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Sample records for surface activated bonding

  1. Mechanism of bonding and debonding using surface activated bonding method with Si intermediate layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kai; Fujino, Masahisa; Matsumoto, Yoshiie; Suga, Tadatomo

    2018-04-01

    Techniques of handling thin and fragile substrates in a high-temperature process are highly required for the fabrication of semiconductor devices including thin film transistors (TFTs). In our previous study, we proposed applying the surface activated bonding (SAB) method using Si intermediate layers to the bonding and debonding of glass substrates. The SAB method has successfully bonded glass substrates at room temperature, and the substrates have been debonded after heating at 450 °C, in which TFTs are fabricated on thin glass substrates for LC display devices. In this study, we conducted the bonding and debonding of Si and glass in order to understand the mechanism in the proposed process. Si substrates are also successfully bonded to glass substrates at room temperature and debonded after heating at 450 °C using the proposed bonding process. By the composition analysis of bonding interfaces, it is clarified that the absorbed water on the glass forms interfacial voids and cause the decrease in bond strength.

  2. Developments of a bonding technique for optical materials by a surface activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Akira; Oda, Tomohiro; Abe, Tomoyuki; Kusunoki, Isao

    2005-01-01

    We started developing the laser crystal bounding by the surface activation method which can splice crystals together without using hydrogen bonding. For the surface activation, neutral argon beams were used for irradiation of specimens. In the bonding trials with sapphire crystals, we recognized possibility of the bonding method for optical elements. (author)

  3. Surface activated room-temperature bonding in Ar gas ambient for MEMS encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hideki; Kurashima, Yuichi; Takamizawa, Akifumi; Ikegami, Takeshi; Yanagimachi, Shinya

    2018-02-01

    Surface activated room-temperature bonding of Si and sapphire wafers in high-purity inert gas ambient was examined. Although surface activated bonding has been mainly performed in high vacuum, Si and sapphire wafers were successfully bonded in Ar gas ambient up to 90 kPa, which is almost atmospheric pressure. The dicing test proved that the bonding prepared in Ar gas ambient was strong enough for MEMS packaging, although the bonding strength was slightly decreased compared with that prepared in vacuum. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the bonding interface prepared in Ar gas ambient is almost the same as that prepared in vacuum. It means that Ar atoms in the bonding ambient do not hamper the interatomic bond formation at the bonding interface. Room-temperature bonding in gas ambient enables hermetic packaging of MEMS devices, such as inertia sensors, MEMS switches, and Cs vapor cells for MEMS atomic clocks at various pressures.

  4. Improvement of silicon direct bonding using surfaces activated by hydrogen plasma treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, W B; Lee Jae Sik; Sung, M Y

    2000-01-01

    The plasma surface treatment, using hydrogen gas, of silicon wafers was studied as a pretreatment for silicon direct bonding. Chemical reactions of the hydrogen plasma with the surfaces were used for both surface activation and removal of surface contaminants. Exposure of the silicon wafers to the plasma formed an active oxide layer on the surface. This layer was hydrophilic. The surface roughness and morphology were examined as functions of the plasma exposure time and power. The surface became smoother with shorter plasma exposure time and lower power. In addition, the plasma surface treatment was very efficient in removing the carbon contaminants on the silicon surface. The value of the initial surface energy, as estimated by using the crack propagation method, was 506 mJ/M sup 2 , which was up to about three times higher than the value for the conventional direct bonding method using wet chemical treatments.

  5. New Concept of C–H and C–C Bond Activation via Surface Organometallic Chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Samantaray, Manoja

    2015-08-18

    In this chapter we describe the recent applications of well-defined oxidesupported metal alkyls/alkylidenes/alkylidynes and hydrides of group IV, V, and VI transition metals in the field of C–H and C–C bond activation. The activation of ubiquitous C–H and C–C bonds of paraffin is a long-standing challenge because of intrinsic low reactivity. There are many concepts derived from surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC): surface organometallic fragments are always intermediates in heterogeneous catalysis. The study of their synthesis and reactivity is a way to rationalize mechanism of heterogeneous catalysis and to achieve structure activity relationship. By surface organometallic chemistry one can enter any catalytic center by a reaction intermediate leading in fine to single site catalysts. With surface organometallic chemistry one can coordinate to the metal which can play a role in different elementary steps leading for example to C–H activation and Olefin metathesis. Because of the development of SOMC there is a lot of space for the improvement of homogeneous catalysis. After the 1997 discovery of alkane metathesis using silica-supported tantalum hydride by Basset et al. at low temperature (150ºC) the focus in this area was shifted to the discovery of more and more challenging surface complexes active in the application of C–H and C–C bond activation. Here we describe the evolution of well-defined metathesis catalyst with time as well as the effect of support on catalysis. We also describe here which metal–ligand combinations are responsible for a variety of C–H and C–C bond activation.

  6. Bonding of Si wafers by surface activation method for the development of high efficiency high counting rate radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Ikuo; Yamashita, Makoto; Onabe, Hideaki

    2006-01-01

    Si wafers with two different resistivities ranging over two orders of magnitude were bonded by the surface activation method. The resistivities of bonded Si wafers were measured as a function of annealing temperature. Using calculations based on a model, the interface resistivities of bonded Si wafers were estimated as a function of the measured resistivities of bonded Si wafers. With thermal treatment from 500degC to 900degC, all interfaces showed high resistivity, with behavior that was close to that of an insulator. Annealing at 1000degC decreased the interface resistivity and showed close to ideal bonding after thermal treatment at 1100degC. (author)

  7. Electrical conduction of Si/indium tin oxide/Si junctions fabricated by surface activated bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jianbo; Ogawa, Tomoki; Hara, Tomoya; Araki, Kenji; Kamioka, Takefumi; Shigekawa, Naoteru

    2018-02-01

    The electrical properties of n+-Si//indium tin oxide (ITO)/n+-Si, n+-Si//ITO/p+-Si, and p+-Si//ITO/n+-Si junctions fabricated by surface activated bonding (SAB) were investigated. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of n+-Si//ITO/n+-Si, n+-Si//ITO/p+-Si, and p+-Si//ITO/n+-Si junctions showed excellent linear properties. The interface resistances of n+-Si//ITO/n+-Si, n+-Si//ITO/p+-Si, and p+-Si//ITO/n+-Si junctions were found to be 0.030, 0.025, and 0.029 Ω·cm2, respectively, which are lower than required for concentrator photovoltaics. The interface resistances of all the junctions increased with increasing annealing temperature. The degradation of the interface resistance is lower in n+-Si//ITO/n+-Si junctions than in n+-Si//ITO/p+-Si and p+-Si//ITO/n+-Si junctions, when the annealing temperature is higher than 100 °C. These results demonstrate that the ITO thin film as an intermediate layer has high potential application for the connection of subcells in the fabrication of tandem solar cells.

  8. Electrical properties of Al foil/n-4H-SiC Schottky junctions fabricated by surface-activated bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Sho; Liang, Jianbo; Matsubara, Moeko; Dhamrin, Marwan; Nishio, Yoshitaka; Shigekawa, Naoteru

    2018-02-01

    We fabricate 17-µm-thick Al foil/n-4H-SiC Schottky junctions by surface-activated bonding. Their current–voltage and capacitance–voltage characteristics are compared with those of Schottky junctions fabricated by evaporating Al layers on n-4H-SiC epilayers. We find that the ideality factor of Al foil/SiC junctions is larger than that of conventional junctions, which is due to the irradiation of the fast atom beam (FAB) of Ar. The ideality factor of Al foil/SiC junctions is improved by annealing at 400 °C. We also find that the Schottky barrier height is increased by FAB irradiation, which is likely to be due to the negative charges formed at SiC surfaces.

  9. Vacuum ultraviolet-induced surface modification of cyclo-olefin polymer substrates for photochemical activation bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young-Jong; Taniguchi, Yoshinao; Murase, Kuniaki; Taguchi, Yoshihiro; Sugimura, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    The surface of cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) was treated with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light at 172 nm wavelength to improve the wettability and adhesion properties. Through VUV treatment in air, the terminal groups of the COP surface were oxidized into oxygen functional groups, containing C-O, C=O, and COO components, making the COP surface hydrophilic. The extent of oxygenation was evaluated by XPS and FTIR-ATR spectra, and it was shown that the surface properties, hydrophilicity, and functionalization were dependent on both VUV irradiation distance and irradiation time, which have an effect on the concentration of oxygen functional groups. VUV-light treatment with a short irradiation distance was more effective in introducing oxygen functional groups.

  10. Cooperativity in Surface Bonding and Hydrogen Bonding of Water and Hydroxyl at Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Ogasawara, H.; Naslund, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    of the mixed phase at metal surfaces. The surface bonding can be considered to be similar to accepting a hydrogen bond, and we can thereby apply general cooperativity rules developed for hydrogen-bonded systems. This provides a simple understanding of why water molecules become more strongly bonded...... to the surface upon hydrogen bonding to OH and why the OH surface bonding is instead weakened through hydrogen bonding to water. We extend the application of this simple model to other observed cooperativity effects for pure water adsorption systems and H3O+ on metal surfaces.......We examine the balance of surface bonding and hydrogen bonding in the mixed OH + H2O overlayer on Pt(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) via density functional theory calculations. We find that there is a cooperativity effect between surface bonding and hydrogen bonding that underlies the stability...

  11. Fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Østergaard, Christian; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2011-01-01

    While silicon nitride surfaces are widely used in many micro electrical mechanical system devices, e.g. for chemical passivation, electrical isolation or environmental protection, studies on fusion bonding of two silicon nitride surfaces (Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding) are very few and highly application...

  12. Activation of wood surfaces for glue bonds by mechanical pre-treatment and its effects on some properties of veneer surfaces and plywood panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, İsmail

    2004-06-01

    Some chemical pre-treatments with chemical reagents are widely applied to wood surfaces in order to improve bonding ability, wettability and reactivate wood surfaces for glue-wood bonds. Besides these chemical treatments, some mechanical pre-treatments such as sanding and planing can be applied to get a fresh surface which eliminates bonding problems and improves glue bonding of wood. In this study, 2 mm thick rotary cut veneers obtained from steamed beech ( Fagus orientalis) logs were used as material. Both air-drying and oven-drying methods were used for drying veneer. After drying, the surfaces of some veneers were sanded with 100 and 180 grit sandpapers. Three-layer-plywood panels were produced from sanded and non-sanded veneers by using urea formaldehyde and phenol formaldehyde glue resins to evaluate the effects of sanding some mechanical properties of plywood. Changes in pH, surface roughness and adhesive wettability of veneers were evaluated. Wettability of veneers was assessed with contact angle measurements according to the sessile drop method. Both veneer and plywood properties investigated in this study improved clearly after the sanding process. Shear and bending strength values of plywood panels manufactured from sanded and non-sanded veneers were vary depending on glue types and veneer drying methods.

  13. Room temperature wafer direct bonding of smooth Si surfaces recovered by Ne beam surface treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashima, Yuichi; Maeda, Atsuhiko; Takagi, Hideki

    2013-06-01

    We examined the applicability of a Ne fast atom beam (FAB) to surface activated bonding of Si wafers at room temperature. With etching depth more than 1.5 nm, the bonding strength comparable to Si bulk strength was attained. Moreover, we found the improvement of the bonding strength by surface smoothing effect of the Ne FAB. Silicon surface roughness decreased from 0.40 to 0.17 nm rms by applying a Ne FAB of 30 nm etching depth. The bonding strength between surfaces recovered by Ne FAB surface smoothing was largely improved and finally became equivalent to Si bulk strength.

  14. Hydrogen-Bonding Surfaces for Ice Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Hadley, Kevin R.; McDougall, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Ice formation on aircraft, either on the ground or in-flight, is a major safety issue. While ground icing events occur predominantly during the winter months, in-flight icing can happen anytime during the year. The latter is more problematic since it could result in increased drag and loss of lift. Under a Phase I ARMD NARI Seedling Activity, coated aluminum surfaces possessing hydrogen-bonding groups were under investigation for mitigating ice formation. Hydroxyl and methyl terminated dimethylethoxysilanes were prepared via known chemistries and characterized by spectroscopic methods. These materials were subsequently used to coat aluminum surfaces. Surface compositions were based on pure hydroxyl and methyl terminated species as well as mixtures of the two. Coated surfaces were characterized by contact angle goniometry. Receding water contact angle data suggested several potential surfaces that may exhibit reduced ice adhesion. Qualitative icing experiments performed under representative environmental temperatures using supercooled distilled water delivered via spray coating were inconclusive. Molecular modeling studies suggested that chain mobility affected the interface between ice and the surface more than terminal group chemical composition. Chain mobility resulted from the creation of "pockets" of increased free volume for longer chains to occupy.

  15. Research on the Effects of Process Parameters on Surface Roughness in Wet-Activated Silicon Direct Bonding Base on Orthogonal Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei NIE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface roughness is a very important index in silicon direct bonding and it is affected by processing parameters in the wet-activated process. These parameters include the concentration of activation solution, holding time and treatment temperature. The effects of these parameters were investigated by means of orthogonal experiments. In order to analyze the wafer roughness more accurately, the bear ratio of the surface was used as the evaluation index. From the results of the experiments, it could be concluded that the concentration of the activation solution affected the roughness directly and the higher the concentration, the lower the roughness. Holding time did not affect the roughness as acutely as that of the concentration, but a reduced activation time decreased the roughness perceptibly. It was also discovered that the treatment temperature had a weak correlation with the surface roughness. Based on these conclusions, the parameters of concentration, temperature and holding time were optimized respectively as NH4OH:H2O2=1:1 (without water, 70 °C and 5 min. The results of bonding experiments proved the validity of the conclusions of orthogonal experiments.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9711

  16. Promotional effects of chemisorbed oxygen and hydroxide in the activation of C-H and O-H bonds over transition metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbitts, David; Neurock, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    Electronegative coadsorbates such as atomic oxygen (O*) and hydroxide (OH*) can act as Brønsted bases when bound to Group 11 as well as particular Group 8-10 metal surfaces and aid in the activation of X-H bonds. First-principle density functional theory calculations were carried out to systematically explore the reactivity of the C-H bonds of methane and surface methyl intermediates as well as the O-H bond of methanol directly and with the assistance of coadsorbed O* and OH* intermediates over Group 11 (Cu, Ag, and Au) and Group 8-10 transition metal (Ru, Rh, Pd, Os, Ir, and Pt) surfaces. C-H as well as O-H bond activation over the metal proceeds via a classic oxidative addition type mechanism involving the insertion of the metal center into the C-H or O-H bond. O* and OH* assist C-H and O-H activation over particular Group 11 and Group 8-10 metal surfaces via a σ-bond metathesis type mechanism involving the oxidative addition of the C-H or O-H bond to the metal along with a reductive deprotonation of the acidic C-H and O-H bond over the M-O* or M-OH* site pair. The O*- and OH*-assisted C-H activation paths are energetically preferred over the direct metal catalyzed C-H scission for all Group 11 metals (Cu, Ag, and Au) with barriers that are 0.4-1.5 eV lower than those for the unassisted routes. The barriers for O*- and OH*-assisted C-H activation of CH4 on the Group 8-10 transition metals, however, are higher than those over the bare transition metal surfaces by as much as 1.4 eV. The C-H activation of adsorbed methyl species show very similar trends to those for CH4 despite the differences in structure between the weakly bound methane and the covalently adsorbed methyl intermediates. The activation of the O-H bond of methanol is significantly promoted by O* as well as OH* intermediates over both the Group 11 metals (Cu, Ag, and Au) as well as on all Group 8-10 metals studied (Ru, Rh, Pd, Os, Ir, and Pt). The O*- and OH*-assisted CH3O-H barriers are 0.6 to 2

  17. Bonding and interaction of molecules with surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    In this lecture it is intended to discuss some general features of bonding and interaction of molecules with surfaces. The geometry of surface complexes is sufficiently difficult and the interaction mechanisms are sufficiently subtle. That all possible theoretical models need to be exploited such as: i) Semiempirical - including Huckel molecular orbital theory; ii)first principles including self-consistent-field Hartree-Fock and Local Density approaches; iii)explicitly correlated, including C.I., Generalized Valence Bond, Coupled Cluster Perturbation Theory and Many Body Perturbation Theory. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  18. Tensile bond strength of metal bracket bonding to glazed ceramic surfaces with different surface conditionings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhoundi, Ms Ahmad; Kamel, M Rahmati; Hashemi, Sh Mahmood; Imani, M

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of metal brackets bonding to glazed ceramic surfaces using three various surface treatments. Forty two glazed ceramic disks were assigned to three groups. In the first and second groups the specimens were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HFA). Subsequently in first group, ceramic primer and adhesive were applied, but in second group a bonding agent alone was used. In third group, specimens were treated with 35% phosphoric acid followed by ceramic primer and adhesive application. Brackets were bonded with light cure composites. The specimens were stored in distilled water in the room temperature for 24 hours and thermocycled 500 times between 5°C and 55°C. The universal testing machine was used to test the tensile bond strength and the adhesive remenant index scores between three groups was evaluated. The data were subjected to one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Kruskal-Wallis tests respectively. The tensile bond strength was 3.69±0.52 MPa forfirst group, 2.69±0.91 MPa for second group and 3.60±0.41 MPa for third group. Group II specimens showed tensile strength values significantly different from other groups (Ptensile bond strength.

  19. Strength and leak testing of plasma activated bonded interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, M.M.; Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De

    2002-01-01

    Bond strength and hermeticity of plasma activated bonded (PAB) Si-Si interfaces are reported. Bonding of 100 mm Si(1 0 0) wafers was performed. An average bond strength of 9.0+/-3.9 MPa was achieved without performing any annealing steps. Cavities bonded in vacuum were found to be hermetic based...... on detection of changes in membrane deflections. The detection limit for leak was 8E-13 mbar l/s. For comparison, strength and leak tests were also performed with regular fusion bonded wafers annealed at 1100 degreesC. The PAB was found to withstand post-processing steps such as RCA cleaning, 24 h in de......-ionised water (DIW), 24 h in 2.5% HF, 24 h in acetone and 60 s in a resist developer. By analysing the thin silicon oxide present on the surfaces to be bonded with optical methods, the influence of pre-cleaning and activation process parameters was investigated....

  20. Tensile Bond Strength of Metal Bracket Bonding to Glazed Ceramic Surfaces With Different Surface Conditionings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Imani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of metal brackets bonding to glazed ceramic surfaces using three various surface treatments.Materials and Methods: Forty two glazed ceramic disks were assigned to three groups. In the first and second groups the specimens were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HFA. Subsequently in first group, ceramic primer and adhesive were applied, but in second group a bonding agent alone was used. In third group, specimens were treated with 35% phosphoric acid followed by ceramic primerand adhesive application. Brackets were bonded with light cure composites. The specimens were stored in distilled water in the room temperature for 24 hours and thermocycled 500 times between 5°C and 55°C. The universal testing machine was used to test the tensile bond strength and the adhesive remenant index scores between three groups was evaluated. The data were subjected to one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Kruskal-Wallis tests respectively.Results: The tensile bond strength was 3.69±0.52 MPa forfirst group, 2.69±0.91 MPa for second group and 3.60±0.41 MPa for third group. Group II specimens showed tensile strength values significantly different from other groups (P<0.01.Conclusion: In spite of limitations in laboratory studies it may be concluded that in application of Scotch bond multipurpose plus adhesive, phosphoric acid can be used instead of HFA for bonding brackets to the glazed ceramic restorations with enough tensile bond strength.

  1. Effect of EDTA with various surface active agents on the bond strength of an epoxy resin-based sealer to dentin: ex vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Burak Güneşer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of addition of various surface-modifying agents to EDTA solution on the bond strength of an epoxy-based sealer to the root canal dentin. Materials and Method: Sixty single-rooted human mandibular premolars were decoronated and instrumented using rotary system. The specimens were then randomly divided into four groups (n=15 according to irrigation with different EDTA solution (Wizard, Rehber Kimya, Istanbul, Turkey combinations as follows: Group 1: 17% EDTA + 0.1% benzalkonium chloride; Group 2: 17% EDTA + 0.1% Tween 80; Group 3: 17% EDTA + 0.1% Triton X-100 and control group: 17% EDTA without any surface-modifying agents. Surface tensions of the EDTA solutions were controlled with a tensiometer. Final irrigation was with 5 mL of 5% sodium hypochlorite (Wizard for 1 min, followed by 5 mL of the mentioned EDTA solution for another minute. Roots were obturated with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer (Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany using cold lateral compaction technique. Horizontal root sections were obtained, and push-out test was used to measure the bond strength between the root canal dentin and sealer. Data were analyzed using the two-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey tests (p<0.05. Results: The bond strength of sealer in groups irrigated with EDTA in combination with surface modifying agents did not differ from that of the control (p=0.106. The coronal and middle third in all groups exhibited significantly greater bond strength values when compared with the apical third (p=0.004 and p=0.002, respectively. There was no statistical significant difference between the coronal and the middle thirds (p=0.979. Conclusion: The addition of surface modifying agents to EDTA solution did not affect the bond strength of the epoxy resin–based sealer.

  2. Transport characteristics of minority electrons across surface-activated-bonding based p-Si/n-4H-SiC heterointerfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigekawa, Naoteru; Shimizu, Sae; Liang, Jianbo; Shingo, Masato; Shiojima, Kenji; Arai, Manabu

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the transport properties of minority electrons across p-Si/n-4H-SiC interfaces fabricated using surface activated bonding. The transport properties along each direction are examined by measuring the photoresponse (PR) of p-Si/n-4H-SiC heterojunctions and characterizing 4H-SiC/Si heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs). The photoyield obtained in PR measurements is sensitive to the concentration of acceptors in p-Si and reverse-bias voltages, which indicates that the energy of optically excited electrons in p-Si is first relaxed and then they are driven to n-SiC through the tunneling process. By the postprocess annealing of HBTs, the properties of emitter/base interfaces are improved so that the current gain is drastically increased, which means that the Si/4H-SiC interfaces are in metastable states when the device process is completed. A maximum current gain of >10 is demonstrated.

  3. Science and technology of plasma activated direct wafer bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberds, Brian Edward

    This dissertation studied the kinetics of silicon direct wafer bonding with emphasis on low temperature bonding mechanisms. The project goals were to understand the topological requirements for initial bonding, develop a tensile test to measure the bond strength as a function of time and temperature and, using the kinetic information obtained, develop lower temperature methods of bonding. A reproducible surface metrology metric for bonding was best described by power spectral density derived from atomic force microscopy measurements. From the tensile strength kinetics study it was found that low annealing temperatures could be used to obtain strong bonds, but at the expense of longer annealing times. Three models were developed to describe the kinetics. A diffusion controlled model and a reaction rate controlled model were developed for the higher temperature regimes (T > 600sp°C), and an electric field assisted oxidation model was proposed for the low temperature range. An in situ oxygen plasma treatment was used to further enhance the field-controlled mechanism which resulted in dramatic increases in the low temperature bonding kinetics. Multiple internal transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (MIT-FTIR) was used to monitor species evolution at the bonded interface and a capacitance-voltage (CV) study was undertaken to investigate charge distribution and surface states resulting from plasma activation. A short, less than a minute, plasma exposure prior to contacting the wafers was found to obtain very strong bonds for hydrophobic silicon wafers at very low temperatures (100sp°C). This novel bonding method may enable new technologies involving heterogeneous material systems or bonding partially fabricated devices to become realities.

  4. Cleaning of diffusion bonding surface by argon ion bombardment treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Airu; Ohashi, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Norio; Aoki, Masanori; Higashi, Yasuo; Hitomi, Nobuteru

    2003-05-01

    The specimens of oxygen-free high conductivity copper, SUS304L stainless steel and pure iron were treated by argon ion bombardment and then were bonded by diffusion bonding method. The effects of argon ion bombardment treatment on faying surface morphology, tensile strength of bonding joints and inclusions at the fracture surface were investigated. The results showed that argon ion bombardment treatment was effective to remove the oxide film and contamination at the faying surface and improve the quality of joints. The tensile strength of the bonded joints was improved, and minimum bonding temperature to make the metallic bonding at the interface was lowered by argon ion bombardment treatment. At the joints with argon ion bombardment treatment, ductile fractured surface was seen and the amount of inclusions was obviously decreased.

  5. Bonding to zirconia using a new surface treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aboushelib, M.N.; Feilzer, A.J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Selective infiltration etching (SIE) is a newly developed surface treatment used to modify the surface of zirconia-based materials, rendering them ready for bonding to resin cements. The aim of this study was to evaluate the zirconia/resin bond strength and durability using the proposed

  6. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical pre-bonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  7. Enhancing wire-composite bond strength of bonded retainers with wire surface treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesterle, L J; Shellhart, W C; Henderson, S

    2001-06-01

    Bonded orthodontic retainers with wires embedded in composite resin are commonly used for orthodontic retention. The purpose of this study was to test, in vitro, various wire surface treatments to determine the optimal method of enhancing the wire-composite bond strength. Coaxial wires and stainless steel wires with different surface treatments were bonded to bovine enamel and then pulled along their long axes with an Instron universal testing machine. Wire surface treatments included placing a right-angle bend in the wire, microetching the wire, and treating the wire with adhesion promoters; combinations of treatments were also examined. The results demonstrated a 24-fold increase in the wire-composite bond strength of wire that was microetched (sandblasted), compared with that of untreated straight wire. The difference between the amount of force required to break the bond produced by microetching alone (246.1 +/- 46.0 MPa) and that required for the bonds produced by the retentive bend (87.8 +/- 16.3 MPa), the adhesion promoters (silane, 11.0 +/- 3.1 MPa; Metal Primer, 28.5 +/- 15.8 MPa), or for any combination of surface treatments, was statistically significant. Microetching a stainless steel wire produced a higher wire-composite bond strength than that obtained from a coaxial wire (113.5 +/- 27.5 MPa). The results of this study indicate that microetching or sandblasting a stainless steel wire significantly increases the strength of the wire-composite bond.

  8. The influence of adherent surface preparation on bond durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rider, A.N.; Arnott, D.R.; Olsson-Jacques, C.L.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: One of the major factors limiting the use of adhesive bonding is the problem associated with the production of adhesive joints that can maintain their initial strength over long periods of time in hostile environments. It is well known that the adherent surface preparation method is critical to the formation of a durable adhesive bond. Work presented in this paper focuses on the critical aspects of the surface preparation of aluminium employed for the manufacture of aluminium-epoxy joints. The surface preparation procedure examined is currently employed by the RAAF for repairs requiring metal to adhesive bonding. The influence of each step in the surface preparation on the ultimate bond durability performance of the adhesive joint is examined by a combination of methods. Double cantilever wedge style adhesive joints are loaded in mode 1 opening and then exposed to a humid environment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements of the aluminium adherent before bonding provides information about the adherent surface chemistry. XPS is also employed to analyse the surfaces of the bonded specimens post failure to establish the locus of fracture. This approach provides important information regarding the properties influencing bond durability as well as the bond failure mechanisms. A two step bond degradation model was developed to qualitatively describe the observed bond durability performance and fracture data. The first step involves controlled moisture ingress by stress induced microporosity of the adhesive in the interfacial region. The second step determines the locus of fracture through the relative dominance of one of three competitive processes, viz: oxide degradation, polymer desorption, or polymer degradation. A key element of the model is the control exercised over the interfacial microporosity by the combined interaction of stress and the relative densities of strong and weak linkages at the metal to adhesive interface

  9. complexes on disulphide bond activation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The antitumor, antibiotic leinamycin and its analogues are known as 'chemical nucleases' forming reactive hydroxyl species. 8,9. Earlier reports from our laboratory have shown that redox active copper(II) complexes having ligands with thioalkyl moieties are efficient DNA-cleaving agents on treat- ment with either a reducing ...

  10. Tantalum surface oxidation: Bond relaxation, energy entrapment, and electron polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yongling [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Bo, Maolin [Yangtze Normal University, College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Chongqing 408100 (China); Wang, Yan [School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Hunan 411201 (China); Liu, Yonghui [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Sun, Chang Q. [NOVITAS, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Huang, Yongli, E-mail: huangyongli@xtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Graphical abstract: The bond, electron and energy relaxation result in core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Highlights: • Increasing the oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. • Electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to sp-hydrated oxygen, creating dipole moment that decreases the work function. • Oxygen chemisorption modified valence density-of-state (DOS) for Ta with four excessive DOS features: O−Ta bonding, O{sup 2−} lone pairs, Ta+ electron holes, and the lone-pair polarized Ta dipoles. • The bond, electron and energy relaxation between surface undercoordinated atoms are responsible for core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Abstract: A combination of photoelectron spectrometric analysis and density functional theory calculations has enabled reconciliation of the bond-energy-electron relaxation for the Ta(100, 110, 111) surfaces chemisorbed with oxygen at different coverages. Results show that increasing oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. Valence electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to oxygen to create four excessive DOS features in terms of O−Ta bonding, lone pairs of oxygen, Ta{sup +} electron holes, and polarized Ta dipoles. Oxidation proceeds in the following dynamics: oxygen gets electrons from two neighboring Ta atoms left behind Ta{sup +}; the sp{sup 3}-orbital hybridization takes place with additional two electron lone pairs, the lone pairs polarize the other two Ta neighbors becoming dipoles. X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis results in the 4f binding energy of an isolated Ta atom and its shift upon bond formation and oxidation. Exercises provide not only a promising numerical approach for the quantitative information about the bond and electronic behavior but also consistent

  11. Enhancement of surface magnetism due to bulk bond dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsallis, C.; Sarmento, E.F.; Albuquerque, E.L. de

    1985-01-01

    Within a renormalization group scheme, the phase diagram of a semi-infinite simple cubic Ising ferromagnet is discussed, with arbitrary surface and bulk coupling constants, and including possible dilution of the bulk bonds. It is obtained that dilution makes easier the appearance of surface magnetism in the absence of bulk magnetism. (Author) [pt

  12. Analysis of surface bond lengths reported for chemisorption on metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, K. A. R.

    1985-01-01

    A review is given of bond length information available from the techniques of surface crystallography (particularly with LEED, SEXAFS and photoelectron diffraction) for chemisorption on well-defined surfaces of metals (M). For adsorbed main-group atoms (X), measured X-M interatomic distances for 38 combinations of X and M have been assessed with a bond order-bond length relation in combination with the Schomaker-Stevenson approach for determining single-bond lengths. When the surface bond orders are fixed primarily by the valency of X, this approach appears to provide a simple framework for predicing X-M surface bond lengths. Further, in cases where agreement has been reached from different surface crystallographic techniques, this framework has the potential for assessing refinements to the surface bonding model (e.g. in determining the roles of the effective surface valency of M, and of coordinate bonding and supplementary π bonding between X and M). Preliminary comparisons of structural data are also given for molecular adsorption (CO and ethylidyne) and for the chemisorption of other metal atoms.

  13. Shear bond strength of two bonding systems on dentin surfaces prepared with Er:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dall'Magro, Eduardo

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the shear bond strength of two bonding dentin systems, one 'one step' (Single Bond - 3M) and one 'self-etching' (Prompt-L-ESPE), when applied on dentin surfaces prepared with Er:YAG laser (2,94μm) that underwent ar not, acid etched. Forty one human molars just extracted were selected and after the cut with diamond disc and included in acrylic resin, resulting in 81 specimens (hemi crowns). After, the specimens were divided in one group treated with sand paper and another two groups treated with Er:YAG laser with 200 mJ and 250 mJ of energy and 2 Hz of frequency. Next, the prepared surfaces received three treatments with following application: 1) acid + Single Bond + Z 250 resin, 2) prompt-L-Pop + Z 250 resin, and 3) acid without, Single Bond + Z 250 resin. The Z 250 resin was applied and photopolymerized in increments on a Teflon matrix that belonged to an apparatus called 'Assembly Apparatus' machine producing cylinders of 3,5 mm of diameter and 5 mm of height. After these specimens were submitted to thermo cycling during 1 minute the 55 deg C and during 1 minute with 5 deg C with a total of 500 cycles for specimen, and the measures of shear bond strength were abstained using EMIC model DL 2000 rehearsed machine, with speed of 0,5 mm/min, measuring the final rupture tension (Mpa). The results showed an statistic superiority of 5% of probability level in dentin flattened with sandpaper and with laser using 200 mJ of energy with aspect to the ones flattened with laser using 250 mJ of energy. It was observed that using 'Single Bond' bonding dentin system the marks were statistically superior at 5% of probability with reference to the use of the Prompt-L-Pop adhesive system. So, it was concluded that Er:YAG Laser with 200 mJ of energy produced similar dentin cavity prepare than sandpaper and Single Bond seemed the best bonding agent system between restorative material and dentin. (author)

  14. Bonding, Achievement, and Activities: School Bonding, Academic Achievement, and Participation in Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Anissa K.; Ziomek-Daigle, Jolie

    2009-01-01

    Utilizing a single-group interrupted time series design (Creswell, 2003), this pilot study examined the relationship between academic achievement, school bonding, and the extracurricular activity participation of "uninvolved" students (n=11) who participated in a voluntary support group at a suburban high school in the southeast. Results…

  15. Real earnings management activities prior to bond issuance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristhian Mellado-Cid

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We examine real activities manipulation by firms prior to their debt issuances and how such manipulation activities affect bond yield spreads. We find that bond-issuing firms increase their real activities manipulation in the five quarters leading to a bond issuance. We document an inverse association between yield spread and pre-issue real activities manipulation, i.e., firms engaged in abnormally high levels of real activities manipulation are associated with subsequent lower cost of debt.

  16. Tensile bond strength of hydroxyethyl methacrylate dentin bonding agent on dentin surface at various drying techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Ismiyatin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are several dentin surface drying techniques to provide a perfect resin penetration on dentin. There are two techniques which will be compared in this study. The first technique was by rubbing dentin surface gently using cotton pellet twice, this technique is called blot dry technique. The second technique is by air blowing dentin surface for one second and continued by rubbing dentin surface gently using moist cotton. Purpose: This experiment was aimed to examine the best dentin surface drying techniques after 37% phosphoric acid etching to obtain the optimum tensile bond strength between hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA and dentin surface. Method: Bovine teeth was prepared flat to obtain the dentin surface and than was etched using 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds. After etching the dentin was cleaned using 20 cc plain water and dried with blot dry techniques (group I, or dried with air blow for one second (group II, or dried with air blow for one second, and continued with rubbing gently using moist cotton pellet (group III, and without any drying as control group (group IV. After these drying, the dentin surfaces were applied with resin dentin bonding agent and put into plunger facing the composite mould. The antagonist plunger was filled with composite resin. After 24 hours, therefore bond strength was measured using Autograph. Result: Data obtained was analyzed using One-Way ANOVA with 95% confidence level and continued with LSD test on p≤0.05. The result showed that the highest tensile bond strength was on group I, while the lowest on group IV. Group II and IV, III and IV, II and III did not show signigicant difference (p>0.05. Conclusion: Dentin surface drying techniques through gentle rubbing using cotton pellet twice (blot dry technique gave the greatest tensile bond strength.Latar belakang masalah: Tehnik pengeringan permukaan dentin agar resin dapat penetrasi dengan sempurna adalah dengan cara pengusapan secara

  17. Effect of different surface treatments on bond strength, surface and microscopic structure of zirconia ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab R. El-Shrkawy

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: (1 Surface treatments of Y-TZP ceramic together with MDP primer and silane-coupling agent application improve the bond strength to resin cement. (2 Plasma-Silica coating and plasma-oxygen treatment, both are valuable methods that improve the bond strength of resin cement to Y-TZP ceramic. (3 Silica coating by plasma technology provides durable bond strength and can be a promising alternative pretreatment before silane application to enhance bonding with zirconia ceramic. (4 Tetragonal-monoclinic phase transformation had occurred in Y-TZP samples received both types of plasma treatment.

  18. Mechanics of active surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salbreux, Guillaume; Jülicher, Frank

    2017-09-01

    We derive a fully covariant theory of the mechanics of active surfaces. This theory provides a framework for the study of active biological or chemical processes at surfaces, such as the cell cortex, the mechanics of epithelial tissues, or reconstituted active systems on surfaces. We introduce forces and torques acting on a surface, and derive the associated force balance conditions. We show that surfaces with in-plane rotational symmetry can have broken up-down, chiral, or planar-chiral symmetry. We discuss the rate of entropy production in the surface and write linear constitutive relations that satisfy the Onsager relations. We show that the bending modulus, the spontaneous curvature, and the surface tension of a passive surface are renormalized by active terms. Finally, we identify active terms which are not found in a passive theory and discuss examples of shape instabilities that are related to active processes in the surface.

  19. Strength and leak testing of plasma activated bonded interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, M.M.; Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De

    2002-01-01

    on detection of changes in membrane deflections. The detection limit for leak was 8E-13 mbar l/s. For comparison, strength and leak tests were also performed with regular fusion bonded wafers annealed at 1100 degreesC. The PAB was found to withstand post-processing steps such as RCA cleaning, 24 h in de......Bond strength and hermeticity of plasma activated bonded (PAB) Si-Si interfaces are reported. Bonding of 100 mm Si(1 0 0) wafers was performed. An average bond strength of 9.0+/-3.9 MPa was achieved without performing any annealing steps. Cavities bonded in vacuum were found to be hermetic based...

  20. 76 FR 28801 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-18

    ... Activities: Bonded Warehouse Regulations AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland... (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Bonded Warehouse.... Title: Bonded Warehouse Regulations. OMB Number: 1651-0041. Form Number: None. Abstract: Owners or...

  1. 76 FR 12364 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    ... Activities: Bonded Warehouse Regulations AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of... requirement concerning the Bonded Warehouse Regulations. This request for comment is being made pursuant to...: Title: Bonded Warehouse Regulations. OMB Number: 1651-0041. Form Number: None. Abstract: Owners or...

  2. Sequential plasma activation methods for hydrophilic direct bonding at sub-200 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ran; Yamauchi, Akira; Suga, Tadatomo

    2018-02-01

    We present our newly developed sequential plasma activation methods for hydrophilic direct bonding of silica glasses and thermally grown SiO2 films. N2 plasma was employed to introduce a metastable oxynitride layer on wafer surfaces for the improvement of bond energy. By using either O2-plasma/N2-plasma/N-radical or N2-plasma/N-radical sequential activation, the quartz-quartz bond energy was increased from 2.7 J/m2 to close to the quartz bulk fracture energy that was estimated to be around 9.0 J/m2 after post-bonding annealing at 200 °C. The silicon bulklike bond energy between thermal SiO2 films was also obtained. We suggest that the improvement is attributable to surface modification such as N-related defect formation and asperity softening by the N2 plasma surface treatment.

  3. Bond-selective control of a gas-surface reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killelea, Daniel R.

    The prospect of using light to selectively control chemical reactions has tantalized chemists since the development of the laser. Unfortunately, the realization of laser-directed chemistry is frequently thwarted by the randomization of energy within the molecule through intramolecular vibrational energy distribution (IVR). However, recent results showing vibrational mode-specific reactivity on metal surfaces suggest that IVR may not always be complete for gas-surface reactions. Here, we combine molecular beam techniques and direct laser excitation to characterize the bond-specific reactivity of trideuteromethane on a Ni(111) surface. Our results reveal important details about how vibrational energy is distributed in the reactive molecule. We use a molecular beam to direct state-selected trideuteromethane (CHD 3) molecules onto a nickel single crystal sample and use the results we obtain to describe the flow of vibrational energy in the methane-surface reaction complex. We show that CHD3 molecules initially excited to v=1, J=2, K=0 of the v 1 symmetric C-H stretching mode will dissociate exclusively via C-H cleavage on Ni(111). This result highlights the localization of vibrational energy in the reaction complex, despite the presence of many energy exchange channels with the high state-density surface. We demonstrate, for the first time, highly parallel bond-selective control of a heterogeneously catalyzed reaction. We place our results in the context of recent experiments investigating IVR for molecules in both the gas phase and liquid solutions. If IVR is fast on the reaction timescale, vibrational energy would be randomly distributed throughout the nascent methane-surface reaction complex and vibrational mode-specific behavior would not occur. The short timescale of a direct gas-surface collision may explain how the exchange of energy via IVR is limited to only a small subset of the energetic configurations available to the reaction complex. This framework

  4. Chemical Warfare Agent Surface Adsorption: Hydrogen Bonding of Sarin and Soman to Amorphous Silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Erin Durke; Gordon, Wesley O; Wilmsmeyer, Amanda R; Troya, Diego; Morris, John R

    2014-04-17

    Sarin and soman are warfare nerve agents that represent some of the most toxic compounds ever synthesized. The extreme risk in handling such molecules has, until now, precluded detailed research into the surface chemistry of agents. We have developed a surface science approach to explore the fundamental nature of hydrogen bonding forces between these agents and a hydroxylated surface. Infrared spectroscopy revealed that both agents adsorb to amorphous silica through the formation of surprisingly strong hydrogen-bonding interactions with primarily isolated silanol groups (SiOH). Comparisons with previous theoretical results reveal that this bonding occurs almost exclusively through the phosphoryl oxygen (P═O) of the agent. Temperature-programmed desorption experiments determined that the activation energy for hydrogen bond rupture and desorption of sarin and soman was 50 ± 2 and 52 ± 2 kJ/mol, respectively. Together with results from previous studies involving other phosphoryl-containing molecules, we have constructed a detailed understanding of the structure-function relationship for nerve agent hydrogen bonding at the gas-surface interface.

  5. Diffusion bonding of reduced activation ferritic steel F82H for demo blanket application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurasawa, T.; Tamura, M.

    1996-01-01

    A reduced activation ferritic steel, a grade F82H developed by JAERI, is a promising candidate structural material for the blanket and the first wall of DEMO reactors. In the present study, diffusion bonding of F82H has been investigated to develop the fabrication procedures of the blanket box and the first wall panel with cooling channels embedded by F82H. The parameters examined are the bonding temperature (810-1050 C), bonding pressure (2-10 MPa) and roughness of the bonding surface (0.5-12.8 μR max ), and metallurgical examination and mechanical tests of the diffusion bonded joints have been conducted. From the tests, sufficient bonding was obtained under the temperatures of 840-1 050 C (compressive stress of 3-12 MPa), and it was found that heat treatment following diffusion bonding is essential to obtain the mechanical properties similar to that of the base metal. (orig.)

  6. Active Free Surface Density Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelen, S.

    2016-10-01

    Percolation problems were occupied to many physical problems after their establishment in 1957 by Broadbent and Hammersley. They can be used to solve complex systems such as bone remodeling. Volume fraction method was adopted to set some algorithms in the literature. However, different rate of osteoporosis could be observed for different microstructures which have the same mass density, mechanical stimuli, hormonal stimuli and nutrition. Thus it was emphasized that the bone might have identical porosity with different specific surfaces. Active free surface density of bone refers the used total area for its effective free surface. The purpose of this manuscript is to consolidate a mathematical approach which can be called as “active free surface density maps” for different surface patterns and derive their formulations. Active free surface density ratios were calculated for different Archimedean lattice models according to Helmholtz free energy and they were compared with their site and bond percolation thresholds from the background studies to derive their potential probability for bone remodeling.

  7. Evaluation of push-out bond strength of surface treatments of two esthetic posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherif Adel Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Glass fiber posts recorded higher bond strength than glass ceramic post to both root canal and resin core. Surface treatments increase bond strength for glass fiber and zirconia ceramic posts to both root canal and resin core. SB+SIC+SC gave higher bond strength than E+SC. Bond strength at the cervical section is higher than at the apical section.

  8. Porous surface modified bioactive bone cement for enhanced bone bonding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang He

    Full Text Available Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement cannot provide an adhesive chemical bonding to form a stable cement-bone interface. Bioactive bone cements show bone bonding ability, but their clinical application is limited because bone resorption is observed after implantation. Porous polymethylmethacrylate can be achieved with the addition of carboxymethylcellulose, alginate and gelatin microparticles to promote bone ingrowth, but the mechanical properties are too low to be used in orthopedic applications. Bone ingrowth into cement could decrease the possibility of bone resorption and promote the formation of a stable interface. However, scarce literature is reported on bioactive bone cements that allow bone ingrowth. In this paper, we reported a porous surface modified bioactive bone cement with desired mechanical properties, which could allow for bone ingrowth.The porous surface modified bioactive bone cement was evaluated to determine its handling characteristics, mechanical properties and behavior in a simulated body fluid. The in vitro cellular responses of the samples were also investigated in terms of cell attachment, proliferation, and osteoblastic differentiation. Furthermore, bone ingrowth was examined in a rabbit femoral condyle defect model by using micro-CT imaging and histological analysis. The strength of the implant-bone interface was also investigated by push-out tests.The modified bone cement with a low content of bioactive fillers resulted in proper handling characteristics and adequate mechanical properties, but slightly affected its bioactivity. Moreover, the degree of attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblast cells was also increased. The results of the push-out test revealed that higher interfacial bonding strength was achieved with the modified bone cement because of the formation of the apatite layer and the osseointegration after implantation in the bony defect.Our findings suggested a new bioactive

  9. Effect of surface treatment of FRC-Post on bonding strength to resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Hyun Park,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatment of FRC-Post on bonding strength to resin cements. Materials and Methods Pre-surface treated LuxaPost (DMG, Rely-X Fiber Post (3M ESPE and self adhesive resin cement Rely-X Unicem (3M ESPE, conventional resin cement Rely-X ARC (3M ESPE, and Rely-X Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE were used. After completing the surface treatments of the posts, posts and resin cement were placed in clear molds and photo-activation was performed. The specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the FRC-Post into 2 mm-thick segments, and push-out strength were measured. The results of bond strength value were statistically analyzed using independent samples t-test and one-way ANOVA with multiple comparisons using Scheffe's test. Results Silanization of posts affect to the bond strength in LuxaPost, and did not affect in Rely-X Fiber Post. Rely-X ARC showed higher value than Rely-X Unicem. Conclusions Silanization is needed to enhance the bond strength between LuxaPost and resin cements.

  10. Hydrogen bonds and antiviral activity of benzaldehyde derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Belkov, M. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Brinkevich, S. D.; Samovich, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    We have obtained the Fourier transform IR spectra of solutions of benzaldehyde derivatives having different antiviral activities against a herpes virus. We observe a correlation between the presence of hydrogen bonds in the benzaldehyde molecules and the appearance of antiviral properties in the compounds. For compounds having antiviral activity, we have obtained spectral data suggesting the existence of hydrogen bonds of the type C=OṡṡṡH-O and O-HṡṡṡO in the molecules. When the hydrogen atom in the hydroxyl groups are replaced by a methyl group, no intramolecular hydrogen bonds are formed and the compounds lose their antiviral activity.

  11. Shear bond strength between veneering composite and PEEK after different surface modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosentritt, Martin; Preis, Verena; Behr, Michael; Sereno, Nuno; Kolbeck, Carola

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to test the influence of different surface treatments and conditioning on the shear bond strength between polyetherketone (PEEK) and composite. Surfaces (570 plates) were used untreated, etched, air-particle abraded or activated with silica-modified alumina oxide. Surface roughness was determined after different treatments. Cylinders of composite were polymerized onto the surfaces. Eighteen different pre-treatment combinations were applied, partly combined with opaque application. Shear bond strength (SBS) was determined following ISO TR 11405. Baseline tests were performed 24 h after composite polymerization. For investigating the influence of storage and aging, the specimens were either stored in distilled water (37 °C, 90 days) or thermally cycled (12,000 cycles 5 °C/55 °C, distilled water). Means and standard deviations were calculated (statistics: one-way ANOVA/Bonferroni (α = 0.05)). Surface roughness varied between 0.04 ± 0.01 and 6.76 ± 1.11 μm. Only etching caused a significant (p < 0.001) increase. SBS strongly varied between 0.0 ± 0.0 and 23.2 ± 2.1 MPa. After thermal cycling (TC), nine of the investigated systems showed SBS higher than 5 MPa, varying from 8.8 ± 2.7 MPa (#7) to 19.4 ± 2.5 MPa (#4). After water storage, nine systems provided SBS higher than 5 MPa, seven even values higher than 10 MPa. Maximum SBS was 27.1 ± 3.1 MPa (#2) and lowest value was 5.4 ± 2.6 MPa (#4). Significant (p < 0.001) differences were found between the individual systems after 24 h, TC and after 90 days storage. For good bonding between PEEK and composite, cleaning and roughening is recommended. Surface conditioning prior to bonding seems essential. Combination with opaque revealed an increase in SBS. Successful bonding on PEEK surfaces can be achieved by surface roughening and subsequent surface activation with acetone- or phosphate-based methacrylate primers or tribochemical treatment.

  12. Immediate repair bond strengths of microhybrid, nanohybrid and nanofilled composites after different surface treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinastiti, Margareta; Siswomihardjo, Widowati; Busscher, Henk J.; Ozcan, Mutlu

    Objectives: To evaluate immediate repair bond strengths and failure types of resin composites with and without surface conditioning and characterize the interacting composite surfaces by their surface composition and roughness. Methods: Microhybrid, nanohybrid and nanofilled resin composites were

  13. Influence of application method on surface free-energy and bond strength of universal adhesive systems to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Arisa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Sai, Keiichi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Nojiri, Kie; Endo, Hajime; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of different adhesive application methods and etching modes on enamel bond effectiveness of universal adhesives using shear bond strength (SBS) testing and surface free-energy (SFE) measurements. The adhesives Scotchbond Universal, All-Bond Universal, Adhese Universal, and G-Premio Bond were used. Prepared bovine enamel specimens were divided into four groups, based on type of adhesive, and subjected to the following surface treatments: (i) total-etch mode with active application; (ii) total-etch mode with inactive application; (iii) self-etch mode with active application; and (iv) self-etch mode with inactive application. Bonded specimens were subjected to SBS testing. The SFE of the enamel surfaces with adhesive was measured after rinsing with acetone and water. The SBS values in total-etch mode were significantly higher than those in self-etch mode. In total-etch mode, significantly lower SBS values were observed with active application compared with inactive application; in contrast, in self-etch mode there were no significant differences in SBS between active and inactive applications. A reduction in total SFE was observed for active application compared with inactive application. The interaction between etching mode and application method was statistically significant, and the application method significantly affected enamel bond strength in total-etch mode. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  14. Effects of surface treatment of provisional crowns on the shear bond strength of brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Josiane Xavier; Deprá, Mauren Bitencourt; Marquezan, Mariana; Retamoso, Luciana Borges; Tanaka, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    To assess the adhesive resistance of metallic brackets bonded to temporary crowns made of acrylic resin after different surface treatments. 180 specimens were made of Duralay and randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 30) according to surface treatment and bonding material: G1 - surface roughening with Soflex and bonding with Duralay; G2 - roughening with aluminum oxide blasting and bonding with Duralay; G3 - application of monomer and bonding with Duralay; G4 - roughening with Soflex and bonding with Transbond XT; G5 - roughening with aluminum oxide blasting and bonding with Transbond XT and G6 - application of monomer and bonding with Transbond. The results were statistically assessed by ANOVA/Games-Howell. The means (MPa) were: G1= 18.04, G2= 22.64, G3= 22.4, G4= 9.71, G5= 11.23, G6= 9.67. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) ranged between 2 and 3 on G1, G2 and G3 whereas in G4, G5 and G6 it ranged from 0 to 1, showing that only the material affects the pattern of adhesive flaw. The surface treatment and the material influenced adhesive resistance of brackets bonded to temporary crowns. Roughening by aluminum blasting increased bond strength when compared to Soflex, in the group bonded with Duralay. The bond strength of Duralay acrylic resin was superior to that of Transbond XT composite resin.

  15. Effects of surface treatment of provisional crowns on the shear bond strength of brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Xavier de Almeida

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the adhesive resistance of metallic brackets bonded to temporary crowns made of acrylic resin after different surface treatments. METHODS: 180 specimens were made of Duralay and randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 30 according to surface treatment and bonding material: G1 - surface roughening with Soflex and bonding with Duralay; G2 - roughening with aluminum oxide blasting and bonding with Duralay; G3 - application of monomer and bonding with Duralay; G4 - roughening with Soflex and bonding with Transbond XT; G5 - roughening with aluminum oxide blasting and bonding with Transbond XT and G6: application of monomer and bonding with Transbond. The results were statistically assessed by ANOVA/Games-Howell. RESULTS: The means (MPa were: G1= 18.04, G2= 22.64, G3= 22.4, G4= 9.71, G5= 11.23, G6= 9.67. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI ranged between 2 and 3 on G1, G2 and G3 whereas in G4, G5 and G6 it ranged from 0 to 1, showing that only the material affects the pattern of adhesive flaw. CONCLUSION: The surface treatment and the material influenced adhesive resistance of brackets bonded to temporary crowns. Roughening by aluminum blasting increased bond strength when compared to Soflex, in the group bonded with Duralay. The bond strength of Duralay acrylic resin was superior to that of Transbond XT composite resin.

  16. Amphoteric surface active agents

    OpenAIRE

    Eissa, A.M. F.

    1995-01-01

    2-[trimethyl ammonium, triethyl ammonium, pyridinium and 2-amino pyridinium] alkanoates, four series of surface active agents containing carbon chain C12, C14, C16 and C18carbon atoms, were prepared. Their structures were characterized by microanalysis, infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Surface and interfacial tension, Krafft point, wetting time, emulsification power, foaming height a...

  17. Evaluation of one-dimensional potential energy surfaces for prediction of spectroscopic properties of hydrogen bonds in linear bonded complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouypazadeh, Hamidreza; Farrokhpour, Hossein; Solimannejad, Mohammad

    2017-05-01

    This work evaluated the reliability of the one-dimensional potential energy surface for calculating the spectroscopic properties (rovibrational constants and rotational line energies) of hydrogen bonds in linear bonded complexes by comparing theoretical results with the corresponding experimental results. For this purpose, two hydrogen bonded complexes were selected: the HCN···HCN homodimer and the HCN···HF heterodimer. The one-dimensional potential energy surfaces related to the hydrogen bonds in these complexes were calculated using different computational methods and basis sets. The calculated potential curve of each complex was fitted to an analytical one-dimensional potential function to obtain the potential parameters. The obtained analytical potential function of each complex was used in a two-particle Schrödinger equation to obtain the rovibrational energy levels of the hydrogen bond. Using the calculated rovibrational levels, the rovibrational spectra and constants of each complex were calculated and compared with experimental data available from the literature. Compared with experimental data, the calculated one-dimensional potential energy surface at the QCISD/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory was found to predict the spectroscopic properties of hydrogen bonds better than the potential curves obtained using other computational methods, especially for the HCN···HCN homodimer complex. Generally, the results obtained for the HCN···HCN homodimer complex were closer to experimental data than those obtained for the HCN···HF heterodimer complex. The investigation performed in this work showed that the one-dimensional potential curve related to the hydrogen bond between two linear molecules can be used to predict the spectroscopic constants of hydrogen bonds. Graphical abstract Potential energy curves of HCN···HCN and HCN···HF complexes calculated at the different computational levels.

  18. Preservation of atomically clean silicon surfaces in air by contact bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Francois; Ljungberg, Karin

    1997-01-01

    When two hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces are placed in contact under cleanroom conditions, a weak bond is formed. Cleaving this bond under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions, and observing the surfaces with low energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy, we find that the or......When two hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces are placed in contact under cleanroom conditions, a weak bond is formed. Cleaving this bond under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions, and observing the surfaces with low energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy, we find...... that the ordered atomic structure of the surfaces is protected from oxidation, even after the bonded samples have been in air for weeks. Further, we show that silicon surfaces that have been cleaned and hydrogen-passivated in UHV can be contacted in UHV in a similarly hermetic fashion, protecting the surface...

  19. Influence of various surface-conditioning methods on the bond strength of metal brackets to ceramic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmage, P; Nergiz, [No Value; Herrmann, W; Ozcan, M; Nergiz, Ibrahim; �zcan, Mutlu

    With the increase in adult orthodontic treatment comes the need to find a reliable method for bonding orthodontic brackets onto metal or ceramic crowns and fixed partial dentures. In this study, shear bond strength and surface roughness tests were used to examine the effect of 4 different surface

  20. Evaluation of Surface Treatment Methods on the Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramics Systems, Resin Cements and Tooth Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkuş Emek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the effects of airborne-particle abrasion (APA and tribochemical silica coating (TSC surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramics systems, resin cements and tooth surface

  1. Dentine bond strength and antimicrobial activity evaluation of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Carolina Bosso; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo Almeida; Duque, Thais Mageste; Stipp, Rafael Nobrega; Chan, Daniel Chi Ngai; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Giannini, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the dentine bond strength (BS) and the antibacterial activity (AA) of six adhesives against strict anaerobic and facultative bacteria. Three adhesives containing antibacterial components (Gluma 2Bond (glutaraldehyde)/G2B, Clearfil SE Protect (MDPB)/CSP and Peak Universal Bond (PUB)/chlorhexidine) and the same adhesive versions without antibacterial agents (Gluma Comfort Bond/GCB, Clearfil SE Bond/CSB and Peak LC Bond/PLB) were tested. The AA of adhesives and control groups was evaluated by direct contact method against four strict anaerobic and four facultative bacteria. After incubation, according to the appropriate periods of time for each microorganism, the time to kill microorganisms was measured. For BS, the adhesives were applied according to manufacturers' recommendations and teeth restored with composite. Teeth (n=10) were sectioned to obtain bonded beams specimens, which were tested after artificial saliva storage for one week and one year. BS data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Saliva storage for one year reduces the BS only for GCB. In general G2B and GCB required at least 24h for killing microorganisms. PUB and PLB killed only strict anaerobic microorganisms after 24h. For CSP the average time to eliminate the Streptococcus mutans and strict anaerobic oral pathogens was 30 min. CSB showed no AA against facultative bacteria, but had AA against some strict anaerobic microorganisms. Storage time had no effect on the BS for most of the adhesives. The time required to kill bacteria depended on the type of adhesive and never was less than 10 min. Most of the adhesives showed stable bond strength after one year and the Clearfil SE Protect may be a good alternative in restorative procedures performed on dentine, considering its adequate bond strength and better antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Explicit consideration of spatial hydrogen bonding direction for activity coefficient prediction based on implicit solvation calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Lin; Lin, Shiang-Tai

    2017-08-09

    The activity coefficient of a chemical in a mixture is important in understanding the thermodynamic properties and non-ideality of the mixture. The COSMO-SAC model based on the result of quantum mechanical implicit solvation calculations has been shown to provide reliable predictions of activity coefficients for mixed fluids. However, it is found that the prediction accuracy is in general inferior for associating fluids. Existing methods for describing the hydrogen-bonding interaction consider the strength of the interaction based only on the polarity of the screening charges, neglecting the fact that the formation of hydrogen bonds requires a specific orientation between the donor and acceptor pairs. In this work, we propose a new approach that takes into account the spatial orientational constraints in hydrogen bonds. Based on the Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion (VSEPR) theory, the molecular surfaces associated with the formation of hydrogen bonds are limited to those in the projection of the lone pair electrons of hydrogen bond acceptors, in addition to the polarity of the surface screening charges. Our results show that this new directional hydrogen bond approach, denoted as the COSMO-SAC(DHB) model, requires fewer universal parameters and is significantly more accurate and reliable compared to previous models for a variety of properties, including vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE), infinite dilution activity coefficient (IDAC) and water-octanol partition coefficient (K ow ).

  3. Shear bond strength of different surface treatments in bulk fill, microhybrid, and nanoparticle repair resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Jesus Tavarez RR

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus Tavarez,1 Lauber Jose dos Santos Almeida Júnior,2 Tayanne Christine Gomes Guará,1 Izabella Santos Ribeiro,1 Etevaldo Matos Maia Filho,1 Leily Macedo Firoozmand2 1Department of Restorative Dentistry, Ceuma University (CEUMA, 2Department of Dentistry I, University Federal of Maranhão (UFMA, São Luís, Maranhão, Brazil Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of surface treatment and different types of composite resin on the microshear bond strength of repairs. Materials and methods: Seventy-two specimens (n=72 were prepared using a nanoparticle resin and stored in artificial saliva at 37 ± 1°C for 24 h. After this period, the specimens (n=24 were restored with microhybrid resin P60 (3M ESPE, nanoparticle resin Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE, and Bulk Fill Surefil SDR Flow (Dentsply composite resins. Previously, the surfaces of the samples were treated, forming the following subgroups (n=12: (A conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s, and (B abrasioned with a diamond tip for 3 s and conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid. In all groups, before insertion of the composite resin, the adhesive system Adper Single Bond 2 was actively applied and photopolymerized for 20 s. Results: The microshear test was executed to assess bond strength. Kruskal–Wallis (p<0.05 and Mann–Whitney statistical tests showed significant statistical difference considering that the bulk-fill resin turned out to have a lower bond strength than the conventional nanoparticle and microhybrid composites. With regard to the technique, the roughening with diamond bur followed by the application of phosphoric acid exhibited values higher than the exclusive use of acid. Conclusion: The microshear bond strength of the composite resin repairs varies in accordance with the type of composite resin utilized, and roughening the surface increased the bond strength of these materials. Keywords: bulk-fill resins, composite resins, dental

  4. The biologically active form of the sea urchin egg receptor for sperm is a disulfide-bonded homo-multimer

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Since many cell surface receptors exist in their active form as oligomeric complexes, we have investigated the subunit composition of the biologically active sperm receptor in egg plasma membranes from Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Electrophoretic analysis of the receptor without prior reduction of disulfide bonds revealed that the surface receptor exists in the form of a disulfide-bonded multimer, estimated to be a tetramer. These findings are in excellent agreement with the fact that the N...

  5. Amphoteric surface active agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eissa, A.M. F.

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available 2-[trimethyl ammonium, triethyl ammonium, pyridinium and 2-amino pyridinium] alkanoates, four series of surface active agents containing carbon chain C12, C14, C16 and C18carbon atoms, were prepared. Their structures were characterized by microanalysis, infrared (IR and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. Surface and interfacial tension, Krafft point, wetting time, emulsification power, foaming height and critical micelle concentration (cmc were determined and a comparative study was made between their chemical structure and surface active properties. Antimicrobial activity of these surfactants was also determined.

    Se prepararon cuatro series de agentes tensioactivos del tipo 2-[trimetil amonio, trietil amonio, piridinio y 2-amino piridinio] alcanoatos, que contienen cadenas carbonadas con C12, C14, C16 y C18 átomos de carbono.
    Se determinaron la tensión superficial e interfacial, el punto de Krafft, el tiempo humectante, el poder de emulsionamiento, la altura espumante y la concentración critica de miscela (cmc y se hizo un estudio comparativo entre la estructura química y sus propiedades tensioactivas. Se determinó también la actividad antimicrobiana de estos tensioactivos. Estas estructuras se caracterizaron por microanálisis, infrarrojo (IR y resonancia magnética nuclear (RMN.

  6. Effect of dangling bonds of ultra-thin silicon film surface on electronic states of internal atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiyama, Eiji, E-mail: ejkamiyama@aol.com [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-1197 (Japan); Sueoka, Koji, E-mail: sueoka@c.oka-pu.ac.jp [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-1197 (Japan)

    2012-04-15

    We investigate how dangling bonds at the surface of ultra-thin films affect electronic states inside the film by first principles calculation. In the calculation models, dangling bonds at the surface are directly treated, and the impact on the electronic states of the internal atoms was estimated. Models with a H-terminated surface at both sides have no state in the bandgap. Whereas, new states appear at around the midgap by removing terminated H at surfaces of one or both sides. These mid-gap states appear at all layers, the states of which decrease as the layer moves away from the surface with dangling bonds. The sum of local DOS corresponds to the number of dangling bonds of the model. If the activation rate is assumed as 2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}, which is an ordinary value of thermal oxide passivation on Si (1 0 0) surface, volume concentration and surface concentration at the 18th layer from the surface in a 36-layer model are estimated to be 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} and 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}, respectively. These numbers are comparable to the values, especially the dopant volume concentration of Si substrate used in current VLSI technology ({approx}10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}). Therefore, the midgap states inside ultra-thin films may degrade performance of the FinFETs.

  7. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, Marcus A.; List, Martina S.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Hopkins, John W.; Connell, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesively bonded structures are potentially lighter in weight than mechanically fastened ones, but existing surface treatments are often considered unreliable. Two main problems in achieving reproducible and durable adhesive bonds are surface contamination and variability in standard surface preparation techniques. In this work three surface pretreatments were compared: laser etching with and without grit blasting and conventional Pasa-Jell treatment. Ti-6Al-4V surfaces were characterized by contact angle goniometry, optical microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Laser -etching was found to produce clean surfaces with precisely controlled surface topographies and PETI-5 lap shear strengths and durabilities were equivalent to those produced with Pasa-Jell.

  8. Shear bond strength to enamel after power bleaching activated by different sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can-Karabulut, Deniz C; Karabulut, Baris

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate enamel bond strength of a composite resin material after hydrogen peroxide bleaching, activated by a diode laser (LaserSmile), an ozone device (HealOzone), a light-emitting diode (BT Cool whitening system), and a quartz-Plus. Fifty extracted caries-free permanent incisors were used in this study. Thirty-eight percent hydrogen peroxidegel was applied to sound, flattened labial enamel surfaces and activated by different sources. Enamel surfaces that had received no treatment were used as control samples. Bonding agent was applied according to the manufacturer's instructions and the adhesion test was performed according to ISO/TS 11405. Statistical analysis showed significant influence of the different activation technique of hydrogen peroxide on shear bond strength to enamel (ANOVA, LSD, P < 0.05). The data in this vitro explorative study suggest the activation of hydrogen peroxide by different sources may further affect the shear bond strength of subsequent composite resin restoration to enamel. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, further studies examining the structural changes of activated hydrogen peroxide-treated enamel are needed. Due to the different activation methods; duration of light irradiation effects, longer time periods may be needed before application of adhesive restorations to enamel, compared with non-activated bleaching.

  9. Influence of Surface Treatments on the Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Monolithic Zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    To assess the influence of surface treatment on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of resin cements to monolithic zirconia materials. Two types of monolithic zirconia (Zenostar T [ZT] and Prettau Anterior [PA]) were evaluated. The specimens were assigned to three groups based on the surface treatment applied: group 1: control, assintered; group 2: sandblasted with 50-μm Al₂O₃; group 3: tribochemically silica sandblasted. Two types of resin cements (Multilink Speed [MS] and Multilink N [MN]) were applied to each group for evaluating the bond strength using the μTBS test. The fractured specimens were observed with a stereomicroscope and SEM. Surface roughness and topography of monolithic zirconia were examined after treatment. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. A Weibull analysis was performed on the bond strength data. The bond strength was significantly affected by the surface treatment and the type of resin cement (p zirconia (p = 0.387). Surface treatment with tribochemical silica sandblasting revealed significantly higher bond strength (p zirconia was changed due to surface treatments. The surface treatment of monolithic zirconia with tribochemical silica sandblasting enhanced the bond strength between zirconia and resin cements. Resins cements containing adhesive phosphate monomer (APM, MS) provided higher bond strength to monolithic zirconia than non-APM (MN).

  10. Relationship between enamel bond fatigue durability and surface free-energy characteristics with universal adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagura, Yuko; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2018-04-01

    The relationship between enamel bond fatigue durability and surface free-energy characteristics with universal adhesives was investigated. The initial shear bond strengths and shear fatigue strengths of five universal adhesives to enamel were determined with and without phosphoric acid pre-etching. The surface free-energy characteristics of adhesive-treated enamel with and without pre-etching were also determined. The initial shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength of universal adhesive to pre-etched enamel were higher than those to ground enamel. The initial shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength of universal adhesive to pre-etched enamel were material dependent, unlike those to ground enamel. The surface free-energy of the solid (γ S ) and the hydrogen-bonding force (γSh) of universal adhesive-treated enamel were different depending on the adhesive, regardless of the presence or absence of pre-etching. The bond fatigue durability of universal adhesives was higher to pre-etched enamel than to ground enamel. In addition, the bond fatigue durability to pre-etched enamel was material dependent, unlike that to ground enamel. The surface free-energy characteristics of universal adhesive-treated enamel were influenced by the adhesive type, regardless of the presence or absence of pre-etching. The surface free-energy characteristics of universal adhesive-treated enamel were related to the results of the bond fatigue durability. © 2018 Eur J Oral Sci.

  11. Effect of mineral trioxide aggregate surface treatments on morphology and bond strength to composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Joo-Hee; Jang, Ji-Hyun; Park, Sang Hyuk; Kim, Euiseong

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the micromorphologic changes that accompany different surface treatments on mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and their effect on the bond strength to the composite resin with 4 adhesive systems. Three types of MTA cement, ProRoot MTA (WMTA) (Dentsply, Tulsa, OK), MTA Angelus (AMTA) (Angelus, Londrina, PR, Brazil), and Endocem MTA (EMTA) (Maruchi, Wonju, Korea), were prepared and stored for a week to encourage setting. Surface treatment was performed using phosphoric acid or self-etch primer, and an untreated MTA surface was prepared as a control. The surface changes were observed using scanning electron microscopy. MTA surfaces were bonded with 4 adhesive systems, including Scotchbond Multipurpose (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN), Single Bond 2 (3M ESPE), Clearfil SE BOND (Kuraray, Osaka, Japan), and AdheSE One F (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein), to evaluate the adhesive effectiveness of MTA followed by composite resin restoration. The shear bond strength of the polymerized specimens was tested. For WMTA and AMTA, untreated surfaces showed an irregular crystalline plate with clusters of globular aggregate particles. For EMTA, the untreated surface presented a reticular matrix with acicular crystals. After surface treatment, superficial crystalline structures were eroded regardless of the MTA cement and adhesive system used. WMTA bonded significantly more strongly than AMTA and EMTA, regardless of the adhesive system used. In the WMTA and AMTA groups, AdheSE One F showed the highest bond strength to the composite. For EMTA, no significant differences were found across adhesive systems. Acidic treatment of the MTA surface affected the micromorphology and the bond strength to the composite. Within the limitations of this study, using a 1-step self-etch adhesive system might result in a strong bond to WMTA when the composite resin restoration is required over MTA cement. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists

  12. Special Advanced Studies for Pollution Prevention. Delivery Order 0017: Sol-Gel Surface Preparation for Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel Bonding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zheng, Haixing

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this program is to study the feasibility of using sol-gel active alumina coatings for the surface preparation of carbon steel and stainless steel for adhesive bonding, and to optimize...

  13. Laser Ablation Surface Preparation of Ti-6A1-4V for Adhesive Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Watson, Kent A.; Morales, Guillermo; Williams, Thomas; Hicks, Robert; Wohl, Christopher J.; Hopkins, John W.; Connell, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive bonding offers many advantages over mechanical fastening, but requires certification before it can be incorporated in primary structures for commercial aviation without disbond-arrestment features or redundant load paths. Surface preparation is widely recognized as the key step to producing robust and predictable bonds. Laser ablation imparts both topographical and chemical changes to a surface which can lead to increased bond durability. A laser based process provides an alternative to chemical-dip, manual abrasion and grit blast treatments which are expensive, hazardous, polluting, and less precise. This report documents preliminary testing of a surface preparation technique using laser ablation as a replacement for the chemical etch and abrasive processes currently applied to Ti-6Al-4V alloy adherends. Failure mode, surface roughness, and chemical makeup were analyzed using fluorescence enhanced visualization, microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Single lap shear tests were conducted on bonded and aged specimens to observe bond strength retention and failure mode. Some promising results showed increasing strength and durability of lap shear specimens as laser ablation coverage area and beam intensity increased. Chemical analyses showed trends for surface chemical species which correlated with improved bond strength and durability. Combined, these results suggest that laser ablation is a viable process for inclusion with or/and replacement of one or more currently used titanium surface treatments. On-going work will focus on additional mechanical tests to further demonstrate improved bond durability.

  14. Influence of surface treatments on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to porcelain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Zeng, Jishan; Wang, Shaoan; Yang, Zheng; Huang, Qian; Chen, Pixiu; Zhou, Shujuan; Liu, Xiaoqing

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of various surface treatments after different storage time and thermocycling on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to the feldspathic porcelain surfaces. 128 disc-shaped porcelain specimens were randomly assigned to the following surface treatments: 9.6% HFA, 9.6% HFA combined with silane, 50 μ aluminum trioxide sandblasting followed by silane and application of silane after 37% phosphoric acid. Metal or ceramic brackets were bonded onto each treated porcelain facet with light cured resin. The samples were stored in 37 °C water 1 day or 7 days, thermocycled 500 times from 5 to 55 °C. The shear bond strengths were measured (1 mm/min), and statistically analyzed. The bond failure sites were classified according to ARI system. The surface of the glazed, sandblasted, hydrofluoric and phosphoric acid etched porcelain were examined with SEM. All groups achieved reasonable bond strengths to withstand the application of orthodontic forces. Water storage for 7 days caused lower shear bond strength than that of 1 day. But there is no statistically significant difference between the two groups. The mean shear bond strength provided by ceramic bracket with mechanical retention had no statistical difference with that of metal bracket. Therefore, the optimal treatment for orthodontic brackets bonding to feldspathic porcelain was to apply phosphoric acid combined with silane.

  15. Bond strength durability of direct and indirect composite systems following surface conditioning for repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Ozcan, Mutlu; Vanderlei, Aleska Dias; Leite, Fabiola Pessoa Pereira; Kimpara, Estevao Tomomitsu; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the effect of surface conditioning methods and thermocycling on the bond strength between a resin composite and an indirect composite system in order to test the repair bond strength. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of indirect resin composite

  16. Influence of different surface treatments on push‑out bond strengths ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-26

    Jun 26, 2015 ... Despite all these advantages, fiber posts have several disadvantages. Debonding is one problem that causes. Influence of different surface treatments on push‑out bond strengths of fiber‑reinforced posts luted with dual‑cure resin cement ... of ceramics and metals for improved adhesion and bonding.

  17. Thin bonded overlay and surface laminates-construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-02-01

    In 1997, a Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) Thin Bonded Overlay (TBO) using a one and one-half inch thickness was placed on two bridges, I-10 at the Bonne Carre Spillway and US 90 at Bayou Des Allemands, under the Applied Research & Technology Program ...

  18. Excellent bonding behaviour of novel surface-tailored fibre ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    and processing time (Iovinella et al 2013). In the present paper, an alternative method has been reported to enhance the bonding characteristics between ... braiding and consolidation of the braided structures were performed simultaneously (Fangueiro et al 2007). The resulting braided structures were subsequently cured ...

  19. Effects of surface hydration state and application method on the bond strength of self-etching adhesives to cut enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneppele, Taciana Marco Ferraz; Torres, Carlos Rocha Carlos; Sassaki, Alan; Valdetaro, Fernanda; Fernandes, Ricardo Silva; Prieto de Freitas, Carolina; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of surface hydration state and application method on the microtensile bond strength of one-step self-etching adhesives systems to cut enamel. One hundred ninety-five bovine teeth were used. The enamel on the buccal side was flattened with 600-grit SiC paper. For the control group, 15 teeth received Adper Single Bond 2, applied according to manufacturer's recommendations. The other specimens were divided into three groups according to the adhesive system used: Futura Bond M (FM; Voco), Clearfil S3 Bond (CS; Kuraray), and Optibond All in One (OA; Kerr). For each group, two hydration states were tested: D: blown dry with air; W: the excess of water was removed with absorbent paper. Two application methods were tested: P (passive): the adhesive was simply left on the surface; A (active): the adhesive was rubbed with an applicator point. A coat of Grandio composite resin (Voco) was applied on the surface. The teeth were sectioned to obtain enamel-resin sticks (1 x 1 mm), which underwent microtensile bond testing. The data in MPa were submitted to a three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). The ANOVA showed significant differences for application method and the type of adhesive, but not for hydration state. For the application method, the results of Tukey's test were: P: 31.46 (± 7.09)a; A: 34.04 (± 7.19)b. For the type of adhesive, the results were: OA: 31.29 (± 7.05)a; CS: 32.28 (± 7.14)a; FM: 34.68 (± 7.17)b; different lower-case letters indicate statistically significant differences. Active application improved the bond strength to cut enamel. The adhesive Futurabond M showed the highest bond strength to cut enamel.

  20. Environmentally Benign Sol-Gel Surface Treatment for Aluminum Bonding Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Osborne, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    A surface treatment process for aluminum using sol-gel chemistry has been developed that produces strong adhesive bonds without the rinse water requirements of traditional anodizing or etching processes...

  1. Bond strength of resin cements to noble and base metal alloys with different surface treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkhondeh Raeisosadat

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The bond strength of resin cements to metal alloys depends on the type of the metal, conditioning methods and the adhesive resins used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of resin cements to base and noble metal alloys after sand blasting or application of silano-pen.Cylinders of light cured Z 250 composite were cemented to "Degubond 4" (Au Pd and "Verabond" (Ni Cr alloys by either RelyX Unicem or Panavia F2, after sandblasting or treating the alloys with Silano-Pen. The shear bond strengths were evaluated. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t tests at a significance level of P<0.05.When the alloys were treated by Silano-Pen, RelyX Unicem showed a higher bond strength for Degubond 4 (P=0.021 and Verabond (P< 0.001. No significant difference was observed in the bond strength of Panavia F2 to the alloys after either of surface treatments, Degubond 4 (P=0.291 and Verabond (P=0.899. Panavia F2 showed a higher bond strength to sandblasted Verabond compared to RelyX Unicem (P=0.003. The bond strength of RelyX Unicem was significantly higher to Silano-Pen treated Verabond (P=0.011. The bond strength of the cements to sandblasted Degubond 4 showed no significant difference (P=0.59. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated Degubond 4 (P=0.035.The bond strength of resin cements to Verabond alloy was significantly higher than Degubond 4. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated alloys. Surface treatments of the alloys did not affect the bond strength of Panavia F2.

  2. Effect of thermocycling and surface treatment on repair bond strength of composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Saburian, Pardis; Chiniforush, Nasim; Karazifard, Mohammad-Javd

    2017-01-01

    Background Repair of composite restorations is a conservative method that can increase the longevity and durability of restorations while preserving the tooth structure. Achieving a suitable bond between the old and new composite is difficult. To overcome this problem, some methods have been recommended to increase the repair bond strength of composite.This study aimed to assess the effect of aging by thermocycling (5,000 and 10,000 cycles) and mechanical surface treatments (Er,Cr:YSGG laser and bur) on repair shear bond strength of composite resin. Material and Methods Totally, 120 composite blocks measuring 6x4x4 mm were fabricated of Filtek Z250 composite and were randomly divided into three groups (n=40) based on initial aging protocol: (a) no aging: storage in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, (b) 5,000 thermal cycles, (c) 10,000 thermal cycles. Each group was then randomly divided into two subgroups (n=20) based on mechanical surface treatment (laser and bur). The laser and bur-prepared surfaces were silanized and Adper Single Bond 2 was then applied. The repair composite was bonded to surfaces. Half of the samples in each subgroup (n=10) were subjected to 5,000 thermal cycles to assess durability of bond. The remaining half were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours and all samples were then subjected to shear bond strength testing in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Data (in megapascals) were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (P=0.05). Mode of failure was determined under a stereomicroscope. Results Bur preparation significantly improved the bond strength compared to laser (Pcomposite (Pcomposite and surface preparation by bur provides a higher bond strength compared to laser. Key words:Thermocycling, Composite, Repair, Laser. PMID:28936282

  3. Low-temperature wafer direct bonding of silicon and quartz glass by a two-step wet chemical surface cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenxi; Xu, Jikai; Zeng, Xiaorun; Tian, Yanhong; Wang, Chunqing; Suga, Tadatomo

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate a facile bonding process for combining silicon and quartz glass wafers by a two-step wet chemical surface cleaning. After a post-annealing at 200 °C, strong bonding interfaces with no defects or microcracks were obtained. On the basis of the detailed surface and bonding interface characterizations, the bonding mechanism was explored and discussed. The amino groups terminated on the cleaned surfaces might contribute to the bonding strength enhancement during the annealing. This cost-effective bonding process has great potentials for silicon- and glass-based heterogeneous integrations without requiring a vacuum system.

  4. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strengths of facing composite resins to zirconia copings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumita, M; Kokubo, Y; Kano, T

    2012-09-01

    The present study evaluated and compared the bond strength between zirconia and facing composite resin using different surface conditioning methods before and after thermocycling. Four primers, three opaque resins, and two facing composite resins were used, and 10 surface treatment procedures were conducted. The bond strength was measured before and after 4,000 cycles of thermocycling. The mean values of each group were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The bond strengths of facing composite resins to zirconia after various treatments varied depending on the primers, opaque resins, body resins, and thermocycling. The application of primers and opaque resins to the zirconia surface after sandblasting is expected to yield strong bond strength of the facing composite resin (Estenia CG&B) even after thermocycling.

  5. Effect of Enamel and Dentin Surface Treatment on the Self-Adhesive Resin Cement Bond Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushashe, Amanda Mahmmad; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Moro, Alexandre; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of enamel and dentin surface treatment on the micro-shear bond strength of self-adhesive cement. Seventy-two extracted third molars had their crowns embedded in acrylic resin and worn to obtain a flat enamel or dentin surface. The enamel and dentin specimens were randomly assigned to 8 groups (n=12) that were based on surface treatment (11.5% polyacrylic acid solution or no treatment), substrate condition (wet or dry) and storage period (1 day or 90 days), and treated accordingly. Cylinders (1 × 1 mm) were fabricated using self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200) following the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for either 1 day or 90 days and subjected to micro-shear bond strength test (EMIC DL 2000 at 0.5 mm/min). After this, the failure type of the specimens was determined. Data were subjected to statistical analysis (a=0.05). According to the results, the 11.5% polyacrylic acid application decreased the bond strength in both enamel and dentin samples. The moist groups showed higher bond strength than the dry ones, regardless of the substrate and surface treatment. Storage period did not influence bond strength. In conclusion, surface treatment with 11.5% polyacrylic acid and absence of moisture decreased the bond strength of the resin-cement (RelyU200), regardless of the storage period.

  6. Toward accurate prediction of potential energy surfaces and the spectral density of hydrogen bonded systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekik, Najeh

    2014-01-01

    Despite the considerable progress made in quantum theory and computational methods, detailed descriptions of the potential energy surfaces of hydrogen-bonded systems have not yet been achieved. In addition, the hydrogen bond (H-bond) itself is still so poorly understood at the fundamental level that it remains unclear exactly what geometry constitutes a “real” H-bond. Therefore, in order to investigate features essential for hydrogen bonded complexes, a simple, efficient, and general method for calculating matrix elements of vibrational operators capable of describing the stretching modes and the H-bond bridges of hydrogen-bonded systems is proposed. The derived matrix elements are simple and computationally easy to evaluate, which makes the method suitable for vibrational studies of multiple-well potentials. The method is illustrated by obtaining potential energy surfaces for a number of two-dimensional systems with repulsive potentials chosen to be in Gaussian form for the stretching mode and of the Morse-type for the H-bond bridge dynamics. The forms of potential energy surfaces of weak and strong hydrogen bonds are analyzed by varying the asymmetry of the Gaussian potential. Moreover, the choice and applicability of the selected potential for the stretching mode and comparison with other potentials used in the area of hydrogen bond research are discussed. The approach for the determination of spectral density has been constructed in the framework of the linear response theory for which spectral density is obtained by Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function of the dipole moment operator of the fast mode. The approach involves anharmonic coupling between the high frequency stretching vibration (double well potential) and low-frequency donor-acceptor stretching mode (Morse potential) as well as the electrical anharmonicity of the dipole moment operator of the fast mode. A direct relaxation mechanism is incorporated through a time decaying exponential

  7. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moradabadi, Ashkan; Roudsari, Sareh Esmaeily Sabet; Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari; Rahbar, Nima

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30 × magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments. - Highlights: • Understanding the dominant mechanism of bonding

  8. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradabadi, Ashkan [Department of Electrochemistry, Universität Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Roudsari, Sareh Esmaeily Sabet [Department of Optoelectonics, Universität Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari [School of Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahbar, Nima, E-mail: nrahbar@wpi.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA 01609 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30 × magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments. - Highlights: • Understanding the dominant mechanism of bonding

  9. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradabadi, Ashkan; Roudsari, Sareh Esmaeily Sabet; Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari; Rahbar, Nima

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30× magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments. © 2013.

  10. Supersonic Retropulsion Surface Preparation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites for Adhesive Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Blohowiak, Kay Y.; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Surface preparation is widely recognized as a key step to producing robust and predictable bonds in a precise and reproducible manner. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, can lack precision and reproducibility, which can lead to variation in surface properties and subsequent bonding performance. The use of a laser to ablate composite surface resin can provide an efficient, precise, and reproducible means of preparing composite surfaces for adhesive bonding. Advantages include elimination of physical waste (i.e., grit media and sacrificial peel ply layers that ultimately require disposal), reduction in process variability due to increased precision (e.g. increased reproducibility), and automation of surface preparation, all of which improve reliability and process control. This paper describes a Nd:YAG laser surface preparation technique for composite substrates and the mechanical performance and failure modes of bonded laminates thus prepared. Additionally, bonded specimens were aged in a hot, wet environment for approximately one year and subsequently mechanically tested. The results of a one year hygrothermal aging study will be presented.

  11. Immobilization of Active Bacteriophages on Polyhydroxyalkanoate Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chanchan; Sauvageau, Dominic; Elias, Anastasia

    2016-01-20

    A rapid, efficient technique for the attachment of bacteriophages (phages) onto polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) surfaces has been developed and compared to three reported methods for phage immobilization. Polymer surfaces were modified to facilitate phage attachment using (1) plasma treatment alone, (2) plasma treatment followed by activation by 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS), (3) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting, or (4) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting with activation by EDC and sulfo-NHS. The impact of each method on the surface chemistry of PHA was investigated using contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Each of the four treatments was shown to result in both increased hydrophilicity and in the modification of the surface functional groups. Modified surfaces were immersed in suspensions of phage T4 for immobilization. The highest level of phage binding was observed for the surfaces modified by plasma treatment alone. The change in chemical bond states observed for surfaces that underwent plasma treatment is suspected to be the cause of the increased binding of active phages. Plasma-treated surfaces were further analyzed through phage-staining and fluorescence microscopy to assess the surface density of immobilized phages and their capacity to capture hosts. The infective capability of attached phages was confirmed by exposing the phage-immobilized surfaces to the host bacteria Escherichia coli in both plaque and infection dynamic assays. Plasma-treated surfaces with immobilized phages displayed higher infectivity than surfaces treated with other methods; in fact, the equivalent initial multiplicity of infection was 2 orders of magnitude greater than with other methods. Control samples - prepared by immersing polymer surfaces in phage suspensions (without prior plasma treatment) - did not show any bacterial growth inhibition, suggesting they did not bind

  12. Shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to coping materials with different pre-surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarib, Natasya Ahmad; Anuar, Norsamihah; Ahmad, Marlynda

    2016-10-01

    Pre-surface treatments of coping materials have been recommended to enhance the bonding to the veneering ceramic. Little is known on the effect on shear bond strength, particularly with new coping material. The aim of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to three coping materials: i) metal alloy (MA), ii) zirconia oxide (ZO), and iii) lithium disilicate (LD) after various pre-surface treatments. Thirty-two (n = 32) discs were prepared for each coping material. Four pre-surface treatments were prepared for each sub-group (n = 8); a) no treatment or control (C), b) sandblast (SB), c) acid etch (AE), and d) sandblast and acid etch (SBAE). Veneering ceramics were applied to all discs. Shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons tests. Mean shear bond strengths were obtained for MA (19.00 ± 6.39 MPa), ZO (24.45 ± 5.14 MPa) and LD (13.62 ± 5.12 MPa). There were statistically significant differences in types of coping material and various pre-surface treatments ( P veneering ceramic to zirconia oxide was higher than metal alloy and lithium disilicate. The highest shear bond strengths were obtained in sandblast and acid etch treatment for zirconia oxide and lithium disilicate groups, and in acid etch treatment for metal alloy group.

  13. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Mondelli, José

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1) rinsing with water and drying; (G2) application of an adhesive system; (G3) rinsing and drying, abrasion wit...

  14. Actor Bonds in Situations of Discontinuous Business Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaates, Maria Anne

    2000-01-01

    in situations of discontinuity. Therefore an analysis and comparison of relevant concepts that capture the key generative features of actor bonds in both socially constructed networks and socially constructed markets is undertaken. These concepts include the "milieu" of project marketing (Cova et al., 1996......Demand in many industrial buying situations, e.g. project purchases or procurement related to virtual organizations, is discontinuous. In situations of discontinuity, networks are often more of an ad hos informational and social nature, as strong activity and resource links are not present......) and the institutional concept of the "field". Finally this paper introduces the concept of "social capital" (Bourdieu, 1983) and discusses whether it can be used to conceptualize the dynamic features of actor bonds in situations of discontinuity....

  15. Deproteinization of tooth enamel surfaces to prevent white spot lesions and bracket bond failure: A revolution in orthodontic bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Justus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment success is jeopardized by the risk of development of white spot lesions (WSLs around orthodontic brackets. Unfortunately, the formation of WSLs still remains a common complication during treatment in patients with poor oral hygiene. Nearly 75% of orthodontic patients are reported to develop enamel decalcification because of prolonged plaque retention around brackets. It is the orthodontist′s responsibility to minimize the risk of patients having enamel decalcifications as a consequence of orthodontic treatment. This can be achieved by using hybrid, fluoride-releasing, glass ionomer cement to bond brackets, with deproteinization of the enamel surface before phosphoric acid etching.

  16. Kwik Bond Polymers(R) high friction surface treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    High friction surface treatment (HFST) was applied to two on-ramps in the Seattle urban area to improve : friction resistance. The ramps were high accident locations. The system applied was polyester resin binder and : calcined bauxite aggregate. Tes...

  17. Surface Bonding Effects in Compound Semiconductor Nanoparticles: II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helen H. Farrell

    2008-07-01

    Small nanoparticles have a large proportion of their atoms either at or near the surface, and those in clusters are essentially all on the surface. As a consequence, the details of the surface structure are of paramount importance in governing the overall stability of the particle. Just as with bulk materials, factors that determine this stability include “bulk” structure, surface reconstruction, charge balance and hybridization, ionicity, strain, stoichiometry, and the presence of adsorbates. Needless to say, many of these factors, such as charge balance, hybridization and strain, are interdependent. These factors all contribute to the overall binding energy of clusters and small nanoparticles and play a role in determining the deviations from an inverse size dependence that we have previously reported for compound semiconductor materials. Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, we have explored how these factors influence particle stability under a variety of conditions.

  18. Influence of surface treatment on bond strength of veneering ceramics fused to zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Kouki; Sato, Toru; Yoshinari, Masao

    2012-01-01

    In all-ceramic restorations involving a zirconia framework, surface treatment of the zirconia surface is required to enhance bonding strength with the veneering ceramics and thus prevent chipping. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of surface roughness and heat treatment of the zirconia and use of liner porcelain on bond strength between veneering ceramics and a zirconia framework. Debonding/crack-initiation strength (τb) was determined according to ISO 9693. No significant difference was observed among conditions, except with use of a liner under heat treatment, which yielded a τb of 26.0±2.9-28.9±1.7 MPa. Electron probe microanalysis revealed that components of the veneering ceramics remained on the zirconia surface after debonding, suggesting that fractures occur in the veneering ceramics and that improving the strength of the veneering ceramics themselves might increase bond strength.

  19. Atmospheric pressure plasma surface modification of titanium for high temperature adhesive bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akram, M.; Jansen, K.M.B.; Ernst, L.J.; Bhowmik, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation surface treatment of titanium is carried out by plasma ion implantation under atmospheric pressure plasma in order to increase the adhesive bond strength. Prior to the plasma treatment, titanium surfaces were mechanically treated by sand blasting. It is observed that the

  20. 30 CFR 942.800 - Bond and insurance requirements for surface coal mining and reclamation operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... required for postmining water treatment must remain bonded. However, the trust fund or annuity may serve as... coal mining and reclamation operations. 942.800 Section 942.800 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING...

  1. Effect of alloy type and surface conditioning on roughness and bond strength of metal brackets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nergiz, I.; Schmage, P.; Herrmann, W.; Ozcan, M.; Nergiz, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    The effect of 5 different surface conditioning methods on bonding of metal brackets to cast dental alloys was examined. The surface conditioning methods were fine (30-µm) or rough (125-µm) diamond bur, sandblasting (50-µm or 110-µm aluminum oxide [Al2O3]), and silica coating (30-µm silica). Fifty

  2. Recent Trends in Surface Treatment Methods for Bonding Composite Cement to Zirconia: A Reveiw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aftab Ahmed; Al Kheraif, Abdul Aziz A; Jamaluddin, Syed; Elsharawy, Mohamad; Divakar, Darshan Devang

    To evaluate the in vitro studies conducted in the last six years on new zirconia materials to discover and explore current trends in bonding composite cement to zirconia substrate. An in-depth review of the in vitro studies performed between 2010 and 2016 was conducted, focusing on the current trends in surface conditioning methods for zirconia ceramic. PubMed was used for searching the literature. Resin composite bonding to zirconia, zirconia surface coating, and zirconia surface treatment method were the keywords used. Complete scientific articles were reviewed and evaluated for appropriateness. The literature survey showed a variety of surface treatment techniques comprising grit blasting (laboratory or chairside) with or without silica-coated alumina particles, the use of materials containing phosphate monomers, different silanes and primers, laser irradiation, Si vapor-phase deposition, and selective infiltration etching. The problem of composite cement bonding to zirconia has yet to be definitively solved. Nevertheless, the application of phosphate monomer on tribochemically silica-coated zirconia surfaces is currently the least complicated and most efficaceous means of bonding composite cement to zirconia. Selective infiltration etching seems to be a promising technique for establishing a durable bond between composite cement and zirconia, and should be studied further.

  3. Effect of different surface treatments on tensile bond strength of silicone-based soft denture liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Hakan; Tugut, Faik; Mutaf, Burcu; Akin, Gulsah; Ozdemir, A Kemal

    2011-11-01

    Failure of the bond between the acrylic resin and resilient liner material is commonly encountered in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments (sandblasting, Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, and KTP lasers) on tensile bond strength of silicone-based soft denture liner. Polymethyl methacrylate test specimens were fabricated and each received one of eight surface treatments: untreated (control), sandblasted, Er:YAG laser irradiated, sandblasted + Er:YAG laser irradiated, Nd:YAG laser irradiated, sandblasted + Nd:YAG laser irradiated, KTP laser irradiated, and sandblasted + KTP laser irradiated. The resilient liner specimens (n = 15) were processed between two polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) blocks. Bonding strength of the liners to PMMA were compared by tensile test with the use of a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests were used to analyze the data (α = 0.05). Altering the polymethyl methacrylate surface by Er:YAG laser significantly increased the bond strengths in polymethyl methacrylate/silicone specimens, however, sandblasting before applying a lining material had a weakening effect on the bond. In addition, Nd:YAG and KTP lasers were found to be ineffective for increasing the strength of the bond.

  4. Nanoscale Bonding between Human Bone and Titanium Surfaces: Osseohybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Sik Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Until now, the chemical bonding between titanium and bone has been examined only through a few mechanical detachment tests. Therefore, in this study, a sandblasted and acid-etched titanium mini-implant was removed from a human patient after 2 months of placement in order to identify the chemical integration mechanism for nanoscale osseointegration of titanium implants. To prepare a transmission electron microscopy (TEM specimen, the natural state was preserved as much as possible by cryofixation and scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam (SEM-FIB milling without any chemical treatment. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and scanning TEM (STEM/electron energy loss spectroscopic analysis (EELS were used to investigate the chemical composition and structure at the interface between the titanium and bone tissue. HRTEM and EDS data showed evidence of crystalline hydroxyapatite and intermixing of bone with the oxide layer of the implant. The STEM/EELS experiment provided particularly interesting results: carbon existed in polysaccharides, calcium and phosphorus existed as tricalcium phosphate (TCP, and titanium existed as oxidized titanium. In addition, the oxygen energy loss near edge structures (ELNESs showed a possibility of the presence of CaTiO3. These STEM/EELS results can be explained by structures either with or without a chemical reaction layer. The possible existence of the osseohybridization area and the form of the carbon suggest that reconsideration of the standard definition of osseointegration is necessary.

  5. Covalent-Bond Formation via On-Surface Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Philipp Alexander; Fuchs, Harald; Studer, Armido

    2017-05-02

    In this Review article pioneering work and recent achievements in the emerging research area of on-surface chemistry is discussed. On-surface chemistry, sometimes also called two-dimensional chemistry, shows great potential for bottom-up preparation of defined nanostructures. In contrast to traditional organic synthesis, where reactions are generally conducted in well-defined reaction flasks in solution, on-surface chemistry is performed in the cavity of a scanning probe microscope on a metal crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The metal first acts as a platform for self-assembly of the organic building blocks and in many cases it also acts as a catalyst for the given chemical transformation. Products and hence success of the reaction are directly analyzed by scanning probe microscopy. This Review provides a general overview of this chemistry highlighting advantages and disadvantages as compared to traditional reaction setups. The second part of the Review then focuses on reactions that have been successfully conducted as on-surface processes. On-surface Ullmann and Glaser couplings are addressed. In addition, cyclodehydrogenation reactions and cycloadditions are discussed and reactions involving the carbonyl functionality are highlighted. Finally, the first examples of sequential on-surface chemistry are considered in which two different functionalities are chemoselectively addressed. The Review gives an overview for experts working in the area but also offers a starting point to non-experts to enter into this exciting new interdisciplinary research field. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to zirconia core after different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmali, Omer; Akin, Hakan; Ozdemir, Ali Kemal

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments: sandblasting, liners, and different laser irradiations on shear bond strength (SBS) of pre-sintered zirconia to veneer ceramic. The SBS between veneering porcelain and zirconium oxide (ZrO2) substructure was weak. Various surface treatment methods have been suggested for zirconia to obtain high bond strength to veneering porcelain. There is no study that evaluated the bond strength between veneering porcelain and the different surface treatments on pre-sintered ZrO2 substructure. Two hundred specimens with 7 mm diameter and 3 mm height pre-sintered zirconia blocks were fabricated. Specimens were randomly divided into 10 groups (n=20) according to surface treatments applied. Group C, untreated (Control); Group E, erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser irradiated; Group N, neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiated; Group SB, sandblasted; Group L, liner applied; Group NL, Nd:YAG laser irradiated+liner applied; Group EL, Er:YAG laser irradiated+liner applied; Group SN, sandblasted+Nd:YAG laser irradiated; Group SE, sandblasted+Er:YAG laser irradiated; and Group SL, sandblasted+liner applied. The disks were then veneered with veneering porcelain. Before the experiment, specimens were steeped in 37°C distilled water for 24 h. All specimens were thermocycled for 5000 cycles between 5°C and 55°C with a 30 sec dwell time. Shear bond strength test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The fractured specimens were examined under a stereomicroscope to evaluate the fracture pattern. Surface treatments significantly changing the topography of the yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) ceramic according to scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images. The highest mean bond strength value was obtained in Group SE, and the lowest bond strength value was observed in NL group. Bond strength values of the other groups were similar to each other. This

  7. Effect of LASER Irradiation on the Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramic Surface to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Shahabi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Reliable bonding between tooth substrate and zirconia-based ceramic restorations is always of great importance. The laser might be useful for treatment of ceramic surfaces. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic surface to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 40 Cercon zirconia ceramic blocks were fabricated. The surface treatment was performed using sandblasting with 50-micrometer Al2O3, CO2 laser, or Nd:YAG laser in each test groups. After that, the specimens were cemented to human dentin with resin cement. The shear bond strength of ceramics to dentin was determined and failure mode of each specimen was analyzed by stereo-microscope and SEM investigations. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey multiple comparisons. The surface morphology of one specimen from each group was investigated under SEM. Results: The mean shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic to dentin was 7.79±3.03, 9.85±4.69, 14.92±4.48 MPa for CO2 irradiated, Nd:YAG irradiated, and sandblasted specimens, respectively. Significant differences were noted between CO2 (P=0.001 and Nd:YAG laser (P=0.017 irradiated specimens with sandblasted specimens. No significant differences were observed between two laser methods (P=0.47. The mode of bond failure was predominantly adhesive in test groups (CO2 irradiated specimens: 75%, Nd:YAG irradiated: 66.7%, and sandblasting: 41.7%. Conclusion: Under the limitations of the present study, surface treatment of zirconia ceramics using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers was not able to produce adequate bond strength with dentin surfaces in comparison to sandblasting technique. Therefore, the use of lasers with the mentioned parameters may not be recommended for the surface treatment of Cercon ceramics.

  8. Effects of silane application on the shear bond strength of ceramic orthodontic brackets to enamel surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinandi Sri Pudyani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fixed orthodontic appliances with ceramic brackets are used frequently to fulfill the aesthetic demand of patient through orthodontic treatment. Ceramic brackets have some weaknesses such as bond strength and enamel surface damage. In high bond strength the risk of damage in enamel surfaces increases after debonding. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the effect of silane on base of bracket and adhesive to shear bond strength and enamel structure of ceramic bracket. Method: Sixteen extracted upper premolars were randomly divided into four groups based on silane or no silane on the bracket base and on the adhesive surface. Design of the base on ceramic bracket in this research was microcrystalline to manage the influence of mechanical interlocking. Samples were tested in shear mode on a universal testing machine after attachment. Following it, adhesive remnant index (ARI scores were used to assess bond failure site. Statistical analysis was performed using a two-way Anova and the Mann-Whitney test. A scanning electron microscope (SEM with a magnification of 2000x was used to observe enamel structure after debonding. Result: Shear bond strength was increased between group without silane and group with silane on the base of bracket (p<0,05. There was no significance different between group without silane and group with silane on adhesive (p<0,05. Conclusion: Application of silane on base of bracket increases shear bond strength, however, application of silane on adhesive site does not increase shear bond strength of ceramic bracket. Most bonding failure occurred at the enamel adhesive interface and damage occurred on enamel structure in group contains silane of ceramic bracket.

  9. Biomimetic superhydrophobic polyolefin surfaces fabricated with a facile scraping, bonding and peeling method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Huanhuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by the superhydrophobicity of juicy peach surface, on which microscale hairs are standing vertically to the surface plane, an extremely simple, inexpensive physical method is developed for fabrication of superhydrophobic polyolefin surfaces over large areas. This method includes three steps: abrasive paper scraping, adhesive tape bonding and 90° peeling. Scraping increases the roughness and enhence water contact angles (CAs on polyolefin surfaces. It increases more when the scraped surface are bonded with adhesive types and then then 90° peeled. The CA variation depends on the types of polyolefin and abrasive paper. Superhydrophobic lowdensity polyethylene (LDPE, high-density polyethylene (HDPE and polypropylene (PP surfaces (CA>150° are obtained and they all exhibit very low adhesive force and high resistance to strong acids and bases.

  10. Active Particles on Curved Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Fily, Yaouen; Baskaran, Aparna; Hagan, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the sensitivity of active matter to boundaries and their geometries. Here we develop a general theory for the dynamics and statistics of active particles on curved surfaces and illustrate it on two examples. We first show that active particles moving on a surface with no ability to probe its curvature only exhibit steady-state inhomogeneities in the presence of orientational order. We then consider a strongly confined 3D ideal active gas and compute its steady-...

  11. Surface modifications and Nano-composite coatings to improve the bonding strength of titanium-porcelain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Litong, E-mail: guolitong810104@163.com [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); ustralian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Chen, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Xuemei; Feng, Wei [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Li, Baoe [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Lin, Cheng; Tao, Xueyu; Qiang, Yinghuai [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China)

    2016-04-01

    Surface modifications of Ti and nano-composite coatings were employed to simultaneously improve the surface roughness, corrosion resistance and chemical bonding between porclain-Ti. The specimens were studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, surface roughness, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, corrosion resistance and bonding strength tests. The SEM results showed that hybrid structures with micro-stripes, nano-pores and nano-protuberances were prepared by surface modification of Ti, which significantly enhanced the surface roughness and corrosion resistance of Ti. Porous nano-composite coatings were synthesized on Ti anodized with pre-treatment in 40% HF acid. TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were added into the hybrid coating to increase the solid phase content of the sols and avoid the formation of microcracks. With the TiO{sub 2} content increasing from 45 wt% to 60 wt%, the quantities of the microcracks on the coating surface gradually decreased. The optimal TiO{sub 2} content for the nanocomposite coatings is 60 wt% in this research. Compared to the uncoated group, the bonding strength of the coated groups showed a bonding strength improvement of 23.96%. The cytotoxicity of the 4# coating group was ranked as zero, which corresponds to non-cytotoxicity. - Highlights: • Surface roughness of Ti was increased by surface modification of Ti. • Corrosion resistance was enhanced by surface modification of Ti. • Porous nano-composite coatings were synthesized on Ti by sol–gel process. • TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were added into the coating to avoid formation of cracks. • The nano-composite coatings increased the bonding strength of about 24%.

  12. Effect of different laser surface treatment on microshear bond strength between zirconia ceramic and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan Zanjani, Vagharaldin; Ahmadi, Hadi; Nateghifard, Afshin; Ghasemi, Amir; Torabzadeh, Hassan; Abdoh Tabrizi, Maryam; Alikhani, Farnaz; Razi, Reza; Nateghifard, Ardalan

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of sandblasting, carbon dioxide (CO₂), and erbium,chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) lasers on the microshear bond strength of zirconia to resin cement. Sixty-one sintered yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia blocks (10 × 5 × 2 mm) were prepared and divided into four experimental groups (n = 15); one sample was retained as a control. The samples were treated by aluminium oxide air abrasion, CO₂4W, Er,Cr:YSGG 3W, and Er,Cr:YSGG 2W, respectively. One sample from each group and the control sample were analyzed by scanning electron microscope. Panavia F2.0 resin microcylinders were prepared and placed on treated surfaces, light cured, and incubated for 48 h. Microshear bond strength testing was done by a microtensile tester machine, and the type of bond failures were determined by stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by one-way anova and Tukey's test at a significance level of P ceramic surfaces to enhance the bonding strength of resin cement to zirconia. CO₂laser at 4W and Er,Cr:YSGG laser at only 3-W output power can be regarded as surface treatment options for roughening the zirconia surface to establish better bond strength with resin cements. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Effect of chemical surface treatment of titanium on its bond with dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchańska-Kowalik, Monika; Wołowiec-Korecka, Emilia; Klimek, Leszek

    2018-04-05

    Airborne-particle abrasion of titanium is a clinically accepted method of surface preparation. As a side effect of airborne-particle abrasion, particles of the abrasive material get embedded into the surface. How particle presence or removal from the titanium surface affects the strength of the titanium-ceramic bond is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the effect of removing Al 2 O 3 particles embedded into the surface by means of chemical surface treatment on the strength of the titanium-ceramic bond. Titanium (TritanCpTi 1, Dentaurum, 99.5% Ti) disks were airborne-particle abraded with 110 μm Al 2 O 3 at a pressure of 0.4 MPa and an angle of approximately 45 degrees. The surface was etched chemically using 1 of 8 reagents, and the veneering ceramic applied and fired. The strength of the metal-ceramic bond was determined using the shear strength test. Further, the effect of thermal fatigue on the bond strength was evaluated. The results were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey honest significant difference (HSD) test (α=.05). Fractographic investigations and microscopic tests were also performed to determine the quality of the titanium-ceramic bond. Effective etching of the titanium surface and removal of Al 2 O 3 particles included a 30% water solution of HNO 3  + 3% HF, a mixture of HNO 3  + HF + glycerin, a 4% solution of HF in H 2 O 2 , and a 4% solution of HF in H 2 O. A statistically significant difference (of about 50%) in bond strength was found between the groups subjected to chemical etching and the control group (P<.05). Additionally, a statistically significant difference (about 25%) was found after thermocycling (P<.05). Removing the Al 2 O 3 particles embedded into the titanium surface after airborne-particle abrasion lowers the strength of the titanium-ceramic bond (P<.05). Thermocycling also weakens the strength of the titanium-ceramic bond, regardless of the surface preparation (P<.05). Copyright © 2018

  14. Electronic structure, molecular bonding and potential energy surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedenberg, K. [Ames Laboratory, IA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    By virtue of the universal validity of the generalized Born-Oppenheimer separation, potential energy surfaces (PES`) represent the central conceptual as well as quantitative entities of chemical physics and provide the basis for the understanding of most physicochemical phenomena in many diverse fields. The research in this group deals with the elucidation of general properties of PES` as well as with the quantitative determination of PES` for concrete systems, in particular pertaining to reactions involving carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen molecules.

  15. Four chemical methods of porcelain conditioning and their influence over bond strength and surface integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, João Paulo Fragomeni; Oliveira, Andrea Becker; Nojima, Lincoln Issamu; Marquezan, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess four different chemical surface conditioning methods for ceramic material before bracket bonding, and their impact on shear bond strength and surface integrity at debonding. METHODS: Four experimental groups (n = 13) were set up according to the ceramic conditioning method: G1 = 37% phosphoric acid etching followed by silane application; G2 = 37% liquid phosphoric acid etching, no rinsing, followed by silane application; G3 = 10% hydrofluoric acid etching alone; and G4 = 10% hydrofluoric acid etching followed by silane application. After surface conditioning, metal brackets were bonded to porcelain by means of the Transbond XP system (3M Unitek). Samples were submitted to shear bond strength tests in a universal testing machine and the surfaces were later assessed with a microscope under 8 X magnification. ANOVA/Tukey tests were performed to establish the difference between groups (α= 5%). RESULTS: The highest shear bond strength values were found in groups G3 and G4 (22.01 ± 2.15 MPa and 22.83 ± 3.32 Mpa, respectively), followed by G1 (16.42 ± 3.61 MPa) and G2 (9.29 ± 1.95 MPa). As regards surface evaluation after bracket debonding, the use of liquid phosphoric acid followed by silane application (G2) produced the least damage to porcelain. When hydrofluoric acid and silane were applied, the risk of ceramic fracture increased. CONCLUSIONS: Acceptable levels of bond strength for clinical use were reached by all methods tested; however, liquid phosphoric acid etching followed by silane application (G2) resulted in the least damage to the ceramic surface. PMID:26352845

  16. Surface modifications and Nano-composite coatings to improve the bonding strength of titanium-porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Litong; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Xuemei; Feng, Wei; Li, Baoe; Lin, Cheng; Tao, Xueyu; Qiang, Yinghuai

    2016-04-01

    Surface modifications of Ti and nano-composite coatings were employed to simultaneously improve the surface roughness, corrosion resistance and chemical bonding between porclain-Ti. The specimens were studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, surface roughness, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, corrosion resistance and bonding strength tests. The SEM results showed that hybrid structures with micro-stripes, nano-pores and nano-protuberances were prepared by surface modification of Ti, which significantly enhanced the surface roughness and corrosion resistance of Ti. Porous nano-composite coatings were synthesized on Ti anodized with pre-treatment in 40% HF acid. TiO2 nanoparticles were added into the hybrid coating to increase the solid phase content of the sols and avoid the formation of microcracks. With the TiO2 content increasing from 45 wt% to 60 wt%, the quantities of the microcracks on the coating surface gradually decreased. The optimal TiO2 content for the nanocomposite coatings is 60 wt% in this research. Compared to the uncoated group, the bonding strength of the coated groups showed a bonding strength improvement of 23.96%. The cytotoxicity of the 4# coating group was ranked as zero, which corresponds to non-cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydrogen-bonding layer-by-layer-assembled biodegradable polymeric micelles as drug delivery vehicles from surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Su; Park, Sang Wook; Hammond, Paula T

    2008-02-01

    We present the integration of amphiphilic block copolymer micelles as nanometer-sized vehicles for hydrophobic drugs within layer-by-layer (LbL) films using alternating hydrogen bond interactions as the driving force for assembly for the first time, thus enabling the incorporation of drugs and pH-sensitive release. The film was constructed based on the hydrogen bonding between poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) as an H-bond donor and biodegradable poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PEO-b-PCL) micelles as the H-bond acceptor when assembled under acidic conditions. By taking advantage of the weak interactions of the hydrogen-bonded film on hydrophobic surfaces, it is possible to generate flexible free-standing films of these materials. A free-standing micelle LbL film of (PEO-b-PCL/PAA)60 with a thickness of 3.1 microm was isolated, allowing further characterization of the bulk film properties, including morphology and phase transitions, using transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Because of the sensitive nature of the hydrogen bonding employed to build the multilayers, the film can be rapidly deconstructed to release micelles upon exposure to physiological conditions. However, we could also successfully control the rate of film deconstruction by cross-linking carboxylic acid groups in PAA through thermally induced anhydride linkages, which retard the drug release to the surrounding medium to enable sustained release over multiple days. To demonstrate efficacy in delivering active therapeutics, in vitro Kirby-Bauer assays against Staphylococcus aureus were used to illustrate that the drug-loaded micelle LbL film can release significant amounts of an active antibacterial drug, triclosan, to inhibit the growth of bacteria. Because the micellar encapsulation of hydrophobic therapeutics does not require specific chemical interactions, we believe this noncovalent approach provides a new route to integrating active small

  18. Effects of surface treatments of conventional glass-ionomer on shear bond strength to giomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimyai, Soodabeh; Mohammadi, Narmin; Oskoee, Parnian Alizadeh; Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel Ebrahimi; Bahari, Mahmood; Sadr, Alireza; Ahmadizenouz, Ghazaleh

    2012-01-01

    Background: An appropriate bond between glass-ionomer and the superficial resin materials is very important for the success of sandwich technique. The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of three surface treatments of conventional glass-ionomer on its shear bond strength to giomer. Materials and Methods: Sixty cylindrical specimens of a conventional glass-ionomer (GC Fuji II) were prepared and randomly divided into three groups (n = 20). The specimens in groups 1 and 2 were treated with total-etch adhesive resin (Single Bond) along with acid etching, and self-etch adhesive resin (FL-Bond II) on the set glass-ionomer, respectively. Specimens in group 3 were treated with self-etch adhesive resin (FL-Bond II) before initial setting of the glass-ionomer was complete. Then a giomer restorative (Beautifil II) was added to the specimens. Subsequent to thermocycling, the specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test. Failure modes were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and a post hoc Tukey test at a significance level of P glass-ionomer yielded the highest bond strength in the glass-ionomer/giomer sandwich technique. PMID:23559944

  19. Bonding of Metal Orthodontic Attachments to Sandblasted Porcelain and Zirconia Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates tensile bond strength (TBS) of metal orthodontic attachments to sandblasted feldspathic porcelain and zirconia with various bonding protocols. Thirty-six (36) feldspathic and 36 zirconia disc samples were prepared, glazed, embedded in acrylic blocks and sandblasted, and divided into three groups according to one or more of the following treatments: hydrofluoric acid 4% (HF), Porcelain Conditioner silane primer, Reliance Assure® primer, Reliance Assure plus® primer, and Z Prime™ plus zirconia primer. A round traction hook was bonded to each sample. Static tensile bond strength tests were performed in a universal testing machine and adhesive remnant index (ARI) scoring was done using a digital camera. One-way ANOVA and Pearson chi-square tests were used to analyze TBS (MPa) and ARI scores. No statistically significant mean differences were found in TBS among the different bonding protocols for feldspathic and zirconia, p values = 0.369 and 0.944, respectively. No statistically significant distribution of ARI scores was found among the levels of feldspathic, p value = 0.569. However, statistically significant distribution of ARI scores was found among the levels of zirconia, p value = 0.026. The study concluded that silanization following sandblasting resulted in tensile bond strengths comparable to other bonding protocols for feldspathic and zirconia surface. PMID:27747233

  20. Effects of silica-coating on surface topography and bond strength of porcelain fused to CAD/CAM pure titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Takushi; Hamano, Naho; Ino, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of porcelain fusing to titanium and the effects of surface treatment on surface structure of titanium. In the shear bond strength test, titanium surface treatments were: conventional, silica-coating without bonding agent, and silica-coating with bonding agent. Titanium surface treatments for analysis by the atomic force microscope (AFM) were: polishing, alumina sandblasting and silica-coating. The shear bond strength value of silica-coating with bonding agent group showed significantly higher than that of other groups. In AFM observation results, regular foamy structure which is effective for wetting was only observed in silica-coating. Therefore, this structure might indicate silicon. Silica-coating renders forms a nanoscopic regular foamy structure, involved in superhydrophilicity, to titanium surface, which is markedly different from the irregular surface generated by alumina sandblasting.

  1. [Effects of sandblasting on surface character and resin bond of zirconia ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiang-Feng; Xie, Zhi-Gang; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Gu, Ning

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of Al2O3 particles sandblasting on the surface roughness, element composition and resin bond durability of zirconia ceramic. Sixty 2.5 mm thick computer aided design and computer aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) zirconia ceramic (Vita Inceram YZ) plates were fired, polished and cleaned. Half of polished ceramic plates was sandblasted with 50 µm alumina particles at 0.3 MPa for 20 s. The surface roughness of polished and sandblasted ceramic surface were measured by 3D-laser scanning microscope, and the surface element weight and atom ratio of the ceramic surface were measured by energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS). Then polished and sandblasted ceramic plates were randomized into six groups. In Group 1 and 2 the polished and sandblasted ceramic plates were bonded irrespectively with conventional resin cement (DUOLINK). In Group 3 and 4 the ceramic plates were bonded with resin cement containing MDP (Panavia F), In Group 5 and 6 the specimens were pretreated with silane coupler acitivated by MDP (Clearfil Ceramic Primer), then bond with Panavia F. The specimens of each test group were then divided into two subgroups, and to received shear test after 0 and 10 000 time thermal cycle. The data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA and independent t test. Comparing with polishing, sandblasting reduced the oxygen atom and weight ratio of zirconia ceramic surface (P ceramic plates and resin cement in all test groups decreased after thermocycling (P ceramic and resin cement containing MDP, not only by increasing the roughness and area of ceramic surface, but also by changing its surface element composition to obtain more chemical bond.

  2. Heterolytic cleavage of ammonia N-H bond by bifunctional activation in silica-grafted single site Ta(V) imido amido surface complex. Importance of the outer sphere NH3 assistance

    KAUST Repository

    Gouré, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia N-H bond is cleaved at room temperature by the silica-supported tantalum imido amido complex [(≡SiO)2Ta(NH)(-NH2)], 2, if excess ammonia is present, but requires 150 °C to achieve the same reaction if only one equivalent NH3 is added to 2. MAS solid-state 15N NMR and in situ IR spectroscopic studies of the reaction of either 15N or 2H labeled ammonia with 2 show that initial coordination of the ammonia is followed by scrambling of either 15N or 2H among ammonia, amido and imido groups. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations with a cluster model [{(μ-O)[(H3SiO) 2SiO]2}Ta(NH)(-NH2)(NH3)], 2 q·NH3, show that the intramolecular H transfer from Ta-NH2 to TaNH is ruled out, but the H transfers from the coordinated ammonia to the amido and imido groups have accessible energy barriers. The energy barrier for the ammonia N-H activation by the Ta-amido group is energetically preferred relative to the Ta-imido group. The importance of excess NH3 for getting full isotope scrambling is rationalized by an outer sphere assistance of ammonia acting as proton transfer agent, which equalizes the energy barriers for H transfer from coordinated ammonia to the amido and imido groups. In contrast, additional coordinated ammonia does not favor significantly the H transfer. These results rationalize the experimental conditions used. © The Royal Society of Chemistry and the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique 2011.

  3. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Mondelli, José

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1) rinsing with water and drying; (G2) application of an adhesive system; (G3) rinsing and drying, abrasion with finishing disks, etching and application of adhesive system; (G4) rinsing and drying, etching, application of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin-resin interfaces with saliva significantly reduced shear strength, especially after prolonged storage (presin increments.

  4. Effects of different sulfuric acid etching concentrations on PEEK surface bonding to resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaijareenont, Pisaisit; Prakhamsai, Sasiprapha; Silthampitag, Patcharawan; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Arksornnukit, Mansuang

    2018-01-26

    This study evaluated the effects of surface pretreatment with different concentrations of sulfuric acid etching on surface properties and bonding between Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and a resin composite. Six groups of surface pretreatment (no pretreatment, etched with 70, 80, 85, 90, and 98% sulfuric acid for 60 s) were treated on PEEK. Surface roughness, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses were examined. Shear bond strength (SBS) and cross-sectional observations of the interfaces were performed. One-way ANOVA analysis revealed differences in surface roughness and SBS between groups. The 90 and 98% sulfuric acid etching significantly achieved the highest SBS (psulfuric acid etching were suggested to be the optimal concentration to improve adhesion between PEEK and the resin composite.

  5. The effect of dentine surface preparation and reduced application time of adhesive on bonding strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikaew, Pipop; Chowdhury, A F M Almas; Fukuyama, Mai; Kakuda, Shinichi; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Sano, Hidehiko

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of surface preparation and the application time of adhesives on the resin-dentine bond strengths with universal adhesives. Sixty molars were cut to exposed mid-coronal dentine and divided into 12 groups (n=5) based on three factors; (1) adhesive: G-Premio Bond (GP, GC Corp., Tokyo, Japan), Clearfil Universal Bond (CU, Kuraray Noritake Dental Inc., Okayama, Japan) and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SB, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA); (2) smear layer preparation: SiC paper ground dentine or bur-cut dentine; (3) application time: shortened time or as manufacturer's instruction. Fifteen resin-dentine sticks per group were processed for microtensile bond strength test (μTBS) according to non-trimming technique (1mm(2)) after storage in distilled water (37 °C) for 24h. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 tests (α=0.05). Fractured surfaces were observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Another 12 teeth were prepared and cut into slices for SEM examination of bonded interfaces. μTBS were higher when bonded to SiC-ground dentine according to manufacturer's instruction. Bonding to bur-cut dentine resulted in significantly lower μTBS (padhesive resin interface. This was more pronounced when adhesives were bonded with a reduced application time and on bur cut dentine. The performance of universal adhesives can be compromised on bur cut dentine and when applied with a reduced application time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Can surface preparation with CVD diamond tip influence on bonding to dental tissues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparecido Kawaguchi, Fernando; Brossi Botta, Sergio; Nilo Vieira, Samuel; Steagall Júnior, Washington; Bona Matos, Adriana

    2008-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) tips surface treatments of enamel and dentin on bonding resistance of two adhesive systems. Thirty embedded samples were divided in 12 groups ( n = 10), according to factors: substrate (enamel and dentin), adhesive system [etch-and-rinse (SB) and self-etch]; and the surface treatments (paper discs, impact CVD tips and tangential CVD tip). When CVD tip was used in the impact mode the tip was applied perpendicular to dental surface, while at tangential mode, the tip worked parallel to dental surface. Specimens were tested in tension after 24 h at 0.5 mm/min of cross-head speed. ANOVA results, in MPa showed that in enamel, only adhesive system factor was statistically significant ( p = 0.015) under tested conditions, with higher bond strength observed for SB groups. However, in dentin the best bonding performance was obtained in SE groups ( p = 0.00). In both tested substrates, results did not show statistically significant difference for factors treatment and its interactions. ConclusionsIt may be concluded that CVD-tip surface treatment, in both tested modes, did not influence on adhesion to enamel and dentin. But, it is important to choose adhesive system according to the tissue available to bonding.

  7. Tensile bond strength of composite luting cements to metal alloys after various surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denizoglu Saip

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the effects of two different surface treatments and bonding agents on tensile bond strength between a Co-Cr and a Ni-Cr cast alloy and two resin-luting cements. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and forty alloy samples were cast and subjected to surface treatments such as sandblasting, chemical etching, and sandblasting plus chemical etching. Panavia F and CandB cement were used as cementing mediums. The etching qualities were examined by a stereooptic microscope. Failure surfaces were examined throughout scanning electron microscopy. The data were evaluated using statistical methods, namely analysis of variance and multiple comparison test (Tukey HSD. Results: Significant differences were found in the bonding provided by the various cements (P < 0.001 and also type of surface treatments (P < 0.001. For all groups, sandblasted surfaces showed the highest bond strength values. There was no significant difference between the Cr-Co and the Cr-Ni alloys (P > 0.05. Conclusions: Panavia F showed higher tensile strength and the sandblasted samples possessed higher tensile strength.

  8. Bond strength enhancement of zirconia-porcelain interfaces via Nd:YAG laser surface structuring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Bruno; Fabris, Douglas; Souza, Júlio C M; Silva, Filipe S; Carvalho, Óscar; Fredel, Márcio C; Mesquita-Guimarães, Joana

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of laser surface structuring on the bond strength of feldspar-based porcelain to zirconia, as compared to conventional sandblasting treatment. Thirty cylindrical zirconia substrates, previously sintered, were divided in three groups according to the type of surface conditioning: 1) sandblasting with 50 µm Al 2 O 3 ; 2) laser structuring (Ø25 µm holes); and 3) laser structuring (Ø50 µm holes). Porcelain was injected onto the zirconia substrates. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) was used to evaluate the influence of the laser treatment on zirconia crystallographic phases. Shear bond strength test was performed. Micrographs using SEM were used to evaluate the zirconia surface after each surface treatment and to evaluate the fracture surface after the shear test. The laser-structured groups presented the highest shear bond strength (65 ± 16 MPa and 65 ± 11 MPa, for the 25 µm and 50 µm holes, respectively). The sandblasting samples presented shear bond strength of 37 ± 16 MPa. XRD analysis showed that there was no phase transformation on the thermally affected surface due to laser action. Microcracks were created at some holes due to the high temperature gradient generated by laser. Laser structuring significantly increased (up to 75%) the shear bond strength of zirconia to veneering porcelain as compared to conventional sandblasting treatment. Therefore, laser structuring arises as a surface conditioning method for producing stronger and long lasting zirconia-porcelain interfaces. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bonding and structure of a reconstructed (001) surface of SrTiO3 from TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guo-zhen; Radtke, Guillaume; Botton, Gianluigi A

    2012-10-18

    The determination of the atomic structure and the retrieval of information about reconstruction and bonding of metal oxide surfaces is challenging owing to the highly defective structure and insulating properties of these surfaces. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) offers extremely high spatial resolution (less than one ångström) and the ability to provide systematic information from both real and reciprocal space. However, very few TEM studies have been carried out on surfaces because the information from the bulk dominates the very weak signals originating from surfaces. Here we report an experimental approach to extract surface information effectively from a thickness series of electron energy-loss spectra containing different weights of surface signals, using a wedge-shaped sample. Using the (001) surface of the technologically important compound strontium titanate, SrTiO(3) (refs 4-6), as a model system for validation, our method shows that surface spectra are sensitive to the atomic reconstruction and indicate bonding and crystal-field changes surrounding the surface Ti cations. Very good agreement can be achieved between the experimental surface spectra and crystal-field multiplet calculations based on the proposed atomic surface structure optimized by density functional calculations. The distorted TiO(6-x) units indicated by the proposed model can be viewed directly in our high-resolution scanning TEM images. We suggest that this approach be used as a general method to extract valuable spectroscopic information from surface atoms in parallel with high-resolution images in TEM.

  10. Activation of Dihydrogen by Masked Doubly Bonded Aluminum Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Koichi; Murosaki, Takahiro; Agou, Tomohiro; Sasamori, Takahiro; Matsuo, Tsukasa; Tokitoh, Norihiro

    2016-10-04

    Activation of dihydrogen by masked dialumenes (Al=Al doubly bonded species) is reported. Reactions of barrelene-type dialumanes, which have the reactivity as masked equivalents of 1,2-diaryldialumenes ArAl=AlAr, with H2 afforded dihydroalumanes ArAlH2 at room temperature (Ar: bulky aryl groups). These dihydroalumanes form hydrogen-bridged dimers [ArHAl(μ-H)]2 in the crystalline state, while a monomer-dimer equilibrium was suggested in solution. The 1,2-diaryldialumenes generated from the barrelene-type dialumanes are the putative active species in the cleavage of H2 . © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Methacrylate bonding to zirconia by in situ silica nanoparticle surface deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Ogliari, Aline; Collares, Fabrício M; Feitosa, Victor P; Sauro, Salvatore; Ogliari, Fabrício A; Moraes, Rafael R

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces an innovative method to enhance adhesion of methacrylate-based cements to yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) by means of a silica-nanoparticle deposition process. Two alkoxide organic precursors, tetraethyl-orthosilicate (TEOS) and zirconium tert-butoxide (ZTB) were diluted in hexane at different concentrations in order to obtain several experimental materials to enhance deposition of a SiO(x) reactive layer to Y-TZP. This deposition was attained via sintering alkoxide precursors directly on pre-sintered zirconia (infiltration method—INF) or application on the surface of fully sintered zirconia (coating method—COA). Untreated specimens and a commercial tribochemical silica coating were also tested as controls and all the treated Y-TZP specimens were analyzed using SEM-EDX. Specimens were bonded using silane, adhesive and dual-cure luting cement and submitted to shear bond strength test after different water storage periods (24 h, 3-, 6- and 12-months). SEM-EDX revealed Y-TZP surface covered by silica nanoclusters. The morphology of silica-covered Y-TZP surfaces was influenced by sintering method, employed to deposit nanoclusters. High bond strength (MPa) was observed when using COA method; highest TEOS percentage achieved the greatest bond strengths to Y-TZP surface (36.7±6.3 at 24 h). However, bonds stability was dependent on ZTB presence (32.9±9.7 at 3 months; 32.3±7.1 at 6 months). Regarding INF method, the highest and more stable resin-zirconia bond strength was attained when using experimental solutions containing TEOS and no ZTB. Both sintering methods tested in this study were able to achieve a bonding performance similar to that of classic tribochemical strategies. This study demonstrates that it is possible to achieve a reliable and long-lasting bonding between yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic and methacrylate-based cements when using this novel, simple, and cost-effective bonding approach. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental

  12. Effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of zirconia to three resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadjoo, Nisa

    Statement of problem: There are no standard guidelines for material selection to obtain acceptable bonding to high-strength zirconium oxide ceramic. Studies suggest resin cements in combination with MDP-containing primer is a reasonable choice, however, the other cements cannot be rejected and need further investigation. Objective: The purpose of this in vitro study was the evaluation of the shear bond strength of three composite resin cements to zirconia ceramic after using different surface conditioning methods. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty sintered Y-TZP ceramic (IPS e.max ZirCAD) squares (8 x 8 x 4 mm) were embedded in acrylic molds, then divided into three groups (n=40) based on the type of cement used. Within each group, the specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=10) and treated as follows: (1) Air abrasion with 50microm aluminum oxide (Al2O 3) particles (ALO); (2) Air abrasion + Scotchbond Universal adhesive (SBU); (3) Air abrasion + Monobond Plus (MBP); (4) Air abrasion + Z-Prime Plus (ZPP). Composite cylinders were used as carriers to bond to conditioned ceramic using (1) RelyX Ultimate adhesive resin cement (RX); (2) Panavia SA self-adhesive resin cement (PSA); (3) Calibra esthetic cement (CAL). The bonded specimens were submerged in distilled water and subjected to 24-hour incubation period at 37°C. All specimens were stressed in shear at a constant crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA. The bond strength values (MPa), means and standard deviations were calculated and data were analyzed using analysis of variance with Fisher's PLSD multiple comparison test at the 0.05 level of significance. The nature of failure was recorded. Results: The two-way ANOVA showed Panavia SA to have the highest strength at 44.3 +/- 16.9 MPa (presin cement, Panavia SA, yielded the strongest bond to Y-TZP ceramic when compared to adhesive (RelyX Ultimate) or esthetic (Calibra) resin cements. Air

  13. Effect of surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of luting cement to ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Özcan, Mutlu; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of a Bis-GMA based luting cement to six commercial dental ceramics. Methods. Six disc shaped ceramic specimens (glass ceramics, glass infiltrated alumina, glass infiltrated zirconium

  14. Effect of surface treatment of titanium posts on the tensile bond strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmage, P; Sohn, J; Ozcan, M; Nergiz, [No Value

    Objectives. Retention of composite resins to metal can be improved when metal surfaces are conditioned. The purpose of this investigation was to investigate the effect of two conditioning treatments on the tensile bond strength of four resin-based luting cements and zinc phosphate cement to titanium

  15. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2007-01-01

    of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin...

  16. [Effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond of zirconia substructure and veneering ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qun; Peng, Yan; Wu, Xue-ying; Weng, Jia-wei

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of zirconia substructure and veneering ceramic. Kavo zirconia specimens were divided into 4 groups (each group contains 8 specimens) according to different surface treatments: Group A was pigmented by dipping presintered blocks in the coloring solution VITA LL5, and not treated with abrasion after firing; Group B was pigmented with the same solution and then dealt with abrasion; Group C was not treated by any methods and Group D was only dealt with abrasion. All the veneering ceramics were fired on the zirconia substructure by slip-casting technique and the shear bond strength of zirconia substructure and veneering ceramic were tested. The data was analyzed statistically with SPSS 10.0 software package. The shear bond strength of the abrasive-treated groups (group B and group D) was significantly higher than the other two groups, but no significant difference was found between pigmented-treated groups (group A and group C) and non-pigmented-treated groups (group B and group D). Abrasion can increase the shear bond between Kavo zirconia substructure and veneering ceramics while pigmentation has no significant effect on the bonding strength.

  17. The Effect of Nylon and Polyester Peel Ply Surface Preparation on the Bond Quality of Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moench, Molly K.

    The preparation of the surfaces to be bonded is critical to the success of composite bonds. Peel ply surface preparation is attractive from a manufacturing and quality assurance standpoint, but is a well known example of the extremely system-specific nature of composite bonds. This study examined the role of the surface energy, morphology, and chemistry left by peel ply removal in resulting bond quality. It also evaluated the use of contact angle surface energy measurement techniques for predicting the resulting bond quality of a prepared surface. The surfaces created by preparing three aerospace fiber-reinforced composite prepregs were compared when prepared with a nylon vs a polyester peel ply. The prepared surfaces were characterized with contact angle measurements with multiple fluids, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray electron spectroscopy. The laminates were bonded with aerospace grade film adhesives. Bond quality was assessed via double cantilever beam testing followed by optical and scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surfaces.The division was clear between strong bonds (GIC of 600- 1000J/m2 and failure in cohesion) and weak bonds (GIC of 80-400J/m2 and failure in adhesion). All prepared laminates showed the imprint of the peel ply texture and evidence of peel ply remnants after fabric removal, either through SEM or XPS. Within an adhesive system, large amounts of SEM-visible peel ply material transfer correlated with poor bond quality and cleaner surfaces with higher bond quality. The both sides of failed weak bonds showed evidence of peel ply remnants under XPS, showing that at least some failure is occurring through the remnants. The choice of adhesive was found to be significant. AF 555 adhesive was more tolerant of peel ply contamination than MB 1515-3. Although the bond quality results varied substantially between tested combinations, the total surface energies of all prepared surfaces were very similar. Single fluid contact angle

  18. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Yoshio Furuse

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1 rinsing with water and drying; (G2 application of an adhesive system; (G3 rinsing and drying, abrasion with finishing disks, etching and application of adhesive system; (G4 rinsing and drying, etching, application of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin-resin interfaces with saliva significantly reduced shear strength, especially after prolonged storage (p<0.05. Similar values to the original bond strength were obtained after abrasion and application of adhesive (G3 or etching and application of silane and adhesive (G4. If contamination occurs, a surface treatment is required to guarantee an adequate interaction between the resin increments.

  19. A study of laser surface treatment in bonded repair of composite aircraft structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaolong; Sun, Ting; Liu, Chang; Yang, Wenfeng; Tang, Qingru

    2018-03-01

    Surface pre-treatment is one of the key processes in bonded repair of aircraft carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites. This paper investigates the surface modification of physical and chemical properties by laser ablation and conventional polish treatment techniques. Surface morphology analysed by laser scanning confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that a laser-treated surface displayed higher roughness than that of a polish-treated specimen. The laser-treated laminate exhibited more functional groups in the form of O 1 s/C 1 s atomic ratio of 30.89% for laser-treated and 20.14% for polish-treated as evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy observation. Contact angle goniometry demonstrated that laser treatment can provide increased surface free energy and wettability. In the light of mechanical interlocking, molecular bonding and thermodynamics theories on adhesion, laser etching process displayed enhanced bonding performance relative to the polishing surface treatment. These properties resulted in an increased single lap shear strength and a cohesive failure mode for laser etching while an adhesive failure mode occurred in polish-treated specimen.

  20. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of veneering ceramic to zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Bagis, Bora; Turgut, Sedanur; Ates, Sabit Melih; Ayaz, Elif Aydogan

    2015-03-18

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength of veneering ceramic to zirconia. Square (15 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm) zirconia specimens (n=18) received one of the following surface treatments: Group 1, sandblasting; Group 2, Clearfil ceramic primer application; Group 3, grinding; Group 4, alloy primer application; and Group 5, RelyX ceramic primer application. The zirconia core specimens were layered with a veneering porcelain (5 mm x 3 mm x 3 mm). Mean shear bond strength values (MPa) were calculated. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc pairwise comparisons (α=0.05). Fractured surfaces of the specimens were examined with scanning electron microscope (SEM). This study showed that bond strengths of the metal primer-treated zirconia specimens (Group 4) were significantly higher than those of the other paired groups. The application of metal primer affected the specimens' failure mode. SEM analysis demonstrated that Group 4 had mainly cohesive fractures, while the other groups showed approximately equal levels of adhesive and mixed fracture types. The mean and SD values for shear bond strengths ranged from 8.90 ± 3.42 MPa (Group 2) to 19.74 ± 4.96 MPa (Group 4). In conclusion, the application of a metal primer to a zirconia core increased the bond strength of veneering ceramics. The use of chemical agents to improve the strength of the zirconia core's bond to veneering ceramic may have more benefits than the use of mechanical pretreatments.

  1. Evaluation of shear bond strength of composite resin to nonprecious metal alloys with different surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassini E.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Replacing fractured ceramometal restorations may be the best treatment option, but it is costly. Many different bonding systems are currently available to repair the fractured ceramometal restorations. This study compared the shear bond strength of composite to a base metal alloy using 4 bonding systems.Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, fifty discs, casted in a Ni-Cr-Be base metal alloy (Silvercast, Fulldent,were ground with 120, 400 and 600 grit sandpaper and divided equally into 5 groups receiving 5 treatments for veneering. Conventional feldspathic porcelain (Ceramco2, Dentsply Ceramco was applied on control group (PFM or group1 and the remaining metal discs were air- abraded for 15 seconds with 50 mm aluminum oxide at 45 psi and washed for 5 seconds under tap water.Then the specimens were dried by compressed air and the  groups were treated with one of the bonding systems as follows: All-Bond 2 (AB, Ceramic Primer (CP, Metal Primer II (MP and Panavia F2 (PF. An opaque composite (Foundation opaque followed by a hybrid composite (Gradia Direct was placed on the treated metal surface and light cured separately. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 370C and thermocycled prior to shear strength testing. Fractured specimens were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis was performed with one way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significance.Results: Mean shear bond strengths of the groups in MPa were as follows: PFM group 38.6±2, All-Bond 2 17.06±2.85, Ceramic Primer 14.72±1.2, Metal Primer II 19.04±2.2 and Panavia F2 21.37±2.1. PFM group exhibited the highest mean shear bond strength and Ceramic Primer showed the lowest. Tukey's HSD test revealed the mean bond strength of the PFM group to be significantly higher than the other groups (P<0.001. The data for the PF group was significantly higher than AB and CP groups (P<0.05 and the shear

  2. Disulfide bond within mu-calpain active site inhibits activity and autolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lametsch, René; Lonergan, Steven; Huff-Lonergan, Elisabeth

    2008-09-01

    Oxidative processes have the ability to influence mu-calpain activity. In the present study the influence of oxidation on activity and autolysis of mu-calpain was examined. Furthermore, LC-MS/MS analysis was employed to identify and characterize protein modifications caused by oxidation. The results revealed that the activity of mu-calpain is diminished by oxidation with H2O2 in a reversible manner involving cysteine and that the rate of autolysis of mu-calpain concomitantly slowed. The LC-MS/MS analysis of the oxidized mu-calpain revealed that the amino acid residues 105-133 contained a disulfide bond between Cys(108) and Cys(115). The finding that the active site cysteine in mu-calpain is able to form a disulfide bond has, to our knowledge, not been reported before. This could be part of a unique oxidation mechanism for mu-calpain. The results also showed that the formation of the disulfide bond is limited in the control (no oxidant added), and further limited in a concentration-dependent manner when beta-mercaptoethanol is added. However, the disulfide bond is still present to some extent in all conditions indicating that the active site cysteine is potentially highly susceptible to the formation of this intramolecular disulfide bond.

  3. Effect of various surface treatments of tooth – colored posts on bonding strength of resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirzaei M.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Various studies have shown that reliable bond at the root - post - core interfaces are critical for the clinical success of post - retained restorations. Severe stress concentration at post - cement interface increases post debonding from the root. To form a bonded unit that reduces the risk of fracture, it is important to optimize the adhesion. Therefore, some post surface treatments have been proposed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of various surface treatments of tooth - colored posts on the bonding of resin cement. "nMaterials and Methods: In this interventional study, 144 tooth colored posts were used in 18 groups (8 samples in each group. The posts included quartz fiber (Matchpost, glass fiber (Glassix, and zirconia ceramic (Cosmopost and the resin cement was Panavia F 2.0. The posts received the following surface treatments: 1- No surface treatment (control group, 2- Etching with HF and silane, 3- Sandblasting with Cojet sand, 4- Sandblasting with Cojet sand and application of silane, 5- Sandblasting with alumina particles, 6- Sandblasting with alumina particles and application of silane. Then, posts were cemented into acrylic molds with Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The specimens were placed in water for 2 days and debonded in pull - out test. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA followed by Tamhane and Tukey HSD. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope (10 . P<0.05 was considered as the significant level. "nResults: Surface treatments (sandblasting with Cojet and alumina particles ,with or without silane resulted in improved bond strength of resin cement to glass fiber post (Glassix and zirconia ceramic (Cosmopost [p<0/05], but not to the quartz fiber post (Matchpost. In general, higher bond strengths resulted in a to higher percentage of cohesive failures within the cement. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, sandblasting with cojet and alumina

  4. Influence of zirconia surface treatment on veneering porcelain shear bond strength after cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigori, Atsushi; Yoshida, Takamitsu; Bottino, Marco C; Platt, Jeffrey A

    2014-12-01

    The influence of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal surface treatment on veneering porcelain shear bond strength after cyclic loading is not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal surface treatment on veneering porcelain shear bond strength and cyclic loading on the shear bond strength between the 2 materials. A total of 48 cylinder-shaped yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal specimens were fabricated with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM), sintered for 8 hours at 1500°C, ground with 320-grit diamond paper, and divided into 4 groups (n = 12) according to surface treatment as follows: no treatment/control; heat treatment of 650°C to 1000°C at 55°C/min; airborne-particle abrasion with 50-μm alumina at 0.4 MPa pressure for 10 seconds; or heat treatment after abrasion. A veneering porcelain cylinder was built and fired on the prepared yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal specimens. The shear bond strength was tested with a universal testing machine. Six specimens from each group were subjected to cyclic loading (10000 cycles, 1.5 Hz, 10 N load) before testing. The mean ± SD ranged from 10.7 ± 15.4 to 34.1 ± 10.0. Three-way ANOVA found no statistically significant (P > .05) effect of surface treatment and cyclic loading on shear bond strength. The Sidak multiple comparisons procedure found that cyclic loading specimens had significantly lower shear bond strength than noncyclic loading specimens after airborne-particle abrasion without heat treatment (P = .013). Within the limitations of this study, the shear bond strength between yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal and veneering porcelain was not significantly affected by surface treatment. Airborne-particle abrasion without subsequent heat treatment should be avoided as a surface treatment in fabrication methods. Copyright © 2014

  5. 77 FR 6814 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Proprietor's Submission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... Activities: Bonded Warehouse Proprietor's Submission AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP... requirement concerning the Bonded Warehouse Proprietor's Submission (CBP Form 300). This request for comment... collection: Title: Bonded Warehouse Proprietor's Submission. OMB Number: 1651-0033. Form Number: CBP Form 300...

  6. 77 FR 26024 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Proprietor's Submission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... Activities: Bonded Warehouse Proprietor's Submission AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department... Budget (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Bonded Warehouse..., or other technological techniques or other forms of information. Title: Bonded Warehouse Proprietor's...

  7. Effects of carbon fiber surface characteristics on interfacial bonding of epoxy resin composite subjected to hygrothermal treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Min; Liu, Hongxin; Gu, Yizhuo; Li, Yanxia; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2014-01-01

    The changes of interfacial bonding of three types of carbon fibers/epoxy resin composite as well as their corresponding desized carbon fiber composites subjecting to hygrothermal conditions were investigated by means of single fiber fragmentation test. The interfacial fracture energy was obtained to evaluate the interfacial bonding before and after boiling water aging. The surface characteristics of the studied carbon fiber were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effects of activated carbon atoms and silicon element at carbon fiber surface on the interfacial hygrothermal resistance were further discussed. The results show that the three carbon fiber composites with the same resin matrix possess different hygrothermal resistances of interface and the interfacial fracture energy after water aging can not recovery to the level of raw dry sample (irreversible changes) for the carbon fiber composites containing silicon. Furthermore, the activated carbon atoms have little impact on the interfacial hygrothermal resistance. The irreversible variations of interfacial bonding and the differences among different carbon fiber composites are attributed to the silicon element on the carbon fiber bodies, which might result in hydrolyzation in boiling water treatment and degrade interfacial hygrothermal resistance.

  8. α-Halogenoacetanilides as hydrogen-bonding organocatalysts that activate carbonyl bonds: fluorine versus chlorine and bromine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeller, Sylvain; Thomas, Coralie; Peruch, Fréderic; Deffieux, Alain; Massip, Stéphane; Léger, Jean-Michel; Desvergne, Jean-Pierre; Milet, Anne; Bibal, Brigitte

    2014-03-03

    α-Halogenoacetanilides (X=F, Cl, Br) were examined as H-bonding organocatalysts designed for the double activation of CO bonds through NH and CH donor groups. Depending on the halide substituents, the double H-bond involved a nonconventional CH⋅⋅⋅O interaction with either a HCXn (n=1-2, X=Cl, Br) or a HCAr bond (X=F), as shown in the solid-state crystal structures and by molecular modeling. In addition, the catalytic properties of α-halogenoacetanilides were evaluated in the ring-opening polymerization of lactide, in the presence of a tertiary amine as cocatalyst. The α-dichloro- and α-dibromoacetanilides containing electron-deficient aromatic groups afforded the most attractive double H-bonding properties towards CO bonds, with a NH⋅⋅⋅O⋅⋅⋅HCX2 interaction. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The Effect of Bond Albedo on Venus' Atmospheric and Surface Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, M. A.; Limaye, S. S.; Grinspoon, D. H.; Way, M.

    2017-12-01

    In spite of Venus' high planetary albedo, sufficient solar energy reaches the surface to drive a powerful greenhouse effect. The surface temperature is three times higher than it would be without an atmosphere. However, the details of the energy balance within Venus' atmosphere are poorly understood. Half of the solar energy absorbed within the clouds, where most of the solar energy is absorbed, is due to an unknown agent. One of the challenges of modeling Venus' atmosphere has been to account for all the sources of opacity sufficient to generate a globally averaged surface temperature of 735 K, when only 2% of the incoming solar energy is deposited at the surface. The wavelength and spherically integrated albedo, or Bond albedo, has typically been cited as between 0.7 and 0.82 (Colin 1983). Yet, recent photometry of Venus at extended phase angles between 2 and 179° indicate a Bond albedo of 0.90 (Mallama et al., 2006). The authors note an increase in cloud top brightness at phase angles right). Venus surface temperature as Bond Albedo changes. Radiative-convective equilibrium models predict the correct globally averaged surface temperature at a=0.81. Calculations here show that a Bond albedo of a=0.9 would yield a surface temperature of 666.4 K, about 70 K too low, unless there is additional thermal absorption within the atmosphere that is not understood. Colin, L.,, Venus, University of Arizona Press, Tucson, 1983, pp 10-26. Mallama, A., et al., 2006. Icarus. 182, 10-22.

  10. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated posts on bonding of resin cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeld, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments of prefabricated posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White) and zirconia (Cerapost) on the bonding of two resin cements: ParaPost Cement and Panavia F by a diametral tensile strength (DTS) test...... the start of mixing the resin cement, the specimen was freed from the mold and stored in water at 37 degrees C for seven days. Following water storage, the specimen was wet-ground to a final length of approximately 3 mm. The DTS of specimens was determined in a Universal Testing Machine. The bonding...

  11. Adsorbate-metal bond effect on empirical determination of surface plasmon penetration depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Laurel L; Menegazzo, Nicola; Booksh, Karl S

    2013-05-21

    The penetration depth of surface plasmons is commonly determined empirically from the observed response for adsorbate loading on gold surface plasmon resonance (SPR) substrates. However, changes in the SPR spectrum may originate from both changes in the effective refractive index near the metal surface and changes in the metal permittivity following covalent binding of the adsorbate layer. Herein, the significance of incorporating an additional adsorbate-metal bonding effect in the calculation is demonstrated in theory and in practice. The bonding effect is determined from the nonzero intercept of a SPR shift versus adsorbate thickness calibration and incorporated into the calculation of penetration depth at various excitation wavelengths. Determinations of plasmon penetration depth with and without the bonding response for alkanethiolate-gold are compared and are shown to be significantly different for a thiol monolayer adsorbate system. Additionally, plasmon penetration depth evaluated with bonding effect compensation shows greater consistency over different adsorbate thicknesses and better agreement with theory derived from Maxwell's equation, particularly for adsorbate thicknesses that are much smaller (<5%) than the plasmon penetration depth. The method is also extended to a more practically applicable polyelectrolyte multilayer adsorbate system.

  12. Bonding of the Polymer Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) to Human Dentin: Effect of Surface Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Regina Furbino Villefort; Anami, Lilian Costa; Campos, Tiago Moreira Bastos; Melo, Renata Marques de; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio de Assunção E; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a material suitable for frameworks of fixed dental prostheses. The effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength of PEEK bonded to human dentin was evaluated. One hundred PEEK cylinders (3 mm×3 mm) were divided into five groups according to surface treatment: silica coating, sandblasting with 45 μm Al2O3 particles, etching with 98% sulfuric acid for 5, 30 and for 60 s. These cylinders were luted with resin cement onto 50 human molars. First, each tooth was embedded in epoxy resin and the buccal dentin surface was exposed. Then, two delimited dentin areas (Æ:3 mm) per tooth were etched with 35% phosphoric acid and bonded with a two-step self-priming adhesive system. After the luting procedure the specimens were stored in water (24 h/37 °C). Shear bond strength (SBS) was tested using a universal testing machine (crosshead speed 0.5 mm/min; load cell 50 kgf) and failure types were assessed. Stress data (MPa) were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Comparison of the proportions of different failure types was performed using the Bonferroni method (pPEEK, resin cement and dentin.

  13. The effect of different surface treatments of stainless steel crown and different bonding agents on shear bond strength of direct composite resin veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajami B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Stainless steel crown (SSC is the most durable and reliable restoration for primary teeth with extensive caries but its metalic appearance has always been a matter of concern. With advances in restorative materials and metal bonding processes, composite veneer has enhanced esthetics of these crowns in clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of SSC to composite resin using different surface treatments and adhesives. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 90 stainless steel crowns were selected. They were mounted in molds and divided into 3 groups of 30 each (S, E and F. In group S (sandblast, buccal surfaces were sandblasted for 5 seconds. In group E (etch acidic gel was applied for 5 minutes and in group F (fissure bur surface roughness was created by fissure diamond bur. Each group was divided into 3 subgroups (SB, AB, P based on different adhesives: Single Bond, All Bond2 and Panavia F. Composite was then bonded to specimens. Cases were incubated in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength was measured by Zwick machine with crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by ANOVA test with p0.05 so the two variables were studied separately. No significant difference was observed in mean shear bond strength of composite among the three kinds of adhesives (P>0.05. Similar results were obtained regarding surface treatments (P>0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, treating the SSC surface with bur and using single bond adhesive and composite can be used successfully to obtain esthetic results in pediatric restorative treatments.

  14. Redox-​Active Ligand-​Induced Homolytic Bond Activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broere, D.L.J.; Metz, L.L.; de Bruin, B.; Reek, J.N.H.; Siegler, M.A.; van der Vlugt, J.I.

    2015-01-01

    Coordination of the novel redox-​active phosphine-​appended aminophenol pincer ligand (PNOH2) to PdII generates a paramagnetic complex with a persistent ligand-​centered radical. The complex undergoes fully reversible single-​electron oxidn. and redn. Homolytic bond activation of diphenyldisulfide

  15. Discrete impurity band from surface danging bonds in nitrogen and phosphorus doped SiC nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Jing; Li, Shu-Long; Gong, Pei; Li, Ya-Lin; Cao, Mao-Sheng; Fang, Xiao-Yong

    2018-04-01

    The electronic structure and optical properties of the nitrogen and phosphorus doped silicon carbide nanowires (SiCNWs) are investigated using first-principle calculations based on density functional theory. The results show doping can change the type of the band gap and improve the conductivity. However, the doped SiCNWs form a discrete impurity levels at the Fermi energy, and the dispersion degree decreases with the diameter increasing. In order to reveal the root of this phenomenon, we hydrogenated the doped SiCNWs, found that the surface dangling bonds were saturated, and the discrete impurity levels are degeneracy, which indicates that the discrete impurity band of the doped SiCNWs is derived from the dangling bonds. The surface passivation can degenerate the impurity levels. Therefore, both doping and surface passivation can better improve the photoelectric properties of the SiCNWs. The result can provide additional candidates in producing nano-optoelectronic devices.

  16. Evaluation of four surface coating treatments for resin to zirconia bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Pow, Edmond H N; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P

    2014-04-01

    To compare the effects of four surface coating methods on resin to zirconia shear bond strength. Eighty pre-sintered zirconia discs were prepared and randomly divided into five study groups according to the corresponding methods of surface treatments as follows: group C (control group, fully sintered without any surface treatment), group S (fully sintered and then sandblasted with silica coated alumina powder), group G (fully sintered and then coated with glazing porcelain followed by acid etching), group Si (pre-coated with silica slurry then fully sintered), and group Z (coated with zirconia particles and then fully sintered). The observation of surface morphology and elemental composition analysis were conducted by SEM and EDX. Self-adhesive resin cement stubs (diameter 3.6mm and height 3mm) were then bonded on the zirconia discs with a cylindrical shape. Both initial and artificial aged (including 30-day water storage, thermal cycling for 3000 and 6000 cycles) shear bond strengths were then evaluated. All the tested coating methods showed significantly higher shear bond strengths than the control group, in both dry and aged conditions. Group S produced the strongest initial zirconia/resin bonding (19.7MPa) and the control group had the lowest value (8.8MPa). However, after thermal cycling, group Z exhibited the highest mean value. All the samples in the control group failed in the thermal cycling. Both different coating methods (ptreatments (pcoating might be a reliable way in enhancing adhesion between resin and zirconia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Light Makes a Surface Banana-Bond Split: Photodesorption of Molecular Hydrogen from RuO 2 (110)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Michael A.; Mu, Rentao; Dahal, Arjun; Lyubinetsky, Igor; Dohnálek, Zdenek; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Rousseau, Roger

    2016-07-20

    The coordination of H2 to a metal center via polarization of its bond electron density, known as a Kubas complex, is the means by which H2 chemisorbs at Ru4+ sites on the rutile RuO2(110) surface. This distortion of electron density off an interatomic axis is often described as a ‘banana-bond.’ We show that the Ru-H2 banana-bond can be destabilized, and split, using visible light. Photodesorption of H2 (or D2) is evident by mass spectrometry and scanning tunneling microscopy. From time-dependent density functional theory, the key optical excitation splitting the Ru-H2 banana-bond involves an interband transition in RuO2 which effectively diminishes its Lewis acidity, and thereby weakening the Kubas complex. Such excitations are not expected to affect adsorbates on RuO2 given its metallic properties. Therefore, this common thermal co-catalyst employed in promoting water splitting is, itself, photo-active in the visible.

  18. Microtensile Bond Strength between Zirconia Core and Veneering Porcelain after Different Surface Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakineh Nikzadjamnani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The long-term clinical success of all-ceramic restorations requires sufficient bond strength between the veneering ceramic and substructure. The present study compared the effects of three methods of surface treatment on the microtensile bond strength of the veneering porcelain to zirconia.Materials and Methods: Twelve zirconia blocks were randomly divided into four groups of aluminum oxide (Al2O3 air abrasion, carbon dioxide (CO2 laser irradiation, erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG laser irradiation, and control samples (no surface treatment. After surface treatment, the zirconia blocks were veneered with porcelain. To assess the surface topographies, four surface-treated specimens were left uncoated. Microtensile bond strength was tested in each group and was statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test. Surface topographies were examined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Results: The highest and lowest microtensile bond strength values were recorded in the Al2O3 (43.6±10.0 MPa and control groups (34.7±8.2 MPa, P<0.05. The bond strengths in the CO2- and Er:YAG-irradiated groups were equal to 40.4±6.5 MPa and 38.2±7.5 MPa, respectively. The majority of the failures (mean=92.44% were of cohesive nature located in the veneer, followed by mixed fractures (mean=7.6%. The milling marks of the computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM machine were apparent in the control samples, while desert-like micro-cracks were observed on the surfaces treated with CO2 and Er:YAG lasers. Al2O3 air abrasion produced the roughest topography.Conclusions: Al2O3 air abrasion resulted in a higher microtensile bond strength compared to CO2 or Er:YAG laser irradiation. Cohesive failure mode was predominant. No pure adhesive failures were observed.

  19. Properties of various plasma surface treatments for low-temperature Au–Au bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Michitaka; Higurashi, Eiji; Suga, Tadatomo; Sawada, Renshi; Itoh, Toshihiro

    2018-04-01

    Atmospheric-pressure (AP) plasma treatment using three different types of gases (an argon-hydrogen mixed gas, an argon-oxygen mixed gas, and a nitrogen gas) and low-pressure (LP) plasma treatment using an argon gas were compared for Au–Au bonding with thin films and stud bumps at low temperature (25 or 150 °C) in ambient air. The argon-hydrogen gas mixture AP plasma treatment and argon LP plasma treatment were found to distinctly increase the shear bond strength for both samples at both temperatures. From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, the removal of organic contaminants on Au surfaces without the formation of hydroxyl groups and gold oxide is considered effective in increasing the Au–Au bonding strength at low temperature.

  20. The effect of surface conditioning on the bond strength of resin composite to amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Igor R; Hafiana, Khaula; Curtis, Andrew; Barbour, Michele E; Attin, Thomas; Lynch, Christopher D; Jagger, Daryll C

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the tensile bond strength (TBS) and integrity of the amalgam-resin composite interface, using commercially available restoration repair systems. One hundred and sixty Gamma 2 amalgam specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 2 weeks and then randomly assigned to one of the following conditioning groups (n=20/group): Group 1: air abrasion, alloy primer and 'Panavia 21', Group 2: air abrasion and 'Amalgambond Plus', Group 3: air abrasion and 'All-Bond 3', Group 4: diamond bur, alloy primer and 'Panavia 21', Group 5: diamond bur and 'Amalgambond Plus', Group 6: diamond bur and 'All-Bond 3', Group 7: silica coating technique, and Group 8: non-conditioned amalgam surfaces (control group). Subsequently, resin composite material was added to the substrate surfaces and the amalgam-resin composite specimens were subjected to TBS testing. Representative samples from the test groups were subjected to scanning electron microscopy and surface profilometry. The data was analysed statistically with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's tests (α=0.05). The mean TBS of amalgam-resin composite ranged between 1.34 and 5.13MPa and varied with the degree of amalgam surface roughness and the type of conditioning technique employed. Significantly highest TBS values (5.13±0.96MPa) were obtained in Group 1 (p=0.013). Under the tested conditions, significantly greater tensile bond strength of resin composite to amalgam was achieved when the substrate surface was conditioned by air abrasion followed by the application of the Panavia 21 adhesive system. Effecting a repair of an amalgam restoration with resin composite via the use of air abrasion and application of Panavia 21 would seem to enhance the integrity of the amalgam-resin composite interface. Clinical trials involving the implementation of this technique are indicated to determine the usefulness of this technique. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All

  1. Shear Bond Strength of a Resin Cement to Different Alloys Subjected to Various Surface Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Ezoji

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Micromechanical retention of resin cements to alloys is an important factor affecting the longevity of metal base restorations. This study aimed to compare the bond strength and etching pattern of a newly introduced experimental etchant gel namely Nano Met Etch with those of conventional surface treatment techniques for nickel-chrome (Ni-Cr and high noble alloys. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 discs (8×10×15 mm were cast with Ni-Cr (n=20, high noble BegoStar (n=50 and gold coin alloys (n=50. Their Surfaces were ground with abrasive papers. Ni-Cr specimens received sandblasting and etching. High noble alloy specimens (begoStar and gold coin received sandblasting, sandblasting-alloy primer, etching, etch-alloy primer and alloy primer alone. Cylindrical specimens of Panavia were bonded to surfaces using Tygon tubes. Specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength testing after storing at 37°C for 24 hours.Results: In gold coin group, the highest bond strength was achieved after sandblasting (25.82±1.37MPa, P<0.001 and etching+alloy primer (26.60 ± 5.47 MPa, P<0.01. The lowest bond strength belonged to sandblasting+alloy primer (17.79±2.96MPa, P<0.01. In BegoStar group, the highest bond strength was obtained in the sandblasted group (38.40±3.29MPa, P<0.001 while the lowest bond strength was detected in the sandblast+ alloy primer group (15.38±2.92MPa, P<0.001. For the Ni-Cr alloy, bond strength in the etched group (20.79±2.01MPa was higher than that in the sandblasted group (18.25±1.82MPa (P<0.01.Conclusions: For the Ni-Cr alloy, etching was more efficient than sandblasting but for the high noble alloys, higher Au content increased the efficacy of etching.

  2. Shear bond strength of acrylic teeth to acrylic denture base after different surface conditioning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhav, Gajula Venu; Raj, Soundar; Yadav, Naveen; Mudgal, Ishitha; Mehta, Nidhi; Tatwadiya, Riddhi

    2013-09-01

    Acrylic resin ruled the dental profession for 60 years, and this success is attributed to its aesthetics, handling properties, physical and biological compatibility, its stability in oral environment and its cost effectiveness. The objective of this study is to evaluate and compare the bond strength of acrylic resin teeth treated with various conditioning materials like monomer and silane coupling agent. METHDOLOGY: A study was carried out in which 96 samples were grouped into 3 groups with a sample size of 32 each (16 premolars, 16 molars). They were conditioned with different conditioning materials i,e monomer and silane coupling agent. Monomer, Silane coupling agent are coated on the ridge lap area before thermocycling and cured according to the manufacturer recommendations. The samples are retained from the fask; trimmed and polished. The samples are then subjected to shear bond strength using the Insteron Universal Testing Machine. In the present study it was found that application of monomer increased the bond strength between acrylic teeth and denture base, when compared to the conventionally processed samples. However it was found that application of silane coupling agent further increased the shear bond strength between acrylic teeth and denture base. Interprations and Within the confnes of this study it is found that there was a signifcant improvement in the bond strength between the acrylic teeth and denture base when silane coupling agent and monomer were used as surface conditioning material. The order of shear strength of samples is control > monomer > silane coupling agent.

  3. [Effect of different surface processes on the bond strength between zirconia framework and veneering ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Gong; Huiqiang, Sun; Yijun, Hu; Jia, Chen; Weishan, Ding

    2017-12-01

    To compare the effect of different surface processes on bond strength and microscopic structure using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an energy distribution spectrum (EDS) at the bonding interface between zirconia framework and veneering ceramic. WIELAND zirconia core material was cut into 33 rectangular specimens and fired on into rectangular specimens (10 mm×5 mm×5 mm). The specimens were randomly divided into three groups (n=
11). The sandblasting group was sandblasted before firing. The sandblasting and liner coverage group was sandblasted before firing and then sintered with liner coverage after firing. The control group was not processed. All the veneering ceramics (5 mm×
5 mm×5 mm) were fired on into the zirconia substructure by slip-casting technique. One bilayered specimen in each group was prepared for SEM and EDS to examine the bonding conditions. The other specimens were measured for shear force using an electronic universal dynamometer. The data obtained were analyzed by using the statistical software SPSS 17.0. The values of the shear bond strength test were (13.80±1.54) MPa for the control group, (18.06±0.59) MPa for the sandblasting group, and (21.04±1.23) MPa for the sandblasting and liner coverage group. Significant differences existed among the three groups (Pveneering porcelain. The use of porcelain combined with liner increases the shear bond strength.

  4. Effect of surface area and air-drying distance on shear bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Mohammed Sabry El-Askary

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effects of air-drying distance and bond surface area on the shear bond strength of a 2-step etch-and-rinse adhesive. A total of 120 bovine anterior teeth were equally divided into 6 main groups based on bonding surface area. The main groups were divided into sub-groups (n = 5 according to air-drying distance. The shear strength was determined using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The averaged results were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05. Two-way ANOVA testing identified no significant cross-product interactions (p > 0.05, but the main factors of area (p < 0.0001 and air-drying distance (p < 0.00001 significantly affected the mean bond strength. Shorter air-drying distances improved bond strength, and increased surface area decreased the bond strength.

  5. Real-Time Observation of Surface Bond Breaking with an X-ray Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dell'Angela, M.; Anniyev, T.; Beye, M.

    2013-01-01

    Surface Molecules Not Quite Desorbing The dynamics of molecules desorbing from or adsorbing on surfaces requires that molecules rapidly gain or lose a large amount or translational and rotational energy to enter or leave the gas phase. An intermediate precursor state has long been invoked in which...... molecules interact weakly with the surface but translate along it and exchange energy without forming localized surface bonds. Dell'Angela et al. (p. 1302) found evidence for such a state in changes in x-ray absorption and emission spectra of CO molecules adsorbed on a ruthenium surface after optical...... excitation rapidly heated the surface. The use of a free electron laser provided high time resolution for x-ray spectroscopy studies. Density function theory and modeling of high temperature states revealed a state that forms from molecules that have not overcome the desorption barrier during heating...

  6. Effect of dentin surface modification using carbon nanotubes on dental bonding and antibacterial ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Lai; Li, Zhongjie; Luo, Feng; Chen, Junyu; Jia, Lingling; Wang, Tong; Pei, Xibo; Wan, Qianbing

    2017-11-03

    This study developed carbon nanotube coatings for the dentin surface and investigated the bonding strength and the in vitro antibacterial properties of carbon nanotube-coated dentin. Single-walled carbon nanotubes and multi-walled carbon nanotubes were first modified and then characterized using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscopy. Second, dentin samples were coated using either single-walled carbon nanotubes or multi-walled carbon nanotubes and observed under a scanning electron microscope. Then, the shear bonding strength and antibacterial properties of the dentin samples were tested. The results showed that both modified single-walled carbon nanotubes and multi-walled carbon nanotubes formed a stable coating on the dentin surface without affecting the shear bonding strength. Moreover, the antibacterial properties of the single-walled carbon nanotube-coated samples was obviously superior to those of the multi-walled carbon nanotubecoated samples. Consequently, single-walled carbon nanotube coating may be an antibacterial agent for potential application in the dental bonding field.

  7. In situ metalation of free base phthalocyanine covalently bonded to silicon surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Lupo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Free 4-undecenoxyphthalocyanine molecules were covalently bonded to Si(100 and porous silicon through thermic hydrosilylation of the terminal double bonds of the undecenyl chains. The success of the anchoring strategy on both surfaces was demonstrated by the combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with control experiments performed adopting the commercially available 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octakis(octyloxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine, which is not suited for silicon anchoring. Moreover, the study of the shape of the XPS N 1s band gave relevant information on the interactions occurring between the anchored molecules and the substrates. The spectra suggest that the phthalocyanine ring interacts significantly with the flat Si surface, whilst ring–surface interactions are less relevant on porous Si. The surface-bonded molecules were then metalated in situ with Co by using wet chemistry. The efficiency of the metalation process was evaluated by XPS measurements and, in particular, on porous silicon, the complexation of cobalt was confirmed by the disappearance in the FTIR spectra of the band at 3290 cm−1 due to –NH stretches. Finally, XPS results revealed that the different surface–phthalocyanine interactions observed for flat and porous substrates affect the efficiency of the in situ metalation process.

  8. Evaluation of surface roughness and bond strength of quartz fiber posts after various pre-treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Gulsah E; Akin, Hakan; Sipahi, Cumhur; Piskin, Bulent; Kirmali, Omer

    2014-11-01

    Debonding at the post-adhesive interface is a major problem for quartz fiber posts. The objective of this study was to evaluate surface roughness and bond strength of quartz fiber posts after various surface treatments. Sixty-six quartz fiber posts were randomly divided into six experimental groups (n = 11) including group C, untreated (control); group SB, sandblasted; group SC, silica coated; group HF, hydrofluoric acid-etched; group N, Nd:YAG laser irradiated; group E, Er:YAG laser irradiated. Surface roughness of the posts was measured before and after pre-treatment. They were then bonded to resin cement and tensile bond strength was determined in a universal testing machine. Furthermore, two-way ANOVA and post hoc comparison tests (α = 0.05) were performed on all data. The highest mean force value was observed in group SB and followed by group E. Tukey's HSD test showed that there was no statistical difference between group SB and group E (p = 0.673). The highest mean roughness value was observed in group SB and a significant difference was found between group SB and all other groups (p quartz fiber posts and resin cement. Sandblasting or Er:YAG laser-irradiation of the surface of the quartz fiber post before cementation is recommended for increasing retention.

  9. Surface treatment of titanium by a polydimethylsiloxane coating on bond strength of resin to titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Christie Ying Kei; Liu, Dan; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the in vitro effect of titanium surface treatment by a polydimethylsiloxane coating on the shear bond strength of a resin composite cement to titanium. The titanium samples (40×30mm) were divided into 4 groups (n=12). A control group was surface treated by sandblasting using 110µm silica-coated alumina powder at a constant pressure of 300kPa for 15s/1cm(2). For other three test groups, a polydimethylsiloxane silicone grease was applied onto the surface. The samples were subjected to thermal treatment in air at temperatures of 800°C, 1000°C, and 1100°C for 2h. A silane coupling agent was then applied and a resin composite stub was bonded using a polyethylene mold. The samples were submitted to three different storage conditions: dry storage, water storage in deionized water at 37°C for 30 days and thermo-cycled for 6000 cycles between 5.0 and 55.0°C. The shear bond strengths of all test groups were determined using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD (psurface morphology of titanium and elemental composition were examined with SEM and EDAX. The results showed that there was a significant difference for different surface treatments (psurface after thermal treatment of the coating. Surface treatment of titanium with a polydimethylsiloxane coating at 1000°C and 1100°C curing provides sufficient resin bonding for clinical services. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bond Lengths and Bond Strengths in Weak and Strong Chemisorption: N2, CO, and CO/H on Nickel Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Sayago, David I.; Hoeft, Jon T.; Polcik, Martin; Kittel, Martin; Toomes, Rachel L.; Robinson, J.; Woodruff, David Phillip; Pascal, Mathieu; Lamont, Christine L.A.; Nisbet, Gareth

    2003-01-01

    New chemical-state-specific scanned-energy mode photoelectron diffraction experiments and density functional theory calculations, applied to CO, CO/H, and N2 adsorption on Ni(100), show that chemisorption bond length changes associated with large changes in bond strength are small, but those associated with changes in bond order are much larger, and are similar to those found in molecular systems. Specifically, halving the bond strength of atop CO to Ni increases the Ni-C distance by 0.06 Å...

  11. Rhodium-Catalyzed C-C Bond Formation via Heteroatom-Directed C-H Bond Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colby, Denise; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2010-05-13

    Once considered the 'holy grail' of organometallic chemistry, synthetically useful reactions employing C-H bond activation have increasingly been developed and applied to natural product and drug synthesis over the past decade. The ubiquity and relative low cost of hydrocarbons makes C-H bond functionalization an attractive alternative to classical C-C bond forming reactions such as cross-coupling, which require organohalides and organometallic reagents. In addition to providing an atom economical alternative to standard cross - coupling strategies, C-H bond functionalization also reduces the production of toxic by-products, thereby contributing to the growing field of reactions with decreased environmental impact. In the area of C-C bond forming reactions that proceed via a C-H activation mechanism, rhodium catalysts stand out for their functional group tolerance and wide range of synthetic utility. Over the course of the last decade, many Rh-catalyzed methods for heteroatom-directed C-H bond functionalization have been reported and will be the focus of this review. Material appearing in the literature prior to 2001 has been reviewed previously and will only be introduced as background when necessary. The synthesis of complex molecules from relatively simple precursors has long been a goal for many organic chemists. The ability to selectively functionalize a molecule with minimal pre-activation can streamline syntheses and expand the opportunities to explore the utility of complex molecules in areas ranging from the pharmaceutical industry to materials science. Indeed, the issue of selectivity is paramount in the development of all C-H bond functionalization methods. Several groups have developed elegant approaches towards achieving selectivity in molecules that possess many sterically and electronically similar C-H bonds. Many of these approaches are discussed in detail in the accompanying articles in this special issue of Chemical Reviews. One approach

  12. Atomic configuration of hydrogenated and clean tantalum(111) surfaces: Bond relaxation, energy entrapment and electron polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Maolin; Li, Lei; Guo, Yongling; Yao, Chuang; Peng, Cheng; Sun, Chang Q.

    2018-01-01

    By studying the tantalum (Ta)(111) surface with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory, we determined binding energy values for the clean Ta(111) (+3.068 eV) and hydrogenated Ta(111) (+3.421 eV) surfaces with an isolated atom level of 18.977 eV. Using the bond-band barrier and zone-selective electron spectroscopy correlation, we investigated the mechanism of hydrogenation adsorption on the Ta(111) surface. We found the local densities of states of the first layer of Ta atoms in the reconstructed structure, which formed on the adsorbent hydrogen of the surface chemical bond contracts and dipole polarization. Moreover, we showed that on the Ta(111) surface, the hydrogen-induced surface core level shifts are dominated by quantum entrapment and are proportional to the calculated hybridized orbitals of the valence band. The latter is therefore correlated to the local surface chemical reactivity and is useful for other adsorbate systems on transition metals.

  13. Enhancing structural integrity of adhesive bonds through pulsed laser surface micro-machining

    KAUST Repository

    Diaz, Edwin Hernandez

    2015-06-01

    Enhancing the effective peel resistance of plastically deforming adhesive joints through laser-based surface micro-machining Edwin Hernandez Diaz Inspired by adhesion examples commonly found in nature, we reached out to examine the effect of different kinds of heterogeneous surface properties that may replicate this behavior and the mechanisms at work. In order to do this, we used pulsed laser ablation on copper substrates (CuZn40) aiming to increase adhesion for bonding. A Yb-fiber laser was used for surface preparation of the substrates, which were probed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Heterogeneous surface properties were devised through the use of simplified laser micromachined patterns which may induce sequential events of crack arrest propagation, thereby having a leveraging effect on dissipation. The me- chanical performance of copper/epoxy joints with homogeneous and heterogeneous laser micromachined interfaces was then analyzed using the T-peel test. Fractured surfaces were analyzed using SEM to resolve the mechanism of failure and adhesive penetration within induced surface asperities from the treatment. Results confirm positive modifications of the surface morphology and chemistry from laser ablation that enable mechanical interlocking and cohesive failure within the adhesive layer. Remarkable improvements of apparent peel energy, bond toughness, and effective peel force were appreciated with respect to sanded substrates as control samples.

  14. Surface bond contraction and its effect on the nanometric sized lead zirconate titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haitao Huang; Sun, Chang Q.; Hing, Peter

    2000-01-01

    The grain size effect of lead zirconate titanate PbZr 1-x Ti x O 3 (PZT, x≥0.6) caused by surface bond contraction has been investigated by using the Landau-Ginsburg-Devonshire (LGD) phenomenological theory. It has been shown that, due to the surface bond contraction, both the Curie temperature and the spontaneous polarization of tetragonal PZT decrease with decreasing grain size. These effects become more significant when the grain size is in the nanometre range. A dielectric anomaly appears with decreasing grain size, which corresponds to a size dependent phase transformation. The ferroelectric critical size below which a loss of ferroelectricity will happen is estimated from the results obtained. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  15. Metal-ligand cooperation by aromatization-dearomatization as a tool in single bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstein, David

    2015-03-13

    Metal-ligand cooperation (MLC) plays an important role in bond activation processes, enabling many chemical and biological catalytic reactions. A recent new mode of activation of chemical bonds involves ligand aromatization-dearomatization processes in pyridine-based pincer complexes in which chemical bonds are broken reversibly across the metal centre and the pincer-ligand arm, leading to new bond-making and -breaking processes, and new catalysis. In this short review, such processes are briefly exemplified in the activation of C-H, H-H, O-H, N-H and B-H bonds, and mechanistic insight is provided. This new bond activation mode has led to the development of various catalytic reactions, mainly based on alcohols and amines, and to a stepwise approach to thermal H2 and light-induced O2 liberation from water. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  17. Effect of a New Surface Treatment Solution on the Bond Strength of Composite to Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    a lubricated highspeed handpiece. In addition to handpiece lubricant, contaminants such as saliva, blood, dental cements , and imaging powder could...HEALTH SCIENCES AIR FORCE POSTGRADUATE DENTAL SCHOOL 2450 Pepperrell Street Lackland AFB Texas, 78236-5345 http://www.usuhs.ml1 "The author hereby...Solution on the Bond Strength of Composite to Enamel ABSTRACT Clean & Boost (Apex Dental Materials) is a novel surface treatment solution

  18. Comparison of the proton-transfer paths in hydrogen bonds from theoretical potential-energy surfaces and the concept of conservation of bond order III. O-H-O hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerz, Irena; Olovsson, Ivar

    2010-01-01

    The quantum-mechanically derived reaction coordinates (QMRC) for the proton transfer in O-H-O hydrogen bonds have been derived from ab initio calculations of potential-energy surfaces. A comparison is made between the QMRC and the corresponding bond-order reaction coordinates (BORC) derived by applying the Pauling bond order concept together with the principle of conservation of bond order. In agreement with earlier results for N-H-N(+) hydrogen bonds there is virtually perfect agreement between the QMRC and BORC curves for intermolecular O-H-O hydrogen bonds. For intramolecular O-H-O hydrogen bonds, the donor and acceptor parts of the molecule impose strong constraints on the O···O distance and the QMRC does not follow the BORC relation in the whole range. The neutron-determined proton positions are located close to the theoretically calculated potential-energy minima, and where the QMRC and the BORC curves coincide with each other. The results confirm the universal character of intermolecular hydrogen bonds: BORC is identical with QMRC and the proton can be moved from donor to acceptor keeping its valency equal to 1. The shape of PES for intramolecular hydrogen bonds is more complex as it is sensitive to the geometry of the molecule as well as of the hydrogen bridge. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2010

  19. Tensile bond strength of an adhesive resin cement to different alloys having various surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Amara; Loza, Maria A; Elias, Augusto; Mukhopadhyay, Siuli; Looney, Stephen; Rueggeberg, Frederick A

    2009-02-01

    The ability of a resin cement to bond to a restorative alloy is critical for maximal crown retention to nonideal preparations. Surface treatment and metal type may have an important role in optimizing resin-to-metal strength. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of surface pretreatment on the tensile strength of base and noble metals bonded using a conventional resin cement. Cylindrical plastic rods (9.5 mm in diameter), cast in base (Rexillium NBF) or noble metal (IPS d.SIGN 53), were divided into rods 10 mm in length (n=10-12). Specimens were heated in a porcelain furnace to create an oxide layer. Test specimens were further subjected to airborne-particle abrasion (50-microm Al(2)O(3) particles) alone or with the application of a metal primer (Alloy Primer). Similarly treated rod ends were joined using resin cement (RelyX ARC), thermocycled (x500, 5 degrees -55 degrees C) and stored (24 hours, 37 degrees C) before debonding using a universal testing machine. Debond strength and failure site were recorded. Rank-based ANOVA for unbalanced designs was used to test for significant interaction (alpha=.050). Each pair of treatments was compared separately for each metal (Bonferroni-adjusted significance level of .0083, overall error rate for comparisons, .05). The 2 metals were compared separately for each of the 3 treatments using an adjusted significance level of .017, maintaining an overall error rate of .05. A multinomial logit model was used to describe the effect of metal type and surface pretreatment on failure site location (alpha=.05). Interaction between metal type and surface pretreatment was significant for stress values (P=.019). Metal type did not significantly affect tensile bond strength for any of the compared surface pretreatments. Metal primer significantly improved tensile bond strength for each metal type. Most failures tended to occur as either adhesive or mixed in nature. Metal primer application significantly enhanced tensile bond

  20. Effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazaleh Ahmadizenouz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Repairing aged composite resin is a challenging process. Many surface treatment options have been proposed to this end. This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS of nano-filled composite resin repairs. Methods. Seventy-five cylindrical specimens of a Filtek Z350XT composite resin were fabricated and stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours. After thermocycling, the specimens were divided into 5 groups according to the following surface treatments: no treatment (group 1; air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles (group 2; irradiation with Er:YAG laser beams (group 3; roughening with coarse-grit diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid (group 4; and etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 120 s (group 5. Another group of Filtek Z350XT composite resin samples (4×6 mm was fabricated for the measurement of cohesive strength (group 6. A silane coupling agent and an adhesive system were applied after each surface treatment. The specimens were restored with the same composite resin and thermocycled again. A shearing force was applied to the interface in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P < 0.05. Results. One-way ANOVA indicated significant differences between the groups (P < 0.05. SBS of controls was significantly lower than the other groups; differences between groups 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 were not significant. Surface treatment with diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid resulted in the highest bond strength. Conclusion. All the surface treatments used in this study improved the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite resin used.

  1. Bond strength of resin cement to dentin and to surface-treated posts of titanium alloy, glass fiber, and zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    To determine the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of two resin cements (ParaPost Cement and Panavia F) to posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White), and zirconia (Cerapost), and to dentin. After embedding, planar surfaces of posts (n = 9 to 14) and human dentin (n = 10) were obtained by grinding. The posts received one of three surface treatments: 1. roughening (sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid etching), 2. application of primer (Alloy Primer, Metalprimer II, silane), or 3. roughening followed by application of primer (sandblasting or etching followed by primer, Cojet treatment). ParaPost Cement and Panavia F were bonded to the post and dentin specimens, and the bonded specimens were placed in water at 37 degrees C for 7 days. The specimens were debonded in shear. Panavia F had significantly higher bond strength to ground ParaPost XH, Cerapost, and dentin than did ParaPost Cement. Most surface treatments resulted in an improved bond strength of resin cements to the posts. Compared to the ground control, Cojet treatment and sandblasting were the most effective treatments. Etching of Cerapost with hydrofluoric acid with and without silane treatment significantly decreased the bond strength of Panavia F to the post. The bond strength of resin cements to the posts was affected by the material of the post, the surface treatment of the post, and by the type of resin cement. The bond strength of resin cement to dentin was influenced by the type of resin cement.

  2. The evaluation of microleakage and bond strength of a silicone-based resilient liner following denture base surface pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarac, Duygu; Sarac, Y Sinasi; Basoglu, Tarik; Yapici, Oktay; Yuzbasioglu, Emir

    2006-02-01

    The failure of adhesion between a silicone-based resilient liner and a denture base is a significant clinical problem. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of denture base resin surface pretreatments with different chemical etchants preceding the silicone-based resilient liner application on microleakage and bond strength. The initial effects of chemical etchants on the denture base resin in terms of microstructural changes and flexural strength were also examined. Forty-two polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin (Meliodent) specimens consisting of 2 plates measuring 30 x 30 x 2 mm were prepared and divided into 7 groups (n = 6). Specimen groups were treated by immersion in acetone for 30 (A30) or 45 (A45) seconds, methyl methacrylate monomer for 180 (M180) seconds, and methylene chloride for 5 (MC5), 15 (MC15) or 30 (MC30) seconds. Group C had no surface treatment and served as the control. Subsequently, an adhesive (Mollosil) and a silicone-based resilient denture liner (Mollosil) were applied to the treated surfaces, and all specimens were immersed in the radiotracer solution (thalium-201 chloride) for 24 hours. Tracer activity (x-ray counts), as a parameter of microleakage, was measured using a gamma camera. For bond-strength measurement, 84 rectangular PMMA specimens (10 x 10 x 40 mm) were surface-smoothed for bonding and treated with the different chemical etchants using the same previously described group configurations. The adhesive and the silicone-based denture liner were applied to the treated surfaces. Tensile bond-strength (MPa) was measured in a universal testing machine. Flexural strength measurement was performed with 49 PMMA specimens (65 x 10 x 3.3 mm according to ISO standard 1567) in 7 groups (n = 7), with 1 flat surface of each treated with 1 of the chemical etchants preceding adhesive application. The flexural strength (MPa) was measured using a 3-point bending test in a universal testing machine. The data were

  3. PEEK surface treatment effects on tensile bond strength to veneering resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Jordan, Peter; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Roos, Malgorzata; Eichberger, Marlis; Gernet, Wolfgang; Keul, Christine

    2014-11-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) can be used as a framework material for fixed dental prostheses. However, information about the durable bond to veneering resins is still scarce. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chemical treatments of PEEK on tensile bond strength (TBS) to veneering resins with special emphasis on surface free energy (SFE) and surface roughness (SR). Seven-hundred fifty PEEK specimens were fabricated and divided into the following 3 pretreatment groups (n=250/group): etching with sulfuric acid for 60 seconds, etching with piranha acid for 30 seconds, and an unetched control. After pretreatment, SFE was determined by using contact angle measurements and SR with a profilometer (n=10/group). The topography of pretreated PEEK surfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopy. Remaining specimens (n=240 per group) were conditioned with visio.link or Signum PEEK Bond, or were left untreated as the control group. Half of each group was veneered with Sinfony or VITA VM LC (n=40/group), and TBS was measured after storage in distilled water at 37°C for either 24 hours or 60 days. Data were analyzed by 4-way and 1-way ANOVA followed by the Scheffé post hoc test and chi-square test (α=.05). PEEK specimens etched with sulfuric acid resulted in higher SFE and SR than specimens without pretreatment or etching with piranha acid. Etching with sulfuric acid or piranha acid led to no general recommendations with respect to TBS. Conditioning with visio.link or Signum PEEK Bond significantly increased the TBS (Pveneered with Sinfony showed significantly higher TBS values than those veneered with VITA VM LC (Pveneering resin can only be achieved when additional adhesive materials were applied. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of Degrees of Potential-Energy-Surface Anharmonicity for Complexes and Clusters with Hydrogen Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovskaya, E. N.; Doroshenko, I. Yu.; Pogorelov, V. E.; Vaskivskyi, Ye. V.; Pitsevich, G. A.

    2018-01-01

    Previously calculated multidimensional potential-energy surfaces of the MeOH monomer and dimer, water dimer, malonaldehyde, formic acid dimer, free pyridine-N-oxide/trichloroacetic acid complex, and protonated water dimer were analyzed. The corresponding harmonic potential-energy surfaces near the global minima were constructed for series of clusters and complexes with hydrogen bonds of different strengths based on the behavior of the calculated multidimensional potential-energy surfaces. This enabled the introduction of an obvious anharmonicity parameter for the calculated potential-energy surfaces. The anharmonicity parameter was analyzed as functions of the size of the analyzed area near the energy minimum, the number of points over which energies were compared, and the dimensionality of the solved vibrational problem. Anharmonicity parameters for potential-energy surfaces in complexes with strong, medium, and weak H-bonds were calculated under identical conditions. The obtained anharmonicity parameters were compared with the corresponding diagonal anharmonicity constants for stretching vibrations of the bridging protons and the lengths of the hydrogen bridges.

  5. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-3T - Private activity bond limit (temporary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... containing constitutional home rule cities. Q-2: What is the private activity bond limit for a State agency... a constitutional home rule city is an amount that bears the same ratio to the State ceiling for such... population of the entire State. The private activity bond limit for issuers other than constitutional home...

  6. Effect of MDP-Based Silane and Different Surface Conditioner Methods on Bonding of Resin Cements to Zirconium Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Hatice; Yanikoğlu, Nuran; Sağsöz, Nurdan

    2017-07-24

    To determine the shear bond strength (SBS) between zirconium framework and resin cements after different surface conditioner methods and after application of 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) based silane and a bonding agent mix. 128 disc-shaped zirconium-oxide specimens were prepared. Specimens were placed in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The bonding surface of specimens was smoothed consecutively with 600-, 800-, and 1200-grit silicon carbide papers under water cooling. Eight groups were prepared: CJ, Co-Jet; N, Nd-YAG laser; E, Er-YAG laser; NS, Nd-YAG laser + silane; ES, Er-YAG laser + silane; CJB, Co-Jet + bonding agent; NSB, Nd-YAG laser + silane + bonding agent; ESB, Er-YAG laser + silane + bonding agent. SEM analysis was performed under 2000× magnification. Dual- and self-cured resin cements were bonded to specimens, and shear force was applied. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison test (p MDP-based silane and bonding agent mix increased SBS values of each cement belonging to each group. SB values of dual-cure resin cement were higher than those of self-cure resin cements. Different surface conditioner methods exhibit an important effect on the SBS of resin cements to zirconium. The application of MDP-based silane and bonding agent mix enhanced SB values. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  7. Effect of Surface Treatment, Silane, and Universal Adhesive on Microshear Bond Strength of Nanofilled Composite Repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornazari, I A; Wille, I; Meda, E M; Brum, R T; Souza, E M

     The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatment and universal adhesive on the microshear bond strength of nanoparticle composite repairs.  One hundred and forty-four specimens were built with a nanofilled composite (Filtek Supreme Ultra, 3M ESPE). The surfaces of all the specimens were polished with SiC paper and stored in distilled water at 37°C for 14 days. Half of the specimens were then air abraded with Al 2 O 3 particles and cleaned with phosphoric acid. Polished specimens (P) and polished and air-abraded specimens (A), respectively, were randomly divided into two sets of six groups (n=12) according to the following treatments: hydrophobic adhesive only (PH and AH, respectively), silane and hydrophobic adhesive (PCH, ACH), methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP)-containing silane and hydrophobic adhesive (PMH, AMH), universal adhesive only (PU, AU), silane and universal adhesive (PCU, ACU), and MDP-containing silane and universal adhesive (PMU, AMU). A cylinder with the same composite resin (1.1-mm diameter) was bonded to the treated surfaces to simulate the repair. After 48 hours, the specimens were subjected to microshear testing in a universal testing machine. The failure area was analyzed under an optical microscope at 50× magnification to identify the failure type, and the data were analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and the Games-Howell test (α=0.05).  The variables "surface treatment" and "adhesive" showed statistically significant differences for psilane did not lead to a statistically significant increase in bond strength. Silane-containing universal adhesive on its own was as effective as any combination of silane and adhesive, particularly when applied on air-abraded surfaces.

  8. Laser-based surface patterning of composite plates for improved secondary adhesive bonding

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Ran

    2018-03-01

    The effects of laser irradiation surface pretreatments on the mode I fracture toughness of adhesively bonded composite joints were evaluated. First, pulsed CO2 laser irradiation was uniformly deployed on carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) substrates. Next, double cantilever beam (DCB) tests were performed to assess the effects of surface pretreatments on the mode I fracture toughness of the adhesive joints. Then, a thoughtful combination of the proposed surface pretreatments was deployed to fabricate DCB specimens with patterned interfaces. A wide range of techniques, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact profilometry, and optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to ascertain the effects of all investigated surface pretreatments. It is shown that patterning promoted damage mechanisms that were not observed in the uniformly treated interfaces, resulting in an effective fracture toughness well above that predicted by a classical rule of mixture.

  9. Accelerated C-N Bond Formation in Dropcast Thin Films on Ambient Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K.; Campbell, Dahlia I.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2012-09-01

    The aza-Michael addition and the Mannich condensation occur in thin films deposited on ambient surfaces. The reagents for both C-N bond formation reactions were transferred onto the surface by drop-casting using a micropipette. The surface reactions were found to be much more efficient than the corresponding bulk solution-phase reactions performed on the same scale in the same acetonitrile solvent. The increase in rate of product formation in the thin film is attributed to solvent evaporation in the open air which results in reagent concentration and produces rate acceleration similar to that seen in evaporating droplets in desorption electrospray ionization. This thin film procedure has potential for the rapid synthesis of reaction products on a small scale, as well as allowing rapid derivatization of analytes to produce forms that are easily ionized by electrospray ionization. Analysis of the derivatized sample directly from the reaction surface through the use of desorption electrospray ionization is also demonstrated.

  10. Origin of the Ability of α-Fe2 O3 Mesopores to Activate C-H Bonds in Methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bing; Han, Zhen; Zhang, Yongbo; Yu, Youyi; Kong, Aiguo; Shan, Yongkui

    2016-02-01

    Methane is a most abundant and inexpensive hydrocarbon feedstock for the production of chemicals and fuels. However, it is extremely difficult to directly convert methane to higher hydrocarbons because the C-H bonds in methane are the most stable C-H bonds of all hydrocarbons. The activation of the C-H bonds in methane by using an efficient and mild route remains a daunting challenge. Here, we show that the inner surface structures of the pore walls in mesoporous α-Fe 2 O 3 possess excellent catalytic performance for methane activation and convert C-H bonds into the C-O bonds in an O 2 atmosphere at 140 °C. We found that such unusual structures are mainly comprised of turbostratic ribbons and K crystal faces and have higher catalytic activity than the (110) plane. These results are without precedent in the history of catalysis chemistry and will provide a new pathway for designing and preparing highly efficient catalytic materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Erosive cola-based drinks affect the bonding to enamel surface: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Caroll CASAS-APAYCO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to assess the impact of in vitro erosion provoked by different cola-based drinks (Coke types, associated or not with toothbrushing, to bonding to enamel. Material and methods: Forty-six bovine enamel specimens were prepared and randomly assigned into seven groups (N=8: C- Control (neither eroded nor abraded, ERO-RC: 3x/1-minute immersion in Regular Coke (RC, ERO-LC: 3x/1-minute immersion in Light Coke (LC, ERO-ZC: 3x/1-minute immersion in Zero Coke (ZC and three other eroded groups, subsequently abraded for 1-minute toothbrushing (EROAB-RC, EROAB-LC and EROAB-ZC, respectively. After challenges, they were stored overnight in artificial saliva for a total of 24 hours and restored with Adper Single Bond 2/Filtek Z350. Buildup coronal surfaces were cut in 1 mm2 -specimens and subjected to a microtensile test. Data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA/Bonferroni tests (α=0.05. Failure modes were assessed by optical microscopy (X40. The Interface of the restorations were observed using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM. Results: All tested cola-based drinks significantly reduced the bond strength, which was also observed in the analyses of interfaces. Toothbrushing did not have any impact on the bond strength. CLSM showed that except for Zero Coke, all eroded specimens resulted in irregular hybrid layer formation. Conclusions: All cola-based drinks reduced the bond strength. Different patterns of hybrid layers were obtained revealing their impact, except for ZC.

  12. Hydroxamic acid surface active agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Sawy, A. A.

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available p-Hydroxy phenyloctadecanol and p-hydroxy phenyloctadecanoic acid were used as new precursors for the preparation of surface active hydroxamic acid including different moles of propylene oxide. The hydroxamic acid was prepared by the reaction of propenoxylated products with sodium chloroacetate, followed by methyl esterification and the resultant product reacted with hydroxyl amine hydrochloride to give the hydroxamic acid. The structures of prepared hydroxamic acid were confirmed by spectroscopic study. The surface activity of prepared hydroxamic acid was studied; the results revealed that, the prepared hydroxamic acid has pronounced surface activity, the alcohol substrate shows a surface activity superior than the acid substrate.Se han utilizado el p-hidroxifeniloctadecanol y el ácido p-hidroxifeniloctadecanoico como nuevos precursores para la preparación de tensioactivos derivados del ácido hidroxámico, que incluyen diferentes moles de óxido de propileno. El ácido hidroxámico se preparó por reacción de los productos propenoxilados con cloroacetato sódico, seguido de la formación de ésteres metílicos, y los productos resultantes se hicieron reaccionar con clorhidrato de hidroxilamina para dar los derivados del ácido hidroxámico. Las estructuras de los derivados preparados del ácido hidroxámico, se confirmaron por técnicas espectroscópicas, estudiándose su actividad superficial cuyos resultados mostraron que dichos compuestos tenían un alto valor. La actividad superficial del sustrato alcohólico fue mayor que la del sustrato ácido.

  13. Effects of surface treatment and artificial aging on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to four different provisional restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Jabbari, Youssef S; Al Taweel, Sara M; Al Rifaiy, Mohammed; Alqahtani, Mohammed Q; Koutsoukis, Theodoros; Zinelis, Spiros

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the combined effects of material type, surface treatment, and thermocycling on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets to materials used for the fabrication of provisional crowns. Four materials were included in this study (ProTemp, Trim Plus, Trim II, and Superpont C+B). Sixty cylindrical specimens (1 × 3 cm) were prepared from each material and equally divided into three groups. The first group was ground with silica carbide paper, the second was polished with pumice, and the last group was sandblasted with 50-µm aluminum oxide particles. Stainless-steel maxillary central incisor brackets (Victory Series, 3M) were bonded to the provisional material specimens with Transbond XT light-cured composite resin, and half of the specimens from each group were thermocycled 500 times in 5°C and 55°C water baths. Then the brackets were debonded with shear testing, and the results were statistically analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple-comparison tests at α  =  0.05. Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was also identified. Before and after thermocycling, ProTemp materials showed the highest shear bond strength with orthodontic brackets (10.3 and 13.1 MPa, respectively). The statistical analysis indicated an interaction among the three independent variables (P provisional materials (P provisional material type, surface treatment, and artificial aging have a significant effect on bond strength. Sandblasting treatment exerts a beneficial effect on shear bond strength.

  14. A General Catalyst for Site-Selective C(sp(3))-H Bond Amination of Activated Secondary over Tertiary Alkyl C(sp(3))-H Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scamp, Ryan J; Jirak, James G; Dolan, Nicholas S; Guzei, Ilia A; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2016-06-17

    The discovery of transition metal complexes capable of promoting general, catalyst-controlled and selective carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bond amination of activated secondary C-H bonds over tertiary alkyl C(sp(3))-H bonds is challenging, as substrate control often dominates when reactive nitrene intermediates are involved. In this letter, we report the design of a new silver complex, [(Py5Me2)AgOTf]2, that displays general and good-to-excellent selectivity for nitrene insertion into propargylic, benzylic, and allylic C-H bonds over tertiary alkyl C(sp(3))-H bonds.

  15. Effects of hardness of abrasive grains on surface roughness of work piece in PVA bonded grinding wheel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitta, S.; Takata, A.; Ishizaki, K.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify relation between hardness of abrasive grains and surface roughness of work piece in the case of PVA (Polyvinyl alcohol) bonded grinding wheels. Two PVA bonded grinding wheels; with diamond or silicon carbide as abrasive grains and grinding of glass and aluminum alloy was performed. The PVA bonded grinding wheels The PVA bonded grinding wheel with silicon carbide could not grind the glass. Because insufficiency in hardness, the PVA bonded grinding wheel with the diamond abrasive grains caused deep scratch on the aluminum alloy. It was found that the final surface roughness of the work piece was not proportional to the hardness of abrasive grains. The suitable hardness of abrasive grains will be obtained by the hardness of work piece. Copyright (2000) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  16. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated teeth on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumerlato, Marina; de Lima, Eduardo Martinelli; Osorio, Leandro Berni; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; de Menezes, Luciane Macedo; Rizzatto, Susana Maria Deon

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effects of grinding, drilling, sandblasting, and ageing prefabricated teeth (PfT) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets, as well as the effects of surface treatments on the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Methods: One-hundred-ninety-two PfT were divided into four groups (n = 48): Group 1, no surface treatment was done; Group 2, grinding was performed with a cylindrical diamond bur; Group 3, two drillings were done with a spherical diamond bur; Group 4, sandblasting was performed with 50-µm aluminum oxide. Before the experiment, half of the samples stayed immersed in distilled water at 37oC for 90 days. Brackets were bonded with Transbond XT and shear strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine. SBS were compared by surface treatment and by ageing with two-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey’s test. ARI scores were compared between surface treatments with Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn’s test. Results: Surface treatments on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets (p< 0.01), result not observed with ageing (p= 0.45). Groups II, III, and IV showed higher SBS and greater ARI than the Group 1 (p< 0.05). SBS was greater in the groups 3 and 4 (drilling, sandblasting) than in the Group 2 (grinding) (p< 0.05). SBS and ARI showed a positive correlation (Spearman’s R2= 0.57; p< 0.05). Conclusion: Surface treatment on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets, however ageing did not show any relevance. Sandblasting and drilling showed greater SBS than grinding. There was a positive correlation between SBS and ARI. PMID:28902249

  17. Bond strength of resin composite to light activated bleached enamel

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-02

    Sep 2, 2015 ... Conclusion: The various irradiation treatments following the application of the whiteness HP bleaching agent to enamel did not significantly reduce the µTBS within a 14‑day period. Key words: Bleaching agents, lasers, lasers neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet, resin bonding, tooth bleaching. Date of ...

  18. Activation of C-H bond in methane by Pd atom from the bonding evolution theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizovtsev, Anton S

    2013-08-15

    We report detailed study focused on the electron density redistribution during the simple oxidative addition reaction being the crucial stage of various catalytic processes. The bonding evolution theory based on the electron localization function and Thom's catastrophe theory shows that activation of methane's C-H bond by Pd atom consist of six elementary steps. The important feature revealed is the pronounced reorganization of Pd's outer core maxima corresponding to N-shell electrons of metal. Electronic rearrangements identified in this model reaction are likely to be the case in the more complex reactions of the same type involving transition metal compounds and, in principle, can be observed by modern ultrafast spectroscopy and diffraction techniques. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Bond strength of resin cement to dentin and to surface-treated posts of titanium alloy, glass fiber, and zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    of posts (n = 9 to 14) and human dentin (n = 10) were obtained by grinding. The posts received one of three surface treatments: 1. roughening (sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid etching), 2. application of primer (Alloy Primer, Metalprimer II, silane), or 3. roughening followed by application of primer...... with and without silane treatment significantly decreased the bond strength of Panavia F to the post. CONCLUSION: The bond strength of resin cements to the posts was affected by the material of the post, the surface treatment of the post, and by the type of resin cement. The bond strength of resin cement to dentin...

  20. 78 FR 66038 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Exportation of Articles Under Special Bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... forms of information. Title: Application for Exportation of Articles under Special Bond. OMB Number... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U. S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Exportation of Articles Under Special Bond AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border...

  1. Bonding two surfaces by exposing to actinic radiation an epoxide liquid composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    A method for preparing a film adhesive from an epoxide resin is described. A liquid containing an epoxide resin and a photopolymerizable compound is polymerized to form a solid continuous film by exposure to actinide radiation. A catalyst can be used but no thermal crosslinking should be allowed to occur. The film so obtained is used to bond surfaces together by the application of heat and pressure. The period of heating can be very short, as there need be no solvent to evaporate and the films need not be thick, typically 20 to 250 μm. (O.T.)

  2. Improvement in the Tensile Bond Strength between 3Y-TZP Ceramic and Enamel by Surface Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon-Mi Byeon

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of 3 mol % yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (3Y-TZP ceramic surface treatments on the tensile bond strength and surface characteristics of enamel. To measure the tensile bond strength, the 3Y-TZP and tooth specimens were manufactured in a mini-dumbbell shape and divided into four groups based on the type of 3Y-TZP surface treatment: polishing (P, 110 µm alumina sandblasting (S, 110 µm alumina sandblasting combined with selective infiltration etching (SS, and 110 µm alumina sandblasting combined with MDP (10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate-containing silane primer (SP. After surface treatment, the surface roughness, wettability, and surface changes were examined, and the tensile bond strength was measured. The mean values (from lowest to highest for tensile bond strength (MPa were as follows: P, 8.94 ± 2.30; S, 21.33 ± 2.00; SS, 26.67 ± 4.76; and SP, 31.74 ± 2.66. Compared to the P group, the mean surface roughness was significantly increased, and the mean contact angle was significantly decreased, while wettability was increased in the other groups. Therefore, surface treatment with 110 µm alumina sandblasting and MDP-containing silane primer is suitable for clinical applications, as it considerably improves the bond strength between 3Y-TZP and enamel.

  3. Silanated Surface Treatment: Effects on the Bond Strength to Lithium Disilicate Glass-Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratto, Samantha Schaffer Pugsley; Spina, Denis Roberto Falcão; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Baratto Filho, Flares; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silanization protocols on the bond strength of two resin cements to a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic. Thirty-two ceramic discs were assigned to 2 groups (n=16): G1 - dual-cured resin cement and G2 - light-cured resin cement. Four subgroups were evaluated according to the used silanization protocol. The glass-ceramic was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 s and silane was applied for 1 min, as follows: CTL - according to the manufacturer's instructions; HA - dried with hot air; NWA - washed and dried with water and air at room temperature; HWA - washed and dried with hot water and hot air. Thereafter, adhesive was applied and light-cured for 20 s. Silicon molds were used to prepare resin cement cylinders (1x1 mm) on the ceramic surface. The specimens were stored in deionized water at 37 °C for 48 h and subjected to a micro-shear test. The data were submitted to statistical analysis (?#61537;=0.05). Group G1 showed higher bond strengths than G2, except for the CTL and NWA subgroups. Differences as function of the silanization protocol were only observed in G1: HWA (25.13±6.83)≥HA (22.95±7.78)≥CTL(17.44±7.24) ≥NWA(14.63±8.76). For G2 there was no difference among the subgroups. In conclusion, the silanization protocol affected the resin cement/ceramic bond strengths, depending on the material. Washing/drying with hot water and/or hot air increased only the bond strength of the dual-cured resin cement.

  4. Rhodium mediated bond activation: from synthesis to catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Hung-An [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Recently, our lab has developed monoanionic tridentate ligand, ToR, showing the corresponding coordination chemistry and catalyst reactivity of magnesium, zirconium, zinc and iridium complexes. This thesis details synthetic chemistry, structural study and catalytic reactivity of the ToR-supported rhodium compounds. Tl[ToR] has been proved to be a superior ligand transfer agent for synthesizing rhodium complexes. The salt metathesis route of Tl[ToM] with [Rh(μ-Cl)(CO)]2 and [Rh(μ- Cl)(COE)]2 gives ToMRh(CO)2 (2.2) and ToMRhH(β3-C8H13) (3.1) respectively while Tl[ToM] with [Rh(μ-Cl)(CO)]2 affords ToPRh(CO)2 (2.3). 2.2 reacts with both strong and weak electrophiles, resulting in the oxazoline N-attacked and the metal center-attacked compounds correspondingly. Using one of the metal center-attacked electrophiles, 2.3 was demonstrated to give high diastereoselectivity. Parallel to COE allylic C-H activation complex 3.1, the propene and allylbenzene allylic C-H activation products have also been synthesized. The subsequent functionalization attempts have been examined by treating with Brønsted acids, Lewis acids, electrophiles, nucleophiles, 1,3-dipolar reagents and reagents containing multiple bonds able to be inserted. Various related complexes have been obtained under these conditions, in which one of the azide insertion compounds reductively eliminates to give an allylic functionalization product stoichiometrically. 3.1 reacts with various primary alcohols to give the decarbonylation dihydride complex ToMRh(H)2CO (4.1). 4.1 shows catalytic reactivity for primary alcohol decarbonylation under a photolytic condition. Meanwhile, 2.2 has been found to be more reactive than 4.1 for catalytic alcohol decarbonylation under the same condition. Various complexes and primary

  5. Metal-free oxidative olefination of primary amines with benzylic C-H bonds through direct deamination and C-H bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Liang; Xing, Li-Juan; Xu, Tong; Zhu, Xue-Ping; Zhou, Wen; Kang, Ning; Wang, Bin

    2014-09-14

    An oxidative olefination reaction between aliphatic primary amines and benzylic sp(3) C-H bonds has been achieved using N-bromosuccinimide as catalyst and tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidant. The olefination proceeds under mild metal-free conditions through direct deamination and benzylic C-H bond activation, and provides easy access to biologically active 2-styrylquinolines with (E)-configuration.

  6. Influence of surface modification techniques on shear bond strength between different zirconia cores and veneering ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rismanchian, Mansour; Savabi, Omid; Ashtiani, Alireza Hashemi

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Veneering porcelain might be delaminated from underlying zirconia-based ceramics. The aim of this study was the evaluation of the effect of different surface treatments and type of zirconia (white or colored) on shear bond strength (SBS) of zirconia core and its veneering porcelain. MATERIALS AND METHODS Eighty zirconia disks (40 white and 40 colored; 10 mm in diameter and 4 mm thick) were treated with three different mechanical surface conditioning methods (Sandblasting with 110 µm Al2O3 particle, grinding, sandblasting and liner application). One group had received no treatment. These disks were veneered with 3 mm thick and 5 mm diameter Cercon Ceram Kiss porcelain and SBS test was conducted (cross-head speed = 1 mm/min). Two and one way ANOVA, Tukey's HSD Past hoc, and T-test were selected to analyzed the data (α=0.05). RESULTS In this study, the factor of different types of zirconia ceramics (P=.462) had no significant effect on SBS, but the factors of different surface modification techniques (P=.005) and interaction effect (P=.018) had a significant effect on SBS. Within colored zirconia group, there were no significant differences in mean SBS among the four surface treatment subgroups (P=0.183). Within white zirconia group, "Ground group" exhibited a significantly lower SBS value than "as milled" or control (P=0.001) and liner (P=.05) groups. CONCLUSION Type of zirconia did not have any effect on bond strength between zirconia core and veneer ceramic. Surface treatment had different effects on the SBS of the different zirconia types and grinding dramatically decreased the SBS of white zirconia-porcelain. PMID:22259706

  7. Verification of the effect of surface preparation on Hot Isostatic Pressing diffusion bonding joints of CLAM steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanyun; Li, Chunjing; Huang, Bo; Liu, Shaojun; Huang, Qunying

    2014-12-01

    Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) diffusion bonding with CLAM steel is the primary candidate fabrication technique for the first wall (FW) of DFLL-TBM. Surface state is one of the key factors for the joints quality. The effect of surface state prepared with grinder and miller on HIP diffusion bonding joints of CLAM steel was investigated. HIP diffusion bonding was performed at 140 MPa and 1373 K within 3 h. The mechanical properties of the joints were investigated with instrumented Charpy V-notch impact tests and the microstructures of the joints were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the milled samples with fine surface roughness were more suitable for CLAM steel HIP diffusion bonding.

  8. Tailoring the surface chemical bond states of the NbN films by doping Ag: Achieving hard hydrophobic surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Ping; Zhang, Kan; Du, Suxuan [Department of Materials Science, State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, and Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials, MOE, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China); Meng, Qingnan [College of Construction Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun, 130026 (China); He, Xin [Department of Materials Science, State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, and Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials, MOE, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China); Wang, Shuo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wen, Mao, E-mail: wenmao225@jlu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science, State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, and Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials, MOE, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China); Zheng, Weitao, E-mail: WTZheng@jlu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science, State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, and Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials, MOE, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Intrinsically hydrophilic NbN films can transfer to hydrophobic Nb-Ag-N films by doping Ag atoms into NbN sublattice. • Solute Ag can promote that the hydrophobic Ag{sub 2}O groups formed on the Nb-Ag-N film surface through self-oxidation. • The present work may provide a straightforward approach for the production of robust hydrophobic ceramic surfaces. - Abstract: Robust hydrophobic surfaces based on ceramics capable of withstanding harsh conditions such as abrasion, erosion and high temperature, are required in a broad range of applications. The metal cations with coordinative saturation or low electronegativity are commonly chosen to achieve the intrinsically hydrophobic ceramic by reducing Lewis acidity, and thus the ceramic systems are limited. In this work, we present a different picture that robust hydrophobic surface with high hardness (≥20 GPa) can be fabricated through doping Ag atoms into intrinsically hydrophilic ceramic film NbN by reactive co-sputtering. The transition of wettability from hydrophilic to hydrophobic of Nb-Ag-N films induced by Ag doping results from the appearance of Ag{sub 2}O groups on the films surfaces through self-oxidation, because Ag cations (Ag{sup +}) in Ag{sub 2}O are the filled-shell (4d{sup 10}5S{sup 0}) electronic structure with coordinative saturation that have no tendency to interact with water. The results show that surface Ag{sub 2}O benefited for hydrophobicity comes from the solute Ag atoms rather than precipitate metal Ag, in which the more Ag atoms incorporated into Nb-sublattice are able to further improve the hydrophobicity, whereas the precipitation of Ag nanoclusters would worsen it. The present work opens a window for fabricating robust hydrophobic surface through tailoring surface chemical bond states by doping Ag into transition metal nitrides.

  9. Surface analysis applied to metal-ceramic and bioceramic interfacial bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, R.St.C.; Arora, P.S.; Steveson, M.; Kawashima, N.; Cavallaro, G.P.; Ming, H.; Skinner, W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Low temperature plasma reactions, combined with sol-gel coatings, have been used to produce a variety of ceramic surface layers on metal substrates and interfacial layers between metals and oxides or other ceramics. These layers can be designed to be compositionally and functionally graded from the metal to bulk ceramic material, eg. silica, alumina, hydroxyapatite. The graded layers are generally <50nm thick, continuous, fully bonded to the substrate and deformable without disbonding. The objectives in design of these layers have been to produce: metal surfaces protected from oxidation, corrosion and acid attack; improved metal-ceramic bonding; and bioceramic titanium-based interfaces to bioactive hydroxyapatite for improved dental and medical implants. Modified Auger parameter studies for Si in XPS spectra show that the structure on the metal surfaces grades from amorphous, dehydroxylated silica on the outer surface through layer silicates, chain silicates, pyrosilicates to orthosilicates close to the metal interface. At the metal interface, detached grains of the metal are imaged with interpenetration of the oxide and silicate species linking the layer to the oxidised metal surface. The ∼30nm layer has a substantially increased frictional load compared with the untreated oxidised metal, i.e. behaviour consistent with either stronger adhesion of the coating to the substrate or a harder surface. The composition, structure and thickness of these layers can be controlled by the duration of each plasma reaction and the choice of the final reagent. The mechanisms of reaction in each process step have been elucidated with a combination of XPS, TOF-SIMS, TEM, SEM and FTIR. Similar, graded titanium/oxide/silicate/silica ceramic surface layers have been shown to form using the low temperature plasma reactions on titanium alloys used in medical and dental implants. Thicker (i.e. μm) overlayers of ceramic materials can be added to the graded surface layers

  10. Effect of surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of auto-polymerized resin to thermoplastic denture base polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Polyamide polymers do not provide sufficient bond strength to auto-polymerized resins for repairing fractured denture or replacing dislodged denture teeth. Limited treatment methods have been developed to improve the bond strength between auto-polymerized reline resins and polyamide denture base materials. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of surface modification by acetic acid on surface characteristics and bond strength of reline resin to polyamide denture base. MATERIALS AND METHODS 84 polyamide specimens were divided into three surface treatment groups (n=28): control (N), silica-coated (S), and acid-treated (A). Two different auto-polymerized reline resins GC and Triplex resins were bonded to the samples (subgroups T and G, respectively, n=14). The specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test after they were stored in distilled water for 1 week and thermo-cycled for 5000 cycles. Data were analyzed with independent t-test, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (α=.05). RESULTS The bond strength values of A and S were significantly higher than those of N (Pdenture base materials with acetic acid may be an efficient and cost-effective method for increasing the shear bond strength to auto-polymerized reline resin. PMID:28018569

  11. Organometallic Bonding in an Ullmann-Type On-Surface Chemical Reaction Studied by High-Resolution Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shigeki; Sadeghi, Ali; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Pawlak, Rémy; Meier, Tobias; Takeya, Jun; Goedecker, Stefan; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-10-01

    The on-surface Ullmann-type chemical reaction synthesizes polymers by linking carbons of adjacent molecules on solid surfaces. Although an organometallic compound is recently identified as the reaction intermediate, little is known about the detailed structure of the bonded organometallic species and its influence on the molecule and the reaction. Herein atomic force microscopy at low temperature is used to study the reaction with 3,9-diiododinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-d]thiophene (I-DNT-VW), which is polymerized on Ag(111) in vacuum. Thermally sublimated I-DNT-VW picks up a Ag surface atom, forming a CAg bond at one end after removing an iodine. The CAg bond is usually short-lived, and a CAgC organometallic bond immediately forms with an adjacent molecule. The existence of the bonded Ag atoms strongly affects the bending angle and adsorption height of the molecular unit. Density functional theory calculations reveal the bending mechanism, which reveals that charge from the terminus of the molecule is transferred via the Ag atom into the organometallic bond and strengths the local adsorption to the substrate. Such deformations vanish when the Ag atoms are removed by annealing and CC bonds are established. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1991-10-01

    The formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies has been developed into a single equation which unifies the treatment of covalent bonds, ionic bonds, and partially ionic bonds. This relationship has been used to clarify the fundamental thermodynamic information relating to metal-hydrogen, metal-alkyl, and metal-metal bond energies. We have been able to obtain a direct observation and measurement of the stabilization energy provided by the agostic interaction of the C-H bond with the metal. The ionization energies have also been used to correlate the rates of carbonyl substitution reactions of (η 5 -C 5 H 4 X)Rh(CO) 2 complexes, and to reveal the electronic factors that control the stability of the transition state. The extent that the electronic features of these bonding interactions transfer to other chemical systems is being investigated in terms of the principle of additivity of ligand electronic effects. Specific examples under study include metal- phosphines, metal-halides, and metallocenes. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C 60 molecule, buckminsterfullerene, and its interaction with a metal surface. The high-resolution valence ionizations in the gas phase reveal the high symmetry of the molecule, and studies of thin films of C 60 reveal weak intermolecular interactions. Scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy reveal the arrangement of spherical molecules on gold substrates, with significant delocalization of charge from the metal surface. 21 refs

  13. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation on bond strength of fiber post: Evaluation of surface characteristic and bonded area of fiber post with resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Fazal; Ibrahim, Nur Sukainah

    2015-01-01

    Fiber post is cemented to a root canal to restore coronal tooth structure. This research aims to evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on bond strength of fiber post with resin cement. A total of 40 of the two types of fiber posts, namely, FRC Prostec (FRC) and Fiber KOR (KOR), were used for the experiment. UV irradiation was applied on top of the fiber post surface for 0, 15, 20, and 30 min. The irradiated surface of the fiber posts (n = 5) were immediately bonded with resin cement (Rely X U200) after UV irradiation. Shear bond strength (SBS) MPa was measured, and the dislodged area of post surfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopes. Changes in surface roughness (Ra) of the FRC group after UV irradiation were observed (n = 3) using atomic force microscopy. Data of SBS were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, followed by multiple comparisons (P < 0.05). SBS was significantly higher for 20 min of UV irradiation of the FRC group while significantly higher SBS was observed with 15 min of UV irradiation of the KOR group. Resin cement was more evident (cohesive failure) on the dislodged post surface of the UV treated groups compared with the control. The surface roughness of the FRC post was Ra = 175.1 nm and Ra = 929.2 nm for the control and the 20 min group, respectively. Higher surface roughness of the UV irradiated group indicated formation of mechanical retention on the fiber post surface. Evidence of cohesive failure was observed which indicated higher SBS of fiber post with the UV irradiated group.

  14. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-1T - Limitation on aggregrate amount of private activity bonds (temporary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... activity bonds (temporary). 1.103(n)-1T Section 1.103(n)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Excluded from Gross Income § 1.103(n)-1T Limitation on aggregrate amount of private activity bonds (temporary). Q-1: What does section 103(n) provide? A-1: Interest on an issue of private activity bonds will...

  15. Influence of different surface treatments on the short-term bond strength and durability between a zirconia post and a composite resin core material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgungor, Gokhan; Sen, Deniz; Aydin, Murat

    2008-05-01

    Reliable bonding between zirconia posts and composite resin core materials is difficult to achieve because of the smooth surface texture and lack of silica content of zirconia posts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the short-term bond strength and durability between a zirconia post and a composite resin core material. Eighty zirconia posts were divided into 4 groups (n=20). Specimens received 1 of 4 different surface treatments: group AIRB, airborne-particle abrasion; group TSC-SIL, tribochemical silica coating (CoJet system) and silanization (ESPE Sil); group AIRB-BSIL, airborne-particle abrasion and MDP-containing primer (Clearfil SE Bond Primer)/silane coupling agent (Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator) mixture application; and group TSC-BSIL, tribochemical silica coating and MDP-containing primer/silane coupling agent mixture application. Average surface roughness (Ra) of zirconia posts produced by airborne-particle abrasion or silica coating was measured using an optical profilometer. Composite resin core foundations (Build-it FR) were formed using transparent acrylic resin tubes (12mm in length and 7mm in diameter). Each group was further divided into 2 subgroups of 10 specimens and stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C, either for 24 hours or for 150 days with 37,500 thermal cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C, with a dwell time of 30 seconds. Following water storage, the specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonded interface into 2-mm-thick post-and-core specimens under water cooling. Push-out tests were performed with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min. Debonded post surfaces were examined with SEM. Data were analyzed with 1- and 2-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison tests (alpha=0.05). No significant differences were detected between the Ra values of airborne-particle-abraded and silica-coated specimens (P=.781). The short-term mean bond strengths for

  16. Tensile bond strength of silicone-based soft denture liner to two chemically different denture base resins after various surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Hakan; Tugut, Faik; Guney, Umit; Kirmali, Omer; Akar, Turker

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of a silicone-based soft denture liner to two chemically different denture base resins, heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), and light-activated urethane dimethacrylate or Eclipse denture base resin. PMMA test specimens were fabricated and relined with a silicone-based soft denture liner (group AC). Eclipse test specimens were prepared according to the manufacturer's recommendation. Before they were relined with a silicone-based soft denture liner, each received one of three surface treatments: untreated (control, group EC), Eclipse bonding agent applied (group EB), and laser-irradiated (group EL). Tensile bond strength tests (crosshead speed = 5 mm/min) were performed for all specimens, and the results were analyzed using the analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (p = 0.05). Eclipse denture base and PMMA resins presented similar bond strengths to the silicone-based soft denture liner. The highest mean force was observed in group EL specimens, and the tensile bond strengths in group EL were significantly different (p < 0.05) from those in the other groups.

  17. Effect of activation mode of dual-cured resin cements and low-viscosity composite liners on bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Rubens Nazareno; Reis, André Figueiredo; Giannini, Marcelo

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the activation mode of dual-cured resin cements and application of low-viscosity composite liners over self-primed dentin on bond strength (BS) of dentin-bonding agents (DBA). Three DBA (Single Bond; Prompt L-Pop and Clearfil SE Bond), their respective resin cements (RelyX ARC and Panavia F) and two low-viscosity composites (Filtek Flow and Protect Liner F) were tested. After removing the buccal enamel surfaces of 25 bovine incisors, each flat dentin surface was sectioned longitudinally and divided into two similar parts. The dentin surfaces were wet-abraded with 600-grit SiC paper and randomly divided into 10 groups. Experimental groups comprised the use of DBA and their respective dual-cured resin cements, with or without light-activation of resin cements. The low-viscosity resin was used only for the self-etching systems, Prompt L-Pop and Clearfil SE Bond. Three resin cement cylinders (0.5mm high and 0.75mm diameter) were built on each bonded dentin surface, using a tygon tubing mold. After water storage for 24h, specimens were subjected to micro-shear testing. Data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Light-activation of resin cements resulted in significantly higher BS for all DBA versus groups in which the resin cements were allowed to self-cure. The low-viscosity composite application increased the BS only for Prompt L-Pop. The bond strength of resin cements to dentin is reduced if light-activation is not employed. The use of a low-viscosity composite liner resulted in improved bond strength only for the single-step self-etching adhesive.

  18. 30 CFR 800.17 - Bonding requirements for underground coal mines and long-term coal-related surface facilities and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bonding requirements for underground coal mines... REQUIREMENTS FOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS BOND AND INSURANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS UNDER REGULATORY PROGRAMS § 800.17 Bonding requirements for...

  19. The effect of hydrofluoric acid surface treatment and bond strength of a zirconia veneering ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyabutr, Yada; McGowan, Steve; Phillips, Keith M; Kois, John C; Giordano, Russell A

    2008-09-01

    Clinicians are frequently faced with a challenge in selecting materials for adjacent restorations, particularly when one tooth requires a zirconia-based restoration and the next requires a veneer. While it may be desirable to use the same veneering ceramic on adjacent teeth, little information is available about the use of veneering ceramics over a zirconia-based material. The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) to study the influence of hydrofluoric acid-etched treatment on the surface topography of the zirconia veneering ceramic, (2) to test the bond strength of zirconia veneering ceramic to enamel, and (3) to evaluate the flexural strength and the elemental composition of ceramic veneers. Three zirconia veneering ceramics (Cerabien CZR (CZ), Lava Ceram (L), and Zirox (Z)) and 4 conventional veneering ceramics (Creation (C), IPS d.Sign (D), Noritake EX-3 (E), and Reflex (R)) were evaluated. Twenty ceramic bars of each material were fabricated and surface treated with hydrofluoric acid according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Ten specimens from each group of materials were examined with a profilometer, and a sample of this group was selected for quantitative evaluation using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Another 10 acid-etched specimens from each group of materials were treated with silane prior to cementing with resin cement (Variolink II) on enamel surfaces. These luted specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine in the shear mode with a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min. The data were analyzed with a 1-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's HSD test (alpha=.05). An additional 10 ceramic bars from each material group were fabricated to evaluate flexural strength and elemental composition. The flexural strength (MPa) of each specimen was determined by using a 4-point-1/4-point flexure test. A Weibull statistic tested the reliability of the strength data; pairwise differences among the 7 groups were evaluated at confidence intervals

  20. Effect of surface modifications on the bond strength of zirconia ceramic with resin cement resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Lubica; Ulmer, Peter; Lehmann, Frank; Wille, Sebastian; Polonskyi, Oleksander; Johannes, Martina; Köbel, Stefan; Trottenberg, Thomas; Bornholdt, Sven; Haase, Fabian; Kersten, Holger; Kern, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of surface modifications on the tensile bond strength between zirconia ceramic and resin. Zirconia ceramic surfaces were treated with 150-μm abrasive alumina particles, 150-μm abrasive zirconia particles, argon-ion bombardment, gas plasma, and piranha solution (H2SO4:H2O2=3:1). In addition, slip casting surfaces were examined. Untreated surfaces were used as the control group. Tensile bond strengths (TBS) were measured after water storage for 3 days or 150 days with additional 37,500 thermal cycling for artificial aging. Statistical analyses were performed with 1-way and 3-way ANOVA, followed by comparison of means with the Tukey HSD test. After storage in distilled water for three days at 37 °C, the highest mean tensile bond strengths (TBS) were observed for zirconia ceramic surfaces abraded with 150-μm abrasive alumina particles (TBS(AAP)=37.3 MPa, TBS(CAAP)=40.4 MPa), and 150-μm abrasive zirconia particles (TBS(AZP)=34.8 MPa, TBS(CAZP)=35.8 MPa). Also a high TBS was observed for specimens treated with argon-ion bombardment (TBS(BAI)=37.8 MPa). After 150 days of storage, specimens abraded with 150-μm abrasive alumina particles and 150-μm abrasive zirconia particles revealed high TBS (TBS(AAP)=37.6 MPa, TBS(CAAP)=33.0 MPa, TBS(AZP)=22.1 MPa and TBS(CAZP)=22.8 MPa). A high TBS was observed also for specimens prepared with slip casting (TBS(SC)=30.0 MPa). A decrease of TBS was observed for control specimens (TBS(UNT)=12.5 MPa, TBS(CUNT)=9.0 MPa), specimens treated with argon-ion bombardment (TBS(BAI)=10.3 MPa) and gas plasma (TBS(GP)=11.0 MPa). A decrease of TBS was observed also for specimens treated with piranha solution (TBS(PS)=3.9 MPa, TBS(CPS)=4.1 MPa). A significant difference in TBS after three days storage was observed for specimens treated with different methods (p0.05), CAAP(p>0.05) and SC(p>0.05). However, the failure patterns of debonded specimens prepared with 150-μm abrasive zirconia

  1. Shear bond strength of metallic brackets photo-activated with light-emitting diode (LED at different exposure times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Braga Rêgo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic metallic brackets photo-activated with two different light-curing sources at different exposure times: halogen light (XL 1500, 3M ESPE and LED light (Ortholux, 3M Unitek. Sixty bovine permanent lower incisors were inserted into PVC tubes containing plaster. The buccal surfaces were cleaned with pumice and water, and then etched with 37% phosphoric acid gel. The XT Primer bonding agent (3M Unitek was applied to the enamel surfaces and the metallic pre-coated brackets (Transbond APC II system, 3M Unitek were attached to upper central incisors. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups (n=15. In Group I (Control, halogen light was used for 40 seconds, while in Groups II, III, and IV were light-cured with LED light unit for 40, 10, and 5 seconds, respectively. The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. The brackets were submitted to shear bond strength test in universal testing machine (Instron at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Shear bond strength means (MPa were 4.87 for Group I; 5.89 for Group II; 4.83 for Group III, and 4.39 for Group IV. Tukey's test detected no statistically significant differences among the groups regarding the shear bond strength (p>0.05. Neither of the types of light-curing sources or exposure times influenced the shear bond strength of metallic brackets.

  2. Structural snapshots of concerted double E-H bond activation at a transition metal centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Joseph A. B.; Caise, Alexa; Sindlinger, Christian P.; Tirfoin, Rémi; Thompson, Amber L.; Edwards, Alison J.; Aldridge, Simon

    2017-12-01

    Bond activation at a transition metal centre is a key fundamental step in numerous chemical transformations. The oxidative addition of element-hydrogen bonds, for example, represents a critical step in a range of widely applied catalytic processes. Despite this, experimental studies defining steps along the bond activation pathway are very rare. In this work, we report on fundamental studies defining a new oxidative activation pathway: combined experimental and computational approaches yield structural snapshots of the simultaneous activation of both bonds of a β-diketiminate-stabilized GaH2 unit at a single metal centre. Systematic variation of the supporting phosphine ligands and single crystal X-ray/neutron diffraction are exploited in tandem to allow structural visualization of the activation process, from a η2-H,H σ-complex showing little Ga-H bond activation, through species of intermediate geometry featuring stretched Ga-H and compressed M-H/M-Ga bonds, to a fully activated metal dihydride featuring a neutral (carbene-type) N-heterocyclic GaI ligand.

  3. Investigation of Surface Pre-Treatment Methods for Wafer-Level Cu-Cu Thermo-Compression Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koki Tanaka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To increase the yield of the wafer-level Cu-Cu thermo-compression bonding method, certain surface pre-treatment methods for Cu are studied which can be exposed to the atmosphere before bonding. To inhibit re-oxidation under atmospheric conditions, the reduced pure Cu surface is treated by H2/Ar plasma, NH3 plasma and thiol solution, respectively, and is covered by Cu hydride, Cu nitride and a self-assembled monolayer (SAM accordingly. A pair of the treated wafers is then bonded by the thermo-compression bonding method, and evaluated by the tensile test. Results show that the bond strengths of the wafers treated by NH3 plasma and SAM are not sufficient due to the remaining surface protection layers such as Cu nitride and SAMs resulting from the pre-treatment. In contrast, the H2/Ar plasma–treated wafer showed the same strength as the one with formic acid vapor treatment, even when exposed to the atmosphere for 30 min. In the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS measurement of the H2/Ar plasma–treated Cu sample, the total number of the detected H2 was 3.1 times more than the citric acid–treated one. Results of the TDS measurement indicate that the modified Cu surface is terminated by chemisorbed hydrogen atoms, which leads to high bonding strength.

  4. Improvement of bonding properties of laser transmission welded, dissimilar thermoplastics by plasma surface treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Weber, M.; Schöngart, M.; Sooriyapiragasam, S.; Behm, H.; Dahlmann, R.

    2015-01-01

    Compared to different welding methods such as ultrasonic welding, laser transmission welding is a relatively new technology to join thermoplastic parts. The most significant advantages over other methods are the contactless energy input which can be controlled very precisely and the low mechanical loads on the welded parts. Therefore, laser transmission welding is used in various areas of application, for example in medical technology or for assembling headlights in the automotive sector. However, there are several challenges in welding dissimilar thermoplastics. This may be due to different melting points on the one hand and different polarities on the other hand. So far these problems are faced with the intermediate layer technique. In this process a layer bonding together the two components is placed between the components. This means that an additional step in the production is needed to apply the extra layer. To avoid this additional step, different ways of joining dissimilar thermoplastics are investigated. In this regard, the improvement in the weldability of the dissimilar thermoplastics polyamide 6 (PA 6) and polypropylene (PP) by means of plasma surface modification and contour welding is examined. To evaluate the influence of the plasma surface modification process on the subsequent welding process of the two dissimilar materials, the treatment time as well as the storage time between treatment and welding are varied. The treatment time in pulsed micro wave excited oxygen plasmas with an electron density of about 1x10 17 m −3 is varied from 0.5 s to 120 s and the time between treatment and welding is varied from a few minutes up to a week. As reference, parts being made of the same polymer (PP and PA 6) are welded and tested. For the evaluation of the results of the welding experiments, short-time tensile tests are used to determine the bond strength. Without plasma treatment the described combination of PA 6/PP cannot be welded with sufficient bond

  5. New approaches to organocatalysis based on C–H and C–X bonding for electrophilic substrate activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Nagorny

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen bond donor catalysis represents a rapidly growing subfield of organocatalysis. While traditional hydrogen bond donors containing N–H and O–H moieties have been effectively used for electrophile activation, activation based on other types of non-covalent interactions is less common. This mini review highlights recent progress in developing and exploring new organic catalysts for electrophile activation through the formation of C–H hydrogen bonds and C–X halogen bonds.

  6. Peptide bond formation of alanine on silica and alumina surfaces as a catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Arenillas, M.; Mateo-Martí, E.

    2012-09-01

    Polymerization of amino acids has been important for the origin of life because the peptides may have been the first self-replicating systems. The amino acid concentrations in the oceans may have been too diluted in the early phases of the Earth. The formation of the biopolymers could have been due to the catalytic action of various minerals (such as silica or alumina). Our work is based on the comparison between alumina and silica minerals with and without prior activation of their silanol groups for the formation of peptide bonds using alanina like amino acid which it is the simplest quiral amino acid.

  7. Effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of glass fiber-reinforced composite root canal posts to composite core material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kurt

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: Er:YAG laser treatments on the FRC post surface decreased the bond strength. Airborne-particle abrasion and HF acid etching are alternative methods for increasing bond strength of FRC posts to composite core material.

  8. Shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to preformed metal crowns for primary molars using a universal adhesive and two different surface treatments: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, S S; Kontham, U R; Kamath, A; Kontham, R

    2016-10-01

    This was to determine the shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to preformed metal crowns with a new adhesive. Buccal surfaces of the crowns were roughened by two different methods to increase retention. Typodont mandibular second primary molars (38) were divided into two groups (19 per group). Preformed metal crowns were cemented to the teeth with glass-ionomer cement. To enhance retention, buccal surfaces of the crowns in group I were roughened with cross-cut carbide burs (SS White #56); crowns in group II were sandblasted (aluminium oxide, 50 µm). Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (3 M-ESPE) was used to bond composite resin to the crowns. A universal testing machine tested the maximum shearing force withstood by the veneered composite surfaces. Sandblasted crowns demonstrated significantly higher resistance (p = 0.001) to shearing force (324.4 N) than did the crowns that were roughened with a bur (234.2 N). Chairside veneering of composite resin to pretreated crowns could be a feasible, aesthetically pleasing, and an economical option in paediatric dentistry.

  9. Surface active monomers synthesis, properties, and application

    CERN Document Server

    Borzenkov, Mykola

    2014-01-01

    This brief includes information on the background?of and development of synthesis of various types of surface active monomers. The authors explain the importance of utilization of surface active monomers for creation of surface active polymers? and the various biomedical applications of such compounds . This brief introduces techniques for the synthesis of novel types of surface active monomers, their colloidal and polymerizable properties and application for needs of medicine and biology.

  10. Microfluidic DNA microarrays in PMMA chips: streamlined fabrication via simultaneous DNA immobilization and bonding activation by brief UV exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabourin, David; Petersen, J; Snakenborg, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    This report presents and describes a simple and scalable method for producing functional DNA microarrays within enclosed polymeric, PMMA, microfluidic devices. Brief (30 s) exposure to UV simultaneously immobilized poly(T)poly(C)-tagged DNA probes to the surface of unmodified PMMA and activated...... the surface for bonding below the glass transition temperature of the bulk PMMA. Functionality and validation of the enclosed PMMA microarrays was demonstrated as 18 patients were correctly genotyped for all eight mutation sites in the HBB gene interrogated. The fabrication process therefore produced probes...

  11. Effect of Different Surface Treatments on the Bond Strength of Repaired Resin Restorations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engy Fahmy Ismaiel Fekry Abaza

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, growing demands by patients for mercury-free esthetic restorations had markedly increased the use of resin composites in restorative dentistry. However, despite the continuing development of resin composites with improved properties, several factors, such as discoloration, color mismatch, wear; chipping or bulk fracture might present clinical problems (Mjor and Gordan. 2002, Vichi et al. 2004 and Kolbeck et al. 2006). As a result, the clinician should decide whether to replace or simply repair these restorations. Total replacement of the restoration might be regarded as over-treatment since in most cases, large portions of the restorations might be clinically and radio graphically considered free of failure. Moreover, complete removal of the restoration inevitably resulted in weakening of the tooth, unnecessary removal of intact dental tissues, more money and time consuming. For these reasons, the repair of the restoration instead of its removal would be a favorable procedure (Lucena-Martin et al. 2001, Frankenberger et al. 2003 a and Oztas et al. 2003). The key element in the determination of successful repair procedures was the adequate bond strength between the existing resin composite and the new one. Various methods have been suggested to improve the bond strength of the repaired resin restorations (Tezvergil et al. 2003 and Bonstein et al. 2005). Mechanical and/or chemical treatments had been investigated for preparation of the aged resin restorations to be repaired (Tezvergil et al. 2003, Ozcan et al. 2005 and Hannig et al. 2006). These treatments were introduced to counteract the problems of aged resin restorations which were limited amount of residual free radicals available for reaction with the repair material, contaminated surface, and highly cross-linked resin matrix ( Dall Oca et al. 2006 and Papacchini et al. 2007 a) Previous studies emphasized that mechanical treatments are the most important factor in obtaining optimal repair

  12. Role of Hydrogen Bonding in the Formation of Adenine Chains on Cu(110 Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanxia Cheng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the adsorption properties of DNA bases on metal surfaces is fundamental for the rational control of surface functionalization leading to the realisation of biocompatible devices for biosensing applications, such as monitoring of particular parameters within bio-organic environments and drug delivery. In this study, the effects of deposition rate and substrate temperature on the adsorption behavior of adenine on Cu(110 surfaces have been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM and density functional theory (DFT modeling, with a focus on the characterization of the morphology of the adsorbed layers. STM results revealed the formation of one-dimensional linear chains and ladder-like chains parallel to the [110] direction, when dosing at a low deposition rate at room temperature, followed by annealing to 490 K. Two mirror related, well-ordered chiral domains oriented at ±55° with respect to the [110] direction are formed upon deposition on a substrate kept at 490 K. The molecular structures observed via STM are rationalized and qualitatively described on the basis of the DFT modeling. The observation of a variety of ad-layer structures influenced by deposition rate and substrate temperature indicates that dynamic processes and hydrogen bonding play an important role in the self-assembly of adenine on the Cu(110 surface.

  13. Torsional Wave Propagation in a Pre-Stressed Structure with Corrugated and Loosely Bonded Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Manoj K.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An analytical model is presented to study the behaviour of propagation of torsional surface waves in initially stressed porous layer, sandwiched between an orthotropic half-space with initial stress and pre-stressed inhomogeneous anisotropic half-space. The boundary surfaces of the layer and halfspaces are taken as corrugated, as well as loosely bonded. The heterogeneity of the lower half-space is due to trigonometric variation in elastic parameters of the pre-stressed inhomogeneous anisotropic medium. Expression for dispersion relation has been obtained in closed form for the present analytical model to observe the effect of undulation parameter, flatness parameter and porosity on the propagation of torsional surface waves. The obtained dispersion relation is found to be in well agreement with classical Love wave equation for a particular case. The cases of ideally smooth interface and welded interface have also been analysed. Numerical example and graphical illustrations are made to demonstrate notable effect of initial stress, wave number, heterogeneity parameter and initial stress on the phase velocity of torsional surface waves.

  14. Influence of light intensity on surface free energy and dentin bond strength of core build-up resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Y; Tsujimoto, A; Furuichi, T; Suzuki, T; Tsubota, K; Miyazaki, M; Platt, J A

    2015-01-01

    We examined the influence of light intensity on surface free energy characteristics and dentin bond strength of dual-cure direct core build-up resin systems. Two commercially available dual-cure direct core build-up resin systems, Clearfil DC Core Automix with Clearfil Bond SE One and UniFil Core EM with Self-Etching Bond, were studied. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in acrylic resin and the facial dentin surfaces were wet ground on 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Adhesives were applied to dentin surfaces and cured with light intensities of 0 (no irradiation), 200, 400, and 600 mW/cm(2). The surface free energy of the adhesives (five samples per group) was determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. To determine the strength of the dentin bond, the core build-up resin pastes were condensed into the mold on the adhesive-treated dentin surfaces according to the methods described for the surface free energy measurement. The resin pastes were cured with the same light intensities as those used for the adhesives. Ten specimens per group were stored in water maintained at 37°C for 24 hours, after which they were shear tested at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute in a universal testing machine. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a Tukey-Kramer test were performed, with the significance level set at 0.05. The surface free energies of the adhesive-treated dentin surfaces decreased with an increase in the light intensity of the curing unit. Two-way ANOVA revealed that the type of core build-up system and the light intensity significantly influence the bond strength, although there was no significant interaction between the two factors. The highest bond strengths were achieved when the resin pastes were cured with the strongest light intensity for all the core build-up systems. When polymerized with a light intensity of 200 mW/cm(2) or less, significantly lower bond strengths were observed. CONClUSIONS: The

  15. Bond strength of three luting agents to zirconia ceramic - influence of surface treatment and thermocycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Attia

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments, 3 luting agents and thermocycling on microtensile bond strength (µTBS to zirconia ceramic. Material and METHODS: A total of 18 blocks (5x5x4 mm were fabricated from zirconia ceramic (ICE Zirkonia and duplicated into composite blocks (Alphadent. Ceramic blocks were divided into 3 groups (n=6 according to the following surface treatments: airborne-particle abrasion (AA, silica-coating, (SC (CoJet and silica coating followed by silane application (SCSI (ESPE Sil. Each group was divided into 3 subgroups (n=2 according to the 3 luting agents used. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC, Ketac Cem Plus, self-adhesive resin cement (UN, RelyX Unicem and adhesive resin cement (ML, MultiLink Automix were used for bonding composite and zirconia blocks. Each bonding assembly was cut into microbars (10 mm long and 1±0.1 mm². Seven specimens of each subgroup were stored in water bath at 37ºC for 1 week. The other 7 specimens were stored in water bath at 37ºC for 30 days then thermocycled (TC for 7,500 cycles. µTBS values were recorded for each specimen using a universal testing machine. Statistical analyses were performed using a 3-way ANOVA model followed by serial 1-way ANOVAs. Comparison of means was performed with Tukey's HSD test at (α=0.05. RESULTS: µTBS ranged from 16.8 to 31.8 MPa after 1 week and from 7.3 to 16.4 MPa after 30 days of storage in water and thermocycling. Artificial aging significantly decreased µTBS (p<0.05. Considering surface treatment, SCSI significantly increased µTBS (p<0.05 compared to SC and AA. Resin cements (UN and ML demonstrated significantly higher µTBS (p<0.05 compared to RMGIC cement. CONCLUSIONS: Silica coating followed by silane application together with adhesive resin cements significantly increased µTBS, while thermocycling significantly decreased µTBS.

  16. Bond strength of three luting agents to zirconia ceramic - Influence of surface treatment and thermocycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATTIA, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Objective This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments, 3 luting agents and thermocycling on microtensile bond strength (µTBS) to zirconia ceramic. Material and Methods A total of 18 blocks (5x5x4 mm) were fabricated from zirconia ceramic (ICE Zirkonia) and duplicated into composite blocks (Alphadent). Ceramic blocks were divided into 3 groups (n=6) according to the following surface treatments: airborne-particle abrasion (AA), silica-coating, (SC) (CoJet) and silica coating followed by silane application (SCSI) (ESPE Sil). Each group was divided into 3 subgroups (n=2) according to the 3 luting agents used. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC, Ketac Cem Plus), self-adhesive resin cement (UN, RelyX Unicem) and adhesive resin cement (ML, MultiLink Automix) were used for bonding composite and zirconia blocks. Each bonding assembly was cut into microbars (10 mm long and 1±0.1 mm2). Seven specimens of each subgroup were stored in water bath at 37ºC for 1 week. The o ther 7 specimens were stored in water bath at 37ºC for 30 days then thermocycled (TC) for 7,500 cycles. µTBS values were recorded for each specimen using a universal testing machine. Statistical analyses were performed using a 3-way ANOVA model followed by serial 1-way ANOVAs. Comparison of means was performed with Tukey's HSD test at (α=0.05). Results µTBS ranged from 16.8 to 31.8 MPa after 1 week and from 7.3 to 16.4 MPa after 30 days of storage in water and thermocycling. Artificial aging significantly decreased µTBS (p<0.05). Considering surface treatment, SCSI significantly increased µTBS (p<0.05) compared to SC and AA. Resin cements (UN and ML) demonstrated significantly higher µTBS (p<0.05) compared to RMGIC cement. Conclusions Silica coating followed by silane application together with adhesive resin cements significantly increased µTBS, while thermocycling significantly decreased µTBS. PMID:21710091

  17. In Vitro Evaluation of Various Surface Treatments of Fiber Posts on the Bond Strength to Composite Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sareh Nadalizadeh

    Full Text Available Introduction: The reliable bond at the root-post-core interface is critical for the clinical success of post-retained restorations. To decrease the risk of fracture, it is important to optimize the adhesion. Therefore, various post surface treatments have been proposed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of various surface treatments of fiber posts on the bond strength to composite core. Materials & Methods: In this study, 40 fiber reinforced posts were used. After preparing and sectioning them, resulting specimens were divided into four groups (N=28. The posts received different surface treatments such as no surface treatment (control group, preparing with hydrogen peroxide 10%, preparing with silane, preparing with HF and silane. Then, posts were tested in micro tensile testing machine. The results were analyzed by One-Way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Results: The greatest bond strength observed was in treatment with hydrogen peroxide 10% (19.84±8.95 MPa, and the lowest strength was related to the control group (12.44±3.40 MPa. The comparison of the groups with Dunnett T3 test showed that the differences between the groups was statistically significant (α=0.05.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, preparing with H2O2 -10 % and silane increases the bond strength of FRC posts to the composite core more than the other methods. Generally, the bond strength of posts to the composite core increases by surface treatment.

  18. Further Investigation Into the Use of Laser Surface Preparation of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy for Adhesive Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Crow, Allison; Zetterberg, Anna; Hopkins, John; Wohl, Christopher J.; Connell, John W.; Belcher, Tony; Blohowiak, Kay Y.

    2014-01-01

    Adhesive bonding offers many advantages over mechanical fastening, but requires robust materials and processing methodologies before it can be incorporated in primary structures for aerospace applications. Surface preparation is widely recognized as one of the key steps to producing robust and predictable bonds. This report documents an ongoing investigation of a surface preparation technique based on Nd:YAG laser ablation as a replacement for the chemical etch and/or abrasive processes currently applied to Ti-6Al-4V alloys. Laser ablation imparts both topographical and chemical changes to a surface that can lead to increased bond durability. A laser based process provides an alternative to chemical-immersion, manual abrasion, and grit blast process steps which are expensive, hazardous, environmentally unfriendly, and less precise. In addition, laser ablation is amenable to process automation, which can improve reproducibility to meet quality standards for surface preparation. An update on work involving adhesive property testing, surface characterization, surface stability, and the effect of laser surface treatment on fatigue behavior is presented. Based on the tests conducted, laser surface treatment is a viable replacement for the immersion chemical surface treatment processes. Testing also showed that the fatigue behavior of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy is comparable for surfaces treated with either laser ablation or chemical surface treatment.

  19. Preparation and photocatalytic activity of chemically-bonded phosphate ceramics containing TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Monize Aparecida; de Lima, Bruna de Oliveira; Ferreira, Leticia Patrício; Colonetti, Emerson; Feltrin, Jucilene; De Noni, Agenor

    2017-05-01

    Titanium dioxide was incorporated into chemically-bonded phosphate ceramic for use as photocatalytic inorganic coating. The coatings obtained were applied to unglazed ceramic tiles and cured at 350 °C. The surfaces were characterized by photocatalytic activity, determined in aqueous medium, based on the degradation of methylene blue dye. The effects of the percentage of TiO2 and the thickness of the layer on the photocatalytic efficiency were evaluated. The influence of the incorporation of TiO2 on the consolidation of the phosphate matrix coating was investigated using the wear resistance test. The crystalline phases of the coatings obtained were determined by XRD. The microstructure of the surfaces was analyzed by SEM. The thermal curing treatment did not cause a phase transition from anatase to rutile. An increase in the photocatalytic activity of the coating was observed with an increase in the TiO2 content. The dye degradation indices ranged from 14.9 to 44.0%. The photocatalytic efficiency was not correlated with the thickness of the coating layer deposited. The resistance to wear decreased with an increase in the TiO2 content. Comparison with a commercial photocatalytic ceramic coating indicated that there is a range of values for the TiO2 contents which offer potential for photocatalytic applications.

  20. Influence of Surface Modifications of Acrylic Resin Teeth on Shear Bond Strength with Denture Base Resin-An Invitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Vallabh; Krishnan, Madhusudan; Krishnan, Chitra Shankar; Azhagarasan, N S; Sampathkumar, Jayakrishnakumar; Ramasubramanian, Hariharan

    2015-09-01

    Debonding of artificial teeth from the denture base is an important issue for edentulous patients rehabilitated with conventional or implant supported complete dentures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate shear bond strength between denture base resin and acrylic resin denture teeth subjected to three different surface modifications on the ridge lap area as compared to unmodified denture teeth. Forty acrylic resin central incisor denture teeth were selected and randomly divided into four test groups. The teeth in each group were subjected to one of the three different surface modifications, namely, chemical treatment, sandblasting and placement of retentive grooves on the ridge lap area respectively, prior to packing of the denture base resin. The group with unmodified teeth served as control. Forty acrylic resin test blocks thus obtained were tested for shear bond strength between acrylic resin teeth and denture base resin in Universal Testing Machine. Data obtained was statistically analysed using one-way ANOVA and Student- Newman- Keul's test (p< 0.05). Analysis of shear bond strength revealed that retentive grooves on the ridge lap area showed highest bond strength values followed by sandblasting and both were statistically significant compared to the control and chemically treated groups. Unmodified surface of the resin teeth showed the least bond strength. Within the limitations of this invitro study the placement of retentive grooves or sandblasting of the ridge lap area showed highly significant improvement in shear bond strength compared to the unmodified surface. Chemical treatment did not result in any significant improvement in the shear bond strength compared to the unmodified surface.

  1. Influence of Surface Modifications of Acrylic Resin Teeth on Shear Bond Strength with Denture Base Resin-An Invitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Madhusudan; Krishnan, Chitra Shankar; Azhagarasan, N.S.; Sampathkumar, Jayakrishnakumar; Ramasubramanian, Hariharan

    2015-01-01

    Background Debonding of artificial teeth from the denture base is an important issue for edentulous patients rehabilitated with conventional or implant supported complete dentures. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate shear bond strength between denture base resin and acrylic resin denture teeth subjected to three different surface modifications on the ridge lap area as compared to unmodified denture teeth. Materials and Methods Forty acrylic resin central incisor denture teeth were selected and randomly divided into four test groups. The teeth in each group were subjected to one of the three different surface modifications, namely, chemical treatment, sandblasting and placement of retentive grooves on the ridge lap area respectively, prior to packing of the denture base resin. The group with unmodified teeth served as control. Forty acrylic resin test blocks thus obtained were tested for shear bond strength between acrylic resin teeth and denture base resin in Universal Testing Machine. Data obtained was statistically analysed using one-way ANOVA and Student- Newman- Keul’s test (p< 0.05). Results Analysis of shear bond strength revealed that retentive grooves on the ridge lap area showed highest bond strength values followed by sandblasting and both were statistically significant compared to the control and chemically treated groups. Unmodified surface of the resin teeth showed the least bond strength. Conclusion Within the limitations of this invitro study the placement of retentive grooves or sandblasting of the ridge lap area showed highly significant improvement in shear bond strength compared to the unmodified surface. Chemical treatment did not result in any significant improvement in the shear bond strength compared to the unmodified surface. PMID:26501005

  2. Pre-sintered Y-TZP sandblasting: effect on surface roughness, phase transformation, and Y-TZP/veneer bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Müller Ramos-Tonello

    Full Text Available Abstract Sandblasting is a common method to try to improve the Y-TZP/veneer bond strength of dental prostheses, however, it may put stress on zirconia surfaces and could accelerate the t→m phase transformation. Y-TZP sandblasting before sintering could be an alternative to improve surface roughness and bonding strength of veneering ceramic. Objectives. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of Y-TZP pre-sintering sandblasting on surface roughness, phase transformation, and the Y-TZP/veneer shear bond strength. Material and Methods. The Y-TZP specimen surface underwent sandblasting with aluminum oxide (50 μm pre-sintering (Z-PRE and post-sintering (Z-POS. Z-CTR was not subjected to surface treatment. After ceramic veneer application, the specimens were subjected to shear bond testing. Surface roughness was analyzed by confocal microscopy. Y-TZP monoclinic and tetragonal phases were evaluated by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Shear bond strength and surface roughness data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α=0.05. Differences in the wave numbers and the broadening bands of the Raman spectra were compared among groups. Results. Z-POS (9.73±5.36 MPa and Z-PRE (7.94±2.52 MPa showed the highest bond strength, significantly higher than that of Z-CTR (5.54±2.14 MPa. The Ra of Z-PRE (1.59±0.23 µm was much greater and significantly different from that of Z-CTR (0.29±0.05 µm and Z-POS (0.77±0.13 µm. All groups showed bands typical of the tetragonal (T and monoclinic (M phases. Y-TZP sandblasting before sintering resulted in rougher surfaces but did not increase the shear bond strength compared to post-sintering and increased surface defects. Conclusions. Surface treatment with Al3O2, regardless of the moment and application, improves the results of Y-TZP/veneer bonding and is not a specific cause of t→m transformation.

  3. Iron Coordination and Halogen-Bonding Assisted Iodosylbenzene Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegeberg, Christina; Poulsen de Sousa, David; McKenzie, Christine

    The iron complex of the hexadentate ligand N,N,N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylendiamine-N'-acetate (tpena) efficiently catalyzes selective oxidations of electron-rich olefins and sulfides by insoluble iodosylbenzene (PhIO). Surprisingly, these reactions are faster and more selective than homogenous...... catalytic mixtures using soluble terminal oxygen transfer agents. Isolation of a reactive iron-terminal oxidant adduct, an unique Fe(III)-OIPh complex, is facilitated by strong stabilizing supramolecular halogen-bonding. L3-edge XANES suggests +1.6 for the average oxidation state for the iodine atom3...... in the iron(III)-coordinated PhIO. This represents a reduction of iodine relative to the original “hypervalent” (+3) PhIO. The equivalent of electron density must be removed from the {(tpena)Fe(III)O} moiety, however Mössbauer spectroscopy shows that the iron atom is not high valent....

  4. Effect of silica coating and silane surface treatment on the bond strength of soft denture liner to denture base material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsü, Saadet; Keskın, Yasemin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of different surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of an autopolymerizing silicone denture liner to a denture base material after thermocycling. Fifty rectangular heat-polymerized acrylic resin (QC-20) specimens consisting of a set of 2 acrylic blocks were used in the tensile test. Specimens were divided into 5 test groups (n=10) according to the bonding surface treatment as follows: Group A, adhesive treatment (Ufi Gel P adhesive) (control); Group S, sandblasting using 50-µm Al2O3; Group SCSIL, silica coating using 30-µm Al2O3 modified by silica and silanized with silane agent (CoJet System); Group SCA, silica coating and adhesive application; Group SCSILA, silica coating, silane and adhesive treatment. The 2 PMMA blocks were placed into molds and the soft lining materials (Ufi Gel P) were packed into the space and polymerized. All specimens were thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before the tensile test. Bond strength data were analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and Duncan tests. Fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (FTIR) analysis were used for the chemical analysis and a profilometer was used for the roughness of the sample surfaces. The highest bond strength test value was observed for Group A (1.35±0.13); the lowest value was for Group S (0.28±0.07) and Group SCSIL (0.34±0.03). Mixed and cohesive type failures were seen in Group A, SCA and SCSILA. Group S and SCSIL showed the least silicone integrations and the roughest surfaces. Sandblasting, silica coating and silane surface treatments of the denture base resin did not increase the bond strength of the silicone based soft liner. However, in this study, the chemical analysis and surface profilometer provided interesting insights about the bonding mechanism between the denture base resin and silicone soft liner.

  5. Effect of Different Surface Treatments on Repair Micro-shear Bond Strength of Silica- and Zirconia-filled Composite Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joulaei, Mohammad; Bahari, Mahmoud; Ahmadi, Anahid; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Effect of surface treatments on repair bond strength of aged composite resins might be different due to their dissimilar fillers. The aim was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on repair micro-shear bond strength (µSBS) of silica- (Spectrum TPH) and zirconia-filled (Filtek Z250) composite resins. Materials and methods Twenty-seven composite resin blocks were made from each type of composite resin: Z250 and Spectrum TPH. After aging, blocks of each type were randomly divided into three groups according to surface treatments: alloy primer, silane, and only surface roughening. Subsequently, each group was further subdivided into 3 subgroups based on the adhesive system used: Single Bond, Clearfil SE Bond, and Margin Bond. Four composite resin columns were added on each block. After thermocycling, µSBStest were done at cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data was analysed using multifactor ANOVA, one-way ANOVA and a post-hoc Bonferroni tests (α = 0.05). Results Analysis of data showed that the effect of composite resin type was not significant (p > 0.05), but the effects of the type of surface treatment (p = 0.01) and the type of adhesive system (p = 0.01) were significant on repair µSBS. In addition, the cumulative effect of the composite type-surface treatment and the composite type with the type of adhesive system were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). However, the cumulative effects of the adhesive system-surface treatment (p = 0.03) and the composite type-the adhesive system-surface treatments (p = 0.002) were significant. Conclusion Although repair µSBS values of both silica- and zirconia-filled composite resins were similar, use of different combinations of surface treatments and adhesive systems affected their repair µSBS differently. PMID:23277859

  6. Effect of sandblasting on surface roughness of zirconia-based ceramics and shear bond strength of veneering porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min; Zhang, Zutai; Zheng, Dongxiang; Ding, Ning; Liu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of sandblasting on the surface roughness of zirconia and the shear bond strength of the veneering porcelain. Pre-sintered zirconia plates were prepared and divided into four groups. Group A were not treated at all; group B were first sandblasted under 0.2 MPa pressure and then densely sintered; group C and D were sintered first, and then sandblasted under 0.2 MPa and 0.4 MPa pressures respectively. Surface roughness was measured and 3D roughness was reconstructed for the specimens, which were also analyzed with X-ray diffractometry. Finally after veneering porcelain sintering, shear bond tests were conducted. Sandblasting zirconia before sintering significantly increased surface roughness and the shear bond strength between zirconia and veneering porcelain (pveneering porcelain.

  7. Antibacterial Activity of Commercial Dentine Bonding Systems against E. faecalis–Flow Cytometry Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Lukomska-Szymanska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Literature presents inconsistent results on the antibacterial activity of dentine bonding systems (DBS. Antibacterial activity of adhesive systems depends on several factors, including composition and acidity. Flow cytometry is a novel detection method to measure multiple characteristics of a single cell: total cell number, structural (size, shape, and functional parameters (viability, cell cycle. The LIVE/DEAD® BacLightTM bacterial viability assay was used to evaluate an antibacterial activity of DBS by assessing physical membrane disruption of bacteria mediated by DBS. Ten commercial DBSs: four total-etching (TE, four self-etching (SE and two selective enamel etching (SEE were tested. Both total-etching DBS ExciTE F and OptiBond Solo Plus showed comparatively low antibacterial activity against E. faecalis. The lowest activity of all tested TE systems showed Te-Econom Bond. Among SE DBS, G-ænial Bond (92.24% dead cells followed by Clearfil S3 Bond Plus (88.02% and Panavia F 2.0 ED Primer II (86.67% showed the highest antibacterial activity against E. faecalis, which was comparable to isopropranol (positive control. In the present study, self-etching DBS exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than tested total-etching adhesives against E. faecalis.

  8. Antibacterial Activity of Commercial Dentine Bonding Systems against E. faecalis-Flow Cytometry Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukomska-Szymanska, Monika; Konieczka, Magdalena; Zarzycka, Beata; Lapinska, Barbara; Grzegorczyk, Janina; Sokolowski, Jerzy

    2017-04-29

    Literature presents inconsistent results on the antibacterial activity of dentine bonding systems (DBS). Antibacterial activity of adhesive systems depends on several factors, including composition and acidity. Flow cytometry is a novel detection method to measure multiple characteristics of a single cell: total cell number, structural (size, shape), and functional parameters (viability, cell cycle). The LIVE/DEAD® BacLightTM bacterial viability assay was used to evaluate an antibacterial activity of DBS by assessing physical membrane disruption of bacteria mediated by DBS. Ten commercial DBSs: four total-etching (TE), four self-etching (SE) and two selective enamel etching (SEE) were tested. Both total-etching DBS ExciTE F and OptiBond Solo Plus showed comparatively low antibacterial activity against E. faecalis. The lowest activity of all tested TE systems showed Te-Econom Bond. Among SE DBS, G-ænial Bond (92.24% dead cells) followed by Clearfil S3 Bond Plus (88.02%) and Panavia F 2.0 ED Primer II (86.67%) showed the highest antibacterial activity against E. faecalis, which was comparable to isopropranol (positive control). In the present study, self-etching DBS exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than tested total-etching adhesives against E. faecalis.

  9. Effects of different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of composite resin to amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, M; Koolman, C; Aladag, A; Dündar, M

    2011-01-01

    Repairing amalgam restorations with composite resins using surface conditioning methods is a conservative treatment approach. This study investigated the effects of different conditioning methods that could be used for repair of amalgam fractures. Amalgam (N=96) was condensed into cavities within autopolymerizing polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and the exposed surface of each specimen (diameter, 6 mm; thickness, 2 mm) was ground finished. The specimens were randomly divided into nine experimental groups (n=12 per group), depending on the conditioning method used. The control group had natural central incisors with amalgam (n=12). The combination of the following conditioning methods was tested: silicacoating (Sc), sandblasting (Sb), metal primers, coupling agents, fiber (Fb) application, and opaquers (O). Five types of silanes, metal primers, or adhesives (Visiobond [V], Porcelain Photobond [PP], Alloy Primer [AP], Unibond sealer [Us], ESPE-Sil [ES]), and four opaquers, namely, Clearfil St Opaquer (CstO), Sinfony (S), Miris (M), and an experimental Opaquer (EO-Cavex), were used. The groups were as follows: group 1, Sc+ES+S+V; group 2, Sc+ES+CstO+V; group 3, Sc+ES+M+V; group 4, Sc+ES+EO+V; group 5, Sb+AP+S; group 6, Sb+AP+PP+CstO; group 7, Sc+ES+S+Fb+V+Fb; group 8-control, SC+ES+V; and group 9, Etch+Sc+ES+S+Us. One repair composite was used for all groups (Clearfil Photo Bond Posterior, Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan). Shear bond strengths (SBSs) (MPa ± SD) were evaluated after 5 weeks of water storage (analysis of variance [ANOVA], Tukey honestly significant differences [HSD], α=0.05). Group 1 exhibited significantly higher values (35.5 ± 4.1) than were seen in group 4 (19.4 ± 8.9), group 6 (19.1 ± 7.8), and group 8 (20.1 ± 4.1) (pcomposite adhesion to amalgam. Experimental opaquer exhibited lower values. Leaving a small border of enamel around the restoration decreased the bond strength.

  10. Effect of Various Treatment Modalities on Surface Characteristics and Shear Bond Strengths of Polyetheretherketone-Based Core Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çulhaoğlu, Ahmet Kürşat; Özkır, Serhat Emre; Şahin, Volkan; Yılmaz, Burak; Kılıçarslan, Mehmet Ali

    2017-11-13

    To investigate the effect of different surface treatments on the surface roughness (Ra), wettability, and shear bond strength of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) to composite resin. One hundred ninety eight PEEK specimens were divided into six groups (n = 33). Specimen surfaces were treated with the following surface treatment modalities: silicoating (CoJet), acetone treatment, acid etching (H 2 SO 4 ), airborne particle abrasion (Al 2 O 3 ), laser irradiation (Yb:PL laser), and the nontreated surface serving as the control. Surface roughness was measured with an profilometer (n = 11) and a goniometer was used to measure the surface wettability through contact angle (θ)(n = 11). PEEK surfaces were veneered with a composite resin (n = 11). The specimens were then thermocycled for 10,000 cycles at 5 to 55°C. Shear bond strengths between the PEEK and composite resin were measured with an universal test machine. One-way ANOVA was used to analyze the data. Tukey's post-hoc test was used to determine significant differences between groups (α = 0.05). Surface roughness and wettability of PEEK surfaces along with shear bond strength of PEEK to composite resin were influenced by the surface treatments. (p PEEK surfaces treated by laser irradiation (2.85 ± 0.2 µm) followed by airborne particle abrasion (2.26 ± 0.33 µm), whereas other surface treatment modalities provided similar Ra values, with the acid-etched PEEK surfaces having the lowest mean Ra values (0.35 ± 0.14 µm). Silicoating provided the most wettable PEEK surfaces (48.04 ± 6.28º), followed by either acetone treatment (70.19 ± 4.49º) or acid treatment (76.07 ± 6.61º). Decreased wettability was observed for airborne particle abraded (84.83 ± 4.56º) and laser-treated PEEK surfaces (103.06 ± 4.88º). The highest mean shear bond strength values were observed for acid-etched PEEK surfaces (15.82 ± 4.23 MPa) followed by laser irradiated (11.46 ± 1.97 MPa), airborne particle abraded (10.81 ± 3.06 MPa

  11. Adhesive bonding of resin composite to various titanium surfaces using different metal conditioners and a surface modification system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercules Jorge ALMILHATTI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the effect of three metal conditioners on the shear bond strength (SBS of a prosthetic composite material to cpTi grade I having three surface treatments. Material and Methods: One hundred sixty eight rivet-shaped specimens (8.0x2.0 mm were cast and subjected to polishing (P or sandblasting with either 50 mm (50SB or 250 mm (250SB Al2O3. The metal conditioners Metal Photo Primer (MPP, Cesead II Opaque Primer (OP, Targis Link (TL, and one surface modification system Siloc (S, were applied to the specimen surfaces, which were covered with four 1-mm thick layers of resin composite. The resin layers were exposed to curing light for 90 s separately. Seven specimens from each experimental group were stored in water at 37ºC for 24 h while the other 7 specimens were subjected to 5,000 thermal cycles consisting of water baths at 4ºC and 60ºC (n=7. All specimens were subjected to SBS test (0.5 mm/min until failure occurred, and further 28 specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Tukey's test (α=0.05. Results: On 50SB surfaces, OP groups showed higher SBS means than MPP (P<0.05, while no significant difference was found among OP, S, and TL groups. On 250SB surfaces, OP and TL groups exhibited higher SBS than MPP and S (P<0.05. No significant difference in SBS was found between OP and TL groups nor between MPP and S groups. The use of conditioners on 250SB surfaces resulted in higher SBS means than the use of the same products on 50SB surfaces (P<0.05. Conclusion: Sandblasting associated with the use of metal conditioners improves SBS of resin composites to cpTi.

  12. Assessment of Bond Strength between Metal Brackets and Non-Glazed Ceramic in Different Surface Treatment Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Harririan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength between metal brackets and non-glazed ceramic with three different surface treatment methods.Materials and Methods: Forty-two non-glazed ceramic disks were assigned into three groups. Group I and II specimens were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid. Subsequently in group I, silane and adhesive were applied and in group II, bonding agent was used only.In group III, specimens were treated with 35% phosphoric acid and then silane and adhesive were applied. Brackets were bonded with light-cured composites. The specimens were stored in water in room temperature for 24 hours and then thermocycled 500 times between 5°C and 55°C.Results: The difference of tensile bond strength between groups I and III was not significant(P=0.999. However, the tensile bond strength of group II was significantly lower than groups I, and III (P<0.001. The adhesive remnant index scores between the threegroups had statistically significant differences (P<0.001.Conclusion: With the application of scotch bond multi-purpose plus adhesive, we can use phosphoric acid instead of hydrofluoric acid for bonding brackets to non-glazed ceramic restorations.

  13. Influence of different surface treatments on push‑out bond strengths ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Air abrasion affected the bond strength significantly (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Air abrasion attained higher bond strengths when FRC posts were luted to dual‑cure resin cement. Additional studies should be designed with different types and parameters of laser devices to understand the effect of these devices on bond strength ...

  14. Influence of warm air-drying on enamel bond strength and surface free-energy of self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiratsuchi, Koji; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Furuichi, Tetsuya; Tsubota, Keishi; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2013-08-01

    We examined the effect of warm air-drying on the enamel bond strengths and the surface free-energy of three single-step self-etch adhesives. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in self-curing resin and then wet ground with #600 silicon carbide (SiC) paper. The adhesives were applied according to the instructions of the respective manufacturers and then dried in a stream of normal (23°C) or warm (37°C) air for 5, 10, and 20 s. After visible-light irradiation of the adhesives, resin composites were condensed into a mold and polymerized. Ten samples per test group were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and then the bond strengths were measured. The surface free-energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. The enamel bond strengths varied according to the air-drying time and ranged from 15.8 to 19.1 MPa. The trends for the bond strengths were different among the materials. The value of the γS⁺ component increased slightly when drying was performed with a stream of warm air, whereas that of the γS⁻ component decreased significantly. These data suggest that warm air-drying is essential to obtain adequate enamel bond strengths, although increasing the drying time did not significantly influence the bond strength. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  15. The interplay between surface-water and hydrogen bonding in a water adlayer on Pt(111) and Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delle Site, Luigi [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Ackermannweg 10, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Ghiringhelli, Luca M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Ackermannweg 10, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Andreussi, Oliviero [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56100 Pisa (Italy); Donadio, Davide [Computational Science, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, USI-Campus, via Giuseppe Buffi 13, CH-6900 Lugano (Switzerland); Parrinello, Michele [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56100 Pisa (Italy)

    2007-06-20

    The structure of a water adlayer on a Pt(111) surface is investigated by means of extensive first-principles calculations. Allowing for proton disorder, the ground state energy for the {radical}3 x {radical}3R30{sup o} structure can be found. This results from an interplay between water/metal chemical bonding and the hydrogen bonding of the water network. This picture is supported by substituting Pt(111) with Ag(111): the almost inert surface allows for the reconstruction of the hydrogen network. (fast track communication)

  16. The interplay between surface-water and hydrogen bonding in a water adlayer on Pt(111) and Ag(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delle Site, Luigi; Ghiringhelli, Luca M; Andreussi, Oliviero; Donadio, Davide; Parrinello, Michele

    2007-01-01

    The structure of a water adlayer on a Pt(111) surface is investigated by means of extensive first-principles calculations. Allowing for proton disorder, the ground state energy for the √3 x √3R30 o structure can be found. This results from an interplay between water/metal chemical bonding and the hydrogen bonding of the water network. This picture is supported by substituting Pt(111) with Ag(111): the almost inert surface allows for the reconstruction of the hydrogen network. (fast track communication)

  17. [Effect of hydrofluoric acid concentration on the surface morphology and bonding effectiveness of lithium disilicate glass ceramics to resin composites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailan, Qian; Lingyan, Ren; Rongrong, Nie; Xiangfeng, Meng

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed at determining the influence of hydrofluoric acid (HF) in varied concentrations on the surface morphology of lithium disilicate glass ceramics and bond durability between resin composites and post-treated lithium disilicate glass ceramics. After being sintered, ground, and washed, 72 as-prepared specimens of lithium disilicate glass ceramics with dimensions of 11 mm×13 mm×2 mm were randomly divided into three groups. Each group was treated with acid solution [32% phosphoric acid (PA) or 4% or 9.5% HF] for 20 s. Then, four acidified specimens from each group were randomly selected. One of the specimens was used to observe the surface morphology using scanning electron microscopy, and the others were used to observe the surface roughness using a surface roughness meter (including Ra, Rz, and Rmax). After treatment with different acid solutions in each group, 20 samples were further treated with silane coupling agent/resin adhesive/resin cement (Monobond S/Multilink Primer A&B/Multilink N), followed by bonding to a composite resin column (Filtek™ Z350) with a diameter of 3 mm. A total of 20 specimens in each group were randomly divided into two subgroups, which were used for measuring the microshear bond strength, with one of them subjected to cool-thermal cycle for 20 000 times. The surface roughness (Ra, Rz, and Rmax) of lithium disilicate glass ceramics treated with 4% or 9.5% HF was significantly higher than that of the ceramic treated with PA (Pglass ceramics treated with 9.5% HF also demonstrated better surface roughness (Rz and Rmax) than that of the ceramics treated with 4% HF. Cool-thermal cycle treatment reduced the bond strength of lithium disilicate glass ceramics in all groups (Pglass ceramics treated with HF had higher bond strength than that of the ceramics treated with PA. The lithium disilicate glass ceramics treated with 4% HF had higher bond strength than that of the ceramics treated with 9.5% HF (Pglass ceramics treated with 4

  18. Effects of surface treatments on bond strength of dental Ti-20Cr and Ti-10Zr alloys to porcelain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Hsi-Chen [Department of Dental Technology and Materials Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan (China); Wu, Shih-Ching [Department of Dental Technology and Materials Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Material Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan (China); Ho, Wen-Fu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Da-Yeh University, Taiwan (China); Huang, Ling-Hsiu [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Material Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Hsueh-Chuan, E-mail: hchsu@ctust.edu.t [Department of Dental Technology and Materials Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Material Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan (China)

    2010-08-27

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of surface treatments, including sandblasting and grinding, on the bond strength between a low-fusing porcelain and c.p. Ti, Ti-20Cr and Ti-10Zr alloys. The surface treatments were divided into 2 groups. Grinding surface treatment was applied to the first group, which served as the control, and sandblasting was applied to the second group. After treatment, low-fusing porcelain (Titankeramik) was fired onto the surface of the specimens. A universal testing machine was used to perform a 3-point bending test. The metal-ceramic interfaces were subjected to scanning electron microscopic analysis. Of the sandblasted samples, the debonding test showed that Ti-20Cr alloy had the strongest (31.50 MPa) titanium-ceramic bond (p < 005), followed by c.p. Ti (29.4 MPa) and Ti-10Zr (24.3 MPa). Of the grinded samples, Ti-20Cr alloy showed 27.3 MPa titanium-ceramic bond (p < 005), followed by c.p. Ti (14.3 MPa) and Ti-10Zr (failure). The SEM micrographs of the metal surface after debonding showed residual porcelain retained on all samples. On the whole, sandblasting surface treatment appears to have had a more beneficial effect on the Ti-ceramic bond strength than grinding surface treatment. Furthermore, surface treatment of Ti-20Cr with either grinding or sandblasting resulted in adequate bond strength, which exceeded the lower limit value in the ISO 9693 standard (25 MPa).

  19. Cu-catalyzed cross-dehydrogenative coupling: A versatile strategy for C-C bond formations via the oxidative activation of sp3 C-H bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiping; Bohle, D. Scott; Li, Chao-Jun

    2006-06-01

    Cu-catalyzed cross-dehydrogenative coupling (CDC) methodologies were developed based on the oxidative activation of sp3 C-H bonds adjacent to a nitrogen atom. Various sp, sp2, and sp3 C-H bonds of pronucleophiles were used in the Cu-catalyzed CDC reactions. Based on these results, the mechanisms of the CDC reactions also are discussed. C-H activation | catalysis | Baylis-Hillman reaction | Mannich reaction | Friedel-Crafts reaction

  20. CHEMICAL ACTIVATION OF MOLECULES BY METALS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS AND BONDING; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LICHTENBERGER, DENNIS L.

    2002-01-01

    This research program is directed at obtaining detailed experimental information on the electronic interactions between metals and organic molecules. These interactions provide low energy pathways for many important chemical and catalytic processes. A major feature of the program is the continued development and application of our special high-resolution valence photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and high-precision X-ray core photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) instrumentation for study of organometallic molecules in the gas phase. The study involves a systematic approach towards understanding the interactions and activation of bound carbonyls, C-H bonds, methylenes, vinylidenes, acetylides, alkenes, alkynes, carbenes, carbynes, alkylidenes, alkylidynes, and others with various monometal, dimetal, and cluster metal species. Supporting ligands include -aryls, alkoxides, oxides, and phosphines. We are expanding our studies of both early and late transition metal species and electron-rich and electron-poor environments in order to more completely understand the electronic factors that serve to stabilize particular organic fragments and intermediates on metals. Additional new directions for this program are being taken in ultra-high vacuum surface UPS, XPS, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments on both physisorbed and chemisorbed organometallic thin films. The combination of these methods provides additional electronic structure information on surface-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions. A very important general result emerging from this program is the identification of a close relationship between the ionization energies of the species and the thermodynamics of the chemical and catalytic reactions of these systems

  1. CHEMICAL ACTIVATION OF MOLECULES BY METALS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS AND BONDING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LICHTENBERGER, DENNIS L.

    2002-03-26

    This research program is directed at obtaining detailed experimental information on the electronic interactions between metals and organic molecules. These interactions provide low energy pathways for many important chemical and catalytic processes. A major feature of the program is the continued development and application of our special high-resolution valence photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and high-precision X-ray core photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) instrumentation for study of organometallic molecules in the gas phase. The study involves a systematic approach towards understanding the interactions and activation of bound carbonyls, C-H bonds, methylenes, vinylidenes, acetylides, alkenes, alkynes, carbenes, carbynes, alkylidenes, alkylidynes, and others with various monometal, dimetal, and cluster metal species. Supporting ligands include -aryls, alkoxides, oxides, and phosphines. We are expanding our studies of both early and late transition metal species and electron-rich and electron-poor environments in order to more completely understand the electronic factors that serve to stabilize particular organic fragments and intermediates on metals. Additional new directions for this program are being taken in ultra-high vacuum surface UPS, XPS, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments on both physisorbed and chemisorbed organometallic thin films. The combination of these methods provides additional electronic structure information on surface-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions. A very important general result emerging from this program is the identification of a close relationship between the ionization energies of the species and the thermodynamics of the chemical and catalytic reactions of these systems.

  2. Surface-activated joining method for surveillance coupon reconstitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaihara, Shoichiro; Nakamura, Terumi

    1993-01-01

    As nuclear power plants approach the end of their license periods and license renewal is contemplated, there is an increasing need to expand the data base of mechanical properties obtainable from archival surveillance specimens. A new joining method for reconstituting broken Charpy specimens is being developed, the objective being to retain the original properties of the material in the process. The new method is called surface-activated joining (SAJ). It is designed to obtain a good junction without applying extra heating and deformation. In particular, the purpose of SAJ is to minimize the width of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and to decrease the maximum temperature experienced by the specimen during reconsolidation of the two pieces. Generally, machined metal surfaces are contaminated with films of oxide, adsorbed gas, oil, or other vapors that impede bonding of surfaces during joining. However, if surface contamination is removed and the two surfaces are mated as closely as possible, joining can be achieved at low temperatures and modest stress levels. In order to apply the SAJ method, the following requirements must be met: (1) inert atmosphere to protect the surfaces from atmospheric gases and oxidation; (2) removal of the existing contamination layers to activate the surfaces; and (3) method for bringing the two surfaces into very intimate contact prior to joining

  3. The effects of dentin and intaglio indirect ceramic optimized polymer restoration surface treatment on the shear bond strength of resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitarini, A.; Suprastiwi, E.; Usman, M.

    2017-08-01

    Ceramic optimized polymer (ceromer) bonds to the tooth substrate through resin cements. The bond strength between dentin, resin cement, and ceromer depends on the applied surface treatment. To analyze the effects of dentin and intaglio ceromer surface treatment on the shear bond strength self-adhesive resin cement. Forty-five dentin premolar and ceromer specimens were bonded with resin cement and divided into three groups as follows: in group 1, no treatment was applied; in group 2, dentin surface treatment was carried out with acid etching and a bonding agent; and in group 3, dentin surface treatment was carried out with acid etching, a bonding agent, and intaglio ceromer surface treatment with etching and silane. All specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 hours, and the shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Group 3 showed the highest shear bond strength, followed by group 2. The surface treatment of dentin and intaglio ceromer showed significantly improved shear bond strength in the group comparison. Dentin and intaglio ceromer surface treatment can improved the shear bond strength self-adhesive resin cement.

  4. 29 CFR 2580.412-8 - The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates. 2580.412-8 Section 2580.412-8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE... INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Scope and Form of the Bond § 2580.412-8 The nature of...

  5. An in vitro evaluation of the zirconia surface treatment by mesoporous zirconia coating on its bonding to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanli; Sun, Ting; Liu, Ruoyu; Feng, Xiaoli; Chen, Aijie; Shao, Longquan

    2014-01-01

    The effect of zirconia surface treatment by mesoporous zirconia coating on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) between zirconia and resin cement was investigated in this work. 160 zirconia specimens were prepared and divided into four groups according to surface treatments: (1) airborne-particle-abrasion treatment (APA); (2) glass infiltration and hydrofluoric acid treatment (GI+HF); (3) mesoporous zirconia coating (MZ); and (4) no treatment (C). The as-prepared zirconia specimens were bonded using Panavia F2.0 and RelyX Unicem. The MTBS values were tested using a universal testing machine, and data were analyzed using ANOVA and SNK methods (a=0.05). The MTBS values obtained after GI+HF and MZ treatments were significantly higher than those obtained after APA and C treatments (Psurface treatments using GI+HF and MZ yield higher bond strength than those using APA or C, regardless of the resin cements.

  6. Active application of primer acid on acid-treated enamel: Influence on the bond effectiveness of self-etch adhesives systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Cíntia Tereza Pimenta; Prieto, Lúcia Trazzi; Costa, Daiane Cristianismo; Bosso, Mariana Avalone; Coppini, Erick Kamiya; Dias, Carlos Tadeu Santos; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2017-08-01

    Evaluate the composite-to-enamel bond after passive or active application of self-etching primer systems on polished or pre-etched enamel with phosphoric acid. Two self-etch adhesives systems (SEAS) were used: Clearfil SE Bond and Easy Bond. Third human molars were divided into 8 groups (N = 10). The crown of each tooth was sectioned into halves and the mesial/distal surfaces were used. The adhesives were actively or passively applied on enamel with or without prior phosphoric-acid etching. Resin composite cylinders were built after adhesive application. After stored in relative humidity for 24 hr/37°C the specimens were subjected to microshear test in universal testing a machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The results were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and the Tukey test. The enamel-etching pattern was evaluated under SEM. The 2-step SEAS system presented significantly higher adhesive bond strength means (47.37 MPa) than the 1-step (36.87 MPa). A poor enamel- etching pattern was observed in active mode showing irregular and short resin tags, however there was not compromised the bond strength. Active or passive application produced similar values of bond strength to enamel regardless of enamel pretreatment and type of SEAS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. One-step surface modification for irreversible bonding of various plastics with a poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Lee, Nae Yoon

    2014-05-07

    Here, we introduce a simple and facile method for bonding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) to various plastics irreversibly via a one-step chemical treatment at room temperature. This was mediated by poly[dimethylsiloxane-co-(3-aminopropyl)methylsiloxane] (amine-PDMS linker), a chemical composed of a PDMS backbone incorporating an amine side group. Room temperature anchoring of the linker was achieved via a reaction between the amine functionality of the linker and the carbon backbone of the plastics, thereby producing urethane bonds. This resulted in the PDMS functionality being exposed on the plastic surface, mimicking the surface properties of bulk PDMS. Following corona treatment of the PDMS-modified plastic and a sheet of PDMS, the two surfaces were placed in contact with each other and heated at 80 °C for 1 h. This resulted in permanent bonding between PDMS and the plastic. To examine the effectiveness of the amine-PDMS linker coating procedure, the surfaces were characterized by measuring water contact angles and by employing X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Polycarbonate (PC), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), poly(vinylchloride) (PVC), and polyimide (PI) were bonded successfully to PDMS using this method, with bond strengths of PC, PET, and PVC with PDMS measured to be approximately 428.5 ± 17.9, 361.7 ± 31.2, and 430.0 ± 14.9 kPa, respectively. The bond strength of a PC-PC homogeneous assembly, also realized using the proposed method, was measured to be approximately 343.9 ± 7.4 kPa. Delamination tests revealed that the PC-PC assembly was able to withstand intense introduction of a liquid whose per-minute injection volume was approximately 278 times greater than the total internal volume of the microchannel fabricated in PC. This demonstrated the robustness of the seal formed using the proposed technique.

  8. Modification of Purine and Pyrimidine Nucleosides by Direct C-H Bond Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal-catalyzed modifications of the activated heterocyclic bases of nucleosides as well as DNA or RNA fragments employing traditional cross-coupling methods have been well-established in nucleic acid chemistry. This review covers advances in the area of cross-coupling reactions in which nucleosides are functionalized via direct activation of the C8-H bond in purine and the C5-H or C6-H bond in uracil bases. The review focuses on Pd/Cu-catalyzed couplings between unactivated nucleoside bases with aryl halides. It also discusses cross-dehydrogenative arylations and alkenylations as well as other reactions used for modification of nucleoside bases that avoid the use of organometallic precursors and involve direct C-H bond activation in at least one substrate. The scope and efficiency of these coupling reactions along with some mechanistic considerations are discussed.

  9. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of soft denture lining materials to an acrylic resin denture base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Mustafa; Yesil Duymus, Zeynep; Alkurt, Murat

    2014-10-01

    Adhesive failure between acrylic resin and resilient liner material is commonly encountered in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength of 2 different resilient lining materials to an acrylic resin denture base. Ninety-six dumbbell-shaped specimens were fabricated from heat-polymerized acrylic resin, and 3 mm of the material was cut from the thin midsection. The specimens were divided into 6 groups according to their surface treatments: no surface treatment (control group), 36% phosphoric acid etching (acid group), erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser (laser group), airborne-particle abrasion with 50-μm Al2O3 particles (abrasion group), an acid+laser group, and an abrasion+laser group. The specimens in each group were divided into 2 subgroups according to the resilient lining material used: heat-polymerized silicone based resilient liner (Molloplast B) and autopolymerized silicone-based resilient liner (Ufi Gel P). After all of the specimens had been polymerized, they were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 1 week. A tensile bond strength test was then performed. Data were analyzed with a 2-way ANOVA, and the Sidak multiple comparison test was used to identify significant differences (α=.05). The effects of the surface treatments and resilient lining materials on the surface of the denture base resin were examined with scanning electron microscopy. The tensile bond strength was significantly different between Molloplast B and Ufi Gel P (Presin. Molloplast B exhibited significantly higher bond strength than Ufi Gel P. Altering the surface of the acrylic resin denture base with 36% phosphoric acid etching increased bond strength. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Biocatalytic Route to Surface Active Lipid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheong, Ling-Zhi; Xu, Xuebing

    Lipid can be structurally modified in order to attain improved functional properties. This work look into the possibilities of developing surface active lipids with improved functional properties through biocatalytic route. Biocatalytic route to surface active lipid are usually complex involving ...... distinct self assembling property and find useful application in surfactant industry.......Lipid can be structurally modified in order to attain improved functional properties. This work look into the possibilities of developing surface active lipids with improved functional properties through biocatalytic route. Biocatalytic route to surface active lipid are usually complex involving...

  11. Effect of surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin composite to composite after aging conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Barbosa, Silvia Helena; Melo, Renata Marques; Galhano, Graziela Avila Prado; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of two different surface conditioning methods on the repair bond strength of a bis-GMA-adduct/bis-EMA/TEGDMA based resin composite after three aging conditions. Methods. Thirty-six composite resin blocks (Esthet X, Dentsply) were prepared (5 mm x 6 mm x 6

  12. Effects of surface treatments and bonding types on the interfacial behavior of fiber metal laminate based on magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Ma, Quanyang; Dai, Yu; Hu, Faping; Liu, Gang; Xu, Zouyuan; Wei, Guobing; Xu, Tiancai; Zeng, Qingwen; Xie, Weidong

    2018-01-01

    Fiber metal laminates based on magnesium alloys (MgFML) with different surface treatments and different bonding types were tested and analyzed. By using dynamic contact angle measurement and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), it was found that phosphating treatment can significantly improve the surface energy and wettability of magnesium alloy, and the surface energy of phosphated magnesium alloy was approximately 50% higher than that of abraded-only magnesium alloy. The single cantilever beam (SCB) test showed that the interfacial fracture energies of directly bonded MgFMLs based on abraded-only magnesium and abraded + phosphated magnesium were 650 J/m2 and 1030 J/m2, respectively, whereas the interfacial fracture energies of indirectly bonded MgFMLs were 1650 J/m2 and 2260 J/m2, respectively. Phosphating treatment and modified polypropylene interleaf were observed to improve the tensile strength and interfacial fracture toughness of MgFML. In addition, the rougher surface was more conducive to enhance the bonding strength and interfacial fracture toughness of MgFML.

  13. Effects of surface conditioning on repair bond strengths of non-aged and aged microhybrid, nanohybrid, and nanofilled composite resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinastiti, Margareta; Siswomihardjo, Widowati; Busscher, Henk J.; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates effects of aging on repair bond strengths of microhybrid, nanohybrid, and nanofilled composite resins and characterizes the interacting surfaces after aging. Disk-shaped composite specimens were assigned to one of three aging conditions: (1) thermocycling (5,000x, 5-55 degrees

  14. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to glass infiltrated zirconia-reinforced ceramic : The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, R; Ozcan, M; Bottino, MA; Valandro, LF

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-reinforced alumina-based core ceramic. Methods. Thirty blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (In-Ceram Zirconia-INC-ZR,

  15. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to glass infiltrated zirconia-reinforced ceramic: The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, R.; Ozcan, M.; Bottino, M.A.; Valandro, L.F.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-reinforced alumina-based core ceramic. Methods. Thirty blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (In-Ceram Zirconia-INC-ZR,

  16. Bond strength of a resin cement to high-alumina and zirconia-reinforced ceramics: The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valandro, L.F.; Ozcan, M.; Bottino, M.C.; Bottino, M.A.; Scotti, R.; Della Bona, A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to three high-strength core ceramics: high alumina-based (In-Ceram Alumina, Procera AllCeram) and zirconia-reinforced alumina-based (in-Ceram Zirconia)

  17. Bond strength of a resin cement to high-alumina and zirconia-reinforced ceramics : The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felipe Valandro, Luiz; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Cicero; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Scotti, Roberto; Della Bona, Alvaro

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to three high-strength core ceramics: high alumina-based (In-Ceram Alumina, Procera AllCeram) and zirconia-reinforced alumina-based (in-Ceram Zirconia)

  18. INFLUENCE OF SILANE HEAT TREATMENT ON THE TENSILE BOND STRENGTH BETWEEN EX-3 SYNTHETIC VENEERING PORCELAIN AND COMPOSITE RESIN USING FIVE DIFFERENT ACTIVATION TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spartak Yanakiev

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the present study is to assess the effect of five different silane activation temperatures and eight activation methods on the tensile bond strength between one veneering porcelain and one composite resin material. Material and methods: A total of 81 ceramic rods were made of EX-3 veneering ceramic (Kuraray Noritake Dental, Japan. Sintered ceramic bars were grinded with diamond disks to size 10x2x2mm ± 0,05mm. The front part of each bar was polished. After ultrasonic cleaning in distilled water, the specimens were divided into nine groups. Silane was activated with air at room temperature, 38º С, 50º С, 100º С, 120º С using a custom made blow drier. In a silicone mold, a composite resin Z250 (3М ESPE, St. Paul, USA was condensed toward the bond ceramic surface. A total of 81 specimens approximately 2,0 cm long were prepared for tensile bond testing. One way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni and Games-Howell tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: The lowest tensile bond strength was observed in the control group (3,51MPa. Group 2 yielded the highest bond strength among all groups (19,54MPa. Silane heat treatment enhanced the bond strength for all treatment methods. Within the polished specimens, the highest bond strength was yielded with warm air at 120ºС (11,31MPa. Conclusion: The most effective method for bonding Z250 composite resin to EX-3 veneering ceramic includes HF etching, silane, and adhesive resin. The most effective heat treatment method for bonding is hot air at 120ºС.

  19. Hormonal changes and couple bonding in consensual sadomasochistic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagarin, Brad J; Cutler, Bert; Cutler, Nadine; Lawler-Sagarin, Kimberly A; Matuszewich, Leslie

    2009-04-01

    In two studies, 58 sadomasochistic (SM) practitioners provided physiological measures of salivary cortisol and testosterone (hormones associated with stress and dominance, respectively) and psychological measures of relationship closeness before and after participating in SM activities. Observed activities included bondage, sensory deprivation, a variety of painful and pleasurable stimulation, verbal and non-verbal communication, and expressions of caring and affection. During the scenes, cortisol rose significantly for participants who were bound, receiving stimulation, and following orders, but not for participants who were providing stimulation, orders, or structure. Female participants who were bound, receiving stimulation, and following orders also showed increases in testosterone during the scenes. Thereafter, participants who reported that their SM activities went well showed reductions in physiological stress (cortisol) and increases in relationship closeness. Among participants who reported that their SM activities went poorly, some showed decreases in relationship closeness whereas others showed increases. The increases in relationship closeness combined with the displays of caring and affection observed as part of the SM activities offer support for the modern view that SM, when performed consensually, has the potential to increase intimacy between participants.

  20. Effect of Porcelain Surface Pretreatments on Composite Resin-Porcelain Shear Bond Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    compared shear bond strengths between mechanically retained, silicoated, and sputter coated orthodontic brackets cemented with three different cements...between composite resin and porcelain, it is thought that thermocycling accelerates the hydrolysis induced degradation of the composite resin-porcelain bond...Bonding Orthodontic Attachments to Porcelain Teeth Using a Silane Coupling Agent, Am J Orthod 77: 233. Jones, D. W. (1985): Low Fusing Porcelains. In

  1. SEM/XPS analysis of fractured adhesively bonded graphite fibre surface resin-rich/graphite fibre composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devilbiss, T. A.; Wightman, J. P.; Progar, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    Samples of graphite fiber-reinforced polyimide were fabricated allowing the resin to accumulate at the composite surface. These surface resin-rich composites were then bonded together and tested for lap shear strength both before and after thermal aging. Lap shear strength did not appear to show a significant improvement over that previously recorded for resin-poor samples and was shown to decrease with increasing aging time and temperature.

  2. Surface-Relief Gratings in Halogen-Bonded Polymer–Azobenzene Complexes: A Concentration-Dependence Study

    OpenAIRE

    Stumpel, Jelle E.; Marco, Saccone; Valentina, Dichiarante; Ossi, Lehtonen; Matti, Virkki; Pierangelo, Metrangolo; Arri, Priimagi

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, supramolecular complexes comprising a poly(4-vinylpyridine) backbone and azobenzene-based halogen bond donors have emerged as a promising class of materials for the inscription of light-induced surface-relief gratings (SRGs). The studies up to date have focused on building supramolecular hierarchies, i.e., optimizing the polymer-azobenzene noncovalent interaction for efficient surface patterning. They have been conducted using systems with relatively low azobenzene content, a...

  3. Grafting of diazonium salts on oxides surface: formation of aryl-O bonds on iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brymora, Katarzyna; Fouineau, Jonathan; Eddarir, Asma; Chau, François; Yaacoub, Nader; Grenèche, Jean-Marc; Pinson, Jean; Ammar, Souad; Calvayrac, Florent

    2015-01-01

    Combining ab initio modeling and 57 Fe Mössbauer spectrometry, we characterized the nature of the chemical linkage of aminoalkyl arenediazonium salt on the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles. We established that it is built through a metal–oxygen–carbon bonding and not a metal–carbon one, as usually suggested and commonly observed in previously studied metal- or carbon-based surfaces

  4. Grafting of diazonium salts on oxides surface: formation of aryl-O bonds on iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brymora, Katarzyna [LUNAM Université du Maine, IMMM UMR CNRS 6283 (France); Fouineau, Jonathan; Eddarir, Asma; Chau, François [Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, ITODYS CNRS UMR 7086 (France); Yaacoub, Nader; Grenèche, Jean-Marc [LUNAM Université du Maine, IMMM UMR CNRS 6283 (France); Pinson, Jean; Ammar, Souad [Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, ITODYS CNRS UMR 7086 (France); Calvayrac, Florent, E-mail: florent.calvayrac@univ-lemans.fr [LUNAM Université du Maine, IMMM UMR CNRS 6283 (France)

    2015-11-15

    Combining ab initio modeling and {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectrometry, we characterized the nature of the chemical linkage of aminoalkyl arenediazonium salt on the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles. We established that it is built through a metal–oxygen–carbon bonding and not a metal–carbon one, as usually suggested and commonly observed in previously studied metal- or carbon-based surfaces.

  5. Development of Statistical Process Control Methodology for an Environmentally Compliant Surface Cleaning Process in a Bonding Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Dale E.; Doan, Patrick A.; Boothe, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    Bonding labs at both MSFC and the northern Utah production plant prepare bond test specimens which simulate or witness the production of NASA's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). The current process for preparing the bonding surfaces employs 1,1,1-trichloroethane vapor degreasing, which simulates the current RSRM process. Government regulations (e.g., the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act) have mandated a production phase-out of a number of ozone depleting compounds (ODC) including 1,1,1-trichloroethane. In order to comply with these regulations, the RSRM Program is qualifying a spray-in-air (SIA) precision cleaning process using Brulin 1990, an aqueous blend of surfactants. Accordingly, surface preparation prior to bonding process simulation test specimens must reflect the new production cleaning process. The Bonding Lab Statistical Process Control (SPC) program monitors the progress of the lab and its capabilities, as well as certifies the bonding technicians, by periodically preparing D6AC steel tensile adhesion panels with EA-91 3NA epoxy adhesive using a standardized process. SPC methods are then used to ensure the process is statistically in control, thus producing reliable data for bonding studies, and identify any problems which might develop. Since the specimen cleaning process is being changed, new SPC limits must be established. This report summarizes side-by-side testing of D6AC steel tensile adhesion witness panels and tapered double cantilevered beams (TDCBs) using both the current baseline vapor degreasing process and a lab-scale spray-in-air process. A Proceco 26 inches Typhoon dishwasher cleaned both tensile adhesion witness panels and TDCBs in a process which simulates the new production process. The tests were performed six times during 1995, subsequent statistical analysis of the data established new upper control limits (UCL) and lower control limits (LCL). The data also demonstrated that the new process was equivalent to the vapor

  6. Effect of Surface Treatment with Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser on Bond Strength between Cement Resin and Zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasraei, Shahin; Atefat, Mohammad; Beheshti, Maryam; Safavi, Nassimeh; Mojtahedi, Maryam; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman

    2014-01-01

    Since it is not possible to form an adequate micromechanical bond between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using common surface treatment techniques, laser pretreatment has been suggested for zirconia ceramic surfaces. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser treatment on shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic. In this in vitro study thirty discs of zirconia with a diameter of 6 mm and a thickness of 2 mm were randomly divided into two groups of 15. In the test group the zirconia disc surfaces were irradiated by CO2 laser with an output power of 3 W and energy density of 265.39 j/cm(2). Composite resin discs were fabricated by plastic molds, measuring 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness and were cemented on zirconia disk surfaces with Panavia F2.0 resin cement (Kuraray Co. Ltd, Osaka, Japan). Shear bond strength was measured by a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The fracture type was assessed under a stereomicroscope at ×40. Surface morphologies of two specimens of the test group were evaluated under SEM before and after laser pretreatment. Data was analyzed by paired t-test (p value resin cement and zirconia ceramic (p value = 0.001). Under the limitations of this study, surface treatment with CO2 laser increased the SBS between resin cement and the zirconia ceramic.

  7. A comparative effect of various surface chemical treatments on the resin composite-composite repair bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaloo Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was an attempt to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength between pre-existing composite and repair composite resin. Materials and Methods: Forty acrylic blocks were prepared in a cuboidal mould. In each block, a well of 5 mm diameter and 5 mm depth was prepared to retain the composite resin (Filtek™ Z350, 3M/ESPE. Aging of the composite discs was achieved by storing them in water at 37°C for 1 week, and after that were divided into 5 groups (n = 8 according to surface treatment: Group I- 37% phosphoric acid, Group II-10% hydrofluoric acid, Group III-30% citric acid, Group IV-7% maleic acid and Group V- Adhesive (no etchant. The etched surfaces were rinsed and dried followed by application of bonding agent (Adper™ Single Bond 2. 3M/ESPE. The repair composite was placed on aged composite, light-cured for 40 seconds and stored in water at 37°C for 1 week. Shear bond strength between the aged and the new composite resin was determined with a universal testing machine (crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis: The compressive shear strengths were compared for differences using ANOVA test followed by Tamhane′s T2 post hoc analysis. Results: The surface treatment with 10% hydrofluoric acid showed the maximum bond strength followed by 30% citric acid, 7% maleic acid and 37% phosphoric acid in decreasing order. Conclusion: The use of 10% hydrofluoric acid can be a good alternative for surface treatment in repair of composite resin restoration as compared to commonly used 37% orthophosphoric acid.

  8. Diffusion Bonding Beryllium to Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel: Development of Processes and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Ryan Matthew

    Only a few materials are suitable to act as armor layers against the thermal and particle loads produced by magnetically confined fusion. These candidates include beryllium, tungsten, and carbon fiber composites. The armor layers must be joined to the plasma facing components with high strength bonds that can withstand the thermal stresses resulting from differential thermal expansion. While specific joints have been developed for use in ITER (an experimental reactor in France), including beryllium to CuCrZr as well as tungsten to stainless steel interfaces, joints specific to commercially relevant fusion reactors are not as well established. Commercial first wall components will likely be constructed front Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel, which will need to be coating with one of the three candidate materials. Of the candidates, beryllium is particularly difficult to bond, because it reacts during bonding with most elements to form brittle intermetallic compounds. This brittleness is unacceptable, as it can lead to interface crack propagation and delamination of the armor layer. I have attempted to overcome the brittle behavior of beryllium bonds by developing a diffusion bonding process of beryllium to RAFM steel that achieves a higher degree of ductility. This process utilized two bonding aids to achieve a robust bond: a. copper interlayer to add ductility to the joint, and a titanium interlayer to prevent beryllium from forming unwanted Be-Cu intermetallics. In addition, I conducted a series of numerical simulations to predict the effect of these bonding aids on the residual stress in the interface. Lastly, I fabricated and characterized beryllium to ferritic steel diffusion bonds using various bonding parameters and bonding aids. Through the above research, I developed a process to diffusion bond beryllium to ferritic steel with a 150 M Pa tensile strength and 168 M Pa shear strength. This strength was achieved using a Hot Isostatic

  9. Bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to self-adhesive resin cement: the effect of surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to self-adhesive resin cement. Two types of CAD/CAM restorative materials (Vita Enamic [VE] and Lava Ultimate [LU]) were used. The specimens were divided into five groups in each test according to the surface treatment performed; Gr 1 (control; no treatment), Gr 2 (sandblasted [SB]), Gr 3 (SB+silane [S]), Gr 4 (hydrofluoric acid [HF]), and Gr 5 (HF+S). A dual-curing self-adhesive resin cement (Bifix SE [BF]) was applied to each group for testing the adhesion after 24 h of storage in distilled water or after 30 days using the μTBS test. Following fracture testing, specimens were examined with a stereomicroscope and SEM. Surface roughness and morphology of the CAD/CAM restorative materials were characterized after treatment. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The surface treatment, type of CAD/CAM restorative material, and water storage periods showed a significant effect on the μTBS (p0.05). On the other hand, for the VE/BF system, surface treatment with HF+S showed higher bond strength values compared with SB and HF surface treatments (pmaterials was modified after treatments. The effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement is material dependent. The VE/BF CAD/CAM material provided higher bond strength values compared with the LU/BF CAD/CAM material.

  10. Controlling hydrogenation activity and selectivity of bimetallic surfaces and catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Luis E.

    Studies of bimetallic systems are of great interest in catalysis due to the novel properties that they often show in comparison with the parent metals. The goals of this dissertation are: (1) to expand the studies of self-hydrogenation and hydrogenation reactions on bimetallic surfaces under ultra high vacuum conditions (UHV) using different hydrocarbon as probe molecules; (2) to attempt to correlate the surface science findings with supported catalyst studies under more realistic conditions; and (3) to investigate the competitive hydrogenation of C=C versus C=O bonds on Pt(111) modified by different 3d transition metals. Hydrogenation studies using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) on Ni/Pt(111) bimetallic surfaces have demonstrated an enhancement in the low temperature hydrogenation activity relative to that of clean Pt(111). This novel hydrogenation pathway can be achieved under UHV conditions by controlling the structures of the bimetallic surfaces. A low temperature hydrogenation activity of 1-hexene and 1-butene has been observed on a Pt-Ni-Pt(111) subsurface structure, where Ni atoms are mainly present on the second layer of the Pt(111) single crystal. These results are in agreement with previous studies of self-hydrogenation and hydrogenation of cyclohexene. However, a much higher dehydrogenation activity is observed in the reaction of cyclohexene to produce benzene, demonstrating that the hydrocarbon structure has an effect on the reaction pathways. On the other hand, self-hydrogenation of 1-butene is not observed on the Pt-Ni-Pt(111) surface, indicating that the chain length (or molecular weight) has a significant effect on the selfhydrogenation activity. The gas phase reaction of cyclohexene on Ni/Pt supported on alumina catalysts has also shown a higher self-hydrogenation activity in comparison with the same reaction performed on supported monometallic catalysts. The effects of metal loading and impregnation sequence of the metal precursors are

  11. Effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of acrylic denture teeth to polymethylmethacrylate denture base material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Hakan; Kirmali, Omer; Tugut, Faik; Coskun, Mehmet Emre

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of various surface pretreatments in the ridge lap area of acrylic resin denture teeth on the shear bond strength to heat-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin. Tooth debonding of the denture is a major problem for patients with removable prostheses. A total of 84 central incisor denture teeth were used in this study. Seven test groups with 12 specimens for each group were prepared as follows: untreated (control, group C), ground, with a tungsten carbide bur (group H), airborne-particle abrasion (group AA), primed with methyl methacrylate (group M), treated with izobutyl methacrylate (group iBMA), Eclipse Bonding Agent applied (group E), and Er:YAG laser irradiated (group L). Test specimens were produced according to the manufacturers' instructions and mounted to a universal testing machine for shear testing with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were evaluated by one way variance analysis (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Similar bond strength values were found between groups L and M, and these were the highest shear bond strengths among the groups. The lowest one was observed in group E. All surface treatments, except group E, exhibited significant difference when compared with group C (pacrylic resin denture teeth to PMMA denture base resin might be an alternative to wetting with MMA monomer. To overcome tooth debonding, surface treatment of the ridge lap area should be performed as part of denture fabrication.

  12. Hydrogen bonds induced supramolecular self-assembly of azobenzene derivatives on the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xinrui; Cheng, Zhiyu; Ren, Biye; Deng, Wenli

    2012-08-01

    The self-assembly of azobenzene derivatives (CnAzCOOH) with various lengths of peripheral alkyl chains (with carbon number of n = 8, 10, 12, 14, 16) were observed by scanning tunneling microscopy on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface. The effect of van der Waals interactions and the intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the two-dimensional self-assembly was systematically studied. No alkyl-chain length effect was observed according to the STM images. All kinds of CnAzCOOH adopting the same pattern self-assembled on the HOPG surface, suggesting the formation of the two-dimensional structures was dominated by the hydrogen bonding of the functional groups. It could be found that two CnAzCOOH molecules formed a hydrogen-bonded dimer with “head-to-head” fashion as expected; however, the dimers organized themselves in the form of relative complex lamellae. Three dimers as a group arranged side by side and formed a well-defined stripe with periodic dislocations due to the registry mechanism of the alkyl chain with the underlying HOPG surface. The hydrogen bonds between the adjacent dimers in one lamella were formed and dominated the self-assembled pattern.

  13. A facile preparation of TiO2/ACF with Csbnd Ti bond and abundant hydroxyls and its enhanced photocatalytic activity for formaldehyde removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R. F.; Li, W. B.; Peng, A. Y.

    2018-01-01

    The quantum yields and efficiency(ACF) was prepared via a modified deposition-precipitation method to facilitate its photon absorption and of photogenerated charge carriers have been the major issues for photocatalysis on titania catalyst. The TiO2/ACF catalyst with anatase TiO2 uniformly dispersed on activated carbon fibers electron transfer, thus improve the quantum yields and efficiency of the photogenerated electrons and holes. XPS analysis on the catalyst demonstrates the existence of Ti3+ and Ti2+ species, Csbnd Ti bond and abundant hydroxyls, which are also proved by UV-vis DRS and TG-DSC analysis. It is believed that the acid environment in preparation plays an essential role in the formation of Csbnd Ti bond and surface hydroxyls, which can be tuned by changing hydrothermal synthesis time. The Csbnd Ti bond can improve the electron transfer in the catalyst and the substantial surface hydroxyls lead to high absorption for UV lines and enhanced adsorption of water and formaldehyde, resulting in more active OH free radicals and the outstanding photocatalytic activity of TiO2/ACF, which is much higher than the titania powder for photocatalytic removal of low concentration formaldehyde. The essential role of surface hydroxyls for photocatalytic activity was confirmed surpassing that of chemical bond between carbon and titanium in TiO2-carbon composite for the first time.

  14. Active screen plasma nitriding enhances cell attachment to polymer surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaklamani, Georgia; Bowen, James; Mehrban, Nazia; Dong, Hanshan; Grover, Liam M.; Stamboulis, Artemis

    2013-01-01

    Active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is a well-established technique used for the surface modification of materials, the result of which is often a product with enhanced functional performance. Here we report the modification of the chemical and mechanical properties of ultra-high molecular weight poly(ethylene) (UHMWPE) using 80:20 (v/v) N 2 /H 2 ASPN, followed by growth of 3T3 fibroblasts on the treated and untreated polymer surfaces. ASPN-treated UHMWPE showed extensive fibroblast attachment within 3 h of seeding, whereas fibroblasts did not successfully attach to untreated UHMWPE. Fibroblast-coated surfaces were maintained for up to 28 days, monitoring their metabolic activity and morphology throughout. The chemical properties of the ASPN-treated UHMWPE surface were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, revealing the presence of C-N, C=N, and C≡N chemical bonds. The elastic modulus, surface topography, and adhesion properties of the ASPN-treated UHMWPE surface were studied over 28 days during sample storage under ambient conditions and during immersion in two commonly used cell culture media.

  15. Effect of Bracket Base Sandblasting on Bonding of Orthodontic Brackets on Enamel Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Farahani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In evaluating bond failure, considerable attention has been paid to the various factors that affect bond strength. The bracket–resin interface is the site of usual bond failure. Therefore, many efforts have been accomplished on this interface. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of sandblasting on shear bond strength of three different metal brackets. Materials and Methods: For this experimental study, 180 human maxillary first and second premolars teeth were cleaned and stored in 0.1% thymol solution. The teeth were randomly assigned to either the control (n = 90 or experimental group (n = 90. Each group was subdivided into three equal groups (n = 30. In the control group, three different non-sandblasted metal brackets (American Orthodontics, Dentarum, and 3M Unitek were bonded with 3M (Unitek no-mix resin. In the next stage of the experiment, similar brackets were sandblasted and bonded. All samples were pumiced and etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s. The teeth were embedded in blocks of autopolymerization polymethyl methacrylate, utilizing a special device to make their slots parallel to the horizontal. Samples were stored in distilled water for 24 h before testing. Shear bond testing was carried out with UTM Instron machine. Results: Mean shear bond strength of untreated groups was 15.51, 16.60, and 18.58 MPa for American Orthodontics, Dentarum, and 3M Unitek brackets, respectively. Mean shear bond strength of sandblasted brackets was 15.8, 19.36, and 18.66 for American Orthodontics, Dentarum, and 3M Unitek brackets, respectively. Conclusion: This study showed that there was a significant difference in the mean shear bond strength between untreated and sandblasted specimens only in the Dentarum bracket groups.

  16. Effect of silica coating and silane surface treatment on the bond strength of soft denture liner to denture base material

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATSÜ, Saadet; KESKİN, Yasemin

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the effects of different surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of an autopolymerizing silicone denture liner to a denture base material after thermocycling. Material and Methods Fifty rectangular heat-polymerized acrylic resin (QC-20) specimens consisting of a set of 2 acrylic blocks were used in the tensile test. Specimens were divided into 5 test groups (n=10) according to the bonding surface treatment as follows: Group A, adhesive treatment (Ufi Gel P adhesive) (control); Group S, sandblasting using 50-µm Al2O3; Group SCSIL, silica coating using 30-µm Al2O3 modified by silica and silanized with silane agent (CoJet System); Group SCA, silica coating and adhesive application; Group SCSILA, silica coating, silane and adhesive treatment. The 2 PMMA blocks were placed into molds and the soft lining materials (Ufi Gel P) were packed into the space and polymerized. All specimens were thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before the tensile test. Bond strength data were analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and Duncan tests. Fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (FTIR) analysis were used for the chemical analysis and a profilometer was used for the roughness of the sample surfaces. Results The highest bond strength test value was observed for Group A (1.35±0.13); the lowest value was for Group S (0.28±0.07) and Group SCSIL (0.34±0.03). Mixed and cohesive type failures were seen in Group A, SCA and SCSILA. Group S and SCSIL showed the least silicone integrations and the roughest surfaces. Conclusion Sandblasting, silica coating and silane surface treatments of the denture base resin did not increase the bond strength of the silicone based soft liner. However, in this study, the chemical analysis and surface profilometer provided interesting insights about the bonding mechanism between the denture base resin and silicone soft liner

  17. Effect of silica coating and silane surface treatment on the bond strength of soft denture liner to denture base material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadet Atsu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the effects of different surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of an autopolymerizing silicone denture liner to a denture base material after thermocycling. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty rectangular heat-polymerized acrylic resin (QC-20 specimens consisting of a set of 2 acrylic blocks were used in the tensile test. Specimens were divided into 5 test groups (n=10 according to the bonding surface treatment as follows: Group A, adhesive treatment (Ufi Gel P adhesive (control; Group S, sandblasting using 50-µm Al2O3; Group SCSIL, silica coating using 30-µm Al2O3 modified by silica and silanized with silane agent (CoJet System; Group SCA, silica coating and adhesive application; Group SCSILA, silica coating, silane and adhesive treatment. The 2 PMMA blocks were placed into molds and the soft lining materials (Ufi Gel P were packed into the space and polymerized. All specimens were thermocycled (5,000 cycles before the tensile test. Bond strength data were analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and Duncan tests. Fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS and Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (FTIR analysis were used for the chemical analysis and a profilometer was used for the roughness of the sample surfaces. RESULTS: The highest bond strength test value was observed for Group A (1.35±0.13; the lowest value was for Group S (0.28±0.07 and Group SCSIL (0.34±0.03. Mixed and cohesive type failures were seen in Group A, SCA and SCSILA. Group S and SCSIL showed the least silicone integrations and the roughest surfaces. CONCLUSION: Sandblasting, silica coating and silane surface treatments of the denture base resin did not increase the bond strength of the silicone based soft liner. However, in this study, the chemical analysis and surface profilometer provided interesting insights about the bonding mechanism between the denture base resin and silicone

  18. 78 FR 49761 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Exportation of Articles Under Special Bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Exportation of Articles Under Special Bond AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border... existing collection of information. SUMMARY: As part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork and...

  19. 75 FR 61162 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Exportation of Articles Under Special Bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Exportation of Articles Under Special Bond AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border... existing information collection: 1651-0004. SUMMARY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) of the...

  20. Si-H Bond Activation of Alkynylsilanes by Group 4 Metallocene Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lamač, Martin; Spannenberg, A.; Baumann, W.; Jiao, H.; Fischer, Ch.; Hansen, S.; Arndt, P.; Rosenthal, U.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 12 (2010), s. 4369-4380 ISSN 0002-7863 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Si-H bond activation * alkynylsilanes * metallocene complexes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 9.019, year: 2010

  1. Synergy of corrosion activity and defects in weld bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Černý

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented work evaluates synergism of atmosphere corrosive action and material defects. These defects appear not only during particular technological process of connecting of structural material but also during cooling and up to hundreds hours afterwards. The multiplication of degradation impact of defects in joint welds and heat-affected zone caused by activity of atmosphere acidic medium is simulated in condensation chambers. The verification is realized by use of mechanical uniaxial tension loading and following fractographic and metalgraphic analysis.The metal plasticity is sufficient factor to eliminate thermal stress in tough metal (11 373. This is reflected in more homogenous weld root area (with no cracks. The corrosion influence of environment is in case of such specimens limited to very slight decrease of weld maximum load. The ultimate strength value decreases approximately for 20MPa only in contrast to dramatic strength decrease in case of 11 503 material. Before metalographic examination was observed surprisingly great value of load capacity of spot welds. These welds were not ruptured nor in a single case even during maximum length of corrosion exploitation. The consequent material analysis discovered high qualitative material and strength properties of this kind of joint.

  2. Activation of Propane C-H and C-C Bonds by Gas-Phase Pt Atom: A Theoretical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Wei Hu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The reaction mechanism of the gas-phase Pt atom with C3H8 has been systematically investigated on the singlet and triplet potential energy surfaces at CCSD(T//BPW91/6-311++G(d, p, Lanl2dz level. Pt atom prefers the attack of primary over secondary C-H bonds in propane. For the Pt + C3H8 reaction, the major and minor reaction channels lead to PtC3H6 + H2 and PtCH2 + C2H6, respectively, whereas the possibility to form products PtC2H4 + CH4 is so small that it can be neglected. The minimal energy reaction pathway for the formation of PtC3H6 + H2, involving one spin inversion, prefers to start at the triplet state and afterward proceed along the singlet state. The optimal C-C bond cleavages are assigned to C-H bond activation as the first step, followed by cleavage of a C-C bond. The C-H insertion intermediates are kinetically favored over the C-C insertion intermediates. From C-C to C-H oxidative insertion, the lowering of activation barrier is mainly caused by the more stabilizing transition state interaction ΔEint, which is the actual interaction energy between the deformed reactants in the transition state.

  3. Bond strength of resin cement to dentin and to surface-treated posts of titanium alloy, glass fiber, and zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of two resin cements (ParaPost Cement and Panavia F) to posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White), and zirconia (Cerapost), and to dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After embedding, planar surfaces...... of posts (n = 9 to 14) and human dentin (n = 10) were obtained by grinding. The posts received one of three surface treatments: 1. roughening (sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid etching), 2. application of primer (Alloy Primer, Metalprimer II, silane), or 3. roughening followed by application of primer...

  4. Quantification of the selective activation of C--H bonds in short chain alkanes: The reactivity of ethane, propane, isobutane, n-butane, and neopentane on Ir(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.F.; Weinberg, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    The initial probabilities of precursor-mediated, dissociative chemisorption of the saturated hydrocarbons 13 C-labeled ethane, propane, isobutane, n-butane, and neopentane on the close-packed Ir(111) surface have been measured. The selective activation of primary (1 degree), secondary (2 degree), and tertiary (3 degree) C--H bonds has been quantified by examining the reactivities of the selectively deuterated isotopomers of propane, C 3 H 8 , CH 3 CD 2 CH 3 , and C 3 D 8 , and of isobutane, (CH 3 ) 3 CH, (CH 3 ) 3 CD, and (CD 3 ) 3 CH. With respect to the bottom of the physically adsorbed well for each hydrocarbon, the apparent C--H bond activation energies have been found to be 10.4±0.3 kcal/mol (ethane), 11.4±0.3 kcal/mol (propane), 11.5±0.3 kcal/mol (n-butane), 11.3±0.3 kcal/mol (i-butane), and 11.3±0.3 kcal/mol (neopentane). For all the alkanes examined, the ratios of the preexponential factors of the rate coefficients of reaction and desorption are 1x10 -2 . The C--D bond activation energies are higher than the corresponding C--H bond activation energies by 480 cal/mol (ethane), 630 cal/mol (propane), and 660 cal/mol (i-butane). By analyzing the primary kinetic isotope effects for the selectively deuterated isotopomers of propane and isobutane, the 2 degree C--H bond activation energy is found to be 310±160 cal/mol less than the 1 degree C--H bond activation energy on this surface, and similarly, 3 degree C--H bond cleavage is less by 80±70 cal/mol. The quantification of the branching ratios within the C--H bond activation channel for propane and isobutane on this surface shows that the formation of 1 degree-alkyl intermediates is, in general, favored over the formation of either 2 degree- or 3 degree-alkyl intermediates. (Abstract Truncated)

  5. New bonding configuration on Si(111) and Ge(111) surfaces induced by the adsorption of alkali metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lottermoser, L.; Landemark, E.; Smilgies, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    The structure of the (3×1) reconstructions of the Si(111) and Ge(111) surfaces induced by adsorption of alkali metals has been determined on the basis of surface x-ray diffraction and low-energy electron diffraction measurements and density functional theory. The (3×1) surface results primarily f...... from the substrate reconstruction and shows a new bonding configuration consisting of consecutive fivefold and sixfold Si (Ge) rings in 〈11̅ 0〉 projection separated by channels containing the alkali metal atoms. © 1998 The American Physical Society......The structure of the (3×1) reconstructions of the Si(111) and Ge(111) surfaces induced by adsorption of alkali metals has been determined on the basis of surface x-ray diffraction and low-energy electron diffraction measurements and density functional theory. The (3×1) surface results primarily...

  6. Determination of Optimal Parameters for Diffusion Bonding of Semi-Solid Casting Aluminium Alloy by Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaewploy Somsak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid state welding techniques available are prone to gas porosity problems. To avoid this solid state bonding is usually an alternative of preference. Among solid state bonding techniques, diffusion bonding is often employed in aluminium alloy automotive parts welding in order to enhance their mechanical properties. However, there has been no standard procedure nor has there been any definitive criterion for judicious welding parameters setting. It is thus a matter of importance to find the set of optimal parameters for effective diffusion bonding. This work proposes the use of response surface methodology in determining such a set of optimal parameters. Response surface methodology is more efficient in dealing with complex process compared with other techniques available. There are two variations of response surface methodology. The one adopted in this work is the central composite design approach. This is because when the initial upper and lower bounds of the desired parameters are exceeded the central composite design approach is still capable of yielding the optimal values of the parameters that appear to be out of the initially preset range. Results from the experiments show that the pressing pressure and the holding time affect the tensile strength of jointing. The data obtained from the experiment fits well to a quadratic equation with high coefficient of determination (R2 = 94.21%. It is found that the optimal parameters in the process of jointing semi-solid casting aluminium alloy by using diffusion bonding are the pressing pressure of 2.06 MPa and 214 minutes of the holding time in order to achieve the highest tensile strength of 142.65 MPa

  7. The effect of different power outputs of carbon dioxide laser on bonding between zirconia ceramic surface and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, CaĞri; KalyoncuoĞlu, Elif; Balkaya, Veysel

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different power outputs of a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser on shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconium dioxide-based ceramic. Fifty zirconium dioxide core specimens (10 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness) were produced and they were embedded in the centers of auto-polymerizing acrylic resin blocks. Ten specimens served as control and no surface treatment was applied. Subsequently specimens were randomly divided into four groups, each containing 10 specimens for surface treatment with CO2 laser with different output power; laser treated with 2 W (Group 2 W), 3 W (Group 3 W), 4 W (Group 4 W) and finally 5 W (Group 5 W). Fifty composite resin discs were fabricated and cemented with adhesive resin cement to the specimen surfaces. A universal test machine was used for shear bond strength test at a crosshead speed 1 mm/min. Data were statistically analyzed by one-way analyses of variance (ANOVA) with Post-Hoc Tukey tests (α = 0.05). It was found that the shear bond strength values were affected by power outputs of laser (p < 0.05). Highest shear bond strength values were obtained with group 2 W (21.0 ± 2.7). Lowest values were obtained with group 5 W (14.4 ± 1.6). The current study revealed that there was a relationship between laser output power and shear bond strength for zirconium dioxide ceramics. However, output power of the laser and the energy level is a critical factor on micromechanical retention.

  8. Comparative evaluation of tensile bond strength of silicone-based denture liners after thermocycling and surface treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harsimran; Datta, Kusum

    2015-01-01

    To examine, evaluate, and compare the tensile bond strength of two silicone-based liners; one autopolymerizing and one heat cured, when treated with different chemical etchants to improve their adhesion with denture base resin. Hundred and sixty test specimens of heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) were fabricated; out of which 80 specimens were tested for tensile bond strength after bonding it to autopolymerizing resilient liner (Ufigel P) and rest 80 to heat-cured resilient liner (Molloplast B). Each main group was further divided into four subgroups of 20 specimens each, one to act as a control and three were subjected to surface treatment with different chemical etchants namely dichloromethane, MMA monomer, and chloroform. The two silicone-based denture liners were processed between 2 PMMA specimens (10 mm × 10 mm × 40 mm) in the space provided by a spacer of 3 mm, thermocycled (5-55°C) for 500 cycles, and then their tensile strength measurements were done in the universal testing machine. One-way ANOVA technique showed a highly significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength values for all the groups. The Student's t-test computed values of statistics for the compared groups were greater than the critical values both at 5% and at 1% levels. Surface treatment of denture base resin with chemical etchants prior to the application of silicone-based liner (Ufigel P and Molloplast-B) increased the tensile bond strength. The increase was the highest with specimens subjected to 180 s of MMA surface treatment and the lowest with control group specimens.

  9. Comparative evaluation of tensile bond strength of silicone-based denture liners after thermocycling and surface treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsimran Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To examine, evaluate, and compare the tensile bond strength of two silicone-based liners; one autopolymerizing and one heat cured, when treated with different chemical etchants to improve their adhesion with denture base resin. Materials and Methods: Hundred and sixty test specimens of heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA were fabricated; out of which 80 specimens were tested for tensile bond strength after bonding it to autopolymerizing resilient liner (Ufigel P and rest 80 to heat-cured resilient liner (Molloplast B. Each main group was further divided into four subgroups of 20 specimens each, one to act as a control and three were subjected to surface treatment with different chemical etchants namely dichloromethane, MMA monomer, and chloroform. The two silicone-based denture liners were processed between 2 PMMA specimens (10 mm × 10 mm × 40 mm in the space provided by a spacer of 3 mm, thermocycled (5-55°C for 500 cycles, and then their tensile strength measurements were done in the universal testing machine. Results: One-way ANOVA technique showed a highly significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength values for all the groups. The Student′s t-test computed values of statistics for the compared groups were greater than the critical values both at 5% and at 1% levels. Conclusion: Surface treatment of denture base resin with chemical etchants prior to the application of silicone-based liner (Ufigel P and Molloplast-B increased the tensile bond strength. The increase was the highest with specimens subjected to 180 s of MMA surface treatment and the lowest with control group specimens.

  10. Surface-Relief Gratings in Halogen-Bonded Polymer–Azobenzene Complexes: A Concentration-Dependence Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle E. Stumpel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, supramolecular complexes comprising a poly(4-vinylpyridine backbone and azobenzene-based halogen bond donors have emerged as a promising class of materials for the inscription of light-induced surface-relief gratings (SRGs. The studies up to date have focused on building supramolecular hierarchies, i.e., optimizing the polymer–azobenzene noncovalent interaction for efficient surface patterning. They have been conducted using systems with relatively low azobenzene content, and little is known about the concentration dependence of SRG formation in halogen-bonded polymer–azobenzene complexes. Herein, we bridge this gap, and study the concentration dependence of SRG formation using two halogen-bond-donating azobenzene derivatives, one functionalized with a tetrafluoroiodophenyl and the other with an iodoethynylphenyl group. Both have been previously identified as efficient molecules in driving the SRG formation. We cover a broad concentration range, starting from 10 mol % azobenzene content and going all the way up to equimolar degree of complexation. The complexes are studied as spin-coated thin films, and analyzed by optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and optical diffraction arising during the SRG formation. We obtained diffraction efficiencies as high as 35%, and modulation depths close to 400 nm, which are significantly higher than the values previously reported for halogen-bonded polymer–azobenzene complexes.

  11. Surface-Relief Gratings in Halogen-Bonded Polymer-Azobenzene Complexes: A Concentration-Dependence Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpel, Jelle E; Saccone, Marco; Dichiarante, Valentina; Lehtonen, Ossi; Virkki, Matti; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Priimagi, Arri

    2017-10-28

    In recent years, supramolecular complexes comprising a poly(4-vinylpyridine) backbone and azobenzene-based halogen bond donors have emerged as a promising class of materials for the inscription of light-induced surface-relief gratings (SRGs). The studies up to date have focused on building supramolecular hierarchies, i.e., optimizing the polymer-azobenzene noncovalent interaction for efficient surface patterning. They have been conducted using systems with relatively low azobenzene content, and little is known about the concentration dependence of SRG formation in halogen-bonded polymer-azobenzene complexes. Herein, we bridge this gap, and study the concentration dependence of SRG formation using two halogen-bond-donating azobenzene derivatives, one functionalized with a tetrafluoroiodophenyl and the other with an iodoethynylphenyl group. Both have been previously identified as efficient molecules in driving the SRG formation. We cover a broad concentration range, starting from 10 mol % azobenzene content and going all the way up to equimolar degree of complexation. The complexes are studied as spin-coated thin films, and analyzed by optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and optical diffraction arising during the SRG formation. We obtained diffraction efficiencies as high as 35%, and modulation depths close to 400 nm, which are significantly higher than the values previously reported for halogen-bonded polymer-azobenzene complexes.

  12. Influence of an oxygen-inhibited layer on enamel bonding of dental adhesive systems: surface free-energy perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Hirofumi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Oouchi, Hajime; Sai, Keiichi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    The influence of an oxygen-inhibited layer (OIL) on the shear bond strength (SBS) to enamel and surface free-energy (SFE) of adhesive systems was investigated. The adhesive systems tested were Scotchbond Multipurpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and Scotchbond Universal (SU). Resin composite was bonded to bovine enamel surfaces to determine the SBS, with and without an OIL, of adhesives. The SFE of cured adhesives with and without an OIL were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. There were no significant differences in the mean SBS of SM and CS specimens with or without an OIL; however, the mean SBS of SU specimens with an OIL was significantly higher than that of SU specimens without an OIL. For all three systems, the mean total SFE (γS), polarity force (γSp), and hydrogen bonding force (γSh) values of cured adhesives with an OIL were significantly higher than those of cured adhesives without an OIL. The results of this study indicate that the presence of an OIL promotes higher SBS of a single-step self-etch adhesive system, but not of a three-step or a two-step self-etch primer system. The SFE values of cured adhesives with an OIL were significantly higher than those without an OIL. The SFE characteristics of the OIL of adhesives differed depending on the type of adhesive. © 2015 Eur J Oral Sci.

  13. Shear bond, wettability and AFM evaluations on CO2 laser-irradiated CAD/CAM ceramic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gamal, Ahmed; Medioni, Etienne; Rocca, Jean Paul; Fornaini, Carlo; Muhammad, Omid H; Brulat-Bouchard, Nathalie

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the CO 2 laser irradiation in comparison with sandblasting (Sb), hydrofluoric acid (Hf) and silane coupling agent (Si) on shear bond strength (SBS), roughness (Rg) and wettability (Wt) of resin cement to CAD/CAM ceramics. Sixty (CAD/CAM) ceramic discs were prepared and distributed into six different groups: group A, control lithium disilicate (Li); group B, control zirconia (Zr); group C, Li: CO 2 /HF/Si; group D, Li: HF/Si; group E, Zr: CO 2 /Sb/Si; group F, Zr: Sb/Si. Result showed significant difference between irradiated and non-irradiated in terms of shear bond strength for zirconia ceramics (p value = 0.014). Moreover, partial surface wettability for irradiated and non-irradiated ceramics. Irradiated surface demonstrated more rough surface in lithium disilicate than zirconia ceramics. CO 2 irradiation could increase shear bond strength, surface roughness and wettability for both CAD/CAM ceramics.

  14. Adhesive-Bonded Composite Joint Analysis with Delaminated Surface Ply Using Strain-Energy Release Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadegani, Alireza; Yang, Chihdar; Smeltzer, Stanley S. III

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model to determine the strain energy release rate due to an interlaminar crack of the surface ply in adhesively bonded composite joints subjected to axial tension. Single-lap shear-joint standard test specimen geometry with thick bondline is followed for model development. The field equations are formulated by using the first-order shear-deformation theory in laminated plates together with kinematics relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. The system of second-order differential equations is solved to using the symbolic computation tool Maple 9.52 to provide displacements fields. The equivalent forces at the tip of the prescribed interlaminar crack are obtained based on interlaminar stress distributions. The strain energy release rate of the crack is then determined by using the crack closure method. Finite element analyses using the J integral as well as the crack closure method are performed to verify the developed analytical model. It has been shown that the results using the analytical method correlate well with the results from the finite element analyses. An attempt is made to predict the failure loads of the joints based on limited test data from the literature. The effectiveness of the inclusion of bondline thickness is justified when compared with the results obtained from the previous model in which a thin bondline and uniform adhesive stresses through the bondline thickness are assumed.

  15. Effect of surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin composite to composite after aging conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Barbosa, Silvia Helena; Melo, Renata Marques; Galhano, Graziela Avila Prado; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-10-01

    This study evaluated the effect of two different surface conditioning methods on the repair bond strength of a bis-GMA-adduct/bis-EMA/TEGDMA based resin composite after three aging conditions. Thirty-six composite resin blocks (Esthet X, Dentsply) were prepared (5 mm x 6 mm x 6 mm) and randomly assigned into three groups for aging process: (a) immersion in citric acid (pH 3.0 at 37 degrees C, 1 week) (CA); (b) boiling in water for 8h (BW) and (c) thermocycling (x5000, 5-55 degrees C, dwell time: 30s) (TC). After aging, the blocks were assigned to one of the following surface conditioning methods: (1) silica coating (30 microm SiO(x)) (CoJet, 3M ESPE)+silane (ESPE-Sil) (CJ), (2) phosphoric acid+adhesive resin (Single Bond, 3M ESPE) (PA). Resin composite (Esthet.X) was bonded to the conditioned substrates incrementally and light polymerized. The experimental groups formed were as follows: Gr1:CA+PA; Gr2:CA+CJ; Gr3:BW+PA; Gr4: BW+CJ; Gr5:TC+PA; Gr6: TC+CJ. The specimens were sectioned in two axes (x and y) with a diamond disc under coolant irrigation in order to obtain non-trimmed bar specimens (sticks, 10 mm x 1 mm x 1 mm) with 1 mm(2) of bonding area. The microtensile test was accomplished in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed: 0.5 mm min(-1)). The means and standard deviations of bond strength (MPa+/-S.D.) per group were as follows: Gr1: 25.5+/-10.3; Gr2: 46.3+/-10.1; Gr3: 21.7+/-7.1; Gr4: 52.3+/-15.1; Gr5: 16.1+/-5.1; Gr6, 49.6+/-13.5. The silica coated groups showed significantly higher mean bond values after all three aging conditions (presin-resin bond strength values compared to acid etching with phosphoric acid followed by adhesive resin applications. Thermocycling the composite substrates resulted in the lowest repair bond strength compared to citric acid challenge or boiling in water.

  16. Shear bond strength and failure types of polymethyl methacrylate denture base resin and titanium treated with surface conditioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyun-Pil; Kim, Su-Sung; Yang, Hong-So; Vang, Mong-Sook

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the shear bond strength and failure types of a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin to commercially pure (CP) titanium, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and cobalt-chromium alloy using a metal surface conditioner. The PMMA denture base resin (5 x 5 x 5 mm(3)) was cured onto disks, 10 mm in diameter and 2.5-mm thick. The shear bond strength of the PMMA resin with the surface conditioner was significantly higher than that without (P < .05). There was no significant difference between the types of metal. The conditioned specimens showed mixed failures, whereas the nonconditioned specimens exhibited only adhesive failure at the metal-resin interface.

  17. The active site of hen egg-white lysozyme: flexibility and chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, Jeanette; Smaalen, Sander van

    2014-01-01

    Chemical bonding at the active site of lysozyme is analyzed on the basis of a multipole model employing transferable multipole parameters from a database. Large B factors at low temperatures reflect frozen-in disorder, but therefore prevent a meaningful free refinement of multipole parameters. Chemical bonding at the active site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) is analyzed on the basis of Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules [QTAIM; Bader (1994 ▶), Atoms in Molecules: A Quantum Theory. Oxford University Press] applied to electron-density maps derived from a multipole model. The observation is made that the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) of HEWL at a temperature of 100 K are larger than ADPs in crystals of small biological molecules at 298 K. This feature shows that the ADPs in the cold crystals of HEWL reflect frozen-in disorder rather than thermal vibrations of the atoms. Directly generalizing the results of multipole studies on small-molecule crystals, the important consequence for electron-density analysis of protein crystals is that multipole parameters cannot be independently varied in a meaningful way in structure refinements. Instead, a multipole model for HEWL has been developed by refinement of atomic coordinates and ADPs against the X-ray diffraction data of Wang and coworkers [Wang et al. (2007), Acta Cryst. D63, 1254–1268], while multipole parameters were fixed to the values for transferable multipole parameters from the ELMAM2 database [Domagala et al. (2012), Acta Cryst. A68, 337–351] . Static and dynamic electron densities based on this multipole model are presented. Analysis of their topological properties according to the QTAIM shows that the covalent bonds possess similar properties to the covalent bonds of small molecules. Hydrogen bonds of intermediate strength are identified for the Glu35 and Asp52 residues, which are considered to be essential parts of the active site of HEWL. Furthermore, a series of weak C

  18. The active site of hen egg-white lysozyme: flexibility and chemical bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Held, Jeanette, E-mail: jeanette.netzel@uni-bayreuth.de; Smaalen, Sander van [University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Chemical bonding at the active site of lysozyme is analyzed on the basis of a multipole model employing transferable multipole parameters from a database. Large B factors at low temperatures reflect frozen-in disorder, but therefore prevent a meaningful free refinement of multipole parameters. Chemical bonding at the active site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) is analyzed on the basis of Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules [QTAIM; Bader (1994 ▶), Atoms in Molecules: A Quantum Theory. Oxford University Press] applied to electron-density maps derived from a multipole model. The observation is made that the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) of HEWL at a temperature of 100 K are larger than ADPs in crystals of small biological molecules at 298 K. This feature shows that the ADPs in the cold crystals of HEWL reflect frozen-in disorder rather than thermal vibrations of the atoms. Directly generalizing the results of multipole studies on small-molecule crystals, the important consequence for electron-density analysis of protein crystals is that multipole parameters cannot be independently varied in a meaningful way in structure refinements. Instead, a multipole model for HEWL has been developed by refinement of atomic coordinates and ADPs against the X-ray diffraction data of Wang and coworkers [Wang et al. (2007), Acta Cryst. D63, 1254–1268], while multipole parameters were fixed to the values for transferable multipole parameters from the ELMAM2 database [Domagala et al. (2012), Acta Cryst. A68, 337–351] . Static and dynamic electron densities based on this multipole model are presented. Analysis of their topological properties according to the QTAIM shows that the covalent bonds possess similar properties to the covalent bonds of small molecules. Hydrogen bonds of intermediate strength are identified for the Glu35 and Asp52 residues, which are considered to be essential parts of the active site of HEWL. Furthermore, a series of weak C

  19. Effects of silica coating and silane surface conditioning on the bond strength of rebonded metal and ceramic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadet Atsü

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tribochemical silica coating and silane surface conditioning on the bond strength of rebonded metal and ceramic brackets. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty debonded metal and 20 debonded ceramic brackets were randomly assigned to receive one of the following surface treatments (n=10 for each group: (1 sandblasting (control; (2 tribochemical silica coating combined with silane. Brackets were rebonded to the enamel surface on the labial and lingual sides of premolars with a light-polymerized resin composite. All specimens were stored in distilled water for 1 week and then thermocycled (5,000 cycles between 5-55ºC. Shear bond strength values were measured using a universal testing machine. Student's t-test was used to compare the data (α=0.05. Failure mode was assessed using a stereomicroscope, and the treated and non-treated bracket surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: Rebonded ceramic brackets treated with silica coating followed by silanization had significantly greater bond strength values (17.7±4.4 MPa than the sandblasting group (2.4±0.8 MPa, P<0.001. No significant difference was observed between the rebonded metal brackets treated with silica coating with silanization (15±3.9 MPa and the sandblasted brackets (13.6±3.9 MPa. Treated rebonded ceramic specimens primarily exhibited cohesive failure in resin and adhesive failure at the enamel-adhesive interface. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison to sandblasting, silica coating with aluminum trioxide particles followed by silanization resulted in higher bond strengths of rebonded ceramic brackets.

  20. Passive characterization and active testing of epoxy bonded regenerators for room temperature magnetic refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Tian; Navickaité, Kristina; Engelbrecht, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    Epoxy bonded regenerators of both spherical and irregular La(Fe,Mn,Si)13Hy particles have been developed aiming at increasing the mechanical strength of active magnetic regenerators (AMR) loaded with brittle magnetocaloric materials and improving the flexibility of shaping the regenerator geometry......-layer AMR based on spherical particles is tested actively in a small reciprocating magnetic refrigerator, achieving a no-load temperature span of 16.8 °C using about 143 g of epoxy-bonded La(Fe,Mn,Si)13Hy materials. Simulations based on a one-dimensional (1D) AMR model are also implemented to validate...... and analyze the results from the active test....

  1. Oxygen inhibition layer of composite resins: effects of layer thickness and surface layer treatment on the interlayer bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijelic-Donova, Jasmina; Garoushi, Sufyan; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-02-01

    An oxygen inhibition layer develops on surfaces exposed to air during polymerization of particulate filling composite. This study assessed the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer of short-fiber-reinforced composite in comparison with conventional particulate filling composites. The effect of an oxygen inhibition layer on the shear bond strength of incrementally placed particulate filling composite layers was also evaluated. Four different restorative composites were selected: everX Posterior (a short-fiber-reinforced composite), Z250, SupremeXT, and Silorane. All composites were evaluated regarding the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer and for shear bond strength. An equal amount of each composite was polymerized in air between two glass plates and the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer was measured using a stereomicroscope. Cylindrical-shaped specimens were prepared for measurement of shear bond strength by placing incrementally two layers of the same composite material. Before applying the second composite layer, the first increment's bonding site was treated as follows: grinding with 1,000-grit silicon-carbide (SiC) abrasive paper, or treatment with ethanol or with water-spray. The inhibition depth was lowest (11.6 μm) for water-sprayed Silorane and greatest (22.9 μm) for the water-sprayed short-fiber-reinforced composite. The shear bond strength ranged from 5.8 MPa (ground Silorane) to 36.4 MPa (water-sprayed SupremeXT). The presence of an oxygen inhibition layer enhanced the interlayer shear bond strength of all investigated materials, but its absence resulted in cohesive and mixed failures only with the short-fiber-reinforced composite. Thus, more durable adhesion with short-fiber-reinforced composite is expected. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  2. Push-Out Bond Strength and Surface Microhardness of Calcium Silicate-Based Biomaterials: An in vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Abdul; AlShwaimi, Emad

    2017-01-01

    Objective This was an in vitro evaluation of push-out bond strength and surface microhardness of calcium silicate-based biomaterials in coronal and apical root dentin. Materials and Methods Ninety sections (2 mm thick) of coronal and apical root dentin were obtained from roots of 60 extracted teeth; the canals were enlarged to a standardized cavity diameter of 1.3 mm. Sections were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 15 per group), and cavities were filled with Biodentine™, BioAggregate, or ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), according to the manufacturers' instructions. Push-out bond strength values were measured using a universal testing machine under a compressive load at a speed of 1 mm/min. Samples were analyzed under a light microscope to determine the nature of bond failure. Ten samples (2 mm thick) were prepared for all the materials, and Vickers microhardness was determined using a digital hardness tester. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests at a significance level of p Biodentine (42.02; 39.35 MPa) and ProRoot MTA (21.86; 34.13 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strengths than BioAggregate (6.63; 10.09 MPa) in coronal and apical root dentin, respectively (p Biodentine also differed significantly from ProRoot MTA in coronal dentin. Bond failure was predominantly adhesive in Biodentine and ProRoot MTA, while BioAggregate showed predominantly mixed failure. ProRoot MTA (158.52 HV) showed significantly higher microhardness and BioAggregate (68.79 HV) showed the lowest hardness. Conclusion Biodentine and ProRoot MTA showed higher bond strength and microhardness compared to BioAggregate. PMID:27852076

  3. Oligomeric Amyloid-β Peptide on Sialylic Lewisx–Selectin Bonding at Cerebral Endothelial Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sholpan Askarova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder, which affects approximately 10% of the population aged 65 and 40% of people over the age 80. Currently, AD is on the list of diseases with no effective treatment. Thus, the study of molecular and cellular mechanisms of AD progression is of high scientific and practical importance. In fact, dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB plays an important role in the onset and progression of the disease. Increased deposition of amyloid b peptide (Aβ in cerebral vasculature and enhanced transmigration of monocytes across the BBB are frequently observed in AD brains and are some of the pathological hallmarks of the diseases. Since the transmigration of monocytes across the BBB is both a mechanical and a biochemical process, the expression of adhesion molecules and mechanical properties of endothelial cells are the critical factors that require investigation.Methods: Because of recent advances in the biological applications of atomic force microscopy (AFM, we applied AFM with cantilever tips bio-functionalized by sLex in combination with the advanced immunofluorescent microscopy (QIM to study the direct effects of Aβ42 oligomers on the selectins expression, actin polymerization, and cellular mechanical and adhesion properties in cerebral endothelial cells (mouse bEnd3 line and primary human CECs and find a possible way to attenuate these effects. Results: QIM results showed that Aβ42 increased the expressions of P-selectin on the cell surface and enhanced actin polymerization. Consistent with our QIM results, AFM data showed that Aβ42 increased the probability of cell adhesion with sLex-coated cantilever and cell stiffness. These effects were counteracted by lovstatin, a cholesterol-lowering drug.  Surprisingly, the apparent rupture force of sLex-selectin bonding was significantly lower after treatment with Aβ42, as compared with the control (i.e. no treatment

  4. A study on poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone covalently bonded NiTi surface for inhibiting protein adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Near equiatomic NiTi alloys have been extensively applied as biomaterials owing to its unique shape memory effect, superelasticity and biocompatibility. It has been demonstrated that surfaces capable of preventing plasma protein adsorption could reduce the reactivity of biomaterials with human blood. This motivated a lot of researches on the surface modification of NiTi alloy. In the present work, following heat and alkaline treatment and silanization by trichlorovinylsilane (TCVS, coating of poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (PVP was produced on the NiTi alloy by gamma ray induced chemical bonding. The structures and properties of modified NiTi were characterized and in vitro biocompatibility of plasma protein adsorption was investigated. The results indicated that heat treatment at 823 K for 1 h could result in the formation of a protective TiO2 layer with “Ni-free” zone on NiTi surface. It was found that PVP was covalently bonded on NiTi surface to create a hydrophilic layer for inhibiting protein adsorption on the surface. The present work offers a green approach to introduce a bioorganic surface on metal and other polymeric or inorganic substrates by gamma irradiation.

  5. The effect of surface treatment of the interfacial surface on fatigue-related microtensile bond strength of milled zirconia to veneering porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Aaron B; Norling, Barry K; Teixeira, Erica C

    2012-07-01

    The success of zirconia-reinforced all-ceramic crowns depends on the formation of a stable bond between the zirconia core and the veneering porcelain. The purpose of this study was to test the effects of liner application and airborne particle abrasion of a postsintered Y-TZP core on the bond strength between the zirconia core and veneering porcelain with or without cyclic loading. Kavo Everest® Y-TZP blank disks were sintered and divided into three treatment groups: airborne particle abrasion, IPS e.max® Ceram Zirliner application, or no surface treatment. The disks were then veneered with IPS e.max® ZirPress veneering porcelain. Half the veneered disks from each group were cyclically loaded. This created six experimental groups: three surface treatment groups cyclically loaded and three not loaded. The disks were then sectioned into microbars for microtensile bond strength (MTBS) testing (40 specimens per group). Specimens were luted to a fixture mount and loaded to failure using a universal testing machine (MTS Insight). The maximum force was measured and bond strength computed. Data were analyzed with a two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (α= 0.05). Airborne particle abrasion significantly decreased MTBS values (p= 0.043), and ZirLiner application did not have a significant effect on MTBS values compared to control. Cyclic loading did not have a significant effect on MTBS values. The predominant failure mode in all groups was mixed. Airborne particle abrasion of the interfacial surface of the Everest® Y-TZP core significantly decreased the MTBS to ZirPress veneering porcelain when compared to no interfacial surface treatment. Application of ZirLiner to the interfacial surface of the Everest® Y-TZP core did not significantly increase or decrease the MTBS to ZirPress veneering porcelain, compared to the other surface treatments. Cyclic loading did not affect bond strengths in any of the groups, regardless of surface treatment. Neither cyclic loading nor

  6. Effect of surface treatment on the bonding of an autopolymerizing soft denture liner to a denture base resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Shiro; Ohashi, Hirohumi; Kurashige, Hisanori; Tanaka, Takuo

    2004-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effects of surface treatments and thermocycling on the bonding of autopolymerizing silicone soft denture liner (Sofreliner) to denture base resin. The bonding surfaces of denture base cylinders were polished with 600-grit silicon carbide paper and pretreated with applications of Sofreliner Primer, Sofreliner Primer after air abrasion, Reline Primer, or Reline Primer after air abrasion. Failure loads and elongation at failure were measured after subjecting specimens to 0, 10,000, 20,000, and 30,000 thermocycles. Failure modes were assessed for all specimens. Seven specimens were fabricated for each of 16 groups, including four pretreatments and four thermocycle groups. Failure loads of the Sofreliner Primer group were significantly higher than those of the air-abrasion group up to 20,000 thermocycles; both groups showed cohesive failures of the soft denture liner. Failure loads of the Reline Primer group were significantly higher than with Reline Primer after air abrasion up to 10,000 thermocycles. Failure mode after 10,000 thermocycles was cohesive for the Reline Primer group and mixed cohesive/adhesive for Reline Primer after air abrasion. Failure loads of the Sofreliner Primer group were significantly higher than those of the Reline Primer group at each thermocycling interval. Elongation values decreased after 10,000 thermocycles for all groups. Air abrasion on the denture base resin surface was not effective in enhancing failure load. Cyclic thermal stress is one factor degrading the bond between soft denture liner and acrylic resin denture base.

  7. The effect of different surface conditioning methods and curing protocols on bond strengths of two different fissure sealants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezin Özer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate in vitro shear bond strength of two different resin-based fissure sealants [BeautiSealant (BS, UltraSeal XT hydro (UH] associated with application of an acid etching (Ultra-Etch Acid or a primer (BeautiSealant Primer and two different polymerization modes (Standard mode; 10 s or Xtra power mode; 3 s of a third generation light emitting diode (LED light curing unit. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Eighty enamel surface samples were prepared from 40 extracted human third molar teeth. Samples were randomly divided into 8 subgroups according to fissure sealants, conditioning methods and polymerization modes (n=10; Group 1: Acid + BS+ Xtra power mode, Group 2: Primer + BS + Xtra power mode, Group 3: Acid + BS + Standard mode, Group 4: Primer + BS + Standard mode, Group 5: Acid + UH + Xtra power mode, Group 6: Primer + UH + Xtra power mode, Group 7: Acid + UH + Standard mode, Group 8: Primer + UH + Standard mode. An Instron machine (1.0 mm/min was used to measure shear bond strength values. Data were statistically analyzed by using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (p<0.05. RESULTS: Significant differences were detected between the groups (p<0.05. Shear bond strength values of all BS subgroups were significantly lower than UH subgroups (p<0.05. Highest shear bond strength values were obtained in Group 5 and the lowest was obtained in Group 1. CONCLUSION: Shear bond strength values of fissure sealants can be affected by surface conditioning methods and curing protocols.

  8. Polysiloxane layers created by sol-gel and photochemistry: ideal surfaces for rapid, low-cost and high-strength bonding of epoxy components to polydimethylsiloxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Elisabeth; Deshpande, Kaustubh; Kotz, Frederik; Schild, Dieter; Keller, Nico; Heissler, Stefan; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Länge, Kerstin; Neumann, Christiane; Rapp, Bastian E

    2015-04-07

    In this article we introduce and compare three techniques for low-cost and rapid bonding of stereolithographically structured epoxy components to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). In short, we first create a polysiloxane layer on the epoxy surface via silane surface coupling and polymerization. Afterwards, the modified epoxy surface can be bonded to a PDMS component at room temperature using a handheld corona discharger, which is a commonly used low-cost technique for bonding two PDMS components. Using these methods bonds of desirable strength can be generated within half an hour. Depending on the epoxy resin, we found it necessary to modify the silanization procedure. Therefore, we provide a total of three different silanization techniques that allow bonding of a wide variety of stereolithographically structurable epoxy resins. The first technique is a UV-light induced silanization process which couples a silane that contains an epoxy-ring ((3-glycidoxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GPTMS)). For surfaces that cannot be modified with this silane we use dimethoxydimethylsilane (DMDMS). This silane can either be coupled to the surface by a sol-gel process or UV-light induced polymerisation. The sol-gel process which is a heat induced surface modification technique results in high bond strengths. Because of the heat which triggers the sol-gel process, this technique is limited to epoxy polymers with high glass transition temperatures. For the majority of stereolithographically structured epoxy resins which typically have glass transition temperatures of around 60 °C the light-induced bonding technique is preferable. For all three techniques we performed DIN EN-conform tensile testing demonstrating maximum bond strengths of up to 350 kPa which is comparable with bond strengths reported for PDMS-to-PDMS bonds. For all bond methods, long-term stability as well as hydrolytic stability was assessed.

  9. Enhanced bonding property of cold-sprayed Zn-Al coating on interstitial-free steel substrate with a nanostructured surface layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Y.L. [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei 230026 (China); Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Advanced Technology Division, Research Institute, Baoshan Iron & Steel Co., Ltd., 655 Fujin Road, Shanghai 201900 (China); Wang, Z.B., E-mail: zbwang@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, J. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, J.B. [Advanced Technology Division, Research Institute, Baoshan Iron & Steel Co., Ltd., 655 Fujin Road, Shanghai 201900 (China); Lu, K. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A nanostructured surface layer was produced on hot-rolled interstitial-free steel. • Zn-Al coating was cold-sprayed on the steel plate with nanostructured surface layer. • Bonding strength of the coating on the nanostructured surface increases ∼30%. • Improved bonding property was due to promoted diffusion and hardness in surface layer. • No further increase in bonding property was achieved after annealing at 400 °C. - Abstract: By means of surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT), a gradient nanostructured surface layer was fabricated on a hot-rolled interstitial-free steel plate. A Zn-Al coating was subsequently deposited on the SMAT sample by using cold spray process. The bonding property of the coating on the SMAT substrate was compared with that on the coarse-grained (CG) sample. Stud-pull tests showed that the bonding strength in the as-sprayed SMAT sample is ∼30% higher than that in the as-sprayed CG sample. No further improvement in bonding strength was achieved in the coated SMAT sample after annealing at 400 °C, mostly due to the formation of cracks and intermetallic compounds at the coating/substrate interface in an earlier stage (<30 min) and in a final stage (>90 min), respectively. The enhanced bonding property of the Zn-Al coating on the SMAT sample might be related with the promoted atomic diffusion and hardness in the nanostructured surface layer.

  10. Site-selective and stereoselective functionalization of non-activated tertiary C-H bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Kuangbiao; Pickel, Thomas C.; Boyarskikh, Vyacheslav; Bacsa, John; Musaev, Djamaladdin G.; Davies, Huw M. L.

    2017-11-01

    The synthesis of complex organic compounds usually relies on controlling the reactions of the functional groups. In recent years, it has become possible to carry out reactions directly on the C-H bonds, previously considered to be unreactive. One of the major challenges is to control the site-selectivity because most organic compounds have many similar C-H bonds. The most well developed procedures so far rely on the use of substrate control, in which the substrate has one inherently more reactive C-H bond or contains a directing group or the reaction is conducted intramolecularly so that a specific C-H bond is favoured. A more versatile but more challenging approach is to use catalysts to control which site in the substrate is functionalized. p450 enzymes exhibit C-H oxidation site-selectivity, in which the enzyme scaffold causes a specific C-H bond to be functionalized by placing it close to the iron-oxo haem complex. Several studies have aimed to emulate this enzymatic site-selectivity with designed transition-metal catalysts but it is difficult to achieve exceptionally high levels of site-selectivity. Recently, we reported a dirhodium catalyst for the site-selective functionalization of the most accessible non-activated (that is, not next to a functional group) secondary C-H bonds by means of rhodium-carbene-induced C-H insertion. Here we describe another dirhodium catalyst that has a very different reactivity profile. Instead of the secondary C-H bond, the new catalyst is capable of precise site-selectivity at the most accessible tertiary C-H bonds. Using this catalyst, we modify several natural products, including steroids and a vitamin E derivative, indicating the applicability of this method of synthesis to the late-stage functionalization of complex molecules. These studies show it is possible to achieve site-selectivity at different positions within a substrate simply by selecting the appropriate catalyst. We hope that this work will inspire the design of

  11. Effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyun, Jung-Hoon; Shin, Tae-Bong; Lee, Joo-Hee; Ahn, Kang-Min; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Cha, Hyun-Suk

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement. The specimens were prepared to evaluate the bond strength of epoxy resin-based fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) to dual-curing resin cement (RelyX U200). The specimens were divided into four groups (n=18) according to different surface treatments: group 1, no treatment; group 2, silanization; group 3, silanization after hydrogen peroxide etching; group 4, silanization with warm drying at 80℃ after hydrogen peroxide etching. After storage of the specimens in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours, the shear bond strength (in MPa) between the fiber post and resin cement was measured using a universal testing machine. The fractured surface of the fiber post was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis with Tukey's HSD test (α=0.05). Silanization of the fiber post (Group 2) significantly increased the bond strength in comparison with the non treated control (Group 1) (Psilanization also significantly increased the bond strength (Group 3 and 4) (Psilane agent (Group 2 and 3) (P>.05). Fiber post silanization and subsequent heat treatment (80℃) with warm air blower can be beneficial in clinical post cementation. However, hydrogen peroxide etching prior to silanization was not effective in this study.

  12. Bonding promotion of resin composite to silica-coated zirconia implant surface using a novel silane system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matinlinna, Jukka P; Choi, Andy H; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon

    2013-03-01

    Bonding of restorative materials in dentistry may be enhanced significantly by the use of engineered silane blends. Trialkoxy silane esters have the unique property to unite dissimilar materials. Silanization is required when cementing the crown or the abutment on a silica-coated zirconia subgingival implant surface with an organophosphate-resin-composite. In this laboratory study, we report about our latest findings in laboratory experiments on experimental silane primers. In the adhesion promotion of resin-composites to the zirconia implant surface using four experimental blends, a so-called "Novel Silane System", consisting of a functional silane (3-acryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane, 3-isocyanatopropyltriethoxysilane, 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and 3-styrylethyltrimethoxysilane) and a cross-linking silane, bis-1,2-(triethoxysilyl)ethane, were mixed in a water/ethanol solvent system with a pH of 4.5, and applied onto silica-coated planar zirconia specimens. A resin composite stub (with a bonding area diameter of 2.0 mm) was cemented using a polypropylene mold. Initial shear bond strengths (baseline values) were measured of specimens after dry storage and after thermo-cycling between 5.0 ± 0.5°C and 55.0 ± 0.5°C. As the control was a dental prehydrolyzed ready-to-use silane product. All the values for shear bond strength test were significantly increased (P > 0.05) during thermo-cycling. The results showed that the highest shear bond strength was obtained for 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane +bis-1,2-(triethoxysilyl)ethane in both dry and thermo-cycled conditions with stress values of 11.04 and 14.89 MPa, respectively. The lowest values were found for the control silane in both dry and thermo-cycled conditions with stress values of 4.5 and 6.5 MPa, respectively. Silanization with a novel silane system yielded significantly higher shear bond strength than the control silane (a 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane containing). We have introduced a

  13. From Molecules to Surfaces: Radical-Based Mechanisms of Si-S and Si-Se Bond Formation on Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buriak, Jillian M; Sikder, Md Delwar H

    2015-08-05

    The derivatization of silicon surfaces can have profound effects on the underlying electronic properties of the semiconductor. In this work, we investigate the radical surface chemistry of silicon with a range of organochalcogenide reagents (comprising S and Se) on a hydride-terminated silicon surface, to cleanly and efficiently produce surface Si-S and Si-Se bonds, at ambient temperature. Using a diazonium-based radical initiator, which induces formation of surface silicon radicals, a group of organochalcogenides were screened for reactivity at room temperature, including di-n-butyl disulfide, diphenyl disulfide, diphenyl diselenide, di-n-butyl sulfide, diphenyl selenide, diphenyl sulfide, 1-octadecanethiol, t-butyl disulfide, and t-butylthiol, which comprises the disulfide, diselenide, thiol, and thioether functionalities. The surface reactions were monitored by transmission mode Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ionization mass spectrometry. Calculation of Si-Hx consumption, a semiquantitative measure of yield of production of surface-bound Si-E bonds (E = S, Se), was carried out via FTIR spectroscopy. Control experiments, sans the BBD diazonium radical initiator, were all negative for any evident incorporation, as determined by FTIR spectroscopy. The functional groups that did react with surface silicon radicals included the dialkyl/diphenyl disulfides, diphenyl diselenide, and 1-octadecanethiol, but not t-butylthiol, diphenyl sulfide/selenide, and di-n-butyl sulfide. Through a comparison with the rich body of literature regarding molecular radicals, and in particular, silyl radicals, reaction mechanisms were proposed for each. Armed with an understanding of the reaction mechanisms, much of the known chemistry within the extensive body of radical-based reactivity has the potential to be harnessed on silicon and could be extended to a range of technologically relevant semiconductor

  14. A Raman spectroscopy study on the effects of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on water molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fabing; Li, Zhanlong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Shenghan; Wang, Xiaojun; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2018-05-01

    The structural forms of water/deuterated water molecules located on the surface of borosilicate capillaries have been first investigated in this study on the basis of the Raman spectral data obtained at different temperatures and under atmospheric pressure for molecules in bulk and also for molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface. The strongest two fundamental bands locating at 3063 cm-1 (2438 cm-1) in the recorded Raman spectra are assigned here to the Osbnd H (Osbnd D) bond stretching vibrations and they are compared with the corresponding bands observed at 3124 cm-1 (2325 cm-1) in the Raman spectrum of ice Ih. Our spectroscopic observations have indicated that the structure of water and deuterated water molecules on borosilicate surface is similar to that of ice Ih (hexagonal phase of ice). These observations have also indicated that water molecules locate on the borosilicate surface so as to construct a bilayer structure and that strong and weak intermolecular hydrogen bonds are formed between water/deuterated molecules and silanol groups on borosilicate surface. In accordance with these findings, water and deuterated water molecules at the interface of capillary have a higher melting temperature.

  15. A Raman spectroscopy study on the effects of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on water molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fabing; Li, Zhanlong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Shenghan; Wang, Xiaojun; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2018-05-05

    The structural forms of water/deuterated water molecules located on the surface of borosilicate capillaries have been first investigated in this study on the basis of the Raman spectral data obtained at different temperatures and under atmospheric pressure for molecules in bulk and also for molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface. The strongest two fundamental bands locating at 3063cm -1 (2438cm -1 ) in the recorded Raman spectra are assigned here to the OH (OD) bond stretching vibrations and they are compared with the corresponding bands observed at 3124cm -1 (2325cm -1 ) in the Raman spectrum of ice Ih. Our spectroscopic observations have indicated that the structure of water and deuterated water molecules on borosilicate surface is similar to that of ice Ih (hexagonal phase of ice). These observations have also indicated that water molecules locate on the borosilicate surface so as to construct a bilayer structure and that strong and weak intermolecular hydrogen bonds are formed between water/deuterated molecules and silanol groups on borosilicate surface. In accordance with these findings, water and deuterated water molecules at the interface of capillary have a higher melting temperature. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Structure determination of the Si(001)-(2 x 1)-H reconstruction by surface X-ray diffraction: Weakening of the dimer bond by the addition of hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, E.M.; Baker, J.; Nielsen, M.

    2000-01-01

    The atomic structure of the monohydride Si(001)-(2 x 1)-H reconstruction has been investigated by surface X-ray diffraction. Atomic relaxations down to the eighth layer have been determined. The bond length of the hydrogenated silicon dimers was found to be 2.47 +/- 0.02 Angstrom. which is longer...... than the dimer bond of the clean (2 x 1)-reconstructed Si(001) surface and also 5% longer than the bulk bond length of 2.35 Angstrom. The differences to the (2 x 1) structure of the clean surface are discussed in terms of the elimination of the weak pi-bond character of the dimer bond by the addition...

  17. Influence of light intensity on surface-free energy and dentin bond strength of single-step self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojiri, Kie; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Suzuki, Takayuki; Shibasaki, Syo; Matsuyoshi, Saki; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of light intensity on the surface-free energy and dentin bond strength of single-step selfetch adhesives. The adhesives were applied to the dentin surfaces of bovine mandibular incisors and cured with light intensities of 0 (no irradiation), 200, 400, and 600 mW/cm(2). Surface-free energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. Dentin bond strengths of the specimens were also measured. Polymerization with a higher light intensity resulted in a lower surface-free energy of the cured adhesives. The greatest bond strength was achieved when a light intensity of 400 mW/cm(2) or greater was used. Our data suggest that the surface-free energy and dentin bond strength of single-step self-etch adhesives are affected by light intensity of the curing unit.

  18. Enantioselective synthesis of a PKC inhibitor via catalytic C-H bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rebecca M; Thalji, Reema K; Bergman, Robert G; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2006-04-13

    [reaction: see text] The syntheses of two biologically active molecules possessing dihydropyrroloindole cores (1 and 2) were completed using rhodium-catalyzed imine-directed C-H bond functionalization, with the second of these molecules containing a stereocenter that can be set with 90% ee during cyclization using chiral nonracemic phosphoramidite ligands. Catalytic decarbonylation and direct indole/maleimide coupling provide efficient access to 2.

  19. Surface active complexes formed between keratin polypeptides and ionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fang; Lu, Zhiming; Tucker, Ian; Hosking, Sarah; Petkov, Jordan; Lu, Jian R

    2016-12-15

    Keratins are a group of important proteins in skin and hair and as biomaterials they can provide desirable properties such as strength, biocompatibility, and moisture regaining and retaining. The aim of this work is to develop water-soluble keratin polypeptides from sheep wool and then explore how their surface adsorption behaves with and without surfactants. Successful preparation of keratin samples was demonstrated by identification of the key components from gel electrophoresis and the reproducible production of gram scale samples with and without SDS (sodium dodecylsulphate) during wool fibre dissolution. SDS micelles could reduce the formation of disulphide bonds between keratins during extraction, reducing inter-molecular crosslinking and improving keratin polypeptide solubility. However, Zeta potential measurements of the two polypeptide batches demonstrated almost identical pH dependent surface charge distributions with isoelectric points around pH 3.5, showing complete removal of SDS during purification by dialysis. In spite of different solubility from the two batches of keratin samples prepared, very similar adsorption and aggregation behavior was revealed from surface tension measurements and dynamic light scattering. Mixing of keratin polypeptides with SDS and C 12 TAB (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide) led to the formation of keratin-surfactant complexes that were substantially more effective at reducing surface tension than the polypeptides alone, showing great promise in the delivery of keratin polypeptides via the surface active complexes. Neutron reflection measurements revealed the coexistence of surfactant and keratin polypeptides at the interface, thus providing the structural support to the observed surface tension changes associated with the formation of the surface active complexes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Microstructure and surface properties of lignocellulosic-based activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, P., E-mail: pegonzal@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040, Madrid (Spain); Centeno, T.A. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon-CSIC, Apartado 73, E-33080 Oviedo (Spain); Urones-Garrote, E. [Centro Nacional de Microscopia Electronica, Universidad Complutense, E-28040, Madrid (Spain); Avila-Brande, D.; Otero-Diaz, L.C. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activated carbons were produced by KOH activation at 700 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The observed nanostructure consists of highly disordered graphene-like layers with sp{sup 2} bond content Almost-Equal-To 95%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Textural parameters show high surface area ( Almost-Equal-To 1000 m{sup 2}/g) and pore width of 1.3-1.8 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific capacitance reaches values as high as 161 F/g. - Abstract: Low cost activated carbons have been produced via chemical activation, by using KOH at 700 Degree-Sign C, from the bamboo species Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata and the residues from shells of the fruits of Castanea Sativa and Juglans Regia as carbon precursors. The scanning electron microscopy micrographs show the conservation of the precursor shape in the case of the Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata activated carbons. Transmission electron microscopy analyses reveal that these materials consist of carbon platelet-like particles with variable length and thickness, formed by highly disordered graphene-like layers with sp{sup 2} content Almost-Equal-To 95% and average mass density of 1.65 g/cm{sup 3} (25% below standard graphite). Textural parameters indicate a high porosity development with surface areas ranging from 850 to 1100 m{sup 2}/g and average pore width centered in the supermicropores range (1.3-1.8 nm). The electrochemical performance of the activated carbons shows specific capacitance values at low current density (1 mA/cm{sup 2}) as high as 161 F/g in the Juglans Regia activated carbon, as a result of its textural parameters and the presence of pseudocapacitance derived from surface oxygenated acidic groups (mainly quinones and ethers) identified in this activated carbon.

  1. Spectroscopic characterization of a single dangling bond on a bare Si(100)- c ( 4 × 2 ) surface for n - and p -type doping

    KAUST Repository

    Mantega, M.

    2012-07-19

    We investigate the charging state of an isolated single dangling bond formed on an unpassivated Si(100) surface with c(4×2) reconstruction, by comparing scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy analysis with density functional theory calculations. The dangling bond is created by placing a single hydrogen atom on the bare surface with the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. The H atom passivates one of the dimer dangling bonds responsible for the surface one-dimensional electronic structure. This leaves a second dangling at the reacted surface dimer which breaks the surface periodicity. We consider two possible H adsorption configurations for both the neutral and the doped situation (n- and p-type). In the case of n-doping we find that the single dangling bond state is doubly occupied and the most stable configuration is that with H bonded to the bottom Si atom of the surface dimer. In the case of p-doping the dangling bond is instead empty and the configuration with the H attached to the top atom of the dimer is the most stable. Importantly the two configurations have different scattering properties and phase shift fingerprints. This might open up interesting perspectives for fabricating a switching device by tuning the doping level or by locally charging the single dangling bond state. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  2. Z-H Bond Activation in (Di)hydrogen Bonding as a Way to Proton/Hydride Transfer and H2Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkova, Natalia V; Filippov, Oleg A; Shubina, Elena S

    2018-02-01

    The ability of neutral transition-metal hydrides to serve as a source of hydride ion H - or proton H + is well appreciated. The hydride ligands possessing a partly negative charge are proton accepting sites, forming a dihydrogen bond, M-H δ- ⋅⋅⋅ δ+ HX (M=transition metal or metalloid). On the other hand, some metal hydrides are able to serve as a proton source and give hydrogen bond of M-H δ+ ⋅⋅⋅X type (X=organic base). In this paper we analyse recent works on transition-metal and boron hydrides showing i) how formation of an intermolecular complex between the reactants changes the Z-H (M-H and X-H) bond polarity and ii) what is the implication of such activation in the mechanisms of hydrides reactions. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Evaluation of Bond Strength between Grooved Titanium Alloy Implant Abutments and Provisional Veneering Materials after Surface Treatment of the Abutments: An In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Gowtham; Krishnan, Murugesan; Srinivasan, Suganya; Balasubramanian, Muthukumar

    2017-01-01

    Titanium has become the material of choice with greater applications in dental implants. The success of the dental implant does not only depend on the integration of the implant to the bone but also on the function and longevity of the superstructure. The clinical condition that demands long-term interim prosthesis is challenging owing to the decreased bond between the abutment and the veneering material. Hence, various surface treatments are done on the abutments to increase the bond strength. This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between the abutment and the provisional veneering materials by surface treatments such as acid etching, laser etching, and sand blasting of the abutment. Forty titanium alloy abutments of 3 mm diameter and 11 mm height were grouped into four groups with ten samples. Groups A, B, C, and D are untreated abutments, sand blasted with 110 μm aluminum particles, etched with 1% hydrofluoric acid and 30% nitric acid, and laser etched with Nd: YAG laser, respectively. Provisional crowns were fabricated with bis-acrylic resin and cemented with noneugenol temporary luting cement. The shear bond strength was measured in universal testing machine using modified Shell-Nielsen shear test after the cemented samples were stored in water at 25°C for 24 h. Load was applied at a constant cross head speed of 5 mm/min until a sudden decrease in resistance indicative of bond failure was observed. The corresponding force values were recorded, and statistical analysis was done using one-way ANOVA and Newman-Keuls post hoc test. The laser-etched samples showed higher bond strength. Among the three surface treatments, laser etching showed the highest bond strength between titanium alloy implant abutment and provisional restorations. The sand-blasted surfaces demonstrated a significant difference in bond strength compared to laser-etched surfaces. The results of this study confirmed that a combination of surface treatments and bond agents enhances the

  4. Assessment and characterization of degradation effect for the varied degrees of ultra-violet radiation onto the collagen-bonded polypropylene non-woven fabric surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyan, Yu-Chang; Liao, Jiunn-Der; Klauser, Ruth; Wu, Ie-Der; Weng, Chih-Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Exposure to ultra-violet (UV)-C radiation is a frequently used method to prevent bacteria from invasion of blood-contact biomedical products. Potential damage induced by UV radiation to collagen is of concern due to the decay of bioactivity, considerably correlated with structural alterations. Our current investigation studies the collagen-bonded non-woven polypropylene (PP) fabric surface. In this experiment, antenna-coupling microwave plasma is utilized to activate PP fabric and then the sample is grafted with acrylic acid (AAc). Type III collagen is immobilized by using water soluble 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide as coupling agent. The collagen-bonded samples with sample temperature ca. 4 degrees C are then exposed to UV-254nm radiation for different time intervals. By using fourier-transformed infrared with attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), we examine the chemical structures of samples with different treatments. Coomassie brilliant blue G250 method is utilized to quantify the immobilized collagen on the PP fabric surfaces. Blood-clotting effects are evaluated by activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, and fibrinogen concentration tests. By means of cell counter and scanning electron microscopy we count red blood cells and platelets adhesion in the modified porous matrix. Our experimental results have demonstrated that with pAAc-grafting of ca. 173 microg cm(-2) and immobilized collagen of 80.5+/-4.7 microg cm(-2), for human plasma incubated samples of various intervals of UV-254 nm radiation, fibrinogen concentration decreases in human plasma, while platelets and red blood cells adhesions increase before UV radiation. However, the required time for thrombination shows significant change for UV radiation exposure of less than 20 h (alpha = 0.05). The decay of bioactivity for the UV-irradiated, collagen-bonded surfaces is thus evaluated. Surface analyses indicate that the decrease of

  5. Effect of nonthermal plasma treatment on surface chemistry of commercially-pure titanium and shear bond strength to autopolymerizing acrylic resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vechiato-Filho, Aljomar José, E-mail: aljomarvechiatoflo@gmail.com [Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Univ. Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Aracatuba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Silva Vieira Marques, Isabella da [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Santos, Daniela Micheline dos [Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Univ. Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Aracatuba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira Matos, Adaias [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; Cruz, Nilson Cristino da [Laboratory of Technological Plasmas (LaPTec), Engineering College, Univ. Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Sorocaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-03-01

    The effect of nonthermal plasma on the surface characteristics of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti), and on the shear bond strength between an autopolymerizing acrylic resin and cp-Ti was investigated. A total of 96 discs of cp-Ti were distributed into four groups (n = 24): Po (no surface treatment), SB (sandblasting), Po + NTP and SB + NTP (methane plasma). Surface characterization was performed through surface energy, surface roughness, scanning microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction tests. Shear bond strength test was conducted immediately and after thermocycling. Surface treatment affected the surface energy and roughness of cp-Ti discs (P < .001). SEM–EDS showed the presence of the carbide thin film. XRD spectra revealed no crystalline phase changes. The SB + NTP group showed the highest bond strength values (6.76 ± 0.70 MPa). Thermocycling reduced the bond strength of the acrylic resin/cp-Ti interface (P < .05), except for Po group. NTP is an effective treatment option for improving the shear bond strength between both materials. - Highlights: • We tested the bond strength between two widely used materials in dentistry (acrylic and titanium). • We performed an innovative surface treatment with nonthermal plasma. • Increasing adhesion will avoid complications of full-arch implant-retained prostheses.

  6. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch,; Darren W. , Meyer; Grant D. , Craighead; Harold, G [Ithaca, NY

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  7. Performance of thin bonded epoxy overlays on asphalt and concrete bridge deck surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This study is the evaluation of two thin bonded epoxy overlays: SafeLane (marketed by Cargill), and Flexogrid : (developed by PolyCarb). SafeLane is advertised as an anti-skid/anti-icing overlay that stores deicing chemicals for : release during wint...

  8. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to base metal alloys having different surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Shafiei

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Based on the results, sandblasting improves the shear bond strength of self-etch and self-adhesive resin cement to base metal alloys. The best results can be achieved with a combination of sandblasting and metal primers. The performance of resin cement depends on to their chemical composition, not to the type of system.

  9. Influence of light-activated and auto- and dual-polymerizing adhesive systems on bond strength of indirect composite resin to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Maria Jose Lorena; Arrais, Cesar Augusto Galvao; Giannini, Marcelo

    2006-08-01

    Clinicians must be aware of the bonding effectiveness of auto- and dual- polymerizing adhesive systems before choosing the material and technique of cementing inlay/onlays to dentin. An inadequate choice may compromise the success of indirect restorations. This study compared the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of indirect composite resin bonded to dentin by light-activated, autopolymerizing, and dual-polymerizing adhesive systems. Occlusal dentin surfaces of 36 human third molars were exposed and flattened. Teeth were assigned to 1 of the following 6 groups (n=6) of adhesive luting systems: 2 dual-polymerizing systems (Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus/Rely X [SBMP] and Prime & Bond NT Dual Cure/Enforce [PBDC]); 1 autopolymerizing system (ED Primer/Panavia F [EDP]); and 3 light-activated systems (control groups) (Adper Single Bond/Rely X [SB], Prime & Bond NT/Enforce [PB], and Clearfil SE Bond/Panavia F [CF]). The restorative materials were applied according to manufacturer's directions. A 2-mm-thick prepolymerized composite resin (Clearfil APX) disc was cemented with the resin cements on the bonded dentin. Teeth were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Afterwards, teeth were sectioned both mesial-distally and buccal-lingually to obtain multiple bonded beam specimens with 0.8 mm(2) of cross-sectional area. Each specimen was tested in tension at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Data (MPa) were analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance and the Tukey post hoc test (alpha=.05). Failure patterns of tested specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Mean MTBS values (MPa) for experimental groups were as follows: SBMP, 32.89 +/- 3.26(a); SB, 26.74 +/- 7.45(ab); PB, 26.11 +/- 4.48(ab); CF, 25.30 +/- 6.42(ab); EDP, 16.82 +/- 5.53(bc); PBDC, 11.20 +/- 5.89(c) (P<.001). Groups with similar lowercase letters were not significantly different. Failure pattern of fractured specimens varied according to the polymerization mode. The

  10. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-4T - Elective carryforward of unused private activity bond limit (temporary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... bond limit (temporary). 1.103(n)-4T Section 1.103(n)-4T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Excluded from Gross Income § 1.103(n)-4T Elective carryforward of unused private activity bond limit... carryforward for any one or more projects described in A-5 of this § 1.103(n)-4T (carryforward projects). Q-2...

  11. Shock-induced electrical activity in polymeric solids. A mechanically induced bond scission model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    When polymeric solids are subjected to high-pressure shock loading, two anomalous electrical phenomena, shock-induced conduction and shock-induced polarization, are observed. The present paper proposes a model of mechanically induced bond scission within the shock front to account for the effects. An experimental study of shock-induced polarization in poly(pyromellitimide) (Vespel SP-1) is reported for shock compressions from 17 to 23% (pressures from 2.5 to 5.4 GPa). Poly(pyromellitimide) is found to be a strong generator of such polarization and the polarization is found to reflect an irreversible or highly hysteretic process. The present measurements are combined with prior measurements to establish a correlation between monomer structure and strength of shock-induced polarization; feeble signals are observed in the simpler monomer repeat units of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) and polyethylene while the strongest signals are observed in more complex monomers of poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(pyromellitimide). It is also noted that there is an apparent correlation between shock-induced conduction and shock-induced polarization. Such shock-induced electrical activity is also found to be well correlated with the propensity for mechanical bond scission observed in experiments carried out in conventional mechanochemical studies. The bond scission model can account for characteristics observed for electrical activity in shock-loaded polymers and their correlation to monomer structure. Localization of elastic energy within the monomer repeat unit or along the main chain leads to the different propensities for bond scission and resulting shock-induced electrical activity

  12. Influence of the Oxygen-inhibited Layer on Bonding Performance of Dental Adhesive Systems: Surface Free Energy Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    To examine the influence of the oxygen inhibited layer (OIL) on shear bond strength (SBS) to dentin and surface free energy (SFE) characteristics of different adhesive systems. Three adhesive systems were used: Scotchbond Multipurpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and Scotchbond Universal (SU). Resin composite was bonded to dentin surfaces to determine SBS with and without OIL of adhesives. The SFE, dispersion force (γSd), polarity force (γSp), and hydrogen bonding force (γSh) of cured adhesives with and without an OIL were measured. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) test were used for analysis of SBS data, and one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test were used for the SFE and contact angle data. The SBS of SM and CS showed no significant differences between specimens with and without the OIL. However, the SBS of SU with the OIL was significantly higher than without the OIL. The SFE, γSp, and γSh of cured adhesives with an OIL were significantly higher than those of cured adhesives without an OIL. The SFE, γSp, and γSh of SM and CS with an OIL were significantly higher than those of SU with an OIL. The results of this study indicate that the presence of an OIL with a single-step self-etching adhesive promotes higher SBS to dentin, unlike in the other types of adhesive systems. The SFE characteristics of the OIL of dental adhesives differed depending on the type of adhesive system.

  13. The effect of silane applied to glass ceramics on surface structure and bonding strength at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Tevfik; Eraslan, Oguz

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of various surface treatments on the surface structure and shear bond strength (SBS) of different ceramics. 288 specimens (lithium-disilicate, leucite-reinforced, and glass infiltrated zirconia) were first divided into two groups according to the resin cement used, and were later divided into four groups according to the given surface treatments: G1 (hydrofluoric acid (HF)+silane), G2 (silane alone-no heat-treatment), G3 (silane alone-then dried with 60℃ heat-treatment), and G4 (silane alone-then dried with 100℃ heat-treatment). Two different adhesive luting systems were applied onto the ceramic discs in all groups. SBS (in MPa) was calculated from the failure load per bonded area (in N/mm(2)). Subsequently, one specimen from each group was prepared for SEM evaluation of the separated-resin-ceramic interface. SBS values of G1 were significantly higher than those of the other groups in the lithium disilicate ceramic and leucite reinforced ceramic, and the SBS values of G4 and G1 were significantly higher than those of G2 and G3 in glass infiltrated zirconia. The three-way ANOVA revealed that the SBS values were significantly affected by the type of resin cement (P<.001). FIN ceramics had the highest rate of cohesive failure on the ceramic surfaces than other ceramic groups. AFM images showed that the surface treatment groups exhibited similar topographies, except the group treated with HF. The heat treatment was not sufficient to achieve high SBS values as compared with HF acid etching. The surface topography of ceramics was affected by surface treatments.

  14. The effect of silane applied to glass ceramics on surface structure and bonding strength at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraslan, Oguz

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effect of various surface treatments on the surface structure and shear bond strength (SBS) of different ceramics. MATERIALS AND METHODS 288 specimens (lithium-disilicate, leucite-reinforced, and glass infiltrated zirconia) were first divided into two groups according to the resin cement used, and were later divided into four groups according to the given surface treatments: G1 (hydrofluoric acid (HF)+silane), G2 (silane alone-no heat-treatment), G3 (silane alone-then dried with 60℃ heat-treatment), and G4 (silane alone-then dried with 100℃ heat-treatment). Two different adhesive luting systems were applied onto the ceramic discs in all groups. SBS (in MPa) was calculated from the failure load per bonded area (in N/mm2). Subsequently, one specimen from each group was prepared for SEM evaluation of the separated-resin–ceramic interface. RESULTS SBS values of G1 were significantly higher than those of the other groups in the lithium disilicate ceramic and leucite reinforced ceramic, and the SBS values of G4 and G1 were significantly higher than those of G2 and G3 in glass infiltrated zirconia. The three-way ANOVA revealed that the SBS values were significantly affected by the type of resin cement (Pceramics had the highest rate of cohesive failure on the ceramic surfaces than other ceramic groups. AFM images showed that the surface treatment groups exhibited similar topographies, except the group treated with HF. CONCLUSION The heat treatment was not sufficient to achieve high SBS values as compared with HF acid etching. The surface topography of ceramics was affected by surface treatments. PMID:27141250

  15. Technical activities, 1990: Surface Science Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, C.J.

    1991-05-01

    The report summarizes technical activities and accomplishments of the NIST Surface Science Division during Fiscal Year 1990. Overviews are presented of the Division and of its three constituent groups: Surface Dynamical Processes, Thin Films and Interfaces, and Surface Spectroscopies and Standards. These overviews are followed by reports of selected technical accomplishments during the year. A summary is given of Division outputs and interactions that includes lists of publications, talks, committee assignments, seminars (including both Division seminars and Interface Science seminars arranged through the Division), conferences organized, and a standard reference material certified. Finally, lists are given of Division staff and of guest scientists who have worked in the Division during the past year

  16. Importance of the oxygen bond strength for catalytic activity in soot oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jakob M.; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Jensen, Anker D.

    2016-01-01

    energies for soot oxidation follow linear Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relationships with the heat of oxygen chemisorption. Among the tested metal or metal oxide catalysts Co3O4 and CeO2 were nearest to the optimal bond strength in tight contact oxidation, while Cr2O3 was nearest to the optimum in loose contact......The oxygen bond strength on a catalyst, as measured by the heat of oxygen chemisorption, is observed to be a very important parameter for the activity of the catalyst in soot oxidation. With both intimate contact between soot and catalyst (tight contact) and with the solids stirred loosely together...... oxidation. The optimum of the volcano curve in loose contact is estimated to occur between the bond strengths of α-Fe2O3 and α-Cr2O3. Guided by an interpolation principle FeaCrbOx binary oxides were tested, and the activity of these oxides was observed to pass through an optimum for an FeCr2Ox binary oxide...

  17. Photosynthetic water oxidation: binding and activation of substrate waters for O-O bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinyard, David J; Khan, Sahr; Brudvig, Gary W

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic water oxidation occurs at the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of Photosystem II (PSII). The OEC, which contains a Mn4CaO5 inorganic cluster ligated by oxides, waters and amino-acid residues, cycles through five redox intermediates known as S(i) states (i = 0-4). The electronic and structural properties of the transient S4 intermediate that forms the O-O bond are not well understood. In order to gain insight into how water is activated for O-O bond formation in the S4 intermediate, we have performed a detailed analysis of S-state dependent substrate water binding kinetics taking into consideration data from Mn coordination complexes. This analysis supports a model in which the substrate waters are both bound as terminal ligands and react via a water-nucleophile attack mechanism.

  18. Sphalerite is a geochemical catalyst for carbon-hydrogen bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, Jessie A; Gould, Ian R; Shock, Everett L; Williams, Lynda B; Hartnett, Hilairy E

    2014-08-12

    Reactions among minerals and organic compounds in hydrothermal systems are critical components of the Earth's deep carbon cycle, provide energy for the deep biosphere, and may have implications for the origins of life. However, there is limited information as to how specific minerals influence the reactivity of organic compounds. Here we demonstrate mineral catalysis of the most fundamental component of an organic reaction: the breaking and making of a covalent bond. In the absence of mineral, hydrothermal reaction of cis- and trans-1,2-dimethylcyclohexane is extremely slow and generates many products. In the presence of sphalerite (ZnS), however, the reaction rate increases dramatically and one major product is formed: the corresponding stereoisomer. Isotope studies show that the sphalerite acts as a highly specific heterogeneous catalyst for activation of a single carbon-hydrogen bond in the dimethylcyclohexanes.

  19. Adhesive wafer bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklaus, F.; Stemme, G.; Lu, J.-Q.; Gutmann, R. J.

    2006-02-01

    Wafer bonding with intermediate polymer adhesives is an important fabrication technique for advanced microelectronic and microelectromechanical systems, such as three-dimensional integrated circuits, advanced packaging, and microfluidics. In adhesive wafer bonding, the polymer adhesive bears the forces involved to hold the surfaces together. The main advantages of adhesive wafer bonding include the insensitivity to surface topography, the low bonding temperatures, the compatibility with standard integrated circuit wafer processing, and the ability to join different types of wafers. Compared to alternative wafer bonding techniques, adhesive wafer bonding is simple, robust, and low cost. This article reviews the state-of-the-art polymer adhesive wafer bonding technologies, materials, and applications.

  20. JCMT active surface control system: implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ian A.

    1998-05-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on the summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii is a 15 meter sub-millimeter telescope which operates in the 350 microns to 2 millimeter region. The primary antenna surface consists of 276 panels, each of which is positioned by 3 stepper motors. In order to achieve the highest possible surface accuracy we are embarking upon a project to actively control the position of the panels adjuster system is based on a 6809 micro connected to the control computer by a GPIB interface. This system is slow and inflexible and it would prove difficult to build an active surface control system with it. Part of the upgrade project is to replace the existing micro with a 68060 VME micro. The poster paper will describe how the temperature of the antenna is monitored with the new system, how a Finite Element Analyses package transforms temperature changes into a series of panel adjuster moves, and how these moves are then applied to the surface. The FEA package will run on a high end Sun workstation. A series of DRAMA tasks distributed between the workstation and the Baja 68060 VxWorks Active Surface Control System micro will control the temperature monitoring, FEA and panel adjustment activities. Users can interact with the system via a Tcl/TK based GUI.

  1. Comparative evaluation of bond strength of all-metal crowns with different luting agents after undergoing various modes of surface treatments: An in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivam Singh Tomar

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Among all types of surface treatments used in this study, maximum bond strength was yielded by sandblasting with 110 µm alumina + ultrasonic cleaning and the best luting agent was resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

  2. Nonmetals Test and Evaluation: Delivery Order 0007: The Development of On-Aircraft Surface Preparations Utilizing Sol-Gel Coatings for Adhesive Bonding Aluminum Alloys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCray, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    ...), and hexavalent chromium. Surface preparations used for on-aircraft repair of aluminum rely on hazardous materials or inconvenient processing steps, or they do not yield adequate bond performance. Grit-blast/silane (GBS...

  3. Effect of surface conditioning modalities on the repair bond strength of resin composite to the zirconia core / veneering ceramic complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Pereira, Sarina Maciel; Amaral, Regina; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Pekkan, Gurel

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface conditioning protocols on the repair strength of resin composite to the zirconia core / veneering ceramic complex, simulating the clinical chipping phenomenon. Forty disk-shaped zirconia core (Lava Zirconia, 3M ESPE) (diameter: 3 mm) specimens were veneered circumferentially with a feldspathic veneering ceramic (VM7, Vita Zahnfabrik) (thickness: 2 mm) using a split metal mold. They were then embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic with the bonding surfaces exposed. Specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following surface conditioning protocols (n = 10 per group): group 1, veneer: 4% hydrofluoric acid (HF) (Porcelain Etch) + core: aluminum trioxide (50-µm Al2O3) + core + veneer: silane (ESPE-Sil); group 2: core: Al2O3 (50 µm) + veneer: HF + core + veneer: silane; group 3: veneer: HF + core: 30 µm aluminum trioxide particles coated with silica (30 µm SiO2) + core + veneer: silane; group 4: core: 30 µm SiO2 + veneer: HF + core + veneer: silane. Core and veneer ceramic were conditioned individually but no attempt was made to avoid cross contamination of conditioning, simulating the clinical intraoral repair situation. Adhesive resin (VisioBond) was applied to both the core and the veneer ceramic, and resin composite (Quadrant Posterior) was bonded onto both substrates using polyethylene molds and photopolymerized. After thermocycling (6000 cycles, 5°C-55°C), the specimens were subjected to shear bond testing using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure modes were identified using an optical microscope, and scanning electron microscope images were obtained. Bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed statistically using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test followed by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and the Bonferroni Holm correction (α = 0.05). Group 3 demonstrated significantly higher values (MPa) (8.6 ± 2.7) than those of the other groups (3.2 ± 3.1, 3.2 ± 3, and 3.1 ± 3.5 for groups 1, 2, and 4

  4. Controlling Physical and Chemical Bonding of Polypyrrole to Boron Doped Diamond by Surface Termination

    OpenAIRE

    Ukraintsev, Egor; Kromka, Alexander; Janssen, Wiebke; Haenen, Ken; Rezek, Bohuslav

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate and to control polypyrrole (PPy) attachment to diamond we electrochemically grow PPy layers on hydrogen- and oxygen-terminated boron doped diamonds (BDD). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that the PPy layers have similar morphology (15 nm features) and thickness (> 5 nm) on H- and O-BDD. To resolve type of PPy-diamond bonding, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to compare intensity of secondary electron emission from original BDD regions and regions where PPy was grown...

  5. Diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding. At least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces is coated with nickel. A coated surface portion is positioned in a contiguous relationship with another surface portion and subjected to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure. A force is applied on the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other. The contiguous surface portions are heated to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, and the applied force is decreased while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature. A portion of the applied force is maintained at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions

  6. THE EFFECTS OF RARE EARTHS ON ACTIVITY AND SURFACE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    higher the temperature of H2O desorption is, the stronger the Ru−OH2 bond at the surface of the catalysts and the greater the dissociation of H2O become. The shift reaction needs the dissociative of adsorption H2O to break OH−H and O−H bonds. Therefore the increase of the adsorbing intensity of H2O is associated with ...

  7. Differences in tensile adhesion strength between HEMA and nonHEMA-based dentin bonding applied on superficial and deep dentin surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eresha Melati Kusuma Wurdani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improvement in dentistry shows some progresses, due to patients awareness on the importance of dental care. Cervical lesion is the most common phenomenon which oftenly found 46.36% in man and 38.13% in woman. Cervical lesions need composite restoration for treatment to stop the process of tissue damage. The process of adhesion of composite restoration material to the structure of the tooth is not easily separated and it needs optimal function in the oral cavity. Application of dentin bonding agents to attach the composite is needed. Selection of HEMA-based bonding material and Hema free-based bonding material which have a different solvent in their composition, as applied to the dentin superficial and deep dentin, affect the results of debonding test. Debonding test is done to measure the adhesion strength of a bonding material. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze differences in tensile bond strength of dentine bonding HEMA-based and HEMA-free based after application in superficial and deep dentine surfaces. Method: The tooth of the bovine was as samples. A superficial dentine sample was taken from 0.5-1 mm of dentino enamel junction and a deep dentine sample was taken from 0.5 mm culmination of pulp horn. Dentine surface area was equal to p x r2 = (3.14 x 22 = 12.56 mm2. Six samples of HEMA-based bonding was applied to the dentine superficial. Six samples of HEMAfree based bonding was applied to the superficial dentine. Six samples of HEMA-based bonding was applied to the deep dentine. Six samples of HEMA-free based bonding was applied to the deep dentine. Tensile strength was measured using an Autograph AG-10TE. Result: There were differences tensile bond strength of dentine bonding HEMA-based and HEMA-free based after the application on superficial (p=0.000 and deep dentine surfaces (p=0.000. Conclusion: There were differences tensile bond strength of dentine bonding HEMA-based and HEMA-free based after the

  8. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strength between resin cement and differently sintered zirconium-oxide ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenisey, Murat; Dede, Doğu Ömür; Rona, Nergiz

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of surface treatments on bond strength between resin cement and differently sintered zirconium-oxide ceramics. 220 zirconium-oxide ceramic (Ceramill ZI) specimens were prepared, sintered in two different period (Short=Ss, Long=Ls) and divided into ten treatment groups as: GC, no treatment; GSil, silanized (ESPE-Sil); GSilPen, silane flame treatment (Silano-Pen); GSb, sandblasted; GSbSil, sandblasted+silanized; GSbCoSil, sandblasted+silica coated (CoJet)+silanized; GSbRoSil, sandblasted+silica coated (Rocatech-Plus)+silanized; GSbDSil, sandblasted+diamond particle abraded (Micron MDA)+silanized; GSbSilPen, sandblasted+silane flame treatment+silanized; GSbLSil, sandblasted+Er:Yag (Asclepion-MCL30) laser treated+silanized. The composite resin (Filtek Z-250) cylinders were cemented to the treated ceramic surfaces with a resin cement (Panavia F2.0). Shear bond strength test was performed after specimens were stored in water for 24h and thermo-cycled for 6000 cycles (5-55 °C). Data were statistically analyzed with two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tamhane's multiple comparison test (α=0.05). According to the ANOVA, sintering time, surface treatments and their interaction were statistically significant (presin cement and differently sintered zirconium-oxide ceramics. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Increased Back-Bonding Explains Step-Edge Reactivity and Particle Size Effect for CO Activation on Ru Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppa, Lucas; Copéret, Christophe; Comas-Vives, Aleix

    2016-12-28

    Carbon monoxide is a ubiquitous molecule, a key feedstock and intermediate in chemical processes. Its adsorption and activation, typically carried out on metallic nanoparticles (NPs), are strongly dependent on the particle size. In particular, small NPs, which in principle contain more corner and step-edge atoms, are surprisingly less reactive than larger ones. Hereby, first-principles calculations on explicit Ru NP models (1-2 nm) show that both small and large NPs can present step-edge sites (e.g., B 5 and B 6 sites). However, such sites display strong particle-size-dependent reactivity because of very subtle differences in local chemical bonding. State-of-the-art crystal orbital Hamilton population analysis allows a detailed molecular orbital picture of adsorbed CO on step-edges, which can be classified as flat (η 1 coordination) and concave (η 2 coordination) sites. Our analysis shows that the CO π-metal d π hybrid band responsible for the electron back-donation is better represented by an oxygen lone pair on flat sites, whereas it is delocalized on both C and O atoms on concave sites, increasing the back-bonding on these sites compared to flat step-edges or low-index surface sites. The bonding analysis also rationalizes why CO cleavage is easier on step-edge sites of large NPs compared to small ones irrespective of the site geometry. The lower reactivity of small NPs is due to the smaller extent of the Ru-O interaction in the η 2 adsorption mode, which destabilizes the η 2 transition-state structure for CO direct cleavage. Our findings provide a molecular understanding of the reactivity of CO on NPs, which is consistent with the observed particle size effect.

  10. Ultrafast studies of organometallic photochemistry: The mechanism of carbon-hydrogen bond activation in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberg, S.E.

    1998-05-01

    When certain organometallic compounds are photoexcited in room temperature alkane solution, they are able to break or activate the C-H bonds of the solvent. Understanding this potentially practical reaction requires a detailed knowledge of the entire reaction mechanism. Because of the dynamic nature of chemical reactions, time-resolved spectroscopy is commonly employed to follow the important events that take place as reactants are converted to products. For the organometallic reactions examined here, the electronic/structural characteristics of the chemical systems along with the time scales for the key steps in the reaction make ultrafast UV/Vis and IR spectroscopy along with nanosecond Step-Scan FTIR spectroscopy the ideal techniques to use for this study. An initial study of the photophysics of (non-activating) model metal carbonyls centering on the photodissociation of M(CO){sub 6} (M = Cr, W, Mo) was carried out in alkane solutions using ultrafast IR spectroscopy. Next, picosecond UV/vis studies of the C-H bond activation reaction of Cp{sup *}M(CO){sub 2} (M = Rh, Ir), conducted in room temperature alkane solution, are described in an effort to investigate the origin of the low quantum yield for bond cleavage ({approximately}1%). To monitor the chemistry that takes place in the reaction after CO is lost, a system with higher quantum yield is required. The reaction of Tp{sup *}Rh(CO){sub 2} (Tp{sup *} = HB-Pz{sub 3}{sup *}, Pz{sup *} = 3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl) in alkanes has a quantum yield of {approximately}30%, making time resolved spectroscopic measurements possible. From ultrafast IR experiments, two subsequently formed intermediates were observed. The nature of these intermediates are discussed and the first comprehensive reaction mechanism for a photochemical C-H activating organometallic complex is presented.

  11. Bactericidal activity of biomimetic diamond nanocone surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Leanne E; Yang, Yang; Yuen, Muk-Fung; Zhang, Wenjun; Nobbs, Angela H; Su, Bo

    2016-03-17

    The formation of biofilms on implant surfaces and the subsequent development of medical device-associated infections are difficult to resolve and can cause considerable morbidity to the patient. Over the past decade, there has been growing recognition that physical cues, such as surface topography, can regulate biological responses and possess bactericidal activity. In this study, diamond nanocone-patterned surfaces, representing biomimetic analogs of the naturally bactericidal cicada fly wing, were fabricated using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition, followed by bias-assisted reactive ion etching. Two structurally distinct nanocone surfaces were produced, characterized, and the bactericidal ability examined. The sharp diamond nanocone features were found to have bactericidal capabilities with the surface possessing the more varying cone dimension, nonuniform array, and decreased density, showing enhanced bactericidal ability over the more uniform, highly dense nanocone surface. Future research will focus on using the fabrication process to tailor surface nanotopographies on clinically relevant materials that promote both effective killing of a broader range of microorganisms and the desired mammalian cell response. This study serves to introduce a technology that may launch a new and innovative direction in the design of biomaterials with capacity to reduce the risk of medical device-associated infections.

  12. Active Thermochemical Tables: Sequential Bond Dissociation Enthalpies of Methane, Ethane, and Methanol and the Related Thermochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruscic, Branko

    2015-07-16

    Active Thermochemical Tables (ATcT) thermochemistry for the sequential bond dissociations of methane, ethane, and methanol systems were obtained by analyzing and solving a very large thermochemical network (TN). Values for all possible C–H, C–C, C–O, and O–H bond dissociation enthalpies at 298.15 K (BDE298) and bond dissociation energies at 0 K (D0) are presented. The corresponding ATcT standard gas-phase enthalpies of formation of the resulting CHn, n = 4–0 species (methane, methyl, methylene, methylidyne, and carbon atom), C2Hn, n = 6–0 species (ethane, ethyl, ethylene, ethylidene, vinyl, ethylidyne, acetylene, vinylidene, ethynyl, and ethynylene), and COHn, n = 4–0 species (methanol, hydroxymethyl, methoxy, formaldehyde, hydroxymethylene, formyl, isoformyl, and carbon monoxide) are also presented. The ATcT thermochemistry of carbon dioxide, water, hydroxyl, and carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen atoms is also included, together with the sequential BDEs of CO2 and H2O. The provenances of the ATcT enthalpies of formation, which are quite distributed and involve a large number of relevant determinations, are analyzed by variance decomposition and discussed in terms of principal contributions. The underlying reasons for periodic appearances of remarkably low and/or unusually high BDEs, alternating along the dissociation sequences, are analyzed and quantitatively rationalized. The present ATcT results are the most accurate thermochemical values currently available for these species.

  13. Activation of interfacial enzymes at membrane surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Halperin, Avi

    2006-01-01

    A host of water-soluble enzymes are active at membrane surfaces and in association with membranes. Some of these enzymes are involved in signalling and in modification and remodelling of the membranes. A special class of enzymes, the phospholipases, and in particular secretory phospholipase A2 (s...

  14. Plasma-Surface Interaction Activities in KSTAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, S. H.; Yu, Y.; Kim, K. P.; Bak, J. G.; Park, H. J.; Oh, Y. S.; Chung, J.; Nam, Y. U.; Bang, E. N.; Kim, K. R.; Litnovsky, A.; Hellwig, M.; Matveev, D.; Komm, M.; van den Berg, M. A.; Kim, W. C.; Kim, H. K.; Rho, T. H.; Chu, Y.; Oh, Y. K.; Yang, H. L.; Park, K. R.; Chung, K. S.; Kstar Team,

    2013-01-01

    Selected topics of Plasma-Surface Interaction (PSI) activities in KSTAR are briefly introduced. SOL parameter measurements, particle balance and fuel retention, in-vessel dust research, and finally tungsten R & D are discussed. Some quantitative numbers from the initial phase of the operation

  15. Influence of hydrogen bond accepting ability of anions on the adsorption performance of ionic liquid surface molecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guifen; Gao, Xia; Wang, Xiaolong; Wang, Jianji; Fan, Jing

    2018-01-12

    To illuminate the influence mechanism of anionic structure of ionic liquids (ILs) on the adsorption performance of surface molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), in this work, six newly designed MIPs were prepared on the surface of amino-poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) particles by using imidazolium ILs with the same cation [C 4 mim] + but different anions (Cl, CH 3 SO 3 , PF 6 , BF 4 , C 4 F 7 O 2 , C 4 F 9 SO 3 ) as template molecules, methacrylic acid as functional monomer, and ethylene dimethacrylate as cross-linker. The resulting MIP materials were characterized by IR and SEM, and the influence of hydrogen bond accepting ability of anions on the adsorption performance of the MIPs for the ILs was investigated in acetonitrile. It was found that adsorption capacity of the MIPs towards the ILs decreased in the order MIP [C4mim][Cl]  > MIP [C4mim][C4F7O2]  ≥ MIP [C4mim][BF4] and MIP [C4mim][CH3SO3]  > MIP [C4mim][C4F9SO3]  > MIP [C4mim][PF6] , which is in good agreement with the ability of anions of the ILs to form hydrogen bonds. Ultraviolet, 1 H-NMR and 35 Cl-NMR spectroscopy was then used to study the interactions of anions of the ILs with the functional monomer. It was found that the hydrogen bond interaction between anions of the ILs and acidic proton of the functional monomer was the main driving force for the high adsorption selectivity of the imprinted polymers, and the stronger hydrogen bond interaction indicates higher binding capacity and higher selectivity of the polymers towards the ILs. It was also verified that the ILs with stronger hydrogen bond accepting ability of anions could be selectively extracted by the corresponding IL-MIPs. These results may provide new insight into the recognition mechanism of MIPs for ILs, and are also useful for the rational design of this new class of imprinting materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Biomimetic superhydrophobic polyolefin surfaces fabricated with a facile scraping, bonding and peeling method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Huanhuan; Zheng, Tingting; Wang, Huiliang

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the superhydrophobicity of juicy peach surface, on which microscale hairs are standing vertically to the surface plane, an extremely simple, inexpensive physical method is developed for fabrication of superhydrophobic polyolefin surfaces over large areas. This method includes three

  17. Au@Pd Bimetallic Nanocatalyst for Carbon-Halogen Bond Cleavage: An Old Story with New Insight into How the Activity of Pd is Influenced by Au.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Chen, Hui-Min; Fang, Li-Ping; Xu, Cuihong; He, Zuoliang; Lai, Yujian; Zhao, Huachao; Bekana, Deribachew; Liu, Jing-Fu

    2018-03-21

    AuPd bimetallic nanocatalysts exhibit superior catalytic performance in the cleavage of carbon-halogen bonds (C-X) in the hazardous halogenated pollutants. A better understanding of how Au atoms promote the reactivity of Pd sites rather than vaguely interpreting as bimetallic effect and determining which type of Pd sites are necessary for these reactions are crucial factors for the design of atomically precise nanocatalysts that make full use of both the Pd and Au atoms. Herein, we systematically manipulated the coordination number of Pd-Pd, d-orbital occupation state, and the Au-Pd interface of the Pd reactive centers and studied the structure-activity relationship of Au-Pd in the catalyzed cleavage of C-X bonds. It is revealed that Au enhanced the activity of Pd atoms primarily by increasing the occupation state of Pd d-orbitals. Meanwhile, among the Pd sites formed on the Au surface, five to seven contiguous Pd atoms, three or four adjacent Pd atoms, and isolated Pd atoms were found to be the most active in the cleavage of C-Cl, C-Br, and C-I bonds, respectively. Besides, neighboring Au atoms directly contribute to the weakening of the C-Br/C-I bond. This work provides new insight into the rational design of bimetallic metal catalysts with specific catalytic properties.

  18. Heat treatment following surface silanization in rebonded tribochemical silica-coated ceramic brackets: shear bond strength analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Adriane Silva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of heat treatment on the tribochemical silica coating and silane surface conditioning and the bond strength of rebonded alumina monocrystalline brackets. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty alumina monocrystalline brackets were randomly divided according to adhesive base surface treatments (n=20: Gc, no treatment (control; Gt, tribochemical silica coating + silane application; Gh, as per Gt + post-heat treatment (air flux at 100ºC for 60 s. Brackets were bonded to the enamel premolars surface with a light-polymerized resin and stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 100 days. Additionally, half the specimens of each group were thermocycled (6,000 cycles between 5-55ºC (TC. The specimens were submitted to the shear bond strength (SBS test using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min. Failure mode was assessed using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, together with the surface roughness (Ra of the resin cement in the bracket using interference microscopy (IM. 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey test were used to compare the data (p>0.05. RESULTS: The strategies used to treat the bracket surface had an effect on the SBS results (p=0.0, but thermocycling did not (p=0.6974. Considering the SBS results (MPa, Gh-TC and Gc showed the highest values (27.59±6.4 and 27.18±2.9 and Gt-TC showed the lowest (8.45±6.7. For the Ra parameter, ANOVA revealed that the aging method had an effect (p=0.0157 but the surface treatments did not (p=0.458. For the thermocycled and non-thermocycled groups, Ra (µm was 0.69±0.16 and 1.12±0.52, respectively. The most frequent failure mode exhibited was mixed failure involving the enamel-resin-bracket interfaces. CONCLUSION: Regardless of the aging method, Gh promoted similar SBS results to Gc, suggesting that rebonded ceramic brackets are a more effective strategy.

  19. Mechanotransductive surfaces for reversible biocatalysis activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Damien; Vogt, Cédric; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Mutterer, Jérôme; Ball, Vincent; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Schaaf, Pierre; Lavalle, Philippe

    2009-09-01

    Fibronectin, like other proteins involved in mechanotransduction, has the ability to exhibit recognition sites under mechanical stretch. Such cryptic sites are buried inside the protein structure in the native fold and become exposed under an applied force, thereby activating specific signalling pathways. Here, we report the design of new active polymeric nanoassembled surfaces that show some similarities to these cryptic sites. These nanoassemblies consist of a first polyelectrolyte multilayer stratum loaded with enzymes and capped with a second polyelectrolyte multilayer acting as a mechanically sensitive nanobarrier. The biocatalytic activity of the film is switched on/off reversibly by mechanical stretching, which exposes enzymes through the capping barrier, similarly to mechanisms involved in proteins during mechanotransduction. This first example of a new class of biologically inspired surfaces should have great potential in the design of various devices aimed to trigger and modulate chemical reactions by mechanical action with applications in the field of microfluidic devices or mechanically controlled biopatches for example.

  20. In vitro evaluation of repair bond strength of composite: Effect of surface treatments with bur and laser and application of universal adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Espahbodi, Melika; Chiniforush, Nasim; Karazifard, Mohammad Javd; Kamangar, Sedighe Sadat Hashemi

    2017-09-30

    This study aimed to assess the effect of surface treatment by bur and laser and application of universal adhesive on repair bond strength of composite resin. A total of 120 composite blocks measuring 6×4×4 mm were fabricated of Filtek Z250 composite. All samples were subjected to 5,000 thermal cycles and divided into two groups for surface preparation by bur and by Er,Cr:YSGG laser (n = 60). The surfaces were then etched with orthophosphoric acid, rinsed with water and divided into three groups (silane, silane plus Single Bond and silane plus Single Bond Universal). Repair composite was then bonded to aged composite. Half of the samples in each group were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours and the other half underwent 5000 thermal cycles. All samples were then subjected to shear bond strength testing using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. Mode of failure was determined using a stereomicroscope. Bur preparation plus universal adhesive yielded the highest bond strength (30.16 µ 2.26 MPa). Laser plus silane yielded the lowest bond strength (5.63 µ 2.43 MPa). Bur preparation yielded significantly higher bond strength than laser (P composite by bur and application of universal adhesive can improve the repair bond strength of composite. Application of silane (without adhesive) in the process of repair cannot provide adequately high repair bond strength.

  1. Active colloidal propulsion over a crystalline surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Udit; Straube, Arthur V.; Fischer, Peer; Gibbs, John G.; Höfling, Felix

    2017-12-01

    We study both experimentally and theoretically the dynamics of chemically self-propelled Janus colloids moving atop a two-dimensional crystalline surface. The surface is a hexagonally close-packed monolayer of colloidal particles of the same size as the mobile one. The dynamics of the self-propelled colloid reflects the competition between hindered diffusion due to the periodic surface and enhanced diffusion due to active motion. Which contribution dominates depends on the propulsion strength, which can be systematically tuned by changing the concentration of a chemical fuel. The mean-square displacements (MSDs) obtained from the experiment exhibit enhanced diffusion at long lag times. Our experimental data are consistent with a Langevin model for the effectively two-dimensional translational motion of an active Brownian particle in a periodic potential, combining the confining effects of gravity and the crystalline surface with the free rotational diffusion of the colloid. Approximate analytical predictions are made for the MSD describing the crossover from free Brownian motion at short times to active diffusion at long times. The results are in semi-quantitative agreement with numerical results of a refined Langevin model that treats translational and rotational degrees of freedom on the same footing.

  2. Surface active properties of lipid nanocapsules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia R A Mouzouvi

    Full Text Available Lipid nanocapsules (LNCs are biomimetic nanocarriers used for the encapsulation of a broad variety of active ingredients. Similar to surface active compounds, LNCs contain both hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts in their structure. Moreover, the components of LNCs, macrogol 15 hydroxystearate (MHS and lecithin, are known for their surface active properties. Therefore, the aim of this paper was to investigate the capability of the LNCs to decrease surface tension using two techniques: drop tensiometry and the Wilhelmy plate method. LNCs with diameters ranging from 30 to 100 nm were successfully obtained using a phase inversion technique. The LNCs' properties, such as size and zeta potential, depend on the composition. LNCs exhibit a lower limiting surface tension compared to MHS (34.8-35.0 mN/m and 37.7-38.8 mN/m, respectively, as confirmed by both drop tensiometry and the Wilhelmy plate method. LNCs have exhibited a saturated interfacial concentration (SIC that was 10-fold higher than the critical micellar concentration (CMC of MHS or the SIC of binary and ternary mixtures of LNC ingredients. The SIC of the LNC formulations depended on the mass mixing ratio of the MHS/triglycerides but not on the presence of lecithin. The CMC/SIC values measured by the Wilhelmy plate method were higher than those obtained using drop tensiometry because of the longer duration of the tensiometry measurement. In conclusion, the surfactant-like properties of the LNCs offer new possibilities for medical and pharmaceutical applications.

  3. Annulation of aromatic imines via directed C-H bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalji, Reema K; Ahrendt, Kateri A; Bergman, Robert G; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2005-08-19

    A directed C-H bond activation approach to the synthesis of indans, tetralins, dihydrofurans, dihydroindoles, and other polycyclic aromatic compounds is presented. Cyclization of aromatic ketimines and aldimines containing alkenyl groups tethered at the meta position relative to the imine directing group has been achieved using (PPh3)3RhCl (Wilkinson's catalyst). The cyclization of a range of aromatic ketimines and aldimines provides bi- and tricyclic ring systems with good regioselectivity. Different ring sizes and substitution patterns can be accessed through the coupling of monosubstituted, 1,1- or 1,2-disubstituted, and trisubstituted alkenes bearing both electron-rich and electron-deficient functionality.

  4. Highly efficient and enantioselective cyclization of aromatic imines via directed C-H bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalji, Reema K; Ellman, Jonathan A; Bergman, Robert G

    2004-06-16

    The first highly enantioselective catalytic reaction involving aromatic C-H bond activation is communicated. Enantioselective cyclization of aromatic ketimines containing alkenyl groups tethered at the meta position of an imine directing group has been achieved using 5 mol % [RhCl(coe)2]2 and 15 mol % of an (S)-binol-derived phosphoramidite ligand. Selectivities of up to 96% ee and up to quantitative yields were obtained. Moreover, the identified catalyst system enables the intramolecular alkylation reaction to be performed at temperatures 75 degrees C lower than our previously reported achiral system. The reaction can even be performed at room temperature for one of the optimal substrates.

  5. Selective molecular recognition, C-H bond activation, and catalysis in nanoscale reaction vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Dorothea; Leung, Dennis H.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Bergman, Robert G.

    2004-11-27

    Supramolecular chemistry represents a way to mimic enzyme reactivity by using specially designed container molecules. We have shown that a chiral self-assembled M{sub 4}L{sub 6} supramolecular tetrahedron can encapsulate a variety of cationic guests, with varying degrees of stereoselectivity. Reactive iridium guests can be encapsulated and the C-H bond activation of aldehydes occurs, with the host cavity controlling the ability of substrates to interact with the metal center based upon size and shape. In addition, the host container can act as a catalyst by itself. By restricting reaction space and preorganizing the substrates into reactive conformations, it accelerates the sigmatropic rearrangement of enammonium cations.

  6. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Liang

    2015-04-22

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold–gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen.

  7. New procedure to record the rupture of bonds between macromolecules and the surface of the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dultsev, Fedor N; Kolosovsky, Eugeny A; Mik, Ivan A

    2012-10-02

    It is shown that an increase in the amplitude of QCM shear oscillations during frequency scanning around the resonance frequency is accompanied (at a definite voltage) by distortions in the amplitude-frequency dependence for QCM. We demonstrated that these distortions are connected to the rupture of macromolecules from the QCM surface. It is shown that the identification of the rupture of particles and macromolecules from the QCM surface can be carried out by relying on the analysis of these distortions of the amplitude-frequency dependence. The distortions were distinguished as a signal. The number of broken bonds can be estimated from the value of this distortion signal, and the threshold voltage applied to the system can be used to estimate the rupture force to high accuracy. Using the proposed method, we estimated the strength of a physical bond, which was 3 pN. This procedure can be useful for studying biological objects and represents an advanced step in the development of the REVS (rupture event scanning) technique.

  8. Adsorption of cobalt (II) octaethylporphyrin and 2H-octaethylporphyrin on Ag(111): new insight into the surface coordinative bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Yun; Buchner, Florian; Kellner, Ina; Schmid, Martin; Vollnhals, Florian; Steinrueck, Hans-Peter; Marbach, Hubertus; Michael Gottfried, J

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption of cobalt (II) octaethylporphyrin (CoOEP) and 2H-octaethylporphyrin (2HOEP) on Ag(111) was investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS/UPS), in order to achieve a detailed mechanistic understanding of the surface chemical bond of coordinated metal ions. Previous studies of related systems, especially cobalt (II) tetraphenylporphyrin (CoTPP) on Ag(111), have revealed adsorption-induced changes of the oxidation state of the Co ion and the appearance of a new valence state. These effects were attributed to a covalent interaction of the Co ion with the silver substrate. However, recent studies show that the porphyrin ligand of adsorbed CoTPP undergoes a pronounced saddle-shape distortion, which could alter the electronic structure and thus provide an alternative explanation for the new valence state previously attributed to the formation of a surface coordinative bond. With the octaethylporphyrins investigated here, which were found to adsorb in a flat, undistorted conformation on Ag(111), the effects of geometric distortion can be separated from those of the electronic interaction with the substrate. The CoOEP monolayer gives rise to an adsorption-induced shift of the Co 2p signal (-1.9 eV relative to the multilayer), a new valence state at 0.6 eV below the Fermi energy, and a work-function shift of -0.84 eV (2HOEP: -0.44 eV) relative to the clean surface. Comparison with data for the distorted CoTPP confirms the existence of a covalent ion-surface interaction that is insensitive to the conformation of the ligand.

  9. Methods for surface treating metals, ceramics, and plastics before adhesive bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Althouse, L.P.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for pretreating the surfaces of metals, ceramics, and plastics before they are coated with adhesive and used in assembly are described. The treatments recommended have been used successfully in the laboratory at LLL. Many are used in the assembly of nuclear devices. However, an unusual alloy or complex configuration may require trials before a specific surface treatment is chosen

  10. Subsurface hydrogen bonds at the polar Zn-terminated ZnO(0001) surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström, Matti; Beinik, Igor; Broqvist, Peter

    2016-01-01

    techniques, we find that the polar Zn-terminated ZnO(0001) surface becomes excessively Zn deficient during high-temperature annealing (780 K) in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). The Zn vacancies align themselves into rows parallel to the [10-10] direction, and the remaining surface Zn ions alternately occupy wurtzite...

  11. Infrared active thermography for surface layer characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semerok, A.; Fomichev, S.; Farcage, D.; Sortais, C.; Courtois, X.

    2006-05-01

    Deposited layer characterization was stated as the main goal of our studies for 2006. The investigations by DRFC/SIPP/GCFP (CEA Cadarache) were performed with the procedure of surface temperature measurements based on infrared thermography with synchronous demodulation (Lock-in Thermography). It was applied to provide the temperature surface monitoring during the modulated heating by illumination. The obtained 2D-cartography revealed the zones with a weak heat transfer resulting from a low layer/surface adhesion or poor layer thermal conductivity. The obtained lock-in cartography data should be regarded only as qualitative. For deposited layers characterization (layer depth, adhesion with the substrate), the active laser pyrometer measurements with the developed experimental device were made in LILM laboratory (CEA Saclay). Active surface pyrometry with repetitive laser heating can provide both qualitative and quantitative data on the first layer and the interface with the substrate. A 3D-numerical model of graphite deposited layer heating by a pulsed high repetition rate laser beam was developed to determine the heated surface temperature with a high temporal and spatial resolution. The theoretical data obtained with 3D-numerical model for surface heating were compared with the experimental results. It was demonstrated that for the given optical and thermo-physical parameters of materials, the theoretical temperatures may be fitted with the experimental results to assess certain unknown parameters of the layer (thermal contact resistance, diffusivity, thickness, porosity, ). Based on the comparison of the obtained experimental and theoretical results, the deposited layer characterization was made. The results of the investigations on Active Laser Pyrometry and Lock-in Thermography demonstrated that the methods can provide qualitative and quantitative data on the deposited layer and on the layer/substrate interface. The correlation and cross-check of the results

  12. Bonding xenon and krypton on the surface of uranium dioxide single crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dąbrowski Ludwik

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present density functional theory (DFT calculation results of krypton and xenon atoms interaction on the surface of uranium dioxide single crystal. A pseudo-potential approach in the generalised gradient approximation (GGA was applied using the ABINIT program package. To compute the unit cell parameters, the 25 atom super-cell was chosen. It has been revealed that close to the surface of a potential well is formed for xenon and krypton atom due to its interaction with the atoms of oxygen and uranium. Depth and shape of the well is the subject of ab initio calculations in adiabatic approximation. The calculations were performed both for the case of oxygenic and metallic surfaces. It has been shown that the potential well for the oxygenic surface is deeper than for the metallic surface. The thermal stability of immobilising the atoms of krypton and xenon in the potential wells were evaluated. The results are shown in graphs.

  13. Effects of the surface concentration of fixed charges in C18-bonded stationary phases on the adsorption process and on the preparative chromatography of small ionizable compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-11-06

    The effects of the surface concentration of positive charges attached to the surface of research BEH-C 18 hybrid particles on the overloaded band profiles and the adsorption isotherms of a neutral (caffeine) and a positively charged (nortryptilinium hydrochloride) compounds were measured and investigated. The inverse method (IM) of chromatography was used to determine the isotherm parameters. Three columns were packed with endcapped BEH-C 18 particles doped with three different charge densities on their surfaces (LOW, MEDIUM and HIGH). Two other columns packed with unbonded, non-endcapped, and endcapped BEH-C 18 particles served as standard reference materials. Minor disturbance method (MDM) experiments were conducted with acetonitrile/water mixtures in order to assess qualitatively the surface densities of the fixed positive charges. A more quantitative approach based on the solution of the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the decrease of the experimental Henry constant was also applied. The results show that the surface concentrations of the fixed charges in the LOW, MEDIUM and HIGH columns were 0.029, 0.050, and 0.064μmol/m 2 , e.g., close to two orders of magnitude smaller than the surface density of bonded C 18 chains (2.1μmol/m 2 ). The adsorption isotherm of the ionizable compound nortryptilinium onto the BEH-C 18 columns is consistent with a two-sites adsorption model. The density of the high energy sites correlates directly to the total amount of the fixed charges and isolated silanols amidst the C 18 -bonded chains. The amount of low energy sites reflects the specific surface area of the adsorbent. The binding constants on the high- and low-energy adsorption sites are respectively ten and two times lower on the HIGH column than on the reference endcapped column. The active sites are closer to the adsorbent surface than the weak adsorption sites. Finally, a higher production rate of ionizable compounds can be achieved in preparative

  14. The Effect of Phosphoric Acid Pre-etching Times on Bonding Performance and Surface Free Energy with Single-step Self-etch Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, A; Barkmeier, W W; Takamizawa, T; Latta, M A; Miyazaki, M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of phosphoric acid pre-etching times on shear bond strength (SBS) and surface free energy (SFE) with single-step self-etch adhesives. The three single-step self-etch adhesives used were: 1) Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (3M ESPE), 2) Clearfil tri-S Bond (Kuraray Noritake Dental), and 3) G-Bond Plus (GC). Two no pre-etching groups, 1) untreated enamel and 2) enamel surfaces after ultrasonic cleaning with distilled water for 30 seconds to remove the smear layer, were prepared. There were four pre-etching groups: 1) enamel surfaces were pre-etched with phosphoric acid (Etchant, 3M ESPE) for 3 seconds, 2) enamel surfaces were pre-etched for 5 seconds, 3) enamel surfaces were pre-etched for 10 seconds, and 4) enamel surfaces were pre-etched for 15 seconds. Resin composite was bonded to the treated enamel surface to determine SBS. The SFEs of treated enamel surfaces were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the enamel surfaces and enamel-adhesive interface. The specimens with phosphoric acid pre-etching showed significantly higher SBS and SFEs than the specimens without phosphoric acid pre-etching regardless of the adhesive system used. SBS and SFEs did not increase for phosphoric acid pre-etching times over 3 seconds. There were no significant differences in SBS and SFEs between the specimens with and without a smear layer. The data suggest that phosphoric acid pre-etching of ground enamel improves the bonding performance of single-step self-etch adhesives, but these bonding properties do not increase for phosphoric acid pre-etching times over 3 seconds.

  15. An XPS study on the attachment of triethoxsilylbutyraldehyde to two titanium surfaces as a way to bond chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Holly J.; Schulz, Kirk H.; Bumgardner, Joel D.; Walters, Keisha B.

    2008-01-01

    A bioactive coating has the ability to create a strong interface between bone tissue and implant. Chitosan, a biopolymer derived from the exoskeletons of shellfish, exhibits many bioactive properties that make it an ideal material for use as a coating such as antibacterial, biodegradable, non-toxic, and the ability to attract and promote bone cell growth and organized bone formation. A previous study reported on the bonding of chitosan to a titanium surface using a three-step process. In the current study, 86.4% de-acetylated chitosan coatings were bound to implant quality titanium in a two-step process that involved the deposition of triethoxsilylbutyraldehyde (TESBA) in toluene, followed by a reaction between the aldehyde of TESBA with chitosan. The chitosan coatings were examined on two different metal treatments to determine if any major differences in the ability of titanium to bind chitosan could be detected. The surface of the titanium metal and the individual reaction steps were examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Following the deposition of TESBA, significant changes were seen in the amounts of oxygen, silicon, carbon, and titanium present on the titanium surface, which were consistent with the anticipated reaction steps. It was demonstrated that more TESBA was bound to the piranha-treated titanium surface as compared to the passivated titanium surface. The two different silane molecules, aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and TESBA, did not affect the chemistry of the resultant chitosan films. XPS showed that both the formation of unwanted polysiloxanes and the removal of the reactive terminal groups were prevented by using toluene as the carrier solvent to bond TESBA to the titanium surfaces, instead of an aqueous solvent. Qualitatively, the chitosan films demonstrated improved adhesion after using toluene, as the films remained attached to the titanium surface even when placed under the ultra-high vacuum necessary for XPS, unlike the

  16. ADSORPTION OF ASSOCIATING FLUIDS AT ACTIVE SURFACES: A DENSITY FUNCTIONAL THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Tripathi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a density functional theory (DFT to describe adsorption in systems where molecules of associating fluids can bond (or associate with discrete, localized functional groups attached to the surfaces, in addition to other fluid molecules. For such systems as water adsorbing on activated carbon, silica, clay minerals etc. this is a realistic model to account for surface heterogeneity rather than using a continuous smeared surface-fluid potential employed in most of the theoretical works on adsorption on heterogeneous surfaces. Association is modelled within the framework of first order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT1. The new theory accurately predicts the distribution of bonded and non-bonded species and adsorption behavior under various conditions of bulk pressure, surface-fluid and fluid-fluid association strengths. Competition between the surface-fluid and fluid-fluid association is analyzed for fluids with multiple association sites and its impact on adsorption is discussed. The theory, supported by simulations demonstrates that the extent and the nature of adsorption (e.g. monolayer vary with the number of association sites on the fluid molecules.

  17. Development of ELID mirror surface grinding by cast iron bond grinding wheel. Ohkochi memorial technology prize; Chutetsu bond toishi ni yoru denkai inpurosesu doresshingu (ELID) kyomen kensakuho no kaihatsu. Okochi kinen gijutsusho jusho ni yosete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omori, H.; Takahashi, I. [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Tokyo (Japan); Nakagawa, T. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Institute of Industrial Science; Hagiuda, Y.; Karikome, K. [Tokyo Metropolitan College of Aeronautical Engineering, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    Development was accomplished on the electrolytic in-process dressing (ELID) mirror surface grinding process using a cast iron bonded grinding wheel. This paper describes the history of the development, which may be summarized as follows: a study was begun on powder forging of cutting chips in 1970; a research was started on powder forging of decarburized cast iron powder; developments were made on powder metallurgy of cast irons and cast iron bonded lapping tools in 1980, and cast iron bonded diamond grinding wheels were put on the market; a high-efficiency grinding process using MC and cast iron fiber-bonded grinding wheels were developed in 1985 and the grinding wheels made therefrom were put on the market; and a study was begun on the ELID grinding in 1987, and marketing was started on power supply, grinding liquid and tools for the ELID grinding process in 1990. Discussions on converting raw materials for the powder forging into cutting chips have triggered developing the cast iron bonded grinding wheel. The cast iron bonded diamond grinding wheel improves dressability and sharpness of conventional grinding wheels. The grinding wheel is fabricated by mixing carbonyl iron powder, diamond grinding grains and cast iron powder, pressing the mixture in a die, sintering it at 1140 degC, and assembling and dressing the sinter. The grinding stone can grind high-tech materials. 4 figs.

  18. Chemical bonding of water to metal surfaces studied with core-level spectroscopies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Andersson, Klas Jerker; Pettersson, L.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    The nature of the contact layer of water on surfaces is of relevance for many practical fields, including corrosion, electrochemistry, environmental science and heterogeneous catalysis. Here we focus on the geometric and electronic structure of the water contact layer on transition metal surfaces......-specific information on the partial local density of states, local atomic structure, geometrical parameters and molecular orientation, allowing general principles for water-metal interaction to be derived....

  19. Restoration of endodontically treated teeth with major hard tissue loss - influence of post surface design on pull-out bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Andreas Thomas Alfred; Binus, Stefanie Martina; Holzschuh, Barbara; Petschelt, Anselm; Powers, John M; Berthold, Christine

    2014-08-01

    The aim was to evaluate the influence of post surface design and luting system on bond strength of quartz-fiber-reinforced composite posts (QFRCPs) luted to root canal dentin. Single-rooted bovine teeth (n = 650) were randomly assigned (13 groups, n = 50), sectioned, endodontically treated, filled, and post space (length 8 mm) prepared. Custom-made plain-surfaced fiber posts (PSXRO) and (both RTD) macroretentive Macro-Lock Post Illusion X-RO (MLXRO) were inserted into the post spaces using six luting systems: Ketac Cem (KC), Fuji Plus (FP), RelyX Unicem, Multilink Primer_Multilink, Sealbond Ultima_CoreCem, and LuxaBond_LuxaCore Z. As control, a titanium post was cemented with KC. After water storage (24 h, 37°C), pull-out test was performed, followed by failure mode assessment. Bond strength was calculated in MPa and analyzed using anova, Dunnett-T3-test, and Student's t-test with Bonferroni correction. Post design and luting system significantly influenced the bond strength [MPa] (P < 0.05). Compared with the control 4.3 (1.5), all test groups exhibited higher bond strengths (P < 0.05), except for group PSXRO/KC 4.2 (1.0). The remaining bond strengths were PSXRO: FP 8.6 (1.5), RelyX Unicem 10.4 (3.4), Multilink Primer_Multilink 12.7 (3.0), SealBond Ultima_CoreCem 12.7 (3.0), LuxaBond_LuxaCore Z 15.7 (2.5), and MLXRO: KC 7.2 (2.2), FP 13.4 (2.5), RelyX Unicem 9.2 (2.9), Multilink Primer_Multilink 12.5 (4.5), SealBond Ultima_CoreCem 13.7 (4.6), LuxaBond_LuxaCore Z 20.6 (2.2). The bond strengths of MLXRO were higher than those of PSXRO when luted with KC, FP, and LuxaBond_LuxaCore Z (P < 0.05). The post surface design and luting system selection influenced the bond strength of conventionally and adhesively luted QFRCPs to bovine root canal dentin. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Effects of different surface-treatment methods on the bond strengths of resin cements to full-ceramic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Kansu

    2011-09-01

    Conclusions: The in vitro findings from this study indicate that surface-treatment procedures applied to the IPS Empress and the IPS Empress 2 full-ceramic systems are important when cement types are considered. In contrast, cement types and surface-treatment methods had no effect on changing the bond strength of the In-Ceram ceramic system.

  1. Influence of different surface treatments on bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kömürcüoğlu, Meltem Bektaş; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Tulga, Ayça

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement by four point bending test. The CAD/CAM materials under investigation were e.max CAD, Mark II, Lava Ultimate, and Enamic. A total of 400 bar specimens (4×1.2×12 mm) (n=10) milled from the CAD/CAM blocks underwent various pretreatments (no pretreatment (C), hydrofluoric acid (A), hydrofluoric acid + universal adhesive (Scotchbond) (AS), sandblasting (Sb), and sandblasting + universal adhesive (SbS)). The bars were luted end-to-end on the prepared surfaces with a dual curing adhesive resin cement (Variolink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) on the custom-made stainless steel mold. Ten test specimens for each treatment and material combination were performed with four point bending test method. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The surface treatment and type of CAD/CAM restorative material showed a significant effect on the four point bending strength (FPBS) ( P CAD/CAM restorative materials was modified after treatments. The surface treatment of sandblasting or HF acid etching in combination with a universal adhesive containing MDP can be suggested for the adhesive cementation of the novel CAD/CAM restorative materials.

  2. Thermocycling effect on microshear bond strength to zirconia ceramic using Er:YAG and tribochemical silica coating as surface conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Ana Luísa; Ramos, João Carlos; Santos-del Riego, Sérgio; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the thermocycling effect on the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of different self-adhesive resin cements to zirconia using tribochemical silica coating Rocatec™ (ROC) and Er:YAG as surface conditioners. Two hundred forty square-like zirconia samples were polished and randomly assigned in four groups according surface treatment applied as follows: (1) no treatment (NT), (2) silica coating with ROC, 3) Er:YAG laser irradiation (LAS: 2.940 nm, 200 mJ; 10 Hz), and (4) laser followed by Rocatec™ (LAROC). Each group was divided into two subgroups according the resin tested as follows: (A) BiFix SE (BIF) and (B) Clearfil SA (CLE). After 24 h, half of the specimens from each subgroup were tested. The other half was stored and thermocycled (5-55 °C/5,000 cycles). A μSBS test was performed using a universal testing machine (cross head speed = 0.5 mm/min). Failure modes were recorded and observed by scanning electronic microscopy. Data was analyzed with ANOVA, Student's t test, and chi-square tests, and linear regression was performed (p surface coated with silica, independently of previous Er:YAG surface treatment.

  3. Nickel-Catalyzed C sp2 –C sp3 Cross-Coupling via C–O Bond Activation

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Lin

    2016-06-13

    A new and efficient nickel-catalyzed alkylation of CAr-O electrophiles with B-alkyl-9-BBNs is described. The transformation is characterized by its functional group tolerance and provides a practical and versatile access to various Csp2-Csp3 bonds through Csp2-O substitution, without the restriction of β-hydride elimination. Moreover, the advantage of the newly developed method was demonstrated in a selective and sequential C-O bond activation process. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  4. Selective Activation of C−H Bonds in a Cascade Process Combining Photochemistry and Biocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wuyuan; Burek, Bastien O.; Fernández‐Fueyo, Elena; Alcalde, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Selective oxyfunctionalizations of inert C−H bonds can be achieved under mild conditions by using peroxygenases. This approach, however, suffers from the poor robustness of these enzymes in the presence of hydrogen peroxide as the stoichiometric oxidant. Herein, we demonstrate that inorganic photocatalysts such as gold–titanium dioxide efficiently provide H2O2 through the methanol‐driven reductive activation of ambient oxygen in amounts that ensure that the enzyme remains highly active and stable. Using this approach, the stereoselective hydroxylation of ethylbenzene to (R)‐1‐phenylethanol was achieved with high enantioselectivity (>98 % ee) and excellent turnover numbers for the biocatalyst (>71 000). PMID:28994504

  5. Shear bond strength of two bonding systems on dentin surfaces prepared with Er:YAG laser; Resistencia de uniao ao cisalhamento de dois sistemas adesivos em superficies dentinarias preparadas com laser de Er:YAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall' Magro, Eduardo

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the shear bond strength of two bonding dentin systems, one 'one step' (Single Bond - 3M) and one 'self-etching' (Prompt-L-ESPE), when applied on dentin surfaces prepared with Er:YAG laser (2,94{mu}m) that underwent ar not, acid etched. Forty one human molars just extracted were selected and after the cut with diamond disc and included in acrylic resin, resulting in 81 specimens (hemi crowns). After, the specimens were divided in one group treated with sand paper and another two groups treated with Er:YAG laser with 200 mJ and 250 mJ of energy and 2 Hz of frequency. Next, the prepared surfaces received three treatments with following application: 1) acid + Single Bond + Z 250 resin, 2) prompt-L-Pop + Z 250 resin, and 3) acid without, Single Bond + Z 250 resin. The Z 250 resin was applied and photopolymerized in increments on a Teflon matrix that belonged to an apparatus called 'Assembly Apparatus' machine producing cylinders of 3,5 mm of diameter and 5 mm of height. After these specimens were submitted to thermo cycling during 1 minute the 55 deg C and during 1 minute with 5 deg C with a total of 500 cycles for specimen, and the measures of shear bond strength were abstained using EMIC model DL 2000 rehearsed machine, with speed of 0,5 mm/min, measuring the final rupture tension (Mpa). The results showed an statistic superiority of 5% of probability level in dentin flattened with sandpaper and with laser using 200 mJ of energy with aspect to the ones flattened with laser using 250 mJ of energy. It was observed that using 'Single Bond' bonding dentin system the marks were statistically superior at 5% of probability with reference to the use of the Prompt-L-Pop adhesive system. So, it was concluded that Er:YAG Laser with 200 mJ of energy produced similar dentin cavity prepare than sandpaper and Single Bond seemed the best bonding agent system between restorative material and dentin

  6. Manganese-Oxygen Intermediates in O-O Bond Activation and Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Derek B; Massie, Allyssa A; Jackson, Timothy A

    2017-11-21

    Biological systems capitalize on the redox versatility of manganese to perform reactions involving dioxygen and its derivatives superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and water. The reactions of manganese enzymes influence both human health and the global energy cycle. Important examples include the detoxification of reactive oxygen species by manganese superoxide dismutase, biosynthesis by manganese ribonucleotide reductase and manganese lipoxygenase, and water splitting by the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. Although these enzymes perform very different reactions and employ structurally distinct active sites, manganese intermediates with peroxo, hydroxo, and oxo ligation are commonly proposed in catalytic mechanisms. These intermediates are also postulated in mechanisms of synthetic manganese oxidation catalysts, which are of interest due to the earth abundance of manganese. In this Account, we describe our recent efforts toward understanding O-O bond activation pathways of Mn III -peroxo adducts and hydrogen-atom transfer reactivity of Mn IV -oxo and Mn III -hydroxo complexes. In biological and synthetic catalysts, peroxomanganese intermediates are commonly proposed to decay by either Mn-O or O-O cleavage pathways, although it is often unclear how the local coordination environment influences the decay mechanism. To address this matter, we generated a variety of Mn III -peroxo adducts with varied ligand environments. Using parallel-mode EPR and Mn K-edge X-ray absorption techniques, the decay pathway of one Mn III -peroxo complex bearing a bulky macrocylic ligand was investigated. Unlike many Mn III -peroxo model complexes that decay to oxo-bridged-Mn III Mn IV dimers, decay of this Mn III -peroxo adduct yielded mononuclear Mn III -hydroxo and Mn IV -oxo products, potentially resulting from O-O bond activation of the Mn III -peroxo unit. These results highlight the role of ligand sterics in promoting the formation of mononuclear products and mark an important

  7. Tribological Properties of Laser Microtextured Surface Bonded With Composite Solid Lubricant at High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xijun; Sun, Jianguo; Zhang, Peiyun; Liu, Kai; Wang, Rong; Ji, Jinghu; Fu, Yonghong

    2016-07-01

    A combination technology of the solid lubricant and the laser surface texturing (LST) can significantly improve the tribological properties of friction pairs. The plate sample was textured by fiber laser and composite lubricant of polyimide (PI) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) powders were filled in the microdimples. Sliding friction performances of micron-sized composite lubricant and nano-sized composite lubricant were investigated by ring-plate tribometer at temperatures ranging from room temperature (RT) to 400 °C. On the one hand, the results of the micron-sized composite lubricant show that the friction coefficient of the textured surface filled with composite lubricant (TS) exhibits the lowest level and the highest stability compared to a textured surface without solid lubrication, smooth surface without lubrication, smooth surface burnished with a layer of composite solid lubricant. The better dimple density range is 35-46%. The friction coefficients of the sample surface filled with micron-composite solid lubricant with the texture density of 35% are maintained at a low level (about 0.1) at temperatures ranging from RT to 300 °C. On the other hand, the results of the nano-sized composite lubricant show that these friction properties are better than those of MoS 2 -PI micron-sized composite. The friction coefficients of MoS 2 -PI-CNTs nano-sized composite solid lubricant are lower than those of the MoS 2 -PI composite lubricant at temperatures ranging from RT to 400 °C. In addition, the possible mechanisms involving the synergetic effect of the surface texture and the solid lubricant are discussed in the present work.

  8. Peel resistance characterization of localized polymer film bonding via thin film adhesive thermally activated by scanned CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, Colin; Dowding, Robert; Griffiths, Jonathan; Lawrence, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    Thermal laser polymer bonding is a non-contact process for the joining of polymer laminates using thermally activated adhesives. Conventional, contact based bonding techniques suffer from mechanical wear, geometric inflexibility and poor energy efficiency. The application of lasers offers the potential for highly localized delivery of energy and increased process flexibility whilst achieving controlled and repeatable bonding of polymer laminates in a contact free process. Unlike previously reported techniques, here it is reported that laser based non-contact bonding is both viable and highly desirable due to the increased levels of control it affords the user. In this work, laser polymer bonding of 75 μm thick linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) film backed with a thermally activated adhesive to a 640 μm thick polypropylene (PP) substrate was conducted using continuous wave 10.6 μm laser radiation and scanning galvanometric optics. The effect of laser power and scanning traverse speed on the peel resistance properties of the bonded polymer laminates is presented, with a threshold specific energy density for successful adhesive activation determined.

  9. N-heterocyclic carbene gold(I) and copper(I) complexes in C-H bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Sylvain; Cazin, Catherine S J; Nolan, Steven P

    2012-06-19

    Environmental concerns have and will continue to have a significant role in determining how chemistry is carried out. Chemists will be challenged to develop new, efficient synthetic processes that have the fewest possible steps leading to a target molecule, the goal being to decrease the amount of waste generated and reduce energy use. Along this path, chemists will need to develop highly selective reactions with atom-economical pathways producing nontoxic byproduct. In this context, C-H bond activation and functionalization is an extremely attractive method. Indeed, for most organic transformations, the presence of a reactive functionality is required. In Total Synthesis, the "protection and deprotection" approach with such reactive groups limits the overall yield of the synthesis, involves the generation of significant chemical waste, costs energy, and in the end is not as green as one would hope. In turn, if a C-H bond functionalization were possible, instead of the use of a prefunctionalized version of the said C-H bond, the number of steps in a synthesis would obviously be reduced. In this case, the C-H bond can be viewed as a dormant functional group that can be activated when necessary during the synthetic strategy. One issue increasing the challenge of such a desired reaction is selectivity. The cleavage of a C-H bond (bond dissociation requires between 85 and 105 kcal/mol) necessitates a high-energy species, which could quickly become a drawback for the control of chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivity. Transition metal catalysts are useful reagents for surmounting this problem; they can decrease the kinetic barrier of the reaction yet retain control over selectivity. Transition metal complexes also offer important versatility in having distinct pathways that can lead to activation of the C-H bond. An oxidative addition of the metal in the C-H bond, and a base-assisted metal-carbon bond formation in which the base can be coordinated (or not) to the metal

  10. Chemical bonding of water to metal surfaces studied with core-level spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiros, T.; Andersson, K.J.; Pettersson, L.G.M.; Nilsson, A.; Ogasawara, H.

    2010-01-01

    The nature of the contact layer of water on surfaces is of relevance for many practical fields, including corrosion, electrochemistry, environmental science and heterogeneous catalysis. Here we focus on the geometric and electronic structure of the water contact layer on transition metal surfaces and the interaction between the water monolayer and the surface. By combining synchrotron radiation-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) techniques with density functional theory (DFT) computational methods we obtain element-specific information on the partial local density of states, local atomic structure, geometrical parameters and molecular orientation, allowing general principles for water-metal interaction to be derived.

  11. Influence of different surface treatments on bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kömürcüoğlu, Meltem Bektaş; Sağırkaya, Elçin

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement by four point bending test. MATERIALS AND METHODS The CAD/CAM materials under investigation were e.max CAD, Mark II, Lava Ultimate, and Enamic. A total of 400 bar specimens (4×1.2×12 mm) (n=10) milled from the CAD/CAM blocks underwent various pretreatments (no pretreatment (C), hydrofluoric acid (A), hydrofluoric acid + universal adhesive (Scotchbond) (AS), sandblasting (Sb), and sandblasting + universal adhesive (SbS)). The bars were luted end-to-end on the prepared surfaces with a dual curing adhesive resin cement (Variolink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) on the custom-made stainless steel mold. Ten test specimens for each treatment and material combination were performed with four point bending test method. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. RESULTS The surface treatment and type of CAD/CAM restorative material showed a significant effect on the four point bending strength (FPBS) (P<.001). For LDC, AS surface treatment showed the highest FPBS results (100.31 ± 10.7 MPa) and the lowest values were obtained in RNC (23.63 ± 9.0 MPa) for control group. SEM analyses showed that the surface topography of CAD/CAM restorative materials was modified after treatments. CONCLUSION The surface treatment of sandblasting or HF acid etching in combination with a universal adhesive containing MDP can be suggested for the adhesive cementation of the novel CAD/CAM restorative materials. PMID:29279763

  12. CFC/Cu bond damage in actively cooled plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, J; Martin, E; Henninger, C; Boscary, J; Camus, G; Escourbiac, F; Leguillon, D; Missirlian, M; Mitteau, R

    2007-01-01

    Carbon fibre composite (CFC) armours have been successfully used for actively cooled plasma facing components (PFCs) of the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak. They were also selected for the divertor of the stellarator W7-X under construction and for the vertical target of the ITER divertor. In TS and W7-X a flat tile design for heat fluxes of 10 MW m -2 has been chosen. To predict the lifetime of such PFCs, it is necessary to analyse the damage mechanisms and to model the damage propagation when the component is exposed to thermal cycling loads. Work has been performed to identify a constitutive law for the CFC and parameters to model crack propagation from the edge singularity. The aim is to predict damage rates and to propose geometric or material improvements to increase the strength and the lifetime of the interfacial bond. For ITER a tube-in-tile concept (monoblock), designed to sustain heat fluxes up to 20 MW m -2 , has been developed. The optimization of the CFC/Cu bond, proposed for flat tiles, could be adopted for the monoblock concept

  13. Evaluation of bond strength between grooved titanium alloy implant abutments and provisional veneering materials after surface treatment of the abutments: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowtham Venkat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Titanium has become the material of choice with greater applications in dental implants. The success of the dental implant does not only depend on the integration of the implant to the bone but also on the function and longevity of the superstructure. The clinical condition that demands long-term interim prosthesis is challenging owing to the decreased bond between the abutment and the veneering material. Hence, various surface treatments are done on the abutments to increase the bond strength. Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between the abutment and the provisional veneering materials by surface treatments such as acid etching, laser etching, and sand blasting of the abutment. Materials and Methods: Forty titanium alloy abutments of 3 mm diameter and 11 mm height were grouped into four groups with ten samples. Groups A, B, C, and D are untreated abutments, sand blasted with 110 μm aluminum particles, etched with 1% hydrofluoric acid and 30% nitric acid, and laser etched with Nd: YAG laser, respectively. Provisional crowns were fabricated with bis-acrylic resin and cemented with noneugenol temporary luting cement. The shear bond strength was measured in universal testing machine using modified Shell–Nielsen shear test after the cemented samples were stored in water at 25°C for 24 h. Load was applied at a constant cross head speed of 5 mm/min until a sudden decrease in resistance indicative of bond failure was observed. The corresponding force values were recorded, and statistical analysis was done using one-way ANOVA and Newman–Keuls post hoc test. Results: The laser-etched samples showed higher bond strength. Conclusion: Among the three surface treatments, laser etching showed the highest bond strength between titanium alloy implant abutment and provisional restorations. The sand-blasted surfaces demonstrated a significant difference in bond strength compared to laser-etched surfaces. The results of this

  14. Density functional theory based-study of 5-fluorouracil adsorption on β-cristobalite (1 1 1) hydroxylated surface: The importance of H-bonding interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonetti, S., E-mail: ssimonet@uns.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS)—Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Universidad Tecnológica Nacional (UTN), Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Compañy, A. Díaz [Comisión de Investigaciones Científicas (CIC), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pronsato, E.; Juan, A.; Brizuela, G. [Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS)—Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Lam, A. [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales (IMRE), Universidad de La Habana (Cuba)

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Favorable energies results in optimum four adsorption geometries. • Silanols are partially weakening and establish H-bonds with polar groups of 5-FU drug. • Dispersion forces approach the 5-FU molecule toward the surface. • Electron exchange is presented after adsorption. • H-bonds stabilize the molecule playing significant role in the adsorption mechanism. - Abstract: Silica-based mesoporous materials have been recently proposed as an efficient support for the controlled release of a popular anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Although the relevance of this topic, the atomistic details about the specific surface-drug interactions and the energy of adsorption are almost unknown. In this work, theoretical calculations using the Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP) applying Grimme's—D2 correction were performed to elucidate the drug–silica interactions and the host properties that control 5-FU drug adsorption on β-cristobalite (1 1 1) hydroxylated surface. This study shows that hydrogen bonding, electron exchange, and dispersion forces are mainly involved to perform the 5-FU adsorption onto silica. This phenomenon, revealed by favorable energies, results in optimum four adsorption geometries that can be adopted for 5-FU on the hydroxylated silica surface. Silanols are weakening in response to the molecule approach and establish H-bonds with polar groups of 5-FU drug. The final geometry of 5-FU adopted on hydroxylated silica surface is the results of H-bonding interactions which stabilize and fix the molecule to the surface and dispersion forces which approach it toward silica (1 1 1) plane. The level of hydroxylation of the SiO{sub 2} (1 1 1) surface is reflected by the elevated number of hydrogen bonds that play a significant role in the adsorption mechanisms.

  15. Effects of different surface treatments on bond strength of an indirect composite to bovine dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laiza Tatiana Poskus

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Sandblasting was a safe surface treatment for the indirect composite, increasing the BS values. Hydrofluoric acid applied after sandblasting damaged the BS values and should not be recommended while ethanol and H2O2, when applied after sandblasting, were effective in increasing BS values.

  16. Control of reactivity and regioselectivity for on-surface dehydrogenative aryl-aryl bond formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kocić, N.; Liu, X.; Chen, S.; Decurtins, S.; Krejčí, Ondřej; Jelínek, Pavel; Repp, J.; Liu, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 138, č. 17 (2016), s. 5585-5593 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC14-16963J Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : on-surface reaction * AFM * DFT * metal-organic coordination Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 13.858, year: 2016

  17. Effect of adhesive resin type for bonding to zirconia using two surface pretreatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samimi, P.; Hasankhani, A.; Matinlinna, J.P.; Mirmohammadi, H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This laboratory study evaluated the short-term adhesive properties of one 10-MDP-containing and two MDP-free resin composite cements, using two types of zirconia surface pretreatments. Materials and Methods: Eighteen sintered zirconia disks (Procera, Nobel Biocare) were randomly divided

  18. Chemisorption bonding and catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danese, J.B.; Schrieffer, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The general features of the LCAO--MO, Green's function, and multiple-scattering chi α methods and their applications to surfaces and surface-related problems are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the localization of bonding in surface complexes

  19. Cu-Cu diffusion bonding enhancement at low temperature by surface passivation using self-assembled monolayer of alkane-thiol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, C. S.; Lim, D. F.; Singh, S. G.; Goulet, S. K.; Bergkvist, M.

    2009-11-01

    Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 1-hexanethiol is applied on copper (Cu) surface to retard surface oxidation during exposure in the ambient. This SAM layer can be desorbed effectively with an annealing step in inert N2 ambient to provide a clean Cu surface. Using this passivation method with SAM, wafers covered with thin Cu layer are passivated, stored, desorbed, and bonded at 250 °C. The bonded Cu layer presents clear evidence of substantial interdiffusion and grain growth despite prolonged exposure in the ambient. This method of passivation is proven to be effective and can be further optimized to enable high quality Cu-Cu direct bonding at low temperature for application in three-dimensional integration.

  20. Initial Screening of Environmentally Sustainable Surface Pretreatments for Adhesive Bonding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-17

    environmentally sustainable TT-C-490F surface pretreatments. Testing consisted of single-lap-joint testing using aluminum and steel specimens at room...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 76 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...maximum strength at failure (MPa) for 1010 mild steel , RT, and H/W conditioning. ET conditioning not tested for steel samples

  1. Adsorption of 2 Chloroethyl Ethyl Sulfide on Silica: Binding Mechanism and Energy of a Bifunctional Hydrogen-Bond Acceptor at the Gas Surface Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-19

    hydroxylated silica to help construct an understanding of how sulfur mustard gas adheres to hydroxyl-containing surfaces. In this study, infrared spectroscopy...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This work investigates the fundamental nature of sulfur mustard surface adsorption by characterizing interfacial hydrogen...Hydrogen-Bond Acceptor at the Gas –Surface Interface The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and

  2. Annulation of Aromatic Imines via Directed C-H BondActivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thalji, Reema K.; Ahrendt, Kateri A.; Bergman, Robert G.; Ellman,Jonathan A.

    2005-04-14

    A directed C-H bond activation approach to the synthesis of indans, tetralins, dihydrofurans, dihydroindoles, and other polycyclic aromatic compounds is presented. Cyclization of aromatic ketimines and aldimines containing alkenyl groups tethered at the meta position relative to the imine directing group has been achieved using (PPh{sub 3}){sub 3}RhCl (Wilkinson's catalyst). The cyclization of a range of aromatic ketimines and aldimines provides bi- and tricyclic ring systems with good regioselectivity. Different ring sizes and substitution patterns can be accessed through the coupling of monosubstituted, 1,1- or 1,2-disubstituted, and trisubstituted alkenes bearing both electron-rich and electron-deficient functionality.

  3. Annealing effects on recombinative activity of nickel at direct silicon bonded interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Takuto; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    By performing capacitance transient analyses, the recombination activity at a (110)/(100) direct silicon bonded (DSB) interface contaminated with nickel diffused at different temperatures, as a model of grain boundaries in multicrystalline silicon, was studied. The trap level depth from the valence band, trap density of states, and hole capture cross section peaked at an annealing temperature of 300 °C. At temperatures ⩾400 °C, the hole capture cross section increased with temperature, but the density of states remained unchanged. Further, synchrotron-based X-ray analyses, microprobe X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses were performed. The analysis results indicated that the chemical phase after the sample was annealed at 200 °C was a mixture of NiO and NiSi 2

  4. The road to the first, fully active and more stable human insulin variant with an additional disulfide bond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Tine N.; Kjeldsen, Thomas B.; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Insulin, a small peptide hormone, is crucial in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis. The stability and activity of the protein is directed by an intricate system involving disulfide bonds to stabilize the active monomeric species and by their non-covalent oligomerization. All known insulin vari...

  5. To evaluate and compare the effect of different Post Surface treatments on the Tensile Bond Strength between Fiber Posts and Composite Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shori, Deepa; Pandey, Swapnil; Kubde, Rajesh; Rathod, Yogesh; Atara, Rahul; Rathi, Shravan

    2013-10-01

    Fiber posts are widely used for restoration of mutilated teeth that lack adequate coronal tooth structure to retain a core for definitive restoration, bond between the fiber post and composite material depends upon the chemical reaction between the post surface and the resin material used for building up the core. In attempt to maximize the resin bonding with fiber post, different post surface conditioning is advocated. Therefore the purpose of the study is to examine the interfacial strength between fiber post and composite, as core build-up material after different surface treatments of fiber posts. Twenty fiber posts were split into four groups off five each according to different surface treatments viz. Group I-(Negative Control), Group II-Silanization (Positive control), Group III-(37% Phosphoric Acid & Silanization) ,Group IV- (10% Hydrogen Peroxide and Silanization). With the preformed plastic mould, a core of dual cure composite resin around the fiber post having the uniform thickness was created. Tensile bond strength of each specimen was measured under Universal Testing Machine (UTM) at the cross head speed of 3mm/min. The results achieved with 10% Hydrogen peroxide had a marked effect on micro tensile bond strength values between the tested materials. Immense enhancement in the silanization efficiency of quartz fiber phase was observed with different surface chemical treatment of the resin phase of fiber posts with the marked increase in the micro-tensile bond strength between fiber post and composite core. Shori D, Pandey S, Kubde R, Rathod Y, Atara R, Rathi S. To evaluate and compare the effect of different Post Surface treatments on the Tensile Bond Strength between Fiber Posts and Composite Resin. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):27-32.

  6. Effect of oxygen inhibition in two-step self-etch systems on surface free energy and dentin bond strength with a chemically cured resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaji, Ayumi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Asaoka, Tetsui; Matsuyoshi, Saki; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2014-09-01

    We compared the surface free energies and dentin bond strengths of two-step self-etch systems with and without an oxygen-inhibited layer. The adhesives were applied to self-etching primer-treated dentin surfaces of bovine incisors, after which the teeth were light-irradiated and the oxygen-inhibited layer was left intact or removed with ethanol. We determined surface free energies (γS) and their components by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. We also measured the dentin bond strengths of chemically cured resin composite to the adhesives, with and without the oxygen-inhibited layer. For all surfaces, the estimated surface tension component, γS(LW), was relatively constant. The Lewis base (γS(-)) component decreased significantly when the oxygen-inhibited layer was removed, whereas the Lewis acid (γS(+)) component slightly increased. The dentin bond strengths of the two-step self-etch systems did not significantly differ in relation to the presence of the oxygen-inhibited layer. Although the surface free energy of the adhesive was affected by the presence of the oxygen-inhibited layer, no changes in dentin bond strength were detected.

  7. Active vibration reduction of a flexible structure bonded with optimised piezoelectric pairs using half and quarter chromosomes in genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daraji, A H; Hale, J M

    2012-01-01

    The optimal placement of sensors and actuators in active vibration control is limited by the number of candidates in the search space. The search space of a small structure discretized to one hundred elements for optimising the location of ten actuators gives 1.73 × 10 13 possible solutions, one of which is the global optimum. In this work, a new quarter and half chromosome technique based on symmetry is developed, by which the search space for optimisation of sensor/actuator locations in active vibration control of flexible structures may be greatly reduced. The technique is applied to the optimisation for eight and ten actuators located on a 500×500mm square plate, in which the search space is reduced by up to 99.99%. This technique helps for updating genetic algorithm program by updating natural frequencies and mode shapes in each generation to find the global optimal solution in a greatly reduced number of generations. An isotropic plate with piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs bonded to its surface was investigated using the finite element method and Hamilton's principle based on first order shear deformation theory. The placement and feedback gain of ten and eight sensor/actuator pairs was optimised for a cantilever and clamped-clamped plate to attenuate the first six modes of vibration, using minimization of linear quadratic index as an objective function.

  8. Combinatorial near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure: Simultaneous determination of molecular orientation and bond concentration on chemically heterogeneous surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genzer, Jan; Fischer, Daniel A.; Efimenko, Kirill

    2003-01-01

    We show that simultaneous molecular orientation and bond chemistry of planar chemically heterogeneous surfaces can be obtained by combining near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and rastering the incident x-ray beam on the specimen. This rastering produces serially two-dimensional NEXAFS images in space and energy, revealing information about the chemistry (including bond concentration) and orientation of the surface-bound molecules with submillimeter planar spatial resolution and submonolayer molecular sensitivity. We illustrate the power of the combinatorial NEXAFS method by simultaneously probing the concentration and molecular orientation of semifluorinated (SF) molecules in double-SF molecular gradients on flat silica substrates

  9. Effect of different blood contaminated adherent surface treatments on shear bond strength of compomer and composite resin to dentin, using a self etching adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortazavi V.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Blood contamination is a common problem in dentistry that can decrease bond strength dramatically which may be affected by methods of decontamination as well. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the influence of blood contamination on shear bond strength of composite and compomer to dentin using Prompt L-Pop as an adhesive system. Also, to assess the effectiveness of different surface treatments on the bond strength. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 120 molar teeth were sectioned to provide flat occlusal dentinal surfaces. Specimens were embedded in acrylic resin with the flat surface exposed. The dentinal expose surfaces were polished to 600 grit. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups of twelve specimens (F1–F5 for compomer material and five other groups (Z1- Z5 for composite resin. After application of Promt L-Pop to dentinal surfaces of specimens, the surfaces in all groups, except for F1 and Z1, (as controls were contaminated with human blood and then one of the following surface treatments was applied. Groups F2 and Z2 without any treatment, groups F3 and Z3 rinsing with water, groups F4 and Z4 rinsing with water and reapplication of adhesive, groups F5 and Z5 rinsing with NaOCl and using Prompt L-Pop again. Restorative materials were applied to treated surfaces using plastic molds. After thermocycling, shear bond strengths, mode of failures and morphology of dentin-material interfaces were evaluated. The data were statistically analyzed using Factorial analysis of Variance, One-Way ANOVA, Duncan, T-student and Chi-Square tests with P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: Compomer showed statistically significant higher bond strength in comparison to composite (P<0.001. Duncan test showed significant differences between all compomer groups, except between groups F4 and F5, and between all composite groups except for groups Z1 and Z4 and for groups Z2 and Z3

  10. Activation of a σ-SnSn bond at copper, followed by double addition to an alkyne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassauque, Nicolas; Gualco, Pauline; Mallet-Ladeira, Sonia; Miqueu, Karinne; Amgoune, Abderrahmane; Bourissou, Didier

    2013-09-18

    Many synthetically useful copper-catalyzed transformations involve the activation of apolar or weakly polar σ-bonds (E-H and E-E' bonds, with E = C, B, Si, Sn, etc.). Yet, little is known so far about the associated elementary steps, and it is highly desirable to gain better knowledge regarding the way σ-bonds can be activated by copper to help further development in this area. To this end, we became interested in investigating the coordination and activation of apolar or weakly polar σ-bonds at copper using chelating assistance. Here we report investigations of gold and copper complexes deriving from the diphosphine-stannane [Ph2P(o-C6H4)Me2Sn-SnMe2(o-C6H4)PPh2] 1. The σ-SnSn bond of 1 readily undergoes oxidative addition at both gold and copper, giving bis(stannyl) Au(+) and Cu(+) complexes 2 and 3. Coordination of 1 to CuBr leads to the neutral complex 4 which features more σ-SnSn complex character. The ability of complex 3 to undergo insertion reactions with alkynes was then examined. With methyl propiolate, a clean reaction occurred, and the bis-stannylated alkene copper complex 5 was isolated. The structures of ligand 1 and complexes 2-5 have been unambiguously determined by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and crystallography. These results substantiate the ability of copper to promote the addition of apolar σ-bonds to CC multiple bonds via a 2e redox sequence and draw thereby an unprecedented parallel with the group 10 metals.

  11. Does Titan have an Active Surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R.

    2009-12-01

    ammonia, a compound expected in Titan’s interior. This, combined with the previous evidence from VIMS and RADAR images, creates a strong case for Titan having a presently active surface, possibly due to cryovolcanism. Cassini encountered Titan at very close range on 2008-11-19-13:58 and again on 2008-12-05-12:38. These epochs are called T47 and T48. Comparison of earlier lower resolution data (T5) with the recent T47 and T48 data reveal changes of the surface reflectance and morphology in the Hotei region. This is the first evidence from VIMS that confirms the RADAR report that Hotei Reggio has morphology consistent with volcanic terrain. It has not escaped our attention that ammonia, in association with methane and nitrogen, the principal species of Titan’s atmosphere, closely replicates the environment at the time that live first emerged on earth. If Titan is currently active then these results raise the following questions: What is the full extent of current geologic activity? What are the ongoing processes? Are Titan’s chemical processes today supporting a prebiotic chemistry similar to that under which life evolved on Earth? This work done at JPL under contract with NASA. Refs: [1]R. M. Nelson et al., Icarus 199 (2009) 429-441. [2]R. M. Nelson et al., GRL, VOL. 36, L04202, doi:10.1029/2008GL036206, 2009. [3]S. D. Wall GRL, VOL. 36, L04203, doi:10.1029/2008GL036415, 2009

  12. Shear bond strength of veneering porcelain to zirconia: Effect of surface treatment by CNC-milling and composite layer deposition on zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, R L P; Silva, F S; Nascimento, R M; Souza, J C M; Motta, F V; Carvalho, O; Henriques, B

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of veneering feldspathic porcelain to zirconia substrates modified by CNC-milling process or by coating zirconia with a composite interlayer. Four types of zirconia-porcelain interface configurations were tested: RZ - porcelain bonded to rough zirconia substrate (n=16); PZ - porcelain bonded to zirconia substrate with surface holes (n=16); RZI - application of a composite interlayer between the veneering porcelain and the rough zirconia substrate (n=16); PZI - application of a composite interlayer between the porcelain and the zirconia substrate treated by CNC-milling (n=16). The composite interlayer was composed of zirconia particles reinforced porcelain (30%, vol%). The mechanical properties of the ceramic composite have been determined. The shear bond strength test was performed at 0.5mm/min using a universal testing machine. The interfaces of fractured and untested specimens were examined by FEG-SEM/EDS. Data was analyzed with Shapiro-Wilk test to test the assumption of normality. The one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD multiple comparison test was used to compare shear bond strength results (α=0.05). The shear bond strength of PZ (100±15MPa) and RZI (96±11MPa) specimens were higher than that recorded for RZ (control group) specimens (89±15MPa), although not significantly (p>0.05). The highest shear bond strength values were recorded for PZI specimens (138±19MPa), yielding a significant improvement of 55% relative to RZ specimens (p<0.05). This study shows that it is possible to highly enhance the zirconia-porcelain bond strength - even by ~55% - by combining surface holes in zirconia frameworks and the application of a proper ceramic composite interlayer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of copper-sulphur bond on the DNA photo-cleavage activity of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Cu-N bond lengths are in the range of 1.968(3) to 2.158(4) Å. The Cu-S bond lengths of 2.599(2) and 2.705(2) Å are significantly long indicating weak covalent interaction between copper and sulphur atoms. The thiomethyl groups are cis to each other giving S-Cu-S angle of 75.82(5)°. The Cu-N(pyridyl) bond distances ...

  14. Mechanistic Insights on C-O and C-C Bond Activation and Hydrogen Insertion during Acetic Acid Hydrogenation Catalyzed by Ruthenium Clusters in Aqueous Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shangguan, Junnan; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Chin, Ya-Huei [Cathy

    2016-06-07

    Catalytic pathways for acetic acid (CH3COOH) and hydrogen (H2) reactions on dispersed Ru clusters in the aqueous medium and the associated kinetic requirements for C-O and C-C bond cleavages and hydrogen insertion are established from rate and isotopic assessments. CH3COOH reacts with H2 in steps that either retain its carbon backbone and lead to ethanol, ethyl acetate, and ethane (47-95 %, 1-23 %, and 2-17 % carbon selectivities, respectively) or break its C-C bond and form methane (1-43 % carbon selectivities) at moderate temperatures (413-523 K) and H2 pressures (10-60 bar, 298 K). Initial CH3COOH activation is the kinetically relevant step, during which CH3C(O)-OH bond cleaves on a metal site pair at Ru cluster surfaces nearly saturated with adsorbed hydroxyl (OH*) and acetate (CH3COO*) intermediates, forming an adsorbed acetyl (CH3CO*) and hydroxyl (OH*) species. Acetic acid turnover rates increase proportionally with both H2 (10-60 bar) and CH3COOH concentrations at low CH3COOH concentrations (<0.83 M), but decrease from first to zero order as the CH3COOH concentration and the CH3COO* coverages increase and the vacant Ru sites concomitantly decrease. Beyond the initial CH3C(O)-OH bond activation, sequential H-insertions on the surface acetyl species (CH3CO*) lead to C2 products and their derivative (ethanol, ethane, and ethyl acetate) and the competitive C-C bond cleavage of CH3CO* causes the eventual methane formation. The instantaneous carbon selectivities towards C2 species (ethanol, ethane, and ethyl acetate) increase linearly with the concentration of proton-type Hδ+ (derived from carboxylic acid dissociation) and chemisorbed H*. The selectivities towards C2 products decrease with increasing temperature, because of higher observed barriers for C-C bond cleavage than H-insertion. This study offers an interpretation of mechanism and energetics and provides kinetic evidence of carboxylic acid assisted proton-type hydrogen (Hδ+) shuffling during H

  15. Evaluation of plasma treatment effects on improving adhesive/dentin bonding by using the same tooth controls and varying cross-sectional surface areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Ritts, Andy Charles; Staller, Corey; Yu, Qingsong; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate and verify the effectiveness of plasma treatment for improving adhesive/dentin interfacial bonding by performing micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) test using the same-tooth controls and varying cross-sectional surface areas. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used by removing the crowns to expose the dentin surface. For each dentin surface, one half of it was treated with a non-thermal argon plasma brush, while another half was shielded with glass slide and used as untreated control. Adper Single Bond Plus adhesive and Filtek Z250 dental composite were then applied as directed. The teeth thus prepared were further cut into micro-bar specimens with cross-sectional size of 1×1 mm2, 1×2 mm2 and 1×3 mm2 for μTBS test. The test results showed that plasma treated specimens gave substantially stronger adhesive/dentin bonding than their corresponding same tooth controls. As compared with their untreated controls, plasma treatment gave statistically significant higher bonding strength for specimens having cross-sectional area of 1×1 mm2 and 1×2 mm2, with mean increases of 30.8% and 45.1%, respectively. Interface examination using optical and electron microscopy verified that plasma treatment improved the quality of the adhesive/dentin interface by reducing defects/voids and increasing the resin tag length in dentin tubules. PMID:23841788

  16. Ultra-stable Molecule-Surface Architectures at Metal Oxides: Structure, Bonding, and Electron-transfer Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamers, Robert John

    2013-12-07

    Research funded by this project focused on the development of improved strategies for functionalization of metal oxides to enhance charge-transfer processes relevant to solar energy conversion. Initial studies included Fe2O3, WO3, TiO2, SnO2, and ZnO as model oxide systems; these systems were chosen due to differences in metal oxidation state and chemical bonding types in these oxides. Later studies focused largely on SnO2 and ZnO, as these materials show particularly promising surface chemistry, have high electron mobility, and can be readily grown in both spherical nanoparticles and as elongated nanorods. New molecules were synthesized that allowed the direct chemical assembly of novel nanoparticle ?dyadic? structures in which two different oxide materials are chemically joined, leading to an interface that enhances the separation of of charge upon illumination. We demonstrated that such junctions enhance photocatalytic efficiency using model organic compounds. A separate effort focused on novel approaches to linking dye molecules to SnO2 and ZnO as a way to enhance solar conversion efficiency. A novel type of surface binding through

  17. Size-dependent Young’s modulus in ZnO nanowires with strong surface atomic bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shiwen; Bi, Sheng; Li, Qikun; Guo, Qinglei; Liu, Junshan; Ouyang, Zhongliang; Jiang, Chengming; Song, Jinhui

    2018-03-01

    The mechanical properties of size-dependent nanowires are important in nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMSs), and have attracted much research interest. Characterization of the size effect of nanowires in atmosphere directly to broaden their practical application instead of just in high vacuum situations, as reported previously, is desperately needed. In this study, we systematically studied the Young’s modulus of vertical ZnO nanowires in atmosphere. The diameters ranged from 48 nm to 239 nm with a resonance method using non-contact atomic force microscopy. The values of Young’s modulus in atmosphere present extremely strong increasing tendency with decreasing diameter of nanowire due to stronger surface atomic bonds compared with that in vacuum. A core-shell model for nanowires is proposed to explore the Young’s modulus enhancement in atmosphere, which is correlated with atoms of oxygen occurring near the nanowire surface. The modified model is more accurate for analyzing the mechanical behavior of nanowires in atmosphere compared with the model in vacuum. Furthermore, it is possible to use this characterization method to measure the size-related elastic properties of similar wire-sharp nanomaterials in atmosphere and estimate the corresponding mechanical behavior. The study of the size-dependent Young’s modulus in ZnO nanowires in atmosphere will improve the understanding of the mechanical properties of nanomaterials as well as providing guidance for applications in NEMSs, nanogenerators, biosensors and other related areas.

  18. Surface pH and bond strength of a self-etching primer/adhesive system to intracoronal dentin after application of hydrogen peroxide bleach with sodium perborate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhatib, Hanadi; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Hiraishi, Noriko; Kitasako, Yuichi; Tagami, Junji; Nomura, Satoshi

    2003-01-01

    This study compared the dentin bond strength of a self-etching primer/adhesive system with dentin surface pH with or without bleaching and observed the morphological changes in bleached dentin treated with a self-etching primer. Dentin disks were prepared from the coronal-labial region of 32 human anterior teeth. The pulpal surfaces of the dentin disks were polished with 600-grit SiC paper under running water. The dentin surfaces on all specimens were bleached with a mixture of 30% hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate in 100% humidity at 37 degrees C for one week. The bleaching agent was then rinsed off with water for 5, 15 or 30 seconds. All specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C. Half of the five-second rinsing specimens were stored in water for an additional week. Dentin surface pH with or without bleaching was examined using a pH-imaging microscope (SCHEM-100). A self-etching primer/adhesive system (Clearfil SE Bond) was applied to bleached or unbleached dentin according to the manufacturer's instructions. After 24-hour water storage, the bonded specimens were prepared for microtensile testing. Microtensile bond strength (microTBS) to dentin was measured using a universal-testing machine (EZ test, Shimadzu, Japan) at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Scheffe's test (alpha=0.05). The pH values of the dentin surfaces of the 5 and 15 second rinsing groups were significantly higher than the control group (ppH values to the control group (ppH value of the dentin surface and decreased the bond strength of the self-etching primer/adhesive system. One-week water storage after bleaching recovered the surface pH and the microTBS to dentin.

  19. Study the bonding mechanism of binders on hydroxyapatite surface and mechanical properties for 3DP fabrication bone scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qinghua; Wang, Yanen; Li, Xinpei; Yang, Mingming; Chai, Weihong; Wang, Kai; zhang, Yingfeng

    2016-04-01

    In 3DP fabricating artificial bone scaffolds process, the interaction mechanism between binder and bioceramics power determines the microstructure and macro mechanical properties of Hydroxyapatite (HA) bone scaffold. In this study, we applied Molecular Dynamics (MD) methods to investigating the bonding mechanism and essence of binders on the HA crystallographic planes for 3DP fabrication bone scaffolds. The cohesive energy densities of binders and the binding energies, PCFs g(r), mechanical properties of binder/HA interaction models were analyzed through the MD simulation. Additionally, we prepared the HA bone scaffold specimens with different glues by 3DP additive manufacturing, and tested their mechanical properties by the electronic universal testing machine. The simulation results revealed that the relationship of the binding energies between binders and HA surface is consistent with the cohesive energy densities of binders, which is PAM/HA>PVA/HA>PVP/HA. The PCFs g(r) indicated that their interfacial interactions mainly attribute to the ionic bonds and hydrogen bonds which formed between the polar atoms, functional groups in binder polymer and the Ca, -OH in HA. The results of mechanical experiments verified the relationship of Young׳s modulus for three interaction models in simulation, which is PVA/HA>PAM/HA>PVP/HA. But the trend of compressive strength is PAM/HA>PVA/HA>PVP/HA, this is consistent with the binding energies of simulation. Therefore, the Young׳s modulus of bone scaffolds are limited by the Young׳s modulus of binders, and the compressive strength is mainly decided by the viscosity of binder. Finally, the major reasons for differences in mechanical properties between simulation and experiment were found, the space among HA pellets and the incomplete infiltration of glue were the main reasons influencing the mechanical properties of 3DP fabrication HA bone scaffolds. These results provide useful information in choosing binder for 3DP fabrication

  20. Direct Functionalization of Nitrogen Heterocycles via Rh-Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Jared; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2008-02-04

    Nitrogen heterocycles are present in many compounds of enormous practical importance, ranging from pharmaceutical agents and biological probes to electroactive materials. Direct funtionalization of nitrogen heterocycles through C-H bond activation constitutes a powerful means of regioselectively introducing a variety of substituents with diverse functional groups onto the heterocycle scaffold. Working together, our two groups have developed a family of Rh-catalyzed heterocycle alkylation and arylation reactions that are notable for their high level of functional-group compatibility. This Account describes their work in this area, emphasizing the relevant mechanistic insights that enabled synthetic advances and distinguished the resulting transformations from other methods. They initially discovered an intramolecular Rh-catalyzed C-2-alkylation of azoles by alkenyl groups. That reaction provided access to a number of di-, tri-, and tetracyclic azole derivatives. They then developed conditions that exploited microwave heating to expedite these reactions. While investigating the mechanism of this transformation, they discovered that a novel substrate-derived Rh-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex was involved as an intermediate. They then synthesized analogous Rh-NHC complexes directly by treating precursors to the intermediate [RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2}] with N-methylbenzimidazole, 3-methyl-3,4-dihydroquinazolein, and 1-methyl-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one. Extensive kinetic analysis and DFT calculations supported a mechanism for carbene formation in which the catalytically active RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2} fragment coordinates to the heterocycle before intramolecular activation of the C-H bond occurs. The resulting Rh-H intermediate ultimately tautomerizes to the observed carbene complex. With this mechanistic information and the discovery that acid co-catalysts accelerate the alkylation, they developed conditions that efficiently and intermolecularly alkylate a variety of

  1. Active Metal Brazing and Adhesive Bonding of Titanium to C/C Composites for Heat Rejection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, Tarah; Cerny, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Robust assembly and integration technologies are critically needed for the manufacturing of heat rejection system (HRS) components for current and future space exploration missions. Active metal brazing and adhesive bonding technologies are being assessed for the bonding of titanium to high conductivity Carbon-Carbon composite sub components in various shapes and sizes. Currently a number of different silver and copper based active metal brazes and adhesive compositions are being evaluated. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Several mechanical tests have been employed to ascertain the effectiveness of different brazing and adhesive approaches in tension and in shear that are both simple and representative of the actual system and relatively straightforward in analysis. The results of these mechanical tests along with the fractographic analysis will be discussed. In addition, advantages, technical issues and concerns in using different bonding approaches will also be presented.

  2. Surface and interface electronic structure: Three year activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevan, S.D.

    1992-01-01

    The 3-year activity report covers surface structure and phonon anomalies (surface reconstruction on W(001) and Mo(001), adsorbate lateral ordering, surface Fermi contours and phonon anomalies on Pt(111) and Pd(001)), adsorbate vibrational damping, charge transfer in momentum space: W(011)-K, surface states and resonances (relativistic effects ampersand computations, surface resonances)

  3. Hydrodesulfurization on Transition Metal Catalysts: Elementary Steps of C-S Bond Activation and Consequences of Bifunctional Synergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yik, Edwin Shyn-Lo

    convergence to a single phase is expected and predictable from thermodynamics at a given temperature and sulfur chemical potential, metastability of two phases can exist. We demonstrate, through extensive characterization and kinetic evidence, such behaviors exist in Re, where structural disparities between its phases lead to kinetic hurdles that prevent interconversions between layered ReSx nanostructures and sulfur-covered Re metal clusters. Such features allowed, for the first time, direct comparisons of reaction rates at identical conditions on two disparate phases of the same transition metal identity. Rigorous assessments of kinetic and selectivity data indicated that more universal mechanistic features persist across all catalysts studied, suggesting that differences in their catalytic activity were the result of different densities of HDS sites, which appeared to correlate with their respective metal-sulfur bond energies. Kinetic responses and product distributions indicated that the consumption of thiophene proceeds by the formation of a partially-hydrogenated surface intermediate, which subsequently produces tetrahydrothiophene (THT) and butene/butane (C4) via primary routes on similar types of sites. These sites are formed from desorption of weakly-bound sulfur adatoms on sulfur-covered metal surfaces, which can occur when the heat of sulfur adsorption is sufficiently low at high sulfur coverage as a result of increased sulfur-sulfur repulsive interactions. Relative stabilities and differences in the molecularity of the respective transition states that form THT and C4 dictate product distributions. THT desulfurization to form C4 occurs via readsorption and subsequent dehydrogenation, evidenced by secondary rates that exhibited negative H2 dependences. These behaviors suggest that C-S bond activation occurs on a partially (un)saturated intermediate, analogous to behaviors observed in C-C bond scission reactions of linear and cycloalkanes on hydrogen-covered metal

  4. Integration of Multiplexed Microfluidic Electrokinetic Concentrators with a Morpholino Microarray via Reversible Surface Bonding for Enhanced DNA Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Diogo; Wei, Xi; Levicky, Rastislav; Song, Yong-Ak

    2016-04-05

    We describe a microfluidic concentration device to accelerate the surface hybridization reaction between DNA and morpholinos (MOs) for enhanced detection. The microfluidic concentrator comprises a single polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel onto which an ion-selective layer of conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) ( PSS) was directly printed and then reversibly surface bonded onto a morpholino microarray for hybridization. Using this electrokinetic trapping concentrator, we could achieve a maximum concentration factor of ∼800 for DNA and a limit of detection of 10 nM within 15 min. In terms of the detection speed, it enabled faster hybridization by around 10-fold when compared to conventional diffusion-based hybridization. A significant advantage of our approach is that the fabrication of the microfluidic concentrator is completely decoupled from the microarray; by eliminating the need to deposit an ion-selective layer on the microarray surface prior to device integration, interfacing between both modules, the PDMS chip for electrokinetic concentration and the substrate for DNA sensing are easier and applicable to any microarray platform. Furthermore, this fabrication strategy facilitates a multiplexing of concentrators. We have demonstrated the proof-of-concept for multiplexing by building a device with 5 parallel concentrators connected to a single inlet/outlet and applying it to parallel concentration and hybridization. Such device yielded similar concentration and hybridization efficiency compared to that of a single-channel device without adding any complexity to the fabrication and setup. These results demonstrate that our concentrator concept can be applied to the development of a highly multiplexed concentrator-enhanced microarray detection system for either genetic analysis or other diagnostic assays.

  5. Modifications of the alpha,beta-double bond in chalcones only marginally affect the antiprotozoal activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S F; Kharazmi, A; Christensen, S B

    1998-01-01

    Methods for selective alkylation of chalcones in the alpha- or beta-position and for selective reduction of the alpha,beta-double bond have been developed. The antiparasitic potencies of the alpha,beta-double bond modified chalcones only differ marginally from the potencies of the parent chalcones...

  6. 75 FR 47608 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Exportation of Articles under Special Bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... information collection requirement concerning the: Application for Exportation of Articles under Special Bond... information collection: Title: Application for Exportation of Articles under Special Bond. OMB Number: 1651... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection...

  7. Pre-treatments applied to oxidized aluminum surfaces to modify the interfacial bonding with bis-1,2-(triethoxysilyl)ethane (BTSE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, M.; Kim, J.; Wong, P.C.; Wong, K.C.; Mitchell, K.A.R.

    2005-01-01

    A remote microwave-generated H 2 plasma and heating to 250 deg. C were separately used to modify high-purity oxidized aluminum surfaces and to assess whether these treatments can help enhance adhesion with bis-1,2-(triethoxysilyl)ethane (BTSE) coatings. Different initial oxide surfaces were considered, corresponding to the native oxide and to surfaces formed by the Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) treatment applied for either 15 or 60 min. BTSE is applied from solution at pH 4, and competing processes of etching, protonation (to form OH groups) and coupling (to form Al-O-Si interfacial bonds) occur at the solid-liquid interface. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to determine how the topographies of the modified Al surfaces changed with the different pre-treatments and with exposure to a buffer solution of pH 4. Secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to determine the direct amount of Al-O-Si interfacial bonds by measuring the ratio of peak intensities 71-70 amu, while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the overall strength of the silane coating adhesion by measuring the Si 2p signals before and after application of an ultrasonic rinse to the coated sample. Measured Al 2p and O 1s spectra helped assess how the different pre-treatments modified the various Al oxidized surfaces prior to BTSE coating. Pre-treated samples that showed increased Al-O-Si bonding after BTSE coating corresponded to surfaces, which did not show evidence of significant etching after exposure to a pH 4 environment. This suggests that such surfaces are more receptive to the coupling reaction during exposure to the BTSE coating solution. These surfaces include all H 2 plasma-treated samples, the heated native oxide and the sample that only received the 15 min FPL treatment. In contrast, other surfaces that show evidence of etching in pH 4 environments are samples that received lower amounts of Al-O-Si interfacial bonding. Overall, heating improved the

  8. N-Heterocyclic carbenes on close-packed coinage metal surfaces: bis-carbene metal adatom bonding scheme of monolayer films on Au, Ag and Cu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Zhang, Bodong; Médard, Guillaume; Seitsonen, Ari Paavo; Haag, Felix; Allegretti, Francesco; Reichert, Joachim; Kuster, Bernhard; Barth, Johannes V; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C

    2017-12-01

    By means of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), complementary density functional theory (DFT) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) we investigate the binding and self-assembly of a saturated molecular layer of model N -heterocyclic carbene (NHC) on Cu(111), Ag(111) and Au(111) surfaces under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions. XPS reveals that at room temperature, coverages up to a monolayer exist, with the molecules engaged in metal carbene bonds. On all three surfaces, we resolve similar arrangements, which can be interpreted only in terms of mononuclear M(NHC) 2 (M = Cu, Ag, Au) complexes, reminiscent of the paired bonding of thiols to surface gold adatoms. Theoretical investigations for the case of Au unravel the charge distribution of a Au(111) surface covered by Au(NHC) 2 and reveal that this is the energetically preferential adsorption configuration.

  9. Effect of temperature on magnetic and impedance properties of Fe3BO6 of nanotubular structure with a bonded B2O3 surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Kalpana; Ram, S.; Kotnala, R. K.

    2018-03-01

    In this investigation, we explore a facile synthesis of Fe3BO6 in the form of small crystallites in the specific shape of nanotubes crystallized from a supercooled liquid Fe2O3-B2O3 precursor. This study includes high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, magnetic, optical, and impedance properties of the sample. HRTEM images reveal small tubes of Fe3BO6 of 20 nm diameter. A well resolved hysteresis loop appears at 5 K in which the magnetization does not saturate even up to as high field as 50 kOe. It means that the Fe3BO6 nanotubes behave as highly antiferromagnetic in nature in which the surface spins do not align along the field so easily. The temperature dependent impedance describes an ionic Fe3BO6 conductor with a reasonably small activation energy Ea ˜ 0.33 eV. Impedance formalism in terms of a Cole-Cole plot shows a deviation from an ideal Debye-like behavior. We have also reported that electronic absorption spectra are over a spectral range 200-800 nm of wavelengths in order to find out how a bonded surface layer present on the Fe3BO6 crystallites tunes the 3d → 3d electronic transitions in Fe3+ ions.

  10. Thermal and UV Hydrosilylation of Alcohol-Based Bifunctional Alkynes on Si (111) surfaces: How surface radicals influence surface bond formation

    OpenAIRE

    Khung, Y. L.; Ngalim, S. H.; Scaccabarozi, A.; Narducci, D.

    2015-01-01

    Using two different hydrosilylation methods, low temperature thermal and UV initiation, silicon (111) hydrogenated surfaces were functionalized in presence of an OH-terminated alkyne, a CF3-terminated alkyne and a mixed equimolar ratio of the two alkynes. XPS studies revealed that in the absence of premeditated surface radical through low temperature hydrosilylation, the surface grafting proceeded to form a Si-O-C linkage via nucleophilic reaction through the OH group of the alkyne. This led ...

  11. Thermal and UV Hydrosilylation of Alcohol-Based Bifunctional Alkynes on Si (111) surfaces: How surface radicals influence surface bond formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khung, Y. L.; Ngalim, S. H.; Scaccabarozi, A.; Narducci, D.

    2015-06-01

    Using two different hydrosilylation methods, low temperature thermal and UV initiation, silicon (111) hydrogenated surfaces were functionalized in presence of an OH-terminated alkyne, a CF3-terminated alkyne and a mixed equimolar ratio of the two alkynes. XPS studies revealed that in the absence of premeditated surface radical through low temperature hydrosilylation, the surface grafting proceeded to form a Si-O-C linkage via nucleophilic reaction through the OH group of the alkyne. This led to a small increase in surface roughness as well as an increase in hydrophobicity and this effect was attributed to the surficial etching of silicon to form nanosize pores (~1-3 nm) by residual water/oxygen as a result of changes to surface polarity from the grafting. Furthermore in the radical-free thermal environment, a mix in equimolar of these two short alkynes can achieve a high contact angle of ~102°, comparable to long alkyl chains grafting reported in literature although surface roughness was relatively mild (rms = ~1 nm). On the other hand, UV initiation on silicon totally reversed the chemical linkages to predominantly Si-C without further compromising the surface roughness, highlighting the importance of surface radicals determining the reactivity of the silicon surface to the selected alkynes.

  12. The Effect of Four Surface Treatment Methods on the Shear Bond Strength of Metallic Brackets to the Fluorosed Enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Hooman Zarif Najafi; Vahid Moshkelgosha; Atefeh Khanchemehr; Akram Alizade; Ali Mokhtar

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Some studies have reported the bond strength to be significantly lower in fluorotic enamels than the non-fluorosed. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of metallic brackets to non-fluorosed and fluorosed teeth after different enamel conditioning. Materials and Method: A total of 176 freshly extracted human premolars (88 non-fluorosed and 88 fluorosed teeth) were used in this study for bonding the metallic brackets. Teeth w...

  13. C–H Bond activation of methane with gaseous [(CH3)Pt(L)]+ complexes (L = pyridine, bipyridine, and phenanthroline)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Butschke, B.; Schlangen, M.; Schwarz, H.; Schröder, Detlef

    62b, č. 3 (2007), s. 309-311 ISSN 0932-0776 Grant - others:Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) SFB546 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : C-H bond activation * electrospray ionization * mass spectrometry * methane * platinum Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.770, year: 2007

  14. Unlocking the Electrocatalytic Activity of Chemically Inert Amorphous Carbon-Nitrogen for Oxygen Reduction: Discerning and Refactoring Chaotic Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Caihong; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Mild annealing enables inactive nitrogen (N)-doped amorphous carbon (a-C) films abundant with chaotic bonds prepared by magnetron sputtering to become effective for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) by virtue of generating pyridinic N. The rhythmic variation of ORR activity elaborates well on t...

  15. Reactions of 4-nitro-1,2,3-triazole with alkylating agents and compounds with activated multiple bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vereshchagin, L.I.; Kuznetsova, N.I.; Kirillova, L.P.; Shcherbakov, V.V.; Sukhanov, G.T.; Gareev, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    When 4-nitro-1,2,3-triazole is alkylated, a mixture of N1- and N2-isomers is formed, with the latter usually predominating. The same behavior is also observed in addition reactions of 4-nitrotriazole to activated multiple bonds.

  16. Effect of Different Surface Treatments and Thermocycling on Bond Strength of a Silicone-based Denture Liner to a Denture Base Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhaei, Mohammadreza; Dashti, Hossein; Ahrari, Farzaneh; Vasigh, Samaneh; Mushtaq, Shazia; Shetty, Rohit Mohan

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of three different surface treatments and thermocycling on the tensile strength of a silicone lining material to denture resin. A total of 96 cube-shaped specimens were fabricated using heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin. Three millimeters of the material was cut from the midsection. The specimens were divided into four groups. The bonding surfaces of the specimens in each group received one of the following surface treatments: no surface treatment (control group), airborne particle abrasion with 110 pirn alumina particles (air abrasion group), Er:yttrium aluminum garnet laser irradiation (laser group), and air abrasion + laser. After the lining materials were processed between the two PMMA blocks, each group was divided into two subgroups (n = 12), either stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours or thermocycled between 5 and 55°C for 5,000 cycles. The specimens were tested in tensile and shear strength in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Tamhane's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). The mode of failure was determined, and one specimen in each group was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Surface-treated groups demonstrated significantly higher tensile strengths compared to the control group (p 0.05). The tensile strength was significantly different between thermocycled and water-stored specimens (p = 0.021). Altering the surface of the acrylic denture base resin with air abrasion, laser, and air abrasion + laser increased the tensile strength. Thermocycling resulted in decrease in bond strength of silicone-based liner to surface-treated acrylic resin. Pretreatment of denture base resins before applying the soft liner materials improves the bond strength. However, thermocycling results in decrease in bond strength of soft denture liner to surface-treated acrylic resin.

  17. Epoxy-bonded La(Fe,mn,si)13Hz As A Multi Layered Active Magnetic Regenerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neves Bez, Henrique; Navickaité, Kristina; Lei, Tian

    2016-01-01

    of the material may break apart during operation. In this context, we studied epoxy-bonded La(Fe,Mn,Si)13Hz regenerators, in a small versatile active magnetic regeneration (AMR) test device with a 1.1 T permanent magnet source. The magnetocaloric material was in the form of packed irregular particles (250-500 µm......), which were mechanically held in place by an epoxy matrix connecting the particles, improving the mechanical integrity, while allowing a continuous porosity for the fluid flow. Water with 2 wt% ENTEK FNE as anti-corrosion additive was used as the heat transfer fluid for the epoxy-bonded regenerators...

  18. Effect of composite surface treatment and aging on the bond strength between a core build-up composite and a luting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotes, Caroline; Cardoso, Mayra; Melo, Renata Marques de; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of conditioning methods and thermocycling on the bond strength between composite core and resin cement. Eighty blocks (8×8×4 mm) were prepared with core build-up composite. The cementation surface was roughened with 120-grit carbide paper and the blocks were thermocycled (5,000 cycles, between 5°C and 55°C, with a 30 s dwell time in each bath). A layer of temporary luting agent was applied. After 24 h, the layer was removed, and the blocks were divided into five groups, according to surface treatment: (NT) No treatment (control); (SP) Grinding with 120-grit carbide paper; (AC) Etching with 37% phosphoric acid; (SC) Sandblasting with 30 mm SiO2 particles, silane application; (AO) Sandblasting with 50 mm Al2O3 particles, silane application. Two composite blocks were cemented to each other (n=8) and sectioned into sticks. Half of the specimens from each block were immediately tested for microtensile bond strength (µTBS), while the other half was subjected to storage for 6 months, thermocycling (12,000 cycles, between 5°C and 55°C, with a dwell time of 30 s in each bath) and µTBS test in a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data were analyzed by repeated measures two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α=0.05). The µTBS was significantly affected by surface treatment (p=0.007) and thermocycling (p=0.000). Before aging, the SP group presented higher bond strength when compared to NT and AC groups, whereas all the other groups were statistically similar. After aging, all the groups were statistically similar. SP submitted to thermocycling showed lower bond strength than SP without thermocycling. Core composites should be roughened with a diamond bur before the luting process. Thermocycling tends to reduce the bond strength between composite and resin cement.

  19. Preparation and evaluation of surface-bonded tricationic ionic liquid silica as stationary phases for high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Lizhen; Shi, Xianzhe; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2015-05-29

    Two tricationic ionic liquids were prepared and then bonded onto the surface of supporting silica materials through "thiol-ene" click chemistry as new stationary phases for high-performance liquid chromatography. The obtained columns of tricationic ionic liquids were evaluated respectively in the reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) mode and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) mode, and possess ideal column efficiency of 80,000 plates/m in the RPLC mode with naphthalene as the test solute. The tricationic ionic liquid stationary phases exhibit good hydrophobic and shape selectivity to hydrophobic compounds, and RPLC retention behavior with multiple interactions. In the HILIC mode, the retention and selectivity were evaluated through the efficient separation of nucleosides and bases as well as flavonoids, and the typical HILIC retention behavior was demonstrated by investigating retention changes of hydrophilic solutes with water volume fraction in mobile phase. The results show that the tricationic ionic liquid columns possess great prospect for applications in analysis of hydrophobic and hydrophilic samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Adhesive bond of veneering composites on various metal surfaces using silicoating, titanium-coating or functional monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Michael; Rosentritt, Martin; Gröger, Gerhard; Handel, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) between veneering composites and titanium (grade 1), a cobalt-chromium-alloy and a high precious-alloy, which were pretreated using silicoating systems, functional monomers or an experimental titanium-dioxide coating system. The specimens were sized to rectangular plates of 20 x10 x 2mm(3) (l,w,h) and a composite cylinder (height of 4mm, diameter 5mm) was axially polymerized to the middle of the plates. After aging (24h or 150 d storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C, or thermal-cycling: 6000 x 5 degrees /55 degrees C) the SBS was determined. Independent of the type of metal and the conditioning/coating techniques the lowest SBSs were found after thermal-cycling. Titanium. The SBS of the silica coating systems and the functional monomers did not differ statistically on titanium. However, the titanium-dioxide coating method had significantly higher values than the other methods. Cobalt-chromium. The highest mean values were observed with the titanium-dioxide coating system and the phosphate acid ester. Precious alloy. No statistical significant different SBS was found for the silicoating and the titanium-dioxide coating methods, while the functional monomers were statistically significant (lower) different to both systems. Generally, the titanium-dioxide coating system achieved the highest SBS under different aging conditions and on all three different metal-surfaces.

  1. An algorithm to locate optimal bond breaking points on a potential energy surface for applications in mechanochemistry and catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bofill, Josep Maria; Ribas-Ariño, Jordi; García, Sergio Pablo; Quapp, Wolfgang

    2017-10-01

    The reaction path of a mechanically induced chemical transformation changes under stress. It is well established that the force-induced structural changes of minima and saddle points, i.e., the movement of the stationary points on the original or stress-free potential energy surface, can be described by a Newton Trajectory (NT). Given a reactive molecular system, a well-fitted pulling direction, and a sufficiently large value of the force, the minimum configuration of the reactant and the saddle point configuration of a transition state collapse at a point on the corresponding NT trajectory. This point is called barrier breakdown point or bond breaking point (BBP). The Hessian matrix at the BBP has a zero eigenvector which coincides with the gradient. It indicates which force (both in magnitude and direction) should be applied to the system to induce the reaction in a barrierless process. Within the manifold of BBPs, there exist optimal BBPs which indicate what is the optimal pulling direction and what is the minimal magnitude of the force to be applied for a given mechanochemical transformation. Since these special points are very important in the context of mechanochemistry and catalysis, it is crucial to develop efficient algorithms for their location. Here, we propose a Gauss-Newton algorithm that is based on the minimization of a positively defined function (the so-called σ -function). The behavior and efficiency of the new algorithm are shown for 2D test functions and for a real chemical example.

  2. Influence of duration of phosphoric acid pre-etching on bond durability of universal adhesives and surface free-energy characteristics of enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of duration of phosphoric acid pre-etching on the bond durability of universal adhesives and the surface free-energy characteristics of enamel. Three universal adhesives and extracted human molars were used. Two no-pre-etching groups were prepared: ground enamel; and enamel after ultrasonic cleaning with distilled water for 30 s to remove the smear layer. Four pre-etching groups were prepared: enamel pre-etched with phosphoric acid for 3, 5, 10, and 15 s. Shear bond strength (SBS) values of universal adhesive after no thermal cycling and after 30,000 or 60,000 thermal cycles, and surface free-energy values of enamel surfaces, calculated from contact angle measurements, were determined. The specimens that had been pre-etched showed significantly higher SBS and surface free-energy values than the specimens that had not been pre-etched, regardless of the aging condition and adhesive type. The SBS and surface free-energy values did not increase for pre-etching times of longer than 3 s. There were no significant differences in SBS values and surface free-energy characteristics between the specimens with and without a smear layer. The results of this study suggest that phosphoric acid pre-etching of enamel improves the bond durability of universal adhesives and the surface free-energy characteristics of enamel, but these bonding properties do not increase for phosphoric acid pre-etching times of longer than 3 s. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  3. Hydrogen bonding effect between active site and protein environment on catalysis performance in H2-producing [NiFe] hydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Siyao; Azofra, Luis Miguel; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Sun, Chenghua

    2018-02-28

    The interaction between the active site and the surrounding protein environment plays a fundamental role in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in [NiFe] hydrogenases. Our density functional theory (DFT) findings demonstrate that the reaction Gibbs free energy required for the rate determining step decreases by 7.1 kcal mol -1 when the surrounding protein environment is taken into account, which is chiefly due to free energy decreases for the two H + /e - addition steps (the so-called Ni-SIa to I1, and Ni-C to Ni-R), being the largest thermodynamic impediments of the whole reaction. The variety of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) between the amino acids and the active site is hypothesised to be the main reason for such stability: H-bonds not only work as electrostatic attractive forces that influence the charge redistribution, but more importantly, they act as an electron 'pull' taking electrons from the active site towards the amino acids. Moreover, the electron 'pull' effect through H-bonds via the S - in cysteine residues shows a larger influence on the energy profile than that via the CN - ligands on Fe.

  4. Tast Force report on bonding and perpetual care of nuclear licensed activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Potential issues which should be considered prior to the adoption and implementation of a bonding or perpetual care program are examined. The following topics are discussed: problem definition; major processors; factors in setting the amount of a bond; waste handling licensees; ore refineries and mills; former AEC licensed facilities; other specific licenses; authority; states where it is deemed that amendment of existing statutes is necessary to authorize imposition of a bonding requirement for licenses; administration; and recommendations. The following appendices are included: summary of cost estimate to decontaminate the American Nuclear Company; report on 1974 national conference on radiation control workshop no. 3; suggested changes to state regulations; and suggested legislation for licensee bonding and perpetual care trust funds

  5. Micro-shear bond strength and surface micromorphology of a feldspathic ceramic treated with different cleaning methods after hydrofluoric acid etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    STEINHAUSER, Henrique Caballero; TURSSI, Cecília Pedroso; FRANÇA, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; do AMARAL, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; BASTING, Roberta Tarkany

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of feldspathic ceramic surface cleaning on micro-shear bond strength and ceramic surface morphology. Material and Methods Forty discs of feldspathic ceramic were prepared and etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 2 minutes. The discs were randomly distributed into five groups (n=8): C: no treatment, S: water spray + air drying for 1 minute, US: immersion in ultrasonic bath for 5 minutes, F: etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 1 minute, followed by 1-minute rinse, F+US: etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 1 minute, 1-minute rinse and ultrasonic bath for 5 minutes. Composite cylinders were bonded to the discs following application of silane and hydrophobic adhesive for micro-shear bond strength testing in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until failure. Stereomicroscopy was used to classify failure type. Surface micromorphology of each treatment type was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy at 500 and 2,500 times magnification. Results One-way ANOVA test showed no significant difference between treatments (p=0.3197) and the most common failure types were cohesive resin cohesion followed by adhesive failure. Micro-shear bond strength of the feldspathic ceramic substrate to the adhesive system was not influenced by the different surface cleaning techniques. Absence of or less residue was observed after etching with hydrofluoric acid for the groups US and F+US. Conclusions Combining ceramic cleaning techniques with hydrofluoric acid etching did not affect ceramic bond strength, whereas, when cleaning was associated with ultrasound, less residue was observed. PMID:24676577

  6. Evaluation of Effect of Zirconia Surface Treatment, Using Plasma of Argon and Silane, on the Shear Bond Strength of Two Composite Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimal, Aswathy; Ramdev, Poojya; Shruthi, C S

    2017-08-01

    Yttria stabilised tetragonal zirconia opens new vistas for all ceramic restoration by the mechanism of transformation toughening, making it much stronger compared to all other ceramic materials. Currently, it is the most recent core material for all ceramic fixed partial dentures due to its ability to withstand high simulated masticatory loads. Problems which have been reported with zirconia restorations involve the core cement interface leading to loss of retention of the prosthesis. Different reasons which have been reported for the same include the lack of adhesion between zirconia and commonly used cements due to absence of silica phase which makes zirconia not etchable. In addition, the hydrophobic nature of zirconia causes low wettability of zirconia surface by the adhesive cements which are commonly used. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare and evaluate the effect of two pre-treatments of zirconia, using plasma of argon and silane, on the shear bond strength values of two composite resin cements to zirconia and to evaluate the failure pattern of the debonded areas using stereomicroscopic analysis. Sixty zirconia discs (10 mm×2 mm) were randomly divided into three groups (n=20), following surface treatment, with airborne particle abrasion, using 110 µm Al2O3: Group I (control), Group II (plasma of argon cleaning), and Group III (application of silane primer). Each group had two subgroups based on the type of resin cement used for bonding: subgroup A; Rely X Ultimate (3M ESPE) and subgroup B; Panavia F (Kuraray). In subgroup A, Rely X universal silane primer and in subgroup B Clearfil ceramic primer was used. Shear bond strengths were determined after water storage for one day and thermocycling for 5000 cycles. Data (megapascal) were analyzed using ANOVA and Bonferroni test. Specimens were subjected to stereomicroscopic analysis, for evaluation of failure pattern. Group III produced the highest shear bond strength followed by Group II and Group

  7. H-bonding networks of the distal residues and water molecules in the active site of Thermobifida fusca hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Francesco P; Droghetti, Enrica; Howes, Barry D; Bustamante, Juan P; Bonamore, Alessandra; Sciamanna, Natascia; Estrin, Darío A; Feis, Alessandro; Boffi, Alberto; Smulevich, Giulietta

    2013-09-01

    The ferric form of truncated hemoglobin II from Thermobifida fusca (Tf-trHb) and its triple mutant WG8F-YB10F-YCD1F at neutral and alkaline pH, and in the presence of CN(-) have been characterized by resonance Raman spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations. Tf-trHb contains three polar residues in the distal site, namely TrpG8, TyrCD1 and TyrB10. Whereas TrpG8 can act as a potential hydrogen-bond donor, the tyrosines can act as donors or acceptors. Ligand binding in heme-containing proteins is determined by a number of factors, including the nature and conformation of the distal residues and their capability to stabilize the heme-bound ligand via hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interactions. Since both the RR Fe-OH(-) and Fe-CN(-) frequencies are very sensitive to the distal environment, detailed information on structural variations has been obtained. The hydroxyl ligand binds only the WT protein giving rise to two different conformers. In form 1 the anion is stabilized by H-bonds with TrpG8, TyrCD1 and a water molecule, in turn H-bonded to TyrB10. In form 2, H-bonding with TyrCD1 is mediated by a water molecule. Unlike the OH(-) ligand, CN(-) binds both WT and the triple mutant giving rise to two forms with similar spectroscopic characteristics. The overall results clearly indicate that H-bonding interactions both with distal residues and water molecules are important structural determinants in the active site of Tf-trHb. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxygen Binding and Sensing Proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of de