechanisms of renal epithelial cell ammonia transport has occurred, replacing the previous model which was based upon diffusion equilibrium for NH3 and trapping of NH4+ with a new model in which specific and regulated transport of both NH3 and NH4+ across renal epithelial cell membranes via specific membrane proteins is required for normal ammonia metabolism. A major advance has been the recognition that members of a recently recognized transporter family, the Rhesus glycoprotein family, mediate critical roles in renal and extrarenal ammonia transport. The erythroid-specific Rhesus glycoprotein, Rh A Glycoprotein (Rhag), was the first Rhesus glycoprotein recognized as an ammonia-specific transporter. Subsequently, the nonerythroid Rh glycoproteins, Rh B Glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhcg), were cloned and identified as ammonia transporters. They are expressed in specific cell populations and membrane domains in distal renal epithelial cells, where they facilitate ammonia secretion. In this review, we discuss the distribution of Rhbg and Rhcg in the kidney, the regulation of their expression and activity in physiological disturbances, the effects of genetic deletion on renal ammonia metabolism, and the molecular mechanisms of Rh glycoprotein-mediated ammonia transport. PMID:24647713

  12. Bioinformatics Analysis of Envelope Glycoprotein E epitopes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The E glycoprotein of dengue virus is responsible for the viral binding to the receptor. The crystal structure of envelope glycoprotein has already been determined. However, where the well-defined Bcell and T-cell epitopes are located is still a question. Because of the large variations among the four dengue genotypes, it is ...

  13. Treatment Changes among Users of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Husted, Steen Elkjaer; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2016-01-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation discontinuing anticoagulant therapy are left unprotected against ischaemic stroke. Further, switching between oral anticoagulants may be associated with a transiently increased risk of bleeding or thromboembolism. However, there is a paucity of real-life data...... on pattern of switching and discontinuation of oral anticoagulants. To address this, we conducted a nationwide drug utilization study including all registered Danish atrial fibrillation patients initiating a non-VKA oral anticoagulant (NOAC) between August 2011 and February 2016. We assessed changes...... in anticoagulant treatment, including switching between oral anticoagulants and discontinuation of NOACs, and explored patient characteristics predicting these changes. We identified 50,632 patients with atrial fibrillation initiating NOAC therapy within the study period. The majority initiated dabigatran (49...

  14. Anti-coagulation effect of Fc fragment against anti-β2-GP1 antibodies in mouse models with APS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Weidong; Zhang, Yaou; Bu, Cunya; Sun, Shijing; Hu, Shaoliang; Cai, Guoping

    2011-01-01

    Anti-beta (2)-glycoprotein I (anti-β2-GP1) is one of the important pathogenesis factors responsible for thrombosis formation in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Administration of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is a common method used to inhibit the abnormal antibody levels and decrease the mortality of APS in emergency situations. We hypothesize that the Fc fragment of IgG is the molecular structure responsible for these effects. The present study investigates the beneficial effects of both recombinant and natural human Fc fragments of heterogeneous IgG against human anti-β2-GP1 antibodies in mouse models with APS. Results showed that both recombinant and natural human Fc fragments moderately but significantly decreased the levels of serum anti-β2-GP1 antibodies and had anti-coagulation effects in human β2-GP1-immunized mice. Furthermore, both recombinant and natural human Fc fragments inhibited thrombosis formation and decreased mortality in mouse models infused intravenously with human anti-β2GP1 antibodies from patients with APS. Findings suggest that the Fc fragment might be one of the active structural units of heterogeneous IgG. Thus, recombinant human Fc fragment administration may be a useful treatment for individuals with APS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. An improved radioimmunoassay for urinary Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawnay, A.B. St. J.; Thornley, C.; Cattell, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    A rapid specific radioimmunoassay has been used to measure Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein (TH glycoprotein) in urine, and the method described. The apparent concentration increased with increasing dilution of urine in water, reaching a plateau at 1 in 20. This increase was greater the higher the osmolality and TH glycoprotein concentration and the lower the pH of the original sample. The apparent concentration of TH glycoprotein in neat or diluted urine was not affected by freezing or by storage at 4 0 C or room temperature for at least 2 days. A physiological range for the urinary excretion rate was established as 22-56 mg/24h, (considerably higher than the amount present in serum) based on samples from 29 individuals with normal renal function, as defined by their creatinine clearance. There was no significant correlation between serum concentrations of TH glycoprotein and its urinary excretion rate, nor between urinary excretion rate and creatinine clearance. (author)

  16. Assessment of the efficacy of a novel tailored vitamin K dosing regimen in lowering the International Normalised Ratio in over-anticoagulated patients: a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampouraki, Emmanouela; Avery, Peter J; Wynne, Hilary; Biss, Tina; Hanley, John; Talks, Kate; Kamali, Farhad

    2017-09-01

    Current guidelines advocate using fixed-doses of oral vitamin K to reverse excessive anticoagulation in warfarinised patients who are either asymptomatic or have minor bleeds. Over-anticoagulated patients present with a wide range of International Normalised Ratio (INR) values and response to fixed doses of vitamin K varies. Consequently a significant proportion of patients remain outside their target INR after vitamin K administration, making them prone to either haemorrhage or thromboembolism. We compared the performance of a novel tailored vitamin K dosing regimen to that of a fixed-dose regimen with the primary measure being the proportion of over-anticoagulated patients returning to their target INR within 24 h. One hundred and eighty-one patients with an index INR > 6·0 (asymptomatic or with minor bleeding) were randomly allocated to receive oral administration of either a tailored dose (based upon index INR and body surface area) or a fixed-dose (1 or 2 mg) of vitamin K. A greater proportion of patients treated with the tailored dose returned to within target INR range compared to the fixed-dose regimen (68·9% vs. 52·8%; P = 0·026), whilst a smaller proportion of patients remained above target INR range (12·2% vs. 34·0%; P K dosing is more accurate than fixed-dose regimen in lowering INR to within target range in excessively anticoagulated patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Understanding the Process of Envelope Glycoprotein Incorporation into Virions in Simian and Feline Immunodeficiency Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Affranchino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lentiviral envelope glycoproteins (Env mediate virus entry by interacting with specific receptors present at the cell surface, thereby determining viral tropism and pathogenesis. Therefore, Env incorporation into the virions formed by assembly of the viral Gag polyprotein at the plasma membrane of the infected cells is a key step in the replication cycle of lentiviruses. Besides being useful models of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infections in humans and valuable tools for developing AIDS therapies and vaccines, simian and feline immunodeficiency viruses (SIV and FIV, respectively are relevant animal retroviruses; the study of which provides important information on how lentiviral replication strategies have evolved. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying the incorporation of the SIV and FIV Env glycoproteins into viral particles.

  18. New anticoagulants: how to deal with treatment failure and bleeding complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmi, Rashid S; Lwaleed, Bashir A

    2011-10-01

    Conventional anticoagulants have proven efficacy in the management of thromboembolism. Their adverse effects and a narrow therapeutic window, necessitating regular need for monitoring, however, have long been an incentive for the development of safer anticoagulants without compromising efficacy. Over the last decade or so several new parenteral and oral anticoagulants have been launched with efficacy comparable with conventional agents. From fondaparinux to its long acting derivative idraparinux, and the factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban to the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran, the advent of new anticoagulants is radically changing anticoagulation. For conventional anticoagulants, despite their shortcomings, effective methods of reversing their anticoagulant effects exist. Moreover, strategies to deal with the occurrence of fresh thrombotic events in the face of therapeutic anticoagulation with the conventional agents have also been addressed. Nevertheless, for the new anticoagulants, the optimal management of these complications remains unknown. This review explores these issues in the light of current evidence. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Abnormal uterine bleeding in women receiving direct oral anticoagulants for the treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Richard; Marcoux, Violaine; Tagalakis, Vicky

    2017-08-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common complication of anticoagulant therapy in premenopausal women affected with acute venous thromboembolism. AUB impacts quality of life, and can lead to premature cessation of anticoagulation. There is increasing data to suggest that the direct oral anticoagulants when used for the treatment of venous thromboembolism differ in their menstrual bleeding profile. This article aims to review the existing literature regarding the association between AUB and the direct oral anticoagulants and make practical recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Major cerebral events in Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis: is anticoagulant therapy safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Snygg-Martin, Ulrika; Olaison, Lars

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the impact of anticoagulation on major cerebral events in patients with left-sided Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis (IE). METHODS: A prospective cohort study; the use of anticoagulation and the relation to major cerebral events was evaluated separately at onset......-19%), and cerebral haemorrhage in 5 patients (3%; 95% CI: 0.5-6%). Patients receiving anticoagulation were less likely to have experienced a major cerebral event at the time of admission (15%) compared with those without anticoagulation (37%, p = 0.009; adjusted OR: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.075-0.96; p = 0.04). In...

  1. Postoperative anticoagulation in patients with mechanical heart valves following surgical treatment of subdural hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Anubhav G; Ng, Julie; Hsu, Wesley; Pradilla, Gustavo; Raza, Shaan; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Lim, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Thromboembolic events and anticoagulation-associated bleeding events represent frequent complications following cardiac mechanical valve replacement. Management guidelines regarding the timing for resuming anticoagulation therapy following a surgically treated subdural hematoma (SDH) in patients with mechanical valves remains to be determined. To determine optimal anticoagulation management in patients with mechanical heart valves following treatment of SDH. Outcomes were retrospectively reviewed for 12 patients on anticoagulation therapy for thromboembolic prophylaxis for mechanical cardiac valves who underwent surgical intervention for a SDH at the Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1995 and 2010. The mean age at admission was 71 years. All patients had St. Jude's mechanical heart valves and were receiving anticoagulation therapy. All patients had their anticoagulation reversed with vitamin K and fresh frozen plasma and underwent surgical evacuation. Anticoagulation was withheld for a mean of 14 days upon admission and a mean of 9 days postoperatively. The average length of stay was 19 days. No deaths or thromboembolic events occurred during the hospitalization. Average follow-up time was 50 months, during which two patients had a recurrent SDH. No other associated morbidities occurred during follow-up. Interruptions in anticoagulation therapy for up to 3 weeks pose minimal thromboembolic risk in patients with mechanical heart valves. Close follow-up after discharge is highly recommended, as recurrent hemorrhages can occur several weeks after the resumption of anticoagulation.

  2. HIV envelope glycoprotein imaged at high resolution | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The outer surface of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is surrounded by an envelope studded with spike-shaped glycoproteins called Env that help the deadly virus identify, bind, and infect cells. When unbound, Env exists in a “closed” conformational state. Upon binding with target cells, such as CD4+ T cells, the protein transitions to an “open” configuration. Given that Env is the only viral protein expressed on HIV’s surface, knowing its detailed structure—especially in the unbound state—may be critical for designing antibodies and vaccines against HIV.

  3. Pumping of drugs by P-glycoprotein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Skovsgaard, Torben; Stein, Wilfred D

    2003-01-01

    The apparent inhibition constant, Kapp, for the blockade of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) by four drugs, verapamil, cyclosporin A, XR9576 (tariquidar), and vinblastine, was measured by studying their ability to inhibit daunorubicin and calcein-AM efflux from four strains of Ehrlich cells with different...... levels of drug resistance and P-gp content. For daunorubicin as a transport substrate, Kapp was independent of [P-gp] for verapamil but increased strictly linearly with [P-gp] for vinblastine, cyclosporin A, and XR9576. A theoretical analysis of the kinetics of drug pumping and its reversal shows...... but rather, in serial, i.e., a drug that is pumped from the cytoplasmic phase has to pass the preemptive route upon leaving the cell. Our results are consistent with the Sauna-Ambudkar two-step model for pumping by P-gp. We suggest that the vinblastine/cyclosporin A/XR9576-binding site accepts daunorubicin...

  4. Raman optical activity of proteins and glycoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyth, E.

    2000-03-01

    Raman optical activity (ROA), measured in this project as a small difference in the intensity of Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarised incident laser light, offers the potential to provide more information about the structure of biological molecules in aqueous solution than conventional spectroscopic techniques. Chapter one contains a general discussion of the relative merits of different spectroscopic techniques for structure determination of biomolecules, as well as a brief introduction to ROA. In Chapter two a theoretical analysis of ROA is developed, which extends the discussion in chapter one. The spectrometer setup and sample preparation is then discussed in chapter three. Instrument and sample conditions are monitored to ensure that the best results are obtained. As with any experimental project problems occur, which may result in a degradation of the spectra obtained. The cause of these problems was explored and remedied whenever possible. Chapter four introduces a brief account of protein, glycoprotein and carbohydrate structure and function, with a particular emphasis on the structure of proteins. In the remaining chapters experimental ROA results on proteins and glycoproteins, with some carbohydrate samples, from a wide range of sources are examined. For example, in chapter five some β-sheet proteins are examined. Structural features in these proteins are examined in the extended amide III region of their ROA spectra, revealing that ROA is sensitive to the rigidity or flexibility inherent in proteins. Chapter six concentrates on a group of proteins (usually glycoproteins) known as the serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins). Medically, the serpins are one of the most important groups of proteins of current interest, with wide-ranging implications in conditions such as Down's syndrome, Alzheimer's disease, and emphysema with associated cirrhosis of the liver. With favourable samples and conditions ROA may offer the

  5. Patients' knowledge on oral anticoagulant treatment in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Reka; Fekete, Helga; Csoka, Ildiko

    2017-12-01

    Background A key element for an effective and safe oral anticoagulant treatment (OAT) is to have the relevant information delivered to patients in an easy-to-understand way and thus have them apply this knowledge in their own therapy. Objective To assess knowledge about OAT, reveal knowledge gaps and identify at-risk patients in terms of limited knowledge about their anticoagulant therapy. Setting Community pharmacies in Hungary. Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study used a structured, validated, self-developed questionnaire to assess patients' knowledge about OAT. Scores were calculated on each domain and the association between knowledge and patients' or treatment characteristics were analysed. Responses in all domains were assessed to identify at-risk patients and knowledge gaps. Main outcome measures Knowledge and knowledge gaps on OAT, and risk factors for limited knowledge. Results The questionnaire developed based on four validated questionnaires passed the field test and had a good internal consistency (Cronbach α = 0.795). Our full patient population (N = 427) had a mean percentage score of 59.39 (29.7% good, 41.2% average, 29.0% poor knowledge on OAT). Poor knowledge level was found to significantly correlate with advanced age (> 75 years), lower education, diagnosis of atrial fibrillation, and unawareness of the indication of OAT. The lowest frequency of correct answers regarded the questions on drug interactions (10.2%) and diet (11.4%). Pharmacists were infrequently indicated as the healthcare professionals to share information with regarding OAT (12.7%). Conclusion Findings of our study offer a valuable insight into the required directions of developing new strategies for patient education to improve knowledge on the treatment with oral anticoagulants.

  6. Management of anticoagulation in hip fractures: A pragmatic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassa, Rafik; Khalfaoui, Mahdi Yacine; Hujazi, Ihab; Sevenoaks, Hannah; Dunkow, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Hip fractures are common and increasing with an ageing population. In the United Kingdom, the national guidelines recommend operative intervention within 36 hours of diagnosis. However, long-term anticoagulant treatment is frequently encountered in these patients which can delay surgical intervention. Despite this, there are no set national standards for management of drug-induced coagulopathy pre-operatively in the context of hip fractures.The aim of this study was to evaluate the management protocols available in the current literature for the commonly encountered coagulopathy-inducing agents.We reviewed the current literature, identified the reversal agents used in coagulopathy management and assessed the evidence to determine the optimal timing, doses and routes of administration.Warfarin and other vitamin K antagonists (VKA) can be reversed effectively using vitamin K with a dose in the range of 2 mg to 10 mg intravenously to correct coagulopathy.The role of fresh frozen plasma is not clear from the current evidence while prothrombin complex remains a reliable and safe method for immediate reversal of VKA-induced coagulopathy in hip fracture surgery or failed vitamin K treatment reversal.The literature suggests that surgery should not be delayed in patients on classical antiplatelet medications (aspirin or clopidogrel), but spinal or regional anaesthetic methods should be avoided for the latter. However, evidence regarding the use of more novel antiplatelet medications (e.g. ticagrelor) and direct oral anticoagulants remains a largely unexplored area in the context of hip fracture surgery. We suggest treatment protocols based on best available evidence and guidance from allied specialties.Hip fracture surgery presents a common management dilemma where semi-urgent surgery is required. In this article, we advocate an evidence-based algorithm as a guide for managing these anticoagulated patients. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:394-402. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160083.

  7. Anticoagulation in heart failure: current status and future direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Fonarow, Gregg C; Greene, Stephen J; Greenberg, Barry H; Liu, Peter P; Massie, Barry M; Mehra, Mandeep R; Metra, Marco; Zannad, Faiez; Cleland, John G F; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Shah, Ami N; Butler, Javed

    2013-11-01

    Despite therapeutic advances, patients with worsening heart failure (HF) requiring hospitalization have unacceptably high post-discharge mortality and re-admission rates soon after discharge. Evidence suggests a hypercoagulable state is present in patients with HF. Although thromboembolism as a direct consequence of HF is not frequently clinically recognized, it may contribute to mortality and morbidity. Additionally, many patients with HF have concomitant disorders conferring additional thrombotic risk, including atrial fibrillation (AF) and coronary artery disease (CAD). Acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a known consequence of coronary thrombosis, is a common precipitating factor for worsening HF. Coronary thrombosis may also cause sudden death in patients with HF and CAD. Because data are largely derived from observational studies or trials of modest size, guideline recommendations on anticoagulation for HF vary between organizations. The recently presented Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction trial of HF patients in sinus rhythm suggested anticoagulation reduces the risk of stroke, although rates of the combined primary endpoint (death, ischemic stroke, or intracerebral hemorrhage) were similar for acetylsalicylic acid and warfarin. Newer oral anticoagulants dabigatran, apixaban, and rivaroxaban have successfully completed trials for the prevention of stroke in patients with AF and have shown benefits in the subpopulation of patients with concomitant HF. Positive results of the Anti-Xa Therapy to Lower Cardiovascular Events in Addition to Standard Therapy in Subjects with Acute Coronary Syndrome-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 51 (ATLAS ACS 2-TIMI 51) trial of rivaroxaban in ACS are also encouraging. These data suggest there is a need to assess the potential role for these newer agents in the management of patients hospitalized for HF who continue to have a high post-discharge event rate despite available therapies.

  8. Anticoagulant Effect of Sugammadex: Just an In Vitro Artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkmann, Daniel; Britten, Martin W; Pauling, Henning; Weidle, Juliane; Volbracht, Lothar; Görlinger, Klaus; Peters, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Sugammadex prolongs activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) suggestive of anticoagulant effects. To pinpoint its presumed anticoagulant site of action, the authors assessed Sugammadex's impact on a panel of coagulation assays. Sugammadex, Rocuronium, Sugammadex and Rocuronium combined, or saline were added to blood samples from healthy volunteers and analyzed using plasmatic (i.e., aPTT, thrombin time, and fibrinogen concentration) (n = 8 each), PT (quick), activities of plasmatic coagulation factors, and whole blood (extrinsically and intrinsically activated thromboelastometry) assays (n = 18 each). Furthermore, dose-dependent effects of Sugammadex were also assessed (n = 18 each) in diluted Russel viper venom time (DRVVT) assays with low (DRVVT1) and high (DRVVT2) phospholipid concentrations and in a highly phospholipid-sensitive aPTT assay. Sugammadex increased PT (+9.1%; P IX, XI, and XII decreased (-7%, P = 0.009; -7.8%, P < 0.0001; -6.9%, P < 0.0001; and -4.3%, P = 0.011, respectively). Sugammadex dose-dependently prolonged both DRVVT1 and the highly phospholipid-sensitive aPTT assays, but additional phospholipids in the DRVVT2 assay almost abolished these prolongations. Thrombin time, a thromboelastometric thrombin generation assay, clot firmness, clot lysis, fibrinogen concentration, and activities of other coagulation factors were unaltered. Rocuronium, Sugammadex and Rocuronium combined, and saline exerted no effects. Sugammadex significantly affects various coagulation assays, but this is explainable by an apparent phospholipid-binding effect, suggesting that Sugammadex`s anticoagulant effects are likely an in vitro artifact.

  9. Increased use of oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadsbøll, Kasper; Staerk, Laila; Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup

    2017-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to examine temporal trends in the use oral anticoagulants (OAC) as stroke prophylaxis in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and to examine factors associated with OAC initiation. Methods and results From Danish nationwide registries, we identified patients diagnosed...... initiation rates increased (P age > 75 years and high risk of stroke). The increased OAC...... initiation was accompanied by introduction and increased uptake of the NOACs. By the end of the study, NOACs accounted for 72.5% of all OACs prescribed in newly diagnosed AF patients. OAC initiation was associated with male gender, age 65-74 years, few comorbidities and increased risk of stroke. Conclusion...

  10. Direct Oral Anticoagulant Drugs in Dental Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stasko J.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The direct oral anticoagulant drugs (DOAC are generally safe and effective in several clinical settings including acute venous thromboembolic disease, prophylaxis in the postoperative setting, prevention of thromboembolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, and in the management of acute coronary syndrome. The relatively short half-life, rapid onset of action, and predictable pharmacokinetics should simplify periprocedural use of the DOAC. The aim of this work is to propose and summarize periprocedural management of patients treated with the DOAC in dental practice and to inform about the principal specifications of this treatment.

  11. Novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Dobreanu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess clinical practice in relation to stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF), particularly into the use of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for stroke prevention, among members of the EHRA electrophysiology (EP......) research network. In this EP Wire survey, we have provided some insights into current practice in Europe for the use of NOACs for stroke prevention in AF. There were clear practice differences evident, and also the need for greater adherence to the guidelines, especially since guideline adherent management...

  12. Anticoagulants Influence the Performance of In Vitro Assays Intended for Characterization of Nanotechnology-Based Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedrone, Edward; Neun, Barry W; Rodriguez, Jamie; Vermilya, Alison; Clogston, Jeffrey D; McNeil, Scott E; Barenholz, Yechezkel; Szebeni, Janos; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2017-12-21

    The preclinical safety assessment of novel nanotechnology-based drug products frequently relies on in vitro assays, especially during the early stages of product development, due to the limited quantities of nanomaterials available for such studies. The majority of immunological tests require donor blood. To enable such tests one has to prevent the blood from coagulating, which is usually achieved by the addition of an anticoagulant into blood collection tubes. Heparin, ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), and citrate are the most commonly used anticoagulants. Novel anticoagulants such as hirudin are also available but are not broadly used. Despite the notion that certain anticoagulants may influence assay performance, a systematic comparison between traditional and novel anticoagulants in the in vitro assays intended for immunological characterization of nanotechnology-based formulations is currently not available. We compared hirudin-anticoagulated blood with its traditional counterparts in the standardized immunological assay cascade, and found that the type of anticoagulant did not influence the performance of the hemolysis assay. However, hirudin was more optimal for the complement activation and leukocyte proliferation assays, while traditional anticoagulants citrate and heparin were more appropriate for the coagulation and cytokine secretion assays. The results also suggest that traditional immunological controls such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS ) are not reliable for understanding the role of anticoagulant in the assay performance. We observed differences in the test results between hirudin and traditional anticoagulant-prepared blood for nanomaterials at the time when no such effects were seen with traditional controls. It is, therefore, important to recognize the advantages and limitations of each anticoagulant and consider individual nanoparticles on a case-by-case basis.

  13. Anticoagulation Quality and Complications of using Vitamin K Antagonists in the Cardiac Surgery Outpatient Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Augusto Cray da Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: In patients with mechanical prosthetic heart valves or atrial fibrillation requiring anticoagulation to prevent thromboembolic events, several factors influence adherence and anticoagulation complications. Objective: To evaluate the factors that interfere with the quality and complications of anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 100 patients, in the period from 2011 to 2014, was performed. Anticoagulation conditions in the last year, regarding the presence of complications (embolisms/bleeding and inadequate treatment were assessed: achievement of less than 8 annual prothrombin times and International Normalized Ratio outside therapeutic target in more than 40% of prothrombin times. Results: There were 31 complications (22 minor bleeding without hospitalization and 9 major complications: 7 bleeding with hospitalization and two emboli; 70 were with International Normalized Ratio outside the target in more than 40% of the tests and 36 with insufficient number of prothrombin times. Socioeconomic factors, anticoagulant type and anticoagulation reason had no relationship with complications or with inadequate treatment. There were more complications in patients with longer duration of anticoagulation (P=0.001. Women had more International Normalized Ratio outside the target range (OR 2.61, CI:1.0-6.5; P=0.04. Patients with lower number of annual prothrombin times had longer times of anticoagulation (P=0.03, less annual consultations (P=0.02 and less dose adjustments (P=0.003. Patients with longer duration of anticoagulation have more complications (P=0.001. Conclusion: There was a high rate of major complications and International Normalized Ratio was outside the goal. Less annual prothrombin times was related to longer duration of anticoagulation, less annual consultations and less dose adjustments. More major complications occurred in patients with longer duration of

  14. Anticoagulants Influence the Performance of In Vitro Assays Intended for Characterization of Nanotechnology-Based Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Cedrone

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The preclinical safety assessment of novel nanotechnology-based drug products frequently relies on in vitro assays, especially during the early stages of product development, due to the limited quantities of nanomaterials available for such studies. The majority of immunological tests require donor blood. To enable such tests one has to prevent the blood from coagulating, which is usually achieved by the addition of an anticoagulant into blood collection tubes. Heparin, ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA, and citrate are the most commonly used anticoagulants. Novel anticoagulants such as hirudin are also available but are not broadly used. Despite the notion that certain anticoagulants may influence assay performance, a systematic comparison between traditional and novel anticoagulants in the in vitro assays intended for immunological characterization of nanotechnology-based formulations is currently not available. We compared hirudin-anticoagulated blood with its traditional counterparts in the standardized immunological assay cascade, and found that the type of anticoagulant did not influence the performance of the hemolysis assay. However, hirudin was more optimal for the complement activation and leukocyte proliferation assays, while traditional anticoagulants citrate and heparin were more appropriate for the coagulation and cytokine secretion assays. The results also suggest that traditional immunological controls such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS are not reliable for understanding the role of anticoagulant in the assay performance. We observed differences in the test results between hirudin and traditional anticoagulant-prepared blood for nanomaterials at the time when no such effects were seen with traditional controls. It is, therefore, important to recognize the advantages and limitations of each anticoagulant and consider individual nanoparticles on a case-by-case basis.

  15. Diverse IgG serum response to novel glycopeptide epitopes detected within immunodominant stretches of Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein 350/220

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arrigo, Isotta; Cló, Emiliano; Bergström, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) envelope glycoprotein 350/220 (gp350/220) is the most abundant molecule on the viral surface and it is responsible for the initial viral attachment to cell surface of the host. As many other viral envelope proteins, it is highly glycosylated, not least with O...

  16. Regulation of glycoprotein synthesis in yeast by mating pheromones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, W.

    1984-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, glycosylated proteins amount to less than 2% of the cell protein. Two intensively studied examples of yeast glycoproteins are the external cell wall - associated invertase and the vacuolar carboxypeptidase Y. Recently, it was shown that the mating pheromone, alpha factor, specifically and strongly inhibits the synthesis of N-glycosylated proteins in haploid a cells, whereas O-glycosylated proteins are not affected. In this paper, the pathways of glycoprotein biosynthesis are summarized briefly, and evidence is presented that mating pheomones have a regulatory function in glycoprotein synthesis

  17. 21 CFR 866.5430 - Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system....5430 Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system. (a) Identification. A beta-2-glycoprotein I... the beta-2-glycoprotein I (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of beta-2...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5440 - Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system....5440 Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system. (a) Identification. A beta-2-glycoprotein III... the beta-2-glycoprotein III (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of beta-2...

  19. INR targets and site-level anticoagulation control: results from the Veterans AffaiRs Study to Improve Anticoagulation (VARIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, A J; Berlowitz, D R; Miller, D R; Hylek, E M; Ozonoff, A; Zhao, S; Reisman, J I; Ash, A S

    2012-04-01

    Not all clinicians target the same International Normalized Ratio (INR) for patients with a guideline-recommended target range of 2-3. A patient's mean INR value suggests the INR that was actually targeted. We hypothesized that sites would vary by mean INR, and that sites of care with mean values nearest to 2.5 would achieve better anticoagulation control, as measured by per cent time in therapeutic range (TTR). To examine variations among sites in mean INR and the relationship with anticoagulation control in an integrated system of care. We studied 103,897 patients receiving oral anticoagulation with an expected INR target between 2 and 3 at 100 Veterans Health Administration (VA) sites from 1 October 2006 to 30 September 2008. Key site-level variables were: proportion near 2.5 (that is, percentage of patients with mean INR between 2.3 and 2.7) and mean risk-adjusted TTR. Site mean INR ranged from 2.22 to 2.89; proportion near 2.5, from 30 to 64%. Sites' proportions of patients near 2.5, below 2.3 and above 2.7 were consistent from year to year. A 10 percentage point increase in the proportion near 2.5 predicted a 3.8 percentage point increase in risk-adjusted TTR (P < 0.001). Proportion of patients with mean INR near 2.5 is a site-level 'signature' of care and an implicit measure of targeted INR. This proportion varies by site and is strongly associated with site-level TTR. Our study suggests that sites wishing to improve TTR, and thereby improve patient outcomes, should avoid the explicit or implicit pursuit of non-standard INR targets. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  20. Warfarin anticoagulation in hemodialysis patients with atrial fibrillation: comparison of nephrologist-led and anticoagulation clinic-led management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahbahani, Hamad; AlTurki, Ahmed; Dawas, Ahmed; Lipman, Mark L

    2018-01-08

    There is conflicting evidence of benefit versus harm for warfarin anticoagulation in hemodialysis patients with atrial fibrillation. This equipoise may be explained by suboptimal Time in Therapeutic Range (TTR), which correlates well with thromboembolic and bleeding complications. This study aimed to compare nephrologist-led management of warfarin therapy versus that led by specialized anticoagulation clinic. In a retrospective cohort of chronic hemodialysis patients from two institutions (Institution A: Nephrologist-led warfarin management, Institution B: Anticoagulation clinic-led warfarin management), we identified patients with atrial fibrillation who were receiving warfarin for thromboembolic prophylaxis. Mean TTRs, proportion of patients achieving TTR ≥ 60%, and frequency of INR testing were compared using a logistic regression model. In Institution A, 16.7% of hemodialysis patients had atrial fibrillation, of whom 36.8% were on warfarin. In Institution B, 18% of hemodialysis patients had atrial fibrillation, and 55.5% were on warfarin. The mean TTR was 61.8% (SD 14.5) in Institution A, and 60.5% (SD 15.8) in Institution B (p-value 0.95). However, the proportion of patients achieving TTR ≥ 60% was 65% versus 43.3% (Adjusted OR 2.22, CI 0.65-7.63) and mean frequency of INR testing was every 6 days versus every 13.9 days in Institutions A and B respectively. There was no statistical difference in mean TTR between nephrologist-led management of warfarin and that of clinic-led management. However, the former achieved a trend toward a higher proportion of patients with optimal TTR. This improved therapeutic results was associated with more frequent INR monitoring.

  1. A Cell-Cell Fusion Assay to Assess Arenavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Membrane-Fusion Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Joanne; Nunberg, Jack H

    2018-01-01

    For many viruses that enter their target cells through pH-dependent fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes, cell-cell fusion assays can provide an experimental platform for investigating the structure-function relationships that promote envelope glycoprotein membrane-fusion activity. Typically, these assays employ effector cells expressing the recombinant envelope glycoprotein on the cell surface and target cells engineered to quantitatively report fusion with the effector cell. In the protocol described here, Vero cells are transfected with a plasmid encoding the arenavirus envelope glycoprotein complex GPC and infected with the vTF7-3 vaccinia virus expressing the bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. These effector cells are mixed with target cells infected with the vCB21R-lacZ vaccinia virus encoding a β-galactosidase reporter under the control of the T7 promoter. Cell-cell fusion is induced upon exposure to low-pH medium (pH 5.0), and the resultant expression of the β-galactosidase reporter is quantitated using a chemiluminescent substrate. We have utilized this robust microplate cell-cell fusion assay extensively to study arenavirus entry and its inhibition by small-molecule fusion inhibitors.

  2. A lectin-based gold nanoparticle assay for probing glycosylation of glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Pomales, Germarie; Morris, Todd A; Falabella, James B; Tarlov, Michael J; Zangmeister, Rebecca A

    2012-09-01

    We report a glycoanalysis method in which lectins are used to probe the glycans of therapeutic glycoproteins that are adsorbed on gold nanoparticles. A model mannose-presenting glycoprotein, ribonuclease B (RNase B), and the therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) rituximab, were found to adsorb spontaneously and non-specifically to bare gold nanoparticles such that glycans were accessible for lectin binding. Addition of a multivalent binding lectin, such as concanavalin A (Con A), to a solution of the modified gold nanoparticles resulted in cross-linking of the nanoparticles. This phenomenon was evidenced within 1 min by a change in the hydrodynamic diameter, D(H), measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and a shift and increase in absorbance of the plasmon resonance band of the gold nanoparticles. By combining the sugar-binding specificity and the cross-linking capabilities of lectins, the non-specific adsorption of glycoproteins to gold surfaces, and the unique optical reporting properties of gold nanoparticles, a glycosylation pattern of rituximab could be generated. This assay provides advantages over currently used glycoanalysis methods in terms of short analysis time, simplicity of the conjugation method, convenience of simple spectroscopic detection, and feasibility of providing glycan characterization of the protein drug product by using a variety of binding lectins. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Biofilm development on metal surfaces in tropical marine waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    De; Bhosle, N.B.

    The immersion of solid surfaces in aquatic environment results in the rapid adsorption of dissolved organic matter, thereby conditioning the surfaces. A number of compounds including glycoproteins humic material and / or unspecified macromolecules...

  4. Does novel oral anticoagulant improve anticoagulation for non-valvular atrial fibrillation associated stroke: An inpatient registration study in Shanghai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Di Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstracts: Objective: To summarize the use rate, safety, efficacy of antithrombotics in stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA prevention, and reasons for not using dabigatran etexilate (DE in Shanghai, China. Methods: Non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF-associated stroke patients were prospectively registered as an electronic database. Use rate of antithrombotics and reasons for not using DE were extracted during follow-up. Patients' baseline characteristics, recurrent ischemic stroke/TIA events and bleeding complications were analyzed. Patients: From April 2012 to August 2014, 110 inpatients with NVAF-associated stroke were studied in our hospital. NVAF was diagnosed by 12-lead electrocardiogram, 24 h Holter and echocardiography. Results: Before introduction of DE (April 2013, use rates of warfarin and antiplatelets were 28.9% (11/38 and 60.5% (23/38 respectively; after that, use rates of warfarin, DE, and antiplatelets were 20.8% (15/72, 12.5% (9/72, and 43.1% (31/72. The DE did not improve use of anticoagulants (P = 0.639. There were 19 (17.3% recurrent ischemic stroke events up to October 2015; two (9.5% in the non-user group, 10 (18.5% in the antiplatelet group, and seven (20.0% in the anticoagulants group (P = 0.570. Furthermore, recurrence rates were similar between the DE group (20.0% and the Warfarin group (20.0%, P = 1.000. The most common reason for not using DE was financial concerns (61.0%, followed by inconvenience to purchase (14.0% and hemorrhage concerns (11.0%. Two patients using warfarin found fecal occult blood so they stopped warfarin and began to use antiplatelet drugs. No bleeding event occurred in the other groups. Only one patient had side effects (dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux from DE. Conclusion: The use rate of either DE or warfarin in Shanghai was low; DE had not improved anticoagulation therapy for NVAF patients in Shanghai mainly because DE had not been covered by health insurance. Keywords

  5. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation. Is there a gap in care for ambulatory patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Wayne; Nicol, Kelly; Anderson, David; Brownell, Brenda; Chiasson, Meredith; Burge, Frederick I.; Flowerdew, Gordon; Cox, Jafna

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Atrial fibrillation (AF) substantially increases risk of stroke. Evidence suggests that anticoagulation to reduce risk is underused (a "care gap"). Our objectives were to clarify measures of this gap in care by including data from family physicians and to determine why eligible patients were not receiving anticoagulation therapy. DESIGN: Telephone survey of family physicians regarding specific patients in their practices. SETTING: Nova Scotia. PARTICIPANTS: Ambulatory AF patients not taking warfarin who had risk factors that made anticoagulation appropriate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of patients removed from the care gap; reasons given for not giving the remainder anticoagulants. RESULTS: Half the patients thought to be in the care gap had previously unknown contraindications to anticoagulation, lacked a clear indication for anticoagulation, or were taking warfarin. Patients' refusal and anticipated problems with compliance and monitoring were among the reasons for not giving patients anticoagulants. CONCLUSION: Adding data from primary care physicians significantly narrowed the care gap. Attention should focus on the remaining reasons for not giving eligible patients anticoagulants. PMID:15508374

  6. Safety and efficacy of anticoagulation for secondary stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation patients: The AMADEUS trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lane, D.A.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Minini, P.; Buller, H.R.; Lip, G.Y.H.

    2010-01-01

    ackground: Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and previous ischemic stroke are at high risk of recurrent stroke, but are also perceived to be at increased bleeding risk while treated with anticoagulants. Methods: Post-hoc analyses examined the efficacy and safety of anticoagulation of 4576 AF

  7. Conservative approach to dental extractions in patients on anticoagulant therapy: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somma, Francesco; Grande, Nicola Maria; Plotino, GianLuca; Cameli, Giorgio; Pameijer, Cornelis H

    2010-01-01

    This clinical study reviewed dental surgical extractions that were performed on 532 patients diagnosed at risk of thromboembolism without interrupting their anticoagulant therapy. The results confirmed that anticoagulant therapy can be modified successfully and does not need to be interrupted, which can carry significant risks.

  8. Comparing Direct Oral Anticoagulants and Warfarin for Atrial Fibrillation, Venous Thromboembolism, and Mechanical Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, Todd R; Truong, Teresa; Rai, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    To summarize available data for use of direct oral anticoagulants in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, venous thromboembolism, and mechanical heart valves including dose-response consistency to offer considerations for pharmacotherapeutic decision-making for oral anticoagulants. A Medline search of English-language studies published between 2000 and March 2015 was conducted to identify pertinent papers using combinations of the following words: apixaban, atrial fibrillation, dabigatran, direct oral anticoagulant, edoxaban, factor IIa inhibitors, factor Xa inhibitors, mechanical heart valves, novel oral anticoagulant, rivaroxaban, venous thromboembolism, and warfarin. Original studies, guidelines, and approved prescribing information were evaluated and included if contributing new or complementary data toward the objective. References for all identified studies were reviewed and entries included if contributory. Randomized controlled trials have established the safety and efficacy of direct oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism for most patient groups. Direct oral anticoagulants should not be used in patients with mechanical heart valves until proven safe and effective. There are groups for which questions remain regarding inter-patient dose-response consistency for direct oral anticoagulants. There are postmarketing data suggesting poorer real-world performance of dabigatran relative to clinical trial data. Direct oral anticoagulants offer several advantages over warfarin, and large clinical trial data establish the appropriateness of their use in broad populations. There remain groups for whom the relative benefit and risk of these agents relative to warfarin are uncertain. A patient-specific approach in pharmacotherapeutic decision-making is appropriate.

  9. The use of prophylactic anticoagulation during induction and consolidation chemotherapy in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Rachael F; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stevenson, Kristen E; Neuberg, Donna; Sallan, Stephen E; Mourad, Yasser R Abou; Bergeron, Julie; Seftel, Matthew D; Kokulis, Caroline; Connors, Jean M

    2018-02-01

    Treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adults confers a high risk of venous thromboembolic (VTE) complications. We describe the implementation and results of prophylactic anticoagulation guidelines in adults (18-50 years) treated on a Dana-Farber Cancer Institute ALL pediatric inspired consortium protocol from 2007 to 2013. A high rate of asparaginase related toxicity events, including thrombosis, resulted in a protocol amendment adding guidelines for prophylactic anticoagulation and a modified asparaginase dose and schedule. After excluding patients with Philadelphia positive ALL, a cohort of 36 patients were treated after the protocol amendment with prophylactic anticoagulation and compared to 49 patients who received no prophylactic anticoagulation. Bleeding complications were not significantly different in those treated with prophylactic anticoagulation compared with those enrolled prior to the amendment (p = 0.26). No patients on prophylactic anticoagulation had grade ≥ 3 bleeding. Prior to the amendment, the 2 year cumulative incidence of VTE post-induction was 41% compared to 28% while on prophylactic anticoagulation (p = 0.32). The 2 year cumulative incidence pulmonary embolus pre-amendment was 16% compared with 8% post-amendment (p = 0.34). Prophylactic anticoagulation can be safely administered to adults with ALL without increasing the number or severity of bleeding events and, in addition to modifications in the asparaginase regimen, resulted in a reduction in the cumulative incidence of VTE.

  10. Anticoagulant effects of an antidiabetic drug on monocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, C E; Hellum, M; Haug, K B F; Aass, H C; Joø, G B; Øvstebø, R; Trøseid, A M; Klingenberg, O; Kierulf, P

    2011-11-01

    Monocyte- and microparticle (MP)-associated tissue factor (TF) is upregulated in diabetes. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces expression of TF and alternatively spliced TF (asTF) and increases MP release from monocytes. Using LPS-stimulated TF-bearing human monocytes, we examined whether glibenclamide, a sulfonylurea used to treat diabetes type 2, might possess anticoagulant properties. We studied the effects of glibenclamide on cell- and supernatant-associated procoagulant activity (Factor Xa-generating assay and clot formation assay), on expression of TF and asTF (flow cytometry, RT-qPCR, western blot) and on cell viability and MP release (flow cytometry). Glibenclamide dose-dependently decreased procoagulant activity of cells and supernatants. The reduction in cellular procoagulant activity coincided with reduced expression of TF and asTF in cells, whereas cell viability remained almost unchanged. The glibenclamide-induced reduction in procoagulant activity of supernatants appeared to be associated with a decreased number of released MPs. Reduction of monocyte- and supernatant-associated procoagulant activity by glibenclamide is associated with decreased expression of TF and asTF and possibly with a reduced MP number. Our data indicate that glibenclamide reduces the prothrombotic state in LPS-stimulated monocytes in vitro. Glibenclamide might therefore also have an anticoagulant effect in vivo, but this needs to be further evaluated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Stabilization of the E* Form Turns Thrombin into an Anticoagulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bah, Alaji; Carrell, Christopher J.; Chen, Zhiwei; Gandhi, Prafull S.; Di Cera, Enrico; (WU-MED)

    2009-07-31

    Previous studies have shown that deletion of nine residues in the autolysis loop of thrombin produces a mutant with an anticoagulant propensity of potential clinical relevance, but the molecular origin of the effect has remained unresolved. The x-ray crystal structure of this mutant solved in the free form at 1.55 {angstrom} resolution reveals an inactive conformation that is practically identical (root mean square deviation of 0.154 {angstrom}) to the recently identified E* form. The side chain of Trp215 collapses into the active site by shifting >10 {angstrom} from its position in the active E form, and the oxyanion hole is disrupted by a flip of the Glu192-Gly193 peptide bond. This finding confirms the existence of the inactive form E* in essentially the same incarnation as first identified in the structure of the thrombin mutant D102N. In addition, it demonstrates that the anticoagulant profile often caused by a mutation of the thrombin scaffold finds its likely molecular origin in the stabilization of the inactive E* form that is selectively shifted to the active E form upon thrombomodulin and protein C binding.

  12. Lupus anticoagulant: a marker for stroke and venous thrombosis in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasoto, Sandra Gofinet; Chakkour, Henrique Pires; Natalino, Renato Romera; Viana, Vilma S T; Bueno, Cleonice; Lianza, Alessandro Cavalcanti; de Andrade, José Lázaro; Neto, Mauricio Levy; Fuller, Ricardo; Bonfa, Eloisa

    2012-09-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) have been described in primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) with controversial findings regarding aPL prevalence and their association with thrombotic events. We evaluated 100 consecutive pSS patients (American-European criteria) and 89 age-gender-ethnicity-matched healthy controls for IgG/IgM anticardiolipin (aCL), IgG/IgM anti-beta2-glycoprotein-I (aβ2GPI), and lupus anticoagulant (LA) (positivity according to APS Sydney's criteria). Clinical analysis followed standardized interview and physical examination assessing thrombotic and nonthrombotic APS manifestations and thrombosis risk factors. aPLs were detected in 16 % patients and 5.6 % controls (p = 0.035). LA was the most common aPL in patients (9 %), followed by aβ2GPI (5 %) and aCL (4 %). Thrombotic events occurred in five patients [stroke in two, myocardial infarction in one and deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) in four], but in none of controls (p = 0.061). Mean age at time of stroke was 35 years. Three patients with thrombotic events (including the two with stroke) had APS (Sydney's criteria) and were positive exclusively for LA. Comparison of patients with (n = 16) and without (n = 84) aPL revealed similar mean age, female predominance, and ethnicity (p > =0.387). Frequencies of livedo reticularis (25 vs. 4.8 %, p = 0.021), stroke (12.5 vs. 0 %, p = 0.024), and DVT (18.8 vs. 1.2 %, p = 0.013) were significantly higher in APL + patients. Conversely, frequencies of hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, obesity, smoking, sedentarism, and hormonal contraception were similar in patients with or without aPL (p ≥ 0.253). Our study identified LA as an important marker for APS in pSS, particularly for stroke in young patients, warranting routine evaluation of these antibodies and rigorous intervention in modifiable risk factors.

  13. Self-monitoring and self-management of oral anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneghan, Carl J; Garcia-Alamino, Josep M; Spencer, Elizabeth A; Ward, Alison M; Perera, Rafael; Bankhead, Clare; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Fitzmaurice, David; Mahtani, Kamal R; Onakpoya, Igho J

    2016-07-05

    The introduction of point-of-care devices for the management of patients on oral anticoagulation allows self-testing by the patient at home. Patients who self-test can either adjust their medication according to a pre-determined dose-INR (international normalized ratio) schedule (self-management), or they can call a clinic to be told the appropriate dose adjustment (self-monitoring). Increasing evidence suggests self-testing of oral anticoagulant therapy is equal to or better than standard monitoring. This is an updated version of the original review published in 2010. To evaluate the effects on thrombotic events, major haemorrhages, and all-cause mortality of self-monitoring or self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy compared to standard monitoring. For this review update, we re-ran the searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), 2015, Issue 6, the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to June week 4 2015), Embase (Ovid, 1980 to 2015 week 27) on 1 July 2015. We checked bibliographies and contacted manufacturers and authors of relevant studies. We did not apply any language restrictions . Outcomes analysed were thromboembolic events, mortality, major haemorrhage, minor haemorrhage, tests in therapeutic range, frequency of testing, and feasibility of self-monitoring and self-management. Review authors independently extracted data and we used a fixed-effect model with the Mantzel-Haenzel method to calculate the pooled risk ratio (RR) and Peto's method to verify the results for uncommon outcomes. We examined heterogeneity amongst studies with the Chi(2) and I(2) statistics and used GRADE methodology to assess the quality of evidence. We identified 28 randomised trials including 8950 participants (newly incorporated in this update: 10 trials including 4227 participants). The overall quality of the evidence was generally low to moderate. Pooled estimates showed a reduction in thromboembolic events (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.45 to 0

  14. Expression of glycoprotein VI in vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bing; Tao, Lian; Lin, Shihua; Calingasan, Noel Y; Li, Jess; Tandon, Narendra N; Yoshitake, Masuhiro; Kambayashi, Jun-ichi

    2003-06-01

    Glycoprotein (GP) VI, a collagen receptor, plays a important role in collagen-mediated platelet aggregation and adhesion. To date, GPVI expression has been found only in platelets and megakaryocytes. In the present studies, we have demonstrated that GPVI was also expressed in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) at both transcript and protein levels. Using a GPVI-specific probe, a approximately 6-kb band was detected in HUVEC as well as in platelets and megakaryoblastic cell lines by Northern blotting. Using polyclonal antibodies raised against platelet GPVI peptides, the same size band (57 kDa) was labeled with convulxin (CVX) after immuo-precipitation in both HUVEC and platelet lysates. In addition, a approximately 70-kDa band was also labeled in HUVEC. Surface expression of GPVI in HUVEC was confirmed by flow cytometry with GPVI-specific IgG or by direct labeling with FITC-conjugated CVX. Since HUVEC lack FcRgamma chain that forms complex with GPVI in platelets for signaling process, the function of GPVI in vascular endothelial cells remains to be determined.

  15. Rabies virus glycoprotein as a carrier for anthrax protective antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Live viral vectors expressing foreign antigens have shown great promise as vaccines against viral diseases. However, safety concerns remain a major problem regarding the use of even highly attenuated viral vectors. Using the rabies virus (RV) envelope protein as a carrier molecule, we show here that inactivated RV particles can be utilized to present Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) domain-4 in the viral membrane. In addition to the RV glycoprotein (G) transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, a portion of the RV G ectodomain was required to express the chimeric RV G anthrax PA on the cell surface. The novel antigen was also efficiently incorporated into RV virions. Mice immunized with the inactivated recombinant RV virions exhibited seroconversion against both RV G and anthrax PA, and a second inoculation greatly increased these responses. These data demonstrate that a viral envelope protein can carry a bacterial protein and that a viral carrier can display whole polypeptides compared to the limited epitope presentation of previous viral systems

  16. Comparative Studies of Vertebrate Platelet Glycoprotein 4 (CD36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger S. Holmes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Platelet glycoprotein 4 (CD36 (or fatty acyl translocase [FAT], or scavenger receptor class B, member 3 [SCARB3] is an essential cell surface and skeletal muscle outer mitochondrial membrane glycoprotein involved in multiple functions in the body. CD36 serves as a ligand receptor of thrombospondin, long chain fatty acids, oxidized low density lipoproteins (LDLs and malaria-infected erythrocytes. CD36 also influences various diseases, including angiogenesis, thrombosis, atherosclerosis, malaria, diabetes, steatosis, dementia and obesity. Genetic deficiency of this protein results in significant changes in fatty acid and oxidized lipid uptake. Comparative CD36 amino acid sequences and structures and CD36 gene locations were examined using data from several vertebrate genome projects. Vertebrate CD36 sequences shared 53–100% identity as compared with 29–32% sequence identities with other CD36-like superfamily members, SCARB1 and SCARB2. At least eight vertebrate CD36 N-glycosylation sites were conserved which are required for membrane integration. Sequence alignments, key amino acid residues and predicted secondary structures were also studied. Three CD36 domains were identified including cytoplasmic, transmembrane and exoplasmic sequences. Conserved sequences included N- and C-terminal transmembrane glycines; and exoplasmic cysteine disulphide residues; TSP-1 and PE binding sites, Thr92 and His242, respectively; 17 conserved proline and 14 glycine residues, which may participate in forming CD36 ‘short loops’; and basic amino acid residues, and may contribute to fatty acid and thrombospondin binding. Vertebrate CD36 genes usually contained 12 coding exons. The human CD36 gene contained transcription factor binding sites (including PPARG and PPARA contributing to a high gene expression level (6.6 times average. Phylogenetic analyses examined the relationships and potential evolutionary origins of the vertebrate CD36 gene with vertebrate

  17. A sheep hydatid cyst glycoprotein as receptors for three toxic lectins, as well as Abrus precatorius and Ricinus communis agglutinins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, A M; Song, S C; Wu, J H; Pfüller, U; Chow, L P; Lin, J Y

    1995-01-18

    The binding properties of a glycoprotein with blood group P1 specificity isolated from sheep hydatid cyst fluid with Gal and GalNAc specific lectins was investigated by quantitative precipitin and precipitin inhibition assays. The glycoprotein completely precipitated Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA1), Abrus precatorius agglutinin (APA) and Mistletoe toxic lectin-I (ML-I). Only 1.0 microgram of P1 glycoprotein was required to precipitate 50% of 5.1 micrograms ML-I nitrogen. It also reacted well with abrin-a and ricin, precipitating over 73% of the lectin nitrogen added, but poorly or weakly with Dolichos biflorus (DBL), Vicia villosa (VVL, a mixture of A4, A2B2 and B4), VVL-B4, Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Maclura pomifera (MPL), Bauchinia purpurea alba (BPL) and Wistaria floribunda (WFL) lectins. When an inhibition assay in the range of 5.1 micrograms N to 5.9 micrograms N of lectins (ML-I, abrin-a; ricin, RCA1, and APA, and 10 micrograms P1 active glycoprotein interaction was performed; from 76 to 100% of the precipitations were inhibited by 0.44 and 0.52 mumol of Gal alpha 1-->4Gal and Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc, respectively, but not or insignificantly with 1.72 mumol of GlcNAc. The Gal alpha 1-->4Gal disaccharide found in this P1 active glycoprotein is a frequently occurring sequence of many glycosphingolipids located at the surface of mammalian cell membranes, especially human erythrocytes and intestinal cells for ligand binding and microbial toxin attachment. The present finding suggests that the Gal alpha 1-->4Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc sequence in this P1 active glycoprotein is one of the best glycoprotein receptors for three toxic lectins (ricin, abrin-a, and ML-I) as well as for APA, and RCA1, and the result of inhibition assay implies that these lectins are recognizing part or all of the Gal alpha 1-->4Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc sequence in the P1 active glycoprotein.

  18. When and in which patients can anticoagulation be resumed after intracerebral haemorrhage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Marietta

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Whether to resume the anticoagulant or the antiaggregant therapy after an episode of major haemorrhage is a difficult dilemma for the physician. The physician has to take into consideration two major questions: whether the benefits of restarting anticoagulation outweigh the risk, and if so, when and how should anticoagulation be restarted. Although some case reports suggest that anticoagulation can be withheld safely for short periods after ICH, even in patients with mechanical heart valves, it is still not clear if long-term anticoagulation can be safely reinstituted after haemorrhage, for example in patients with atrial fibrillation. In fact, no large and well-conducted randomised clinical trials are available, and there is lack of strong evidence on which guidelines recommendations can be based. The article summarise the available literature findings. Finally, a protocol is suggested which may represent a useful tool for assessing treatment options.

  19. Herpesvirus glycoproteins undergo multiple antigenic changes before membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Glauser

    Full Text Available Herpesvirus entry is a complicated process involving multiple virion glycoproteins and culminating in membrane fusion. Glycoprotein conformation changes are likely to play key roles. Studies of recombinant glycoproteins have revealed some structural features of the virion fusion machinery. However, how the virion glycoproteins change during infection remains unclear. Here using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies we show in situ that each component of the Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4 entry machinery--gB, gH/gL and gp150--changes in antigenicity before tegument protein release begins. Further changes then occurred upon actual membrane fusion. Thus virions revealed their final fusogenic form only in late endosomes. The substantial antigenic differences between this form and that of extracellular virions suggested that antibodies have only a limited opportunity to block virion membrane fusion.

  20. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics of fungal wall glycoproteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, Q.Y.; de Groot, P.W.J.; de Koster, C.G.; Klis, F.M.

    2008-01-01

    The manifold functions of fungal wall glycoproteins include maintenance of cell wall integrity, homotypic and heterotypic adhesion, biofilm formation, acquisition of iron and sterols, protein degradation and coping with oxidative stress. Transcriptome studies indicate that the expression levels of

  1. Optical sensing of anticoagulation status: Towards point-of-care coagulation testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M Tshikudi

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant overdose is associated with major bleeding complications. Rapid coagulation sensing may ensure safe and accurate anticoagulant dosing and reduce bleeding risk. Here, we report the novel use of Laser Speckle Rheology (LSR for measuring anticoagulation and haemodilution status in whole blood. In the LSR approach, blood from 12 patients and 4 swine was placed in disposable cartridges and time-varying intensity fluctuations of laser speckle patterns were measured to quantify the viscoelastic modulus during clotting. Coagulation parameters, mainly clotting time, clot progression rate (α-angle and maximum clot stiffness (MA were derived from the clot viscoelasticity trace and compared with standard Thromboelastography (TEG. To demonstrate the capability for anticoagulation sensing in patients, blood samples from 12 patients treated with warfarin anticoagulant were analyzed. LSR clotting time correlated with prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin time (r = 0.57-0.77, p<0.04 and all LSR parameters demonstrated good correlation with TEG (r = 0.61-0.87, p<0.04. To further evaluate the dose-dependent sensitivity of LSR parameters, swine blood was spiked with varying concentrations of heparin, argatroban and rivaroxaban or serially diluted with saline. We observed that anticoagulant treatments prolonged LSR clotting time in a dose-dependent manner that correlated closely with TEG (r = 0.99, p<0.01. LSR angle was unaltered by anticoagulation whereas TEG angle presented dose-dependent diminution likely linked to the mechanical manipulation of the clot. In both LSR and TEG, MA was largely unaffected by anticoagulation, and LSR presented a higher sensitivity to increased haemodilution in comparison to TEG (p<0.01. Our results establish that LSR rapidly and accurately measures the response of various anticoagulants, opening the opportunity for routine anticoagulation monitoring at the point-of-care or for patient self-testing.

  2. The anticoagulant ability of ferulic acid and its applications for improving the blood compatibility of silk fibroin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Song; Gao Zhen; Chen Xiaomeng; Lian Xiaojie; Zhu Hesun [School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zheng Jun; Sun Lizhong [Department of Cardiac Surgery, Cardiovascular Institute and Fu Wai Hospital, CAMS and PUMC, Beijing 100037 (China)], E-mail: wangsongbit@hotmail.com

    2008-12-15

    The hemocompatibility of silk fibroin (SF) was improved with ferulic acid (FA) by graft polymerization. Ferulic acid is an active ingredient of many Chinese herbal medicines, such as Chuanxiong (Rhizoma ligustici wallichii), Danggui (Angelica sinensis) and Awei (Asafoetida giantfennel), which have been used to treat cardiovascular diseases by Chinese physicians for thousands of years. The inhibitory functions of FA on blood coagulation and erythrocyte agglutination were first characterized by a Lee-White test tube method and a micropipette technique, respectively. Then, FA was immobilized on SF by graft polymerization and the surface composition of modified SF was characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and optical microscopy. The anticoagulant activity of modified SF was assessed, respectively, by in vitro clotting time measurements on a photo-optical clot detection instrument and with the Lee-White test tube method. The test results indicated that in comparison to untreated SF, the anticoagulant activity of modified SF has been improved significantly. Moreover, the SF surface composition is altered by FA but its {beta}-sheet conformation is not disturbed.

  3. Enzymatic sulfation of mucus glycoprotein in gastric mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liau, Y.H.; Carter, S.R.; Gwozdzinski, K.; Nadziejko, C.; Slomiany, A.; Slomiany, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    Among the posttranslational modifications that mucus glycoprotein undergo prior to secretion into the gastric lumen is the process of sulfation of the carbohydrate chains. These sulfate groups impart strongly negative charge to nucus glycoprotein and are thought to play a major role in the maintenance of gastric mucosal integrity. The authors report here the presence and some properties of an enzyme involved in the sulfation of gastric mucus glycoprotein. The sulfotransferase activity which catalyzes the transfer of sulfate ester group from PAPS to mucus glycoprotein was located in the detergent extracts of the microsomal fraction of rat gastric mucosa. Optimum enzymatic activity for sulfation of gastric mucin was obtained using 0.5% Triton X-100 and 25mM NaF at a pH of 6.8. ATP, ADP, MgCl 2 and MnCl 2 at concentrations examined were inhibitory. Under optimal conditions, the rate of sulfate incorporation was proportional to the microsomal enzyme protein concentration up to 50μg and remained constant with time of incubation for at least 1h. The apparent Km value of the enzyme for gastric mucus glycoprotein was 8.3 x 10 -6 M. The 35 S-labeled product of the enzyme reaction cochromatographed on Bio-Gel A-50 with gastric mucin, and gave on CsCl equilibrium density gradient centrifugation a band at the density of 1.48 in which the 35 S label coincided with the glycoprotein

  4. Nucleic acid-binding glycoproteins which solubilize nucleic acids in dilute acid: re-examination of the Ustilago maydis glycoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unrau, P.; Champ, D.R.; Young, J.L.; Grant, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    Holloman reported the isolation from Ustilago maydis of a glycoprotein which prevented the precipitation of nucleic acids in cold 5% trichloroacetic acid. Two glycoprotein fractions from U. maydis with this nucleic acid-solubilizing activity were isolated in our laboratory using improved purification procedures. The activity was not due to nuclease contamination. The glycoproteins are distinguished by: their ability to bind to concanavalin A-Sepharose; their differential binding to double- and single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid, and to ribonucleic acid; their molecular weights (46,000 and 69,000); and the relative amounts present in growing versus nongrowing cells. Both fractions required sulfhydryl-reducing conditions for optimal yields, specific activity, and stability. Nucleic acid binding was cooperative, the minimum number of glycoproteins required to make a native T7 DNA molecule soluble in dilute acid being estimated at 2 and 15, respectively.

  5. Antifreeze glycoprotein agents: structural requirements for activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Rondanelli, Patricio A; Marshall, Sergio H; Guzman, Fanny

    2011-11-01

    Antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) are considered to be the most efficient means to reduce ice damage to cell tissues since they are able to inhibit growth and crystallization of ice. The key element of antifreeze proteins is to act in a non-colligative manner which allows them to function at concentrations 300-500 times lowers than other dissolved solutes. During the past decade, AFGPs have demonstrated tremendous potential for many pharmaceutical and food applications. Presently, the only route to obtain AFGPs involves the time consuming and expensive process of isolation and purification from deep-sea polar fishes. Unfortunately, it is not amenable to mass production and commercial applications. The lack of understanding of the mechanism through which the AFGPs inhibit ice growth has also hampered the realization of industrial and biotechnological applications. Here we report the structural motifs that are essential for antifreeze activity of AFGPs, and propose a unified mechanism based on both recent studies of short alanine peptides and structure activity relationship of synthesized AFGPs. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. P-glycoprotein targeted nanoscale drug carriers

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Wengang

    2013-02-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) is a trend whereby tumor cells exposed to one cytotoxic agent develop cross-resistance to a range of structurally and functionally unrelated compounds. P -glycoprotein (P -gp) efflux pump is one of the mostly studied drug carrying processes that shuttle the drugs out of tumor cells. Thus, P -gp inhibitors have attracted a lot of attention as they can stop cancer drugs from being pumped out of target cells with the consumption of ATP. Using quantitive structure activity relationship (QSAR), we have successfully synthesized a series of novel P -gp inhibitors. The obtained dihydropyrroloquinoxalines series were fully characterized and then tested against bacterial and tumor assays with over-expressed P -gps. All compounds were bioactive especially compound 1c that had enhanced antibacterial activity. Furthermore, these compounds were utilized as targeting vectors to direct drug delivery vehicles such as silica nanoparticles (SNPs) to cancerous Hela cells with over expressed P -gps. Cell uptake studies showed a successful accumulation of these decorated SNPs in tumor cells compared to undecorated SNPs. The results obtained show that dihydropyrroloquinoxalines constitute a promising drug candidate for targeting cancers with MDR. Copyright © 2013 American Scientific Publishers All rights reserved.

  7. Splice variation in the cytoplasmic domains of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein affects its cellular localisation and transport1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Louise H; Traherne, James A; Plotnek, Gemma; Ward, Rosemary; Trowsdale, John

    2007-01-01

    Although myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein is a candidate autoantigen in multiple sclerosis, its function remains unknown. In humans, mRNA expressed by the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein gene is alternatively spliced resulting in at least nine unique protein isoforms. In this study, we investigated the sub-cellular localisation and membrane trafficking of six isoforms by cloning them into mammalian expression vectors. Confocal microscopy revealed that these protein products are expressed in different cellular compartments. While two full-length isoforms (25.6 and 25.1) are expressed at the cell surface, three alternatively spliced forms (22.7, 21.0 and 20.5) have a more intracellular distribution, localising to the endoplasmic reticulum and/or endosomes. Isoform 16.3, which lacks a transmembrane domain, is secreted. A switch in the sub-cellular localisation of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein may have profound effects on receptor:ligand interactions and consequently the function of the protein. The structural features of the alternative isoforms and their differential, sub-cellular expression patterns could dictate the exposure of major immunogenic determinants within the central nervous system. Our findings highlight myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein splicing as a factor that could be critical to the phenotypic expression of multiple sclerosis. PMID:17573820

  8. Humoral immune response to the entire human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein made in insect cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusche, J.R.; Lynn, D.L.; Robert-Guroff, M.; Langlois, A.J.; Lyerly, H.K.; Carson, H.; Krohn, K.; Ranki, A.; Gallo, R.C.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Putney, S.D.

    1987-10-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus envelope gene was expressed in insect cells by using a Baculovirus expression vector. The protein has an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa, appears on the surface of infected insect cells, and does not appear to be cleaved to glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. Goats immunized with the 160-kDa protein have high titers of antibody that neutralizes virus infection as measured by viral gene expression or cell cytolysis. In addition, immune sera can block fusion of human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in culture. Both neutralization and fusion-blocking activities are bound to and eluted from immobilized gp120.

  9. Structure and anticoagulant properties of sulfated glycosaminoglycans from primitive Chordates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAURO S. G. PAVÃO

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Dermatan sulfates and heparin, similar to the mammalian glycosaminoglycans, but with differences in the degree and position of sulfation were previously isolated from the body of the ascidian Styela plicata and Ascidia nigra. These differences produce profound effects on their anticoagulant properties. S. plicata dermatan sulfate composed by 2-O-sulfatedalpha-L-iduronic acid and 4-O-sulfated N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosamine residues is a potent anticoagulant due to a high heparin cofactor II activity. Surprisingly, it has a lower potency to prevent thrombus formation on an experimental model and a lower bleeding effect in rats than the mammalian dermatan sulfate. In contrast, A. nigra dermatan sulfate, also enriched in 2-O-sulfated alpha-L-iduronic acid, but in this case sulfated at O-6 of the N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosamine units, has no in vitro or in vivo anticoagulant activity, does not prevent thrombus formation but shows a bleeding effect similar to the mammalian glycosaminoglycan. Ascidian heparin, composed by 2-O-sulfated alpha-L-iduronic acid, N- and 6-O-sulfated glucosamine (75% and alpha-L-iduronic acid, N- and 6-O-sulfated glucosamine (25% disaccharide units has an anticoagulant activity 10 times lower than the mammalian heparin, is about 20 times less potent in the inhibition of thrombin by antithrombin, but has the same heparin cofactor II activity as mammalian heparin.Dermatam sulfato e heparina semelhantes aos glicosaminoglicanos de mamíferos, mas apresentando diferenças no grau e posição de sulfatação foram previamente isolados do corpo das ascídias Styela plicata e Ascidia nigra. Estas diferenças produzem efeitos profundos nas suas propriedades anticoagulantes. O dermatam sulfato de S. plicata, composto por resíduos de ácido alfa-L-idurônico 2-O-sulfatados e N-acetilgalactosamina 4-O-sulfatados é um potente anticoagulante devido a sua alta atividade de cofator II da heparina. Surpreendentemente, este polímero possui uma

  10. Cerebrovascular Accident due to Thyroid Storm: Should We Anticoagulate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Gonzalez-Bossolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid storm is a life-threatening condition that occurs secondary to an uncontrolled hyperthyroid state. Atrial fibrillation is a cardiovascular complication occurring in up to 15% of patients experiencing thyroid storm, and if left untreated this condition could have up to a 25% mortality rate. Thyroid storm with stroke is a rare presentation. This case report details a left middle cerebral artery (MCA stroke with global aphasia and thyroid storm in a 53-year-old Hispanic male patient. Although uncommon, this combination has been reported in multiple case series. Although it is well documented that dysfunctional thyroid levels promote a hypercoagulable state, available guidelines from multiple entities are unclear on whether anticoagulation therapy is appropriate in this situation.

  11. New oral anticoagulants in the prevention of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Jarząbek

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is associated with a few folds higher risk of stroke. Traditional vitamin K antagonists used in the prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation are often not efficient enough due to their interactions with a broad range of substances including medicines or food ingridients and problems with monitoring the treatment. New oral anticoagulants pose an alternative for the vitamin K antagonists. They are equally efficient in the prevention of stroke, but are safer and have no requirement for routine coagulation monitoring. We present a case of a patient with atrial fibrillation, high risk of tromboembolism and recurring episodes of hemorrhages. Considering the possible complications, rivaroxaban was administered.

  12. Prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis in pregnancy: from thrombolysis to anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Gonçalo; Aguiar, Carlos; Andrade, Maria João; Patrício, Lino; Freire, Isabel; Serrano, Fátima; Anjos, Rui; Mendes, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pregnant women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves are at increased risk for valve thrombosis. Management decisions for this life-threatening complication are complex. Open-heart surgery has a very high risk of maternal mortality and fetal loss. Bleeding and embolic risks associated with thrombolytic agents, the limited efficacy of thrombolysis in certain subgroups, and a lack of experience in the setting of pregnancy raise important concerns. We report a case of mitral prosthetic valve thrombosis in early pregnancy, which was successfully treated with streptokinase. Ten years later, the same patient had an uneventful pregnancy, throughout which acenocoumarol was maintained. With this case we review the prevention (with oral anticoagulant therapy) and treatment of prosthetic valve thrombosis during pregnancy, which is important for both obstetrician and cardiologist. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of novel anticoagulants for patients with mechanical heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Peter; DeSancho, Maria T

    2014-11-01

    The introduction of the target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOACs) has led to a major shift in the management of patients at risk for thrombosis. The landscape continues to evolve as the evidence regarding their efficacy and safety in various clinical situations emerges. Antithrombotic therapy for thromboprophylaxis in patients with mechanical heart valves is challenging. To date, the RE-ALIGN trial comparing dabigatran etexilate to warfarin is the only randomized controlled study in this patient population. The higher risk of thromboembolic and bleeding events in the group of patients who received dabigatran compared with warfarin reinforced current guidelines recommending against the use of TSOACs in patients with mechanical heart valves. However, additional studies are needed to find suitable alternatives to vitamin K antagonists in this unique patient population.

  14. Ischaemic stroke in patients treated with oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, L M; Cardona, P; Quesada, H; Lara, B; Rubio, F

    2016-01-01

    Cardioembolic stroke is associated with poorer outcomes. Prevention is based on oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy. Haemorrhage is the main complication of OACs, which are sometimes ineffective. We retrospectively reviewed 1014 consecutive patients who suffered an ischaemic stroke between 2011 and 2013, analysing those who were receiving OAC treatment at stroke onset (107 patients in total) with special attention to aetiology, outcomes, and INR value in the acute phase. The mean age (SD) was 71.9 (10) years. Patients had been treated with OACs for 5.9 (5.5) years; 98.1% of them were being treated for heart disease. INR was strokes were cardioembolic and 1.9% were atherothrombotic. Anticoagulation therapy was discontinued in 48 patients (44.9%) due to haemorrhagic transformation (24 patients), extensive infarction (23), or endarterectomy (1). Therapy was resumed in 24 patients (50%) after a mean lapse of 36 days. This was not possible in the remaining patients because of death or severe sequelae. New OACs (NOACs) were prescribed to 9 patients (18.7% of all potential candidates). At 3 months, patients with INR>1.7 in the acute phase exhibited better outcomes than patients with INR≤1.7 (mRS 0-2 in 62% vs 30.8%; death in 10% vs 38.4%; P=.0004). Some patients taking OACs suffer ischaemic strokes that are usually cardioembolic, especially if INR is below the therapeutic range. OACs can be resumed without complications, and NOACs are still underused. Despite cases in which treatment is ineffective, outcomes are better when INR is above 1.7 at stroke onset. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical significance of anti-domain 1 β2-glycoprotein I antibodies in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaniec, Teresa; Kaczor, Marcin P; Celińska-Löwenhoff, Magdalena; Polański, Stanisław; Musiał, Jacek

    2017-05-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is characterized by the presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in patients with thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity. In APS patients anti-domain 1 β2-glycoprotein I (anti-D1 β2GPI) IgG antibodies correlate strongly with thrombosis and to the lesser extent, with pregnancy complications. The aim of this study was to assess clinical utility of the anti-D1 β2GPI antibodies in the diagnosis and risk stratification of antiphospholipid syndrome. In this retrospective study 202 autoimmune patients were studied (primary APS - 58, secondary - 45 SLE - 99). Anticardiolipin (aCL) and anti-β 2 GPI (aβ 2 GPI antibodies) (IgG and IgM class) together with anti-D1 IgG were tested with QUANTA Flash chemiluminescent immunoassay and lupus anticoagulant (LA) with coagulometric methods. The highest anti-D1 values were observed in triple positive patients as compared to patients with other antiphospholipid antibody profiles. A strong correlation was found between levels of anti-D1 IgG and a β2GPI IgG antibodies for all patients analyzed (Spearman's ρ=0.87; p<0.0001). Anti-D1 IgG antibodies increase specificity resulting from classic aPL positivity but at the expense of sensitivity. Anti-D1 test does not add accuracy in predicting APS thrombotic complications on the top of accuracy offered by classic aPL tests and their profiles. Anti-D1 IgG antibodies did not add diagnostic power to the standard laboratory aPL tests as assessed by this retrospective study. A true clinical significance of anti-D1 antibodies in thrombotic risk stratification of aPL positive patients will require a properly designed clinical prospective trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Anticardiolipin antibody and anti-beta 2 glycoprotein I antibody assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raby, Anne; Moffat, Karen; Crowther, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease and is a risk factor for a number of clinical manifestations; the classic presentations include fetal death or thrombosis (arterial or venous thromboembolism), in the presence of persistently increased titers of antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies. The actual cause of APS is unknown but thought to be multifactorial. The disease is characterized by the presence of a heterogenous population of autoantibodies against phospholipid-binding proteins. APS presents either in isolation with no evidence of an underlying disease or in concert with an autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis. The wide diversity in clinical presentation often causes difficulty in identifying and treating patients and therefore a concise laboratory report containing interpretative comments is required to provide needed guidance to the clinician. For a diagnosis of APS to be made both clinical and laboratory classification criteria must be met. Laboratory testing to identify aPL antibodies includes lupus anticoagulant (liquid-based clotting assays) and immunological solid-phase assays (usually enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay formats) for IgG and/or IgM anticardiolipin (aCL) antibodies and anti-beta 2 glycoprotein I (β2-GPI) antibodies. Other autoantibodies, such as those directed against anionic phospholipids, can also be assayed; however they are not of clinical significance. Participation in a quality assurance program and an in-depth technical and clinical understanding of testing for aPL antibodies are required, as methods are limited by poor robustness, reproducibility, specificity, and standardization. Testing is further complicated by the lack of a "gold standard" laboratory test to diagnose or classify a patient as having APS. This chapter discusses the clinical and laboratory theoretical and technical aspects of aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody assays.

  17. P-glycoprotein activity and biological response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaalburg, W.; Hendrikse, N.H.; Elsinga, P.H.; Bart, J.; Waarde, A. van

    2005-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a transmembrane drug efflux pump encoded by the MDR-1 gene in humans. Most likely P-gp protects organs against endogenous and exogenous toxins by extruding toxic compounds such as chemotherapeutics and other drugs. Many drugs are substrates for P-gp. Since P-gp is also expressed in the blood-brain barrier, P-gp substrates reach lower concentrations in the brain than in P-gp-negative tissues. Failure of response to chemotherapy of malignancies can be due to intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. Many tumors are multidrug resistant (MDR); resistant to several structurally unrelated chemotherapeutic agents. Several mechanisms are involved in MDR of which P-gp is studied most extensively. P-gp extrudes drugs out of tumor cells resulting in decreased intracellular drug concentrations, leading to the MDR phenotype. Furthermore, the MDR-1 gene exhibits several single nucleotide polymorphisms, some of which result in different transport capabilities. P-gp functionality and the effect of P-gp modulation on the pharmacokinetics of novel and established drugs can be studied in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET) using carbon-11 and fluorine-18-labeled P-gp substrates and modulators. PET may demonstrate the consequences of genetic differences on tissue pharmacokinetics. Inhibitors such as calcium-channel blockers (verapamil), cyclosporin A, ONT-093, and XR9576 can modulate the P-gp functionality. With PET the effect of P-gp modulation on the bioavailability of drugs can be investigated in humans in vivo. PET also allows the measurement of the efficacy of newly developed P-gp modulators

  18. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in patients taking direct oral anticoagulants: A case series and discussion of management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph H. McMordie, MD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Direct oral anticoagulants are becoming more commonplace for the treatment of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and deep vein thrombosis. Unfortunately, effective reversal agents are not widely available limiting options for neurosurgical intervention during active anticoagulation. We report a case series of 3 patients treated for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage while taking direct oral anticoagulants. All three underwent open surgical clipping after adequate time was allowed for drug metabolism. Decision-making must take into account timing of intervention, drug half-life, and currently available reversal agents.

  19. Lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome and catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome in a patient with antidomain I antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Joris; Mohamed, Shirine; Revuz, Sabine; de Maistre, Emmanuel; de Laat, Bas; Marie, Pierre-Yves; Zuily, Stéphane; Lévy, Bruno; Regnault, Véronique; Wahl, Denis

    2016-07-01

    Lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome is a rare condition characterized by the association of acquired factor II deficiency and lupus anticoagulant. Contrary to classical antiphospholipid syndrome, it may cause severe life-threatening bleeding (89% of published cases). We report a patient, positive for antidomain I antibodies, with initially primary lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome without previous clinical manifestation or underlying systemic disease. Five years later, he experienced the first systemic lupus erythematous flare. Within a few days, catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome was diagnosed with heart, liver and kidney involvement. The patient recovered under pulse steroids, intravenous heparin and intravenous immunoglobulins.

  20. Treatment of metabolic alkalosis during continuous renal replacement therapy with regional citrate anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindgen-Milles, D; Amman, J; Kleinekofort, W; Morgera, S

    2008-04-01

    The use of citrate as an anticoagulant in continuous renal replacement therapy is an effective method to achieve regional anticoagulation of the extracorporeal blood circuit and to avoid systemic anticoagulation. This allows bleeding complications to be reduced and filter life time to be prolonged. However, citrate enters the systemic circulation and is metabolized in the liver to bicarbonate, causing metabolic alkalosis in some patients. In this case report, we discuss therapeutic interventions to control the acid-base status and to restore normal pH during continuous citrate hemodialysis.

  1. Monitoring the Effects and Antidotes of the Non-vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahmat, Nur A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, we have witnessed the emergence of the oral non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which have numerous advantages compared with the vitamin K antagonists, particularly their lack of need for monitoring; as a result their use is increasing. Nonetheless, the NOACs face two...... major challenges: the need for reliable laboratory assays to assess their anticoagulation effect, and the lack of approved antidotes to reverse their action. This article provides an overview of monitoring the anticoagulant effect of NOACs and their potential specific antidotes in development....

  2. Anticoagulation and delayed bowel resection in the management of mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Kee; Chun, Jae Min; Huh, Seung

    2013-08-14

    Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis is potentially lethal because it can result in mesenteric ischemia and, ultimately, bowel infarction requiring surgical intervention. Systemic anticoagulation for the prevention of thrombus propagation is a well-recognized treatment modality and the current mainstay therapy for patients with acute mesenteric venous thrombosis. However, the decision between prompt surgical exploration vs conservative treatment with anticoagulation is somewhat difficult in patients with suspected bowel ischemia. Here we describe a patient with acute mesenteric venous thrombosis who presented with bowel ischemia and was treated with anticoagulation and delayed short-segment bowel resection.

  3. Therapeutic Anticoagulant Does not Modify Thromboses Rate Vein after Venous Reconstruction Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ouaïssi

    2008-01-01

    confluent SMV (n=12; type III (n=1 resulted from a primary end-to-end anastomosis above confluent and PTFE graph was used for reconstruction for type IV (n=2. Curative anticoagulant treatment was always indicated after type IV (n=2 resection, and after resection of type II when the length of venous resection was longer than ≥2 cm. Results. Venous thrombosis rate reached: 0%, 41%, and 100% for type I, II, IV resections, respectively. Among them four patients received curative anticoagulant treatment. Conclusion. After a portal vein resection was achieved in the course of a PD, curative postoperative anticoagulation does not prevent efficiently the onset of thrombosis.

  4. Will NOACs become the new standard of care in anticoagulation therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergene Oktay

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in the general population, with a prevalence of 1–3%, which increases with age, reaching 15% in elderly people. Prophylaxis of ischemic stroke with warfarin was the gold standard of medical management for many years. On the other hand heparin and warfarin was the main pharmacologic agents for the prophylaxis/treatment of venous thromboembolism. In the last 5 years warfarin is getting replaced by non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants at least partly. In this article it is attempted to foresee whether new oral anticoagulants will become the new standard of care in anticoagulation therapy.

  5. Where do we go from here? Reappraising the data on anticoagulation in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirulis, Meghan M; Ryan, John J

    2016-05-01

    The use of anticoagulation as part of the treatment regimen in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains a topic of debate. A recently published analysis of anticoagulation use in the Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-Term PAH Disease Management (REVEAL) study offers conflicting conclusions regarding the benefit of this therapeutic strategy. There remains no robust randomized trial in PAH weighing the risks versus benefits of including anticoagulation in treatment regimens, leaving clinicians to surmise value in individual patients. Reexamination of available data may help to provide guidance on this controversial topic in the absence of future dedicated investigations.

  6. Practical considerations in emergency management of bleeding in the setting of target-specific oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael P; Trujillo, Toby C; Nordenholz, Kristen E

    2014-04-01

    The recent arrival of the target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOACs) offers potential advantages in the field of anticoagulation. However, there are no rapid and accurate and routinely available laboratory assays to evaluate their contribution to clinical bleeding. With the expanding clinical indications for the TSOACs, and the arrival of newer reversal agents on the market, the emergency clinician will need to be familiar with drug specifics as well as methods for anticoagulation reversal. This review offers a summary of the literature and some practical strategies for the approach to the patient taking TSOACs and the management of bleeding in these cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A mainframe interfacing computer management system for the control of oral anticoagulant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, P; Stear, M

    1992-01-01

    A unique computerized management system has been used to control the anticoagulation of over 400 patients at a large teaching hospital for the last eighteen months. The system is located on the main pathology computer which can be interfaced with the patient administration system (PAS). This enables files in the anticoagulant program to be linked with files in the PAS and files in the haematology database. This system has many advantages over a stand-alone microcomputer system and will form the basis for the next generation of computerized anticoagulant management systems.

  8. Structure?Activity Relationship Studies of Indole-Based Compounds as Small Molecule HIV-1 Fusion Inhibitors Targeting Glycoprotein 41

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Guangyan; Sofiyev, Vladimir; Kaur, Hardeep; Snyder, Beth A.; Mankowski, Marie K.; Hogan, Priscilla A.; Ptak, Roger G.; Gochin, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    We previously described indole-containing compounds with the potential to inhibit HIV-1 fusion by targeting the hydrophobic pocket of transmembrane glycoprotein gp41. Here we report optimization and structure?activity relationship studies on the basic scaffold, defining the role of shape, contact surface area, and molecular properties. Thirty new compounds were evaluated in binding, cell?cell fusion, and viral replication assays. Below a 1 ?M threshold, correlation between binding and biologi...

  9. Alkylation of phosphorothioated thrombin binding aptamers improves the selectivity of inhibition of tumor cell proliferation upon anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiantao; Zhu, Yuejie; Wang, Chao; Guan, Zhu; Zhang, Lihe; Yang, Zhenjun

    2017-07-01

    Recently, aptamers have been extensively researched for therapy and diagnostic applications. Thrombin-binding aptamer is a 15nt deoxyribonucleic acid screened by SELEX, it can specifically bind to thrombin and inhibit blood coagulation. Since it is also endowed with excellent antitumor activity, the intrinsic anticoagulation advantage converted to a main potential side effect for its further application in antiproliferative therapy. Site-specific alkylation was conducted through nucleophilic reaction of phosphorothioated TBAs using bromide reagents. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements were used to evaluate anticoagulation activity, and a CCK-8 assay was used to determine cell proliferation activity. The CD spectra of the modified TBAs were weakened, and their affinity for thrombin was dramatically reduced, as reflected by the K D values. On the other hand, their inhibition of A549 cells was retained. Incorporation of different alkyls apparently disrupted the binding of TBA to thrombin while maintaining the antitumor activity. A new modification strategy was established for the use of TBA as a more selective antitumor agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ebola virus glycoprotein needs an additional trigger, beyond proteolytic priming for membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shridhar Bale

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Ebolavirus belongs to the family filoviridae and causes severe hemorrhagic fever in humans with 50-90% lethality. Detailed understanding of how the viruses attach to and enter new host cells is critical to development of medical interventions. The virus displays a trimeric glycoprotein (GP(1,2 on its surface that is solely responsible for membrane attachment, virus internalization and fusion. GP(1,2 is expressed as a single peptide and is cleaved by furin in the host cells to yield two disulphide-linked fragments termed GP1 and GP2 that remain associated in a GP(1,2 trimeric, viral surface spike. After entry into host endosomes, GP(1,2 is enzymatically cleaved by endosomal cathepsins B and L, a necessary step in infection. However, the functional effects of the cleavage on the glycoprotein are unknown.We demonstrate by antibody binding and Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (DXMS of glycoproteins from two different ebolaviruses that although enzymatic priming of GP(1,2 is required for fusion, the priming itself does not initiate the required conformational changes in the ectodomain of GP(1,2. Further, ELISA binding data of primed GP(1,2 to conformational antibody KZ52 suggests that the low pH inside the endosomes also does not trigger dissociation of GP1 from GP2 to effect membrane fusion.The results reveal that the ebolavirus GP(1,2 ectodomain remains in the prefusion conformation upon enzymatic cleavage in low pH and removal of the glycan cap. The results also suggest that an additional endosomal trigger is necessary to induce the conformational changes in GP(1,2 and effect fusion. Identification of this trigger will provide further mechanistic insights into ebolavirus infection.

  11. Surface labeling of Pneumocystis carinii from in vitro culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radding, J.A.; Armstrong, M.Y.; Bogucki, M.S.; Richards, F.F.

    1989-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii is an opportunistic pathogen of man, carried as a commensal in healthy subjects. It frequently causes a fatal pneumonia in the immunosuppressed host. It is a major complication of HIV-1 infection in man (AIDS). Using surface radioiodination of rat-derived P. carinii trophozoites obtained from in vitro culture, a major surface glycoprotein (gp120) has been identified. The glycoprotein exhibits adherent behavior similar to that of the intact organism. Purification of gp120 by conventional methods was unsuccessful as the glycoprotein irreversibly bound to numerous column matrices. A combination of gel chromatography and hydroxyapatite chromatography in sodium dodecylsulfate was utilized to purify the glycoprotein. Some preliminary characterization of the glycoprotein is presented

  12. Pollen tube access to the ovule is mediated by glycoprotein secretion on the obturator of apple (Malus × domestica, Borkh).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losada, Juan M; Herrero, Maria

    2017-04-01

    Within the ovary, the obturator bridges the pathway of the pollen tube from the style to the ovule. Despite its widespread presence among flowering plants, its function has only been studied in a handful of species, and the molecules involved in pollen tube-obturator cross-talk have not been explored hitherto. This work evaluates the involvement of glucans and glycoproteins on pollen tube growth in the obturator of apple flowers ( Malus × domestica) . Pollen tube kinetics were sequentially examined in the pistil and related to changes occurring on the obturator using histochemistry and inmunocytochemistry. To discriminate between changes in the obturator induced by pollen tubes from those developmentally regulated, both pollinated and unpollinated pistils were examined. Pollen tube growth rates were slow in the stigma, faster in the style and slow again in the ovary. The arrival of pollen tubes at the obturator was concomitant with the secretion of proteins, saccharides and glycoprotein epitopes belonging to extensins and arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs). While some of these secretions - extensins and AGPs labelled by JIM13 - were developmentally regulated, others - AGPs labelled by JIM8 - were elicited by the presence of pollen tubes. Following pollen tube passage, all these glycoproteins were depleted. The results show a timely secretion of glycoproteins on the obturator surface concomitant with pollen tube arrival at this structure. The fact that their secretion is depleted following pollen tube passage strongly suggests their role in regulating pollen tube access to the ovule. Remarkably, both the regulation of the secretion of the different glycoproteins, as well as their association with the performance of pollen tubes exhibit similarities with those observed in the stigma, in line with their common developmental origin. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  13. Biosynthesis of ascites sialoglycoprotein-1, the major O-linked glycoprotein of 13762 rat mammary adenocarcinoma ascites cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielman, J.

    1987-01-01

    The present studies were undertaken to determine the timing of the major events in biosynthesis, and to characterize the contributions of chain initiation and elongation in maturation of the glycoprotein. Initiation of the earliest O-linked chains was detected by analysis of conversion of 3 H-thr to 3 H 2-aminobutyrate following mild alkaline borohydride elimination of O-linked sugars from peanut lectin-precipitated ASGP-1. Initiation was detected within 5 min of translation; amino sugar analysis of GlcNH 2 -labeled, trypsinized cells also showed that GalNAc was added as late as 5 min prior to arrival of ASGP-1 at the cell surface. Thus initiation occurs throughout biosynthesis. Maturation of the glycoprotein from a lightly-glycosylated immature form to the heavily-glycosylated mature from involved both continued initiation of new chains and chain elongation, and occurred with a half-time of about 30 min. Analysis of labeled ASGP-1 released from the cell surface by trypsinization showed that although some newly-synthesized ASGP-1 reached the cell surface within 70-80 min of protein synthesis, the half-time for appearance of mature glycoprotein was in excess of 4 hr, indicating that most molecules reside in an intracellular compartment(s) for a considerable time

  14. Thyroid Hormone and P-Glycoprotein in Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Davis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available P-glycoprotein (P-gp; multidrug resistance pump 1, MDR1; ABCB1 is a plasma membrane efflux pump that when activated in cancer cells exports chemotherapeutic agents. Transcription of the P-gp gene (MDR1 and activity of the P-gp protein are known to be affected by thyroid hormone. A cell surface receptor for thyroid hormone on integrin αvβ3 also binds tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac, a derivative of L-thyroxine (T4 that blocks nongenomic actions of T4 and of 3,5,3′-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3 at αvβ3. Covalently bound to a nanoparticle, tetrac as nanotetrac acts at the integrin to increase intracellular residence time of chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin and etoposide that are substrates of P-gp. This action chemosensitizes cancer cells. In this review, we examine possible molecular mechanisms for the inhibitory effect of nanotetrac on P-gp activity. Mechanisms for consideration include cancer cell acidification via action of tetrac/nanotetrac on the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE1 and hormone analogue effects on calmodulin-dependent processes and on interactions of P-gp with epidermal growth factor (EGF and osteopontin (OPN, apparently via αvβ3. Intracellular acidification and decreased H+ efflux induced by tetrac/nanotetrac via NHE1 is the most attractive explanation for the actions on P-gp and consequent increase in cancer cell retention of chemotherapeutic agent-ligands of MDR1 protein.

  15. Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein: Deciphering a Target in Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Peschl

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG, a member of the immunoglobulin (Ig superfamily, is a myelin protein solely expressed at the outermost surface of myelin sheaths and oligodendrocyte membranes. This makes MOG a potential target of cellular and humoral immune responses in inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Due to its late postnatal developmental expression, MOG is an important marker for oligodendrocyte maturation. Discovered about 30 years ago, it is one of the best-studied autoantigens for experimental autoimmune models for multiple sclerosis (MS. Human studies, however, have yielded controversial results on the role of MOG, especially MOG antibodies (Abs, as a biomarker in MS. But with improved detection methods using different expression systems to detect Abs in patients’ samples, this is meanwhile no longer the case. Using cell-based assays with recombinant full-length, conformationally intact MOG, several recent studies have revealed that MOG Abs can be found in a subset of predominantly pediatric patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM, aquaporin-4 (AQP4 seronegative neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD, monophasic or recurrent isolated optic neuritis (ON, or transverse myelitis, in atypical MS and in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-encephalitis with overlapping demyelinating syndromes. Whereas MOG Abs are only transiently observed in monophasic diseases such as ADEM and their decline is associated with a favorable outcome, they are persistent in multiphasic ADEM, NMOSD, recurrent ON, or myelitis. Due to distinct clinical features within these diseases it is controversially disputed to classify MOG Ab-positive cases as a new disease entity. Neuropathologically, the presence of MOG Abs is characterized by MS-typical demyelination and oligodendrocyte pathology associated with Abs and complement. However, it remains unclear whether MOG Abs are a mere inflammatory bystander effect or truly pathogenetic

  16. Convulxin binds to native, human glycoprotein Ib alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaji, Sachiko; Kanaji, Taisuke; Furihata, Kenichi; Kato, Kazunobu; Ware, Jerry L; Kunicki, Thomas J

    2003-10-10

    Convulxin (CVX), a C-type snake protein from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom, is the quintessential agonist for studies of the collagen receptor, glycoprotein VI (GPVI) and its role in platelet adhesion to collagens. In this study, CVX, purified from venom, behaves as expected, i.e. it binds to platelet GPVI and recombinant human GPVI, induces platelet aggregation and platelet prothrombinase activity, and binds uniquely to GPVI in ligand blots of SDS-denatured proteins. Nonetheless, we find that CVX has a dual specificity for both GPVI and native but not denatured human GPIb alpha. First, CVX binds to human GPIb alpha expressed on the surface of CHO cells. Second, CVX binds weakly to murine platelet GPIb alpha but more strongly to human platelet GPIb alpha, as evidenced by comparative binding to wild-type, GPVI(-/-), FcR gamma (-/-), and human GPIb transgenic mice. Third, the binding of CVX to human GPIb alpha is inhibited by soluble, recombinant human GPVI. Fourth, CVX binding to GPIb alpha is disrupted by phenylalanine substitutions at GPIb alpha tyrosine-276, tyrosine-278, and tyrosine-279, which also disrupts von Willebrand factor and alpha-thrombin binding to GPIb alpha. Fifth, CVX binding to GPIb alpha on Chinese hamster ovary cell transfectants is inhibited by function-blocking murine monoclonal anti-GPIb alpha antibodies. Lastly, CVX fails to bind to denatured GPIb alpha in detergent extracts of platelets. Three separate preparations of CVX (two purified by the authors; one obtained commercially) produced equivalent results. These results indicate that CVX exhibits dual specificity for both native GPIb alpha and GPVI. Furthermore, the binding site on GPIb alpha for CVX may be close to that for von Willebrand factor. Therefore, a contribution of GPIb alpha to CVX-induced platelet responses needs to be carefully re-evaluated.

  17. Study of the role of the covalently linked cell wall protein (Ccw14p) and yeast glycoprotein (Ygp1p) within biofilm formation in a flor yeast strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-García, J; Coi, A L; Zara, G; García-Martínez, T; Mauricio, J C; Budroni, M

    2018-03-01

    Flor yeasts are Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains noted by their ability to create a type of biofilm in the air-liquid interface of some wines, known as 'flor' or 'velum', for which certain proteins play an essential role. Following a proteomic study of a flor yeast strain, we deleted the CCW14 (covalently linked cell wall protein) and YGP1 (yeast glycoprotein) genes-codifying for two cell surface glycoproteins-in a haploid flor yeast strain and we reported that both influence the weight of the biofilm as well as cell adherence (CCW14).

  18. Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Glycoprotein B by a Recombinant Vaccinia Virus and Protection of Mice against Lethal Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantin, Edouard M.; Eberle, Richard; Baldick, Joseph L.; Moss, Bernard; Willey, Dru E.; Notkins, Abner L.; Openshaw, Harry

    1987-08-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) strain F gene encoding glycoprotein gB was isolated and modified at the 5' end by in vitro oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. The modified gB gene was inserted into the vaccinia virus genome and expressed under the control of a vaccinia virus promoter. The mature gB glycoprotein produced by the vaccinia virus recombinant was glycosylated, was expressed at the cell surface, and was indistinguishable from authentic HSV-1 gB in terms of electrophoretic mobility. Mice immunized intradermally with the recombinant vaccinia virus produced gB-specific neutralizing antibodies and were resistant to a lethal HSV-1 challenge.

  19. Anticoagulant Prairie Dog Bait Risk Mitigation Measures to Protect Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Web page contains information on how certified pesticide applicators can use anticoagulant prairie dog bait products such as Rozol and Kaput-D while minimizing exposure risks to listed and non-target species.

  20. Guideline-related barriers to optimal prescription of oral anticoagulants in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukenhorst, A. L.; Arts, D. L.; Lucassen, W.; Jager, K. J.; van der Veer, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines provide recommendations for antithrombotic treatment to prevent stroke in people with atrial fibrillation, but oral anticoagulant prescriptions in Dutch primary care are often discordant with these recommendations. Suboptimal guideline features (i.e. format and content) have been

  1. Aspirin or anticoagulants for treating recurrent miscarriage in women without antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaandorp, Stef; Di Nisio, Marcello; Goddijn, Mariette; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2009-01-01

    Background Since hypercoagulability might result in recurrent miscarriage, anticoagulant agents could potentially increase the live-birth rate in subsequent pregnancies in women with either inherited thrombophilia or unexplained recurrent miscarriage. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety

  2. Anticoagulants for the treatment of recurrent pregnancy loss in women without antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Nisio, M.; Peters, L. W.; Middeldorp, S.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since hypercoagulability might result in recurrent pregnancy loss, anticoagulant agents could potentially increase the live-birth rate in subsequent pregnancies in women with either inherited thrombophilia or unexplained pregnancy loss. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of

  3. Congenital Malformations Associated with the Administration of Oral Anticoagulants During Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettifor, J. M.; Benson, R.

    1975-01-01

    Reported are case histories of three infants with congenital malformations (including defective formation of the nose and hands) associated with ingestion of oral anticoagulants during the first trimester of pregnancy. (CL)

  4. The potential interaction between oral anticoagulants and acetaminophen in everyday practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bemt, PMLA; Geven, LM; Kuitert, NA; Risselada, A; Brouwers, JRBJ

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The drug-drug interaction between oral anticoagulants (especially warfarin) and acetaminophen has been described, but evidence is conflicting and evidence for a similar interaction between acenocoumarol or phenprocoumon and acetaminophen is limited. Therefore, a study was performed to

  5. Recurrent venous thromboembolism and abnormal uterine bleeding with anticoagulant and hormone therapy use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinelli, Ida; Lensing, Anthonie W. A.; Middeldorp, Saskia; Levi, Marcel; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; van Bellen, Bonno; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A.; Cohen, Alexander T.; Trajanovic, Mila; Gebel, Martin; Lam, Phuong; Wells, Philip S.; Prins, Martin H.

    2016-01-01

    Women receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) require adequate contraception because of the potential for fetal complications. It is unknown whether the use of hormonal therapy, especially those containing estrogens, is associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) during anticoagulation.

  6. Stability of direct oral anticoagulants in whole blood and plasma from patients in steady state treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGrail, Rie; Revsholm, Jesper; Nissen, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    Using functional haemostasis assays, we demonstrated important differences in stability of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in citrated whole blood and plasma from DOAC treated patients. Laboratories and clinicians should take this into consideration and adjust clinical practices accordingly....

  7. Anticoagulation dilemma in a high-risk patient with On-X valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami M Karkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thromboembolism continues to be a major concern in patients with mechanical heart valves, especially in those with unsatisfactory anticoagulation levels. The new On-X valve (On-X Life Technologies, Austin, TX, USA has been reported as having unique structural characteristics that offer lower thrombogenicity to the valve. We report a case where the patient received no or minimal systemic anticoagulation after placement of On-X mitral and aortic valves due to development of severe mucosal arterio-venous malformations yet did not show any evidence of thromboembolism. This case report reinforces the findings of recent studies that lower anticoagulation levels may be acceptable in patients with On-X valves and suggests this valve may be particularly useful in those in whom therapeutic levels of anticoagulation cannot be achieved due to increased risk of bleeding.

  8. Switching, Adverse Effects and Use of Over-the-Counter Analgesics among Users of Oral Anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Hyllested, Lea Maria Ronneberg; Meegaard, Line

    2017-01-01

    collected information concerning the patients' knowledge of their anticoagulant treatment including prior drug switching. Further, patients were asked about use of over-the-counter analgesics, adverse effects, and how the treatment affected their everyday life. Among 335 eligible patients, 301 (90%) agreed......) to a NOAC. Switching was most frequently caused by inconvenience (34%) and adverse effects (23%). Although half of all patients had recently bought over-the-counter analgesics, purchase of ibuprofen and aspirin was rare (6%). More VKA users than NOAC users felt limited in their everyday life because...... of anticoagulant treatment (18% vs. 9%). Among non-incident NOAC users, 21% had experienced adverse effects during their current treatment. Based on first-hand information from a large sample of anticoagulant users, we conclude that the main drug-related issues leading to anticoagulant switching and perceived...

  9. Improved late survival and disability after stroke with therapeutic anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation: a population study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, Niamh

    2011-09-01

    Although therapeutic anticoagulation improves early (within 1 month) outcomes after ischemic stroke in hospital-admitted patients with atrial fibrillation, no information exists on late outcomes in unselected population-based studies, including patients with all stroke (ischemic and hemorrhagic).

  10. Australine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid that inhibits amyloglucosidase and glycoprotein processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tropea, J.E.; Molyneux, R.J.; Kaushal, G.P.; Pan, Y.T.; Mitchell, M.; Elbein, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    Australine is a polyhydroxylated pyrrolizidine alkaloid that was isolated from the seeds of the Australian tree Castanospermum australe and characterized by NMR and X-ray diffraction analysis. Since swainsonine and catanospermine are polyhydroxylated indolizidine alkaloids that inhibit specific glycosidases, the authors tested australine against a variety of exoglycosidases to determine whether it would inhibit any of these enzymes. This alkaloid proved to be a good inhibitor of the α-glucosidase amyloglucosidase (50% inhibition at 5.8 μM), but it did not inhibit β-glucosidase, α- or β-mannosidase, or α- or β-galactosidase. The inhibition of amyloglucosidase was of a competitive nature. Australine also inhibited the glycoprotein processing enzyme glucosidase I, but had only slight activity toward glucosidase II. When incubated with cultured cells, this alkaloid inhibited glycoprotein processing at the glucosidase I step and caused the accumulation of glycoproteins with Glc 3 Man 7-9 (GlcNAc) 2 -oligosaccharides

  11. A new instrument for measuring anticoagulation-related quality of life: development and preliminary validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiklund Ingela

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anticoagulation can reduce quality of life, and different models of anticoagulation management might have different impacts on satisfaction with this component of medical care. Yet, to our knowledge, there are no scales measuring quality of life and satisfaction with anticoagulation that can be generalized across different models of anticoagulation management. We describe the development and preliminary validation of such an instrument – the Duke Anticoagulation Satisfaction Scale (DASS. Methods The DASS is a 25-item scale addressing the (a negative impacts of anticoagulation (limitations, hassles and burdens; and (b positive impacts of anticoagulation (confidence, reassurance, satisfaction. Each item has 7 possible responses. The DASS was administered to 262 patients currently receiving oral anticoagulation. Scales measuring generic quality of life, satisfaction with medical care, and tendency to provide socially desirable responses were also administered. Statistical analysis included assessment of item variability, internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha, scale structure (factor analysis, and correlations between the DASS and demographic variables, clinical characteristics, and scores on the above scales. A follow-up study of 105 additional patients assessed test-retest reliability. Results 220 subjects answered all items. Ceiling and floor effects were modest, and 25 of the 27 proposed items grouped into 2 factors (positive impacts, negative impacts, this latter factor being potentially subdivided into limitations versus hassles and burdens. Each factor had a high degree of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.78–0.91. The limitations and hassles factors consistently correlated with the SF-36 scales measuring generic quality of life, while the positive psychological impact scale correlated with age and time on anticoagulation. The intra-class correlation coefficient for test-retest reliability was 0.80. Conclusions

  12. New insights into the Hendra virus attachment and entry process from structures of the virus G glycoprotein and its complex with Ephrin-B2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Xu

    Full Text Available Hendra virus and Nipah virus, comprising the genus Henipavirus, are recently emerged, highly pathogenic and often lethal zoonotic agents against which there are no approved therapeutics. Two surface glycoproteins, the attachment (G and fusion (F, mediate host cell entry. The crystal structures of the Hendra G glycoprotein alone and in complex with the ephrin-B2 receptor reveal that henipavirus uses Tryptophan 122 on ephrin-B2/B3 as a "latch" to facilitate the G-receptor association. Structural-based mutagenesis of residues in the Hendra G glycoprotein at the receptor binding interface document their importance for viral attachments and entry, and suggest that the stability of the Hendra-G-ephrin attachment complex does not strongly correlate with the efficiency of viral entry. In addition, our data indicates that conformational rearrangements of the G glycoprotein head domain upon receptor binding may be the trigger leading to the activation of the viral F fusion glycoprotein during virus infection.

  13. An alternative conformation of the gp41 heptad repeat 1 region coiled coil exists in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mische, Claudia C.; Yuan Wen; Strack, Bettina; Craig, Stewart; Farzan, Michael; Sodroski, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) transmembrane envelope glycoprotein, gp41, which mediates virus-cell fusion, exists in at least three different conformations within the trimeric envelope glycoprotein complex. The structures of the prefusogenic and intermediate states are unknown; structures representing the postfusion state have been solved. In the postfusion conformation, three helical heptad repeat 2 (HR2) regions pack in an antiparallel fashion into the hydrophobic grooves on the surface of a triple-helical coiled coil formed by the heptad repeat 1 (HR1) regions. We studied the prefusogenic conformation of gp41 by mutagenic alteration of membrane-anchored and soluble forms of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. Our results indicate that, in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein precursor, the gp41 HR1 region is in a conformation distinct from that of a trimeric coiled coil. Thus, the central gp41 coiled coil is formed during the transition of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins from the precursor state to the receptor-bound intermediate

  14. Characterization of a human glycoprotein with a potential role in sperm-egg fusion: cDNA cloning, immunohistochemical localization, and chromosomal assignment of the gene (AEGL1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Masaru; Fujimoto, Seiichiro; Takano, Hiroko [Hokkaido Univ. School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    Acidic epididymal glycoprotein (AEG), thus far identified only in rodents, is one of the sperm surface proteins involved in the fusion of the sperm and egg plasma membranes. In the present study, we describe the isolation and characterization of cDNA encoding a human glycoprotein related to AEG. Although this protein, designated ARP (AEG-related protein), is not the ortholog of rodent AEG, it resembles AEG in that it is an epididymal secretory glycoprotein that binds to the postacrosomal region of the sperm head. The fact that no AEG mRNA can be detected in the human epididymis suggests that ARP might be the functional counterpart of rodent AEG. The gene encoding ARP (AEGL1) was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to 6p21.1-p21.2. This result indicates that AEGL1 and the mouse gene for AEG are located in the chromosomal segments with conserved syntenies. 43 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Isolated gastrocnemius and soleal vein thrombosis: should these patients receive therapeutic anticoagulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautz, Timothy B; Abbas, Farah; Walsh, Sarah J Novis; Chow, Christopher; Amaranto, Daniel J; Wang, Edward; Blackburn, Donna; Pearce, William H; Kibbe, Melina R

    2010-04-01

    To determine the incidence of isolated gastrocnemius and soleal vein thrombosis (IGSVT) and the effect of anticoagulation on venous thromboembolism (VTE) events in patients with IGSVT. Although IGSVT is diagnosed with increasing frequency, the clinical significance and optimal management remains unknown. Vascular laboratory studies from April 2002 to April 2007 were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients with IGSVT. Medical records were reviewed for demographic data, risk factors, treatment modalities, and VTE events. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed. Of 38,426 lower extremity venous duplex studies, 406 patients with IGSVT were included in this study. Mean follow-up was 7.5 +/- 11 months. The overall incidence of VTE among the entire cohort was 18.7%, which included 3.9% pulmonary embolism and 16.3% deep venous thrombosis, with 1.5% of patients having both pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis. However, the incidence of VTE was 30% (36/119) and 27% (13/48) in patients who received no or prophylactic anticoagulation, respectively, but only 12% in patients treated with therapeutic anticoagulation (23/188; P = 0.0003). Multivariate analysis identified lack of therapeutic anticoagulation (P = 0.017) and history of VTE (P = 0.011) as independent predictors of subsequent VTE development. The rate of IGSVT resolution during follow up was 61.2% with therapeutic anticoagulation, but only 40.0% and 41.0% with prophylactic or no anticoagulation, respectively (P = 0.003). IGSVT is associated with a clinically significant rate of VTE which is dramatically reduced with therapeutic anticoagulation. These data warrant further investigation, taking into account the risks and benefits of anticoagulation.

  16. Prevalence of lupus anticoagulant in multiparous women in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awodu, O A; Ejele, O A; Shokunbi, W A; Enosolease, M E

    2003-03-01

    Lupus anticoagulant which in the past was regarded as a laboratory nuisance is now known to be associated with numerous clinical conditions including thrombosis and recurrent foetal loss, however, no work has been done to assess its prevalence in non-pregnant healthy multiparous women. Our aim therefore was to determine the prevalence of lupus anticoagulant in non-pregnant multiparous Nigerian women of childbearing age. Fifty non-pregnant multiparous women who were considered healthy following verbal interviews were studied. An eligibility criterion was used. Coagulation studies were performed on plasma samples from all the women using the Kaolin clotting time. Mixing experiments were conducted on samples with prolonged clotting time to detect the presence of the lupus anticoagulant. The Kaolin clotting time ratio of greater than or equal to 1.2 was considered positive for the lupus anticoagulant. Forty-four (88%) of the 50 women had a normal cloning time, 2(4%) had subnormal clotting time while 4(8%) of them had a prolonged Kaolin clotting time. Mixing experiments on these 4 samples revealed Kaolin clotting time ratios of over 1.2, signifying the presence of the lupus anticoagulant (i.e. 8 per cent prevalence) among the population of women studied Multiparous women with the lupus anticoagulant may not be symptomatic therefore the anticoagulant should be screened for in women with unexplained prolongation of cloning time. We recommend that these women should be followed up especially in pregnancy to forestall any of the obstetric complications that have been associated with the lupus anticoagulant.

  17. Anticoagulation therapy a risk factor for the development of chronic subdural hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aspegren, Oskar P.; Åstrand, Ramona; Lundgren, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease among the elderly and with increasing incidence we have chosen to focus on associations between development and recurrence of CSDH and anticoagulation and/or antiplatelet agent therapy.......Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease among the elderly and with increasing incidence we have chosen to focus on associations between development and recurrence of CSDH and anticoagulation and/or antiplatelet agent therapy....

  18. Current Perioperative Anticoagulation Practices in Children with Prosthetic Mechanical Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nguyenvu; Sharathkumar, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the clinician practices on perioperative anticoagulation in children with prosthetic mechanical heart valves who undergo elective surgeries. An online survey was administered to members of PediHeartNet. The survey consisted of multiple choice questions and clinical scenarios. The study described clinical practice patterns and variables that influence the clinicians' bridging anticoagulation decisions. Ninety-one respondents completed the survey; 68% were affiliated with university settings; 91% were pediatric cardiologists, and 49% had ≥10 years of experience in pediatric cardiology. Approximately one-half of the respondents (54%) independently provided perioperative anticoagulation management to their patients, while 46% utilized cardiac or hematology anticoagulation services. Resources that influenced bridging decisions included hematology experts (20%), American College of Chest Physicians guidelines (34%), and the clinicians' personal experience (56%). In planning for major surgeries, 47% of the respondents hospitalized patients for unfractionated heparin (UFH) and 46% prescribed outpatient low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). For minor surgeries, 58% hospitalized patients for UFH, 22% prescribed outpatient LMWH, and 17% opted out of bridging anticoagulation. Immediately after mitral valve replacement, 23% used bridging anticoagulation with UFH. When LMWH was used, there were no reports of thromboembolic complications. Major bleeding complications were rare and reported by 2% of the respondents. This was the first documentation that clinical practice of bridging perioperative anticoagulation in children with mechanical heart valves varies widely among pediatric cardiac specialists. There is poor adoption of published guidelines and a tendency toward more conservative strategies. Further studies comparing the safety and efficacy of LMWH vs. UFH as perioperative anticoagulation agents in children with mechanical heart valves are needed

  19. Oral anticoagulant discontinuation in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachroo, Sumesh; Hamilton, Melissa; Liu, Xianchen; Pan, Xianying; Brixner, Diana; Marrouche, Nassir; Biskupiak, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    To identify factors associated with all-cause discontinuation (patient discontinued on their own or physician discontinuation) of oral anticoagulants (OACs) among nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) patients. Retrospective cohort study. We analyzed the MarketScan claims database from October 2009 to July 2012. Adult patients were eligible if they newly initiated an OAC in the study period, had an atrial fibrillation diagnosis (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code 427.31 or 472.32), and had at least 6 months of continuous enrollment after OAC initiation. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess factors associated with discontinuation. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were reported. Among 12,129 eligible patients, 8143 (67.1%) initiated warfarin and 3986 (32.9%) initiated direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs). Overall, 47.3% of patients independently discontinued during follow-up (mean number of days of follow-up = 416.6 [SD ± 141.7]) with mean time to discontinuation of 120 days (SD ± 114.7). Patients significantly less likely to discontinue included those taking DOACs versus warfarin (HR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.86-0.97), older patients (≥65 years vs 18 to 34 years) (HR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.24-0.43), those with diabetes (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.77-0.90), those with prior stroke/transient ischemic attack (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.56-0.75), those with prior pulmonary embolism (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.58-0.88), and those with congestive heart failure (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.74-0.87). Patients with prior bleeding events were significantly more likely to independently discontinue (HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.08-1.34). The risk of independent discontinuation of OAC treatment among NVAF patients was high. Patients on DOACs compared with warfarin and those with several comorbid conditions had significantly lower risk of discontinuation, while those with prior bleeding were more likely to discontinue.

  20. New perspectives and recommendations for anticoagulant therapy post orthopedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Kropf

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant therapy is essential for the prevention of risks associated with the formation of thrombus in patients after surgery, especially in orthopedics. Recently, new oral anticoagulants were introduced in the therapeutic arsenal. This fact is important, because the current drug of choice in clinical practice is enoxaparin, a low molecular weight heparin. As all injecting drugs, enoxaparin may reduce patients' adherence to treatment by dissatisfaction with and resistance to the administration. This article reviews the available literature on the overall utility of these innovative medicines, approaching the pharmacology, the compared efficacy in relation to current agents, and the potential targets for new agents, as well as points to new trends in research and development. The article also contributes with a practical guide for use and recommendations to health professionals, especially focusing on the reversibility of hemorrhagic events, and discusses the importance of convenience/satisfaction of use, the cost of treatment, and the risk-benefit profile for patients.A terapia anticoagulante é fundamental para a prevenção de riscos associados à formação de trombos em pacientes pós-cirúrgicos, principalmente em ortopedia. Recentemente, novos anticoagulantes orais foram introduzidos no arsenal terapêutico. Tal fato é importantíssimo, visto que o atual medicamento de primeira escolha na prática clínica é a enoxaparina, uma heparina de baixo peso molecular. Por ser de uso injetável, a enoxaparina pode diminuir a adesão do paciente ao tratamento, devido à insatisfação e à resistência quanto à via de administração. Este artigo revisa a literatura disponível sobre a utilidade total desses medicamentos inovadores ao abordar a farmacologia, a eficácia em comparação com os agentes atuais e os alvos potenciais para novos agentes, bem como aponta as novas tendências em pesquisa e desenvolvimento. O artigo também contribui

  1. A Functional Henipavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Pseudotyped Lentivirus Assay System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broder Christopher C

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hendra virus (HeV and Nipah virus (NiV are newly emerged zoonotic paramyxoviruses discovered during outbreaks in Queensland, Australia in 1994 and peninsular Malaysia in 1998/9 respectively and classified within the new Henipavirus genus. Both viruses can infect a broad range of mammalian species causing severe and often-lethal disease in humans and animals, and repeated outbreaks continue to occur. Extensive laboratory studies on the host cell infection stage of HeV and NiV and the roles of their envelope glycoproteins have been hampered by their highly pathogenic nature and restriction to biosafety level-4 (BSL-4 containment. To circumvent this problem, we have developed a henipavirus envelope glycoprotein pseudotyped lentivirus assay system using either a luciferase gene or green fluorescent protein (GFP gene encoding human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 genome in conjunction with the HeV and NiV fusion (F and attachment (G glycoproteins. Results Functional retrovirus particles pseudotyped with henipavirus F and G glycoproteins displayed proper target cell tropism and entry and infection was dependent on the presence of the HeV and NiV receptors ephrinB2 or B3 on target cells. The functional specificity of the assay was confirmed by the lack of reporter-gene signals when particles bearing either only the F or only G glycoprotein were prepared and assayed. Virus entry could be specifically blocked when infection was carried out in the presence of a fusion inhibiting C-terminal heptad (HR-2 peptide, a well-characterized, cross-reactive, neutralizing human mAb specific for the henipavirus G glycoprotein, and soluble ephrinB2 and B3 receptors. In addition, the utility of the assay was also demonstrated by an examination of the influence of the cytoplasmic tail of F in its fusion activity and incorporation into pseudotyped virus particles by generating and testing a panel of truncation mutants of NiV and HeV F

  2. Intestinal mucus and juice glycoproteins have a liquid crystalline structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisova, E.A.; Lazarev, P.I.; Vazina, A.A.; Zheleznaya, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns have been obtained from the following components of canine gastrointestinal tract: (1) native small intestine mucus layer; (2) the precipitate of the flocks formed in the duodenal juice with decreasing pH; (3) concentrated solutions of glycoproteins isolated from the duodenal juice. The X-ray patterns consist of a large number of sharp reflections of spacings between about 100 and 4 A. Some reflections are common for all components studied. All the patterns are interpreted as arising from the glycoprotein molecules ordered into a liquid crystalline structure. (author)

  3. Mind the gap: results of a multispecialty survey on coordination of care for peri-procedural anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurlander, Jacob E; Barnes, Geoffrey D; Anderson, Michelle A; Haymart, Brian; Kline-Rogers, Eva; Kaatz, Scott; Saini, Sameer D; Krein, Sarah L; Richardson, Caroline R; Froehlich, James B

    2018-04-01

    To understand how physicians from various specialties perceive coordination of care when managing peri-procedural anticoagulation. Cross-sectional survey of cardiologists, gastroenterologists, and primary care physicians (PCPs) in an integrated health system (N = 251). The survey began with a vignette of a patient with atrial fibrillation co-managed by his PCP, cardiologist, and an anticoagulation clinic who must hold warfarin for a colonoscopy. Respondents' experiences and opinions around responsibilities and institutional support for managing peri-procedural anticoagulation were elicited using multiple choice questions. We examined differences in responses across specialties using Chi square analysis. The response rate was 51% (n = 127). 52% were PCPs, 28% cardiologists, and 21% gastroenterologists. Nearly half (47.2%) of respondents believed that the cardiologist should be primarily responsible for managing peri-procedural anticoagulation, while fewer identified the PCP (25.2%), anticoagulation clinic (21.3%), or gastroenterologist (6.3%; p = 0.09). Respondents across specialties had significantly different approaches to deciding how to manage the clinical case presented (p procedural anticoagulation, and there was broad support (88.1%) for anticoagulation clinics' managing all aspects of peri-procedural anticoagulation. Providers across specialties agree that their institution could do more to help manage peri-procedural anticoagulation, and overwhelmingly support anticoagulation clinics' taking responsibility.

  4. Oxygen plasma modified P(3HB-4HB) used as anticoagulant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Jiezhao; Tian, Xiaojun; Zhu, Yongjun; Wang, Lin; Ren, Li

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we report the modification of P(3HB-4HB) film with oxygen plasma. The results showed that both the chemical components and topography of the P(3HB-4HB) film changed after oxygen plasma modification. In addition, the decrease of contact angle and the increase of the surface oxygen content were observed. The results of BSA adsorption onto those films studied by QCM-D showed that the plasma treatment could improve the protein-resistant activity of the film. After 10-minute plasma treatment, the BSA-resistant activity of the film improved 27% in PBS buffer solution and 57.5% in aqueous solution. Platelet adhesion test showed that the platelet-resistant activity of the film improved 68.6%, 82.3%, 96.8% after treated for 2, 5 and 10 min, respectively. Also, the cck8 assay of L929 cells showed that there was no cytotoxicity for the sample treated with oxygen plasma. This film has the potential to be used as anticoagulant materials, which required high protein-resistant activity.

  5. Nonoclusive thrombosis of mechanical mitral valve prosthesis caused by inadequate treatment of anticoagulant therapy resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Branislava

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oral anticoagulants have been used in the prevention of thromboembolic complications for over six decades. A rare, but possible problem in the application of these medications could be resistance to them. Case report. We presented a patient with nonocclusive thrombosis of the mechanical mitral prosthesis due to inadequately treated resistance to peroral anticoagulant therapy. Resistance to oral anticoagulant medications was proven by an increased dosage of warfarin up to 20 mg and, after that, acenokumarol to 15 mg over ten days which did not lead to an increase in the international normalized ratio (INR value over 1.2. On the basis of information that she did not take food rich in vitamin K or medications which could reduce effects of oral anticoagulants, and that she did not have additional illnesses and conditions that could cause an inadequate response to anticoagulant therapy, it was circumstantially concluded that this was a hereditary form of resistance. Because of the existing mechanical prosthetics on the mitral position, low molecular heparin has been introduced into the therapy. The patient reduced it on her own initiative, leading to nonocclusive valvular thrombosis. Conclusion. When associated complications like absolute arrhithmia does not exist, the finding of resistance to oral anticoagulant agents is an indication for the replacement of a mechanical prosthetic with a biological one which has been done in this patients.

  6. Thromboembolic and bleeding risks in patients undergoing atrial fibrillation ablation: oral anticoagulation perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, David F; Madan, Nidhi; Romero, Jorge; Londoño, Alejandra; Villablanca, Pedro A; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2017-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Catheter ablation for AF (CAAF) has emerged as an effective treatment option of rhythm control for patients with symptomatic AF. However, the risk of thromboembolism and bleeding in the periprocedural period represent a worrisome complication of this therapy. The reported incidence of thromboembolic and bleeding events associated with CAAF varies from 0.9% to 5% depending on the CAAF strategy and the anticoagulation regimen used in the periprocedural period. Areas covered: The different anticoagulation regimens used prior to, during, and after CAAF to minimize the risk of thromboembolic and bleeding events are reviewed. The use of uninterrupted oral anticoagulation and appropriate heparin dosing to achieve safe activated clotting time levels are also detailed. A comprehensive approach with assessment of individual risk for thromboembolic and bleeding complications, and understanding the pharmacokinetics of the anticoagulant agents available is also reviewed. Expert opinion: The key advances done in the periprocedural anticoagulation field include the use of uninterrupted anticoagulation strategies in patients undergoing AF ablation and efforts to simplify the selection of patients who need LAA thrombus screening prior to ablation.

  7. Healthcare resources and needs in anticoagulant therapy for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. SAMOA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, V; Egocheaga-Cabello, M I; Gállego-Culleré, J; Ignacio-García, E; Manzano-Espinosa, L; Martín-Martínez, A; Mateo-Arranz, J; Polo-García, J; Vargas-Ortega, D

    2017-05-01

    To determine, in the various medical specialties, the healthcare process for anticoagulated patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, to determine the available and necessary resources and to identify potential areas of improvement in the care of these patients. We performed a cross-sectional survey of primary care and specialised physicians involved in the care of anticoagulated patients. The questionnaires referred to the healthcare process, the indication and prescription of anticoagulant therapy and the barriers and deficiencies present for these patients. A total of 893 physicians participated in the study, 437 of whom worked in primary care and 456 of whom were specialists (mostly cardiologists). Forty-two percent of the family doctors indicated that they assessed and prescribed anticoagulant therapy, and 66% performed the regular follow-up of these patients. In both healthcare settings, the physicians noted the lack of standardised protocols. There was also a lack of quality control in the treatment. The role of primary care in managing anticoagulated patients has grown compared with previous reports. The responses of the participating physicians suggest marked gaps in the standardisation of the healthcare process and several areas for improvement in these patients' follow-up. The promotion of training in direct-acting anticoagulant drugs remains pivotal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  8. A rapid pro-hemostatic approach to overcome direct oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalji, Nabil K; Ivanciu, Lacramioara; Davidson, Robert; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Krishnaswamy, Sriram; Camire, Rodney M

    2016-08-01

    Direct inhibitors of coagulation factor Xa (FXa) or thrombin are promising oral anticoagulants that are becoming widely adopted. The ability to reverse their anticoagulant effects is important when serious bleeding occurs or urgent medical procedures are needed. Here, using experimental mouse models of hemostasis, we show that a variant coagulation factor, FXa(I16L), rapidly restores hemostasis in the presence of the anticoagulant effects of these inhibitors. The ability of FXa(I16L) to reverse the anticoagulant effects of FXa inhibitor depends, at least in part, on the ability of the active site inhibitor to hinder antithrombin-dependent FXa inactivation, paradoxically allowing uninhibited FXa to persist in plasma. Because of its inherent catalytic activity, FXa(I16L) is more potent (by >50-fold) in the hemostasis models tested than a noncatalytic antidote that is currently in clinical development. FXa(I16L) also reduces the anticoagulant-associated bleeding in vivo that is induced by the thrombin inhibitor dabigatran. FXa(I16L) may be able to fill an important unmet clinical need for a rapid, pro-hemostatic agent to reverse the effects of several new anticoagulants.

  9. Could Some Geriatric Characteristics Hinder the Prescription of Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation in the Elderly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paule Denoël

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported underprescription of anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation (AF. We conducted an observational study on 142 out of a total of 995 consecutive ≥75 years old patients presenting AF (14% when admitted in an emergency unit of a general hospital, in search of geriatric characteristics that might be associated with the underprescription of anticoagulation therapy (mostly antivitamin K at the time of the study. The following data was collected from patients presenting AF: medical history including treatment and comorbidities, CHADS2 score, ISAR scale (frailty, Lawton’s scale (ADL, GDS scale (mood status, MUST (nutrition, and blood analysis (INR, kidney function, and albumin. Among those patients for who anticoagulation treatment was recommended (73%, only 61% were treated with it. In the group with anticoagulation therapy, the following characteristics were observed more often than in the group without such therapy: a recent (≤6 months hospitalization and medical treatment including digoxin or based on >3 different drugs. Neither the value of the CHADS2 score, nor the geriatric characteristics could be correlated with the presence or the absence of an anticoagulation therapy. More research is thus required to identify and clarify the relative importance of patient-, physician-, and health care system-related hurdles for the prescription of oral anticoagulation therapy in older patients with AF.

  10. Approche à l’égard des nouveaux anticoagulants oraux en pratique familiale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douketis, James; Bell, Alan David; Eikelboom, John; Liew, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Comparer les caractéristiques principales des nouveaux anticoagulants oraux (NACO), soit le dabigatran, le rivaroxaban et l’apixaban, et répondre aux questions qui font surface lors de la comparaison de ces agents. Qualité des données Une recherche dans PubMed a été effectuée afin de relever les études cliniques récentes (de janvier 2008 à la semaine 32 de 2013) portant sur l’emploi des NACO pour la prévention des AVC dans les cas de fibrillation auriculaire (FA) et pour le traitement de la thromboembolie veineuse aiguë. Message principal Selon 3 essais d’envergure, tous les NACO sont au moins aussi efficaces que la warfarine dans la prévention des AVC chez les patients atteints d’une FA non valvulaire, et au moins aussi sûrs pour ce qui est du risque de saignement. Des méta-analyses de ces essais ont montré que, comparativement au traitement par la warfarine, les NACO avaient réduit la mortalité totale, la mortalité d’origine cardiovasculaire et les saignements intracrâniens, et était aussi ressortie une tendance vers la réduction des saignements généraux. Du côté pratique, les avantages des NACO par rapport à la warfarine sont : posologie orale fixe uniquotidienne ou biquotidienne sans devoir surveiller la coagulation et peu d’interactions connues ou définies avec d’autres médicaments ou des aliments. Les désavantages potentiels des NACO sont notamment un risque de saignement qui serait accru chez les patients de plus de 75 ans, une hausse des saignements gastro-intestinaux majeurs avec des doses élevées de dabigatran, une hausse des cas de dyspepsie avec le dabigatran, l’absence d’un test de laboratoire de routine visant à mesurer de façon fiable l’effet anticoagulant et l’absence d’antidote pour renverser l’effet anticoagulant. Aucun essai randomisé contrôlé n’a effectué de comparaison directe des NACO, et le choix d’un NACO est influencé par les caract

  11. Anticoagulation in pregnant females with mechanical heart valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafique, H.; Chaudhry, A.; Ayyub, M.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the complications and outcome of anticoagulation therapy in pregnant females with valvular heart diseases. All pregnant females with prosthetic heart valves admitted in Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology from Jan 2004 to Dec 2004 were included in this study Basic demographic data including age, duration of pregnancy and complications observed were recorded. Warfarin was replaced with un-fractionated heparin (UFH) in first trimester and after that warfarin was continued with a targeted INR between 2.0-3.0. At 36 weeks warfarin was stopped and UFH was added; however, if patient went into spontaneous labour before this then immediate caesarian section was performed and UFH was restarted 4-6 hours after delivery along with oral warfarin. Out of 21 patients, sixteen (76.1%) had mitral valve diseases and five (23.9%) had both mitral and atrial. Majority (42.3%)of patients were in age group 26-30 years. Eleven (52.2%) reported in 9th month of gestation. Complications observed were hypertension (1), transient ischaemic attacks (1), pulmonary embolism (1), haemoptysis (1) and abortion (1). All patients, except one had successful completion of pregnancy. No case of foetal abnormality was seen. In 76% patients, daily dose of warfarin was <5 mg. Thrombo-prophylaxis in pregnancy with warfarin and UFH with an INR of 2.0-3.0 is effective in preventing thrombotic complications in females with mechanical valves without resulting in increase hemorrhagic complications. (author)

  12. Management of novel oral anticoagulants in emergency and trauma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Gomes, Ana-Catarina; Hague, Adam; Ghosh, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    The compelling safety, efficacy and predictable effect of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) is driving a rapid expansion in their therapeutic indications. Management of the increasing number of patients on those new agents in the setting of emergency or trauma surgery can be challenging and the absence of specific reversal agents has been a matter of concern. This review summarises the key principles that underpin the management of those patients with a particular emphasis on the recent development of specific antidotes. As of 2015, a new line of antidotes, specific for these drugs, are at different stages of their development with their release imminent. However, as NOACs are innately reversible due to their short half-life, the use of reversal agents will probably be restricted to a few exceptional cases. Post-marketing surveillance will be paramount to better clarify the role of these promising drugs. Management of patients on NOACs in the context of emergency or trauma surgery relies on best supportive care in combination with the blood products and/or specific antidotes as required. Familiarity with the new reversal agents is essential but further evidence on their indications, safety and efficacy as well as consensus guidelines are warranted prior to widespread adoption. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. P-glycoprotein ABCB1: a major player in drug handling by mammals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, Piet; Schinkel, Alfred H.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian P-glycoproteins are active drug efflux transporters located in the plasma membrane. In the early nineties, we generated knockouts of the three P-glycoprotein genes of mice, the Mdr1a, Mdr1b, and Mdr2 P-glycoproteins, now known as Abcb1a, Abcb1b, and Abcb4, respectively. In the JCI papers

  14. Outpatient management of oral anticoagulation treatment (OAT in general practice: the “Medicina di Gruppo di Masate” experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorenzo Massimo Corti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Outpatient management of oral anticoagulation treatment (OAT in general practice: the “Medicina di Gruppo di Masate” experienceOral anticoagulants are used for prophylaxis in thromboembolic conditions. Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs such as warfarin, are commonly employed. The anticoagulation activity induced by VKAs is monitored by the prothrombin time test to determine the International Normalized Ratio (INR. Point-of-care testing (POCT devices can be used to monitor anticoagulant therapy improving the quality of oral anticoagulation. This paper aims at describing the relevant experience of the “Medicina di Gruppo di Masate” in general practice. We also put this experience into the general context of the international evidence on the impact of POCT. Both our experience and the international evidence may support anticoagulant therapy management by GPs (General Practitioners.

  15. Cereal n-glycoproteins enrichment by lectin affinity monolithic chromatography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flodrová, Dana; Bobálová, Janette; Laštovičková, Markéta

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 2 (2016), s. 286-297 ISSN 0133-3720 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP503/12/P395 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : barley * wheat * glycoprotein * mass spectrometry * lectin chromatography Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.496, year: 2016

  16. Humanizing recombinant glycoproteins from Chinese hamster ovary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Holmgaard; Amann, Thomas; Kol, Stefan

    hamster ovary (CHO) cells are making a very heterogeneous mixture of NGlycans. We speculate that the CHO pattern of N-Glycans would affect half-life and/or efficacy of the glycoprotein in the bloodstream making it unsuitable for human intravenous use, whereas our humanized version would be identical...

  17. Molecular cloning of S1 glycoprotein gene of infectious bronchitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro protein expression is an important method of obtaining large amounts of viral proteins to investigate their biological properties. The S1 glycoprotein of infectious bronchitis virus, due to its effective immune-dominant role is an appropriate candidate for production of recombinant vaccine against infectious bronchitis ...

  18. Separation and identification of carp pituitary proteins and glycoproteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ryšlavá, H.; Janatová, M.; Čalounová, G.; Selicharová, Irena; Barthová, J.; Barth, Tomislav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 9 (2005), 430-437 ISSN 1212-1819 R&D Projects: GA MZe(CZ) QF3028 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : carp hormones * glycoproteins * oligosaccharide chains Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.254, year: 2005

  19. QUANTITATIVE MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS OF GLYCOPROTEINS COMBINED WITH ENRICHMENT METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies. © 2014 The Authors. Mass Spectrometry Reviews Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Rapid Commun. Mass Spec Rev 34:148–165, 2015. PMID:24889823

  20. Cancer Biomarker Discovery: Lectin-Based Strategies Targeting Glycoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Clark

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarker discovery can identify molecular markers in various cancers that can be used for detection, screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease progression. Lectin-affinity is a technique that can be used for the enrichment of glycoproteins from a complex sample, facilitating the discovery of novel cancer biomarkers associated with a disease state.

  1. Increasing nerve agent treatment efficacy by P-glycoprotein inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosen, M.J.A.; Vester, S.M.; Hamelink, J.; Klaassen, S.D.; Berg, R.M. van den

    2016-01-01

    One of the shortcomings of current treatment of nerve agent poisoning is that not all drugs effectively penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB), whereas most nerve agents easily do. P-glycoprotein (Pgp) efflux transporters at the BBB may contribute to this aspect. It was previously shown that Pgp

  2. Glycoprotein Ibalpha signalling in platelet apoptosis and clearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, E.

    2010-01-01

    Storage of platelets at low temperature reduces bacterial growth and might better preserve the haemostatic function of platelets than current procedures. Incubation at 0C is known to expose ?-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-residues on glycoprotein (GP)Ibalpha inducing receptor-clustering and platelet

  3. Glycoprotein Ibα clustering in platelet storage and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gitz, E.

    2013-01-01

    Platelets are anucleated, discoid-shaped cells that play an essential role in the formation of a hemostatic plug to prevent blood loss from injured vessels. Initial platelet arrest at the damaged arterial vessel wall is mediated through the interaction between the platelet receptor glycoprotein (GP)

  4. Do N-glycoproteins have preference for specific sequons?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, Shyama Prasad; Wollenweber, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    (hemagglutinin of influenza A H3N2 and glycoprotein120 of HIV-1) are indeed preferred sequon types, which may provide a selective advantage. Accordingly, although there seems to be some preference for sequons, this preference may not be unique to N-glycosylation....

  5. Extra-oviductal expression of oviductal glycoprotein 1 in mouse ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. Biosci. 42(1), March 2017, 69–80 * Indian Academy of Sciences. 69. DOI: 10.1007/s12038-016-9657-2. Keywords. Epididymis; ovary; oviductal glycoprotein 1; testis. Supplementary materials pertaining to this article are available on the Journal of Biosciences Website. Published online: 11 January 2017 ...

  6. Direct chemical modification and voltammetric detection of glycans in glycoproteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trefulka, Mojmír; Paleček, Emil

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 48, NOV2014 (2014), s. 52-55 ISSN 1388-2481 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2055 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Glycoproteins * Chemical modification * Os(VI)L complexes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.847, year: 2014

  7. Does sex affect anticoagulant use for stroke prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation? The prospective global anticoagulant registry in the FIELD-Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lip, G.Y.; Rushton-Smith, S.K.; Goldhaber, S.Z.; Fitzmaurice, D.A.; Mantovani, L.G.; Goto, S.; Haas, S.; Bassand, J.P.; Camm, A.J.; Ambrosio, G.; Jansky, P.; Mahmeed, W. Al; Oh, S.; Eickels, M. van; Raatikainen, P.; Steffel, J.; Oto, A.; Kayani, G.; Accetta, G.; Kakkar, A.K.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; et al.,

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), women are at higher risk of stroke than men. Using prospective cohort data from a large global population of patients with nonvalvular AF, we sought to identify any differences in the use of anticoagulants for stroke prevention in women and

  8. Oral anticoagulants in coronary heart disease (Section IV). Position paper of the ESC Working Group on Thrombosis - Task Force on Anticoagulants in Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caterina, R. De; Husted, S.; Wallentin, L.; Andreotti, F.; Arnesen, H.; Bachmann, F.; Baigent, C.; Collet, J.P.; Halvorsen, S.; Huber, K.; Jespersen, J.; Kristensen, S.D.; Lip, G.Y.; Morais, J.; Rasmussen, L.H.; Ricci, F.; Sibbing, D.; Siegbahn, A.; Storey, R.F.; Berg, J ten; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Weitz, J.I.

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) were the only available oral anticoagulants evaluated for long-term treatment of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), particularly after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Despite efficacy in this setting, VKAs are rarely used because they are

  9. Anticoagulation for the Pregnant Patient with a Mechanical Heart Valve, No Perfect Therapy: Review of Guidelines for Anticoagulation in the Pregnant Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Richardson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart valve replacement with a mechanical valve requires lifelong anticoagulation. Guidelines currently recommend using a vitamin K antagonist (VKA such as warfarin. Given the teratogenic effects of VKAs, it is often favorable to switch to heparin-derived therapies in pregnant patients since they do not cross the placenta. However, these therapies are known to be less effective anticoagulants subjecting the pregnant patient to a higher chance of a thrombotic event. Guidelines currently recommend pregnant women requiring more than 5 mg a day of warfarin be switched to alternative therapy during the first trimester. This case report highlights a patient who was switched to alternative therapy during her first pregnancy and suffered a devastating cerebrovascular accident (CVA. Further complicating her situation was during a subsequent pregnancy; this patient continued warfarin use during the first trimester and experienced multiple transient ischemic attacks (TIAs. This case highlights the increased risk of thrombotic events in pregnant patients with mechanical valves. It also highlights the difficulty of providing appropriate anticoagulation for the pregnant patient who has experienced thrombotic events on multiple anticoagulants.

  10. Palmitoylation of the cysteine-rich endodomain of the SARS-coronavirus spike glycoprotein is important for spike-mediated cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, Chad M.; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.; Iyer, Arun; Colgrove, Robin; Farzan, Michael; Knipe, David M.; Kousoulas, K.G.

    2007-01-01

    The SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein mediates membrane fusion events during virus entry and virus-induced cell-to-cell fusion. The cytoplasmic portion of the S glycoprotein contains four cysteine-rich amino acid clusters. Individual cysteine clusters were altered via cysteine-to-alanine amino acid replacement and the modified S glycoproteins were tested for their transport to cell-surfaces and ability to cause cell fusion in transient transfection assays. Mutagenesis of the cysteine cluster I, located immediately proximal to the predicted transmembrane, domain did not appreciably reduce cell-surface expression, although S-mediated cell fusion was reduced by more than 50% in comparison to the wild-type S. Similarly, mutagenesis of the cysteine cluster II located adjacent to cluster I reduced S-mediated cell fusion by more than 60% compared to the wild-type S, while cell-surface expression was reduced by less than 20%. Mutagenesis of cysteine clusters III and IV did not appreciably affect S cell-surface expression or S-mediated cell fusion. The wild-type S was palmitoylated as evidenced by the efficient incorporation of 3 H-palmitic acid in wild-type S molecules. S glycoprotein palmitoylation was significantly reduced for mutant glycoproteins having cluster I and II cysteine changes, but was largely unaffected for cysteine cluster III and IV mutants. These results show that the S cytoplasmic domain is palmitoylated and that palmitoylation of the membrane proximal cysteine clusters I and II may be important for S-mediated cell fusion

  11. Inactivated Recombinant Rabies Viruses Displaying Canine Distemper Virus Glycoproteins Induce Protective Immunity against Both Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fontoura Budaszewski, Renata; Hudacek, Andrew; Sawatsky, Bevan; Krämer, Beate; Yin, Xiangping; Schnell, Matthias J; von Messling, Veronika

    2017-04-15

    The development of multivalent vaccines is an attractive methodology for the simultaneous prevention of several infectious diseases in vulnerable populations. Both canine distemper virus (CDV) and rabies virus (RABV) cause lethal disease in wild and domestic carnivores. While RABV vaccines are inactivated, the live-attenuated CDV vaccines retain residual virulence for highly susceptible wildlife species. In this study, we developed recombinant bivalent vaccine candidates based on recombinant vaccine strain rabies virus particles, which concurrently display the protective CDV and RABV glycoprotein antigens. The recombinant viruses replicated to near-wild-type titers, and the heterologous glycoproteins were efficiently expressed and incorporated in the viral particles. Immunization of ferrets with beta-propiolactone-inactivated recombinant virus particles elicited protective RABV antibody titers, and animals immunized with a combination of CDV attachment protein- and fusion protein-expressing recombinant viruses were protected from lethal CDV challenge. However, animals that were immunized with only a RABV expressing the attachment protein of CDV vaccine strain Onderstepoort succumbed to infection with a more recent wild-type strain, indicating that immune responses to the more conserved fusion protein contribute to protection against heterologous CDV strains. IMPORTANCE Rabies virus and canine distemper virus (CDV) cause high mortality rates and death in many carnivores. While rabies vaccines are inactivated and thus have an excellent safety profile and high stability, live-attenuated CDV vaccines can retain residual virulence in highly susceptible species. Here we generated recombinant inactivated rabies viruses that carry one of the CDV glycoproteins on their surface. Ferrets immunized twice with a mix of recombinant rabies viruses carrying the CDV fusion and attachment glycoproteins were protected from lethal CDV challenge, whereas all animals that received

  12. Control of the posoperative bleeding in patíents using anticoagulants mouthwash with tranexamic acid. Implicans of the periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Méndez Visag, Christian; Docente Ad Honorem en el curso de Medicina Estomatologica II. Facultad de Odontología. UNMSM.; Cisneros Zárate, Luis; Profesor Principal Asociado del curso Medicina Estomatologica. Facultad de Odontología. UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    This study analysed the hemostatic clinical effect of the tranexamic acid mouthwash against the conventional treatment in patients treated with oral anticoagulants. After suspending the anticoagulant medication for three days, ten surgical procedures were carried out in ten patients(control group), and without modifying or altering the . anticoagulant treatment, 20 procedures were carried out using tranexamic acid in 15 palients(case group). In this last group, before suturing the surgical fl...

  13. Value of trans-oesophageal echocardiography as a method of encouraging patients with chronic atrial fibrillation to use anticoagulation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bakalli, Aurora; Kamberi, Lulzim; Dragusha, Gani; Zeqiri, Nexhmi; Gashi, Fitim; Prekpalaj, Lazer

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the indisputable role of anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF) patients at risk for stroke, anticoagulants remain under-used in everyday clinical practice. We assumed that by performing trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) on patients with AF who were not on anticoagulation treatment prior to the procedure, and by explaining to them the TEE images obtained, as well as the possible consequences of these findings, we could convince patients to start anticoa...

  14. [Use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants in Primary Care: ACTUA study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, V; Escobar, C; Lobos, J M; Polo, J; Vargas, D

    2017-10-01

    Approximately 40% of patients with non-valvular auricular fibrillation (NVAF) who receive vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in Primary Care in Spain have poor anticoagulation control. The objective of the study Actuación en antiCoagulación, Tratamiento y Uso de anticoagulantes orales de acción directa (ACOD) en Atención primaria (ACTUA) (Action in Coagulation, Treatment and Use of direct oral anticoagulants [DOACs]) in Primary Care) was to analyse the current situation regarding the use of VKA and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in patients with NVAF in Primary Care in Spain and the possible issues arising from it. An online survey was created covering various aspects of the use of oral anticoagulants in NAFV. A two-round modified Delphi approach was used. Results were compiled as a set of practical guidelines. Forty-four experts responded to the survey. Consensus was reached in 62% (37/60) of the items. Experts concluded that a considerable number of patients with NVAF who receive VKA do not have a well-controlled INR and that a substantial group of patients who could benefit from being treated with NOACs do not receive them. The use of NOACs increases the probability of having good anticoagulation control and decreases the risk of severe and intracranial haemorrhage. Current limitations to the use of NOACs include administrative barriers, insufficient knowledge about the benefits and risks of NOACs, limited experience of doctors in using them, and their price. Renal insufficiency influences the choice of a particular anticoagulant. The ACTUA study highlights the existing controversies about the use of oral anticoagulants for the treatment of NVAF in Primary Care in Spain, and provides consensus recommendations that may help to improve the use of these medications. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Improvement in long-term ECMO by detailed monitoring of anticoagulation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, Alicia; Uber, Walter; Laws, Stacey; Cochran, Joel

    2011-01-01

    The use of unfractionated heparin (UFH) as an anticoagulant during long-term extracorporeal support presents a unique challenge for the clinician in balancing the amount of anticoagulant to maintain adequate anticoagulation without causing excessive bleeding. Activated clotting times (ACT) and activated partial thromboplastin times (aPTT) are the most common modality to monitor UFH on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Limitations to these tests include consumptive coagulopathies, clotting factor deficiencies, platelet dysfunction, and fibrinolysis. The following case report describes the use of alternative monitoring strategies to assess more accurately anticoagulation during ECMO. A 20-month-old female presented to the emergency department with a 5-6 day history of cough, fever, tachypnea, and respiratory distress. She was diagnosed with influenza A and B with pneumonia. The patient was placed on veno-venous ECMO (V-V ECMO) after mechanical ventilation failed. On ECMO day eight, the patient developed a thrombus in her inferior vena cava and pleural effusions, obstructing cannula flow. Laboratory tests revealed the ACT was within range, yet the aPTT was dropping, despite increased heparin. Heparin levels were low and antithrombin-III (AT) concentrations were 40%. Recombinant AT was given and subsequent aPTTs were within the therapeutic range. Later, the aPTT decreased to 475 mg/ dL, and Factor VIII >150 IU/dL, suggesting an acute phase reaction or ongoing systemic inflammation, increasing the risk for thrombosis. We maintained heparin assays between 0.5-0.7 IU/mL and AT >60% to assure heparin's effect. The patient showed no signs of excess bleeding, blood product administration, or clots in the circuit, suggesting proper anticoagulation. The patient was successfully weaned on day 33 and is currently alive and at home. Monitoring of anti-Xa UFH and AT proved effective for measuring anticoagulation and detecting inconsistencies in other anticoagulation

  16. Outcomes during anticoagulation in patients with symptomatic vs. incidental splanchnic vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufano, Antonella; Ageno, Walter; Di Micco, Pierpaolo; Niglio, Alferio; Rosa, Vladimir; Ballaz, Aitor; Braester, Andrei; Rubio, Carmen Mª; Isern, Virginia; Imbalzano, Egidio; Monreal, Manuel

    2018-02-27

    Current guidelines recommend the use of anticoagulant therapy in patients with symptomatic splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT) and suggest no routine anticoagulation in those with incidental SVT. We used the RIETE (Registro Informatizado Enfermedad Trombo Embólica) registry to assess the rate and severity of symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) recurrences and major bleeding events appearing during the course of anticoagulation in patients with symptomatic or incidental SVT. In March 2017, 521 patients with SVT were recruited. Of them, 212 (41%) presented with symptomatic SVT and 309 had incidental SVT. Most (93%) patients received anticoagulant therapy (median, 147 days). During the course of anticoagulation, 20 patients developed symptomatic VTE recurrences (none died) and 26 had major bleeding (fatal bleeding, 5). On multivariable analysis, patients with incidental SVT had a non-significantly higher risk for symptomatic VTE recurrences (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 2.04; 95%CI: 0.71-5.88) and a similar risk for major bleeding (HR: 1.12; 95%CI: 0.47-2.63) than those with symptomatic SVT. Active cancer was associated with at increased risk for VTE recurrences (HR: 3.06; 95%CI: 1.14-8.17) and anaemia (HR: 4.11; 95%CI: 1.45-11.6) or abnormal prothrombin time (HR: 4.10; 95%CI: 1.68-10.1) were associated with at increased risk for major bleeding. The rates of recurrent SVT and major bleeding were similar between patients with incidental or symptomatic SVT. Because the severity of bleeding complications during anticoagulation may outweigh the severity of VTE recurrences in both groups, further studies should identify those SVT patients who benefit from anticoagulant therapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Specific antidotes against direct oral anticoagulants: A comprehensive review of clinical trials data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummala, Ramyashree; Kavtaradze, Ana; Gupta, Anjan; Ghosh, Raktim Kumar

    2016-07-01

    The Vitamin K antagonist warfarin was the only oral anticoagulant available for decades for the treatment of thrombosis and prevention of thromboembolism until Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs); a group of new oral anticoagulants got approved in the last few years. Direct thrombin inhibitor: dabigatran and factor Xa inhibitors: apixaban, rivaroxaban, and edoxaban directly inhibit the coagulation cascade. DOACs have many advantages over warfarin. However, the biggest drawback of DOACs has been the lack of specific antidotes to reverse the anticoagulant effect in emergency situations. Activated charcoal, hemodialysis, and activated Prothrombin Complex Concentrate (PCC) were amongst the nonspecific agents used in a DOAC associated bleeding but with limited success. Idarucizumab, the first novel antidote against direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran was approved by US FDA in October 2015. It comprehensively reversed dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in a phase I study. A phase III trial on Idarucizumab also complete reversal of anticoagulant effect of dabigatran. Andexanet alfa (PRT064445), a specific reversal agent against factor Xa inhibitors, showed a complete reversal of anticoagulant activity of apixaban and rivaroxaban within minutes after administration without adverse effects in two recently completed parallel phase III trials ANNEXA-A and ANNEXA-R respectively. It is currently being studied in ANNEXA-4, a phase IV study. Aripazine (PER-977), the third reversal agent, has shown promising activity against dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban, as well as subcutaneous fondaparinux and LMWH. This review article summarizes pharmacological characteristics of these novel antidotes, coagulation's tests affected, available clinical and preclinical data, and the need for phase III and IV studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of pharmacist managed anticoagulation with usual medical care in a family medicine clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dillon Carla

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The beneficial outcomes of oral anticoagulation therapy are dependent upon achieving and maintaining an optimal INR therapeutic range. There is growing evidence that better outcomes are achieved when anticoagulation is managed by a pharmacist with expertise in anticoagulation management rather than usual care by family physicians. This study compared a pharmacist managed anticoagulation program (PC to usual physician care (UC in a family medicine clinic. Methods A retrospective cohort study was carried out in a family medicine clinic which included a clinical pharmacist. In 2006, the pharmacist assumed anticoagulation management. For a 17-month period, the PC group (n = 112 of patients on warfarin were compared to the UC patients (n = 81 for a similar period prior to 2006. The primary outcome was the percentage of time patients' INR was in the therapeutic range (TTR. Secondary outcomes were the percentage of time in therapeutic range within ± 0.3 units of the recommended range (expanded TTR and percentage of time the INR was >5.0 or Results The baseline characteristics were similar between the groups. Fifty-five percent of the PC group was male with a mean age of 67 years; 51% of the UC group was male with a mean age of 71 years. The most common indications for warfarin in both groups were atrial fibrillation, mechanical heart valves and deep vein thrombosis. The TTR was 73% for PC and 65% for UC (p 5 were 0.3% for PC patients and 0.1% for UC (p Conclusion The pharmacist-managed anticoagulation program within a family practice clinic compared to usual care by the physicians achieved significantly better INR control as measured by the percentage of time patients' INR values were kept in both the therapeutic and expanded range. Based on the results of this study, a collaborative family practice clinic using pharmacists and physicians may be an effective model for anticoagulation management with these results verified in future

  19. A comparative study on anticoagulant activities of three Chinese herbal medicines from the genus Panax and anticoagulant activities of ginsenosides Rg1 and Rg2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C T; Wang, H B; Xu, B J

    2013-08-01

    Chemical compositions of three herbal plants from the family Araliaceae genus Panax [Panax ginseng C. A. Mey, P. quinquefolius L. and P. notoginseng (Burk.) F. H. Chen] are quite similar; however, their medicinal natures vary greatly. The reason for differences has been explained in traditional Chinese medicine theory and partially verified by modern pharmacological investigations, such as antiplatelet aggregation. Aside from platelet aggregation, a variety of plasma coagulation factors are also involved in blood coagulation. The anticoagulation profiles of three herbs have not been investigated. The current research compared the inhibitory effects of three herbal extracts from Panax spp. and the purified ginsenosides from P. ginseng on blood coagulation. Human plasma was mixed with the water extracts (0.05 and 0.1 mg/mL) from roots of P. ginseng, P. quinquefolius and P. notoginseng and ginsenosides Rg1 and Rg2 (0.05 and 0.1 mg/mL), the blood clotting time of activated partial thromboplastin, prothrombin and thrombin were measured by a biochemical analyzer. The water extracts (0.05 mg/mL) of P. ginseng, P. quinquefolius and P. notoginseng could significantly extend blood clotting time as compared to the control group. Among three herbal medicines, 0.05 mg/mL of water extract from P. ginseng exhibited the strongest anticoagulation effects, followed by P. notoginseng, while P. quinquefolius presented the weakest effects. Both ginsenosides Rg1 and Rg2 could significantly extend blood clotting time in all three tests; ginsenoside Rg2 exhibited relative stronger anticoagulation effects as compared to ginsenoside Rg1. Among three herbs tested, P. ginseng as well as its active component ginsenoside Rg2 shows the strongest anticoagulation activity; current results indicate that P. ginseng and ginsenoside Rg2 have great potential to be an anticoagulation drug.

  20. Risks and Benefits of Ceasing or Continuing Anticoagulant Medication for Image-Guided Procedures for Spine Pain: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clark C; Schneider, Byron; McCormick, Zachary L; Gill, Jatinder; Loomba, Vivek; Engel, Andrew J; Duszynski, Belinda; King, Wade

    2018-03-01

    To determine the risks of continuing or ceasing anticoagulant or antiplatelet medications prior to image-guided procedures for spine pain. Systematic review of the literature with comprehensive analysis of the published data. Following a search of the literature for studies pertaining to spine pain interventions in patients on anticoagulant medication, seven reviewers appraised the studies identified and assessed the quality of evidence presented. Evidence was sought regarding risks associated with either continuing or ceasing anticoagulant and antiplatelet medication in patients having image-guided interventional spine procedures. The evidence was evaluated in accordance with the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system. From a source of 120 potentially relevant articles, 14 provided applicable evidence. Procedures involving interlaminar access carry a nonzero risk of hemorrhagic complications, regardless of whether anticoagulants are ceased or continued. For other procedures, hemorrhagic complications have not been reported, and case series indicate that they are safe when performed in patients who continue anticoagulants. Three articles reported the adverse effects of ceasing anticoagulants, with serious consequences, including death. Other than for interlaminar procedures, the evidence does not support the view that anticoagulant and antiplatelet medication must be ceased before image-guided spine pain procedures. Meanwhile, the evidence shows that ceasing anticoagulants carries a risk of serious consequences, including death. Guidelines on the use of anticoagulants should reflect these opposing bodies of evidence.

  1. Variation in human platelet glycoprotein VI content modulates glycoprotein VI-specific prothrombinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furihata, K; Clemetson, K J; Deguchi, H; Kunicki, T J

    2001-11-01

    - Glycoprotein VI (GPVI) is a platelet-specific receptor for collagen that figures prominently in signal transduction. An addition to binding to type I and III collagens, GPVI is also bound specifically by collagen-related peptide and convulxin (CVX), a snake venom protein. We developed a quantitative assay of platelet GPVI in which biotin-conjugated CVX binds selectively to GPVI in separated total platelet proteins by a ligand blot procedure. Using this approach, we have documented a 5-fold range in platelet GPVI content among 23 normal healthy subjects. In addition, we have determined that CVX-induced or collagen-related peptide-induced prothrombinase activity is directly proportional to the platelet content of GPVI. A statistically significant correlation was observed at 2 CVX concentrations: 14.7 ng/mL (R(2)=0.854 and P<0.001, n=11) and 22 ng/mL (R(2)=0.776 and P<0.001, n=12). In previous studies, we established a similar range of expression of the integrin collagen receptor alpha(2)beta(1) on platelets of normal subjects. Among 15 donors, there is a direct correlation between platelet alpha(2)beta(1) density and GPVI content (R(2)=0.475 and P=0.004). In view of the well-documented association of GPVI with platelet procoagulant activity, this study suggests that the variation in GPVI content is a potential risk factor that may predispose individuals to hemorrhagic or thromboembolic disorders.

  2. Platelet receptor expression and shedding: glycoprotein Ib-IX-V and glycoprotein VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K

    2014-04-01

    Quantity, quality, and lifespan are 3 important factors in the physiology, pathology, and transfusion of human blood platelets. The aim of this review is to discuss the proteolytic regulation of key platelet-specific receptors, glycoprotein(GP)Ib and GPVI, involved in the function of platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis, and nonimmune or immune thrombocytopenia. The scope of the review encompasses the basic science of platelet receptor shedding, practical aspects related to laboratory analysis of platelet receptor expression/shedding, and clinical implications of using the proteolytic fragments as platelet-specific biomarkers in vivo in terms of platelet function and clearance. These topics can be relevant to platelet transfusion regarding both changes in platelet receptor expression occurring ex vivo during platelet storage and/or clinical use of platelets for transfusion. In this regard, quantitative analysis of platelet receptor profiles on blood samples from individuals could ultimately enable stratification of bleeding risk, discrimination between causes of thrombocytopenia due to impaired production vs enhanced clearance, and monitoring of response to treatment prior to change in platelet count. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of Thromboelastography (TEG) for Detection of New Oral Anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, João D; Norem, Katherine; Doorneweerd, Derek D; Thurer, Robert L; Popovsky, Mark A; Omert, Laurel A

    2015-05-01

    The clinical introduction of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) has stimulated the development of tests to quantify the effects of these drugs and manage complications associated with their use. Until recently, the only treatment choices for the prevention of venous thromboembolism in orthopedic surgical patients, as well as for stroke and systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation, were vitamin K antagonists, antiplatelet drugs, and unfractionated and low-molecular-weight heparins. With the approval of NOACs, treatment options and consequent diagnostic challenges have expanded. To study the utility of thromboelastography (TEG) in monitoring and differentiating between 2 currently approved classes of NOACs, direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban and apixaban). Blood samples from healthy volunteers were spiked with each NOAC in both the presence and absence of ecarin, and the effects on TEG were evaluated. Both the kaolin test reaction time (R time) and the time to maximum rate of thrombus generation were prolonged versus control samples and demonstrated a dose response for apixaban (R time within the normal range) and dabigatran. The RapidTEG activated clotting time test allowed the creation of a dose-response curve for all 3 NOACs. In the presence of anti-Xa inhibitors, the ecarin test promoted significant shortening of kaolin R times to the hypercoagulable range, while in the presence of the direct thrombin inhibitor only small and dose-proportional R time shortening was observed. The RapidTEG activated clotting time test and the kaolin test appear to be capable of detecting and monitoring NOACs. The ecarin test may be used to differentiate between Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors. Therefore, TEG may be a valuable tool to investigate hemostasis and the effectiveness of reversal strategies for patients receiving NOACs.

  4. Effect of Statins and Anticoagulants on Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, Moein [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre [Research Center, Department of Statistics, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Zilli, Thomas; Van Nguyen, Thu; Guay, Jean-Pierre; Bahary, Jean-Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Taussky, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.taussky.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Statins and anticoagulants (ACs) have both been associated with a less-aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) and a better outcome after treatment of localized PCa. The results of these studies might have been confounded because patients might often take both medications. We examined their respective influence on PCa aggressiveness at initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 381 patients treated with either external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for low-risk (n = 152), intermediate-risk (n = 142), or high-risk (n = 87) localized PCa. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate an association between these drug classes and prostate cancer aggressiveness. We tested whether the concomitant use of statins and ACs had a different effect than that of either AC or statin use alone. Results: Of the 381 patients, 172 (45.1%) were taking statins and 141 (37.0%) ACs; 105 patients (27.6%) used both. On univariate analysis, the statin and AC users were associated with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (p = .017) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = .0022). On multivariate analysis, statin use was associated with a PSA level <10 ng/mL (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-6.8; p = .012) and a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.29; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.83; p = .03). The use of ACs was associated with a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.59, p = .02). Conclusion: Both AC and statins have an effect on PCa aggressiveness, with statins having a more stringent relationship with the PSA level, highlighting the importance of considering statin use in studies of PCa aggressiveness.

  5. Synthesis of fucosyl-containing glycoproteins of the vitelline coat in oocytes of Ciona intestinalis (Ascidia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, F; Cotelli, F; De Santis, R; Monroy, A; Pinto, M R

    1982-01-01

    The sperm receptors of the ascidian oocyte are located at the outer surface of the vitelline coat (formerly called the chorion). The fucose residues are the receptor's most important components for sperm recognition and binding. We asked whether the fucosyl-containing glycoproteins of the vitelline coat are a product of the oocyte, the follicle cells, or the test cells. Ovaries of Ciona intestinalis were injected with L-[3H]fucose and the progress of its incorporation was followed by using autoradiography and sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the injected gonads and of the isolated vitelline coats. We found that incorporation of fucose begins within the vitellogenic oocytes, and fucose slowly accumulates in the differentiating vitelline coat. At no time could fucose incorporation be detected in the follicle cells or in the test cells. Sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of vitelline coats prepared from the injected ovaries showed fucose incorporation into the same three glycoproteins present in vitelline coats from mature oocytes and identified by their affinity for 125I-labeled fucose-binding protein [Pinto, M. R., De Santis, R., D'Alessio, G. & Rosati, F. (1981) Exp. Cell Res. 132, 289-295]. A radioactive band not found in the mature oocyte was also present. Images PMID:6952240

  6. A recombinant canine distemper virus expressing a modified rabies virus glycoprotein induces immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhili; Wang, Jigui; Yuan, Daoli; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Jiazeng; Yi, Bao; Hou, Qiang; Mao, Yaping; Liu, Weiquan

    2015-06-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) and rabies virus (RV) are two important pathogens of the dog. CDV, a member of the morbillivirus genus, has shown promise as an expression vector. The glycoprotein from RV is a main contributor to protective immunity and capable of eliciting the production of virus-neutralizing antibodies. In this study, we recovered an attenuated strain of canine distemper virus and constructed a recombinant virus, rCDV-RV-G, expressing a modified (R333Q) rabies virus glycoprotein (RV-G) of RV Flury strain LEP. RV-G expression by the recombinant viruses was confirmed. Furthermore, G was proved to be incorporated into the surface of CDV particles. While replication of the recombinant virus was slightly reduced compared with the parental CDV, it stably expressed the RV-G over ten serial passages. Inoculation of mice induced specific neutralizing antibodies against both RV-G and CDV. Therefore, the rCDV-RV-G has the potential as a vaccine that may be used to control rabies virus infection in dogs and other animals.

  7. Strategies for induction of catalytic antibodies toward HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 in autoimmune prone mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durova, Oxana M; Vorobiev, Ivan I; Smirnov, Ivan V; Reshetnyak, Andrew V; Telegin, Georgy B; Shamborant, Olga G; Orlova, Nadezda A; Genkin, Dmitry D; Bacon, Andrew; Ponomarenko, Natalia A; Friboulet, Alain; Gabibov, Alexander G

    2009-11-01

    Tremendous efforts to produce an efficient vaccine for HIV infection have been unsuccessful. The ability of HIV to utilize sophisticated mechanisms to escape killing by host immune system rises dramatic problems in the development of antiviral therapeutics. The HIV infection proceeds by interaction of coat viral glycoprotein gp120 trimer with CD4(+) receptor of the lymphocyte. Thus this surface antigen may be regarded as a favorable target for immunotherapy. In the present study, we have developed three different strategies to produce gp120-specific response in autoimmune prone mice (SJL strain) as potential tools for production "catalytic vaccine". Therefore (i) reactive immunization by peptidylphosphonate, structural part of the coat glycoprotein, (ii) immunization by engineered fused epitopes of gp120 and encephalogenic peptide, a part of myelin basic protein, and (iii) combined vaccination by DNA and corresponding gp120 fragments incorporated into liposomes were investigated. In the first two cases monoclonal antibodies and their recombinant fragments with amidolytic and gp120-specific proteolytic activities were characterized. In the last case, catalytic antibodies with virus neutralizing activity proved in cell line models were harvested.

  8. Low temperature-dependent salmonid alphavirus glycoprotein processing and recombinant virus-like particle formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W Metz

    Full Text Available Pancreas disease (PD and sleeping disease (SD are important viral scourges in aquaculture of Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout. The etiological agent of PD and SD is salmonid alphavirus (SAV, an unusual member of the Togaviridae (genus Alphavirus. SAV replicates at lower temperatures in fish. Outbreaks of SAV are associated with large economic losses of ~17 to 50 million $/year. Current control strategies rely on vaccination with inactivated virus formulations that are cumbersome to obtain and have intrinsic safety risks. In this research we were able to obtain non-infectious virus-like particles (VLPs of SAV via expression of recombinant baculoviruses encoding SAV capsid protein and two major immunodominant viral glycoproteins, E1 and E2 in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cells. However, this was only achieved when a temperature shift from 27°C to lower temperatures was applied. At 27°C, precursor E2 (PE2 was misfolded and not processed by host furin into mature E2. Hence, E2 was detected neither on the surface of infected cells nor as VLPs in the culture fluid. However, when temperatures during protein expression were lowered, PE2 was processed into mature E2 in a temperature-dependent manner and VLPs were abundantly produced. So, temperature shift-down during synthesis is a prerequisite for correct SAV glycoprotein processing and recombinant VLP production.

  9. Enzyme activity assay of glycoprotein enzymes based on a boronate affinity molecularly imprinted 96-well microplate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhen

    2014-12-16

    Enzyme activity assay is an important method in clinical diagnostics. However, conventional enzyme activity assay suffers from apparent interference from the sample matrix. Herein, we present a new format of enzyme activity assay that can effectively eliminate the effects of the sample matrix. The key is a 96-well microplate modified with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) prepared according to a newly proposed method called boronate affinity-based oriented surface imprinting. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a glycoprotein enzyme that has been routinely used as an indicator for several diseases in clinical tests, was taken as a representative target enzyme. The prepared MIP exhibited strong affinity toward the template enzyme (with a dissociation constant of 10(-10) M) as well as superb tolerance for interference. Thus, the enzyme molecules in a complicated sample matrix could be specifically captured and cleaned up for enzyme activity assay, which eliminated the interference from the sample matrix. On the other hand, because the boronate affinity MIP could well retain the enzymatic activity of glycoprotein enzymes, the enzyme captured by the MIP was directly used for activity assay. Thus, additional assay time and possible enzyme or activity loss due to an enzyme release step required by other methods were avoided. Assay of ALP in human serum was successfully demonstrated, suggesting a promising prospect of the proposed method in real-world applications.

  10. Glycan Reader: Automated Sugar Identification and Simulation Preparation for Carbohydrates and Glycoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sunhwan; Song, Kevin C.; Desaire, Heather; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Im, Wonpil

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how glycosylation affects protein structure, dynamics, and function is an emerging and challenging problem in biology. As a first step toward glycan modeling in the context of structural glycobiology, we have developed Glycan Reader and integrated it into the CHARMM-GUI, http://www.charmm-gui.org/input/glycan. Glycan Reader greatly simplifies the reading of PDB structure files containing glycans through (i) detection of carbohydrate molecules, (ii) automatic annotation of carbohydrates based on their three-dimensional structures, (iii) recognition of glycosidic linkages between carbohydrates as well as N-/O-glycosidic linkages to proteins, and (iv) generation of inputs for the biomolecular simulation program CHARMM with the proper glycosidic linkage setup. In addition, Glycan Reader is linked to other functional modules in CHARMM-GUI, allowing users to easily generate carbohydrate or glycoprotein molecular simulation systems in solution or membrane environments and visualize the electrostatic potential on glycoprotein surfaces. These tools are useful for studying the impact of glycosylation on protein structure and dynamics. PMID:21815173

  11. The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein structure: nailing down a moving target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A

    2017-01-01

    Structure determination of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) presented a number of challenges, but several high-resolution structures have now become available. In 2013, cryo-EM and x-ray structures of soluble, cleaved SOSIP Env trimers from the clade A BG505 strain provided the first glimpses into the Env trimer fold as well as more the variable regions. A recent cryo-EM structure of a native full-length trimer without any stabilizing mutations had the same core structure, but revealed new insights and features. A more comprehensive and higher resolution understanding of the glycan shield has also emerged, enabling a more complete representation of the Env glycoprotein structure. Complexes of Env trimers with broadly neutralizing antibodies have surprisingly illustrated that most of the Env surface can be targeted in natural infection and that the neutralizing epitopes are almost all composed of both peptide and glycan components. These structures have also provided further evidence of the inherent plasticity of Env and how antibodies can exploit this flexibility by perturbing or even stabilizing the trimer to facilitate neutralization. These breakthroughs have stimulated further design and stabilization of Env trimers as well as other platforms to generate trimers that now span multiple subtypes. These Env trimers when used as immunogens, have led to the first vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies for structural and functional analyses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Postoperative bleeding risk for oral surgery under continued rivaroxaban anticoagulant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanken, Henning; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max; Smeets, Ralf; Kluwe, Lan; Wikner, Johannes; Koehnke, Robert; Al-Dam, Ahmed; Eichhorn, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the risk of postoperative bleeding complications after oral procedures performed under continued mono or dual anticoagulation therapy with rivaroxaban (and aspirin). This retrospective single-center observational study included 52 oral procedures performed under continued oral anticoagulant therapy with rivaroxaban (20 mg/day). Among them, two procedures were performed under continued dual therapy with aspirin (100 mg/day) added to the regimen. Postoperative bleeding events were compared with 285 oral procedures in patients without any anticoagulation/antiplatelet therapy. Postoperative bleeding complications after oral surgery occurred significantly more often in patients under continued rivaroxaban therapy (11.5 %) than in the control cases without anticoagulation/antiplatelet medication (0.7 %). All of the bleeding events were manageable: Two of them were treated with local compression, three by applying new fibrin glue with (one case) or without (two cases) secondary sutures, one occurred during a weekend and was therefore treated under inpatient conditions with suture replacement. All postoperative bleeding episodes occurred during the first postoperative week. According to our data, continued anticoagulation therapy with rivaroxaban significantly increases postoperative bleeding risk for oral surgical procedures, although the bleeding events were manageable. Oral surgeons, cardiologists, general physicians, and patients should be aware of the increased bleeding risk after oral surgical procedures. Close observation up to 1 week postoperatively is advisable to prevent excessive bleeding.

  13. [The study of anticoagulants selection in platelet-rich plasma preparation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lei; Lai, Gui; Zhenjun, Liu; Guie, Ma

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the effect of the anticoagulants on PRP quality, so as to clarify the appropriate anticoagulant used in PRP production. The microstructure change of platelets collected via heparin, citrate, acid citrate dextrose (ACD) and citrate-theophylline-adenosine-dipyridamole ( CTAD) was observed by TEM following time course. The extent of spontaneous activation of platelets in four groups was detected by measuring sP-selectin in plasma. The TGF-β1 release amount of activated PRP of four groups was measured. CTAD is superior to other anticoagulants in maintaining the integrity of platelet structures for a long time and preventing platelet spontaneous activation. ACD slightly surpassed heparin and citrate in above two aspects. ACD-PRP and CTAD-PRP released significantly more TGF-β1 compared with heparin and citrate. The PRP quality and biological effects were strongly associated with the type of Anticoagulants. ACD and CTAD are optimal anticoagulants in PRP production for they can maintain platelet viability at a high level.

  14. Can we withdraw anticoagulation in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome after seroconvertion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciascia, S; Coloma-Bazán, E; Radin, M; Bertolaccini, M L; López-Pedrera, C; Espinosa, Gerard; Meroni, P L; Cervera, R; Cuadrado, M J

    2017-11-01

    The current mainstay of treatment in patients with thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is long-term anticoagulation, mainly with Vitamin K antagonist agents. Some recently available studies have created new ground for discussion about the possible discontinuation of anticoagulation therapy in patients with a history of thrombotic APS in whom antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) are not detected any longer (i.e. aPL seroconversion). We report the main points discussed at the last CORA Meeting regarding the issue whether or not anticoagulation can be stopped after aPL seroconversion. In particular, we systematically reviewed the available evidence investigating the clinical outcome of APS patients with aPL seroconversion in whom anticoagulation was stopped when compared to those in whom therapy was continued regardless the aPL profile. Furthermore, the molecular basis for the aPL pathogenicity, the available evidence of non-criteria aPL and their association with thrombosis are addressed. To date, available evidence is still limited to support the indication to stop oral anticoagulation therapy in patients with a previous diagnosis of thrombotic APS who subsequently developed a negative aPL profile. The identification of the whole risk profile for cardiovascular manifestations and possibly of a second level aPL testing in selected patients with aPL might support the eventual clinical decision but further investigation is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Seronegative antiphospholipid syndrome, catastrophic syndrome, new anticoagulants: learning from a difficult case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joalland, F; de Boysson, H; Darnige, L; Johnson, A; Jeanjean, C; Cheze, S; Augustin, A; Auzary, C; Geffray, L

    2014-11-01

    The diagnosis of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is based on clinical and biological criteria including the persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies and thrombotic events or pregnancy morbidity. Heparins relayed by vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are the gold standard treatment for thrombosis. We report a 17-year-old man who presented with an initially seronegative antiphospholipid syndrome, in whom the diagnosis was late, only obtained after anticoagulation withdrawing, when a catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) with cutaneous lesions and disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome occurred. For personal convenience, this patient was initially treated with fondaparinux followed by a new oral anticoagulant (rivaroxaban) before to return to the conventional VKA treatment. The "seronegative" APS is a controversial concept reflecting the heterogeneity of antigenic targets for aPL. This diagnosis may be considered after a rigorous work-up, with the help of haemostasis laboratories testing new emerging aPL assays. In APS, the new anticoagulants represent an attractive option needing nevertheless prospective studies to evaluate their safety and efficacy. Lupus anticoagulant detection in patients treated by new oral anticoagulants is not easy by usually recommended coagulation tests. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  16. Gaps in monitoring during oral anticoagulation: insights into care transitions, monitoring barriers, and medication nonadherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Adam J; Miller, Donald R; Ozonoff, Al; Berlowitz, Dan R; Ash, Arlene S; Zhao, Shibei; Reisman, Joel I; Hylek, Elaine M

    2013-03-01

    Among patients receiving oral anticoagulation, a gap of > 56 days between international normalized ratio tests suggests loss to follow-up that could lead to poor anticoagulation control and serious adverse events. We studied long-term oral anticoagulation care for 56,490 patients aged 65 years and older at 100 sites of care in the Veterans Health Administration. We used the rate of gaps in monitoring per patient-year to predict percentage time in therapeutic range (TTR) at the 100 sites. Many patients (45%) had at least one gap in monitoring during an average of 1.6 years of observation; 5% had two or more gaps per year. The median gap duration was 74 days (interquartile range, 62-107). The average TTR for patients with two or more gaps per year was 10 percentage points lower than for patients without gaps (P < .001). Patient-level predictors of gaps included nonwhite race, area poverty, greater distance from care, dementia, and major depression. Site-level gaps per patient-year varied from 0.19 to 1.78; each one-unit increase was associated with a 9.2 percentage point decrease in site-level TTR (P < .001). Site-level gap rates varied widely within an integrated care system. Sites with more gaps per patient-year had worse anticoagulation control. Strategies to address and reduce gaps in monitoring may improve anticoagulation control.

  17. Cerebral microbleeds on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and anticoagulant-associated intracerebral haemorrhage risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eCharidimou

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing use of antithrombotic drugs in an ageing population (including anticoagulants to prevent future ischaemic stroke in individuals with atrial fibrillation has been associated with a dramatic increase in the incidence of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH in users of antithrombotic drugs. Several lines of evidence suggest that cerebral small vessel disease (particularly sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a risk factor for this rare but devastating complication of these commonly used treatments. Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs have emerged as a key MRI marker of small vessel disease and a potentially powerful marker of future ICH risk, but adequately powered, high quality prospective studies of CMBs and ICH risk on anticoagulation are not available. Further data are urgently needed to determine how neuroimaging and other biomarkers may contribute to individualised risk prediction to make anticoagulation as safe and effective as possible. In this review we discuss the available evidence on cerebral small vessel disease and CMBs in the context of antithrombotic treatments, especially regarding their role as a predictor of future ICH risk after ischaemic stroke, where risk-benefit judgements can be a major challenge for physicians. We will focus on patients with atrial fibrillation because these are frequently treated with anticoagulation. We briefly describe the rationale and design of a new prospective observational inception cohort study (Clinical Relevance of Microbleeds in Stroke; CROMIS-2 which investigates the value of MRI markers of small vessel disease (including CMBs and genetic factors in assessing the risk of oral anticoagulation-associated ICH.

  18. Epistaxis and dabigatran, a new non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Callejo, Francisco Javier; Bécares Martínez, Carmen; Calvo González, Jordi; Martínez Beneyto, Paz; Marco Sanz, Marta; Marco Algarra, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Dabigatran is a new non-vitamin K antagonist (VKA) anticoagulant with anti-thrombin action, with supposedly fewer haemorrhagic complications. However, there are actually no established agents to reverse its effect, nor specific coagulation time tests for monitoring it. An observational prospective study was developed, noting epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic features among subjects with epistaxis treated with dabigatran. Results were compared with a group of epistaxis cases of individuals under anticoagulant therapy with VKA (acenocoumarol) and a control group without anticoagulation. Since its inclusion in our health system almost 3 years ago, 19 patients with epistaxis and concomitant use of dabigatran have been attended at the Emergency Unit in our hospital, as against 59 under VKA therapy and 144 without anticoagulation, with a mean admittance rate of 26%, 28% and 14%, respectively. In 3 out of 5 individuals admitted due to dabigatran treatment, previously unobserved renal failure was detected. Blood transfusion was needed in 80% of patients using dabigatran, 58% using VKA and 23% without anticoagulation. Invasive procedures to control nosebleed were required in 80%, 35% and 21%, respectively. Although haemorrhagic risk was lower in dabigatran cases, they showed the longest stay in the hospital when compared to the other groups. With dabigatran, there are fewer cases of severe epistaxis than with acenocoumarol, but controlling them is more difficult. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  19. Factors associated with availability of anticoagulation reversal agents in rural and community emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faine, Brett A; Amendola, Julie; Homan, Jordan; Ahmed, Azeemuddin; Mohr, Nicholas

    2018-01-15

    Results of a study of anticoagulation reversal agent availability in rural and community hospital emergency departments (EDs) are reported. A cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted to test the hypothesis that anticoagulation reversal agents are not commonly stocked in low-volume EDs. In phase 1 of the study, a physician, pharmacist, or nurse manager at a sample of EDs in 1 state was surveyed to characterize anticoagulation reversal agent availability and the presence or absence of reversal protocols; in phase 2, follow-up qualitative interviews were conducted with hospital pharmacists selected by purposive sampling to identify barriers to availability. Among the 103 EDs represented in the survey, 87 (84%) stocked fresh frozen plasma, 14 (14%) stocked 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (4F-PCC), and 2 (2%) stocked activated 4F-PCC. Forty-one EDs (40%) had a warfarin reversal protocol, but only 2 (2%) EDs had a protocol for direct oral anticoagulant reversal. ED volume and neurology coverage were significantly associated with reversal agent availability ( p = 0.014) and warfarin protocol availability ( p availability, and concerns about shelf life. An investigation of rural and community hospitals in 1 state revealed that the institutions rarely have specialized anticoagulation reversal drugs available. Cost and infrequency of utilization were 2 commonly cited reasons for reversal agent nonavailability. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The use of anticoagulants for prevention and treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peipei; Gao, Fuqiang; Wang, Yanhua; Zhang, Zhenkun; Sun, Wei; Jiang, Baoguo; Wang, Bailiang; Li, Zirong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is a progressive disease, which mainly affects young adults and often necessitates total hip arthroplasty (THA), so early interventions are critical to successfully protect hip joint from THA. In this review, our purpose was to determine the effects of anticoagulants for preventing and treating the primary and secondary ONFH, respectively, before the collapse stage or before the pathology of necrosis. Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science databases for relevant studies. Any observational or experimental studies that evaluated anticoagulants and ONFH were our goal of searching the electric databases. Results: Four studies including a total of 218 hips were identified in this review, 2 of them were prospective studies which performed by 1 group, 1 was a retrospective study, and the last was a prospective comparative study. Conclusions: Our findings supported that the anticoagulants could be used for primary ONFH. However, anticoagulants cannot play a protective role on secondary ONFH. Moreover, there were no serious adverse effects reported in the studies after anticoagulants treatment. Nevertheless, our present study with some limitations such as the limited sample size only provided limited quality of evidence; confirmation from further systematic review or meta-analysis with large-scale, well-designed randomized control trials is required. PMID:28422866

  1. Antithrombotic management in patients with percutaneous coronary intervention requiring oral anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Zalewski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic evolution of therapeutic options including the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKA, non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOAC, more potent antiplatelet drugs as well as new generation drug-eluting stents could lead to the view that the current recommendations on the management of patients with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI requiring oral anticoagulation do not keep up with the results of several clinical studies published within the last 5 years. In the present overview, we summarize the recent advances in antithrombotic management used in atrial fibrillation patients undergoing PCI for stable coronary artery disease or acute coronary syndrome (ACS. The safety and efficacy of prasugrel and ticagrelor taken with oral anticoagulants also remain to be established in randomized trials; therefore the P2Y12 inhibitor clopidogrel on top of aspirin or without is now recommended to be used together with a VKA or NOAC. It is still unclear which dose of a NOAC in combination with antiplatelet agents and different stents should be used in this clinical setting and whether indeed NOAC are safer compared with VKA in such cardiovascular patients. Moreover, we discuss the use of anticoagulation in addition to antiplatelet therapy for secondary prevention in patients with ACS. To minimize bleeding risk in anticoagulated patients following PCI or ACS, the right agent should be prescribed to the right patient at the right dose and supported by regular clinical evaluation and laboratory testing, especially assessment of renal function when a NOAC is used.

  2. Receptor-Targeted Nipah Virus Glycoproteins Improve Cell-Type Selective Gene Delivery and Reveal a Preference for Membrane-Proximal Cell Attachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben R Bender

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Receptor-targeted lentiviral vectors (LVs can be an effective tool for selective transfer of genes into distinct cell types of choice. Moreover, they can be used to determine the molecular properties that cell surface proteins must fulfill to act as receptors for viral glycoproteins. Here we show that LVs pseudotyped with receptor-targeted Nipah virus (NiV glycoproteins effectively enter into cells when they use cell surface proteins as receptors that bring them closely enough to the cell membrane (less than 100 Å distance. Then, they were flexible in receptor usage as demonstrated by successful targeting of EpCAM, CD20, and CD8, and as selective as LVs pseudotyped with receptor-targeted measles virus (MV glycoproteins, the current standard for cell-type specific gene delivery. Remarkably, NiV-LVs could be produced at up to two orders of magnitude higher titers compared to their MV-based counterparts and were at least 10,000-fold less effectively neutralized than MV glycoprotein pseudotyped LVs by pooled human intravenous immunoglobulin. An important finding for NiV-LVs targeted to Her2/neu was an about 100-fold higher gene transfer activity when particles were targeted to membrane-proximal regions as compared to particles binding to a more membrane-distal epitope. Likewise, the low gene transfer activity mediated by NiV-LV particles bound to the membrane distal domains of CD117 or the glutamate receptor subunit 4 (GluA4 was substantially enhanced by reducing receptor size to below 100 Å. Overall, the data suggest that the NiV glycoproteins are optimally suited for cell-type specific gene delivery with LVs and, in addition, for the first time define which parts of a cell surface protein should be targeted to achieve optimal gene transfer rates with receptor-targeted LVs.

  3. Cloning of partial cDNA encoding differentiation and tumor-associated mucin glycoproteins expressed by human mammary epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gender, S.J.; Burchell, J.M.; Duhig, T.; Lamport, D.; White, R.; Parker, M.; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J.

    1987-09-01

    Human mammary epithelial cells secrete and express on their cell surfaces complex mucin glycoproteins that are developmentally regulated, tumor-associated, and highly immunogenic. Studies using monoclonal antibodies directed to these glycoproteins suggest that their molecular structures can vary with differentiation stages in the normal gland and in malignancy. To analyze the molecular nature of these glycoproteins, milk mucin was affinity-purifed and deglycosylated with hydrogen fluoride, yielding bands at 68 and 72 kDa on silver-stained gels. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to the stripped core protein were developed and used to screen a lambdagt11 expression library of cDNA made from mRNA of the mammary tumor cell line MCF-7. Seven crossreacting clones were isolated, with inserts 0.1-1.8 kilobases long. RNA blot analysis, using as a probe the 1.8-kilobase insert subcloned in plasmid pUC8 (pMUC10), revealed transcripts of 4.7 and 6.4 kilobases in MCF-7 and T47D mammary tumor cells, whereas normal mammary epithelial cells from pooled milks have additional transcripts. The expression of mRNA correlates with antigen expression as determined by binding of two previously characterized anti-mucin monoclonal antibodies (HMFG-1 and HMFG-2) to seven cell lines. Restriction enzyme analysis detected a restriction fragment length polymorphism when human genomic DNA was digested with EcoRI or HinfI.

  4. Genomic clone encoding the α chain of the OKM1, LFA-1, and platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosgrove, L.J.; Sandrin, M.S.; Rajasekariah, P.; McKenzie, I.F.C.

    1986-01-01

    LFA-1, an antigen involved in cytolytic T lymphocyte-mediated killing, and Mac-1, the receptor for complement component C3bi, constitute a family of structurally and functionally related cell surface glycoproteins involved in cellular interactions. In both mouse and man, Mac-1 (OKM1) and LFA-1 share a common 95-kDa β subunit but are distinguished by their α chains, which have different cellular distributions, apparent molecular masses (165 and 177 kDa, respectively), and peptide maps. The authors report the isolation of a genomic clone from a human genomic library that on transfection into mouse fibroblasts produced a molecule(s) reactive with monoclonal antibodies to OKM1, to LFA-1, and to platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa. This gene was cloned by several cycles of transfection of L cells with a human genomic library cloned in λ phase Charon 4A and subsequent rescue of the λ phage. Transfection with the purified recombinant λ DNA yielded a transfectant that expressed the three human α chains of OKM1, LFA-1, and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa, presumably in association with the murine β chain

  5. New oral anticoagulants in severe trauma patients: enemy at the gates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea-Guerrero, J J; Quintana Díaz, M

    2015-04-01

    The high incidence of trauma, especially in elderly people anticoagulated with new oral anticoagulants (NOAs), has become a major challenge, particularly in critical situations with life-threatening bleeding. Under these circumstances, urgent NOA reversion becomes mandatory. Prothrombin complex has become a frequent indication in critical situations in which rapid reversal of anticoagulation is needed and where the use of fresh frozen plasma is limited. This study offers our point of view regarding the usefulness of NOAs, not only in the prevention of cardioembolic events but also as regards their emergent reversion in cases of severe bleeding associated to trauma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  6. Cost evaluation of two methods of post tooth extraction hemostasis in patients on anticoagulant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zusman, S P; Lustig, J P; Bin Nun, G

    1993-06-01

    The classical management of patients on oral anticoagulant therapy included hospitalisation, cessation of the anticoagulant agent, and extraction of teeth when the prothrombine levels rise. This method was substituted in the High Risk Dental Clinic at Barzilai Medical Center in Ashkelon by use of a tissue sealant (Tisseel) which does not need hospitalisation nor cessation of the anticoagulant therapy. In comparing the last 23 sessions employing the former method to the first 23 sessions using the new method there were significant differences in the cost effectiveness for the health system, provider, insurer and patient. Despite the fact that from the health system point of view the new method is much more cost effective, there is no financial incentive for the provider (hospital) nor awareness on the part of the insurer (General Sick Fund) to embrace it and 'market' it.

  7. Direct oral anticoagulants in the management of venous thromboembolism--evidence from major clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holy, Erik W; Beer, Jürg H

    2014-04-01

    For decades the antithrombotic management of venous thromboembolism (VTE) was limited to parenteral heparin formulations and oral vitamin K antagonists. Even though both classes of anticoagulants are effective, they have several limitations, including a narrow therapeutic window and the need to monitor anticoagulant activity. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) that specifically target factor IIa or Xa have emerged. Recent data suggest that they are at least as effective and as safe as conventional therapy and have practical advantages, such as fixed dose regimen and no need for laboratory monitoring. Hence, they represent a major step forward in the acute treatment and long-term prevention of VTE. In this review, we outline the use of DOACs in the management of VTE and provide an overview of recently published major trials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sulfated modification and anticoagulant activity of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo, Lady Godiva) polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Li; Ao, Le; Ma, Tao; Ni, Yuanying; Liao, Xiaojun; Hu, Xiaosong; Song, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Sulfated modification of pumpkin polysaccharide using CAS with pyridines as catalysts under different conditions was conducted to obtain different degrees of sulfation on a laboratory scale. Anticoagulant activities of pumpkin polysaccharide and its sulfated derivatives were also investigated employing various established in vitro systems. Results showed that addition of high ratio of CAS/pyridine under constant conditions could increase the degree of substitution. Sulfate substitution was further confirmed by the FT-IR and 13 C NMR analysis. The d f values between 2.11-2.73 indicated the relatively expanded conformation of the sulfated derivatives. The sulfated polysaccharides showed higher anticoagulant activities through activated partial thrombosis time (aPTT), thrombin time (TT), prothrombin time (PT) and anti-Xa activity assay, which revealed that better anticoagulant activities could be obtained when DS remained higher and M w maintained in a moderate range. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prognostic impact of anticardiolipin antibodies in women with recurrent miscarriage negative for the lupus anticoagulant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette Svarre; Christiansen, Ole Bjarne

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA) are found with increased prevalence in women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage (RM) but their impact on future pregnancy outcome in lupus anticoagulant (LAC) negative patients needs better quantification. METHODS: The impact of a repeatedly positive...... ACA test on the chance of live birth in the next pregnancy after adjustment for relevant prognostic factors was studied in 147 RM patients who had been included in placebo-controlled trials of immunotherapy. Patients with LAC were excluded and none of the patients received therapy with anticoagulation...... OR for live birth among ACA positive patients was 0.48 (95% CI 0.2-1.1, P = 0.10). Positivity for IgM ACA was found to be much stronger correlated to pregnancy outcome than IgG ACA. CONCLUSIONS: In RM women not receiving anticoagulation or prednisone, the presence of ACA in the absence of LAC most likely...

  10. Practice points in gynecardiology: Abnormal uterine bleeding in premenopausal women taking oral anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Angela H E M; Euler, Mia von; Bongers, Marlies Y; Rolden, Herbert J A; Grutters, Janneke P C; Ulrich, Lian; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin

    2015-12-01

    A growing number of premenopausal women are currently using antithrombotic and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy for various cardiovascular indications. These may induce or exacerbate abnormal uterine bleeding and more awareness and knowledge among prescribers is required. Heavy and irregular menstrual bleeding is common in women in their forties and may have a variety of underlying causes that require different treatment options. Thus using anticoagulants in premenopausal women demands specific expertise and close collaboration between cardiovascular physicians and gynecologists. In this article we summarize the scope of the problem and provide practical recommendations for the care for young women taking anticoagulants and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy. We also recommend that more safety data on uterine bleeding with novel anticoagulants in premenopausal women should be obtained. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Recommendations for the anticoagulation of pregnant patients with mechanical heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapkaitz, Elise; Jacobson, Barry Frank; Manga, Pravin; Chitsike, Rufaro Saeed; Benade, Estee; Jackson, S; Haas, Sylvia; Buller, Harry R

    2015-09-14

    The management of pregnant patients with mechanical heart valves remains challenging because there are no large randomised studies to provide guidelines for effective anticoagulant therapy. Both vitamin K antagonists and heparins may be associated with maternal and foetal adverse events. The Southern African Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis reviewed available literature and comprehensive evidence-based guidelines for the anticoagulation of pregnant patients with mechanical heart valves. A draft document was produced and revised by consensus agreement. The guidelines were adjudicated by independent international experts to avoid local bias. We present concise, practical guidelines for the clinical management of pregnant patients with mechanical heart valves. Recommendations reflect current best practice which will hopefully lead to improved anticoagulation practice in this select group of high risk patients.

  12. Thermospray and particle beam liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of coumarin anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, J X; Kymber, K A

    1991-01-02

    Positive ion mass spectra were obtained from several coumarin oral anticoagulants (phenprocoumon, warfarin, acenocoumarol and dicoumarol) and derivatives by liquid chromatography-thermospray mass spectrometry (LC-TSP-MS) and liquid chromatography-electron impact mass spectrometry (LC-EI-MS) to assess the use of LC-MS methods for the determination of these compounds in biological materials. LC-TSP mass spectra showed a single [M + 1]+ ion with no fragmentation; LC-EI mass spectra showed fragment ions which were similar in mass and relative intensities to those obtained by conventional EI-MS. These data should serve as a basis for the development of LC-MS methods for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of coumarin anticoagulants in biological samples. LC-TSP-MS was applied to the determination of phenprocoumon in a plasma extract from an anticoagulated patient.

  13. A Modular Synthetic Approach to Isosteric Sulfonic Acid Analogues of the Anticoagulant Pentasaccharide Idraparinux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Mező

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Heparin-based anticoagulants are drugs of choice in the therapy and prophylaxis of thromboembolic diseases. Idraparinux is a synthetic anticoagulant pentasaccharide based on the heparin antithrombin-binding domain. In the frame of our ongoing research aimed at the synthesis of sulfonic acid-containing heparinoid anticoagulants, we elaborated a modular pathway to obtain a series of idraparinux-analogue pentasaccharides bearing one or two primary sulfonic acid moieties. Five protected pentasaccharides with different C-sulfonation patterns were prepared by two subsequent glycosylation reactions, respectively, using two monosaccharide and four disaccharide building blocks. Transformation of the protected derivatives into the fully O-sulfated, O-methylated sulfonic acid end-products was also studied.

  14. Neutralisation of the anti-coagulant effects of heparin by histones in blood plasma and purified systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longstaff, Colin; Hogwood, John; Gray, Elaine; Komorowicz, Erzsebet; Varjú, Imre; Varga, Zoltán; Kolev, Krasimir

    2016-03-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) composed primarily of DNA and histones are a link between infection, inflammation and coagulation. NETs promote coagulation and approaches to destabilise NETs have been explored to reduce thrombosis and treat sepsis. Heparinoids bind histones and we report quantitative studies in plasma and purified systems to better understand physiological consequences. Unfractionated heparin (UFH) was investigated by activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and alongside low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) in purified systems with thrombin or factor Xa (FXa) and antithrombin (AT) to measure the sensitivity of UFH or LMWH to histones. A method was developed to assess the effectiveness of DNA and non-anticoagulant heparinoids as anti-histones. Histones effectively neutralised UFH, the IC50 value for neutralisation of 0.2 IU/ml UFH was 1.8 µg/ml histones in APTT and 4.6 µg/ml against 0.6 IU/ml UFH in a purified system. Histones also inhibited the activities of LMWHs with thrombin (IC50 6.1 and 11.0 µg/ml histones, for different LMWHs) or FXa (IC50 7.8 and 7.0 µg/ml histones). Direct interactions of UFH and LMWH with DNA and histones were explored by surface plasmon resonance, while rheology studies showed complex effects of histones, UFH and LMWH on clot resilience. A conclusion from these studies is that anticoagulation by UFH and LMWH will be compromised by high affinity binding to circulating histones even in the presence of DNA. A complete understanding of the effects of histones, DNA and heparins on the haemostatic system must include an appreciation of direct effects on fibrin and clot structure.

  15. Modelling exposure of mammalian predators to anticoagulant rodenticide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher John Topping

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant rodenticides (AR are a widespread and effective method of rodent control but there is concern about the impact these may have on non-target organisms, in particular secondary poisoning of rodent predators. Incidence and concentration of AR in free-living predators in Denmark is very high. We postulate that this is caused by widespread exposure due to widespread use of AR in Denmark in and around buildings. To investigate this theory a spatio-temporal model of AR use and mammalian predator distribution was created. This model was supported by data from an experimental study of mice as vectors of AR, and was used to evaluate likely impacts of restrictions imposed on AR use in Denmark banning the use of rodenticides for plant protection in woodlands and tree-crops. The model uses input based on frequencies and timings of baiting for rodent control for urban, rural and woodland locations and creates an exposure map based on spatio-temporal modelling of movement of mice-vectored AR (based on Apodemus flavicollis. Simulated predator territories are super-imposed over this exposure map to create an exposure index. Predictions from the model concur with field studies of AR prevalence both before and after the change in AR use. In most cases incidence of exposure to AR is predicted to be greater than 90%, although cessation of use in woodlots and Christmas tree plantations should reduce mean exposure concentrations. Model results suggest that the driver of high AR incidence in non-target small mammal predators is likely to be the pattern of use and not the distance AR is vectored. Reducing baiting frequency by 75% had different effects depending on the landscape simulated, but having a maximum of 12% reduction in exposure incidence, and in one landscape a maximum reduction of <2%. We discuss sources of uncertainty in the model and directions for future development of predictive models for environmental impact assessment of rodenticides. The

  16. Ice growth in supercooled solutions of antifreeze glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, K; Hallett, J; Burcham, T S; Feeney, R E; Kerr, W L; Yeh, Y

    Inhibition of ice growth in supercooled solution by certain proteins is vital to the survival of many living organisms. Some fish, native to both subzero northern and southern waters, have special proteins or glycoproteins in their blood serum that inhibit ice formation. Whereas these proteins have only a very small effect on the melting temperature of ice, the temperature of these fish can fall to nearly 1 K below the melting point before ice crystals grow. This phenomenon is called freezing hysteresis, in contrast to the normal colligative effect of solutes that depresses the equilibrium temperature, around which small changes lead to crystal growth or melting depending on sign. Some insects also exhibit a serum freezing hysteresis. We report the effects of different degrees of supercooling on the habit and rates of growth of ice crystals from solutions of these antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs). We find that the crystallization rate is up to five times greater than that in pure water.

  17. Comparison of glycoprotein expression between ovarian and colon adenocarcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, H A; Arenas-Elliott, C P; Warhol, M J

    1999-01-01

    , carcinoembryonic antigen, and cytokeratins 7 and 20 to detect tumor-associated glycoproteins and keratin proteins in ovarian and colonic carcinomas. RESULTS: CA125, carcinoembryonic antigen, and cytokeratins 7 and 20 can distinguish between colonic and serous or endometrioid adenocarcinomas of the ovary in both...... primary and metastatic lesions. Mucinous ovarian adenocarcinomas differed in that they express carcinoembryonic antigen and cytokeratins 7 and 20 and weakly express CA125. The other glycoprotein antigens were equally expressed by ovarian and colonic adenocarcinomas and therefore were of no use...... in distinguishing between these 2 entities. CONCLUSION: A panel of monoclonal antibodies against cytokeratins 7 and 20 antigens, CA125, and carcinoembryonic antigen is useful in differentiating serous and endometrioid adenocarcinomas of the ovary from colonic adenocarcinomas. Mucinous ovarian adenocarcinomas cannot...

  18. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel R

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE. For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly challenging when given in an ambulatory setting. Current treatment pathways for most patients with deep-vein thrombosis typically involve initial hospital or community-based ambulatory care with subsequent follow-up in a secondary care setting. With the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs into routine clinical practice, it is now possible for the initial acute management of patients with deep-vein thrombosis to be undertaken by primary care. As hospital admissions associated with VTE become shorter, primary care will play an increasingly important role in the long-term management of these patients. Although the NOACs can potentially simplify patient management and improve clinical outcomes, primary care physicians may be less familiar with these new treatments compared with traditional therapy. To assist primary care physicians in further understanding the role of the NOACs, this article outlines the main differences between NOACs and traditional anticoagulation therapy and discusses the benefit–risk profile of the different NOACs in the treatment and secondary prevention of recurrent VTE. Key considerations for the use of NOACs in the primary care setting are highlighted, including dose transition, risk assessment and follow-up, duration of anticoagulant therapy, how to minimize bleeding risks, and the importance of patient education and counseling. Keywords: venous thromboembolism, oral anticoagulant, prevention, treatment, primary

  19. Physical activity and risk of bleeding in elderly patients taking anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, P M; Méan, M; Limacher, A; Jaeger, K; Beer, H-J; Frauchiger, B; Aschwanden, M; Rodondi, N; Righini, M; Egloff, M; Osterwalder, J; Kucher, N; Angelillo-Scherrer, A; Husmann, M; Banyai, M; Matter, C M; Aujesky, D

    2015-02-01

    Although the possibility of bleeding during anticoagulant treatment may limit patients from taking part in physical activity, the association between physical activity and anticoagulation-related bleeding is uncertain. To determine whether physical activity is associated with bleeding in elderly patients taking anticoagulants. In a prospective multicenter cohort study of 988 patients aged ≥ 65 years receiving anticoagulants for venous thromboembolism, we assessed patients' self-reported physical activity level. The primary outcome was the time to a first major bleeding, defined as fatal bleeding, symptomatic bleeding in a critical site, or bleeding causing a fall in hemoglobin or leading to transfusions. The secondary outcome was the time to a first clinically relevant non-major bleeding. We examined the association between physical activity level and time to a first bleeding by using competing risk regression, accounting for death as a competing event. We adjusted for known bleeding risk factors and anticoagulation as a time-varying covariate. During a mean follow-up of 22 months, patients with a low, moderate, and high physical activity level had an incidence of major bleeding of 11.6, 6.3, and 3.1 events per 100 patient-years and an incidence of clinically relevant non-major bleeding of 14.0, 10.3, and 7.7 events per 100 patient-years, respectively. A high physical activity level was significantly associated with a lower risk of major bleeding (adjusted sub-hazard ratio 0.40, 95% confidence interval 0.22-0.72). There was no association between physical activity and non-major bleeding. A high level of physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of major bleeding in elderly patients receiving anticoagulant therapy. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  20. Features of Modern Anticoagulant Therapy in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Daabul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF in population is very high and continues to grow. According to the existing statistics its prevalence reaches about 2% so it is twice more, than it was considered in the last decade. Prevalence of AF among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD varies from 11 to 22% (according to other data – from 15 to 20% and increases with age, considerably surpassing that in the general population among all age groups. Vast majority of patients with AF need in treatment with anticoagulants to prevent an ischemic stroke and systemic thromboembolisms. However, in case of combination AF and CKD, in addition to increase in frequency of strokes and the thromboembolic events, also the frequency of major bleedings significantly increases that considerably complicates the choice of adequate anticoagulant therapy in such situation. Many years the vitamin K antagonists were the only representatives of a class of anticoagulants for long-term therapy in patients with AF. Their well-known deficiencies (a narrow therapeutic window, need of frequent laboratory control, numerous drug-drug and dietary interactions, unpredictability of a pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics at certain patients promoted search of new medicines, more convenient in use. Direct oral anticoagulants were easier to use, and by results of the main studies didn't yield or exceeded warfarin concerning balance of efficiency and safety. However, they were not specially studied in patients with the reduced kidney function. Features of modern anticoagulant therapy in patients with the nonvalvular AF and CKD are considered in the review. The possibility of the safest use of anticoagulants for patients with decreased creatinine clearance is analyzed.

  1. Characterization and structural analysis of a potent anticoagulant phospholipase A2 from Pseudechis australis snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qianyun Sharon; Trabi, Manuela; Richards, Renée Stirling; Mirtschin, Peter; Madaras, Frank; Nouwens, Amanda; Zhao, Kong-Nan; de Jersey, John; Lavin, Martin F; Guddat, Luke W; Masci, Paul P

    2016-03-01

    Pseudechis australis is one of the most venomous and lethal snakes in Australia. Numerous phospholipase A2 (PLA2) isoforms constitute a major portion of its venom, some of which have previously been shown to exhibit not only enzymatic, but also haemolytic, neurotoxic and anticoagulant activities. Here, we have purified a potent anticoagulant PLA2 (identified as PA11) from P. australis venom to investigate its phospholipase, anticoagulant, haemolytic and cytotoxic activities and shown that addition of 11 nM PA11 resulted in a doubling of the clotting time of recalcified whole blood. We have also demonstrated that PA11 has high PLA2 enzymatic activity (10.9 × 10(4) Units/mg), but low haemolytic activity (0.6% of red blood cells hydrolysed in the presence of 1 nM PA11). PA11 at a concentration lower than 600 nM is not cytotoxic towards human cultured cells. Chemical modification experiments using p-bromophenacyl bromide have provided evidence that the catalytic histidine of PA11 is critical for the anticoagulant activity of this PLA2. PA11 that was subjected to trypsin digestion without previous reduction and alkylation of the disulfide bonds maintained enzymatic and anticoagulant activity, suggesting that proteolysis alone cannot abolish these properties. Consistent with these results, administration of PA11 by gavage in a rabbit stasis thrombosis model increased the clotting time of recalcified citrated whole blood by a factor of four. These data suggest that PA11 has potential to be developed as an anticoagulant in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Hematology of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus subjected to anesthesia and anticoagulation protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Cristine Weinert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical hematology facilitates the diagnosis of disease and can act as a prognostic indicator of pathological conditions in fish. The aim of the present study was to evaluate hematological parameters of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus subjected to different anesthetics and anticoagulants. Thirty apparently healthy fishes (average weight of 473 ± 35. 50 g and mean total length of 29. 33 ± 0. 37 cm, were selected from the local commercial fish farm in the Lages municipality (Santa Catarina, Brazil. The animals were randomly divided into three groups of 10. In two groups, anesthesia was induced with eugenol (70 mg·L- 1 (EG and Benzocaine hydrochloride (100 mg·L-1 (BG, respectively. Anesthesia was not administered to fish of the third group (CG/control group. Blood samples were obtained by venipuncture of the caudal vessels and placed into microtubes containing sodium heparin or Na2EDTA for further analysis. The results were analyzed by Sigma Stat for Windows, the paired t-test for significant differences between anticoagulants of the same group, and analysis of variance followed by the Tukey test for comparison of means between groups (p ? 0. 05. Most of the observed changes in the erythrogram were significantly higher for the anticoagulant heparin and benzocaine group in comparison to the control group. However, the values obtained for the leukogram were significantly higher for all groups subjected to the Na2EDTA anticoagulant, suggesting that heparin may cause cell clumping. The results suggest that the anesthetics under investigation effectively minimizes the effects of stress caused by handling and invasive procedures, and that the anticoagulant heparin causes less hemolysis in comparison to Na2EDTA for Nile tilapia. Thus, the hematological variations attributed to different anesthetic protocols and/or different anticoagulants should be considered for the species Oreochromis niloticus.

  3. Honey Bee Venom (Apis mellifera Contains Anticoagulation Factors and Increases the Blood-clotting Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Zolfagharian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Bee venom (BV is a complex mixture of proteins and contains proteins such as phospholipase and melittin, which have an effect on blood clotting and blood clots. The mechanism of action of honey bee venom (HBV, Apis mellifera on human plasma proteins and its anti-thrombotic effect were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-coagulation effect of BV and its effects on blood coagulation and purification. Methods: Crude venom obtained from Apis mellifera was selected. The anti-coagulation factor of the crude venom from this species was purified by using gel filtration chromatography (sephadex G-50, and the molecular weights of the anti-coagulants in this venom estimated by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. Blood samples were obtained from 10 rabbits, and the prothrombin time (PT and the partial thromboplastin time (PTT tests were conducted. The approximate lethal dose (LD values of BV were determined. Results: Crude BV increased the blood clotting time. For BV concentrations from 1 to 4 mg/mL, clotting was not observed even at more than 300 seconds, standard deviations (SDs = ± 0.71; however, clotting was observed in the control group 13.8 s, SDs = ± 0.52. Thus, BV can be considered as containing anti-coagulation factors. Crude BV is composed 4 protein bands with molecular weights of 3, 15, 20 and 41 kilodalton (kDa, respectively. The LD50 of the crude BV was found to be 177.8 μg/mouse. Conclusion: BV contains anti-coagulation factors. The fraction extracted from the Iranian bees contains proteins that are similar to anti-coagulation proteins, such as phospholipase A2 (PLA2 and melittin, and that can increase the blood clotting times in vitro.

  4. The risk of venous thromboembolism with aspirin compared to anticoagulants after hip and knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Janet N; Maselli, Judith; Auerbach, Andrew D; Fang, Margaret C

    2017-07-01

    Recent guidelines include aspirin as an option to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in selected patients undergoing hip or knee replacement surgery. However, the efficacy of aspirin after arthroplasty has not been well-defined, particularly in more contemporary patient populations. We compared rates of post-operative VTE between patients who received aspirin-only versus anticoagulants after hip or knee arthroplasty, using data from a large US-based administrative database. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 231,780 adults who underwent total knee arthroplasty and 110,621 who underwent total hip arthroplasty in 2009-2012 and who received pharmacologic VTE prophylaxis (aspirin or anticoagulant) within the first 7days after surgery. We compared the risk of post-operative VTE between patients receiving aspirin-only vs. anticoagulants, controlling for clinical and hospital characteristics using multivariable logistic regression with propensity score adjustment. Aspirin-only prophylaxis was administered to 7.5% of patients after knee arthroplasty and 8.0% after hip arthroplasty. Post-operative VTE was diagnosed in 2217 (0.96%) patients after knee arthroplasty and 454 (0.41%) after hip arthroplasty. Compared to anticoagulants, aspirin was not associated with a higher risk for post-operative VTE either after knee arthroplasty (adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval [OR] 0.34 [0.24-0.48]) or hip arthroplasty (OR 0.82 [0.45-1.51]). Aspirin was uncommonly administered as the sole prophylactic agent after hip or knee arthroplasty in this study. However, patients who received aspirin-only had similar rates of post-operative VTE compared to patients who received anticoagulants. Further research should focus on distinguishing which patients benefit more from anticoagulants versus aspirin after arthroplasty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Tumor specific glycoproteins and method for detecting tumorigenic cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, E.A.; Bolmer, S.D.

    1981-01-01

    The detection of tumour specific glycoproteins (TSGP) in human sera often indicates the presence of a malignant tumour in a patient. The distinguishing characteristics of TSGP isolated from the blood sera of cancer patients are described in detail together with methods of TSGP isolation and purification. Details are also given of radioimmunoassay techniques capable of detecting very low levels of serum TSGP with high specificity. (U.K.)

  6. Mucus glycoprotein secretion by tracheal explants: effects of pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, J.A.; Kaizu, T.

    1980-01-01

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium secrete labeled mucus glycoproteins into the culture medium. We have used an in vivtro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pollutants on mucus biosynthesis by rat airways. In addition, we have purified the mucus glycoproteins secreted by rat tracheal explants in order to determine putative structural changes that might by the basis for the observed augmented secretion rates after exposure of rats to H2SO4 aerosols in combination with high ambient levels of ozone. After digestion with papain, mucus glycoproteins secreted by tracheal explants may be separated into five fractions by ion-exchange chromatography, with recovery in high yield, on columns of DEAE-cellulose. Each of these five fractions, one neutral and four acidic, migrates as a single unique spot upon cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH values of 8.6 and 1.2. The neutral fraction, which is labeled with [3H] glucosamine, does not contain radioactivity when Na2 35SO4 is used as the precursor. Acidic fractions I to IV are all labeled with either 3H-glucosamine or Na2 35SO4 as precursor. Acidic fraction II contains sialic acid as the terminal sugar on its oligosaccharide side chains, based upon its chromatographic behavior on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin-Agarose. Treatment of this fraction with neuraminidase shifts its elution position in the gradient to a lower salt concentration, coincident with acidic fraction I. After removal of terminal sialic acid residues with either neuraminidase or low pH treatment, the resultant terminal sugar on the oligosaccharide side chains is fucose. These results are identical with those observed with mucus glycoproteins secreted by cultured human tracheal explants and purified by these same techniques

  7. Prediction of conserved sites and domains in glycoproteins B, C and D of herpes viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Muhammad Asif; Ansari, Abdur Rahman; Ihsan, Awais; Navid, Muhammad Tariq; Ur-Rehman, Shahid; Raza, Sohail

    2018-03-01

    Glycoprotein B (gB), C (gC) and D (gD) of herpes simplex virus are implicated in virus adsorption and penetration. The gB, gC and gD are glycoproteins for different processes of virus binding and attachment to the host cells. Moreover, their expression is necessary and sufficient to induce cell fusion in the absence of other glycoproteins. Egress of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and other herpes viruses from cells involves extensive modification of cellular membranes and sequential envelopment, de-envelopment and re-envelopment steps. Viral glycoproteins are important in these processes, and frequently two or more glycoproteins can largely suffice in any step. Hence, we target the 3 important glycoproteins (B, C and D) of eight different herpes viruses of different species. These species include human (HSV1 and 2), bovine (BHV1), equine (EHV1 and 4), chicken (ILT1 and MDV2) and pig (PRV1). By applying different bioinformatics tools, we highlighted the conserved sites in these glycoproteins which might be most significant regarding attachment and infection of the viruses. Moreover the conserved domains in these glycoproteins are also highlighted. From this study, we will able to analyze the role of different viral glycoproteins of different species during herpes virus adsorption and penetration. Moreover, this study will help to construct the antivirals that target the glycoproteins of different herpes viruses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The response of the Egyptian spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus) and two other species of commensal rodents to anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, W; Redfern, R

    1981-06-01

    The response of Acomys cahirinus to three anticoagulant rodenticides was investigated in the laboratory. In contrast to the other commensal rodents Rattus rattus and R. norvegicus, this species appears to be naturally very resistant to warfarin, difenacoum and brodifacoum. It is considered unlikely that anticoagulant poisons would be effective in the field for the control of A. cahirinus.

  9. Differential expression of cytochrome P450 genes between bromadiolone-resistant and anticoagulant-susceptible Norway rats:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    Anticoagulant resistance in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) has been suggested to be due to mutations in the VKORC1 gene, encoding the target protein of anticoagulant rodenticides such as warfarin and bromadiolone. Other factors, e.g. pharmacokinetics, may however also contribute to resistance. We...

  10. Differential expression of cytochrome P450 genes between bromadiolone-resistant and anticoagulant-susceptible Norway rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude Kjær; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    Background: Anticoagulant resistance in Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus (Berk.), has been suggested to be conferred by mutations in the VKORC1 gene, encoding the target protein of anticoagulant rodenticides. Other factors, e.g. pharmacokinetics, may also contribute to resistance, however. To examine...

  11. The interaction between anticoagulant protein S and complement regulatory C4b-binding protein (C4BP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poel, R. H.; Meijers, J. C.; Bouma, B. N.

    2000-01-01

    An important mechanism of regulation of blood coagulation is the anticoagulant protein C pathway. In this pathway, the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C is increased by its cofactor protein S. The cofactor activity of protein S can be regulated by binding to complement regulatory

  12. The effect of some anticoagulants against three commensal rodents under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Bahrawy, A F; Morsy, T A

    1990-06-01

    Eight anticoagulant rodenticides were used against Rattus norvegicus, R. r. frugivorous and Muss musculus. Phenal proved to be the most suitable against R. norvegicus, while Redentin 75 was less effective. However, males accepted Super-Caid as bait. On the other hand, Klerat Super was more effective than Storm against R. r. frugivorous and M. musculus, in choice feeding and V.V. in no choice feeding. It was concluded that more than one anticoagulant rodenticide being recommended with interval between application in a large rodent infested area.

  13. Effect of an interactive voice response system on oral anticoagulant management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oake, Natalie; van Walraven, Carl; Rodger, Marc A; Forster, Alan J

    2009-04-28

    Monitoring oral anticoagulants is logistically challenging for both patients and medical staff. We evaluated the effect of adding an interactive voice response system to computerized decision support for oral anticoagulant management. We developed an interactive voice response system to communicate to patients the results of international normalized ratio testing and their dosage schedules for anticoagulation therapy. The system also reminded patients of upcoming and missed appointments for blood tests. We recruited patients whose anticoagulation control was stable after at least 3 months of warfarin therapy. We prospectively examined clinical data and outcomes for these patients for an intervention period of at least 3 months. We also collected retrospective data for each patient for the 3 months before study enrolment. We recruited 226 patients between Nov. 23, 2006, and Aug. 1, 2007. The mean duration of the intervention period (prospective data collection) was 4.2 months. Anticoagulation control was similar for the periods during and preceding the intervention (mean time within the therapeutic range 80.3%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 77.5% to 83.1% v. 79.9%, 95% CI 77.3% to 82.6%). The interactive voice response system delivered 1211 (77.8%) of 1557 scheduled dosage messages, with no further input required from clinic staff. The most common reason for clinic staff having to deliver the remaining messages (accounting for 143 [9.2%] of all messages) was an international normalized ratio that was excessively high or low, (i.e., 0.5 or more outside the therapeutic range). When given the option, 76.6% of patients (164/214) chose to continue with the interactive voice response system for management of their anticoagulation after the study was completed. The system reduced staff workload for monitoring anticoagulation therapy by 48 min/wk, a 33% reduction from the baseline of 2.4 hours. Interactive voice response systems have a potential role in improving the

  14. Traumatic events involving elderly patients treated with anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation: the downside of stroke prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Riccardi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A group of oral anticoagulant-treated patients affected by permanent atrial fibrillation was evaluated after their access to the emergency room as a result of a traumatic accident. In these patients, the re-evaluation of their risk of thromboembolism and bleeding was performed together with the evaluation of their risk of falling and institutionalization. Results show that the emergency department identifies a cohort of very elderly frail patients, who should be carefully reconsidered for anticoagulant therapy after a traumatic event.

  15. [Retrospective analysis of correlative factors between digestive system injury and anticoagulant or antiplatelet-agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ning; Luo, Hesheng

    2014-05-27

    To explore the correlative factors and clinical characteristics of digestive system injury during the treatment of anticoagulant and (or) antiplatelet-agents. A total of 1 443 hospitalized patients on anticoagulant and (or) antiplatelet-agents from January 2010 to December 2013 at Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University were analyzed retrospectively. Their length of hospital stay was from 5 to 27 days. Most of them were elderly males (n = 880, 61.0%) with an average age of (62 ± 6) years. 1 138 patients (78.9%) were farmers, workers or someone without a specific occupation. During the treatment of anticoagulant/antiplatelet-agents, statistical difference existed (P = 0.01) between positively and negatively previous digestive disease groups for actively newly occurring digestive system injury (16.0% (41/256) vs 15.9% (189/1 187)). After the dosing of anticoagulant and (or) antiplatelet-agents, 57 (66.3%, 57/86) patients were complicated by hemorrhage of digestive tract, taking 62.9% (61/97) of all positive result patients for Helicobacter pylori test. Comparing preventive PPI group with no PPI group, there was no marked statistical differences (P = 2.67) for digestive system complication (including hemorrhage of digestive tract) while receiving anticoagulant and (or) antiplatelet-agents (13.9% (74/533) vs 17.1% (156/910)). During anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet-agent therapy, 185 patients (12.8%) were complicated by peptic ulcer or peptic ulcer with bleeding, 40 patients (2.8%) had erosive gastritis and 5 (0.3%) developed acute gastric mucosal lesions. And 42 of 76 patients complicated by hemorrhage of digestive tract underwent endoscopic hemostasis while 2 patients were operated. Ninety-seven patients (6.7%) died, including 61 (62.9%, 61/97) from hemorrhage of digestive tract. The remainder became cured, improved and discharged. Moreover, no significant statistical differences existed (P = 2.29) among three combination group (aspirin, clopidogrel, warfarin), two

  16. Self management of oral anticoagulant therapy in children with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas D; Attermann, Jørn; Hjortdal, Vibeke E.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The concept of self – management of oral anticoagulation has been shown to entail better quality of treatment than conventional management when assessed in selected adults. We have extended the concept of self – management to include children with congenital cardiac disease......, hypothesizing self-management of oral anticoagulation is also possible in this subset of patients. Our aim was to assess the quality of self-management. Methods: We trained 14 children aged from 2.2 to 15.6 years, with a mean age of 9.7 years, and their parents, in domiciliary analysis of the International...

  17. Extracellular Glycoproteins in Embryogenic Culture of Pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Čipčić Paljetak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular proteins in three distinctly induced embryogenic lines of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L. cultivated in four MS media modified regarding the nitrogen composition or auxin presence/absence have been analyzed. Extracellular glycoproteins containing α-D-mannose were specifically detected by the lectine concavalin A. During the cultivation of embryogenic tissue in the medium supplemented with reduced nitrogen, the embryos were mostly arrested at preglobular and globular developmental stages, which coincide with the absence of protein secretion. Secreted glycoproteins of 76, 68, 37 and 34 kDa were detected only if any of the three lines were cultivated in the medium that stimulates embryo development, irrespectively of the addition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid or tunicamycin. The glycoprotein of 64 kDa was detected in all lines cultivated in hormone-free MS medium with conventional nitrogen sources and it appears to be associated with embryo maturation. Tunicamycin treatment did not influence embryogenesis, although it specifically affected glycosylation of proteins in the investigated lines. Our results show that besides auxin, the source of nitrate is of great importance for proper protein glycosylation, excretion and developmental transition of pumpkin somatic embryos.

  18. Australine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid that inhibits amyloglucosidase and glycoprotein processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tropea, J.E.; Molyneux, R.J.; Kaushal, G.P.; Pan, Y.T.; Mitchell, M.; Elbein, A.D. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (USA))

    1989-03-07

    Australine is a polyhydroxylated pyrrolizidine alkaloid that was isolated from the seeds of the Australian tree Castanospermum australe and characterized by NMR and X-ray diffraction analysis. Since swainsonine and catanospermine are polyhydroxylated indolizidine alkaloids that inhibit specific glycosidases, the authors tested australine against a variety of exoglycosidases to determine whether it would inhibit any of these enzymes. This alkaloid proved to be a good inhibitor of the {alpha}-glucosidase amyloglucosidase (50% inhibition at 5.8 {mu}M), but it did not inhibit {beta}-glucosidase, {alpha}- or {beta}-mannosidase, or {alpha}- or {beta}-galactosidase. The inhibition of amyloglucosidase was of a competitive nature. Australine also inhibited the glycoprotein processing enzyme glucosidase I, but had only slight activity toward glucosidase II. When incubated with cultured cells, this alkaloid inhibited glycoprotein processing at the glucosidase I step and caused the accumulation of glycoproteins with Glc{sub 3}Man{sub 7-9}(GlcNAc){sub 2}-oligosaccharides.

  19. Internal quality control and external quality assurance in testing for antiphospholipid antibodies: Part II--Lupus anticoagulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Bonar, Roslyn; Marsden, Katherine

    2012-06-01

    In addition to the presence of appropriate clinical features, the diagnosis of the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) fundamentally requires the finding of positive antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) test result(s), with these comprising clot-based assays for the identification of lupus anticoagulant (LA) and immunologic ("solid-phase") assays such as anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) and anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies (aβ2GPI). This article is the second of two that review the process for, and provide recommendations to improve, internal quality control (IQC) and external quality assurance (EQA; or proficiency testing) for aPL assays. These processes are critical for ensuring the quality of laboratory test results, and thence the appropriate clinical diagnosis and management of APS. This article covers LA testing. We provide some updated findings from the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia Haematology Quality Assurance Program, and cover testing results for the past 3 years (2009 to 2011 inclusive). In brief: (1) essentially all laboratories currently perform LA testing using activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and dilute Russell viper venom time (dRVVT) methods, and about one-third also employ the kaolin clotting time (KCT); (2) KCT usage has dropped slightly, from around 50% of laboratories in 2009, to around 35% in 2011, presumably reflecting take up of the latest consensus recommendations; (3) other methodologies such as silica clotting time (SCT) and the platelet neutralization procedure (PNP) are only used by <5% of laboratories; (4) interlaboratory coefficients of variation (CVs) are in general moderate, and substantially better than those reported for solid-phase assays such as aCL and aβ2GPI, with median (range) values being 11.6% (9.2 to 25.5%) for APTT ratios, 16.7% (10.1 to 19.2%) for KCT ratios, and 11.7% (5.7 to 17.4%) for dRVVT ratios; (5) CVs increase slightly with increasing LA positivity; (6) most laboratories correctly

  20. The Ebola virus glycoprotein mediates entry via a non-classical dynamin-dependent macropinocytic pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulherkar, Nirupama; Raaben, Matthijs; Torre, Juan Carlos de la; Whelan, Sean P.; Chandran, Kartik

    2011-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) has been reported to enter cultured cell lines via a dynamin-2-independent macropinocytic pathway or clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The route(s) of productive EBOV internalization into physiologically relevant cell types remain unexplored, and viral-host requirements for this process are incompletely understood. Here, we use electron microscopy and complementary chemical and genetic approaches to demonstrate that the viral glycoprotein, GP, induces macropinocytic uptake of viral particles into cells. GP's highly-glycosylated mucin domain is dispensable for virus-induced macropinocytosis, arguing that interactions between other sequences in GP and the host cell surface are responsible. Unexpectedly, we also found a requirement for the large GTPase dynamin-2, which is proposed to be dispensable for several types of macropinocytosis. Our results provide evidence that EBOV uses an atypical dynamin-dependent macropinocytosis-like entry pathway to enter Vero cells, adherent human peripheral blood-derived monocytes, and a mouse dendritic cell line.