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Sample records for suprathermal electron transport

  1. 5D simulation study of suprathermal electron transport in non-axisymmetric plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Idei, H.; Kubo, S.; Nakajima, N.; Okamoto, M.; Gasparino, U.; Maassberg, H.; Rome, M.; Marushchenko, N.

    1999-01-01

    ECRH-driven transport of suprathermal electrons is studied in non-axisymmetric plasmas using a new Monte Carlo simulation technique in 5D phase space. Two different phases of the ECRH-driven transport of suprathermal electrons can be seen; one is a rapid convective phase due to the direct radial motion of trapped electrons and the other is a slower phase due to the collisional transport. The important role of the radial transport of suprathermal electrons in the broadening of the ECRH deposition profile is clarified in W7-AS. The ECRH driven flux is also evaluated and put in relation with the 'electron root' feature recently observed in W7-AS. It is found that, at low collisionalities, the ECRH driven flux due to the suprathermal electrons can play a dominant role in the condition of ambipolarity and, thus, the observed 'electron root' feature in W7-AS is thought to be driven by the radial (convective) flux of ECRH generated suprathermal electrons. The possible scenario of this 'ECRH-driven electron root' is considered in the LHD plasma. (author)

  2. Influence of suprathermal electrons kinetics on cyclotron radiation transport in hot toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherepanov, K.V.; Kukushkin, A.B.

    2005-01-01

    Numerical studies of the contribution of suprathermal electrons to electron cyclotron radiation (ECR) transport in hot (Te > 10 keV) plasmas confined by a strong toroidal magnetic field (B > 5 T) are reported. The respective code (Proc. 14th IAEA Conf. PPCF, Wuerzburg, 1992, v.2, p.35) which, for maxwellian electron velocity distribution (EVD) with inhomogeneous temperature/density, has been tested against well-known numerical and semi-analytical codes by S. Tamor, is now applied to solving the following two problems for ITER-like conditions. (1) Spatial profile of the net radiated power density, P EC (r), is found to be strongly sensitive to the presence of suprathermal electrons. This enables us to evaluate allowable limits for local rise of effective temperature/density of suprathermal electrons (in terms of bi-maxwellian EVD). (2) Self-consistent modeling of the ECR transport and the kinetics of suprathermal electrons gives spatial profile of deviations from maxwellian EVD, caused by the transport of plasma's self EC radiation. These kinetic effects work ultimately for the global flattening of the P EC (r) profile: a lowering, in the core, and a rise, in the periphery. For ITER-like conditions, these effects upon P EC (r) appear to be small. The results of treating the above two tasks suggest the necessity of solving self-consistently the problems of (i) ECRH and ECCD optimization and (ii) ECR transport in the entire range of radiation frequency, when strong enough suprathermals may be produced. (author)

  3. 5D simulation study of suprathermal electron transport in non-axisymmetric plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Idei, H.; Kubo, S.; Nakajima, N.; Okamoto, M.; Gasparino, U.; Maassberg, H.; Rome, M.; Marushchenko, N.

    2001-01-01

    ECRH-driven transport of is studied in using a new Monte Carlo simulation technique in 5D phase space. Two different phases of the ECRH-driven transport of suprathermal electrons can be seen; one is a rapid convective phase due to the direct radial motion of trapped electrons and the other is a slower phase due to the collisional transport. The important role of the radial transport of suprathermal electrons in the broadening of the ECRH deposition profile is clarified in W7-AS. The ECRH driven flux is also evaluated and put in relation with the ''electron root'' feature recently observed in W7-AS. It is found that, at low collisionalities, the ECRH driven flux due to the suprathermal electrons can play a dominant role in the condition of ambipolarity and, thus, the observed ''electron root'' feature in W7-AS is thought to be driven by the radial (convective) flux of ECRH generated suprathermal electrons. The possible scenario of this ''ECRH-driven electron root'' is considered in the LHD plasma. (author)

  4. Suprathermal ion transport in turbulent magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovet, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Suprathermal ions, which have an energy greater than the quasi-Maxwellian background plasma temperature, are present in many laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. In fusion devices, they are generated by the fusion reactions and auxiliary heating. Controlling their transport is essential for the success of future fusion devices that could provide a clean, safe and abundant source of electric power to our society. In space, suprathermal ions include energetic solar particles and cosmic rays. The understanding of the acceleration and transport mechanisms of these particles is still incomplete. Basic plasma devices allow detailed measurements that are not accessible in astrophysical and fusion plasmas, due to the difficulty to access the former and the high temperatures of the latter. The basic toroidal device TORPEX offers an easy access for diagnostics, well characterized plasma scenarios and validated numerical simulations of its turbulence dynamics, making it the ideal platform for the investigation of suprathermal ion transport. This Thesis presents three-dimensional measurements of a suprathermal ion beam injected in turbulent TORPEX plasmas. The combination of uniquely resolved measurements and first principle numerical simulations reveals the general non-diffusive nature of the suprathermal ion transport. A precise characterization of their transport regime shows that, depending on their energies, suprathermal ions can experience either a super diffusive transport or a subdiffusive transport in the same background turbulence. The transport character is determined by the interaction of the suprathermal ion orbits with the turbulent plasma structures, which in turn depends on the ratio between the ion energy and the background plasma temperature. Time-resolved measurements reveal a clear difference in the intermittency of suprathermal ions time-traces depending on the transport regime they experience. Conditionally averaged measurements uncover the influence of

  5. Study of suprathermal electron transport in solid or compressed matter for the fast-ignitor scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, F.

    2010-01-01

    The inertial confinement fusion (ICF) concept is widely studied nowadays. It consists in quickly compressing and heating a small spherical capsule filled with fuel, using extremely energetic lasers. Since approximately 15 years, the fast-ignition (FI) technique has been proposed to facilitate the fuel heating by adding a particle beam - electrons generated by an ultra-intense laser - at the exact moment when the capsule compression is at its maximum. This thesis constitutes an experimental study of these electron beams generated by picosecond-scale lasers. We present new results on the characteristics of these electrons after they are accelerated by the laser (energy, divergence, etc.) as well as their interaction with the matter they pass through. The experimental results are explained and reveal different aspects of these laser-accelerated fast electrons. Their analysis allowed for significant progress in understanding several mechanisms: how they are injected into solid matter, how to measure their divergence, and how they can be automatically collimated inside compressed matter. (author) [fr

  6. Ripple enhanced transport of suprathermal alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, K.; Takizuka, T.; Azumi, M.

    1986-01-01

    The ripple enhanced transport of suprathermal alpha particles has been studied by the newly developed Monte-Carlo code in which the motion of banana orbit in a toroidal field ripple is described by a mapping method. The existence of ripple-resonance diffusion has been confirmed numerically. We have developed another new code in which the radial displacement of banana orbit is given by the diffusion coefficients from the mapping code or the orbit following Monte-Carlo code. The ripple loss of α particles during slowing down has been estimated by the mapping model code as well as the diffusion model code. From the comparison of the results with those from the orbit-following Monte-Carlo code, it has been found that all of them agree very well. (author)

  7. The STEREO IMPACT Suprathermal Electron (STE) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, R. P.; Curtis, D. W.; Larson, D. E.; Luhmann, J. G.; McBride, S. E.; Maier, M. R.; Moreau, T.; Tindall, C. S.; Turin, P.; Wang, Linghua

    2008-04-01

    The Suprathermal Electron (STE) instrument, part of the IMPACT investigation on both spacecraft of NASA’s STEREO mission, is designed to measure electrons from ˜2 to ˜100 keV. This is the primary energy range for impulsive electron/3He-rich energetic particle events that are the most frequently occurring transient particle emissions from the Sun, for the electrons that generate solar type III radio emission, for the shock accelerated electrons that produce type II radio emission, and for the superhalo electrons (whose origin is unknown) that are present in the interplanetary medium even during the quietest times. These electrons are ideal for tracing heliospheric magnetic field lines back to their source regions on the Sun and for determining field line lengths, thus probing the structure of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and of the ambient inner heliosphere. STE utilizes arrays of small, passively cooled thin window silicon semiconductor detectors, coupled to state-of-the-art pulse-reset front-end electronics, to detect electrons down to ˜2 keV with about 2 orders of magnitude increase in sensitivity over previous sensors at energies below ˜20 keV. STE provides energy resolution of Δ E/ E˜10 25% and the angular resolution of ˜20° over two oppositely directed ˜80°×80° fields of view centered on the nominal Parker spiral field direction.

  8. Measurement of suprathermal electron confinement by cyclotron transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkwood, R.; Hutchinson, I.H.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Porkolab, M.; Squire, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    The confinement time of suprathermal electrons is determined experimentally from the distribution function determined via wave transmission measurements. Measurements of the lowest moment of the distribution perpendicular to the B field as a function of the parallel electron momentum as well as the global input power allow the suprathermal electron confinement time (τ se ) to be calculated during lower-hybrid and inductive current drive. Finite particle confinement is found to be the dominant energy loss term for the suprathermals and improves with plasma current and density

  9. Suprathermal electron acceleration during reconnection onset in the magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vaivads

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We study one event of reconnection onset associated to a small substorm on 27 September 2006 by using Cluster observations at inter-spacecraft separation of about 10 000 km. We focus on the acceleration of suprathermal electrons during different stages of reconnection. We show that several distinct stages of acceleration occur: (1 moderate acceleration during reconnection of pre-existing plasma sheet flux tubes, (2 stronger acceleration during reconnection of lobe flux tubes, (3 production of the most energetic electrons within dipolarization fronts (magnetic pile-up regions. The strongest acceleration is reached at the location of Bz maxima inside the magnetic pile-up region where the reconnection jet stops. Very strong localized dawn-dusk electric field are observed within the magnetic pile-up regions and are associated to most of the magnetic flux transport.

  10. Suprathermal electron studies in the TCV tokamak: Design of a tomographic hard-x-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnesin, S.; Coda, S.; Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance heating and electron cyclotron current drive, disruptive events, and sawtooth activity are all known to produce suprathermal electrons in fusion devices, motivating increasingly detailed studies of the generation and dynamics of this suprathermal population. Measurements have been performed in the past years in the tokamak a configuration variable (TCV) tokamak using a single pinhole hard-x-ray (HXR) camera and electron-cyclotron-emission radiometers, leading, in particular, to the identification of the crucial role of spatial transport in the physics of ECCD. The observation of a poloidal asymmetry in the emitted suprathermal bremsstrahlung radiation motivates the design of a proposed new tomographic HXR spectrometer reported in this paper. The design, which is based on a compact modified Soller collimator concept, is being aided by simulations of tomographic reconstruction. Quantitative criteria have been developed to optimize the design for the greatly variable shapes and positions of TCV plasmas.

  11. Generation of Suprathermal Electrons by Collective Processes in Collisional Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigik, S. F.; Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.

    2017-11-01

    The ubiquity of high-energy tails in the charged particle velocity distribution functions (VDFs) observed in space plasmas suggests the existence of an underlying process responsible for taking a fraction of the charged particle population out of thermal equilibrium and redistributing it to suprathermal velocity and energy ranges. The present Letter focuses on a new and fundamental physical explanation for the origin of suprathermal electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) in a collisional plasma. This process involves a newly discovered electrostatic bremsstrahlung (EB) emission that is effective in a plasma in which binary collisions are present. The steady-state EVDF dictated by such a process corresponds to a Maxwellian core plus a quasi-inverse power-law tail, which is a feature commonly observed in many space plasma environments. In order to demonstrate this, the system of self-consistent particle- and wave-kinetic equations are numerically solved with an initially Maxwellian EVDF and Langmuir wave spectral intensity, which is a state that does not reflect the presence of EB process, and hence not in force balance. The EB term subsequently drives the system to a new force-balanced steady state. After a long integration period it is demonstrated that the initial Langmuir fluctuation spectrum is modified, which in turn distorts the initial Maxwellian EVDF into a VDF that resembles the said core-suprathermal VDF. Such a mechanism may thus be operative at the coronal source region, which is characterized by high collisionality.

  12. Rapid Pitch Angle Evolution of Suprathermal Electrons Behind Dipolarization Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. M.; Fu, H. S.; Cao, J. B.; Xu, Y.; Yu, Y. Q.; Kronberg, E. A.; Daly, P. W.

    2017-10-01

    The pitch angle distribution (PAD) of suprathermal electrons can have both spatial and temporal evolution in the magnetotail and theoretically can be an indication of electron energization/cooling processes there. So far, the spatial evolution of PAD has been well studied, leaving the temporal evolution as an open question. To reveal the temporal evolution of electron PAD, spacecraft should monitor the same flux tube for a relatively long period, which is not easy in the dynamic magnetotail. In this study, we present such an observation by Cluster spacecraft in the magnetotail behind a dipolarization front (DF). We find that the PAD of suprathermal electrons can evolve from pancake type to butterfly type during cigar type during <8 s. During this process, the flow velocity is nearly zero and the plasma entropy is constant, meaning that the evolution is temporal. We interpret such temporal evolution using the betatron cooling process, which is driven by quasi-adiabatic expansion of flux tubes, and the magnetic mirror effect, which possibly exists behind the DF as well.

  13. SUPRATHERMAL ELECTRONS AT SATURN'S BOW SHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Sulaiman, A. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Sergis, N. [Office of Space Research and Technology, Academy of Athens, Soranou Efesiou 4, 11527 Athens (Greece); Stawarz, L. [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, ul. Orla 171, 30-244 Krakow (Poland); Fujimoto, M. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Coates, A. J., E-mail: a.masters@imperial.ac.uk [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Department of Space and Climate Physics, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-20

    The leading explanation for the origin of galactic cosmic rays is particle acceleration at the shocks surrounding young supernova remnants (SNRs), although crucial aspects of the acceleration process are unclear. The similar collisionless plasma shocks frequently encountered by spacecraft in the solar wind are generally far weaker (lower Mach number) than these SNR shocks. However, the Cassini spacecraft has shown that the shock standing in the solar wind sunward of Saturn (Saturn's bow shock) can occasionally reach this high-Mach number astrophysical regime. In this regime Cassini has provided the first in situ evidence for electron acceleration under quasi-parallel upstream magnetic conditions. Here we present the full picture of suprathermal electrons at Saturn's bow shock revealed by Cassini . The downstream thermal electron distribution is resolved in all data taken by the low-energy electron detector (CAPS-ELS, <28 keV) during shock crossings, but the higher energy channels were at (or close to) background. The high-energy electron detector (MIMI-LEMMS, >18 keV) measured a suprathermal electron signature at 31 of 508 crossings, where typically only the lowest energy channels (<100 keV) were above background. We show that these results are consistent with the theory in which the “injection” of thermal electrons into an acceleration process involves interaction with whistler waves at the shock front, and becomes possible for all upstream magnetic field orientations at high Mach numbers like those of the strong shocks around young SNRs. A future dedicated study will analyze the rare crossings with evidence for relativistic electrons (up to ∼1 MeV).

  14. Spaced resolved analysis of suprathermal electrons in dense plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moinard A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of the hot electron fraction is a crucial topic for high energy density laser driven plasmas: first, energy losses and radiative properties depend strongly on the hot electron fraction and, second, in ICF hohlraums suprathermal electrons preheat the D-T-capsule and seriously reduce the fusion performance. In the present work we present our first experimental and theoretical studies to analyze single shot space resolved hot electron fractions inside dense plasmas via optically thin X-ray line transitions from autoionizing states. The benchmark experiment has been carried out at an X-pinch in order to create a dense, localized plasma with a well defined symmetry axis of hot electron propagation. Simultaneous high spatial and spectral resolution in the X-ray spectral range has been obtained with a spherically bent quartz Bragg crystal. The high performance of the X-ray diagnostics allowed to identify space resolved hot electron fractions via the X-ray spectral distribution of multiple excited states.

  15. A system to measure suprathermal electron distribution functions in toroidal plasmas by electron cyclotron wave absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, D.A.; Skiff, F.; Gulick, S.

    1997-01-01

    A two-chord, four-beam suprathermal electron diagnostic has been installed on TdeV (B>1.5 T, R=0.86 m, a=0.25 m). Resonant absorption of extraordinary mode electron cyclotron waves is measured to deduce the chordal averaged suprathermal electron distribution function amplitude at the resonant momentum. Simultaneously counterpropagating beams permit good refractive loss cancellation. A nonlinear frequency sweep leads to a concentration of appropriately propagating power in a narrow range of time of flight, thus increasing the signal-to-noise ratio and facilitating the rejection of spurious reflections. Numerous measurements of electron distribution functions have been obtained during lower-hybrid current-drive experiments. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  16. Suprathermal electron studies in Tokamak plasmas by means of diagnostic measurements and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamleitner, J.

    2015-01-01

    Configuration Variable (TCV) data were refurbished and a detailed benchmarking of these two codes was performed. The theory-predicted toroidal and poloidal emission asymmetries could be verified by experiment and modelling. The effects of supra-thermal electron diffusion and radio frequency (RF) wave scattering, both resulting in a radial broadening of the HXR emission, were separated by a poloidal deposition location angle scan. Previous results on anomalous diffusion and CD efficiency were reproduced with increased confidence arising from enhanced diagnostic specifications. The plasma response to electron cyclotron (EC) absorption and the role of quasi-linear effects were investigated. Several MHD instabilities can occur in the plasma centre and better understanding of these modes and events is indispensable for their mitigation in order to prevent their negative effects on confinement and stability. Sawtooth crashes are a major instability and localized at the q = 1 surface. They can be described as the evolution of an internal m = 1 kink mode leading to magnetic reconnection and consequently enhanced transport. Additionally, the crashes can trigger secondary deleterious instabilities. The electron acceleration in the magnetic reconnection process was studied as well as the impact on the supra-thermal tail. While acceleration was not observed, the efficient ejection of supra-thermal electrons due to sawtooth crashes could be quantified. In low density discharges this rapid transport leads to bursts of energetic HXR thick-target Bremsstrahlung from the limiter. An m/n = 1/1 internal kink mode coupled to an m/n = 2/1 component and closely related to sawtooth crashes is observed in the presence of ECRH/CD close to the q = 1 surface. It occurs in bursts, alternating with phases of one or more sawtooth crashes. The dynamics of this bursty mode turn out to be connected to supra-thermal electrons that are efficiently reheated after the preceding sawtooth crash and then dragged by

  17. Suprathermal electron studies in Tokamak plasmas by means of diagnostic measurements and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamleitner, J.

    2015-07-01

    Configuration Variable (TCV) data were refurbished and a detailed benchmarking of these two codes was performed. The theory-predicted toroidal and poloidal emission asymmetries could be verified by experiment and modelling. The effects of supra-thermal electron diffusion and radio frequency (RF) wave scattering, both resulting in a radial broadening of the HXR emission, were separated by a poloidal deposition location angle scan. Previous results on anomalous diffusion and CD efficiency were reproduced with increased confidence arising from enhanced diagnostic specifications. The plasma response to electron cyclotron (EC) absorption and the role of quasi-linear effects were investigated. Several MHD instabilities can occur in the plasma centre and better understanding of these modes and events is indispensable for their mitigation in order to prevent their negative effects on confinement and stability. Sawtooth crashes are a major instability and localized at the q = 1 surface. They can be described as the evolution of an internal m = 1 kink mode leading to magnetic reconnection and consequently enhanced transport. Additionally, the crashes can trigger secondary deleterious instabilities. The electron acceleration in the magnetic reconnection process was studied as well as the impact on the supra-thermal tail. While acceleration was not observed, the efficient ejection of supra-thermal electrons due to sawtooth crashes could be quantified. In low density discharges this rapid transport leads to bursts of energetic HXR thick-target Bremsstrahlung from the limiter. An m/n = 1/1 internal kink mode coupled to an m/n = 2/1 component and closely related to sawtooth crashes is observed in the presence of ECRH/CD close to the q = 1 surface. It occurs in bursts, alternating with phases of one or more sawtooth crashes. The dynamics of this bursty mode turn out to be connected to supra-thermal electrons that are efficiently reheated after the preceding sawtooth crash and then dragged by

  18. Shaping the solar wind electron temperature anisotropy by the interplay of core and suprathermal populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban Hamd, S. M.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Pierrard, V.; Štverák

    2017-12-01

    We present the results of an advanced parametrization of the temperature anisotropy of electrons in the slow solar wind and the electromagnetic instabilities resulting from the interplay of their thermal core and suprathermal halo populations. A large set of observational data (from the Ulysses, Helios and Cluster missions) is used to parametrize these components and establish their correlations. Comparative analysis demonstrates for the first time a particular implication of the suprathermal electrons which are less dense but hotter than thermal electrons. The instabilities are significantly stimulated by the interplay of the core and halo populations, leading to lower thresholds which shape the observed limits of the temperature anisotropy for both the core and halo populations. This double agreement strongly suggests that the selfgenerated instabilities play the major role in constraining the electron anisotropy.

  19. Observation of suprathermal electrons during magnetic reconnection at the sawtooth instability in DIII-D TOKAMAK

    CERN Document Server

    Savrukhin, R V

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 Observation of suprathermal electrons during magnetic reconnection at the sawtooth instability in DIII-D TOKAMAK. Intense bursts of x-ray and electron cyclotron emission are observed during sawtooth instabilities in high-temperature plasmas in the DIII-D tokamak. The bursts are initiated around the X-point of the m = 1, n = 1 magnetic island at the beginning of the sawtooth crash and are displaced to larger radii later during the temperature collapse. Reconstruction of the magnetic configuration using motional Stark effect (MSE) data and numerical simulations indicates that the bursts can be connected with suprathermal electrons (E sub r approx 30-40 keV) generated during reconnection of the magnetic field around the q = 1 surface.

  20. Electron cyclotron heating and supra-thermal electron dynamics in the TCV Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnesin, S.

    2011-10-01

    This thesis is concerned with the physics of supra-thermal electrons in thermonuclear, magnetically confined plasmas. Under a variety of conditions, in laboratory as well as space plasmas, the electron velocity distribution function is not in thermodynamic equilibrium owing to internal or external drives. Accordingly, the distribution function departs from the equilibrium Maxwellian, and in particular generally develops a high-energy tail. In tokamak plasmas, this occurs especially as a result of injection of high-power electromagnetic waves, used for heating and current drive, as well as a result of internal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. The physics of these phenomena is intimately tied to the properties and dynamics of this supra-thermal electron population. This motivates the development of instrumental apparatus to measure its properties as well as of numerical codes to simulate their dynamics. Both aspects are reflected in this thesis work, which features advanced instrumental development and experimental measurements as well as numerical modeling. The instrumental development consisted of the complete design of a spectroscopic and tomographic system of four multi-detector hard X-ray (HXR) cameras for the TCV tokamak. The goal is to measure bremsstrahlung emission from supra-thermal electrons with energies in the 10-300 keV range, with the ultimate aim of providing the first full tomographic reconstruction at these energies in a noncircular plasma. In particular, supra-thermal electrons are generated in TCV by a high-power electron cyclotron heating (ECH) system and are also observed in the presence of MHD events, such as sawtooth oscillations and disruptive instabilities. This diagnostic employs state-of-the-art solid-state detectors and is optimized for the tight space requirements of the TCV ports. It features a novel collimator concept that combines compactness and flexibility as well as full digital acquisition of the photon pulses, greatly

  1. Suprathermal electron loss cone distributions in the solar wind: Ulysses observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.; Hammond, C. M.; Forsyth, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    We present observations by the Ulysses solar wind plasma experiment of a new class of suprathermal electron signatures. At low solar latitudes and heliocentric distances beyond 3.37 AU Ulysses encountered seven intervals, ranging in duration from 1 hour to 22 hours, in which the suprathermal distributions included an antisunward field-aligned beam and a return population with a flux dropout typically spanning ±60 deg. from the sunward field-aligned direction. All events occurred between the forward and reverse shocks or waves bounding corotating interaction regions (CIRs). The observations support a scenario in which the sunward-moving electrons result from reflection of the prevailing antisunward field-aligned beam at magnetic field compressions downstream from the spacecraft, with wide loss cones caused by the relatively weak mirror ratio. This hypothesis requires that the field magnitude within the CIRs actually increased locally with increasing field-aligned distance from the Sun

  2. Measurement and modelling of suprathermal electron bursts generated in front of a lower hybrid antenna

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gunn, J. P.; Fuchs, Vladimír; Petržílka, Václav; Ekedahl, A.; Fedorczak, N.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2016), č. článku 036004. ISSN 0029-5515 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : lower hybrid * scrape off layer * SOL turbulence * Landau damping * suprathermal electrons Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0029-5515/56/3/036004

  3. Study of thermal and suprathermal electron density fluctuations in a plasma Focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolas, Alain.

    1982-02-01

    Thomson scattering of ruby laser light is used to study electron density fluctuations in a plasma Focus. One measures frequency and wavenumber spectra as well as angular distribution of fluctuations at given wavenumber. During the implosion phase, plasma layers with different characteristics are evidenced: a dense plasma layer where density fluctuations are isotropic with a thermal level, and a tenuous plasma layer where fluctuations are clearly anisotropic with a suprathermal level. The suprathermal fluctuations are attributed to microscopic instabilities due to the large electrical current which flows in the transition zone where the magnetic field mixes into the plasma. Thermal fluctuation measurements allow the determination of electron density and electron and ion temperatures of the dense layer plasma. One compares the observed characteristics of spectral components of suprathermal fluctuations with various types of known micro-instabilities. Relying on a simplified shock wave model it is deduced an average electrical resistivity greater than the classical Spitzer relation by two order of magnitudes. The lower hybrid drift instability appears to be dominant at the beginning of the implosion phase [fr

  4. Interaction of suprathermal solar wind electron fluxes with sheared whistler waves: fan instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Krafft

    Full Text Available Several in situ measurements performed in the solar wind evidenced that solar type III radio bursts were some-times associated with locally excited Langmuir waves, high-energy electron fluxes and low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves; moreover, in some cases, the simultaneous identification of energetic electron fluxes, Langmuir and whistler waves was performed. This paper shows how whistlers can be excited in the disturbed solar wind through the so-called "fan instability" by interacting with energetic electrons at the anomalous Doppler resonance. This instability process, which is driven by the anisotropy in the energetic electron velocity distribution along the ambient magnetic field, does not require any positive slope in the suprathermal electron tail and thus can account for physical situations where plateaued reduced electron velocity distributions were observed in solar wind plasmas in association with Langmuir and whistler waves. Owing to linear calculations of growth rates, we show that for disturbed solar wind conditions (that is, when suprathermal particle fluxes propagate along the ambient magnetic field, the fan instability can excite VLF waves (whistlers and lower hybrid waves with characteristics close to those observed in space experiments.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Radio Science (waves in plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (radio emissions

  5. Interaction of suprathermal solar wind electron fluxes with sheared whistler waves: fan instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Krafft

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Several in situ measurements performed in the solar wind evidenced that solar type III radio bursts were some-times associated with locally excited Langmuir waves, high-energy electron fluxes and low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves; moreover, in some cases, the simultaneous identification of energetic electron fluxes, Langmuir and whistler waves was performed. This paper shows how whistlers can be excited in the disturbed solar wind through the so-called "fan instability" by interacting with energetic electrons at the anomalous Doppler resonance. This instability process, which is driven by the anisotropy in the energetic electron velocity distribution along the ambient magnetic field, does not require any positive slope in the suprathermal electron tail and thus can account for physical situations where plateaued reduced electron velocity distributions were observed in solar wind plasmas in association with Langmuir and whistler waves. Owing to linear calculations of growth rates, we show that for disturbed solar wind conditions (that is, when suprathermal particle fluxes propagate along the ambient magnetic field, the fan instability can excite VLF waves (whistlers and lower hybrid waves with characteristics close to those observed in space experiments.Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Radio Science (waves in plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (radio emissions

  6. Electron velocity distribution function in a plasma with temperature gradient and in the presence of suprathermal electrons: application to incoherent-scatter plasma lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guio

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution function are calculated numerically for any arbitrary velocity distribution function with cylindrical symmetry along the magnetic field. The electron velocity distribution is separated into two distributions representing the distribution of the ambient electrons and the suprathermal electrons. The velocity distribution function of the ambient electrons is modelled by a near-Maxwellian distribution function in presence of a temperature gradient and a potential electric field. The velocity distribution function of the suprathermal electrons is derived from a numerical model of the angular energy flux spectrum obtained by solving the transport equation of electrons. The numerical method used to calculate the plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution is described. The numerical code is used with simulated data to evaluate the Doppler frequency asymmetry between the up- and downshifted plasma lines of the incoherent-scatter plasma lines at different wave vectors. It is shown that the observed Doppler asymmetry is more dependent on deviation from the Maxwellian through the thermal part for high-frequency radars, while for low-frequency radars the Doppler asymmetry depends more on the presence of a suprathermal population. It is also seen that the full evaluation of the plasma dispersion function gives larger Doppler asymmetry than the heat flow approximation for Langmuir waves with phase velocity about three to six times the mean thermal velocity. For such waves the moment expansion of the dispersion function is not fully valid and the full calculation of the dispersion function is needed.Key words. Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution · Incoherent scatter plasma lines · EISCAT · Dielectric response function

  7. Electron velocity distribution function in a plasma with temperature gradient and in the presence of suprathermal electrons: application to incoherent-scatter plasma lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guio

    Full Text Available The plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution function are calculated numerically for any arbitrary velocity distribution function with cylindrical symmetry along the magnetic field. The electron velocity distribution is separated into two distributions representing the distribution of the ambient electrons and the suprathermal electrons. The velocity distribution function of the ambient electrons is modelled by a near-Maxwellian distribution function in presence of a temperature gradient and a potential electric field. The velocity distribution function of the suprathermal electrons is derived from a numerical model of the angular energy flux spectrum obtained by solving the transport equation of electrons. The numerical method used to calculate the plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution is described. The numerical code is used with simulated data to evaluate the Doppler frequency asymmetry between the up- and downshifted plasma lines of the incoherent-scatter plasma lines at different wave vectors. It is shown that the observed Doppler asymmetry is more dependent on deviation from the Maxwellian through the thermal part for high-frequency radars, while for low-frequency radars the Doppler asymmetry depends more on the presence of a suprathermal population. It is also seen that the full evaluation of the plasma dispersion function gives larger Doppler asymmetry than the heat flow approximation for Langmuir waves with phase velocity about three to six times the mean thermal velocity. For such waves the moment expansion of the dispersion function is not fully valid and the full calculation of the dispersion function is needed.

    Key words. Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution · Incoherent scatter plasma lines · EISCAT · Dielectric response function

  8. Microwave heating and diagnostic of suprathermal electrons in an overdense stellarator plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stange, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    The resonant coupling of microwaves into a magnetically confined plasma is one of the fundamental methods for the heating of such plasmas. Identifying and understanding the processes of the heating of overdense plasmas, in which the wave propagation is generally not possible because the wave frequency is below the plasma frequency, is becoming increasingly important for high density fusion plasmas. This work focuses on the heating of overdense plasmas in the WEGA stellarator. The excitation of electron Bernstein waves, utilizing the OXB-conversion process, provides a mechanism for the wave to reach the otherwise not accessible resonant absorption layer. In WEGA these OXB-heated plasmas exhibit a suprathermal electron component with energies up to 80 keV. The fast electrons are located in the plasma center and have a Maxwellian energy distribution function within the soft X-ray related energy range. The corresponding averaged energy is a few keV. The OXB-discharges are accompanied by a broadband microwave radiation spectrum with radiation temperatures of the order of keV. Its source was identified as a parametric decay of the heating wave and has no connection to the suprathermal electron component. For the detailed investigation of the microwave emission, a quasioptical mirror system, optimized for the OX-conversion, has been installed. Based on the measurement of the broadband microwave stray radiation of the decay process, the OX-conversion efficiency has been determined to 0.56 being in good agreement with full-wave calculations. In plasmas without an electron cyclotron resonance, corresponding to the wave frequency used, non-resonant heating mechanisms have been identified in the overdense plasma regions. Whistler waves or R-like waves are the only propagable wave types within the overdense plasmas. The analysis of the heating efficiency in dependence on the magnetic flux density leads to tunneling as the most probable coupling mechanism. For the determination

  9. Investigation of the role of electron cyclotron resonance heating and magnetic configuration on the suprathermal ion population in the stellarator TJ-II using a luminescent probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, M.; Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.; Jiménez-Rey, D.; Tribaldos, V.

    2018-02-01

    Numerous observation exist of a population of high energetic ions with energies well above the corresponding thermal values in plasmas generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating in TJ-II stellarator and in other magnetically confined plasmas devices. In this work we study the impact of ECR heating different conditions (positions and powers) on fast ions escaping from plasmas in the TJ-II stellarator. For this study, an ion luminescent probe operated in counting mode is used to measure the energy distribution of suprathermal ions, in the range from 1 to 30 keV. It is observed that some suprathermal ions characteristics (such as temperature, particle and energy fluxes) are related directly with the gyrotron power and focus position of the heating beam in the plasma. Moreover, it is found that suprathermal ion characteristics vary during a magnetic configuration scan (performed along a single discharge). By investigating the suprathermal ions escaping from plasmas generated using two gyrotrons, one with fixed power and the other modulated (on/off) at low frequency (10 Hz), the de-confinement time of the suprathermal ions can be measured, which is of the order of a few milliseconds (<4 ms). A model that uses a zero-dimensional power balance is used to understand the de-confinement times in terms of the interaction of suprathermal ions and plasma components. This model also can be used to interpret experimental results of energy loss due to suprathermal ions. Finally, observations of increases (peaks) in the population of escaping suprathermal ions, which are well localized at discrete energies, is documented, these peaks being observed in the energy distributions along a discharge.

  10. Suprathermal electron production in laser-irradiated Cu targets characterized by combined methods of x-ray imaging and spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Renner, Oldřich; Šmíd, Michal; Batani, D.; Antonelli, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 7 (2016), 1-8, č. článku 075007. ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LQ1606; GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14089 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser-plasma interaction * inertial confinement fusion * suprathermal electron Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.392, year: 2016

  11. Hot-electron production and suprathermal heat flux scaling with laser intensity from the two-plasmon–decay instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, H. X.; DuBois, D. F.; Myatt, J. F.; Russell, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    The fully kinetic reduced-description particle-in-cell (RPIC) method has been applied to simulations of two-plasmon–decay (TPD) instability, driven by crossed laser beams, in an inhomogeneous plasma for parameters consistent with recent direct-drive experiments related to laser-driven inertial fusion. The nonlinear saturated state is characterized by very spiky electric fields, with Langmuir cavitation occurring preferentially inside density channels produced by the ponderomotive beating of the crossed laser beams and the primary TPD Langmuir waves (LWs). The heated electron distribution function is, in all cases, bi-Maxwellian, with instantaneous hot-electron temperatures in the range 60–100 keV. The net hot-electron energy flux out of the system is a small fraction (∼1% to 2%) of the input laser intensity in these simulations. Scalings of the hot-electron temperature and suprathermal heat flux as functions of the laser intensity are obtained numerically from RPIC simulations. These simulations lead to the preliminary conclusion that Langmuir cavitation and collapse provide dissipation by producing suprathermal electrons, which stabilize the system in saturation and drive the LW spectrum to the small dissipation scales at the Landau cutoff. The Langmuir turbulence originates at an electron density 0.241× the laser's critical density, where the crossed laser beams excite a “triad” mode—a common forward LW plus a pair of backward LWs. Remnants of this “triad” evolve in k-space and dominate the time-averaged energy spectrum. At times exceeding 10 ps, the excited Langmuir turbulence spreads toward lower densities. Comparisons of RPIC simulations with the extended Zakharov model are presented in appropriate regimes, and the necessary requirements for the validity of a quasi-linear Zakharov model (where the spatially averaged electron-velocity distribution is evolved) are verified by RPIC simulation results.

  12. ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Stimulated Raman Scattering off Gould-Trivelpiece Modes and Generation of Suprathermal Electrons and Energetic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-04-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering in the electron cyclotron frequency range of the X-Mode and O-Mode driver with the ITER plasma leads to the ``tail heating'' via the generation of suprathermal electrons and energetic ions. The scattering off Trivelpiece-Gould (T-G) modes is studied for the gyrotron frequency of 170GHz; X-Mode and O-Mode power of 24 MW CW; on-axis B-field of 10T. The synergy between the two-plasmon decay and Raman scattering is analyzed in reference to the bulk plasma heating. Supported in part by Nikola TESLA Labs, La Jolla, CA

  13. Sunward Strahl: A Method to Unambiguously Determine Open Solar Flux from In Situ Spacecraft Measurements Using Suprathermal Electron Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, M. J.; Lockwood, M.; Riley, P.; Linker, J.

    2017-11-01

    A fraction of the magnetic flux which threads the photosphere reaches sufficient coronal altitude to be dragged out by the solar wind and form the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF). Directly measuring this "open solar flux" (OSF) component, however, is difficult. While OSF can be extrapolated from photospheric magnetic field measurements, the most direct method is from in situ spacecraft measurements of the HMF. The difficultly is unambiguously distinguishing between HMF which connects directly back to the Sun (the OSF) and that which is locally distorted by waves, turbulence, and near-Sun reconnection. Suitable temporal filtering of the data can remove such "noise," but the level of filtering cannot be known a priori and varies with solar cycle, solar wind types, etc. Here we use the suprathermal electron beam, or "strahl," to distinguish between different HMF topologies. As strahl moves antisunward on global scales, times when strahl is observed to be moving sunward indicate that the HMF is locally inverted. By subtracting the inverted HMF, we compute the OSF without need for arbitrary filtering of the data. We find that the OSF obtained in this manner is slightly larger than the proposed "kinematic correction" based on observed solar wind velocity structure, though in general agreement. Our new OSF estimate agrees with methods based wholly on HMF data, if the data are first used to compute approximately 1 day averages during solar minimum and approximately 3 day averages during solar maximum, stressing the point that the filter method is unreliable because the required characteristics vary.

  14. SUPRATHERMAL ELECTRON STRAHL WIDTHS IN THE PRESENCE OF NARROW-BAND WHISTLER WAVES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajdič, P. [Instituto de Geofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City (Mexico); Alexandrova, O.; Maksimovic, M.; Lacombe, C. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, UPMC UniversitéParis 06, Université Paris-Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Fazakerley, A. N., E-mail: primoz@geofisica.unam.mx [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-20

    We perform the first statistical study of the effects of the interaction of suprathermal electrons with narrow-band whistler mode waves in the solar wind (SW). We show that this interaction does occur and that it is associated with enhanced widths of the so-called strahl component. The latter is directed along the interplanetary magnetic field away from the Sun. We do the study by comparing the strahl pitch angle widths in the SW at 1 AU in the absence of large scale discontinuities and transient structures, such as interplanetary shocks, interplanetary coronal mass ejections, stream interaction regions, etc. during times when the whistler mode waves were present and when they were absent. This is done by using the data from two Cluster instruments: Spatio Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations experiment (STAFF) data in the frequency range between ∼0.1 and ∼200 Hz were used for determining the wave properties and Plasma Electron And Current Experiment (PEACE) data sets at 12 central energies between ∼57 eV (equivalent to ∼10 typical electron thermal energies in the SW, E{sub T}) and ∼676 eV (∼113 E{sub T}) for pitch angle measurements. Statistical analysis shows that, during the intervals with the whistler waves, the strahl component on average exhibits pitch angle widths between 2° and 12° larger than during the intervals when these waves are not present. The largest difference is obtained for the electron central energy of ∼344 eV (∼57 ET).

  15. Calculation of Self-consistent Radial Electric Field in Presence of Convective Electron Transport in a Stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernbichler, W.; Heyn, M.F.; Kasilov, S.V.

    2003-01-01

    Convective transport of supra-thermal electrons can play a significant role in the energy balance of stellarators in case of high power electron cyclotron heating. Here, together with neoclassical thermal particle fluxes also the supra-thermal electron flux should be taken into account in the flux ambipolarity condition, which defines the self-consistent radial electric field. Since neoclassical particle fluxes are non-linear functions of the radial electric field, one needs an iterative procedure to solve the ambipolarity condition, where the supra-thermal electron flux has to be calculated for each iteration. A conventional Monte-Carlo method used earlier for evaluation of supra-thermal electron fluxes is rather slow for performing the iterations in reasonable computer time. In the present report, the Stochastic Mapping Technique (SMT), which is more effective than the conventional Monte Carlo method, is used instead. Here, the problem with a local monoenergetic supra-thermal particle source is considered and the effect of supra-thermal electron fluxes on both, the self-consistent radial electric field and the formation of different roots of the ambipolarity condition are studied

  16. Mach probe interpretation in the presence of supra-thermal electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fuchs, Vladimír; Gunn, J. P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 3 (2007), 032501-1 ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/0360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Mach probes * supra -thermal electrons * quasi-neutral PIC codes Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.325, year: 2007

  17. Studies of suprathermal emission due to cyclotron-electronic heating of the tokamak TCV plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, P.

    2002-07-01

    Photo sensitization of wide band gap semiconductors is used in a wide range of application like silver halide photography and xerography. The development of a new type of solar cells, based on the sensitization of meso porous metal oxide films by panchromatic dyes, has triggered a lot of fundamental research on electron transfer dynamics. Upon excitation, the sensitizer transfers an electron in the conduction band of the semiconductor. Recombination of the charge separated state is prevented by the fast regeneration of the dye by an electron donor present in solution. Until recently, most of the work in this area has been focused on the competition between the recombination and the regeneration processes, which take place in the nanosecond to millisecond regime. With the development of solid-state femtosecond laser, the measurement of the dynamics of the first electron transfer step occurring in the solar cell has become possible . Electron injection from ruthenium(Il) poly pyridyl complexes into titanium dioxide has been found to occur with a poly exponential rate, with time constants ranging from 10 ps. In spite of the lately acquired capacity to measure the dynamics of these reactions, the physical meaning of this poly exponential kinetics and the factors that can influence this process are still poorly understood. In this work, the development of a new femtosecond pump-probe spectrometer, intended to monitor the ultrafast dynamics of electron injection, is presented. The study of this process requires an excellent temporal resolution and a large wavelength tunability to be able to excite a great variety of dyes and to probe the different products of the reaction. These specifications were met using the latest progress made in optical parametric amplification, which allowed the construction of a versatile experimental set-up. The interfacing by computer of the different devices used during the experiments increase the ease of use of the set-up. Transient

  18. Effects of ionization and ion loss on dust ion-acoustic solitary waves in a collisional dusty plasma with suprathermal electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayout, Saliha; Gougam, Leila Ait [Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Plasma Physics Group, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Tribeche, Mouloud, E-mail: mouloudtribeche@yahoo.fr, E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz [Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Plasma Physics Group, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Algerian Academy of Sciences and Technologies, Algiers (Algeria)

    2016-03-15

    The combined effects of ionization, ion loss, and electron suprathermality on dust ion-acoustic solitary waves in a collisional dusty plasma are examined. Carrying out a small but finite amplitude analysis, a damped Korteweg-de Vries (dK–dV) equation is derived. The damping term decreases with the increase of the spectral index and saturates for Maxwellian electrons. Choosing typical plasma parameters, the analytical approximate solution of the dK-dV equation is numerically analyzed. We first neglect the ionization and ion loss effects and account only for collisions to estimate the relative importance between these damping terms which can act concurrently. Interestingly, we found that as the suprathermal character of the electrons becomes important, the strength of the collisions related dissipation becomes more important and causes the dust ion-acoustic solitary wave amplitude to decay more rapidly. Moreover, the collisional damping may largely prevail over the ionization and ion loss related damping. The latter becomes more effective as the electrons evolve far away from their thermal equilibrium. Our results complement and provide new insights into previously published work on this problem.

  19. Paleoclassical electron heat transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    Radial electron heat transport in low collisionality, magnetically-confined toroidal plasmas is shown to result from paleoclassical Coulomb collision processes (parallel electron heat conduction and magnetic field diffusion). In such plasmas the electron temperature equilibrates along magnetic field lines a long length L, which is the minimum of the electron collision length and a maximum effective half length of helical field lines. Thus, the diffusing field lines induce a radial electron heat diffusivity M ≅ L/(πR 0q ) ∼ 10 >> 1 times the magnetic field diffusivity η/μ 0 ≅ ν e (c/ω p ) 2 . The paleoclassical electron heat flux model provides interpretations for many features of 'anomalous' electron heat transport: magnitude and radial profile of electron heat diffusivity (in tokamaks, STs, and RFPs), Alcator scaling in high density plasmas, transport barriers around low order rational surfaces and near a separatrix, and a natural heat pinch (or minimum temperature gradient) heat flux form. (author)

  20. Discovery of Suprathermal Fe+ in and near Earth's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christon, S. P.; Hamilton, D. C.; Plane, J. M. C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Spjeldvik, W. N.; Nylund, S. R.

    2017-12-01

    Suprathermal (87-212 keV/e) singly charged iron, Fe+, has been observed in and near Earth's equatorial magnetosphere using long-term ( 21 years) Geotail/STICS ion composition data. Fe+ is rare compared to dominant suprathermal solar wind and ionospheric origin heavy ions. Earth's suprathermal Fe+ appears to be positively associated with both geomagnetic and solar activity. Three candidate lower-energy sources are examined for relevance: ionospheric outflow of Fe+ escaped from ion layers altitude, charge exchange of nominal solar wind Fe+≥7, and/or solar wind transported inner source pickup Fe+ (likely formed by solar wind Fe+≥7 interaction with near sun interplanetary dust particles, IDPs). Semi-permanent ionospheric Fe+ layers form near 100 km altitude from the tons of IDPs entering Earth's atmosphere daily. Fe+ scattered from these layers is observed up to 1000 km altitude, likely escaping in strong ionospheric outflows. Using 26% of STICS's magnetosphere-dominated data at low-to-moderate geomagnetic activity levels, we demonstrate that solar wind Fe charge exchange secondaries are not an obvious Fe+ source then. Earth flyby and cruise data from Cassini/CHEMS, a nearly identical instrument, show that inner source pickup Fe+ is likely not important at suprathermal energies. Therefore, lacking any other candidate sources, it appears that ionospheric Fe+ constitutes at least an important portion of Earth's suprathermal Fe+, comparable to observations at Saturn where ionospheric origin suprathermal Fe+ has also been observed.

  1. Improved electron transport layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides: a method of preparing a coating ink for forming a zinc oxide electron transport layer, comprising mixing zinc acetate and a wetting agent in water or methanol; a coating ink comprising zinc acetate and a wetting agent in aqueous solution or methanolic solution......; a method of preparing a zinc oxide electron transporting layer, which method comprises: i) coating a substrate with the coating ink of the present invention to form a film; ii) drying the film; and iii) heating the dry film to convert the zinc acetate substantially to ZnO; a method of preparing an organic...... photovoltaic device or an organic LED having a zinc oxide electron transport layer, the method comprising, in this order: a) providing a substrate bearing a first electrode layer; b) forming an electron transport layer according to the following method: i) coating a coating ink comprising an ink according...

  2. Electronic transport properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    The theory of the electron transport properties of liquid alkali metals is described. Conductivity coefficients, Boltzmann theory, Ziman theory, alkali form factors, Ziman theory and alkalis, Faber-Ziman alloy theory, Faber-Ziman theory and alkali-alkali methods, status of Ziman theory, and other transport properties, are all discussed. (UK)

  3. Suprathermal viscosity of dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, Mark; Mahmoodifar, Simin; Schwenzer, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the existence of unstable modes of compact stars that eventually grow large, we study the bulk viscosity of dense matter, taking into account non-linear effects arising in the large amplitude regime, where the deviation μ Δ of the chemical potentials from chemical equilibrium fulfills μ Δ > or approx. T. We find that this supra-thermal bulk viscosity can provide a potential mechanism for saturating unstable modes in compact stars since the viscosity is strongly enhanced. Our study confirms previous results on strange quark matter and shows that the suprathermal enhancement is even stronger in the case of hadronic matter. We also comment on the competition of different weak channels and the presence of suprathermal effects in various color superconducting phases of dense quark matter.

  4. Supra-thermal charged particle energies in a low pressure radio-frequency electrical discharge in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littlefield, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Velocity spectra of supra-thermal electrons escaping from a low-pressure radio-frequency discharge in air have been measured by a time-of-flight method of original design. In addition, the energy spectra of the supra-thermal electrons and positive ions escaping from the rf discharge have been measured by a retarding potential method. Various parameters affecting the energy of the supra-thermal charged particles are experimentally investigated. A model accounting for the supra-thermal charged particle energies is developed and is shown to be consistent with experimental observations

  5. Alignment of suprathermally rotating grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarian, A.

    1995-12-01

    It is shown that mechanical alignment can be efficient for suprathermally rotating grains, provided that they drift with supersonic velocities. Such a drift should be widely spread due to both Alfvenic waves and ambipolar diffusion. Moreover, if suprathermal rotation is caused by grain interaction with a radiative flux, it is shown that mechanical alignment may be present even in the absence of supersonic drift. This means that the range of applicability of mechanical alignment is wider than generally accepted and that it can rival the paramagnetic one. We also study the latter mechanism and re-examine the interplay between poisoning of active sites and desorption of molecules blocking the access to the active sites of H_2 formation, in order to explain the observed poor alignment of small grains and good alignment of large grains. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of alignment, we briefly discuss the alignment by radiation fluxes and by grain magnetic moments.

  6. Electron beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudjak, Yu.V.; Vladyko, V.B.

    1993-01-01

    The electron beam transport in ion channel has been investigated. The influence of the external longitudinal magnetic field and self beam magnetic field on the charge neutralization process was defined. Beam head erosion under channel is curved or the availability of transverse external magnetic field was numerically simulated. The numerical investigation of the ion-hose instability was performed. The conditions, when as a result of ion-hose instability development may be coming out of the channel by beam tail, were founded. It was shown, that supplementary creation of plasma by electron beam and ions did not lead to the reduction of ion-hose instability. Sufficient slowing down of ion-hose instability development could be achieved if betatron length increased to impulse tail. In the case of a weak initial nonsymmetrical perturbation, sausage instability was investigated. Numerical simulation showed that this instability could lead to beam radius increasing in order. The electron beam guiding by low conductive plasma channel was considered. The attractive force of beam to this channel under nonsymmetrical injection was defined analytically

  7. Molecular electronic junction transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Gemma C.; Herrmann, Carmen; Ratner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Whenasinglemolecule,oracollectionofmolecules,isplacedbetween two electrodes and voltage is applied, one has a molecular transport junction. We discuss such junctions, their properties, their description, and some of their applications. The discussion is qualitative rather than quantitative......, and focuses on mechanism, structure/function relations, regimes and mechanisms of transport, some molecular regularities, and some substantial challenges facing the field. Because there are many regimes and mechanisms in transport junctions, we will discuss time scales, geometries, and inelastic scattering...

  8. Electron transport in molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Chengjun

    This thesis addresses the electron transport in molecular junctions, focusing on the energy level alignment and correlation effects. Various levels of theory have been applied to study the structural and electronic effects in different molecular junctions, starting from the single particle density...

  9. Ballistic transport and electronic structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schep, Kees M.; Kelly, Paul J.; Bauer, Gerrit E.W.

    1998-01-01

    The role of the electronic structure in determining the transport properties of ballistic point contacts is studied. The conductance in the ballistic regime is related to simple geometrical projections of the Fermi surface. The essential physics is first clarified for simple models. For real

  10. Electron Transport in Si Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramayya, E [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Vasileska, D [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Goodnick, S M [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Knezevic, I [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2006-05-15

    We investigate electron transport in silicon nanowires taking into account acoustic, non-polar optical phonons and surface/interface roughness scattering. We find that at very high transverse fields the reduced density of final states to which the carriers can scatter into gives rise to a reduced influence of interface-roughness scattering, which is promising result from a fabrication point of view.

  11. Electron transport code theoretical basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubi, A.; Horowitz, Y.S.

    1978-04-01

    This report mainly describes the physical and mathematical considerations involved in the treatment of the multiple collision processes. A brief description is given of the traditional methods used in electron transport via Monte Carlo, and a somewhat more detailed description, of the approach to be used in the presently developed code

  12. Excess electron transport in cryoobjects

    CERN Document Server

    Eshchenko, D G; Brewer, J H; Cottrell, S P; Cox, S F J

    2003-01-01

    Experimental results on excess electron transport in solid and liquid phases of Ne, Ar, and solid N sub 2 -Ar mixture are presented and compared with those for He. Muon spin relaxation technique in frequently switching electric fields was used to study the phenomenon of delayed muonium formation: excess electrons liberated in the mu sup + ionization track converge upon the positive muons and form Mu (mu sup + e sup -) atoms. This process is shown to be crucially dependent upon the electron's interaction with its environment (i.e., whether it occupies the conduction band or becomes localized in a bubble of tens of angstroms in radius) and upon its mobility in these states. The characteristic lengths involved are 10 sup - sup 6 -10 sup - sup 4 cm, the characteristic times range from nanoseconds to tens microseconds. Such a microscopic length scale sometimes enables the electron spend its entire free lifetime in a state which may not be detected by conventional macroscopic techniques. The electron transport proc...

  13. Mesoscopic electronics beyond DC transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Carlo, Leonardo

    Since the inception of mesoscopic electronics in the 1980's, direct current (dc) measurements have underpinned experiments in quantum transport. Novel techniques complementing dc transport are becoming paramount to new developments in mesoscopic electronics, particularly as the road is paved toward quantum information processing. This thesis describes seven experiments on GaAs/AlGaAs and graphene nanostructures unified by experimental techniques going beyond traditional dc transport. Firstly, dc current induced by microwave radiation applied to an open chaotic quantum dot is investigated. Asymmetry of mesoscopic fluctuations of induced current in perpendicular magnetic field is established as a tool for separating the quantum photovoltaic effect from classical rectification. A differential charge sensing technique is next developed using integrated quantum point contacts to resolve the spatial distribution of charge inside a double quantum clot. An accurate method for determining interdot tunnel coupling and electron temperature using charge sensing is demonstrated. A two-channel system for detecting current noise in mesoscopic conductors is developed, enabling four experiments where shot noise probes transmission properties not available in dc transport and Johnson noise serves as an electron thermometer. Suppressed shot noise is observed in quantum point contacts at zero parallel magnetic field, associated with the 0.7 structure in conductance. This suppression evolves with increasing field into the shot-noise signature of spin-lifted mode degeneracy. Quantitative agreement is found with a phenomenological model for density-dependent mode splitting. Shot noise measurements of multi-lead quantum-dot structures in the Coulomb blockade regime distill the mechanisms by which Coulomb interaction and quantum indistinguishability correlate electron flow. Gate-controlled sign reversal of noise cross correlation in two capacitively-coupled dots is observed, and shown to

  14. Electron transport in quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    When I was contacted by Kluwer Academic Publishers in the Fall of 200 I, inviting me to edit a volume of papers on the issue of electron transport in quantum dots, I was excited by what I saw as an ideal opportunity to provide an overview of a field of research that has made significant contributions in recent years, both to our understanding of fundamental physics, and to the development of novel nanoelectronic technologies. The need for such a volume seemed to be made more pressing by the fact that few comprehensive reviews of this topic have appeared in the literature, in spite of the vast activity in this area over the course of the last decade or so. With this motivation, I set out to try to compile a volume that would fairly reflect the wide range of opinions that has emerged in the study of electron transport in quantum dots. Indeed, there has been no effort on my part to ensure any consistency between the different chapters, since I would prefer that this volume instead serve as a useful forum for the...

  15. Electronic transport in bilayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshino, Mikito

    2009-01-01

    We present theoretical studies on the transport properties and localization effects of bilayer graphene. We calculate the conductivity by using the effective mass model with the self-consistent Born approximation, in the presence and absence of an energy gap opened by the interlayer asymmetry. We find that, in the absence of the gap, the minimum conductivity approaches the universal value by increasing the disorder potential, and the value is robust in the strong disorder regime where mixing with high-energy states is considerable. The gap-opening suppresses the conductivity over a wide energy range, even in the region away from the gap.We also study the localization effects in the vicinity of zero energy in bilayer graphene. We find that the states are all localized in the absence of the gap, while the gap-opening causes a phase transition analogous to the quantum Hall transition, which is accompanied by electron delocalization.

  16. The Role of Diffusion in the Transport of Energetic Electrons during Solar Flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Nicolas H.; Kontar, Eduard P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Emslie, A. Gordon, E-mail: nicolas.bian@glasgow.gla.ac.uk, E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The transport of the energy contained in suprathermal electrons in solar flares plays a key role in our understanding of many aspects of flare physics, from the spatial distributions of hard X-ray emission and energy deposition in the ambient atmosphere to global energetics. Historically the transport of these particles has been largely treated through a deterministic approach, in which first-order secular energy loss to electrons in the ambient target is treated as the dominant effect, with second-order diffusive terms (in both energy and angle) generally being either treated as a small correction or even neglected. Here, we critically analyze this approach, and we show that spatial diffusion through pitch-angle scattering necessarily plays a very significant role in the transport of electrons. We further show that a satisfactory treatment of the diffusion process requires consideration of non-local effects, so that the electron flux depends not just on the local gradient of the electron distribution function but on the value of this gradient within an extended region encompassing a significant fraction of a mean free path. Our analysis applies generally to pitch-angle scattering by a variety of mechanisms, from Coulomb collisions to turbulent scattering. We further show that the spatial transport of electrons along the magnetic field of a flaring loop can be modeled rather effectively as a Continuous Time Random Walk with velocity-dependent probability distribution functions of jump sizes and occurrences, both of which can be expressed in terms of the scattering mean free path.

  17. Phonon limited electronic transport in Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittweger, F.; Hinsche, N. F.; Mertig, I.

    2017-09-01

    We present a fully ab initio based scheme to compute electronic transport properties, i.e. the electrical conductivity σ and thermopower S, in the presence of electron-phonon interaction. We explicitly investigate the \

  18. Electron and Phonon Transport in Molecular Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qian

    transmission at the Fermi energy. We propose and analyze a way of using π   stacking to design molecular junctions to control heat transport. We develop a simple model system to identify optimal parameter regimes and then use density functional theory (DFT) to extract model parameters for a number of specific......Molecular electronics provide the possibility to investigate electron and phonon transport at the smallest imaginable scale, where quantum effects can be investigated and exploited directly in the design. In this thesis, we study both electron transport and phonon transport in molecular junctions....... The system we are interested in here are π-stacked molecules connected with two semi-infinite leads. π-stacked aromatic rings, connected via π-π electronic coupling, provides a rather soft mechanical bridge while maintaining high electronic conductivity. We investigate electron transport...

  19. Coupled electron-photon radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorence, L.; Kensek, R.P.; Valdez, G.D.; Drumm, C.R.; Fan, W.C.; Powell, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Massively-parallel computers allow detailed 3D radiation transport simulations to be performed to analyze the response of complex systems to radiation. This has been recently been demonstrated with the coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo code, ITS. To enable such calculations, the combinatorial geometry capability of ITS was improved. For greater geometrical flexibility, a version of ITS is under development that can track particles in CAD geometries. Deterministic radiation transport codes that utilize an unstructured spatial mesh are also being devised. For electron transport, the authors are investigating second-order forms of the transport equations which, when discretized, yield symmetric positive definite matrices. A novel parallelization strategy, simultaneously solving for spatial and angular unknowns, has been applied to the even- and odd-parity forms of the transport equation on a 2D unstructured spatial mesh. Another second-order form, the self-adjoint angular flux transport equation, also shows promise for electron transport

  20. Hydrodynamic approach to electronic transport in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narozhny, Boris N. [Institute for Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Gornyi, Igor V. [Institute for Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mirlin, Alexander D. [Institute for Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Schmalian, Joerg [Institute for Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Solid State Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The last few years have seen an explosion of interest in hydrodynamic effects in interacting electron systems in ultra-pure materials. In this paper we briefly review the recent advances, both theoretical and experimental, in the hydrodynamic approach to electronic transport in graphene, focusing on viscous phenomena, Coulomb drag, non-local transport measurements, and possibilities for observing nonlinear effects. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Electron transport in wurtzite InN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 79; Issue 1 ... InN transport; mobility; energy and momentum relaxation; impurity scattering. ... the transport properties of InN such as the drift velocity, the drift mobility, the average electron, energy relaxation times and momentum relaxation times at high electric field.

  2. The Electron Transport Chain: An Interactive Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Chris; Choun, James

    2014-01-01

    This activity provides students an interactive demonstration of the electron transport chain and chemiosmosis during aerobic respiration. Students use simple, everyday objects as hydrogen ions and electrons and play the roles of the various proteins embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane to show how this specific process in cellular…

  3. Electronic Ticketing in Public Transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, J.E.C.; Rietveld, P.

    2007-01-01

    The NoordNed Mobile Ticketing service (in this article referred to as M-Ticketing) is an early example of electronic ticketing in the Netherlands. Using this service, customers no longer need to buy a ticket at a ticket office or ticket machine. Instead, people can order M-Tickets through the

  4. Transport experiments with Dirac electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checkelsky, Joseph George

    This thesis presents transport experiments performed on solid state systems in which the behavior of the charge carriers can be described by the Dirac equation. Unlike the massive carriers in a typical material, in these systems the carriers behave like massless fermions with a photon-like dispersion predicted to greatly modify their spin and charge transport properties. The first system studied is graphene, a crystalline monolayer of carbon arranged in a hexagonal lattice. The band structure calculated from the hexagonal lattice has the form of the massless Dirac Hamiltonian. At the charge neutral Dirac point, we find that application of a magnetic field drives a transition to an insulating state. We also study the thermoelectric properties of graphene and find that the states near the Dirac point have a unique response compared to those at higher charge density. The second system is the 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3, where a Dirac-like dispersion for states on the 2D surface of the insulating 3D crystal arises as a result of the topology of the 3D bands and time reversal symmetry. To access the transport properties of the 2D states, we suppress the remnant bulk conduction channel by chemical doping and electrostatic gating. In bulk crystals we find strong quantum corrections to transport at low temperature when the bulk conduction channel is maximally suppressed. In microscopic crystals we are able better to isolate the surface conduction channel properties. We identify in-gap conducting states that have relatively high mobility compared to the bulk and exhibit weak anti-localization, consistent with predictions for protected 2D surface states with strong spin-orbit coupling.

  5. Monte Carlo electron/photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.M.; Morel, J.E.; Hughes, H.G.

    1985-01-01

    A review of nonplasma coupled electron/photon transport using Monte Carlo method is presented. Remarks are mainly restricted to linerarized formalisms at electron energies from 1 keV to 1000 MeV. Applications involving pulse-height estimation, transport in external magnetic fields, and optical Cerenkov production are discussed to underscore the importance of this branch of computational physics. Advances in electron multigroup cross-section generation is reported, and its impact on future code development assessed. Progress toward the transformation of MCNP into a generalized neutral/charged-particle Monte Carlo code is described. 48 refs

  6. Electron transport in heterogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcao, Rossana Cavalieri

    1992-05-01

    In this work it is presented a model to calculate dose enhancement in the vicinity of plane interfaces irradiated by therapeutic electron beams. The proposed model is based on an approximation of the Boltzmann Equation. The solutions presented to the equation are exact on its angular dependency, making it possible to observe that at low Z/high Z interfaces the dose enhancement is due to an increase of the backscattering. For the inverse situation a decrease of the backscattering can be observed. Calculations have been made for some tissue-metal interfaces irradiated by 13 MeV electron beam. The dose perturbations in tissue were obtained and the results were compared with experimental data as well as Monte Carlo simulations. In both cases the agreement found was very good. (author)

  7. Innovative electron transport methods in EGS5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielajew, A.F.; Wilderman, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    The initial formulation of a Monte Carlo scheme for the transport of high-energy (>≅ 100 keV) electrons was established by Berger in 1963. Calling his method the 'condensed history theory', Berger combined the theoretical results of the previous generation of research into developing approximate solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation with numerical algorithms for exploiting the power of computers to permit iterative, piece-wise solution of the transport equation in a computationally intensive but much less approximate fashion. The methods devised by Berger, with comparatively little modification, provide the foundation of all present day Monte Carlo electron transport simulation algorithms. Only in the last 15 years, beginning with the development and publication of the PRESTA algorithm, has there been a significant revisitation of the problem of simulating electron transport within the condensed history framework. Research in this area is ongoing, highly active, and far from complete. It presents an enormous challenge, demanding derivation of new analytical transport solutions based on underlying fundamental interaction mechanisms, intuitive insight in the development of computer algorithms, and state of the art computer science skills in order to permit deployment of these techniques in an efficient manner. The EGS5 project, a modern ground-up rewrite of the EGS4 code, is now in the design phase. EGS5 will take modern photon and electron transport algorithms and deploy them in an easy-to-maintain, modern computer language-ANSI-standard C ++. Moreover, the well-known difficulties of applying EGS4 to practical geometries (geometry code development, tally routine design) should be made easier and more intuitive through the use of a visual user interface being designed by Quantum Research, Inc., work that is presented elsewhere in this conference. This report commences with a historical review of electron transport models culminating with the proposal of a

  8. Electron transport through monovalent atomic wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Y. J.; Brandbyge, Mads; Puska, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    Using a first-principles density-functional method we model electron transport through linear chains of monovalent atoms between two bulk electrodes. For noble-metal chains the transport resembles that for free electrons over a potential barrier whereas for alkali-metal chains resonance states...... at the chain determine the conductance. As a result, the conductance for noble-metal chains is close to one quantum of conductance, and it oscillates moderately so that an even number of chain atoms yields a higher value than an odd number. The conductance oscillations are large for alkali-metal chains...

  9. A deterministic model of electron transport for electron probe microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünger, J.; Richter, S.; Torrilhon, M.

    2018-01-01

    Within the last decades significant improvements in the spatial resolution of electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) were obtained by instrumental enhancements. In contrast, the quantification procedures essentially remained unchanged. As the classical procedures assume either homogeneity or a multi-layered structure of the material, they limit the spatial resolution of EPMA. The possibilities of improving the spatial resolution through more sophisticated quantification procedures are therefore almost untouched. We investigate a new analytical model (M 1-model) for the quantification procedure based on fast and accurate modelling of electron-X-ray-matter interactions in complex materials using a deterministic approach to solve the electron transport equations. We outline the derivation of the model from the Boltzmann equation for electron transport using the method of moments with a minimum entropy closure and present first numerical results for three different test cases (homogeneous, thin film and interface). Taking Monte Carlo as a reference, the results for the three test cases show that the M 1-model is able to reproduce the electron dynamics in EPMA applications very well. Compared to classical analytical models like XPP and PAP, the M 1-model is more accurate and far more flexible, which indicates the potential of deterministic models of electron transport to further increase the spatial resolution of EPMA.

  10. Epitaxial graphene electronic structure and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Heer, Walt A; Berger, Claire; Wu Xiaosong; Sprinkle, Mike; Hu Yike; Ruan Ming; First, Phillip N; Stroscio, Joseph A; Haddon, Robert; Piot, Benjamin; Faugeras, Clement; Potemski, Marek; Moon, Jeong-Sun

    2010-01-01

    Since its inception in 2001, the science and technology of epitaxial graphene on hexagonal silicon carbide has matured into a major international effort and is poised to become the first carbon electronics platform. A historical perspective is presented and the unique electronic properties of single and multilayered epitaxial graphenes on electronics grade silicon carbide are reviewed. Early results on transport and the field effect in Si-face grown graphene monolayers provided proof-of-principle demonstrations. Besides monolayer epitaxial graphene, attention is given to C-face grown multilayer graphene, which consists of electronically decoupled graphene sheets. Production, structure and electronic structure are reviewed. The electronic properties, interrogated using a wide variety of surface, electrical and optical probes, are discussed. An overview is given of recent developments of several device prototypes including resistance standards based on epitaxial graphene quantum Hall devices and new ultrahigh frequency analogue epitaxial graphene amplifiers.

  11. Epitaxial graphene electronic structure and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Heer, Walt A; Berger, Claire; Wu Xiaosong; Sprinkle, Mike; Hu Yike; Ruan Ming; First, Phillip N [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Stroscio, Joseph A [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, NIST, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Haddon, Robert [Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Departments of Chemistry and Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Piot, Benjamin; Faugeras, Clement; Potemski, Marek [LNCMI -CNRS, Grenoble, 38042 Cedex 9 (France); Moon, Jeong-Sun, E-mail: walt.deheer@physics.gateh.ed [HRL Laboratories LLC, Malibu, CA 90265 (United States)

    2010-09-22

    Since its inception in 2001, the science and technology of epitaxial graphene on hexagonal silicon carbide has matured into a major international effort and is poised to become the first carbon electronics platform. A historical perspective is presented and the unique electronic properties of single and multilayered epitaxial graphenes on electronics grade silicon carbide are reviewed. Early results on transport and the field effect in Si-face grown graphene monolayers provided proof-of-principle demonstrations. Besides monolayer epitaxial graphene, attention is given to C-face grown multilayer graphene, which consists of electronically decoupled graphene sheets. Production, structure and electronic structure are reviewed. The electronic properties, interrogated using a wide variety of surface, electrical and optical probes, are discussed. An overview is given of recent developments of several device prototypes including resistance standards based on epitaxial graphene quantum Hall devices and new ultrahigh frequency analogue epitaxial graphene amplifiers.

  12. Computational methods of electron/photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    A review of computational methods simulating the non-plasma transport of electrons and their attendant cascades is presented. Remarks are mainly restricted to linearized formalisms at electron energies above 1 keV. The effectiveness of various metods is discussed including moments, point-kernel, invariant imbedding, discrete-ordinates, and Monte Carlo. Future research directions and the potential impact on various aspects of science and engineering are indicated

  13. Enhanced transport of relativistic electrons through nanochannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Kumar Singh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Efficient transport of fast electrons driven by intense laser solid interaction depends crucially on optimal target design. We demonstrate a hybrid target design that incorporates two important features—efficient generation of relativistic electrons and their unimpeded transport in dense media. The target was fabricated on a porous alumina base consisting of an array of sublambda cylindrical holes partially filled with Cu nanorods, such that light field propagates in the hollow channels, located ahead of the metallic fillings. The hollow array acts as an efficient source of hot electrons when driven by relativistically intense, femtosecond laser pulses and shows a 60-fold enhancement in electron flux compared to a solid target. This enhancement is ascribed to an increased penetration of laser through subwavelength pores and enhanced local electric fields. The metal doped part facilitates efficient transport of the generated electrons, due to its large background conductivity. A 4-fold enhancement in target rear side electron flux is observed compared with unfilled porous alumina.

  14. Electronic and transport properties of kinked graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Toft Rasmussen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Local curvature, or bending, of a graphene sheet is known to increase the chemical reactivity presenting an opportunity for templated chemical functionalisation. Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT, we investigate the reaction barrier reduction for the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at linear bends in graphene. We find a significant barrier lowering (≈15% for realistic radii of curvature (≈20 Å and that adsorption along the linear bend leads to a stable linear kink. We compute the electronic transport properties of individual and multiple kink lines, and demonstrate how these act as efficient barriers for electron transport. In particular, two parallel kink lines form a graphene pseudo-nanoribbon structure with a semimetallic/semiconducting electronic structure closely related to the corresponding isolated ribbons; the ribbon band gap translates into a transport gap for electronic transport across the kink lines. We finally consider pseudo-ribbon-based heterostructures and propose that such structures present a novel approach for band gap engineering in nanostructured graphene.

  15. Filamentous bacteria transport electrons over centimetre distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeffer, Christian; Larsen, Steffen; Song, Jie

    2012-01-01

    across centimetre-wide zones. Here we present evidence that the native conductors are long, filamentous bacteria. They abounded in sediment zones with electric currents and along their length they contained strings with distinct properties in accordance with a function as electron transporters. Living...

  16. Electron transport in wurtzite InN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E-mail: fadlaeg@yahoo.com. MS received 4 July 2011; revised 7 January 2012; accepted 8 February 2012. Abstract. Using ensemble Monte Carlo simulation technique, we have calculated the transport properties of InN such as the drift velocity, the drift mobility, the average electron, energy relaxation times and momentum ...

  17. Electronic transport in partially ionized water plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Martin; Redmer, Ronald

    2017-09-01

    We use ab initio simulations based on density functional theory to calculate the electrical and thermal conductivities of electrons in partially ionized water plasmas at densities above 0.1 g/cm3. The resulting conductivity data are then fitted to analytic expressions for convenient application. For low densities, we develop a simple and fully analytic model for electronic transport in low-density plasmas in the chemical picture using the relaxation-time approximation. In doing so, we derive a useful analytic expression for electronic transport cross sections with neutral particles, based on a model potential. In the regime of thermal ionization, electrical conductivities from the analytic model agree with the ab initio data within a factor of 2. Larger deviations are observed for the thermal conductivity, and their origin is discussed. Our results are relevant for modeling the interior and evolution of water-rich planets as well as for technical plasma applications.

  18. Electronic and transport properties of kinked graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jesper Toft; Gunst, Tue; Bøggild, Peter

    2013-01-01

    for the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at linear bends in graphene. We find a significant barrier lowering (≈15%) for realistic radii of curvature (≈20 Å) and that adsorption along the linear bend leads to a stable linear kink. We compute the electronic transport properties of individual and multiple kink lines......Local curvature, or bending, of a graphene sheet is known to increase the chemical reactivity presenting an opportunity for templated chemical functionalisation. Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), we investigate the reaction barrier reduction......, and demonstrate how these act as efficient barriers for electron transport. In particular, two parallel kink lines form a graphene pseudo-nanoribbon structure with a semimetallic/semiconducting electronic structure closely related to the corresponding isolated ribbons; the ribbon band gap translates...

  19. Fast electron transport in shaped solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anle Lei; Cao, L.H.; He, X.T.; Zhang, W.Y.; Tanaka, K.A.; Kodama, R.; Mima, K.; Nakamura, T.; Normatsu, T.; Yu, W.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The scheme of fast ignition fusion energy relies on the ultra-intense ultra-short (UIUS) laser energy transport into the compressed core plasma. One solution is to insert a hollow cone in the fuel shell to block the UIUS laser from the coronal plasma, thus allowing it to reach the core plasma. The cone not only can guide the UIUS laser to its tip, but can play important roles in the specific cone-in-shell target designed for FI. It was found in a PIC simulation that the cone can guide the fast electrons generated at the inner wall to propagate along the wall surface toward its tip, which would increase the energy density at the tip and might enhance the heating of the core plasma. Surface guiding of fast electrons with planar foil targets has been demonstrated experimentally. However, the guided fast electrons will mix the electrons generated ahead by the laser light with a planar target, and hence one cannot experimentally quantitatively validate the guide of the fast electrons. We investigate the cone guiding of fast electrons with an inverse cone target. We found a novel surface current of fast electrons propagating along the cone wall. The fast electrons generated at the planar outer tip of the inverse cone are guided and confined to propagate along the inverse cone wall to form a surface current by induced transient electric and magnetic fields associated with the current itself. Once departing from the source at the outer tip, this surface current of fast electrons is 'clean', neither experiencing the interacting laser light nor mixing fast electrons ahead, unlike those in cone or planar targets. This surface current in the inverse cone may explicitly give the capability of the guide of fast electron energy by the cone wall. The guiding and confinement of fast electrons is of important for fast ignition in inertial confinement fusion and several applications in high energy density science.

  20. Disorder and electronic transport in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucciolo, E R; Lewenkopf, C H

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we provide an account of the recent progress in understanding electronic transport in disordered graphene systems. Starting from a theoretical description that emphasizes the role played by band structure properties and lattice symmetries, we describe the nature of disorder in these systems and its relation to transport properties. While the focus is primarily on theoretical and conceptual aspects, connections to experiments are also included. Issues such as short- versus long-range disorder, localization (strong and weak), the carrier density dependence of the conductivity, and conductance fluctuations are considered and some open problems are pointed out. (topical review)

  1. Phonon limited electronic transport in Pb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittweger, Florian; Hinsche, Nicki Frank; Mertig, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    We present a fully ab initio based scheme to compute electronic transport properties, i.e. the electrical conductivity σ and thermopower S, in the presence of electron-phonon interaction. We explicitly investigate the k-dependent structure of the Éliashberg spectral function, the coupling strength......, the linewidth and the relaxation time τ. We obtain a state-dependent τ and show its necessity to reproduce the increased thermopower for temperatures below the Debye temperature, without accounting for the phonon-drag effect. Despite the detailed investigations of various k- and q-dependencies, the presented...

  2. Electronic transport in methylated fragments of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, M. L. de; Oliveira, J. I. N.; Lima Neto, J. X.; Gomes, C. E. M.; Fulco, U. L., E-mail: umbertofulco@gmail.com; Albuquerque, E. L. [Departamento de Biofísica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal-RN (Brazil); Freire, V. N. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, 60455-760 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Caetano, E. W. S. [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Ceará, 60040-531 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Moura, F. A. B. F. de; Lyra, M. L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-900 Maceió-AL (Brazil)

    2015-11-16

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of methylated deoxyribonucleic-acid (DNA) strands, a biological system in which methyl groups are added to DNA (a major epigenetic modification in gene expression), sandwiched between two metallic platinum electrodes. Our theoretical simulations apply an effective Hamiltonian based on a tight-binding model to obtain current-voltage curves related to the non-methylated/methylated DNA strands. The results suggest potential applications in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  3. Recent developments in discrete ordinates electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, J.E.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The discrete ordinates method is a deterministic method for numerically solving the Boltzmann equation. It was originally developed for neutron transport calculations, but is routinely used for photon and coupled neutron-photon transport calculations as well. The computational state of the art for coupled electron-photon transport (CEPT) calculations is not as developed as that for neutron transport calculations. The only production codes currently available for CEPT calculations are condensed-history Monte Carlo codes such as the ETRAN and ITS codes. A deterministic capability for production calculations is clearly needed. In response to this need, we have begun the development of a production discrete ordinates code for CEPT calculations. The purpose of this paper is to describe the basic approach we are taking, discuss the current status of the project, and present some new computational results. Although further characterization of the coupled electron-photon discrete ordinates method remains to be done, the results to date indicate that the discrete ordinates method can be just as accurate and from 10 to 100 times faster than the Monte Carlo method for a wide variety of problems. We stress that these results are obtained with standard discrete ordinates codes such as ONETRAN. It is clear that even greater efficiency can be obtained by developing a new generation of production discrete ordinates codes specifically designed to solve the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation. However, the prospects for such development in the near future appear to be remote

  4. Fused electron deficient semiconducting polymers for air stable electron transport

    KAUST Repository

    Onwubiko, Ada

    2018-01-23

    Conventional semiconducting polymer synthesis typically involves transition metal-mediated coupling reactions that link aromatic units with single bonds along the backbone. Rotation around these bonds contributes to conformational and energetic disorder and therefore potentially limits charge delocalisation, whereas the use of transition metals presents difficulties for sustainability and application in biological environments. Here we show that a simple aldol condensation reaction can prepare polymers where double bonds lock-in a rigid backbone conformation, thus eliminating free rotation along the conjugated backbone. This polymerisation route requires neither organometallic monomers nor transition metal catalysts and offers a reliable design strategy to facilitate delocalisation of frontier molecular orbitals, elimination of energetic disorder arising from rotational torsion and allowing closer interchain electronic coupling. These characteristics are desirable for high charge carrier mobilities. Our polymers with a high electron affinity display long wavelength NIR absorption with air stable electron transport in solution processed organic thin film transistors.

  5. Quantum electron transport in toroidal carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Mark; Encinosa, Mario

    2008-03-01

    Electron transport under bias is treated in tight-binding approximation using a non-equilibrium Green's function approach. Density-of-states D(E), transmissivity T(E), and current ISD are calculated through a (3,3) armchair nanotorus with laterally attached metallic leads and a magnetic field penetrating the toroidal plane. Plateaus in T(E) through the torus are observed as a function of both the relative angle between leads and magnetic flux. Initial computational studies performed with 1800 atoms and attached leads show substantial computational slowdown when increasing the system size by a factor of two. Results are generated by inverting the device Hamiltonian with a standard recursion method extended to account for unit cell toroidal closure. Significant computational speed-up is expected for a parallelized code on a multiprocessor computer cluster. The dependence of electronic features on torus size and torus curvature is tested for three tori with 900, 1800 and 3600 carbon atoms, respectively. References: 1. M. Jack and M. Encinosa, Quantum electron transport in toroidal carbon nanotubes with metallic leads. ArXiv: quant-ph/0709.0760. 2. M. Encinosa and M. Jack, Dipole and solenoidal magnetic moments of electronic surface currents on toroidal nanostructures. J. Comp.-Aided Mat. Design (Springer), 14 (1) (2007) 65 -- 71.

  6. Electronic transport in graphene-based heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, J. Y.; Avsar, A.; Balakrishnan, J.; Taychatanapat, T.; O' Farrell, E. C. T.; Eda, G.; Castro Neto, A. H. [Graphene Research Center, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Koon, G. K. W.; Özyilmaz, B., E-mail: barbaros@nus.edu.sg [Graphene Research Center, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); NanoCore, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2014-05-05

    While boron nitride (BN) substrates have been utilized to achieve high electronic mobilities in graphene field effect transistors, it is unclear how other layered two dimensional (2D) crystals influence the electronic performance of graphene. In this Letter, we study the surface morphology of 2D BN, gallium selenide (GaSe), and transition metal dichalcogenides (tungsten disulfide (WS{sub 2}) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2})) crystals and their influence on graphene's electronic quality. Atomic force microscopy analysis shows that these crystals have improved surface roughness (root mean square value of only ∼0.1 nm) compared to conventional SiO{sub 2} substrate. While our results confirm that graphene devices exhibit very high electronic mobility (μ) on BN substrates, graphene devices on WS{sub 2} substrates (G/WS{sub 2}) are equally promising for high quality electronic transport (μ ∼ 38 000 cm{sup 2}/V s at room temperature), followed by G/MoS{sub 2} (μ ∼ 10 000 cm{sup 2}/V s) and G/GaSe (μ ∼ 2200 cm{sup 2}/V s). However, we observe a significant asymmetry in electron and hole conduction in G/WS{sub 2} and G/MoS{sub 2} heterostructures, most likely due to the presence of sulphur vacancies in the substrate crystals. GaSe crystals are observed to degrade over time even under ambient conditions, leading to a large hysteresis in graphene transport making it a less suitable substrate.

  7. The SupraThermal Ion Monitor for space weather predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegrini, F; Desai, M I; Livi, S; McComas, D J; Ho, G C

    2014-05-01

    Measurement of suprathermal energy ions in the heliosphere has always been challenging because (1) these ions are situated in the energy regime only a few times higher than the solar wind plasma, where intensities are orders of magnitude higher and (2) ion energies are below or close to the threshold of state-of-art solid-state detectors. Suprathermal ions accelerated at coronal mass ejection-driven shocks propagate out ahead of the shocks. These shocks can cause geomagnetic storms in the Earth's magnetosphere that can affect spacecraft and ground-based power and communication systems. An instrument with sufficient sensitivity to measure these ions can be used to predict the arrival of the shocks and provide an advance warning for potentially geo-effective space weather. In this paper, we present a novel energy analyzer concept, the Suprathermal Ion Monitor (STIM) that is designed to measure suprathermal ions with high sensitivity. We show results from a laboratory prototype and demonstrate the feasibility of the concept. A list of key performances is given, as well as a discussion of various possible detectors at the back end. STIM is an ideal candidate for a future space weather monitor in orbit upstream of the near-earth environment, for example, around L1. A scaled-down version is suitable for a CubeSat mission. Such a platform allows proofing the concept and demonstrating its performance in the space environment.

  8. Replacing Electron Transport Cofactors with Hydrogenases

    KAUST Repository

    Laamarti, Rkia

    2016-12-01

    Enzymes have found applications in a broad range of industrial production processes. While high catalytic activity, selectivity and mild reaction conditions are attractive advantages of the biocatalysts, particularly costs arising from required cofactors pose a sever limitation. While cofactor-recycling systems are available, their use implies constraints for process set-up and conditions, which are a particular problem e.g. for solid-gas-phase reactions. Several oxidoreductases are able to directly exchange electrons with electrodes. Hence, the co-immobilization of both, an electron-utilizing and an electron-generating oxidoreductase on conductive nanoparticles should facilitate the direct electron flow from an enzymatic oxidation to a reduction reaction circumventing redox-cofactors requirements. In such a set-up, hydrogenases could generate and provide electrons directly form gaseous hydrogen. This thesis describes the co-immobilization of the oxygen tolerant hydrogenases from C. eutropha or C. metallidurans and cytochrome P450BM3 as test system. Conductive material in the form of carbon nanotubes (CNT) serves as a suitable support. A combination of the hydrogenase and the catalytic domain of P450BM3 immobilized on carbon nanotubes were tested for the oxidation of lauric acid in the presence of hydrogen instead of an electron-transport cofactor. The GC-MS analysis reveals the conversion of 4% of lauric acid (LA) into three products, which correspond to the hydroxylated lauric acid in three different positions with a total turnover (TON) of 34. The product distribution is similar to that obtained when using the wildtype P450BM3 with the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) cofactor. Such electronic coupling couldn’t be achieved for the conversion of other substrates such as propane and cyclohexane, probably due to the high uncoupling rate within the heme-domain of cytochrome P450BM3 when unnatural substrates are introduced.

  9. Mitochondrial Electron Transport and Plant Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan G; Møller, Ian Max

    2011-01-01

    redox compounds from carbon degradation are used for powering ATP synthesis. The standard ETC contains three sites of energy conservation in complexes I, III, and IV, which are in common with most other eukaryotes. However, the complexity of the plant metabolic system is mirrored in the ETC. In addition...... conservation in the ETC. The alternative oxidase provides a non-energy-conserving alternative to electron transport through complexes III and IV. There also appears to be a special coupling between specific NAD(P)H dehydrogenases and specific members of the alternative oxidase family. These additional enzymes...

  10. Electron transport in doped fullerene molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Milanpreet; Sawhney, Ravinder Singh; Engles, Derick

    The effect of doping on the electron transport of molecular junctions is analyzed in this paper. The doped fullerene molecules are stringed to two semi-infinite gold electrodes and analyzed at equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions of these device configurations. The contemplation is done using nonequilibrium Green’s function (NEGF)-density functional theory (DFT) to evaluate its density of states (DOS), transmission coefficient, molecular orbitals, electron density, charge transfer, current, and conductance. We conclude from the elucidated results that Au-C16Li4-Au and Au-C16Ne4-Au devices behave as an ordinary p-n junction diode and a Zener diode, respectively. Moreover, these doped fullerene molecules do not lose their metallic nature when sandwiched between the pair of gold electrodes.

  11. Electronic transport properties of (fluorinated) metal phthalocyanine

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, M M

    2015-12-21

    The magnetic and transport properties of the metal phthalocyanine (MPc) and F16MPc (M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ag) families of molecules in contact with S–Au wires are investigated by density functional theory within the local density approximation, including local electronic correlations on the central metal atom. The magnetic moments are found to be considerably modified under fluorination. In addition, they do not depend exclusively on the configuration of the outer electronic shell of the central metal atom (as in isolated MPc and F16MPc) but also on the interaction with the leads. Good agreement between the calculated conductance and experimental results is obtained. For M = Ag, a high spin filter efficiency and conductance is observed, giving rise to a potentially high sensitivity for chemical sensor applications.

  12. Electron Transport through Porphyrin Molecular Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi

    The goal of this work is to study the properties that would affect the electron transport through a porphyrin molecular junction. This work contributes to the field of electron transport in molecular junctions in the following 3 aspects. First of all, by carrying out experiments comparing the conductance of the iron (III) porphyrin (protected) and the free base porphyrin (protected), it is confirmed that the molecular energy level broadening and shifting occurs for porphyrin molecules when coupled with the metal electrodes, and this level broadening and shifting plays an important role in the electron transport through molecular junctions. Secondly, by carrying out an in-situ deprotection of the acetyl-protected free base porphyrin molecules, it is found out that the presence of acetyl groups reduces the conductance. Thirdly, by incorporating the Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) spectrum and the in-situ deprotection prior to formation of molecular junctions, it allows a more precise understanding of the molecules involved in the formation of molecular junctions, and therefore allows an accurate analysis of the conductance histogram. The molecules are prepared by self-assembly and the junctions are formed using a Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) molecular break junction technique. The porphyrin molecules are characterized by MALDI in solution before self-assembly to a gold/mica substrate. The self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of porphyrins on gold are characterized by Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) reflection spectroscopy to confirm that the molecules are attached to the substrate. The SAMs are then characterized by Angle-Resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) to determine the thickness and the average molecular orientation of the molecular layer. The electron transport is measured by conductance-displacement (G-S) experiments under a given bias (-0.4V). The conductance value of a single molecule is identified by a statistical analysis

  13. Studies of suprathermal emission due to cyclotron-electronic heating of the tokamak TCV plasma; Etudes du rayonnement suprathermique emis lors du chauffage cyclotronique electronique du plasma du tokamak TCV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, P

    2002-07-01

    Photo sensitization of wide band gap semiconductors is used in a wide range of application like silver halide photography and xerography. The development of a new type of solar cells, based on the sensitization of meso porous metal oxide films by panchromatic dyes, has triggered a lot of fundamental research on electron transfer dynamics. Upon excitation, the sensitizer transfers an electron in the conduction band of the semiconductor. Recombination of the charge separated state is prevented by the fast regeneration of the dye by an electron donor present in solution. Until recently, most of the work in this area has been focused on the competition between the recombination and the regeneration processes, which take place in the nanosecond to millisecond regime. With the development of solid-state femtosecond laser, the measurement of the dynamics of the first electron transfer step occurring in the solar cell has become possible . Electron injection from ruthenium(Il) poly pyridyl complexes into titanium dioxide has been found to occur with a poly exponential rate, with time constants ranging from < 100 fs up to > 10 ps. In spite of the lately acquired capacity to measure the dynamics of these reactions, the physical meaning of this poly exponential kinetics and the factors that can influence this process are still poorly understood. In this work, the development of a new femtosecond pump-probe spectrometer, intended to monitor the ultrafast dynamics of electron injection, is presented. The study of this process requires an excellent temporal resolution and a large wavelength tunability to be able to excite a great variety of dyes and to probe the different products of the reaction. These specifications were met using the latest progress made in optical parametric amplification, which allowed the construction of a versatile experimental set-up. The interfacing by computer of the different devices used during the experiments increase the ease of use of the set

  14. Theory of electronic transport through molecular nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koentopp, M.B.

    2005-05-01

    The main issue of this work is to describe electronic transport through single molecule junctions. We implemented the ''standard'' approach to molecular conductance, namely transport calculations in a Landauer-Buettiker framework based on Kohn-Sham orbitals extracted from density functional theory (DFT). Our particular implementation ensures, that apart from approximations inherent in the exchange-correlation functional in DFT no further approximations are made. Comparison of our numerical calculations with available experimental data shows, that, while in some cases qualitative information on transport can be gained, the experimental conductance is two to three orders of magnitude below the theoretical estimate. Changes in bond geometry can not account for this discrepancy. We are led to the conclusion that approximations in the exchange-correlation functional may be the major underlying reason for the discrepancy. To this end, we formulated the condition under which the ''standard'' approach would be exact. Furthermore, we investigated three situations where despite these shortcomings quantitative results can be obtained. Thereby we, for first time, calculated the step positions in the I-V characteristics of a ''diode-type'' molecule quantitatively. (orig.)

  15. Electron thermal transport in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konings, J.A.

    1994-11-30

    The process of fusion of small nuclei thereby releasing energy, as it occurs continuously in the sun, is essential for the existence of mankind. The same process applied in a controlled way on earth would provide a clean and an abundant energy source, and be the long term solution of the energy problem. Nuclear fusion requires an extremely hot (10{sup 8} K) ionized gas, a plasma, that can only be maintained if it is kept insulated from any material wall. In the so called `tokamak` this is achieved by using magnetic fields. The termal insulation, which is essential if one wants to keep the plasma at the high `fusion` temperature, can be predicted using basic plasma therory. A comparison with experiments in tokamaks, however, showed that the electron enery losses are ten to hundred times larger than this theory predicts. This `anomalous transport` of thermal energy implies that, to reach the condition for nuclear fusion, a fusion reactor must have very large dimensions. This may put the economic feasibility of fusion power in jeopardy. Therefore, in a worldwide collaboration, physicists study tokamak plasmas in an attempt to understand and control the energy losses. From a scientific point of view, the mechanisms driving anomalous transport are one of the challenges in fudamental plasma physics. In Nieuwegein, a tokamak experiment (the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project, RTP) is dedicated to the study of anomalous transport, in an international collaboration with other laboratories. (orig./WL).

  16. The "step feature" of suprathermal ion distributions: a discriminator between acceleration processes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The discussion of exactly which process is causing the preferred build-up of v−5-power law tails of the velocity distribution of suprathermal particles in the solar wind is still ongoing. Criteria allowing one to discriminate between the various suggestions that have been made would be useful in order to clarify the physics behind these tails. With this study, we draw the attention to the so-called "step feature" of the velocity distributions and offer a criterion that allows one to distinguish between those scenarios that employ velocity diffusion, i.e. second-order Fermi processes, which are prime candidates in the present debate. With an analytical approximation to the self-consistently obtained velocity diffusion coefficient, we solve the transport equation for suprathermal particles. The numerical simulation reveals that this form of the diffusion coefficient naturally leads to the step feature of the velocity distributions. This finding favours – at least in regions of the appearance of the step feature (i.e. for heliocentric distances up to about 11 AU and at lower energies – the standard velocity diffusion as a consequence of the particle's interactions with the plasma wave turbulence as opposed to that caused by velocity fluctuation-induced compressions and rarefactions.

  17. ECRH and electron heat transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, X.L.; Giruzzi, G.; Dumont, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    It has been observed during the ECRH experiments in tokamaks that the shape of the electron temperature profile in stationary regimes is not very sensitive to the ECRH power deposition i.e. the temperature profile remains peaked at the center even though the ECRH power deposition is off-axis. Various models have been invoked for the interpretation of this profile resilience phenomenon: the inward heat pinch, the critical temperature gradient, the Self-Organized Criticality, etc. Except the pinch effect, all of these models need a specific form of the diffusivity in the heat transport equation. In this work, our approach is to solve a simplified time-dependent heat transport equation analytically in cylindrical geometry. The features of this analytical solution are analyzed, in particular the relationship between the temperature profile resilience and the Eigenmode of the physical system with respect to the heat transport phenomenon. Finally, applications of this analytical solution for the determination of the transport coefficient and the polarization of the EC waves are presented. It has been shown that the solution of the simplified transport equation in a finite cylinder is a Fourier-Bessel series. This series represents in fact a decomposition of the heat source in Eigenmode, which are characterized by the Bessel functions of order 0. The physical interpretation of the Eigenmodes is the following: when the heat source is given by a Bessel function of order 0, the temperature profile has exactly the same form as the source at every time. At the beginning of the power injection, the effectiveness of the temperature response is the same for each Eigenmode, and the response in temperature, having the same form as the source, is local. Conversely, in the later phase of the evolution, the effectiveness of the temperature response for each Eigenmode is different: the higher the order, the lower the effectiveness. In this case the response in temperature appears as

  18. Ion age transport: developing devices beyond electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2014-03-01

    There is more to current devices than conventional electronics. Increasingly research into the controlled movement of ions and molecules is enabling a range of new technologies. For example, as Weihua Guan, Sylvia Xin Li and Mark Reed at Yale University explain, 'It offers a unique opportunity to integrate wet ionics with dry electronics seamlessly'. In this issue they provide an overview of voltage-gated ion and molecule transport in engineered nanochannels. They cover the theory governing these systems and fabrication techniques, as well as applications, including biological and chemical analysis, and energy conversion [1]. Studying the movement of particles in nanochannels is not new. The transport of materials in rock pores led Klinkenberg to describe an analogy between diffusion and electrical conductivity in porous rocks back in 1951 [2]. And already in 1940, Harold Abramson and Manuel Gorin noted that 'When an electric current is applied across the living human skin, the skin may be considered to act like a system of pores through which transfer of substances like ragweed pollen extract may be achieved both by electrophoretic and by diffusion phenomena' [3]. Transport in living systems through pore structures on a much smaller scale has attracted a great deal of research in recent years as well. The selective transport of ions and small organic molecules across the cell membrane facilitates a number of functions including communication between cells, nerve conduction and signal transmission. Understanding these processes may benefit a wide range of potential applications such as selective separation, biochemical sensing, and controlled release and drug delivery processes. In Germany researchers have successfully demonstrated controlled ionic transport through nanopores functionalized with amine-terminated polymer brushes [4]. The polymer nanobrushes swell and shrink in response to changes in temperature, thus opening and closing the nanopore passage to ionic

  19. EUV-driven ionospheres and electron transport on extrasolar giant planets orbiting active stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadney, J. M.; Galand, M.; Koskinen, T. T.; Miller, S.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Unruh, Y. C.; Yelle, R. V.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and structure of the upper atmospheres of extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) are affected by the high-energy spectrum of their host stars from soft X-rays to the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). This emission depends on the activity level of the star, which is primarily determined by its age. In this study, we focus upon EGPs orbiting K- and M-dwarf stars of different ages - ɛ Eridani, AD Leonis, AU Microscopii - and the Sun. X-ray and EUV (XUV) spectra for these stars are constructed using a coronal model. These spectra are used to drive both a thermospheric model and an ionospheric model, providing densities of neutral and ion species. Ionisation - as a result of stellar radiation deposition - is included through photo-ionisation and electron-impact processes. The former is calculated by solving the Lambert-Beer law, while the latter is calculated from a supra-thermal electron transport model. We find that EGP ionospheres at all orbital distances considered (0.1-1 AU) and around all stars selected are dominated by the long-lived H+ ion. In addition, planets with upper atmospheres where H2 is not substantially dissociated (at large orbital distances) have a layer in which H3+ is the major ion at the base of the ionosphere. For fast-rotating planets, densities of short-lived H3+ undergo significant diurnal variations, with the maximum value being driven by the stellar X-ray flux. In contrast, densities of longer-lived H+ show very little day/night variability and the magnitude is driven by the level of stellar EUV flux. The H3+ peak in EGPs with upper atmospheres where H2 is dissociated (orbiting close to their star) under strong stellar illumination is pushed to altitudes below the homopause, where this ion is likely to be destroyed through reactions with heavy species (e.g. hydrocarbons, water). The inclusion of secondary ionisation processes produces significantly enhanced ion and electron densities at altitudes below the main EUV ionisation peak, as

  20. Magnetoelectronic transport of the two-dimensional electron gas in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 72; Issue 2 ... CdSe quantum wells; 2D electron gas; magneto-electronic transport. Abstract. Hall mobility and magnetoresistance coefficient for the two-dimensional (2D) electron transport parallel to the heterojunction interfaces in a single quantum well of CdSe are ...

  1. Observations of thermal and suprathermal tail ions from WIND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randol, B. M.; Christian, E. R.; Wilson, L. B., III

    2016-12-01

    The velocity distribution function (VDF) of solar wind protons (as well as other ion populations) is comprised of a thermal Maxwellian core and an accelerated suprathermal tail, beginning at around 1 keV in the frame co-moving with solar wind bulk velocity. The form of the suprathermal tail is a power law in phase space density, f, vs. speed, v, such that f / vγ, where γ is the power law index. This commonly observed index is of particular interest because no traditional theory predicts its existence. We need more data in order to test these theories. The general shape is of interest because it is kappa-like. We show combined observations from three different instruments on the WIND spacecraft: 3DP/PLSP, STICS, and 3DP/SST/Open. These data stretch from 102 to 107 eV in energy, encompassing both the thermal and suprathermal proton populations. We show further evidence for this kappa-like distribution and report on our progress on fitting of empirical functions to these data.

  2. Problems of linear electron (polaron) transport theory in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Klinger, M I

    1979-01-01

    Problems of Linear Electron (Polaron) Transport Theory in Semiconductors summarizes and discusses the development of areas in electron transport theory in semiconductors, with emphasis on the fundamental aspects of the theory and the essential physical nature of the transport processes. The book is organized into three parts. Part I focuses on some general topics in the theory of transport phenomena: the general dynamical theory of linear transport in dissipative systems (Kubo formulae) and the phenomenological theory. Part II deals with the theory of polaron transport in a crystalline semicon

  3. Melatonin and the electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2017-11-01

    Melatonin protects the electron transport chain (ETC) in multiple ways. It reduces levels of ·NO by downregulating inducible and inhibiting neuronal nitric oxide synthases (iNOS, nNOS), thereby preventing excessive levels of peroxynitrite. Both ·NO and peroxynitrite-derived free radicals, such as ·NO 2 , hydroxyl (·OH) and carbonate radicals (CO 3 · - ) cause blockades or bottlenecks in the ETC, by ·NO binding to irons, protein nitrosation, nitration and oxidation, changes that lead to electron overflow or even backflow and, thus, increased formation of superoxide anions (O 2 · - ). Melatonin improves the intramitochondrial antioxidative defense by enhancing reduced glutathione levels and inducing glutathione peroxidase and Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) in the matrix and Cu,Zn-SOD in the intermembrane space. An additional action concerns the inhibition of cardiolipin peroxidation. This oxidative change in the membrane does not only initiate apoptosis or mitophagy, as usually considered, but also seems to occur at low rate, e.g., in aging, and impairs the structural integrity of Complexes III and IV. Moreover, elevated levels of melatonin inhibit the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and shorten its duration. Additionally, high-affinity binding sites in mitochondria have been described. The assumption of direct binding to the amphipathic ramp of Complex I would require further substantiation. The mitochondrial presence of the melatonin receptor MT 1 offers the possibility that melatonin acts via an inhibitory G protein, soluble adenylyl cyclase, decreased cAMP and lowered protein kinase A activity, a signaling pathway shown to reduce Complex I activity in the case of a mitochondrial cannabinoid receptor.

  4. Effects of toroidal field ripple on suprathermal ions in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.; Towner, H.H.

    1980-02-01

    Analytic calculations of three important effects of toroidal field ripple on suprathermal ions in tokamak plasmas are presented. In the first process, collisional ripple-trapping, beam ions become trapped in local magnetic wells near their banana tips due to pitch-angle scattering as they traverse the ripple on barely unripple-trapped orbits. In the second process, collisionless ripple-trapping, near-perpendicular untrapped ions are captured (again near a banana tip) due to their finite orbits, which carry them out into regions of higher ripple. In the third process, banana-drift diffusion, fast-ion banana orbits fail to close precisely, due to a ripple-induced variable lingering period near the banana tips. These three mechanisms lead to substantial radial transport of banana-trapped, neutral-beam-injected ions when the quantity α* identical with epsilon/sin theta/Nqdelta is of order unity or smaller

  5. Effects of toroidal field ripple on suprathermal ions in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.; Towner, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    Analytic calculations of three important effects of toroidal field ripple on suprathermal ions in tokamak plasmas are presented. In the first process, collisional ripple-trapping, ions become trapped in local magnetic wells near their banana tips owing to pitch-angle scattering as they traverse the ripple on barely unripple-trapped orbits. In the second process, collisionless ripple-trapping, ions are captured (again near a banana tip) owing to their finite orbits, which carry them out into regions of higher ripple. In the third process, banana-drift diffusion, fast-ion banana orbits fail to close precisely, due to a ripple-induced 'variable lingering period' near the banana tips. These three mechanisms lead to substantial radial transport of banana-trapped, neutral-beam-injected ions when the quantity α* is identical with epsilonsinthetaNqdelta is of order unity or smaller. (author)

  6. Electron transport through a diatomic molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imran, Muhammad, E-mail: imran1gee@gmail.com

    2014-08-01

    Electron transport through a diatomic molecular tunnel junction shows wave like interference phenomenon. By using Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) theory, we have explicitly presented current and differential conductance calculation for a diatomic molecular and two isolated atoms (two atoms having zero hybridization between their energy orbitals) tunnel junctions. In case of a diatomic molecular tunnel junction, Green's function propagators entering into current and differential conductance formula interfere constructively for a molecular anti-bonding state and destructively for bonding state. Consequently, conductance through a molecular bonding state is suppressed, and to conserve current, conductance through anti-bonding state is enhanced. Therefore, current steps and differential conductance peaks amplitude show asymmetric correspondence between molecular bonding and anti-bonding states. Interestingly, for a diatomic molecule, comprising of two atoms of same energy level, these propagators interfere completely destructively for molecular bonding state and constructively for molecular anti-bonding state. Hence under such condition, a single step or a single peak is shown up in current versus voltage or differential conductance versus voltage studies.

  7. Electron transport through a diatomic molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imran, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Electron transport through a diatomic molecular tunnel junction shows wave like interference phenomenon. By using Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) theory, we have explicitly presented current and differential conductance calculation for a diatomic molecular and two isolated atoms (two atoms having zero hybridization between their energy orbitals) tunnel junctions. In case of a diatomic molecular tunnel junction, Green's function propagators entering into current and differential conductance formula interfere constructively for a molecular anti-bonding state and destructively for bonding state. Consequently, conductance through a molecular bonding state is suppressed, and to conserve current, conductance through anti-bonding state is enhanced. Therefore, current steps and differential conductance peaks amplitude show asymmetric correspondence between molecular bonding and anti-bonding states. Interestingly, for a diatomic molecule, comprising of two atoms of same energy level, these propagators interfere completely destructively for molecular bonding state and constructively for molecular anti-bonding state. Hence under such condition, a single step or a single peak is shown up in current versus voltage or differential conductance versus voltage studies.

  8. Thermal Transport in Diamond Films for Electronics Thermal Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    Advanced Research Projects Agency EBSD Electron Backscatter Diffraction EELS Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy EOM electro-optic modulator ERT...AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2017-0219 THERMAL TRANSPORT IN DIAMOND FILMS FOR ELECTRONICS THERMAL MANAGEMENT Samuel Graham Georgia Institute of Technology MARCH...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) March 2018 Final 5 December 2014 – 30 September 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE THERMAL TRANSPORT IN DIAMOND FILMS FOR

  9. Electron transport in wurtzite InN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is found that the maximum peak velocity only occurs when the electric field is increased to a value above a certain critical field. This critical field is strongly dependent on InN parameters. The steady-state transport parameters are in fair agreement with other recent calculations. Keywords. InN transport; mobility; energy and ...

  10. Proceedings of eighth joint workshop on electron cyclotron emission and electron cyclotron resonance heating. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The theory of electron cyclotron resonance phenomena is highly developed. The main theoretical tools are well established, generally accepted and able to give a satisfactory description of the main results obtained in electron cyclotron emission, absorption and current drive experiments. In this workshop some advanced theoretical and numerical tools have been presented (e.g., 3-D Fokker-Planck codes, treatment of the r.f. beam as a whole, description of non-linear and finite-beam effects) together with the proposal for new scenarios for ECE and ECA measurements (e.g., for diagnosing suprathermal populations and their radial transport). (orig.)

  11. Proceedings of eighth joint workshop on electron cyclotron emission and electron cyclotron resonance heating. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The theory of electron cyclotron resonance phenomena is highly developed. The main theoretical tools are well established, generally accepted and able to give a satisfactory description of the main results obtained in electron cyclotron emission, absorption and current drive experiments. In this workshop some advanced theoretical and numerical tools have been presented (e.g., 3-D Fokker-Planck codes, treatment of the r.f. beam as a whole, description of non-linear and finite-beam effects) together with the proposal for new scenarios for ECE and ECA measurements (e.g., for diagnosing suprathermal populations and their radial transport). (orig.)

  12. Photosynthetic, respiratory and extracellular electron transport pathways in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea-Smith, David J; Bombelli, Paolo; Vasudevan, Ravendran; Howe, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobacteria have evolved elaborate electron transport pathways to carry out photosynthesis and respiration, and to dissipate excess energy in order to limit cellular damage. Our understanding of the complexity of these systems and their role in allowing cyanobacteria to cope with varying environmental conditions is rapidly improving, but many questions remain. We summarize current knowledge of cyanobacterial electron transport pathways, including the possible roles of alternative pathways in photoprotection. We describe extracellular electron transport, which is as yet poorly understood. Biological photovoltaic devices, which measure electron output from cells, and which have been proposed as possible means of renewable energy generation, may be valuable tools in understanding cyanobacterial electron transfer pathways, and enhanced understanding of electron transfer may allow improvements in the efficiency of power output. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Conrad Mullineaux. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots and Heat Transport in Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirsanskas, Gediminas

    to make a device in order to get fundamentally new properties?” [1], or more concretely, when do the quantum effects become important. During the last 30 years, the innovations in fabrication and cooling techniques allowed to produce nanometer scale solid-state or single molecule-based devices......, electrically confined electrons in semiconductor nanowires, two dimensional electron gases, carbon nanotubes, or just small metallic particles, nanoscale pieces of semiconductor....

  14. Fast electron generation and transport in a turbulent, magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoneking, W.R.

    1994-05-01

    The nature of fast electron generation and transport in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated using two electron energy analyzer (EEA) probes and a thermocouple calorimeter. The parallel velocity distribution of the fast electron population is well fit by a drifted Maxwellian distribution with temperature of about 100 eV and drift velocity of about 2 x 10 6 m/s. Cross-calibration of the EEA with the calorimeter provides a measurement of the fast electron perpendicular temperature of 30 eV, much lower than the parallel temperature, and is evidence that the kinetic dynamo mechanism (KDT) is not operative in MST. The fast electron current is found to match to the parallel current at the edge, and the fast electron density is about 4 x 10 11 cm -3 independent of the ratio of the applied toroidal electric field to the critical electric field for runaways. First time measurements of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport are reported. By correlating electron current fluctuations with radial magnetic fluctuations the transported flux of electrons is found to be negligible outside r/a∼0.9, but rises the level of the expected total particle losses inside r/a∼0.85. A comparison of the measured diffusion coefficient is made with the ausilinear stochastic diffusion coefficient. Evidence exists that the reduction of the transport is due to the presence of a radial ambipolar electric field of magnitude 500 V/m, that acts to equilibrate the ion and electron transport rates. The convective energy transport associated with the measured particle transport is large enough to account for the observed magnetic fluctuation induced energy transport in MST

  15. Fast electron generation and transport in a turbulent, magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoneking, Matthew Randall [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The nature of fast electron generation and transport in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated using two electron energy analyzer (EEA) probes and a thermocouple calorimeter. The parallel velocity distribution of the fast electron population is well fit by a drifted Maxwellian distribution with temperature of about 100 eV and drift velocity of about 2 x 106 m/s. Cross-calibration of the EEA with the calorimeter provides a measurement of the fast electron perpendicular temperature of 30 eV, much lower than the parallel temperature, and is evidence that the kinetic dynamo mechanism (KDT) is not operative in MST. The fast electron current is found to match to the parallel current at the edge, and the fast electron density is about 4 x 1011 cm-3 independent of the ratio of the applied toroidal electric field to the critical electric field for runaways. First time measurements of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport are reported. By correlating electron current fluctuations with radial magnetic fluctuations the transported flux of electrons is found to be negligible outside r/a~0.9, but rises the level of the expected total particle losses inside r/a~0.85. A comparison of the measured diffusion coefficient is made with the ausilinear stochastic diffusion coefficient. Evidence exists that the reduction of the transport is due to the presence of a radial ambipolar electric field of magnitude 500 V/m, that acts to equilibrate the ion and electron transport rates. The convective energy transport associated with the measured particle transport is large enough to account for the observed magnetic fluctuation induced energy transport in MST.

  16. Nonequilibrium electron transport through quantum dots in the Kondo regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wölfle, Peter; Paaske, Jens; Rosch, Achim

    2005-01-01

    Electron transport at large bias voltage through quantum dots in the Kondo regime is described within the perturbative renormalization group extended to nonequilibrium. The conductance, local magnetization, dynamical spin susceptibility and local spectral function are calculated. We show how the ...

  17. Hot electrons in superlattices: quantum transport versus Boltzmann equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Rott, S.

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent solution of the transport equation is presented for semiconductor superlattices within different approaches: (i) a full quantum transport model based on nonequilibrium Green functions, (ii) the semiclassical Boltzmann equation for electrons in a miniband, and (iii) Boltzmann...... equation for electrons in Wannier-Stark states. We find good quantitative agreement of the approximations (ii) and (iii) with (i) in their respective ranges of validity. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  18. Nano-structured electron transporting materials for perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hefei; Huang, Ziru; Wei, Shiyuan; Zheng, Lingling; Xiao, Lixin; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-03-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells have been developing rapidly in the past several years, and their power conversion efficiency has reached over 20%, nearing that of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Because the diffusion length of the hole in perovskites is longer than that of the electron, the performance of the device can be improved by using an electron transporting layer, e.g., TiO2, ZnO and TiO2/Al2O3. Nano-structured electron transporting materials facilitate not only electron collection but also morphology control of the perovskites. The properties, morphology and preparation methods of perovskites are reviewed in the present article. A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between the structure and property will benefit the precise control of the electron transporting process and thus further improve the performance of perovskite solar cells.

  19. Study of Electron Transport and Amplification in Diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Muller, Erik [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2015-01-05

    The development of the Diamond Amplified Photocathode (DAP) has produced significant results under our previous HEP funded efforts both on the fabrication of working devices and the understanding of the underlying physics governing its performance. The results presented here substantiate the use of diamond as both a secondary electron amplifier for high-brightness, high-average-current electron sources and as a photon and particle detector in harsh radiation environments. Very high average current densities (>10A/cm2) have been transported through diamond material. The transport has been measured as a function of incident photon energy and found to be in good agreement with theoretical models. Measurements of the charge transport for photon energies near the carbon K-edge (290 eV for sp3 bonded carbon) have provided insight into carrier loss due to diffusion; modeling of this aspect of charge transport is underway. The response of diamond to nanosecond x-ray pulses has been measured; in this regime the charge transport is as expected. Electron emission from hydrogenated diamond has been measured using both electron and x-ray generated carriers; a gain of 178 has been observed for electron-generated carriers. The energy spectrum of the emitted electrons has been measured, providing insight into the electron affinity and ultimately the thermal emittance. The origin of charge trapping in diamond has been investigated for both bulk and surface trapping

  20. Electronic transport in disordered bilayer and trilayer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Shengjun; De Raedt, Hans; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.

    2010-01-01

    We present a detailed numerical study of the electronic transport properties of bilayer and trilayer graphene within a framework of single-electron tight-binding model. Various types of disorder are considered, such as resonant (hydrogen) impurities, vacancies, short-or long-range Gaussian random

  1. Transport of secondary electrons and reactive species in ion tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2015-08-01

    The transport of reactive species brought about by ions traversing tissue-like medium is analysed analytically. Secondary electrons ejected by ions are capable of ionizing other molecules; the transport of these generations of electrons is studied using the random walk approximation until these electrons remain ballistic. Then, the distribution of solvated electrons produced as a result of interaction of low-energy electrons with water molecules is obtained. The radial distribution of energy loss by ions and secondary electrons to the medium yields the initial radial dose distribution, which can be used as initial conditions for the predicted shock waves. The formation, diffusion, and chemical evolution of hydroxyl radicals in liquid water are studied as well. COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy.

  2. Molecular Electronics: Insight from First-Principles Transport Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsson, Magnus; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2010-01-01

    with transport calculations to study more irregular situations, such as the evolution of a nanoscale contact with the mechanically controllable break-junction technique. Finally we discuss calculations of inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy as a characterization technique that reveals information about...... the electronic transport. Here we describe key computational ingredients and discuss these in relation to simulations for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments with C-60 molecules where the experimental geometry is well characterized. We then show how molecular dynamics simulations may be combined...... the atomic arrangement and transport channels....

  3. Extracellular Electron Transport Coupling Biogeochemical Processes Centimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Fossing, Henrik; Christensen, Peter Bondo

    2010-01-01

    Recent observations in marine sediment have revealed  conductive networks transmitting electrons from oxidation processes in the anoxic zone to oxygen reduction in the oxiczone [1]. The electrochemical processes and conductors seem to be biologically controlled and may account for more than half...

  4. Structural disorder and electron transport in graphene at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobenko, N. G.; Egorushkin, V. E.; Melnikova, N. V.; Ponomarev, A. N.; Belosludtseva, A. A.; Barkalov, L. D.

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical study of electron transport characteristics of metalized epitaxial graphene with impurities and structural inhomogeneous of the short-range order type was performed. The electron relaxation time, mean free path, and diffusion coefficient were calculated and shown to be of the same order of magnitude as the corresponding values for phonon characteristics. It means that electron scattering on the short-range ordered domains has to be taken into account, especially at low temperatures when it may dominate phonon scattering.

  5. Multidimensional electron-photon transport with standard discrete ordinates codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drumm, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for generating electron cross sections that are compatible with standard discrete ordinates codes without modification. There are many advantages of using an established discrete ordinates solver, e.g. immediately available adjoint capability. Coupled electron-photon transport capability is needed for many applications, including the modeling of the response of electronics components to space and man-made radiation environments. The cross sections have been successfully used in the DORT, TWODANT and TORT discrete ordinates codes. The cross sections are shown to provide accurate and efficient solutions to certain multidimensional electronphoton transport problems

  6. Kinetic Theory of Electronic Transport in Random Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Andrew

    2018-03-01

    We present the theory of quasiparticle transport in perturbatively small inhomogeneous magnetic fields across the ballistic-to-hydrodynamic crossover. In the hydrodynamic limit, the resistivity ρ generically grows proportionally to the rate of momentum-conserving electron-electron collisions at large enough temperatures T . In particular, the resulting flow of electrons provides a simple scenario where viscous effects suppress conductance below the ballistic value. This new mechanism for ρ ∝T2 resistivity in a Fermi liquid may describe low T transport in single-band SrTiO3 .

  7. Electronic transport in Si:P δ-doped wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, J. S.; Drumm, D. W.; Budi, Akin

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of Si:P δ-doped wires for modern nanoelectronics, there are currently no computational models of electron transport in these devices. In this paper we present a nonequilibrium Green’s function model for electronic transport in a δ-doped wire, which is described by a tight......-binding Hamiltonian matrix within a single-band effective-mass approximation. We use this transport model to calculate the current-voltage characteristics of a number of δ-doped wires, achieving good agreement with experiment. To motivate our transport model we have performed density-functional calculations...... for a variety of δ-doped wires, each with different donor configurations. These calculations also allow us to accurately define the electronic extent of a δ-doped wire, which we find to be at least 4.6 nm....

  8. A ballistic transport model for electronic excitation following particle impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, S.; Heuser, C.; Weidtmann, B.; Wucher, A.

    2018-01-01

    We present a ballistic model for the transport of electronic excitation energy induced by keV particle bombardment onto a solid surface. Starting from a free electron gas model, the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) is employed to follow the evolution of the temporal and spatial distribution function f (r → , k → , t) describing the occupation probability of an electronic state k → at position r → and time t. Three different initializations of the distribution function are considered: i) a thermal distribution function with a locally and temporally elevated electron temperature, ii) a peak excitation at a specific energy above the Fermi level with a quasi-isotropic distribution in k-space and iii) an anisotropic peak excitation with k-vectors oriented in a specific transport direction. While the first initialization resembles a distribution function which may, for instance, result from electronic friction of moving atoms within an ion induced collision cascade, the peak excitation can in principle result from an autoionization process after excitation in close binary collisions. By numerically solving the BTE, we study the electronic energy exchange along a one dimensional transport direction to obtain a time and space resolved excitation energy distribution function, which is then analyzed in view of general transport characteristics of the chosen model system.

  9. Diffusion tensor in electron swarm transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makabe, T.; Mori, T.

    1983-01-01

    Expression for the diffusion tensor of the electron (or light ion) swarm is presented from the higher-order expansion of the velocity distribution in the Boltzmann equation in hydrodynamic stage. Derived diffusion coefficients for the transverse and longitudinal directions include the additional terms representative of the curvature effect under the action of an electric field with the usual-two-term expressions. Numerical analysis is given for the electron swarm in model gases having the momentum transfer cross section Qsub(m)(epsilon)=Q 0 epsilon sup(beta) (β=0, 1/2, 1) using the present theory. As the result, appreciable degree of discrepancy appears between the transverse diffusion coefficient defined here and the conventional expression with increasing of β in Qsub(m). (Author)

  10. Effects of electron-electron interactions on electronic transport in disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, Simon Timothy

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the role of electron-electron interactions on electronic transport in disordered systems. We first consider a novel non-linear sigma model in order to microscopically treat the effects of disorder and electronic interaction. We successfully reproduce the perturbative results for the zero-bias anomaly and the interaction correction to the conductivity in a weakly disordered system, and discuss possible directions for future work. Secondly we consider the fluctuations of the dephasing rate for a closed diffusive and quantum dot system. Using the Keldysh technique we derive an expression for the inelastic scattering rate with which we self-consistently obtain the fluctuations in the dephasing rate. For the diffusive regime we find the relative fluctuations is given by F ∼ (L φ /L) 2 /g 2 , where g is the dimensionless conductance, L φ is the dephasing length and L is the sample size. For the quantum dot regime we find a perturbative divergence due to the presence of the zero mode. By mapping divergent diagrams to those for the two-level correlation function, we conjecture the existence of an exact relation between the two. Finally we discuss the consequences of this relation. (author)

  11. Vibrationally coupled electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertle, Rainer

    2012-04-26

    Single-molecule junctions are among the smallest electric circuits. They consist of a molecule that is bound to a left and a right electrode. With such a molecular nanocontact, the flow of electrical currents through a single molecule can be studied and controlled. Experiments on single-molecule junctions show that a single molecule carries electrical currents that can even be in the microampere regime. Thereby, a number of transport phenomena have been observed, such as, for example, diode- or transistor-like behavior, negative differential resistance and conductance switching. An objective of this field, which is commonly referred to as molecular electronics, is to relate these transport phenomena to the properties of the molecule in the contact. To this end, theoretical model calculations are employed, which facilitate an understanding of the underlying transport processes and mechanisms. Thereby, one has to take into account that molecules are flexible structures, which respond to a change of their charge state by a profound reorganization of their geometrical structure or may even dissociate. It is thus important to understand the interrelation between the vibrational degrees of freedom of a singlemolecule junction and the electrical current flowing through the contact. In this thesis, we investigate vibrational effects in electron transport through singlemolecule junctions. For these studies, we calculate and analyze transport characteristics of both generic and first-principles based model systems of a molecular contact. To this end, we employ a master equation and a nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Both methods are suitable to describe this nonequilibrium transport problem and treat the interactions of the tunneling electrons on the molecular bridge non-perturbatively. This is particularly important with respect to the vibrational degrees of freedom, which may strongly interact with the tunneling electrons. We show in detail that the resulting

  12. Evidence for global electron transportation into the jovian inner magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, K; Murakami, G; Yamazaki, A; Tsuchiya, F; Kimura, T; Kagitani, M; Sakanoi, T; Uemizu, K; Kasaba, Y; Yoshikawa, I; Fujimoto, M

    2014-09-26

    Jupiter's magnetosphere is a strong particle accelerator that contains ultrarelativistic electrons in its inner part. They are thought to be accelerated by whistler-mode waves excited by anisotropic hot electrons (>10 kiloelectron volts) injected from the outer magnetosphere. However, electron transportation in the inner magnetosphere is not well understood. By analyzing the extreme ultraviolet line emission from the inner magnetosphere, we show evidence for global inward transport of flux tubes containing hot plasma. High-spectral-resolution scanning observations of the Io plasma torus in the inner magnetosphere enable us to generate radial profiles of the hot electron fraction. It gradually decreases with decreasing radial distance, despite the short collisional time scale that should thermalize them rapidly. This indicates a fast and continuous resupply of hot electrons responsible for exciting the whistler-mode waves. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Fast electron transport study for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touati, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A new hybrid reduced model for relativistic electron beam transport in solids and dense plasmas is presented. It is based on the two first angular moments of the relativistic kinetic equation completed with the Minerbo maximum angular entropy closure. It takes into account collective effects with the self-generated electromagnetic fields as well as collisional effects with the slowing down of the electrons in collisions with plasmons, bound and free electrons and their angular scattering on both ions and electrons. This model allows for fast computations of relativistic electron beam transport while describing the kinetic distribution function evolution. Despite the loss of information concerning the angular distribution of the electron beam, the model reproduces analytical estimates in the academic case of a collimated and monoenergetic electron beam propagating through a warm and dense Hydrogen plasma and hybrid PIC simulation results in a realistic laser-generated electron beam transport in a solid target. The model is applied to the study of the emission of Kα photons in laser-solid experiments and to the generation of shock waves. (author) [fr

  14. A physical mechanism producing suprathermal populations and initiating substorms in the Earth's magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Sarafopoulos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We suggest a candidate physical mechanism, combining there dimensional structure and temporal development, which is potentially able to produce suprathermal populations and cross-tail current disruptions in the Earth's plasma sheet. At the core of the proposed process is the "akis" structure; in a thin current sheet (TCS the stretched (tail-like magnetic field lines locally terminate into a sharp tip around the tail midplane. At this sharp tip of the TCS, ions become non-adiabatic, while a percentage of electrons are accumulated and trapped: The strong and transient electrostatic electric fields established along the magnetic field lines produce suprathermal populations. In parallel, the tip structure is associated with field aligned and mutually attracted parallel filamentary currents which progressively become more intense and inevitably the structure collapses, and so does the local TCS. The mechanism is observationally based on elementary, almost autonomous and spatiotemporal entities that correspond each to a local thinning/dipolarization pair having duration of ~1 min. Energetic proton and electron populations do not occur simultaneously, and we infer that they are separately accelerated at local thinnings and dipolarizations, respectively. In one example energetic particles are accelerated without any dB/dt variation and before the substorm expansion phase onset. A particular effort is undertaken demonstrating that the proposed acceleration mechanism may explain the plasma sheet ratio Ti/Te≈7. All our inferences are checked by the highest resolution datasets obtained by the Geotail Energetic Particles and Ion Composition (EPIC instrument. The energetic particles are used as the best diagnostics for the accelerating source. Near Earth (X≈10 RE selected events support our basic concept. The proposed mechanism seems to reveal a fundamental building block of the substorm phenomenon and may be the basic process/structure, which is now

  15. A physical mechanism producing suprathermal populations and initiating substorms in the Earth's magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Sarafopoulos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We suggest a candidate physical mechanism, combining there dimensional structure and temporal development, which is potentially able to produce suprathermal populations and cross-tail current disruptions in the Earth's plasma sheet. At the core of the proposed process is the "akis" structure; in a thin current sheet (TCS the stretched (tail-like magnetic field lines locally terminate into a sharp tip around the tail midplane. At this sharp tip of the TCS, ions become non-adiabatic, while a percentage of electrons are accumulated and trapped: The strong and transient electrostatic electric fields established along the magnetic field lines produce suprathermal populations. In parallel, the tip structure is associated with field aligned and mutually attracted parallel filamentary currents which progressively become more intense and inevitably the structure collapses, and so does the local TCS. The mechanism is observationally based on elementary, almost autonomous and spatiotemporal entities that correspond each to a local thinning/dipolarization pair having duration of ~1 min. Energetic proton and electron populations do not occur simultaneously, and we infer that they are separately accelerated at local thinnings and dipolarizations, respectively. In one example energetic particles are accelerated without any dB/dt variation and before the substorm expansion phase onset. A particular effort is undertaken demonstrating that the proposed acceleration mechanism may explain the plasma sheet ratio Ti/Te≈7. All our inferences are checked by the highest resolution datasets obtained by the Geotail Energetic Particles and Ion Composition (EPIC instrument. The energetic particles are used as the best diagnostics for the accelerating source. Near Earth (X≈10 RE selected events support our basic concept. The proposed mechanism seems to reveal a fundamental building block of the substorm

  16. Time Variations of the Spectral Indices of the Suprathermal Distribution as observed by WIND/STICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruesbeck, J. R.; Christian, E. R.; Lepri, S. T.; Thomas, J.; Zurbuchen, T.; Gloeckler, G.

    2011-12-01

    Suprathermal particle spectra, measured in various regions of the heliosphere and heliosheath by Ulysses, ACE and Voyager, have recently been reported. In many cases long accumulation times had to be used to obtain sufficient statistical accuracy, and corrections were necessary, since only a fraction of phase space was measured. The SupraThermal Ion Composition Spectrometer (STICS), onboard Wind, enables observations of the suprathermal plasma in the solar wind at much higher time resolution. In addition, the STICS samples nearly full three-dimensional phase space, enabling measurements of anisotropies. We present a multi-year investigation of the spectral index of the suprathermal distribution, accumulated over 1 day and less, where we see significant time variation. An average lower bound value of the spectral index is at ~ -5, however, there are time periods during which the observed distributions steepen. We will also present an analysis of time and spatial variations of the suprathermal particle fluxes, observed by STICS and other instruments. In particular, we will compare the observed variability with predictions from a model by Bochsler and Moebius, based on data of the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX), who postulated that energetic neutral atoms, from outside of the heliosheath, which then penetrate the inner heliosphere and are finally ionized, could be a source of the very suprathermal populations we observe.

  17. Electron thermal conduction in LASNEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, D.; Weber, S.

    1994-01-01

    This report is a transcription of hand-written notes by DM dated 29 January 1986, transcribed by SW, with some clarifying comments added and details specific to running the LASNEX code deleted. Reference to the esoteric measurement units employed in LASNEX has also been deleted by SW (hopefully, without introducing errors in the numerical constants). The report describes the physics equations only, and only of electron conduction. That is, it does not describe the numerical method, which may be finite difference or finite element treatment in space, and (usually) implicit treatment in time. It does not touch on other electron transport packages which are available, and which include suprathermal electrons, nonlocal conduction, Krook model conduction, and modifications to electron conduction by magnetic fields. Nevertheless, this model is employed for the preponderance of LASNEX simulations

  18. Investigation of electronic transport properties of some liquid transition metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, H. P.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Thakor, P. B.

    2018-04-01

    We investigated electronic transport properties of some liquid transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Pt) using Ziman formalism. Our parameter free model potential which is realized on ionic and atomic radius has been incorporated with the Hard Sphere Yukawa (HSY) reference system to study the electronic transport properties like electrical resistivity (ρ), thermal conductivity (σ) and thermo electrical power (Q). The screening effect on aforesaid properties has been studied by using different screening functions. The correlations of our results and others data with in addition experimental values are profoundly promising to the researchers working in this field. Also, we conclude that our newly constructed parameter free model potential is capable to explain the aforesaid electronic transport properties.

  19. Electron thermal transport in RTP: filaments, barriers and bifurcations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Hogeweij, G.M.D.; Baar, M. de; Barth, C.J.; Beurskens, M.N.A.; Donne, A.J.H.; Gelder, J.F.M. van; Groot, B. de; Karelse, F.A.; Kloe, J. de; Kruijt, O.G.; Lok, J.; Meiden, H.J. van der; Oomens, A.A.M.; Oyevaar, Th.; Pijper, R.J.; Polman, R.W.; Salzedas, F.; Schueller, F.C.; Westerhof, E.; De Luca, F.; Galli, P.; Gorini, G.; Jacchia, A.; Mantica, P.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments with strong localized electron cyclotron heating (ECH) in the RTP tokamak show that electron heat transport is governed by alternating layers of good and bad thermal conduction. For central deposition hot T e filaments are observed inside the q = 1 radius. Moving the ECH resonance from the centre to the edge of the plasma results in discrete steps of the central electron temperature. The transitions occur when the minimum q value crosses q = 1,2,5/2 or 3, and correspond to the loss of a transport barrier situated close to the rational q value. Close to the transitions a new type of sawtooth activity is observed, characterized by the formation of sharp off-axis maxima on the T e profile, which collapse abruptly. The formation of the off-axis maxima is attributed to heat deposition precisely 'on top of' a transport barrier. (author)

  20. Effect of dephasing on DNA sequencing via transverse electronic transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwolak, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Krems, Matt [NON LANL; Pershin, Yuriy V [NON LANL; Di Ventra, Massimiliano [NON LANL

    2009-01-01

    We study theoretically the effects of dephasing on DNA sequencing in a nanopore via transverse electronic transport. To do this, we couple classical molecular dynamics simulations with transport calculations using scattering theory. Previous studies, which did not include dephasing, have shown that by measuring the transverse current of a particular base multiple times, one can get distributions of currents for each base that are distinguishable. We introduce a dephasing parameter into transport calculations to simulate the effects of the ions and other fluctuations. These effects lower the overall magnitude of the current, but have little effect on the current distributions themselves. The results of this work further implicate that distinguishing DNA bases via transverse electronic transport has potential as a sequencing tool.

  1. Chaotic electron transport in semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scannell, William Christian

    The field of quantum chaos investigates the quantum mechanical behavior of classically chaotic systems. This dissertation begins by describing an experiment conducted on an apparatus constructed to represent a three dimensional analog of a classically chaotic system. Patterns of reflected light are shown to produce fractals, and the behavior of the fractal dimension D F is shown to depend on the light's ability to escape the apparatus. The classically chaotic system is then used to investigate the conductance properties of semiconductor heterostructures engineered to produce a conducting plane relatively free of impurities and defects. Introducing walls that inhibit conduction to partition off sections considerably smaller than the mean distance between impurities defines devices called 'billiards'. Cooling to low temperatures enables the electrons traveling through the billiard to maintain quantum mechanical phase. Exposure to a changing electric or magnetic field alters the electron's phase, leading to fluctuations in the conductance through the billiard. Magnetoconductance fluctuations in billiards have previously been shown to be fractal. This behavior has been charted using an empirical parameter, Q, that is a measure of the resolution of the energy levels within the billiard. The relationship with Q is shown to extend beyond the ballistic regime into the 'quasi-ballistic' and 'diffusive' regimes, characterized by having defects within the conduction plane. A model analogous to the classically chaotic system is proposed as the origin of the fractal conductance fluctuations. This model is shown to be consistent with experiment and to account for changes of fine scale features in MCF known to occur when a billiard is brought to room temperature between low temperature measurements. An experiment is conducted in which fractal conductance fluctuations (FCF) are produced by exposing a billiard to a changing electric field. Comparison of DF values of FCF produced by

  2. Spin-Dependent Quasiparticle Transport in Aluminum Single Electron Transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, A. J.; Andresen, S. E.; Brenner, R.; Clark, R. G.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the effect of Zeeman-splitting on quasiparticle transport in normal-superconducting-normal (NSN) aluminum single electron transistors (SETs). In the above-gap transport the interplay of Coulomb blockade and Zeeman-splitting leads to spin-dependence of the sequential tunneling. This creates regimes where either one or both spin species can tunnel onto or off the island. At lower biases, spin-dependence of the single quasiparticle state is studied and operation of the device as a...

  3. Advances in Monte Carlo electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielajew, Alex F.

    1995-01-01

    Notwithstanding the success of Monte Carlo (MC) calculations for determining ion chamber correction factors for air-kerma standards and radiotherapy applications, a great challenge remains. MC is unable to calculate ion chamber response to better than 1% for low-Z and 3% for high-Z wall materials. Moreover, the two major MC code systems employed in radiation dosimetry, the EGS and ITS codes, differ in opposite directions from ion chamber experiments. The discrepancy with experiment is due to inadequacies in the underlying e - condensed-history algorithms. As modeled by MC calculations, the e - step-lengths in the chamber walls and the ionisation cavity differ in terms of material traversed by about three orders of magnitude. This demands that the underlying e - transport algorithms be very stable over a great dynamic range. Otherwise a spurious e - disequilibrium may be generated. The multiple-scattering (MS) algorithms, Moliere in the case of EGS and Goudsmit-Saunderson (GS) in the case of ITS, are either mathematically or numerically unstable in the plural-scattering environment of the ionisation cavity. Recently, a new MS theory has been developed that is an exact solution of the Wentzel small-angle formalism using a screened Rutherford cross section. This new MS theory is mathematically, physically and numerically stable from the no-scattering to the MS regimes. This theory is the small-angle equivalent of the GS equation for a Rutherford cross section. Large-angle corrections connecting this theory to GS theory have been derived by Bethe. The Moliere theory is the large-pathlength limit of this theory. The strategy for employing this new theory for ion chamber and radiotherapy calculations is described

  4. Nonequilibrium statistical operator in hot-electron transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, D.Y.; Liu, M.

    1991-09-01

    The Nonequilibrium Statistical Operator method developed by Zubarev is generalized and applied to the study of hot-electron transport in semiconductors. The steady-state balance equations for momentum and energy are derived to the lowest order in the electron-lattice coupling. We show that the derived balance equations are exactly the same as those obtained by Lei and Ting. This equivalence stems from the fact that to the linear order in the electron-lattice coupling, two statistical density matrices have identical effect when they are used to calculate the average value of a dynamical operator. The application to the steady-state and transient hot-electron transport in multivalley semiconductors is also discussed. (author). 28 refs, 1 fig

  5. Power electronics applied to industrial systems and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Patin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    If the operation of electronic components switching scheme to reduce congestion and losses (in power converters in general and switching power supplies in particular), it also generates electromagnetic type of pollution in its immediate environment. Power Electronics for Industry and Transport, Volume 4 is devoted to electromagnetic compatibility. It presents the sources of disturbance and the square wave signal, spectral modeling generic perturbation. Disturbances propagation mechanisms called ""lumped"" by couplings such as a common impedance, a parasitic capacitance or a mutual and ""dis

  6. Electron transport in magnetic multilayers: effect of disorder

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drchal, Václav; Kudrnovský, Josef; Bruno, P.; Dederichs, P. H.; Turek, Ilja; Weinberger, P.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 65, - (2002), s. 214414-1-214414-8 ISSN 0163-1829 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC P5.30; GA ČR GA202/00/0122; GA AV ČR IAA1010829; GA AV ČR IBS2041105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : electron transport * magnetic multilayers * ballistic transport * diffusive transport * disorder Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.327, year: 2002

  7. Electron-vibron coupling effects on electron transport via a single-molecule magnet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCaskey, A.; Yamamoto, Y.; Warnock, M.; Burzuri, E.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Park, K.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how the electron-vibron coupling influences electron transport via an anisotropic magnetic molecule, such as a single-molecule magnet (SMM) Fe4, by using a model Hamiltonian with parameter values obtained from density-functional theory (DFT). The magnetic anisotropy parameters,

  8. Role of hot electron transport in scintillators: A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Huihui [SZU-NUS Collaborative Innovation Center for Optoelectronic Science and Technology, Key Lab. of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen Univ. (China); Li, Qi [Physical Sciences Division, IBM TJ Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States); Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Lu, Xinfu; Williams, R.T. [Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Qian, Yiyang [College of Engineering and Applied Science, Nanjing University (China); Wu, Yuntao [Scintillation Materials Research Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Despite recent intensive study on scintillators, several fundamental questions on scintillator properties are still unknown. In this work, we use ab-initio calculations to determine the energy dependent group velocity of the hot electrons from the electronic structures of several typical scintillators. Based on the calculated group velocities and optical phonon frequencies, a Monte-Carlo simulation of hot electron transport in scintillators is carried out to calculate the thermalization time and diffusion range in selected scintillators. Our simulations provide physical insights on a recent trend of improved proportionality and light yield from mixed halide scintillators. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Electronic repository and standardization of processes and electronic documents in transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz DĘBICKI

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article refers to the idea of the use of electronic repository to store standardised scheme of processes between a Logistics Service Provider and its business partners. Application of repository for automatic or semi-automatic configuration of interoperability in electronic data interchange between information systems of differentcompanies based on transport (road, rail, sea and combined related processes. Standardisation includes processes, scheme of cooperation and related to them, electronic messages.

  10. Investigation of electron beam transport in a helical undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Y.U.; Lee, B.C.; Kim, S.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Lossless transport of electrons through the undulator is essential for CW operation of the FELs driven by recirculating electrostatic accelerators. We calculate the transport ratio of an electron beam in a helical undulator by using a 3-D simulation code and compare the results with the experimental results. The energy and the current of the electron beam are 400 keV and 2 A, respectively. The 3-D distribution of the magnetic field of a practical permanent-magnet helical undulator is measured and is used in the calculations. The major parameters of the undutlator are : period = 32 mm, number of periods = 20, number of periods in adiabatic region = 3.5, magnetic field strength = 1.3 kG. The transport ratio is very sensitive to the injection condition of the electron beam such as the emittance, the diameter, the divergence, etc.. The injection motion is varied in the experiments by changing the e-gun voltage or the field strength of the focusing magnet located at the entrance of the undulator. It is confirmed experimentally and with simulations that most of the beam loss occurs at the adiabatic region of the undulator regardless of the length of the adiabatic region The effect of axial guiding magnetic field on the beam finish is investigated. According to the simulations, the increase of the strength of axial magnetic field from 0 to 1 kG results in the increase of the transport ratio from 15 % to 95%.

  11. Anticancer Drugs Targeting the Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rohlena, Jakub; Dong, L.-F.; Ralph, S.J.; Neužil, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 12 (2011), s. 2951-2974 ISSN 1523-0864 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200520703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Targets for anticancer drugs * mitochondrial electron transport chain * mitocans Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.456, year: 2011

  12. Magnetoelectronic transport of the two-dimensional electron gas in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Hall mobility and magnetoresistance coefficient for the two-dimensional (2D) electron transport parallel to the heterojunction interfaces in a single quantum well of. CdSe are calculated with a numerical iterative technique in the framework of Fermi–Dirac statistics. Lattice scatterings due to polar-mode longitudinal ...

  13. Electron transport and coherence in semiconductor quantum dots and rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wiel, W.G.

    2002-01-01

    A number of experiments on electron transport and coherence in semiconductor vertical and lateral quantum dots and semiconductor rings is described. Quantum dots are often referred to as "artificial atoms", because of their similarities with real atoms. Examples of such atom-like properties that

  14. Flux and reactive contributions to electron transport in methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ness, K.F.; Nolan, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    A previously developed theoretical analysis (Nolan et al. 1997) is applied to the study of electron transport in methane for reduced electric fields in the range 1 to 1000 Td. The technique of analysis identifies the flux and reactive components of the measurable transport, without resort to the two-term approximation. A comparison of the results of the Monte Carlo method with those of a multiterm Boltzmann equation analysis (Ness and Robson 1986) shows good agreement. The sensitivity of the modelled electron transport to post-ionisation energy partitioning is studied by comparison of three ionisation energy partitioning regimes at moderate (300 Td) and high (1000 Td) values of the reduced electric field. Copyright (2000) CSIRO Australia

  15. Relativistic electron transport and bremsstrahlung production in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James A.; Ramaty, Reuven

    1989-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of ultrarelativistic electron transport in solar flare magnetic loops has been developed. It includes Coulomb, synchrotron, and bremsstrahlung energy losses; pitch-angle scattering by Alfven and whistler turbulence in the coronal region of the loop; and magnetic mirroring in the converging magnetic flux tubes beneath the transition region. Depth distributions, time profiles, energy spectra, and angular distributions of the resulting bremsstrahlung emission are calculated. It is found that both the preferential detection of solar flares with greater than 10 MeV emission near the limb of the sun and the observation of ultrarelativistic electron bremsstrahlung from flares on the disk are consequences of the loop transport model. The declining portions of the observed time profiles of greater than 10 MeV emission from solar flares can also be accounted for, and it is proposed that these portions are determined by transport and not acceleration.

  16. Power electronics for renewable energy systems, transportation and industrial applications

    CERN Document Server

    Malinowski, Mariusz; Al-Haddad, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Power Electronics for Renewable Energy, Transportation, and Industrial Applications combines state-of-the-art global expertise to present the latest research on power electronics and its application in transportation, renewable energy, and different industrial applications. This timely book aims to facilitate the implementation of cutting-edge techniques to design problems offering innovative solutions to the growing power demands in small- and large-size industries. Application areas in the book range from smart homes and electric and plug-in hybrid electrical vehicles (PHEVs), to smart distribution and intelligence operation centers where significant energy efficiency improvements can be achieved through the appropriate use and design of power electronics and energy storage devices.

  17. Electron transport for spectrum analysis and experiment design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Wolfgang S.M.

    2010-01-01

    A survey is presented on modeling the effects of electron transport on the energy and angular spectra of electrons emitted or reflected from non-crystalline solid surfaces and nanostructures. This is intended to aid in the quantitative interpretation of such spectra and should also provide a useful guideline for experiment design. A brief review of the most significant characteristics of the electron-solid interaction is given and the theory describing the energy dissipation and momentum relaxation of electrons in solids is outlined, which is based on the so-called Landau-Goudsmit-Saunderson (LGS) loss function. It is shown that the basis for true quantitative spectrum interpretation is provided by the collision statistics, i.e. the number of electrons arriving at the detector after participating in a given number of inelastic collisions, being equal to the partial intensities. By introducing an appropriate stochastic process for multiple scattering, the validity of the partial intensity approach (PIA) can be extended to the true slowing down regime making it possible, in a very simple way, to fully account for energy fluctuations in the limit of large energy losses. The LGS loss function thus provides a unified theoretical basis for electron spectroscopy and microscopy. The usefulness of the concept of the collision statistics, or partial intensities, for quantitative spectrum interpretation is illustrated by considering various examples of practical significance, including elastic peak electron spectroscopy (EPES), reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS), (hard) X-ray photoelectron emission ((HA)XPS), electron coincidence spectroscopy, the Auger electron backscattering factor and the ionization depth distribution. Finally, the relationship between the partial intensities and the emission depth is discussed, which allows one to combine the unique features of electron spectroscopy for investigation of chemical, electronic and magnetic properties of

  18. Electron heat transport analysis of low-collisionality plasmas in the neoclassical-transport-optimized configuration of LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Sadayoshi; Yamada, Hiroshi; Wakasa, Arimitsu

    2002-01-01

    Electron heat transport in low-collisionality LHD plasma is investigated in order to study the neoclassical transport optimization effect on thermal plasma transport with an optimization level typical of so-called ''advanced stellarators''. In the central region, a higher electron temperature is obtained in the optimized configuration, and transport analysis suggests the considerable effect of neoclassical transport on the electron heat transport assuming the ion-root level of radial electric field. The obtained experimental results support future reactor design in which the neoclassical and/or anomalous transports are reduced by magnetic field optimization in a non-axisymmetric configuration. (author)

  19. Modelling of electron transport and of sawtooth activity in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angioni, C

    2001-10-01

    Transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas strongly limit the particle and energy confinement and represent a crucial obstacle to controlled thermonuclear fusion. Within the vast framework of transport studies, three topics have been tackled in the present thesis: first, the computation of neoclassical transport coefficients for general axisymmetric equilibria and arbitrary collisionality regime; second, the analysis of the electron temperature behaviour and transport modelling of plasma discharges in the Tokamak a configuration Variable (TCV); third, the modelling and simulation of the sawtooth activity with different plasma heating conditions. The work dedicated to neoclassical theory has been undertaken in order to first analytically identify a set of equations suited for implementation in existing Fokker-Planck codes. Modifications of these codes enabled us to compute the neoclassical transport coefficients considering different realistic magnetic equilibrium configurations and covering a large range of variation of three key parameters: aspect ratio, collisionality, and effective charge number. A comparison of the numerical results with an analytical limit has permitted the identification of two expressions for the trapped particle fraction, capable of encapsulating the geometrical effects and thus enabling each transport coefficient to be fitted with a single analytical function. This has allowed us to provide simple analytical formulae for all the neoclassical transport coefficients valid for arbitrary aspect ratio and collisionality in general realistic geometry. This work is particularly useful for a correct evaluation of the neoclassical contribution in tokamak scenarios with large bootstrap cur- rent fraction, or improved confinement regimes with low anomalous transport and for the determination of the plasma current density profile, since the plasma conductivity is usually assumed neoclassical. These results have been included in the plasma transport code

  20. Electron and ion beam transport to fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.R.; Baker, L.; Miller, P.A.; Mix, L.P.; Olsen, J.N.; Poukey, J.W.; Wright, T.P.

    1979-01-01

    ICF reactors have been proposed which incorporate a gas-filled chamber to reduce x-ray and debris loading of the first wall. Focused beams of either electrons or ions must be transported efficiently for 2-4 m to a centrally located fusion target. Laser-initiated current-carrying plasma discharge channels provide the guiding magnetic field and the charge- and current-neutralizing medium required for beam propagation. Computational studies of plasma channel formation in air using a 1-D MHD model with multigroup radiation diffusion have provided a good comparison with the expansions velocity and time dependent refractivity profile determined by holographic interferometry. Trajectory calculations have identified a beam expansion mechanism which combines with the usual ohmic dissipation to reduce somewhat the transported beam fluence for electrons. Additional trajectory calculations have been performed for both electrons and light ions to predict the limits on the particle current density which can be delivered to a central target by overlapping the many independently-generated beams. Critical features of the use of plasma channels for transport and overlap of charged particle beams are being tested experimentally with up to twelve electron beams from the Proto II accelerator

  1. Magnetism and electronic transport in irradiated organic conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanquer, M.

    1986-01-01

    Quasi-one-dimensional conductors are metallic in a large temperature range. The electronic gas instability can drive a phase transition at low temperature. In one-dimensional conditions, precursor fluctuations grow in the high temperature regime and can give a collective current transport. Under irradiation the quasi-one-dimensional electrons are localized and the conductivity becomes typical of a phonon assisted tunneling between metallic particles. In this study we describe the magnetism of this localized electrons. This disorder reduces the interaction between electronic spins and phonons and favours the interaction between localized spins. But if the electronic gas is less one-dimensional, irradiation disorder can not localize electrons. Our conductivity measurements prove that the disorder first reduces the electronic relaxation before induces the above mentioned localization. Moreover the fluctuative conductivity is revealed by irradiation thanks to a discrepancy with respect to one-electron model. TTF-TCNQ and (TMTSF) 2 ClO 4 are investigated in that way [fr

  2. Anomalous plasma transport due to electron temperature gradient instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Sinji; Ito, Hiroshi; Kamimura, Tetsuo.

    1979-01-01

    The collisionless drift wave instability driven by an electron temperature inhomogeneity (electron temperature gradient instability) and the enhanced transport processes associated with it are studied using a two-and-a-half dimensional particle simulation code. The simulation results show that quasilinear diffusion in phase space is an important mechanism for the saturation of the electron temperature gradient instability. Also, the instability yields particle fluxes toward the hot plasma regions. The heat conductivity of the electron temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field, T sub(e'), is not reduced by magnetic shear but remains high, whereas the heat conductivity of the parallel temperature, T sub(e''), is effectively reduced, and the instability stabilized. (author)

  3. Semiclassical electronic transport in MnAs thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helman, C. [Dpto de Fisica, ' Juan Jose Giambiagi' , Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Unidad de Actividad Fisica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: helman@tandar.cnea.gov.ar; Milano, J.; Steren, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, S.C. Bariloche (Argentina); Llois, A.M. [Dpto de Fisica, ' Juan Jose Giambiagi' , Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Unidad de Actividad Fisica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2008-07-15

    Magneto-transport experiments have been recently performed on MnAs thin films. Hall effect and transverse magnetoresistance measurements have shown interesting and, until now, unknown results. For instance, the transverse magnetoresistance shows no saturation in the presence of very high magnetic fields. In order to understand the contribution of the electronic band structure to the non-saturating magnetoresistance, we perform ab initio calculations, using the Wien2K code and analyze the magneto-transport properties within the semiclassical approximation. We show that non-saturation may be due to the presence of open orbits on the majority Fermi surface.

  4. Strain modification on electronic transport of the phosphorene nanoribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yawen; Cheng, Fang

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate theoretically how local strains can be tailored to control quantum transport of carriers on monolayer armchair and zigzag phosphorene nanoribbon. We find that the electron tunneling is forbidden when the in-plane strain exceeds a critical value. The critical strain is different for different crystal orientation of the ribbons, widths, and incident energies. By tuning the Fermi energy and strain, the channels can be transited from opaque to transparent. Moreover, for the zigzag-phosphorene nanoribbon, the two-fold degenerate quasi-flat edge band splits completely under certain strain. These properties provide us an efficient way to control the transport of monolayer phosphorene-based microstructure.

  5. LDRD project 151362 : low energy electron-photon transport.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Bondi, Robert James; Crawford, Martin James

    2013-09-01

    At sufficiently high energies, the wavelengths of electrons and photons are short enough to only interact with one atom at time, leading to the popular %E2%80%9Cindependent-atom approximation%E2%80%9D. We attempted to incorporate atomic structure in the generation of cross sections (which embody the modeled physics) to improve transport at lower energies. We document our successes and failures. This was a three-year LDRD project. The core team consisted of a radiation-transport expert, a solid-state physicist, and two DFT experts.

  6. Electron density measurements during ion beam transport on Gamble II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, B.V.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Neri, J.M.; Ottinger, P.F.; Rose, D.V.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Young, F.C.

    1999-01-01

    High-sensitivity laser interferometry was used to measure the electron density created when an intense proton beam (100 kA, 1 MeV, 50 ns) from the Gamble II generator was transported through low-pressure gas as part of a project investigating Self-Pinched Transport (SPT) of intense ion beams. This measurement is non-perturbing and sufficiently quantitative to allow benchmarking of codes (particularly IPROP) used to model beam-gas interaction and ion-beam transport. Very high phase sensitivity is required for this measurement. For example, a 100-kA, 1-MeV, 10-cm-radius proton beam with uniform current density has a line-integrated proton density equal to n b L = 3 x 10 13 cm -2 . An equal electron line-density, n e L = n b L, (expected for transport in vacuum) will be detected as a phase shift of the 1.064 microm laser beam of only 0.05degree, or an optical path change of 1.4 x 10 -4 waves (about the size of a hydrogen atom). The time-history of the line-integrated electron density, measured across a diameter of the transport chamber at 43 cm from the input aperture, starts with the proton arrival time and decays differently depending on the gas pressure. The gas conditions included vacuum (10 -4 Torr air), 30 to 220 mTorr He, and 1 Torr air. The measured densities vary by three orders of magnitude, from 10 13 to 10 16 cm -2 for the range of gas pressures investigated. In vacuum, the measured electron densities indicate only co-moving electrons (n e L approximately n b L). In He, when the gas pressure is sufficient for ionization by beam particles and SPT is observed, n e L increases to about 10 n b L. At even higher pressures where electrons contribute to ionization, even higher electron densities are observed with an ionization fraction of about 2%. The diagnostic technique as used on the SPT experiment will be described and a summary of the results will be given. The measurements are in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions from the IPROP code

  7. Transition phenomena and thermal transport properties in LHD plasmas with an electron internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Idei, H.; Inagaki, S.; Tamura, N.; Tokuzawa, T.; Morisaki, T.; Watanabe, K.Y.; Ida, K.; Yamada, I.; Narihara, K.; Muto, S.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshimura, Y.; Notake, T.; Ohkubo, K.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T.; Watari, T.; Komori, A.

    2005-01-01

    Two types of improved core confinement were observed during centrally focused electron cyclotron heating (ECH) into plasmas sustained by counter (CNTR) and Co neutral beam injections (NBI) in the Large Helical Device. The CNTR NBI plasma displayed transition phenomena to the high-electron-temperature state and had a clear electron internal transport barrier, while the Co NBI plasma did not show a clear transition or an ECH power threshold but showed broad high temperature profiles with moderate temperature gradient. This indicated that the Co NBI plasma with additional ECH also had an improved core confinement. The electron heat transport characteristics of these plasmas were directly investigated using heat pulse propagation excited by modulated ECH. These effects appear to be related to the m/n = 2/1 rational surface or the island induced by NBI beam-driven current

  8. Experimental study of fast electron transport in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaisseau, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The framework of this PhD thesis is the inertial confinement fusion for energy production, in the context of the electron fast ignition scheme. The work consists in a characterization of the transport mechanisms of fast electrons, driven by intense laser pulses (10 19 - 10 20 W/cm 2 ) in both cold-solid and warm-dense matter. The first goal was to study the propagation of a fast electron beam, characterized by a current density ≥ 10 11 A/cm 2 , in aluminum targets initially heated close to the Fermi temperature by a counter-propagative planar shock. The planar compression geometry allowed us to discriminate the energy losses due to the resistive mechanisms from collisional ones by comparing solid and compressed targets of the same initial areal densities. We observed for the first time a significant increase of resistive energy losses in heated aluminum samples. The confrontation of the experimental data with the simulations, including a complete characterization of the electron source, of the target compression and of the fast electron transport, allowed us to study the time-evolution of the material resistivity. The estimated resistive electron stopping power in a warm-compressed target is of the same order as the collisional one. We studied the transport of the fast electrons generated in the interaction of a high-contrast laser pulse with a hollow copper cone, buried into a carbon layer, compressed by a counter-propagative planar shock. A X-ray imaging system allowed us to visualize the coupling of the laser pulse with the cone at different moments of the compression. This diagnostic, giving access to the fast electron spatial distribution, showed a fast electron generation in the entire volume of the cone for late times of compression, after shock breakout from the inner cone tip. For earlier times, the interaction at a high-contrast ensured that the source was contained within the cone tip, and the fast electron beam was collimated into the target depth by

  9. Electron transport properties of ordered networks using carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romo-Herrera, J M; Terrones, M; Terrones, H; Meunier, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    The electronic transport properties of ordered networks using carbon nanotubes as building blocks (ON-CNTs) are investigated within the framework of a multiterminal Landauer-Buttiker formalism using an s,p x ,p y ,p z parameterization of the tight-binding Hamiltonian for carbon. The networks exhibit electron pathway selectiveness, which is shown to depend on the atomic structure of the network nodes imposed by the specific architecture of the network and the distribution of its defects (non-hexagonal rings). This work represents the first understandings towards leading current through well-defined trajectories along an organic nanocircuit

  10. Power electronics applied to industrial systems and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Patin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of power electronic converters (DC / DC, DC / AC, AC / DC and AC / AC) conventionally used in industrial and transportation applications, specifically for the supply of electric machines with variable speed drop off window. From the perspective of design and sizing, this book presents the different functions encountered in a modular way for power electronics.Power Converters and Their Control details less traditional topics such as matrix converters and multilevel converters. This book also features a case study design of an industrial controller, wh

  11. Power electronics applied to industrial systems and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Patin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Some power electronic converters are specifically designed to power equipment under a smoothed DC voltage. Therefore, the filtering part necessarily involves the use of auxiliary passive components (inductors and capacitors). This book deals with technical aspects such as classical separation between isolated and non-isolated power supplies, and soft switching through a special converter. It addresses the problem of regulating the output voltage of the switching power supplies in terms of modeling and obtaining transfer of SMPS functions.Power Electronics for Industry and Transport, Volume 3,

  12. Electron dynamics and transport in a mirror field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Haruyuki; Hatori, Tadatsugu.

    1985-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics and the radial transport of an electron in a magnetic mirror field are considered in the presence of an electrostatic monochromatic wave. It is found that a stochastic heating and a stochastic radial diffusion of electrons can simultaneously occur due to the nonlinear interaction between two motions, one is the bounce motion in the mirror and the other is the motion by the monochromatic wave. Three types of dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the wave amplitude are obtained which are different from that derived by the quasilinear theory. (author)

  13. Electronic structure and transport properties of intermetallics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, A.J.; Ellis, D.E.; Welsh, L.B.

    1975-12-01

    The electronic interactions responsible for the unusual properties of several important classes of materials (including the highly anisotropic layered dichalcogenides, and network and cage structure materials and pseudobinary alloys) have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. The unique ability of NMR to probe the local electronic properties of the various constituents of an intermetallic compound or alloy has provided important new information including correlations with observed changes in superconducting transition temperatures. Novel theoretical models (including relativistic effects) are found to yield energy band structures, Fermi surfaces, transport properties, charge and spin densities, generalized magnetic susceptibilities, and optical properties in very good agreement with experimental determinations of these observable phenomena. (Author) (GRA)

  14. Nonlinear features of the electron temperature gradient mode and electron thermal transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaw, P.K.; Singh, R.; Weiland, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    Analytical investigations of several linear and nonlinear features of ETG turbulence are reported. The linear theory includes effects such as finite beta induced electromagnetic shielding, coupling to electron magnetohydrodynamic modes like whistlers etc. It is argued that nonlinearly, turbulence and transport are dominated by radially extended modes called 'streamers'. A nonlinear mechanism generating streamers based on a modulational instability theory of the ETG turbulence is also presented. The saturation levels of the streamers using a Kelvin Helmholtz secondary instability mechanism are calculated and levels of the electron thermal transport due to streamers are estimated. (author)

  15. Temperature dependence of electronic transport property in ferroelectric polymer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, X.L.; Wang, J.L., E-mail: jlwang@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Tian, B.B.; Liu, B.L.; Zou, Y.H.; Wang, X.D.; Sun, S.; Sun, J.L., E-mail: jlsun@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Meng, X.J.; Chu, J.H.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The ferroelectric polymer was fabricated by Langmuir–Blodgett method. • The electrons as the dominant injected carrier were conformed in the ferroelectric polymer films. • The leakage current conduction mechanisms in ferroelectric polymer were investigated. - Abstract: The leakage current mechanism of ferroelectric copolymer of polyvinylidene fluoride with trifluoroethylene prepared by Langmuir–Blodgett was investigated in the temperature range from 100 K to 350 K. The electron as the dominant injected carrier was observed in the ferroelectric copolymer films. The transport mechanisms in copolymer strongly depend on the temperature and applied voltage. From 100 K to 200 K, Schottky emission dominates the conduction. With temperature increasing, the Frenkel–Poole emission instead of the Schottky emission to conduct the carrier transport. When the temperature gets to 260 K, the leakage current becomes independent of temperature, and the space charge limited current conduction was observed.

  16. Electronic and transport properties of BCN alloy nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvishi Gilan, Mahdi; Chegel, Raad

    2018-03-01

    The dependence of the carbon (C) concentration on the electronic and transport properties of boron carbonitride (BCN) alloy nanoribbons have been investigated using surface Green's functions technique and random Hamiltonian model by considering random hopping parameters including first and second nearest neighbors. Our calculations indicate that substituting boron (nitrogen) sites with carbon atoms induces a new band close to conduction (valence) band and carbon atoms behave like a donor (acceptor) dopants. Also, while both nitrogen and boron sites are substituted randomly by carbon atoms, new bands are induced close to both valence and conduction bands. The band gap decreases with C substituting and the number of charge carriers increases in low bias voltage. Far from Fermi level in the higher range of energy, transmission coefficient and current of the system are reduced by increasing the C concentration. Based on our results, tuning the electronic and transport properties of BCN alloy nanoribbons by random carbon dopants could be applicable to design nanoelectronics devices.

  17. Redox-gated electron transport in electrically wired ferrocene molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Xiaoyin [Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Solid State Electronic Research, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Brune, Daniel [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); He Jin [Center for Single Molecule Biophysics, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Lindsay, Stuart [Center for Single Molecule Biophysics, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Gorman, Christopher B. [Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8204 (United States); Tao Nongjian [Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Solid State Electronic Research, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)], E-mail: nongjian.tao@asu.edu

    2006-07-11

    We have synthesized cysteamine-terminated ferrocene molecules and determined the dependence of the electron transport properties of the molecules on their redox states by measuring the current through the molecules as a function of the electrode potential. The current fluctuates over a large range, but its average value increases with the potential. We attribute the current fluctuation and its increase with the potential to the switching of the molecules from low-conductance reduced state to high-conductance oxidized state.

  18. Redox-gated electron transport in electrically wired ferrocene molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Xiaoyin; Brune, Daniel; He Jin; Lindsay, Stuart; Gorman, Christopher B.; Tao Nongjian

    2006-01-01

    We have synthesized cysteamine-terminated ferrocene molecules and determined the dependence of the electron transport properties of the molecules on their redox states by measuring the current through the molecules as a function of the electrode potential. The current fluctuates over a large range, but its average value increases with the potential. We attribute the current fluctuation and its increase with the potential to the switching of the molecules from low-conductance reduced state to high-conductance oxidized state

  19. Electronic, adsorption, and transport properties of diamondoid-based complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Adhikari, Bibek

    2017-01-01

    Quantum simulation is an invaluable tool to researchers from various fields of scientific research. It allows the investigation of various complex condensed matter in the regimes of physics, chemistry, and biology. In this work, we focused our attention in unraveling the physical, chemical, electronic, transport, and optical properties of diamondoids and their complexes through quantum simulations. We have implemented a bottom-up approach where we move from the doping and functionalization of...

  20. Electron and hole transport in poly(fluorene-benzothiadiazole)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Yuan; Blom, Paul W. M.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the electron and hole transport in poly[(9,9-di-n-octylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-(benzo[2,1,3]thiadiazol-4,8-diyl)] (F8BT). An Ohmic hole contact on F8BT is achieved by using the high work function anode MoO(3) as hole injection contact, enabling the occurrence of space-charge limited

  1. Transmembrane electron transport and the neutral theory of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, S

    1984-01-01

    Based on the concept of "pairs of basic functional states" the evolution of the first chemiosmotic mechanism of energy conversion is discussed in terms of point mutations, gene duplications and of the neutral theory of evolution. A model for estimating the overall probability of the evolutionary step in question is presented, both for the "selectionist" and "neutralist" position. It is concluded that, concerning the present stage of knowledge, the evolution of transmembrane electron transport is an unsolved problem in evolutionary biology.

  2. 3rd harmonic electron cyclotron resonant heating absorption enhancement by 2nd harmonic heating at the same frequency in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnesin, S; Coda, S; Goodman, T P; Decker, J; Peysson, Y; Mazon, D

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental mechanisms responsible for the interplay and synergy between the absorption dynamics of extraordinary-mode electron cyclotron waves at two different harmonic resonances (the 2nd and 3rd) are investigated in the TCV tokamak. An enhanced 3rd harmonic absorption in the presence of suprathermal electrons generated by 2nd harmonic heating is predicted by Fokker–Planck simulations, subject to complex alignment requirements in both physical space and momentum space. The experimental signature for the 2nd/3rd harmonic synergy is sought through the suprathermal bremsstrahlung emission in the hard x-ray range of photon energy. Using a synthetic diagnostic, the emission variation due to synergy is calculated as a function of the injected power and of the radial transport of suprathermal electrons. It is concluded that in the present experimental setup a synergy signature has not been unambiguously detected. The detectability of the synergy is then discussed with respect to variations and uncertainties in the plasma density and effective charge in view of future optimized experiments. (paper)

  3. Transport of solar electrons in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablaßmayer, J.; Tautz, R. C., E-mail: robert.c.tautz@gmail.com [Zentrum für Astronomie und Astrophysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Dresing, N., E-mail: dresing@physik.uni-kiel.de [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Leibnizstraße 11, D-24118 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The turbulent transport of solar energetic electrons in the interplanetary magnetic field is investigated by means of a test-particle Monte-Carlo simulation. The magnetic fields are modeled as a combination of the Parker field and a turbulent component. In combination with the direct calculation of diffusion coefficients via the mean-square displacements, this approach allows one to analyze the effect of the initial ballistic transport phase. In that sense, the model complements the main other approach in which a transport equation is solved. The major advancement is that, by recording the flux of particles arriving at virtual detectors, intensity and anisotropy-time profiles can be obtained. Observational indications for a longitudinal asymmetry can thus be explained by tracing the diffusive spread of the particle distribution. The approach may be of future help for the systematic interpretation of observations for instance by the solar terrestrial relations observatory (STEREO) and advanced composition explorer (ACE) spacecrafts.

  4. Kinetic theory of transport for inhomogeneous electron fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Andrew; Hartnoll, Sean A.

    2018-01-01

    The interplay between electronic interactions and disorder is neglected in the conventional Boltzmann theory of transport, yet can play an essential role in determining the resistivity of unconventional metals. When quasiparticles are long lived, one can account for these intertwined effects by solving spatially inhomogeneous Boltzmann equations. Assuming smooth disorder and neglecting umklapp scattering, we solve these inhomogeneous kinetic equations and compute the electrical resistivity across the ballistic-to-hydrodynamic transition. An important consequence of electron-electron interactions is the modification of the momentum-relaxation time; this effect is ignored in the homogeneous theory. We characterize precisely when interactions enhance the momentum scattering rate, and when they decrease it. Our approach unifies existing semiclassical theories of transport, and explains how the resistivity can be proportional to the rate of momentum-conserving collisions without Baber scattering. We compare this result with existing transport mysteries, including the disorder-independent T2 resistivity of many Fermi liquids, and the linear-in-T "Planckian-limited" resistivity of many strange metals.

  5. Detecting Electron Transport of Amino Acids by Using Conductance Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Qiong Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The single molecular conductance of amino acids was measured by a scanning tunneling microscope (STM break junction. Conductance measurement of alanine gives out two conductance values at 10−1.85 G0 (1095 nS and 10−3.7 G0 (15.5 nS, while similar conductance values are also observed for aspartic acid and glutamic acid, which have one more carboxylic acid group compared with alanine. This may show that the backbone of NH2–C–COOH is the primary means of electron transport in the molecular junction of aspartic acid and glutamic acid. However, NH2–C–COOH is not the primary means of electron transport in the methionine junction, which may be caused by the strong interaction of the Au–SMe (methyl sulfide bond for the methionine junction. The current work reveals the important role of the anchoring group in the electron transport in different amino acids junctions.

  6. Electron transport in gold colloidal nanoparticle-based strain gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Helena; Grisolia, Jérémie; Sangeetha, Neralagatta M.; Decorde, Nicolas; Farcau, Cosmin; Viallet, Benoit; Chen, Ke; Viau, Guillaume; Ressier, Laurence

    2013-03-01

    A systematic approach for understanding the electron transport mechanisms in resistive strain gauges based on assemblies of gold colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) protected by organic ligands is described. The strain gauges were fabricated from parallel micrometer wide wires made of 14 nm gold (Au) colloidal NPs on polyethylene terephthalate substrates, elaborated by convective self-assembly. Electron transport in such devices occurs by inter-particle electron tunneling through the tunnel barrier imposed by the organic ligands protecting the NPs. This tunnel barrier was varied by changing the nature of organic ligands coating the nanoparticles: citrate (CIT), phosphines (BSPP, TDSP) and thiols (MPA, MUDA). Electro-mechanical tests indicate that only the gold NPs protected by phosphine and thiol ligands yield high gauge sensitivity. Temperature-dependent resistance measurements are explained using the ‘regular island array model’ that extracts transport parameters, i.e., the tunneling decay constant β and the Coulomb charging energy EC. This reveals that the Au@CIT nanoparticle assemblies exhibit a behavior characteristic of a strong-coupling regime, whereas those of Au@BSPP, Au@TDSP, Au@MPA and Au@MUDA nanoparticles manifest a weak-coupling regime. A comparison of the parameters extracted from the two methods indicates that the most sensitive gauges in the weak-coupling regime feature the highest β. Moreover, the EC values of these 14 nm NPs cannot be neglected in determining the β values.

  7. Electron transport in gold colloidal nanoparticle-based strain gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Helena; Grisolia, Jérémie; Sangeetha, Neralagatta M; Decorde, Nicolas; Farcau, Cosmin; Viallet, Benoit; Chen Ke; Viau, Guillaume; Ressier, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    A systematic approach for understanding the electron transport mechanisms in resistive strain gauges based on assemblies of gold colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) protected by organic ligands is described. The strain gauges were fabricated from parallel micrometer wide wires made of 14 nm gold (Au) colloidal NPs on polyethylene terephthalate substrates, elaborated by convective self-assembly. Electron transport in such devices occurs by inter-particle electron tunneling through the tunnel barrier imposed by the organic ligands protecting the NPs. This tunnel barrier was varied by changing the nature of organic ligands coating the nanoparticles: citrate (CIT), phosphines (BSPP, TDSP) and thiols (MPA, MUDA). Electro-mechanical tests indicate that only the gold NPs protected by phosphine and thiol ligands yield high gauge sensitivity. Temperature-dependent resistance measurements are explained using the ‘regular island array model’ that extracts transport parameters, i.e., the tunneling decay constant β and the Coulomb charging energy E C . This reveals that the Au-CIT nanoparticle assemblies exhibit a behavior characteristic of a strong-coupling regime, whereas those of Au-BSPP, Au-TDSP, Au-MPA and Au-MUDA nanoparticles manifest a weak-coupling regime. A comparison of the parameters extracted from the two methods indicates that the most sensitive gauges in the weak-coupling regime feature the highest β. Moreover, the E C values of these 14 nm NPs cannot be neglected in determining the β values. (paper)

  8. Time dependence of microsecond intense electron beam transport in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucey, R.F. Jr.; Gilgenback, R.M.; Tucker, J.E.; Brake, M.L.; Enloe, C.L.; Repetti, T.E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present results of long-pulse (0.5 μs) electron beam propagation in the ion focused regime (IFR). Electron beam parameters are 800 kV with several hundred amperes injected current. For injection into air (from 0.7 mTorr to 75 mTorr) and helium (from 14 mTorr to 227 mTorr) the authors observe a ''time-dependent propagation window'' in which efficient (up to 100%) propagation starts at a time comparable to the electron impact ionization time needed to achieve n/sub i/ -- (1/γ/sup 2/)n/sub eb/. The transport goes abruptly to zero about 50-150 ns after this initial propagation. This is followed by erratic propagation often consisting of numerous narrower pulses 10-40 ns wide. In these pulses the transported current can be 100% of the injected current, but is generally lower. As the fill pressure is increased, there are differences in the propagated beam pulse, which can be summarized as follows: 1) the temporal occurrence of the beam propagation window shifts to earlier times, 2) the propagated beam current has much faster risetimes, 3) a larger portion of the injected beam is propagated. Similar results are observed when the electron beam is propagated in helium. However, at a given pressure, the beam transport window occurs at later times and exhibits a slower risetime. These effects are consistent with electron beam-induced ionization. Experiments are being performed to determine if the observed beam instability is due to the ion hose instability or streaming instability

  9. Discovery of Suprathermal Ionospheric Origin Fe+ in and Near Earth's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christon, S. P.; Hamilton, D. C.; Plane, J. M. C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Spjeldvik, W. N.; Nylund, S. R.

    2017-11-01

    Suprathermal (87-212 keV/e) singly charged iron, Fe+, has been discovered in and near Earth's 9-30 RE equatorial magnetosphere using 21 years of Geotail STICS (suprathermal ion composition spectrometer) data. Its detection is enhanced during higher geomagnetic and solar activity levels. Fe+, rare compared to dominant suprathermal solar wind and ionospheric origin heavy ions, might derive from one or all three candidate lower-energy sources: (a) ionospheric outflow of Fe+ escaped from ion layers near 100 km altitude, (b) charge exchange of nominal solar wind iron, Fe+≥7, in Earth's exosphere, or (c) inner source pickup Fe+ carried by the solar wind, likely formed by solar wind Fe interaction with near-Sun interplanetary dust particles. Earth's semipermanent ionospheric Fe+ layers derive from tons of interplanetary dust particles entering Earth's atmosphere daily, and Fe+ scattered from these layers is observed up to 1000 km altitude, likely escaping in strong ionospheric outflows. Using 26% of STICS's magnetosphere-dominated data when possible Fe+2 ions are not masked by other ions, we demonstrate that solar wind Fe charge exchange secondaries are not an obvious Fe+ source. Contemporaneous Earth flyby and cruise data from charge-energy-mass spectrometer on the Cassini spacecraft, a functionally identical instrument, show that inner source pickup Fe+ is likely not important at suprathermal energies. Consequently, we suggest that ionospheric Fe+ constitutes at least a significant portion of Earth's suprathermal Fe+, comparable to the situation at Saturn where suprathermal Fe+ is also likely of ionospheric origin.

  10. Multidimensional electron-photon transport with standard discrete ordinates codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drumm, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    A method is described for generating electron cross sections that are comparable with standard discrete ordinates codes without modification. There are many advantages of using an established discrete ordinates solver, e.g. immediately available adjoint capability. Coupled electron-photon transport capability is needed for many applications, including the modeling of the response of electronics components to space and man-made radiation environments. The cross sections have been successfully used in the DORT, TWODANT and TORT discrete ordinates codes. The cross sections are shown to provide accurate and efficient solutions to certain multidimensional electron-photon transport problems. The key to the method is a simultaneous solution of the continuous-slowing-down (CSD) portion and elastic-scattering portion of the scattering source by the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory. The resulting multigroup-Legendre cross sections are much smaller than the true scattering cross sections that they represent. Under certain conditions, the cross sections are guaranteed positive and converge with a low-order Legendre expansion

  11. Multidimensional electron-photon transport with standard discrete ordinates codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drumm, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    A method is described for generating electron cross sections that are compatible with standard discrete ordinates codes without modification. There are many advantages to using an established discrete ordinates solver, e.g., immediately available adjoint capability. Coupled electron-photon transport capability is needed for many applications, including the modeling of the response of electronics components to space and synthetic radiation environments. The cross sections have been successfully used in the DORT, TWODANT, and TORT discrete ordinates codes. The cross sections are shown to provide accurate and efficient solutions to certain multidimensional electron-photon transport problems. The key to the method is a simultaneous solution of the continuous-slowing-down and elastic-scattering portions of the scattering source by the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory. The resulting multigroup-Legendre cross sections are much smaller than the true scattering cross sections that they represent. Under certain conditions, the cross sections are guaranteed positive and converge with a low-order Legendre expansion

  12. Electron-vibron coupling effects on electron transport via a single-molecule magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaskey, Alexander; Yamamoto, Yoh; Warnock, Michael; Burzurí, Enrique; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Park, Kyungwha

    2015-03-01

    We investigate how the electron-vibron coupling influences electron transport via an anisotropic magnetic molecule, such as a single-molecule magnet (SMM) Fe4, by using a model Hamiltonian with parameter values obtained from density-functional theory (DFT). The magnetic anisotropy parameters, vibrational energies, and electron-vibron coupling strengths of the Fe4 are computed using DFT. A giant spin model is applied to the Fe4 with only two charge states, specifically a neutral state with a total spin S =5 and a singly charged state with S =9 /2 , which is consistent with our DFT result and experiments on Fe4 single-molecule transistors. In sequential electron tunneling, we find that the magnetic anisotropy gives rise to new features in the conductance peaks arising from vibrational excitations. In particular, the peak height shows a strong, unusual dependence on the direction as well as magnitude of applied B field. The magnetic anisotropy also introduces vibrational satellite peaks whose position and height are modified with the direction and magnitude of applied B field. Furthermore, when multiple vibrational modes with considerable electron-vibron coupling have energies close to one another, a low-bias current is suppressed, independently of gate voltage and applied B field, although that is not the case for a single mode with a similar electron-vibron coupling. In the former case, the conductance peaks reveal a stronger B -field dependence than in the latter case. The new features appear because the magnetic anisotropy barrier is of the same order of magnitude as the energies of vibrational modes with significant electron-vibron coupling. Our findings clearly show the interesting interplay between magnetic anisotropy and electron-vibron coupling in electron transport via the Fe4. Similar behavior can be observed in transport via other anisotropic magnetic molecules.

  13. Transport of a relativistic electron beam through hydrogen gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haan, P. de.

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis the author describes the transport properties of an electron beam through vacuum and through hydrogen gas with pressure ranging from 25 to 1000 Pa. Maximum beam energy and current are 0.8 MeV and 6 kA, respectively. The pulse length is around 150 ns. A description is given of the experimental device. Also the diagnostics for probing the beam and the plasma, produced by the beam, are discussed, as well as the data acquisition system. The interaction between the beam and hydrogen gas with a pressure around 200 Pa is considered. A plasma with density around 10 19 m -3 is produced within a few nanoseconds. Measurements yield the atomic hydrogen temperature, electron density, beam energy loss, and induced plasma current and these are compared with the results of a model combining gas ionization and dissociation, and turbulent plasma heating. The angular distribution of the beam electrons about the magnetic field axis is discussed. (Auth.)

  14. Fast-electron transport in cylindrically laser-compressed matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, F.; Koenig, M.; Batani, D.; Baton, S. D.; Beg, F. N.; Benedetti, C.; Brambrink, E.; Chawla, S.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Galimberti, M.; Gizzi, L. A.; Heathcote, R.; Higginson, D. P.; Hulin, S.; Jafer, R.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Lancaster, K.; Mac Kinnon, A. J.; McPhee, A. G.; Nazarov, W.; Nicolai, P.; Pasley, J.; Ravasio, A.; Richetta, M.; Santos, J. J.; Sgattoni, A.; Spindloe, C.; Vauzour, B.; Volpe, L.

    2009-12-01

    Experimental and theoretical results of relativistic electron transport in cylindrically compressed matter are presented. This experiment, which is a part of the HiPER roadmap, was achieved on the VULCAN laser facility (UK) using four long pulses beams (~4 × 50 J, 1 ns, at 0.53 µm) to compress a hollow plastic cylinder filled with plastic foam of three different densities (0.1, 0.3 and 1 g cm-3). 2D simulations predict a density of 2-5 g cm-3 and a plasma temperature up to 100 eV at maximum compression. A short pulse (10 ps, 160 J) beam generated fast electrons that propagate through the compressed matter by irradiating a nickel foil at an intensity of 5 × 1018 W cm-2. X-ray spectrometer and imagers were implemented in order to estimate the compressed plasma conditions and to infer the hot electron characteristics. Results are discussed and compared with simulations.

  15. Density-functional method for nonequilibrium electron transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandbyge, Mads; Mozos, J.L.; Ordejon, P.

    2002-01-01

    We describe an ab initio method for calculating the electronic structure, electronic transport, and forces acting on the atoms, for atomic scale systems connected to semi-infinite electrodes and with an applied voltage bias. Our method is based on the density-functional theory (DFT) as implemented...... in the well tested SIESTA approach (which uses nonlocal norm-conserving pseudopotentials to describe the effect of the core electrons, and linear combination of finite-range numerical atomic orbitals to describe the valence states). We fully deal with the atomistic structure of the whole system, treating both...... the contact and the electrodes on the same footing. The effect of the finite bias (including self-consistency and the solution of the electrostatic problem) is taken into account using nonequilibrium Green's functions. We relate the nonequilibrium Green's function expressions to the more transparent scheme...

  16. Taking an electron-magnon duality shortcut from electron to magnon transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook, Alexander; Göbel, Börge; Henk, Jürgen; Mertig, Ingrid

    2018-04-01

    The quasiparticles in insulating magnets are the charge-neutral magnons, whose magnetic moments couple to electromagnetic fields. For collinear easy-axis magnets, this coupling can be mapped elegantly onto the scenario of charged particles in electromagnetic fields. From this mapping we obtain equations of motion for magnon wave packets equal to those of electron wave packets in metals. Thus, well-established electronic transport phenomena can be carried over to magnons: this duality shortcut facilitates the discussion of magnon transport. We identify the magnon versions of normal and anomalous Hall, Nernst, Ettingshausen, and Righi-Leduc effects. They are discussed for selected types of easy-axis magnets: ferromagnets, antiferromagnets, and ferrimagnets. Besides a magnon Wiedemann-Franz law and the magnon counterpart of the negative magnetoresistance of electrons in Weyl semimetals, we predict that certain low-symmetry ferrimagnets exhibit a nonlinear version of the anomalous magnon Hall-effect family.

  17. Electronic transport in narrow-gap semiconductor nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloemers, Christian

    2012-10-19

    Throughout this work the electronic transport properties of InAs, InN, and GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires have been analyzed. This includes the analysis of specific resistivity at room temperature and low temperatures as well as the breakdown of resistivity by a contribution of mobility and carrier concentration using gate measurements. While the InN nanowires showed homogeneous transport properties, there was a large statistical spread in the properties of InAs nanowires. Differing crystal structures and the surface conditions are identified to be the main reasons for the statistical spread. Both quantities of influence have been pointed out by comparing the transport parameters before and after a surface treatment (electron irradiation and long time ambient air exposure), and by comparing the transport parameters of wires grown by different growth methods which exhibit different kinds of crystal structure. In particular, the temperature dependence of the conductivity revealed different activation energies in nanowires with differing crystal structures. An explanation has been suggested in terms of stacking fault induced potential barriers. A field-effect measurement setup has been utilized to determine the nanowire mobility and carrier concentration. Even though this method is widely used for nanowires, it is subject to a serious disadvantage concerning the influence of surface and interface states on the measurements. As an alternative method which does not suffer from this drawback, Hall measurements have been successfully performed on InAs nanowires for the first time. These measurements became possible because of the utilization of a new electron beam lithographic procedure with an alignment accuracy in the 5 nm range. Carrier concentration values could be determined and compared to the ones obtained from conventional field-effect measurements. The results of the Hall measurements revealed a methodical overestimation of the carrier concentrations obtained

  18. Electronic transport in narrow-gap semiconductor nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloemers, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Throughout this work the electronic transport properties of InAs, InN, and GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires have been analyzed. This includes the analysis of specific resistivity at room temperature and low temperatures as well as the breakdown of resistivity by a contribution of mobility and carrier concentration using gate measurements. While the InN nanowires showed homogeneous transport properties, there was a large statistical spread in the properties of InAs nanowires. Differing crystal structures and the surface conditions are identified to be the main reasons for the statistical spread. Both quantities of influence have been pointed out by comparing the transport parameters before and after a surface treatment (electron irradiation and long time ambient air exposure), and by comparing the transport parameters of wires grown by different growth methods which exhibit different kinds of crystal structure. In particular, the temperature dependence of the conductivity revealed different activation energies in nanowires with differing crystal structures. An explanation has been suggested in terms of stacking fault induced potential barriers. A field-effect measurement setup has been utilized to determine the nanowire mobility and carrier concentration. Even though this method is widely used for nanowires, it is subject to a serious disadvantage concerning the influence of surface and interface states on the measurements. As an alternative method which does not suffer from this drawback, Hall measurements have been successfully performed on InAs nanowires for the first time. These measurements became possible because of the utilization of a new electron beam lithographic procedure with an alignment accuracy in the 5 nm range. Carrier concentration values could be determined and compared to the ones obtained from conventional field-effect measurements. The results of the Hall measurements revealed a methodical overestimation of the carrier concentrations obtained

  19. Monte Carlo transport of electrons and positrons through thin foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legarda, F.; Idoeta, R.

    2000-01-01

    In the different measurements made with electrons traversing matter it becomes useful the knowledge of its transmission through that medium, their paths and their angular distribution through matter so as to process and get information about the traversed medium and to improve and innovate the techniques that employ electrons, as medical applications or materials irradiation. This work presents a simulation of the transport of beams of electrons and positrons through thin foils using an analog Monte Carlo code that simulates in a detailed way every electron movement or interaction in matter. As those particles penetrate thin absorbers it has been assumed that they interact with matter only through elastic scattering, with negligible energy loss. This type of interaction has been described quite precisely because its angular form influences very much the angular distribution of electrons and positrons in matter. With this code it has been calculated the number of particles, with energies between 100 and 3000 keV, that are transmitted through different media of various thicknesses as well as its angular distribution, showing a good agreement with experimental data. The discrepancies are less than 5% for thicknesses lower than about 30% of the corresponding range in the tested material. As elastic scattering is very anisotropic, angular distributions resemble a collimated incident beam for very thin foils becoming slowly more isotropic when absorber thickness is increased. (author)

  20. Nanoscale Electron Transport Measurements of Immobilized Cytochrome P450 Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostick, Christopher D.; Flora, Darcy R.; Gannett, Peter M.; Tracy, Timothy S.; Lederman, David

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanopillars, functionalized with an organic self-assembled monolayer, can be used to measure the electrical conductance properties of immobilized proteins without aggregation. Measurements of the conductance of nanopillars with cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) proteins using conducting probe atomic force microscopy demonstrate that a correlation exists between the energy barrier height between hopping sites and CYP2C9 metabolic activity. Measurements performed as a function of tip force indicate that, when subjected to a large force, the protein is more stable in the presence of a substrate. This agrees with the hypothesis that substrate entry into the active site helps to stabilize the enzyme. The relative distance between hopping sites also increases with increasing force, possibly because protein functional groups responsible for electron transport depend on the structure of the protein. The inhibitor sulfaphenazole, in addition to the previously studied aniline, increased the barrier height for electron transfer and thereby makes CYP2C9 reduction more difficult and inhibits metabolism. This suggests that P450 Type II binders may decrease the ease of electron transport processes in the enzyme, in addition to occupying the active site. PMID:25804257

  1. Artemisinin inhibits chloroplast electron transport activity: mode of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adyasha Bharati

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a secondary metabolite produced in Artemisia plant species, besides having antimalarial properties is also phytotoxic. Although, the phytotoxic activity of the compound has been long recognized, no information is available on the mechanism of action of the compound on photosynthetic activity of the plant. In this report, we have evaluated the effect of artemisinin on photoelectron transport activity of chloroplast thylakoid membrane. The inhibitory effect of the compound, under in vitro condition, was pronounced in loosely and fully coupled thylakoids; being strong in the former. The extent of inhibition was drastically reduced in the presence of uncouplers like ammonium chloride or gramicidin; a characteristic feature described for energy transfer inhibitors. The compound, on the other hand, when applied to plants (in vivo, behaved as a potent inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. The major site of its action was identified to be the Q(B; the secondary quinone moiety of photosystemII complex. Analysis of photoreduction kinetics of para-benzoquinone and duroquinone suggest that the inhibition leads to formation of low pool of plastoquinol, which becomes limiting for electron flow through photosystemI. Further it was ascertained that the in vivo inhibitory effect appeared as a consequence of the formation of an unidentified artemisinin-metabolite rather than by the interaction of the compound per se. The putative metabolite of artemisinin is highly reactive in instituting the inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow eventually reducing the plant growth.

  2. Helium, Iron and Electron Particle Transport and Energy Transport Studies on the TFTR Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synakowski, E. J.; Efthimion, P. C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B. C.; Tang, W. M.; Grek, B.; Hill, K. W.; Hulse, R. A.; Johnson, D .W.; Mansfield, D. K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Park, H. K.; Ramsey, A. T.; Redi, M. H.; Scott, S. D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M. C. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Kissick, M. W. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Results from helium, iron, and electron transport on TFTR in L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power are presented. They are compared to results from thermal transport analysis based on power balance. Particle diffusivities and thermal conductivities are radially hollow and larger than neoclassical values, except possibly near the magnetic axis. The ion channel dominates over the electron channel in both particle and thermal diffusion. A peaked helium profile, supported by inward convection that is stronger than predicted by neoclassical theory, is measured in the Supershot The helium profile shape is consistent with predictions from quasilinear electrostatic drift-wave theory. While the perturbative particle diffusion coefficients of all three species are similar in the Supershot, differences are found in the L-Mode. Quasilinear theory calculations of the ratios of impurity diffusivities are in good accord with measurements. Theory estimates indicate that the ion heat flux should be larger than the electron heat flux, consistent with power balance analysis. However, theoretical values of the ratio of the ion to electron heat flux can be more than a factor of three larger than experimental values. A correlation between helium diffusion and ion thermal transport is observed and has favorable implications for sustained ignition of a tokamak fusion reactor.

  3. Helium, iron and electron particle transport and energy transport studies on the TFTR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synakowski, E.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B.C.; Tang, W.M.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Hulse, R.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Redi, M.H.; Scott, S.D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1993-03-01

    Results from helium, iron, and electron transport on TFTR in L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power are presented. They are compared to results from thermal transport analysis based on power balance. Particle diffusivities and thermal conductivities are radially hollow and larger than neoclassical values, except possibly near the magnetic axis. The ion channel dominates over the electron channel in both particle and thermal diffusion. A peaked helium profile, supported by inward convection that is stronger than predicted by neoclassical theory, is measured in the Supershot The helium profile shape is consistent with predictions from quasilinear electrostatic drift-wave theory. While the perturbative particle diffusion coefficients of all three species are similar in the Supershot, differences are found in the L-Mode. Quasilinear theory calculations of the ratios of impurity diffusivities are in good accord with measurements. Theory estimates indicate that the ion heat flux should be larger than the electron heat flux, consistent with power balance analysis. However, theoretical values of the ratio of the ion to electron heat flux can be more than a factor of three larger than experimental values. A correlation between helium diffusion and ion thermal transport is observed and has favorable implications for sustained ignition of a tokamak fusion reactor

  4. Helium, iron and electron particle transport and energy transport studies on the TFTR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Synakowski, E.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B.C.; Tang, W.M.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Hulse, R.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Redi, M.H.; Scott, S.D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M.C. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Kissick, M.W. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Results from helium, iron, and electron transport on TFTR in L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power are presented. They are compared to results from thermal transport analysis based on power balance. Particle diffusivities and thermal conductivities are radially hollow and larger than neoclassical values, except possibly near the magnetic axis. The ion channel dominates over the electron channel in both particle and thermal diffusion. A peaked helium profile, supported by inward convection that is stronger than predicted by neoclassical theory, is measured in the Supershot The helium profile shape is consistent with predictions from quasilinear electrostatic drift-wave theory. While the perturbative particle diffusion coefficients of all three species are similar in the Supershot, differences are found in the L-Mode. Quasilinear theory calculations of the ratios of impurity diffusivities are in good accord with measurements. Theory estimates indicate that the ion heat flux should be larger than the electron heat flux, consistent with power balance analysis. However, theoretical values of the ratio of the ion to electron heat flux can be more than a factor of three larger than experimental values. A correlation between helium diffusion and ion thermal transport is observed and has favorable implications for sustained ignition of a tokamak fusion reactor.

  5. Elastic properties and electron transport in InAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migunov, Vadim

    2013-02-22

    The electron transport and elastic properties of InAs nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition on InAs (001) substrate were studied experimentally, in-situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). A TEM holder allowing the measurement of a nanoforce while simultaneous imaging nanowire bending was used. Diffraction images from local areas of the wire were recorded to correlate elastic properties with the atomic structure of the nanowires. Another TEM holder allowing the application of electrical bias between the nanowire and an apex of a metallic needle while simultaneous imaging the nanowire in TEM or performing electron holography was used to detect mechanical vibrations in mechanical study or holographical observation of the nanowire inner potential in the electron transport studies. The combination of the scanning probe methods with TEM allows to correlate the measured electric and elastic properties of the nanowires with direct identification of their atomic structure. It was found that the nanowires have different atomic structures and different stacking fault defect densities that impacts critically on the elastic properties and electric transport. The unique methods, that were applied in this work, allowed to obtain dependencies of resistivity and Young's modulus of left angle 111 right angle -oriented InAs nanowires on defect density and diameter. It was found that the higher is the defect density the higher are the resistivity and the Young's modulus. Regarding the resistivity, it was deduced that the stacking faults increase the scattering of the electrons in the nanowire. These findings are consistent with the literature, however, the effect described by the other groups is not so pronounced. This difference can be attributed to the significant incompleteness of the physical models used for the data analysis. Regarding the elastic modulus, there are several mechanisms affecting the elasticity of the nanowires discussed in the thesis. It

  6. Interaction of supra-thermal ions with turbulence in a magnetized toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plyushchev, G.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis addresses the interaction of a supra-thermal ion beam with turbulence in the simple magnetized toroidal plasma of TORPEX. The first part of the Thesis deals with the ohmic assisted discharges on TORPEX. The aim of these discharges is the investigation of the open to closed magnetic field line transition. The relevant magnetic diagnostics were developed. Ohmic assisted discharges with a maximum plasma current up to 1 kA are routinely obtained. The equilibrium conditions on the vacuum magnetic field configuration were investigated. In the second part of the Thesis, the design of the fast ion source and detector are discussed. The accelerating electric field needed for the fast ion source was optimized. The fast ion source was constructed and commissioned. To detect the fast ions a specially designed gridded energy analyzer was used. The electron energy distribution function was obtained to demonstrate the efficiency of the detector. The experiments with the fast ion beam were conducted in different plasma regions of TORPEX. In the third part of the Thesis, numerical simulations are used to interpret the measured fast ion beam behavior. It is shown that a simple single particle equation of motion explains the beam behavior in the experiments in the absence of plasma. To explain the fast ion beam experiments with the plasma a turbulent electric field must be used. The model that takes into account this turbulent electrical field qualitatively explains the shape of the fast ion current density profile in the different plasma regions of TORPEX. The vertically elongated fast ion current density profiles are explained by a spread in the fast ion velocity distribution. The theoretically predicted radial fast ion beam spreading due to the turbulent electric field was observed in the experiment. (author)

  7. Contacting nanowires and nanotubes with atomic precision for electronic transport

    KAUST Repository

    Qin, Shengyong

    2012-01-01

    Making contacts to nanostructures with atomic precision is an important process in the bottom-up fabrication and characterization of electronic nanodevices. Existing contacting techniques use top-down lithography and chemical etching, but lack atomic precision and introduce the possibility of contamination. Here, we report that a field-induced emission process can be used to make local contacts onto individual nanowires and nanotubes with atomic spatial precision. The gold nano-islands are deposited onto nanostructures precisely by using a scanning tunneling microscope tip, which provides a clean and controllable method to ensure both electrically conductive and mechanically reliable contacts. To demonstrate the wide applicability of the technique, nano-contacts are fabricated on silicide atomic wires, carbon nanotubes, and copper nanowires. The electrical transport measurements are performed in situ by utilizing the nanocontacts to bridge the nanostructures to the transport probes. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Transport of ions and electrons in nanostructured liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Takashi; Yoshio, Masafumi; Ichikawa, Takahiro; Soberats, Bartolome; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Funahashi, Masahiro

    2017-03-01

    The nanosegregated structures of columnar, smectic and bicontinuous cubic liquid crystals can provide well-organized, nano- and sub-nanosized 1D, 2D and 3D channels capable of ion and electron transport. The molecular shape, intermolecular interactions and nanosegregation of the molecular structures can influence their self-assembly into a range of functional liquid-crystalline nanostructures. The formation of stable and soft liquid-crystalline materials leads to their application as electrolytes for batteries and photovoltaics, semiconductors, electroluminescence and electrochemical devices. In addition, electrochemical devices are obtained by using redox-active liquid crystals. In this Review, we focus on the design of liquid-crystalline phases, the resultant self-assembled structures, the transport mechanisms, and the fabrication, function and future development of devices incorporating nanostructured liquid crystals.

  9. Strain modification on electronic transport of the phosphorene nanoribbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yawen Yuan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate theoretically how local strains can be tailored to control quantum transport of carriers on monolayer armchair and zigzag phosphorene nanoribbon. We find that the electron tunneling is forbidden when the in-plane strain exceeds a critical value. The critical strain is different for different crystal orientation of the ribbons, widths, and incident energies. By tuning the Fermi energy and strain, the channels can be transited from opaque to transparent. Moreover, for the zigzag-phosphorene nanoribbon, the two-fold degenerate quasi-flat edge band splits completely under certain strain. These properties provide us an efficient way to control the transport of monolayer phosphorene-based microstructure.

  10. Electron transport in silicon nanowires having different cross-sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muscato Orazio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Transport phenomena in silicon nanowires with different cross-section are investigated using an Extended Hydrodynamic model, coupled to the Schrödinger-Poisson system. The model has been formulated by closing the moment system derived from the Boltzmann equation on the basis of the maximum entropy principle of Extended Thermodynamics, obtaining explicit closure relations for the high-order fluxes and the production terms. Scattering of electrons with acoustic and non polar optical phonons have been taken into account. The bulk mobility is evaluated for square and equilateral triangle cross-sections of the wire.

  11. Monte Carlo methods in electron transport problems. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleri, F.

    1989-01-01

    The condensed-history Monte Carlo method for charged particles transport is reviewed and discussed starting from a general form of the Boltzmann equation (Part I). The physics of the electronic interactions, together with some pedagogic example will be introduced in the part II. The lecture is directed to potential users of the method, for which it can be a useful introduction to the subject matter, and wants to establish the basis of the work on the computer code RECORD, which is at present in a developing stage

  12. Modified Monte Carlo method for study of electron transport in degenerate electron gas in the presence of electron-electron interactions, application to graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowik, Piotr; Thobel, Jean-Luc; Adamowicz, Leszek

    2017-07-01

    Standard computational methods used to take account of the Pauli Exclusion Principle into Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of electron transport in semiconductors may give unphysical results in low field regime, where obtained electron distribution function takes values exceeding unity. Modified algorithms were already proposed and allow to correctly account for electron scattering on phonons or impurities. Present paper extends this approach and proposes improved simulation scheme allowing including Pauli exclusion principle for electron-electron (e-e) scattering into MC simulations. Simulations with significantly reduced computational cost recreate correct values of the electron distribution function. Proposed algorithm is applied to study transport properties of degenerate electrons in graphene with e-e interactions. This required adapting the treatment of e-e scattering in the case of linear band dispersion relation. Hence, this part of the simulation algorithm is described in details.

  13. Electronic structure, transport, and collective effects in molecular layered systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Hahn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The great potential of organic heterostructures for organic device applications is exemplified by the targeted engineering of the electronic properties of phthalocyanine-based systems. The transport properties of two different phthalocyanine systems, a pure copper phthalocyanine (CoPc and a flourinated copper phthalocyanine–manganese phthalocyanine (F16CoPc/MnPc heterostructure, are investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT and the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF approach. Furthermore, a master-equation-based approach is used to include electronic correlations beyond the mean-field-type approximation of DFT. We describe the essential theoretical tools to obtain the parameters needed for the master equation from DFT results. Finally, an interacting molecular monolayer is considered within a master-equation approach.

  14. Electronic transport in disordered graphene antidot lattice devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Power, Stephen; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructuring of graphene is in part motivated by the requirement to open a gap in the electronic band structure. In particular, a periodically perforated graphene sheet in the form of an antidot lattice may have such a gap. Such systems have been investigated with a view towards application...... in transistor or waveguiding devices. The desired properties have been predicted for atomically precise systems, but fabrication methods will introduce significant levels of disorder in the shape, position and edge configurations of individual antidots. We calculate the electronic transport properties of a wide...... range of finite graphene antidot devices to determine the effect of such disorders on their performance. Modest geometric disorder is seen to have a detrimental effect on devices containing small, tightly packed antidots, which have optimal performance in pristine lattices. Larger antidots display...

  15. Electronic transport properties of the armchair silicon carbide nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Jiuxu; Yang Yintang; Liu Hongxia [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Wide Band Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Guo Lixin [School of Science, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Zhang Zhiyong, E-mail: songjiuxu@126.com [Information Science and Technology Institution, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China)

    2010-11-15

    The electronic transport properties of the armchair silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNT) are investigated by using the combined nonequilibrium Green's function method with density functional theory. In the equilibrium transmission spectrum of the nanotube, a transmission valley of about 2.12 eV is discovered around Fermi energy, which means that the nanotube is a wide band gap semiconductor and consistent with results of first principle calculations. More important, negative differential resistance is found in its current voltage characteristic. This phenomenon originates from the variation of density of states caused by applied bias voltage. These investigations are meaningful to modeling and simulation in silicon carbide nanotube electronic devices.

  16. Electron transport in InAs/AlSb quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuttle, G.; Kroemer, H.; English, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The authors present data on electron transport in AlSb/InAs/AlSb quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Because both anion and cation change across an InAs/Alsb interface, it is possible to grow such wells with two different types of interfaces, one with an InSb-like bond configuration, the other AlAs-like. Electron mobility and concentration were found to depend very strongly on the manner in which the quantum well's interfaces were grown, with high mobilities seen only if the bottom interface is InSb-like. An As-on-Al sites antisite defect model is postulated for bottom AlAs-like interfaces

  17. Electronic transport properties of carbon nanotube metal-semiconductor-metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Khoeini

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available  In this work, we study electronic transport properties of a quasi-one dimensional pure semi-conducting Zigzag Carbon Nanotube (CNT attached to semi-infinite clean metallic Zigzag CNT leads, taking into account the influence of topological defect in junctions. This structure may behave like a field effect transistor. The calculations are based on the tight-binding model and Green’s function method, in which the local density of states(LDOS in the metallic section to semi-conducting section, and muli-channel conductance of the system are calculated in the coherent and linear response regime, numerically. Also we have introduced a circuit model for the system and investigated its current. The theoretical results obtained, can be a base, for developments in designing nano-electronic devices.

  18. Short Wavelength Fluctuations and Electron Transport in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.L. Wong; K. Itoh; S.-I. Itoh; A. Fukuyama; M. Yagi

    2000-09-08

    Correlation between electron heat diffusivity and short wavelength (kri {approximately} 5) fluctuation amplitude was observed in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) tokamak in the core of enhanced reversed shear (ERS) plasmas [1]. These fluctuations propagate in the ion diamagnetic drift direction with wave number comparable to wpe/c. Further analysis of these data yields the ratios ce/ci and ce/De, and their values are consistent with the picture that the electron transport is mainly induced by the short wavelength fluctuations in the plasma core where the long wavelength (kri {approximately} 1) fluctuations are absent. Although there is not enough information to identify these short wavelength modes, the values of ce is found to be comparable to theoretical predictions based on the current diffusive ballooning mode theory [2].

  19. Control of electron internal transport barriers in TCV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, M A; Behn, R; Coda, S; Condrea, I; Duval, B P; Goodman, T P; Karpushov, A; Martin, Y; Martynov, An; Moret, J-M; Nikkola, P; Porte, L; Sauter, O; Scarabosio, A; Zhuang, G

    2004-01-01

    Current profile tailoring has been performed by application of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron cyclotron current drive, leading to improved energy confinement in the plasma core of the TCV tokamak. The improved confinement is characterized by a substantial enhancement (H-factor) of the global electron energy confinement time relative to the prediction of the RLW scaling law (Rebut P H et al 1989 Proc. 12th Int. Conf. of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Research (Nice, 1988) vol 2 (Vienna: IAEA) p 191), which predicts well Ohmic and standard ECH discharges on TCV. The improved confinement is attributed to a hollow current density profile producing a reversed shear profile creating an electron internal transport barrier. We relate the strength of the barrier to the depth of the hollow current density profile and the volume enclosed by the radial location of the peak current density. The ρ T * (Tresset G et al 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 520) criterion is used to evaluate the performance of the barrier relative to changes in the ECH parameters or the addition of Ohmic current, which aid in identifying the control parameters available for improving either the strength or volume of the barrier for enhanced performance. A figure of merit for the global scaling factor is used that scales the confinement enhancement as the product of the barrier volume and strength

  20. Electron transport in heavily doped GdN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, T.; Trodahl, H. J.; Natali, F.; Ruck, B. J.; Vézian, S.

    2018-01-01

    We report measurements of electron transport phenomena in the intrinsic ferromagnetic semiconductor GdN doped with 1.3 ×1021cm-3 electrons. The conductivity, carrier concentration, and thermoelectric power are compared with expectations based on an LSDA+U band structure. In the ferromagnetic state the carriers fill the majority-spin conduction band pockets to the bottom of the minority-spin band. The resistance implies an electron mobility of 18 cm2V-1s-1 at zero temperature, and in turn a mean-free path of 10-30 nm. Spin disorder scattering rapidly reduces the mobility near the 70 K Curie temperature (TC). The thermoelectric power is negative in the paramagnetic phase, as expected for a n -type conductor, with a magnitude that is in agreement with the Fermi energy implied by the band structure. The thermopower reverses sign to be positive in the ferromagnetic phase, which correlates with a strongly temperature-dependent electron diffusion from spin-disorder scattering that increases rapidly as the temperature rises toward TC.

  1. High efficiency blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes without electron transport layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Soon Ok [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Dankook University, Jukjeon-dong, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Yeob, E-mail: leej17@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Dankook University, Jukjeon-dong, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 448-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    High efficiency blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes were fabricated without an electron transport layer using a spirobifluorene based blue triplet host material. The simple blue PHOLEDs without the electron transport layer showed a high external quantum efficiency and current efficiency of 16.1% and 30.2 cd/A, respectively. The high device performances of the electron transport layer free blue PHOLEDs were comparable to those of blue PHOLEDs with the electron transport layer. - Highlights: > Simple device structure without electron transport layer. > High efficiency blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode. > Spirobifluorene based high triplet energy host material.

  2. Attosecond photoelectron spectroscopy of electron transport in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magerl, Elisabeth

    2011-03-31

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of condensed matter systems in the attosecond regime promises new insights into excitation mechanisms and transient dynamics of electrons in solids. This timescale became accessible directly only recently with the development of the attosecond streak camera and of laser systems providing few-cycle, phase-controlled laser pulses in the near-infrared, which are used to generate isolated, sub-femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses with a well-defined timing with respect to the near-infrared pulse. Employing these pulses, the attosecond streak camera offers time resolutions as short as a few 10 attoseconds. In the framework of this thesis, a new, versatile experimental apparatus combining attosecond pulse generation in gases with state of the art surface science techniques is designed, constructed, and commissioned. Employing this novel infrastructure and the technique of the attosecond transient recorder, we investigate transport phenomena occurring after photoexcitation of electrons in tungsten and rhenium single crystals and show that attosecond streaking is a unique method for resolving extremely fast electronic phenomena in solids. It is demonstrated that electrons originating from different energy levels, i.e. from the conduction band and the 4f core level, are emitted from the crystal surface at different times. The origin of this time delay, which is below 150 attoseconds for all studied systems, is investigated by a systematic variation of several experimental parameters, in particular the photon energy of the employed attosecond pulses. These experimental studies are complemented by theoretical studies of the group velocity of highly-excited electrons based on ab initio calculations. While the streaking technique applied on single crystals can provide only information about the relative time delay between two types of photoelectrons, the absolute transport time remains inaccessible. We introduce a scheme of a reference

  3. Attosecond photoelectron spectroscopy of electron transport in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magerl, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of condensed matter systems in the attosecond regime promises new insights into excitation mechanisms and transient dynamics of electrons in solids. This timescale became accessible directly only recently with the development of the attosecond streak camera and of laser systems providing few-cycle, phase-controlled laser pulses in the near-infrared, which are used to generate isolated, sub-femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses with a well-defined timing with respect to the near-infrared pulse. Employing these pulses, the attosecond streak camera offers time resolutions as short as a few 10 attoseconds. In the framework of this thesis, a new, versatile experimental apparatus combining attosecond pulse generation in gases with state of the art surface science techniques is designed, constructed, and commissioned. Employing this novel infrastructure and the technique of the attosecond transient recorder, we investigate transport phenomena occurring after photoexcitation of electrons in tungsten and rhenium single crystals and show that attosecond streaking is a unique method for resolving extremely fast electronic phenomena in solids. It is demonstrated that electrons originating from different energy levels, i.e. from the conduction band and the 4f core level, are emitted from the crystal surface at different times. The origin of this time delay, which is below 150 attoseconds for all studied systems, is investigated by a systematic variation of several experimental parameters, in particular the photon energy of the employed attosecond pulses. These experimental studies are complemented by theoretical studies of the group velocity of highly-excited electrons based on ab initio calculations. While the streaking technique applied on single crystals can provide only information about the relative time delay between two types of photoelectrons, the absolute transport time remains inaccessible. We introduce a scheme of a reference

  4. Self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser devices and nonideal electron beam transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Lazzarino

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have developed, at the SPARC test facility, a procedure for a real time self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (FEL device performance control. We describe an actual FEL, including electron and optical beam transport, through a set of analytical formulas, allowing a fast and reliable on-line “simulation” of the experiment. The system is designed in such a way that the characteristics of the transport elements and the laser intensity are measured and adjusted, via a real time computation, during the experimental run, to obtain an on-line feedback of the laser performances. The detail of the procedure and the relevant experimental results are discussed.

  5. Electronic transport properties of copper and gold at atomic scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadzadeh, Saeideh

    2010-11-23

    The factors governing electronic transport properties of copper and gold atomic-size contacts are theoretically examined in the present work. A two-terminal conductor using crystalline electrodes is adopted. The non-equilibrium Green's function combined with the density functional tight-binding method is employed via gDFTB simulation tool to calculate the transport at both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The crystalline orientation, length, and arrangement of electrodes have very weak influence on the electronic characteristics of the considered atomic wires. The wire width is found to be the most effective geometric aspect determining the number of conduction channels. The obtained conductance oscillation and linear current-voltage curves are interpreted. To analyze the conduction mechanism in detail, the transmission channels and their decomposition to the atomic orbitals are calculated in copper and gold single point contacts. The presented results offer a possible explanation for the relation between conduction and geometric structure. Furthermore, the results are in good agreement with available experimental and theoretical studies. (orig.)

  6. One-Dimensional Electron Transport Layers for Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Ujwal K.; Kisslinger, Ryan; Shankar, Karthik

    2017-01-01

    The electron diffusion length (Ln) is smaller than the hole diffusion length (Lp) in many halide perovskite semiconductors meaning that the use of ordered one-dimensional (1D) structures such as nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs) as electron transport layers (ETLs) is a promising method of achieving high performance halide perovskite solar cells (HPSCs). ETLs consisting of oriented and aligned NWs and NTs offer the potential not merely for improved directional charge transport but also for the enhanced absorption of incoming light and thermodynamically efficient management of photogenerated carrier populations. The ordered architecture of NW/NT arrays affords superior infiltration of a deposited material making them ideal for use in HPSCs. Photoconversion efficiencies (PCEs) as high as 18% have been demonstrated for HPSCs using 1D ETLs. Despite the advantages of 1D ETLs, there are still challenges that need to be overcome to achieve even higher PCEs, such as better methods to eliminate or passivate surface traps, improved understanding of the hetero-interface and optimization of the morphology (i.e., length, diameter, and spacing of NWs/NTs). This review introduces the general considerations of ETLs for HPSCs, deposition techniques used, and the current research and challenges in the field of 1D ETLs for perovskite solar cells. PMID:28468280

  7. One-Dimensional Electron Transport Layers for Perovskite Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujwal K. Thakur

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The electron diffusion length (Ln is smaller than the hole diffusion length (Lp in many halide perovskite semiconductors meaning that the use of ordered one-dimensional (1D structures such as nanowires (NWs and nanotubes (NTs as electron transport layers (ETLs is a promising method of achieving high performance halide perovskite solar cells (HPSCs. ETLs consisting of oriented and aligned NWs and NTs offer the potential not merely for improved directional charge transport but also for the enhanced absorption of incoming light and thermodynamically efficient management of photogenerated carrier populations. The ordered architecture of NW/NT arrays affords superior infiltration of a deposited material making them ideal for use in HPSCs. Photoconversion efficiencies (PCEs as high as 18% have been demonstrated for HPSCs using 1D ETLs. Despite the advantages of 1D ETLs, there are still challenges that need to be overcome to achieve even higher PCEs, such as better methods to eliminate or passivate surface traps, improved understanding of the hetero-interface and optimization of the morphology (i.e., length, diameter, and spacing of NWs/NTs. This review introduces the general considerations of ETLs for HPSCs, deposition techniques used, and the current research and challenges in the field of 1D ETLs for perovskite solar cells.

  8. One-Dimensional Electron Transport Layers for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Ujwal K; Kisslinger, Ryan; Shankar, Karthik

    2017-04-29

    The electron diffusion length ( L n ) is smaller than the hole diffusion length ( L p ) in many halide perovskite semiconductors meaning that the use of ordered one-dimensional (1D) structures such as nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs) as electron transport layers (ETLs) is a promising method of achieving high performance halide perovskite solar cells (HPSCs). ETLs consisting of oriented and aligned NWs and NTs offer the potential not merely for improved directional charge transport but also for the enhanced absorption of incoming light and thermodynamically efficient management of photogenerated carrier populations. The ordered architecture of NW/NT arrays affords superior infiltration of a deposited material making them ideal for use in HPSCs. Photoconversion efficiencies (PCEs) as high as 18% have been demonstrated for HPSCs using 1D ETLs. Despite the advantages of 1D ETLs, there are still challenges that need to be overcome to achieve even higher PCEs, such as better methods to eliminate or passivate surface traps, improved understanding of the hetero-interface and optimization of the morphology (i.e., length, diameter, and spacing of NWs/NTs). This review introduces the general considerations of ETLs for HPSCs, deposition techniques used, and the current research and challenges in the field of 1D ETLs for perovskite solar cells.

  9. Electronic Interactions of n-Doped Perylene Diimide Groups Appended to Polynorbornene Chains: Implications for Electron Transport in Organic Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh T; Biberdorf, Joshua D; Holliday, Bradley J; Jones, Richard A

    2017-11-01

    A polymer consisting of a polynorbornene backbone with perylene diimide (PDI) pendant groups on each monomeric unit is synthesized via ring opening metathesis polymerization. The PDI pendant groups along the polymer backbone, studied by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence emission, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in addition to electrochemical methods, show evidence of molecular aggregation and corresponding electronic coupling with neighboring groups, which forms pathways for efficient electron transport from one group to another in a specific reduced form. When n-doped, the title polymer shows redox conductivity of 5.4 × 10 -3 S cm -1 , comparable with crystalline PDI materials, and is therefore a promising material for use in organic electronics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Fast-electron transport in cylindrically laser-compressed matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, F; Koenig, M; Baton, S D; Brambrink, E [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, Palaiseau (France); Batani, D; Jafer, R [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universito di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Beg, F N; Chawla, S; Higginson, D P [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Benedetti, C [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bologna (Italy); Dorchies, F; Fourment, C; Hulin, S [Universite de Bordeaux - CNRS - CEA, Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, Talence, F-33405 (France); Galimberti, M; Heathcote, R; Lancaster, K [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Gizzi, L A; Koester, P; Labate, L [LIL-IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, PISA (Italy); MacKinnon, A J [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Experimental and theoretical results of relativistic electron transport in cylindrically compressed matter are presented. This experiment, which is a part of the HiPER roadmap, was achieved on the VULCAN laser facility (UK) using four long pulses beams ({approx}4 x 50 J, 1 ns, at 0.53{mu}m) to compress a hollow plastic cylinder filled with plastic foam of three different densities (0.1, 0.3 and 1 g cm{sup -3}). 2D simulations predict a density of 2-5 g cm{sup -3} and a plasma temperature up to 100 eV at maximum compression. A short pulse (10 ps, 160 J) beam generated fast electrons that propagate through the compressed matter by irradiating a nickel foil at an intensity of 5 x 10{sup 18} W cm{sup -2}. X-ray spectrometer and imagers were implemented in order to estimate the compressed plasma conditions and to infer the hot electron characteristics. Results are discussed and compared with simulations.

  11. In-flight verification of avalanche photodiodes: avenue to a low-cost solution to measure suprathermal particles for future missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, K.; Bonnell, J. W.; Christian, E. R.; Desai, M. I.; Grubbs, G. A., II; Jahn, J. M.; Livi, S. A.; Kanekal, S. G.; Llera, K.; McComas, D. J.; Michell, R.; Samara, M.; Vines, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Flight operation results and plans of Avalanche Photodiodes (APDs) to measure suprathermal particles (a ~few keV up to ~100s of keV) are summarized in this presentation. Ions and electrons in this energy range play crucial roles in many fundamental processes of space plasmas including particle heating and acceleration, providing source material for the energetic particles accelerated near the Sun, the heliosphere, and in geospace. Characterizing these populations poses serious technical challenges because this energy region lies between the two most commonly used particle detection techniques, i.e., that used by thermal or plasma instruments and by Solid-State Detector (SSD)-based energetic particle telescopes, which are limited by typical SSD threshold energies of >10s keV. Our previous work has already demonstrated that a new type of low-noise, low-threshold Avalanche Photo-Diode (APD) has an intrinsic noise level of 0.9 keV, and can therefore enable high-energy resolution measurements of suprathermal electrons and ions. In addition, APDs provide suitable solutions for space plasma detectors in low-cost missions/platform because of their light-weight, small-size, power-saving features. This study presents two low-cost missions (a sounding rocket and a CubeSat) that implement APDs as particle detectors: (1) The Medium-energy Electron SPectrometer (MESP) sensor aboard a sounding rocket was launched from Poker Flat Research Range on 3 March 2014 as a part of Ground-to-Rocket Electrodynamics-Electrons Correlative Experiment (GREECE) mission. MESP successfully measured the precipitating electrons from 2 to 200 keV in 100-ms time resolution by using 2 APDs and 1 SSD. We show the overall results and the comparison with an MCP-based instrument results. (2) The Miniaturized Electron and pRoton Telescope (MERiT) on the Compact Radiation bElt Explorer (CeREs) to study charged particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. CeREs will be flown as part of a 3U CubeSat in a

  12. Electron-electron interaction, weak localization and spin valve effect in vertical-transport graphene devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Mingsheng; Gong, Youpin; Wei, Xiangfei; Zhu, Chao; Xu, Jianbao; Liu, Ping; Guo, Yufen; Li, Weiwei; Liu, Liwei, E-mail: lwliu2007@sinano.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications-CAS and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Suzhou 215123 (China); Liu, Guangtong [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-04-14

    We fabricated a vertical structure device, in which graphene is sandwiched between two asymmetric ferromagnetic electrodes. The measurements of electron and spin transport were performed across the combined channels containing the vertical and horizontal components. The presence of electron-electron interaction (EEI) was found not only at low temperatures but also at moderate temperatures up to ∼120 K, and EEI dominates over weak localization (WL) with and without applying magnetic fields perpendicular to the sample plane. Moreover, spin valve effect was observed when magnetic filed is swept at the direction parallel to the sample surface. We attribute the EEI and WL surviving at a relatively high temperature to the effective suppress of phonon scattering in the vertical device structure. The findings open a way for studying quantum correlation at relatively high temperature.

  13. Electron cyclotron absorption in Tokamak plasmas in the presence of radial transport of particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Paulo R. da S.; Ziebell, Luiz F.

    1998-01-01

    We use quasilinear theory to study effects of particle radial transport on the electron cyclotron absorption coefficient by a current carrying plasma, in a tokamak modelated as a plasma slab. Our numerical results indicate significant modification in the profile of the electron cyclotron absorption coefficient when transport is taken into account relative to the situation without transport. (author)

  14. Transport and acceleration of low-emittance electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henke, H.

    1989-01-01

    Linear accelerators for colliders and for free-electron lasers require beams with both high brightness and low emittance. Their transport and acceleration is limited by single-particle effects originating from injection jitter, from the unavoidable position jitter of components, and from chromaticity. Collective phenomena, essentially due to wake fields acting within the bunch, are most severe in the case of high-frequency structures, i.e. a small aperture. Whilst, in the past, the transverse wake-field effects were believed to be most serious, we know that they can even be beneficial when inducing a corresponding spread in betatron oscillation either by an energy spread along the bunch or by an RF focusing system acting on the bunch scale. This paper evaluates the different effects by simple analytical means after making use of the smooth focusing approximation and the two-particle model. Numerical simulation results are used for verification. 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Jing-Xin

    2012-01-01

    The bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains sandwiched between gold electrodes is investigated with density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method. At zero bias, in contrast to the typical odd-even oscillations observed in most metallic chains, we find that the conductance oscillates with a period of four atoms. However, as the bias voltage is increased the current displays a two-atom periodicity. This emerges gradually, first for the longer chains and then, at voltages larger than 0.7 V, for lengths. The oscillatory behaviors are analyzed by the density of states and the energy-dependent and bias-dependent transmission coefficients. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Electron transport in Bi2Se3 ultra thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Bernhart, Alexander M.; Bobisch, Christian A.

    2018-02-01

    We studied the electronic transport properties of a 4 QL thin Bi2Se3 film in the hybridized phase on Si(111) by scanning tunneling potentiometry. When a transverse voltage is applied, the film exhibits a homogeneous electric field on the nm scale. In addition, thermovoltage signals with lateral nm variations are found which result from sample heating by the transverse current. The thermovoltage signals are directly correlated to morphological structures on the surface, i.e. step edges, and indicate a lateral variation of the local density of states at the Bi2Se3 surface. No discernible voltage drops appear at the surface so that the whole film serves as a current carrying medium and scattering at surface defects is less important.

  17. Tuning electronic transport in a self-assembled nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei Sea; Liu, Heng-Jui; Tra, Vu Thanh; Chen, Jhih-Wei; Wei, Tzu-Chiao; Tzeng, W Y; Zhu, Yuanmin; Kuo, Ho-Hung; Hsieh, Ying-Hui; Lin, Jheng-Cyuan; Zhan, Qian; Luo, Chih Wei; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan; He, Jr-Hau; Wu, Chung Lin; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2014-06-24

    Self-assembled nanocomposites with a high interface-to-volume ratio offer an opportunity to overcome limitations in current technology, where intriguing transport behaviors can be tailored by the choice of proper interactions of constituents. Here we integrated metallic perovskite oxide SrRuO3-wurzite semiconductor ZnO nanocomposites to investigate the room-temperature metal-insulator transition and its effect on photoresponse. We demonstrate that the band structure at the interface can be tuned by controlling the interface-to-volume ratio of the nanocomposites. Photoinduced carrier injection driven by visible light was detected across the nanocomposites. This work shows the charge interaction of the vertically integrated multiheterostructures by incorporating a controllable interface-to-volume ratio, which is essential for optimization of the design and functionality of electronic devices.

  18. Effect of doping on the electron transport in polyfluorene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajpai, Manisha, E-mail: mansa83@gmail.com [Soft Materials Research Laboratory, Centre of Material Sciences, Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, 211002 (India); Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005 (India); Srivastava, Ritu [Physics for Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Dhar, Ravindra [Soft Materials Research Laboratory, Centre of Material Sciences, Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, 211002 (India); Tiwari, R. S. [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005 (India)

    2016-05-06

    In this paper, electron transport of pure and DMC doped polyfluorne (PF) films have been studied at various doping concentrations. Pure films show space charge limited conduction with field and temperature dependent mobility. The J–V characteristics of doped PF were ohmic at low voltages due to thermally released carriers from dopant states. At higher voltages the current density increases nonlinearly due to field dependent mobility and carrier concentration thereby filling of tail states of HOMO of the host. The conductivity of doped films were analyzed using the Unified Gaussian Disorder Model (UGDM). The carrier concentration obtained from the fitting show a non-linear dependence on doping concentration which may be due to a combined effect of thermally activated carrier generation and increased carrier mobility.

  19. Modeling Blazar Spectra by Solving an Electron Transport Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tiffany; Finke, Justin; Becker, Peter A.

    2018-01-01

    Blazars are luminous active galaxies across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, but the spectral formation mechanisms, especially the particle acceleration, in these sources are not well understood. We develop a new theoretical model for simulating blazar spectra using a self-consistent electron number distribution. Specifically, we solve the particle transport equation considering shock acceleration, adiabatic expansion, stochastic acceleration due to MHD waves, Bohm diffusive particle escape, synchrotron radiation, and Compton radiation, where we implement the full Compton cross-section for seed photons from the accretion disk, the dust torus, and 26 individual broad lines. We used a modified Runge-Kutta method to solve the 2nd order equation, including development of a new mathematical method for normalizing stiff steady-state ordinary differential equations. We show that our self-consistent, transport-based blazar model can qualitatively fit the IR through Fermi g-ray data for 3C 279, with a single-zone, leptonic configuration. We use the solution for the electron distribution to calculate multi-wavelength SED spectra for 3C 279. We calculate the particle and magnetic field energy densities, which suggest that the emitting region is not always in equipartition (a common assumption), but sometimes matter dominated. The stratified broad line region (based on ratios in quasar reverberation mapping, and thus adding no free parameters) improves our estimate of the location of the emitting region, increasing it by ~5x. Our model provides a novel view into the physics at play in blazar jets, especially the relative strength of the shock and stochastic acceleration, where our model is well suited to distinguish between these processes, and we find that the latter tends to dominate.

  20. Electron transport through ac driven graphene p-n junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Kang, Yan-Zhuo; Ding, Kai-He

    2018-02-01

    We study the electronic transport through ac driven graphene p-n junctions under a perpendicular magnetic field. It is found that subject to the transversely or longitudinally polarized ac field, in the p-n region, the conductance versus the on-site energy of the right electrode exhibits a characteristic structure with a zero value plateau and the followed oscillation peaks, whose widths are greatly suppressed by the ac field. In the n-n region, the conductance plateaus at G = (n + 1 / 2) (4e2 / h) (n is an integer) shrink for the transversely polarized ac field, whereas accompanied with the addition of the new quantized plateaus at G = n (4e2 / h) for the longitudinally polarized ac field. The combined influence of the ac field with the disorder can trigger a change in the mixing of the hole and electron states at the p-n interface, which leads to a destruction of the plateaus structure in the conductance versus the disorder strength with the emergence of new ones. The influence of the elliptically and circularly polarized ac field on the conductance is also shown.

  1. ETRAN, Electron Transport and Gamma Transport with Secondary Radiation in Slab by Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    A - Nature of physical problem solved: ETRAN computes the transport of electrons and photons through plane-parallel slab targets that have a finite thickness in one dimension and are unbound in the other two-dimensions. The incident radiation can consist of a beam of either electrons or photons with specified spectral and directional distribution. Options are available by which all orders of the electron-photon cascade can be included in the calculation. Thus electrons are allowed to give rise to secondary knock-on electrons, continuous Bremsstrahlung and characteristic x-rays; and photons are allowed to produce photo-electrons, Compton electrons, and electron- positron pairs. Annihilation quanta, fluorescence radiation, and Auger electrons are also taken into account. If desired, the Monte- Carlo histories of all generations of secondary radiations are followed. The information produced by ETRAN includes the following items: 1) reflection and transmission of electrons or photons, differential in energy and direction; 2) the production of continuous Bremsstrahlung and characteristic x-rays by electrons and the emergence of such radiations from the target (differential in photon energy and direction); 3) the spectrum of the amounts of energy left behind in a thick target by an incident electron beam; 4) the deposition of energy and charge by an electron beam as function of the depth in the target; 5) the flux of electrons, differential in energy, as function of the depth in the target. B - Method of solution: A programme called DATAPAC-4 takes data for a particular material from a library tape and further processes them. The function of DATAPAC-4 is to produce single-scattering and multiple-scattering data in the form of tabular arrays (again stored on magnetic tape) which facilitate the rapid sampling of electron and photon Monte Carlo histories in ETRAN. The photon component of the electron-photon cascade is calculated by conventional random sampling that imitates

  2. Stereo ENA Imaging of the Ring Current and Multi-point Measurements of Suprathermal Particles and Magnetic Fields by TRIO-CINEMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, R. P.; Sample, J. G.; Immel, T. J.; Lee, D.; Horbury, T. S.; Jin, H.; SEON, J.; Wang, L.; Roelof, E. C.; Lee, E.; Parks, G. K.; Vo, H.

    2012-12-01

    The TRIO (Triplet Ionospheric Observatory) - CINEMA (Cubesat for Ions, Neutrals, Electrons, & Magnetic fields) mission consists of three identical 3-u cubesats to provide high sensitivity, high cadence, stereo measurements of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) from the Earth's ring current with ~1 keV FWHM energy resolution from ~4 to ~200 keV, as well as multi-point in situ measurements of magnetic fields and suprathermal electrons (~2 -200 keV) and ions (~ 4 -200 keV) in the auroral and ring current precipitation regions in low Earth orbit (LEO). A new Suprathermal Electron, Ion, Neutral (STEIN) instrument, using a 32-pixel silicon semiconductor detector with an electrostatic deflection system to separate ENAs from ions and from electrons below 30 keV, will sweep over most of the sky every 15 s as the spacecraft spins at 4 rpm. In addition, inboard and outboard (on an extendable 1m boom) miniature magnetoresistive sensor magnetometers will provide high cadence 3-axis magnetic field measurements. An S-band transmitter will be used to provide ~8 kbps orbit-average data downlink to the ~11m diameter antenna of the Berkeley Ground Station.The first CINEMA (funded by NSF) is scheduled for launch on August 14, 2012 into a 65 deg. inclination LEO. Two more identical CINEMAs are being developed by Kyung Hee University (KHU) in Korea under the World Class University (WCU) program, for launch in November 2012 into a Sun-synchronous LEO to form TRIO-CINEMA. A fourth CINEMA is being developed for a 2013 launch into LEO. This LEO constellation of nanosatellites will provide unique measurements highly complementary to NASA's RBSP and THEMIS missions. Furthermore, CINEMA's development of miniature particle and magnetic field sensors, and cubesat-size spinning spacecraft may be important for future constellation space missions. Initial results from the first CINEMA will be presented if available.

  3. Defect engineering of the electronic transport through cuprous oxide interlayers

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, Mohamed M.

    2016-06-03

    The electronic transport through Au–(Cu2O)n–Au junctions is investigated using first-principles calculations and the nonequilibrium Green’s function method. The effect of varying the thickness (i.e., n) is studied as well as that of point defects and anion substitution. For all Cu2O thicknesses the conductance is more enhanced by bulk-like (in contrast to near-interface) defects, with the exception of O vacancies and Cl substitutional defects. A similar transmission behavior results from Cu deficiency and N substitution, as well as from Cl substitution and N interstitials for thick Cu2O junctions. In agreement with recent experimental observations, it is found that N and Cl doping enhances the conductance. A Frenkel defect, i.e., a superposition of an O interstitial and O substitutional defect, leads to a remarkably high conductance. From the analysis of the defect formation energies, Cu vacancies are found to be particularly stable, in agreement with earlier experimental and theoretical work.

  4. The electronic transport properties of porous zigzag graphene clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simchi, Hamidreza; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi; Mazidabadi, Hossein

    2013-12-01

    By omitting some carbon atoms from middle of a zigzag graphene cluster, and Hydrogen termination of sp2 orbital, we make the different porous zigzag graphene clusters, and investigate the electron transport properties of the structures by the non-equilibrium Green function method at zero bias regime. It is shown that, the conductance of porous clusters depends on the final symmetry of porous cluster and the local imbalance number (nA-nB), in which nA and nB are the number of omitted atoms from A-sublattice and B-sublattice respectively. Also it is shown that, if three carbon atoms (one type-A and two type-B sites) are omitted the conductance for |E-Ef|≥5 eV is significantly higher than the conductance of original zigzag graphene cluster due to the increment in less affected conducting channels. We show that, spin flipping occurs under Rashba spin orbit interaction at E=Ef, when three atoms are omitted from the original cluster. Therefore the local imbalance number and final symmetry of porous graphene cluster can be used as a rule for designing porous graphene devices and the device can be used in spintronic applications.

  5. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A ampersand M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each use, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document. 22 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  6. Comparative investigation of electronic transport across three-dimensional nanojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun-Peng; Zhang, X.-G.; Fry, J. N.; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2017-02-01

    We show the thickness-dependent transition from metallic conduction to tunneling in three-dimensional (3D) Ag/Si/Ag nanojunctions through layer-by-layer electronic structure and quantum transport calculations. The transmission coefficients are calculated quantum mechanically within the framework of density functional theory in conjunction with nonequilibrium Green's function techniques. Thin junctions show nearly metallic character with no energy gap opening in Si layers due to the metal-induced interface states, and the transmission is independent of the stacking order of Si layers. An energy gap reemerges for Si layers deeply buried within thick junction, and the decay rate of transmission in this insulating region depends on the stacking order. Complex band analysis indicates that the decay of transmission is not determined by a single exponential constant but also depends on the available number of evanescent states. Calculating the electric resistance from the transmission coefficient requires a 3D generalization of the Landauer formula, which is not unique. We examine two approaches, the Landauer-Büttiker formula, with and without subtraction of the Sharvin resistance, and a semiclassical Boltzmann equation with boundary conditions defined by the transmission coefficients at the junction. We identify an empirical upper limit of ˜0.05 per channel in the transmission coefficient, below which the Landauer-Büttiker formula without the Sharvin resistance correction remains a good approximation. In the high transmission limit, the Landauer-Büttiker formula with Sharvin correction and the semiclassical Boltzmann method reach fair agreement.

  7. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each case, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document.

  8. Electron transport chains of lactic acid bacteria - walking on crutches is part of their lifestyle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooijmans, Rob; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lactic acid bacteria contain rudimentary electron transport chains that can be reconstituted by the addition of heme and menaquinone to the growth medium. These activated electron transport chains lead to higher biomass production and increased robustness, which is beneficial for industrial applications, but a major concern when dealing with pathogenic lactic acid bacteria. PMID:20948651

  9. Photosynthetic electron transport in purple bacteria: An in vivo spectroscopic study

    OpenAIRE

    BÍNA, David

    2009-01-01

    Electron transport in purple bacteria was studied using combination of absorption spectroscopy and induced bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence in whole cells in vivo. Focus is placed on relations between fluorescence yield, the state of the electron transport chain and the membrane potential. A laboratory-built absorption spectrophotometer-fluorimeter is described.

  10. Using Adobe Flash Animations of Electron Transport Chain to Teach and Learn Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplá, Milada; Klímová, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Teaching the subject of the electron transport chain is one of the most challenging aspects of the chemistry curriculum at the high school level. This article presents an educational program called "Electron Transport Chain" which consists of 14 visual animations including a biochemistry quiz. The program was created in the Adobe Flash…

  11. Impact of radial transport on the quasilinear plateau formation due to electron cyclotron wave absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, A.G.; Westerhof, E.

    1996-01-01

    Numerical simulations using a three-dimensional Fokker-Planck code show that for small tokamaks the transport of electrons across the magnetic surfaces at a level consistent with anomalous transport has a large influence on the formation of the quasilinear plateau during electron cyclotron resonant

  12. Multi-scale modelling and numerical simulation of electronic kinetic transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duclous, R.

    2009-11-01

    This research thesis which is at the interface between numerical analysis, plasma physics and applied mathematics, deals with the kinetic modelling and numerical simulations of the electron energy transport and deposition in laser-produced plasmas, having in view the processes of fuel assembly to temperature and density conditions necessary to ignite fusion reactions. After a brief review of the processes at play in the collisional kinetic theory of plasmas, with a focus on basic models and methods to implement, couple and validate them, the author focuses on the collective aspect related to the free-streaming electron transport equation in the non-relativistic limit as well as in the relativistic regime. He discusses the numerical development and analysis of the scheme for the Vlasov-Maxwell system, and the selection of a validation procedure and numerical tests. Then, he investigates more specific aspects of the collective transport: the multi-specie transport, submitted to phase-space discontinuities. Dealing with the multi-scale physics of electron transport with collision source terms, he validates the accuracy of a fast Monte Carlo multi-grid solver for the Fokker-Planck-Landau electron-electron collision operator. He reports realistic simulations for the kinetic electron transport in the frame of the shock ignition scheme, the development and validation of a reduced electron transport angular model. He finally explores the relative importance of the processes involving electron-electron collisions at high energy by means a multi-scale reduced model with relativistic Boltzmann terms

  13. 41 CFR 102-118.65 - Can my agency receive electronic billing for payment of transportation services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... electronic billing for payment of transportation services? 102-118.65 Section 102-118.65 Public Contracts and... Transportation Services § 102-118.65 Can my agency receive electronic billing for payment of transportation... to use electronic billing for the procurement and billing of transportation services. ...

  14. Modeling electron transport in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Wesley C.; Drumm, Clifton Russell; Pautz, Shawn D.; Turner, C. David

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the theoretical background on modeling electron transport in the presence of electric and magnetic fields by incorporating the effects of the Lorentz force on electron motion into the Boltzmann transport equation. Electromagnetic fields alter the electron energy and trajectory continuously, and these effects can be characterized mathematically by differential operators in terms of electron energy and direction. Numerical solution techniques, based on the discrete-ordinates and finite-element methods, are developed and implemented in an existing radiation transport code, SCEPTRE.

  15. Overview of TFTR transport studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Arunasalam, V.; Beer, M.; Bell, M.; Bell, R.; Biglari, H.; Bitter, M.; Boivin, R.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chu, T.K.; Cohen, S.A.; Cowley, S.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fredrickson, E.; Furth, H.P.; Goldston, R.J.; Greene, G.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.; Hulse, R.A.; Hsuan, H.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Kieras-Phillips, C.; Kilpatrick, S

    1991-10-01

    A review of TFTR plasma transport studies is presented. Parallel transport and the confinement of suprathermal ions are found to be relatively well described by theory. Cross-field transport of the thermal plasma, however, is anomalous with the momentum diffusivity being comparable to the ion thermal diffusivity and larger than the electron thermal diffusivity in neutral beam heated discharges. Perturbative experiments have studied non-linear dependencies in the transport coefficients and examined the role of possible non-local phenomena. The underlying turbulence has been studied using microwave scattering, beam emission spectroscopy and microwave reflectometry over a much broader range in k{perpendicular} than previously possible. Results indicate the existence of large-wavelength fluctuations correlated with enhanced transport. MHD instabilities set important operational constraints. However, by modifying the current profile using current ramp-down techniques, it has been possible to extend the operating regime to higher values of both {var epsilon}{beta}{sub p} and normalized {beta}{sub T}. In addition, the interaction of MHD fluctuations with fast ions, of potential relevance to {alpha}-particle confinement in D-T plasmas, has been investigated. The installation of carbon-carbon composite tiles and improvements in wall conditioning, in particular the use of Li pellet injection to reduce the carbon recycling, continue to be important in the improvement of plasma performance. 96 refs., 16 figs.

  16. Transport Theory for Kinetic Emission of Secondary Electrons from Solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen

    1980-01-01

    Kinetic secondary electron emission from a solid target resulting from incidence of keV electrons or keV and MeV ions is treated theoretically on the basis of ionization cascade theory. The energy and angular distribution and the yield of secondary electrons are calculated for a random target...... a spectrum which shows good agreement with experimental data. The electron- and proton-induced yields from aluminum are evaluated on the basis of existing low-energy-electron stopping-power data. The agreement with existing experimental data is good. Also, experimental yields from electrons, protons...

  17. Chaotic noisy transport of electron pairs in a superconducting junction device: thermal-inertia ratchets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-hui

    2006-07-01

    Chaotic noisy transport of electron pairs in a superconducting junction device (thermal-inertia ratchets) is investigated. The study shows that when the temperature is low enough, the transport of the electron pairs can be mainly chaotic; when the temperature is high enough, it can be mainly stochastic. By controlling the temperature and the amplitude of the input ac signal, the current of electron pairs can be reversed.

  18. Colloquium : Electronic transport in single-crystal organic transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gershenson, M.E.; Podzorov, V.; Morpurgo, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    Small-molecule organic semiconductors, together with polymers, form the basis for the emerging field of organic electronics. Despite the rapid technological progress in this area, our understanding of fundamental electronic properties of these materials remains limited. Recently developed organic

  19. Electronic spin transport and spin precession in single graphene layers at room temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Jozsa, Csaba; Popinciuc, Mihaita; Jonkman, Harry T.; van Wees, Bart J.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic transport in single or a few layers of graphene is the subject of intense interest at present. The specific band structure of graphene, with its unique valley structure and Dirac neutrality point separating hole states from electron states, has led to the observation of new electronic

  20. 76 FR 17470 - Notice of Transportation Services' Transition From Paper to Electronic Fare Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ...] Notice of Transportation Services' Transition From Paper to Electronic Fare Media AGENCY: Office of the... planning to shift to electronic fare media in particular areas, beginning in New York and parts of the... to electronic fare media; thus, compelling the shift from a paper based system (vouchers) to an...

  1. Properties of the suprathermal heavy ion population near 1 AU during solar cycles 23 and 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayeh, Maher A., E-mail: maldayeh@swri.edu; Ebert, Robert W. [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78023 (United States); Desai, Mihir I. [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78023 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Mason, Glenn M. [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States)

    2016-03-25

    Using measurements from the Advanced Composition Explorer/Ultra-Low Energy Isotope Spectrometer (ACE/ULEIS) near 1 AU, we surveyed the composition and spectra of heavy ions (He-through-Fe) during interplanetary quiet times from 1998 January 1 to 2014 December 31 at suprathermal energies between ∼0.11 and ∼1.28 MeV nucleon{sup −1}. The selected time period covers the maxima of solar cycles 23 and 24 and the extended solar minimum in between. We find the following: (1) The number of quiet-hours in each year correlates well with the sunspot number, year 2009 was the quietest for about 90% of the time; (2) The composition of the quiet-time suprathermal heavy ion population ({sup 3}He, C-through-O, and Fe) correlates well with the level of solar activity, exhibiting SEP-like composition signatures during solar maximum, and CIR- or solar wind-like composition during solar minimum; (3) The heavy ion spectra at ∼0.11-0.32 MeV nucleon{sup −1} exhibit suprathermal tails with power-law spectral indices ranging from 1.4 to 2.7. (4) Fe spectral indices get softer (steeper) from solar minimum of cycle 23 to solar cycle 24 maximum. These results imply that during IP quiet times and at energies above ∼0.1 MeV nucleon{sup −1}, the IP medium is dominated by material from prior solar and interplanetary events.

  2. Competition of static magnetic and dynamic photon forces in electronic transport through a quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf Abdullah, Nzar; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2016-09-21

    We investigate theoretically the balance of the static magnetic and the dynamical photon forces in the electron transport through a quantum dot in a photon cavity with a single photon mode. The quantum dot system is connected to external leads and the total system is exposed to a static perpendicular magnetic field. We explore the transport characteristics through the system by tuning the ratio, [Formula: see text], between the photon energy, [Formula: see text], and the cyclotron energy, [Formula: see text]. Enhancement in the electron transport with increasing electron-photon coupling is observed when [Formula: see text]. In this case the photon field dominates and stretches the electron charge distribution in the quantum dot, extending it towards the contact area for the leads. Suppression in the electron transport is found when [Formula: see text], as the external magnetic field causes circular confinement of the charge density around the dot.

  3. Effects of breathing and oblong mode phonons on transport properties in a single-electron transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Norihiko; Wybourne, Martin N

    2010-02-17

    We investigate theoretically the transport characteristics of a single-electron transistor affected by the dynamic deformation of the device configuration due to phonons. By considering changes in capacitances and tunnel resistances caused by the breathing and oblong vibrations of the island that forms part of the transistor, we formulate the electron-phonon interaction peculiar to the device and derive its transport properties by means of the master equation. For a single electron transistor with a gold nanoparticle island of radius 1 nm, we demonstrate the contribution to the transport properties that originates from tunneling channels associated with THz phonon emission and absorption.

  4. Electronic transport properties of 4f shell elements of liquid metal using hard sphere Yukawa system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, H. P.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Thakor, P. B.

    2018-04-01

    The electronic transport properties are analyzed for 4f shell elements of liquid metals. To examine the electronic transport properties like electrical resistivity (ρ), thermal conductivity (σ) and thermo electrical power (Q), we used our own parameter free model potential with the Hard Sphere Yukawa (HSY) reference system. The screening effect on aforesaid properties has been examined by using different screening functions like Hartree (H), Taylor (T) and Sarkar (S). The correlations of our resultsand other data with available experimental values are intensely promising. Also, we conclude that our newly constructed parameter free model potential is capable of explaining the above mentioned electronic transport properties.

  5. Non-Local Diffusion of Energetic Electrons during Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, N. H.; Emslie, G.; Kontar, E.

    2017-12-01

    The transport of the energy contained in suprathermal electrons in solar flares plays a key role in our understanding of many aspects of flare physics, from the spatial distributions of hard X-ray emission and energy deposition in the ambient atmosphere to global energetics. Historically the transport of these particles has been largely treated through a deterministic approach, in which first-order secular energy loss to electrons in the ambient target is treated as the dominant effect, with second-order diffusive terms (in both energy and angle) generally being either treated as a small correction or even neglected. Here, we critically analyze this approach, and we show that spatial diffusion through pitch-angle scattering necessarily plays a very significant role in the transport of electrons. We further show that a satisfactory treatment of the diffusion process requires consideration of non-local effects, so that the electron flux depends not just on the local gradient of the electron distribution function but on the value of this gradient within an extended region encompassing a significant fraction of a mean free path. Our analysis applies generally to pitch-angle scattering by a variety of mechanisms, from Coulomb collisions to turbulent scattering. We further show that the spatial transport of electrons along the magnetic field of a flaring loop can be modeled as a Continuous Time Random Walk with velocity-dependent probability distribution functions of jump sizes and occurrences, both of which can be expressed in terms of the scattering mean free path.

  6. Electronic transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckas, Jennifer Maria

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials combine a pronounced contrast in resistivity and reflectivity between their disordered amorphous and ordered crystalline state with very fast crystallization kinetics. Due to this exceptional combination of properties phase-change materials find broad application in non-volatile optical memories such as CD, DVD or Bluray Disc. Furthermore, this class of materials demonstrates remarkable electrical transport phenomena in their disordered state, which have shown to be crucial for their application in electronic storage devices. The threshold switching phenomenon denotes the sudden decrease in resistivity beyond a critical electrical threshold field. The threshold switching phenomenon facilitates the phase transitions at practical small voltages. Below this threshold the amorphous state resistivity is thermally activated and is observed to increase with time. This effect known as resistance drift seriously hampers the development of multi-level storage devices. Hence, understanding the physical origins of threshold switching and resistance drift phenomena is crucial to improve non-volatile phase-change memories. Even though both phenomena are often attributed to localized defect states in the band gap, the defect state density in amorphous phase-change materials has remained poorly studied. Starting from a brief introduction of the physics of phase-change materials this thesis summarizes the most important models behind electrical switching and resistance drift with the aim to discuss the role of localized defect states. The centerpiece of this thesis is the investigation of defects state densities in different amorphous phase-change materials and electrical switching chalcogenides. On the basis of Modulated Photo Current (MPC) Experiments and Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy, a sophisticated band model for the disordered phase of the binary phase-change alloy GeTe has been developed. By this direct experimental approach the band-model for a

  7. Electronic transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luckas, Jennifer Maria

    2012-09-14

    Phase change materials combine a pronounced contrast in resistivity and reflectivity between their disordered amorphous and ordered crystalline state with very fast crystallization kinetics. Due to this exceptional combination of properties phase-change materials find broad application in non-volatile optical memories such as CD, DVD or Bluray Disc. Furthermore, this class of materials demonstrates remarkable electrical transport phenomena in their disordered state, which have shown to be crucial for their application in electronic storage devices. The threshold switching phenomenon denotes the sudden decrease in resistivity beyond a critical electrical threshold field. The threshold switching phenomenon facilitates the phase transitions at practical small voltages. Below this threshold the amorphous state resistivity is thermally activated and is observed to increase with time. This effect known as resistance drift seriously hampers the development of multi-level storage devices. Hence, understanding the physical origins of threshold switching and resistance drift phenomena is crucial to improve non-volatile phase-change memories. Even though both phenomena are often attributed to localized defect states in the band gap, the defect state density in amorphous phase-change materials has remained poorly studied. Starting from a brief introduction of the physics of phase-change materials this thesis summarizes the most important models behind electrical switching and resistance drift with the aim to discuss the role of localized defect states. The centerpiece of this thesis is the investigation of defects state densities in different amorphous phase-change materials and electrical switching chalcogenides. On the basis of Modulated Photo Current (MPC) Experiments and Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy, a sophisticated band model for the disordered phase of the binary phase-change alloy GeTe has been developed. By this direct experimental approach the band-model for a

  8. ITS - The integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbleib, J.A.; Mehlhorn, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    The TIGER series of time-independent coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes is a group of multimaterial, multidimensional codes designed to provide a state-of-the-art description of the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade. The codes follow both electrons and photons from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV, and the user has the option of combining the collisional transport with transport in macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Source particles can be either electrons or photons. The most important output data are (a) charge and energy deposition profiles, (b) integral and differential escape coefficients for both electrons and photons, (c) differential electron and photon flux, and (d) pulse-height distributions for selected regions of the problem geometry. The base codes of the series differ from one another primarily in their dimensionality and geometric modeling. They include (a) a one-dimensional multilayer code, (b) a code that describes the transport in two-dimensional axisymmetric cylindrical material geometries with a fully three-dimensional description of particle trajectories, and (c) a general three-dimensional transport code which employs a combinatorial geometry scheme. These base codes were designed primarily for describing radiation transport for those situations in which the detailed atomic structure of the transport medium is not important. For some applications, it is desirable to have a more detailed model of the low energy transport. The system includes three additional codes that contain a more elaborate ionization/relaxation model than the base codes. Finally, the system includes two codes that combine the collisional transport of the multidimensional base codes with transport in macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence

  9. Coupled electron-phonon transport from molecular dynamics with quantum baths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Wang, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    Based on generalized quantum Langevin equations for the tight-binding wavefunction amplitudes and lattice displacements, electron and phonon quantum transport are obtained exactly using molecular dynamics (MD) in the ballistic regime. The electron-phonon interactions can be handled with a quasi......-classical approximation. Both charge and energy transport and their interplay can be studied. We compare the MD results with those of a fully quantum mechanical nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) approach for the electron currents. We find a ballistic to diffusive transition of the electron conduction in one...

  10. Modified Monte Carlo method for study of electron transport in degenerate electron gas in the presence of electron–electron interactions, application to graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Piotr, E-mail: pborow@poczta.onet.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Thobel, Jean-Luc, E-mail: jean-luc.thobel@iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologies, UMR CNRS 8520, Université Lille 1, Avenue Poincaré, CS 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cédex (France); Adamowicz, Leszek, E-mail: adamo@if.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland)

    2017-07-15

    Standard computational methods used to take account of the Pauli Exclusion Principle into Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of electron transport in semiconductors may give unphysical results in low field regime, where obtained electron distribution function takes values exceeding unity. Modified algorithms were already proposed and allow to correctly account for electron scattering on phonons or impurities. Present paper extends this approach and proposes improved simulation scheme allowing including Pauli exclusion principle for electron–electron (e–e) scattering into MC simulations. Simulations with significantly reduced computational cost recreate correct values of the electron distribution function. Proposed algorithm is applied to study transport properties of degenerate electrons in graphene with e–e interactions. This required adapting the treatment of e–e scattering in the case of linear band dispersion relation. Hence, this part of the simulation algorithm is described in details.

  11. Effect of ion suprathermality on arbitrary amplitude dust acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Mayout, Saliha; Amour, Rabia

    2009-01-01

    Arbitrary amplitude dust acoustic waves in a high energy-tail ion distribution are investigated. The effects of charge variation and ion suprathermality on the large amplitude dust acoustic (DA) soliton are then considered. The correct suprathermal ion charging current is rederived based on the orbit motion limited approach. In the adiabatic case, the variable dust charge is expressed in terms of the Lambert function and we take advantage of this transcendental function to show the existence of rarefactive variable charge DA solitons involving cusped density humps. The dust charge variation leads to an additional enlargement of the DA soliton, which is less pronounced as the ions evolve far away from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. In the nonadiabatic case, the dust charge fluctuation may provide an alternate physical mechanism causing anomalous dissipation the strength of which becomes important and may prevail over that of dispersion as the ion spectral index κ increases. Our results may provide an explanation for the strong spiky waveforms observed in auroral electric field measurements by Ergun et al.[Geophys. Res. Lett. 25, 2025 (1998)].

  12. Models for the transport of low energy electrons in water and the yield of hydrated electrons at early times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, D.J.; Miller, J.H.; Ritchie, R.H.; Bichsel, H.

    1985-01-01

    An insulator model with four experimental energy bands was used to fit the optical properties of liquid water and to extend these data to non-zero momentum transfer. Inelastic mean free paths derived from this dielectric response function provided the basic information necessary to degrade high energy electrons to the subexcitation energy domain. Two approaches for the transport of subexcitation electrons were investigated. (i) Gas phase cross sections were used to degrade subexcitation electrons to thermal energy and the thermalization lengths were scaled to unit density. (ii) Thermalization lengths were estimated by age-diffusion theory with a stopping power deduced from the data on liquid water and transport cross sections derived from elastic scattering in water vapor. Theoretical ranges were compared to recent experimental results. A stochastic model was used to calculate the rapid diffusion and reaction of hydrated electrons with other radiolysis products. The sensitivity of the calculated yields to the model assumptions and comparison with experimental data are discussed

  13. Radial transport of radiation belt electrons due to stormtime Pc5 waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. Ukhorskiy

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During geomagnetic storms relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt exhibit dynamic variability over multiple orders of magnitude. This requires radial transport of electrons across their drift shells and implies violation of their third adiabatic invariant. Radial transport is induced by the interaction of the electron drift motion with electric and magnetic field fluctuations in the ULF frequency range. It was previously shown that solar-wind driven ULF waves have long azimuthal wave lengths and thus can violate the third invariant of trapped electrons in the process of resonant interaction with their gradient-curvature motion. However, the amplitude of solar-wind driven ULF waves rapidly decreases with decreasing L. It is therefore not clear what mechanisms are responsible for fast transport rates observed inside the geosynchronous orbit. In this paper we investigate wether stormtime Pc5 waves can contribute to this process. Stormtime Pc5s have short azimuthal wave lengths and therefore cannot exhibit resonance with the the electron drift motion. However we show that stormtime Pc5s can cause localized random scattering of electron drift motion that violates the third invariant. According to our results electron interaction with stormtime Pc5s can produce rapid radial transport even as low as L≃4. Numerical simulations show that electron transport can exhibit large deviations from radial diffusion. The diffusion approximation is not valid for individual storms but only applies to the statistically averaged response of the outer belt to stormtime Pc5 waves.

  14. Electronic transport in graphene nanoribbons with sublattice-asymmetric doping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aktor, Thomas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Power, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental findings and theoretical predictions suggest that nitrogen-doped CVD-grown graphene may give rise to electronic band gaps due to impurity distributions which favor segregation on a single sublattice. Here, we demonstrate theoretically that such distributions lead to more complex...... behavior in the presence of edges, where geometry determines whether electrons in the sample view the impurities as a gap-opening average potential or as scatterers. Zigzag edges give rise to the latter case, and remove the electronic band gaps predicted in extended graphene samples.We predict...

  15. 41 CFR 102-118.80 - Who is responsible for keeping my agency's electronic commerce transportation billing records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... keeping my agency's electronic commerce transportation billing records? 102-118.80 Section 102-118.80... Transportation and Transportation Services § 102-118.80 Who is responsible for keeping my agency's electronic commerce transportation billing records? Your agency's internal financial regulations will identify...

  16. Numerical design of electron guns and space charge limited transport systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1980-10-01

    This paper describes the capabilities and limitations of computer programs used to design electron guns and similarly space-charge limited transport systems. Examples of computer generated plots from several different types of gun problems are included

  17. Electron transport system activity of microfouling material: Relationships with biomass parameters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Tulaskar, A.; Wagh, A.B.

    Microfouling material developed on aluminium panels immersed in surface waters of the Dona Paula Bay, Goa India was analysed for biomass (measured as dry weight, organic crabon, protein and chlorophyll @ia@@) and electron transport system actitity...

  18. Electron transport and electrocatalytic properties of MWCNT/nickel nanocomposites: hydrazine and diethylaminoethanethiol as analytical probes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adekunle, AS

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the electron transport and electrocatalytic properties of chemically-synthesized nickel (Ni) and nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) platforms. Successful modification...

  19. Color stable white phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with red emissive electron transport layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wook Kim, Jin; Yoo, Seung Il; Sung Kang, Jin [Department of Green Energy & Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Eun Lee, Song; Kwan Kim, Young [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hwa Yu, Hyeong; Turak, Ayse [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Young Kim, Woo, E-mail: wykim@hoseo.edu [Department of Green Energy & Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2015-06-28

    We analyzed the performance of multi-emissive white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) in relation to various red emitting sites of hole and electron transport layers (HTL and ETL). The shift of the recombination zone producing stable white emission in PHOLEDs was utilized as luminance was increased with red emission in its electron transport layer. Multi-emissive white PHOLEDs including the red light emitting electron transport layer yielded maximum external quantum efficiency of 17.4% with CIE color coordinates (−0.030, +0.001) shifting only from 1000 to 10 000 cd/m{sup 2}. Additionally, we observed a reduction of energy loss in the white PHOLED via Ir(piq){sub 3} as phosphorescent red dopant in electron transport layer.

  20. Red phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes using pyridine based electron transport type triplet host materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Soon Ok [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Dankook University, Jukjeon-dong, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Yeob, E-mail: leej17@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Dankook University, Jukjeon-dong, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 448-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Pyridine based host material for red phosphorescent organic light emitting diode. {yields} Device optimization at low doping concentration of 2%. {yields} Simplified red phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes. - Abstract: Pyridine based electron transport type host materials were developed and their device performances were investigated according to doping concentration. The pyridine substituent was combined with a spirofluorenebenzofluorene core unit and a high quantum efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in red phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes at a low doping concentration of 2%. A simple red device without any electron transport layer could be fabricated and a simple device without any electron transport layer showed better power efficiency than the standard device with an electron transport layer.

  1. Surface electronic transport measurements: A micro multi-point probe approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barreto, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    This work is mostly focused on the study of electronic transport properties of two-dimensional materials, in particular graphene and topological insulators. To study these, we have improved a unique micro multi-point probe instrument used to perform transport measurements. Not only the experimental...... quantities are extracted, such as conductivity, carrier density and carrier mobility. • A method to insulate electrically epitaxial graphene grown on metals, based on a stepwise intercalation methodology, is developed and transport measurements are performed in order to test the insulation. • We show...... a direct measurement of the surface electronic transport on a bulk topological insulator. The surface state conductivity and mobility are obtained. Apart from transport properties, we also investigate the atomic structure of the Bi2Se3(111) surface via surface x-ray diraction and low-energy electron...

  2. Nonlinear charge transport in bipolar semiconductors due to electron heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina-Valdovinos, S., E-mail: sergiom@fisica.uaz.edu.mx [Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Académica de Física, Calzada Solidaridad esq. Paseo, La Bufa s/n, CP 98060, Zacatecas, Zac, México (Mexico); Gurevich, Yu.G. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Departamento de Física, Av. IPN 2508, México D.F., CP 07360, México (Mexico)

    2016-05-27

    It is known that when strong electric field is applied to a semiconductor sample, the current voltage characteristic deviates from the linear response. In this letter, we propose a new point of view of nonlinearity in semiconductors which is associated with the electron temperature dependence on the recombination rate. The heating of the charge carriers breaks the balance between generation and recombination, giving rise to nonequilibrium charge carriers concentration and nonlinearity. - Highlights: • A new mechanism of nonlinearity of current-voltage characteristic (CVC) is proposed. • The hot electron temperature violates the equilibrium between electrons and holes. • This violation gives rise to nonequilibrium concentration of electrons and holes. • This leads to nonlinear CVC (along with the heating nonlinearity).

  3. Electron transport in NH3/NO2 sensed buckled antimonene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anurag; Khan, Md. Shahzad; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2018-04-01

    The structural and electronic properties of buckled antimonene have been analysed using density functional theory based ab-initio approach. Geometrical parameters in terms of bond length and bond angle are found close to the single ruffle mono-layer of rhombohedral antimony. Inter-frontier orbital analyses suggest localization of lone pair electrons at each atomic centre. Phonon dispersion along with high symmetry point of Brillouin zone does not signify any soft mode. With an electronic band gap of 1.8eV, the quasi-2D nano-surface has been further explored for NH3/NO2 molecules sensing and qualities of interaction between NH3/NO2 gas and antimonene scrutinized in terms of electronic charges transfer. A current-voltage characteristic has also been analysed, using Non Equilibrium Green's function (NEGF), for antimonene, in presence of incoming NH3/NO2 molecules.

  4. Ultrafast electron transport across nano gaps in nanowire circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potma, Eric O. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-07-31

    In this Program we aim for a closer look at electron transfer through single molecules. To achieve this, we use ultrafast laser pulses to time stamp an electron tunneling event in a molecule that is connected between two metallic electrodes, while reading out the electron current. A key aspect of this project is the use of metallic substrates with plasmonic activity to efficiently manipulate the tunneling probability. The first Phase of this program is concerned with developing highly sensitive tools for the ultrafast optical manipulation of tethered molecules through the evanescent surface field of plasmonic substrates. The second Phase of the program aims to use these tools for exercising control over the electron tunneling probability.

  5. Optical properties and electron transport in low-dimensional nanostructures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 54, 2-2 (2011), s. 4-13 ISSN 0021-3411 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC10007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : quantum dots * electron-photon interaction * optical properties * electron relaxation * DNA molecule Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics http:// elibrary .ru/contents.asp?issueid=1010336

  6. Alternative photosynthetic electron transport pathways during anaerobiosis in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Happe, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis uses light as energy source to generate an oxidant powerful enough to oxidize water into oxygen, electrons and protons. Upon linear electron transport, electrons extracted from water are used to reduce NADP(+) to NADPH. The oxygen molecule has been integrated into the cellular metabolism, both as the most efficient electron acceptor during respiratory electron transport and as oxidant and/or "substrate" in a number of biosynthetic pathways. Though photosynthesis of higher plants, algae and cyanobacteria produces oxygen, there are conditions under which this type of photosynthesis operates under hypoxic or anaerobic conditions. In the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, this condition is induced by sulfur deficiency, and it results in the production of molecular hydrogen. Research on this biotechnologically relevant phenomenon has contributed largely to new insights into additional pathways of photosynthetic electron transport, which extend the former concept of linear electron flow by far. This review summarizes the recent knowledge about various electron sources and sinks of oxygenic photosynthesis besides water and NADP(+) in the context of their contribution to hydrogen photoproduction by C. reinhardtii. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Regulation of Electron Transport in Chloroplasts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Spin dependent transport of hot electrons through ultrathin epitaxial metallic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heindl, Emanuel

    2010-06-23

    In this work relaxation and transport of hot electrons in thin single crystalline metallic films is investigated by Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy. The electron mean free paths are determined in an energy interval of 1 to 2 eV above the Fermi level. While fcc Au-films appear to be quite transmissive for hot electrons, the scattering lengths are much shorter for the ferromagnetic alloy FeCo revealing, furthermore, a strong spin asymmetry in hot electron transport. Additional information is gained from temperature dependent studies in combination with golden rule approaches in order to disentangle the impact of several relaxation and transport properties. It is found that bcc Fe-films are much less effective in spin filtering than films made of the FeCo-alloy. (orig.)

  8. Electron-hole collision limited transport in charge-neutral bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Youngwoo; Ki, Dong-Keun; Soler-Delgado, David; Morpurgo, Alberto F.

    2017-12-01

    Ballistic transport occurs whenever electrons propagate without collisions deflecting their trajectory. It is normally observed in conductors with a negligible concentration of impurities, at low temperature, to avoid electron-phonon scattering. Here, we use suspended bilayer graphene devices to reveal a new regime, in which ballistic transport is not limited by scattering with phonons or impurities, but by electron-hole collisions. The phenomenon manifests itself in a negative four-terminal resistance that becomes visible when the density of holes (electrons) is suppressed by gate-shifting the Fermi level in the conduction (valence) band, above the thermal energy. For smaller densities, transport is diffusive, and the measured conductivity is reproduced quantitatively, with no fitting parameters, by including electron-hole scattering as the only process causing velocity relaxation. Experiments on a trilayer device show that the phenomenon is robust and that transport at charge neutrality is governed by the same physics. Our results provide a textbook illustration of a transport regime that had not been observed previously and clarify the nature of conduction through charge-neutral graphene under conditions in which carrier density inhomogeneity is immaterial. They also demonstrate that transport can be limited by a fully electronic mechanism, originating from the same microscopic processes that govern the physics of Dirac-like plasmas.

  9. Computer control of the beam transport system of the Chalk River electron test accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMichael, G.E.; Kidner, S.H.; Fraser, J.S.

    1977-05-01

    The beam transport system of the Chalk River Electron Test Accelerator comprises steering coils and solenoidal focusing magnets driven by voltage-programmed, current-regulated power supplies. This report describes the beam transport and beam diagnostics systems presently in use. The computer controls all beam transport magnets from a single, allocatable control knob. The system is currently being expanded to two knobs and two readouts. (author)

  10. The effect of magnetic field and disorders on the electronic transport in graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala Kumar, S.; Jalil, M. B. A.; Tan, S. G.; Liang, Gengchiau

    2010-09-01

    We developed a unified mesoscopic transport model for graphene nanoribbons, which combines the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism with the real-space π-orbital model. Based on this model, we probe the spatial distribution of electrons under a magnetic field, in order to obtain insights into the various signature Hall effects in disordered armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNR). In the presence of a uniform perpendicular magnetic field (B^{ \\perp } -field), a perfect AGNR shows three distinct spatial current profiles at equilibrium, depending on its width. Under nonequilibrium conditions (i.e. in the presence of an applied bias), the net electron flow is restricted to the edges and occurs in opposite directions depending on whether the Fermi level lies within the valence or conduction band. For electrons at an energy level below the conduction window, the B^{ \\perp } -field gives rise to local electron flux circulation, although the global flux is zero. Our study also reveals the suppression of electron backscattering as a result of the edge transport which is induced by the B^{ \\perp } -field. This phenomenon can potentially mitigate the undesired effects of disorder, such as bulk and edge vacancies, on the transport properties of AGNR. Lastly, we show that the effect of B^{ \\perp } -field on electronic transport is less significant in the multimode compared to the single-mode electron transport.

  11. Electronic spin transport in graphene field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popinciuc, M.; Jozsa, C.; Zomer, P. J.; Tombros, N.; Veligura, A.; Jonkman, H. T.; van Wees, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    Spin transport experiments in graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms ordered in a honeycomb lattice, indicate spin-relaxation times that are significantly shorter than the theoretical predictions. We investigate experimentally whether these short spin-relaxation times are due to extrinsic factors,

  12. Electron transport in edge-disordered graphene nanoribbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saloriutta, Karri; Hancock, Y.; Karkkainen, Asta

    2011-01-01

    Ab initio methods are used to study the spin-resolved transport properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) that have both chemical and structural edge disorder. Oxygen edge adsorbates on ideal and protruded ribbons are chosen as representative examples, with the protrusions forming the smallest...

  13. Transport properties and electronic structure of epitaxial tunnel junctions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Freyss, M.; Papanikolaou, N.; Bellini, V.; Zeller, R.; Dederichs, P.; Turek, Ilja

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 240, 1/3 (2002), s. 117-120 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/02/0943; GA MŠk ME 374 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : junctions * transport Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.046, year: 2002

  14. Comparison between s - and d -electron mediated transport in a photoswitching dithienylethene molecule using ab initio transport methods

    KAUST Repository

    Odell, Anders

    2011-10-03

    The influence of the electrode\\'s Fermi surface on the transport properties of a photoswitching molecule is investigated with state-of-the-art ab initio transport methods. We report results for the conducting properties of the two forms of dithienylethene attached either to Ag or to nonmagnetic Ni leads. The I-V curves of the Ag/dithienylethene/Ag device are found to be very similar to those reported previously for Au. In contrast, when Ni is used as the electrode material the zero-bias transmission coefficient is profoundly different as a result of the role played by the Ni d bands in the bonding between the molecule and the electrodes. Intriguingly, despite these differences the overall conducting properties depend little on the electrode material. We thus conclude that electron transport in dithienylethene is, for the cases studied, mainly governed by the intrinsic electronic structure of the molecule. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  15. Power electronics applied to industrial systems and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Patin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Power electronics is based on the switching operating mode of semiconductor components. On this basis, the concepts of type (voltage or current) and reversibility of interconnected sources make it possible to apply a methodology for the synthesis of various types of converters. This book also focuses on the importance of packaging by reviewing the electrical representation of components’ thermal models and the currently available electronics’ cooling technologies. Modeling is discussed, as well as different technological aspects used in the engineering design of an electronic power converter, useful for obtaining satisfactory performance and reliability.

  16. New electron multiple scattering distributions for Monte Carlo transport simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, Omar (Haut Commissariat a la Recherche (C.R.S.), 2 Boulevard Franz Fanon, Alger B.P. 1017, Alger-Gare (Algeria)); Patau, Jean Paul (Laboratoire de Biophysique et Biomathematiques, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques, Universite Paul Sabatier, 35 Chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse cedex (France))

    1994-10-01

    New forms of electron (positron) multiple scattering distributions are proposed. The first is intended for use in the conditions of validity of the Moliere theory. The second distribution takes place when the electron path is so short that only few elastic collisions occur. These distributions are adjustable formulas. The introduction of some parameters allows impositions of the correct value of the first moment. Only positive and analytic functions were used in constructing the present expressions. This makes sampling procedures easier. Systematic tests are presented and some Monte Carlo simulations, as benchmarks, are carried out. ((orig.))

  17. The role of transition metal interfaces on the electronic transport in lithium–air batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jingzhe; Hummelshøj, Jens S.; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2011-01-01

    Low electronic conduction is expected to be a main limiting factor in the performance of reversible lithium–air, Li–O2, batteries. Here, we apply density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function calculations to determine the electronic transport through lithium peroxide, Li2O2, form...

  18. Cytochrome C And The Role Of Zinc Ions In Electron Transport In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The inhibition of electron transfer by zinc ions in the electron transport system of the rat liver mitochondria was investigated. There was an increase in the rate at which oxygen was consumed in rat liver mitochondria pre-incubated with cytochrome c. However, the rate of inhibition of oxygen consumption by zinc ions was ...

  19. The multiplicity of dehydrogenases in the electron transport chain of plant mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan G; Geisler, Daniela A; Møller, Ian Max

    2008-01-01

    The electron transport chain in mitochondria of different organisms contains a mixture of common and specialised components. The specialised enzymes form branches to the universal electron path, especially at the level of ubiquinone, and allow the chain to adjust to different cellular and metabolic...

  20. Electron transport in n-doped Si/SiGe quantum cascade structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazic, I.; Ikonic, Z.; Milanovic, V.; Kelsall, R.W.; Indjin, D.; Harrison, P.

    2007-01-01

    An electron transport model in n-Si/SiGe quantum cascade or superlattice structures is described. The model uses the electronic structure calculated within the effective-mass complex-energy framework, separately for perpendicular (Xz) and in-plane (Xxy) valleys, the degeneracy of which is lifted by

  1. Spin-polarized transport in a two-dimensional electron gas with interdigital-ferromagnetic contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, C.-M.; Nitta, Junsaku; Jensen, Ane

    2001-01-01

    Ferromagnetic contacts on a high-mobility, two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in a narrow gap semiconductor with strong spin-orbit interaction are used to investigate spin-polarized electron transport. We demonstrate the use of magnetized contacts to preferentially inject and detect specific spi...

  2. First-principles study of electron transport through monatomic Al and Na wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Brandbyge, Mads; Tsukada, Masaru

    2000-01-01

    We present first-principles calculations of electron transport, in particular, the conduction channels of monatomic Al and Na atom wires bridged between metallic jellium electrodes. The electronic structures are calculated by the first-principles recursion-transfer matrix method, and the conducti...

  3. Effects of model approximations for electron, hole, and photon transport in swift heavy ion tracks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rymzhanov, R.A.; Medvedev, Nikita; Volkov, A.E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 388, Dec (2016), s. 41-52 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG15013 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : swift heavy ion * electronic stopping * TREKIS * Monte Carlo * electronic kinetics * photon transport Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.109, year: 2016

  4. Theory of high-field electronic transport in bulk ZnS and ZnSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Kevin

    1988-01-01

    This paper theoretically investigates the nature of electronic transport and the high-energy tails of the electron distribution functions in bulk ZnSe and ZnS as a function of the applied electric field were investigated using calculations based on an ensemble Monte Carlo model. The calculations include the full details of the first two conduction bands as well as the full-order treatment of the electron-phonon scattering mechanisms. Results of high-field electronic transport calculations show that the electron energy distribution function is significanty cooler in ZnS than in ZnSe at comparable electric field strengths. The cooler distribution in ZnS is due to the much greater electron scattering rate. Consequently, it is more difficult to achieve carrier heating to comparable energies in ZnS than in ZnSe.

  5. Influence of electron transport on the efficiency of polymer-based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuxhaus, Viktor; Jaiser, Frank; Neher, Dieter [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University Potsdam (Germany); Voges, Frank [Merck KGaA, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Recently, we showed that the mobility of electrons in polymer-based solar cells has a large influence on the overall performance of such devices. Here, we investigate the correlation between electron mobility and charge generation efficiency in organic bilayer solar cells for a series of electron transporting materials (ETMs) with comparable HOMO and LUMO levels. The electron mobility was measured by transient electroluminescence. Here, a thin M3EH-PPV was used as a sensing layer. The interface between M3EH-PPV and ETM acted as a recombination zone of electrons transported through the ETM layer and holes that are blocked at the interface. Therefore, the electron mobility can easily be determined from the onset of M3EH-PPV emission which is spectrally well separated from the ETM emission. To determine the charge generation efficiency, the different ETMs were combined in bilayer solar cell with PFB as donator.

  6. Electronic Monitoring Of Storage And Transport Temperatures Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    change in locations, type of carriage and storage. The data logger was sent back after the vaccination campaign and data were retrieved using a Tinytag Explorer software. The results showed that I-2 vaccine was stored and transported in temperatures within the range of 1.06ºC to 28.77ºC (average17.50ºC). The storage ...

  7. Limiting and Fedosov's Currents of a Strongly Magnetized Electron Beam in Asymmetric Transportation Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goikhman, M. B.; Gromov, A. V.; Kovalev, N. F.; V. Palitsin, A.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the properties of thin-walled, strongly magnetized electron beams in closed evacuated transportation channels with arbitrary cross sections of the channel and the electron beam. Explicit precise formulas are obtained for the limiting and Fedosov's currents of such electron beams. The found relationships allow one to explain many observed phenomena and can serve as a basis for verification of the results of more complicated calculations.

  8. Diameter-dependent electronic transport properties of Au-catalyst/Ge-nanowire Schottky diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picraux, S Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leonard, Francois [SNL; Swartzentruber, Brian S [SNL; Talin, A Alee [SNL

    2008-01-01

    We present electronic transport measurements in individual Au-catalyst/Ge-nanowire interfaces demonstrating the presence of a Schottky barrier. Surprisingly, the small-bias conductance density increases with decreasing diameter. Theoretical calculations suggest that this effect arises because electron-hole recombination in the depletion region is the dominant charge transport mechanism, with a diameter dependence of both the depletion width and the electron-hole recombination time. The recombination time is dominated by surface contributions and depends linearly on the nanowire diameter.

  9. Computation and analysis of the electron transport properties for nitrogen and air inductively-coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Minghao; Kihara, Hisashi; Abe, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    A relatively simple method for calculating accurately the third-order electron transport properties of nitrogen and air thermal plasmas is presented. The electron transport properties, such as the electrical conductivity and the electron thermal conductivity, were computed with the best and latest available collision cross-section data in the temperature and pressure ranges of T = 300 - 15000 K and p = 0.01 - 1.0 atm, respectively. The results obtained under the atmospheric pressure condition showed good agreements with the experimental and the high-accuracy theoretical results. The presently-introduced method has good application potential in numerical simulations of nitrogen and air inductively-coupled plasmas.

  10. Manipulating NiFe/AlOx interfacial chemistry for the spin-polarized electrons transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Chong-Jun; Sun, Li; Ding, Lei; Li, Jian-Wei; Zhang, Jing-Yan; Cao, Yi; Yu, Guang-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Through vacuum annealing, interfacial chemical composition of sputter-deposited AlO x /NiFe/AlO x can be controlled for electron transport manipulation. Chemical status change at the NiFe/AlO x interface was quantified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and correlated to the structure and electron transport properties of the heterostructure. It is found that elemental Al existed in the insulting AlO x after annealing at intermediate temperature can improve the AlO x /NiFe interface and thus favor the electronic transport. Annealing at higher temperature will result in native AlO x formation and degrade transport properties due to the NiFe/AlO x interfaces deterioration caused by significant difference in thermal expansion coefficients of the two materials.

  11. Tuning the electronic transport properties of graphene through functionalisation with fluorine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubois Marc

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We demonstrate the possibility to tune the electronic transport properties of graphene mono-layers and multi-layers by functionalisation with fluorine. For mono-layer samples, with increasing the fluorine content, we observe a transition from electronic transport through Mott variable range hopping (VRH in two dimensions to Efros-Shklovskii VRH. Multi-layer fluorinated graphene with high concentration of fluorine show two-dimensional Mott VRH transport, whereas CF0.28 multi-layer flakes exhibit thermally activated transport through near neighbour hopping. Our experimental findings demonstrate that the ability to control the degree of functionalisation of graphene is instrumental to engineer different electronic properties in graphene materials.

  12. Steepest entropy ascent quantum thermodynamic model of electron and phonon transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanchen; von Spakovsky, Michael R.; Hin, Celine

    2018-01-01

    An advanced nonequilibrium thermodynamic model for electron and phonon transport is formulated based on the steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics framework. This framework, based on the principle of steepest entropy ascent (or the equivalent maximum entropy production principle), inherently satisfies the laws of thermodynamics and mechanics and is applicable at all temporal and spatial scales even in the far-from-equilibrium realm. Specifically, the model is proven to recover the Boltzmann transport equations in the near-equilibrium limit and the two-temperature model of electron-phonon coupling when no dispersion is assumed. The heat and mass transport at a temperature discontinuity across a homogeneous interface where the dispersion and coupling of electron and phonon transport are both considered are then modeled. Local nonequilibrium system evolution and nonquasiequilibrium interactions are predicted and the results discussed.

  13. Nonlocal collisionless and collisional electron transport in low temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaganovich, Igor

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of the talk is to describe recent advances in nonlocal electron kinetics in low-pressure plasmas. A distinctive property of partially ionized plasmas is that such plasmas are always in a non-equilibrium state: the electrons are not in thermal equilibrium with the neutral species and ions, and the electrons are also not in thermodynamic equilibrium within their own ensemble, which results in a significant departure of the electron velocity distribution function from a Maxwellian. These non-equilibrium conditions provide considerable freedom to choose optimal plasma parameters for applications, which make gas discharge plasmas remarkable tools for a variety of plasma applications, including plasma processing, discharge lighting, plasma propulsion, particle beam sources, and nanotechnology. Typical phenomena in such discharges include nonlocal electron kinetics, nonlocal electrodynamics with collisionless electron heating, and nonlinear processes in the sheaths and in the bounded plasmas. Significant progress in understanding the interaction of electromagnetic fields with real bounded plasma created by this field and the resulting changes in the structure of the applied electromagnetic field has been one of the major achievements of the last decade in this area of research [1-3]. We show on specific examples that this progress was made possible by synergy between full scale particle-in-cell simulations, analytical models, and experiments. In collaboration with Y. Raitses, A.V. Khrabrov, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, USA; V.I. Demidov, UES, Inc., 4401 Dayton-Xenia Rd., Beavercreek, OH 45322, USA and AFRL, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433, USA; and D. Sydorenko, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. [4pt] [1] D. Sydorenko, A. Smolyakov, I. Kaganovich, and Y. Raitses, IEEE Trans. Plasma Science 34, 895 (2006); Phys. Plasmas 13, 014501 (2006); 14 013508 (2007); 15, 053506 (2008). [0pt] [2] I. D. Kaganovich, Y. Raitses, D. Sydorenko, and

  14. Tuning electron transport through functionalized C20H10 molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoppi, Laura; Ferretti, Andrea; Baldridge, Kim K

    2015-10-13

    First-principles methodology based on density functional theory (DFT) is used to investigate charge transport phenomena in molecular junctions, with the central active molecular element based on corannulene, C20H10, assembled between two carbon nanotubes (CNT). A number of key factors associated with the design of the molecular nanojunction are shown to have an impact on electron transport to varying degrees, including (I) the composition of the spacer linking the leads to the active element, (II) the composition of the active molecule element, (III) the sensor capabilities of the active element, and (IV) the response of the junction to an external electric field. This study demonstrates the ability to integrate molecular electronic functionality into electronic nanocircuits and provides novel insight into the design of new types of molecular-based devices by revealing the relationship between charge transport mechanisms and the electronic structure of molecular junction components.

  15. Simultaneous Investigation of Hot-electron Transport and Preplasma Formation in Cone-wire Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, H.; Tiedje, H. F.; Singh, S.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Fedosejevs, R.; Ma, T.; Hey, D.; Ping, Y.; Chen, C. D.; Macphee, A.; Key, M. H.; McLean, H. S.; Patel, P.; MacKinnon, A.; Pasley, J.; Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R.; Link, A.; Schumacher, D. W.; Freeman, R. R.; van Woerkom, L. D.; Westover, B.; Wei, M. S.; Beg, F. N.

    2010-11-01

    The generation and transport of MeV electrons is essential to the realization of Fast Ignition fusion. An important factor in determining the hot electron source is the preplasma distribution that is inevitably formed even in high-contrast short-pulse laser systems. A larger preplasma moves the critical surface further from the region where heating is required, and has a significant effect on the electron source and transport. In this paper we present analysis of results where bremstrahhlung emission from the preplasma region was imaged simultaneously with k-alpha emission from a copper tracer in cone-wire targets using a grazing-incidence x-Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray microscope. The predicted scalings from simulations and theory will be compared with experimental results to determine unique characteristics of how the hot electron source and transport are affected by the presence of the wire as well as preplasma.

  16. Study on the Electronic Transport Properties of Zigzag GaN Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Enling; Wang Xiqiang; Hou Liping; Zhao Danna; Dai Yuanbin [Sciences School, Xi' an University of Technology, Xi' an, China 710054 (China); Wang Xuewen [Electronic Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi' an, China 710068 (China)

    2011-02-01

    The electronic transport properties of zigzag GaN nanotubes (n, 0) (4 {<=} n {<=} 9) have been calculated using the density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's functions method. Firstly, the density functional theory (DFT) is used to optimize and calculate the electronic structure of GaNNTs (n, 0) (4{<=}n{<=}9). Secondly, DFT and non-equilibrium Green function (NEGF) method are also used to predict the electronic transport properties of GaNNTs two-probe system. The results showed: there is a corresponding relation between the electronic transport properties and the valley of state density of each GaNNT. In addition, the volt-ampere curve of GaNNT is approximately linear.

  17. High-speed evaluation of track-structure Monte Carlo electron transport simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasciak, A S; Ford, J R

    2008-10-07

    There are many instances where Monte Carlo simulation using the track-structure method for electron transport is necessary for the accurate analytical computation and estimation of dose and other tally data. Because of the large electron interaction cross-sections and highly anisotropic scattering behavior, the track-structure method requires an enormous amount of computation time. For microdosimetry, radiation biology and other applications involving small site and tally sizes, low electron energies or high-Z/low-Z material interfaces where the track-structure method is preferred, a computational device called a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is capable of executing track-structure Monte Carlo electron-transport simulations as fast as or faster than a standard computer can complete an identical simulation using the condensed history (CH) technique. In this paper, data from FPGA-based track-structure electron-transport computations are presented for five test cases, from simple slab-style geometries to radiation biology applications involving electrons incident on endosteal bone surface cells. For the most complex test case presented, an FPGA is capable of evaluating track-structure electron-transport problems more than 500 times faster than a standard computer can perform the same track-structure simulation and with comparable accuracy.

  18. Energy transport in mirror machine LISA at electron cyclotron resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha Rapozo, C. da; Serbeto, A.; Torres-Silva, H.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that a classical transport calculation is adequate to predict the steady state temperature of the RF produced plasma in LISA machine for both large and small resonant volumes. Temperature anisotropy ranging from 55 to 305 was found which was larger for small resonant volume, and the temperature relaxation was larger at large resonant one. This agrees with the fact that there is a Coulomb relaxation ν c which is proportional to T e -3/2 . It is also shown that the fitting parameter alpha is larger for large resonant volume than for small resonant one. (L.C.J.A.)

  19. Suprathermal ions in the solar wind from the Voyager spacecraft: Instrument modeling and background analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randol, B M; Christian, E R

    2015-01-01

    Using publicly available data from the Voyager Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) instruments, we investigate the form of the solar wind ion suprathermal tail in the outer heliosphere inside the termination shock. This tail has a commonly observed form in the inner heliosphere, that is, a power law with a particular spectral index. The Voyager spacecraft have taken data beyond 100 AU, farther than any other spacecraft. However, during extended periods of time, the data appears to be mostly background. We have developed a technique to self-consistently estimate the background seen by LECP due to cosmic rays using data from the Voyager cosmic ray instruments and a simple, semi-analytical model of the LECP instruments

  20. Electrode Cultivation and Interfacial Electron Transport in Subsurface Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbelkar, A. A.; Jangir, Y.; Reese, B. K.; Wanger, G.; Anderson, C.; El-Naggar, M.; Amend, J.

    2016-12-01

    Continental subsurface environments can present significant energetic challenges to the resident microorganisms. While these environments are geologically diverse, potentially allowing energy harvesting by microorganisms that catalyze redox reactions, many of the abundant electron donors and acceptors are insoluble and therefore not directly bioavailable. Microbes can use extracellular electron transfer (EET) as a metabolic strategy to interact with redox active surfaces. This process can be mimicked on electrode surfaces and hence can lead to enrichment and quantification of subsurface microorganisms A primary bioelectrochemical enrichment with different oxidizing and reducing potentials set up in a single bioreactor was applied in situ to subsurface microorganisms residing in iron oxide rich deposits in the Sanford Underground Research Facility. Secondary enrichment revealed a plethora of classified and unclassified subsurface microbiota on both oxidizing and reducing potentials. From this enrichment, we have isolated a Gram-positive Bacillus along with Gram-negative Cupriavidus and Anaerospora strains (as electrode reducers) and Comamonas (as an electrode oxidizer). The Bacillus and Comamonas isolates were subjected to a detailed electrochemical characterization in half-reactors at anodic and cathodic potentials, respectively. An increase in cathodic current upon inoculation and cyclic voltammetry measurements confirm the hypothesis that Comamonas is capable of electron uptake from electrodes. In addition, measurements of Bacillus on anodes hint towards novel mechanisms that allow EET from Gram-positive bacteria. This study suggests that electrochemical approaches are well positioned to dissect such extracellular interactions that may be prevalent in the subsurface, while using physical electrodes to emulate the microhabitats, redox and geochemical gradients, and the spatially dependent interspecies interactions encountered in the subsurface. Electrochemical

  1. Novel electronic and transport properties of graphene superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol-Hwan

    2009-03-01

    Charge carriers in graphene show linear and isotropic energy dispersion relation and chiral behavior, like massless neutrinos in particle physics. Because of these novel properties, many interesting and unconventional phenomena occur in graphene. On the other hand, since the 1970's, metallic and semiconducting superlattice structures -- man-made crystals -- have been extensively studied regarding to their fundamental electronic and optical properties as well as many applications. In this talk, I will present calculations on the properties of charge carriers in graphene under an external periodic potential (graphene superlattices) which are found to be greatly different from those of conventional two-dimensional electron gases in similar conditions [1-3]. I will discuss the anisotropies in the group velocity around the Dirac point and in the gap opening at the supercell Brillouin zone boundary [1]. Next, I will focus on the special cases where the group velocity along one direction becomes zero [1,2], emphasizing the phenomena of pseudospin collapse and possible electron beam supercollimation effects in these systems [2]. Finally, I will discuss the properties of a new generation of massless Dirac fermions at the supercell Brillouin zone boundaries and their experimental implications [3]. [4pt] [1] C. -H. Park, L. Yang, Y. -W. Son, M. L. Cohen, and S. G. Louie, Nature Phys. 4, 870 (2008). [0pt] [2] C. -H. Park, Y. -W. Son, L. Yang, M. L. Cohen, and S. G. Louie, Nano Lett. 8, 2920 (2008). [0pt] [3] C. -H. Park, L. Yang, Y. -W. Son, M. L. Cohen, and S. G. Louie, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 126804 (2008).

  2. Development and application of a 2-electron reduced density matrix approach to electron transport via molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Erik P.; Mazziotti, David A.; Seideman, Tamar

    2017-11-01

    Can an electronic device be constructed using only a single molecule? Since this question was first asked by Aviram and Ratner in the 1970s [Chem. Phys. Lett. 29, 277 (1974)], the field of molecular electronics has exploded with significant experimental advancements in the understanding of the charge transport properties of single molecule devices. Efforts to explain the results of these experiments and identify promising new candidate molecules for molecular devices have led to the development of numerous new theoretical methods including the current standard theoretical approach for studying single molecule charge transport, i.e., the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism (NEGF). By pairing this formalism with density functional theory (DFT), a wide variety of transport problems in molecular junctions have been successfully treated. For some systems though, the conductance and current-voltage curves predicted by common DFT functionals can be several orders of magnitude above experimental results. In addition, since density functional theory relies on approximations to the exact exchange-correlation functional, the predicted transport properties can show significant variation depending on the functional chosen. As a first step to addressing this issue, the authors have replaced density functional theory in the NEGF formalism with a 2-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM) method, creating a new approach known as the NEGF-RDM method. 2-RDM methods provide a more accurate description of electron correlation compared to density functional theory, and they have lower computational scaling compared to wavefunction based methods of similar accuracy. Additionally, 2-RDM methods are capable of capturing static electron correlation which is untreatable by existing NEGF-DFT methods. When studying dithiol alkane chains and dithiol benzene in model junctions, the authors found that the NEGF-RDM predicts conductances and currents that are 1-2 orders of magnitude below

  3. Specific Interaction between Redox Phospholipid Polymers and Plastoquinone in Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenya; Kaneko, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Masahito; Kato, Souichiro; Ito, Hidehiro; Kamachi, Toshiaki; Kamiya, Kazuhide; Nakanishi, Shuji

    2017-04-19

    Redox phospholipid polymers added in culture media are known to be capable of extracting electrons from living photosynthetic cells across bacterial cell membranes with high cytocompatibility. In the present study, we identify the intracellular redox species that transfers electrons to the polymers. The open-circuit electrochemical potential of an electrolyte containing the redox polymer and extracted thylakoid membranes shift to positive (or negative) under light irradiation, when an electron transport inhibitor specific to plastoquinone is added upstream (or downstream) in the photosynthetic electron transport chain. The same trend is also observed for a medium containing living photosynthetic cells of Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. These results clearly indicate that the phospholipid redox polymers extract photosynthetic electrons mainly from plastoquinone. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Relativistic electron transport in a solid target: study of heating in the framework of inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinolli, E.

    2003-04-01

    This work is dedicated to the study of the energy deposition of fast electrons in matter. This topic is of prime importance for inertial fusion driven by laser since relativistic electrons are produced in laser-matter interaction for a laser operating in ultra-intense regime. This thesis is made up of: a theoretical chapter dealing with the generation and transport of fast electrons, of 2 chapters reporting experimental data obtained with optical and X-rays diagnostics at the laser facilities of LULI in France and RAL in U.K., and of a chapter dedicated to the simulation of electron transport by using a Monte-Carlo code combined to a hybrid collisional-electromagnetic PIC code. A new spectrometer has been designed: the detection of Kα rays coming from a fluorescent layer embedded in the target has allowed us to assess the size of the electron beam and the level of ionisation. (A.C.)

  5. Computational aspects of electronic transport in nanoscale devices

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, Hans Henrik Brandenborg; Hansen, Per Christian; Stokbro, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the modeling of electronic properties of nano-scale devices. In particular the computational aspects of calculating the transmission and current-voltage characteristics of Landauer-Büttiker two-probe systems are in focus. To begin with, the main existing methods are described in detail and benchmarked. These are the Green’s function method and the wave function matching method. The methods are subsequently combined in a hybrid scheme in order to benefit from a co...

  6. Electron ray tracing programs for gun design and beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1988-05-01

    Computer simulation of electron and ion sources is made by using a class of computer codes known as gun design programs. In this paper, we shall first list most of the necessary and some optional capabilities of such programs. Then we will briefly note specific codes and/or authors of codes with attention to specialized applications if any. There may be many more such programs in use than are treated here; we are only trying to cover a range of examples, not perform a comprehensive survey

  7. Electronic transport properties of one dimensional lithium nanowire using density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Anil, E-mail: anil-t2001@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Govt. P.G. College Solan, Himachal Pradesh, India 173212 (India); Kumar, Arun [Department of Physics, Govt. P.G. College Banjar, Himachal Pradesh (India); Chandel, Surjeet [Department of Physics, Govt. P.G. College Bilaspur, Himachal Pradesh (India); Ahluwalia, P. K. [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India 171005 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Single nanowire electrode devices are a unique platform for studying as energy storage devices. Lithium nanowire is of much importance in lithium ion batteries and therefore has received a great deal of attention in past few years. In this paper we investigated structural and electronic transport properties of Li nanowire using density functional theory (DFT) with SIESTA code. Electronic transport properties of Li nanowire are investigated theoretically. The calculations are performed in two steps: first an optimized geometry for Li nanowire is obtained using DFT calculations, and then the transport relations are obtained using NEGF approach. SIESTA and TranSIESTA simulation codes are used in the calculations correspondingly. The electrodes are chosen to be the same as the central region where transport is studied, eliminating current quantization effects due to contacts and focusing the electronic transport study to the intrinsic structure of the material. By varying chemical potential in the electrode regions, an I-V curve is traced which is in agreement with the predicted behavior. Agreement of bulk properties of Li with experimental values make the study of electronic and transport properties in lithium nanowires interesting because they are promising candidates as bridging pieces in nanoelectronics. Transmission coefficient and V-I characteristic of Li nano wire indicates that Li nanowire can be used as an electrode device.

  8. Electronic Transport in Hydrogen-Terminated Si(001) Nanomembranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Weina; Zamiri, Marziyeh; Scott, Shelley A.; Cavallo, Francesca; Endres, James J.; Knezevic, Irena; Eriksson, Mark A.; Lagally, Max G.

    2018-02-01

    Charge carrier transport in thin hydrogen (H)-terminated Si(001) sheets is explored via a four-probe device fabricated on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) using the bulk host Si as a back gate. The method enables electrical measurements without the need to contact the sample surface proper. Sheet conductance measurements as a function of back-gate voltage demonstrate the presence of acceptor- and donorlike surface states. These states are distributed throughout the gap and can be removed or transformed with low-temperature annealing. The density of donorlike states is just under 1012 cm-2 eV-1 and 3 times higher than that of the acceptorlike states. We discuss the possible origins of these states. The conductance through the surface layer is too small to measure.

  9. High field electron-spin transport and observation of the Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation of drifting electrons in low temperature-grown gallium arsenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M. Idrish

    2008-01-01

    High field electron-spin transport in low temperature-grown gallium arsenide is studied. We generate electron spins in the samples by optical pumping. During transport, we observe the Dyakonov-Perel (DP) [M.I. Dyakonov, V.I. Perel, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 60 (1971) 1954] spin relaxation of the drifting electrons. The results are discussed and are compared with those obtained in calculations of the DP spin relaxation frequency of the hot electrons. A good agreement is obtained

  10. High field electron-spin transport and observation of the Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation of drifting electrons in low temperature-grown gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M. Idrish [Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.au

    2008-11-17

    High field electron-spin transport in low temperature-grown gallium arsenide is studied. We generate electron spins in the samples by optical pumping. During transport, we observe the Dyakonov-Perel (DP) [M.I. Dyakonov, V.I. Perel, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 60 (1971) 1954] spin relaxation of the drifting electrons. The results are discussed and are compared with those obtained in calculations of the DP spin relaxation frequency of the hot electrons. A good agreement is obtained.

  11. Balanced electron-hole transport in spin-orbit semimetal SrIrO3 heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, Nicola; Groenendijk, Dirk J.; Pallecchi, Ilaria; Autieri, Carmine; Tang, Lucas M. K.; Telesio, Francesca; Mattoni, Giordano; McCollam, Alix; Picozzi, Silvia; Caviglia, Andrea D.

    2018-02-01

    Relating the band structure of correlated semimetals to their transport properties is a complex and often open issue. The partial occupation of numerous electron and hole bands can result in properties that are seemingly in contrast with one another, complicating the extraction of the transport coefficients of different bands. The 5 d oxide SrIrO3 hosts parabolic bands of heavy holes and light electrons in gapped Dirac cones due to the interplay between electron-electron interactions and spin-orbit coupling. We present a multifold approach relying on different experimental techniques and theoretical calculations to disentangle its complex electronic properties. By combining magnetotransport and thermoelectric measurements in a field-effect geometry with first-principles calculations, we quantitatively determine the transport coefficients of different conduction channels. Despite their different dispersion relationships, electrons and holes are found to have strikingly similar transport coefficients, yielding a holelike response under field-effect and thermoelectric measurements and a linear electronlike Hall effect up to 33 T.

  12. Molecular Engineering of Non-Halogenated Solution-Processable Bithiazole based Electron Transport Polymeric Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Boyi

    2015-04-01

    The electron deficiency and trans planar conformation of bithiazole is potentially beneficial for the electron transport performance of organic semiconductors. However, the incorporation of bithiazole into polymers through a facile synthetic strategy remains a challenge. Herein, 2,2’-bithiazole was synthesized in one step and copolymerized with dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole to afford poly(dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole-bithiazole), PDBTz. PDBTz exhibited electron mobility reaching 0.3 cm2V-1s-1 in organic field-effect transistor (OFET) configuration; this contrasts with a recently discussed isoelectronic conjugated polymer comprising an electron rich bithiophene and dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole, which displays merely hole transport characteristics. This inversion of charge carrier transport characteristics confirms the significant potential for bithiazole in the development of electron transport semiconducting materials. Branched 5-decylheptacyl side chains were incorporated into PDBTz to enhance polymer solubility, particularly in non-halogenated, more environmentally compatible solvents. PDBTz cast from a range of non-halogenated solvents exhibited film morphologies and field-effect electron mobility similar to those cast from halogenated solvents.

  13. Two-dimensional electron transport in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Renbing; Xu Wen; Zhou Yu; Zhang Xiaoyu; Qin Hua

    2012-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of electron transport properties of two-dimensional electron gas in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. By assuming a drifted Fermi-Dirac distribution and taking into account all major scattering mechanisms, including polar optical and acoustic phonons, background impurities, dislocation and interface roughness, the momentum- and energy-balance equations derived from Boltzmann equation are solved self-consistently. The dependence of the electron drift velocity and electron temperature as a function of the applied electric field are obtained and discussed.

  14. Two-dimensional electron transport in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan Renbing [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215125 (China); Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu Wen, E-mail: wenxu_issp@yahoo.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhou Yu; Zhang Xiaoyu [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215125 (China); Qin Hua, E-mail: hqin2007@sinano.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215125 (China)

    2012-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of electron transport properties of two-dimensional electron gas in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. By assuming a drifted Fermi-Dirac distribution and taking into account all major scattering mechanisms, including polar optical and acoustic phonons, background impurities, dislocation and interface roughness, the momentum- and energy-balance equations derived from Boltzmann equation are solved self-consistently. The dependence of the electron drift velocity and electron temperature as a function of the applied electric field are obtained and discussed.

  15. Electron transport in nanometer GaAs structure under radiation exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Demarina, N V

    2002-01-01

    One investigates into effect of neutron and proton irradiation on electron transport in nanometer GaAs structures. Mathematical model takes account of radiation defects via introduction of additional mechanisms od scattering of carriers at point defects and disordered regions. To investigate experimentally into volt-ampere and volt-farad characteristics one used a structure based on a field-effect transistor with the Schottky gate and a built-in channel. Calculation results of electron mobility, drift rate of electrons, time of energy relaxation and electron pulse are compared with the experimental data

  16. Radial transport of radiation belt electrons due to stormtime Pc5 waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. Ukhorskiy

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During geomagnetic storms relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt exhibit dynamic variability over multiple orders of magnitude. This requires radial transport of electrons across their drift shells and implies violation of their third adiabatic invariant. Radial transport is induced by the interaction of the electron drift motion with electric and magnetic field fluctuations in the ULF frequency range. It was previously shown that solar-wind driven ULF waves have long azimuthal wave lengths and thus can violate the third invariant of trapped electrons in the process of resonant interaction with their gradient-curvature motion. However, the amplitude of solar-wind driven ULF waves rapidly decreases with decreasing L. It is therefore not clear what mechanisms are responsible for fast transport rates observed inside the geosynchronous orbit. In this paper we investigate wether stormtime Pc5 waves can contribute to this process. Stormtime Pc5s have short azimuthal wave lengths and therefore cannot exhibit resonance with the the electron drift motion. However we show that stormtime Pc5s can cause localized random scattering of electron drift motion that violates the third invariant. According to our results electron interaction with stormtime Pc5s can produce rapid radial transport even as low as L≃4. Numerical simulations show that electron transport can exhibit large deviations from radial diffusion. The diffusion approximation is not valid for individual storms but only applies to the statistically averaged response of the outer belt to stormtime Pc5 waves.

  17. Theoretical study of electron transport throughout some molecular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mohammed A. A.; Hanoon, Falah H.; Al-Badry, Lafy F.

    2017-11-01

    The present work is a theoretical study of the electronic properties of some molecular structures. The system that takes into account in the study is left lead-donor-molecule-acceptor-right lead. The molecule, such as (phenyl, biphenyl, triphenyl, naphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene), is threaded by magnetic flux. This work contains two parts. First is computing density of states of the molecular structures as a closed system by density functional theory (DFT). Second is calculating the transmission probability and electric current of such molecular structures as an open system by steady-state theoretical model. Furthermore, the most important effects, taking into consideration are quantum interference, magnetic flux, and interface structure. Our results show that the connection of the molecule to the two leads, the number of rings, the magnetic flux, and the geometrical structure of the molecule play an important role in determining the energy gap of molecular structures.

  18. Computational aspects of electronic transport in nanoscale devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Henrik Brandenborg

    2008-01-01

    is for the calculation of the block tridiagonal matrix inverse of a block tridiagonal matrix in O(N) operations. This algorithm also leads to an optimal evaluation of the frequently used Caroli transmission formula. A modified wave function matching scheme is then developed which allows for a significant reduction...... in the cost of the self-energy matrix calculations when combined with an iterative eigensolver. Finally, such an iterative eigensolver is developed and implemented based of a shift-and-invert Krylov subspace approach. The method is applied to a selection of nano-scale systems and speed-ups of up to an order......This thesis is concerned with the modeling of electronic properties of nano-scale devices. In particular the computational aspects of calculating the transmission and current-voltage characteristics of Landauer-Büttiker two-probe systems are in focus. To begin with, the main existing methods...

  19. Electronic transport on the nanoscale: ballistic transmission and Ohm's law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homoth, J; Wenderoth, M; Druga, T; Winking, L; Ulbrich, R G; Bobisch, C A; Weyers, B; Bannani, A; Zubkov, E; Bernhart, A M; Kaspers, M R; Möller, R

    2009-04-01

    If a current of electrons flows through a normal conductor (in contrast to a superconductor), it is impeded by local scattering at defects as well as phonon scattering. Both effects contribute to the voltage drop observed for a macroscopic complex system as described by Ohm's law. Although this concept is well established, it has not yet been measured around individual defects on the atomic scale. We have measured the voltage drop at a monatomic step in real space by restricting the current to a surface layer. For the Si(111)-( [see text]3 x [see text]3)-Ag surface a monotonous transition with a width below 1 nm was found. A numerical analysis of the data maps the current flow through the complex network and the interplay between defect-free terraces and monatomic steps.

  20. Opto-electronic and quantum transport properties of semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabathil, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work a novel and efficient method for the calculation of the ballistic transport properties of open semiconductor nanostructures connected to external reservoirs is presented. It is based on the Green's function formalism and reduces the effort to obtain the transmission and the carrier density to a single solution of a hermitian eigenvalue problem with dimensions proportional to the size of the decoupled device and the multiple inversion of a small matrix with dimensions proportional to the size of the contacts to the leads. Using this method, the 4-band GaAs hole transport through a 2-dimensional three-terminal T-junction device, and the resonant tunneling current through a 3-dimensional InAs quantum dot molecule embedded into an InP heterostructure have been calculated. The further extension of the method into a charge self-consistent scheme enables the efficient prediction of the IV-characteristics of highly doped nanoscale field effect transistors in the ballistic regime, including the influence of quasi bound states and the exchange-correlation interaction. Buettiker probes are used to emulate the effect of inelastic scattering on the current for simple 1D devices, systematically analyzing the dependence of the density of states and the resulting self-consistent potential on the scattering strength. The second major topic of this work is the modeling of the optical response of quantum confined neutral and charged excitons in single and coupled self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots. For this purpose the existing device simulator nextnano{sup 3} has been extended to incorporate particle-particle interactions within the means of density functional theory in local density approximation. In this way the exciton transition energies for neutral and charged excitons as a function of an externally applied electric field have been calculated, revealing a systematic reduction of the intrinsic dipole with the addition of extra holes to the exciton, a finding

  1. Correlation of electron transport and photocatalysis of nanocrystalline clusters studied by Monte-Carlo continuity random walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoshun; Li, Ziqiang; Zhao, Xiujian

    2015-02-21

    In this research, Monte-Carlo Continuity Random Walking (MC-RW) model was used to study the relation between electron transport and photocatalysis of nano-crystalline (nc) clusters. The effects of defect energy disorder, spatial disorder of material structure, electron density, and interfacial transfer/recombination on the electron transport and the photocatalysis were studied. Photocatalytic activity is defined as 1/τ from a statistical viewpoint with τ being the electron average lifetime. Based on the MC-RW simulation, a clear physical and chemical "picture" was given for the photocatalytic kinetic analysis of nc-clusters. It is shown that the increase of defect energy disorder and material spatial structural disorder, such as the decrease of defect trap number, the increase of crystallinity, the increase of particle size, and the increase of inter-particle connection, can enhance photocatalytic activity through increasing electron transport ability. The increase of electron density increases the electron Fermi level, which decreases the activation energy for electron de-trapping from traps to extending states, and correspondingly increases electron transport ability and photocatalytic activity. Reducing recombination of electrons and holes can increase electron transport through the increase of electron density and then increases the photocatalytic activity. In addition to the electron transport, the increase of probability for electrons to undergo photocatalysis can increase photocatalytic activity through the increase of the electron interfacial transfer speed.

  2. Temperature dependent transport of two dimensional electrons in the integral quantum Hall regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wi, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the temperature dependent electronic transport properties of a two dimensional electron gas subject to background potential fluctuations and a perpendicular magnetic field. The author carried out an extensive temperature dependent study of the transport coefficients, in the region of an integral quantum plateau, in an In/sub x/Ga/sub 1-x/As/InP heterostructure for 4.2K 10 cm -2 meV -1 ) even at the middle between two Landau levels, which is unexpected from model calculations based on short ranged randomness. In addition, the different T dependent behavior of rho/sub xx/ between the states in the tails and those near the center of a Landau level, indicates the existence of different electron states in a Landau level. Additionally, the author reports T-dependent transport measurements in the transition region between two quantum plateaus in several different materials

  3. SPHERE: a spherical-geometry multimaterial electron/photon Monte Carlo transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbleib, J.A. Sr.

    1977-06-01

    SPHERE provides experimenters and theorists with a method for the routine solution of coupled electron/photon transport through multimaterial configurations possessing spherical symmetry. Emphasis is placed upon operational simplicity without sacrificing the rigor of the model. SPHERE combines condensed-history electron Monte Carlo with conventional single-scattering photon Monte Carlo in order to describe the transport of all generations of particles from several MeV down to 1.0 and 10.0 keV for electrons and photons, respectively. The model is more accurate at the higher energies, with a less rigorous description of the particle cascade at energies where the shell structure of the transport media becomes important. Flexibility of construction permits the user to tailor the model to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the model to more sophisticated applications through relatively simple update procedures. 8 figs., 3 tables

  4. The electronic and transport properties of borophane with defects: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Zhang, Yujin; Leng, Jiancai; Ma, Hong

    2018-03-01

    Recent works well confirm the stability of hydrogenated borophene, known as borophane. Here, first principles studies have performed on the electronic and transport properties of borophane with defects. The calculations indicate that the introduction of defects results in different behavior of charges redistribution along x and y directions. The intrinsic electronic structure of borophane with Dirac cone is destroyed in various degrees by each type of defect. The inducing defect states lead to the occurrence of flat bands, which are not benefit for the electronic transport properties. According to the transmission spectra and I-V characteristics, these defects decrease the transmission intensity and the current value both along two directions. However, the transport anisotropy can be efficiently tuned by defect, which may contribute to the design of functional device.

  5. Electron transport through supported biomembranes at the nanoscale by conductive atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casuso, I; Fumagalli, L; Samitier, J; Padros, E; Reggiani, L; Akimov, V; Gomila, G

    2007-01-01

    We present a reliable methodology to perform electron transport measurements at the nanoscale on supported biomembranes by conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). It allows measurement of both (a) non-destructive conductive maps and (b) force controlled current-voltage characteristics in wide voltage bias range in a reproducible way. Tests experiments were performed on purple membrane monolayers, a two-dimensional (2D) crystal lattice of the transmembrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. Non-destructive conductive images show uniform conductivity of the membrane with isolated nanometric conduction defects. Current-voltage characteristics under different compression conditions show non-resonant tunneling electron transport properties, with two different conduction regimes as a function of the applied bias, in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. This methodology opens the possibility for a detailed study of electron transport properties of supported biological membranes, and of soft materials in general

  6. Electron transport in InAs nanowires and heterostructure nanowire devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelander, C.; Björk, M. T.; Larsson, M. W.; Hansen, A. E.; Wallenberg, L. R.; Samuelson, L.

    2004-09-01

    Nanowires in the InAs/InP material system are grown with catalyst-assisted chemical beam epitaxy. Ohmic contacts are then fabricated to selected wires, allowing electron transport measurements to be carried out at room-temperature as well as at low T. InAs nanowires show strong quantum confinement effects, where thin wires (Heterostructure barriers of InP are also incorporated into InAs wires to produce resonant tunneling diodes and single-electron transistors (SETs) with different dot lengths. Wires containing dots with a length of 100 nm function as ideal SETs, whereas the transport in wires with 15 nm long dots is strongly governed by quantum confinement and resonant tunneling. For the smaller dots it is possible to observe electron transport through excited states.

  7. Light Quality Affects Chloroplast Electron Transport Rates Estimated from Chl Fluorescence Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John R; Morgan, Patrick B; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2017-10-01

    Chl fluorescence has been used widely to calculate photosynthetic electron transport rates. Portable photosynthesis instruments allow for combined measurements of gas exchange and Chl fluorescence. We analyzed the influence of spectral quality of actinic light on Chl fluorescence and the calculated electron transport rate, and compared this with photosynthetic rates measured by gas exchange in the absence of photorespiration. In blue actinic light, the electron transport rate calculated from Chl fluorescence overestimated the true rate by nearly a factor of two, whereas there was closer agreement under red light. This was consistent with the prediction made with a multilayer leaf model using profiles of light absorption and photosynthetic capacity. Caution is needed when interpreting combined measurements of Chl fluorescence and gas exchange, such as the calculation of CO2 partial pressure in leaf chloroplasts. © Crown copyright 2017.

  8. Light harvesting and chloroplast electron transport in NADP-malic enzyme type C4 plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima Munekage, Yuri

    2016-06-01

    The structure of thylakoids in chloroplasts and the organization of the electron transport chain changed dynamically during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis, especially in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP)-malic enzyme type C4 species. Stacked grana membranes are strongly reduced in the bundle sheath chloroplasts of these plants, where photosystem II activity is diminished and cyclic electron transport around photosystem I mainly occurs. This change optimizes the ATP/NADPH production ratio in bundle sheath chloroplasts to drive the metabolic cycle of C4 photosynthesis. This review summarizes the current model of light harvesting and electron transport in the NADP-malic enzyme type C4 plants and discusses how it changed during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Electron transport in nano-scaled piezoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhengping; Kuroda, Marcelo A.; Tan, Yaohua; Newns, Dennis M.; Povolotskyi, Michael; Boykin, Timothy B.; Kubis, Tillmann; Klimeck, Gerhard; Martyna, Glenn J.

    2013-05-01

    The Piezoelectronic Transistor (PET) has been proposed as a post-CMOS device for fast, low-power switching. In this device, the piezoresistive channel is metalized via the expansion of a relaxor piezoelectric element to turn the device on. The mixed-valence compound SmSe is a good choice of PET channel material because of its isostructural pressure-induced continuous metal insulator transition, which is well characterized in bulk single crystals. Prediction and optimization of the performance of a realistic, nano-scaled PET based on SmSe requires the understanding of quantum confinement, tunneling, and the effect of metal interface. In this work, a computationally efficient empirical tight binding (ETB) model is developed for SmSe to study quantum transport in these systems and the scaling limit of PET channel lengths. Modulation of the SmSe band gap under pressure is successfully captured by ETB, and ballistic conductance shows orders of magnitude change under hydrostatic strain, supporting operability of the PET device at nanoscale.

  10. Conceptual density functional theory for electron transfer and transport in mesoscopic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Paulo R; Miranda, David A

    2017-02-22

    Molecular and supramolecular systems are essentially mesoscopic in character. The electron self-exchange, in the case of energy fluctuations, or electron transfer/transport, in the case of the presence of an externally driven electrochemical potential, between mesoscopic sites is energetically driven in such a manner where the electrochemical capacitance (C [small mu, Greek, macron] ) is fundamental. Thus, the electron transfer/transport through channels connecting two distinct energetic (ΔE [small mu, Greek, macron] ) and spatially separated mesoscopic sites is capacitively modulated. Remarkably, the relationship between the quantum conductance (G) and the standard electrochemical rate constant (k r ), which is indispensable to understanding the physical and chemical characteristics governing electron exchange in molecular scale systems, was revealed to be related to C [small mu, Greek, macron] , that is, C [small mu, Greek, macron] = G/k r . Accordingly, C [small mu, Greek, macron] is the proportional missing term that controls the electron transfer/transport in mesoscopic systems in a wide-range, and equally it can be understood from first principles density functional quantum mechanical approaches. Indeed the differences in energy between states is calculated (or experimentally accessed) throughout the electrochemical capacitance as ΔE [small mu, Greek, macron] = β/C [small mu, Greek, macron] , and thus constitutes the driving force for G and/or k r , where β is only a proportional constant that includes the square of the unit electron charge times the square of the number of electron particles interchanged.

  11. Microbial electron transport and energy conservation – the foundation for optimizing bioelectrochemical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracke, Frauke; Vassilev, Igor; Krömer, Jens O.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial electrochemical techniques describe a variety of emerging technologies that use electrode–bacteria interactions for biotechnology applications including the production of electricity, waste and wastewater treatment, bioremediation and the production of valuable products. Central in each application is the ability of the microbial catalyst to interact with external electron acceptors and/or donors and its metabolic properties that enable the combination of electron transport and carbon metabolism. And here also lies the key challenge. A wide range of microbes has been discovered to be able to exchange electrons with solid surfaces or mediators but only a few have been studied in depth. Especially electron transfer mechanisms from cathodes towards the microbial organism are poorly understood but are essential for many applications such as microbial electrosynthesis. We analyze the different electron transport chains that nature offers for organisms such as metal respiring bacteria and acetogens, but also standard biotechnological organisms currently used in bio-production. Special focus lies on the essential connection of redox and energy metabolism, which is often ignored when studying bioelectrochemical systems. The possibility of extracellular electron exchange at different points in each organism is discussed regarding required redox potentials and effect on cellular redox and energy levels. Key compounds such as electron carriers (e.g., cytochromes, ferredoxin, quinones, flavins) are identified and analyzed regarding their possible role in electrode–microbe interactions. This work summarizes our current knowledge on electron transport processes and uses a theoretical approach to predict the impact of different modes of transfer on the energy metabolism. As such it adds an important piece of fundamental understanding of microbial electron transport possibilities to the research community and will help to optimize and advance bioelectrochemical

  12. Microbial electron transport and energy conservation – the foundation for optimizing bioelectrochemical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauke eKracke

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial electrochemical techniques describe a variety of emerging technologies that use electrode-bacteria-interactions for biotechnology applications including the production of electricity, waste and wastewater treatment, bioremediation and production of valuable products. Central in each application is the ability of the microbial catalyst to interact with external electron acceptors and/or donors and its metabolic properties that enable the combination of electron transport and carbon metabolism. And here also lies the key challenge. A wide range of microbes has been discovered to be able to exchange electrons with solid surfaces or mediators but only a few have been studied in depth. Especially electron transfer mechanisms from cathodes towards the microbial organism are poorly understood but are essential for many applications such as microbial electrosynthesis. We analyse the different electron transport chains that nature offers for organisms such as metal respiring bacteria and acetogens, but also standard biotechnological organisms currently used in bio-production. Special focus lies on the essential connection of redox and energy metabolism, which is often ignored when studying bio-electrochemical systems. The possibility of extracellular electron exchange at different points in each organism is discussed regarding required redox potentials and effect on cellular redox and energy levels. Key compounds such as electron carriers (e.g. cytochromes, ferredoxin, quinones, flavins are identified and analysed regarding their possible role in electrode-microbe-interactions. This work summarizes our current knowledge on electron transport processes and uses a theoretical approach to predict the impact of different modes of transfer on the energy metabolism. As such it adds an important piece of fundamental understanding of microbial electron transport possibilities to the research community and will help to optimize and advance bio

  13. Electronic transport properties of a molecular switch with carbon nanotube electrodes: A first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, P.; Wang, P.J.; Zhang, Z.; Liu, D.S.

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the electronic transport properties of a new kind of optical molecular switch with two single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) electrodes using first-principles transport calculations. It is shown that the enol form shows an overall higher conductance than the keto form at low-bias voltage, which is independent of the SWCNTs' chirality. Meantime, it is possible to tune the conductance of the molecular switch by changing the chirality of the SWCNTs.

  14. Proton stoichiometry of electron transport in rodent tumor mitoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, J; Reynafarje, B; Costa, L E; Lehninger, A L

    1988-02-01

    The mechanistic vectorial H+/O translocation ratios characteristic of energy-conserving sites 2 + 3 and site 3 of the respiratory chain of two tumor cell lines were determined using succinate and ferrocytochrome c, respectively, as electron donors. The measurements were carried out on mitoplasts in order to allow ferrocytochrome c free access to its binding site on the inner mitochondrial membrane. The tumor cell lines used were Ehrlich ascites tumor and the AS30-D ascites tumor. K+ was used as charge-compensating cation in the presence of valinomycin. The O2 uptake rate measurements were made with a fast-responding membrane-less electrode whose response time was closely matched with that of a pH electrode. The rates of O2 uptake and H+ ejection during the apparent zero-order rate phase of respiration, analyzed by computer, were extrapolated to zero time. The observed H+/O ratios for succinate oxidation in both tumors exceeded 7 and approached 8 and the H+/O ratios for the cytochrome oxidase reaction closely approached 4.0, in agreement with data or normal mitochondria. However, the rates of H+ back decay in the tumor mitochondria are relatively high and may influence the net efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation under intracellular conditions.

  15. Single-electron transport in graphene-like nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Kuei-Lin, E-mail: klc43@mit.edu [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Xu, Yang, E-mail: yangxu-isee@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, College of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, 310027 (China)

    2017-01-31

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials for their versatile band structures and strictly 2D nature have attracted considerable attention over the past decade. Graphene is a robust material for spintronics owing to its weak spin–orbit and hyperfine interactions, while monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) possess a Zeeman effect-like band splitting in which the spin and valley degrees of freedom are nondegenerate. The surface states of topological insulators (TIs) exhibit a spin–momentum locking that opens up the possibility of controlling the spin degree of freedom in the absence of an external magnetic field. Nanostructures made of these materials are also viable for use in quantum computing applications involving the superposition and entanglement of individual charge and spin quanta. In this article, we review a selection of transport studies addressing the confinement and manipulation of charges in nanostructures fabricated from various 2D materials. We supply the entry-level knowledge for this field by first introducing the fundamental properties of 2D bulk materials followed by the theoretical background relevant to the physics of nanostructures. Subsequently, a historical review of experimental development in this field is presented, from the early demonstration of graphene nanodevices on SiO{sub 2} substrate to more recent progress in utilizing hexagonal boron nitride to reduce substrate disorder. In the second part of this article, we extend our discussion to TMDs and TI nanostructures. We aim to outline the current challenges and suggest how future work will be geared towards developing spin qubits in 2D materials.

  16. Graphene frameworks promoted electron transport in quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanyan; Meng, Xin; Cui, Huijuan; Jia, Suping; Dong, Jianhui; Zheng, Jianfeng; Zhao, Jianghong; Wang, Zhijian; Li, Li; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Zhenping

    2014-08-27

    Graphene frameworks (GFs) were incorporated into TiO2 photoanode as electron transport medium to improve the photovoltaic performance of quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) for their excellent conductivity and isotropic framework structure that could permit rapid charge transport. Intensity modulated photocurrent/photovoltage spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results show that the electron transport time (τ(d)) of 1.5 wt % GFs/TiO2 electrode is one-fifth of that of the TiO2 electrode, and electron lifetime (τ(n)) and diffusion path length (Ln) are thrice those of the TiO2 electrode. Results also revealed that the GFs/TiO2 electrode has a shorter electron transport time (τ(d)), as well as longer electron lifetime (τ(n)) and diffusion path length (Ln), than conventional 2D graphene sheets/TiO2 electrode, thus indicating that GFs could promote rapid electron transfer in TiO2 photoanodes. Photocurrent-voltage curves demonstrated that when incorporating 1.5 wt % GFs into TiO2 photoanode, a maximum power conversion efficiency of 4.2% for QDSSCs could be achieved. This value was higher than that of TiO2 photoanode and 2D graphene sheets/TiO2 electrode. In addition, the reasons behind the sensitivity of photoelectric conversion efficiency to the graphene concentration in the TiO2 were also systematically investigated. Our results provide a basic understanding of how GFs can efficiently promote electron transport in TiO2-based solar cells.

  17. Time-resolved electron transport in quantum-dot systems; Zeitaufgeloester Elektronentransport in Quantendotsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croy, Alexander

    2010-06-30

    In this thesis the time-resolved electron transport in quantum dot systems was studied. For this two different formalisms were presented: The nonequilibrium Green functions and the generalized quantum master equations. For both formalisms a propagation method for the numerical calculation of time-resolved expectation values, like the occupation and the electron current, was developed. For the demonstration of the propagation method two different question formulations were considered. On the one hand the stochastically driven resonant-level model was studied. On the other hand the pulse-induced transport through a double quantum dot was considered.

  18. Parallelizing an electron transport Monte Carlo simulator (MOCASIN 2.0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwetman, H.; Burdick, S.

    1988-01-01

    Electron transport simulators are tools for studying electrical properties of semiconducting materials and devices. As demands for modeling more complex devices and new materials have emerged, so have demands for more processing power. This paper documents a project to convert an electron transport simulator (MOCASIN 2.0) to a parallel processing environment. In addition to describing the conversion, the paper presents PPL, a parallel programming version of C running on a Sequent multiprocessor system. In timing tests, models that simulated the movement of 2,000 particles for 100 time steps were executed on ten processors, with a parallel efficiency of over 97%

  19. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R.; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F.; Leemans, Wim

    2011-01-01

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  20. Energy of auroral electrons and Z mode generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Wong, H. K.

    1990-01-01

    The present consideration of Z-mode radiation generation, in light of observational results indicating that the O mode and second-harmonic X-mode emissions can prevail over the X-mode fundamental radiation when suprathermal electron energy is low, gives attention to whether the thermal effect on the Z-mode dispersion can be equally important, and whether the Z-mode can compete for the available free-energy source. It is found that, under suitable circumstances, the growth rate of the Z-mode can be substantial even for low suprathermal auroral electron energies. Growth is generally maximized for propagation perpendicular to the magnetic field.

  1. Experimental study of electron temperature gradient influence on impurity turbulent transport in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villegas, D.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding impurity transport is a key to an optimal regime for a future fusion device. In this thesis, the theoretical and experimental influence of the electron temperature gradient R/L Te on heavy impurity transport is analyzed both in Tore Supra and ASDEX Upgrade. The electron temperature profile is modified locally by heating the plasma with little ECRH power deposited at two different radii. Experimental results have been obtained with the impurity transport code (ITC) which has been completed with a genetic algorithm allowing to determine the transport coefficient profiles with more accuracy. Transport coefficient profiles obtained by a quasilinear gyrokinetic code named QuaLiKiz are consistent with the experimental ones despite experimental uncertainties on gradients. In the core dominated by electron modes, the lower R/L Te the lower the nickel diffusion coefficient. The latter tends linearly to the neoclassical level when the instability threshold is approached. The experimental threshold is in agreement with the one computed by QuaLiKiz. Further out, where the plasma is dominated by ITG, which are independent of R/L Te , both experimental and simulated results show no modification in the diffusion coefficient profile. Furthermore, the convection velocity profile is not modified. This is attributed to a very small contribution of the thermodiffusion (1/Z dependence) in the total convection. On ASDEX, the preliminary results, very different from the Tore Supra ones, show a internal transport barrier for impurities located at the same radius as the strong ECRH power deposit. (author) [fr

  2. Probing the electronic transport on the reconstructed Au/Ge(001 surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciszek Krok

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available By using scanning tunnelling potentiometry we characterized the lateral variation of the electrochemical potential µec on the gold-induced Ge(001-c(8 × 2-Au surface reconstruction while a lateral current flows through the sample. On the reconstruction and across domain boundaries we find that µec shows a constant gradient as a function of the position between the contacts. In addition, nanoscale Au clusters on the surface do not show an electronic coupling to the gold-induced surface reconstruction. In combination with high resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, we conclude that an additional transport channel buried about 2 nm underneath the surface represents a major transport channel for electrons.

  3. ZZ ENDLIB, Coupled Electron and Photon Transport Library in ENDL Format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Description of program or function: The LLNL Evaluated Nuclear Data Library has existed since 1958 in a succession of forms and formats. The present form is as a machine-independent character file format and contains data for the evaluated atomic relaxation data library (EADL), the evaluated photon interaction data library (EPDL), and the evaluated electron interaction data library (EEDL). The purpose of these libraries is to furnish data for coupled electron-photon transport calculations. In order to perform coupled photon-electron transport calculations, all three libraries are required. The UCRL-ID-117796 report included in the documentation for this package provides information on the contents and formats for all three libraries, which are included in this package. All of these libraries span atomic numbers, Z, from 1 to 100. Additionally the electron and photon interaction libraries cover the incident particle energy range from 10 eV to 100 GeV

  4. Electron transport in bulk GaN under ultrashort high-electric field transient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotyeyev, V. V.; Kochelap, V. A.; Kim, K. W.

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated nonlinear electron transport in GaN induced by high-electric field transients by analyzing the temporal dependence of the electron drift velocity and temperature. For picosecond transients, our calculations have established that the electron dynamics retain almost all the features of the steady-state velocity-field characteristics including the portion with negative differential conductivity. It was also found that transient currents in GaN samples give rise to the THz re-emission effect—radiation of electromagnetic field, temporal and spectral properties of which directly relate to the velocity-field characteristics of the sample. The results clearly indicate that existing methods for the generation of high-electric field transients and subpicosecond signal measurements can be applied to the characterization of hot electron transport at ultrahigh fields while avoiding Joule self-heating, hot phonon accumulation and other undesirable effects.

  5. Asymmetric electron and hole transport in a high-mobility n-type conjugated polymer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzelaer, Gert-Jan A. H.; Kuik, Martijn; Olivier, Yoann; Lemaur, Vincent; Cornil, Jerome; Fabiano, Simone; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Blom, Paul W. M.; Cornil, Jérôme

    2012-01-01

    Electron-and hole-transport properties of the n-type copolymer poly{[N, N'-bis(2-octyldodecyl)-naphthalene-1,4,5,8-bis(dicarboximide)-2,6-diyl]-alt-5,5'-(2,2'-dithiophene)} [P(NDI2OD-T2), PolyeraActivInk (TM) N2200] are investigated. Electron- and hole-only devices with Ohmic contacts are

  6. Zeeman splitting spin filter in a single quantum dot electron transport with Coulomb blockade effect

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Wenxi

    2014-01-01

    Electron spin filter induced by Zeeman splitting in a few-electron quantum dot coupled to two normal electrodes is studied considering Coulomb blockade effect. Based on the Anderson model and Liouville-von Neumann equation, equation of motion of the system is derived and analytical solutions are achieved. Transport windows for perfectly polarized current, partially polarized current and non-polarized current induced by the Zeeman splitting energy and Coulomb blockade potential are exploited. ...

  7. Diffusive transport of energetic electrons in the solar corona: X-ray and radio diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musset, S.; Kontar, E.; Vilmer, N.

    2017-12-01

    Solar flares are associated with efficient particule acceleration. Energetic electrons are diagnosed through X-ray and radio emissions produced as they interact in the solar atmosphere. Particle transport from the acceleration region to the emission sites has a crucial impact on the interpretation of particle emissions in the context of acceleration models, and remains one of the challenging topics in the field of high energy solar physics. In order to address the transport of flare accelerated electrons in the low corona, we used the imaging spectroscopy capabilities of the RHESSI spacecraft to analyze X-ray emissions during the 2004 May 21 flare. We show that non-thermal energetic electrons are trapped in the coronal part of the flaring loop. In the hypothesis of turbulent pitch-angle scattering of energetic electrons (Kontar et al, 2014), diffusive transport of energetic electrons can lead to a confinement of accelerated electrons in the coronal part of the loop. We show that this model can explain the X-ray observations with a scattering mean free path of the order of 108 cm, much smaller than the length of the whole loop. Such results are compared to the observation of the gyrosynchrotron emission of the same flare (Kuznetsov et al, 2015). The diffusive transport model can explain the radio observations with a scattering mean free path of the order or 107 cm. The presented combination of X-ray and radio diagnostics during a flare leads to the first estimate of the energy dependence of the scattering mean free path of energetic electrons in the low corona. This result is comparable with studies of the energy dependence of the scattering mean free path of electrons in the interplanetary medium.

  8. Non-steady-state transport of superthermal electrons in the plasmasphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khazanov, G.V.; Liemohn, M.W.; Gombosi, T.I.; Nagy, A.F. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States))

    1993-12-23

    Numerical solutions to the time-dependent kinetic equation, which describes the transport of superthermal electrons in the plasmasphere between the two conjugate ionospheres, are presented. The model calculates the distribution function as a function of time, field-aligned distance, energy, and pitch-angle. The processes of refilling, depleting, and establishing steady-state conditions of superthermal electrons in the plasmasphere are discussed. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Physiology and biochemistry of reduction of azo compounds by Shewanella strains relevant to electron transport chain

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Yi-Guo; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2010-01-01

    Azo dyes are toxic, highly persistent, and ubiquitously distributed in the environments. The large-scale production and application of azo dyes result in serious environmental pollution of water and sediments. Bacterial azo reduction is an important process for removing this group of contaminants. Recent advances in this area of research reveal that azo reduction by Shewanella strains is coupled to the oxidation of electron donors and linked to the electron transport and energy conservation i...

  10. Effect of torsion angle on electronic transport through different anchoring groups in molecular junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Caijuan; Fang Changfeng; Zhao Peng; Xie Shijie; Liu Desheng

    2009-01-01

    By applying nonequilibrium Green's function formalism combined with first-principles density functional theory, we investigate effect of torsion angle on electronic transport properties of 4,4 ' -biphenyl molecule connected with different anchoring groups (dithiocarboxylate and thiol group) to Au(111) electrodes. The influence of the HOMO-LUMO gaps and the spatial distributions of molecular orbitals on the quantum transport through the molecular device are discussed. Theoretical results show that the torsion angle plays important role in conducting behavior of molecular devices. By changing the torsion angle between two phenyl rings, namely changing the magnitude of the intermolecular coupling effect, a different transport behavior can be observed in these two systems.

  11. Electron transport and nonlinear optical properties of substituted aryldimesityl boranes: a DFT study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaf Hussain Pandith

    Full Text Available A comprehensive theoretical study was carried out on a series of aryldimesityl borane (DMB derivatives using Density Functional theory. Optimized geometries and electronic parameters like electron affinity, reorganization energy, frontiers molecular contours, polarizability and hyperpolarizability have been calculated by employing B3PW91/6-311++G (d, p level of theory. Our results show that the Hammett function and geometrical parameters correlates well with the reorganization energies and hyperpolarizability for the series of DMB derivatives studied in this work. The orbital energy study reveals that the electron releasing substituents increase the LUMO energies and electron withdrawing substituents decrease the LUMO energies, reflecting the electron transport character of aryldimesityl borane derivatives. From frontier molecular orbitals diagram it is evident that mesityl rings act as the donor, while the phenylene and Boron atom appear as acceptors in these systems. The calculated hyperpolarizability of secondary amine derivative of DMB is 40 times higher than DMB (1. The electronic excitation contributions to the hyperpolarizability studied by using TDDFT calculation shows that hyperpolarizability correlates well with dipole moment in ground and excited state and excitation energy in terms of the two-level model. Thus the results of these calculations can be helpful in designing the DMB derivatives for efficient electron transport and nonlinear optical material by appropriate substitution with electron releasing or withdrawing substituents on phenyl ring of DMB system.

  12. Relativistic electron transport in wire and foil targets driven by intense short pulse lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R. J.; Stephens, R. B.; Wei, M.; Freeman, R. R.; Hill, J.; van Woerkom, L. D.

    2006-10-01

    We model intense laser driven electron transport in wires and foils with the new implicit hybrid code e-PLAS. We focus on background plasma heating for Fast Ignitor applications. The model tracks collisional relativistic PIC electrons undergoing scatter and drag in a background plasma of colliding cold electron and ion Eulerian fluids. Application to 10 μm diameter, 250 μm long, fully ionized carbon wires with an attached cone [Kodama et al. Nature 432 1005 (2004)], exposed to 1 ps, 10^19 W/cm^2 pulses in a 30 μm centered spot, directly calculates resistive Joule heating of the background electrons in the wire to 1.7 KeV. 150 MG magnetic fields arise at the wire surfaces corresponding to hot electron flow outside the wire and a return electron flow just within it. Shorter wires (25 μm) exhibit hot electron recycling. Preliminary simulations indicate that reduction of the cone to a 30 μm diameter nail head produces little change in these results. We also report on tapered wires, wires attached to foils, and the modifying effects of pre-plasma on electron transport into the foils.

  13. The theory and simulation of relativistic electron beam transport in the ion-focused regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanekamp, S.B.; Holloway, J.P.; Kammash, T.; Gilgenbach, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    Several recent experiments involving relativistic electron beam (REB) transport in plasma channels show two density regimes for efficient transport; a low-density regime known as the ion-focused regime (IFR) and a high-pressure regime. The results obtained in this paper use three separate models to explain the dependency of REB transport efficiency on the plasma density in the IFR. Conditions for efficient beam transport are determined by examining equilibrium solutions of the Vlasov--Maxwell equations under conditions relevant to IFR transport. The dynamic force balance required for efficient IFR transport is studied using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. These simulations provide new insight into the transient beam front physics as well as the dynamic approach to IFR equilibrium. Nonlinear solutions to the beam envelope are constructed to explain oscillations in the beam envelope observed in the PIC simulations but not contained in the Vlasov equilibrium analysis. A test particle analysis is also developed as a method to visualize equilibrium solutions of the Vlasov equation. This not only provides further insight into the transport mechanism but also illustrates the connections between the three theories used to describe IFR transport. Separately these models provide valuable information about transverse beam confinement; together they provide a clear physical understanding of REB transport in the IFR

  14. Electronic transport of molecular nanowires by considering of electron hopping energy between the second neighbors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Rabani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the electronic conductance of molecular nanowires by considering the electron hopping between the first and second neighbors with the help Green’s function method at the tight-binding approach. We investigate three types of structures including linear uniform and periodic chains as well as poly(p-phenylene molecule which are embedded between two semi-infinite metallic leads. The results show that in the second neighbor approximation, the resonance, anti-resonance and Fano phenomena occur in the conductance spectra of these structures. Moreover, a new gap is observed at edge of the lead energy band wich its width depends on the value of the electron hopping energy between the second neighbors. In the systems including intrinsic gap, this hopping energy shifts the gap in the energy spectra.

  15. Diffusive Transport of Several Hundred keV Electrons in the Earth's Slot Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Turner, D. L.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Baker, D. N.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the gradual diffusion of energetic electrons from the inner edge of the outer radiation belt into the slot region. The Van Allen Probes observed slow inward diffusion and decay of 200-600 keV electrons following the intense geomagnetic storm that occurred on 17 March 2013. During the 10 day nondisturbed period following the storm, the peak of electron fluxes gradually moved from L 2.7 to L 2.4, and the flux levels decreased by a factor of 2-4 depending on the electron energy. We simulated the radial intrusion and decay of electrons using a three-dimensional diffusion code, which reproduced the energy-dependent transport of electrons from 100 keV to 1 MeV in the slot region. At energies of 100-200 keV, the electrons experience fast transport across the slot region due to the dominance of radial diffusion; at energies of 200-600 keV, the electrons gradually diffuse and decay in the slot region due to the comparable rate of radial diffusion and pitch angle scattering by plasmaspheric hiss; at energies of E > 700 keV, the electrons stopped diffusing near the inner edge of outer radiation belt due to the dominant pitch angle scattering loss. In addition to plasmaspheric hiss, magnetosonic waves and VLF transmitters can cause the loss of high pitch angle electrons, relaxing the sharp "top-hat" shaped pitch angle distributions created by plasmaspheric hiss. Our simulation indicates the importance of balance between radial diffusion and loss through pitch angle scattering in forming the diffusive intrusion of energetic electrons across the slot region.

  16. Diffusive transport of several hundred keV electrons in the Earth's slot region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the gradual diffusion of energetic electrons from the inner edge of the outer radiation belt into the slot region. The Van Allen Probes observed slow inward diffusion and decay of 200-600 keV electrons following the intense geomagnetic storm that occurred on 17 March 2013. During the 10-day non-disturbed period following the storm, the peak of electron fluxes gradually moved from L 2.7 to L 2.4, and the flux levels decreased by a factor of 2-4 depending on the electron energy. We simulated the radial intrusion and decay of electrons using a 3-dimentional diffusion code, which reproduced the energy-dependent transport of electrons from 100 keV to 1 MeV in the slot region. At energies of 100-200 keV, the electrons experience fast transport across the slot region due to the dominance of radial diffusion; at energies of 200-600 keV, the electrons gradually diffuse and decay in the slot region due to the comparable radial diffusion rate and pitch angle scattering rate by plasmaspheric hiss; at energies of E > 700 keV, the electrons stopped diffusing near the inner edge of outer radiation belt due to the dominant pitch angle scattering loss. In addition to plasmaspheric hiss, magnetosonic waves and VLF waves can cause the loss of high pitch angle electrons, relaxing the sharp `top-hat' shaped pitch angle distributions created by plasmaspheric hiss. Our simulation indicates the importance of radial diffusion and pitch angle scattering in forming the diffusive intrusion of energetic electrons across the slot region.

  17. The Possibilities of Installing Electronic CMR Waybill in Road Transport Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvydas Baublys

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the article opportunities of changing paper CMR waybill into electronic are analysed, whereas the paper CMR waybill does not guarantee operational information exchange between participants of logistics chain components in road transport. Due to this reason use ofelectronic CMR waybill becomes more and more important. According to researches done by article authors, the article submitted the limitations of paper CMR waybill, benefits of electronic CMR waybill, concept model of implementing electronic CMR waybill and application possibilities of supply chain components.

  18. Effect of increasing length on the electronic transport of an armchair graphene nano-ribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Aghamiri Esfahani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, we have investigated the effect of increasing length on the electronic transport of an armchair graphene nano-ribbons with nitrogen atom impurity and without impurity. The semi-infinite, one-dimensional molecular systems are connected to two electrodes and the electron-electron interaction is ignored. The system is described by a simple tight binding model. All calculations are based on the Green's function and Landauer–Buttiker approach, and the electrodes are described in a wide band approximation.

  19. The effect of non-uniformities on the measured transport parameters of electron swarms in hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blevin, H.A.; Fletcher, J.; Hunter, S.R.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of transport parameters of pulsed electron swarms moving through a low-pressure gas by observation of the photon flux resulting from electron-molecule collisions have been recently reported by Blevin et al. (J. Phys. D., 9:465, 471 and 1671 (1976)). One of the possible sources of error in this kind of experiment is the variation of mean electron energy through the swarm. This effect is considered here along with the resulting variation of ionisation and excitation frequency through the swarm. The validity of the experimental method is considered in the light of the above factors. (author)

  20. The effect of non-uniformities on the measured transport parameters of electron swarms in hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blevin, H.A.; Fletcher, J.; Hunter, S.R.

    1978-05-01

    Measurements of transport parameters of pulsed electron swarms moving through a low pressure gas by observation of the photon flux resulting from electron-molecule collisions have been recently reported. One of the possible sources of error in this kind of experiment is the variation of mean electron energy through the swarm. This effect is considered here along with the resulting variation of ionization and excitation frequency through the swarm. The validity of the experimental method is considered in the light of the above factors

  1. Simulation of the transport of low-energy electrons in various forms of carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrissol, M.; Combes, M.A.; Patau, J.P. (Centre de Physique Atomique, Toulouse (France))

    1981-10-01

    This work describes a Monte Carlo transport simulation of electrons with energies ranging from 10 eV to 30 keV in homogeneous and porous graphites and amorphous carbon. We have used results of Lindhard theory adapted by Ritchie for the free electron model and by Ashley who takes electron bond into account. In the case of porous graphite we have considered the pore crossing as an interaction with the possibility of surface plasmon creation at interfaces. We compare our results with Jacobi experiments and Ashley calculations.

  2. Nonlinear ion-mixing-mode particle transport in the dissipative trapped electron regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.S.; Terry, P.W.

    1993-09-01

    The nonlinear particle transport arising from the convection of nonadiabatic electron density by ion temperature gradient driven turbulence is examined for trapped electron collisionality regimes. The renormalized dissipative nonadiabatic trapped electron phase space density response is derived and used to calculate the nonlinear particle flux along with an ansatz for the turbulently broadened frequency spectrum. In the lower temperature end of this regime, trapped electrons are collisional and all components of the quasilinear particle flux are outward (i.e., in the direction of the gradients). Nonlinear effects can alter the phase between the nonadiabatic trapped electron phase space density and the electrostatic potential, producing inward components in the particle flux. Specifically, both turbulent shifting of the peak of the frequency spectrum and nonlinear source terms in the trapped electron response can give rise to inward components. However, in the dissipative regime these terms are small and the trapped electron response remains dominantly laminar. When the trapped electrons are collisionless, there is a temperature threshold above which the electron temperature gradient driven component of the quasilinear particle flux changes sign and becomes inward. For finite amplitude turbulence, however, turbulent broadening of both the electron collisional resonance and the frequency spectrum removes tills threshold., and the temperature gradient driven component remains outward

  3. Electron transport in heterogeneous media; Transporte de eletrons em meios heterogeneos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcao, Rossana Cavalieri

    1992-05-15

    In this work it is presented a model to calculate dose enhancement in the vicinity of plane interfaces irradiated by therapeutic electron beams. The proposed model is based on an approximation of the Boltzmann Equation. The solutions presented to the equation are exact on its angular dependency, making it possible to observe that at low Z/high Z interfaces the dose enhancement is due to an increase of the backscattering. For the inverse situation a decrease of the backscattering can be observed. Calculations have been made for some tissue-metal interfaces irradiated by 13 MeV electron beam. The dose perturbations in tissue were obtained and the results were compared with experimental data as well as Monte Carlo simulations. In both cases the agreement found was very good. (author)

  4. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Modulation of Transport in Graphene Nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A; Qi, Zhengqing John; Crook, Alexander; Ahn, Jae-Hyuk; Johnson, A T Charlie; Drndić, Marija

    2016-04-26

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) electronic transport measurements in nanoscale systems have been previously confined to two-electrode configurations. Here, we use the focused electron beam of a TEM to fabricate a three-electrode geometry from a continuous 2D material where the third electrode operates as side gate in a field-effect transistor configuration. Specifically, we demonstrate TEM nanosculpting of freestanding graphene sheets into graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with proximal graphene side gates, together with in situ TEM transport measurements of the resulting GNRs, whose conductance is modulated by the side-gate potential. The TEM electron beam displaces carbon atoms from the graphene sheet, and its position is controlled with nanometer precision, allowing the fabrication of GNRs of desired width immediately prior to each transport measurement. We also model the corresponding electric field profile in this three-terminal geometry. The implementation of an in situ TEM three-terminal platform shown here further extends the use of a TEM for device characterization. This approach can be easily generalized for the investigation of other nanoscale systems (2D materials, nanowires, and single molecules) requiring the correlation of transport and atomic structure.

  5. Photosynthetic electron transport in thylakoid preparations from two marine red algae (Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A C; Larkum, A W

    1983-01-01

    Thylakoid membrane preparations active in photosynthetic electron transport have been obtained from two marine red algae, Griffithsia monilis and Anotrichium tenue. High concentrations (0.5-1.0 M) of salts such as phosphate, citrate, succinate and tartrate stabilized functional binding of phycobilisomes to the membrane and also stabilized Photosystem II-catalysed electron-transport activity. High concentrations (1.0 M) of chloride and nitrate, or 30 mM-Tricine/NaOH buffer (pH 7.2) in the absence of salts, detached phycobilisomes and inhibited electron transport through Photosystem II. The O2-evolving system was identified as the electron-transport chain component that was inhibited under these conditions. Washing membranes with buffers containing 1.0-1.5 M-sorbitol and 5-50 mM concentrations of various salts removed the outer part of the phycobilisome but retained 30-70% of the allophycocyanin 'core' of the phycobilisome. These preparations were 30-70% active in O2 evolution compared with unwashed membranes. In the sensitivity of their O2-evolving apparatus to the composition of the medium in vitro, the red algae resembled blue-green algae and differed from other eukaryotic algae and higher plants. It is suggested that an environment of structured water may be essential for the functional integrity of Photosystem II in biliprotein-containing algae. PMID:6860312

  6. Photosynthetic control of electron transport and the regulation of gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foyer, C.H.; Neukermans, J.; Queval, G.; Noctor, G.; Harbinson, J.

    2012-01-01

    The term ‘photosynthetic control’ describes the short- and long-term mechanisms that regulate reactions in the photosynthetic electron transport (PET) chain so that the rate of production of ATP and NADPH is coordinated with the rate of their utilization in metabolism. At low irradiances these

  7. Study of structural and electronic transport properties of Ce-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The structural and electronic transport properties of La1-CeMnO3 (=0.0-1.0) have been studied. All the samples exhibit orthorhombic crystal symmetry and the unit cell volume decreases with Ce doping. They also make a metal–insulator transition (MIT) and transition temperature increases with increase in Ce ...

  8. Using Adobe Flash animations of electron transport chain to teach and learn biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplá, Milada; Klímová, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Teaching the subject of the electron transport chain is one of the most challenging aspects of the chemistry curriculum at the high school level. This article presents an educational program called "Electron Transport Chain" which consists of 14 visual animations including a biochemistry quiz. The program was created in the Adobe Flash CS3 Professional animation program and is designed for high school chemistry students. Our goal is to develop educational materials that facilitate the comprehension of this complex subject through dynamic animations which show the course of the electron transport chain and simultaneously explain its nature. We record the process of the electron transport chain, including connections with oxidative phosphorylation, in such a way as to minimize the occurrence of discrepancies in interpretation. The educational program was evaluated in high schools through the administration of a questionnaire, which contained 12 opened-ended items and which required participants to evaluate the graphics of the animations, chemical content, student preferences, and its suitability for high school biochemistry teaching. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  9. Targeting the Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain Complexes for the Induction of Apoptosis and Cancer Treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rohlena, Jakub; Dong, L. F.; Neužil, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 3 (2013), s. 377-389 ISSN 1389-2010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Cancer * mitochondria * electron transport chain Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.511, year: 2013

  10. Giant electron-hole transport asymmetry in ultra-short quantum transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, A. C.; Tayari, V.; Porter, J. M.; Champagne, A. R.

    2017-05-01

    Making use of bipolar transport in single-wall carbon nanotube quantum transistors would permit a single device to operate as both a quantum dot and a ballistic conductor or as two quantum dots with different charging energies. Here we report ultra-clean 10 to 100 nm scale suspended nanotube transistors with a large electron-hole transport asymmetry. The devices consist of naked nanotube channels contacted with sections of tube under annealed gold. The annealed gold acts as an n-doping top gate, allowing coherent quantum transport, and can create nanometre-sharp barriers. These tunnel barriers define a single quantum dot whose charging energies to add an electron or a hole are vastly different (e-h charging energy asymmetry). We parameterize the e-h transport asymmetry by the ratio of the hole and electron charging energies ηe-h. This asymmetry is maximized for short channels and small band gap tubes. In a small band gap device, we demonstrate the fabrication of a dual functionality quantum device acting as a quantum dot for holes and a much longer quantum bus for electrons. In a 14 nm-long channel, ηe-h reaches up to 2.6 for a device with a band gap of 270 meV. The charging energies in this device exceed 100 meV.

  11. Tuning the electronic transport anisotropy in α-phase phosphorene through superlattice design

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuanyuan; Xiong, Shiyun; Xia, Feifei; Shao, Zhibin; Zhao, Jianwei; Zhang, Xiujuan; Jie, Jiansheng; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2018-02-01

    Rational tuning the anisotropic electronic properties of monolayer phosphorene is essential to their applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices. By combining the density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green's function method, we developed a strategy to tune the anisotropic transport properties of phosphorene by designing stable arsenic-phosphorene (A sxP1 -x ) superlattice (SL). It was found that, with a careful design of As:P ratio and atomic arrangement, the anisotropic transport properties could be tuned in a wide range. The transport current along the zigzag direction, which is very low in pristine phosphorene, was gradually enhanced by increasing the As:P ratio, and even became larger than that along armchair direction when the As:P ratio achieved 1:1 under a given arrangement of As atoms in A sxP1 -x SL. The tunable anisotropic transport properties of A sxP1 -x SL are attributed to the interplay between the different scattering rates related to the number and orientation of As-P interfaces. This finding demonstrates that the A sxP1 -x SL design could be an effective approach to tune the anisotropic electronic properties of monolayer phosphorene, which is important for the development of high-performance electronic and optoelectronic devices based on phosphorene.

  12. Structural, magnetic and electronic transport studies of RAgSn2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Structural, magnetic and electronic transport studies of RAgSn2 compounds (R = Y, Tb, Dy, Ho and Er) with Cu3Au-type. L ROMAKAa, V V ROMAKAb, I LOTOTSKAa, A SZYTULAc, B KUZHELa, A ZARZYCKIc,. E K HLILd,∗ and D FRUCHARTd. aDepartment of Inorganic Chemistry, Ivan Franko Lviv National University, Kyryl ...

  13. Electron transport in the stochastic fields of RFP ZT-40M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjabi, A.; Verma, A.; Kim, Myung-Hee; Boozer, A.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, we use our newly developed Monte Carlo Method to study the transport of electrons in stochastic magnetic fields of the device RFP ZT4OM. The results of this calculation will be compared with the Rechester-Rosenbluth scaling

  14. Extension of a biochemical model for the generalized stoichiometry of electron transport limited C3 photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, X.; Oijen, van M.; Schapendonk, A.H.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    The widely used steady-state model of Farquhar et al. (Planta 149: 78-90, 1980) for C-3 photosynthesis was developed on the basis of linear whole-chain (non-cyclic) electron transport. In this model, calculation of the RuBP-regeneration limited CO2-assimilation rate depends on whether it is

  15. Model for ballistic spin-transport in ferromagnet/two-dimensional electron gas/ferromagnet structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schapers, T; Nitta, J; Heersche, HB; Takayanagi, H

    The spin dependent conductance of a ferromagnet/two-dimensional electron gas ferromagnet structure is theoretically examined in the ballistic transport regime. It is shown that the spin signal can be improved considerably by making use of the spin filtering effect of a barrier at the ferromagnet

  16. Promotion of Cyclic Electron Transport Around Photosystem I with the Development of C4 Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munekage, Yuri Nakajima; Taniguchi, Yukimi Y

    2016-05-01

    C4 photosynthesis is present in approximately 7,500 species classified into 19 families, including monocots and eudicots. In the majority of documented cases, a two-celled CO2-concentrating system that uses a metabolic cycle of four-carbon compounds is employed. C4 photosynthesis repeatedly evolved from C3 photosynthesis, possibly driven by the survival advantages it bestows in the hot, often dry, and nutrient-poor soils of the tropics and subtropics. The development of the C4 metabolic cycle greatly increased the ATP demand in chloroplasts during the evolution of malic enzyme-type C4 photosynthesis, and the additional ATP required for C4 metabolism may be produced by the cyclic electron transport around PSI. Recent studies have revealed the nature of cyclic electron transport and the elevation of its components during C4 evolution. In this review, we discuss the energy requirements of C3 and C4 photosynthesis, the current model of cyclic electron transport around PSI and how cyclic electron transport is promoted during C4 evolution using studies on the genus Flaveria, which contains a number of closely related C3, C4 and C3-C4 intermediate species. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Isolating the segment of the mitochondrial electron transport chain responsible for mitochondrial damage during cardiac ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qun; Yin, Guotian; Stewart, Sarah; Hu, Ying [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Lesnefsky, Edward J., E-mail: edward.lesnefsky@va.gov [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Medical Service, Louis Stokes Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2010-07-09

    Ischemia damages the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), mediated in part by damage generated by the mitochondria themselves. Mitochondrial damage resulting from ischemia, in turn, leads to cardiac injury during reperfusion. The goal of the present study was to localize the segment of the ETC that produces the ischemic mitochondrial damage. We tested if blockade of the proximal ETC at complex I differed from blockade distal in the chain at cytochrome oxidase. Isolated rabbit hearts were perfused for 15 min followed by 30 min stop-flow ischemia at 37 {sup o}C. Amobarbital (2.5 mM) or azide (5 mM) was used to block proximal (complex I) or distal (cytochrome oxidase) sites in the ETC. Time control hearts were buffer-perfused for 45 min. Subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM) were isolated. Ischemia decreased cytochrome c content in SSM but not in IFM compared to time control. Blockade of electron transport at complex I preserved the cytochrome c content in SSM. In contrast, blockade of electron transport at cytochrome oxidase with azide did not retain cytochrome c in SSM during ischemia. Since blockade of electron transport at complex III also prevented cytochrome c loss during ischemia, the specific site that elicits mitochondrial damage during ischemia is likely located in the segment between complex III and cytochrome oxidase.

  18. Biguanides sensitize leukemia cells to ABT-737-induced apoptosis by inhibiting mitochondrial electron transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Juliana; Pan, Rongqing; Lee, Jason T.C.; Enciso, Leonardo; Suarez, Marta; Duque, Jorge Eduardo; Jaramillo, Daniel; Lopez, Catalina; Morales, Ludis; Bornmann, William; Konopleva, Marina; Krystal, Gerald; Andreeff, Michael; Samudio, Ismael

    2016-01-01

    Metformin displays antileukemic effects partly due to activation of AMPK and subsequent inhibition of mTOR signaling. Nevertheless, Metformin also inhibits mitochondrial electron transport at complex I in an AMPK-independent manner, Here we report that Metformin and rotenone inhibit mitochondrial electron transport and increase triglyceride levels in leukemia cell lines, suggesting impairment of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). We also report that, like other FAO inhibitors, both agents and the related biguanide, Phenformin, increase sensitivity to apoptosis induction by the bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-737 supporting the notion that electron transport antagonizes activation of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in leukemia cells. Both biguanides and rotenone induce superoxide generation in leukemia cells, indicating that oxidative damage may sensitize toABT-737 induced apoptosis. In addition, we demonstrate that Metformin sensitizes leukemia cells to the oligomerization of Bak, suggesting that the observed synergy with ABT-737 is mediated, at least in part, by enhanced outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Notably, Phenformin was at least 10-fold more potent than Metformin in abrogating electron transport and increasing sensitivity to ABT-737, suggesting that this agent may be better suited for targeting hematological malignancies. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism by Metformin or Phenformin is associated with increased leukemia cell susceptibility to induction of intrinsic apoptosis, and provide a rationale for clinical studies exploring the efficacy of combining biguanides with the orally bioavailable derivative of ABT-737, Venetoclax. PMID:27283492

  19. Electron Transport through Single and Multiple Quantum Dots : The Formation of a One-Dimensional Bandstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, B.J. van; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Enden, A. van der; Harmans, C.J.P.M.

    1991-01-01

    We describe transport experiments performed on ballistic submicron devices which are defined in the two dimensional electron gas of GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures by means of metallic gates. Conductance measurements on single quantum dots reveal the formation of magnetically induced zero-dimensional

  20. Quantum and classical ballistic transport in a chaotic 2D electron channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna A, G.A.; Rodriguez, M.A.; Krokhin, A.; Na, K.; Mendez, A.

    1998-01-01

    We review recent results concerning the quantum and classical dynamical properties of ballistic electrons in a ripple channel, their transport properties and its classical-quantum correspondence is analyzed in terms of q uantum Poincare plots , energy level statistics, and certain features of the energy-band spectra. (Author)

  1. Effects of Temperature on Electron Transport in Arum maculatum Mitochondria 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Neil D.; Cammack, Richard

    1985-01-01

    The effects of temperature upon the respiratory pathways of Arum maculatum mitochondria have been studied. The alternate oxidase sustained a greater proportion of the total respiration at low temperatures than at higher temperatures. Arrhenius plots of respiratory activities show two discontinuities, one at 14°C and one at 21°C. The lower temperature discontinuity was associated with electron transport from succinate dehydrogenase to the alternative oxidase, enzymes that face the inner side of the membrane while the higher temperature discontinuity was associated with electron transport from the external NADH dehydrogenase to cytochrome c oxidase, which face the outer side of the membrane. Both discontinuities resulted in a decrease in the activation energy for electron transport on one side of the membrane. Arrhenius plots of transmembrane electron transport showed discontinuities at both 14° and 21°C but the upper discontinuity resulted in an increase in the activation energy. Activation energies determined for the respiratory activities show that above 21°C the exogenous NADH-cytochrome pathway and the succinate-alternative oxidase pathway were lower than those for the NADH-alternative pathway or the succinate cytochrome pathway. PMID:16664411

  2. Electronic transport properties of 1D-defects in graphene and other 2D-systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willke, P.; Wenderoth, M. [IV. Physical Institute, Solids and Nanostructures, Georg-August-University Goettingen (Germany); Schneider, M.A. [Lehrstuhl fuer Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The continuous progress in device miniaturization demands a thorough understanding of the electron transport processes involved. The influence of defects - discontinuities in the perfect and translational invariant crystal lattice - plays a crucial role here. For graphene in particular, they limit the carrier mobility often demanded for applications by contributing additional sources of scattering to the sample. Due to its two-dimensional nature graphene serves as an ideal system to study electron transport in the presence of defects, because one-dimensional defects like steps, grain boundaries and interfaces are easy to characterize and have profound effects on the transport properties. While their contribution to the resistance of a sample can be extracted by carefully conducted transport experiments, scanning probe methods are excellent tools to study the influence of defects locally. In this letter, the authors review the results of scattering at local defects in graphene and other 2D systems by scanning tunneling potentiometry, 4-point-probe microscopy, Kelvin probe force microscopy and conventional transport measurements. Besides the comparison of the different defect resistances important for device fabrication, the underlying scattering mechanisms are discussed giving insight into the general physics of electron scattering at defects. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Response matrix Monte Carlo based on a general geometry local calculation for electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, C.T.; Rathkopf, J.A.; Martin, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    A Response Matrix Monte Carlo (RMMC) method has been developed for solving electron transport problems. This method was born of the need to have a reliable, computationally efficient transport method for low energy electrons (below a few hundred keV) in all materials. Today, condensed history methods are used which reduce the computation time by modeling the combined effect of many collisions but fail at low energy because of the assumptions required to characterize the electron scattering. Analog Monte Carlo simulations are prohibitively expensive since electrons undergo coulombic scattering with little state change after a collision. The RMMC method attempts to combine the accuracy of an analog Monte Carlo simulation with the speed of the condensed history methods. Like condensed history, the RMMC method uses probability distributions functions (PDFs) to describe the energy and direction of the electron after several collisions. However, unlike the condensed history method the PDFs are based on an analog Monte Carlo simulation over a small region. Condensed history theories require assumptions about the electron scattering to derive the PDFs for direction and energy. Thus the RMMC method samples from PDFs which more accurately represent the electron random walk. Results show good agreement between the RMMC method and analog Monte Carlo. 13 refs., 8 figs

  4. A Comparative Study of Spectral Auroral Intensity Predictions From Multiple Electron Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Guy; Michell, Robert; Samara, Marilia; Hampton, Donald; Hecht, James; Solomon, Stanley; Jahn, Jorg-Micha

    2018-01-01

    It is important to routinely examine and update models used to predict auroral emissions resulting from precipitating electrons in Earth's magnetotail. These models are commonly used to invert spectral auroral ground-based images to infer characteristics about incident electron populations when in situ measurements are unavailable. In this work, we examine and compare auroral emission intensities predicted by three commonly used electron transport models using varying electron population characteristics. We then compare model predictions to same-volume in situ electron measurements and ground-based imaging to qualitatively examine modeling prediction error. Initial comparisons showed differences in predictions by the GLobal airglOW (GLOW) model and the other transport models examined. Chemical reaction rates and radiative rates in GLOW were updated using recent publications, and predictions showed better agreement with the other models and the same-volume data, stressing that these rates are important to consider when modeling auroral processes. Predictions by each model exhibit similar behavior for varying atmospheric constants, energies, and energy fluxes. Same-volume electron data and images are highly correlated with predictions by each model, showing that these models can be used to accurately derive electron characteristics and ionospheric parameters based solely on multispectral optical imaging data.

  5. Generalized Fokker-Planck theory for electron and photon transport in biological tissues: application to radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbrant, Edgar; Frank, Martin

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we study a deterministic method for particle transport in biological tissues. The method is specifically developed for dose calculations in cancer therapy and for radiological imaging. Generalized Fokker-Planck (GFP) theory [Leakeas and Larsen, Nucl. Sci. Eng. 137 (2001), pp. 236-250] has been developed to improve the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation in cases where scattering is forward-peaked and where there is a sufficient amount of large-angle scattering. We compare grid-based numerical solutions to FP and GFP in realistic medical applications. First, electron dose calculations in heterogeneous parts of the human body are performed. Therefore, accurate electron scattering cross sections are included and their incorporation into our model is extensively described. Second, we solve GFP approximations of the radiative transport equation to investigate reflectance and transmittance of light in biological tissues. All results are compared with either Monte Carlo or discrete-ordinates transport solutions.

  6. A Transport Model for Non-Local Heating of Electrons in ICP Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C. H.; Bose, Deepak; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A new model has been developed for non-local heating of electrons in ICP reactors, based on a hydrodynamic approach. The model has been derived using the electron momentum conservation in azimuthal direction with electromagnetic and frictional forces respectively as driving force and damper of harmonic oscillatory motion of electrons. The resulting transport equations include the convection of azimuthal electron momentum in radial and axial directions, thereby accounting for the non-local effects. The azimuthal velocity of electrons and the resulting electrical current are coupled to the Maxwell's relations, thus forming a self-consistent model for non-local heating. This model is being implemented along with a set of Navier-Stokes equations for plasma dynamics and gas flow to simulate low-pressure (few mTorr's) ICP discharges. Characteristics of nitrogen plasma in a TCP 300mm etch reactor is being studied. The results will be compared against the available Langmuir probe measurements.

  7. Transportation Accessibility and Location Choice of Japanese-Funded Electronic Information Manufacturing Firms in Shanghai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haining Jiang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of globalization, information communication and transportation, it is argued that the effect of transportation accessibility in the location choice of manufacturing firms has diminished. However, comprehensive and systematic research on the impact of transportation accessibility on firm location choice in cities remains scarce. Taking Shanghai as the research area, this paper uses a catalog of Japanese-funded electronic information manufacturing firms to explore the influence of transportation accessibility on their location choice. The paper first describes firm distribution using the nuclear density estimation method. The Poisson regression model is then used to estimate the significance of transportation accessibility in influencing firm location. The empirical results show that most of the firms are concentrated in the inner suburbs of Shanghai, with only a small number in the outer suburban areas. The spatial coupling relationship between firm distribution and transportation accessibility is significant. These firms tend to choose areas with good accessibility to transportation infrastructure, and, in particular, the effect of airport accessibility is significant. Compared with the joint venture enterprises, wholly-owned Japanese enterprises are more inclined to be in areas with better transportation accessibility.

  8. Tokamak electron heat transport by direct numerical simulation of small scale turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labit, B.

    2002-10-01

    In a fusion machine, understanding plasma turbulence, which causes a degradation of the measured energy confinement time, would constitute a major progress in this field. In tokamaks, the measured ion and electron thermal conductivities are of comparable magnitude. The possible sources of turbulence are the temperature and density gradients occurring in a fusion plasma. Whereas the heat losses in the ion channel are reasonably well understood, the origin of the electron losses is more uncertain. In addition to the radial velocity associated to the fluctuations of the electric field, electrons are more affected than ions by the magnetic field fluctuations. In experiments, the confinement time can be conveniently expressed in terms of dimensionless parameters. Although still somewhat too imprecise, these scaling laws exhibit strong dependencies on the normalized pressure β or the normalized Larmor radius, ρ * . The present thesis assesses whether a tridimensional, electromagnetic, nonlinear fluid model of plasma turbulence driven by a specific instability can reproduce the dependence of the experimental electron heat losses on the dimensionless parameters β and ρ * . The investigated interchange instability is the Electron Temperature Gradient driven one (ETG). The model is built by using the set of Braginskii equations. The developed simulation code is global in the sense that a fixed heat flux is imposed at the inner boundary, leaving the gradients free to evolve. From the nonlinear simulations, we have put in light three characteristics for the ETG turbulence: the turbulent transport is essentially electrostatic; the potential and pressure fluctuations form radially elongated cells called streamers; the transport level is very low compared to the experimental values. The thermal transport dependence study has shown a very small role of the normalized pressure, which is in contradiction with the Ohkama's formula. On the other hand, the crucial role of the

  9. Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo studies of electron transport in resistive plate chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bošnjaković, D; Petrović, Z Lj; Dujko, S; White, R D

    2014-01-01

    A multi term theory for solving the Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo simulation technique are used to investigate electron transport in Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) that are used for timing and triggering purposes in many high energy physics experiments at CERN and elsewhere. Using cross sections for electron scattering in C 2 H 2 F 4 , iso-C 4 H 10 and SF 6 as an input in our Boltzmann and Monte Carlo codes, we have calculated data for electron transport as a function of reduced electric field E/N in various C 2 H 2 F 4 /iso-C 4 H 10 /SF 6 gas mixtures used in RPCs in the ALICE, CMS and ATLAS experiments. Emphasis is placed upon the explicit and implicit effects of non-conservative collisions (e.g. electron attachment and/or ionization) on the drift and diffusion. Among many interesting and atypical phenomena induced by the explicit effects of non-conservative collisions, we note the existence of negative differential conductivity (NDC) in the bulk drift velocity component with no indication of any NDC for the flux component in the ALICE timing RPC system. We systematically study the origin and mechanisms for such phenomena as well as the possible physical implications which arise from their explicit inclusion into models of RPCs. Spatially-resolved electron transport properties are calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation technique in order to understand these phenomena. (paper)

  10. Improved atomic data for electron-transport predictions by the codes TIGER and TIGERP: II. Electron stopping and range data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peek, J.M.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1983-04-01

    The electron stopping and range data now used in the TIGER and TIGERP electron-transport codes are extracted and compared with other data for these processes. At the smallest collision energies treated by these codes, E approx. 1 keV, the stopping-power is estimated to be accurate for small-Z targets, to be about 25 percent too small for Z near 36 and to be a factor of three too small for Z > 79. These errors decrease with increasing E and the largest error for any target is roughly 20 percent for E = 10 keV. The closely related continuous-slowing-down range is estimated, at 1 keV, to be about 25 percent too small for small-Z targets and a factor of 2 too large for large-Z targets. The electron-transport problem of reflection from planer surfaces is re-investigated with improved stopping-power data. The effects of this change for the examples considered were about the size of the statistical uncertainties in the calculation, 1 to 2 percent

  11. Electron uptake and delivery sites on plastocyanin in its reactions with the photosynthetic electron transport system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Shahak, Y; Pecht, I

    1982-01-01

    French bean plastocyanin is stoichiometrically and specifically labeled upon reduction by Cr(II)aq ions, yielding a substitution-inert (Cr(III) adduct at the protein surface. The effect of the modification on the activity of plastocyanin in electron transfer between photosystems II and I has been...... investigated. The photoreduction and photooxidation by chloroplasts or by photosystem I reaction centers, respectively, chloroplasts or by photosystem I reaction centers, respectively, of native and Cr(III)-labeled plastocyanin have been compared. It was found that whereas the photoreduction rates of native...... and Cr-labeled plastocyanin were indistinguishable, the rates of photooxidation of the modified protein were markedly attenuated relative to those of the native one. This difference in reactivity clearly reflects the perturbation of the electron transfer pathway to P700. These findings, in conjunction...

  12. Magnetic, electronic transport and magneto-transport behaviors of Co xFe1-xMnP compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, N.K.; Li, Y.B.; Li, D.; Zhang, Q.; Du, J.; Xiong, D.K.; Zhang, W.S.; Ma, S.; Liu, J.J.; Zhang, Z.D.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic, electronic transport and magneto-transport behaviors of Co x Fe 1-x MnP (0.40 ≤ x ≤ 0.75) compounds have been investigated systematically. Co 0.4 Fe 0.6 MnP is antiferromagnetic below its Neel temperature of 310 K, while an anomalous increase of resistivity occurs with decreasing the temperature from 350 to 190 K, which is attributed to the effect of critical spin fluctuation on resistivity. Increasing Co concentration gives rise to dramatic changes of magnetic, electronic transport and magneto-transport behaviors. With increasing temperature, a magnetic phase transition from an antiferromagnetic state to a ferromagnetic one takes place at about 280, 218 and 180 K for Co 0.55 Fe 0.45 MnP, Co 0.65 Fe 0.35 MnP and Co 0.75 Fe 0.25 MnP, respectively. Moreover, the compounds experience a metal-insulator transition at 26, 29, 35 and 45 K, respectively, for x = 0.40, 0.55, 0.65 and 0.75. Maximum magnetoresistance ratios of -8.1%, -4.7% and -2.9% are observed in the Co 0.75 Fe 0.25 MnP, Co 0.65 Fe 0.35 MnP and Co 0.55 Fe 0.45 MnP compounds at an external magnetic field of 5 T. The mechanisms of magnetoresistance behaviors are interpreted in terms of the suppression of spin fluctuations in the antiferromagnets by the applied fields

  13. Modulation of the electron transport properties in graphene nanoribbons doped with BN chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using density-functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function method, the electron transport properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs doped with BN chains are studied by systematically calculating the energy band structure, density of states and the transmission spectra for the systems. The BN chains destroyed the electronic transport properties of the ZGNRs, and an energy gap appeared for the ZGNRs, and displayed variations from a metal to a wide-gap semiconductor. With an increase in the number of BN chains, the band gap increased gradually in the band structure and the transmission coefficient decreased near the Fermi surface. Additionally, the doping position had a significant effect on the electronic properties of the ZGNRs.

  14. Exorcising Ghost Transmission from Electron Transport Calculations: Refighting Old Battles in New Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Matthew; Harrison, Robert

    2014-03-01

    First-principles calculations of electron transport aim to understand the dynamics of electrons as they traverse quantum mechanical systems. For instance, how does electric current travel through a molecule? Despite their successes over the years, these calculations are known to be haunted by several numerical artifacts. Ghost transmission is among the most serious of these unphysical results, causing transmission coefficients to show an extreme dependence on the basis set and to be many orders of magnitude too large. In this talk, we discuss electron transport formalisms, uncover the cause of ghost transmission, develop exorcism strategies, and present several numerical examples. In the end, ghost transmission is a ramification of poorly chosen spatial partitions. Instead of choosing partitions with the basis set (in a manner reminiscent of Mulliken or Löwdin population analyses), the relevant projection operators must be selected without referencing the basis set.

  15. Electron transport properties of indium oxide - indium nitride metal-oxide-semiconductor heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.Y.; Hauguth, S.; Polyakov, V.; Schwierz, F.; Cimalla, V.; Kups, T.; Himmerlich, M.; Schaefer, J.A.; Krischok, S.; Ambacher, O. [Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies, Technical University Ilmenau, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Morales, F.M.; Lozano, J.G.; Gonzalez, D. [Dpto. de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Cadiz, 11510 Cadiz (Spain); Lebedev, V.

    2008-07-01

    The structural, chemical and electron transport properties of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InN heterostructures and oxidized InN epilayers are reported. It is shown that the accumulation of electrons at the InN surface can be manipulated by the formation of a thin surface oxide layer. The epitaxial In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InN heterojunctions show an increase in the electron concentration due to the increasing band banding at the heterointerface. The oxidation of InN results in improved transport properties and in a reduction of the sheet carrier concentration of the InN epilayer very likely caused by a passivation of surface donors. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Non-local transport in a tokamak plasma divertor with recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Assaleh, Z.; Petravic, M.; Vesey, R.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma transport, particle and energy fluxes, near the diverter plate with high recycling has been modeled by using an electron kinetic code (Fokker-Planck International) in conjunction with a two-fluid ambipolar code. We include the effects of ionization and excitation of the hydrogen atoms. The electron energy distribution calculated from the kinetic code shows a large deviation from Maxwellian especially near the plate. This deviation from Maxwellian is due to the non-local transport of the suprathermal electrons from the SOL, and due also to the absorption of the fast electrons by the target plate. The heat flux near the plate is shown to be nonlocal, in that it is not determined uniquely by the local plasma parameters. Therefore the classical transport coefficients in the fluid model must be modified by including a nonlocal effect to produce the kinetic results. The kinetic calculation is compared with those of the fluid code with different values of the electron heat flux limiter factor (f). To reduce the computer load, the initial condition we used corresponds to the equilibrium solution already found with the fluid code with f=0.2. The fluid and Fokker-Planck codes are relaxed until all transients associated with electron dynamics have disappeared. In section 2, we present the kinetic code. The fluid code is presented in section 3. The boundary conditions used in these simulations are given in section 4. Finally the results and conclusion of these simulations are presented in section 5

  17. ePLAS modeling of hot electron transport in nail-wire targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R. J.; Faehl, R.; Kirkpatrick, R.; Ma, T.; Wei, M. S.; Beg, F. N.; Key, M. H.; Stephens, R. B.

    2010-08-01

    Relativistic electron transport in short-pulse laser illuminated nail-wire and foil targets has been studied with the e-PLAS implicit/hybrid plasma simulation code in a cylindrical geometry. The intensities are typical of the Vulcan and Titan petawatt lasers (1.06 μm, 1.7×1020 W/cm2) in 10 μm diameter Gaussian spots, producing hot electrons at a relativistic γ = 3.4 according to Beg scaling, and with 20% absorption assumed. The targets are 200 μm long nail-headed copper wires 20 μm in diameter, and copper foils 120 μm thick. The code dumps energy at constant intensity for a picosecond at the critical surface into an isotropic relativistic Maxwellian particle-in-cell hot electron distribution. The emitted hot particles draw a cold electron return current scattering off the background ions taken as ionized at a fixed Z = 15. Transport of the hot electrons is impeded by the electric field from a Spitzer resistivity acting on the cold electron return current. Assumed emission angle is shown to seriously affect hot e- penetration in the wires.

  18. Cryo Electron Tomography of Herpes Simplex Virus during Axonal Transport and Secondary Envelopment in Primary Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibiricu, Iosune; Huiskonen, Juha T.; Döhner, Katinka; Bradke, Frank; Sodeik, Beate; Grünewald, Kay

    2011-01-01

    During herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) egress in neurons, viral particles travel from the neuronal cell body along the axon towards the synapse. Whether HSV1 particles are transported as enveloped virions as proposed by the ‘married’ model or as non-enveloped capsids suggested by the ‘separate’ model is controversial. Specific viral proteins may form a recruitment platform for microtubule motors that catalyze such transport. However, their subviral location has remained elusive. Here we established a system to analyze herpesvirus egress by cryo electron tomography. At 16 h post infection, we observed intra-axonal transport of progeny HSV1 viral particles in dissociated hippocampal neurons by live-cell fluorescence microscopy. Cryo electron tomography of frozen-hydrated neurons revealed that most egressing capsids were transported independently of the viral envelope. Unexpectedly, we found not only DNA-containing capsids (cytosolic C-capsids), but also capsids lacking DNA (cytosolic A-/B-capsids) in mid-axon regions. Subvolume averaging revealed lower amounts of tegument on cytosolic A-/B-capsids than on C-capsids. Nevertheless, all capsid types underwent active axonal transport. Therefore, even few tegument proteins on the capsid vertices seemed to suffice for transport. Secondary envelopment of capsids was observed at axon terminals. On their luminal face, the enveloping vesicles were studded with typical glycoprotein-like spikes. Furthermore, we noted an accretion of tegument density at the concave cytosolic face of the vesicle membrane in close proximity to the capsids. Three-dimensional analysis revealed that these assembly sites lacked cytoskeletal elements, but that filamentous actin surrounded them and formed an assembly compartment. Our data support the ‘separate model’ for HSV1 egress, i.e. progeny herpes viruses being transported along axons as subassemblies and not as complete virions within transport vesicles. PMID:22194682

  19. The electron transport problem sampling by Monte Carlo individual collision technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsenko, P.A.; Belousov, V.I.

    2005-01-01

    The problem of electron transport is of most interest in all fields of the modern science. To solve this problem the Monte Carlo sampling has to be used. The electron transport is characterized by a large number of individual interactions. To simulate electron transport the 'condensed history' technique may be used where a large number of collisions are grouped into a single step to be sampled randomly. Another kind of Monte Carlo sampling is the individual collision technique. In comparison with condensed history technique researcher has the incontestable advantages. For example one does not need to give parameters altered by condensed history technique like upper limit for electron energy, resolution, number of sub-steps etc. Also the condensed history technique may lose some very important tracks of electrons because of its limited nature by step parameters of particle movement and due to weakness of algorithms for example energy indexing algorithm. There are no these disadvantages in the individual collision technique. This report presents some sampling algorithms of new version BRAND code where above mentioned technique is used. All information on electrons was taken from Endf-6 files. They are the important part of BRAND. These files have not been processed but directly taken from electron information source. Four kinds of interaction like the elastic interaction, the Bremsstrahlung, the atomic excitation and the atomic electro-ionization were considered. In this report some results of sampling are presented after comparison with analogs. For example the endovascular radiotherapy problem (P2) of QUADOS2002 was presented in comparison with another techniques that are usually used. (authors)

  20. Energy level alignment and electron transport through metal/organic contacts. From interfaces to molecular electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abad, Enrique

    2013-07-01

    A new calculational approach to describing metal/organic interfaces. A valuable step towards a better understanding of molecular electronics. Nominated as an outstanding contribution by the Autonomous University of Madrid. In recent years, ever more electronic devices have started to exploit the advantages of organic semiconductors. The work reported in this thesis focuses on analyzing theoretically the energy level alignment of different metal/organic interfaces, necessary to tailor devices with good performance. Traditional methods based on density functional theory (DFT), are not appropriate for analyzing them because they underestimate the organic energy gap and fail to correctly describe the van der Waals forces. Since the size of these systems prohibits the use of more accurate methods, corrections to those DFT drawbacks are desirable. In this work a combination of a standard DFT calculation with the inclusion of the charging energy (U) of the molecule, calculated from first principles, is presented. Regarding the dispersion forces, incorrect long range interaction is substituted by a van der Waals potential. With these corrections, the C60, benzene, pentacene, TTF and TCNQ/Au(111) interfaces are analyzed, both for single molecules and for a monolayer. The results validate the induced density of interface states model.

  1. Thermal electron transport in regimes with low and negative magnetic shear in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitsekhovitch, I.; Litaudon, X.; Moreau, D.; Aniel, T.; Becoulet, A.; Erba, M.; Joffrin, E.; Kazarian-Vibert, F.; Peysson, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The magnetic shear effect on thermal electron transport is studied in a large variety of non-inductive plasmas in Tore Supra. An improved confinement in the region of low and negative shear was observed and quantified with an exponential dependence on the magnetic shear (Litaudon, et al., Fusion Energy 1996 (Proc. 16th Int. Conf. Montreal, 1996), Vol. 1, IAEA, Vienna (1997) 669). This is interpreted as a consequence of a decoupling of the global modes (Romanelli and Zonca, Phys. Fluids B 5 (1993) 4081) that are thought to be responsible for anomalous transport. This dependence is proposed in order to complete the Bohm-like L mode local electron thermal diffusivity so as to describe the transition from Bohm-like to gyroBohm transport in the plasma core. The good agreement between the predictive simulations of the different Tore Supra regimes (hot core lower hybrid enhanced performance, reversed shear plasmas and combined lower hybrid current drive and fast wave electron heating) and experimental data provides a basis for extrapolation of this magnetic shear dependence in the local transport coefficients to future machines. As an example, a scenario for non-inductive current profile optimization and control in ITER is presented. (author)

  2. Thermal electron transport in the regimes with low and negative magnetic shear on tore supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitsekhovitch, I.; Litaudon, X.; Moreau, D.; Aniel, T.; Becoulet, A.; Erba, M.; Joffrin, E.; Kazarian-Vibert, F.; Peysson, Y.

    1997-04-01

    The magnetic shear effect on the thermal electron transport is studied in a large variety of non-inductive plasmas of Tore Supra. An improved confinement in the region of low and negative shear was observed and quantified with an exponential dependence on the magnetic shear [Litaudon et al. in Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, 1996, Montreal (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1997) to be published]. This is interpreted as the consequence of a decoupling of the global modes [Romanelli and Zonka, Phys. Fluids B5 (1993), 4081] which are thought to be responsible for anomalous transport. This dependence is proposed to complete the Bohm-like L-mode local electron thermal diffusivity to describe the transition from the Bohm-like to the gyro-Bohm transport in the plasma core. The good agreement between the predictive simulations of the different Tore Supra regimes (hot core lower hybrid enhanced performance, reversed shear plasmas and combined lower hybrid current drive and fast wave electron heating) and experimental data gives a basis for the extrapolation of this magnetic shear dependence in the local transport coefficients for future machines. As an example a scenario for non-inductive current profile optimisation and control in ITER is presented. (author)

  3. Electronic spin transport and spin precession in single graphene layers at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Jozsa, Csaba; Popinciuc, Mihaita; Jonkman, Harry T; van Wees, Bart J

    2007-08-02

    Electronic transport in single or a few layers of graphene is the subject of intense interest at present. The specific band structure of graphene, with its unique valley structure and Dirac neutrality point separating hole states from electron states, has led to the observation of new electronic transport phenomena such as anomalously quantized Hall effects, absence of weak localization and the existence of a minimum conductivity. In addition to dissipative transport, supercurrent transport has also been observed. Graphene might also be a promising material for spintronics and related applications, such as the realization of spin qubits, owing to the low intrinsic spin orbit interaction, as well as the low hyperfine interaction of the electron spins with the carbon nuclei. Here we report the observation of spin transport, as well as Larmor spin precession, over micrometre-scale distances in single graphene layers. The 'non-local' spin valve geometry was used in these experiments, employing four-terminal contact geometries with ferromagnetic cobalt electrodes making contact with the graphene sheet through a thin oxide layer. We observe clear bipolar (changing from positive to negative sign) spin signals that reflect the magnetization direction of all four electrodes, indicating that spin coherence extends underneath all of the contacts. No significant changes in the spin signals occur between 4.2 K, 77 K and room temperature. We extract a spin relaxation length between 1.5 and 2 mum at room temperature, only weakly dependent on charge density. The spin polarization of the ferromagnetic contacts is calculated from the measurements to be around ten per cent.

  4. Electronic transport on the spatial structure of the protein: Three-dimensional lattice model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmento, R.G.; Frazão, N.F.; Macedo-Filho, A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The electronic transport on the structure of the three-dimensional lattice model of the protein is studied. • The signing of the current–voltage is directly affected by permutations of the weak bonds in the structure. • Semiconductor behave of the proteins suggest a potential application in the development of novel biosensors. - Abstract: We report a numerical analysis of the electronic transport in protein chain consisting of thirty-six standard amino acids. The protein chains studied have three-dimensional structure, which can present itself in three distinct conformations and the difference consist in the presence or absence of thirteen hydrogen-bondings. Our theoretical method uses an electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian model, appropriate to describe the protein segments modeled by the amino acid chain. We note that the presence and the permutations between weak bonds in the structure of proteins are directly related to the signing of the current–voltage. Furthermore, the electronic transport depends on the effect of temperature. In addition, we have found a semiconductor behave in the models investigated and it suggest a potential application in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  5. Electronic transport on the spatial structure of the protein: Three-dimensional lattice model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmento, R.G. [Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Piauí, 64800-000 Floriano, PI (Brazil); Frazão, N.F. [Centro de Educação e Saúde, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, 581750-000 Cuité, PB (Brazil); Macedo-Filho, A., E-mail: amfilho@gmail.com [Campus Prof. Antonio Geovanne Alves de Sousa, Universidade Estadual do Piauí, 64260-000 Piripiri, PI (Brazil)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • The electronic transport on the structure of the three-dimensional lattice model of the protein is studied. • The signing of the current–voltage is directly affected by permutations of the weak bonds in the structure. • Semiconductor behave of the proteins suggest a potential application in the development of novel biosensors. - Abstract: We report a numerical analysis of the electronic transport in protein chain consisting of thirty-six standard amino acids. The protein chains studied have three-dimensional structure, which can present itself in three distinct conformations and the difference consist in the presence or absence of thirteen hydrogen-bondings. Our theoretical method uses an electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian model, appropriate to describe the protein segments modeled by the amino acid chain. We note that the presence and the permutations between weak bonds in the structure of proteins are directly related to the signing of the current–voltage. Furthermore, the electronic transport depends on the effect of temperature. In addition, we have found a semiconductor behave in the models investigated and it suggest a potential application in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  6. A theoretical study for electronic and transport properties of covalent functionalized MoS2 monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lijuan; Yang, Zhao-Di; Zhang, Guiling

    2017-06-01

    The geometries, electronic and electron transport properties of a series of functionalized MoS2 monolayers were investigated using density-functional theory (DFT) and the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) methods. n-Propyl, n-trisilicyl, phenyl, p-nitrophenyl and p-methoxyphenyl are chosen as electron-donating groups. The results show covalent functionalization with electron-donating groups could make a transformation from typical semiconducting to metallic properties for appearance of midgap level across the Fermi level (Ef). The calculations of transport properties for two-probe devices indicate that conductivities of functionalized systems are obviously enhanced relative to pristine MoS2 monolayer. Grafted groups contribute to the major transport path and play an important role in enhancing conductivity. The NDR effect is found. The influence of grafted density is also studied. Larger grafted density leads to wider bandwidth of midgap level, larger current response of I-V curves and larger current difference between peak and valley.

  7. Perturbation of the Electron Transport Mechanism by Proton Intercalation in Nanoporous TiO2 Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halverson, A. F.; Zhu, K.; Erslev, P. T.; Kim, J. Y.; Neale, N. R.; Frank, A. J.

    2012-04-11

    This study addresses a long-standing controversy about the electron-transport mechanism in porous metal oxide semiconductor films that are commonly used in dye-sensitized solar cells and related systems. We investigated, by temperature-dependent time-of-flight measurements, the influence of proton intercalation on the electron-transport properties of nanoporous TiO{sub 2} films exposed to an ethanol electrolyte containing different percentages of water (0-10%). These measurements revealed that increasing the water content in the electrolyte led to increased proton intercalation into the TiO{sub 2} films, slower transport, and a dramatic change in the dependence of the thermal activation energy (E{sub a}) of the electron diffusion coefficient on the photogenerated electron density in the films. Random walk simulations based on a microscopic model incorporating exponential conduction band tail (CBT) trap states combined with a proton-induced shallow trap level with a long residence time accounted for the observed effects of proton intercalation on E{sub a}. Application of this model to the experimental results explains the conditions under which E{sub a} dependence on the photoelectron density is consistent with multiple trapping in exponential CBT states and under which it appears at variance with this model.

  8. SEM technique for imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen [Knoxville, TN; Geohegan, David B [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael [Brooktondale, NY

    2009-02-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for SEM imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast. A method includes mounting a sample onto a sample holder, the sample including a sample material; wire bonding leads from the sample holder onto the sample; placing the sample holder in a vacuum chamber of a scanning electron microscope; connecting leads from the sample holder to a power source located outside the vacuum chamber; controlling secondary electron emission from the sample by applying a predetermined voltage to the sample through the leads; and generating an image of the secondary electron emission from the sample. An apparatus includes a sample holder for a scanning electron microscope having an electrical interconnect and leads on top of the sample holder electrically connected to the electrical interconnect; a power source and a controller connected to the electrical interconnect for applying voltage to the sample holder to control the secondary electron emission from a sample mounted on the sample holder; and a computer coupled to a secondary electron detector to generate images of the secondary electron emission from the sample.

  9. Electron and phonon transport in shandite-structured Ni3Sn2S2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Alex; Mangelis, Panagiotis; Vaqueiro, Paz; Powell, Anthony V.; Grau-Crespo, Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    The shandite family of solids, with hexagonal structure and composition A3M2X2 (A = Ni, Co, Rh, Pd; M = Pb, In, Sn, Tl; X = S, Se), has attracted recent research attention due to promising applications as thermoelectric materials. Herein we discuss the electron and phonon transport properties of shandite-structured Ni3Sn2S2 , based on a combination of density functional theory, Boltzmann transport theory, and experimental measurements. Ni3Sn2S2 exhibits a metallic and nonmagnetic ground state with Ni0 oxidation state and very low charge on Sn and S atoms. Seebeck coefficients obtained from theoretical calculations are in excellent agreement with those measured experimentally between 100 and 600 K. From the calculation of the ratio σ /τ between the electronic conductivity and relaxation time, and the experimental determination of electron conductivity, we extract the variation of the scattering rate (1 /τ ) with temperature between 300 and 600 K, which turns out to be almost linear, thus implying that the dominant electron-scattering mechanism in this temperature range is via phonons. The electronic thermal conductivity, which deviates only slightly from the Wiedemann-Franz law, provides the main contribution to thermal transport. The small lattice contribution to the thermal conductivity is calculated from the phonon structure and third-order force constants, and is only ˜2 W m-1K-1 at 300 K (less than 10% of the total thermal conductivity), which is confirmed by experimental measurements. Overall, Ni3Sn2S2 is a poor thermoelectric material (Z T ˜ 0.01 at 300 K), principally due to the low absolute value of the Seebeck coefficient. However, the understanding of its transport properties will be useful for the rationalization of the thermoelectric behavior of other, more promising members of the shandite family.

  10. Influence of the electronic structure on the transport properties of some iron pnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullier-Albenque, Florence

    2016-01-01

    An important feature of the iron-based pnictides is their multi-band electronic structure with both electron and hole bands at the Fermi level. The size of these pockets can be changed by different types of substitution, resulting in a variety of original magnetic and electronic properties. The contributions of both types of carriers will thus have important consequences on the evolution of the transport properties versus temperature and doping. It has been pointed out that Hund's rule interaction plays a prominent role in the physics of these compounds by allowing a strong orbital differentiation between the 3d Fe orbitals. As a result, a description in terms of more or less correlated electrons was proposed and may have important consequences on the scattering lifetimes of the different carriers. Finally, the presence of very flat bands at the Fermi level may induce a semiconductor-like behavior, with a change in carrier concentration with temperature. In this paper, we will review the evolution of transport properties with chemical doping/substitution in iron pnictides. We will more particularly focus on the 122 family (Ba(Sr,Ca)Fe2As2) and the 111 LiFeAs compound for which sizeable single crystals required for transport measurements are available. The combined resistivity, Hall effect and magnetoresistance data will be analyzed in association with electronic structure calculations, angle-resolved photoemission measurements and quantum oscillations. In spite of the strong interplay between antiferromagnetism and superconductivity in most part of their phase diagram, direct signatures of spin fluctuations are difficult to identify in the transport properties of iron pnictides. We will show that measurements of the longitudinal magnetoresistance provide a powerful tool for studying the coupling between the charge carriers and the spin degrees of freedom.

  11. Modification of the electronic transport in Au by prototypical impurities and interlayers

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, Majida M.

    2010-02-01

    Electronic transport calculations for metallic interfaces based on density functional theory and a scattering theory on the Landauer-Büttiker level are presented. We study the modifications of the transport through Au due to prototypical impurities and interlayers. Our results show that the influence of S and Si impurities is well described in terms of simple vacancies. Metallic impurities and interlayers, on the other hand, have even more drastic effects, in particular when the Au s-d hybrid states at the Fermi energy are perturbed. The effects of a possible interface alloy formation are discussed in detail. © 2010 EPLA.

  12. Spin-dependent quasiparticle transport in aluminum single-electron transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, A J; Andresen, S E; Brenner, R; Clark, R G

    2006-08-25

    We investigate the effect of Zeeman splitting on quasiparticle transport in normal-superconducting-normal (NSN) aluminum single-electron transistors (SETs). In the above-gap transport, the interplay of Coulomb blockade and Zeeman splitting leads to spin-dependence of the sequential tunneling. This creates regimes where either one or both spin species can tunnel onto or off the island. At lower biases, spin-dependence of the single quasiparticle state is studied, and operation of the device as a bipolar spin filter is suggested.

  13. Electron-phonon scattering from Green’s function transport combined with molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Palsgaard, Mattias Lau Nøhr; Stradi, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    approach by comparing to mobilities and conductivities obtained by the Boltzmann transport equation for different bulk and one-dimensional systems. For bulk silicon and gold we compare against experimental values. We discuss limitations and advantages of each of the computational approaches.......We present a conceptually simple method for treating electron-phonon scattering and phonon limited mobilities. By combining Green’s function based transport calculations and molecular dynamics, we obtain a temperature dependent transmission from which we evaluate the mobility. We validate our...

  14. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scisciò, M.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Antici, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  15. High throughput ab initio modeling of charge transport for bio-molecular-electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruque, Nicolas Alexander

    2009-12-01

    Self-assembled nanostructures, composed of inorganic and organic materials, have multiple applications in the fields of engineering and nanotechnology. Experimental research using nanoscaled materials, such as semiconductor/metallic nanocrystals, nanowires (NW), and carbon nanotube (CNT)-molecular systems have potential applications in next generation nano electronic devices. Many of these molecular systems exhibit electronic device functionality. However, experimental analytical techniques to determine how the chemistry and geometry affects electron transport through these devices does not yet exist. Using theory and modeling, one can approximate the chemistry and geometry at the atomic level and also determine how the chemistry and geometry governs electron current. Nanoelectronic devices however, contain several thousand atoms which makes quantum modeling difficult. Popular atomistic modeling approaches are capable of handling small molecular systems, which are of scientific interest, but have little engineering value. The lack of large scale modeling tools has left the scientific and engineering community with a limited ability to understand, explore, and design complex systems of engineering interest. To address these issues, I have developed a high performance general quantum charge transport model based on the non-equilibrium Green function (NEGF) formalism using density functional theory (DFT) as implemented in the FIREBALL software. FIREBALL is a quantum molecular dynamics code which has demonstrated the ability to model large molecular systems. This dissertation project of integrating NEGF into FIREBALL provides researchers with a modeling tool capable of simulating charge current in large inorganic/organic systems. To provide theoretical support for experimental efforts, this project focused on CNT-molecular systems, which includes the discovery of a CNT-molecular resonant tunneling diode (RTD) for electronic circuit applications. This research also

  16. The Role of Shape on Electronic Structure and Charge Transport in Faceted PbSe Nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Kaushik, Ananth P.

    2014-03-25

    We have determined the effect of shape on the charge transport characteristics of nanocrystals. Our study looked at the explicit determination of the electronic properties of faceted nanocrystals that essentially probe the limit of current computational reach, i.e., nanocrystals from 1.53 to 2.1 nm in diameter. These nanocrystals, which resemble PbSe systems, are either bare or covered in short ligands. They also differ in shape, octahedral vs cube-octahedral, and in superlattice symmetry (fcc vs bcc). We have provided insights on electron and hole coupling along different facets and overall charge mobility in bcc and fcc superlattices. We have determined that the relative areas of (100) to (111) facets, and facet atom types are important factors governing the optimization of charge transport. The calculated electronic density of states shows no role of -SCH3 - ligands on states near the band gap. Electron coupling between nanocrystals is significantly higher than that of hole coupling; thiol ligands lower the ratio between electron and hole couplings. Stronger coupling exists between smaller nanocrystals. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  17. Electronic structure and transport in graphene/haeckelite hybrids: an ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Zhen; Fthenakis, Zacharias G; Tománek, David

    2015-01-01

    We combine ab initio density functional theory (DFT) structural studies with DFT-based nonequilibrium Green's function calculations to investigate how the presence of non-hexagonal rings affects electronic transport in graphitic structures. We find that infinite monolayers, finite-width nanoribbons, and nanotubes formed of 5–8 haeckelite with only 5- and 8-membered rings are generally more conductive than their graphene-based counterparts. The presence of haeckelite defect lines in the perfect graphitic structure, a model of grain boundaries in CVD-grown graphene, increases the electronic conductivity and renders it highly anisotropic. (paper)

  18. Transport properties of V4 and Mo4-cluster compounds: An electron glass?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastogi, A.K.; Niazi, A.

    1996-01-01

    DC and AC conductivity, thermopower and non-ohmic conduction properties have been reported for GaV 4 S 8 and GaMo 4 Se 4 Te 4 . The transport properties indicate the formation of electron glass state at low temperature. In a simplified model the band spread of localised states, DOS and localisation length are estimated. Coulomb gap effects in variable range hopping (VRH) and AC conductivity σ ac (ω) are found in the more ordered Mo 4 compound. Both the compounds show negative resistance behaviour at high current densities that may indicate the melting of the electron glass. (orig.)

  19. Electronic transport properties of fullerene functionalized carbon nanotubes: Ab initio and tight-binding calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, Joachim Alexander; Hashemi, J.; Markussen, Troels

    2009-01-01

    techniques and tight-binding calculations to illustrate these materials' transmission properties and give physical arguments to interpret the numerical results. Specifically, above the Fermi energy we find a strong reduction in electron transmission due to localized states in certain regions of the structure......Fullerene functionalized carbon nanotubes-NanoBuds-form a novel class of hybrid carbon materials, which possesses many advantageous properties as compared to the pristine components. Here, we report a theoretical study of the electronic transport properties of these compounds. We use both ab initio...

  20. Electronic transport at semiconductor surfaces - from point-contact transistor to micro-four-point probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasegawa, S.; Grey, Francois

    2002-01-01

    show that this type of conduction is measurable using new types of experimental probes, such as the multi-tip scanning tunnelling microscope and the micro-four-point probe. The resulting electronic transport properties are intriguing, and suggest that semiconductor surfaces should be considered...... of the first point-contact transistors, and led to the successful fabrication of field-effect transistors. However, to this day, one property of semiconductor surface states remains poorly understood, both theoretically and experimentally. That is the conduction of electrons or holes directly through...

  1. Electron-phonon interactions in manganites: efect on the electronic transport and magnetization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otero-Leal, M.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Mixed-valent manganese oxides with perovskite structure offer a certain degree of chemical flexibility that allows making systematic studies of the relationship between the electric and magnetic properties with the crystalline structure. Here we present magnetic measurements in La2/3(Ca1-xSrx1/3MnO3 that demonstrate that the adiabatic approximation breaks down at low x, due to the strong coupling of the electronic and the lattice degrees of freedom.

    Los óxidos de manganeso con valencia mixta y estructura de perovskita poseen un cierto grado de flexibilidad química que permite hacer estudios sistemáticos entre las propiedades eléctricas y magnéticas, con la estructura cristalina. En este trabajo presentamos medidas magnéticas en la serie La2/3(Ca1-xSrx1/3MnO3 donde se demuestra que la aproximación adiabática falla para pequeñas x, debido el fuerte acoplamiento de los grados de libertad electrónicos y de la red.

  2. Electron transport with re-acceleration and radiation in the jets of X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Li, Zhi-Ren; Xiang, Fu-Yuan; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2018-01-01

    This paper studies the acceleration processes of background thermal electrons in X-ray binary jets via turbulent stochastic interactions and shock collisions. By considering turbulent magnetized jets mixed with fluctuating magnetic fields and an ordered large-scale magnetic field, and numerically solving the transport equation along the jet axis, we explore the influence on acceleration efficiency of magnetic turbulence, electron injection, the location of the acceleration region and various cooling mechanisms. The results show the following: (1) Dominant turbulent magnetic fields in the jets are necessary to accelerate background thermal electrons to relativistic energies. (2) The acceleration of electrons depends on the type of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and turbulence with a hard slope can accelerate electrons more effectively. (3) The effective acceleration region is located at a distance >103Rg away from the central black hole (Rg being the gravitational radius). As a result of acceleration mechanisms competing with various cooling mechanisms, background thermal electrons gain energy and their spectra are broadened beyond the initial distribution to form a thermal-like distribution. (4) The acceleration mechanisms explored in this work can reasonably provide the maximum electron energy required for interpreting high-energy γ-ray observations from microquasars; however, some extreme parameter values are needed for the possible very high-energy γ-ray signals.

  3. Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

  4. Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated cell death via impairing electron transport chain complex III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Seokheon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Hwang, Joohyun; Shin, Ki Soon; Kang, Shin Jung

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Heptachlor inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. •Heptachlor promoted generation of reactive oxygen species. •Heptachlor induced Bax activation. •Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis. -- Abstract: Environmental toxins like pesticides have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Epidemiological studies suggested that exposures to organochlorine pesticides have an association with an increased PD risk. In the present study, we examined the mechanism of toxicity induced by an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor. In a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, heptachlor induced both morphological and functional damages in mitochondria. Interestingly, the compound inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. Rapid generation of reactive oxygen species and the activation of Bax were then detected. Subsequently, mitochondria-mediated, caspase-dependent apoptosis followed. Our results raise a possibility that an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor can act as a neurotoxicant associated with PD

  5. Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated cell death via impairing electron transport chain complex III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seokheon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Hwang, Joohyun [Department of Molecular Biology, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Ki Soon [Department of Biology, Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Sciences, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Shin Jung, E-mail: sjkang@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Biology, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Heptachlor inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. •Heptachlor promoted generation of reactive oxygen species. •Heptachlor induced Bax activation. •Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis. -- Abstract: Environmental toxins like pesticides have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Epidemiological studies suggested that exposures to organochlorine pesticides have an association with an increased PD risk. In the present study, we examined the mechanism of toxicity induced by an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor. In a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, heptachlor induced both morphological and functional damages in mitochondria. Interestingly, the compound inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. Rapid generation of reactive oxygen species and the activation of Bax were then detected. Subsequently, mitochondria-mediated, caspase-dependent apoptosis followed. Our results raise a possibility that an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor can act as a neurotoxicant associated with PD.

  6. Measurements of Electron Transport in Foils Irradiated with a Picosecond Time Scale Laser Pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C. R. D.; Hoarty, D. J.; James, S. F.; Swatton, D.; Hughes, S. J.; Morton, J. W.; Guymer, T. M.; Hill, M. P.; Chapman, D. A.; Andrew, J. E.; Comley, A. J.; Shepherd, R.; Dunn, J.; Chen, H.; Schneider, M.; Brown, G.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Emig, J.

    2011-01-01

    The heating of solid foils by a picosecond time scale laser pulse has been studied by using x-ray emission spectroscopy. The target material was plastic foil with a buried layer of a spectroscopic tracer material. The laser pulse length was either 0.5 or 2 ps, which resulted in a laser irradiance that varied over the range 10 16 -10 19 W/cm 2 . Time-resolved measurements of the buried layer emission spectra using an ultrafast x-ray streak camera were used to infer the density and temperature conditions as a function of laser parameters and depth of the buried layer. Comparison of the data to different models of electron transport showed that they are consistent with a model of electron transport that predicts the bulk of the target heating is due to return currents.

  7. Stimulatory Effect of Xenobiotics on Oxidative Electron Transport of Chemolithotrophic Nitrifying Bacteria Used as Biosensing Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woznica, Andrzej; Nowak, Agnieszka; Ziemski, Przemyslaw; Kwasniewski, Mirosław; Bernas, Tytus

    2013-01-01

    Electron transport chain (ETCh) of ammonium (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) participates in oxidation of ammonium to nitrate (nitrification). Operation of ETCh may be perturbed by a range of water-soluble xenobiotics. Therefore, consortia of nitrifying bacteria may be used as a biosensor to detect water contamination. A surprising feature of this system is an increase of oxygen consumption, detected in the presence of certain inhibitors of ETCh. Thus, to shed light on the mechanism of this effect (and other differences between inhibitors) we monitored separately respiration of the bacteria of the first (AOB - Nitrosomonas) and second (NOB -Nitrobacter) stages of nitrification. Furthermore, we measured plasma membrane potential and the level of reduction of NAD(P)H. We propose a novel model of ETCh in NOB to explain the role of reverse electron transport in the stimulation of oxygen consumption (previously attributed to hormesis). PMID:23326438

  8. The dependence of electronic transport on compressive deformation of C{sub 60} molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H. [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China)], E-mail: lihuilmy@hotmail.com; Zhang, X.Q. [Physics Department, Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China)

    2008-06-02

    The dependence of electronic transport on compressive deformation of C{sub 60} molecule is studied theoretically in this work. Brenner's 'second generation' empirical potential is used to describe the many-body short-range interatomic interactions for C{sub 60} in the molecular dynamics simulations. Our results demonstrate that C{sub 60} can be compressed up to a strain {epsilon}=0.31 before collapsing. Electronic transport under an applied bias is calculated by using a self-consistent field approach coupled with non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The transmission probability, conductance gap, and conductance spectrum are found to be sensitive to the compression. The peak value of conductance decreases with the increase of strain until the C{sub 60} is compressed up to a strain {epsilon}=0.31.

  9. The effects of two counterpropagating surface acoustic wave beams on single electron acoustic charge transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jianhong; Guo Huazhong; Song Li; Zhang Wei; Gao Jie; Lu Chuan

    2010-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the effects of two counterpropagating surface acoustic waves on the acoustoelectric current of single electron transport devices. A significant improvement in the accuracy of current quantization is achieved as a result of an additional surface acoustic wave beam. The experiments reveal the sinusoidally periodical modulation in the acoustoelectric current characteristic as a function of the relative phase of the two surface acoustic wave beams. Besides, by using standing surface acoustic waves, the acoustoelectric current is detected which we consider as the so-called anomalous acoustoelectric current produced by acoustic wave mechanical deformations. This kind current is contributed to one component of the acoustoelectric current in surface acoustic wave device, which could enable us to establish a more adequate description of acoustoelectric effects on single-electron acoustic charge transport.

  10. Measurement of Preheat Due to Nonlocal Electron Transport in Warm Dense Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, K.; Holec, M.; Fontes, C. J.; Fryer, C. L.; Greeff, C. W.; Johns, H. M.; Montgomery, D. S.; Schmidt, D. W.; Šmíd, M.

    2018-01-01

    This Letter presents a novel approach to study electron transport in warm dense matter. It also includes the first x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) measurement from low-density CH foams compressed by a strong laser-driven shock at the OMEGA laser facility. The XRTS measurement is combined with velocity interferometry (VISAR) and optical pyrometry (SOP) providing a robust measurement of thermodynamic conditions in the shock. Evidence of significant preheat contributing to elevated temperatures reaching 17.5-35 eV in shocked CH foam is measured by XRTS. These measurements are complemented by abnormally high shock velocities observed by VISAR and early emission seen by SOP. These results are compared to radiation hydrodynamics simulations that include first-principles treatment of nonlocal electron transport in warm dense matter with excellent agreement. Additional simulations confirm that the x-ray contribution to this preheat is negligible.

  11. Halogenated 1-Hydroxynaphthalene-2-Carboxanilides Affecting Photosynthetic Electron Transport in Photosystem II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goněc, T.; Kos, J.; Pesko, M.; Dohanosová, J.; Oravec, Michal; Liptaj, T.; Králová, K.; Jampílek, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 1709. ISSN 1420-3049 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : hydroxynaphthalene-carboxamides * photosynthetic electron transport (PET) inhibition * spinach chloroplasts * structure-activity relationships Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 2.861, year: 2016

  12. Study of structural and electronic transport properties of Ce-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The structural and electronic transport properties of La1−x Cex MnO3 (x =0.0–1.0) have been studied. All the samples exhibit orthorhombic crystal symmetry and the unit cell volume de- creases with Ce doping. They also make a metal–insulator transition (MIT) and transition temper- ature increases with increase in ...

  13. Krylov subspace method for evaluating the self-energy matrices in electron transport calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Henrik Brandenborg; Hansen, Per Christian; Petersen, D. E.

    2008-01-01

    We present a Krylov subspace method for evaluating the self-energy matrices used in the Green's function formulation of electron transport in nanoscale devices. A procedure based on the Arnoldi method is employed to obtain solutions of the quadratic eigenvalue problem associated with the infinite...... calculations. Numerical tests within a density functional theory framework are provided to validate the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method, which in most cases is an order of magnitude faster than conventional methods....

  14. Stoichiometric relationship between energy-dependent proton ejection and electron transport in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, M D; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1976-01-01

    The number of protons ejected during electron transport per pair of electrons per energy-conserving site (the H+/site ratio) was measured in rat liver mitochondria by three different methods under conditions in which transmembrane movements of endogenous phosphate were minized or eliminated. (1) In the Ca2+ pulse method, between 3.5 and 4.0 molecules of 3-hydroxybutyrate and 1.75 to 2.0 Ca2+ ions were accumulated per 2 e- per site during Ca2+ induced electron transport in the presence of rotenone, when measured under conditions in which movements of endogenous phosphate were negligible. Since entry of 3-hydroxybutyrate requires its protonation to the free acid these data correspond to an H+/site ratio of 3.5-4.0 (2) In the oxygen pulse method addition of known amounts of oxygen to anaerobic mitochondria in the presence of substrate yielded H+/site ratios of 3.0 when phosphate transport was eliminated by addition of N-ethylmaleimide or by anaerobic washing to remove endogenous phosphate. In the absence of such measures the observed H+/site ratio was 2.0. (3) In the reductant pulse method measurement of the initial steady rates of H+ ejection and oxygen consumption by mitochondria in an aerobic medium after addition of substrate gave H+/site near 4.0 in the presence of N-ethylmaleimide; in the absence of the inhibitor the observed ratio was only 2.0. These and other experiments reported indicate that the values of 2.0 earlier obtained for the H+/site ratio by Mitchell and Moyle [Biochem J. (1967) 105, 1147-1162] and others were underestimates due to the unrecognized masking of H+ ejection by movements of endogenous phosphate. The results presented here show that the H+/site ratio of mitochondrial electron transport is at least 3.0 and may be as high as 4.0. PMID:1061146

  15. Low energy transport coefficients and cross sections for electrons in deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, Z.L.; Crompton, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    For the design of negative ion sources the reliable cross section data of electron swarms in deuterium are necessary. Earlier theoretical calucations could not reproduce the experimental data. This paper presents new experimental data for drift velocities and mobility in the energy range above the treshold of 2.5 eV where vibrational excitation is the dominant inelastic process. The low energy cross sections are derived from the transport data and are compared with results of other experiments. (D.Gy.)

  16. Fully Relativistic Temperature-Dependent Electronic Transport Properties of Magnetic Alloys From the First Principles.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wagenknecht, David; Carva, K.; Turek, Ilja

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 11 (2017), č. článku 1700205. ISSN 0018-9464 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13436S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : electronic transport * magnetic alloys * ab initio theory Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.243, year: 2016

  17. Electronic properties of mesoscopic graphene structures: Charge confinement and control of spin and charge transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozhkov, A.V., E-mail: arozhkov@gmail.co [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125412, Moscow (Russian Federation); Giavaras, G. [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Bliokh, Yury P. [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Freilikher, Valentin [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    This brief review discusses electronic properties of mesoscopic graphene-based structures. These allow controlling the confinement and transport of charge and spin; thus, they are of interest not only for fundamental research, but also for applications. The graphene-related topics covered here are: edges, nanoribbons, quantum dots, pn-junctions, pnp-structures, and quantum barriers and waveguides. This review is partly intended as a short introduction to graphene mesoscopics.

  18. Significant Electronic Thermal Transport in the Conducting Polymer Poly(3,4‐ethylenedioxythiophene)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weathers, Annie; Khan, Zia Ullah; Brooke, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Suspended microdevices are employed to measure the in-plane electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient of suspended poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) thin films. The measured thermal conductivity is higher than previously reported for PEDOT and generally increases...... with the electrical conductivity. The increase exceeds that predicted by the Wiedemann–Franz law for metals and can be explained by significant electronic thermal transport in PEDOT....

  19. Design and engineering of a man-made diffusive electron-transport protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Bryan A; Solomon, Lee A; Leslie Dutton, P; Moser, Christopher C

    2016-05-01

    Maquettes are man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences. Here we focus on water-soluble maquettes designed and engineered to perform diffusive electron transport of the kind typically carried out by cytochromes, ferredoxins and flavodoxins and other small proteins in photosynthetic and respiratory energy conversion and oxido-reductive metabolism. Our designs were tested by analysis of electron transfer between heme maquettes and the well-known natural electron transporter, cytochrome c. Electron-transfer kinetics were measured from seconds to milliseconds by stopped-flow, while sub-millisecond resolution was achieved through laser photolysis of the carbon monoxide maquette heme complex. These measurements demonstrate electron transfer from the maquette to cytochrome c, reproducing the timescales and charge complementarity modulation observed in natural systems. The ionic strength dependence of inter-protein electron transfer from 9.7×10(6) M(-1) s(-1) to 1.2×10(9) M(-1) s(-1) follows a simple Debye-Hückel model for attraction between +8 net charged oxidized cytochrome c and -19 net charged heme maquette, with no indication of significant protein dipole moment steering. Successfully recreating essential components of energy conversion and downstream metabolism in man-made proteins holds promise for in vivo clinical intervention and for the production of fuel or other industrial products. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Electronic Commerce: a battle on regulation, standards transportation media and business integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Andersen

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available The drive towards the electronic commerce organisation is both a troublesome and a strifted path for government, enterprises and consumers worldwide. In this article we analyse the evolution of electronic commerce in Denmark during the period 1995-1998 from four perspectives: regulation, standards, transportation media and business integration. The Danish government is stimulating the use of electronic commerce using direct and indirect policy initiatives on central, governmental regulation and establishment of greens enabling self-regulation. Also, the governments own, organisational management is in Denmark seen as a mean to exalt electronic commerce. Onwards, the fist on proprietary standards and the UN/EDIFACT is an ongoing source of delaying, stimulating or reventing electronic commerce depending on the business sector and the size of market actor addressed. In Denmark, the direct access and value added network supporters have so far been the dominating mean to transport the electronic documents in the business transaction. The Internet and XML technology is at the turn of the century challenging the way of doing business within this field. Some view this as the big blue to speed the diffusion of electronic commerce; others are worried that the incentive to investment and pull the partners in the value chain to use EDI might be lost. Finally, our study conclude that the debate on business integration issues is ambiguous and characterised by substantial uncertainty on for example the role of intermediates, direct sale, hyper-shift in business partners and the pull/push of global enterprises at the local markets.

  1. Action of the antitumor and antispermatogenic agent lonidamine on electron transport in Ehrlich ascites tumor mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floridi, A; Lehninger, A L

    1983-10-01

    The effect of lonidamine, an antispermatogenic and antitumor drug, on the oxygen consumption, ATPase activity, and redox state of the electron carriers of Ehrlich ascites tumor mitochondria has been studied. Lonidamine inhibits ADP- and uncoupler-stimulated respiration on various NAD- and FAD-linked substrates, but does not affect state 4 respiration. Experiments to determine its site of action showed that lonidamine does not significantly inhibit electron flow through cytochrome oxidase. Electron flow through site 2, the ubiquinone-cytochrome b-cytochrome c1 complex, also was unaffected by lonidamine, which failed to inhibit the oxidation of duroquinol. Moreover, inhibition of electron flow through site 2 was also excluded because of the inability of the N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine bypass to relieve the lonidamine inhibition of the oxidation of pyruvate + malate. The F0F1ATPase activity and vectorial H+ ejection are also unaffected by lonidamine. The inhibition of succinate oxidation by lonidamine was found to take place at a point between succinate and iron-sulfur center S3. Spectroscopic experiments demonstrated that lonidamine inhibits the reduction of mitochondrial NAD+ by pyruvate + malate and other NAD-linked substrates in the transition from state 1 to state 4. However, lonidamine does not inhibit reduction of added NAD+ by submitochondrial vesicles or by soluble purified NAD-linked dehydrogenases. These observations, together with other evidence, suggest that electron transport in tumor mitochondria is inhibited by lonidamine at the dehydrogenase-coenzyme level, particularly when the electron carriers are in a relatively oxidized state and/or when the inner membrane-matrix compartment is in the condensed state. The action of lonidamine in several respects resembles the selective inhibition of electron transport in tumor cells produced by cytotoxic macrophages (D. L. Granger and A. L. Lehninger (1982) J. Cell Biol. 95, 527).

  2. Exponential discontinuous numerical scheme for electron transport in the continuous slowing down approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prinja, A.K.

    1997-01-01

    A nonlinear discretization scheme in space and energy, based on the recently developed exponential discontinuous method, is applied to continuous slowing down dominated electron transport (i.e., in the absence of scattering.) Numerical results for dose and charge deposition are obtained and compared against results from the ONELD and ONEBFP codes, and against exact results from an adjoint Monte Carlo code. It is found that although the exponential discontinuous scheme yields strictly positive and monotonic solutions, the dose profile is considerably straggled when compared to results from the linear codes. On the other hand, the linear schemes produce negative results which, furthermore, do not damp effectively in some cases. A general conclusion is that while yielding strictly positive solutions, the exponential discontinuous method does not show the crude cell accuracy for charged particle transport as was apparent for neutral particle transport problems

  3. Color graphics display of low-high energy electron-photon transport using EGS4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloepping, R.J.; Huntzinger, C.J.; Benson, E.; Nelson, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    Visual presentations are widely accepted and are a dynamic tool in education. The technique of visual presentations of Monte Carlo simulated interaction and transport using the EGS4 code system via SLAC Unified Graphics, connected to an IBM-5080 high resolution color monitor, has been previously demonstrated. EGS was originally developed by the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the High Energy Physics Laboratory (HEPL) at Stanford University as an analytical tool for engineering and physics. The EGS4 version released in 1985 is capable of simulating radiation transport from several TeV down to 1 KeV (photons) and 10 KeV (electrons and positrons). EGS can not only transport monoenergetic particles, but also particles generated from an energy distribution. This paper demonstrates the graphics capability as a teaching tool. The EGS code has been thoroughly verified by comparison with experiment and theory

  4. The geochemical fingerprint of microbial long-distance electron transport in the seafloor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meysman, Filip J. R.; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-03-01

    Recently, a novel “electrogenic” type of sulfur oxidation has been documented in marine sediments, whereby long filamentous cable bacteria are generating electrical currents over centimeter-scale distances. Here we propose a numerical model description that is capable of quantitatively simulating the solute depth profiles and biogeochemical transformations in such electro-active marine sediments. The model is based on a conventional reactive transport description of marine sediments, which is extended with a new model formulation for the long-distance electron transport induced by the cable bacteria. The mechanism of electron hopping is implemented to describe the electron transport along the longitudinal axis of the microbial filaments. We demonstrate that this model is capable of reproducing the observed geochemical fingerprint of electrogenic sulfur oxidation, which consists of a characteristic set of O2, pH and H2S depth profiles. Our simulation results suggest that the cable bacteria must have a high affinity for both oxygen and sulfide, and that intensive cryptic sulfur cycling takes place within the suboxic zone. A sensitivity analysis shows how electrogenic sulfur oxidation strongly impacts the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur, iron, carbon and calcium in marine sediments.

  5. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of single-electron multiple-trapping transport in disordered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Mohammad; Abdi, Yaser

    2017-12-01

    The conventional single-particle Monte Carlo simulation of charge transport in disordered media is based on the truncated density of localized states (DOLS) which benefits from very short time execution. Although this model successfully clarifies the properties of electron transport in moderately disordered media, it overestimates the electron diffusion coefficient for strongly disordered media. The origin of this deviation is discussed in terms of zero-temperature approximation in the truncated DOLS and the ignorance of spatial occupation of localized states. Here, based on the multiple-trapping regime we introduce a modified single-particle kinetic Monte Carlo model that can be used to investigate the electron transport in any disordered media independent from the value of disorder parameter. In the proposed model, instead of using a truncated DOLS we imply the raw DOLS. In addition, we have introduced an occupation index for localized states to consider the effect of spatial occupation of trap sites. The proposed model is justified in a simple cubic lattice of trap sites for broad interval of disorder parameters, Fermi levels, and temperatures.

  6. ACCEPT: three-dimensional electron/photon Monte Carlo transport code using combinatorial geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halbleib, J.A. Sr.

    1979-05-01

    The ACCEPT code provides experimenters and theorists with a method for the routine solution of coupled electron/photon transport through three-dimensional multimaterial geometries described by the combinational method. Emphasis is placed upon operational simplicity without sacrificing the rigor of the model. ACCEPT combines condensed-history electron Monte Carlo with conventional single-scattering photon Monte Carlo in order to describe the transport of all generations of particles from several MeV down to 1.0 and 10.0 keV for electrons and photons, respectively. The model is more accurate at the higher energies with a less rigorous description of the particle cascade at energies where the shell structure of the transport media becomes important. Flexibility of construction permits the user to tailor the model to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the model to more sophisticated applications through relatively simple update procedures. The ACCEPT code is currently running on the CDC-7600 (66000) where the bulk of the cross-section data and the statistical variables are stored in Large Core Memory (Extended Core Storage).

  7. ACCEPT: three-dimensional electron/photon Monte Carlo transport code using combinatorial geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbleib, J.A. Sr.

    1979-05-01

    The ACCEPT code provides experimenters and theorists with a method for the routine solution of coupled electron/photon transport through three-dimensional multimaterial geometries described by the combinational method. Emphasis is placed upon operational simplicity without sacrificing the rigor of the model. ACCEPT combines condensed-history electron Monte Carlo with conventional single-scattering photon Monte Carlo in order to describe the transport of all generations of particles from several MeV down to 1.0 and 10.0 keV for electrons and photons, respectively. The model is more accurate at the higher energies with a less rigorous description of the particle cascade at energies where the shell structure of the transport media becomes important. Flexibility of construction permits the user to tailor the model to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the model to more sophisticated applications through relatively simple update procedures. The ACCEPT code is currently running on the CDC-7600 (66000) where the bulk of the cross-section data and the statistical variables are stored in Large Core Memory

  8. Sites of inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport in macrophage-injured neoplastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, D L; Lehninger, A L

    1982-11-01

    Previous work has shown that injury of neoplastic cells by cytotoxic macrophages (CM) in cell culture is accompanied by inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. We have investigated the nature of this inhibition by studying mitochondrial respiration in CM-injured leukemia L1210 cells permeabilized with digitonin. CM-induced injury affects the mitochondrial respiratory chain proper. Complex I (NADH-coenzyme Q reductase) and complex II (succinate-coenzyme Q reductase) are markedly inhibited. In addition a minor inhibition of cytochrome oxidase was found. Electron transport from alpha-glycerophosphate through the respiratory chain to oxygen is unaffected and permeabilized CM-injured L1210 cells oxidizing this substrate exhibit acceptor control. However, glycerophosphate shuttle activity was found not to occur within CM-injured or uninjured L1210 cells in culture hence, alpha-glycerophosphate is apparently unavailable for mitochondrial oxidation in the intact cell. It is concluded that the failure of respiration of intact neoplastic cells injured by CM is caused by the nearly complete inhibition of complexes I and II of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The time courses of CM-induced electron transport inhibition and arrest of L1210 cell division are examined and the possible relationship between these phenomena is discussed.

  9. Ab Initio Study of Electronic Transport in Cubic-HfO2 Grain Boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Degoli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In polycrystalline materials the grain boundaries (GBs are particularly important as they can act as a sink for atom defects and impurities, which may drive structural transformation of the materials and consequently modify their properties. Characterising the structure and properties of GBs is critical for understanding and controlling material property. Here, we investigated how GBs can modify the structural, electronic, and transport properties of the polycrystalline material HfO2. In general, grain boundaries are considered to be detrimental to the physical stability and electronic transport in HfO2. Anyway, studying by first principles the two most stable and common types of GBs, the tilt and the twist, we found substantial differences on the impact they have on the material properties. In fact, while tilt defects create channels of different sizes and shapes in hafnia along which the electronic transport is stronger in relation to leakage current through GBs, twist defects create a sort of amorphous structure that tends to resemble the bulk and which is independent of the number of rotated planes/atoms.

  10. Competition between deformability and charge transport in semiconducting polymers for flexible and stretchable electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Printz, Adam D.; Lipomi, Darren J., E-mail: dlipomi@ucsd.edu [Department of NanoEngineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, Mail Code 0448, La Jolla, California 92093-0448 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The primary goal of the field concerned with organic semiconductors is to produce devices with performance approaching that of silicon electronics, but with the deformability—flexibility and stretchability—of conventional plastics. However, an inherent competition between deformability and charge transport has long been observed in these materials, and achieving the extreme (or even moderate) deformability implied by the word “plastic” concurrently with high charge transport may be elusive. This competition arises because the properties needed for high carrier mobilities—e.g., rigid chains in π-conjugated polymers and high degrees of crystallinity in the solid state—are antithetical to deformability. On the device scale, this competition can lead to low-performance yet mechanically robust devices, or high-performance devices that fail catastrophically (e.g., cracking, cohesive failure, and delamination) under strain. There are, however, some observations that contradict the notion of the mutual exclusivity of electronic and mechanical performances. These observations suggest that this problem may not be a fundamental trade-off, but rather an inconvenience that may be negotiated by a logical selection of materials and processing conditions. For example, the selection of the poly(3-alkylthiophene) with a critical side-chain length—poly(3-heptylthiophene) (n = 7)—marries the high deformability of poly(3-octylthiophene) (n = 8) with the high electronic performance (as manifested in photovoltaic efficiency) of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (n = 6). This review explores the relationship between deformability and charge transport in organic semiconductors. The principal conclusions are that reducing the competition between these two parameters is in fact possible, with two demonstrated routes being: (1) incorporation of softer, insulating material into a stiffer, semiconducting material and (2) increasing disorder in a highly ordered film, but not

  11. Hall-Effect Thruster Simulations with 2-D Electron Transport and Hydrodynamic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard H.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2009-01-01

    A computational approach that has been used extensively in the last two decades for Hall thruster simulations is to solve a diffusion equation and energy conservation law for the electrons in a direction that is perpendicular to the magnetic field, and use discrete-particle methods for the heavy species. This "hybrid" approach has allowed for the capture of bulk plasma phenomena inside these thrusters within reasonable computational times. Regions of the thruster with complex magnetic field arrangements (such as those near eroded walls and magnets) and/or reduced Hall parameter (such as those near the anode and the cathode plume) challenge the validity of the quasi-one-dimensional assumption for the electrons. This paper reports on the development of a computer code that solves numerically the 2-D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law, with no assumptions regarding the rate of electron transport in the parallel and perpendicular directions. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations in a computational mesh that is aligned with the magnetic field. The fully-2D approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction, and encompasses the cathode boundary. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for charge-exchange and multiple-ionization collisions in the momentum equations. A first series of simulations of two Hall thrusters, namely the BPT-4000 and a 6-kW laboratory thruster, quantifies the significance of ion diffusion in the anode region and the importance of the extended physical domain on studies related to the impact of the transport coefficients on the electron flow field.

  12. Long-Term and Seasonal Variation of Suprathermal O2+ and Mass-28+ Ions at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christon, S. P.; Hamilton, D. C.; Mitchell, D. G.; DiFabio, R. D.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    Two suprathermal singly-charged molecular ion species exhibit long-term temporal variations in Saturn's near-equatorial magnetosphere at ~4-20 Rs from 2004 to 2012. These ~83-167 keV/e minor heavy ions measured by the Cassini Charge-Energy-Mass Spectrometer, CHEMS, at ~32 and ~28 amu/e are identified as O2+ and 28M+ (Mass-28+, possibly C2H5+, HCNH+, N2+, CO+, and/or Si+), respectively. Their partial density temporal profiles differ from each other and differ relative to the dominant water group ions, W+ (O+, OH+, H2O+, and H3O+). O2+, initially the second most abundant heavy ion species relative to W+, has decreased to much lower values. The relative O2+ and 28M+ partial densities declined as ring plane illumination decreased approaching Saturn's equinox in mid-2009. O2+/W+, initially ~4-5%, steadily declined by a factor of ~6 until near equinox. 28M+/W+, initially ~6 times lower than O2+/W+, declined by a factor of ~2 in a manner similar to O2+/W+ until early-2007, over 2 years before equinox. After decline, both ratios remained at consistently low levels until mid-2011, about 2 years after equinox, when O2+/W+ began recovering and 28M+/W+ did not. The main ring atmosphere/ionosphere is the most likely primary source for the O2+. Titan, Enceladus, Rhea, and the E-ring are possible candidate sources for the 28M+. To our knowledge, no temporal/seasonal 28M+ source variation in Saturn's magnetosphere has been anticipated or predicted. Transition from higher/declining to lower/persistent levels may indicate multiple competing components for both ion groups, that is, one component, probably ring-insolation related, is initially dominant and decreases gradually to be subsequently masked by another lower-level component.

  13. Source Population and Acceleration Location of Suprathermal Heavy Ions in Corotating Interaction Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filwett, R. J.; Desai, M. I. [University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Dayeh, M. A.; Broiles, T. W. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2017-03-20

    We have analyzed the ∼20–320 keV nucleon{sup −1} suprathermal (ST) heavy ion abundances in 41 corotating interaction regions (CIRs) observed by the Wind spacecraft from 1995 January to 2008 December. Our results are: (1) the CIR Fe/CNO and NeS/CNO ratios vary with the sunspot number, with values being closer to average solar energetic particle event values during solar maxima and lower than nominal solar wind values during solar minima. The physical mechanism responsible for the depleted abundances during solar minimum remains an open question. (2) The Fe/CNO increases with energy in the 6 events that occurred during solar maximum, while no such trends are observed for the 35 events during solar minimum. (3) The Fe/CNO shows no correlation with the average solar wind speed. (4) The Fe/CNO is well correlated with the corresponding upstream ∼20–320 keV nucleon{sup −1} Fe/CNO and not with the solar wind Fe/O measured by ACE in 31 events. Using the correlations between the upstream ∼20–40 keV nucleon{sup −1} Fe/CNO and the ∼20–320 keV nucleon{sup −1} Fe/CNO in CIRs, we estimate that, on average, the ST particles traveled ∼2 au along the nominal Parker spiral field line, which corresponds to upper limits for the radial distance of the source or acceleration location of ∼1 au beyond Earth orbit. Our results are consistent with those obtained from recent surveys, and confirm that CIR ST heavy ions are accelerated more locally, and are at odds with the traditional viewpoint that CIR ions seen at 1 au are bulk solar wind ions accelerated between 3 and 5 au.

  14. Modeling the electron transport chain of purple non-sulfur bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klamt, Steffen; Grammel, Hartmut; Straube, Ronny; Ghosh, Robin; Gilles, Ernst Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Purple non-sulfur bacteria (Rhodospirillaceae) have been extensively employed for studying principles of photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport phosphorylation and for investigating the regulation of gene expression in response to redox signals. Here, we use mathematical modeling to evaluate the steady-state behavior of the electron transport chain (ETC) in these bacteria under different environmental conditions. Elementary-modes analysis of a stoichiometric ETC model reveals nine operational modes. Most of them represent well-known functional states, however, two modes constitute reverse electron flow under respiratory conditions, which has been barely considered so far. We further present and analyze a kinetic model of the ETC in which rate laws of electron transfer steps are based on redox potential differences. Our model reproduces well-known phenomena of respiratory and photosynthetic operation of the ETC and also provides non-intuitive predictions. As one key result, model simulations demonstrate a stronger reduction of ubiquinone when switching from high-light to low-light conditions. This result is parameter insensitive and supports the hypothesis that the redox state of ubiquinone is a suitable signal for controlling photosynthetic gene expression.

  15. Electronic transport property in Weyl semimetal with local Weyl cone tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liwei; Feng, Lanting; Yao, Haibo; Zheng, Yisong

    2018-03-01

    In realistic materials of Weyl semimetal (WSM), the Weyl cone tilt (WCT) is allowed due to the absence of Lorentz invariance in condensed matter physics. In this context, we theoretically study the electronic transport property in WSM with the local WCT as the scattering mechanism. In so doing, we establish an electronic transport structure of WSM with the WCT occurring only in the central region sandwiched between two pieces of semi-infinite WSM without the WCT. By means of two complementary theoretical approaches, i.e. the continuum-model method and the lattice-model method, the electronic transmission probability, the conductivity and the Fano factor as functions of the incident electron energy are calculated respectively. We find that the WCT can give rise to nontrivial intervalley scattering, as a result, the Klein tunneling is notably suppressed. More importantly, the minimal conductivity of a WSM shifts in energy from the Weyl nodal point. The Fano factor of the shot noise deviates obviously from the sub-Poissonian value in a two dimensional WSM with the WCT.

  16. Penelope - a code system for Monte Carlo simulation of electron and photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Radiation is used in many applications of modern technology. Its proper handling requires competent knowledge of the basic physical laws governing its interaction with matter. To ensure its safe use, appropriate tools for predicting radiation fields and doses, as well as pertinent regulations, are required. One area of radiation physics that has received much attention concerns electron-photon transport in matter. PENELOPE is a modern, general-purpose Monte Carlo tool for simulating the transport of electrons and photons, which is applicable for arbitrary materials and in a wide energy range. PENELOPE provides quantitative guidance for many practical situations and techniques, including electron and X-ray spectroscopies, electron microscopy and microanalysis, biophysics, dosimetry, medical diagnostics and radiotherapy, as well as radiation damage and shielding. These proceedings contain the extensively revised teaching notes of the second workshop/training course on PENELOPE held in 2003, along with a detailed description of the improved physic models, numerical algorithms and structure of the code system. (author)

  17. A simplified spherical harmonic method for coupled electron-photon transport calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josef, J.A.

    1997-12-01

    In this thesis the author has developed a simplified spherical harmonic method (SP{sub N} method) and associated efficient solution techniques for 2-D multigroup electron-photon transport calculations. The SP{sub N} method has never before been applied to charged-particle transport. He has performed a first time Fourier analysis of the source iteration scheme and the P{sub 1} diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA) scheme applied to the 2-D SP{sub N} equations. The theoretical analyses indicate that the source iteration and P{sub 1} DSA schemes are as effective for the 2-D SP{sub N} equations as for the 1-D S{sub N} equations. In addition, he has applied an angular multigrid acceleration scheme, and computationally demonstrated that it performs as well as for the 2-D SP{sub N} equations as for the 1-D S{sub N} equations. It has previously been shown for 1-D S{sub N} calculations that this scheme is much more effective than the DSA scheme when scattering is highly forward-peaked. The author has investigated the applicability of the SP{sub N} approximation to two different physical classes of problems: satellite electronics shielding from geomagnetically trapped electrons, and electron beam problems.

  18. Electron transport in pure and substituted iron oxyhydroxides by small-polaron migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrov, Vitaly, E-mail: vitali.alexandrov@pnnl.gov; Rosso, Kevin M. [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2014-06-21

    Iron oxyhydroxides (FeOOH) are common crystalline forms of iron that play a critical role in technology and the natural environment via a variety of important reduction-oxidation reactions, including electrical semiconduction as an aspect. However, a basic understanding of the electron transport properties of these systems is still lacking. We examine the electron mobility in goethite (α-FeOOH), akaganéite (β-FeOOH), and lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) polymorphs by means of density functional theory based (DFT+U) calculations. We show that room temperature charge transport should be dominated by the small-polaron hopping type, and that the attendant mobility should be highest for pure goethite and akaganéite. Hopping pathways through the various lattices are discussed in terms of individual electron exchange steps and rates for each. Given the usual occurrence of compositional impurities in natural iron oxyhydroxides, we also investigate the effect of common stoichiometric defects on the electron hopping activation energies such as Al and Cr substitutional cations in goethite, and Cl anions in the channels of akaganéite.

  19. Spin-orbit coupling, electron transport and pairing instabilities in two-dimensional square structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen N. Kocharian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rashba spin-orbit effects and electron correlations in the two-dimensional cylindrical lattices of square geometries are assessed using mesoscopic two-, three- and four-leg ladder structures. Here the electron transport properties are systematically calculated by including the spin-orbit coupling in tight binding and Hubbard models threaded by a magnetic flux. These results highlight important aspects of possible symmetry breaking mechanisms in square ladder geometries driven by the combined effect of a magnetic gauge field spin-orbit interaction and temperature. The observed persistent current, spin and charge polarizations in the presence of spin-orbit coupling are driven by separation of electron and hole charges and opposite spins in real-space. The modeled spin-flip processes on the pairing mechanism induced by the spin-orbit coupling in assembled nanostructures (as arrays of clusters engineered in various two-dimensional multi-leg structures provide an ideal playground for understanding spatial charge and spin density inhomogeneities leading to electron pairing and spontaneous phase separation instabilities in unconventional superconductors. Such studies also fall under the scope of current challenging problems in superconductivity and magnetism, topological insulators and spin dependent transport associated with numerous interfaces and heterostructures.

  20. Halogenated contorted hexabenzocoronene derivatives for electron transport in thin-film transistors and organic photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiszpanski, Anna; Shaw, Leo; Bruzek, Matthew; Luettich, Franziska; Kahn, Antoine; Anthony, John; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2013-03-01

    In investigating electron acceptor substitutes for fullerene derivatives in organic photovoltaic applications, we have modified a semiconductor, contorted hexabenzocoronene (HBC), with halogens to increase its oxidative stability and lower its lower unoccupied molecular orbital energy level relative to vacuum level. We synthesized a series of HBC derivatives with increasing fluorine substitution on the peripheral aromatic rings and elucidated the effect of chemical modification on electronic properties. Though we observe a 57 meV shift in both the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied energy levels of the molecules with each progressive addition of fluorine, none of the fluorinated HBC derivatives demonstrate electron transport in thin-film transistors. By substituting chlorine for four of the peripheral fluorines, however, this mixed-halogenated compound exhibits n-transport characteristics. Unoptimized thin-film transistors comprising 8F-8Cl-HBC have demonstrated electron mobilities as high as 0.01 cm2/Vs, and unoptimized bulk-heterojunction solar cells with poly(3-hexyl thiophene) as the polymer donor have yielded power conversion efficiencies as high as 0.9%.

  1. Electron-Hole Symmetry Breaking in Charge Transport in Nitrogen-Doped Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiayu; Lin, Li; Rui, Dingran; Li, Qiucheng; Zhang, Jincan; Kang, Ning; Zhang, Yanfeng; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan; Xu, H Q

    2017-05-23

    Graphitic nitrogen-doped graphene is an excellent platform to study scattering processes of massless Dirac Fermions by charged impurities, in which high mobility can be preserved due to the absence of lattice defects through direct substitution of carbon atoms in the graphene lattice by nitrogen atoms. In this work, we report on electrical and magnetotransport measurements of high-quality graphitic nitrogen-doped graphene. We show that the substitutional nitrogen dopants in graphene introduce atomically sharp scatters for electrons but long-range Coulomb scatters for holes and, thus, graphitic nitrogen-doped graphene exhibits clear electron-hole asymmetry in transport properties. Dominant scattering processes of charge carriers in graphitic nitrogen-doped graphene are analyzed. It is shown that the electron-hole asymmetry originates from a distinct difference in intervalley scattering of electrons and holes. We have also carried out the magnetotransport measurements of graphitic nitrogen-doped graphene at different temperatures and the temperature dependences of intervalley scattering, intravalley scattering, and phase coherent scattering rates are extracted and discussed. Our results provide an evidence for the electron-hole asymmetry in the intervalley scattering induced by substitutional nitrogen dopants in graphene and shine a light on versatile and potential applications of graphitic nitrogen-doped graphene in electronic and valleytronic devices.

  2. Electronic transport at semiconductor surfaces - from point-contact transistor to micro-four-point probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasegawa, S.; Grey, Francois

    2002-01-01

    show that this type of conduction is measurable using new types of experimental probes, such as the multi-tip scanning tunnelling microscope and the micro-four-point probe. The resulting electronic transport properties are intriguing, and suggest that semiconductor surfaces should be considered......The electrical properties of semiconductor surfaces have played a decisive role in one of the most important discoveries of the last century, transistors. In the 1940s, the concept of surface states-new electron energy levels characteristic of the surface atoms-was instrumental in the fabrication...... of the first point-contact transistors, and led to the successful fabrication of field-effect transistors. However, to this day, one property of semiconductor surface states remains poorly understood, both theoretically and experimentally. That is the conduction of electrons or holes directly through...

  3. Space applications of the MITS electron-photon Monte Carlo transport code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kensek, R.P.; Lorence, L.J.; Halbleib, J.A.; Morel, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The MITS multigroup/continuous-energy electron-photon Monte Carlo transport code system has matured to the point that it is capable of addressing more realistic three-dimensional adjoint applications. It is first employed to efficiently predict point doses as a function of source energy for simple three-dimensional experimental geometries exposed to simulated uniform isotropic planar sources of monoenergetic electrons up to 4.0 MeV. Results are in very good agreement with experimental data. It is then used to efficiently simulate dose to a detector in a subsystem of a GPS satellite due to its natural electron environment, employing a relatively complex model of the satellite. The capability for survivability analysis of space systems is demonstrated, and results are obtained with and without variance reduction

  4. Electron transport in the two-dimensional channel material - zinc oxide nanoflake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jian-Jhong; Jian, Dunliang; Lin, Yen-Fu; Ku, Ming-Ming; Jian, Wen-Bin

    2018-03-01

    ZnO nanoflakes of 3-5 μm in lateral size and 15-20 nm in thickness are synthesized. The nanoflakes are used to make back-gated transistor devices. Electron transport in the ZnO nanoflake channel between source and drain electrodes are investigated. In the beginning, we argue and determine that electrons are in a two-dimensional system. We then apply Mott's two-dimensional variable range hopping model to analyze temperature and electric field dependences of resistivity. The disorder parameter, localization length, hopping distance, and hopping energy of the electron system in ZnO nanoflakes are obtained and, additionally, their temperature behaviors and dependences on room-temperature resistivity are presented. On the other hand, the basic transfer characteristics of the channel material are carried out, as well, and the carrier concentration, the mobility, and the Fermi wavelength of two-dimensional ZnO nanoflakes are estimated.

  5. Long distance electron transport in marine sediments: Microbial and geochemical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Larsen, Steffen; Pfeffer, Christian

    redox half-reactions in distant regions of the sediment leads to formation of electrical fields, which modifies ion transport. The local proton producing and proton consuming half reactions induces pH extremes that accelerate dissolution of iron sulphides and calcium carbonates in anoxic layers...... and promotes the formation of Mg-calcite and iron oxides in the oxic zone. Oxygen seems to be the major electron acceptor, and more than 40% of the oxygen consumption in sediments can be driven by long distance electron transfer from distant electron donors. The major e-donor is sulfide, which is oxidized......-structural properties suggesting that they are living electric micro cables. The mode of action of these organisms has major impacts on element cycling by redox processes, pH balances, mineral dissolution/precipitations, and electro migration of ions in marine sediment. The ability of Desulfubulbus filaments to bridge...

  6. Nonlinear electron transport in InAs/AlGaSb three-terminal ballistic junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, M; Inoue, T; Amano, N; Maemoto, T; Sasa, S; Inoue, M

    2008-01-01

    We have fabricated and characterized an InAs/AlGaSb three-terminal ballistic junction device. The fabricated device exhibited nonlinear electron transport properties because of ballistic motion of electrons in this structure that is comparable to the electron mean free path. When the left branch is biased to a finite voltage Vand the right to a voltage of -V (push-pull fashion), negative voltages appeared at the floating central branch regardless of the polarity of the input voltages. In the case of the central branch grounded in push-pull fashion, the clear current rectification effect also observed in the current flow of the central branch at 4.2K to even at 300K

  7. An overview of the Boltzmann transport equation solution for neutrons, photons and electrons in cartesian geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Barbara D. do Amaral; Vilhena, Marco Tullio

    2009-01-01

    Questions regarding accuracy and efficiency of deterministic transport methods are still on our mind today, even with modern supercomputers. The most versatile and widely used deterministic methods are the P N approximation, the S N method (discrete ordinates method) and their variants. In the discrete ordinates (S N ) formulations of the transport equation, it is assumed that the linearized Boltzmann equation only holds for a set of distinct numerical values of the direction-of-motion variables. In this work, looking forward to confirm the capabilities of deterministic methods in obtaining accurate results, we present a general overview of deterministic methods to solve the Boltzmann transport equation for neutral and charged particles. First, we describe a review in the Laplace transform technique applied to S N two dimensional transport equation in a rectangular domain considering Compton scattering. Next, we solved the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, an alternative approach for the Boltzmann transport equation, assuming a monoenergetic electron beam in a rectangular domain. The main idea relies on applying the P N approximation, a recent advance in the class of deterministic methods, in the angular variable, to the two dimensional Fokker-Planck equation and then applying the Laplace Transform in the spatial x-variable. Numerical results are given to illustrate the accuracy of deterministic methods presented. (author)

  8. Unravelling the progressive role of rattlers in thermoelectric clathrate and strategies for performance improvement: Concurrently enhancing electronic transport and blocking phononic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia-Yue; Cheng, Long; Hu, Ming

    2017-12-01

    Intermetallic clathrates, one class of guest-host systems with perfectly crystalline structures, hold great potential to be the "phonon glass - electron crystal" thermoelectric materials. Previous studies focus on revealing the atomistic origins of blocked phononic transport, yet little attention is drawn to the enhanced electronic transport. In this work, we investigate the binary type-I M8Si46 (M = Sr, Ba, Tl, and Pb) clathrates and unravel how rattlers concurrently block phononic transport and enhance electronic transport from first-principles. By comparing the empty and filled clathrates, the lattice thermal conductivity is greatly reduced by a factor of 21 due to the decrease in phonon relaxation time for propagative phonons over 0-6 THz by 1.5 orders of magnitude. On the other hand, rattlers bridge charge gaps among cages by donating electrons and thus drastically increase electrical conductivity. The concurrent realization of blocked phononic transport and enhanced electronic transport boosts the figure-of-merit (ZT) of empty clathrate by 4 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, by manipulating metallic rattlers and n-type doping, the power factor is markedly improved and ZT can reach 0.55 at 800 K. These results provide a quantitative description of the guest-host interaction and coupling dynamics from first-principles. The proposed strategy of manipulating ratting atoms and in-situ doping offers important guidance to engineer clathrates with high thermoelectric performance.

  9. Electron transport in mercury vapor: cross sections, pressure and temperature dependence of transport coefficients and NDC effects★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirić, Jasmina; Simonović, Ilija; Petrović, Zoran Lj.; White, Ronald D.; Dujko, Saša

    2017-11-01

    In this work we propose a complete and consistent set of cross sections for electron scattering in mercury vapor. The set is validated through a series of comparisons between swarm data calculated using a multi term theory for solving the Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo simulations, and the available experimental data. Other sets of cross sections for electron scattering in mercury vapor were also used as input in our numerical codes with the aim of testing their completeness, consistency and accuracy. The calculated swarm parameters are compared with measurements in order to assess the quality of the cross sections in providing data for plasma modeling. In particular, we discuss the dependence of transport coefficients on the pressure and temperature of mercury vapor, and the occurrence of negative differential conductivity (NDC) in the limit of lower values of E/N. We have shown that the phenomenon of NDC is induced by the presence of mercury dimers and that can be controlled by varying either pressure or temperature of mercury vapor. The effective inelastic cross section for mercury dimers is estimated for a range of pressures and temperatures. It is shown that the measured and calculated drift velocities agree very well only if the effective inelastic cross section for mercury dimers and thermal motion of mercury atoms are carefully considered and implemented in numerical calculations. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Physics of Ionized Gases (SPIG 2016)", edited by Goran Poparic, Bratislav Obradovic, Dragana Maric and Aleksandar Milosavljevic.

  10. 'Anomalous electron transport' with 'Giant Current Density' at room temperature observed with nanogranular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koops, Hans W.P.

    2013-01-01

    Focused electron beam induced deposition is a novel bottom up nano-structurization technology. An electron beam of high power density is used to generate nano- structures with dimensions > 20 nm, but being composed from amorphous or nanogranular materials with crystals of 2 to 5 nm diameter embedded in a Fullerene matrix. Those compounds are generated in general by secondary or low energy electrons in layers of inorganic, organic, organometallic compounds absorbed to the sample. Those are converted into nanogranular materials by the electron beam following chemical and physical laws, as given by 'Mother Nature'. Metals and amorphous mixtures of chemical compounds from metals are normal resistors, which can carry a current density J 2 . Nanogranular composites like Au/C or Pt/C with metal nanocrystals embedded in a Fullerene matrix have hopping conduction with 0-dimensional Eigen-value characteristics and show 'anomalous electron transport' and can carry 'Giant Current Densities' with values from > 1 MA/cm 2 to 0.1 GA/cm 2 without destruction of the materials. However the area connecting the nanogranular material with a metal with a 3-dimensional electron gas needs to be designed, that the flowing current is reduced to the current density values which the 3-D metal can support without segregation. The basis for a theoretical explanation of the phenomenon can be geometry quantization for Coulomb blockade, of electron surface orbitals around the nanocrystals, hopping conduction, and the limitation of the density of states for phonons in geometry confined non percolated granular materials with strong difference in mass and orientation. Several applications in electronics, signal generators, light sources, detectors, and solar energy harvesting are suggested. (author)

  11. Electric Field Tuned Crossover from Classical to Weakly Localized Quantum Transport in Electron Doped SrTiO3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngai, J.H.; Segal, Y.; Su, D.; Zhu, Y.; Walker, F.J.; Ismail-Beigi, S.; Le Hur, K.; Ahn, C.H.

    2010-06-21

    Electron gases created by modulating the charge density near interfaces and surfaces of insulating SrTiO{sub 3} offer a wide range of tunable behavior. Here, we utilize the nonlinear dielectric response of SrTiO{sub 3} to electrostatically manipulate the spatial confinement of an electron gas relative to an interface, where scattering is enhanced. Magnetotransport measurements reveal that the electron gas can be tuned from weakly localized to classical transport regimes. This crossover in transport demonstrates that elastic scattering can be electrostatically controlled, providing another degree of tunability for electron gases in SrTiO{sub 3}.

  12. The electron transport system of the anaerobic Propionibacterium shermanii: cytochrome and inhibitor studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, A C; Sporkenbach, J

    1975-03-10

    1. Electron transport particles obtained from cell-free extracts of Propionibacterium shermanii by centrifugation at 105000 times g for 3 hrs oxidized NADH, D,L-lactate, L-glycerol-3-phosphate and succinate with oxygen and, except for succinate, with fumarate, too. 2. Spectral investigation of the electron transport particles revealed the presence of cytochromes b, d and o, and traces of cytochrome alpha1 and a c-type cytochrome. Cytochrome b was reduced by succinate to about 50%, and by NADH, lactate or glycerol-3-phosphate to 80--90%. 3. The inhibitory effects of amytal and rotenone on NADH oxidation, but not on the oxidation of the other substrates, indicated the presence of the NADH dehydrogenase complex, or "site I region", in the electron transport system of P. shermanii. 4. NQNO inhibited substrate oxidations by oxygen and fumarate, as well as equilibration of the flavoproteins of the substrate dehydrogenases by way of menaquinone. The inhibition occurred at low concentrations of the inhibitor and reached 80--100%, depending on the substrate tested. The site of inhibition of the respiratory activity was located between menaquinone and cytochrome b. In addition, inhibition of flavoprotein equilibration suggested that NQNO acted upon the electron transfer directed from menaquinol towards the acceptor to be reduced, either cytochrome b or the flavoproteins, which would include fumarate reductase. 5. In NQNO-inhibited particles, cytochrome b was not oxidized by oxygen-free fumarate, but readily oxidized by oxygen. It was concluded from this and the above evidence that the branching-point of the electron transport chain towards fumarate reductase was located at the menaquinone in P. shermanii. It was further concluded that all cytochromes were situated in the oxygen-linked branch of the chain, which formed a dead end of the system under anaerobic conditions. 6. Antimycin A inhibited only oxygen-linked reactions of the particles to about 50% at high concentrations

  13. Electron and Hole Transport Layers: Their Use in Inverted Bulk Heterojunction Polymer Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Lattante

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells (BHJ PSCs are very promising organic-based devices for low-cost solar energy conversion, compatible with roll-to-roll or general printing methods for mass production. Nevertheless, to date, many issues should still be addressed, one of these being the poor stability in ambient conditions. One elegant way to overcome such an issue is the so-called “inverted” BHJ PSC, a device geometry in which the charge collection is reverted in comparison with the standard geometry device, i.e., the electrons are collected by the bottom electrode and the holes by the top electrode (in contact with air. This reverted geometry allows one to use a high work function top metal electrode, like silver or gold (thus avoiding its fast oxidation and degradation, and eliminates the need of a polymeric hole transport layer, typically of an acidic nature, on top of the transparent metal oxide bottom electrode. Moreover, this geometry is fully compatible with standard roll-to-roll manufacturing in air and is less demanding for a good post-production encapsulation process. To date, the external power conversion efficiencies of the inverted devices are generally comparable to their standard analogues, once both the electron transport layer and the hole transport layer are fully optimized for the particular device. Here, the most recent results on this particular optimization process will be reviewed, and a general outlook regarding the inverted BHJ PSC will be depicted.

  14. How to probe transverse magnetic anisotropy of a single-molecule magnet by electronic transport?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiorny, M.; Burzuri, E.; Gaudenzi, R.; Park, K.; Leijnse, M.; Wegewijs, M.; Paaske, J.; Cornia, A.; van der Zant, H.

    We propose an approach for in-situ determination of the transverse magnetic anisotropy (TMA) of an individual molecule by electronic transport measurements, see Phys. Rev. B 91, 035442 (2015). We study a Fe4 single-molecule magnet (SMM) captured in a gateable junction, a unique tool for addressing the spin in different redox states of a molecule. We show that, due to mixing of the spin eigenstates of the SMM, the TMA significantly manifests itself in transport. We predict and experimentally observe the pronounced intensity modulation of the Coulomb peak amplitude with the magnetic field in the linear-response transport regime, from which the TMA parameter E can be estimated. Importantly, the method proposed here does not rely on the small induced tunnelling effects and, hence, works well at temperatures and electron tunnel broadenings by far exceeding the tunnel splittings and even E itself. We deduce that the TMA for a single Fe4 molecule captured in a junction is substantially larger than the bulk value. Work supported by the Polish Ministry of Science and Education as `Iuventus Plus' project (IP2014 030973) in years 2015-2016.

  15. Multi-term approximation to the Boltzmann transport equation for electron energy distribution functions in nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yue

    Plasma is currently a hot topic and it has many significant applications due to its composition of both positively and negatively charged particles. The energy distribution function is important in plasma science since it characterizes the ability of the plasma to affect chemical reactions, affect physical outcomes, and drive various applications. The Boltzmann Transport Equation is an important kinetic equation that provides an accurate basis for characterizing the distribution function---both in energy and space. This dissertation research proposes a multi-term approximation to solve the Boltzmann Transport Equation by treating the relaxation process using an expansion of the electron distribution function in Legendre polynomials. The elastic and 29 inelastic cross sections for electron collisions with nitrogen molecules (N2) and singly ionized nitrogen molecules ( N+2 ) have been used in this application of the Boltzmann Transport Equation. Different numerical methods have been considered to compare the results. The numerical methods discussed in this thesis are the implicit time-independent method, the time-dependent Euler method, the time-dependent Runge-Kutta method, and finally the implicit time-dependent relaxation method by generating the 4-way grid with a matrix solver. The results show that the implicit time-dependent relaxation method is the most accurate and stable method for obtaining reliable results. The results were observed to match with the published experimental data rather well.

  16. Bulk and surface electron transport in topological insulator candidate YbB{sub 6-δ}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glushkov, Vladimir V.; Demishev, Sergey V.; Sluchanko, Nikolay E. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of RAS, Vavilov str. 38, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutskii per. 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Bozhko, Alexey D.; Bogach, Alexey V.; Semeno, Alexey V.; Voronov, Valeriy V. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of RAS, Vavilov str. 38, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dukhnenko, Anatoliy V.; Filipov, Volodimir B.; Shitsevalova, Natalya Yu. [Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science NAS, Krzhyzhanovsky str. 3, 03680, Kiev (Ukraine); Kondrin, Mikhail V. [Vereshchagin Institute of High Pressure Physics of RAS, 142190, Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, Alexey V.; Sannikov, Ilia I. [National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' , Kashirskoe Shosse 31, 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-04-15

    We report the study of transport and magnetic properties of the YbB{sub 6-δ}single crystals grown by inductive zone melting. A strong disparity in the low temperature resistivity, Seebeck and Hall coefficients is established for the samples with the different level of boron deficiency. The effective parameters of the charge transport in YbB{sub 6-δ} are shown to depend on the concentration of intrinsic defects, which is estimated to range from 0.09% to 0.6%. The pronounced variation of Hall mobility μ{sub H} found for bulk holes is induced by the decrease of transport relaxation time from τ ∼ 7.7 fs for YbB{sub 5.994} to τ ∼ 2.2 fs for YbB{sub 5.96}. An extra contribution to conductivity from electrons with μ{sub H}∼ -1000 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} and the very low concentration n /n{sub Yb}∼ 10{sup -6} discovered below 20 K for all the single crystals under investigation is suggested to arise from the surface electron states appeared in the inversion layer due to the band bending. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. ITS, TIGER System of Coupled Electron Photon Transport by Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbleib, J.A.; Mehlhorn, T.A.; Young, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: ITS permits a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-integrated coupled electron/ photon radiation transport problems with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. 2 - Method of solution: Through a machine-portable utility that emulates the basic features of the CDC UPDATE processor, the user selects one of eight codes for running on a machine of one of four (at least) major vendors. With the ITS-3.0 release the PSR-0245/UPEML package is included to perform these functions. The ease with which this utility is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is maximized by employing the best available cross sections and sampling distributions, and the most complete physical model for describing the production and transport of the electron/ photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. Flexibility of construction permits the codes to be tailored to specific applications and the capabilities of the codes to be extended to more complex applications through update procedures. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: - Restrictions and/or limitations for ITS depend upon the local operating system

  18. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolch, W.E.

    1994-11-01

    The goal of this particular task is to consider, for the first time, the explicit transport of beta particles and photon-generated electrons in the series of six phantoms developed by Cristy and Eckerman (1987) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In their report, ORNL/TM-8381, specific absorbed fractions of energy are reported for phantoms representing the newborn (3.4 kg), the one-year-old (9.8 kg), the five-year-old (19 kg), the ten-year-old (32 kg), the fifteen-year-old/adult female (55-58 kg), and the adult male (70 kg). Radiation transport calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo code ALGAMP which allows photon transport only. In subsequent calculations of radionuclide S values as is done in the MIRDOSE2 computer program, electron absorbed fractions are thus considered to be either unity or zero depending upon whether the source region does or does not equal the target region, respectively.

  19. Understanding the effects of electronic polarization and delocalization on charge-transport levels in oligoacene systems

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher

    2017-06-13

    Electronic polarization and charge delocalization are important aspects that affect the charge-transport levels in organic materials. Here, using a quantum mechanical/ embedded-charge (QM/EC) approach based on a combination of the long-range corrected omega B97X-D exchange-correlation functional (QM) and charge model 5 (CM5) point-charge model (EC), we evaluate the vertical detachment energies and polarization energies of various sizes of crystalline and amorphous anionic oligoacene clusters. Our results indicate that QM/EC calculations yield vertical detachment energies and polarization energies that compare well with the experimental values obtained from ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy measurements. In order to understand the effect of charge delocalization on the transport levels, we considered crystalline naphthalene systems with QM regions including one or five-molecules. The results for these systems show that the delocalization and polarization effects are additive; therefore, allowing for electron delocalization by increasing the size of the QM region leads to the additional stabilization of the transport levels. Published by AIP Publishing.

  20. ITS Version 6 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2008-04-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of lineartime-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 6, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 5.0 codes, and (2) conversion to Fortran 90. The general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through memory allocation to reduce the need for users to modify and recompile the code.