WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface accessible tyrosines

  1. Airport Surface Access and Mobile Apps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Martin-Domingo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Airport Surface Access faces two main opposite issues: (1 cars, being the main transport mode, contribute to the increasing level of congestion and pollution of cities; and (2 simultaneously, parking fees are one important source of airports commercial revenue, creating a dilemma for airports when facing the problem. Following the recent trend of air passengers travelling with Smartphone (78% in 2013, the purpose of this paper is to monitor the adoption of mobile Applications (Apps by airports and to analyze if the information and functions provided in those Apps can help to overcome the above two issues. Design/methodology/approach: 31 iPhone App of some of the largest European airports were evaluated in the lab using the evaluation model of Destinations Mobile Applications (Scolari and Fernández-Cavia 2014 adapted for for the Airport Surface Access on Airport Apps Findings and Originality/value: The Apps evaluated provided a very limited functionality to help passengers to plan and book their trips to/from the airports on public transports and gave high priority to parking information and services. Originality/value: Although Airport Surface Access has been a widely researched, the originality of this paper is the analysis of airport mobile Apps as a potential tool for airports to deal with the surface airport access problems.Access, Airports, Mobile Internet, Commercial Revenues

  2. Accessible surface area from NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafsa, Noor E.; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S., E-mail: david.wishart@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Computing Science (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Accessible surface area (ASA) is the surface area of an atom, amino acid or biomolecule that is exposed to solvent. The calculation of a molecule’s ASA requires three-dimensional coordinate data and the use of a “rolling ball” algorithm to both define and calculate the ASA. For polymers such as proteins, the ASA for individual amino acids is closely related to the hydrophobicity of the amino acid as well as its local secondary and tertiary structure. For proteins, ASA is a structural descriptor that can often be as informative as secondary structure. Consequently there has been considerable effort over the past two decades to try to predict ASA from protein sequence data and to use ASA information (derived from chemical modification studies) as a structure constraint. Recently it has become evident that protein chemical shifts are also sensitive to ASA. Given the potential utility of ASA estimates as structural constraints for NMR we decided to explore this relationship further. Using machine learning techniques (specifically a boosted tree regression model) we developed an algorithm called “ShiftASA” that combines chemical-shift and sequence derived features to accurately estimate per-residue fractional ASA values of water-soluble proteins. This method showed a correlation coefficient between predicted and experimental values of 0.79 when evaluated on a set of 65 independent test proteins, which was an 8.2 % improvement over the next best performing (sequence-only) method. On a separate test set of 92 proteins, ShiftASA reported a mean correlation coefficient of 0.82, which was 12.3 % better than the next best performing method. ShiftASA is available as a web server ( http://shiftasa.wishartlab.com http://shiftasa.wishartlab.com ) for submitting input queries for fractional ASA calculation.

  3. Scalable Lunar Surface Networks and Adaptive Orbit Access, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovative network architecture, protocols, and algorithms are proposed for both lunar surface networks and orbit access networks. Firstly, an overlaying...

  4. Fully automated synthesis of (phosphopeptide arrays in microtiter plate wells provides efficient access to protein tyrosine kinase characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldstein David J

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic peptides have played a useful role in studies of protein kinase substrates and interaction domains. Synthetic peptide arrays and libraries, in particular, have accelerated the process. Several factors have hindered or limited the applicability of various techniques, such as the need for deconvolution of combinatorial libraries, the inability or impracticality of achieving full automation using two-dimensional or pin solid phases, the lack of convenient interfacing with standard analytical platforms, or the difficulty of compartmentalization of a planar surface when contact between assay components needs to be avoided. This paper describes a process for synthesis of peptides and phosphopeptides on microtiter plate wells that overcomes previous limitations and demonstrates utility in determination of the epitope of an autophosphorylation site phospho-motif antibody and utility in substrate utilization assays of the protein tyrosine kinase, p60c-src. Results The overall reproducibility of phospho-peptide synthesis and multiplexed EGF receptor (EGFR autophosphorylation site (pY1173 antibody ELISA (9H2 was within 5.5 to 8.0%. Mass spectrometric analyses of the released (phosphopeptides showed homogeneous peaks of the expected molecular weights. An overlapping peptide array of the complete EGFR cytoplasmic sequence revealed a high redundancy of 9H2 reactive sites. The eight reactive phospopeptides were structurally related and interestingly, the most conserved antibody reactive peptide motif coincided with a subset of other known EGFR autophosphorylation and SH2 binding motifs and an EGFR optimal substrate motif. Finally, peptides based on known substrate specificities of c-src and related enzymes were synthesized in microtiter plate array format and were phosphorylated by c-Src with the predicted specificities. The level of phosphorylation was proportional to c-Src concentration with sensitivities below 0.1 Units of

  5. Itk tyrosine kinase substrate docking is mediated by a nonclassical SH2 domain surface of PLCgamma1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Lie; Joseph, Raji E; Fulton, D Bruce; Andreotti, Amy H

    2009-12-15

    Interleukin-2 tyrosine kinase (Itk) is a Tec family tyrosine kinase that mediates signaling processes after T cell receptor engagement. Activation of Itk requires recruitment to the membrane via its pleckstrin homology domain, phosphorylation of Itk by the Src kinase, Lck, and binding of Itk to the SLP-76/LAT adapter complex. After activation, Itk phosphorylates and activates phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1), leading to production of two second messengers, DAG and IP(3). We have previously shown that phosphorylation of PLC-gamma1 by Itk requires a direct, phosphotyrosine-independent interaction between the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of PLC-gamma1 and the kinase domain of Itk. We now define this docking interface using a combination of mutagenesis and NMR spectroscopy and show that disruption of the Itk/PLCgamma1 docking interaction attenuates T cell signaling. The binding surface on PLCgamma1 that mediates recognition by Itk highlights a nonclassical binding activity of the well-studied SH2 domain providing further evidence that SH2 domains participate in important signaling interactions beyond recognition of phosphotyrosine.

  6. Scalable Lunar Surface Networks and Adaptive Orbit Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    Teranovi Technologies, Inc., has developed innovative network architecture, protocols, and algorithms for both lunar surface and orbit access networks. A key component of the overall architecture is a medium access control (MAC) protocol that includes a novel mechanism of overlaying time division multiple access (TDMA) and carrier sense multiple access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA), ensuring scalable throughput and quality of service. The new MAC protocol is compatible with legacy Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.11 networks. Advanced features include efficiency power management, adaptive channel width adjustment, and error control capability. A hybrid routing protocol combines the advantages of ad hoc on-demand distance vector (AODV) routing and disruption/delay-tolerant network (DTN) routing. Performance is significantly better than AODV or DTN and will be particularly effective for wireless networks with intermittent links, such as lunar and planetary surface networks and orbit access networks.

  7. Diffusion accessibility as a method for visualizing macromolecular surface geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yingssu; Holton, Thomas; Yeates, Todd O

    2015-10-01

    Important three-dimensional spatial features such as depth and surface concavity can be difficult to convey clearly in the context of two-dimensional images. In the area of macromolecular visualization, the computer graphics technique of ray-tracing can be helpful, but further techniques for emphasizing surface concavity can give clearer perceptions of depth. The notion of diffusion accessibility is well-suited for emphasizing such features of macromolecular surfaces, but a method for calculating diffusion accessibility has not been made widely available. Here we make available a web-based platform that performs the necessary calculation by solving the Laplace equation for steady state diffusion, and produces scripts for visualization that emphasize surface depth by coloring according to diffusion accessibility. The URL is http://services.mbi.ucla.edu/DiffAcc/. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  8. Solvent accessible surface area (ASA) of simulated phospholipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuchsen, E.; Jensen, Morten Østergaard; Westh, P.

    2003-01-01

    The membrane-solvent interface has been investigated through calculations of the solvent accessible surface area (ASA) for simulated membranes of DPPC and POPE. For DPPC at 52 degreesC we found an ASA of 126 +/- 8 Angstrom(2) per lipid molecule, equivalent to twice the projected lateral area......, even the most exposed parts of the PC head-group show average ASAs of less than half of its maximal or 'fully hydrated' value. The average ASA of a simulated POPE membrane was 96 +/- 7 Angstrom(2) per lipid. The smaller value than for DPPC reflects much lower ASA of the ammonium ion, which is partially...... compensated by increased exposure of the ethylene and phosphate moieties. The ASA of the polar moieties Of (PO4, NH3 and COO) constitutes 65% of the total accessible area for POPE, making this interface more polar than that of DPPC. It is suggested that ASA information can be valuable in attempts...

  9. Models of the solvent-accessible surface of biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.E.

    1996-09-01

    Many biopolymers such as proteins, DNA, and RNA have been studied because they have important biomedical roles and may be good targets for therapeutic action in treating diseases. This report describes how plastic models of the solvent-accessible surface of biopolymers were made. Computer files containing sets of triangles were calculated, then used on a stereolithography machine to make the models. Small (2 in.) models were made to test whether the computer calculations were done correctly. Also, files of the type (.stl) required by any ISO 9001 rapid prototyping machine were written onto a CD-ROM for distribution to American companies.

  10. Optimization of extraction parameters of PTP1β (protein tyrosine phosphatase 1β), inhibitory polyphenols, and anthocyanins from Zea mays L. using response surface methodology (RSM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seung Hwan; Kwon, Shin Hwa; Wang, Zhiqiang; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Lim, Soon Sung

    2016-08-26

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase expressed in insulin-sensitive tissues (such as liver, muscle, and adipose tissue) has a key role in the regulation of insulin signaling and pathway activation, making protein tyrosine phosphatase a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity and response surface methodology (RSM) is an effective statistical technique for optimizing complex processes using a multi-variant approach. In this study, Zea mays L. (Purple corn kernel, PCK) and its constituents were investigated for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1β (PTP1β) inhibitory activity including enzyme kinetic study and to improve total yields of anthocyanins and polyphenols, four extraction parameters, including temperature, time, solid-liquid ratio, and solvent volume, were optimized by RSM. Isolation of seven polyphenols and five anthocyanins was achieved by PTP1β assay. Among them, cyanidin-3-(6"malonylglucoside) and 3'-methoxyhirsutrin showed the highest PTP1β inhibition with IC50 values of 54.06 and 64.04 μM, respectively and 4.52 mg gallic acid equivalent/g (GAE/g) of total polyphenol content (TPC) and 43.02 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalent/100 g (C3GE/100g) of total anthocyanin content (TAC) were extracted at 40 °C for 8 h with a 33 % solid-liquid ratio and a 1:15 solvent volume. Yields were similar to predictions of 4.58 mg GAE/g of TPC and 42.28 mg C3GE/100 g of TAC. These results indicated that PCK and 3'-methoxyhirsutrin and cyanidin-3-(6"malonylglucoside) might be active natural compounds and could be apply by optimizing of extraction process using response surface methodology.

  11. Rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of Lck following ligation of the tumor-associated cell surface molecule A6H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labuda, T; Gerwien, J; Ødum, Niels

    1999-01-01

    and the TCR-CD3 complex takes place and which signaling pathway might be involved. Here we show that ligation of the A6H antigen with mAb induces tyrosine phosphorylation of the Lck protein tyrosine kinase (PTK). Co-ligation of the A6H antigen with CD3 resulted in augmented Lck phosphorylation and mitogenesis....... In addition, A6H ligation induced an up-regulation of CD3-mediated phosphorylation of the 23 kDa high mol. wt form of TCR zeta and the zeta-associated protein, ZAP-70. Co-precipitation of Lck and ZAP-70 was only seen in T cells activated by combined A6H and anti-CD3 stimulation. In contrast, another Src...... family PTK, Fyn, was not affected by A6H ligation. In conclusion, we now demonstrate, for the first time, that A6H ligation triggers Lck phosphorylation, and that cross-talk between A6H and the TCR-CD3 complex involves Lck, ZAP-70 and the slow migrating isoform of TCR zeta. These results further suggests...

  12. Tyrosine kinase inhibition increases the cell surface localization of FLT3-ITD and enhances FLT3-directed immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, K; Polzer, H; Krupka, C; Maiser, A; Vick, B; Rothenberg-Thurley, M; Metzeler, K H; Dörfel, D; Salih, H R; Jung, G; Nößner, E; Jeremias, I; Hiddemann, W; Leonhardt, H; Spiekermann, K; Subklewe, M; Greif, P A

    2018-02-01

    The fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) receptor has been extensively studied over the past two decades with regard to oncogenic alterations that do not only serve as prognostic markers but also as therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Internal tandem duplications (ITDs) became of special interest in this setting as they are associated with unfavorable prognosis. Because of sequence-dependent protein conformational changes FLT3-ITD tends to autophosphorylate and displays a constitutive intracellular localization. Here, we analyzed the effect of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) on the localization of the FLT3 receptor and its mutants. TKI treatment increased the surface expression through upregulation of FLT3 and glycosylation of FLT3-ITD and FLT3-D835Y mutants. In T cell-mediated cytotoxicity (TCMC) assays, using a bispecific FLT3 × CD3 antibody construct, the combination with TKI treatment increased TCMC in the FLT3-ITD-positive AML cell lines MOLM-13 and MV4-11, patient-derived xenograft cells and primary patient samples. Our findings provide the basis for rational combination of TKI and FLT3-directed immunotherapy with potential benefit for FLT3-ITD-positive AML patients.

  13. α-Helical element at the hormone-binding surface of the insulin receptor functions as a signaling element to activate its tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Jonathan; Whittaker, Linda J; Roberts, Charles T; Phillips, Nelson B; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Lawrence, Michael C; Weiss, Michael A

    2012-07-10

    The primary hormone-binding surface of the insulin receptor spans one face of the N-terminal β-helix of the α-subunit (the L1 domain) and an α-helix in its C-terminal segment (αCT). Crystallographic analysis of the free ectodomain has defined a contiguous dimer-related motif in which the αCT α-helix packs against L1 β-strands 2 and 3. To relate structure to function, we exploited expanded genetic-code technology to insert photo-activatable probes at key sites in L1 and αCT. The pattern of αCT-mediated photo-cross-linking within the free and bound receptor is in accord with the crystal structure and prior mutagenesis. Surprisingly, L1 photo-probes in β-strands 2 and 3, predicted to be shielded by αCT, efficiently cross-link to insulin. Furthermore, anomalous mutations were identified on neighboring surfaces of αCT and insulin that impair hormone-dependent activation of the intracellular receptor tyrosine kinase (contained within the transmembrane β-subunit) disproportionately to their effects on insulin binding. Taken together, these results suggest that αCT, in addition to its hormone-recognition role, provides a signaling element in the mechanism of receptor activation.

  14. Scalable Lunar Surface Networks and Adaptive Orbit Access, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Based on our proposed innovations and accomplished work in Phase I, we will focus on developing the new MAC protocol and hybrid routing protocol for lunar surface...

  15. Cell surface expression of channel catfish leukocyte immune-type receptors (IpLITRs) and recruitment of both Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP)-1 and SHP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Benjamin C S; Mewes, Jacqueline; Davidson, Chelsea; Burshtyn, Deborah N; Stafford, James L

    2009-04-01

    Channel catfish leukocyte immune-type receptors (IpLITRs) are immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) members believed to play a role in the control and coordination of cellular immune responses in teleost. Putative stimulatory and inhibitory IpLITRs are co-expressed by different types of catfish immune cells (e.g. NK cells, T cells, B cells, and macrophages) but their signaling potential has not been determined. Following cationic polymer-mediated transfections into human cell lines we examined the surface expression, tyrosine phosphorylation, and phosphatase recruitment potential of two types of putative inhibitory IpLITRs using 'chimeric' expression constructs and an epitope-tagged 'native' IpLITR. We also cloned and expressed the teleost Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatases (SHP)-1 and SHP-2 and examined their expression in adult tissues and developing zebrafish embryos. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments support the inhibitory signaling potential of distinct IpLITR-types that bound both SHP-1 and SHP-2 following the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues within their cytoplasmic tail (CYT) regions. Phosphatase recruitment by IpLITRs represents an important first step in understanding their influence on immune cell effector functions and suggests that certain inhibitory signaling pathways are conserved among vertebrates.

  16. Accessibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2017-01-01

    This contribution is timely as it addresses accessibility in regards system hardware and software aligned with introduction of the Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act (CVAA) and adjoined game industry waiver that comes into force January 2017. This is an act created...... by the USA Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to increase the access of persons with disabilities to modern communications, and for other purposes. The act impacts advanced communications services and products including text messaging; e-mail; instant messaging; video communications; browsers; game...... platforms; and games software. However, the CVAA has no legal status in the EU. This text succinctly introduces and questions implications, impact, and wider adoption. By presenting the full CVAA and game industry waiver the text targets to motivate discussions and further publications on the subject...

  17. SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE and Other Data from MULTIPLE SHIPS From Sea of Japan from 19930101 to 19930630 (NODC Accession 9300173)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The sea surface temperature data in this accession was collected in Sea of Japan. Data in this accession was collected over a six month period from thermistor. The...

  18. Sustainable Development and Airport Surface Access: The Role of Technological Innovation and Behavioral Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Qazi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development reflects an underlying tension to achieve economic growth whilst addressing environmental challenges, and this is particularly the case for the aviation sector. Although much of the aviation-related focus has fallen on reducing aircraft emissions, airports have also been under increasing pressure to support the vision of a low carbon energy future. One of the main sources of airport-related emissions is passenger journeys to and from airports (the surface access component of air travel, which is the focus of this paper. Two aspects associated with the relationship between sustainable development and airport surface access are considered. Firstly, there is an evaluation of three technological innovation options that will enable sustainable transport solutions for surface access journeys: telepresence systems to reduce drop-off/pick-up trips, techniques to improve public transport and options to encourage the sharing of rides. Secondly, the role of behavioral change for surface access journeys from a theoretical perspective, using empirical data from Manchester airport, is evaluated. Finally, the contribution of technology and behavioral intervention measures to improvements in sustainable development are discussed.

  19. Tyrosine supplementation for phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Diana; Wildgoose, Joanne

    2013-06-05

    Phenylketonuria is an inherited disease for which the main treatment is the dietary restriction of the amino acid phenylalanine. The diet has to be initiated in the neonatal period to prevent or reduce mental handicap. However, the diet is very restrictive and unpalatable and can be difficult to follow. A deficiency of the amino acid tyrosine has been suggested as a cause of some of the neuropsychological problems exhibited in phenylketonuria. Therefore, this review aims to assess the efficacy of tyrosine supplementation for phenylketonuria. To assess the effects of tyrosine supplementation alongside or instead of a phenylalanine-restricted diet for people with phenylketonuria, who commenced on diet at diagnosis and either continued on the diet or relaxed the diet later in life. To assess the evidence that tyrosine supplementation alongside, or instead of a phenylalanine-restricted diet improves intelligence, neuropsychological performance, growth and nutritional status, mortality rate and quality of life. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Trials Register which is comprised of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Additional studies were identified from handsearches of the Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease (from inception in 1978 to 1998). The manufacturers of prescribable dietary products used in the treatment of phenylketonuria were also contacted for further references.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Inborn Errors of Metabolism Trials Register: 28 June 2012. All randomised or quasi-randomised trials investigating the use of tyrosine supplementation versus placebo in people with phenylketonuria in addition to, or instead of, a phenylalanine-restricted diet. People treated for maternal phenylketonuria were excluded. Two authors independently assessed the trial eligibility, methodological quality

  20. Exploring oxidative modifications of tyrosine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houée-Lévin, C; Bobrowski, K; Horakova, L

    2015-01-01

    residues are oxidised in vivo with impact on cellular homeostasis and redox signalling pathways. A notable example is tyrosine, which can undergo a number of oxidative post-translational modifications to form 3-hydroxy-tyrosine, tyrosine crosslinks, 3-nitrotyrosine and halogenated tyrosine, with different...... effects on cellular functions. Tyrosine oxidation has been studied extensively in vitro, and this has generated detailed information about the molecular mechanisms that may occur in vivo. An important aspect of studying tyrosine oxidation both in vitro and in biological systems is the ability to monitor...... residues modified and the nature of the modification. These approaches have helped understanding of the consequences of tyrosine oxidation in biological systems, especially its effects on cell signalling and cell dysfunction, linking to roles in disease. There is mounting evidence that tyrosine oxidation...

  1. Sustainable Development and Airport Surface Access: The Role of Technological Innovation and Behavioral Change

    OpenAIRE

    Ryley, Tim; Elmirghani, Jaafar; Budd, Tom; Miyoshi, Chikage; Mason, Keith; Moxon, Richard; Ahmed, Imad; Qazi, Bilal; Zanni, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable development reflects an underlying tension to achieve economic growth whilst addressing environmental challenges, and this is particularly the case for the aviation sector. Although much of the aviation-related focus has fallen on reducing aircraft emissions, airports have also been under increasing pressure to support the vision of a low carbon energy future. One of the main sources of airport-related emissions is passenger journeys to and from airports (the surface access compon...

  2. RADIATION ACCESS ZONE AND VENTILATION CONFINEMENT ZONE CRITERIA FOR THE MGR SURFACE FACILITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. A. Padula

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this technical report are to: (1) Establish the criteria for Radiation Access Zone (RAZ) designation. (2) Establish the criteria for the Ventilation Confinement Zone (VCZ) designation. The scope will be to formulate the RAZ and VCZ zoning designation for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface facilities and to apply the zoning designations to the current Waste Handling Building (WHB), Waste Treatment Building (WTB), and Carrier Preparation Building (CPB) configurations

  3. Interacting with the biomolecular solvent accessible surface via a haptic feedback device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayward Steven

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From the 1950s computer based renderings of molecules have been produced to aid researchers in their understanding of biomolecular structure and function. A major consideration for any molecular graphics software is the ability to visualise the three dimensional structure of the molecule. Traditionally, this was accomplished via stereoscopic pairs of images and later realised with three dimensional display technologies. Using a haptic feedback device in combination with molecular graphics has the potential to enhance three dimensional visualisation. Although haptic feedback devices have been used to feel the interaction forces during molecular docking they have not been used explicitly as an aid to visualisation. Results A haptic rendering application for biomolecular visualisation has been developed that allows the user to gain three-dimensional awareness of the shape of a biomolecule. By using a water molecule as the probe, modelled as an oxygen atom having hard-sphere interactions with the biomolecule, the process of exploration has the further benefit of being able to determine regions on the molecular surface that are accessible to the solvent. This gives insight into how awkward it is for a water molecule to gain access to or escape from channels and cavities, indicating possible entropic bottlenecks. In the case of liver alcohol dehydrogenase bound to the inhibitor SAD, it was found that there is a channel just wide enough for a single water molecule to pass through. Placing the probe coincident with crystallographic water molecules suggests that they are sometimes located within small pockets that provide a sterically stable environment irrespective of hydrogen bonding considerations. Conclusion By using the software, named HaptiMol ISAS (available from http://www.haptimol.co.uk, one can explore the accessible surface of biomolecules using a three-dimensional input device to gain insights into the shape and water

  4. [Development and Application of Catalytic Tyrosine Modification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shinichi; Tsushima, Michihiko; Nakamura, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2018-01-01

     The chemical labeling of proteins with synthetic probes is a key technique used in chemical biology, protein-based therapy, and material science. Much of the chemical labeling of native proteins, however, depends on the labeling of lysine and cysteine residues. While those methods have significantly contributed to native protein labeling, alternative methods that can modify different amino acid residues are still required. Herein we report the development of a novel methodology of tyrosine labeling, inspired by the luminol chemiluminescence reaction. Tyrosine residues are often exposed on a protein's surface and are thus expected to be good targets for protein functionalization. In our studies so far, we have found that 1) hemin oxidatively activates luminol derivatives as a catalyst, 2) N-methyl luminol derivative specifically forms a covalent bond with a tyrosine residue among the 20 kinds of natural amino acid residues, and 3) the efficiency of tyrosine labeling with N-methyl luminol derivative is markedly improved by using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a catalyst. We were able to use molecular oxygen as an oxidant under HRP/NADH conditions. By using these methods, the functionalization of purified proteins was carried out. Because N-methyl luminol derivative is an excellent protein labeling reagent that responds to the activation of peroxidase, this new method is expected to open doors to such biological applications as the signal amplification of HRP-conjugated antibodies and the detection of protein association in combination with peroxidase-tag technology.

  5. Roles of the tyrosine isomers meta-tyrosine and ortho-tyrosine in oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipson, Brett R; Fisher, Alfred L

    2016-05-01

    The damage to cellular components by reactive oxygen species, termed oxidative stress, both increases with age and likely contributes to age-related diseases including Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cataract formation. In the setting of oxidative stress, hydroxyl radicals can oxidize the benzyl ring of the amino acid phenylalanine, which then produces the abnormal tyrosine isomers meta-tyrosine or ortho-tyrosine. While elevations in m-tyrosine and o-tyrosine concentrations have been used as a biological marker of oxidative stress, there is emerging evidence from bacterial, plant, and mammalian studies demonstrating that these isomers, particularly m-tyrosine, directly produce adverse effects to cells and tissues. These new findings suggest that the abnormal tyrosine isomers could in fact represent mediators of the effects of oxidative stress. Consequently the accumulation of m- and o-tyrosine may disrupt cellular homeostasis and contribute to disease pathogenesis, and as result, effective defenses against oxidative stress can encompass not only the elimination of reactive oxygen species but also the metabolism and ultimately the removal of the abnormal tyrosine isomers from the cellular amino acid pool. Future research in this area is needed to clarify the biologic mechanisms by which the tyrosine isomers damage cells and disrupt the function of tissues and organs and to identify the metabolic pathways involved in removing the accumulated isomers after exposure to oxidative stress. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. "Simultaneous measurement of flame impingement and piston surface temperatures in an optically accessible spark ignition engine"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Carl-Philipp; Honza, Rene; Böhm, Benjamin; Dreizler, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    This paper shows the results of spatially resolved temperature measurements of the piston surface of an optically accessible direct injection spark ignition engine during flame impingement. High-speed thermographic phosphor thermometry (TPT), using Gd3Ga5O12:Cr,Ce, and planar laser-induced fluorescence of the hydroxyl radical (OH-PLIF) were used to investigate the temperature increase and the time and position of flame impingement at the piston surface. Measurements were conducted at two operating cases and showed heating rates of up to 16,000 K/s. The OH-PLIF measurements were used to localize flame impingement and calculate conditioned statistics of the temperature profiles. The TPT coating was characterized and its influence on the temperature measurements evaluated.

  7. Tyrosine residues modification studied by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santrucek, Jiri; Strohalm, Martin; Kadlcik, Vojtech; Hynek, Radovan; Kodicek, Milan

    2004-01-01

    Amino acid residue-specific reactivity in proteins is of great current interest in structural biology as it provides information about solvent accessibility and reactivity of the residue and, consequently, about protein structure and possible interactions. In the work presented tyrosine residues of three model proteins with known spatial structure are modified with two tyrosine-specific reagents: tetranitromethane and iodine. Modified proteins were specifically digested by proteases and the mass of resulting peptide fragments was determined using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Our results show that there are only small differences in the extent of tyrosine residues modification by tetranitromethane and iodine. However, data dealing with accessibility of reactive residues obtained by chemical modifications are not completely identical with those obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography. These interesting discrepancies can be caused by local molecular dynamics and/or by specific chemical structure of the residues surrounding

  8. Surface effects of electrode-dependent switching behavior of resistive random-access memory

    KAUST Repository

    Ke, Jr Jian

    2016-09-26

    The surface effects of ZnO-based resistive random-access memory (ReRAM) were investigated using various electrodes. Pt electrodes were found to have better performance in terms of the device\\'s switching functionality. A thermodynamic model of the oxygen chemisorption process was proposed to explain this electrode-dependent switching behavior. The temperature-dependent switching voltage demonstrates that the ReRAM devices fabricated with Pt electrodes have a lower activation energy for the chemisorption process, resulting in a better resistive switching performance. These findings provide an in-depth understanding of electrode-dependent switching behaviors and can serve as design guidelines for future ReRAM devices.

  9. Data on the role of accessible surface area on osmolytes-induced protein stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safikur Rahman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes data related to the research article “Testing the dependence of stabilizing effect of osmolytes on the fractional increase in the accessible surface area on thermal and chemical denaturations of proteins” [1]. Heat- and guanidinium chloride (GdmCl-induced denaturation of three disulfide free proteins (bovine cytochrome c (b-cyt-c, myoglobin (Mb and barstar in the presence of different concentrations of methylamines (sarcosine, glycine-betaine (GB and trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO was monitored by [ϴ]222, the mean residue ellipticity at 222 nm at pH 7.0. Methylamines belong to a class of osmolytes known to protect proteins from deleterious effect of urea. This paper includes comprehensive thermodynamic data obtained from the heat- and GdmCl-induced denaturations of barstar, b-cyt-c and Mb.

  10. FreeSASA: An open source C library for solvent accessible surface area calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitternacht, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Calculating solvent accessible surface areas (SASA) is a run-of-the-mill calculation in structural biology. Although there are many programs available for this calculation, there are no free-standing, open-source tools designed for easy tool-chain integration. FreeSASA is an open source C library for SASA calculations that provides both command-line and Python interfaces in addition to its C API. The library implements both Lee and Richards' and Shrake and Rupley's approximations, and is highly configurable to allow the user to control molecular parameters, accuracy and output granularity. It only depends on standard C libraries and should therefore be easy to compile and install on any platform. The library is well-documented, stable and efficient. The command-line interface can easily replace closed source legacy programs, with comparable or better accuracy and speed, and with some added functionality.

  11. An accessible micro-capillary electrophoresis device using surface-tension-driven flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Swomitra K.; Warrick, Jay; Gorski, Jack; Beebe, David J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a rapidly fabricated micro-capillary electrophoresis chip that utilizes surface-tension-driven flow for sample injection and extraction of DNA. Surface-tension-driven flow (i.e. passive pumping) injects a fixed volume of sample that can be predicted mathematically. Passive pumping eliminates the need for tubing, valves, syringe pumps, and other equipment typically needed for interfacing with microelectrophoresis chips. This method requires a standard micropipette to load samples before separation, and remove the resulting bands after analysis. The device was made using liquid phase photopolymerization to rapidly fabricate the chip without the need of special equipment typically associated with the construction of microelectrophoresis chips (e.g. cleanroom). Batch fabrication time for the device presented here was 1.5 h including channel coating time to suppress electroosmotic flow. Devices were constructed out of poly-isobornyl acrylate and glass. A standard microscope with a UV source was used for sample detection. Separations were demonstrated using Promega BenchTop 100 bp ladder in hydroxyl ethyl cellulose (HEC) and oligonucleotides of 91 and 118 bp were used to characterize sample injection and extraction of DNA bands. The end result was an inexpensive micro-capillary electrophoresis device that uses tools (e.g. micropipette, electrophoretic power supplies, and microscopes) already present in most labs for sample manipulation and detection, making it more accessible for potential end users. PMID:19425002

  12. Accessible reactive surface area and abiotic redox reactivity of iron oxyhydroxides in acidic brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehlau, Jennifer H.; Toner, Brandy M.; Arnold, William A.; Penn, R. Lee

    2017-01-01

    The reactivity of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in low pH and high ionic strength solutions was quantified to assess abiotic contributions to oxidation-reduction chemistry in acidic brine environments, such as mine groundwater seepage, lakes in Western Australia, and acid mine drainage settings, which are of global interest for their environmental impacts and unique geomicrobiology. Factors expected to influence accessible and reactive surface area, including Fe(II) adsorption and aggregate size, were measured as a function of pH and CaCl2 concentration and related to the kinetics of redox reactions in aqueous suspensions of synthetic goethite (α-FeOOH), akaganeite (β-FeOOH), and ferrihydrite (Fe10O14(OH)2) nanoparticles. Aqueous conditions and iron oxyhydroxides were chosen based on characterization of natural iron-rich mine microbial mats located in Soudan Underground Mine State Park, Minnesota, USA. Quinone species were used as redox sensors because they are well-defined probes and are present in natural organic matter. Fe(II) adsorption to the iron oxyhydroxide mineral surfaces from aqueous solution was measurable only at pH values above 4 and either decreased or was not affected by CaCl2 concentration. Concentrations at or above 0.020 M CaCl2 in acetate buffer (pH 4.5) induced particle aggregation. Assessment of Fe(II) adsorption and particle aggregation in acidic brine suggested that accessible reactive surface area may be limited in acidic brines. This was supported by observations of decreasing benzoquinone reduction rate by adsorbed Fe(II) at high CaCl2 concentration. In contrast, the hydroquinone oxidation rate increased at high CaCl2 concentrations, which may be due to suppressed adsorption of Fe(II) generated by the reaction. Results suggest that iron geochemical cycling in acidic brine environments will be substantially different than for iron oxyhydroxides in low-saline waters with circumneutral pH. These findings have implications for acidic

  13. Surface Accessibility with Spatial Analysis During Fire Extinguishing Procedures: Example on the Island of Vis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruno Lepoglavec

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The existing public and forest transport infrastructure (truck forest roads are permanent objects used when passing through forests. They also serve as a firefighter belt and provide direct access to firefighting vehicles, or are used as the starting point where firefighting teams extinguish fires or move toward remote fires. The paper identifies the existing fire road network (including public roads, forest roads, non-classified roads and fire roads for access of firefighting vehicles during fire extinguishing interventions. Material and Methods: An analysis of the intervention rate was conducted on a dispersive sample (35 positions from two volunteer fire associations (VFA on the island of Vis. Also, an analysis of the surface availability to fire vehicles concerning the time of departure from the fire station was conducted, as well as the comparison with the Standard time of intervention defined by the regulations on fire department organization in the Republic of Croatia. Results: For each simulated fire location for intervention of two existing volunteer fire associations: VFA Komiža and VFA Vis, results show that for a few fire locations, despite a smaller distance from the VFA Komiža, a quicker intervention is possible from the VFA Vis (locations 4, 5 and 14, and vice versa (locations 21, 22 and 25. With the use of a New Service Area, tool intervention times regarding different areas were calculated. Intervention times were divided into intervals: 25 min. The last two categories of area are beyond reach for firefighters within the Standard time of intervention (15 min and together they comprise to 27.88% of the total research area. Conclusions: The results of Closest Facility tool indicate that for the simulated fire position the best/fastest route is not always the shortest one, because of a significant effect of the structural elements of each road, the state of the road and the longitudinal slope of the road

  14. A Brief Survey of Media Access Control, Data Link Layer, and Protocol Technologies for Lunar Surface Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallett, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper surveys and describes some of the existing media access control and data link layer technologies for possible application in lunar surface communications and the advanced wideband Direct Sequence Code Division Multiple Access (DSCDMA) conceptual systems utilizing phased-array technology that will evolve in the next decade. Time Domain Multiple Access (TDMA) and Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) are standard Media Access Control (MAC) techniques that can be incorporated into lunar surface communications architectures. Another novel hybrid technique that is recently being developed for use with smart antenna technology combines the advantages of CDMA with those of TDMA. The relatively new and sundry wireless LAN data link layer protocols that are continually under development offer distinct advantages for lunar surface applications over the legacy protocols which are not wireless. Also several communication transport and routing protocols can be chosen with characteristics commensurate with smart antenna systems to provide spacecraft communications for links exhibiting high capacity on the surface of the Moon. The proper choices depend on the specific communication requirements.

  15. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  16. Protein tyrosine phosphatases: regulatory mechanisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hertog, J.; Ostman, A.; Bohmer, F.D.

    2008-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases are tightly controlled by various mechanisms, ranging from differential expression in specific cell types to restricted subcellular localization, limited proteolysis, post-translational modifications affecting intrinsic catalytic activity, ligand binding and

  17. Tyrosine phosphorylation of WW proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuven, Nina; Shanzer, Matan

    2015-01-01

    A number of key regulatory proteins contain one or two copies of the WW domain known to mediate protein–protein interaction via proline-rich motifs, such as PPxY. The Hippo pathway components take advantage of this module to transduce tumor suppressor signaling. It is becoming evident that tyrosine phosphorylation is a critical regulator of the WW proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on the involved tyrosine kinases and their roles in regulating the WW proteins. PMID:25627656

  18. Urokinase receptor expression involves tyrosine phosphorylation of phosphoglycerate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Praveenkumar; Velusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Bhandary, Yashodhar P; Liu, Ming C; Shetty, Sreerama

    2010-02-01

    The interaction of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) with its receptor, uPAR, plays a central role in several pathophysiological processes, including cancer. uPA induces its own cell surface receptor expression through stabilization of uPAR mRNA. The mechanism involves binding of a 51 nt uPAR mRNA coding sequence with phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) to down regulate cell surface uPAR expression. Tyrosine phosphorylation of PGK mediated by uPA treatment enhances uPAR mRNA stabilization. In contrast, inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation augments PGK binding to uPAR mRNA and attenuates uPA-induced uPAR expression. Mapping the specific peptide region of PGK indicated that its first quarter (amino acids 1-100) interacts with uPAR mRNA. To determine if uPAR expression by uPA is regulated through activation of tyrosine residues of PGK, we mutated the specific tyrosine residue and tested mutant PGK for its ability to interfere with uPAR expression. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation by mutating Y76 residue abolished uPAR expression induced by uPA treatment. These findings collectively demonstrate that Y76 residue present in the first quarter of the PGK molecule is involved in lung epithelial cell surface uPAR expression. This region can effectively mimic the function of a whole PGK molecule in inhibiting tumor cell growth.

  19. Accessible surface area of proteins from purely sequence information and the importance of global features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraggi, Eshel; Zhou, Yaoqi; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    We present a new approach for predicting the accessible surface area of proteins. The novelty of this approach lies in not using residue mutation profiles generated by multiple sequence alignments as descriptive inputs. Rather, sequential window information and the global monomer and dimer compositions of the chain are used. We find that much of the lost accuracy due to the elimination of evolutionary information is recouped by the use of global features. Furthermore, this new predictor produces similar results for proteins with or without sequence homologs deposited in the Protein Data Bank, and hence shows generalizability. Finally, these predictions are obtained in a small fraction (1/1000) of the time required to run mutation profile based prediction. All these factors indicate the possible usability of this work in de-novo protein structure prediction and in de-novo protein design using iterative searches. Funded in part by the financial support of the National Institutes of Health through Grants R01GM072014 and R01GM073095, and the National Science Foundation through Grant NSF MCB 1071785.

  20. RBSURFpred: Modeling protein accessible surface area in real and binary space using regularized and optimized regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafder, Sumit; Toukir Ahmed, Md; Iqbal, Sumaiya; Tamjidul Hoque, Md; Sohel Rahman, M

    2018-03-14

    Accessible surface area (ASA) of a protein residue is an effective feature for protein structure prediction, binding region identification, fold recognition problems etc. Improving the prediction of ASA by the application of effective feature variables is a challenging but explorable task to consider, specially in the field of machine learning. Among the existing predictors of ASA, REGAd 3 p is a highly accurate ASA predictor which is based on regularized exact regression with polynomial kernel of degree 3. In this work, we present a new predictor RBSURFpred, which extends REGAd 3 p on several dimensions by incorporating 58 physicochemical, evolutionary and structural properties into 9-tuple peptides via Chou's general PseAAC, which allowed us to obtain higher accuracies in predicting both real-valued and binary ASA. We have compared RBSURFpred for both real and binary space predictions with state-of-the-art predictors, such as REGAd 3 p and SPIDER2. We also have carried out a rigorous analysis of the performance of RBSURFpred in terms of different amino acids and their properties, and also with biologically relevant case-studies. The performance of RBSURFpred establishes itself as a useful tool for the community. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Solvent-accessible surface area: How well can be applied to hot-spot detection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, João M; Ramos, Rui M; Pimenta, António C; Moreira, Irina S

    2014-03-01

    A detailed comprehension of protein-based interfaces is essential for the rational drug development. One of the key features of these interfaces is their solvent accessible surface area profile. With that in mind, we tested a group of 12 SASA-based features for their ability to correlate and differentiate hot- and null-spots. These were tested in three different data sets, explicit water MD, implicit water MD, and static PDB structure. We found no discernible improvement with the use of more comprehensive data sets obtained from molecular dynamics. The features tested were shown to be capable of discerning between hot- and null-spots, while presenting low correlations. Residue standardization such as rel SASAi or rel/res SASAi , improved the features as a tool to predict ΔΔGbinding values. A new method using support machine learning algorithms was developed: SBHD (Sasa-Based Hot-spot Detection). This method presents a precision, recall, and F1 score of 0.72, 0.81, and 0.76 for the training set and 0.91, 0.73, and 0.81 for an independent test set. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Tyrosine sulfation modulates activity of tick-derived thrombin inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert E.; Liu, Xuyu; Ripoll-Rozada, Jorge; Alonso-García, Noelia; Parker, Benjamin L.; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa; Payne, Richard J.

    2017-09-01

    Madanin-1 and chimadanin are two small cysteine-free thrombin inhibitors that facilitate blood feeding in the tick Haemaphysalis longicornis. Here, we report a post-translational modification—tyrosine sulfation—of these two proteins that is critical for potent anti-thrombotic and anticoagulant activity. Inhibitors produced in baculovirus-infected insect cells displayed heterogeneous sulfation of two tyrosine residues within each of the proteins. One-pot ligation-desulfurization chemistry enabled access to homogeneous samples of all possible sulfated variants of the proteins. Tyrosine sulfation of madanin-1 and chimadanin proved crucial for thrombin inhibitory activity, with the doubly sulfated variants three orders of magnitude more potent than the unmodified inhibitors. The three-dimensional structure of madanin-1 in complex with thrombin revealed a unique mode of inhibition, with the sulfated tyrosine residues binding to the basic exosite II of the protease. The importance of tyrosine sulfation within this family of thrombin inhibitors, together with their unique binding mode, paves the way for the development of anti-thrombotic drug leads based on these privileged scaffolds.

  3. Function of Bruton's tyrosine kinase during B cell development is partially independent of its catalytic activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Middendorp; G.M. Dingjan (Gemma); A. Maas (Alex); K. Dahlenborg; R.W. Hendriks (Rudi)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe Tec family member Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinase that transduces signals from the pre-B and B cell receptor (BCR). Btk is involved in pre-B cell maturation by regulating IL-7 responsiveness, cell surface phenotype changes,

  4. Raman scattering tensors of tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, M; Ezaki, Y; Aida, M; Suzuki, M; Yimit, A; Ushizawa, K; Ueda, T

    1998-01-01

    Polarized Raman scattering measurements have been made of a single crystal of L-tyrosine by the use of a Raman microscope with the 488.0-nm exciting beam from an argon ion laser. The L-tyrosine crystal belongs to the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) (orthorhombic), and Raman scattering intensities corresponding to the aa, bb, cc, ab and ac components of the crystal Raman tensor have been determined for each prominent Raman band. A similar set of measurements has been made of L-tyrosine-d4, in which four hydrogen atoms on the benzene ring are replaced by deuterium atoms. The effects of NH3-->ND3 and OH-->OD on the Raman spectrum have also been examined. In addition, depolarization ratios of some bands of L-tyrosine in aqueous solutions of pH 13 and pH 1 were examined. For comparison with these experimental results, on the other hand, ab initio molecular orbital calculations have been made of the normal modes of vibration and their associated polarizability oscillations of the L-tyrosine molecule. On the basis of these experimental data and by referring to the results of the calculations, discussions have been presented on the Raman tensors associated to some Raman bands, including those at 829 cm-1 (benzene ring breathing), 642 cm-1 (benzene ring deformation), and 432 cm-1 (C alpha-C beta-C gamma bending).

  5. Bacterial Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Lei; Kobir, Ahasanul; Jers, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    in exopolysaccharide production, virulence, DNA metabolism, stress response and other key functions of the bacterial cell. BY-kinases act through autophosphorylation (mainly in exopolysaccharide production) and phosphorylation of other proteins, which have in most cases been shown to be activated by tyrosine......Bacteria and Eukarya share essentially the same family of protein-serine/threonine kinases, also known as the Hanks-type kinases. However, when it comes to protein-tyrosine phosphorylation, bacteria seem to have gone their own way. Bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) are bacterial...... and highlighted their importance in bacterial physiology. Having no orthologues in Eukarya, BY-kinases are receiving a growing attention from the biomedical field, since they represent a particularly promising target for anti-bacterial drug design....

  6. Radiolytic dimerization of tyrosine in alkaline solutions of poly-L-tyrosine, glycyl-L-tyrosine and tyrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boguta, G.; Dancewicz, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Blue fluorescence characteristic of dityrosine appeared in γ-irradiated solutions of tyrosine, glycyl-L-tyrosine or polytyrosine (MW 110,000). The intensity of fluorescence was used for the determination of the dityrosine concentration in hydrolysed samples. The radiation-induced formation of dityrosine depended on pH and on the presence of oxygen during radiolysis carried out with a total dose of the order of 1000 Gy. The presence of oxygen in the system suppressed the formation of dityrosine in solution at low or neutral pH but had no effect on this process in alkaline solutions. Except for the radiolysis of air-saturated poly-L-tyrosine solutions, where G(Dityrosine) = 0.35, the yields of dityrosine at high pH were lower than the yields obtained during radiolysis at low pH and in the absence of oxygen. (author)

  7. SOCS proteins in regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazi, Julhash U.; Kabir, Nuzhat N.; Flores Morales, Amilcar

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are a family of cell surface receptors that play critical roles in signal transduction from extracellular stimuli. Many in this family of kinases are overexpressed or mutated in human malignancies and thus became an attractive drug target for cancer treatment....... The signaling mediated by RTKs must be tightly regulated by interacting proteins including protein-tyrosine phosphatases and ubiquitin ligases. The suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family proteins are well-known negative regulators of cytokine receptors signaling consisting of eight structurally similar...

  8. Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) /Jason-2: Ancillary Files (NODC Accession 0044982)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains the data descriptions for the OSTM/Jason-2 Ancillary data files, which is served through the NOAA/NESDIS Comprehensive Large Array-data...

  9. Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) /Jason-2: Orbital Information (NODC Accession 0044985)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains the descriptions for the OSTM/Jason-2 orbital information, which is served through the NOAA/NESDIS Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship...

  10. Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) /Jason-2: Telemetry (NODC Accession 0044986)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains the data descriptions for the OSTM/Jason-2 Telemetry data, which is served through the NOAA/NESDIS Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship...

  11. Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) /Jason-2: Auxiliary Files (NODC Accession 0044983)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains the data descriptions for the OSTM/Jason-2 Auxiliary data files, which is served through the NOAA/NESDIS Comprehensive Large Array-data...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions TH deficiency Tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) deficiency is a disorder that primarily ...

  13. Synthesis of deuterium and tritium labelled tyrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanska, M.; Drabarek, S.

    1980-01-01

    A new method of synthesis of tyrosine labelled with deuterium and tritium in the aromatic ring has been developed. Deuterated and tritiated tyrosine was obtained by isotope exchange between tyrosine and deuterated or tritiated water at elevated temperature in hydrochloric acid medium using K 2 PtCl 4 as a catalyst. For synthesis of tritiated tyrosine 1 Ci HTO was used; the specific activity of the product was 5 mCi/mMol. (author)

  14. Tyrosine phosphorylation in signal transduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, T.M.; Kaplan, D.; Morgan, W.; Keller, T.; Mamon, H.; Piwnica-Worms, H.; Druker, B.; Whitman, M.; Morrison, D.; Cohen, B.; Schaffhausen, B.; Cantley, L.; Rapp, U.

    1988-01-01

    Recent work has focused on the elucidation of the mechanisms by which membrane-bound tyrosine kinases transmit signals within the cell. To examine the role of tyrosine phosphorylation the authors have employed the following strategy. First, they have utilized antibodies to phosphotyrosine (anti-P.Tyr) to identify candidate substrates of various tyrosine kinases, such as pp60 c-src , the CSF- receptor, or the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor. Second, they have attempted to characterize the biochemical properties of the putative substrates and to determine in what manner these properties are modified by phosphorylation on tyrosine residues. In this endeavor, they are recapitulating the classic biochemical analysis used to study the effect of kinases on metabolism. The final portion of our work consists of using modern molecular biological strategies to clone the genes or cDNAs for the substrates and overproduce the relevant proteins for studies in vitro in defined systems. This paper describes the first and second aspects of this strategy, the identification and characterization of novel substrate molecules

  15. Tyrosine phosphorylation in human lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haralambieva, E; Jones, M.; Roncador, GM; Cerroni, L; Lamant, L; Ott, G; Rosenwald, A; Sherman, C; Thorner, P; Kusec, R; Wood, KM; Campo, E; Falini, B; Ramsay, A; Marafioti, T; Stein, H; Kluin, PM; Pulford, K; Mason, DY

    2002-01-01

    In a previous study, we showed that the high level of protein tyrosine phosphorylation present in lymphomas containing an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) can be demonstrated in routinely processed paraffin tissue sections using immunolabelling techniques. In the present study we investigated

  16. 21 CFR 582.5920 - Tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tyrosine. 582.5920 Section 582.5920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... § 582.5920 Tyrosine. (a) Product. Tyrosine (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  17. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  18. Formylbenzene diazonium hexafluorophosphate reagent for tyrosine-selective modification of proteins and the introduction of a bioorthogonal aldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilyuk, Julia; Ban, Hitoshi; Nagano, Masanobu; Hakamata, Wataru; Barbas, Carlos F

    2012-12-19

    4-Formylbenzene diazonium hexafluorophosphate (FBDP) is a novel bench-stable crystalline diazonium salt that reacts selectively with tyrosine to install a bioorthogonal aldehyde functionality. Model studies with N-acyl-tyrosine methylamide allowed us to identify conditions optimal for tyrosine ligation reactions with small peptides and proteins. FBDP-based conjugation was used for the facile introduction of small molecule tags, poly(ethylene glycol) chains (PEGylation), and functional small molecules onto model proteins and to label the surface of living cells.

  19. 14 km Sea Surface Temperature for North America, 1986 - present (NODC Accession 0099042)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This product presents local sea surface temperatures (degrees C). It is a composite gridded-image derived from 8-km resolution SST observations collected by Advanced...

  20. NODC Standard Product: Atlas of surface marine data 1994 (9 disc set) (NCEI Accession 0101474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A set of 9 CD-ROMs were produced to accompany the analog publication Atlas of Surface Marine Data, 1994. Each CD-ROM contains monthly mean objectively analyzed...

  1. Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) /Jason-3: Orbital Information, 2015- (NODC Accession 0122598)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Jason-3 is the fourth mission in U.S.-European series of satellite missions that measure the height of the ocean surface. Scheduled to launch in 2015, the mission...

  2. Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) /Jason-3: Telemetry, 2015- (NODC Accession 0122599)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Jason-3 is the fourth mission in U.S.-European series of satellite missions that measure the height of the ocean surface. Scheduled to launch in 2015, the mission...

  3. Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) /Jason-3: Auxiliary Files, 2015- (NODC Accession 0122597)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Jason-3 is the fourth mission in U.S.-European series of satellite missions that measure the height of the ocean surface. Scheduled to launch in 2015, the mission...

  4. Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) /Jason-3: Ancillary Files, 2015- (NCEI Accession 0122596)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Jason-3 is the fourth mission in U.S.-European series of satellite missions that measure the height of the ocean surface. Scheduled to launch in 2015, the mission...

  5. SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE and Other Data from 19940301 to 19940331 (NCEI Accession 9400060)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sea Surface Temperatures (SST) data for March 1994 was provided by Kunio Sakurai of Japan Meteorological Agency, Tokyo, Japan. SST were collected from ships in El...

  6. Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas Database Version 5 (SOCATv5) (NCEI Accession 0163180)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT, www.socat.info) is a synthesis activity by the international marine carbon research community and has more than 100 contributors...

  7. Conformational Clusters of Phosphorylated Tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrasoul, Maha; Ponniah, Komala; Mao, Alice; Warden, Meghan S; Elhefnawy, Wessam; Li, Yaohang; Pascal, Steven M

    2017-12-06

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays an important role in many cellular and intercellular processes including signal transduction, subcellular localization, and regulation of enzymatic activity. In 1999, Blom et al., using the limited number of protein data bank (PDB) structures available at that time, reported that the side chain structures of phosphorylated tyrosine (pY) are partitioned into two conserved conformational clusters ( Blom, N.; Gammeltoft, S.; Brunak, S. J. Mol. Biol. 1999 , 294 , 1351 - 1362 ). We have used the spectral clustering algorithm to cluster the increasingly growing number of protein structures with pY sites, and have found that the pY residues cluster into three distinct side chain conformations. Two of these pY conformational clusters associate strongly with a narrow range of tyrosine backbone conformation. The novel cluster also highly correlates with the identity of the n + 1 residue, and is strongly associated with a sequential pYpY conformation which places two adjacent pY side chains in a specific relative orientation. Further analysis shows that the three pY clusters are associated with distinct distributions of cognate protein kinases.

  8. High-Performance, Large Format Surfaces for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy: Increasing the Accessibility of an Analytical Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanipe, Katherine Nicole

    Although surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a spectroscopic technique with unusually high sensitivity and molecular specificity, few practical analytical applications have been implemented that take advantage of its power. Based on what is understood about SERS from the experimental and theoretical research of the past forty years, we developed a few well-defined design principles on the basis of which a reliable and reproducibly manufacturable SERS-active substrate could be fabricated that is highly enhancing, highly uniform, stable, and based on a broad range of metals so that various chemical processes could be probed. Finally, we restricted ourselves to using only readily scalable fabrication techniques. The resulting SERS-active device was a metal over silica, two-dimensional nano-grating that was shown to produce enhancements of ˜107 when compared to a smooth surface of the same metal. This SERS substrate also shows unprecedented signal uniformity over square centimeters, and is fabricated using commonly-available foundry-based approaches exclusively. Initially, we explored the properties of a gold-coated substrates in which a first-order grating resonance due to long-range symmetry is augmented by a local resonance due to the individual core-shell grating elements. The SERS properties of such grating systems were systematically studied as a function of various structural parameters such as the grating pitch, the inter-element gap and the thickness of the metal layer. The most enhancing substrates were found to have a grating parameter with a radiative, rather than evanescent, first-order resonance; a sufficiently small gap between nearest neighbor grating elements to produce near-field interactions; and a gold layer whose thickness was larger than the electronic mean-free-path of the conduction electrons, so as to ensure a high conductivity for the metal layer to sustain strong surface plasmons. We applied these same architectural principles to

  9. Restricted access magnetic materials prepared by dual surface modification for selective extraction of therapeutic drugs from biological fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yu; Wang Yuxia; Chen Lei [School of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wan Qianhong, E-mail: qhwan@tju.edu.cn [School of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2012-02-15

    Magnetic porous particles with dual functionality have been prepared by a two-step procedure and evaluated as novel restricted access materials for extraction of therapeutic agents from biological fluids. The magnetic silica particles served as scaffolds were first modified with diol groups, which were then converted to octadecyl esters through reaction with stearoyl chloride. In the second step, the octadecyl esters on the exterior surface were hydrolyzed by the action of lipase to yield magnetic particles with hydrophobic reversed-phase ligands on the inner surface and biocompatible diol groups on the outer surface. The restricted access behavior of the resulting materials was confirmed by differential binding of small molecules such as methotrexate (MTX), leucovorin (LV) and folic acid (FA) relative to bovine serum albumin. While MTX, LV and FA were all bound to the magnetic particles with high affinity, the adsorption of the protein was markedly reduced due to size exclusion effect. The utility of the magnetic particles for sample preparation was tested in solid-phase extraction of MTX, LV and FA from spiked human serum and the effects of the SPE conditions on the recovery of the analytes were systematically studied. Moreover, the magnetic particle-based sample preparation procedure coupled with reversed-phase liquid chromatography analysis was validated in terms of specificity, linearity and reproducibility. The method was shown to be free from interference of endogenous compounds and linear over the concentration range of 0.5-10 {mu}g/mL for the three drugs studied. The limits of detection for the three drugs in serum were in the range of 0.160-0.302 {mu}g/mL. Reproducibility expressed as the RSD of the recovery for ten replicated extractions at three different concentrations was found to be less than 8.93%. With a unique combination of surface functionality with magnetic cores, the restricted access magnetic particles may be adapted in automated and high

  10. Restricted access magnetic materials prepared by dual surface modification for selective extraction of therapeutic drugs from biological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yu; Wang Yuxia; Chen Lei; Wan Qianhong

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic porous particles with dual functionality have been prepared by a two-step procedure and evaluated as novel restricted access materials for extraction of therapeutic agents from biological fluids. The magnetic silica particles served as scaffolds were first modified with diol groups, which were then converted to octadecyl esters through reaction with stearoyl chloride. In the second step, the octadecyl esters on the exterior surface were hydrolyzed by the action of lipase to yield magnetic particles with hydrophobic reversed-phase ligands on the inner surface and biocompatible diol groups on the outer surface. The restricted access behavior of the resulting materials was confirmed by differential binding of small molecules such as methotrexate (MTX), leucovorin (LV) and folic acid (FA) relative to bovine serum albumin. While MTX, LV and FA were all bound to the magnetic particles with high affinity, the adsorption of the protein was markedly reduced due to size exclusion effect. The utility of the magnetic particles for sample preparation was tested in solid-phase extraction of MTX, LV and FA from spiked human serum and the effects of the SPE conditions on the recovery of the analytes were systematically studied. Moreover, the magnetic particle-based sample preparation procedure coupled with reversed-phase liquid chromatography analysis was validated in terms of specificity, linearity and reproducibility. The method was shown to be free from interference of endogenous compounds and linear over the concentration range of 0.5-10 μg/mL for the three drugs studied. The limits of detection for the three drugs in serum were in the range of 0.160-0.302 μg/mL. Reproducibility expressed as the RSD of the recovery for ten replicated extractions at three different concentrations was found to be less than 8.93%. With a unique combination of surface functionality with magnetic cores, the restricted access magnetic particles may be adapted in automated and high

  11. Testing whether Metazoan Tyrosine Loss Was Driven by Selection against Promiscuous Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Siddharth; Struck, Travis J.; Mannakee, Brian K.; Paniscus, Mary; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a key regulatory modification in metazoans, and the corresponding kinase enzymes have diversified dramatically. This diversification is correlated with a genome-wide reduction in protein tyrosine content, and it was recently suggested that this reduction was driven by selection to avoid promiscuous phosphorylation that might be deleterious. We tested three predictions of this intriguing hypothesis. 1) Selection should be stronger on residues that are more likely to be phosphorylated due to local solvent accessibility or structural disorder. 2) Selection should be stronger on proteins that are more likely to be promiscuously phosphorylated because they are abundant. We tested these predictions by comparing distributions of tyrosine within and among human and yeast orthologous proteins. 3) Selection should be stronger against mutations that create tyrosine versus remove tyrosine. We tested this prediction using human population genomic variation data. We found that all three predicted effects are modest for tyrosine when compared with the other amino acids, suggesting that selection against deleterious phosphorylation was not dominant in driving metazoan tyrosine loss. PMID:25312910

  12. Domestic water buffaloes: Access to surface water, disease prevalence and associated economic losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Ehsan; Abid, Muhammad; Zhang, Huiming; Cui, Weijun; Ul Hasson, Shabeh

    2018-06-01

    Given the shortage and non-availability of freshwater in Pakistan, wastewater is being used for bathing water buffaloes; however, this has a negative impact on animal welfare. Although there is a vast literature on indirect linkages between wastewater and animal productivity, studies focusing on the direct impacts of water buffaloes bathing in wastewater on animal productivity and economic losses are rare. Therefore, using 360 domestic water buffalo farms, this study examines the expenditure and production losses associated with bathing (in wastewater and freshwater) and non-bathing water buffaloes by employing partial budgeting and resource adjustment component techniques. Furthermore, it investigates the prevalence of animal diseases and associated economic effects using correlation analysis and propensity score matching techniques, respectively. The findings reveal that compared to their counterparts (freshwater bathing and non-bathing water buffaloes), buffaloes bathing in wastewater are at increased risk of clinical mastitis, foot and mouth disease (FMD) and tick infestation. Moreover, the use of wastewater for bathing buffaloes also leads to higher economic and production losses by affecting milk productivity, causing premature culling, and reducing slaughter value. The findings of the double-log model show that economic losses are higher if buffaloes bathe in wastewater within 30 min after milking, as there are more chances that those buffaloes would be exposed to bacterial penetration in the teat ducts, which may result in intramammary infection. According to the propensity score matching method, the higher economic damages per month are associated with buffaloes bathing in wastewater and freshwater, 155 and 110 USD per farm, respectively. The study findings reference the need for policies to restrict wastewater access by water buffaloes, and a regular check of and access to cool clean water wallows for bathing during hot summer days, to reduce excess

  13. Uptake of Tyrosine Amino Acid on Nano-Graphene Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam M. Nassef

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO is emerging as a promising nanomaterial with potential application in the detection and analysis of amino acids, DNA, enzymes, and proteins in biological fluid samples. So, the reaction of GO with amino acids should be characterized and determined before using it in biosensing methods and devices. In this study, the reaction of tyrosine amino acid (Tyr with GO was characterized using FT-IR, UV-vis spectrophotometry, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM before its use. The optimum conditions for GO’s interaction with Tyr amino acid have been studied under variable conditions. The optimum conditions of pH, temperature, shaking time, and GO and tyrosine concentrations for the uptaking of tyrosine amino acid onto the GO’s surface from aqueous solution were determined. The SEM analysis showed that the GO supplied was in a particle size range between 5.4 and 8.1 nm. A pH of 8.4–9.4 at 25 °C and 5 min of shaking time were the optimum conditions for a maximum uptake of 1.4 μg/mL of tyrosine amino acid onto 0.2 mg/mL of GO.

  14. Topical treatment of psoriasis: questionnaire results on topical therapy accessibility and influence of body surface area on usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, L; Lange, M M; Bissonette, R; Carvalho, A V E; van de Kerkhof, P C; Kirby, B; Kleyn, C E; Lynde, C W; van der Walt, J M; Wu, J J

    2017-07-01

    Topical treatment of mild to moderate psoriasis is first-line treatment and exhibits varying degrees of success across patient groups. Key factors influencing treatment success are physician topical treatment choice (high efficacy, low adverse events) and strict patient adherence. Currently, no formalized, international consensus guidelines exist to direct optimal topical treatment, although many countries have national guidelines. To describe and analyse cross-regional variations in the use and access of psoriasis topical therapies. The study was conducted as an observational cross-sectional study. A survey was distributed to dermatologists from the International Psoriasis Council (IPC) to assess topical therapy accessibility in 26 countries and to understand how body surface area (BSA) categories guide clinical decisions on topical use. Variation in the availability of tars, topical retinoids, dithranol and balneotherapy was reported. The vast majority of respondents (100% and 88.4%) used topical therapy as first-line monotherapy in situations with BSA 10%, the number of respondents who prescribe topical therapy decreased considerably. In addition, combination therapy of a topical drug and a systemic drug was frequently reported when BSA measured >10%. This physician survey provides new evidence on topical access and the influence of disease severity on topical usage in an effort to improve treatment strategies on a global level. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  15. Gridded 5-day mean sea surface height anomaly and significant wave height from Jason-1 and OSTM/Jason-2 satellites (NODC Accession 0065055)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains the gridded 5-day mean sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) and Ku Band significant wave height (SWH-KU) observed from Jason-1 and OSTM/Jason-2...

  16. Underway pCO2 Measurements in Surface Waters and the Atmosphere During the CGC Healy 2016 Expeditions (NCEI Accession 0166631)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0166631 includes Surface underway data collected from CGC Healy in the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea, Chukchi Sea and Arctic Ocean from 2016-06-30...

  17. Underway pCO2 Measurements in Surface Waters and the Atmosphere During the R/V Laurence M. Gould 2016 Expeditions (NCEI Accession 0166525)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0166525 includes Surface underway data collected from R/V Laurence M. Gould in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from...

  18. Underway pCO2 Measurements in Surface Waters and the Atmosphere During the R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer 2016 Expeditions (NCEI Accession 0166630)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0166630 includes Surface underway data collected from R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer in the South Pacific Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean, Southern Oceans from...

  19. MHC class I signaling in T cells leads to tyrosine kinase activity and PLC-gamma 1 phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Odum, Niels; Claesson, M H

    1995-01-01

    phosphorylation and the subsequent calcium response. The early tyrosine kinase activity was found to be dependent on expression of the TCR/CD3 complex and the CD45 molecule on the surface of the T cells. Furthermore, MHC-I cross-linking was shown to tyrosine phosphorylate PLC-gamma 1 (phospholipase C-gamma 1...

  20. A portion of the Pf155/RESA antigen of Plasmodium falciparum is accessible on the surface of infected erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saul, A.; Maloy, W.L.; Howard, R.J.; Rock, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of antigens accessible to lactoperoxidase-catalysed cell surface iodination on intact Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (RBC) has identified a 125 I-labelled antigen with an apparent size of about 155 kD. This labelled protein was specifically immunoprecipitated by the following antibodies: a rabbit antiserum and a mouse monoclonal antibody raised against a synthetic peptide comprising the 3',8-mer repeat EENVEHDA of the Pf155/RESA protein; a rabbit antiserum raised against a synthetic octapeptide comprising two copies of the 3',4-mer repeat EENV of the Pf155/RESA protein; and rabbit antisera against another synthetic peptide C(MYSNNNVED) 2 . The last antibody shows a strong reaction in asexual blood state parasites with the Pf155/RESA antigen. While this antigen has been described previously as a submembrane component of the outer membrane of infected RBC, this report shows that at least part of it is accessible to the surface of both ring and late trophozoite-infected erythrocytes. 21 refs., 4 figs

  1. Restricted access magnetic materials prepared by dual surface modification for selective extraction of therapeutic drugs from biological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yuxia; Chen, Lei; Wan, Qian-Hong

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic porous particles with dual functionality have been prepared by a two-step procedure and evaluated as novel restricted access materials for extraction of therapeutic agents from biological fluids. The magnetic silica particles served as scaffolds were first modified with diol groups, which were then converted to octadecyl esters through reaction with stearoyl chloride. In the second step, the octadecyl esters on the exterior surface were hydrolyzed by the action of lipase to yield magnetic particles with hydrophobic reversed-phase ligands on the inner surface and biocompatible diol groups on the outer surface. The restricted access behavior of the resulting materials was confirmed by differential binding of small molecules such as methotrexate (MTX), leucovorin (LV) and folic acid (FA) relative to bovine serum albumin. While MTX, LV and FA were all bound to the magnetic particles with high affinity, the adsorption of the protein was markedly reduced due to size exclusion effect. The utility of the magnetic particles for sample preparation was tested in solid-phase extraction of MTX, LV and FA from spiked human serum and the effects of the SPE conditions on the recovery of the analytes were systematically studied. Moreover, the magnetic particle-based sample preparation procedure coupled with reversed-phase liquid chromatography analysis was validated in terms of specificity, linearity and reproducibility. The method was shown to be free from interference of endogenous compounds and linear over the concentration range of 0.5-10 μg/mL for the three drugs studied. The limits of detection for the three drugs in serum were in the range of 0.160-0.302 μg/mL. Reproducibility expressed as the RSD of the recovery for ten replicated extractions at three different concentrations was found to be less than 8.93%. With a unique combination of surface functionality with magnetic cores, the restricted access magnetic particles may be adapted in automated and high

  2. Dose-dependent effects of oral tyrosine administration on plasma tyrosine levels and cognition in aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, van de Ondine; Bloemendaal, Mirjam; Heus, De Rianne; Aarts, Esther

    2017-01-01

    The effects of tyrosine on plasma response and cognition in aging are unknown. We assessed the dose-dependent response to tyrosine administration in older adults in both plasma tyrosine concentrations and working memory performance. In this double blind randomized cross-over trial 17 older adults

  3. Dose-Dependent Effects of Oral Tyrosine Administration on Plasma Tyrosine Levels and Cognition in Aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, O. van de; Bloemendaal, M.; Heus, R.A.A. de; Aarts, E.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of tyrosine on plasma response and cognition in aging are unknown. We assessed the dose-dependent response to tyrosine administration in older adults in both plasma tyrosine concentrations and working memory performance. In this double blind randomized cross-over trial 17 older adults

  4. Biofilm removal technique using sands as a research tool for accessing microbial attachment on surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanon Trachoo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms have profound impacts on improved survival of the constituent microorganisms in nature. Biofilms were believed to protect constituent microorganisms from sanitizer treatment, provide a more suitable habitat for microorganisms, and become a site for genetic material exchanges between microorganisms. As we realize more about the significance of biofilm, methods used for biofilm study should be consistently developed and evaluated. To determine microbial attachment on surfaces, usually biofilms are grown on substratum surfaces and removed by vortexing with glass beads or scraping. However, scraping is not as effective as vortexing with glass beads. Another approach is direct-agar overlaying which cannot be used with high density biofilm. In this experiment, we compared effectiveness of glass beads (298±28 μm in diameter and sands (width: 221±55 μm and length: 329±118 μm in removing biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by vortexing method. The results suggested that acid-washed sands, which are significantly less inexpensive than glass beads, were as effective as (P>0.05 analytical grade glass beads in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm removal without inhibiting growth of the organism.

  5. Sch proteins are localized on endoplasmic reticulum membranes and are redistributed after tyrosine kinase receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lotti, L V; Lanfrancone, L; Migliaccio, E

    1996-01-01

    area of the cell and mostly associated with the cytosolic side of rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Upon epidermal growth factor treatment and receptor tyrosine kinase activation, the immunolabeling became peripheral and was found to be associated with the cytosolic surface of the plasma membrane....... The rough endoplasmic reticulum localization of Shc proteins in unstimulated cells and their massive recruitment to the plasma membrane, endocytic structures, and peripheral cytosol following receptor tyrosine kinase activation could account for multiple putative functions of the adaptor protein....

  6. The mechanism of the tyrosine transporter TyrP supports a proton motive tyrosine decarboxylation pathway in Lactobacillus brevis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolken, WAM; Lucas, PM; Lonvaud-Funel, A; Lolkema, JS; Wolken, Wout A.M.; Lucas, Patrick M.

    The tyrosine decarboxylase operon of Lactobacillus brevis IOEB9809 contains, adjacent to the tyrosine decarboxylase gene, a gene for TyrP, a putative tyrosine transporter. The two genes potentially form a proton motive tyrosine decarboxylation pathway. The putative tyrosine transporter gene of L.

  7. Red Dragon: Low-cost Access to the Surface of Mars using Commercial Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcz, John; Davis, S. M.; Aftosmis, M. J.; Allen, G. A.; Bakhtian, N. M.; Dyakonov, A. A.; Edquist, K. T.; Glass, B. J.; Gonzales, A. A.; Heldmann, J. L.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We will discuss the feasibility of using a minimally-modified variant of a SpaceX Dragon capsule as a low-cost, large-capacity, near-term, Mars lander for scientific and human-precursor missions. We have been evaluating such a Red Dragon platform as an option for a Discovery Program mission concept. A Red Dragon lander has the potential to be low cost primarily because it would be derived from a routinely-flying spacecraft. Dragon is being developed to ferry cargo and crew to and from the International Space Station (ISS). The cargo variant is currently undergoing test flights, which will be followed by standard ISS cargo missions and, eventually, crewed flights. The human variant, unlike other Earth-return vehicles, appears to also have most of the capabilities necessary to land on Mars. In particular, it has a set of high-thrust, throttleable, storable bi-propellant Super- Draco engines integrated directly into the capsule which are intended for launch abort and powered landings on Earth. These thrusters suggest the possibility of a parachute-free, fully-propulsive deceleration at Mars from supersonic speeds to the surface. Concepts for large, human-relevant landers (see, e.g., [1]) also often employ supersonic retro-propulsion; Red Dragon's entry, descent, and landing approach would scale to those landers. Further, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy launch vehicle, currently under development and expected to have its first flight in 2013, will be capable of sending Dragon on a trajectory to Mars. We will discuss our motivation for exploring a Red Dragon lander, the primary technical questions which determine its feasibility, and the current results of our analysis. In particular, we will examine entry, descent, and landing (EDL) in detail. We will describe the modifications to Dragon necessary for interplanetary cruise, EDL, and operations on the Martian surface.

  8. FreeSASA: An open source C library for solvent accessible surface area calculations [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Mitternacht

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Calculating solvent accessible surface areas (SASA is a run-of-the-mill calculation in structural biology. Although there are many programs available for this calculation, there are no free-standing, open-source tools designed for easy tool-chain integration. FreeSASA is an open source C library for SASA calculations that provides both command-line and Python interfaces in addition to its C API. The library implements both Lee and Richards’ and Shrake and Rupley’s approximations, and is highly configurable to allow the user to control molecular parameters, accuracy and output granularity. It only depends on standard C libraries and should therefore be easy to compile and install on any platform. The library is well-documented, stable and efficient. The command-line interface can easily replace closed source legacy programs, with comparable or better accuracy and speed, and with some added functionality.

  9. NetOglyc: prediction of mucin type O-glycosylation sites based on sequence context and surface accessibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Erik; Lund, Ole; Tolstrup, Niels

    1998-01-01

    -glycosylated serine and threonine residues in independent test sets, thus proving more accurate than matrix statistics and vector projection methods. Predicition of O-glycosylation sites in the envelope glycoprotein gp120 from the primate lentiviruses HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV are presented. The most conserved O...... structure and surface accessibility. The sequence context of glycosylated threonines was found to differ from that of serine, and the sites were found to cluster. Non-clustered sites had a sequence context different from that of clustered sites. charged residues were disfavoured at postition -1 and +3......-glycosylation signals in these evolutionary-related glycoproteins were found in their first hypervariable loop, V1. However, the strain variation for HIV-1 gp120 was significant. A computer server, available through WWW or E-mail, has been developed for prediction of mucin type O-glycosylation sites in proteins based...

  10. Role of tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors in cancer treatment with emphasis on SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatases (SHPs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irandoust, Mahban; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Cloos, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms involved in signal transduction pathways. This modification is regulated by concerted action of protein tyrosine phosphatases and protein tyrosine kinases. Deregulation of either of these key regulators lead to abnormal cellular

  11. Dietary Tyrosine Benefits Cognitive and Psychomotor Performance During Body Cooling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Brien, Catherine; Mahoney, Caroline; Tharion, William J; Sils, Ingrid V; Castellani, John W

    2007-01-01

    Supplemental tyrosine is effective at limiting cold-induced decreases in working memory, presumably by augmenting brain catecholamine levels, since tyrosine is a precursor for catecholamine synthesis...

  12. TYROSINE KINASE INHIBITORS AND PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Abruzzese

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML during pregnancy has became recently a matter of continuous debate.  The introduction of the Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs in clinical practice has dramatically changed the prognosis of CML patients.  Patients diagnosed in chronic phase can reasonably expect many years of excellent disease control and good quality of life, as well as a normal life expectancy.  This fact has come the necessity to address issues relating to fertility and pregnancy. Physicians are not infrequently being asked for advice regarding the need for, and or the appropriateness of, stopping treatment in order to conceive. In this report we will review the data published in terms of fertility, conception, pregnancy, pregnancy outcome and illness control for all the approved TKIs, as well as suggest how to manage a planned and/or unplanned pregnancy.

  13. Enzymatic-induced upconversion photoinduced electron transfer for sensing tyrosine in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiongqiong; Fang, Aijin; Li, Haitao; Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-03-15

    This paper reports a novel nanosensor for tyrosine based on photoinduced electron-transfer (PET) between NaYF4:Yb, Tm upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and melanin-like polymers. Melanin-like films were obtained from catalytic oxidation of tyrosine by tyrosinase, and deposited on the surface of UCNPs, and then quenched the fluorescence of UCNPs. Under the optimized conditions, the fluorescence quenching of UCNPs showed a good linear response to tyrosine concentration in the range of 0.8-100 μΜ with a detection limit of 1.1 μΜ. Meanwhile, it showed good sensitivity, stability and has been successfully applied to the detection of tyrosine in human serum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Tyrosine dephosphorylation regulates AMPAR internalisation in mGluR-LTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladding, Clare M; Collett, Valerie J; Jia, Zhengping; Bashir, Zafar I; Collingridge, Graham L; Molnár, Elek

    2009-02-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) can be induced at hippocampal CA1 synapses by activation of either NMDA receptors (NMDARs) or group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), using their selective agonists NMDA and (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG), respectively. Recent studies revealed that DHPG-LTD is dependent on activation of postsynaptic protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which transiently dephosphorylate tyrosine residues in AMPA receptors (AMPARs). Here we show that while both endogenous GluR2 and GluR3 AMPAR subunits are tyrosine phosphorylated at basal activity, only GluR2 is dephosphorylated in DHPG-LTD. The tyrosine dephosphorylation of GluR2 does not occur in NMDA-LTD. Conversely, while NMDA-LTD is associated with the dephosphorylation of GluR1-serine-845, DHPG-LTD does not alter the phosphorylation of this site. The increased AMPAR endocytosis in DHPG-LTD is PTP-dependent and involves tyrosine dephosphorylation of cell surface AMPARs. Together, these results indicate that the subunit selective tyrosine dephosphorylation of surface GluR2 regulates AMPAR internalisation in DHPG-LTD but not in NMDA-LTD in the hippocampus.

  15. 21 CFR 862.1730 - Free tyrosine test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Free tyrosine test system. 862.1730 Section 862....1730 Free tyrosine test system. (a) Identification. A free tyrosine test system is a device intended to measure free tyrosine (an amono acid) in serum and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  16. Expression Profiling of Tyrosine Kinase Genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weier, Heinz

    2000-01-01

    ... of these genes parallels the progression of tumors to a more malignant phenotype. We developed a DNA micro-array based screening system to monitor the level of expression of tyrosine kinase (tk...

  17. Rapid enzymatic analysis of plasma for tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, H; Taniguchi, K; Sugiyama, M; Kanno, T

    1990-01-01

    In this rapid, simple, and convenient enzymatic method for measurement of tyrosine in plasma, tyrosine is converted to tyramine by action of tyrosine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.25) and the tyramine produced is oxidized to p-hydroxybenzyl aldehyde and hydrogen peroxide by action of tyramine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.9). The hydrogen peroxide is reacted with 4-aminoantipyrine and N-ethyl-N-(2-hydroxy-3-sulfopropyl)-m-toluidine in the presence of peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) to obtain quinoneimine dye, the absorbance of which is measured at 570 nm. Thus tyrosine is measured in the visible range. The CV was 4.6% or less, and the measurement was unaffected by other amino acids, except for phenylalanine. The values obtained (y) correlated well with those obtained with an amino acid analyzer (x): y = 0.902x + 3.92 mumol/L (Syx = 12.3; r = 0.985; n = 54).

  18. The Tyrosine Aminomutase TAM1 Is Required for β-Tyrosine Biosynthesis in Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jian; Aboshi, Takako; Teraishi, Masayoshi; Strickler, Susan R.; Spindel, Jennifer E.; Tung, Chih-Wei; Takata, Ryo; Matsumoto, Fuka; Maesaka, Yoshihiro; McCouch, Susan R.; Okumoto, Yutaka; Mori, Naoki; Jander, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Non-protein amino acids, often isomers of the standard 20 protein amino acids, have defense-related functions in many plant species. A targeted search for jasmonate-induced metabolites in cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) identified (R)-β-tyrosine, an isomer of the common amino acid (S)-α-tyrosine in the seeds, leaves, roots, and root exudates of the Nipponbare cultivar. Assays with 119 diverse cultivars showed a distinct presence/absence polymorphism, with β-tyrosine being most prevalent in temperate japonica cultivars. Genetic mapping identified a candidate gene on chromosome 12, which was confirmed to encode a tyrosine aminomutase (TAM1) by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana and in vitro enzyme assays. A point mutation in TAM1 eliminated β-tyrosine production in Nipponbare. Rice cultivars that do not produce β-tyrosine have a chromosome 12 deletion that encompasses TAM1. Although β-tyrosine accumulation was induced by the plant defense signaling molecule jasmonic acid, bioassays with hemipteran and lepidopteran herbivores showed no negative effects at physiologically relevant β-tyrosine concentrations. In contrast, root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana and other tested dicot plants was inhibited by concentrations as low as 1 μM. As β-tyrosine is exuded into hydroponic medium at higher concentrations, it may contribute to the allelopathic potential of rice. PMID:25901084

  19. Ror receptor tyrosine kinases: orphans no more

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Jennifer L.; Kuntz, Steven G.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2008-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor (Ror) proteins are a conserved family of tyrosine kinase receptors that function in developmental processes including skeletal and neuronal development, cell movement and cell polarity. Although Ror proteins were originally named because the associated ligand and signaling pathway were unknown, recent studies in multiple species have now established that Ror proteins are Wnt receptors. Depending on the cellular context, Ror proteins can either act...

  20. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. → Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. → Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  1. Functionalization of protected tyrosine via Sonogashira reaction: synthesis of 3-(1,2,3-triazolyl)-tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Stanley N S; Shamim, Anwar; Ali, Bakhat; de Oliveira, Isadora M; Stefani, Hélio A

    2016-05-01

    1,2,3-Triazol tyrosines were synthesized from tyrosine alkynes that were in turn prepared via Sonogashira cross-coupling reaction. The tyrosine alkynes were subjected to click-chemistry reaction conditions leading to the corresponding 3-(1,2,3-triazolyl)-tyrosines in yields ranging from moderate to good.

  2. Tyrosine-sensitized photodimerization of thymine in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, M.; Matsuyama, A.; Nagata, C.

    1978-01-01

    Photodimerization of thymine in aqueous solution in the presence of tyrosine was studied with monochromatic UV irradiation. The total dimer formation was sensitized in the presence of tyrosine. The action spectrum of sensitized total dimer formation has a peak near 280 nm corresponding to the absorption maximum of tyrosine. Triplet quenchers reduced the sensitization substantially. It seems probable that tyrosine-sensitized photodimerization of thymine occurred via triplet-triplet energy transfer from tyrosine to thymine. (author)

  3. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of the Human Serotonin Transporter: A Role in the Transporter Stability and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Balasubramaniam; Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Arapulisamy, Obulakshmi; Shippenberg, Toni S.; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D.

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) regulates serotoninergic neurotransmission by clearing 5-HT released into the synaptic space. Phosphorylation of SERT on serine and threonine mediates SERT regulation. Whether tyrosine phosphorylation regulates SERT is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that tyrosine-phosphorylation of SERT regulates 5-HT transport. In support of this, alkali-resistant 32P-labeled SERT was found in rat platelets, and Src-tyrosine kinase inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo [3,4,d]pyrimidine (PP2) decreased platelet SERT function and expression. In human placental trophoblast cells expressing SERT, PP2 reduced transporter function, expression, and stability. Although siRNA silencing of Src expression decreased SERT function and expression, coexpression of Src resulted in PP2-sensitive increases in SERT function and expression. PP2 treatment markedly decreased SERT protein stability. Compared with WT-SERT, SERT tyrosine mutants Y47F and Y142F exhibited reduced 5-HT transport despite their higher total and cell surface expression levels. Moreover, Src-coexpression increased total and cell surface expression of Y47F and Y142F SERT mutants without affecting their 5-HT transport capacity. It is noteworthy that Y47F and Y142F mutants exhibited higher protein stability compared with WT-SERT. However, similar to WT-SERT, PP2 treatment decreased the stability of Y47F and Y142F mutants. Furthermore, compared with WT-SERT, Y47F and Y142F mutants exhibited lower basal tyrosine phosphorylation and no further enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation in response to Src coexpression. These results provide the first evidence that SERT tyrosine phosphorylation supports transporter protein stability and 5HT transport. PMID:21992875

  4. Physical and functional interactions between SH2 and SH3 domains of the Src family protein tyrosine kinase p59fyn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panchamoorthy, G.; Fukazawa, T.; Stolz, L.; Payne, G.; Reedquist, K.; Shoelson, S.; Songyang, Z.; Cantley, L.; Walsh, C.; Band, H.

    1994-01-01

    The Src family protein tyrosine kinases participate in signalling through cell surface receptors that lack intrinsic tyrosine kinase domains. All nine members of this family possess adjacent Src homology (SH2 and SH3) domains, both of which are essential for repression of the enzymatic activity. The

  5. 4 km NODC/RSMAS AVHRR Pathfinder v5 Seasonal and Annual Day-Night Sea Surface Temperature Climatologies for 1982-2009 for the Gulf of Mexico (NODC Accession 0072888)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains a set of sea surface temperature climatologies for the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), derived from the AVHRR Pathfinder Version 5 sea surface...

  6. Tyrosine and carboxyl protonation changes in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle. 2. Tyrosine-26 and -64

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roepe, P.; Scherrer, P.; Ahl, P.L.; Gupta, S.K.D.; Bogomolni, R.A.; Herzfeld, J.; Rothschild, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Low-temperature Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV difference spectroscopies combined with selective tyrosine nitration and tyrosine isotopic labeling have been used to investigate the participation of tyrosines-26 and -64 in the bacteriorhodopsin (bR) photocycle. Nitration of Tyr-26 has no detectable effect on the FTIR or UV difference spectra of the BR 570 → K 630 or BR 570 → M 412 transitions. In contrast, nitration of Tyr-64 causes changes in both the FTIR and UV spectra of these transitions. However, this nitration does not alter tyrosine peaks in the FTIR difference spectra which have previously been associated with the protonation of a tyrosinate by K 630 and the deprotonation of a tyrosine by M 412 . Instead, Tyr-64 nitration appears to affect other tyrosine peaks. These results and changes in UV difference spectra upon Tyr-64 nitration are consistent with the deprotonation of Tyr-64 by M 412 as concluded previously. Effects on chromophore vibrations caused by Tyr-64 nitration are unaltered upon reducing the nitrotyrosine to aminotyrosine with sodium dithionite. Finally, nitro-Tyr-64 causes a shift in the frequency of a positive peak at 1739 cm -1 in the BR 570 → M 412 FTIR difference spectrum which reflects the protonation of a carboxyl-containing residue. The shift does not occur for samples containing amino-Tyr-64. These data suggest that Tyr-64 may interact with this carboxyl group

  7. Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) /Jason-2: Near Real-Time Altimetry Validation System (NRTAVS) QA Reports (NODC Accession 0044984)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains the descriptions for the OSTM/Jason-2 Near Real-Time Altimetry Validation System Quality Reports, which are served through the NOAA/NESDIS...

  8. Chlorinated tyrosine derivatives in insect cuticle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Svend Olav

    2004-01-01

    A method for quantitative measurement of 3-monochlorotyrosine and 3,5-dichlorotyrosine in insect cuticles is described, and it is used for determination of their distribution in various cuticular regions in nymphs and adults of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria. The two chlorinated tyrosine......, not-yet sclerotized cuticle of adult femur and tibia, the amounts increased rapidly during the first 24 h after ecdysis and more slowly during the next two weeks. Control analyses using stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry have confirmed that the chlorinated tyrosines are not artifacts formed...

  9. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Petranovic, Dina; Bottini, N.

    2005-01-01

    phosphorylation, indicating that this post-translational modifi cation could regulate physiological processes ranging from stress response and exopolysaccharide synthesis to DNA metabolism. Some interesting work in this fi eld was done in Bacillus subtilis , and we here present the current state of knowledge...... on protein-tyrosine phosphorylation in this gram-positive model organism. With its two kinases, two kinase modulators, three phosphatases and at least four different tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates, B. subtilis is the bacterium with the highest number of presently known participants in the global network...

  10. Investigation Into Accessible Surface Vinyl Concentrations of Nonstoichiometric PDMS Microspheres from Hydrosilylation Reactions and Their Further Crosslinking Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Baoguang; Hansen, Jens Henrik; Hvilsted, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of surface vinyl groups to PDMS microspheres broadens the latter's applicability range since the microspheres can be further functionalized or crosslinked into elastomers. Quantification of the surface vinyl concentration of PDMS microspheres is therefore essential. Here, a novel...

  11. Global relationships of total alkalinity with salinity and temperature in surface waters of the world's oceans. (NCEI Accession 0157795)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Total Alkalinity fields were estimated from five regional TA relationships presented in Lee et al. 2006, using monthly mean sea surface temperature and...

  12. Bulkiness or aromatic nature of tyrosine-143 of actin is important for the weak binding between F-actin and myosin-ADP-phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomibuchi, Yuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan); Uyeda, Taro Q.P. [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, AIST Tsukuba Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Takeyuki, E-mail: tw007@nasu.bio.teikyo-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan); Department of Judo Therapy, Faculty of Medical Technology, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •The effect of mutation of Tyr143 that becomes more exposed on assembly was examined. •Mutation of tyrosine-143 of Dictyostelium actin changed actin polymerizability. •The bulkiness or aromatic nature of Tyr143 is important for the weak binding. •The weak interaction between myosin and actin strengthened by Tyr143Trp mutation. -- Abstract: Actin filaments (F-actin) interact with myosin and activate its ATPase to support force generation. By comparing crystal structures of G-actin and the quasi-atomic model of F-actin based on high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, the tyrosine-143 was found to be exposed more than 60 Å{sup 2} to the solvent in F-actin. Because tyrosine-143 flanks the hydrophobic cleft near the hydrophobic helix that binds to myosin, the mutant actins, of which the tyrosine-143 was replaced with tryptophan, phenylalanine, or isoleucine, were generated using the Dictyostelium expression system. It polymerized significantly poorly when induced by NaCl, but almost normally by KCl. In the presence of phalloidin and KCl, the extents of the polymerization of all the mutant actins were comparable to that of the wild-type actin so that the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity could be reliably compared. The affinity of skeletal heavy meromyosin to F-actin and the maximum ATPase activity (V{sub max}) were estimated by a double reciprocal plot. The Tyr143Trp-actin showed the higher affinity (smaller K{sub app}) than that of the wild-type actin, with the V{sub max} being almost unchanged. The K{sub app} and V{sub max} of the Tyr143Phe-actin were similar to those of the wild-type actin. However, the activation by Tyr143Ile-actin was much smaller than the wild-type actin and the accurate determination of K{sub app} was difficult. Comparison of the myosin ATPase activated by the various mutant actins at the same concentration of F-actin showed that the extent of activation correlates well with the solvent-accessible surface areas (ASA

  13. Phenylketonuria : tyrosine supplementation in phenylalanine-restricted diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spronsen, FJ; van Rijn, M; Bekhof, J; Koch, R; Smit, PGA

    Treatment of phenylketonuria (PKU) consists of restriction of natural protein and provision of a protein substitute that lacks phenylalanine but is enriched in tyrosine. Large and unexplained differences exist, however, in the tyrosine enrichment of the protein substitutes. Furthermore, some

  14. Receptor tyrosine kinase signaling: a view from quantitative proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Joern; Kratchmarova, Irina; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2009-01-01

    Growth factor receptor signaling via receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is one of the basic cellular communication principals found in all metazoans. Extracellular signals are transferred via membrane spanning receptors into the cytoplasm, reversible tyrosine phosphorylation being the hallmark of all...

  15. Development of amperometric L-tyrosine sensor based on Fe-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanchana, P.; Lavanya, N.; Sekar, C.

    2014-01-01

    A novel biosensor based on Fe-doped hydroxyapatite (Fe-HA) nanoparticles and tyrosinase has been developed for the detection of L-tyrosine. Nanostructured Fe-HA was synthesized by a simple microwave irradiation method, and its phase formation, morphology and magnetic property were examined by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Electrochemical performance of the nano Fe-HA/tyrosinase modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for detection of L-tyrosine was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometric methods. The fabricated biosensor exhibited a linear response to L-tyrosine over a wide concentration range of 1.0 × 10 −7 to 1.0 × 10 −5 M with a detection limit of 245 nM at pH 7.0. In addition, the fabricated sensor showed an excellent selectivity, good reproducibility, long-term stability and anti-interference towards the determination of L-tyrosine. - Highlights: • A novel amperometric L-tyrosine biosensor has been fabricated using nanostructured Fe-HA. • The fabricated sensor exhibits a wide linear range, good stability and high reproducibility. • Fe-HA assists microenvironment and direct electron transfer between enzyme and electrode surface. • The nano Fe-HA and electrode fabrication procedure are simple and less expensive

  16. Giant hub Src and Syk tyrosine kinase thermodynamic profiles recapitulate evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2017-10-01

    Thermodynamic scaling theory, previously applied mainly to small proteins, here analyzes quantitative evolution of the titled functional network giant hub enzymes. The broad domain structure identified homologically is confirmed hydropathically using amino acid sequences only. The most surprising results concern the evolution of the tyrosine kinase globular surface roughness from avians to mammals, which is first order, compared to the evolution within mammals from rodents to humans, which is second order. The mystery of the unique amide terminal region of proto oncogene tyrosine protein kinase is resolved by the discovery there of a rare hydroneutral septad targeting cluster, which is paralleled by an equally rare octad catalytic cluster in tyrosine kinase in humans and a few other species (cat and dog). These results, which go far towards explaining why these proteins are among the largest giant hubs in protein interaction networks, use no adjustable parameters.

  17. Evolution: Weevils Get Tough on Symbiotic Tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Colin

    2017-12-04

    Weevils, which represent one of the most diverse groups of terrestrial insects in nature, obtain a tough exoskeleton through the activity of an ancient bacterial symbiont with a tiny genome that serves as a factory for the production of tyrosine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Morphological Features of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Immunoreactive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current immunohistochemical study used the antibody against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) to observe the immunoreactive elements in the mouse pancreas. The results indicated the presence of immunoreactive nerve fibers and endocrine cells. The immunopositive nerve fibers appeared as thick and thin bundles; thick ...

  19. Enzyme kinetic characterization of protein tyrosine phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Branner, S.; Møller, K. B.

    2003-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play a central role in cellular signaling processes, resulting in an increased interest in modulating the activities of PTPs. We therefore decided to undertake a detailed enzyme kinetic evaluation of various transmembrane and cytosolic PTPs (PTPalpha, PTPbeta...

  20. Tyrosine Mutation in AAV9 Capsid Improves Gene Transfer to the Mouse Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Sabrina V; Silva, Adriana L; Ferreira, Debora; Rabelo, Rafael; Ornellas, Felipe M; Gomes, Karina; Rocco, Patricia R M; Petrs-Silva, Hilda; Morales, Marcelo M

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are being increasingly used as the vector of choice for in vivo gene delivery and gene therapy for many pulmonary diseases. Recently, it was shown that phosphorylation of surface-exposed tyrosine residues from AAV capsid targets the viral particles for ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation, and mutations of these tyrosine residues lead to highly efficient vector transduction in vitro and in vivo in different organs. In this study, we evaluated the pulmonary transgene expression efficacy of AAV9 vectors containing point mutations in surface-exposed capsid tyrosine residues. Eighteen C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned into three groups: (1) a control group (CTRL) animals underwent intratracheal (i.t.) instillation of saline, (2) the wild-type AAV9 group (WT-AAV9, 1010 vg), and (3) the tyrosine-mutant Y731F AAV9 group (M-AAV9, 1010 vg), which received (i.t.) self-complementary AAV9 vectors containing the DNA sequence of enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP). Four weeks after instillation, lung mechanics, morphometry, tissue cellularity, gene expression, inflammatory cytokines, and growth factor expression were analyzed. No significant differences were observed in lung mechanics and morphometry among the experimental groups. However, the number of polymorphonuclear cells was higher in the WT-AAV9 group than in the CTRL and M-AAV9 groups, suggesting that the administration of tyrosine-mutant AAV9 vectors was better tolerated. Tyrosine-mutant AAV9 vectors significantly improved transgene delivery to the lung (30%) compared with their wild-type counterparts, without eliciting an inflammatory response. Our results provide the impetus for further studies to exploit the use of AAV9 vectors as a tool for pulmonary gene therapy. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Phenylketonuria : Tyrosine beyond the phenylalanine-restricted diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spronsen, FJ; Smit, PGA; Koch, R

    Controversies exist on the role of tyrosine in the pathogenesis of phenylketonuria (PKU) and, consequently, on the therapeutic role of tyrosine. This review examines data and theoretical considerations on the role of tyrosine in the pathogenesis and treatment of PKU. It is concluded that treatment

  2. Halite as a Methane Sequestration Host: A Possible Explanation for Periodic Methane Release on Mars, and a Surface-accessible Source of Ancient Martian Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M. D.; Steele, Andrew; Hynek, B. M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the hypothesis that halite may play a role in methane sequestration on the martian surface. In terrestrial examples, halite deposits sequester large volumes of methane and chloromethane. Also, examples of chloromethane-bearing, approximately 4.5 Ga old halite from the Monahans meteorite show that this system is very stable unless the halite is damaged. On Mars, methane may be generated from carbonaceous material trapped in ancient halite deposits and sequestered. The methane may be released by damaging its halite host; either by aqueous alteration, aeolian abrasion, heating, or impact shock. Such a scenario may help to explain the appearance of short-lived releases of methane on the martian surface. The methane may be of either biogenic or abiogenic origin. If this scenario plays a significant role on Mars, then martian halite deposits may contain samples of organic compounds dating to the ancient desiccation of the planet, accessible at the surface for future sample return missions.

  3. Sea surface temperature data from a world wide distribution from 01 January 1971 to 31 December 2000 (NODC Accession 0000712)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sea surface temperature data were collected in a world wide distribution from January 1, 1971 to December 31, 2000. Data were submitted by Japan Meteorological...

  4. Documentation for The Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) data archived at NCEI (NCEI Accession 0123222)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) is an international open group for SST data producers, users, and scientists. It brings together...

  5. Data Collected in 1959 by English Research Vessels at Serial and Surface Hydrographic Stations (NODC Accession 6900852)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The present volume contains data collected in 1959 by English research vessels at serial and surface hydrographic stations. The data list are preceded by a number of...

  6. SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE and Other Data from COLUMBUS and Other Platforms from 19250801 to 19320914 (NODC Accession 9400016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sea Surface Temperatures (SST) data from 1925 to 1932 collected using ships COLUMBUS and EUROPA was submitted in two diskettes by Dr. Gerd Becker, Bundesamt fuer...

  7. Carbon dioxide from surface underway survey in global oceans from 1968 to 2006 (Version 1.0) (NODC Accession 0040205)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — More than 3 million measurements of surface water partial pressure of CO2 obtained over the global oceans during 1968 to 2006 are listed in the Lamont-Doherty Earth...

  8. Tyrosine phosphorylation of LRP6 by Src and Fer inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Su, Yi; Wesslowski, Janine; Hagemann, Anja I; Ramialison, Mirana; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Scholpp, Steffen; Davidson, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins 5 and 6 (LRP5/6) function as transmembrane receptors to transduce Wnt signals. A key mechanism for signalling is Wnt-induced serine/threonine phosphorylation at conserved PPPSPxS motifs in the LRP6 cytoplasmic domain, which promotes pathway activation. Conserved tyrosine residues are positioned close to all PPPSPxS motifs, which suggests they have a functional significance. Using a cell culture-based cDNA expression screen, we identified the non-receptor tyrosine kinases Src and Fer as novel LRP6 modifiers. Both Src and Fer associate with LRP6 and phosphorylate LRP6 directly. In contrast to the known PPPSPxS Ser/Thr kinases, tyrosine phosphorylation by Src and Fer negatively regulates LRP6-Wnt signalling. Epistatically, they function upstream of β-catenin to inhibit signalling and in agreement with a negative role in regulating LRP6, MEF cells lacking these kinases show enhanced Wnt signalling. Wnt3a treatment of cells enhances tyrosine phosphorylation of endogenous LRP6 and, mechanistically, Src reduces cell surface LRP6 levels and disrupts LRP6 signalosome formation. Interestingly, CK1γ inhibits Fer-induced LRP6 phosphorylation, suggesting a mechanism whereby CK1γ acts to de-represses inhibitory LRP6 tyrosine phosphorylation. We propose that LRP6 tyrosine phosphorylation by Src and Fer serves a negative regulatory function to prevent over-activation of Wnt signalling at the level of the Wnt receptor, LRP6. Subject Categories Membrane & Intracellular Transport; Post-translational Modifications, Proteolysis & Proteomics PMID:25391905

  9. Analysis of tyrosine-O-sulfation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, J.R.; Sen, J.W.; Johnsen, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Tyrosine O-sulfation was first described about 50 years ago as a post-translational modification of fibrinogen. In the following 30 years it was considered to be a rare modification affecting only a few proteins and peptides. However, in the beginning of the 1980s tyrosine (Tyr) sulfation was shown...... to be a common modification and since then an increasing number of proteins have been identified as sulfated. The target proteins belong to the classes of secretory, plasma membrane, and lysosomal proteins, which reflects the intracellular localization of the enzymes catalyzing Tyr sulfation, the tyrosylprotein...... sulfotransferases (TPSTs).Traditionally, Tyr sulfation has been analyzed by incorporation of radiolabeled sulfate into target cells followed by purification of the target protein. Subsequently, the protein is degraded enzymatically or by alkaline hydrolysis followed by thin-layer electrophoresis to demonstrate...

  10. Tyrosine kinase signalling in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hynes, Nancy E

    2000-01-01

    Cells are continuously exposed to diverse stimuli ranging from soluble endocrine and paracrine factors to signalling molecules on neighbouring cells. Receptors of the tyrosine kinase family play an important role in the integration and interpretation of these external stimuli, allowing a cell to respond appropriately to its environment. The activation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is tightly controlled, allowing a normal cell to correctly integrate its external environment with internal signal transduction pathways. In contrast, due to numerous molecular alterations arising during the course of malignancy, a tumour is characterized by an abnormal response to its environment, which allows cancer cells to evade the normal mechanisms controlling cellular proliferation. Alterations in the expression of various RTKs, in their activation, and in the signalling molecules lying downstream of the receptors play important roles in the development of cancer. This topic is the major focus of the thematic review section of this issue of Breast Cancer Research

  11. Ror receptor tyrosine kinases: orphans no more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jennifer L; Kuntz, Steven G; Sternberg, Paul W

    2008-11-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor (Ror) proteins are a conserved family of tyrosine kinase receptors that function in developmental processes including skeletal and neuronal development, cell movement and cell polarity. Although Ror proteins were originally named because the associated ligand and signaling pathway were unknown, recent studies in multiple species have now established that Ror proteins are Wnt receptors. Depending on the cellular context, Ror proteins can either activate or repress transcription of Wnt target genes and can modulate Wnt signaling by sequestering Wnt ligands. New evidence implicates Ror proteins in planar cell polarity, an alternative Wnt pathway. Here, we review the progress made in understanding these mysterious proteins and, in particular, we focus on their function as Wnt receptors.

  12. ER-bound protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B interacts with Src at the plasma membrane/substrate interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa C Monteleone

    Full Text Available PTP1B is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER anchored enzyme whose access to substrates is partly dependent on the ER distribution and dynamics. One of these substrates, the protein tyrosine kinase Src, has been found in the cytosol, endosomes, and plasma membrane. Here we analyzed where PTP1B and Src physically interact in intact cells, by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC in combination with temporal and high resolution microscopy. We also determined the structural basis of this interaction. We found that BiFC signal is displayed as puncta scattered throughout the ER network, a feature that was enhanced when the substrate trapping mutant PTP1B-D181A was used. Time-lapse and co-localization analyses revealed that BiFC puncta did not correspond to vesicular carriers; instead they localized at the tip of dynamic ER tubules. BiFC puncta were retained in ventral membrane preparations after cell unroofing and were also detected within the evanescent field of total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy (TIRFM associated to the ventral membranes of whole cells. Furthermore, BiFC puncta often colocalized with dark spots seen by surface reflection interference contrast (SRIC. Removal of Src myristoylation and polybasic motifs abolished BiFC. In addition, PTP1B active site and negative regulatory tyrosine 529 on Src were primary determinants of BiFC occurrence, although the SH3 binding motif on PTP1B also played a role. Our results suggest that ER-bound PTP1B dynamically interacts with the negative regulatory site at the C-terminus of Src at random puncta in the plasma membrane/substrate interface, likely leading to Src activation and recruitment to adhesion complexes. We postulate that this functional ER/plasma membrane crosstalk could apply to a wide array of protein partners, opening an exciting field of research.

  13. The CEOS-Land Surface Imaging Constellation Portal for GEOSS: A resource for land surface imaging system information and data access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Thomas; Gallo, Kevin P.; Bailey, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites is an international group that coordinates civil space-borne observations of the Earth, and provides the space component of the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). The CEOS Virtual Constellations concept was implemented in an effort to engage and coordinate disparate Earth observing programs of CEOS member agencies and ultimately facilitate their contribution in supplying the space-based observations required to satisfy the requirements of the GEOSS. The CEOS initially established Study Teams for four prototype constellations that included precipitation, land surface imaging, ocean surface topography, and atmospheric composition. The basic mission of the Land Surface Imaging (LSI) Constellation [1] is to promote the efficient, effective, and comprehensive collection, distribution, and application of space-acquired image data of the global land surface, especially to meet societal needs of the global population, such as those addressed by the nine Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Societal Benefit Areas (SBAs) of agriculture, biodiversity, climate, disasters, ecosystems, energy, health, water, and weather. The LSI Constellation Portal is the result of an effort to address important goals within the LSI Constellation mission and provide resources to assist in planning for future space missions that might further contribute to meeting those goals.

  14. XPS and NEXAFS study of tyrosine-terminated propanethiol assembled on gold

    CERN Document Server

    Petoral, R M

    2003-01-01

    Tyrosine-terminated propanethiol (TPT), tyrosine linked to 3-mercaptopropionic acid through an amide bond, is adsorbed to gold surfaces. The adsorbates are characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). XPS is used to investigate the chemical binding and electronic structure of the monolayer. Strong molecular binding of the tyrosine derivative on the gold surface through the sulfur atom is attained. Angle-dependent XPS results shows that TPT molecules are oriented with the sulfur atoms molecularly oriented close to the gold surface and that the phenol moiety is oriented away from the gold surface. Average orientation of the adsorbate on gold is deduced using the NEXAFS results. It shows that the main molecular axis is tilted approximately 38 deg. relative to the Au surface normal. The ring plane of the phenol moiety exhibits a preferential orientation with an average tilt angle of the normal of the ring plane from the surfa...

  15. Properties of the humic-like material arising from the photo-transformation of L-tyrosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berto, Silvia, E-mail: silvia.berto@unito.it [Università di Torino, Dipartimento Chimica, via P. Giuria, 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); De Laurentiis, Elisa; Tota, Tiziana; Chiavazza, Enrico; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe; Minella, Marco [Università di Torino, Dipartimento Chimica, via P. Giuria, 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Isaia, Marco [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita e Biologia dei Sistemi, Via Accademia Albertina 13, Torino 10123 (Italy); Brigante, Marcello [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6296, ICCF, BP 80026, F-63177 Aubière (France); Vione, Davide, E-mail: davide.vione@unito.it [Università di Torino, Dipartimento Chimica, via P. Giuria, 7, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2016-03-01

    The UVB photolysis of L-tyrosine yields species with fluorescence and absorption spectra that are very similar to those of humic substances. By potentiometric measurements, chemical modeling and the application of NMR, mass spectrometry and laser flash photolysis, it was possible to get insights into the structural and chemical properties of the compounds derived by the L-tyrosine phototransformation. The photolytic process follows aromatic-ring hydroxylation and dimerization. The latter is presumably linked with the photoinduced generation of tyrosyl (phenoxy-type) radicals, which have a marked tendency to dimerize and possibly oligomerize. Interestingly, photoinduced transformation gives compounds with protogenic and complexation capabilities similar to those of the humic substances that occur naturally in surface waters. This finding substantiates a new and potentially important abiotic (photolytic) pathway for the formation of humic compounds in surface-water environments. - Highlights: • Tyrosine photolysis proceeds through deamination, hydroxylation and dimerization. • Dimerization could be linked to the photoinduced formation of tyrosyl radicals. • New protogenic sites are formed by irradiation, compared to the parent amino acid. • The irradiated material has higher copper complexation capacity than tyrosine. • Humic-like substances derived from tyrosine could complex Cu in surface waters.

  16. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Eyer, Peter; Eddleston, Michael; Jiang, Wei; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasma levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. PMID:23566956

  17. Guided access cavity preparation using cone-beam computed tomography and optical surface scans - an ex vivo study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchgreitz, J; Buchgreitz, M; Mortensen, D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate ex vivo, the accuracy of a preparation procedure planned for teeth with pulp canal obliteration (PCO) using a guide rail concept based on a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan merged with an optical surface scan. METHODOLOGY: A total of 48 teeth were mounted in acrylic bloc...

  18. Hairy foam" : carbon nanofibers grown on solid foam. A fully accessible, high surface area, graphitic catalyst support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenmakers, P.W.A.M.; Schaaf, van der J.; Kuster, B.F.M.; Schouten, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on solid carbon foam ("Hairy Foam") by catalytic decompn. of ethylene. The effect of nickel loading on fiber diam. and morphol., CNF coverage, and fiber layer thickness is studied using SEM and N2/Kr-physisorption. The surface area

  19. Surface-Treated versus Untreated Large-Bore Catheters as Vascular Access in Hemodialysis and Apheresis Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Bambauer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Catheter-related infections, thrombosis, and stenosis are among the most frequent complications associated with catheters, which are inserted in vessels. Surface treatment processes of the outer surface, such as ion-beam-assisted deposition, can be used to mitigate such complications. Methods. This retrospective study (1992–2007 evaluated silver-coated (54 patients and noncoated (105 patients implanted large-bore catheters used for extracorporeal detoxification. The catheters were inserted into the internal jugular or subclavian veins. After removal, the catheters were cultured for bacterial colonization using standard microbiologic assays. They also were examined using scanning electron microscope. Results. The silver coated catheters showed a tendency towards longer in situ time. The microbiologic examinations of the catheter tips were in both catheter types high positive, but not significant. Conclusion. The silver-coated catheters showed no significantly reduction in infection rate by evaluation of all collected data in this retrospective study. There was no association between both catheters in significantly reducing savings in treatment costs and in reducing patient discomfort. Other new developed catheter materials such as the microdomain-structured inner and outer surface are considered more biocompatible because they mimic the structure of natural biological surface.

  20. Tyrosine phosphorylation in T cells is regulated by phosphatase activity: studies with phenylarsine oxide.

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Morales, P; Minami, Y; Luong, E; Klausner, R D; Samelson, L E

    1990-01-01

    Activation of T cells induces rapid tyrosine phosphorylation on the T-cell receptor zeta chain and other substrates. These phosphorylations can be regulated by a number of protein-tyrosine kinases (ATP: protein-tyrosine O-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.112) and protein-tyrosine-phosphatases (protein-tyrosine-phosphate phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.48). In this study, we demonstrate that phenylarsine oxide can inhibit tyrosine phosphatases while leaving tyrosine kinase function intact. We use this ...

  1. Sectoral Plan 'Deep Geological Disposal', Stage 2. Proposed site areas for the surface facilities of the deep geological repositories as well as for their access infrastructure. Annexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-12-01

    In line with the provisions of the nuclear energy legislation, the sites for deep geological disposal of Swiss radioactive waste are selected in a three-stage Sectoral Plan process (Sectoral Plan for Deep Geological Disposal). The disposal sites are specified in Stage 3 of the selection process with the granting of a general licence in accordance with the Nuclear Energy Act. The first stage of the process was completed on 30 th November 2011, with the decision of the Federal Council to incorporate the six geological siting regions proposed by the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA) into the Sectoral Plan for Deep Geological Disposal, for further evaluation in Stage 2. The decision also specifies the planning perimeters within which the surface facilities and shaft locations for the repositories will be constructed. In the second stage of the process, at least two geological siting regions each will be specified for the repository for low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW) and for the high-level waste (HLW) repository and these will undergo detailed geological investigation in Stage 3. For each of these potential siting regions, at least one location for the surface facility and a corridor for the access infrastructure will also be specified. NAGRA is responsible, at the beginning of Stage 2, for submitting proposals for potential locations for the surface facilities and their access infrastructure to the Federal Office of Energy (SFOE); these are then considered by the regional participation bodies in the siting regions. The general report and the present annexes volume document these proposals. In Stage 2, under the lead of the SFOE, socio-economic-ecological studies will also be carried out to investigate the impact of a repository project on the environment, economy and society. The present reports also contain the input data to be provided by NAGRA for the generic (site-independent) part of these impact studies. A meaningful

  2. Sectoral Plan 'Deep Geological Disposal', Stage 2. Proposed site areas for the surface facilities of the deep geological repositories as well as for their access infrastructure. General report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-12-01

    In line with the provisions of the nuclear energy legislation, the sites for deep geological disposal of Swiss radioactive waste are selected in a three-stage Sectoral Plan process (Sectoral Plan for Deep Geological Disposal). The disposal sites are specified in Stage 3 of the selection process with the granting of a general licence in accordance with the Nuclear Energy Act. The first stage of the process was completed on 30 th November 2011, with the decision of the Federal Council to incorporate the six geological siting regions proposed by the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA) into the Sectoral Plan for Deep Geological Disposal, for further evaluation in Stage 2. The decision also specifies the planning perimeters within which the surface facilities and shaft locations for the repositories will be constructed. In the second stage of the process, at least two geological siting regions each will be specified for the repository for low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW) and for the high-level waste (HLW) repository and these will undergo detailed geological investigation in Stage 3. For each of these potential siting regions, at least one location for the surface facility and a corridor for the access infrastructure will also be specified. NAGRA is responsible, at the beginning of Stage 2, for submitting proposals for potential locations for the surface facilities and their access infrastructure to the Federal Office of Energy (SFOE); these are then considered by the regional participation bodies in the siting regions. The present report and its annexes volume document these proposals. In Stage 2, under the lead of the SFOE, socio-economic-ecological studies will also be carried out to investigate the impact of a repository project on the environment, economy and society. The present reports also contain the input data to be provided by NAGRA for the generic (site-independent) part of these impact studies. A meaningful discussion

  3. Accessing developmental information of fossil hominin teeth using new synchrotron microtomography-based visualization techniques of dental surfaces and interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline Le Cabec

    Full Text Available Quantification of dental long-period growth lines (Retzius lines in enamel and Andresen lines in dentine and matching of stress patterns (internal accentuated lines and hypoplasias are used in determining crown formation time and age at death in juvenile fossil hominins. They yield the chronology employed for inferences of life history. Synchrotron virtual histology has been demonstrated as a non-destructive alternative to conventional invasive approaches. Nevertheless, fossil teeth are sometimes poorly preserved or physically inaccessible, preventing observation of the external expression of incremental lines (perikymata and periradicular bands. Here we present a new approach combining synchrotron virtual histology and high quality three-dimensional rendering of dental surfaces and internal interfaces. We illustrate this approach with seventeen permanent fossil hominin teeth. The outer enamel surface and enamel-dentine junction (EDJ were segmented by capturing the phase contrast fringes at the structural interfaces. Three-dimensional models were rendered with Phong's algorithm, and a combination of directional colored lights to enhance surface topography and the pattern of subtle variations in tissue density. The process reveals perikymata and linear enamel hypoplasias on the entire crown surface, including unerupted teeth. Using this method, highly detailed stress patterns at the EDJ allow precise matching of teeth within an individual's dentition when virtual histology is not sufficient. We highlight that taphonomical altered enamel can in particular cases yield artificial subdivisions of perikymata when imaged using X-ray microtomography with insufficient resolution. This may complicate assessments of developmental time, although this can be circumvented by a careful analysis of external and internal structures in parallel. We further present new crown formation times for two unerupted canines from South African Australopiths, which were

  4. Accessing developmental information of fossil hominin teeth using new synchrotron microtomography-based visualization techniques of dental surfaces and interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cabec, Adeline; Tang, Nancy; Tafforeau, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of dental long-period growth lines (Retzius lines in enamel and Andresen lines in dentine) and matching of stress patterns (internal accentuated lines and hypoplasias) are used in determining crown formation time and age at death in juvenile fossil hominins. They yield the chronology employed for inferences of life history. Synchrotron virtual histology has been demonstrated as a non-destructive alternative to conventional invasive approaches. Nevertheless, fossil teeth are sometimes poorly preserved or physically inaccessible, preventing observation of the external expression of incremental lines (perikymata and periradicular bands). Here we present a new approach combining synchrotron virtual histology and high quality three-dimensional rendering of dental surfaces and internal interfaces. We illustrate this approach with seventeen permanent fossil hominin teeth. The outer enamel surface and enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) were segmented by capturing the phase contrast fringes at the structural interfaces. Three-dimensional models were rendered with Phong's algorithm, and a combination of directional colored lights to enhance surface topography and the pattern of subtle variations in tissue density. The process reveals perikymata and linear enamel hypoplasias on the entire crown surface, including unerupted teeth. Using this method, highly detailed stress patterns at the EDJ allow precise matching of teeth within an individual's dentition when virtual histology is not sufficient. We highlight that taphonomical altered enamel can in particular cases yield artificial subdivisions of perikymata when imaged using X-ray microtomography with insufficient resolution. This may complicate assessments of developmental time, although this can be circumvented by a careful analysis of external and internal structures in parallel. We further present new crown formation times for two unerupted canines from South African Australopiths, which were found to form over

  5. Accessing the application of in situ cosmogenic 14C to surface exposure dating of amorphous SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesta, J. M.; Goehring, B. M.; Ward, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    We assess the feasibility and utility of in situ cosmogenic 14C as a geochronometer for landforms composed of amorphous SiO2 through the comparison of 14C surface exposure ages to independently determined eruption ages on Obsidian Dome, California. Landforms composed of amorphous SiO2 phases are difficult to date by conventional cosmogenic nuclide methods due to several complications that may arise (e.g., inability to remove meteoric contamination). The onset of an increased understanding of production rates and analytical measurement of in situ 14C in SiO2 provides an opportunity to address this limitation. Obsidian Dome is a 600-year-old phreatomagmatic dome of the Mono-Inyo Craters located in Inyo County, California, and consists of vesicular pumice, obsidian, and rhyolite. Exposure ages from eight obsidian and banded pumice and obsidian surface samples range from 3947 ± 678 to 914 ± 134 years, all significantly older than the accepted radiocarbon age of 650-550 years. δ13C values for the samples range between +2.65‰ and +1.34‰ and show a negative correlation with CO2 yield. The `too old' exposure ages coupled with this negative correlation between δ13C and CO2 yield suggests the incorporation of an atmospheric component of 14C. Measurement of 14C concentrations in shielded, subsurface samples will assist in isolating the atmospheric 14C component and aid in correcting the surface exposure ages.

  6. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from MTU1 Buoy by Michigan Technological University and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-01 to 2017-08-31 (NODC Accession 0123646)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123646 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  7. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from MTU Buoy by Michigan Technological University and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-01 to 2017-09-01 (NODC Accession 0123644)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123644 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  8. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from Holland Buoy by LimnoTech and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-01 to 2017-08-31 (NODC Accession 0123650)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123650 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  9. Salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using not applicable and other instruments from unknown platforms in various oceans and seas World-Wide from 1965-01-01 to 1994-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0157055)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157055 includes Surface underway, chemical and physical data collected from unknown platforms in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea, Bay of Biscay, Indian...

  10. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from Oregon Pump Station by City of Oregon and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2015-06-20 to 2017-08-31 (NCEI Accession 0130547)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0130547 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  11. Underway measurements of surface partial pressure of CO2 during the R/V Roger Revelle Cruise in the Indian Ocean on CLIVAR Repeat Hydrography Section I06S_2008 (Feb. 5 - March 14, 2008). (NCEI Accession 0163185)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163185 includes chemical, meteorological, optical, physical and surface underway data collected from ROGER REVELLE CLIVAR Cruise in the Indian Ocean...

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in 2008 (NODC Accession 0109930)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0109930 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the North...

  13. Engagement of CD81 induces ezrin tyrosine phosphorylation and its cellular redistribution with filamentous actin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, Greg P.; Rajapaksa, Ranjani; Liu, Raymond; Sharpe, Orr; Kuo, Chiung-Chi; Wald Krauss, Sharon; Sagi, Yael; Davis, R. Eric; Staudt, Louis M.; Sharman, Jeff P.; Robinson, William H.; Levy, Shoshana

    2009-06-09

    CD81 is a tetraspanin family member involved in diverse cellular interactions in the immune and nervous systems and in cell fusion events. However, the mechanism of action of CD81 and of other tetraspanins has not been defined. We reasoned that identifying signaling molecules downstream of CD81 would provide mechanistic clues. We engaged CD81 on the surface of Blymphocytes and identified the induced tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins by mass spectrometry. This analysis showed that the most prominent tyrosine phosphorylated protein was ezrin, an actin binding protein and a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family. We also found that CD81 engagement induces spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and that Syk was involved in tyrosine phosphorylation of ezrin. Ezrin colocalized with CD81 and F-actin upon stimulation and this association was disrupted when Syk activation was blocked. Taken together, these studies suggest a model in which CD81 interfaces between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton by activating Syk, mobilizing ezrin, and recruiting F-actin to facilitate cytoskeletal reorganization and cell signaling. This may be a mechanism explaining the pleiotropic effects induced in response to stimulating cells by anti-CD81 antibodies or by the hepatitis C virus, which uses this molecule as its key receptor.

  14. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Bin; Eyer, Peter; Eddleston, Michael; Jiang, Wei; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasma levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos-poisoned patients have adducts on protein tyrosine. • Diethoxyphosphate-tyrosine does not lose an alkyl group. • Proteins in addition to AChE and BChE are modified by organophosphates

  15. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin, E-mail: binli@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Eyer, Peter, E-mail: peter.eyer@lrz.uni-muenchen.de [Walther-Straub-Institut Für Pharmakologie und Toxikologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, 80336 München (Germany); Eddleston, Michael, E-mail: M.Eddleston@ed.ac.uk [Clinical Pharmacology Unit, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Jiang, Wei, E-mail: wjiang@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Schopfer, Lawrence M., E-mail: lmschopf@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Lockridge, Oksana, E-mail: olockrid@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasma levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos-poisoned patients have adducts on protein tyrosine. • Diethoxyphosphate-tyrosine does not lose an alkyl group. • Proteins in addition to AChE and BChE are modified by organophosphates.

  16. Sea Surface Temperature data collected from buoys deployed world-wide in support of the U.S. Coast Guard Office of Search and Rescue (CG-SAR) program from 2004-03-24 to 2016-09-30 (NCEI Accession (0098145) (NCEI Accession 0098145)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NCEI accessions contains Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data collected from buoys deployed in support of the U.S. Coast Guard Office of Search and Rescue...

  17. Mapping the conformational space accessible to BACE2 using surface mutants and cocrystals with Fab fragments, Fynomers and Xaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banner, David W; Gsell, Bernard; Benz, Jörg; Bertschinger, Julian; Burger, Dominique; Brack, Simon; Cuppuleri, Simon; Debulpaep, Maja; Gast, Alain; Grabulovski, Dragan; Hennig, Michael; Hilpert, Hans; Huber, Walter; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Kusznir, Eric; Laeremans, Toon; Matile, Hugues; Miscenic, Christian; Rufer, Arne C; Schlatter, Daniel; Steyaert, Jan; Stihle, Martine; Thoma, Ralf; Weber, Martin; Ruf, Armin

    2013-06-01

    The aspartic protease BACE2 is responsible for the shedding of the transmembrane protein Tmem27 from the surface of pancreatic β-cells, which leads to inactivation of the β-cell proliferating activity of Tmem27. This role of BACE2 in the control of β-cell maintenance suggests BACE2 as a drug target for diabetes. Inhibition of BACE2 has recently been shown to lead to improved control of glucose homeostasis and to increased insulin levels in insulin-resistant mice. BACE2 has 52% sequence identity to the well studied Alzheimer's disease target enzyme β-secretase (BACE1). High-resolution BACE2 structures would contribute significantly to the investigation of this enzyme as either a drug target or anti-target. Surface mutagenesis, BACE2-binding antibody Fab fragments, single-domain camelid antibody VHH fragments (Xaperones) and Fyn-kinase-derived SH3 domains (Fynomers) were used as crystallization helpers to obtain the first high-resolution structures of BACE2. Eight crystal structures in six different packing environments define an ensemble of low-energy conformations available to the enzyme. Here, the different strategies used for raising and selecting BACE2 binders for cocrystallization are described and the crystallization success, crystal quality and the time and resources needed to obtain suitable crystals are compared.

  18. Euglena mitochondria and chloroplasts form tyrosine-O-sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidha, T.; Hanfstingl, U.; Schiff, J.A. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (USA))

    1989-04-01

    Mitochondria from light-grown wild-type Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris Cori or dark-grown mutant W{sub 10}BSmL incubated with {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} and ATP, or with {sup 14}C-tyrosine, non-radioactive sulfate and ATP accumulate a labeled compound in the medium. Since this compound shows exact coelectrophoresis with tyrosine-O-sulfate (TOS) at pH 2.0, 5.8 or 8.0., yields sulfate and tyrosine on acid hydrolysis, and treatment with aryl sulfatase from Aerobacter aerogenes yields sulfate and tyrosine but no tyrosine methyl ester, it is identified as TOS. No TOS is found outside purified developing chloroplasts incubated with {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} and ATP, but both chloroplasts and mitochondria form to {sup 35}S externally when incubated with adenosine 3{prime} phosphate 5{prime}phospho({sup 35}S) sulfate (PAP{sup 35}S). Since no tyrosine need be added, tyrosine is provided from endogenous sources. Although TOS is found in the free pool of Euglena cells it cannot be detected in proteins of cells or mucus ruling our sulfation of tyrosine of protein or incorporation of TOS into proteins. The system forming TOS is membrane-bound and may be involved in tyrosine transport.

  19. SH3 domain tyrosine phosphorylation--sites, role and evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Tatárová

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SH3 domains are eukaryotic protein domains that participate in a plethora of cellular processes including signal transduction, proliferation, and cellular movement. Several studies indicate that tyrosine phosphorylation could play a significant role in the regulation of SH3 domains. RESULTS: To explore the incidence of the tyrosine phosphorylation within SH3 domains we queried the PhosphoSite Plus database of phosphorylation sites. Over 100 tyrosine phosphorylations occurring on 20 different SH3 domain positions were identified. The tyrosine corresponding to c-Src Tyr-90 was by far the most frequently identified SH3 domain phosphorylation site. A comparison of sequences around this tyrosine led to delineation of a preferred sequence motif ALYD(Y/F. This motif is present in about 15% of human SH3 domains and is structurally well conserved. We further observed that tyrosine phosphorylation is more abundant than serine or threonine phosphorylation within SH3 domains and other adaptor domains, such as SH2 or WW domains. Tyrosine phosphorylation could represent an important regulatory mechanism of adaptor domains. CONCLUSIONS: While tyrosine phosphorylation typically promotes signaling protein interactions via SH2 or PTB domains, its role in SH3 domains is the opposite - it blocks or prevents interactions. The regulatory function of tyrosine phosphorylation is most likely achieved by the phosphate moiety and its charge interfering with binding of polyproline helices of SH3 domain interacting partners.

  20. Dietary Tyrosine Benefits Cognitive and Psychomotor Performance During Body Cooling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Brien, Catherine; Mahoney, Caroline; Tharion, William J; Sils, Ingrid V; Castellani, John W

    2007-01-01

    ... examined. This study evaluated the effect of tyrosine supplementation on cognitive, psychomotor, and physical performance following a cold water immersion protocol that lowered body core temperature...

  1. Tyrosine metabolic enzymes from insects and mammals: a comparative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavricka, Christopher John; Han, Qian; Mehere, Prajwalini; Ding, Haizhen; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2014-02-01

    Differences in the metabolism of tyrosine between insects and mammals present an interesting example of molecular evolution. Both insects and mammals possess fine-tuned systems of enzymes to meet their specific demands for tyrosine metabolites; however, more homologous enzymes involved in tyrosine metabolism have emerged in many insect species. Without knowledge of modern genomics, one might suppose that mammals, which are generally more complex than insects and require tyrosine as a precursor for important catecholamine neurotransmitters and for melanin, should possess more enzymes to control tyrosine metabolism. Therefore, the question of why insects actually possess more tyrosine metabolic enzymes is quite interesting. It has long been known that insects rely heavily on tyrosine metabolism for cuticle hardening and for innate immune responses, and these evolutionary constraints are likely the key answers to this question. In terms of melanogenesis, mammals also possess a high level of regulation; yet mammalian systems possess more mechanisms for detoxification whereas insects accelerate pathways like melanogenesis and therefore must bear increased oxidative pressure. Our research group has had the opportunity to characterize the structure and function of many key proteins involved in tyrosine metabolism from both insects and mammals. In this mini review we will give a brief overview of our research on tyrosine metabolic enzymes in the scope of an evolutionary perspective of mammals in comparison to insects. © 2013 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  2. Tyrosine Residues Regulate Multiple Nuclear Functions of P54nrb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ahn R; Hung, Wayne; Xie, Ning; Liu, Liangliang; He, Leye; Dong, Xuesen

    2017-04-01

    The non-POU-domain-containing octamer binding protein (NONO; also known as p54nrb) has various nuclear functions ranging from transcription, RNA splicing, DNA synthesis and repair. Although tyrosine phosphorylation has been proposed to account for the multi-functional properties of p54nrb, direct evidence on p54nrb as a phosphotyrosine protein remains unclear. To investigate the tyrosine phosphorylation status of p54nrb, we performed site-directed mutagenesis on the five tyrosine residues of p54nrb, replacing the tyrosine residues with phenylalanine or alanine, and immunoblotted for tyrosine phosphorylation. We then preceded with luciferase reporter assays, RNA splicing minigene assays, co-immunoprecipitation, and confocal microscopy to study the function of p54nrb tyrosine residues on transcription, RNA splicing, protein-protein interaction, and cellular localization. We found that p54nrb was not phosphorylated at tyrosine residues. Rather, it has non-specific binding affinity to anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. However, replacement of tyrosine with phenylalanine altered p54nrb activities in transcription co-repression and RNA splicing in gene context-dependent fashions by means of differential regulation of p54nrb protein association with its interacting partners and co-regulators of transcription and splicing. These results demonstrate that tyrosine residues, regardless of phosphorylation status, are important for p54nrb function. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 852-861, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Grb14 by Tie2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumont Daniel J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growth factor receptor bound (Grb proteins 7, 10 and 14 are a family of structurally related multi-domain adaptor proteins involved in a variety of biological processes. Grb7, 10 and 14 are known to become serine and/or threonine phosphorylated in response to growth factor (GF stimulation. Grb7 and 10 have also been shown to become tyrosine phosphorylated under certain conditions. Under experimental conditions Grb7 is tyrosine phosphorylated by the Tie2/Tie-2/Tek angiogenic receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK. Furthermore, Grb14 has also been shown to interact with Tie2, however tyrosine phosphorylation of this Grb family member has yet to be reported. Results Here we report for the first time tyrosine phosphorylation of Grb14. This phosphorylation requires a kinase competent Tie2 as well as intact tyrosines 1100 and 1106 (Y1100 and Y1106 on the receptor. Furthermore, a complete SH2 domain on Grb14 is required for Grb14 tyrosine phosphorylation by Tie2. Grb14 was also able to become tyrosine phosphorylated in primary endothelial cells when treated with a soluble and potent variant of the Tie2 ligand, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP Ang1. Conclusion Our results show that Grb14, like its family members Grb7 and Grb10, is able to be tyrosine phosphorylated. Furthermore, our data indicate a role for Grb14 in endothelial signaling downstream of the Tie2 receptor.

  4. Large daily fluctuations in plasma tyrosine in treated patients with phenylketonuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanSpronsen, FJ; vanDijk, T; Smit, GPA; vanRijn, M; Reijngoud, DJ; Berger, Ruud; Heymans, HSA

    1996-01-01

    In patients with phenylketonuria (PKU), extra tyrosine supplementation is advocated in addition to tyrosine-enriched amino acid mixtures. PKU patients have low fasting plasma tyrosine concentrations, but little is known about tyrosine fluctuations during the day. Plasma tyrosine concentrations were

  5. Inhibition of biofilm formation by D-tyrosine: Effect of bacterial type and D-tyrosine concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cong; Li, Xuening; Zhang, Nan; Wen, Donghui; Liu, Charles; Li, Qilin

    2016-04-01

    D-Tyrosine inhibits formation and triggers disassembly of bacterial biofilm and has been proposed for biofouling control applications. This study probes the impact of D-tyrosine in different biofilm formation stages in both G+ and G- bacteria, and reveals a non-monotonic correlation between D-tyrosine concentration and biofilm inhibition effect. In the attachment stage, cell adhesion was studied in a flow chamber, where D-tyrosine caused significant reduction in cell attachment. Biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus subtilis were characterized by confocal laser scanning microscopy as well as quantitative analysis of cellular biomass and extracellular polymeric substances. D-Tyrosine exhibited strong inhibitive effects on both biofilms with an effective concentration as low as 5 nM; the biofilms responded to D-tyrosine concentration change in a non-monotonic, bi-modal pattern. In addition, D-tyrosine showed notable and different impact on EPS production by G+ and G- bacteria. Extracellular protein was decreased in P. aeruginosa biofilms, but increased in those of B. subtilis. Exopolysaccharides production by P. aeruginosa was increased at low concentrations and reduced at high concentrations while no impact was found in B. subtilis. These results suggest that distinct mechanisms are at play at different D-tyrosine concentrations and they may be species specific. Dosage of D-tyrosine must be carefully controlled for biofouling control applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Phosphorylated c-Mpl tyrosine 591 regulates thrombopoietin-induced signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangkhae, Veena; Saur, Sebastian Jonas; Kaushansky, Alexis; Kaushansky, Kenneth; Hitchcock, Ian Stuart

    2014-06-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the primary regulator of platelet production, affecting cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation through binding to and stimulation of the cell surface receptor the cellular myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene (c-Mpl). Activating mutations in c-Mpl constitutively stimulate downstream signaling pathways, leading to aberrant hematopoiesis, and contribute to development of myeloproliferative neoplasms. Several studies have mapped the tyrosine residues within the cytoplasmic domain of c-Mpl that mediate these cellular signals; however, secondary signaling pathways are incompletely understood. In this study, we focused on c-Mpl tyrosine 591 (Y591). We found Y591 of wild-type c-Mpl to be phosphorylated in the presence of TPO. Additionally, eliminating Y591 phosphorylation by mutation to Phe resulted in decreased total receptor phosphorylation. Using a Src homology 2/phosphotyrosine-binding (SH2/PTB) domain binding microarray, we identified novel c-Mpl binding partners for phosphorylated Y591, including Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1), spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). The functional significance of binding partners was determined through small interfering RNA treatment of Ba/F3-Mpl cells, confirming that the increase in pERK1/2 resulting from removal of Y591 may be mediated by spleen tyrosine kinase. These findings identify a novel negative regulatory pathway that controls TPO-mediated signaling, advancing our understanding of the mechanisms required for successful maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells and megakaryocyte development. Copyright © 2014 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Interactions between Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases and growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases regulate tracheal tube formation in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mili Jeon

    2012-04-01

    The respiratory (tracheal system of the Drosophila melanogaster larva is an intricate branched network of air-filled tubes. Its developmental logic is similar in some ways to that of the vertebrate vascular system. We previously described a unique embryonic tracheal tubulogenesis phenotype caused by loss of both of the Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs, Ptp4E and Ptp10D. In Ptp4E Ptp10D double mutants, the linear tubes in unicellular and terminal tracheal branches are converted into bubble-like cysts that incorporate apical cell surface markers. This tube geometry phenotype is modulated by changes in the activity or expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr tyrosine kinase (TK. Ptp10D physically interacts with Egfr. Here we demonstrate that the Ptp4E Ptp10D phenotype is the consequence of the loss of negative regulation by the RPTPs of three growth factor receptor TKs: Egfr, Breathless and Pvr. Reducing the activity of any of the three kinases by tracheal expression of dominant-negative mutants suppresses cyst formation. By competing dominant-negative and constitutively active kinase mutants against each other, we show that the three RTKs have partially interchangeable activities, so that increasing the activity of one kinase can compensate for the effects of reducing the activity of another. This implies that SH2-domain downstream effectors that are required for the phenotype are likely to be able to interact with phosphotyrosine sites on all three receptor TKs. We also show that the phenotype involves increases in signaling through the MAP kinase and Rho GTPase pathways.

  8. Behavioral and cognitive effects of tyrosine intake in healthy human adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hase, Adrian; Jung, Sophie E.; aan het Rot, Marije

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid tyrosine is the precursor to the catecholamine neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine. Increasing tyrosine uptake may positively influence catecholamine-related psychological functioning. We conducted a systematic review to examine the effects of tyrosine on behavior and

  9. Determination of o-tyrosine in irradiated chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoller, O.; Schoeni, D.; Zimmerli, B.

    1991-01-01

    The author explains his method to determine O-Tyrosine in irradiated chickens with a high-performance liquid chromatography. The method is simple and fast, but a proper chromatographic separation is difficult. The detection limit with a high sensitive detector is about 0.05-0.1 mg O-Tyrosine/kg meat (9 refs)

  10. Importance of tyrosine phosphorylation in receptor kinase complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, Alberto P; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Zipfel, Cyril

    2015-05-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification that is known to regulate receptor kinase (RK)-mediated signaling in animals. Plant RKs are annotated as serine/threonine kinases, but recent work has revealed that tyrosine phosphorylation is also crucial for the activation of RK-mediated signaling in plants. These initial observations have paved the way for subsequent detailed studies on the mechanism of activation of plant RKs and the biological relevance of tyrosine phosphorylation for plant growth and immunity. In this Opinion article we review recent reports on the contribution of RK tyrosine phosphorylation in plant growth and immunity; we propose that tyrosine phosphorylation plays a major regulatory role in the initiation and transduction of RK-mediated signaling in plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Requirements for superoxide-dependent tyrosine hydroperoxide formation in peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winterbourn, Christine C; Parsons-Mair, Helena N; Gebicki, Silvia

    2004-01-01

    Superoxide reacts rapidly with other radicals, but these reactions have received little attention in the context of oxidative stress. For tyrosyl radicals, reaction with superoxide is 3-fold faster than dimerization, and forms the addition product tyrosine hydroperoxide. We have explored structural...... requirements for hydroperoxide formation using tyrosine analogues and di- and tri-peptides. Superoxide and phenoxyl radicals were generated using xanthine oxidase, peroxidase and the respective tyrosine derivative, or by gamma-radiation. Peroxides were measured using FeSO4/Xylenol Orange. Tyrosine and tyramine...... formed stable hydroperoxides, but N-acetyltyrosine and p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid did not, demonstrating a requirement for a free amino group. Using [14C]tyrosine, the hydroperoxide and dityrosine were formed at a molar ratio of 1.8:1. Studies with pre-formed hydroperoxides, and measurements of substrate...

  12. A threshold model for receptor tyrosine kinase signaling specificity and cell fate determination [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Zinkle

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Upon ligand engagement, the single-pass transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs dimerize to transmit qualitatively and quantitatively different intracellular signals that alter the transcriptional landscape and thereby determine the cellular response. The molecular mechanisms underlying these fundamental events are not well understood. Considering recent insights into the structural biology of fibroblast growth factor signaling, we propose a threshold model for RTK signaling specificity in which quantitative differences in the strength/longevity of ligand-induced receptor dimers on the cell surface lead to quantitative differences in the phosphorylation of activation loop (A-loop tyrosines as well as qualitative differences in the phosphorylation of tyrosines mediating substrate recruitment. In this model, quantitative differences on A-loop tyrosine phosphorylation result in gradations in kinase activation, leading to the generation of intracellular signals of varying amplitude/duration. In contrast, qualitative differences in the pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation on the receptor result in the recruitment/activation of distinct substrates/intracellular pathways. Commensurate with both the dynamics of the intracellular signal and the types of intracellular pathways activated, unique transcriptional signatures are established. Our model provides a framework for engineering clinically useful ligands that can tune receptor dimerization stability so as to bias the cellular transcriptome to achieve a desired cellular output.

  13. Protein Tyrosine Nitration : Selectivity, Physicochemical and Biological Consequences, Denitration, and Proteomics Methods for the Identification of Tyrosine-Nitrated Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abello, Nicolas; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Bischoff, Rainer

    Protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) is a post-translational modification occurring under the action of a nitrating agent. Tyrosine is modified in the 3-position of the phenolic ring through the addition of a nitro group (NO(2)). In the present article, we review the main nitration reactions and

  14. Spectroscopic studies of fluorescent complexes of tyrosine 8-hydroxyquinoline and tyrosine-8-hydroxyquinaldine in aqueous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakhrani, M.A.; Kazi, T.G.

    2002-01-01

    A new method has been developed by preparing complexes involving condensation of tyrosine with 8-hydroxyquinoline (Oxine) and 8-hydroxyquinaldine (Quinaldine) respectively, producing fluorescent products. The products obtained have been investigated for identification and quantitative estimation using different spectroscopic techniques including fluorescence activity of newly synthesized products. 8-hydroxyquinaldine and 8-hydroxyquinoline (Oxine) condensed with tyrosine separately produced water soluble fluorescent complexes. The complexes have been investigated for identification and quantitative estimation of amino acids. Identification of amino acids in nano mole or below than nano mole has become possible by present fluorometric activity of these complexes involving different excitation and emission wavelengths. The fluorometric activity of complexes has been observed to be 100 to 1000 times higher than assay method involving ninhydrin and amino acid analyzer. The method adopted in our laboratory is rapid, versatile with good reproducibility and provides excellent results for adoption by analytical, agricultural and biomedical laboratories to estimate amino acids and metals in composite matrix. (author)

  15. Tyrosine kinases, drugs, and Shigella flexneri dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoi, Ana-Maria; Agaisse, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is an enteropathogenic bacterium responsible for approximately 100 million cases of severe dysentery each year. S. flexneri colonization of the human colonic epithelium is supported by direct spread from cell to cell, which relies on actin-based motility. We have recently uncovered that, in intestinal epithelial cells, S. flexneri actin-based motility is regulated by the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk). Consequently, treatment with Ibrutinib, a specific Btk inhibitor currently used in the treatment of B-cell malignancies, effectively impaired S. flexneri spread from cell to cell. Thus, therapeutic intervention capitalizing on drugs interfering with host factors supporting the infection process may represent an effective alternative to treatments with antimicrobial compounds.

  16. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase R-PTP-alpha is tyrosine-phosphorylated and associated with the adaptor protein Grb2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Batzer, A; Sap, J

    1994-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine phosphatases (R-PTPases) have generated interest because of their suspected involvement in cellular signal transduction. The adaptor protein Grb2 has been implicated in coupling receptor tyrosine kinases to Ras. We report that a ubiquitous R-PTPase, R-PTP-alpha, is tyrosine......-phosphorylated and associated in vivo with the Grb2 protein. This association can be reproduced in stably and transiently transfected cells, as well as in vitro using recombinant Grb2 protein. Association requires the presence of an intact SH2 domain in Grb2, as well as tyrosine phosphorylation of R-PTP-alpha. This observation...... links a receptor tyrosine phosphatase with a key component of a central cellular signalling pathway and provides a basis for addressing R-PTP-alpha function....

  17. Putative tyrosine kinases expressed in K-562 human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partanen, J.; Maekelae, T.P.; Lehvaeslaiho, H.; Alitalo, K.; Alitalo, R.

    1990-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is important in the transmission of growth and differentiation signals; known tyrosine kinases include several oncoproteins and growth factor receptors. Interestingly, some differentiated cell types, such as erythrocytes and platelets contain high amounts of phosphotyrosine. The authors analyzed tyrosine kinases expressed in the K-562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line, which has a bipotential erythroid and megakaryoblastoid differentiation capacity. Analysis of 359 polymerase chain reaction-amplified cDNA clones led to the identification of 14 different tyrosine kinase-related sequences (JTK1-14). Two of the clones (JTK2 and JTK4) represent unusual members of the fibroblast growth factor receptor gene family, and the clones JTK5, JTK11, and JTK14 may also belong to the family of receptor tyrosine kinases but lack a close relationship to any known tyrosine kinase. Each of these different genes has its own characteristic expression pattern in K-562 cells and several other human tumor cell lines. In addition, the JTK11 and JTK14 mRNAs are induced during the megakaryoblastoid differentiation of K-562 cells. These tyrosine kinases may have a role in the differentiation of megakaryoblasts or in the physiology of platelets

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the USS BOLD in the Gulf of Mexico from 2007-05-02 to 2007-08-24 (NODC Accession 0117500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117500 includes Surface underway, chemical and physical data collected from USS BOLD in the Gulf of Mexico from 2007-05-02 to 2007-08-24. These data...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from NUKA ARCTICA in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and others from 2005-01-07 to 2005-12-03 (NODC Accession 0081037)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0081037 includes chemical, physical and surface underway data collected from NUKA ARCTICA in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea, North Atlantic Ocean,...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and others from 1994-11-04 to 2012-08-31 (NODC Accession 0083189)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0083189 includes chemical, physical and underway - surface data collected from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea, Bering Sea,...

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the HEALY in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and others from 2011-05-17 to 2012-10-26 (NODC Accession 0083197)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0083197 includes chemical, physical and underway - surface data collected from HEALY in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea, Bering Sea, Coastal Waters of...

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from Munida in the South Pacific Ocean from 2004-01-26 to 2006-07-30 (NODC Accession 0100218)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0100218 includes Surface underway data collected from Munida in the South Pacific Ocean from 2004-01-26 to 2006-07-30. These data include Partial...

  3. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from Marcus G. Langseth in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and others from 2010-05-07 to 2013-06-25 (NODC Accession 0109901)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0109901 includes Surface underway data collected from Marcus G. Langseth in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea, Bering Sea, Caribbean Sea, Cordell Bank...

  4. Broadband Access

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Broadband Access. Worldwide market for broadband access $30 Billion! Over 200 million broadband subscribers worldwide! Various Competing Broadband access. Digital Subscriber line; Wireless; Optical Fiber.

  5. Robotic synthesis of L-[1-11C]tyrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luurtsema, Gert; Medema, Jitze; Elsinga, P.H.; Visser, G.M.; Vaalburg, Willem

    1994-01-01

    L-[1- 11 C]tyrosine promises to become an important tracer for determination of the protein synthesis rate (PSR) in tumor tissue and brain. The commercially available Anatech RB-86 robotic system is utilized for the automation of the L-[1- 11 C]tyrosine production via the isocyanide method as reported by Bolster et al. (Eur. J. Nucl. Med. 12, 321-324, 1986). The total synthesis time, including HPLC-purification and enantiomeric separation is 60 min. With a practical yield of 20 mCi L-[1- 11 C]tyrosine at a specific activity > 1000 Ci/mmol. (author)

  6. Assessing the Impact of Surface and Upper-Air Observations on the Forecast Skill of the ACCESS Numerical Weather Prediction Model over Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Soldatenko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology’s in situ observations (land and sea surface observations, upper air observations by radiosondes, pilot balloons, wind profilers, and aircraft observations on the short-term forecast skill provided by the ACCESS (Australian Community Climate and Earth-System Simulator global numerical weather prediction (NWP system is evaluated using an adjoint-based method. This technique makes use of the adjoint perturbation forecast model utilized within the 4D-Var assimilation system, and is able to calculate the individual impact of each assimilated observation in a cycling NWP system. The results obtained show that synoptic observations account for about 60% of the 24-h forecast error reduction, with the remainder accounted for by aircraft (12.8%, radiosondes (10.5%, wind profilers (3.9%, pilot balloons (2.8%, buoys (1.7% and ships (1.2%. In contrast, the largest impact per observation is from buoys and aircraft. Overall, all observation types have a positive impact on the 24-h forecast skill. Such results help to support the decision-making process regarding the evolution of the observing network, particularly at the national level. Consequently, this 4D-Var-based approach has great potential as a tool to assist the design and running of an efficient and effective observing network.

  7. Eating to stop: Tyrosine supplementation enhances inhibitory control but not response execution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colzato, L.S.; Jongkees, B.J.; Sellaro, R.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.; Hommel, B.

    2014-01-01

    Animal studies and research in humans have shown that the supplementation of tyrosine, or tyrosine-containing diets, increase the plasma tyrosine and enhance brain dopamine (DA). However, the strategy of administering tyrosine (and the role of DA therein) to enhance cognition is unclear and heavily

  8. Cytochrome c Is Tyrosine 97 Phosphorylated by Neuroprotective Insulin Treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sanderson, T. H.; Mahapatra, G.; Pecina, Petr; Ji, Q.; Yu, K.; Sinkler, Ch.; Varughese, A.; Kumar, R.; Bukowski, M. J.; Tousignant, R. N.; Salomon, A. R.; Lee, I.; Hüttemann, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 11 (2013), e78627 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cytochrome c * tyrosine phosphorylation * brain ischemia * insulin Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  9. Tyrosine Kinase Gene Expression Profiling in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    ... of these genes parallels the progression of tumors to a more malignant phenotype. We developed a DNA micro-array based screening system to monitor the level of expression of tyrosine kinase (tk...

  10. Tyrosine Kinase Gene Expression Profiling in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    ... of these genes parallels the progression of tumors to a more malignant phenotype. We developed a DNA micro-array based screening system to monitor the level of expression of tyrosine kinase (tk...

  11. Electrode Potentials of l-Tryptophan, l-Tyrosine, 3-Nitro-l-tyrosine, 2,3-Difluoro-l-tyrosine, and 2,3,5-Trifluoro-l-tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Leila; Kissner, Reinhard; Nauser, Thomas; Koppenol, Willem H

    2016-05-24

    Electrode potentials for aromatic amino acid radical/amino acid couples were deduced from cyclic voltammograms and pulse radiolysis experiments. The amino acids investigated were l-tryptophan, l-tyrosine, N-acetyl-l-tyrosine methyl ester, N-acetyl-3-nitro-l-tyrosine ethyl ester, N-acetyl-2,3-difluoro-l-tyrosine methyl ester, and N-acetyl-2,3,5-trifluoro-l-tyrosine methyl ester. Conditional potentials were determined at pH 7.4 for all compounds listed; furthermore, Pourbaix diagrams for l-tryptophan, l-tyrosine, and N-acetyl-3-nitro-l-tyrosine ethyl ester were obtained. Electron transfer accompanied by proton transfer is reversible, as confirmed by detailed analysis of the current waves, and because the slopes of the Pourbaix diagrams obey Nernst's law. E°'(Trp(•),H(+)/TrpH) and E°'(TyrO(•),H(+)/TyrOH) at pH 7 are 0.99 ± 0.01 and 0.97 ± 0.01 V, respectively. Pulse radiolysis studies of two dipeptides that contain both amino acids indicate a difference in E°' of approximately 0.06 V. Thus, in small peptides, we recommend values of 1.00 and 0.96 V for E°'(Trp(•),H(+)/TrpH) and E°'(TyrO(•),H(+)/TyrOH), respectively. The electrode potential of N-acetyl-3-nitro-l-tyrosine ethyl ester is higher, while because of mesomeric stabilization of the radical, those of N-acetyl-2,3-difluoro-l-tyrosine methyl ester and N-acetyl-2,3,5-trifluoro-l-tyrosine methyl ester are lower than that of tyrosine. Given that the electrode potentials at pH 7 of E°'(Trp(•),H(+)/TrpH) and E°'(TyrO(•),H(+)/TyrOH) are nearly equal, they would be, in principle, interchangeable. Proton-coupled electron transfer pathways in proteins that use TrpH and TyrOH are thus nearly thermoneutral.

  12. Tyrosine phosphorylation switching of a G protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jia, Haiyan; Werth, Emily G; Mowrey, David D; Hicks, Leslie M; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Torres, Matthew P; Jones, Alan M

    2018-03-30

    Heterotrimeric G protein complexes are molecular switches relaying extracellular signals sensed by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to downstream targets in the cytoplasm, which effect cellular responses. In the plant heterotrimeric GTPase cycle, GTP hydrolysis, rather than nucleotide exchange, is the rate-limiting reaction and is accelerated by a receptor-like regulator of G signaling (RGS) protein. We hypothesized that posttranslational modification of the Gα subunit in the G protein complex regulates the RGS-dependent GTPase cycle. Our structural analyses identified an invariant phosphorylated tyrosine residue (Tyr 166 in the Arabidopsis Gα subunit AtGPA1) located in the intramolecular domain interface where nucleotide binding and hydrolysis occur. We also identified a receptor-like kinase that phosphorylates AtGPA1 in a Tyr 166 -dependent manner. Discrete molecular dynamics simulations predicted that phosphorylated Tyr 166 forms a salt bridge in this interface and potentially affects the RGS protein-accelerated GTPase cycle. Using a Tyr 166 phosphomimetic substitution, we found that the cognate RGS protein binds more tightly to the GDP-bound Gα substrate, consequently reducing its ability to accelerate GTPase activity. In conclusion, we propose that phosphorylation of Tyr 166 in AtGPA1 changes the binding pattern with AtRGS1 and thereby attenuates the steady-state rate of the GTPase cycle. We coin this newly identified mechanism "substrate phosphoswitching." © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Tyrosine biosynthesis, metabolism, and catabolism in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, Craig A; Maeda, Hiroshi A

    2018-05-01

    L-Tyrosine (Tyr) is an aromatic amino acid (AAA) required for protein synthesis in all organisms, but synthesized de novo only in plants and microorganisms. In plants, Tyr also serves as a precursor of numerous specialized metabolites that have diverse physiological roles as electron carriers, antioxidants, attractants, and defense compounds. Some of these Tyr-derived plant natural products are also used in human medicine and nutrition (e.g. morphine and vitamin E). While the Tyr biosynthesis and catabolic pathways have been extensively studied in microbes and animals, respectively, those of plants have received much less attention until recently. Accumulating evidence suggest that the Tyr biosynthetic pathways differ between microbes and plants and even within the plant kingdom, likely to support the production of lineage-specific plant specialized metabolites derived from Tyr. The interspecies variations of plant Tyr pathway enzymes can now be used to enhance the production of Tyr and Tyr-derived compounds in plants and other synthetic biology platforms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Autophosphorylation of JAK2 on tyrosines 221 and 570 regulates its activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argetsinger, Lawrence S; Kouadio, Jean-Louis K; Steen, Hanno

    2004-01-01

    or which of the 49 tyrosines in JAK2 are autophosphorylated. In this study, mass spectrometry and two-dimensional peptide mapping were used to determine that tyrosines 221, 570, and 1007 in JAK2 are autophosphorylated. Phosphorylation of tyrosine 570 is particularly robust. In response to growth hormone......, JAK2 was rapidly and transiently phosphorylated at tyrosines 221 and 570, returning to basal levels by 60 min. Analysis of the sequences surrounding tyrosines 221 and 570 in JAK2 and tyrosines in other proteins that are phosphorylated in response to ligands that activate JAK2 suggests that the YXX......[L/I/V] motif is one of the motifs recognized by JAK2. Experiments using JAK2 with tyrosines 221 and 570 mutated to phenylalanine suggest that tyrosines 221 and 570 in JAK2 may serve as regulatory sites in JAK2, with phosphorylation of tyrosine 221 increasing kinase activity and phosphorylation of tyrosine 570...

  15. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors: Multi-targeted or single-targeted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekman, Fleur; Giovannetti, Elisa; Peters, Godefridus J

    2011-02-10

    Since in most tumors multiple signaling pathways are involved, many of the inhibitors in clinical development are designed to affect a wide range of targeted kinases. The most important tyrosine kinase families in the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors are the ABL, SCR, platelet derived growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor families. Both multi-kinase inhibitors and single-kinase inhibitors have advantages and disadvantages, which are related to potential resistance mechanisms, pharmacokinetics, selectivity and tumor environment. In different malignancies various tyrosine kinases are mutated or overexpressed and several resistance mechanisms exist. Pharmacokinetics is influenced by interindividual differences and differs for two single targeted inhibitors or between patients treated by the same tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Different tyrosine kinase inhibitors have various mechanisms to achieve selectivity, while differences in gene expression exist between tumor and stromal cells. Considering these aspects, one type of inhibitor can generally not be preferred above the other, but will depend on the specific genetic constitution of the patient and the tumor, allowing personalized therapy. The most effective way of cancer treatment by using tyrosine kinase inhibitors is to consider each patient/tumor individually and to determine the strategy that specifically targets the consequences of altered (epi)genetics of the tumor. This strategy might result in treatment by a single multi kinase inhibitor for one patient, but in treatment by a couple of single kinase inhibitors for other patients.

  16. Synthesis of 14C-labelled α-methyl tyrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajagopal, S.; Venkatachalam, T.K.; Conway, T.; Diksic, M.

    1992-01-01

    A new route for the preparation of radioactively labelled α-methyl L-tyrosine is described. The labelling at the α position has been successfully achieved with 14 C-, 11 C- (very preliminary, unpublished), and 3 H-labelled methyl iodide. A detailed report on 14 C-labelling at the α position and the hydrolysis of 4-methoxy α-methyl phenylalanine is presented. The alkylation proceeds via the methylation of the carbanion of N-benzylidene 4-methoxy phenylalanine methyl ester 2. Hydrolysis of 4-O methyl tyrosine to tyrosine by HBr and HI were analysed and used in the optimization of the hydrolysis conditions of 4. Enantiomeric purity of the isolated L-isomer has been found to be 99% as judged by HPLC. Pseudo first-order rate constant for the hydrolysis of 14 C-labelled α-methyl 4-methoxy phenyl alanine methyl ester was determined. Preliminary findings of the 3 H- and 11 C-radiolabelled α-methyl tyrosine (methyl labelled) are also mentioned. For the first time it was shown that α-methyl D,L-tyrosine can be separated into enantiomerically pure α-methyl D- and L-tyrosine using a CHIRALPAK WH column. (author)

  17. Novel Mutations in the Tyrosine Hydroxylase Gene in the First Czech Patient with Tyrosine Hydroxylase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Szentiványi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency manifests mainly in early childhood and includes two clinical phenotypes: an infantile progressive hypokinetic-rigid syndrome with dystonia (type A and a neonatal complex encephalopathy (type B. The biochemical diagnostics is exclusively based on the quantitative determination of the neurotransmitters or their metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. The implementation of neurotransmitter analysis in clinical praxis is necessary for early diagnosis and adequate treatment. Neurotransmitter metabolites in CSF were analyzed in 82 children (at the age 1 month to 17 years with clinical suspicion for neurometabolic disorders using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with electrochemical detection. The CSF level of homovanillic acid (HVA was markedly decreased in three children (64, 79 and 94 nmol/l in comparison to age related controls (lower limit 218–450 nmol/l. Neurological findings including severe psychomotor retardation, quadruspasticity and microcephaly accompanied with marked dystonia, excessive sweating in the first patient was compatible with the diagnosis of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH deficiency (type B and subsequent molecular analysis revealed two novel heterozygous mutations c.636A>C and c.1124G>C in the TH gene. The treatment with L-DOPA/carbidopa resulted in the improvement of dystonia. Magnetic resonance imaging studies in two other patients with microcephaly revealed postischaemic brain damage, therefore secondary HVA deficit was considered in these children. Diagnostic work-up in patients with neurometabolic disorders should include analysis of neurotransmitter metabolites in CSF.

  18. Salivary peptide tyrosine-tyrosine 3-36 modulates ingestive behavior without inducing taste aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Maria D; Sergeyev, Valeriy G; Acosta, Andres; Spegele, Michael; La Sala, Michael; Waler, Nickolas J; Chiriboga-Hurtado, Juan; Currlin, Seth W; Herzog, Herbert; Dotson, Cedrick D; Gorbatyuk, Oleg S; Zolotukhin, Sergei

    2013-11-20

    Hormone peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY) is secreted into circulation from the gut L-endocrine cells in response to food intake, thus inducing satiation during interaction with its preferred receptor, Y2R. Clinical applications of systemically administered PYY for the purpose of reducing body weight were compromised as a result of the common side effect of visceral sickness. We describe here a novel approach of elevating PYY in saliva in mice, which, although reliably inducing strong anorexic responses, does not cause aversive reactions. The augmentation of salivary PYY activated forebrain areas known to mediate feeding, hunger, and satiation while minimally affecting brainstem chemoreceptor zones triggering nausea. By comparing neuronal pathways activated by systemic versus salivary PYY, we identified a metabolic circuit associated with Y2R-positive cells in the oral cavity and extending through brainstem nuclei into hypothalamic satiety centers. The discovery of this alternative circuit that regulates ingestive behavior without inducing taste aversion may open the possibility of a therapeutic application of PYY for the treatment of obesity via direct oral application.

  19. Implications of tyrosine phosphoproteomics in cervical carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeFord James

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide cervical cancer remains a leading cause of mortality from gynecologic malignancies. The link between cervical cancer and persistent infection with HPV has been established. At a molecular level little is known about the transition from the precancerous state to invasive cancer. To elucidate this process, cervical biopsies from human specimens were obtained from precancerous state to stage III disease. Methods Cervical biopsies were obtained from patients with a diagnosis of cervical cancer undergoing definitive surgery or staging operation. Biopsies were obtained from patients with precancerous lesions at the time of their excisional procedure. Control samples were obtained from patients undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions such as fibroids. Samples were subjected to proteomic profiling using two dimensional gel electrophoresis with subsequent trypsin digestion followed by MALDI-TOF protein identification. Candidate proteins were then further studied using western blotting, immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry. Results Annexin A1 and DNA-PKcs were found to be differentially expressed. Phosphorylated annexin A1 was up regulated in diseased states in comparison to control and its level was strongly detected in the serum of cervical cancer patients compared to controls. DNA-PKcs was noted to be hyperphosphorylated and fragmented in cancer when compared to controls. By immunohistochemistry annexin A1 was noted in the vascular environment in cancer and certain precancerous samples. Conclusion This study suggests a probable role for protein tyrosine phosphorylation in cervical carcinogenesis. Annexin A1 and DNA-PK cs may have synergistic effects with HPV infection. Precancerous lesions that may progress to cervical cancer may be differentiated from lesions that will not base on similar immunohistochemical profile to invasive squamous cell carcinoma.

  20. Carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity, and atmospheric pressure from surface underway survey in the North Pacific from January 1998 to January 2004 (NODC Accession 0045502)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sea surface pCO2, sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity, and atmospheric pressure measurements collected in the North Pacific as part of the NOAA Office of...

  1. Small Molecule Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors of ErbB2/HER2/Neu in the Treatment of Aggressive Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. Schroeder

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 is a member of the erbB class of tyrosine kinase receptors. These proteins are normally expressed at the surface of healthy cells and play critical roles in the signal transduction cascade in a myriad of biochemical pathways responsible for cell growth and differentiation. However, it is widely known that amplification and subsequent overexpression of the HER2 encoding oncogene results in unregulated cell proliferation in an aggressive form of breast cancer known as HER2-positive breast cancer. Existing therapies such as trastuzumab (Herceptin® and lapatinib (Tyverb/Tykerb®, a monoclonal antibody inhibitor and a dual EGFR/HER2 kinase inhibitor, respectively, are currently used in the treatment of HER2-positive cancers, although issues with high recurrence and acquired resistance still remain. Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors provide attractive therapeutic targets, as they are able to block cell signaling associated with many of the proposed mechanisms for HER2 resistance. In this regard we aim to present a review on the available HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as those currently in development. The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors as sequential or combinatorial therapeutic strategies with other HER family inhibitors is also discussed.

  2. Wireless Access

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Wireless Access. Wireless connect to the Base station. Easy and Convenient access. Costlier as compared to the wired technology. Reliability challenges. We see it as a complementary technology to the DSL.

  3. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using PAR Sensor and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS, NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and others in the Bering Sea, Caribbean Sea and others from 1994-01-28 to 2004-07-02 (NODC Accession 0109923)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0109923 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS, NOAA Ship DISCOVERER,...

  4. Open access

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Open access week Van 19 tot en met 25 oktober 2015 vond wereldwijd de Open Access Week plaats. Tijdens deze week werden er over de hele wereld evenementen georganiseerd waar open access een rol speelt. Ook in Nederland zijn er diverse symposia, workshops en debatten georganiseerd zoals het debat in

  5. Fundamentals on the biochemistry of peroxynitrite and protein tyrosine nitration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Bartesaghi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review we provide an analysis of the biochemistry of peroxynitrite and tyrosine nitration. Peroxynitrite is the product of the diffusion-controlled reaction between superoxide (O2•- and nitric oxide (•NO. This process is in competition with the enzymatic dismutation of O2•- and the diffusion of •NO across cells and tissues and its reaction with molecular targets (e.g. guanylate cyclase. Understanding the kinetics and compartmentalization of the O2•- / •NO interplay is critical to rationalize the shift of •NO from a physiological mediator to a cytotoxic intermediate. Once formed, peroxynitrite (ONOO- and ONOOH; pKa = 6,8 behaves as a strong one and two-electron oxidant towards a series of biomolecules including transition metal centers and thiols. In addition, peroxynitrite anion can secondarily evolve to secondary radicals either via its fast reaction with CO2 or through proton-catalyzed homolysis. Thus, peroxynitrite can participate in direct (bimolecular and indirect (through secondary radical intermediates oxidation reactions; through these processes peroxynitrite can participate as cytotoxic effector molecule against invading pathogens and/or as an endogenous pathogenic mediator. Peroxynitrite can cause protein tyrosine nitration in vitro and in vivo. Indeed, tyrosine nitration is a hallmark of the reactions of •NO-derived oxidants in cells and tissues and serves as a biomarker of oxidative damage. Protein tyrosine nitration can mediate changes in protein structure and function that affect cell homeostasis. Tyrosine nitration in biological systems is a free radical process that can be promoted either by peroxynitrite-derived radicals or by other related •NO-dependent oxidative processes. Recently, mechanisms responsible of tyrosine nitration in hydrophobic biostructures such as membranes and lipoproteins have been assessed and involve the parallel occurrence and connection with lipid

  6. Tyrosine isomers mediate the classical phenomenon of concomitant tumor resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Raúl A; Bruzzo, Juan; Chiarella, Paula; di Gianni, Pedro; Isturiz, Martín A; Linskens, Susana; Speziale, Norma; Meiss, Roberto P; Bustuoabad, Oscar D; Pasqualini, Christiane D

    2011-11-15

    Concomitant tumor resistance (CR) is a phenomenon originally described in 1906 in which a tumor-bearing host is resistant to the growth of secondary tumor implants and metastasis. Although recent studies have indicated that T-cell-dependent processes mediate CR in hosts bearing immunogenic small tumors, manifestations of CR induced by immunogenic and nonimmunogenic large tumors have been associated with an elusive serum factor. In this study, we identify this serum factor as tyrosine in its meta and ortho isoforms. In three different murine models of cancer that generate CR, both meta-tyrosine and ortho-tyrosine inhibited tumor growth. In addition, we showed that both isoforms of tyrosine blocked metastasis in a fourth model that does not generate CR but is sensitive to CR induced by other tumors. Mechanistic studies showed that the antitumor effects of the tyrosine isoforms were mediated, in part, by early inhibition of mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway and inactivation of STAT3, potentially driving tumor cells into a state of dormancy. By revealing a molecular basis for the classical phenomenon of CR, our findings may stimulate new generalized approaches to limit the development of metastases that arise after resection of primary tumors, an issue of pivotal importance to oncologists and their patients. ©2011 AACR

  7. Tyrosine-like condensed derivatives as tyrosinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Maria João; Santana, Lourdes; Uriarte, Eugenio; Serra, Silvia; Corda, Marcella; Fadda, Maria Benedetta; Era, Benedetta; Fais, Antonella

    2012-05-01

    We report the pharmacological evaluation of a new series of 3-aminocoumarins differently substituted with hydroxyl groups, which have been synthesized because they include in their structures the tyrosine fragment (tyrosine-like compounds), with the aim of discovering structural features necessary for tyrosinase inhibitory activity. The synthesized compounds 4 and 7-9 were evaluated in vitro as mushroom tyrosinase inhibitors. Two of the described compounds showed lower IC50 (concentration giving 50% inhibition of tyrosinase activity) than umbelliferone, used as a reference compound. Compound 7 (IC50=53µm) was the best tyrosinase inhibitor of this small series, having an IC50 value 10-fold lower than umbelliferone. Compound 7 (3-amino-7-hydroxycoumarin) had amino and hydroxyl groups precisely mimicking the same positions that both groups occupy on the tyrosine molecule. © 2012 The Authors. JPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  8. Evaluation of Brachypodium distachyon L-Tyrosine Decarboxylase Using L-Tyrosine Over-Producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhei Noda

    Full Text Available To demonstrate that herbaceous biomass is a versatile gene resource, we focused on the model plant Brachypodium distachyon, and screened the B. distachyon for homologs of tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC, which is involved in the modification of aromatic compounds. A total of 5 candidate genes were identified in cDNA libraries of B. distachyon and were introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae to evaluate TDC expression and tyramine production. It is suggested that two TDCs encoded in the transcripts Bradi2g51120.1 and Bradi2g51170.1 have L-tyrosine decarboxylation activity. Bradi2g51170.1 was introduced into the L-tyrosine over-producing strain of S. cerevisiae that was constructed by the introduction of mutant genes that promote deregulated feedback inhibition. The amount of tyramine produced by the resulting transformant was 6.6-fold higher (approximately 200 mg/L than the control strain, indicating that B. distachyon TDC effectively converts L-tyrosine to tyramine. Our results suggest that B. distachyon possesses enzymes that are capable of modifying aromatic residues, and that S. cerevisiae is a suitable host for the production of L-tyrosine derivatives.

  9. Skin peptide tyrosine-tyrosine, a member of the pancreatic polypeptide family: isolation, structure, synthesis, and endocrine activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, A; Chartrel, N; Vaudry, H; Nicolas, P

    1994-10-25

    Pancreatic polypeptide, peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY), and neuropeptide tyrosine (NPY), three members of a family of structurally related peptides, are mainly expressed in the endocrine pancreas, in endocrine cells of the gut, and in the brain, respectively. In the present study, we have isolated a peptide of the pancreatic polypeptide family from the skin of the South American arboreal frog Phyllomedusa bicolor. The primary structure of the peptide was established as Tyr-Pro-Pro-Lys-Pro-Glu-Ser-Pro-Gly-Glu10-Asp-Ala-Ser-Pro-Glu-Glu- Met-Asn- Lys-Tyr20-Leu-Thr-Ala-Leu-Arg-His-Tyr-Ile-Asn-Leu30-Val-Thr- Arg-Gln-Arg-Tyr-NH2 . This unusual peptide, named skin peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (SPYY), exhibits 94% similarity with PYY from the frog Rana ridibunda. A synthetic replicate of SPYY inhibits melanotropin release from perifused frog neurointermediate lobes in very much the same way as NPY. These results demonstrate the occurrence of a PYY-like peptide in frog skin. Our data also suggest the existence of a pituitary-skin regulatory loop in amphibians.

  10. Tyrosine-Nitrated Proteins: Proteomic and Bioanalytical Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batthyány, Carlos; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Mastrogiovanni, Mauricio; Lima, Analía; Demicheli, Verónica; Radi, Rafael

    2017-03-01

    "Nitroproteomic" is under active development, as 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins constitutes a footprint left by the reactions of nitric oxide-derived oxidants that are usually associated to oxidative stress conditions. Moreover, protein tyrosine nitration can cause structural and functional changes, which may be of pathophysiological relevance for human disease conditions. Biological protein tyrosine nitration is a free radical process involving the intermediacy of tyrosyl radicals; in spite of being a nonenzymatic process, nitration is selectively directed toward a limited subset of tyrosine residues. Precise identification and quantitation of 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins has represented a "tour de force" for researchers. Recent Advances: A small number of proteins are preferential targets of nitration (usually less than 100 proteins per proteome), contrasting with the large number of proteins modified by other post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, acetylation, and, notably, S-nitrosation. Proteomic approaches have revealed key features of tyrosine nitration both in vivo and in vitro, including selectivity, site specificity, and effects in protein structure and function. Identification of 3-nitrotyrosine-containing proteins and mapping nitrated residues is challenging, due to low abundance of this oxidative modification in biological samples and its unfriendly behavior in mass spectrometry (MS)-based technologies, that is, MALDI, electrospray ionization, and collision-induced dissociation. The use of (i) classical two-dimensional electrophoresis with immunochemical detection of nitrated proteins followed by protein ID by regular MS/MS in combination with (ii) immuno-enrichment of tyrosine-nitrated peptides and (iii) identification of nitrated peptides by a MIDAS™ experiment is arising as a potent methodology to unambiguously map and quantitate tyrosine-nitrated proteins in vivo. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 313-328.

  11. Cortactin Tyrosine Phosphorylation Promotes Its Deacetylation and Inhibits Cell Spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiler, Eugenia; Nieto-Pelegrín, Elvira; Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa

    2012-01-01

    Background Cortactin is a classical Src kinase substrate that participates in actin cytoskeletal dynamics by activating the Arp2/3 complex and interacting with other regulatory proteins, including FAK. Cortactin has various domains that may contribute to the assembly of different protein platforms to achieve process specificity. Though the protein is known to be regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation, how tyrosine phosphorylation regulates cortactin activity is poorly understood. Since the basal level of tyrosine phosphorylation is low, this question must be studied using stimulated cell cultures, which are physiologically relevant but unreliable and difficult to work with. In fact, their unreliability may be the cause of some contradictory findings about the dynamics of tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin in different processes. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, we try to overcome these problems by using a Functional Interaction Trap (FIT) system, which involves cotransfecting cells with a kinase (Src) and a target protein (cortactin), both of which are fused to complementary leucine-zipper domains. The FIT system allowed us to control precisely the tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin and explore its relationship with cortactin acetylation. Conclusions/Significance Using this system, we provide definitive evidence that a competition exists between acetylation and tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin and that phosphorylation inhibits cell spreading. We confirmed the results from the FIT system by examining endogenous cortactin in different cell types. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cell spreading promotes the association of cortactin and FAK and that tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin disrupts this interaction, which may explain how it inhibits cell spreading. PMID:22479425

  12. Modular Engineering of l-Tyrosine Production in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juminaga, Darmawi; Baidoo, Edward E. K.; Redding-Johanson, Alyssa M.; Batth, Tanveer S.; Burd, Helcio; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Petzold, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Efficient biosynthesis of l-tyrosine from glucose is necessary to make biological production economically viable. To this end, we designed and constructed a modular biosynthetic pathway for l-tyrosine production in E. coli MG1655 by encoding the enzymes for converting erythrose-4-phosphate (E4P) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to l-tyrosine on two plasmids. Rational engineering to improve l-tyrosine production and to identify pathway bottlenecks was directed by targeted proteomics and metabolite profiling. The bottlenecks in the pathway were relieved by modifications in plasmid copy numbers, promoter strength, gene codon usage, and the placement of genes in operons. One major bottleneck was due to the bifunctional activities of quinate/shikimate dehydrogenase (YdiB), which caused accumulation of the intermediates dehydroquinate (DHQ) and dehydroshikimate (DHS) and the side product quinate; this bottleneck was relieved by replacing YdiB with its paralog AroE, resulting in the production of over 700 mg/liter of shikimate. Another bottleneck in shikimate production, due to low expression of the dehydroquinate synthase (AroB), was alleviated by optimizing the first 15 codons of the gene. Shikimate conversion to l-tyrosine was improved by replacing the shikimate kinase AroK with its isozyme, AroL, which effectively consumed all intermediates formed in the first half of the pathway. Guided by the protein and metabolite measurements, the best producer, consisting of two medium-copy-number, dual-operon plasmids, was optimized to produce >2 g/liter l-tyrosine at 80% of the theoretical yield. This work demonstrates the utility of targeted proteomics and metabolite profiling in pathway construction and optimization, which should be applicable to other metabolic pathways. PMID:22020510

  13. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase R-PTP-kappa mediates homophilic binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sap, J; Jiang, Y P; Friedlander, D

    1994-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine phosphatases (R-PTPases) feature PTPase domains in the context of a receptor-like transmembrane topology. The R-PTPase R-PTP-kappa displays an extracellular domain composed of fibronectin type III motifs, a single immunoglobulin domain, as well as a recently defined MAM domain (Y...... not require PTPase activity or posttranslational proteolytic cleavage of the R-PTP-kappa protein and is calcium independent. The results suggest that R-PTPases may provide a link between cell-cell contact and cellular signaling events involving tyrosine phosphorylation....

  14. Cloning and expression of a widely expressed receptor tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sap, J; D'Eustachio, P; Givol, D

    1990-01-01

    We describe the identification of a widely expressed receptor-type (transmembrane) protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase; EC 3.1.3.48). Screening of a mouse brain cDNA library under low-stringency conditions with a probe encompassing the intracellular (phosphatase) domain of the CD45 lymphocyte...... antigen yielded cDNA clones coding for a 794-amino acid transmembrane protein [hereafter referred to as receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (R-PTP-alpha)] with an intracellular domain displaying clear homology to the catalytic domains of CD45 and LAR (45% and 53%, respectively). The 142-amino acid...

  15. Natural compounds as a source of protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors : Application to the rational design of small-molecule derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, Carmen V.; Justo, Giselle Z.; Souza, Ana C. S.; Queiroz, Karla C. S.; Zambuzzi, William F.; Aoyama, Hiroshi; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.

    2006-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of tyrosine residues is a key regulatory mechanism for numerous cellular events. Protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have a pivotal role in regulating both normal cell physiology and pathophysiology. Accordingly, deregulated activity of both

  16. Novel tyrosine phosphorylation sites in rat skeletal muscle revealed by phosphopeptide enrichment and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Højlund, Kurt; Luo, Moulun

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a fundamental role in many cellular processes including differentiation, growth and insulin signaling. In insulin resistant muscle, aberrant tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins has been detected. However, due to the low abundance of tyrosine phosphorylation (...

  17. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha is essential for hippocampal neuronal migration and long-term potentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrone, Angiola; Battaglia, Fortunato; Wang, Cheng

    2003-01-01

    Despite clear indications of their importance in lower organisms, the contributions of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) to development or function of the mammalian nervous system have been poorly explored. In vitro studies have indicated that receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha...

  18. Regulation of hematopoietic cell function by protein tyrosine kinase-encoding oncogenes, a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) is an important mechanism in the regulation of various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and transformation. Accumulating data implicate PTKs as essential intermediates in the transduction of

  19. Towards the conception of an amperometric sensor of L-tyrosine based on Hemin/PAMAM/MWCNT modified glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Qiang; Ai Shiyun; Yin Huanshun; Chen Quanpeng; Tang Tiantian

    2010-01-01

    A novel amperometric sensor was fabricated based on the immobilization of hemin onto the poly (amidoamine)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (PAMAM/MWCNT) nanocomposite film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and ultraviolet visible (UV-vis) adsorption spectroscopy were used to investigate the possible state and electrochemical activity of the immobilized hemin. In the Hemin/PAMAM/MWCNT nanocomposite film, MWCNT layer possessed excellent inherent conductivity to enhance the electron transfer rate, while the layer of PAMAM greatly enlarged the surface average concentration of hemin (Γ) on the modified electrode. Therefore, the nanocomposite film showed enhanced electrocatalytical activity towards the oxidation of L-tyrosine. The kinetic parameters of the modified electrode were investigated. In pH 7.0 phosphate buffer solution (PBS), the sensor exhibits a wide linear range from 0.1 μM to 28.8 μM L-tyrosine with a detection limit of 0.01 μM and a high sensitivity of 0.31 μA μM -1 cm -2 . In addition, the response time of the L-tyrosine sensor is less than 5 s. The excellent performance of the sensor is largely attributed to the electro-generated high reactive oxoiron (IV) porphyrin (O = Fe IV -P) which effectively catalyzed the oxidation of L-tyrosine. A mechanism was herein proposed for the catalytic oxidation of L-tyrosine by oxoiron (IV) porphyrin complexes.

  20. rse, a novel receptor-type tyrosine kinase with homology to Axl/Ufo, is expressed at high levels in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, M R; Scadden, D T; Wang, Z; Gu, Q; Goddard, A; Godowski, P J

    1994-04-08

    We have isolated cDNA clones that encode the human and murine forms of a novel receptor-type tyrosine kinase termed Rse. Sequence analysis indicates that human Rse contains 890 amino acids, with an extracellular region composed of two immunoglobulin-like domains followed by two fibronectin type III domains. Murine Rse contains 880 amino acids and shares 90% amino acid identity with its human counterpart. Rse is structurally similar to the receptor-type tyrosine kinase Axl/Ufo, and the two proteins have 35 and 63% sequence identity in their extracellular and intracellular domains, respectively. To study the synthesis and activation of this putative receptor-type tyrosine kinase, we constructed a version of Rse (termed gD-Rse, where gD represents glycoprotein D) that contains an NH2-terminal epitope tag. NIH3T3 cells were engineered to express gD-Rse, which could be detected at the cell surface by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Moreover, gD-Rse was rapidly phosphorylated on tyrosine residues upon incubation of the cells with an antibody directed against the epitope tag, suggesting that rse encodes an active tyrosine kinase. In the human tissues we examined, the highest level of expression of rse mRNA was observed in the brain; rse mRNA was also detected in the premegakaryocytopoietic cell lines CMK11-5 and Dami. The gene for rse was localized to human chromosome 15.

  1. Fluorescence anisotropy of tyrosinate anion using one-, two- and three-photon excitation: tyrosinate anion fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierdaszuk, Borys

    2013-03-01

    We examined the emission spectra and steady-state anisotropy of tyrosinate anion fluorescence with one-photon (250-310 nm), two-photon (570-620 nm) and three-photon (750-930 nm) excitation. Similar emission spectra of the neutral (pH 7.2) and anionic (pH 13) forms of N-acetyl-L-tyrosinamide (NATyrA) (pKa 10.6) were observed for all modes of excitation, with the maxima at 302 and 352 nm, respectively. Two-photon excitation (2PE) and three-photon excitation (3PE) spectra of the anionic form were the same as that for one-photon excitation (1PE). In contrast, 2PE spectrum from the neutral form showed ~30-nm shift to shorter wavelengths relative to 1PE spectrum (λmax 275 nm) at two-photon energy (550 nm), the latter being overlapped with 3PE spectrum, both at two-photon energy (550 nm). Two-photon cross-sections for NATyrA anion at 565-580 nm were 10 % of that for N-acetyl-L-tryptophanamide (NATrpA), and increased to 90 % at 610 nm, while for the neutral form of NATyrA decreased from 2 % of that for NATrpA at 570 nm to near zero at 585 nm. Surprisingly, the fundamental anisotropy of NATyrA anion in vitrified solution at -60 °C was ~0.05 for 2PE at 610 nm as compared to near 0.3 for 1PE at 305 nm, and wavelength-dependence appears to be a basic feature of its anisotropy. In contrast, the 3PE anisotropy at 900 nm was about 0.5, and 3PE and 1PE anisotropy values appear to be related by the cos(6) θ to cos(2) θ photoselection factor (approx. 10/6) independently of excitation wavelength. Attention is drawn to the possible effect of tyrosinate anions in proteins on their multi-photon induced fluorescence emission and excitation spectra as well as excitation anisotropy spectra.

  2. Open Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  3. Open access

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Dennis Ocholla

    The argument that access to information is an instrumental and individual as well as ... and Dean School of Information Studies, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, USA. ... to scholarly publications and can be in any digital format, including text, movies and ... language barriers, censorship, lack of access to the Internet and ...

  4. SERS study of transformation of phenylalanine to tyrosine under particle irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Huang, Qing; Yao, Guohua; Ke, Zhigang; Zhang, Hong; Lu, Yilin

    2014-08-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering or spectroscopy (SERS) is a very powerful analytical tool which has been widely applied in many scientific research and application fields. It is therefore also very intriguing for us to introduce SERS technique in the radiobiological research, where in many cases only a very few of biomolecules are subjected to changes which however can lead to significant biological effects. The radiation induced biochemical reactions are normally very sophisticated with different substances produced in the system, so currently it is still a big challenge for SERS to analyze such a mixture system which contains multiple analytes. In this context, this work aimed to establish and consolidate the feasibility of SERS as an effective tool in radiation chemistry, and this purpose, we employed SERS as a sensitive probe to a known process, namely, the oxidation of phenylalanine (Phe) under particle irradiation, where the energetic particles were obtained from either plasma discharge or electron-beam. During the irradiation, three types of tyrosine (Tyr), namely, p-Tyr, m-Tyr and o-Tyr were produced, and all these tyrosine isomers together with Phe could be identified and measured based on the SERS spectral analysis of the corresponding enhanced characteristic signals, namely, 1002 cm-1 for Phe, 1161 cm-1 for p-Tyr, 990 cm-1 for m-Tyr, and 970 cm-1 for o-Tyr, respectively. The estimation of the quantities of different tyrosine isomers were also given and verified by conventional method such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). As for comparison of different ways of particle irradiation, our results also indicated that electron-beam irradiation was more efficient for converting Phe into Tyr than plasma discharge treatment, confirming the role of hydroxyl radicals in the Phe-Tyr conformation. Therefore, our work has not only demonstrated that SERS can be successfully applied in the radiobiological study, but also given insights into the

  5. Tyrosine sulfation of the amino terminus of PSGL-1 is critical for enterovirus 71 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yorihiro Nishimura

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease, a common febrile disease in children; however, EV71 has been also associated with various neurological diseases including fatal cases in large EV71 outbreaks particularly in the Asia Pacific region. Recently we identified human P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 as a cellular receptor for entry and replication of EV71 in leukocytes. PSGL-1 is a sialomucin expressed on the surface of leukocytes, serves as a high affinity counterreceptor for selectins, and mediates leukocyte rolling on the endothelium. The PSGL-1-P-selectin interaction requires sulfation of at least one of three clustered tyrosines and an adjacent O-glycan expressing sialyl Lewis x in an N-terminal region of PSGL-1. To elucidate the molecular basis of the PSGL-1-EV71 interaction, we generated a series of PSGL-1 mutants and identified the post-translational modifications that are critical for binding of PSGL-1 to EV71. We expressed the PSGL-1 mutants in 293T cells and the transfected cells were assayed for their abilities to bind to EV71 by flow cytometry. We found that O-glycosylation on T57, which is critical for PSGL-1-selectin interaction, is not necessary for PSGL-1 binding to EV71. On the other hand, site-directed mutagenesis at one or more potential tyrosine sulfation sites in the N-terminal region of PSGL-1 significantly impaired PSGL-1 binding to EV71. Furthermore, an inhibitor of sulfation, sodium chlorate, blocked the PSGL-1-EV71 interaction and inhibited PSGL-1-mediated viral replication of EV71 in Jurkat T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the results presented in this study reveal that tyrosine sulfation, but not O-glycosylation, in the N-terminal region of PSGL-1 may facilitate virus entry and replication of EV71 in leukocytes.

  6. Climatological Distributions of pH, pCO2, Total CO2, Alkalinity, and CaCO3 Saturation in the Global Surface Ocean (NCEI accession 01645680) (NCEI Accession 0164568)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Climatological mean monthly distributions of pH in the total H+ scale, total CO2 concentration (TCO2), and the degree of CaCO3 saturation for the global surface...

  7. Role of Tyrosine Isomers in Acute and Chronic Diseases Leading to Oxidative Stress - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Gergő A; Kun, Szilárd; Sélley, Eszter; Kertész, Melinda; Szélig, Lívia; Csontos, Csaba; Böddi, Katalin; Bogár, Lajos; Miseta, Attila; Wittmann, István

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of a variety of acute and chronic diseases. Measurement of the oxidative stress-related end products may be performed, e.g. that of structural isomers of the physiological para-tyrosine, namely meta- and ortho-tyrosine, that are oxidized derivatives of phenylalanine. Recent data suggest that in sepsis, serum level of meta-tyrosine increases, which peaks on the 2(nd) and 3(rd) days (ptyrosine excretion correlated with both need of daily insulin dose and the insulin-glucose product in non-diabetic septic cases (ptyrosine excretion, urinary meta-tyrosine/para-tyrosine, urinary ortho-tyrosine/para-tyrosine and urinary (meta- + orthotyrosine)/ para-tyrosine proved to be markers of carbohydrate homeostasis. In a chronic rodent model, we tried to compensate the abnormal tyrosine isomers using para-tyrosine, the physiological amino acid. Rats were fed a standard high cholesterol-diet, and were given para-tyrosine or vehicle orally. High-cholesterol feeding lead to a significant increase in aortic wall meta-tyrosine content and a decreased vasorelaxation of the aorta to insulin and the glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue, liraglutide, that both could be prevented by administration of para-tyrosine. Concluding, these data suggest that meta- and ortho-tyrosine are potential markers of oxidative stress in acute diseases related to oxidative stress, and may also interfere with insulin action in septic humans. Competition of meta- and ortho-tyrosine by supplementation of para-tyrosine may exert a protective role in oxidative stress-related diseases.

  8. Evidence for a tyrosine protonation change during the primary phototransition of bacteriorhodopsin at low temperature.

    OpenAIRE

    Rothschild, K J; Roepe, P; Ahl, P L; Earnest, T N; Bogomolni, R A; Das Gupta, S K; Mulliken, C M; Herzfeld, J

    1986-01-01

    Isotopically labeled tyrosines have been selectively incorporated into bacteriorhodopsin (bR). A comparison of the low-temperature bR570 to K Fourier transform infrared-difference spectra of these samples and normal bR provides information about the role of tyrosine in the primary phototransition. Several tyrosine contributions to the difference spectrum are found. These results and comparison with the spectra of model compounds suggest that a tyrosinate group protonates during the bR570 to K...

  9. Proteome-wide dataset supporting functional study of tyrosine kinases in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicos Angelopoulos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine kinases (TKs play an essential role in regulating various cellular activities and dysregulation of TK signaling contributes to oncogenesis. However, less than half of the TKs have been thoroughly studied. Through a combined use of RNAi and stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC-based quantitative proteomics, a global functional proteomic landscape of TKs in breast cancer was recently revealed highlighting a comprehensive and highly integrated signaling network regulated by TKs (Stebbing et al., 2015 [1]. We collate the enormous amount of the proteomic data in an open access platform, providing a valuable resource for studying the function of TKs in cancer and benefiting the science community. Here we present a detailed description related to this study (Stebbing et al., 2015 [1] and the raw data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the identifier http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002065.

  10. Role of Bruton's tyrosine kinase in B cells and malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal Singh, S. (Simar); F. Dammeijer (Floris); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractBruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a non-receptor kinase that plays a crucial role in oncogenic signaling that is critical for proliferation and survival of leukemic cells in many B cell malignancies. BTK was initially shown to be defective in the primary immunodeficiency X-linked

  11. Anxious moments for the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnan, Navasona; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress can lead to the development of anxiety and mood disorders. Thus, novel therapies for preventing adverse effects of stress are vitally important. Recently, the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B was identified as a novel regulator of stress-induced anxiety. This opens up exciting opportunities to exploit PTP1B inhibitors as anxiolytics.

  12. Eosin-sensitized photooxidation of substituted phenylalanines and tyrosines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzuto, F.; Spikes, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    The cosin-sensitized photooxidation of tyrosine and a number of compounds related to tyrosine (substituted phenylalanines) was studied by steady-state kinetic and flash photolysis techniques. In particular, the role of the phenolic group and the amino and carboxyl groups of the alanyl side chain in the photooxidation mechanism was investigated in detail. Several relationships between substrate structure and susceptibility to photooxidation as well as effects of substrate structure on photooxidation mechanisms were found. For example, phenylalanine is not photooxidizable, but substitution of electron-donating (activating) groups such as -OH (as in tyrosine) or -NH/sub 2/ (as in p-aminophenylalanine) results in rapidly photooxidized derivatives. However, substituting deactivating groups such as -Cl (as in p-chlorophenylalanine) or weakly activating groups such as -OCH/sub 3/ (as in 4-methoxyphenylalanine) result in non-photooxidizable derivatives. Substitution of additional activating groups to the ring of hydroxy-substituted phenylalanines results in increased rates of photooxidation, whereas additional deactivating groups result in decreased photooxidation rates. The rate-determining step in the photooxidation mechanism is shown to be dependent on the presence and position of an electron-donating substituent on the benzenoid ring. Only minor involvement of the side chain amino and carboxyl groups was found. Both singlet oxygen and hydrogen abstraction mechanisms are involved in the eosin-sensitized photooxidation of hydroxy-substituted phenylalanines (e.g., tyrosine). The hydrogen abstraction mechanism probably predominates at both pH 8 and 11.

  13. Isolation of a tyrosine-activating enzyme from baker's yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, A.M. van de; Koningsberger, V.V.; Overbeek, J.Th.G.

    1958-01-01

    The extracts of ether-CO2-frozen baker's yeast contain enzymes that catalyze the ATP-linked amino acid activation by way of pyrophosphate elimination. From the extract a tyrosine-activating enzyme could be isolated, which, judging from ultracentrifugation and electrophoretic data, was about 70% pure

  14. Variability in bioavailability of small molecular tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herbrink, Maikel; Nuijen, Bastiaan; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2015-01-01

    Small molecular tyrosine kinase inhibitors (smTKIs) are in the centre of the very quickly expanding area of personalized chemotherapy and oral applicability thereof. The number of drugs in this class is rapidly growing, with twenty current approvals by both the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and

  15. Expression of tyrosine kinase gene in mouse thymic stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinke de Wit, T. F.; Izon, D. J.; Revilla, C.; Oosterwegel, M.; Bakker, A. Q.; van Ewijk, W.; Kruisbeek, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    Amongst the most important signal transduction molecules involved in regulating growth and differentiation are the protein tyrosine kinases (PTK). Since T cell development is a consequence of interactions between thymic stromal cells (TSC) and thymocytes, identification of the PTK in both

  16. ZDHHC3 Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulates Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Palmitoylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Patricia Marie-Jeanne; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Kochlamazashvili, Gaga; Cesca, Fabrizia; Gorinski, Natalya; Galil, Dalia Abdel; Cherkas, Volodimir; Ronkina, Natalia; Lafera, Juri; Gaestel, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) mediates cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. It is broadly expressed in the nervous system and regulates neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and synaptic plasticity. Previous in vitro studies revealed that palmitoylation of NCAM is required for fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2)-stimulated neurite outgrowth and identified the zinc finger DHHC (Asp-His-His-Cys)-containing proteins ZDHHC3 and ZDHHC7 as specific NCAM-palmitoylating enzymes. Here, we verified that FGF2 controlled NCAM palmitoylation in vivo and investigated molecular mechanisms regulating NCAM palmitoylation by ZDHHC3. Experiments with overexpression and pharmacological inhibition of FGF receptor (FGFR) and Src revealed that these kinases control tyrosine phosphorylation of ZDHHC3 and that ZDHHC3 is phosphorylated by endogenously expressed FGFR and Src proteins. By site-directed mutagenesis, we found that Tyr18 is an FGFR1-specific ZDHHC3 phosphorylation site, while Tyr295 and Tyr297 are specifically phosphorylated by Src kinase in cell-based and cell-free assays. Abrogation of tyrosine phosphorylation increased ZDHHC3 autopalmitoylation, enhanced interaction with NCAM, and upregulated NCAM palmitoylation. Expression of ZDHHC3 with tyrosine mutated in cultured hippocampal neurons promoted neurite outgrowth. Our findings for the first time highlight that FGFR- and Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of ZDHHC3 modulates ZDHHC3 enzymatic activity and plays a role in neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:27247265

  17. Association of connexin43 with a receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G; Feiken, Elles; Gebbink, Martijn F B G; Moolenaar, Wouter H

    2003-01-01

    Connexin-43(Cx43)-based gap junctional communication is transiently inhibited by certain G protein-coupled receptor agonists, including lysophosphatidic acid, endothelin and thrombin. Our previous studies have implicated the c-Src protein tyrosine kinase in mediating closure of Cx43 based gap

  18. Constitutive Activity in an Ancestral Form of Abl Tyrosine Kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadat U Aleem

    Full Text Available The c-abl proto-oncogene encodes a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that is found in all metazoans, and is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian tissues. The Abl tyrosine kinase plays important roles in the regulation of mammalian cell physiology. Abl-like kinases have been identified in the genomes of unicellular choanoflagellates, the closest relatives to the Metazoa, and in related unicellular organisms. Here, we have carried out the first characterization of a premetazoan Abl kinase, MbAbl2, from the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis. The enzyme possesses SH3, SH2, and kinase domains in a similar arrangement to its mammalian counterparts, and is an active tyrosine kinase. MbAbl2 lacks the N-terminal myristoylation and cap sequences that are critical regulators of mammalian Abl kinase activity, and we show that MbAbl2 is constitutively active. When expressed in mammalian cells, MbAbl2 strongly phosphorylates cellular proteins on tyrosine, and transforms cells much more potently than mammalian Abl kinase. Thus, MbAbl2 appears to lack the autoinhibitory mechanism that tightly constrains the activity of mammalian Abl kinases, suggesting that this regulatory apparatus arose more recently in metazoan evolution.

  19. Next generation of adeno-associated virus 2 vectors: Point mutations in tyrosines lead to high-efficiency transduction at lower doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Li; Li, Baozheng; Mah, Cathryn S.; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Cooper, Mario; Herzog, Roland W.; Zolotukhin, Irene; Warrington, Kenneth H.; Weigel-Van Aken, Kirsten A.; Hobbs, Jacqueline A.; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Srivastava, Arun

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors are in use in several Phase I/II clinical trials, but relatively large vector doses are needed to achieve therapeutic benefits. Large vector doses also trigger an immune response as a significant fraction of the vectors fails to traffic efficiently to the nucleus and is targeted for degradation by the host cell proteasome machinery. We have reported that epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase (EGFR-PTK) signaling negatively affects transduction by AAV2 vectors by impairing nuclear transport of the vectors. We have also observed that EGFR-PTK can phosphorylate AAV2 capsids at tyrosine residues. Tyrosine-phosphorylated AAV2 vectors enter cells efficiently but fail to transduce effectively, in part because of ubiquitination of AAV capsids followed by proteasome-mediated degradation. We reasoned that mutations of the surface-exposed tyrosine residues might allow the vectors to evade phosphorylation and subsequent ubiquitination and, thus, prevent proteasome-mediated degradation. Here, we document that site-directed mutagenesis of surface-exposed tyrosine residues leads to production of vectors that transduce HeLa cells ≈10-fold more efficiently in vitro and murine hepatocytes nearly 30-fold more efficiently in vivo at a log lower vector dose. Therapeutic levels of human Factor IX (F.IX) are also produced at an ≈10-fold reduced vector dose. The increased transduction efficiency of tyrosine-mutant vectors is due to lack of capsid ubiquitination and improved intracellular trafficking to the nucleus. These studies have led to the development of AAV vectors that are capable of high-efficiency transduction at lower doses, which has important implications in their use in human gene therapy. PMID:18511559

  20. Sea surface temperature (SST) and surface current data collected from the Mar Mostro during the around-the-world Volvo Ocean Race (VOR) from 2011-11-05 to 2012-07-12 (NCEI Accession 0130694)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Navigation, surface current, sea surface temperature, wind, and atmospheric pressure data collected by the Mar Mostro during the around-the-world Volvo Ocean Race...

  1. Rapid detection and semi-quantification of IgG-accessible Staphylococcus aureus surface-associated antigens using a multiplex competitive Luminex assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansenova Manaskova, S.; Bikker, F.J.; Veerman, E.C.I.; van Belkum, A.; van Wamel, W.J.B.

    2013-01-01

    The surface characterization of Staphylococcus aureus is currently labor intensive and time consuming. Therefore, we developed a novel method for the rapid yet comprehensive characterization of S. aureus cell-surface-associated proteins and carbohydrates, based on a competitive Luminex assay. In

  2. A protein-tyrosine phosphatase with sequence similarity to the SH2 domain of the protein-tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, S H; Bastien, L; Posner, B I; Chrétien, P

    1991-08-22

    The phosphorylation of proteins at tyrosine residues is critical in cellular signal transduction, neoplastic transformation and control of the mitotic cycle. These mechanisms are regulated by the activities of both protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases). As in the PTKs, there are two classes of PTPases: membrane associated, receptor-like enzymes and soluble proteins. Here we report the isolation of a complementary DNA clone encoding a new form of soluble PTPase, PTP1C. The enzyme possesses a large noncatalytic region at the N terminus which unexpectedly contains two adjacent copies of the Src homology region 2 (the SH2 domain) found in various nonreceptor PTKs and other cytoplasmic signalling proteins. As with other SH2 sequences, the SH2 domains of PTP1C formed high-affinity complexes with the activated epidermal growth factor receptor and other phosphotyrosine-containing proteins. These results suggest that the SH2 regions in PTP1C may interact with other cellular components to modulate its own phosphatase activity against interacting substrates. PTPase activity may thus directly link growth factor receptors and other signalling proteins through protein-tyrosine phosphorylation.

  3. Access Contested

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Transforming Global Information and Communication Markets: The Political Economy of ... 8 Control and Resistance: Attacks on Burmese Opposition Media 153 ...... “Reluctant Gatekeepers: Corporate Ethics on a Filtered Internet,” in Access ...

  4. Accessing memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Doe Hyun; Muralimanohar, Naveen; Chang, Jichuan; Ranganthan, Parthasarathy

    2017-09-26

    A disclosed example method involves performing simultaneous data accesses on at least first and second independently selectable logical sub-ranks to access first data via a wide internal data bus in a memory device. The memory device includes a translation buffer chip, memory chips in independently selectable logical sub-ranks, a narrow external data bus to connect the translation buffer chip to a memory controller, and the wide internal data bus between the translation buffer chip and the memory chips. A data access is performed on only the first independently selectable logical sub-rank to access second data via the wide internal data bus. The example method also involves locating a first portion of the first data, a second portion of the first data, and the second data on the narrow external data bus during separate data transfers.

  5. Forbidden Access

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Colloca TS/FM

    2004-01-01

    TS/FM group informs you that, for the replacement of the door of the main entrance at bldg. 500, the access will be closed to the public between 19 and 30 July 2004. Access to the Main Building complex will be assured at any time through both of the side doors and from bldg. 64. For more information, please contact 73273. C. Colloca TS/FM

  6. Upconversion fluorescence tyrosine doped LaF3:Dy quantum dots useful in biolabeling and biotagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit T.; Khandpekar, M. M.

    2018-04-01

    Water soluble hexahedral colloidal quantum dots (QDOTs) of Tyrosine doped LaF3:Dy have been synthesized by wet chemical route. The nanoparticles have been irradiated by microwave during synthesis for drying and also to reduce agglomeration. The coating of the LaF3:Dy nanoparticles by the amino acid tyrosine results in colloidal quantum dots. XRD studies indicates hexagonal lattice and confirms JCPDS data. The average particle size obtained by XRD and SEM are 22.89nm and 25.5nm respectively. The average sizes of nanorods obtained from TEM are 55 nm. The presence of elements has been verified with EDAX and ICP-AES technique. The SAED pattern of the samples shows sharp concentric rings indicating the crystalline nature of the synthesized nanoparticles. The FTIR spectra have been used to study the surface modification of the nanoparticles. The optical studies have been done using UV-visible and PL spectra. The PL spectra showed upconversion nature of the synthesized nanoparticles with sharp emission at 618 nm. The nanoparticles synthesized have potential application as biomaterials in bio imaging and biotagging.

  7. Atomic resolution crystal structure of VcLMWPTP-1 from Vibrio cholerae O395: Insights into a novel mode of dimerization in the low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nath, Seema; Banerjee, Ramanuj; Sen, Udayaditya, E-mail: udayaditya.sen@saha.ac.in

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • VcLMWPTP-1 forms dimer in solution. • The dimer is catalytically active unlike other reported dimeric LMWPTPs. • The formation of extended dimeric surface excludes the active site pocket. • The surface bears closer resemblance to eukaryotic LMWPTPs. - Abstract: Low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMWPTP) is a group of phosphotyrosine phosphatase ubiquitously found in a wide range of organisms ranging from bacteria to mammals. Dimerization in the LMWPTP family has been reported earlier which follows a common mechanism involving active site residues leading to an enzymatically inactive species. Here we report a novel form of dimerization in a LMWPTP from Vibrio cholera 0395 (VcLMWPTP-1). Studies in solution reveal the existence of the dimer in solution while kinetic study depicts the active form of the enzyme. This indicates that the mode of dimerization in VcLMWPTP-1 is different from others where active site residues are not involved in the process. A high resolution (1.45 Å) crystal structure of VcLMWPTP-1 confirms a different mode of dimerization where the active site is catalytically accessible as evident by a tightly bound substrate mimicking ligand, MOPS at the active site pocket. Although being a member of a prokaryotic protein family, VcLMWPTP-1 structure resembles very closely to LMWPTP from a eukaryote, Entamoeba histolytica. It also delineates the diverse surface properties around the active site of the enzyme.

  8. Site specific interaction between ZnO nanoparticles and tyrosine: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satvinder; Singh, Janpreet; Singh, Baljinder; Singh, Gurinder; Kaura, Aman; Tripathi, S. K.

    2018-05-01

    First Principles Calculations have been performed on ZnO/Tyrosine atomic complex to study site specific interaction of Tyrosine and ZnO nanoparticles. Calculated results shows that -COOH group present in Tyrosine is energetically more favorable than -NH2 group. Interactions show ionic bonding between ZnO and Tyrosine. All the calculations have been performed under the Density Functional Theory (DFT) framework. Structural and electronic properties of (ZnO)3/Tyrosine complex have been studied. Gaussian basis set approach has been adopted for the calculations. A ring type most stable (ZnO)3 atomic cluster has been modeled, analyzed and used for the calculations.

  9. Meteorological and surface water observations from the Chesapeake Bay Interpretive Buoy System from 2007-04-25 to 2016-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0159578)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Meteorological and surface water observations from the Chesapeake Bay Interpretive Buoy System. Ten stations are located from the mouth of the Susquehanna river near...

  10. SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE and Other Data from UNKNOWN PLATFORMS From World-Wide Distribution from 18700101 to 19781231 (NODC Accession 8800040)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Each file contains data on Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly analyses on a 1-degree square for each calender month of the period January 1870 through December 1894 (25...

  11. Historical underway surface temperature data collected aboard the ship Skelton Castle on a voyage from England to India, 28 February 1800 to 3 June 1800 (NODC Accession 0095925)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Underway surface air temperature and sea water temperature were collected aboard the Skelton Castle while in route from England to Bombay India as part of the East...

  12. Quality Assurance statistics for AVHRR Pathfinder Version 5.2 L3-Collated (L3C) sea surface temperature in global and selected regions (NODC Accession 0111871)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These quality monitoring data for Pathfinder Version 5.2 (PFV5.2) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) are based on the concept of a Rich Inventory developed by the...

  13. Hourly surface currents measured by high frequency Wellen radars off western Oahu, Hawaii, from September 2002 to May 2003 (NODC Accession 0013113)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A pair of High Frequency Wellen radars (WERA) shore-based at southwest Oahu (Ko'Olina) and northwest Oahu (Kaena), Hawaii measured surface currents over a nine-month...

  14. Temperature profile data from bucket, surface seawater intake, and XBT casts in a world wide distribution from 07 December 1995 to 18 October 1996 (NODC Accession 9600167)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bucket, surface seawater intake, and XBT casts from several vessels in a world wide distribution from December 07, 1995...

  15. The Coral Reef Temperature Anomaly Database (CoRTAD) - Global, 4 km, Sea Surface Temperature and Related Thermal Stress Metrics for 1985-2005 (NODC Accession 0044419)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coral Reef Temperature Anomaly Database (CoRTAD) is a collection of sea surface temperature (SST) and related thermal stress metrics, developed specifically for...

  16. El Niño Rapid Response (ENRR) Field Campaign: Surface Meteorological Data from Kiritimati Island, January-March 2016 (NCEI Accession 0161526)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains surface meteorological data from Kiritimati (Christmas) Island, collected 25 January to 28 March 2016. These data have been corrected for known...

  17. Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) /Jason-3: Near Real-Time Altimetry Validation System (NRTAVS) QA Reports, 2015 - (NCEI Accession 0122600)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Jason-3 is the fourth mission in U.S.-European series of satellite missions that measure the height of the ocean surface. Scheduled to launch in 2015, the mission...

  18. Hourly surface currents measured by High Frequency (HF) Wellen radars (WERA) off western Oahu, Hawaii, from September 2002 to May 2003 (NODC Accession 0013113)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A pair of High Frequency Wellen radars (WERA) shore-based at southwest Oahu (Ko'Olina) and northwest Oahu (Kaena), Hawaii measured surface currents over a nine-month...

  19. SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE and Other Data from AIRCRAFT From NW Atlantic (limit-40 W) from 19761209 to 19761211 (NCEI Accession 7700021)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is Sea Surface Temperature data collected by United States coast guard (USCG), Groton, CT, US. Data was collected between December 9-11, 1976 over the NW...

  20. Formation of tyrosine isomers in aqueous phenylalanine solutions by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aflaki, F.; Salahinejad, M.; Roozbehani, A.

    2009-01-01

    Ortho-tyrosine detection method can be used for detection of irradiated protein rich foods. Tyrosine isomers produced by gamma radiation of aqueous phenylalanine solutions at wide dose levels (0.1-50 k Gy) were examined to obtain basic information for o-tyrosine detection method of irradiated foods. Determination of tyrosines produced in aqueous phenylalanine solutions were carried out by high performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection. The detection limit of o-tyrosine was 0.01 ppm and the linear range of calibration and the relative standard deviation of analysis was 50 ng and 4-13%, respectively. The amounts of the tyrosines increased with the irradiation level up to 10 k Gy and no further tyrosine formation was observed when the dose level was increased. At a constant dose level, the yield of tyrosines initially increased with the phenylalanine concentration, while with further increase of phenylalanine concentration no effect on increase of tyrosine yield was observed. When the dose rate was varying from 2.3 k Gy/h to 1.2 k Gy/h with a total amount of 10 k Gy in each case, there was no significant effect on tyrosine isomers formation was observed. Also the results showed that tyrosine yield was affected by temperature, p H and the presence of oxygen

  1. Tyrosine transport in winter flounder intestine: Interaction with Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musch, M.W.; McConnell, F.M.; Goldstein, L.; Field, M.

    1987-01-01

    Tyrosine absorption across the brush border of the intestinal epithelium of the winter flounder Pseudopleuronectes americanus was studied in Ussing chambers modified to determine early rates of uptake. At 0.1 mM tyrosine, the 4-min rate of uptake (influx) of tyrosine across the brush border averaged 37.5 nmol·cm -2 ·h -1 . Omission of Na decreased influx by 60%, indicting that tyrosine influx occurs, at least in part, by a Na-coupled process. Ouabain inhibited influx by 80%. Inhibition of brush border Na + -K + -2Cl - cotransport by bumetanide, 8-bromo-cyclic GMP, or Cl replacement stimulated tyrosine influx 2.5- to 4-fold. However, atriopeptin III, which also inhibits Na + -K + -2Cl - cotransport, did not stimulate tyrosine influx. Cyclic AMP, which does not appear to inhibit ion cotransport, did not stimulate tyrosine influx. Both cyclic GMP and bumetanide also stimulated the net mucosa-to-serosa tyrosine flux (43 and 29%, respectively) and increased the cellular concentration of tyrosine by 50%. Thus tyrosine's influx is increased to a greater extent than is its transmural flux or its cellular concentration, suggesting that the main change occurs at the brush border and represents large increases in both influx and efflux of tyrosine across this membrane

  2. Autophosphorylation of JAK2 on tyrosines 221 and 570 regulates its activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argetsinger, Lawrence S; Kouadio, Jean-Louis K; Steen, Hanno; Stensballe, Allan; Jensen, Ole N; Carter-Su, Christin

    2004-06-01

    The tyrosine kinase JAK2 is a key signaling protein for at least 20 receptors in the cytokine/hematopoietin receptor superfamily and is a component of signaling by insulin receptor and several G-protein-coupled receptors. However, there is only limited knowledge of the physical structure of JAK2 or which of the 49 tyrosines in JAK2 are autophosphorylated. In this study, mass spectrometry and two-dimensional peptide mapping were used to determine that tyrosines 221, 570, and 1007 in JAK2 are autophosphorylated. Phosphorylation of tyrosine 570 is particularly robust. In response to growth hormone, JAK2 was rapidly and transiently phosphorylated at tyrosines 221 and 570, returning to basal levels by 60 min. Analysis of the sequences surrounding tyrosines 221 and 570 in JAK2 and tyrosines in other proteins that are phosphorylated in response to ligands that activate JAK2 suggests that the YXX[L/I/V] motif is one of the motifs recognized by JAK2. Experiments using JAK2 with tyrosines 221 and 570 mutated to phenylalanine suggest that tyrosines 221 and 570 in JAK2 may serve as regulatory sites in JAK2, with phosphorylation of tyrosine 221 increasing kinase activity and phosphorylation of tyrosine 570 decreasing kinase activity and thereby contributing to rapid termination of ligand activation of JAK2.

  3. The role of GH receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in Stat5 activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J A; Hansen, L H; Wang, X

    1997-01-01

    Stimulation of GH receptors leads to rapid activation of Jak2 kinase and subsequent tyrosine phosphorylation of the GH receptor. Three specific tyrosines located in the C-terminal domain of the GH receptor have been identified as being involved in GH-stimulated transcription of the Spi 2.1 promoter....... Mutated GH receptors lacking all but one of these three tyrosines are able to mediate a transcriptional response when transiently transfected into CHO cells together with a Spi 2.1 promoter/luciferase construct. Similarly, these GH receptors were found to be able to mediate activation of Stat5 DNA......-binding activity, whereas the GH receptor mutant lacking all intracellular tyrosines was not. Synthetic tyrosine phosphorylated peptides corresponding to the GH receptor sequence around the three tyrosines inhibited Stat5 DNA-binding activity while their non-phosphorylated counterparts were ineffective. Tyrosine...

  4. Accessible Knowledge - Knowledge on Accessibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Inge Mette

    2015-01-01

    Although serious efforts are made internationally and nationally, it is a slow process to make our physical environment accessible. In the actual design process, architects play a major role. But what kinds of knowledge, including research-based knowledge, do practicing architects make use of when...... designing accessible environments? The answer to the question is crucially important since it affects how knowledge is distributed and how accessibility can be ensured. In order to get first-hand knowledge about the design process and the sources from which they gain knowledge, 11 qualitative interviews...... were conducted with architects with experience of designing for accessibility. The analysis draws on two theoretical distinctions. The first is research-based knowledge versus knowledge used by architects. The second is context-independent knowledge versus context-dependent knowledge. The practitioners...

  5. Open access

    CERN Document Server

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue. In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber's influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispe...

  6. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and sea surface temperature collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments during R/V Oden cruise Beringia_2005 (EXPOCODE 77DN20050720) in the Northwest Passage, Can. Archipelago, Bering Strait, Chukchi Sea, East Siberian Sea and Arctic Ocean from 2005-07-20 to 2005-08-17 (NCEI Accession 0164210)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0164210 includes Surface underway data collected from R/V Oden in the Northwest Passage, Can. Archipelago, Bering Strait, Chukchi Sea, East Siberian...

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, temperature, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from Surface underway observations using automated Multi-parameter Inorganic Carbon Analyzer (MICA) for autonomous measurement of pH, carbon dioxide (CO2) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and other instruments from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the Gulf of Alaska, North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2006-02-13 to 2006-03-30 (NCEI Accession 0157411)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157411 includes Surface underway, chemical and physical data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the Gulf of Alaska, North Pacific Ocean and South...

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the LAURENCE M. GOULD in the Caribbean Sea, North Pacific Ocean and others from 2002-03-07 to 2012-11-24 (NODC Accession 0083196)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0083196 includes chemical, physical and underway - surface data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the Caribbean Sea, North Pacific Ocean, South...

  9. Identification and optimization of tyrosine hydroxylase activity in Mucuna pruriens DC. var. utilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Pratibha Mehta; Singh, Satendra

    2010-05-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase, an iron containing tetrahydrobiopterin dependent monooxygenase (tyrosine 3-monooxygenase; EC 1.14.16.2), catalyzes the rate-limiting step in which L: -dopa is formed from the substrate L-tyrosine. L-Dopa concentration and activity of L-tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme were measured in roots, stem, leaves, pods, and immature seeds of Mucuna pruriens. Immature seeds contained maximum L-dopa content and mature leaves possessed maximum catalytic activity of tyrosine hydroxylase. Tyrosine hydroxylase from leaf homogenate was characterized as a 55 kDa protein by SDS-PAGE and Western-blot analysis with monoclonal mouse IgG2a tyrosine hydroxylase antibody. The conditions for maximum tyrosine hydroxylase activity from the leaf extract were optimized with respect to temperature, pH, cofactor 6-MPH(4), and divalent metal ions. The tyrosine hydroxylase from leaf extract possessed a K (m) value of 808.63 microM for L-tyrosine at 37 degrees C and pH 6.0. The activity of the enzyme was slightly inhibited at 2,000 microM L-tyrosine. Higher concentrations of the cofactor 6-MPH(4), however, completely inhibited the synthesis of L-dopa. Tyrosine hydroxylase converted specific monophenols such as L-tyrosine (808.63 microM) and tyramine (K (m) 1.1 mM) to diphenols L-dopa and dopamine, respectively. Fe(II) activated the enzyme while higher concentration of other divalent metals reduced its activity. For the first time, tyrosine hydroxylase from M. pruriens is being reported in this study.

  10. A simple and sensitive fluorescent sensor for methyl parathion based on L-tyrosine methyl ester functionalized carbon dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Juying; Dong, Jing; Zhu, Haishuang; Teng, Xue; Ai, Shiyun; Mang, Minglin

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, a simple and sensitive fluorescent sensor for methyl parathion is developed based on L-tyrosine methyl ester functionalized carbon dots (Tyr-CDs) and tyrosinase system. The carbon dots are obtained by simple hydrothermal reaction using citric acid as carbon resource and L-tyrosine methyl ester as modification reagent. The carbon dots are characterized by transmission electron microscope, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrum, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The carbon dots show strong and stable photoluminescence with a quantum yield of 3.8%. Tyrosinase can catalyze the oxidation of tyrosine methyl ester on the surface of carbon dots to corresponding quinone products, which can quench the fluorescence of carbon dots. When organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) are introduced in system, they can decrease the enzyme activity, thus decrease the fluorescence quenching rate. Methyl parathion, as a model of OPs, was detected. Experimental results show that the enzyme inhibition rate is proportional to the logarithm of the methyl parathion concentration in the range 1.0×10(-10)-1.0×10(-4) M with the detection limit (S/N=3) of 4.8×10(-11) M. This determination method shows a low detection limit, wide linear range, good selectivity and high reproducibility. This sensing system has been successfully used for the analysis of cabbage, milk and fruit juice samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. An SH2 domain-based tyrosine kinase assay using biotin ligase modified with a terbium(III) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueda, Shinji; Shinboku, Yuki; Kusaba, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains are modules of approximately 100 amino acids and are known to bind phosphotyrosine-containing sequences with high affinity and specificity. In the present work, we developed an SH2 domain-based assay for Src tyrosine kinase using a unique biotinylation reaction from archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii. S. tokodaii biotinylation has a unique property that biotin protein ligase (BPL) forms a stable complex with its biotinylated substrate protein (BCCP). Here, an SH2 domain from lymphocyte-specific tyrosine kinase was genetically fused to a truncated BCCP, and the resulting fusion protein was labeled through biotinylation with BPL carrying multiple copies of a luminescent Tb(3+) complex. The labeled SH2 fusion proteins were employed to detect a phosphorylated peptide immobilized on the surface of the microtiter plate, where the phosphorylated peptide was produced by phosphorylation to the substrate peptide by Src tyrosine kinase. Our assay allows for a reliable determination of the activity of Src kinase lower than 10 pg/μL by a simple procedure.

  12. Structure determination of T-cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, L.F.; Møller, K. B.; Pedersen, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has recently received much attention as a potential drug target in type 2 diabetes. This has in particular been spurred by the finding that PTP1B knockout mice show increased insulin sensitivity and resistance to diet-induced obesity. Surprisingly, the highly...... homologous T cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase (TC-PTP) has received much less attention, and no x-ray structure has been provided. We have previously co-crystallized PTP1B with a number of low molecular weight inhibitors that inhibit TC-PTP with similar efficiency. Unexpectedly, we were not able to co...... the high degree of functional and structural similarity between TC-PTP and PTP1B, we have been able to identify areas close to the active site that might be addressed to develop selective inhibitors of each enzyme....

  13. Oligonucleotide aptamers against tyrosine kinase receptors: Prospect for anticancer applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camorani, Simona; Crescenzi, Elvira; Fedele, Monica; Cerchia, Laura

    2018-04-01

    Transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play crucial roles in cancer cell proliferation, survival, migration and differentiation. Area of intense research is searching for effective anticancer therapies targeting these receptors and, to date, several monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors have entered the clinic. However, some of these drugs show limited efficacy and give rise to acquired resistance. Emerging highly selective compounds for anticancer therapy are oligonucleotide aptamers that interact with their targets by recognizing a specific three-dimensional structure. Because of their nucleic acid nature, the rational design of advanced strategies to manipulate aptamers for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications is greatly simplified over antibodies. In this manuscript, we will provide a comprehensive overview of oligonucleotide aptamers as next generation strategies to efficiently target RTKs in human cancers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Bone sialoprotein II synthesized by cultured osteoblasts contains tyrosine sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecarot-Charrier, B.; Bouchard, F.; Delloye, C.

    1989-01-01

    Isolated mouse osteoblasts that retain their osteogenic activity in culture were incubated with [35S] sulfate. Two radiolabeled proteins, in addition to proteoglycans, were extracted from the calcified matrix of osteoblast cultures. All the sulfate label in both proteins was in the form of tyrosine sulfate as assessed by amino acid analysis and thin layer chromatography following alkaline hydrolysis. The elution behavior on DEAE-Sephacel of the major sulfated protein and the apparent Mr on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels were characteristic of bone sialoprotein II extracted from rat. This protein was shown to cross-react with an antiserum raised against bovine bone sialoprotein II, indicating that bone sialoprotein II synthesized by cultured mouse osteoblasts is a tyrosine-sulfated protein. The minor sulfated protein was tentatively identified as bone sialoprotein I or osteopontin based on its elution properties on DEAE-Sephacel and anomalous behavior on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels similar to those reported for rat bone sialoprotein I

  15. Novel Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors currently in development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Cruz OJ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Osmond J D'Cruz,1 Fatih M Uckun1,21Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk is intimately involved in multiple signal-transduction pathways regulating survival, activation, proliferation, and differentiation of B-lineage lymphoid cells. Btk is overexpressed and constitutively active in several B-lineage lymphoid malignancies. Btk has emerged as a new antiapoptotic molecular target for treatment of B-lineage leukemias and lymphomas. Preclinical and early clinical results indicate that Btk inhibitors may be useful in the treatment of leukemias and lymphomas.Keywords: tyrosine kinase, personalized therapy, kinase inhibitors, Btk, leukemia, lymphoma

  16. Access French

    CERN Document Server

    Grosz, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Access is the major new language series designed with the needs of today's generation of students firmly in mind. Whether learning for leisure or business purposes or working towards a curriculum qualification, Access French is specially designed for adults of all ages and gives students a thorough grounding in all the skills required to understand, speak, read and write contemporary French from scratch. The coursebook consists of 10 units covering different topic areas, each of which includes Language Focus panels explaining the structures covered and a comprehensive glossary. Learning tips

  17. Proteomic analysis of tyrosine phosphorylation during human liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutros Tarek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R causes a dramatic reprogramming of cell metabolism during liver transplantation and can be linked to an alteration of the phosphorylation level of several cellular proteins. Over the past two decades, it became clear that tyrosine phosphorylation plays a pivotal role in a variety of important signalling pathways and was linked to a wide spectrum of diseases. Functional profiling of the tyrosine phosphoproteome during liver transplantation is therefore of great biological significance and is likely to lead to the identification of novel targets for drug discovery and provide a basis for novel therapeutic strategies. Results Using liver biopsies collected during the early phases of organ procurement and transplantation, we aimed at characterizing the global patterns of tyrosine phosphorylation during hepatic I/R. A proteomic approach, based on the purification of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins followed by their identification using mass spectrometry, allowed us to identify Nck-1, a SH2/SH3 adaptor, as a potential regulator of I/R injury. Using immunoblot, cell fractionation and immunohistochemistry, we demonstrate that Nck-1 phosphorylation, expression and localization were affected in liver tissue upon I/R. In addition, mass spectrometry identification of Nck-1 binding partners during the course of the transplantation also suggested a dynamic interaction between Nck-1 and actin during I/R. Conclusion Taken together, our data suggest that Nck-1 may play a role in I/R-induced actin reorganization, which was previously reported to be detrimental for the hepatocytes of the transplanted graft. Nck-1 could therefore represent a target of choice for the design of new organ preservation strategies, which could consequently help to reduce post-reperfusion liver damages and improve transplantation outcomes.

  18. SH2 domains: modulators of nonreceptor tyrosine kinase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The Src homology 2 (SH2) domain is a sequence-specific phosphotyrosine-binding module present in many signaling molecules. In cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, the SH2 domain is located N-terminally to the catalytic kinase domain (SH1) where it mediates cellular localization, substrate recruitment, and regulation of kinase activity. Initially, structural studies established a role of the SH2 domain stabilizing the inactive state of Src family members. However, biochemical characterization showed ...

  19. Src protein-tyrosine kinase structure and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roskoski, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Src and Src-family protein kinases are proto-oncogenes that play key roles in cell morphology, motility, proliferation, and survival. v-Src (a viral protein) is encoded by the chicken oncogene of Rous sarcoma virus, and Src (the cellular homologue) is encoded by a physiological gene, the first of the proto-oncogenes. From the N- to C-terminus, Src contains an N-terminal 14-carbon myristoyl group, a unique segment, an SH3 domain, an SH2 domain, a protein-tyrosine kinase domain, and a C-terminal regulatory tail. The chief phosphorylation sites of Src include tyrosine 416 that results in activation from autophosphorylation and tyrosine 527 that results in inhibition from phosphorylation by C-terminal Src kinase. In the restrained state, the SH2 domain forms a salt bridge with phosphotyrosine 527, and the SH3 domain binds to the kinase domain via a polyproline type II left-handed helix. The SH2 and SH3 domains occur on the backside of the kinase domain away from the active site where they stabilize a dormant enzyme conformation. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases such as PTPα displace phosphotyrosine 527 from the Src SH2 domain and mediate its dephosphorylation leading to Src kinase activation. C-terminal Src kinase consists of an SH3, SH2, and kinase domain; it lacks an N-terminal myristoyl group and a C-terminal regulatory tail. Its X-ray structure has been determined, and the SH2 lobe occupies a position that is entirely different from that of Src. Unlike Src, the C-terminal Src kinase SH2 and SH3 domains stabilize an active enzyme conformation. Amino acid residues in the αD helix near the catalytic loop in the large lobe of C-terminal Src kinase serve as a docking site for the physiological substrate (Src) but not for an artificial substrate (polyGlu 4 Tyr)

  20. Tyrosine glycosylation is involved in muscle-glycogen synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, I.R.; Tandecarz, J.S.; Kirkman, B.R.; Whelan, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Rabbit-muscle glycogen contains a covalently bound protein having Mr 37,000 that the authors will henceforth refer to as glycogenin. It is completely insoluble in water at pH 5, and may be generated as a precipitate as a result of the combined action on glycogen of α-amylase and glucoamylase, or by treatment with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. In the former case the protein still carries some of the glucose residues of glycogen (10-30 per mole of glycogenin). The linkage between glycogen and glycogenin has been identified as a novel glycosidic-amino acid bond. The authors demonstrated glucosylation with UDP[/sup 14/C]glucose by a muscle extract of two rabbit-muscle proteins contained in the same extract. The relation of these proteins to glycogenin, and whether the amino acid undergoing glucosylation is tyrosine, remains to be explored. The discovery of glycogenin is, the authors believe, an important clue to the mechanism of biogenesis of glycogen and may represent a previously unsuspected means of metabolic control of the glycogen content of the cell and the location of glycogen within the cell. The facts that the linkage between glycogen and glycogenin is via tyrosine, that insulin stimulates glycogen synthesis, and acts on its receptor by causing it to become an active tyrosine kinase, may be linked by a common thread

  1. SH2 domains: modulators of nonreceptor tyrosine kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    The Src homology 2 (SH2) domain is a sequence-specific phosphotyrosine-binding module present in many signaling molecules. In cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, the SH2 domain is located N-terminally to the catalytic kinase domain (SH1) where it mediates cellular localization, substrate recruitment, and regulation of kinase activity. Initially, structural studies established a role of the SH2 domain stabilizing the inactive state of Src family members. However, biochemical characterization showed that the presence of the SH2 domain is frequently required for catalytic activity, suggesting a crucial function stabilizing the active state of many nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Recently, the structure of the SH2-kinase domain of Fes revealed that the SH2 domain stabilizes the active kinase conformation by direct interactions with the regulatory helix alphaC. Stabilizing interactions between the SH2 and the kinase domains have also been observed in the structures of active Csk and Abl. Interestingly, mutations in the SH2 domain found in human disease can be explained by SH2 domain destabilization or incorrect positioning of the SH2. Here we summarize our understanding of mechanisms that lead to tyrosine kinase activation by direct interactions mediated by the SH2 domain and discuss how mutations in the SH2 domain trigger kinase inactivation.

  2. Global Ocean Surface Water Partial Pressure of CO2 Database: Measurements Performed During 1957-2016 (LDEO Database Version 2016) (NCEI Accession 0160492)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Approximately 10.8 million measurements of surface water pCO2 made over the global oceans during 1957-2016 have been processed to make a uniform data file in this...

  3. Monte Carlo investigations on surface elastic energy of spin-crossover solids: Direct access to image pressure and the Eshelby constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukheddaden, Kamel

    2013-10-01

    We present theoretical investigations on surface elastic energy in spin-crossover (SC) solids studied in the frame of a microscopic elastic model, coupling spin, and lattice deformations. Although surface energy plays a crucial role in driving the SC transition, specific quantitative investigations on its effect have been neglected in most of the recent theoretical works based on atomistic descriptions of the SC transitions, resolved by Monte Carlo or by molecular dynamics simulations. Here, we perform a quantitative study of the surface energy resulting from an inserted high-spin (HS) domain in a low-spin (LS) lattice. This situation may be produced experimentally in SC solids, at low temperature, through a photoexcitation by a single pulse laser shot. We demonstrate that the surface energy depends on the ratio between the local molecular volume misfit (between the LS and HS sites) δυ and the lattice volume V, such as Esurf˜δυ2/V for the HS atom at the center of lattice, while it is Esurf˜δυ2/L (L is the length of the lattice) in the case of the HS atom located on the edge of the lattice. We then derived the image pressure (negative in the case of embedded dilatation centers) through the work of the free surface atoms and evaluated the Eshelby constant, which was found equal to γ˜1.90, in very good agreement with the available data of literature. Energetic configuration diagrams in the homogeneous (HS and LS) and heterogeneous (coexistence of HS and LS) are calculated, from which estimations of the macroscopic bulk modulus were deduced.

  4. Gaining Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wand, Sean; Thermos, Adam C.

    1998-01-01

    Explains the issues to consider before a college decides to purchase a card-access system. The benefits of automation, questions involving implementation, the criteria for technology selection, what typical card technology involves, privacy concerns, and the placement of card readers are discussed. (GR)

  5. UV-Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 1: basic principles and properties of tyrosine chromophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Jan M; Shugar, David

    2016-06-01

    Spectroscopic properties of tyrosine residues may be employed in structural studies of proteins. Here we discuss several different types of UV-Vis spectroscopy, like normal, difference and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, and corresponding optical properties of the tyrosine chromophore, phenol, which are used to study protein structure.

  6. Receptor tyrosine kinase mutations in developmental syndromes and cancer: two sides of the same coin

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonell, Laura M.; Kernohan, Kristin D.; Boycott, Kym M.; Sawyer, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are a family of ligand-binding cell surface receptors that regulate a wide range of essential cellular activities, including proliferation, differentiation, cell-cycle progression, survival and apoptosis. As such, these proteins play an important role during development and throughout life; germline mutations in genes encoding RTKs cause several developmental syndromes, while somatic alterations contribute to the pathogenesis of many aggressive cancers. This creates an interesting paradigm in which mutation timing, type and location in a gene leads to different cell signaling and biological responses, and ultimately phenotypic outcomes. In this review, we highlight the roles of RTKs in developmental disorders and cancer. The multifaceted roles of these receptors, their genetic signatures and their signaling during developmental morphogenesis and oncogenesis are discussed. Additionally, we propose that comparative analysis of RTK mutations responsible for developmental syndromes may shed light on those driving tumorigenesis. PMID:26152202

  7. Tyrosine 769 of the keratinocyte growth factor receptor is required for receptor signaling but not endocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceridono, Mara; Belleudi, Francesca; Ceccarelli, Simona; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria

    2005-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor receptor (KGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase expressed on epithelial cells which belongs to the family of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs). Following ligand binding, KGFR is rapidly autophosphorylated on specific tyrosine residues in the intracellular domain, recruits substrate proteins, and is rapidly internalized by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The role of different autophosphorylation sites in FGFRs, and in particular the role of the tyrosine 766 in FGFR1, first identified as PLCγ binding site, has been extensively studied. We analyzed here the possible role of the tyrosine 769 in KGFR, corresponding to tyrosine 766 in FGFR1, in the regulation of KGFR signal transduction and MAPK activation as well as in the control of the endocytic process of KGFR. A mutant KGFR in which tyrosine 769 was substituted by phenylalanine was generated and transfected in NIH3T3 and HeLa cells. Our results indicate that tyrosine 769 is required for the binding to KGFR and tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCγ as well as for the full activation of MAPKs and for cell proliferation through the regulation of FRS2 tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting that this residue represents a key regulator of KGFR signal transduction. Our data also show that tyrosine 769 is not involved in the regulation of the endocytic process of KGFR

  8. Conversion of p-tyrosine to p-tyramine in the isolated perfused rat kidney: Modulation by perfusate concentrations of p-tyrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brier, M.E.; Bowsher, R.R.; Henry, D.P.; Mayer, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    The authors used the isolated perfused rat kidney to evaluate the role of renal decarboxylation of p-tyrosine as the source of urinary p-tyramine. Kidneys were perfused with concentrations of p-tyrosine ranging from 0.02 mM to 2.0 mM. p-Tyramine was measured by a sensitive and specific radioenzymatic assay. An increase in the perfusate concentration of p-tyrosine resulted in a significant increase in p-tyramine production that was blocked by the addition of NSD-1015, an inhibitor of aromatic-1-amino decarboxylase (AADC). They conclude p-tyrosine is the precursor for the renal production of p-tyramine, renal AADC catalyzes the formation of urinary p-tyramine, synthesized p-tyramine is predominantly excreted in the urine, and p-tyramine synthesis is modulated by the arterial delivery of p-tyrosine to the kidney

  9. High-energy supercapacitors based on hierarchical porous carbon with an ultrahigh ion-accessible surface area in ionic liquid electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hui; Xu, Fei; Li, Zenghui; Fu, Ruowen; Wu, Dingcai

    2013-05-01

    A very important yet really challenging issue to address is how to greatly increase the energy density of supercapacitors to approach or even exceed those of batteries without sacrificing the power density. Herein we report the fabrication of a new class of ultrahigh surface area hierarchical porous carbon (UHSA-HPC) based on the pore formation and widening of polystyrene-derived HPC by KOH activation, and highlight its superior ability for energy storage in supercapacitors with ionic liquid (IL) as electrolyte. The UHSA-HPC with a surface area of more than 3000 m2 g-1 shows an extremely high energy density, i.e., 118 W h kg-1 at a power density of 100 W kg-1. This is ascribed to its unique hierarchical nanonetwork structure with a large number of small-sized nanopores for IL storage and an ideal meso-/macroporous network for IL transfer.A very important yet really challenging issue to address is how to greatly increase the energy density of supercapacitors to approach or even exceed those of batteries without sacrificing the power density. Herein we report the fabrication of a new class of ultrahigh surface area hierarchical porous carbon (UHSA-HPC) based on the pore formation and widening of polystyrene-derived HPC by KOH activation, and highlight its superior ability for energy storage in supercapacitors with ionic liquid (IL) as electrolyte. The UHSA-HPC with a surface area of more than 3000 m2 g-1 shows an extremely high energy density, i.e., 118 W h kg-1 at a power density of 100 W kg-1. This is ascribed to its unique hierarchical nanonetwork structure with a large number of small-sized nanopores for IL storage and an ideal meso-/macroporous network for IL transfer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Sample preparation, material characterization, electrochemical characterization and specific mass capacitance and energy density. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00738c

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea, Coastal Waters of Florida and North Atlantic Ocean from 2012-01-27 to 2012-11-24 (NODC Accession 0108232)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108232 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea, Coastal Waters...

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the North Pacific Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and others from 2004-12-30 to 2005-11-20 (NCEI Accession 0148772)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0148772 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the North Pacific Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and...

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from Trans Future 5 in the Bass Strait, Coral Sea and others from 2011-01-04 to 2011-11-22 (NCEI Accession 0157263)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157263 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Trans Future 5 in the Bass Strait, Coral Sea, Inland Sea...

  13. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from NUKA ARCTICA in the Davis Strait, Kattegat and others from 2012-01-10 to 2012-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0157390)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157390 includes Surface underway, chemical and physical data collected from NUKA ARCTICA in the Davis Strait, Kattegat, The Sound, Great Belt, Little...

  14. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from NOAA Ship KA'IMIMOANA in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2010-01-06 to 2010-09-17 (NODC Accession 0115170)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0115170 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from NOAA Ship KA'IMIMOANA in the North Pacific Ocean and...

  15. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2013-06-02 to 2013-06-05 (NCEI Accession 0157234)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157234 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2013-06-02 to...

  16. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from NUKA ARCTICA in the Davis Strait, Kattegat and others from 2007-04-27 to 2008-01-05 (NCEI Accession 0144288)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144288 includes Surface underway data collected from NUKA ARCTICA in the Davis Strait, Kattegat, The Sound, Great Belt, Little Belt, North Atlantic...

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from NUKA ARCTICA in the Baffin Bay, Davis Strait and others from 2013-02-01 to 2013-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0157395)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157395 includes Surface underway, chemical and physical data collected from NUKA ARCTICA in the Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, Kattegat, The Sound, Great...

  18. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station shp by University of South Florida (USF) Coastal Ocean Monitoring and Prediction System (USF) and assembled by Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) in the Coastal Waters of Florida and North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-02-13 to 2015-01-29 (NODC Accession 0118791)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0118791 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2013-08-03 to 2013-08-21 (NCEI Accession 0157420)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157420 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2013-08-03 to...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the Bristol Channel, English Channel and others from 2012-09-13 to 2012-09-25 (NCEI Accession 0157385)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157385 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the Bristol Channel, English Channel,...

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-11-13 to 2012-11-15 (NCEI Accession 0157309)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157309 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-11-13 to...

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-10-19 to 2012-10-20 (NCEI Accession 0157401)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157401 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-10-19 to...

  3. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea and South Atlantic Ocean from 2013-07-28 to 2013-07-31 (NCEI Accession 0157362)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157362 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea and South Atlantic Ocean...

  4. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-11-17 to 2012-12-01 (NCEI Accession 0157330)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157330 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-11-17 to...

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2013-06-08 to 2013-06-17 (NCEI Accession 0157288)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157288 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2013-06-08 to...

  6. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-04-09 to 2012-04-14 (NCEI Accession 0157299)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157299 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-04-09 to...

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2013-10-06 to 2013-10-08 (NCEI Accession 0157364)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157364 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2013-10-06 to...

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the English Channel and North Atlantic Ocean from 2012-03-24 to 2012-04-07 (NCEI Accession 0157273)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157273 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the English Channel and North Atlantic...

  9. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-10-07 to 2012-10-17 (NCEI Accession 0157324)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157324 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-10-07 to...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the Bristol Channel, English Channel and others from 2013-09-10 to 2013-10-02 (NCEI Accession 0157366)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157366 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the Bristol Channel, English Channel,...

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-03-10 to 2012-03-14 (NCEI Accession 0157343)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157343 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-03-10 to...

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-04-24 to 2012-04-25 (NCEI Accession 0157270)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157270 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-04-24 to...

  13. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-09-10 to 2012-09-12 (NCEI Accession 0157400)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157400 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-09-10 to...

  14. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-05-28 to 2012-05-30 (NCEI Accession 0157384)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157384 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-05-28 to...

  15. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-12-01 to 2012-12-04 (NCEI Accession 0157318)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157318 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the North Sea from 2012-12-01 to...

  16. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from Trans Future 5 in the Bass Strait, Coral Sea and others from 2012-01-16 to 2012-12-07 (NCEI Accession 0144347)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144347 includes Surface underway data collected from Trans Future 5 in the Bass Strait, Coral Sea, East China Sea (Tung Hai), Inland Sea (Seto...

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Thin film type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from 2009-01-04 to 2009-02-09 (NODC Accession 0108227)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108227 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from unknown platforms in the world-wide oceans from 1968-11-16 to 2007-12-31 (NODC Accession 0101726)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0101726 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from unknown platforms in the world-wide oceans from...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from L'ASTROLABE in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and others from 1996-10-21 to 1996-11-23 (NCEI Accession 0157233)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157233 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological, optical and physical data collected from L'ASTROLABE in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MN COLIBRI in the Alboran Sea, Balearic Sea and others from 2015-02-26 to 2016-01-05 (NCEI Accession 0157253)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157253 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from MN COLIBRI in the Alboran Sea, Balearic (or Iberian) Sea,...

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from L'ASTROLABE in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and others from 1997-02-02 to 1997-02-17 (NCEI Accession 0157416)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157416 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological, optical and physical data collected from L'ASTROLABE in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific...

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from RIO BLANCO in the English Channel, Mediterranean Sea and others from 2009-12-13 to 2010-12-14 (NODC Accession 0117291)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0117291 includes Surface underway data collected from RIO BLANCO in the English Channel, Mediterranean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean...

  3. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from Santa Cruz in the English Channel, North Atlantic Ocean and others from 2014-01-17 to 2014-02-28 (NCEI Accession 0157404)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157404 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Santa Cruz in the English Channel, North Atlantic Ocean,...

  4. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Thin film type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from 2011-01-15 to 2011-02-18 (NODC Accession 0114448)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0114448 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from...

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the KEIFU MARU in the East China Sea (Tung Hai), North Pacific Ocean and others from 2001-01-20 to 2011-03-22 (NODC Accession 0081044)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0081044 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from KEIFU MARU in the East China Sea (Tung Hai), North...

  6. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Micro-porous membrane equilibrator and other instruments from WAKATAKA MARU in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Pacific Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2011-06-10 to 2011-12-06 (NCEI Accession 0157428)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157428 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from WAKATAKA MARU in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Pacific...

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Micro-porous membrane equilibrator and other instruments from WAKATAKA MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2012-06-25 to 2012-10-21 (NCEI Accession 0157435)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157435 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from WAKATAKA MARU in the North Pacific Ocean from 2012-06-25...

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Micro-porous membrane equilibrator and other instruments from SOYO-MARU in the North Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea and South Atlantic Ocean from 2012-04-10 to 2012-11-30 (NCEI Accession 0157371)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157371 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from SOYO-MARU in the North Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea and...

  9. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the USS BOLD in the Gulf of Mexico from 2006-06-06 to 2006-09-11 (NODC Accession 0117493)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117493 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from USS BOLD in the Gulf of Mexico from 2006-06-06 to...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the CAPE HATTERAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2009-01-09 to 2010-03-21 (NODC Accession 0115765)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115765 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from CAPE HATTERAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2009-01-09 to...

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the JAMES CLARK ROSS in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea and others from 2012-11-15 to 2013-08-16 (NODC Accession 0115256)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115256 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from JAMES CLARK ROSS in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea,...

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from L'ASTROLABE in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and others from 2002-10-16 to 2006-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0157276)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157276 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from L'ASTROLABE in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean,...

  13. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station fhp by University of South Florida (USF) Coastal Ocean Monitoring and Prediction System (USF) and assembled by Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) in the Coastal Waters of Florida, Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-02-13 to 2015-01-29 (NODC Accession 0118789)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0118789 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  14. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station ilm3 by Coastal Ocean Research and Monitoring Program (CORMP) and assembled by Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-02-13 to 2016-02-01 (NODC Accession 0118742)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Accession 0118742 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention (CF)...

  15. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from Trans Future 5 in the Bass Strait, Coral Sea and others from 2010-01-06 to 2010-12-08 (NCEI Accession 0157308)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157308 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Trans Future 5 in the Bass Strait, Coral Sea, Inland Sea...

  16. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the Caribbean Sea, Coastal Waters of Florida and others from 2006-02-16 to 2006-12-02 (NODC Accession 0081021)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0081021 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological, optical and physical data collected from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the Caribbean Sea,...

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from CONTSHIP WASHINGTON in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2007-09-22 to 2007-11-10 (NODC Accession 0080968)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0080968 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CONTSHIP WASHINGTON in the North Pacific Ocean and South...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from NOAA Ship McARTHUR II in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska, Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary and others from 2007-06-05 to 2007-07-26 (NODC Accession 0109934)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0109934 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from NOAA Ship McARTHUR II in the Coastal Waters of SE...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MARION DUFRESNE in the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden and others from 1999-10-18 to 1999-11-01 (NCEI Accession 0157283)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157283 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological, optical and physical data collected from MARION DUFRESNE in the Arabian Sea, Gulf of...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the Atlantic Companion in the Inner Sea - West Coast Scotland, Irish Sea and St. George's Channel and North Atlantic Ocean from 2006-06-11 to 2007-11-05 (NODC Accession 0115226)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115226 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from Atlantic Companion in the Inner Sea - West Coast...

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans from 1998-01-21 to 1998-12-28 (NODC Accession 0081003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0081003 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological, optical and physical data collected from MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean and Southern...

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from 2008-01-05 to 2008-02-05 (NODC Accession 0081001)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0081001 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological, optical and physical data collected from MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from...

  3. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and underway - surface observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the MIRAI in the Coral Sea, North Pacific Ocean and others from 2009-04-10 to 2009-07-03 (NODC Accession 0108084)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108084 includes chemical, discrete sample, meteorological, physical, profile and underway - surface data collected from MIRAI in the Coral Sea, North...

  4. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway, discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from MIRAI in the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2007-10-08 to 2007-12-26 (NODC Accession 0108123)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108123 includes Surface underway, discrete sample and profile data collected from MIRAI in the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific...

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from New Century 2 in the Caribbean Sea, Coastal Waters of Florida and others from 2015-03-16 to 2015-10-23 (NCEI Accession 0157369)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157369 includes Surface underway, chemical and physical data collected from New Century 2 in the Caribbean Sea, Coastal Waters of Florida, Coastal...

  6. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from NOAA Ship KA'IMIMOANA in the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2008-02-02 to 2008-11-16 (NODC Accession 0081043)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0081043 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from NOAA Ship KA'IMIMOANA in the Hawaiian Islands Humpback...

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from unknown platforms in the world-wide oceans from 1968-11-16 to 2011-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0157631)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157631 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological, navigational and physical data collected from unknown platforms in the world-wide oceans...

  8. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station tarponbay by Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation River, Estuary and Coastal Observing Network (SCCF) and assembled by Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) in the Coastal Waters of Florida, Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-02-13 to 2016-05-31 (NODC Accession 0118785)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0118785 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  9. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MN COLIBRI in the Alboran Sea, English Channel and others from 2010-03-30 to 2011-01-02 (NCEI Accession 0157320)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157320 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from MN COLIBRI in the Alboran Sea, English Channel, Ligurian...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MN COLIBRI in the English Channel and North Atlantic Ocean from 2011-01-07 to 2011-01-17 (NCEI Accession 0157367)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157367 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from MN COLIBRI in the English Channel and North Atlantic...

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the English Channel and North Sea from 2013-07-11 to 2013-07-23 (NCEI Accession 0157281)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157281 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the English Channel and North Sea from...

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MN COLIBRI in the English Channel and North Atlantic Ocean from 2016-01-07 to 2016-05-30 (NCEI Accession 0160554)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0160554 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from MN COLIBRI in the English Channel and North Atlantic...

  13. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the English Channel, North Atlantic Ocean and North Sea from 2013-10-12 to 2013-10-22 (NCEI Accession 0157304)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157304 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the English Channel, North Atlantic...

  14. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from Cap San Lorenzo in the English Channel, North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2016-01-29 to 2016-07-27 (NCEI Accession 0160551)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0160551 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Cap San Lorenzo in the English Channel, North Atlantic...

  15. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the Bristol Channel, English Channel and others from 2013-05-08 to 2013-05-28 (NCEI Accession 0157373)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157373 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the Bristol Channel, English Channel,...

  16. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the Bristol Channel, English Channel and others from 2013-04-19 to 2013-05-08 (NCEI Accession 0157305)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157305 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the Bristol Channel, English Channel,...

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the Bristol Channel, English Channel and others from 2012-09-27 to 2012-10-04 (NCEI Accession 0157267)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157267 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the Bristol Channel, English Channel,...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from Cap San Lorenzo in the English Channel, Mediterranean Sea and others from 2015-02-28 to 2015-12-16 (NCEI Accession 0157377)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157377 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Cap San Lorenzo in the English Channel, Mediterranean...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the English Channel, North Atlantic Ocean and North Sea from 2012-02-18 to 2012-02-29 (NCEI Accession 0157300)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157300 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the English Channel, North Atlantic...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the Bristol Channel, English Channel and others from 2013-02-03 to 2013-02-13 (NCEI Accession 0157382)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157382 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the Bristol Channel, English Channel,...

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the Bristol Channel, English Channel and others from 2012-10-23 to 2012-11-09 (NCEI Accession 0157241)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157241 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from CEFAS ENDEAVOUR in the Bristol Channel, English Channel,...

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the METEOR in the English Channel, Indian Ocean and others from 1994-10-12 to 1994-11-12 (NODC Accession 0115605)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115605 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from METEOR in the English Channel, Indian Ocean, North...

  3. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from U-GLOS Station 45026, Near Cook Nuclear Plant, by LimnoTech and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-01 to 2017-08-31 (NODC Accession 0123647)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123647 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  4. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the XUE LONG in the Bali Sea, Celebes Sea and others from 2007-11-12 to 2008-04-12 (NODC Accession 0108235)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108235 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from XUE LONG in the Bali Sea, Celebes Sea, East China Sea...

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from unknown platforms in the Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea and others from 2012-01-01 to 2012-12-31 (NODC Accession 0059946)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0059946 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from unknown platforms in the Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea,...

  6. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from ROGER REVELLE in the Andaman Sea or Burma Sea, Bali Sea and others from 2016-02-08 to 2016-09-22 (NCEI Accession 0160548)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0160548 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from ROGER REVELLE in the Andaman Sea or Burma Sea, Bali Sea,...

  7. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from unknown platforms in the Arabian Sea, Bering Sea and others from 1955-01-01 to 1974-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0157456)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157456 includes Surface underway, chemical and physical data collected from unknown platforms in the Arabian Sea, Bering Sea, Caribbean Sea, Coastal...

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, thermosalinographs and other instruments from JAMES CLARK ROSS in the South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2009-03-11 to 2009-04-17 (NCEI Accession 0157275)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157275 includes Surface underway, chemical and physical data collected from JAMES CLARK ROSS in the South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  9. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, PAR Sensor and other instruments from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 1997-11-25 to 1997-12-08 (NCEI Accession 0157301)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157301 includes Surface underway, biological, chemical, optical and physical data collected from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the South Pacific Ocean and...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, thermosalinographs and other instruments from JAMES CLARK ROSS in the South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2008-01-02 to 2008-02-17 (NCEI Accession 0157284)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157284 includes Surface underway, chemical and physical data collected from JAMES CLARK ROSS in the South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from New Century 2 in the Bering Sea, Caribbean Sea and others from 2014-04-11 to 2015-01-12 (NCEI Accession 0157356)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157356 includes Surface underway, chemical and physical data collected from New Century 2 in the Bering Sea, Caribbean Sea, Coastal Waters of...

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from NOAA Ship DAVID STARR JORDAN in the Gulf of California and North Pacific Ocean from 2006-08-06 to 2006-12-07 (NODC Accession 0084176)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0084176 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from NOAA Ship DAVID STARR JORDAN in the Gulf of California...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and underway - surface observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the MIRAI in the Bismarck Sea, North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2005-05-25 to 2005-07-02 (NODC Accession 0108081)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108081 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical, profile and underway - surface data collected from MIRAI in the Bismarck Sea, North Pacific...

  14. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the Caribbean Sea, Coastal Waters of Florida and others from 2003-02-06 to 2003-11-21 (NODC Accession 0081017)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0081017 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological, optical and physical data collected from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the Caribbean Sea,...

  15. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from Toledo Low Service Pump Station by LimnoTech and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2015-05-12 to 2017-08-31 (NCEI Accession 0130072)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0130072 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  16. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station 45165, Monroe, MI, by LimnoTech and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-08-07 to 2017-08-31 (NODC Accession 0123661)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123661 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  17. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station bgsusd2, Sandusky Bay 2, by Bowling Green State University and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2017-06-10 to 2017-08-31 (NCEI Accession 0163831)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163831 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the XUE LONG in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and Bering Sea from 2008-07-30 to 2008-09-11 (NODC Accession 0109932)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0109932 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from XUE LONG in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and Bering...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from AEGAEO in the Aegean Sea and Mediterranean Sea from 2006-02-08 to 2006-02-13 (NODC Accession 0084543)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0084543 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from AEGAEO in the Aegean Sea and Mediterranean Sea from...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the Arabian Sea, Arafura Sea and others from 1999-01-14 to 1999-12-02 (NODC Accession 0081013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0081013 includes Surface underway, chemical and physical data collected from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the Arabian Sea, Arafura Sea, Bay of Bengal,...

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the ROGER REVELLE in the Bay of Bengal and Indian Ocean from 2007-03-22 to 2007-04-28 (NODC Accession 0108120)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108120 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from ROGER REVELLE in the Bay of Bengal and...

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from SKOGAFOSS in the North Atlantic Ocean and Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary from 2007-01-07 to 2007-06-04 (NODC Accession 0112887)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0112887 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from SKOGAFOSS in the North Atlantic Ocean and Stellwagen Bank...

  3. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from Ryofu Maru in the East China Sea, North Pacific Ocean and others from 2010-04-15 to 2013-09-13 (NODC Accession 0117056)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0117056 includes Surface underway data collected from Ryofu Maru in the East China Sea (Tung Hai), North Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea and South...

  4. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from RYOFU MARU in the Bismarck Sea, North Pacific Ocean and others from 1983-01-19 to 1989-02-06 (NODC Accession 0080988)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0080988 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from RYOFU MARU in the Bismarck Sea, North Pacific Ocean,...

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from S.A. AGULHAS II in the Gulf of Guinea, North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2012-12-06 to 2014-02-11 (NCEI Accession 0160546)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0160546 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from S.A. AGULHAS II in the Gulf of Guinea, North Atlantic...

  6. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from COLUMBUS WAIKATO in the Bass Strait, North Pacific Ocean and others from 2004-03-03 to 2006-01-15 (NODC Accession 0080979)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0080979 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from COLUMBUS WAIKATO in the Bass Strait, North Pacific Ocean,...

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the SKOGAFOSS in the North Atlantic Ocean and Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary from 2003-11-20 to 2003-12-21 (NODC Accession 0112929)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112929 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from SKOGAFOSS in the North Atlantic Ocean and Stellwagen...

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the SOUTHERN SURVEYOR in the Coral Sea, Indian Ocean and others from 2012-04-11 to 2012-07-25 (NODC Accession 0115295)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115295 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from SOUTHERN SURVEYOR in the Coral Sea, Indian Ocean, South...

  9. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from Gibraltar Island Station by Ohio State University; Stone Laboratory and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2015-05-26 to 2017-08-31 (NCEI Accession 0130545)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0130545 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from WECOMA in the Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary, Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary and others from 2011-08-12 to 2011-08-30 (NCEI Accession 0157448)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157448 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from WECOMA in the Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary,...

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1996-06-06 to 1996-06-19 (NCEI Accession 0157375)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157375 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1996-06-06 to...

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from Atlantic Cartier in the Inner Sea - West Coast Scotland, Irish Sea and St. George's Channel and North Atlantic Ocean from 2015-09-12 to 2015-12-22 (NCEI Accession 0157236)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157236 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Atlantic Cartier in the Inner Sea - West Coast Scotland,...

  13. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from NUKA ARCTICA in the Davis Strait, Kattegat and others from 2011-02-09 to 2011-12-26 (NCEI Accession 0157346)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157346 includes Surface underway, chemical and physical data collected from NUKA ARCTICA in the Davis Strait, Kattegat, The Sound, Great Belt, Little...

  14. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station Port of Albany weather/hydro by Hudson River Environmental Conditions Observing System (HRECOS) and assembled by Mid-Atlantic Regional Association Coastal Ocean Observing System (MARACOOS) in the Hudson River from 2011-01-04 to 2017-07-31 (NCEI Accession 0163364)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163364 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected at Port of Albany weather/hydro, a fixed station in the Hudson River. These...

  15. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic Ocean from 2003-02-08 to 2004-01-03 (NODC Accession 0081032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0081032 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea,...

  16. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from Avon Lake Pump Station by Avon Lake Regional Water and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2015-06-28 to 2017-08-31 (NCEI Accession 0130546)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0130546 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  17. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station Sandusky Bay by Bowling Green State University and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2015-07-04 to 2017-08-31 (NCEI Accession 0155656)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0155656 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from L'ATALANTE in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1994-09-23 to 1994-10-30 (NCEI Accession 0157463)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157463 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from L'ATALANTE in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic Ocean from 2005-01-02 to 2005-12-18 (NODC Accession 0109924)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0109924 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea,...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from JOHAN HJORT in the Barents Sea, North Sea and others from 2007-11-15 to 2008-06-08 (NCEI Accession 0157398)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157398 includes Surface underway, chemical and physical data collected from JOHAN HJORT in the Barents Sea, North Sea, Norwegian Sea and Skagerrak...

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from G.O. SARS in the Barents Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and others from 2009-01-18 to 2009-07-17 (NCEI Accession 0157383)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157383 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from G.O. SARS in the Barents Sea, North Atlantic Ocean, North...

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from Trans Future 5 in the Bass Strait, Coral Sea and others from 2015-01-10 to 2015-11-01 (NCEI Accession 0157329)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157329 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Trans Future 5 in the Bass Strait, Coral Sea, Inland Sea...

  3. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from Trans Future 5 in the Bass Strait, Coral Sea and others from 2012-12-18 to 2014-01-02 (NCEI Accession 0157271)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157271 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Trans Future 5 in the Bass Strait, Coral Sea, Inland Sea...

  4. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the SOUTHERN SURVEYOR in the Bass Strait, Coral Sea and others from 2008011 to 2010-10-31 (NODC Accession 0115181)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115181 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from SOUTHERN SURVEYOR in the Bass Strait, Coral Sea, Great...

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from RYOFU MARU in the Bismarck Sea, East China Sea and others from 1989-11-17 to 1992-03-09 (NCEI Accession 0157056)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157056 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from RYOFU MARU in the Bismarck Sea, East China Sea (Tung...

  6. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station racypoint by Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FLDEP) and assembled by Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) in the Coastal Waters of Florida and North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-03-07 to 2016-04-28 (NODC Accession 0118777)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0118777 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from Atlantic Companion in the Inner Sea - West Coast Scotland, Irish Sea and St. George's Channel and others from 2012-03-17 to 2012-12-06 (NCEI Accession 0157280)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157280 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Atlantic Companion in the Inner Sea - West Coast...

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity and salinity collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from ARMORIQUE in the English Channel from 2013-03-15 to 2013-12-22 (NCEI Accession 0157444)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157444 includes Surface underway, chemical and physical data collected from ARMORIQUE in the English Channel from 2013-03-15 to 2013-12-22. These...

  9. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station melbourne by Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FLDEP) and assembled by Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) in the Coastal Waters of Florida and North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-02-13 to 2016-04-29 (NODC Accession 0118773)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0118773 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  10. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station c21 by University of South Florida (USF) Coastal Ocean Monitoring and Prediction System (USF) and assembled by Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) in the Coastal Waters of Florida, Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-02-13 to 2014-12-14 (NODC Accession 0118788)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0118788 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from unknown platforms in the Andaman Sea or Burma Sea, Arabian Sea and others from 1957-10-21 to 1963-08-15 (NCEI Accession 0157734)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157734 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from unknown platforms in the Andaman Sea or Burma Sea,...

  12. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station ATW20 by University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-01 to 2017-08-31 (NODC Accession 0123639)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123639 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  13. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station Sodus Bay South (ESF2) by State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-01 to 2017-08-31 (NODC Accession 0123654)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123654 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  14. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Thin film type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from 2013-02-10 to 2013-03-09 (NODC Accession 0116410)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0116410 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological, optical and physical data collected from MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from...

  15. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Thin film type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from 2012-01-25 to 2012-03-07 (NODC Accession 0116411)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116411 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from...

  16. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from HUDSON, KNORR and others in the Alboran Sea, Arabian Sea and others from 1977-11-07 to 1990-04-16 (NODC Accession 9400165)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 9400165 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from HUDSON, KNORR, NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE, MELVILLE,...

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Thin film type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from 2009-12-24 to 2010-01-22 (NODC Accession 0108228)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108228 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Thin film type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the POLARSTERN in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1995-11-09 to 1995-12-01 (NODC Accession 0112941)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112941 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from POLARSTERN in the North Atlantic Ocean and South...

  19. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station redbaypoint by Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FLDEP) and assembled by Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) in the Coastal Waters of Florida and North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-02-13 to 2016-04-28 (NODC Accession 0118778)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0118778 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from POLARSTERN in the North Atlantic Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and others from 2016-02-20 to 2016-05-08 (NCEI Accession 0160572)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0160572 includes Surface underway, chemical and meteorological data collected from POLARSTERN in the North Atlantic Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean, South...

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from KEIFU MARU in the East China Sea, North Pacific Ocean and others from 2001-01-20 to 2012-06-12 (NODC Accession 0116978)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0116978 includes Surface underway data collected from KEIFU MARU in the East China Sea (Tung Hai), North Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea, Sea of Japan...

  2. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station Middle Bay Light, AL by Dauphin Island Sea Laboratory (DISL) and assembled by Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System (GCOOS) in the Coastal waters of Alabama and Gulf of Mexico from 2008-01-01 to 2017-05-03 (NCEI Accession 0163754)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163754 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  3. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station apachepier by Long Bay Hypoxia Monitoring Consortium (LBHMC) and assembled by Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-02-13 to 2015-07-09 (NODC Accession 0118794)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Accession 0118794 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention (CF)...

  4. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the SKOGAFOSS in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Greenland Sea and Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary from 2006-03-15 to 2007-01-04 (NODC Accession 0112932)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112932 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from SKOGAFOSS in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Greenland...

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the SKOGAFOSS in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Labrador Sea and others from 2005-01-07 to 2005-12-06 (NODC Accession 0112931)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112931 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from SKOGAFOSS in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Labrador Sea,...

  6. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from SOGEN MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 1991-10-08 to 1991-12-31 (NODC Accession 0080991)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0080991 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from SOGEN MARU in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea...

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from RYOFU MARU in the Bismarck Sea, North Pacific Ocean and others from 1983-01-19 to 1989-02-06 (NCEI Accession 0157286)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157286 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from RYOFU MARU in the Bismarck Sea, North Pacific Ocean,...

  8. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station Perdido Pass, AL by Dauphin Island Sea Laboratory (DISL) and assembled by Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System (GCOOS) in the Coastal waters of Alabama and Gulf of Mexico from 2011-11-07 to 2017-04-30 (NCEI Accession 0163767)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163767 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  9. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station Bon Secour, LA by Dauphin Island Sea Laboratory (DISL) and assembled by Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System (GCOOS) in the Coastal waters of Alabama and Gulf of Mexico from 2011-01-01 to 2017-05-02 (NCEI Accession 0163204)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163204 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from Hakuho Maru in the Bali Sea, Bismarck Sea and others from 1968-11-16 to 1988-03-23 (NODC Accession 0080981)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0080981 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Hakuho Maru in the Bali Sea, Bismarck Sea, Celebes Sea...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Autonomous sensor to measure dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and other instruments from SHIRASE in the Bali Sea, Celebes Sea and others from 1992-11-15 to 1993-03-20 (NODC Accession 0080990)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0080990 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from SHIRASE in the Bali Sea, Celebes Sea (Sulawesi Sea and...

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Autonomous sensor to measure dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from Hakuho Maru in the Bismarck Sea, Coral Sea and others from 1990-09-03 to 2002-01-21 (NODC Accession 0080982)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0080982 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Hakuho Maru in the Bismarck Sea, Coral Sea, Indian Ocean,...

  13. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from unknown platforms in the world-wide oceans from 1996-01-01 to 2004-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0157733)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157733 includes Surface underway and chemical data collected from unknown platforms in the world-wide oceans from 1996-01-01 to 2004-12-31. These...

  14. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station c12 by University of South Florida (USF) Coastal Ocean Monitoring and Prediction System (USF) and assembled by Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) in the Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-02-13 to 2016-05-11 (NODC Accession 0118787)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0118787 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  15. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station redfishpass by Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation River, Estuary and Coastal Observing Network (SCCF) and assembled by Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) in the Coastal Waters of Florida, Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-02-13 to 2016-05-31 (NODC Accession 0118783)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0118783 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  16. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway, discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the Bismarck Sea, Coral Sea and others from 1993-10-05 to 1993-11-10 (NODC Accession 0115019)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0115019 includes Surface underway, chemical, discrete sample, meteorological, physical and profile data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the...

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and underway - surface observations using CTD, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1994-04-03 to 1994-05-21 (NODC Accession 0115002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115002 includes chemical, discrete sample, meteorological, physical, profile and underway - surface data collected from KNORR in the North Atlantic...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using gas chromatograph and other instruments from the LILLOOET in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska, Coral Sea and others from 1988-02-04 to 1988-02-20 (NODC Accession 0000439)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0000439 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from LILLOOET in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska, Coral Sea,...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from L'ATALANTE in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1994-11-05 to 1994-11-29 (NCEI Accession 0157470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157470 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from L'ATALANTE in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MARION DUFRESNE in the Arabian Sea, Bali Sea and others from 1991-01-05 to 1993-08-08 (NCEI Accession 0157100)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157100 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from MARION DUFRESNE in the Arabian Sea, Bali Sea, Gulf of...

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from Trans Future 5 in the Bass Strait, Coral Sea and others from 2014-01-02 to 2015-07-15 (NCEI Accession 0157240)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157240 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Trans Future 5 in the Bass Strait, Coral Sea, Inland Sea...

  2. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station Schodack Island hydro/weather by Hudson River Environmental Conditions Observing System (HRECOS) and assembled by Mid-Atlantic Regional Association Coastal Ocean Observing System (MARACOOS) in the Hudson River from 2008-04-25 to 2017-05-31 (NCEI Accession 0163416)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163416 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected at Schodack Island hydro/weather, a fixed station in the Hudson River. These...

  3. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from POLARSTERN in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea and others from 2011-06-17 to 2012-01-04 (NCEI Accession 0157242)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157242 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from POLARSTERN in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea, Kara Sea,...

  4. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from POLARSTERN in the Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea and others from 2014-03-09 to 2015-01-31 (NCEI Accession 0160489)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0160489 includes Surface underway, chemical and meteorological data collected from POLARSTERN in the Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea, Alboran Sea, Arabian...

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE in the Arabian Sea, Arafura Sea and others from 1995-02-13 to 1996-01-29 (NCEI Accession 0157103)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157103 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological, optical and physical data collected from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE in the Arabian Sea,...

  6. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from METEOR in the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Oman and Indian Ocean from 1995-07-14 to 1995-08-14 (NCEI Accession 0157410)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157410 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from METEOR in the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Oman and Indian Ocean...

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the KNORR in the Andaman Sea or Burma Sea, Arabian Sea and others from 1994-12-01 to 1996-01-21 (NODC Accession 0115589)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115589 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from KNORR in the Andaman Sea or Burma Sea, Arabian Sea, Bay...

  8. NOAA Daily 25km Global Optimally Interpolated Sea Surface Temperature (OISST) in situ and AVHRR analysis supplemented with AVHRR Pathfinder Version 5.0 climatological SST for inland and coastal pixels, 1981-09-01 through 2010-12-31 (NODC Accession 0071180)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains the daily 25km global Optimally Interpolated Sea Surface Temperature (OISST) in situ and AVHRR analysis, supplemented with AVHRR Pathfinder...

  9. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from ROGER REVELLE in the South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2005-01-06 to 2005-02-19 (NCEI Accession 0144243)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144243 includes Surface underway data collected from ROGER REVELLE in the South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees South) from...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the Drifting Buoy in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and others from 2001-11-20 to 2007-05-08 (NODC Accession 0117495)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117495 includes Surface underway, biological, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Drifting Buoy in the Indian Ocean, South...

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and underway - surface observations using CTD, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1991-09-02 to 1991-09-26 (NODC Accession 0115001)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115001 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical, profile and underway - surface data collected from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from...

  12. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station gulfofmexico by Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation River, Estuary and Coastal Observing Network (SCCF) and assembled by Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) in the Coastal Waters of Florida, Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-02-13 to 2016-05-31 (NODC Accession 0118782)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0118782 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  13. DELTA CARBON-14 collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from unknown platforms in the Arabian Sea, Bali Sea and others from 1751-01-01 to 2004-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0157105)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157105 includes Surface underway and chemical data collected from unknown platforms in the Arabian Sea, Bali Sea, Makassar Strait, North Pacific...

  14. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from THALASSA in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2012-08-19 to 2012-09-10 (NODC Accession 0117712)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117712 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from THALASSA in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2012-08-19 to...

  15. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2011-06-28 to 2011-07-13 (NODC Accession 0117690)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117690 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2011-06-28 to...

  16. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station RECON Erie, Cleveland (CLV), by Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-24 to 2017-08-31 (NODC Accession 0123652)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123652 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  17. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from 45171, Granite Island Buoy, by Northern Michigan University and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2015-07-09 to 2017-08-31 (NCEI Accession 0130588)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0130588 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  18. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station Sodus Bay Center (ESF5) by State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-01 to 2017-08-31 (NODC Accession 0123657)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123657 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  19. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from Sodus Bay Weather Station (ESF4) by State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-15 to 2017-08-31 (NODC Accession 0123656)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123656 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  20. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from U-GLOS Station 004, Little Traverse Bay, by University of Michigan and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-01 to 2017-08-31 (NODC Accession 0123643)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123643 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  1. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from RECON Alpena, Thunder Bay Buoy, by Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes and Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary region from 2016-05-19 to 2017-08-31 (NCEI Accession 0137891)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0137891 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from Natalie Schulte in the Bass Strait, North Pacific Ocean and others from 2010-10-01 to 2012-06-21 (NODC Accession 0108233)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108233 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Natalie Schulte in the Bass Strait, North Pacific Ocean,...

  3. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station Katrina Cut, AL by Dauphin Island Sea Laboratory (DISL) and assembled by Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System (GCOOS) in the Coastal waters of Alabama and Gulf of Mexico from 2011-04-15 to 2017-05-04 (NCEI Accession 0163673)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163673 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  4. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station 2ndave by Long Bay Hypoxia Monitoring Consortium (LBHMC) and assembled by Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-02-13 to 2015-06-01 (NODC Accession 0118793)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0118793 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  5. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station gbtf1 by Everglades National Park (ENP) and assembled by Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) in the Coastal Waters of Florida and North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-02-13 to 2016-05-31 (NODC Accession 0118752)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0118752 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  6. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station lobo by Florida Atlantic University (FAU) Land/Ocean Biogeochemical Observatory (LOBO) (FAU) and assembled by Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) in the Coastal Waters of Florida and North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-02-21 to 2014-11-04 (NODC Accession 0118768)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0118768 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Micro-porous membrane equilibrator and other instruments from unknown platforms in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1997-06-19 to 1997-09-16 (NCEI Accession 0157739)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157739 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological, optical and physical data collected from unknown platforms in the North Atlantic Ocean...

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from POSEIDON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2010-05-31 to 2015-04-07 (NCEI Accession 0157471)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157471 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from POSEIDON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2010-05-31 to...

  9. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station wiwf1 by Everglades National Park (ENP) and assembled by Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) in the Coastal Waters of Florida and North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-02-13 to 2016-05-31 (NODC Accession 0118765)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0118765 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  10. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station wwef1 by Everglades National Park (ENP) and assembled by Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA) in the Coastal Waters of Florida, Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-02-13 to 2016-05-31 (NODC Accession 0118767)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0118767 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  11. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from Ottawa County Pump Station by Ottawa County Regional Water Treatment Plant and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2015-06-28 to 2017-08-31 (NCEI Accession 0130587)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0130587 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  12. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station City of Toledo Water Intake Crib by LimnoTech and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2015-05-20 to 2017-08-31 (NCEI Accession 0130548)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0130548 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  13. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from MIRAI in the Indian Ocean, Mozambique Channel and South Atlantic Ocean from 2003-12-09 to 2004-01-24 (NCEI Accession 0144250)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144250 includes Surface underway data collected from MIRAI in the Indian Ocean, Mozambique Channel and South Atlantic Ocean from 2003-12-09 to...

  14. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, and other variables collected from surface underway observations using carbon dioxide gas analyzer, shower head equilibrator and other instruments from SOOP M/V Nuka Arctica lines in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2008-01-08 to 2009-01-07 (NCEI Accession 0162251)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162251 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from SOOP M/V Nuka Arctica lines in the North Atlantic Ocean...

  15. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, and other variables collected from surface underway observations using carbon dioxide gas analyzer, shower head equilibrator and other instruments from SOOP M/V Nuka Arctica lines in the North Atlantic Ocean in 2016 (NCEI Accession 0165355)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0165355 includes surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from SOOP M/V Nuka Arctica lines in the North Atlantic Ocean...

  16. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, and other variables collected from surface underway observations using carbon dioxide gas analyzer, shower head equilibrator and other instruments from SOOP M/V Nuka Arctica lines in the North Atlantic Ocean in 2015 (NCEI Accession 0165353)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0165353 includes surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from SOOP M/V Nuka Arctica lines in the North Atlantic Ocean...

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from Benguela Stream in the Caribbean Sea, English Channel and North Atlantic Ocean from 2015-01-08 to 2015-08-27 (NCEI Accession 0160490)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0160490 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Benguela Stream in the Caribbean Sea, English Channel and...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Thin film type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from 2016-01-08 to 2016-01-21 (NCEI Accession 0160553)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0160553 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological, optical and physical data collected from MARION DUFRESNE in the Indian Ocean from...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Autonomous sensor to measure dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from Kaiyo in the Bismarck Sea, Celebes Sea and others from 1994-01-06 to 1999-11-21 (NODC Accession 0080984)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0080984 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Kaiyo in the Bismarck Sea, Celebes Sea (Sulawesi Sea and...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from BARCELONA EXPRESS in the Alboran Sea, Balearic Sea and others from 2010-03-02 to 2011-01-05 (NCEI Accession 0157298)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157298 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from BARCELONA EXPRESS in the Alboran Sea, Balearic (or...

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from Pyxis in the Bering Sea, Caribbean Sea and others from 2001-11-06 to 2013-04-25 (NODC Accession 0081041)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0081041 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Pyxis in the Bering Sea, Caribbean Sea, Coastal Waters of...

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from S.A. AGULHAS II in the Gulf of Guinea, Indian Ocean and others from 2014-12-05 to 2016-02-10 (NCEI Accession 0160549)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0160549 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from S.A. AGULHAS II in the Gulf of Guinea, Indian Ocean,...

  3. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and underway - surface observations using CTD, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the METEOR in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1992-12-27 to 1993-01-31 (NODC Accession 0115173)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115173 includes chemical, discrete sample, meteorological, physical, profile and underway - surface data collected from METEOR in the South Atlantic...

  4. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from G.O. SARS in the Norwegian Sea from 2008-11-13 to 2008-12-10 (NCEI Accession 0157353)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157353 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from G.O. SARS in the Norwegian Sea from 2008-11-13 to...

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from G.O. SARS in the Barents Sea, North Greenland Sea and others from 2007-02-12 to 2007-10-28 (NCEI Accession 0157392)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157392 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from G.O. SARS in the Barents Sea, North Greenland Sea, North...

  6. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from University of Michigan Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratories Bio Buoy by University of Michigan and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-01 to 2017-08-31 (NODC Accession 0123645)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123645 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  7. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from University of Michigan Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratories Bio Buoy by University of Michigan and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-01 to 2017-08-31 (NCEI Accession 0123660)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123660 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from HEALY in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and others from 2014-05-05 to 2014-08-30 (NCEI Accession 0144350)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144350 includes Surface underway data collected from HEALY in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea, Bering Sea, Coastal Waters of SE Alaska, Gulf of...

  9. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from HEALY in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and others from 2013-08-06 to 2013-10-29 (NCEI Accession 0144346)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144346 includes Surface underway data collected from HEALY in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea, Bering Sea and Northwest Passage from 2013-08-06 to...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and others from 1995-03-17 to 1995-04-27 (NCEI Accession 0157358)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157358 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific...

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the South Pacific Ocean from 2015-12-06 to 2016-01-02 (NCEI Accession 0157474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157474 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the South Pacific Ocean from...

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and others from 2001-01-30 to 2002-01-13 (NCEI Accession 0157365)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157365 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic...

  13. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from HEALY in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and others from 2015-08-09 to 2015-10-12 (NCEI Accession 0157049)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157049 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from HEALY in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea, Bering Sea,...

  14. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from Marcus G. Langseth in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and others from 2011-04-13 to 2011-12-28 (NCEI Accession 0144305)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144305 includes Surface underway data collected from Marcus G. Langseth in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea, Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska, Hawaiian...

  15. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and others from 2004-01-20 to 2005-01-25 (NCEI Accession 0157327)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157327 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic...

  16. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the South Pacific Ocean, Southern Oceans and Tasman Sea from 1997-01-12 to 1998-01-09 (NCEI Accession 0157323)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157323 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the South Pacific Ocean, Southern...

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the North Pacific Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and others from 2008-12-31 to 2009-12-22 (NCEI Accession 0144533)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144533 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the North Pacific Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the Caribbean Sea, North Pacific Ocean and others from 2004-01-01 to 2004-12-21 (NCEI Accession 0144538)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144538 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the Caribbean Sea, North Pacific Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from PRINCE OF SEAS in the Caribbean Sea, English Channel and others from 1994-06-03 to 1995-08-04 (NCEI Accession 0157050)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157050 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from PRINCE OF SEAS in the Caribbean Sea, English Channel,...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from HEALY in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and others from 2015-07-14 to 2015-10-28 (NCEI Accession 0144530)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144530 includes Surface underway data collected from HEALY in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea, Bering Sea, Coastal Waters of SE Alaska, Gulf of Alaska...