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Sample records for supranuclear gaze palsy

  1. Progressive Supranuclear Gaze Palsy with Predominant Cerebellar Ataxia: A Case Series with Videos

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    Zheyu Xu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP with predominant cerebellar ataxia (PSP-C is a rare phenotype of PSP. The clinical and radiological features of this disorder remain poorly characterized. Through a retrospective case series, we aim to characterize the clinical and radiological features of PSP-C. Four patients with PSP-C were identified: patients who presented with prominent cerebellar dysfunction that disappeared with the progression of the disease. Supranuclear gaze palsy occurred at a mean of 2.0 ± 2.3 years after the onset of ataxia. Mild cerebellar volume loss and midbrain atrophy were detected on brain imaging, which are supportive of a diagnosis of PSP. Videos are presented illustrating the co-existence of cerebellar signs and supranuclear gaze palsy and the disappearance of cerebellar signs with disease progression. Better recognition and the development of validated diagnostic criteria would aid in the antemortem recognition of this rare condition.

  2. The Disturbance of Gaze in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP: Implications for Pathogenesis

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    Athena L Chen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is a disease of later life that is currently regarded as a form of neurodegenerative tauopathy. Disturbance of gaze is a cardinal clinical feature of PSP that often helps clinicians to establish the diagnosis. Since the neurobiology of gaze control is now well understood, it is possible to use eye movements as investigational tools to understand aspects of the pathogenesis of PSP. In this review, we summarize each disorder of gaze control that occurs in PSP, drawing on our studies of fifty patients, and on reports from other laboratories that have measured the disturbances of eye movements. When these gaze disorders are approached by considering each functional class of eye movements and its neurobiological basis, a distinct pattern of eye movement deficits emerges that provides insight into the pathogenesis of PSP. Although some aspects of all forms of eye movements are affected in PSP, the predominant defects concern vertical saccades (slow and hypometric, both up and down, impaired vergence, and inability to modulate the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex appropriately for viewing distance. These vertical and vergence eye movements habitually work in concert to enable visuomotor skills that are important during locomotion with the hands free. Taken with the prominent early feature of falls, these findings suggest that PSP tauopathy impairs a recently-evolved neural system concerned with bipedal locomotion in an erect posture and frequent gaze shifts between the distant environment and proximate hands. This approach provides a conceptual framework that can be used to address the nosological challenge posed by overlapping clinical and neuropathological features of neurodegenerative tauopathies.

  3. Zolpidem in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

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    Sandip K. Dash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by motor symptoms, postural instability, personality changes, and cognitive impairment. There is no effective treatment for this disorder. Reduced neurotransmission of GABA in the striatum and globus pallidus may contribute to the symptoms of motor and cognitive symptoms seen in PSP. Zolpidem is a GABA agonist of the benzodiazepine subreceptor BZ1. Here a nondiabetic, normotensive case of PSP is (Progressive Supranuclear Palsy described, which showed improvement in swallowing, speech, and gaze paresis after zolpidem therapy and possible mechanism of actions are discussed. However, more trials are needed with large number of patients to confirm the effectiveness of zolpidem in progressive supranuclear palsy.

  4. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: an Update.

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    Armstrong, Melissa J

    2018-02-17

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a 4R tau neuropathologic entity. While historically defined by the presence of a vertical supranuclear gaze palsy and falls in the first symptomatic year, clinicopathologic studies identify alternate presenting phenotypes. This article reviews the new PSP diagnostic criteria, diagnostic approaches, and treatment strategies. The 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PSP criteria outline 14 core clinical features and 4 clinical clues that combine to diagnose one of eight PSP phenotypes with probable, possible, or suggestive certainty. Evidence supports the use of select imaging approaches in the classic PSP-Richardson syndrome phenotype. Recent trials of putative disease-modifying agents showed no benefit. The new PSP diagnostic criteria incorporating the range of presenting phenotypes have important implications for diagnosis and research. More work is needed to understand how diagnostic evaluations inform phenotype assessment and identify expected progression. Current treatment is symptomatic, but tau-based therapeutics are in active clinical trials.

  5. Genetics of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

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    Sun Young Im

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is clinically characterized by progressive postural instability, supranuclear gaze palsy, parkinsonism and cognitive decline. Pathologically, diagnosis of PSP is based on characteristic features, such as neurofibrillary tangles, neutrophil threads, tau-positive astrocytes and their processes in basal ganglia and brainstem, and the accumulation of 4 repeat tau protein. PSP is generally recognized as a sporadic disorder; however, understanding of genetic background of PSP has been expanding rapidly. Here we review relevant publications to outline the genetics of PSP. Although only small number of familial PSP cases have been reported, the recognition of familial PSP has been increasing. In some familial cases of clinically probable PSP, PSP pathologies were confirmed based on NINDS neuropathological diagnostic criteria. Several mutations in MAPT, the gene that causes a form of familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration with tauopathy, have been identified in both sporadic and familial PSP cases. The H1 haplotype of MAPT is a risk haplotype for PSP, and within H1, a sub-haplotype (H1c is associated with PSP. A recent genome-wide association study on autopsyproven PSP revealed additional PSP risk alleles in STX6 and EIF2AK3. Several heredodegenerative parkinsonian disorders are referred to as PSP-look-alikes because their clinical phenotype, but not their pathology, mimics PSP. Due to the fast development of genomics and bioinformatics, more genetic factors related to PSP are expected to be discovered. Undoubtedly, these studies will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of PSP and clues for developing therapeutic strategies.

  6. Progressive supranuclear palsy: new concepts

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    Orlando Graziani Povoas Barsottini

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is a distinctive form of neurodegenerative disease which affects the brainstem and basal ganglia. Patients present supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, postural instability and mild dementia. PSP is defined neuropathologically by the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles in the subthalamic nucleus, pallidum, red nucleus, substantia nigra, striatum, pontine tegmentum, oculomotor nucleus, medulla and dentate nucleus. Over the last decade many lines of investigations have helped refine PSP in many aspects and it is the purpose of this review to help neurologists identify PSP, to better understand its pathophysiology and to provide a more focused, symptom-based treatment approach.

  7. A case of atypical progressive supranuclear palsy

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    Spaccavento S

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Simona Spaccavento, Marina Del Prete, Angela Craca, Anna Loverre IRCCS Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, Cassano Murge, Bari, Italy Background: Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is a neurodegenerative extrapyramidal syndrome. Studies have demonstrated that PSP can present clinically as an atypical dementing syndrome dominated by a progressive apraxia of speech (AOS and aphasia. Aim: We aimed to investigate the clinical presentation of PSP, using a comprehensive multidimensional evaluation, and the disease response to various pharmacological treatments. Methods: A 72-year-old right-handed male, with 17 years education, who first presented with aphasia, AOS, depression, apathy, and postural instability at 69 years; a complete neuropsychological evaluation, tapping the different cognitive domains, was performed. Results: Testing revealed a moderate global cognitive deficit (Mini-Mental State Examination test score =20, low memory test scores (story recall, Rey’s 15-word Immediate and Delayed Recall, and poor phonemic and semantic fluency. The patient’s language was characterized by AOS, with slow speech rate, prolonged intervals between syllables and words, decreased articulatory accuracy, sound distortions, and anomia. Behavioral changes, such as depression, anxiety, apathy, and irritability, were reported. The neurological examination revealed supranuclear vertical gaze palsy, poor face miming, and a mild balance deficit. Magnetic resonance imaging showed only widespread cortical atrophy. Single photon emission computed tomography demonstrated left > right frontotemporal cortical abnormalities. After 6 months, a further neuropsychological assessment showed a progression in cognitive deficits, with additional attention deficits. The patient reported frequent falls, but the neurological deficits remained unchanged. Neuroimaging tests showed the same brain involvement. Conclusion: Our case highlights the heterogeneity of the clinical features in

  8. Hummingbird sign in progressive supranuclear palsy disease

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    Sanjay Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is characterized by slowness, rigidity, bradykinesia, repeated falls, downgaze limitation and dementia. Midbrain atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging is highly suggestive of PSP and is described as "hummingbird sign". This sign is very helpful in differentiating PSP patients from those with Parkinson′s disease. We hereby report a 72-year-old female case of PSP primarily diagnosed with Parkinson′s disease.

  9. Social cognitive deficits and their neural correlates in progressive supranuclear palsy.

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    Ghosh, Boyd C P; Calder, Andrew J; Peers, Polly V; Lawrence, Andrew D; Acosta-Cabronero, Julio; Pereira, João M; Hodges, John R; Rowe, James B

    2012-07-01

    Although progressive supranuclear palsy is defined by its akinetic rigidity, vertical supranuclear gaze palsy and falls, cognitive impairments are an important determinant of patients' and carers' quality of life. Here, we investigate whether there is a broad deficit of modality-independent social cognition in progressive supranuclear palsy and explore the neural correlates for these. We recruited 23 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (using clinical diagnostic criteria, nine with subsequent pathological confirmation) and 22 age- and education-matched controls. Participants performed an auditory (voice) emotion recognition test, and a visual and auditory theory of mind test. Twenty-two patients and 20 controls underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging to analyse neural correlates of social cognition deficits using voxel-based morphometry. Patients were impaired on the voice emotion recognition and theory of mind tests but not auditory and visual control conditions. Grey matter atrophy in patients correlated with both voice emotion recognition and theory of mind deficits in the right inferior frontal gyrus, a region associated with prosodic auditory emotion recognition. Theory of mind deficits also correlated with atrophy of the anterior rostral medial frontal cortex, a region associated with theory of mind in health. We conclude that patients with progressive supranuclear palsy have a multimodal deficit in social cognition. This deficit is due, in part, to progressive atrophy in a network of frontal cortical regions linked to the integration of socially relevant stimuli and interpretation of their social meaning. This impairment of social cognition is important to consider for those managing and caring for patients with progressive supranuclear palsy.

  10. An autopsy-confirmed case of progressive supranuclear palsy with predominant postural instability.

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    Kurz, Carolin; Ebersbach, Georg; Respondek, Gesine; Giese, Armin; Arzberger, Thomas; Höglinger, Günter Ulrich

    2016-11-14

    Postural instability and supranuclear gaze palsy represent the key symptoms of Richardson's syndrome, the most frequent clinical manifestation of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). However, a proportion of PSP patients never develops ocular motor symptoms, which prevents clinicians from establishing the diagnosis during lifetime according to current diagnostic criteria. We present one instructive autopsy-confirmed PSP case with prospective video-documented clinical course, showing striking temporal divergence of initially present postural instability and delayed development of ocular motor dysfunction. Brain imaging and autopsy findings were typical of PSP, but the temporal sequence of symptoms was unusual with isolated postural instability predominating the clinical course for many years and slowing of vertical saccades/supranuclear gaze palsy evolving not until the 9 th /11 th year after disease onset. Although other differential diagnoses were unlikely, this patient did not pass the threshold for possible or probable diagnosis of PSP according to current diagnostic criteria until very late in the disease course. This first well documented, autopsy confirmed case of PSP with predominant postural instability further expands the clinical spectrum of PSP and points out the need of new clinical diagnostic criteria with sufficient sensitivity and specificity for an early and reliable diagnosis.

  11. Cerebral hypometabolism in progressive supranuclear palsy studied with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, N.L.; Gilman, S.; Berent, S.; Morin, E.M.; Brown, M.B.; Koeppe, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is characterized by supranuclear palsy of gaze, axial dystonia, bradykinesia, rigidity, and a progressive dementia. Pathological changes in this disorder are generally restricted to subcortical structures, yet the type and range of cognitive deficits suggest the involvement of many cerebral regions. We examined the extent of functional impairment to cerebral cortical and subcortical structures as measured by the level of glucose metabolic activity at rest. Fourteen patients with PSP were compared to 21 normal volunteers of similar age using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography. Glucose metabolism was reduced in the caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus, pons, and cerebral cortex, but not in the cerebellum in the patients with PSP as compared to the normal subjects. Analysis of individual brain regions revealed significant declines in cerebral glucose utilization in most regions throughout the cerebral cortex, particularly those in the superior half of the frontal lobe. Declines in the most affected regions of cerebral cortex were greater than those in any single subcortical structure. Although using conventional neuropathological techniques the cerebral cortex appears to be unaffected in PSP, significant and pervasive functional impairments in both cortical and subcortical structures are present. These observations help to account for the constellation of cognitive symptoms in individual patients with PSP and the difficulty encountered in identifying a characteristic psychometric profile for this group of patients

  12. The "hummingbird" lady: A case report on progressive supranuclear palsy

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    Mosam V Phirke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is a rare neurodegenerative disease, which tends to be progressive, causing weakness of the structures in the brain stem that controls eye movements. PSP falls under the rubric of Parkinsonism plus syndromes that are a group of heterogeneous degenerative neurological disorders that differ from the classical idiopathic Parkinson′s disease. PSP is often underreported, making it important for clinicians to be aware of this disorder. Here we report a case of PSP, which presented primarily with speech disturbances and recurrent falls due to postural instability. On investigating, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed a classical sign diagnostic of PSP.

  13. The applause sign and neuropsychological profile in progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson's disease.

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    Somme, Johanne; Gómez-Esteban, Juan Carlos; Tijero, Beatriz; Berganzo, Koldo; Lezcano, Elena; Zarranz, Juan Jose

    2013-08-01

    The applause sign has been associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. We investigate its validity in the differential diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson's disease, and its relationship with neuropsychological tests. 23 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy and 106 patients with Parkinson's disease were included and administered the following scales: progressive supranuclear palsy rating scale, unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS), mini-mental state examination (MMSE), frontal assessment battery (FAB), neuropsychiatric inventory and three-clap test. 73.9% with progressive supranuclear palsy and 21.7% with Parkinson's disease showed a positive applause sign. Only a positive applause sign, UPDRS II score and disease duration were found to be predictors of progressive supranuclear palsy. Both patient-groups showed statistically significant correlations between the applause sign and neuropsychological tests: in progressive supranuclear palsy patients MMSE correlation coefficient: 0.62 (p: 0.002) and FAB correlation coefficient: 0.48 (p: 0.02), and in Parkinson's disease patients MMSE correlation coefficient: 0.47 (pspecific to progressive supranuclear palsy and may also be observed in Parkinson's disease patients with altered cognition, and it's related to cortical frontal abnormalities such as language disorders and inhibitory control. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [18F]AV-1451 tau positron emission tomography in progressive supranuclear palsy.

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    Whitwell, Jennifer L; Lowe, Val J; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Weigand, Stephen D; Senjem, Matthew L; Schwarz, Christopher G; Spychalla, Anthony J; Petersen, Ronald C; Jack, Clifford R; Josephs, Keith A

    2017-01-01

    The [ 18 F]AV-1451 positron emission tomography ligand allows the in vivo assessment of tau proteins in the brain. It shows strong binding in Alzheimer's dementia, but little is known about how it performs in progressive supranuclear palsy, a primary 4R tauopathy. The objectives of this study were to determine whether [ 18 F]AV-1451 uptake can be observed in progressive supranuclear palsy and to characterize the regional distribution when compared with controls and Alzheimer's dementia. [ 18 F]AV-1451 positron emission tomography was performed in 10 patients with probable progressive supranuclear palsy. These patients were age- and gender-matched to 50 controls and 10 Alzheimer's dementia patients who had undergone identical [ 18 F]AV-1451 imaging. Regional comparisons of [ 18 F]AV-1451 uptake were performed across the whole brain using region-of-interest and voxel-level analyses, and correlations between regional [ 18 F]AV-1451 and the progressive supranuclear palsy rating scale were assessed. An elevated [ 18 F]AV-1451 signal was observed in progressive supranuclear palsy when compared with controls in the pallidum, midbrain, dentate nucleus of the cerebellum, thalamus, caudate nucleus, and frontal regions. Signal in the cerebellar dentate and pallidum were also greater in progressive supranuclear palsy when compared with Alzheimer's dementia. Conversely, the [ 18 F]AV-1451 signal across the cortex was higher in Alzheimer's dementia when compared with progressive supranuclear palsy. The [ 18 F]AV-1451 signal in a number of regions correlated with the progressive supranuclear palsy rating scale. Progressive supranuclear palsy is associated with an elevated [ 18 F]AV-1451 signal in a characteristic and distinct regional pattern that correlates with disease severity and differs from the patterns observed in Alzheimer's dementia. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  15. Identification of common variants influencing risk of the tauopathy progressive supranuclear palsy

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    G. Hoglinger (Gunter); N.M. Melhem (Nadine); D. Dickson (Dennis); P.M.A. Sleiman (Patrick); L.-S. Wang; L. Klei (Lambertus); R. Rademakers (Rosa); R. de Silva (Rohan); I. Litvan (Irene); D.E. Riley (David); J.C. van Swieten (John); P. Heutink (Peter); Z.K. Wszolek (Zbigniew); R.J. Uitti (Ryan); J. Vandrovcova (Jana); H.I. Hurtig (Howard); R.G. Gross (Rachel); W. Maetzler (Walter); S. Goldwurm (Stefano); E. Tolosa; B. Borroni (Barbara); P. Pastor (Pau); L.B. Cantwell (Laura); M.R. Han; A. Dillman (Allissa); M.P. van der Brug (Marcel); J. Gibbs (Raphael); M.R. Cookson (Mark); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); A. Singleton (Andrew); M.J. Farrer (Matthew); C.-E. Yu (Changen); L.I. Golbe (Lawrence); T. Revesz (Tamas); J. Hardy (John); A.J. Lees (Andrew); B. Devlin (Bernie); H. Hakonarson (Hakon); U. Müller (Ulrich); G.D. Schellenberg (Gerard); R.L. Albin (Roger); E. Alonso (Elena); M. Apfelbacher (Manuela); S.E. Arnold (Steven); J. Avila (Jesús); T.G. Beach (Thomas); S. Beecher (Sherry); D. Berg (Daniela); T.D. Bird (Thomas); N. Bogdanović (Nenad); A.J.W. Boon (Andrea); Y. Bordelon (Yvette); A. Brice (Alexis); H. Budka (Herbert); M. Canesi (Margherita); W.Z. Chiu (Wang Zheng); R. Cilia (Roberto); C. Colosimo (Carlo); P.P. de Deyn (Peter); J.G. de Yebenes; L. Donker Kaat (Laura); R. Duara (Ranjan); A. Durr; S. Engelborghs (Sebastiaan); G. Fabbrini (Giovanni); N.A. Finch (Nicole); R. Flook (Robyn); M.P. Frosch (Matthew); C. Gaig; D. Galasko (Douglas); T. Gasser (Thomas); M. Gearing (Marla); E.T. Geller (Evan); B. Ghetti (Bernardino); N.R. Graff-Radford (Neill); M. Grossman (Murray); D.A. Hall (Deborah); L.-N. Hazrati; M. Höllerhage (Matthias); J. Jankovic (Joseph); J.L. Juncos (Jorge); A. Karydas (Anna); H.A. Kretzschmar (Hans); I. Leber (Isabelle); V.M.Y. Lee (Virginia); A.P. Lieberman (Andrew); K.E. Lyons (Kelly); C. Mariani (Claudio); E. Masliah (Eliezer); L.A. Massey (Luke); C.A. McLean (Catriona); N. Meucci (Nicoletta); B.L. Miller (Bruce); B. Mollenhauer (Brit); J.C. Möller (Jens); H. Morris (Huw); S.S. O'Sullivan (Sean); W. Oertel; D. Ottaviani (Donatella); A. Padovani (Alessandro); R. Pahwa (Rajesh); G. Pezzoli (Gianni); S. Pickering-Brown (Stuart); W. Poewe (Werner); A. Rabano (Alberto); A. Rajput (Alex); S.G. Reich (Stephen); G. Respondek (Gesine); S. Roeber (Sigrun); J.D. Rohrer (Jonathan Daniel); O.A. Ross (Owen); M. Rossor (Martin); G. Sacilotto (Giorgio); W.W. Seeley (William); K. Seppi (Klaus); L. Silveira-Moriyama (Laura); S. Spina (Salvatore); K. Srulijes (Karin); P. St. George-Hyslop (Peter); M. Stamelou (Maria); D.G. Standaert (David); S. Tesei (Silvana); W.W. Tourtellotte (Wallace); C. Trenkwalder (Claudia); C. Troakes (Claire); J.Q. Trojanowski (John); J.C. Troncoso (Juan); V.M. Deerlin (Vivianna); J.P.G. Vonsattel; G.K. Wenning (Gregor); C.L. White III (Charles); P. Winter (Pia); C. Zarow (Chris); A.L. Zecchinelli (Anna); A. Antonini (Angelo)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractProgressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a movement disorder with prominent tau neuropathology. Brain diseases with abnormal tau deposits are called tauopathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer's disease. Environmental causes of tauopathies include repetitive head trauma associated

  16. Pulmonary embolism: ′the great masquerader′ of pneumonia in a patient with progressive supranuclear palsy

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    Robin G Manappallil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Parkinson′s disease are at risk of developing aspiration pneumonia. Pulmonary embolism is a rare but life-threatening complication in such patients, but could the same be true in progressive supranuclear palsy, an atypical form of Parkinsonism? This case report aims at highlighting the development of unprovoked pulmonary embolism in a patient with progressive supranuclear palsy and also describes how pulmonary embolism can mimic pneumonia in such patients.

  17. Apparent diffusion coefficient measurements in progressive supranuclear palsy

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    Ohshita, T.; Oka, M.; Imon, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Mimori, Y.; Nakamura, S. [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-09-01

    We measured the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI in the cerebral white matter of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and age-matched normal subjects. In PSP, ADC in the prefrontal and precentral white matter was significantly higher than in controls. There was no significant difference in signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The ADC did correlate with signal intensity. The distribution of the elevation of ADC may be the consequence of underlying pathological changes, such as neurofibrillary tangles or glial fibrillary tangles in the cortex. Our findings suggest that ADC measurement might be useful for demonstrating subtle neuropathological changes. (orig.)

  18. Diffusion tensor analysis of corpus callosum in progressive supranuclear palsy

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    Ito, Shoichi; Makino, Takahiro; Shirai, Wakako; Hattori, Takamichi [Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University (Japan)

    2008-11-15

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative disease featuring parkinsonism, supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, dysphagia, and frontal lobe dysfunction. The corpus callosum which consists of many commissure fibers probably reflects cerebral cortical function. Several previous reports showed atrophy or diffusion abnormalities of anterior corpus callosum in PSP patients, but partitioning method used in these studies was based on data obtained in nonhuman primates. In this study, we performed a diffusion tensor analysis using a new partitioning method for the human corpus callosum. Seven consecutive patients with PSP were compared with 29 age-matched patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD) and 19 age-matched healthy control subjects. All subjects underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, and the corpus callosum was partitioned into five areas on the mid-sagittal plane according to a recently established topography of human corpus callosum (CC1-prefrontal area, CC2-premotor and supplementary motor area, CC3-motor area, CC4-sensory area, CC5-parietal, temporal, and occipital area). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were measured in each area and differences between groups were analyzed. In the PSP group, FA values were significantly decreased in CC1 and CC2, and ADC values were significantly increased in CC1 and CC2. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed excellent reliability of FA and ADC analyses of CC1 for differentiating PSP from PD. The anterior corpus callosum corresponding to the prefrontal, premotor, and supplementary motor cortices is affected in PSP patients. This analysis can be an additional test for further confirmation of the diagnosis of PSP.

  19. Diffusion tensor analysis of corpus callosum in progressive supranuclear palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Shoichi; Makino, Takahiro; Shirai, Wakako; Hattori, Takamichi

    2008-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative disease featuring parkinsonism, supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, dysphagia, and frontal lobe dysfunction. The corpus callosum which consists of many commissure fibers probably reflects cerebral cortical function. Several previous reports showed atrophy or diffusion abnormalities of anterior corpus callosum in PSP patients, but partitioning method used in these studies was based on data obtained in nonhuman primates. In this study, we performed a diffusion tensor analysis using a new partitioning method for the human corpus callosum. Seven consecutive patients with PSP were compared with 29 age-matched patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD) and 19 age-matched healthy control subjects. All subjects underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, and the corpus callosum was partitioned into five areas on the mid-sagittal plane according to a recently established topography of human corpus callosum (CC1-prefrontal area, CC2-premotor and supplementary motor area, CC3-motor area, CC4-sensory area, CC5-parietal, temporal, and occipital area). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were measured in each area and differences between groups were analyzed. In the PSP group, FA values were significantly decreased in CC1 and CC2, and ADC values were significantly increased in CC1 and CC2. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed excellent reliability of FA and ADC analyses of CC1 for differentiating PSP from PD. The anterior corpus callosum corresponding to the prefrontal, premotor, and supplementary motor cortices is affected in PSP patients. This analysis can be an additional test for further confirmation of the diagnosis of PSP

  20. New diagnostics and therapeutics for progressive supranuclear palsy

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    Boxer, Adam L.; Yu, Jin-Tai; Golbe, Lawrence I; Litvan, Irene; Lang, Anthony E; Höglinger, Günter U

    2018-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), once simply considered a common cause of atypical parkinsonism is now recognized as a spectrum of motor and behavioral syndromes associated with a specific four repeat (4R) tau neuropathology at autopsy. There are currently no effective treatments for PSP, but because PSP is strongly linked biochemically and genetically to tau protein abnormalities, there is a growing interest in pursuing clinical trials of new tau-directed therapies for this disorder. Such new tau therapies are envisioned to have disease-modifying effects by reducing brain levels of toxic forms of tau or compensating for loss of tau function. To be most effective, these treatments will need to be initiated at early stages of disease. New research criteria that recognize early forms of PSP and operationalize diagnosis of the full spectrum of clinical phenotypes have recently been published. These criteria and new clinical trial designs have benefited from rapid advances in MRI, physiological and fluid biomarker development for PSP. As tau pathology is also central to Alzheimer’s disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, it is believed that a successful tau therapeutic for PSP would inform the treatment of other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28653647

  1. Impaired perception of surface tilt in progressive supranuclear palsy.

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    Marian L Dale

    Full Text Available Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is characterized by early postural instability and backward falls. The mechanisms underlying backward postural instability in PSP are not understood. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that postural instability in PSP is a result of dysfunction in the perception of postural verticality.We gathered posturography data on 12 subjects with PSP to compare with 12 subjects with idiopathic Parkinson's Disease (PD and 12 healthy subjects. Objective tests of postural impairment included: dynamic sensory perception tests of gravity and of surface oscillations, postural responses to surface perturbations, the sensory organization test of postural sway under altered sensory conditions and limits of stability in stance.Perception of toes up (but not toes down surface tilt was reduced in subjects with PSP compared to both control subjects (p≤0.001 standing, p≤0.007 seated and subjects with PD (p≤0.03 standing, p≤0.04 seated. Subjects with PSP, PD and normal controls accurately perceived the direction of gravity when standing on a tilting surface. Unlike PD and control subjects, subjects with PSP exerted less postural corrective torque in response to toes up surface tilts.Difficulty perceiving backward tilt of the surface or body may account for backward falls and postural impairments in patients with PSP. These observations suggest that abnormal central integration of sensory inputs for perception of body and surface orientation contributes to the pathophysiology of postural instability in PSP.

  2. Advancing functional dysconnectivity and atrophy in progressive supranuclear palsy

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    Jesse A. Brown

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome (PSP-S results from neurodegeneration within a network of brainstem, subcortical, frontal and parietal cortical brain regions. It is unclear how network dysfunction progresses and relates to longitudinal atrophy and clinical decline. In this study, we evaluated patients with PSP-S (n = 12 and healthy control subjects (n = 20 at baseline and 6 months later. Subjects underwent structural MRI and task-free functional MRI (tf-fMRI scans and clinical evaluations at both time points. At baseline, voxel based morphometry (VBM revealed that patients with mild-to-moderate clinical symptoms showed structural atrophy in subcortex and brainstem, prefrontal cortex (PFC; supplementary motor area, paracingulate, dorsal and ventral medial PFC, and parietal cortex (precuneus. Tf-fMRI functional connectivity (FC was examined in a rostral midbrain tegmentum (rMT-anchored intrinsic connectivity network that is compromised in PSP-S. In healthy controls, this network contained a medial parietal module, a prefrontal-paralimbic module, and a subcortical-brainstem module. Baseline FC deficits in PSP-S were most severe in rMT network integrative hubs in the prefrontal-paralimbic and subcortical-brainstem modules. Longitudinally, patients with PSP-S had declining intermodular FC between the subcortical-brainstem and parietal modules, while progressive atrophy was observed in subcortical-brainstem regions (midbrain, pallidum and posterior frontal (perirolandic cortex. This suggested that later-stage subcortical-posterior cortical change may follow an earlier-stage subcortical-anterior cortical disease process. Clinically, patients with more severe baseline impairment showed greater subsequent prefrontal-parietal cortical FC declines and posterior frontal atrophy rates, while patients with more rapid longitudinal clinical decline showed coupled prefrontal-paralimbic FC decline. VBM and FC can augment disease monitoring in PSP

  3. A geographical cluster of progressive supranuclear palsy in northern France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caparros-Lefebvre, Dominique; Golbe, Lawrence I; Deramecourt, Vincent; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Huin, Vincent; Buée-Scherrer, Valerie; Obriot, Helene; Sablonnière, Bernard; Caparros, Francois; Buée, Luc; Lees, Andrew J

    2015-10-13

    To describe a cluster of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) in northern France. PSP has not been reported in geographical, temporal, or occupational clusters. A unit of Neurology and Neurogeriatrics opened in 2005 at the Centre Hospitalier de Wattrelos, serving the population of Wattrelos and Leers (combined population 51,551) and parts of neighboring towns. For most of the 20th century, this area was a center for chromate and phosphate ore processing, textile dyeing, and tanning. Significant industrial waste persists close to residential areas. From 2005 to 2014, 92 patients with PSP at Centre Hospitalier de Wattrelos were identified and studied. Detailed residential data were available in the medical records. Eighty cases have had magnetic resonance head scanning and 60 have died, of whom 13 have been examined neuropathologically. The ratio of observed to expected PSP incidence over the period 2005 to 2012 was 12.3 (95% confidence interval: 7.4-35.9). Mean onset age was 74.3 years. The Richardson syndrome/PSP-parkinsonism ratio was 43%/42%. Four other phenotypes each occurred in 2% to 5%. Onset was gait/balance difficulty in 52%. None of the 92 affected patients were relatives and 7 were of North African ancestry. MRI was compatible with a clinical diagnostic of PSP in all cases. Histopathologic examination confirmed neurofibrillary degeneration and tufted astrocytes in all autopsied cases. Western blots revealed a typical tau 4R doublet. The tau H1 haplotype occurred in 95.8% of cases' chromosomes. We have identified a cluster of PSP in a geographical area with severe environmental contamination by industrial metals. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Characteristics of Nonmotor Symptoms in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruwei Ou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To explore the clinical correlates of nonmotor symptoms (NMS in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP and their differences from healthy controls and patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD. Methods. Twenty-seven PSP patients, 27 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HC, and 27 age- and gender-matched PD patients were included for this case-control study. NMS were assessed using the Nonmotor Symptoms Scale (NMSS, including 9 domains. Results. All PSP patients reported NMS. The frequency and severity of “sleep/fatigue,” “mood/apathy,” “attention/memory,” “gastrointestinal,” “sexual dysfunction,” and “miscellaneous” domains in PSP group were significantly higher than those in HC group (P<0.05. The frequency of “mood/apathy,” “attention/memory,” and “sexual dysfunction” domains and the severity of “attention/memory” and “gastrointestinal” domains in PSP group were significantly higher than those in PD group (P<0.05. The “attention/memory” domain in PSP had a significant but weak-to-moderate correlation with age (R=0.387, P=0.046 and onset age (R=0.406, P=0.036. Conclusions. NMS are common in PSP patients. Patients with PSP seem to be subjected to more frequent and severe specific NMS compared to healthy aging subjects and PD patients. Older PSP patients and late-onset patients are likely to be subjected to cognitive decline.

  5. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging in confirmed progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massey, L.A.; Micallef, C.; Paviour, D.C.; O'Sullivan, S.S.; Ling, H.; Williams, D.R.; Kallis, C.; Holton, J.L.; Revesz, T.; Burn, D.J.; Yousry, T.; Lees, A.J.; Fox, N.C.; Jäger, H.R.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) is often used to aid the diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy (MSA), but its ability to predict the histopathological diagnosis has not been systematically studied. cMRI from 48 neuropathologically confirmed

  6. Accuracy of MR markers for differentiating Progressive Supranuclear Palsy from Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Zanigni

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Although several quantitative brain MR markers provided high diagnostic accuracy in differentiating Progressive Supranuclear Palsy-Richardson's Syndrome from Parkinson's disease, the morphometric assessment of midbrain area is the best single diagnostic marker and should be routinely included in the neuroradiological work-up of parkinsonian patients.

  7. Rehabilitation in progressive supranuclear palsy: Effectiveness of two multidisciplinary treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, Ilaria; Ferrazzoli, Davide; Maestri, Roberto; Bossio, Fabiola; Zivi, Ilaria; Canesi, Margherita; Pezzoli, Gianni; Frazzitta, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    to date, there are no medical or surgical treatments for progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). It is possible to speculate that patients with PSP could benefit from rehabilitative treatments designed for Parkinson's disease, including the use of robot-assisted walking training. to evaluate whether the use of the robotic device Lokomat® is superior in PSP patients to the use of treadmill with visual cues and auditory feedbacks (treadmill-plus) in the context of an aerobic, multidisciplinary, intensive, motor-cognitive and goal-based rehabilitation treatment (MIRT) conceived for Parkinsonian patients. we enrolled twenty-four PSP patients. Twelve subjects underwent a 4-week MIRT exploiting the use of the treadmill-plus (MIRT group). Twelve subjects underwent the same treatment, but replacing the treadmill-plus with Lokomat® (MIRT-Lokomat group). Subjects were evaluated with clinical and functional scales at admission and discharge. The primary outcomes were the total PSP Rating Scale (PSPRS) score and its "limb" and "gait" sub-scores. Secondary outcomes were Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Six Minutes Walking test (6MWT) and the number of falls. total PSPRS, PSPRS-gait sub-score, BBS, 6MWT and number of falls improved significantly in both groups (p ≤ 0.003 all, except 6MWT, p = 0.032 and p = 0.018 in MIRT-Lokomat and MIRT group respectively). The PSPRS-limb sub-score improved significantly only in the MIRT group (p = 0.002). A significant difference between groups was observed only for total PSPRS, indicating a slightly better improvement for patients in the MIRT group (p = 0.047). No differences between groups were revealed for the other outcomes, indicating that the effect of rehabilitation was similar in both groups. Lokomat® training, in comparison with treadmill-plus training, does not provide further benefits in PSP patients undergoing MIRT. Our findings suggest the usefulness of an aerobic, multidisciplinary, intensive, motor-cognitive and goal-based approach

  8. Rehabilitation in progressive supranuclear palsy: Effectiveness of two multidisciplinary treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Clerici

    Full Text Available to date, there are no medical or surgical treatments for progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP. It is possible to speculate that patients with PSP could benefit from rehabilitative treatments designed for Parkinson's disease, including the use of robot-assisted walking training.to evaluate whether the use of the robotic device Lokomat® is superior in PSP patients to the use of treadmill with visual cues and auditory feedbacks (treadmill-plus in the context of an aerobic, multidisciplinary, intensive, motor-cognitive and goal-based rehabilitation treatment (MIRT conceived for Parkinsonian patients.we enrolled twenty-four PSP patients. Twelve subjects underwent a 4-week MIRT exploiting the use of the treadmill-plus (MIRT group. Twelve subjects underwent the same treatment, but replacing the treadmill-plus with Lokomat® (MIRT-Lokomat group. Subjects were evaluated with clinical and functional scales at admission and discharge. The primary outcomes were the total PSP Rating Scale (PSPRS score and its "limb" and "gait" sub-scores. Secondary outcomes were Berg Balance Scale (BBS, Six Minutes Walking test (6MWT and the number of falls.total PSPRS, PSPRS-gait sub-score, BBS, 6MWT and number of falls improved significantly in both groups (p ≤ 0.003 all, except 6MWT, p = 0.032 and p = 0.018 in MIRT-Lokomat and MIRT group respectively. The PSPRS-limb sub-score improved significantly only in the MIRT group (p = 0.002. A significant difference between groups was observed only for total PSPRS, indicating a slightly better improvement for patients in the MIRT group (p = 0.047. No differences between groups were revealed for the other outcomes, indicating that the effect of rehabilitation was similar in both groups.Lokomat® training, in comparison with treadmill-plus training, does not provide further benefits in PSP patients undergoing MIRT. Our findings suggest the usefulness of an aerobic, multidisciplinary, intensive, motor-cognitive and goal

  9. Impulsive-compulsive spectrum behaviors in pathologically confirmed progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Sean S; Djamshidian, Atbin; Ahmed, Zeshan; Evans, Andrew H; Lawrence, Andrew D; Holton, Janice L; Revesz, Tamas; Lees, Andrew J

    2010-04-15

    There is growing awareness of impulsive-compulsive spectrum behaviors (ICBs) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) treated with dopamine replacement therapy (DRT). These include pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping, binge eating, punding and compulsive use of DRT, or dopamine dysregulation syndrome. In PD, difficulties exist in separating the effects of DRT from the underlying disease process and aberrant dopaminergic systems in determining the aetiology of ICBs. Recent reports of ICBs associated with dopamine agonist use for conditions other than PD may suggest a significant etiological role for these medications, but currently published cases thus far lack pathological confirmation of diagnoses. We present three cases of pathologically confirmed progressive supranuclear palsy who developed ICBs in association with dopamine agonist use. Pathological comparisons between these three cases and other case series of progressive supranuclear palsy are made. (c) 2010 Movement Disorder Society.

  10. 18F-AV-1451 positron emission tomography in Alzheimer's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamonti, Luca; Vázquez Rodríguez, Patricia; Hong, Young T; Allinson, Kieren S J; Williamson, David; Borchert, Robin J; Sami, Saber; Cope, Thomas E; Bevan-Jones, W Richard; Jones, P Simon; Arnold, Robert; Surendranathan, Ajenthan; Mak, Elijah; Su, Li; Fryer, Tim D; Aigbirhio, Franklin I; O'Brien, John T; Rowe, James B

    2017-03-01

    The ability to assess the distribution and extent of tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy in vivo would help to develop biomarkers for these tauopathies and clinical trials of disease-modifying therapies. New radioligands for positron emission tomography have generated considerable interest, and controversy, in their potential as tau biomarkers. We assessed the radiotracer 18F-AV-1451 with positron emission tomography imaging to compare the distribution and intensity of tau pathology in 15 patients with Alzheimer's pathology (including amyloid-positive mild cognitive impairment), 19 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, and 13 age- and sex-matched controls. Regional analysis of variance and a support vector machine were used to compare and discriminate the clinical groups, respectively. We also examined the 18F-AV-1451 autoradiographic binding in post-mortem tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and a control case to assess the 18F-AV-1451 binding specificity to Alzheimer's and non-Alzheimer's tau pathology. There was increased 18F-AV-1451 binding in multiple regions in living patients with Alzheimer's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy relative to controls [main effect of group, F(2,41) = 17.5, P AV-1451 binding was significantly increased in patients with Alzheimer's disease, relative to patients with progressive supranuclear palsy and with control subjects, in the hippocampus and in occipital, parietal, temporal, and frontal cortices (t's > 2.2, P's AV-1451 binding was elevated in the midbrain (t = 2.1, P AV-1451 uptake in the putamen, pallidum, thalamus, midbrain, and in the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum (t's > 2.7, P's AV-1451 strongly bound to Alzheimer-related tau pathology, but less specifically in progressive supranuclear palsy. 18F-AV-1451 binding to the basal ganglia was strong in all groups in vivo. Postmortem histochemical staining showed absence of

  11. PET studies of brain energy metabolism in a model of subcortical dementia: progressive supranuclear Palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blin, J.; Baron, J.C.; Cambon, H.

    1988-01-01

    In 41 patients with clinically determined Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, a model of degenerative subcortical dementia, alterations in regional brain energy metabolism with respect to control subjects have been investigated using positron computed tomography and correlated to clinical and neuropsychological scores. A generalized significant reduction in brain metabolism was found, which predominated in the prefrontal cortex in accordance with, and statistically correlated to, the frontal neuropsychological score

  12. Validation of mobile eye-tracking as novel and efficient means for differentiating progressive supranuclear palsy from Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Svenja; Respondek, Gesine; Stamelou, Maria; Dowiasch, Stefan; Stoll, Josef; Bremmer, Frank; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Höglinger, Günter U; Einhäuser, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The decreased ability to carry out vertical saccades is a key symptom of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP). Objective measurement devices can help to reliably detect subtle eye movement disturbances to improve sensitivity and specificity of the clinical diagnosis. The present study aims at transferring findings from restricted stationary video-oculography (VOG) to a wearable head-mounted device, which can be readily applied in clinical practice. We investigated the eye movements in 10 possible or probable PSP patients, 11 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, and 10 age-matched healthy controls (HCs) using a mobile, gaze-driven video camera setup (EyeSeeCam). Ocular movements were analyzed during a standardized fixation protocol and in an unrestricted real-life scenario while walking along a corridor. The EyeSeeCam detected prominent impairment of both saccade velocity and amplitude in PSP patients, differentiating them from PD and HCs. Differences were particularly evident for saccades in the vertical plane, and stronger for saccades than for other eye movements. Differences were more pronounced during the standardized protocol than in the real-life scenario. Combined analysis of saccade velocity and saccade amplitude during the fixation protocol with the EyeSeeCam provides a simple, rapid (<20 s), and reliable tool to differentiate clinically established PSP patients from PD and HCs. As such, our findings prepare the ground for using wearable eye-tracking in patients with uncertain diagnoses.

  13. Validation of mobile eye tracking as novel and efficient means for differentiating progressive supranuclear palsy from Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja eMarx

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The decreased ability to carry out vertical saccades is a key symptom of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP. Objective measurement devices can help to reliably detect subtle eye-movement disturbances to improve sensitivity and specificity of the clinical diagnosis. The present study aims at transferring findings from restricted stationary video-oculography to a wearable head-mounted device, which can be readily applied in clinical practice.Methods: We investigated the eye movements in 10 possible or probable PSP patients, 11 Parkinson’s disease (PD patients and 10 age-matched healthy controls (HC using a mobile, gaze-driven video camera setup (EyeSeeCam. Ocular movements were analyzed during a standardized fixation protocol and in an unrestricted real-life scenario while walking along a corridor.Results: The EyeSeeCam detected prominent impairment of both saccade velocity and amplitude in PSP patients, differentiating them from PD and HCs. Differences were particularly evident for saccades in the vertical plane, and stronger for saccades than for other eye movements. Differences were more pronounced during the standardized protocol than in the real-life scenario. Conclusions: Combined analysis of saccade velocity and saccade amplitude during the fixation protocol with the EyeSeeCam provides a simple, rapid (< 20s and reliable tool to differentiate clinically established PSP patients from PD and HCs. As such, our findings prepare the ground for using wearable eye-tracking in patients with uncertain diagnoses.

  14. Lithium-Induced Downbeat Nystagmus and Horizontal Gaze Palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jesper Skovlund; Landschoff Lassen, Lisbeth; Wegener, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of lithium-induced downbeat nystagmus and horizontal gaze palsy in a 62-year-old woman who was treated for a bipolar affective disorder with lithium carbonate for one month. At presentation serum lithium was within therapeutic range. No alternative causes of the ocular motility...

  15. Progressive supranuclear palsy dopamine D2 receptor tomoscintigraphy to detect L-dopamine efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranquart, F.; Henry Le Bras, F.; Toffol, B. de; Autret, A.; Guilloteau, D.; Baulieu, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) may sometimes be misdiagnosed as Parkinson's disease in its early stages, hence an early positive diagnosis of PSP based on dopamine D2 receptor density could be extremely valuable. In the present case report, the absence of dopamine D2 receptors was clearly demonstrated in the striatum using 123 I-iodobenzamide (IBZM) tomoscintigraphy. This illustrates the potential use of IBZM tomoscintigraphy to identify Parkinson-like's disease presenting with decreased dopamine D2 receptor density; and hence to predict L-Dopa effectiveness. Further studies are needed to evaluate the value of IBZM tomoscintigraphy in the different Parkinson's like diseases. (authors). 11 refs., 2 figs

  16. Improvement of balance after audio-biofeedback A 6-week intervention study in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, S.; Mirelman, A.; Herman, T.; Zijlstra, A.; Mancini, M.; Becker, C.; Lindeman, U.; Berg, D.; Maetzler, W.

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative disease with no sufficient treatment options to date. The most devastating symptom is the loss of balance with consecutive falls Based on the observation that postural control improved in patients with vestibular dysfunction after

  17. Horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis: CT and MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bomfim, Rodrigo C.; Tavora, Daniel G.F.; Nakayama, Mauro; Gama, Romulo L. [Sarah Network of Rehabilitation Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Ceara (Brazil)

    2009-02-15

    Horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis (HGPPS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by absence of conjugate horizontal eye movements and progressive scoliosis developing in childhood and adolescence. We present a child with clinical and neuroimaging findings typical of HGPPS. CT and MRI of the brain demonstrated pons hypoplasia, absence of the facial colliculi, butterfly configuration of the medulla and a deep midline pontine cleft. We briefly discuss the imaging aspects of this rare entity in light of the current literature. (orig.)

  18. Progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration: Diagnostic challenges and clinicopathological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusebio, A; Koric, L; Félician, O; Guedj, E; Ceccaldi, M; Azulay, J-P

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD) are two atypical parkinsonian syndromes first described half a century ago. The spectrum of these conditions as well as, more generally, the concept of tauopathy have dramatically changed over the past decade and especially in recent years. In particular, clinicopathological correlations have led to the description of several subtypes of these diseases and the features they share with other neurodegenerative diseases. The present paper is a review of how the concepts of PSP and CBD have evolved over time. In particular, it focuses on the different presentations of the disease and the overlapping syndromes that can complicate the differential diagnoses. Also discussed are some of the tools that may prove useful in making a diagnosis. Indeed, differential diagnosis issues are of particular importance in light of the likely emergence of pathology-specific disease-modifying therapies in the near future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Isolated Horizontal Gaze Palsy: Observations and Explanations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee Ewe

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present three cases that we suggest require a novel diagnosis and a reconsideration of current understandings of pontine anatomy. In this case series, we highlight a series of patients with monophasic, fully recovering inflammatory lesions in the pontine tegmentum not due to any of the currently recognized causes of this syndrome. We highlight other similar cases in the literature and suggest there may be a particular epitope for an as-yet-undiscovered antibody underlying the tropism for this area. We highlight the potential harm of misdiagnosis with relapsing inflammatory or other serious diagnoses with significant adverse impact on the patient. In addition, we propose that this would support a reinterpretation of the currently accepted anatomy of the pontine gaze inputs to the median longitudinal fasciculus and paramedian pontine reticular formation.

  20. 18F-AV-1451 positron emission tomography in Alzheimer’s disease and progressive supranuclear palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamonti, Luca; Vázquez Rodríguez, Patricia; Hong, Young T.; Allinson, Kieren S. J.; Williamson, David; Borchert, Robin J.; Sami, Saber; Cope, Thomas E.; Bevan-Jones, W. Richard; Jones, P. Simon; Arnold, Robert; Surendranathan, Ajenthan; Mak, Elijah; Su, Li; Fryer, Tim D.; Aigbirhio, Franklin I.; O’Brien, John T.; Rowe, James B.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The ability to assess the distribution and extent of tau pathology in Alzheimer’s disease and progressive supranuclear palsy in vivo would help to develop biomarkers for these tauopathies and clinical trials of disease-modifying therapies. New radioligands for positron emission tomography have generated considerable interest, and controversy, in their potential as tau biomarkers. We assessed the radiotracer 18F-AV-1451 with positron emission tomography imaging to compare the distribution and intensity of tau pathology in 15 patients with Alzheimer’s pathology (including amyloid-positive mild cognitive impairment), 19 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, and 13 age- and sex-matched controls. Regional analysis of variance and a support vector machine were used to compare and discriminate the clinical groups, respectively. We also examined the 18F-AV-1451 autoradiographic binding in post-mortem tissue from patients with Alzheimer’s disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and a control case to assess the 18F-AV-1451 binding specificity to Alzheimer’s and non-Alzheimer’s tau pathology. There was increased 18F-AV-1451 binding in multiple regions in living patients with Alzheimer’s disease and progressive supranuclear palsy relative to controls [main effect of group, F(2,41) = 17.5, P AV-1451 binding was significantly increased in patients with Alzheimer’s disease, relative to patients with progressive supranuclear palsy and with control subjects, in the hippocampus and in occipital, parietal, temporal, and frontal cortices (t’s > 2.2, P’s AV-1451 binding was elevated in the midbrain (t = 2.1, P AV-1451 uptake in the putamen, pallidum, thalamus, midbrain, and in the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum (t’s > 2.7, P’s AV-1451 strongly bound to Alzheimer-related tau pathology, but less specifically in progressive supranuclear palsy. 18F-AV-1451 binding to the basal ganglia was strong in all groups in vivo. Postmortem histochemical

  1. A follow-up study on brainstem atrophy in progressive supranuclear palsy. When does brain MRI contribute to the differential diagnosis between progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Oya, Yasushi; Ogawa, Masafumi; Ogata, Katsuhisa; Kawai, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate when the MRI can discriminate progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) from Parkinson disease (PD). We obtained the following parameters using T1-weighted axial images of the midbrain and the middle pons from 40 studies of 17 PSP patients and 26 studies of 26 PD patients; anteroposterior diameter of the pons (Pons AP), anteroposterior length of the pontine tegmentum (Pons T), anteroposterior diameter of the midbrain (Midbrain AP), ratio of anteroposterior diameter of the pontine base to that of the pontine tegmentum (Pons B/T ratio), ratio of the sum of the bilateral crus cerebri widths to the midbrain AP (Midbrain [Cr+Cl]/AP ratio). All the PSP patients were studied more than twice and each study was classified into four groups according to the duration of the illness; less than 24 months (7 studies), from 24 to 47 months (10 studies), from 48 to 71 months (14 studies) and 72 months or longer (9 studies). The first MRI studies (duration of disease 39.9±22.1 months) were compared with the second studies (duration of disease 67.6±31.6 months) in 17 PSP patients. Pons AP, Pons T, and Midbrain AP were significantly smaller in the second studies, indicating progressive pontine and midbrain atrophy. Compared with the PD group, the PSP group showed significant atrophy four years after onset of the disease in Pons AP and two years in Pons T. Pons B/T ratio, and Midbrain [Cr+Cl]/AP ratio were significantly smaller in the PSP group two years after onset, suggesting midbrain and pontine tegmentum atrophy. The diagnostic MRI criteria of Pons B/T ratio more than four and Midbrain [Cr+Cl]/AP ratio more than two each showed accuracy in PSP of more than 70% two years after onset. Discrimination of PSP from PD was difficult during the first two years after onset. The atrophic process in the midbrain and the pontine tegmentum may precede that of the pontine base. Pons B/T ratio and Midbrain [Cr+Cl]/AP ratio presented here are potentially

  2. Advances in progressive supranuclear palsy: new diagnostic criteria, biomarkers, and therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxer, Adam L; Yu, Jin-Tai; Golbe, Lawrence I; Litvan, Irene; Lang, Anthony E; Höglinger, Günter U

    2017-07-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), previously believed to be a common cause of atypical parkinsonism, is now recognised as a range of motor and behavioural syndromes that are associated with a characteristic 4-repeat tau neuropathology. New research criteria that recognise early presentations of PSP and operationalise diagnosis of the full spectrum of clinical phenotypes have been reported. The Movement Disorders Society PSP diagnostic criteria include syndromes with few or mild symptoms that are suggestive of underlying PSP pathology and could provide an opportunity for earlier therapeutic interventions in the future. These criteria also include definitions for variant PSP syndromes with different patterns of movement, language, or behavioural features than have been conclusively associated with PSP pathology. Data from new diagnostic biomarkers can be combined with the clinical features of disease to increase the specificity of the new criteria for underlying PSP pathology. Because PSP is associated with tau protein abnormalities, there is growing interest in clinical trials of new tau-directed therapies. These therapies are hypothesised to have disease-modifying effects by reducing the concentration of toxic forms of tau in the brain or by compensating for loss of tau function. Since tau pathology is also central to Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a successful tau therapeutic for PSP might inform treatment of other neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic linkage of autosomal dominant progressive supranuclear palsy to 1q31.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Raquel; Gómez Garre, Pilar; Hirano, Michio; Tai, Yen F; Ampuero, Israel; Vidal, Lídice; Rojo, Ana; Fontan, Aurora; Vazquez, Ana; Fanjul, Samira; Hernandez, Jaime; Cantarero, Susana; Hoenicka, Janet; Jones, Alison; Ahsan, R Laila; Pavese, Nicola; Piccini, Paola; Brooks, David J; Perez-Tur, Jordi; Nyggard, Torbjorn; de Yébenes, Justo G

    2005-05-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a disorder of unknown pathogenesis. Familial clusters of PSP have been reported related to mutations of protein tau. We report the linkage of a large Spanish family with typical autosomal dominant PSP to a new locus in chromosome 1. Four members of this family had typical PSP, confirmed by neuropathology in one case. At least five ancestors had similar disease. Other members of the family have incomplete phenotypes. The power of the linkage analysis was increased by detecting presymptomatic individuals with 18F-fluoro-dopa and 18F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography. We screened the human genome with 340 polymorphic markers and we enriched the areas of interest with additional markers. The disease status was defined according to the clinical and positron emission tomography data. We excluded linkage to the tau gene in chromosome 17. PSP was linked, in this family, to one area of 3.4 cM in chromosome 1q31.1, with a maximal multipoint < OD score of +3.53. This area contains at least three genes, whose relevance in PSP is unknown. We expect to further define the gene responsible for PSP, which could help to understand the pathogenesis of this disease and to design effective treatment.

  4. Machine learning on brain MRI data for differential diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, C; Cerasa, A; Castiglioni, I; Gallivanone, F; Augimeri, A; Lopez, M; Arabia, G; Morelli, M; Gilardi, M C; Quattrone, A

    2014-01-30

    Supervised machine learning has been proposed as a revolutionary approach for identifying sensitive medical image biomarkers (or combination of them) allowing for automatic diagnosis of individual subjects. The aim of this work was to assess the feasibility of a supervised machine learning algorithm for the assisted diagnosis of patients with clinically diagnosed Parkinson's disease (PD) and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP). Morphological T1-weighted Magnetic Resonance Images (MRIs) of PD patients (28), PSP patients (28) and healthy control subjects (28) were used by a supervised machine learning algorithm based on the combination of Principal Components Analysis as feature extraction technique and on Support Vector Machines as classification algorithm. The algorithm was able to obtain voxel-based morphological biomarkers of PD and PSP. The algorithm allowed individual diagnosis of PD versus controls, PSP versus controls and PSP versus PD with an Accuracy, Specificity and Sensitivity>90%. Voxels influencing classification between PD and PSP patients involved midbrain, pons, corpus callosum and thalamus, four critical regions known to be strongly involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of PSP. Classification accuracy of individual PSP patients was consistent with previous manual morphological metrics and with other supervised machine learning application to MRI data, whereas accuracy in the detection of individual PD patients was significantly higher with our classification method. The algorithm provides excellent discrimination of PD patients from PSP patients at an individual level, thus encouraging the application of computer-based diagnosis in clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The basal ganglia cholinergic neurochemistry of progressive supranuclear palsy and other neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, N M; Piggott, M A; Lees, A J; Burn, D J

    2007-06-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder involving motor and cognitive dysfunction. Currently, there is no effective treatment either for symptomatic relief or disease modification. This relates, in part, to a lack of knowledge of the underlying neurochemical abnormalities, including cholinergic receptor status in the basal ganglia. To measure muscarinic M2 and M4 receptors in the basal ganglia in PSP. The muscarinic M2 (presynaptic) and M4 (postsynaptic) receptors in the striatum, pallidum and adjacent insular cortex were autoradiographically measured in pathologically confirmed cases of PSP (n = 18), and compared with cases of Lewy body dementias (LBDs; n = 45), Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 39) and controls (n = 50). In cases of PSP, there was a reduction in M2 and M4 receptors in the posterior caudate and putamen compared to controls, but no significant changes in the pallidum. Cases with AD showed lower M2 receptors in the posterior striatum. Groups with LBD and AD showed higher M2 binding in the insular cortex compared with controls. The results suggest loss of posterior striatal cholinergic interneurones in PSP, and reduction in medium spiny projection neurones bearing M4 receptors. These results should be taken in the context of more widespread pathology in PSP, but may have implications for future trials of cholinergic treatments.

  6. Trial of Zolpidem, Eszopiclone, and Other GABA Agonists in a Patient with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

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    Andrew Young Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is a progressive, debilitating neurodegenerative disease of the Parkinson-plus family of syndromes. Unfortunately, there are no pharmacologic treatments for this condition, as most sufferers of the classic variant respond poorly to Parkinson medications such as levodopa. Zolpidem, a gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA agonist specific to the α-1 receptor subtype, has been reported to show improvements in symptoms of PSP patients, including motor dysfunction, dysarthria, and ocular disturbances. We observed a 73-year-old woman with a six-year history of PSP, who, upon administration of a single 12.5 mg dose of sustained-release zolpidem, exhibited marked enhancements in speech, facial expressions, and fine motor skills for five hours. These results were reproduced upon subsequent clinic visits. In an effort to find a sustainable medication that maximized these beneficial effects while minimizing side effects and addressing some of her comorbid neuropsychological conditions, a trial of five other GABA receptor agonists was performed with the patient’s consent, while she and her caregivers were blinded to the specific medications. She and her caretakers subsequently reported improvements, especially visual, while on eszopiclone, and, to a lesser degree, temazepam and flurazepam.

  7. Clinical value of MRI and acute madopar responsiveness test in diagnosing progressive supranuclear palsy

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    LI Xiao-hong

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the MRI abnormalities and acute madopar responsiveness test in diagnosing progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP and Parkinson's disease (PD. Methods Seventeen patients with PSP and 17 gender and age matched patients with PD were studied with cranial MRI examinations and results of acute madopar responsiveness test, and the clinical manifestations of PSP were summarized. Results The atrophy of the midbrain tegmentum and hummingbird sign was demonstrated in all of the PSP patients in our study, but was not observed in the PD patients. The areas of the midbrain on mid-sagittal MRI in PSP patients [(77.35 ± 15.30 mm2] were significantly smaller than that in those with PD [(142.35 ± 31.49 mm2]. The average ratio of the area of the midbrain to the area of pons in the patients with PSP [(14.31 ± 2.47%] was significantly smaller than that in those with PD [(24.08 ± 4.73%; P = 0.000, for all]. According to the result of acute madopar responsiveness test, the maximum Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS Ⅲ improvement rate of 2 patients with PSP and 16 patients with PD was more than 30% (χ2 = 23.142, P = 0.000. Conclusion The assessment of the mid-sagittal MRI and acute madopar responsiveness test may be a useful method to differentiate PSP from PD.

  8. MIDBRAIN CATECHOLAMINERGIC NEURONS CO-EXPRESS α-SYNUCLEIN AND TAU IN PROGRESSIVE SUPRANUCLEAR PALSY

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    María Elena eErro Aguirre

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the frequency and distribution of α-synuclein deposits in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP.Methods: The brains of 25 cases of pathologically confirmed PSP were evaluated with immunohistochemistry for α-synuclein and tau. Multiple immunofluorescent stains were applied to analyze the expression of tau and α-synuclein aggregates in catecholaminergic neurons. Patients’ clinical symptoms were retrospectively recorded. Results: Deposits α-synuclein in the form of typical Lewy bodies (LBs were only found in two PSP cases (8% that fulfilled the clinical subtype of PSP known as Richardson’s syndrome (RS. LBs were present in the locus ceruleus, substantia nigra pars compacta, basal forebrain, amygdala and cingulated cortex in a distribution mimicking that of Parkinson’s disease. Triple-immunolabeling revealed co-expression of α-synuclein and tau proteins in some tyrosine hydroxilase-positive neurons of the locus ceruleus and substantia nigra pars compacta.Conclusions: There is no apparent clinical correlation between the presence of LBs in PSP. Tau protein co-aggregate with α-synuclein in catecholaminergic neurons of PSP brains suggesting a synergistic interaction between the two proteins. This is in keeping with the current view of neurodegenerative disorders as ‘misfolded protein diseases’.

  9. Automatic classification of patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy using diffusion MRI datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talai, Sahand; Boelmans, Kai; Sedlacik, Jan; Forkert, Nils D.

    2017-03-01

    Parkinsonian syndromes encompass a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases, which can be classified into various subtypes. The differentiation of these subtypes is typically conducted based on clinical criteria. Due to the overlap of intra-syndrome symptoms, the accurate differential diagnosis based on clinical guidelines remains a challenge with failure rates up to 25%. The aim of this study is to present an image-based classification method of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), an atypical variant of PD. Therefore, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) parameter maps were calculated based on diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets. Mean ADC values were determined in 82 brain regions using an atlas-based approach. The extracted mean ADC values for each patient were then used as features for classification using a linear kernel support vector machine classifier. To increase the classification accuracy, a feature selection was performed, which resulted in the top 17 attributes to be used as the final input features. A leave-one-out cross validation based on 56 PD and 21 PSP subjects revealed that the proposed method is capable of differentiating PD and PSP patients with an accuracy of 94.8%. In conclusion, the classification of PD and PSP patients based on ADC features obtained from diffusion MRI datasets is a promising new approach for the differentiation of Parkinsonian syndromes in the broader context of decision support systems.

  10. Retinal degeneration in progressive supranuclear palsy measured by optical coherence tomography and scanning laser polarimetry.

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    Stemplewitz, Birthe; Kromer, Robert; Vettorazzi, Eik; Hidding, Ute; Frings, Andreas; Buhmann, Carsten

    2017-07-13

    This cross-sectional study compared the retinal morphology between patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and healthy controls. (The retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) around the optic disc and the retina in the macular area of 22 PSP patients and 151 controls were investigated by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Additionally, the RNFL and the nerve fiber index (NFI) were measured by scanning laser polarimetry (SLP). Results of RNFL measurements with SD-OCT and SLP were compared to assess diagnostic discriminatory power. Applying OCT, PSP patients showed a smaller RNFL thickness in the inferior nasal and inferior temporal areas. The macular volume and the thickness of the majority of macular sectors were reduced compared to controls. SLP data showed a thinner RNFL thickness and an increase in the NFI in PSP patients. Sensitivity and specificity to discriminate PSP patients from controls were higher applying SLP than SD-OCT. Retinal changes did not correlate with disease duration or severity in any OCT or SLP measurement. PSP seems to be associated with reduced thickness and volume of the macula and reduction of the RNFL, independent of disease duration or severity. Retinal imaging with SD-OCT and SLP might become an additional tool in PSP diagnosis.

  11. Brain Dopamine Transporter Binding and Glucose Metabolism in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy-Like Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

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    Eero Rissanen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present a patient with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD who developed initial symptoms mimicking progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP. Before the development of typical CJD symptoms, functional imaging supported a diagnosis of PSP when [123I]-FP-CIT-SPECT showed a defect in striatal dopamine transporter binding, while [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET showed cortical hypometabolism suggestive of Lewy body dementia. However, the postmortem neuropathological examination was indicative of CJD only, without tau protein or Lewy body findings. This case demonstrates that CJD should be taken into account in rapidly progressing atypical cases of parkinsonism, even when functional imaging supports a diagnosis of a movement disorder.

  12. PROSPERA: a randomized, controlled trial evaluating rasagiline in progressive supranuclear palsy.

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    Nuebling, Georg; Hensler, Mira; Paul, Sabine; Zwergal, Andreas; Crispin, Alexander; Lorenzl, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    To date, pharmacological treatment options for progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), a neurodegenerative tauopathy, are limited. The MAO-B inhibitor rasagiline has shown neuroprotective effects in preclinical models of neurodegeneration. To evaluate the safety, tolerability and therapeutic effect of rasagiline on symptom progression in PSP. In this 1-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 44 patients fulfilling the NINDS-PSP criteria were randomized to 1 mg/d rasagiline or placebo. The combined primary endpoint included symptom progression as measured by the PSP rating scale (PSP-RS) and the requirement of L-dopa rescue medication. Secondary endpoints included Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living (SEADL), Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, Mini Mental State Examination, Frontal Assessment Battery and posturographic measurements. Of the 44 patients randomized, 26 completed the trial per protocol. Rasagiline was well tolerated, with a slight increase of known side effects (hallucinations, ventricular extrasystoles). No effect on the primary endpoint (p = 0.496) was detected. Symptom progression averaged at 11.2 (rasagiline) and 10.8 (placebo) points per year (ΔPSP-RS). No difference was seen in SEADL, depression, cognitive function, frontal executive function and posturographic measurements. Post hoc analyses of PSP-RS subdomains indicate a potential beneficial effect in the "limb motor" subdomain, whereas performance appeared lower in the "mentation" and "history" subdomains in the treatment group. While rasagiline is well tolerated in PSP, a beneficial effect on overall symptom progression was not detected. Post hoc analyses suggest the implementation of more specific endpoints in future studies.

  13. Disease-specific structural changes in thalamus and dentatorubrothalamic tract in progressive supranuclear palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surova, Yulia; Hall, Sara; Widner, Haakan; Nilsson, Markus; Laett, Jimmy; Lampinen, Bjoern; Lindberg, Olof; Nilsson, Christer; Westen, Danielle van; Hansson, Oskar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify disease-specific changes of the thalamus, basal ganglia, pons, and midbrain in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), Parkinson's disease (PD), and multiple system atrophy with predominant parkinsonism (MSA-P) using diffusion tensor imaging and volumetric analysis. MRI diffusion and volumetric data were acquired in a derivation of 30 controls and 8 patients with PSP and a validation cohort comprised of controls (n = 21) and patients with PSP (n = 27), PD (n = 10), and MSA-P (n = 11). Analysis was performed using regions of interest (ROI), tract-based spatial statistic (TBSS), and tractography and results compared between diagnostic groups. In the derivation cohort, we observed increased mean diffusivity (MD) in the thalamus, superior cerebellar peduncle, and the midbrain in PSP compared to controls. Furthermore, volumetric analysis showed reduced thalamic volumes in PSP. In the validation cohort, the observations of increased MD were replicated by ROI-based analysis and in the thalamus by TBSS-based analysis. Such differences were not found for patients with PD in any of the cohorts. Tractography of the dentatorubrothalamic tract (DRTT) showed increased MD in PSP patients from both cohorts compared to controls and in the validation cohort in PSP compared to PD and MSA patients. Increased MD in the thalamus and along the DRTT correlated with disease stage and motor function in PSP. Patients with PSP, but not PD or MSA-P, exhibit signs of structural abnormalities in the thalamus and in the DRTT. These changes are associated with disease stage and impaired motor function. (orig.)

  14. Disease-specific structural changes in thalamus and dentatorubrothalamic tract in progressive supranuclear palsy

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    Surova, Yulia; Hall, Sara; Widner, Haakan [Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund (Sweden); Skaane University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Lund (Sweden); Nilsson, Markus [Lund University, Lund University Bioimaging Center, Lund (Sweden); Laett, Jimmy [Skaane University Hospital, Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Lampinen, Bjoern [Lund University, Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund (Sweden); Lindberg, Olof [Malmoe, Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmoe (Sweden); Nilsson, Christer [Skaane University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Lund (Sweden); Malmoe, Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmoe (Sweden); Westen, Danielle van [Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund (Sweden); Skaane University Hospital, Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Hansson, Oskar [Malmoe, Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmoe (Sweden); Skaane University Hospital, Memory Clinic, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study is to identify disease-specific changes of the thalamus, basal ganglia, pons, and midbrain in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), Parkinson's disease (PD), and multiple system atrophy with predominant parkinsonism (MSA-P) using diffusion tensor imaging and volumetric analysis. MRI diffusion and volumetric data were acquired in a derivation of 30 controls and 8 patients with PSP and a validation cohort comprised of controls (n = 21) and patients with PSP (n = 27), PD (n = 10), and MSA-P (n = 11). Analysis was performed using regions of interest (ROI), tract-based spatial statistic (TBSS), and tractography and results compared between diagnostic groups. In the derivation cohort, we observed increased mean diffusivity (MD) in the thalamus, superior cerebellar peduncle, and the midbrain in PSP compared to controls. Furthermore, volumetric analysis showed reduced thalamic volumes in PSP. In the validation cohort, the observations of increased MD were replicated by ROI-based analysis and in the thalamus by TBSS-based analysis. Such differences were not found for patients with PD in any of the cohorts. Tractography of the dentatorubrothalamic tract (DRTT) showed increased MD in PSP patients from both cohorts compared to controls and in the validation cohort in PSP compared to PD and MSA patients. Increased MD in the thalamus and along the DRTT correlated with disease stage and motor function in PSP. Patients with PSP, but not PD or MSA-P, exhibit signs of structural abnormalities in the thalamus and in the DRTT. These changes are associated with disease stage and impaired motor function. (orig.)

  15. Subcortical18F-AV-1451 binding patterns in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hanna; Choi, Jae Yong; Hwang, Mi Song; Lee, Seung Ha; Ryu, Young Hoon; Lee, Myung Sik; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of cortical and subcortical tau pathology is the primary pathological substrate for progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). 18 F-AV-1451, a radiotracer that binds to the pathological tau protein, may be helpful for in vivo visualization and quantitation of tau pathology in PSP. The objectives of this study were to investigate cortical and subcortical 18 F-AV-1451 binding patterns in patients with PSP. We recruited 14 PSP patients and compared their cortical and subcortical binding patterns in 18 F-AV-1451 positron emission tomography (PET) studies with those of 15 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and 15 healthy controls. In both the PD and PSP groups, subcortical 18 F-AV-1451 binding did not correlate with the severity of motor dysfunctions, and cortical binding did not differ between the controls and each patient group. However, the PSP patients showed greater 18 F-AV-1451 binding in the putamen, globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus, and dentate nucleus when compared with the controls, whereas the PD patients showed lower 18 F-AV-1451 binding in the substantia nigra than controls. The PSP and PD patients showed distinct subcortical 18 F-AV-1451 binding patterns reflecting subcortical tau pathology in PSP and reduced nigral neuromelanin in PD. However, there was no correlation with the severity of motor dysfunction, no cortical regions with increased binding in PSP patients, and variable degrees of subcortical binding even in the controls. Therefore, the 18 F-AV-1451 PET may be less than ideal for assessing tau pathology in PSP. Further studies will be required to validate the clinical correlation and to understand the clinical utility of 18 F-AV-1451 PET for PSP patients. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  16. Characteristics of progressive supranuclear palsy presenting with corticobasal syndrome: a cortical variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Helen; Ling, H; de Silva, R; Massey, L A; Courtney, R; Hondhamuni, G; Bajaj, N; Lowe, J; Holton, J L; Lees, A; Revesz, T

    2014-02-01

    Since the first description of the classical presentation of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) in 1963, now known as Richardson's syndrome (PSP-RS), several distinct clinical syndromes have been associated with PSP-tau pathology. Like other neurodegenerative disorders, the severity and distribution of phosphorylated tau pathology are closely associated with the clinical heterogeneity of PSP variants. PSP with corticobasal syndrome presentation (PSP-CBS) was reported to have more tau load in the mid-frontal and inferior-parietal cortices than in PSP-RS. However, it is uncertain if differences exist in the distribution of tau pathology in other brain regions or if the overall tau load is increased in the brains of PSP-CBS. We sought to compare the clinical and pathological features of PSP-CBS and PSP-RS including quantitative assessment of tau load in 15 cortical, basal ganglia and cerebellar regions. In addition to the similar age of onset and disease duration, we demonstrated that the overall severity of tau pathology was the same between PSP-CBS and PSP-RS. We identified that there was a shift of tau burden towards the cortical regions away from the basal ganglia; supporting the notion that PSP-CBS is a 'cortical' PSP variant. PSP-CBS also had less severe neuronal loss in the dorsolateral and ventrolateral subregions of the substantia nigra and more severe microglial response in the corticospinal tract than in PSP-RS; however, neuronal loss in subthalamic nucleus was equally severe in both groups. A better understanding of the factors that influence the selective pathological vulnerability in different PSP variants will provide further insights into the neurodegenerative process underlying tauopathies. © 2013 British Neuropathological Society.

  17. Abnormal Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Corticobasal Syndrome

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    Komal Bharti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPathological and MRI-based evidence suggests that multiple brain structures are likely to be involved in functional disconnection between brain areas. Few studies have investigated resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP and corticobasal syndrome (CBS. In this study, we investigated within- and between-network rsFC abnormalities in these two conditions.MethodsTwenty patients with PSP, 11 patients with CBS, and 16 healthy subjects (HS underwent a resting-state fMRI study. Resting-state networks (RSNs were extracted to evaluate within- and between-network rsFC using the Melodic and FSLNets software packages.ResultsIncreased within-network rsFC was observed in both PSP and CBS patients, with a larger number of RSNs being involved in CBS. Within-network cerebellar rsFC positively correlated with mini-mental state examination scores in patients with PSP. Compared to healthy volunteers, PSP and CBS patients exhibit reduced functional connectivity between the lateral visual and auditory RSNs, with PSP patients additionally showing lower functional connectivity between the cerebellar and insular RSNs. Moreover, rsFC between the salience and executive-control RSNs was increased in patients with CBS compared to HS.ConclusionThis study provides evidence of functional brain reorganization in both PSP and CBS. Increased within-network rsFC could represent a higher degree of synchronization in damaged brain areas, while between-network rsFC abnormalities may mainly reflect degeneration of long-range white matter fibers.

  18. Volumetric analysis of the cerebellum in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y; Lee, D K; Lee, J M; Chung, S J; Lee, J J; Sohn, Y H; Lee, P H

    2017-01-01

    Although early cerebellar symptoms are one of the exclusive criteria in the diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), cerebellar involvement in PSP is evident both clinically and pathologically. However, structural analysis focusing on the cerebellum has not been previously studied in patients with PSP. We aimed to evaluate cerebellar involvement in PSP using a magnetic resonance imaging-based segmental volumetric analysis. We retrospectively enrolled 48 patients with PSP composed of 25 patients with PSP-Richardson's syndrome (RS) and 23 patients with pure akinesia with gait freezing, 39 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and 34 healthy controls. Data on both the whole and segmented cerebellar volumes were analyzed using a fully automated procedure. A general linear model showed that whole cerebellar volume in patients with PSP was significantly smaller compared with that of patients with PD or controls after controlling for age, sex and intracranial volume (P = 0.34). In addition, patients with PSP exhibited decreased regional volume in the crus I, lobule VIIIa and lobule VIIIb, which play roles as secondary representations of motor tasks, compared with patients with PD or controls. In subgroup analysis of PSP, volume loss in the whole and segmental cerebellum was more pronounced in patients with PSP-RS than in those with pure akinesia with gait freezing, PD or control subjects. These data demonstrate that cerebellar atrophy is evident in patients with PSP and is especially prominent in the PSP-RS group. These findings increase understanding of the clinicopathological basis of cerebellar involvement in PSP. © 2016 EAN.

  19. Frontal dynamic aphasia in progressive supranuclear palsy: Distinguishing between generation and fluent sequencing of novel thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gail A; Spooner, Donna; Harrison, William J

    2015-10-01

    Frontal dynamic aphasia is characterised by a profound reduction in spontaneous speech despite well-preserved naming, repetition and comprehension. Since Luria (1966, 1970) designated this term, two main forms of dynamic aphasia have been identified: one, a language-specific selection deficit at the level of word/sentence generation, associated with left inferior frontal lesions; and two, a domain-general impairment in generating multiple responses or connected speech, associated with more extensive bilateral frontal and/or frontostriatal damage. Both forms of dynamic aphasia have been interpreted as arising due to disturbances in early prelinguistic conceptual preparation mechanisms that are critical for language production. We investigate language-specific and domain-general accounts of dynamic aphasia and address two issues: one, whether deficits in multiple conceptual preparation mechanisms can co-occur; and two, the contribution of broader cognitive processes such as energization, the ability to initiate and sustain response generation over time, to language generation failure. Thus, we report patient WAL who presented with frontal dynamic aphasia in the context of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). WAL was given a series of experimental tests that showed that his dynamic aphasia was not underpinned by a language-specific deficit in selection or in microplanning. By contrast, WAL presented with a domain-general deficit in fluent sequencing of novel thoughts. The latter replicated the pattern documented in a previous PSP patient (Robinson, et al., 2006); however, unique to WAL, generating novel thoughts was impaired but there was no evidence of a sequencing deficit because perseveration was absent. Thus, WAL is the first unequivocal case to show a distinction between novel thought generation and subsequent fluent sequencing. Moreover, WAL's generation deficit encompassed verbal and non-verbal responses, showing a similar (but more profoundly reduced) pattern

  20. Tideglusib reduces progression of brain atrophy in progressive supranuclear palsy in a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglinger, Günter U; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Andrés, María V; Belloch, Vincente; León, Teresa; Del Ser, Teodoro

    2014-04-01

    It is believed that glycogen synthase kinase-3 hyperphosphorylates tau protein in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The Tau Restoration on PSP (TAUROS) trial assessed the glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitor tideglusib as potential treatment. For the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) substudy reported here, we assessed the progression of brain atrophy. TAUROS was a multinational, phase 2, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in patients with mild-to-moderate PSP who were treated with oral tideglusib (600 mg or 800 mg daily) or with placebo for 1 year. A subset of patients underwent baseline and 52-week MRI. Automated, observer-independent, atlas-based, and mask-based volumetry was done on high-resolution, T1-weighted, three-dimensional data. For primary outcomes, progression of atrophy was compared both globally (brain, cerebrum) and regionally (third ventricle, midbrain, pons) between the active and placebo groups (Bonferroni correction). For secondary outcomes, 15 additional brain structures were explored (Benjamini & Yekutieli correction). In total, MRIs from 37 patient were studied (placebo group, N = 9; tideglusib 600 mg group, N = 19; tideglusib 800 mg group, N = 9). The groups compared well in their demographic characteristics. Clinical results showed no effect of tideglusib over placebo. Progression of atrophy was significantly lower in the active group than in the placebo group for the brain (mean ± standard error of the mean: -1.3% ± 1.4% vs. -3.1% ± 2.3%, respectively), cerebrum (-1.3% ± 1.5% vs. -3.2% ± 2.1%, respectively), parietal lobe (-1.6% ± 1.9% vs. -4.1% ± 3.0%, respectively), and occipital lobe (-0.3% ± 1.8% vs. -2.7% ± 3.2%, respectively). A trend toward reduced atrophy also was observed in the frontal lobe, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, midbrain, and brainstem. In patients with PSP, tideglusib reduced the progression of atrophy in the whole brain, particularly in the parietal and occipital lobes. © 2014 International Parkinson

  1. Unusually prominent horizontal gaze palsy in a case of Niemann-Pick type C disease

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    Pritikanta Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick Type C disease (NPC is a rare inherited metabolic disorder characterized by lipid accumulation and systemic manifestations due to multiple organ involvement. Only a few cases of NPC have been reported so far from India. Varying presentations and often lack of access to complex diagnostic tests have leaded to initial misdiagnosis on few occasions. We here report a provisionally diagnosed case of NPC with prominent horizontal gaze palsy along with characteristic vertical gaze palsy and normal findings on microscopic examination of skin biopsy specimen.

  2. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy-like Syndrome After Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Case Series

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    Sirisha Nandipati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of progressive supranuclear palsy‐like syndrome is a rare complication of ascending aortic aneurysm repair. We report two patients with videos and present a table of prior reported cases. To our knowledge there is no previously published video of this syndrome. The suspected mechanism is brainstem injury though neuroimaging is often negative for an associated infarct. We hope our report will increase recognition of this syndrome after aortic surgery, especially in patients with visual complaints.

  3. Deep brain stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus for treatment of gait and balance disorder in progressive supranuclear palsy: Effects of frequency modulations and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galazky, Imke; Kaufmann, Jörn; Lorenzl, Stefan; Ebersbach, Georg; Gandor, Florin; Zaehle, Tino; Specht, Sylke; Stallforth, Sabine; Sobieray, Uwe; Wirkus, Edyta; Casjens, Franziska; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Kupsch, Andreas; Voges, Jürgen

    2018-02-19

    The pedunculopontine nucleus has been suggested as a potential deep brain stimulation target for axial symptoms such as gait and balance impairment in idiopathic Parkinson's disease as well as atypical Parkinsonian disorders. Seven consecutive patients with progressive supranuclear palsy received bilateral pedunculopontine nucleus deep brain stimulation. Inclusion criteria comprised of the clinical diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy, a levodopa-resistant gait and balance disorder, age stimulation frequencies at 8, 20, 60 and 130 Hz on motor scores and gait were assessed. Motor scores were followed up for two years postoperatively. Activities of daily living, frequency of falls, health-related quality of life, cognition and mood at 12 months were compared to baseline parameters. Surgical and stimulation related adverse events were assessed. Bilateral pedunculopontine nucleus deep brain stimulation at 8 Hz significantly improved axial motor symptoms and cyclic gait parameters, while high frequency stimulation did not ameliorate gait and balance but improved hypokinesia. This improvement however did not translate into clinically relevant benefits. Frequency of falls was not reduced. Activities of daily living, quality of life and frontal cognitive functions declined, while mood remained unchanged. Bilateral pedunculopontine nucleus deep brain stimulation in progressive supranuclear palsy generates frequency-dependent effects with improvement of cyclic gait parameters at low frequency and amelioration of hypokinesia at high frequency stimulation. However, these effects do not translate into a clinically important improvement. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. La belle indifférence revisited: a case report on progressive supranuclear palsy misdiagnosed as conversion disorder

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    van Meerkerk-Aanen PJ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Petra J van Meerkerk-Aanen,1 Lars de Vroege,1,2 David Khasho,1 Aziza Foruz,1 J Thies van Asseldonk,3 Christina M van der Feltz-Cornelis1,2 1Clinical Center of Excellence for Body, Mind, and Health, GGz Breburg, 2Department Tranzo, Tilburg School of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Tilburg University, 3Department of Neurology, Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg, the Netherlands Background: Since the advent of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans, neurological disorders have less often been falsely labeled as conversion disorder (CD. However, misdiagnosis of a neurological disorder as CD still occurs, especially in cases with insidious onset. Misinterpretation of la belle indifférence may contribute to such misdiagnosis. Here, we describe a case of progressive supranuclear palsy/Richardson’s syndrome (PSPS misdiagnosed as a case of CD.Case: A 62-year-old woman consulted two different neurologists in 2012 because of falling spells since 2009 and was diagnosed with CD. She was referred to the Clinical Center of Excellence for Body, Mind, and Health for treatment of CD. After neurological examination, blood tests, and psychiatric examination, in which la belle indifférence and a history of incest were found, CD was confirmed. However, despite treatment for CD, the patient’s physical symptoms deteriorated over a year. After repeated physical and psychiatric examinations, neurocognitive assessment, and consultation with a third neurologist because of suspicion of neurological disease, the patient was diagnosed with PSPS.Conclusion: La belle indifférence may be a psychological sign in the context of CD, but it may also be an expression of lack of mimic due to Parkinsonism or of eye movement disorder in the context of neurological illness. A diagnosis of CD should not be considered definitive if no improvement occurs in terms of physical, mental, and cognitive symptoms despite appropriate therapy. In case of deterioration, neurological

  5. Beyond the midbrain atrophy: wide spectrum of structural MRI finding in cases of pathologically proven progressive supranuclear palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Keita; Tokumaru, Aya M.; Shimoji, Keigo; Murayama, Shigeo; Kanemaru, Kazutomi; Morimoto, Satoru; Aiba, Ikuko; Nakagawa, Motoo; Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Shimohira, Masashi; Shibamoto, Yuta; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Hashizume, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    Recently, it has been recognized that pathologically proven progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) cases are classified into various clinical subtypes with non-uniform symptoms and imaging findings. This article reviews essential imaging findings, general information, and advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for PSP and presents these MRI findings of pathologically proven typical and atypical PSP cases for educational purposes. With the review of literatures, notably including atypical pathologically proven PSP cases, MRI and clinical information of 15 pathologically proven typical and atypical PSP cases were retrospectively evaluated. In addition to typical symptoms, PSP patients can exhibit atypical symptoms including levodopa-responsive parkinsonism, pure akinesia, non-fluent aphasia, corticobasal syndrome, and predominant cerebellar ataxia. As well as clinical symptoms, the degree of midbrain atrophy, a well-known imaging hallmark, is not consistent in atypical PSP cases. This fact has important implications for the limitation of midbrain atrophy as a diagnostic imaging biomarker of PSP pathology. Additional evaluation of other imaging findings including various regional atrophies of the globus pallidus, frontal lobe, cerebral peduncle, and superior cerebellar peduncle is essential for the diagnosis of atypical PSP cases. It is necessary for radiologists to recognize the wide clinical and radiological spectra of typical and atypical PSP cases. (orig.)

  6. Beyond the midbrain atrophy: wide spectrum of structural MRI finding in cases of pathologically proven progressive supranuclear palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Keita; Tokumaru, Aya M.; Shimoji, Keigo [Tokyo Metropolitan Medical Center of Gerontology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Murayama, Shigeo; Kanemaru, Kazutomi; Morimoto, Satoru [Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital, Department of Neurology, Tokyo (Japan); Aiba, Ikuko [National Hospital Organization Higashi Nagoya National Hospital, Department of Neurology, Nagoya (Japan); Nakagawa, Motoo; Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Shimohira, Masashi; Shibamoto, Yuta [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Nagoya (Japan); Matsukawa, Noriyuki [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Nagoya (Japan); Hashizume, Yoshio [Fukushimura Hospital, Choju Medical Institute, Toyohashi (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    Recently, it has been recognized that pathologically proven progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) cases are classified into various clinical subtypes with non-uniform symptoms and imaging findings. This article reviews essential imaging findings, general information, and advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for PSP and presents these MRI findings of pathologically proven typical and atypical PSP cases for educational purposes. With the review of literatures, notably including atypical pathologically proven PSP cases, MRI and clinical information of 15 pathologically proven typical and atypical PSP cases were retrospectively evaluated. In addition to typical symptoms, PSP patients can exhibit atypical symptoms including levodopa-responsive parkinsonism, pure akinesia, non-fluent aphasia, corticobasal syndrome, and predominant cerebellar ataxia. As well as clinical symptoms, the degree of midbrain atrophy, a well-known imaging hallmark, is not consistent in atypical PSP cases. This fact has important implications for the limitation of midbrain atrophy as a diagnostic imaging biomarker of PSP pathology. Additional evaluation of other imaging findings including various regional atrophies of the globus pallidus, frontal lobe, cerebral peduncle, and superior cerebellar peduncle is essential for the diagnosis of atypical PSP cases. It is necessary for radiologists to recognize the wide clinical and radiological spectra of typical and atypical PSP cases. (orig.)

  7. The economic costs of progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy in France, Germany and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrone, Paul; Payan, Christine Anne Mary; Knapp, Martin; Ludolph, Albert; Agid, Yves; Leigh, P Nigel; Bensimon, Gilbert

    2011-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) are progressive disabling neurological conditions usually fatal within 10 years of onset. Little is known about the economic costs of these conditions. This paper reports service use and costs from France, Germany and the UK and identifies patient characteristics that are associated with cost. 767 patients were recruited, and 760 included in the study, from 44 centres as part of the NNIPPS trial. Service use during the previous six months was measured at entry to the study and costs calculated. Mean six-month costs were calculated for 742 patients. Data on patient sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were recorded and used in regression models to identify predictors of service costs and unpaid care costs (i.e., care from family and friends). The mean six-month service costs of PSP were €24,491 in France, €30,643 in Germany and €25,655 in the UK. The costs for MSA were €28,924, €25,645 and €19,103 respectively. Unpaid care accounted for 68-76%. Formal and unpaid costs were significantly higher the more severe the illness, as indicated by the Parkinson's Plus Symptom scale. There was a significant inverse relationship between service and unpaid care costs.

  8. Parametric imaging of the rate constant Ki using [18Fluoro]-L-dopa positron emission tomography in progressive supranuclear palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordes, M.; Snow, B.J.; Morrison, S.; Sossi, V.; Ruth, T.J.; Calne, D.B.

    1993-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies using [18F]-L-dopa were carried out in 9 patients with supranuclear palsy and 13 controls. For quantification of PET data a rate constant K i was calculated for the radiotracer using a graphical method. Corrections for nonspecific activity were performed in both arterial plasma and brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that parametric images of the rate constant K mapping can be obtained on a pixel-by-pixel basis using an appropriate mathematical algorithm. K i values from these parametric images and the graphical approach were compared. Both correlated closely, with y=0.013+0.947 * x, r=0.992 and y=-0.052+1.048 * x, r=0.965 in patients and controls, respectively. Contrast measurements were also performed and showed a striking increase in contrast on parametric images. K mapping offers several advantages over the graphical approach, since parametric images are time-independent, i.e. one image represents the quantitative result of the study. In addition, parmetric images of the rate constant are normalized to arterial plasma radioactivity and corrected for tissue metabolites. Thus, parametric images of K i in different individuals can be compared directly without further processing in order to assess the nigrostriatal integrity. (orig.)

  9. Cortical thickness, surface area and volume measures in Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Worker

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD, Multiple System Atrophy (MSA and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP are neurodegenerative diseases that can be difficult to distinguish clinically. The objective of the current study was to use surface-based analysis techniques to assess cortical thickness, surface area and grey matter volume to identify unique morphological patterns of cortical atrophy in PD, MSA and PSP and to relate these patterns of change to disease duration and clinical features.High resolution 3D T1-weighted MRI volumes were acquired from 14 PD patients, 18 MSA, 14 PSP and 19 healthy control participants. Cortical thickness, surface area and volume analyses were carried out using the automated surface-based analysis package FreeSurfer (version 5.1.0. Measures of disease severity and duration were assessed for correlation with cortical morphometric changes in each clinical group.Results show that in PSP, widespread cortical thinning and volume loss occurs within the frontal lobe, particularly the superior frontal gyrus. In addition, PSP patients also displayed increased surface area in the pericalcarine. In comparison, PD and MSA did not display significant changes in cortical morphology.These results demonstrate that patients with clinically established PSP exhibit distinct patterns of cortical atrophy, particularly affecting the frontal lobe. These results could be used in the future to develop a useful clinical application of MRI to distinguish PSP patients from PD and MSA patients.

  10. Progressive supranuclear palsy and idiopathic Parkinson's disease are associated with local reduction of in vivo brain viscoelasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, Axel; Skowronek, Cornelia; Fehlner, Andreas; Streitberger, Kaspar-Josche; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2018-02-19

    To apply three-dimensional multifrequency MR-elastography (3DMRE) for the measurement of local cerebral viscoelasticity changes in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). T1-weighted anatomical imaging and 3DMRE were performed in 17 PD and 20 PSP patients as well as 12 controls. Two independent viscoelasticity parameters, |G*| and φ, were reconstructed combining seven harmonic vibration frequencies (30-60 Hz). Spatially averaged values were compared by one-way ANOVA, groups were compared using unpaired t test and Mann-Whitney test, respectively. Correlation between clinical data and parameters of brain elasticity and volume were calculated by Pearson's correlation coefficient. In patients, |G*| was significantly reduced in the frontal and mesencephalic regions (p viscoelasticity is correlated with brain atrophy in PSP (r=0.64, p=0.002) and PD (r=0.65, p=0.005) patients but not in controls. MRE-measured viscoelasticity reflects local structural changes of brain tissue in PSP and in PD and provides a useful parameter to differentiate neurodegenerative movement disorders based on imaging examinations. • 3D multifrequency MR-elastography reveals diffuse regional changes in brain viscoelasticity in neurodegenerative disorders. • Reduced mesencephalic viscoelasticity separates PD and PSP. • Reduced brain viscoelasticity and brain atrophy as independent hallmarks of neurodegeneration hypothesized.

  11. Cerebral blood flow SPECT may be helpful in establishing the diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slawek, J.; Lass, P.; Derejko, M.; Dubaniewicz, M.

    2001-01-01

    We present 4 cases, which illustrate the usefulness of neuroimaging studies in atypical forms of Parkinsonism. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) and Corticobasal Degeneration (CBD) are rare neurodegenerative progressive disorders of the central nervous system of unknown cause. The clinical accuracy in this diagnosis is not very high even in centres specialising in movement disorders. Functional imaging can be helpful in diagnosing PSP and CBD. We present the results of cerebral blood flow (CBF) SPECT scanning in 2 patients with PSP and 2 patients with CBD. This was performed using a triple-head gammacamera and 99m Tc-HMPAO. In PSP patients a diffuse frontal perfusion deficit was seen, eventually with striatal and occipital hypoperfusion. CT/MRI was either normal or showed a diffuse cortical-subcortical atrophy. In CBD patients left fronto-parieto-temporal cortex and a striatal hypoperfusion were shown. CT scanning was normal in one case and showed an asymmetrical temporo-parietal atrophy in second one. The pattern of diffuse frontal perfusions deficit in PSP and asymmetrical, contralateral to symptoms of CBD, cortico-subcortical hypoperfusion may be helpful in establishing the correct diagnosis. (author)

  12. Osteoblastoma originating from frontoethmoidal sinus causing personality disorders and superior gaze palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekic, B; Toslak, I E; Yildirim, S; Uyar, R

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblastoma is a rare, solitary benign tumor that is usually situated in axial skeleton mainly in vertebra. It is rarely seen in ethmoid and frontal sinuses. A 40-year-old man who had osteoblastoma originated from frontal and ethmoidal sinuses that extends up to frontal lobe and gave rise to personality disorders by compressing the frontal lobe, and caused superior gaze palsy by compressing the superior rectus muscle. We present this rare case with clinical, radiological and histopathological findings.

  13. A voxel based comparative analysis using magnetization transfer imaging and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in progressive supranuclear palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangalore Sandhya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: In progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP tissue damage occurs in specific cortical and subcortical regions. Voxel based analysis using T1-weighted images depict quantitative gray matter (GM atrophy changes. Magnetization transfer (MT imaging depicts qualitative changes in the brain parenchyma. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether MT imaging could indicate abnormalities in PSP. Settings and Design: A total of 10 patients with PSP (9 men and 1 woman and 8 controls (5 men and 3 women were studied with T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and 3DMT imaging. Voxel based analysis of T1-weighted MRI was performed to investigate brain atrophy while MT was used to study qualitative abnormalities in the brain tissue. We used SPM8 to investigate group differences (with two sample t-test using the GM and white matter (WM segmented data. Results: T1-weighted imaging and MT are equally sensitive to detect changes in GM and WM in PSP. Magnetization transfer ratio images and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition of gradient echo revealed extensive bilateral volume and qualitative changes in the orbitofrontal, prefrontal cortex and limbic lobe and sub cortical GM. The prefrontal structures involved were the rectal gyrus, medial, inferior frontal gyrus (IFG and middle frontal gyrus (MFG. The anterior cingulate, cingulate gyrus and lingual gyrus of limbic lobe and subcortical structures such as caudate, thalamus, insula and claustrum were also involved. Cerebellar involvement mainly of anterior lobe was also noted. Conclusions: The findings suggest that voxel based MT imaging permits a whole brain unbiased investigation of central nervous system structural integrity in PSP.

  14. La belle indifférence revisited: a case report on progressive supranuclear palsy misdiagnosed as conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meerkerk-Aanen, Petra J; de Vroege, Lars; Khasho, David; Foruz, Aziza; van Asseldonk, J Thies; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M

    2017-01-01

    Since the advent of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans, neurological disorders have less often been falsely labeled as conversion disorder (CD). However, misdiagnosis of a neurological disorder as CD still occurs, especially in cases with insidious onset. Misinterpretation of la belle indifférence may contribute to such misdiagnosis. Here, we describe a case of progressive supranuclear palsy/Richardson's syndrome (PSPS) misdiagnosed as a case of CD. A 62-year-old woman consulted two different neurologists in 2012 because of falling spells since 2009 and was diagnosed with CD. She was referred to the Clinical Center of Excellence for Body, Mind, and Health for treatment of CD. After neurological examination, blood tests, and psychiatric examination, in which la belle indifférence and a history of incest were found, CD was confirmed. However, despite treatment for CD, the patient's physical symptoms deteriorated over a year. After repeated physical and psychiatric examinations, neurocognitive assessment, and consultation with a third neurologist because of suspicion of neurological disease, the patient was diagnosed with PSPS. La belle indifférence may be a psychological sign in the context of CD, but it may also be an expression of lack of mimic due to Parkinsonism or of eye movement disorder in the context of neurological illness. A diagnosis of CD should not be considered definitive if no improvement occurs in terms of physical, mental, and cognitive symptoms despite appropriate therapy. In case of deterioration, neurological reexamination and reinterpretation of la belle indifférence should be considered.

  15. Pittsburgh Compound B and AV-1451 positron emission tomography assessment of molecular pathologies of Alzheimer's disease in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, Jennifer L; Ahlskog, J Eric; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Senjem, Matthew L; Spychalla, Anthony J; Petersen, Ronald C; Jack, Clifford R; Lowe, Val J; Josephs, Keith A

    2018-03-01

    Little is known about Alzheimer's disease molecular proteins, beta-amyloid and paired helical filament (PHF) tau, in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Recent techniques have been developed to allow for investigations of these proteins in PSP. We determined the frequency of beta-amyloid deposition in PSP, and whether beta-amyloid deposition in PSP is associated with PHF-tau deposition pattern, or clinical features. Thirty probable PSP participants underwent MRI, [ 18 F]AV-1451 PET and Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET. Apolipoprotein (APOE) genotyping was also performed. A global PiB standard-uptake value ratio (SUVR) was calculated. AV-1451 SUVRs were calculated for a set of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related regions and a set of PSP-related regions. Voxel-level analyses were conducted to assess for differences in AV-1451 uptake patterns and MRI atrophy between PiB(+) and PiB(-) cases compared to 60 normal PiB(-) controls. Statistical testing for correlations and associations between variables of interest were also performed. Twelve subjects (40%) showed beta-amyloid deposition. Higher PiB SUVR correlated with older age but not with AV-1451 SUVR in the AD- or PSP-related regions. Higher AV-1451 SUVR in AD-related regions was associated with higher AV-1451 SUVR in PSP-related regions. We found little evidence for beta-amyloid related differences in clinical metrics, proportion of APOE e4 carriers, pattern of AV-1451 uptake, or pattern of atrophy. Beta-amyloid deposition occurs in a relatively high proportion of PSP subjects. Unlike in Alzheimer's disease, however, there is little evidence that beta-amyloid, and PHF-tau, play a significant role in neurodegeneration in PSP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Combined measurement of plasma cystatin C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol: A valuable tool for evaluating progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Ruihui; Wei, Xiaobo; Yu, Bin; Zhu, Shuzhen; Yang, Xiaohua; Xie, Fen; Zhang, Mahui; Jiang, Ying; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Sun, Hong-Shuo; Xia, Ying; Jin, Kunlin; Chan, Piu; Wang, Qing; Gao, Xiaoya

    2018-03-19

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) was previously thought as a cause of atypical Parkinsonism. Although Cystatin C (Cys C) and low-density cholesterol lipoprotein-C (LDL-C) are known to play critical roles in Parkinsonism, it is unknown whether they can be used as markers to distinguish PSP patients from healthy subjects and to determine disease severity. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine plasma Cys C/HDL/LDL-C levels of 40 patients with PSP and 40 healthy age-matched controls. An extended battery of motor and neuropsychological tests, including the PSP-Rating Scale (PSPRS), the Non-Motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), was used to evaluate the disease severity. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were adopted to assess the prognostic accuracy of Cys C/LDL-C levels in distinguishing PSP from healthy subjects. Patients with PSP exhibited significantly higher plasma levels of Cys C and lower LDL-C. The levels of plasma Cys C were positively and inversely correlated with the PSPRS/NMSS and MMSE scores, respectively. The LDL-C/HDL-C ratio was positively associated with PSPRS/NMSS and GDS scores. The ROC curve for the combination of Cys C and LDL-C yielded a better accuracy for distinguishing PSP from healthy subjects than the separate curves for each parameter. Plasma Cys C and LDL-C may be valuable screening tools for differentiating PSP from healthy subjects; while they could be useful for the PSP intensifies and severity evaluation. A better understanding of Cys C and LDL-C may yield insights into the pathogenesis of PSP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Correlation with neuropsychological assessment and SPM analysis of brain perfusion SPECT in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Young Jin; Kang, Do Young; Park, Kyung Won; Kim, Jae Woo [School of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a degenerative condition of unknown aetiology that produces an akinetic-rigid form of parkinsonism characterised by early falls, dementia and abnormalities of extraocular movements. The patterns of decreased regional cerebral blood flow and cognitive impairment in PSP compared with normal control have been insufficiently investigated and a limited number of studies have been performed. We evaluated clinical symptoms, functional neuroimaging study using Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT and neuropsychological profiles in patients with PSP. Eleven patients with PSP diagnosed by the clinical criteria of National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Society for PSP (NINDS-SPSP) (mean age: 70.5{+-}5.6 years, educational period: 4.5{+-}4.7 years) and age-matched 10 healthy control subjects (mean age: 68.1{+-}4.5 years, educational period: 6.5{+-}4.1 years) participated in this study were participated. All patients were given a neurologic examination, brain MRI and cerebral perfusion SPECT using Tc-99m HMPAO. We concomittently evaluated several cognitive profiles using the Seoul Neuropsychological Screening Battery. SPM analysis of the SPECT image showed significant perfusion deficits in the left inferior frontal gyrus, left caudate nucleus, left middle frontal gyrus and cingulate gyrus in the patients with PSP compared with age-matched healthy control (uncorrected p<0.01). On neuropsychological assessment, cognitive deficits on verbal and visual memory, word fluency and frontal executive functions were prominent in most patients with PSP compared with healthy control subjects. Our findings suggest that measurement of regional cerebral blood flow by perfusion SPECT and voxel-based SPM analysis with neuropsychological assessment are useful to understanding the correlation between perfusion deficits and abnormal cognitive profiles in patients with PSP.

  18. Gazes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khawaja, Iram

    2015-01-01

    , and introduces the concept of panoptical gazes in regard to an understanding of how the young Muslims are looked upon and how they utilize different strategies of positioning in regard to the gazes they are met with. The concept of panoptical gazes, are at the end of the article juxtaposed with the concept...

  19. microRNA profiling: increased expression of miR-147a and miR-518e in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatura, Roman; Buchholz, Malte; Dickson, Dennis W; van Swieten, John; McLean, Catriona; Höglinger, Günter; Müller, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy is a sporadic neurodegenerative disorder. Genetic, environmental, and possibly epigenetic factors contribute to disease. In order to better understand the potential role of epigenetic changes in progressive supranuclear palsy, we investigated whether some microRNAs and their target genes are dysregulated. We analyzed expression of 372 well-characterized microRNAs in forebrains of a total of 40 patients and of 40 controls using TaqMan arrays and SYBR Green quantitative real-time PCR. The exploratory cohort included forebrains from 20 patients and 20 controls provided by the Erasmus Medical Centre in Rotterdam, Netherlands. Confirmatory samples were from Jacksonville, Florida, and from Melbourne, Australia. Both microRNA profiling and SYBR Green quantitative real-time PCR revealed significant upregulation of miR-147 (miR-147a) and miR-518e in the exploratory cohort. Highly increased expression of these two microRNAs was validated in the confirmatory samples. Target genes of miR-147a (NF1, ACLY, ALG12) and of miR-518e (CPEB1, JAZF1, RAP1B) were repressed in patients' forebrains. The results suggest that dysregulation of specific microRNAs contributes to disease by repressing target genes involved in various cellular functions.

  20. Davunetide in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2/3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxer, Adam L; Lang, Anthony E; Grossman, Murray; Knopman, David S; Miller, Bruce L; Schneider, Lon S; Doody, Rachelle S; Lees, Andrew; Golbe, Lawrence I; Williams, David R; Corvol, Jean-Cristophe; Ludolph, Albert; Burn, David; Lorenzl, Stefan; Litvan, Irene; Roberson, Erik D; Höglinger, Günter U; Koestler, Mary; Jack, Clifford R; Van Deerlin, Viviana; Randolph, Christopher; Lobach, Iryna V; Heuer, Hilary W; Gozes, Illana; Parker, Lesley; Whitaker, Steve; Hirman, Joe; Stewart, Alistair J; Gold, Michael; Morimoto, Bruce H

    2014-07-01

    In preclinical studies, davunetide promoted microtubule stability and reduced tau phosphorylation. Because progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is linked to tau pathology, davunetide could be a treatment for PSP. We assessed the safety and efficacy of davunetide in patients with PSP. In a double-blind, parallel group, phase 2/3 trial, participants were randomly assigned with permuted blocks in a 1:1 ratio to davunetide (30 mg twice daily, intranasally) or placebo for 52 weeks at 48 centres in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the UK, and the USA. Participants met the modified Neuroprotection and Natural History in Parkinson Plus Syndrome study criteria for PSP. Primary endpoints were the change from baseline in PSP Rating Scale (PSPRS) and Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living (SEADL) scale at up to 52 weeks. All participants and study personnel were masked to treatment assignment. Analysis was by intention to treat. The trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov, number NCT01110720. 313 participants were randomly assigned to davunetide (n=157) or to placebo (n=156), and 241 (77%) completed the study (118 and 156 in the davunetide and placebo groups, respectively). There were no differences in the davunetide and placebo groups in the baseline PSPRS and SEADL. The davunetide and placebo groups did not differ in the change from baseline in PSPRS (median 11·8 [95% CI 10·5 to 13·0] vs 11·8 [10·5 to 13·0], respectively, p=0·41) or SEADL (-0·20 [-0·20 to -0·17] vs -0·20 [-0·22 to -0·17], respectively, p=0·92). 54 serious adverse events were reported in each of the treatment groups, including 11 deaths in the davunetide group and ten in the placebo group. The frequency of nasal adverse events was greater in the davunetide group than in the placebo group (epistaxis 18 [12%] of 156 vs 13 [8%] of 156, rhinorrhoea 15 [10%] vs eight [5%], and nasal discomfort 15 [10%] vs one [<1%]). Davunetide is not an effective treatment for PSP. Clinical trials of

  1. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vision, difficulties in looking up or down, double vision, light sensitivity, burning eyes, or other eye trouble; 3) slurred speech; and 4) various mental complaints such as slowness of thought, impaired memory, personality changes, and changes in mood. An initial ...

  2. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alterations of mood and behavior, including depression and apathy as well as progressive mild dementia. The disorder's ... alterations of mood and behavior, including depression and apathy as well as progressive mild dementia. The disorder's ...

  3. Progressive supranuclear palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the nervous system (neurologic examination) may show: Dementia that is getting worse Difficulty walking Limited eye movements, especially up and down movements Normal vision, hearing, feeling, and control of movement Stiff and ...

  4. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease. It affects brain cells that control the movement of your eyes. This leads to serious and permanent problems with balance and the way you walk. It usually occurs in middle-aged or elderly people. Symptoms are very different in ...

  5. Gazes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khawaja, Iram

    , and the different strategies of positioning they utilize are studied and identified. The first strategy is to confront stereotyping prejudices and gazes, thereby attempting to position oneself in a counteracting way. The second is to transform and try to normalise external characteristics, such as clothing...... and other symbols that indicate Muslimness. A third strategy is to play along and allow the prejudice in question to remain unchallenged. A fourth is to join and participate in religious communities and develop an alternate sense of belonging to a wider community of Muslims. The concept of panoptical gazes...

  6. Parent Perception of Two Eye-Gaze Control Technology Systems in Young Children with Cerebral Palsy: Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Petra; Wallen, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    Eye-gaze control technology enables people with significant physical disability to access computers for communication, play, learning and environmental control. This pilot study used a multiple case study design with repeated baseline assessment and parents' evaluations to compare two eye-gaze control technology systems to identify any differences in factors such as ease of use and impact of the systems for their young children. Five children, aged 3 to 5 years, with dyskinetic cerebral palsy, and their families participated. Overall, families were satisfied with both the Tobii PCEye Go and myGaze® eye tracker, found them easy to position and use, and children learned to operate them quickly. This technology provides young children with important opportunities for learning, play, leisure, and developing communication.

  7. Intact coupling of M1 receptors and preserved M2 and M4 receptors in the cortex in progressive supranuclear palsy: contrast with other dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Naomi M; Piggott, Margaret A; Lees, Andrew J; Perry, Elaine K; Burn, David J

    2008-05-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative disease characterised clinically by motor and cognitive symptoms. Cholinergic dysfunction is thought to be responsible for much of the cognitive symptomatology. To date, however, cholinergic replacement therapies have been ineffective. We used receptor specific radioligand autoradiography to measure M1, M2, and M4 receptor density, and the functional status of the principal cortical subtype, M1, in the frontal cortex in post-mortem brain tissue of PSP patients (n=14). Results were compared to normal controls (n=17) and patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB, n=12) and Alzheimer's disease (AD, n=15). In PSP there were no changes in M1, M2, or M4 muscarinic receptor densities or M1 coupling. DLB cases showed a non-significant increase in M1 receptors. In AD there was a reduction in M1 receptors and coupling in most frontal cortical areas which reached significance, compared to DLB, for M1 receptors in the cingulate (p<0.05). We conclude from this first systematic study of cortical muscarinic receptors in PSP that functioning cortical muscarinic receptors are preserved. A further, larger trial of cholinergic therapy, such as an M1 agonist, may be warranted.

  8. Right Gaze Palsy and Hoarseness: A Rare Presentation of Mediastinal Tuberculosis with an Isolated Prepontine Cistern Tuberculoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidozie Charles Agu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a previously healthy young man who presented with headaches, diplopia with right lateral gaze palsy, dysphagia, and hoarseness over a 2-month period. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed a small enhancing mass at the prepontine cistern and chest CT showed a left mediastinal mass. Mediastinoscopy and lymph node biopsy were performed. DNA probe and culture of the biopsy specimen were confirmed to be Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Resolution of neurologic symptoms was noted after 6 weeks, in addition to regression of brain stem and mediastinal lesions after 12 weeks of antituberculous therapy.

  9. Functional MRI, DTI and neurophysiology in horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Sven; Wetzel, Stephan G; Lütschg, Jürg

    2008-05-01

    Horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis (HGPPS) is an autosomal recessive disease due to a mutation in the ROBO3 gene. This rare disease is of particular interest because the absence, or at least reduction, of crossing of the ascending lemniscal and descending corticospinal tracts in the medulla predicts abnormal ipsilateral sensory and motor systems. We evaluated the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for the first time in this disease and compared it to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography and neurophysiological findings in the same patient with genetically confirmed ROBO3 mutation. As expected, motor fMRI, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) and motor evoked potentials (MEP) were dominantly ipsilateral to the stimulation side. DTI tractography revealed ipsilateral ascending and descending connectivity in the brainstem yet normal interhemispheric connections in the corpus callosum. Auditory fMRI revealed bilateral auditory activation to monaural left-sided auditory stimulation. No significant cortical activation was observed after monaural right-sided stimulation, a hearing defect having been excluded. Prosaccades fMRI showed no activations in the eye-movement network. Motor fMRI confirmed the established findings of DTI and neurophysiology in the same patient. In suspected HGPPS, any technique appears appropriate for further investigation. Auditory fMRI suggests that a monaural auditory system with bilateral auditory activations might be a physiological advantage as compared to a binaural yet only unilateral auditory system, in analogy to anisometropic amblyopia. Moving-head fMRI studies in the future might show whether the compensatory head movements instead of normal eye movements activate the eye-movement network.

  10. Functional MRI, DTI and neurophysiology in horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, Sven; Wetzel, Stephan G. [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Radiology, Department of Neuroradiology, Basel (Switzerland); Luetschg, Juerg [University Children' s Hospital (UKBB), Basel (Switzerland)

    2008-05-15

    Horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis (HGPPS) is an autosomal recessive disease due to a mutation in the ROBO3 gene. This rare disease is of particular interest because the absence, or at least reduction, of crossing of the ascending lemniscal and descending corticospinal tracts in the medulla predicts abnormal ipsilateral sensory and motor systems. We evaluated the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for the first time in this disease and compared it to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography and neurophysiological findings in the same patient with genetically confirmed ROBO3 mutation. As expected, motor fMRI, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) and motor evoked potentials (MEP) were dominantly ipsilateral to the stimulation side. DTI tractography revealed ipsilateral ascending and descending connectivity in the brainstem yet normal interhemispheric connections in the corpus callosum. Auditory fMRI revealed bilateral auditory activation to monaural left-sided auditory stimulation. No significant cortical activation was observed after monaural right-sided stimulation, a hearing defect having been excluded. Prosaccades fMRI showed no activations in the eye-movement network. Motor fMRI confirmed the established findings of DTI and neurophysiology in the same patient. In suspected HGPPS, any technique appears appropriate for further investigation. Auditory fMRI suggests that a monaural auditory system with bilateral auditory activations might be a physiological advantage as compared to a binaural yet only unilateral auditory system, in analogy to anisometropic amblyopia. Moving-head fMRI studies in the future might show whether the compensatory head movements instead of normal eye movements activate the eye-movement network. (orig.)

  11. Functional MRI, DTI and neurophysiology in horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, Sven; Wetzel, Stephan G.; Luetschg, Juerg

    2008-01-01

    Horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis (HGPPS) is an autosomal recessive disease due to a mutation in the ROBO3 gene. This rare disease is of particular interest because the absence, or at least reduction, of crossing of the ascending lemniscal and descending corticospinal tracts in the medulla predicts abnormal ipsilateral sensory and motor systems. We evaluated the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for the first time in this disease and compared it to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography and neurophysiological findings in the same patient with genetically confirmed ROBO3 mutation. As expected, motor fMRI, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) and motor evoked potentials (MEP) were dominantly ipsilateral to the stimulation side. DTI tractography revealed ipsilateral ascending and descending connectivity in the brainstem yet normal interhemispheric connections in the corpus callosum. Auditory fMRI revealed bilateral auditory activation to monaural left-sided auditory stimulation. No significant cortical activation was observed after monaural right-sided stimulation, a hearing defect having been excluded. Prosaccades fMRI showed no activations in the eye-movement network. Motor fMRI confirmed the established findings of DTI and neurophysiology in the same patient. In suspected HGPPS, any technique appears appropriate for further investigation. Auditory fMRI suggests that a monaural auditory system with bilateral auditory activations might be a physiological advantage as compared to a binaural yet only unilateral auditory system, in analogy to anisometropic amblyopia. Moving-head fMRI studies in the future might show whether the compensatory head movements instead of normal eye movements activate the eye-movement network. (orig.)

  12. Differential distribution of striatal [123I]β-CIT in Parkinson's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy, evaluated with single-photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messa, C.; Volonte, M.A.; Fazio, F.; Zito, F.; Carpinelli, A.; D'Amico, A.; Rizzo, G.; Moresco, R.M.; Paulesu, E.; Franceschi, M.; Lucignani, G.

    1998-01-01

    Functional imaging of the presynaptic dopaminergic activity using single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and iodine-123 labelled 2-β-carboxymethoxy-3-β-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ([ 123 I]β-CIT) is important for the assessment of disease severity and progression in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, its capability to discriminate between different extrapyramidal disorders has not yet been assessed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of differentiating patients with PD and with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) by means of this method. The distribution of [ 123 I]β-CIT in the basal ganglia was assessed in six normal subjects, 13 petients with PD and five patients with PSP in whom the disease was mild. SPET images were obtained 24±2 h after i.v. injection of the tracer using a brain-dedicated system (CERASPECT). MR and SPET images were co-registered in four normal subjects and used to define a standard set of 16 circular regions of interest (ROIs) on the slice showing the highest striatal activity. The basal ganglia ROIs corresponded to (1) the head of caudate, (2) a region of transition between the head of caudate and the anterior putamen, (3) the anterior putamen and (4) the posterior putamen. A ratio of specific to non-displaceable striatal uptake was calculated normalising the activity of the basal ganglia ROIs to that of the occipital cortex (V3''). ANOVA revealed a global reduction of V3'' in all ROIs of PD and PSP patients compared with normal controls (P 123 I]β-CIT distribution in discrete striatal areas provides information on the relative caudate-putamen damage, with different values being obtained in patients clinically diagnosed as having either PD or PSP. (orig.)

  13. Long-term exercise training for an individual with mixed corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy features: 10-year case report follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Teresa M; Boeve, Bradley F; Petersen, Cheryl M; Dvorak, Leah; Kantarci, Kejal

    2014-02-01

    This case report describes the effects of long-term (10-year) participation in a community exercise program for a client with mixed features of corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The effects of exercise participation on both functional status and brain volume are described. A 60-year-old male dentist initially reported changes in gait and limb coordination. He received a diagnosis of atypical CBD at age 66 years; PSP was added at age 72 years. At age 70 years, the client began a therapist-led community group exercise program for people with Parkinson disease (PD). The program included trunk and lower extremity stretching and strengthening, upright balance and strengthening, and both forward and backward treadmill walking. The client participated twice weekly for 1 hour for 10 years and was reassessed in years 9 to 10. Falls (self-reported weekly over the 10-year period of the study by the client and his wife) decreased from 1.9 falls per month in year 1 to 0.3 falls per month in year 10. Balance, walking endurance, and general mobility declined slightly. Gait speed (both comfortable and fast) declined; the client was unable to vary gait speed. Quantitative brain measurements indicated a slow rate of whole brain volume loss and ventricular expansion compared with clients with autopsy-proven CBD or PSP. This client has participated consistently in a regular group exercise program for 10 years. He has reduced fall frequency, maintained balance and endurance, and retained community ambulation using a walker. Combined with the slow rate of brain volume loss, this evidence supports the efficacy of a regular exercise program to prolong longevity and maintain function in people with CBD or PSP.

  14. Voxelwise meta-ananlysis of gray matter anomalies in progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson’s disease using anatomic likelihood estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huifang eShang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous voxel-based morphometry (VBM studies on gray matter (GM of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP and Parkinson’s disease (PD have been conducted separately. Identifying the different neuroanatomical changes in GM resulting from PSP and PD through meta-analysis will aid the differential diagnosis of PSP and PD. In this study, a systematic review of VBM studies of patients with PSP and PD relative to healthy controls (HC in the Embase and PubMed databases from January 1995 to April 2013 was conducted. The anatomical distribution of the coordinates of GM differences was meta-analyzed using anatomical likelihood estimation. Separate maps of GM changes were constructed and subtraction meta-analysis was performed to explore the differences in GM abnormalities between PSP and PD. Nine PSP studies and 24 PD studies were included. GM reductions were present in the bilateral thalamus, basal ganglia, midbrain, insular cortex and inferior frontal gyrus, and left precentral gyrus and anterior cingulate gyrus in PSP. Atrophy of GM was concentrated in the bilateral middle and inferior frontal gyrus, precuneus, left precentral gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, right superior parietal lobule, and right cuneus in PD. Subtraction meta-analysis indicated that GM volume was lesser in the bilateral midbrain, thalamus, and insula in PSP compared with that in PD. Our meta-analysis indicated that PSP and PD shared a similar distribution of neuroanatomical changes in the frontal lobe, including inferior frontal gyrus and precentral gyrus, and that atrophy of the midbrain, thalamus, and insula are neuroanatomical markers for differentiating PSP from PD.

  15. Protein Phosphatase 2A and Its Methylation Modulating Enzymes LCMT-1 and PME-1 Are Dysregulated in Tauopathies of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Jin; Lee, Kang-Woo; Oh, Stephanie; Yan, Run; Zhang, Jie; Beach, Thomas G; Adler, Charles H; Voronkov, Michael; Braithwaite, Steven P; Stock, Jeffry B; Mouradian, M Maral

    2018-02-01

    Hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates are characteristic of tauopathies including progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and Alzheimer disease (AD), but factors contributing to pathologic tau phosphorylation are not well understood. Here, we studied the regulation of the major tau phosphatase, the heterotrimeric AB55αC protein phosphatase 2 A (PP2A), in PSP and AD. The assembly and activity of this PP2A isoform are regulated by reversible carboxyl methylation of its catalytic C subunit, while the B subunit confers substrate specificity. We sought to address whether the decreases in PP2A methylation and its methylating enzyme, leucine carboxyl methyltransferase (LCMT-1), which are reported in AD, relate to tau pathology or to concomitant amyloid pathology by comparing them in the relatively pure tauopathy PSP. Immunohistochemical analysis of frontal cortices showed that methyl-PP2A is reduced while demethyl-PP2A is increased, with no changes in total PP2A or B55α subunit, resulting in a reduction in the methyl/demethyl PP2A ratio of 63% in PSP and 75% in AD compared to controls. Similarly, Western blot analyses showed a decrease of methyl-PP2A and an increase of demethyl-PP2A with a concomitant reduction in the methyl/demethyl PP2A ratio in both PSP (74%) and AD (76%) brains. This was associated with a decrease in LCMT-1 and an increase in the demethylating enzyme, protein phosphatase methylesterase (PME-1), in both diseases. These findings suggest that PP2A dysregulation in tauopathies may contribute to the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau and to neurodegeneration. © 2017 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification by [{sup 99m}Tc]ECD SPECT of anterior cingulate hypoperfusion in progressive supranuclear palsy, in comparison with Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varrone, Andrea [University Federico II, Biostructure and Bioimaging Institute, National Research Council/Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Napoli (Italy); Karolinska Hospital, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Stockholm (Sweden); Pagani, Marco; Salmaso, Dario [National Research Council, Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, Rome and Padua (Italy); Salvatore, Elena; Amboni, Marianna; De Michele, Giuseppe; Filla, Alessandro; Barone, Paolo [University Federico II, Department of Neurological Sciences, Napoli (Italy); Sansone, Valeria; Pappata, Sabina; Salvatore, Marco [University Federico II, Biostructure and Bioimaging Institute, National Research Council/Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Napoli (Italy); Nobili, Flavio [University of Genoa, Clinical Neurophysiology, Department of Endocrinological and Metabolic Sciences, Genoa (Italy)

    2007-07-15

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is an akinetic-rigid syndrome that can be difficult to differentiate from Parkinson's disease (PD), particularly at an early stage. [{sup 99m}Tc]ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT could represent a widely available tool to assist in the differential diagnosis. In this study we used voxel-based analysis and Computerised Brain Atlas (CBA)-based principal component analysis (PCA) of [{sup 99m}Tc]ECD SPECT data to test whether: (1) specific patterns of rCBF abnormalities can differentiate PSP from controls and PD; (2) networks of dysfunctional brain regions can be found in PSP vs controls and PD. Nine PD patients, 16 PSP patients and ten controls were studied with [{sup 99m}Tc]ECD SPECT using a brain-dedicated device (Ceraspect). Voxel-based analysis was performed with statistical parametric mapping. PCA was applied to volume of interest data after spatial normalisation to CBA. The voxel-based analysis showed hypoperfusion of the anterior cingulate and medial frontal cortex in PSP compared with controls and PD. In PSP patients the rCBF impairment extended to the pre-supplementary motor area and prefrontal cortex, areas involved in executive function and motor networks. Compared with PSP patients, PD patients showed a mild rCBF decrease in associative visual areas which could be related to the known impairment of visuospatial function. The PCA identified three principal components differentiating PSP patients from controls and/or PD patients that included groups of cortical and subcortical brain regions with relatively decreased (cingulate cortex, prefrontal cortex and caudate) or increased (parietal cortex) rCBF, representing distinct functional networks in PSP. Anterior cingulate hypoperfusion seems to be an early, distinct brain abnormality in PSP as compared with PD. (orig.)

  17. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) performance in progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorenzato, Eleonora; Weis, Luca; Falup-Pecurariu, Cristian; Diaconu, Stefania; Siri, Chiara; Reali, Elisa; Pezzoli, Gianni; Bisiacchi, Patrizia; Antonini, Angelo; Biundo, Roberta

    2016-12-01

    To determine if Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) is more sensitive than the commonly used Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) in detecting cognitive abnormalities in patients with probable progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) compared with Parkinson's disease (PD). In this multicenter observational study, MMSE and MoCA were administered in a random order to 130 patients: 35 MSA, 30 PSP and 65 age, and education and gender matched-PD. We assessed between-group differences for MMSE, MoCA, and their subitems. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated. The mean MMSE was higher than the mean MoCA score in each MSA (27.7 ± 2.4 vs. 22.9 ± 3.0, p < 0.0001), PSP (26.0 ± 2.9 vs. 18.2 ± 3.9, p < 0.0001), and PD (27.3 ± 2.0 vs. 22.3 ± 3.5, p < 0.0001). MoCA total score as well as its letter fluency subitem differentiated PSP from MSA and PD with high specificity and moderate sensitivity. More specifically, a cut-off score of 7 F-words or less per minute would support a diagnosis of PSP (PSP vs. PD: 86 % specificity, 70 % sensitivity; PSP vs. MSA: 71 % specificity, 70 % sensitivity). By contrast, MMSE presented an overall ceiling effect for most subitems, except for the pentagon scores, where PSP did less well than MSA or PD patients. These preliminary results suggest that PSP and MSA, similar to PD patients, may present normal MMSE and reduced MoCA performance. Overall, MoCA is more sensitive than MMSE in detecting cognitive impairment in atypical parkinsonism and together with verbal fluency would be a useful test to support PSP diagnosis.

  18. Degeneração walleriana de origem vascular em ressonância magnética de paciente com paralisia supranuclear progressiva provável: fator etiológico ou associação fortuita? Vascular wallerian degeneration on magnetic resonance in a patient with probable progressive supranuclear palsy: aetiology or casual link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Alves Rosa

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Paralisia supranuclear progressiva (PSP é uma das principais causas de parkinsonismo-plus não responsivo a terapia. A ocorrência de doença cerebrovascular associada a parkinsonismo não é infreqüente, no entanto é difícil estabelecer a relação causa-efeito entre ambas. Relatamos o caso de um paciente de 65 anos com PSP provável iniciada após infarto cerebral, em que a imagem por ressonância magnética evidenciou sinais de degeneração walleriana do trato córtico-espinhal. Não há relato na literatura pesquisada sobre esta possível correlação.Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is one of the most important causes of parkinsonism non responsive to therapy. Vascular parkinsonism is not uncommon. However, the cause-effect relationship between them is uncertain. We report on a 65 years old man with probable PSP who developed the clinical features of the disease after a ischaemic stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging disclosed a corticospinal tract Wallerian degeneration. There is not such an observation in the literature about this possible correlation.

  19. Horizontal gaze palsy and progressive scoliosis in a patient with congenital esotropia and inability to abduct. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Vega Cueto, A; Rodríguez-Ezcurra, J J; Rodríguez-Maiztegui, I

    2016-12-01

    The case is presented on a 4- year-old child with congenital esotropia, limitation of abduction, cross-fixation, and thoracolumbar scoliosis. Genetic testing of ROBO3 gene confirmed the diagnosis of horizontal gaze palsy and scoliosis (HGPSS) DISCUSSION: HGPPS is a rare congenital disorder characterised by absence of conjugate horizontal eye movements and progressive scoliosis developed in childhood and adolescence. We highlight this motility disorder as a part of the differential diagnosis of early childhood esotropia with cross- fixation and limitation of abduction. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of magnetic resonance planimetry and magnetic resonance parkinsonism index in discriminating Parkinson’s disease and progressive supranuclear palsy: a retrospective study based on 1.5 and 3 T MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizamani WM

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Waseem Mehmood Nizamani,1 Fatima Mubarak,1 Muhammad Danish Barakzai,1 Muhammad Saad Ahmed2 1Department of Radiology, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, 2Department of Radiology, Ziauddin University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan Objective: The objective of the study was to assess magnetic resonance (MR planimetric measurements and MR parkinsonism index (MRPI in differentiating progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP from Parkinson’s disease (PD using 1.5 and 3 T MRI scanner. Subjects and methods: After ethical approval was obtained, analysis of 34 consecutive patients with PSP, 34 patients with PD and 34 healthy controls (HCs was performed. HCs were age-matched adults without any history of neurodegenerative disease or movement disorders. Retrospective data from the past 10 years (from January 2006 to December 2015 were obtained from the Hospital Information Management System, and informed consent was obtained from all participants. The measurements of pons area–midbrain area ratio (P/M and MCP width–superior cerebellar peduncle (SCP width ratio (MCP/SCP were used, and MRPI was calculated by the formula ([P/M]×[MCP/SCP]. Results: Midbrain area and SCP width in patients with PSP (19 males, 15 females; mean age =66.7 years were significantly (P<0.001 smaller than in patients with PD (20 males, 14 females; mean age =66.7 years and control participants (17 males, 17 females; mean age =66.1 years. P/M and MCP/SCP were significantly higher in patients with PSP than in patients with PD and control participants. All measurements showed some overlap of values between patients with PSP and patients from PD group and control participants. MRPI value was significantly higher in patients with PSP (mean 21.00 than in patients with PD (mean 9.50; P<0.001 and control participants (mean 9.6; P<0.001, without any overlap of values among groups. No correlation was found between the duration of disease, PSP rating scale, PSP staging system and MRPI in

  1. Magnetic Resonance Parkinsonism Index: diagnostic accuracy of a fully automated algorithm in comparison with the manual measurement in a large Italian multicentre study in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigro, Salvatore [National Research Council, Institute of Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Catanzaro (Italy); Arabia, Gennarina [University ' ' Magna Graecia' ' , Institute of Neurology, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Catanzaro (Italy); Antonini, Angelo; Weis, Luca; Marcante, Andrea [' ' Fondazione Ospedale San Camillo' ' - I.R.C.C.S, Parkinson' s Disease and Movement Disorders Unit, Venice-Lido (Italy); Tessitore, Alessandro; Cirillo, Mario; Tedeschi, Gioacchino [Second University of Naples, Department of Medical, Surgical, Neurological, Metabolic and Aging Sciences, Naples (Italy); Second University of Naples, MRI Research Center SUN-FISM, Naples (Italy); Zanigni, Stefano; Tonon, Caterina [Policlinico S. Orsola - Malpighi, Functional MR Unit, Bologna (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, Bologna (Italy); Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna [University of Bologna, Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, Bologna (Italy); IRCCS Istituto delle Scienze Neurologiche di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Pezzoli, Gianni; Cilia, Roberto [ASST G.Pini - CTO, ex ICP, Parkinson Institute, Milano (Italy); Zappia, Mario; Nicoletti, Alessandra; Cicero, Calogero Edoardo [University of Catania, Department ' ' G.F. Ingrassia' ' , Section of Neurosciences, Catania (Italy); Tinazzi, Michele; Tocco, Pierluigi [University Hospital of Verona, Department of Neurological and Movement Sciences, Verona (Italy); Cardobi, Nicolo [University Hospital of Verona, Institute of Radiology, Verona (Italy); Quattrone, Aldo [National Research Council, Institute of Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Catanzaro (Italy); University ' ' Magna Graecia' ' , Institute of Neurology, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Catanzaro (Italy)

    2017-06-15

    To investigate the reliability of a new in-house automatic algorithm for calculating the Magnetic Resonance Parkinsonism Index (MRPI), in a large multicentre study population of patients affected by progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) or Parkinson's disease (PD), and healthy controls (HC), and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the automatic and manual MRPI values. The study included 88 PSP patients, 234 PD patients and 117 controls. MRI was performed using both 3T and 1.5T scanners. Automatic and manual MRPI values were evaluated, and accuracy of both methods in distinguishing PSP from PD and controls was calculated. No statistical differences were found between automated and manual MRPI values in all groups. The automatic MRPI values differentiated PSP from PD with an accuracy of 95 % (manual MRPI accuracy 96 %) and 97 % (manual MRPI accuracy 100 %) for 1.5T and 3T scanners, respectively. Our study showed that the new in-house automated method for MRPI calculation was highly accurate in distinguishing PSP from PD. Our automatic approach allows a widespread use of MRPI in clinical practice and in longitudinal research studies. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic Resonance Parkinsonism Index: diagnostic accuracy of a fully automated algorithm in comparison with the manual measurement in a large Italian multicentre study in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigro, Salvatore; Arabia, Gennarina; Antonini, Angelo; Weis, Luca; Marcante, Andrea; Tessitore, Alessandro; Cirillo, Mario; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Zanigni, Stefano; Tonon, Caterina; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Pezzoli, Gianni; Cilia, Roberto; Zappia, Mario; Nicoletti, Alessandra; Cicero, Calogero Edoardo; Tinazzi, Michele; Tocco, Pierluigi; Cardobi, Nicolo; Quattrone, Aldo

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the reliability of a new in-house automatic algorithm for calculating the Magnetic Resonance Parkinsonism Index (MRPI), in a large multicentre study population of patients affected by progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) or Parkinson's disease (PD), and healthy controls (HC), and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the automatic and manual MRPI values. The study included 88 PSP patients, 234 PD patients and 117 controls. MRI was performed using both 3T and 1.5T scanners. Automatic and manual MRPI values were evaluated, and accuracy of both methods in distinguishing PSP from PD and controls was calculated. No statistical differences were found between automated and manual MRPI values in all groups. The automatic MRPI values differentiated PSP from PD with an accuracy of 95 % (manual MRPI accuracy 96 %) and 97 % (manual MRPI accuracy 100 %) for 1.5T and 3T scanners, respectively. Our study showed that the new in-house automated method for MRPI calculation was highly accurate in distinguishing PSP from PD. Our automatic approach allows a widespread use of MRPI in clinical practice and in longitudinal research studies. (orig.)

  3. Novel Eye Movement Disorders in Whipple's Disease-Staircase Horizontal Saccades, Gaze-Evoked Nystagmus, and Esotropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Aasef G; Ghasia, Fatema F

    2017-01-01

    Whipple's disease, a rare systemic infectious disorder, is complicated by the involvement of the central nervous system in about 5% of cases. Oscillations of the eyes and the jaw, called oculo-masticatory myorhythmia, are pathognomonic of the central nervous system involvement but are often absent. Typical manifestations of the central nervous system Whipple's disease are cognitive impairment, parkinsonism mimicking progressive supranuclear palsy with vertical saccade slowing, and up-gaze range limitation. We describe a unique patient with the central nervous system Whipple's disease who had typical features, including parkinsonism, cognitive impairment, and up-gaze limitation; but also had diplopia, esotropia with mild horizontal (abduction more than adduction) limitation, and vertigo. The patient also had gaze-evoked nystagmus and staircase horizontal saccades. Latter were thought to be due to mal-programmed small saccades followed by a series of corrective saccades. The saccades were disconjugate due to the concurrent strabismus. Also, we noted disconjugacy in the slow phase of gaze-evoked nystagmus. The disconjugacy of the slow phase of gaze-evoked nystagmus was larger during monocular viewing condition. We propose that interaction of the strabismic drifts of the covered eyes and the nystagmus drift, putatively at the final common pathway might lead to such disconjugacy.

  4. Novel Eye Movement Disorders in Whipple’s Disease—Staircase Horizontal Saccades, Gaze-Evoked Nystagmus, and Esotropia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aasef G. Shaikh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Whipple’s disease, a rare systemic infectious disorder, is complicated by the involvement of the central nervous system in about 5% of cases. Oscillations of the eyes and the jaw, called oculo-masticatory myorhythmia, are pathognomonic of the central nervous system involvement but are often absent. Typical manifestations of the central nervous system Whipple’s disease are cognitive impairment, parkinsonism mimicking progressive supranuclear palsy with vertical saccade slowing, and up-gaze range limitation. We describe a unique patient with the central nervous system Whipple’s disease who had typical features, including parkinsonism, cognitive impairment, and up-gaze limitation; but also had diplopia, esotropia with mild horizontal (abduction more than adduction limitation, and vertigo. The patient also had gaze-evoked nystagmus and staircase horizontal saccades. Latter were thought to be due to mal-programmed small saccades followed by a series of corrective saccades. The saccades were disconjugate due to the concurrent strabismus. Also, we noted disconjugacy in the slow phase of gaze-evoked nystagmus. The disconjugacy of the slow phase of gaze-evoked nystagmus was larger during monocular viewing condition. We propose that interaction of the strabismic drifts of the covered eyes and the nystagmus drift, putatively at the final common pathway might lead to such disconjugacy.

  5. Conjugate Gaze Palsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Study ALL NEWS > Resources First Aid Videos Figures 3D Models Images Infographics Audio Pronunciations The One-Page Manual of Health Quizzes ... Commentary ALL NEWS > Resources First Aid Videos Figures 3D Models Images Infographics Audio Pronunciations The One-Page Manual of Health Quizzes ...

  6. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Misdiagnosed as Parkinson's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    visual disturbance, drooling of saliva, and slurred speech of. 7‑years duration. There were associated “messy” eating, ... and tremor) and sensory system examinations. Cerebellar signs were also absent. His blood pressure ... impairment (mainly memory and calculation). Glabella and palmomental reflex as well as “aplause ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: progressive supranuclear palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... slow and slurred speech (dysarthria) and trouble swallowing (dysphagia). Most affected individuals also experience changes in personality ... Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related Information How are genetic conditions diagnosed? How ...

  8. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP): Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clump. Another example of post-translational modification of relevance to PSP is “transglutamination,” where the amino acid ... join? See our support group page here. The value of membership in a group of other people ...

  9. A case of complete lateral gaze paralysis and facial diplegia: the 16 syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Robert; Ngan, Vincci; Howard, Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    We describe a patient with complete, bilateral horizontal gaze palsies and facial diplegia caused by a midline tegmental pontine hemorrhage. The term "16 syndrome" (7 + 7 + ½ + ½ + ½ + ½ = 16) describes this combination of clinical findings.

  10. Specific magnetic resonance imaging findings in patient with progressive supranuciear palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuchkova, R.; Zlatareva, D.

    2013-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. The clinical symptoms are vertical supranuclear palsy, gait and postural instability, cognitive deficit, Parkinsonism. It is not always possible to differentiate clinically PSP from other atypical Parkinsonian syndromes and from Parkinson disease. We present a case of 56-years old women with clinically suspected PSP. The typical magnetic resonance findings were of most importance in diagnosis. For diagnosing the disease by means of neuroimaging it is necessary to analyze the sagittal MR images what is achievable in daily routine practice without additional software and post processing. (authors)

  11. Ubiquitous gaze: using gaze at the interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Aghajan, Hamid; López-Cózar Delgado, Ramón; Augusto, Juan Carlos

    2010-01-01

    In the quest for more natural forms of interaction between humans and machines, information on where someone is looking and how (for how long, with long or shorter gaze periods) plays a prominent part. The importance of gaze in social interaction, its manifold functions and expressive force, and the

  12. Gaze beats mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateo, Julio C.; San Agustin, Javier; Hansen, John Paulin

    2008-01-01

    Facial EMG for selection is fast, easy and, combined with gaze pointing, it can provide completely hands-free interaction. In this pilot study, 5 participants performed a simple point-and-select task using mouse or gaze for pointing and a mouse button or a facial-EMG switch for selection. Gaze po...

  13. Gazes and Performances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jonas

    defending the tourist gaze against this new performance turn, I rethink the concept of the tourist gaze as a performative and embodied practice and interaction by highlighting how each gaze depends on practices, interactions and material relations, as much as on discourses and signs. Through various...

  14. Single gaze gestures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllenbach, Emilie; Lilholm, Martin; Gail, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines gaze gestures and their applicability as a generic selection method for gaze-only controlled interfaces. The method explored here is the Single Gaze Gesture (SGG), i.e. gestures consisting of a single point-to-point eye movement. Horizontal and vertical, long and short SGGs were...

  15. Gaze Tracking Through Smartphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsgaard, Henrik; Hansen, John Paulin; Møllenbach, Emilie

    Mobile gaze trackers embedded in smartphones or tablets provide a powerful personal link to game devices, head-mounted micro-displays, pc´s, and TV’s. This link may offer a main road to the mass market for gaze interaction, we suggest.......Mobile gaze trackers embedded in smartphones or tablets provide a powerful personal link to game devices, head-mounted micro-displays, pc´s, and TV’s. This link may offer a main road to the mass market for gaze interaction, we suggest....

  16. Gaze beats mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateo, Julio C.; San Agustin, Javier; Hansen, John Paulin

    2008-01-01

    Facial EMG for selection is fast, easy and, combined with gaze pointing, it can provide completely hands-free interaction. In this pilot study, 5 participants performed a simple point-and-select task using mouse or gaze for pointing and a mouse button or a facial-EMG switch for selection. Gaze...... pointing was faster than mouse pointing, while maintaining a similar error rate. EMG and mouse-button selection had a comparable performance. From analyses of completion time, throughput and error rates, we concluded that the combination of gaze and facial EMG holds potential for outperforming the mouse....

  17. Gaze interaction from bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, John Paulin; San Agustin, Javier; Jensen, Henrik Tomra Skovsgaard Hegner

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a low-cost gaze tracking solution for bedbound people composed of free-ware tracking software and commodity hardware. Gaze interaction is done on a large wall-projected image, visible to all people present in the room. The hardware equipment leaves physical space free to assist...... the person. Accuracy and precision of the tracking system was tested in an experiment with 12 subjects. We obtained a tracking quality that is sufficiently good to control applications designed for gaze interaction. The best tracking condition were achieved when people were sitting up compared to lying down...

  18. Bell's Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of facial paralysis. It usually affects just one side of the ... become inflamed. You are most likely to get Bell's palsy if you are pregnant, diabetic or sick with ...

  19. Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  20. Gaze as a biometric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hong-Jun [ORNL; Carmichael, Tandy [Tennessee Technological University; Tourassi, Georgia [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Two people may analyze a visual scene in two completely different ways. Our study sought to determine whether human gaze may be used to establish the identity of an individual. To accomplish this objective we investigated the gaze pattern of twelve individuals viewing different still images with different spatial relationships. Specifically, we created 5 visual dot-pattern tests to be shown on a standard computer monitor. These tests challenged the viewer s capacity to distinguish proximity, alignment, and perceptual organization. Each test included 50 images of varying difficulty (total of 250 images). Eye-tracking data were collected from each individual while taking the tests. The eye-tracking data were converted into gaze velocities and analyzed with Hidden Markov Models to develop personalized gaze profiles. Using leave-one-out cross-validation, we observed that these personalized profiles could differentiate among the 12 users with classification accuracy ranging between 53% and 76%, depending on the test. This was statistically significantly better than random guessing (i.e., 8.3% or 1 out of 12). Classification accuracy was higher for the tests where the users average gaze velocity per case was lower. The study findings support the feasibility of using gaze as a biometric or personalized biomarker. These findings could have implications in Radiology training and the development of personalized e-learning environments.

  1. Gaze following and gaze priming in lemurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, April; Gómez, Juan Carlos; Roeder, Jean Jacques; Byrne, Richard W

    2009-05-01

    Although primates have often been found to co-orient visually with other individuals, members of these same species have usually failed to use co-orientation to find hidden food in object-choice experiments. This presents an evolutionary puzzle: what is the function of co-orientation if it is not used for a function as basic as locating resources? Co-orientation responses have not been systematically investigated in object-choice experiments, and requiring co-orientation with humans (as is typical in object-choice tasks) may underestimate other species' abilities. Using an object-choice task with conspecific models depicted in photographs, we provide experimental evidence that two lemur species (Eulemur fulvus, n = 4, and Eulemur macaco, n = 2) co-orient with conspecifics. Secondly, by analysing together two measures that have traditionally been examined separately, we show that lemurs' gaze following behaviour and ultimate choice are closely linked. Individuals were more likely to choose correctly after having looked in the same direction as the model, and thus chose objects correctly more often than chance. We propose a candidate system for the evolutionary origins of more complex gaze following: 'gaze priming.'

  2. Auto-Calibrated Gaze Estimation Using Human Gaze Patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alnajar, F.; Gevers, T.; Valenti, R.; Ghebreab, S.

    We present a novel method to auto-calibrate gaze estimators based on gaze patterns obtained from other viewers. Our method is based on the observation that the gaze patterns of humans are indicative of where a new viewer will look at. When a new viewer is looking at a stimulus, we first estimate a

  3. Intraoperative adjustable suture surgery for bilateral superior oblique palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, H; Hasebe, S; Hanabusa, K; Fujimoto, Y; Furuse, T

    1994-01-01

    The modified Harada-Ito procedure has been reported to be an effective treatment for correction of cyclotorsion in bilateral superior oblique palsy. However, there are no reports regarding its use in intraoperative adjustable suture surgery. The authors performed a retrospective study of 12 patients with traumatic bilateral superior oblique palsy who were classified as having either symmetric or asymmetric palsy according to the symmetry of the alternate hyperdeviation on side gazes. Cyclotorsion and vertical and horizontal deviation in the nine diagnostic positions were measured preoperatively and postoperatively. Of the 12 patients, 6 were determined to have symmetric palsy and 6 asymmetric palsy. Intraoperative adjustable suture surgery with the modified Harada-Ito procedure was performed bilaterally in the six patients with symmetric palsy and unilaterally in those with asymmetric palsy. The median measured value of extorsion in the primary position was reduced from 14.5 degrees to 2.5 degrees in patients with symmetric palsy and from 9.5 degrees to 2.0 degrees in those with asymmetric palsy. In downgaze, some degree of residual extorsion remained, and there was no significant change in esodeviation after surgery. In five patients with symmetric palsy and in all of those with asymmetric palsy, normal single binocular vision in the primary position but did not that in downgaze was restored after surgery. Intraoperative adjustable suture surgery is an effective treatment in correcting torsion, but may not be as effective for esodeviation in downgaze.

  4. Gazing and Performing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jonas; Urry, John

    2011-01-01

    -saturated nature of tourism encounters. However, some recent literature has critiqued this notion of the ‘tourist gaze’ for reducing tourism to visual experiences—to sightseeing—and neglecting the other senses, bodily experiences, and ‘adventure’. The influential ‘performance turn’ within tourist studies suggests......The Tourist Gaze [Urry J, 1990 (Sage, London)] is one of the most discussed and cited tourism books (with about 4000 citations on Google scholar). Whilst wide ranging in scope, the book is known for the Foucault-inspired concept of the tourist gaze that brings out the fundamentally visual and image...... that the doings of tourism are physical or corporeal and not merely visual, and it is necessary to regard ‘performing’ rather than ‘gazing’ as the dominant tourist research paradigm. Yet we argue here that there are, in fact, many similarities between the paradigms of gaze and of performance. They should ‘dance...

  5. A GazeWatch Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulin Hansen, John; Biermann, Florian; Møllenbach, Emile

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate potentials of adding a gaze tracking unit to a smartwatch, allowing hands-free interaction with the watch itself and control of the environment. Users give commands via gaze gestures, i.e. looking away and back to the GazeWatch. Rapid presentation of single words on the watch displ...

  6. The Epistemology of the Gaze

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Mette

    2007-01-01

    In psycho-semiotic film theory the gaze is often considered to be a straitjacket for the female spectator. If we approach the gaze from an empiric so-called ‘naturalised’ lens, it is possible to regard the gaze as a functional devise through which the spectator can obtain knowledge essential for ...

  7. Eye Movements in Gaze Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllenbach, Emilie; Hansen, John Paulin; Lillholm, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Gaze as a sole input modality must support complex navigation and selection tasks. Gaze interaction combines specific eye movements and graphic display objects (GDOs). This paper suggests a unifying taxonomy of gaze interaction principles. The taxonomy deals with three types of eye movements...

  8. Gaze-controlled Driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tall, Martin; Alapetite, Alexandre; San Agustin, Javier

    2009-01-01

    We investigate if the gaze (point of regard) can control a remote vehicle driving on a racing track. Five different input devices (on-screen buttons, mouse-pointing low-cost webcam eye tracker and two commercial eye tracking systems) provide heading and speed control on the scene view transmitted...

  9. Gaze Interactive Building Instructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, John Paulin; Ahmed, Zaheer; Mardanbeigi, Diako

    We combine eye tracking technology and mobile tablets to support hands-free interaction with digital building instructions. As a proof-of-concept we have developed a small interactive 3D environment where one can interact with digital blocks by gaze, keystroke and head gestures. Blocks may be moved...

  10. EYE GAZE TRACKING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of performing eye gaze tracking of at least one eye of a user, by determining the position of the center of the eye, said method comprising the steps of: detecting the position of at least three reflections on said eye, transforming said positions to spanning...... a normalized coordinate system spanning a frame of reference, wherein said transformation is performed based on a bilinear transformation or a non linear transformation e.g. a möbius transformation or a homographic transformation, detecting the position of said center of the eye relative to the position...... of said reflections and transforming this position to said normalized coordinate system, tracking the eye gaze by tracking the movement of said eye in said normalized coordinate system. Thereby calibration of a camera, such as knowledge of the exact position and zoom level of the camera, is avoided...

  11. Demo of Gaze Controlled Flying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alapetite, Alexandre; Hansen, John Paulin; Scott MacKenzie, I.

    2012-01-01

    Development of a control paradigm for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) is a new challenge to HCI. The demo explores how to use gaze as input for locomotion in 3D. A low-cost drone will be controlled by tracking user’s point of regard (gaze) on a live video stream from the UAV.......Development of a control paradigm for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) is a new challenge to HCI. The demo explores how to use gaze as input for locomotion in 3D. A low-cost drone will be controlled by tracking user’s point of regard (gaze) on a live video stream from the UAV....

  12. A GAZE TRACKER AND A GAZE TRACKING METHOD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A gaze tracker and a computer-implemented method for gaze tracking, comprising the steps of: recording video images of a being's eye such that an eye pupil and a glint on the eye ball caused by a light source () are recorded; processing the video images to compute an offset between the position...

  13. Gaze holding in healthy subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Bertolini

    Full Text Available Eccentric gaze in darkness evokes minor centripetal eye drifts in healthy subjects, as cerebellar control sufficiently compensates for the inherent deficiencies of the brainstem gaze-holding network. This behavior is commonly described using a leaky integrator model, which assumes that eye velocity grows linearly with gaze eccentricity. Results from previous studies in patients and healthy subjects suggest caution when this assumption is applied to eye eccentricities larger than 20 degrees. To obtain a detailed characterization of the centripetal gaze-evoked drift, we recorded horizontal eye position in 20 healthy subjects. With their head fixed, they were asked to fixate a flashing dot (50 ms every 2 sthat was quasi-stationary displacing(0.5 deg/s between ± 40 deg horizontally in otherwise complete darkness. Drift velocity was weak at all angles tested. Linearity was assessed by dividing the range of gaze eccentricity in four bins of 20 deg each, and comparing the slopes of a linear function fitted to the horizontal velocity in each bin. The slopes of single subjects for gaze eccentricities of ± 0-20 deg were, in median,0.41 times the slopes obtained for gaze eccentricities of ± 20-40 deg. By smoothing the individual subjects' eye velocity as a function of gaze eccentricity, we derived a population of position-velocity curves. We show that a tangent function provides a better fit to the mean of these curves when large eccentricities are considered. This implies that the quasi-linear behavior within the typical ocular motor range is the result of a tuning procedure, which is optimized in the most commonly used range of gaze. We hypothesize that the observed non-linearity at eccentric gaze results from a saturation of the input that each neuron in the integrating network receives from the others. As a consequence, gaze-holding performance declines more rapidly at large eccentricities.

  14. Gaze Holding in Healthy Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, Giovanni; Tarnutzer, Alexander A.; Olasagasti, Itsaso; Khojasteh, Elham; Weber, Konrad P.; Bockisch, Christopher J.; Straumann, Dominik; Marti, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Eccentric gaze in darkness evokes minor centripetal eye drifts in healthy subjects, as cerebellar control sufficiently compensates for the inherent deficiencies of the brainstem gaze-holding network. This behavior is commonly described using a leaky integrator model, which assumes that eye velocity grows linearly with gaze eccentricity. Results from previous studies in patients and healthy subjects suggest caution when this assumption is applied to eye eccentricities larger than 20 degrees. To obtain a detailed characterization of the centripetal gaze-evoked drift, we recorded horizontal eye position in 20 healthy subjects. With their head fixed, they were asked to fixate a flashing dot (50 ms every 2 s)that was quasi-stationary displacing(0.5 deg/s) between ±40 deg horizontally in otherwise complete darkness. Drift velocity was weak at all angles tested. Linearity was assessed by dividing the range of gaze eccentricity in four bins of 20 deg each, and comparing the slopes of a linear function fitted to the horizontal velocity in each bin. The slopes of single subjects for gaze eccentricities of ±0−20 deg were, in median,0.41 times the slopes obtained for gaze eccentricities of ±20−40 deg. By smoothing the individual subjects' eye velocity as a function of gaze eccentricity, we derived a population of position-velocity curves. We show that a tangent function provides a better fit to the mean of these curves when large eccentricities are considered. This implies that the quasi-linear behavior within the typical ocular motor range is the result of a tuning procedure, which is optimized in the most commonly used range of gaze. We hypothesize that the observed non-linearity at eccentric gaze results from a saturation of the input that each neuron in the integrating network receives from the others. As a consequence, gaze-holding performance declines more rapidly at large eccentricities. PMID:23637824

  15. Bell's Palsy Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Bell's Palsy Sections What Is Bell's Palsy? Bell's Palsy Symptoms Bell's Palsy Treatment Bell's Palsy Treatment Leer en Español: Tratamiento de la parálisis ...

  16. Bell's Palsy Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Bell's Palsy Sections What Is Bell's Palsy? Bell's Palsy Symptoms Bell's Palsy Treatment Bell's Palsy Symptoms Leer en Español: Síntomas de la parálisis ...

  17. United Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your local affiliate Find your local affiliate United Cerebral Palsy United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is a trusted resource for individuals with Cerebral Palsy and other disabilities and their networks. Individuals with ...

  18. Clinical diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy: The movement disorder society criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglinger, Günter U; Respondek, Gesine; Stamelou, Maria; Kurz, Carolin; Josephs, Keith A; Lang, Anthony E; Mollenhauer, Brit; Müller, Ulrich; Nilsson, Christer; Whitwell, Jennifer L; Arzberger, Thomas; Englund, Elisabet; Gelpi, Ellen; Giese, Armin; Irwin, David J; Meissner, Wassilios G; Pantelyat, Alexander; Rajput, Alex; van Swieten, John C; Troakes, Claire; Antonini, Angelo; Bhatia, Kailash P; Bordelon, Yvette; Compta, Yaroslau; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Colosimo, Carlo; Dickson, Dennis W; Dodel, Richard; Ferguson, Leslie; Grossman, Murray; Kassubek, Jan; Krismer, Florian; Levin, Johannes; Lorenzl, Stefan; Morris, Huw R; Nestor, Peter; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Poewe, Werner; Rabinovici, Gil; Rowe, James B; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Seppi, Klaus; van Eimeren, Thilo; Wenning, Gregor K; Boxer, Adam L; Golbe, Lawrence I; Litvan, Irene

    2017-06-01

    PSP is a neuropathologically defined disease entity. Clinical diagnostic criteria, published in 1996 by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke/Society for PSP, have excellent specificity, but their sensitivity is limited for variant PSP syndromes with presentations other than Richardson's syndrome. We aimed to provide an evidence- and consensus-based revision of the clinical diagnostic criteria for PSP. We searched the PubMed, Cochrane, Medline, and PSYCInfo databases for articles published in English since 1996, using postmortem diagnosis or highly specific clinical criteria as the diagnostic standard. Second, we generated retrospective standardized clinical data from patients with autopsy-confirmed PSP and control diseases. On this basis, diagnostic criteria were drafted, optimized in two modified Delphi evaluations, submitted to structured discussions with consensus procedures during a 2-day meeting, and refined in three further Delphi rounds. Defined clinical, imaging, laboratory, and genetic findings serve as mandatory basic features, mandatory exclusion criteria, or context-dependent exclusion criteria. We identified four functional domains (ocular motor dysfunction, postural instability, akinesia, and cognitive dysfunction) as clinical predictors of PSP. Within each of these domains, we propose three clinical features that contribute different levels of diagnostic certainty. Specific combinations of these features define the diagnostic criteria, stratified by three degrees of diagnostic certainty (probable PSP, possible PSP, and suggestive of PSP). Clinical clues and imaging findings represent supportive features. Here, we present new criteria aimed to optimize early, sensitive, and specific clinical diagnosis of PSP on the basis of currently available evidence. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  19. Gait and Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP Aspects in Early Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douaa M. Mosalem

    2014-12-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Both CDP and gait analysis are important quantitative tools in the assessment of posture and gait instability as well as allow for early disclosure of the failure of the postural control system in early PSP.

  20. Davunetide for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxer, Adam L.; Lang, Anthony E.; Grossman, Murray; Knopman, David S.; Miller, Bruce L.; Schneider, Lon S.; Doody, Rachelle S.; Lees, Andrew; Golbe, Lawrence I.; Williams, David R.; Corvol, Jean-Cristophe; Ludolph, Albert; Burn, David; Lorenzl, Stefan; Litvan, Irene; Roberson, Erik D.; Höglinger, Günter U.; Koestler, Mary; Jack, Clifford R.; Van Deerlin, Viviana; Randolph, Christopher; Lobach, Iryna V.; Heuer, Hilary W.; Gozes, Illana; Parker, Lesley; Whitaker, Steve; Hirman, Joe; Stewart, Alistair J.; Gold, Michael; Morimoto, Bruce H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Davunetide (AL-108, NAP) is an eightamino acid peptide that promotes microtubule stability and decreases tau phosphorylation in pre-clinical studies. Since PSP is tightly linked to tau pathology, davunetide could be an effective treatment for PSP.The goals of this study were to evaluate the efficacy and safety of davunetide in PSP. Methods A phase 2/3 double-blind, parallel group, clinical trial of davunetide 30 mg or placebo (randomized 1:1) administered intranasally twice daily for 52 weeks was conducted at 48centers. Participants met modifiedNNIPPS criteria for possible or probable PSP. Co-primary endpointswere the change from baseline in PSP Rating Scale (PSPRS) and Schwab and England ADL(SEADL) scale at up to 52 weeks. Data from all individuals who received at least one dose of medication and had a post-baseline efficacy assessment were compared using a rank-based method.Secondary outcomes included the Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGIC) and the change in regional brain volumeon MRI. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01110720. Findings 360 participants were screened, 313 were randomized and 243 (77.6%) completed the study. There were no group differences in PSPRS (mean difference: 0.49 [95% CI: −1.5, 2.5], p = 0.72) or SEADL (1% [−2, 4%], p = 0.76) change from baseline (CFB) and mean 52 week CFB PSPRS scores were similar between the davunetide (11.3 [9.8,12.8]) and placebo groups (10.9 [9.1, 13.0]). There wereno differences in any of the secondary or exploratory endpoints. There were 11deaths in the davunetide group and tenin the placebo group. There were more nasal adverse events in the davunetide group. Interpretation Davunetide is well tolerated but is not an effective treatment for PSP. Clinical trials of disease modifying therapy are feasible in PSP and should be pursued with other promising tau-directed therapies. Funding Allon Therapeutics PMID:24873720

  1. Genetics Home Reference: horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eyes to track moving objects. Up-and-down (vertical) eye movements are typically normal. In people with ... Shattuck DW, Hageman N, Rüb U, Salamon N, Drain AE, Demer JL, Engle EC, Alger JR, Baloh ...

  2. Cerebral palsy characterization by estimating ocular motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Jully; Atehortúa, Angélica; Moncayo, Ricardo; Romero, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a large group of motion and posture disorders caused during the fetal or infant brain development. Sensorial impairment is commonly found in children with CP, i.e., between 40-75 percent presents some form of vision problems or disabilities. An automatic characterization of the cerebral palsy is herein presented by estimating the ocular motion during a gaze pursuing task. Specifically, After automatically detecting the eye location, an optical flow algorithm tracks the eye motion following a pre-established visual assignment. Subsequently, the optical flow trajectories are characterized in the velocity-acceleration phase plane. Differences are quantified in a small set of patients between four to ten years.

  3. Bell's Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick G Meloy, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Audience: Emergency medicine residents and medical students on emergency medicine rotations. Introduction: This oral board review case tests the resident’s ability to differentiate between benign and life-threatening causes of acute facial paralysis. Bell’s Palsy is a peripheral facial nerve palsy with a prevalence of 15-40 per 100,000.1The diagnosis is mainly clinical, based on focused history and thorough neurologic examination, particularly of the cranial nerves. The etiology is unknown; viral reactivation is suspected to be the culprit in the majority of cases and is the target of current therapy, although alternate etiologies of peripheral facial paralysis should be ruled out. The primary objective of the emergency physician is to rule out life-threatening and function-threatening etiologies of facial nerve paralysis (eg, cerebrovascular accident, initiate conservative management, and coordinate appropriate follow-up. Objectives: At the end of this oral boards session, examinees will: 1 Demonstrate ability to perform a thorough neurologic examination including full cranial nerve exam, National Institutes of Health (NIH stroke scale assessment, strength and sensation and reflex testing, pronator drift, speech repetition. 2 Differentiate between Bell’s Palsy and acute stroke with facial paralysis. 3 List appropriate laboratory testing for a case of peripheral facial nerve paralysis (basic metabolic panel [BMP]; complete blood count [CBC]; coagulation studies if considering lumbar puncture; human immunodeficiency virus (HIV test if high-risk by history, or if bilateral; Lyme titer if in endemic area, or if bilateral. 4 Select appropriate treatments (steroids, eye lubricant and patch, PCP referral for peripheral facial nerve paralysis. Methods: Oral boards case Topics: Paralysis, Bell’s palsy, facial nerve paralysis, Lyme disease, viral syndrome, neurologic emergency

  4. Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus With Sixth Cranial Nerve Palsy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Balcı

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Scientific BACKGROUND: Herpes zoster ophthalmicus represents aproximately 25% of all zoster infections. However extraocular gaze palsy in association with herpes zoster infection is extremely rare. OBJECTIVE: We presented here a patient who had herpes zoster ophthalmicus with sixth cranial nerve palsy. CASE: The sixty year old patient had suffered from left retroorbital pain, conjunctival congestion and rashes on the left forehead and the nose and developed ipsilateral sixth cranial nerve palsy. RESULT: Herpes zoster virus infection should be taken into consideration in patients with extraocular paralysis and early treatment may prevent such complications

  5. Isolated sixth nerve palsy from hemorrhage of a pontine cavernous malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallery, Robert M; Klein, Joshua P; Pless, Misha L

    2012-12-01

    A 32-year-old woman who developed binocular horizontal diplopia was found to have an isolated fascicular sixth nerve palsy secondary to hemorrhage of a cavernous malformation within the left pontine tegmentum. There was sparing of the paramedian pontine reticular formation and absence of a horizontal gaze palsy. The natural history of cavernous malformations and a mechanism by which hemorrhage of these vascular lesions may produce minimal neurologic signs, including isolated ocular motor cranial nerve palsies, is discussed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that includes susceptibility-weighted sequences leads to their accurate diagnosis.

  6. La estria supranuclear de las células ciliadas en la rinitis alérgica Supranuclear stria of ciliated cells in allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Zerdiew

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron 80 pacientes adultos alérgicos, que cursaron con los siguientes cuadros clínicos: 16 casos de rinitis intermitente y 64 de rinitis persistente. Se realizó el recuento porcentual de la estría supranuclear de las células ciliadas, respecto de los leucocitos presentes en los extendidos obtenidos por toma endonasal. Con los datos obtenidos se clasificaron los extendidos en 4 grupos; Grupo A (N=23: predominio leucocitario eosinófilo con eosinofilia nasal >10%, Grupo B (N=15: abundantes leucocitos neutrófilos y eosinofilia nasal >10%, Grupo C (N=29: con escasos leucocitos, Grupo D (N=13: con abundantes leucocitos de predominio neutrófilo sin eosinofilia. Se observó que el incremento porcentual de estría supranuclear se correlacionó con eosinofilia nasal >10% y con las muestras que presentaron escasos leucocitos. Sin embargo se evidenció una marcada disminución del porcentaje de estría supranuclear en la leucocitosis neutrófila de etiología bacteriana.Nasal secretions were studied in 80 allergic adults patients: 16 with intermittent rhinitis and 64 with persistent rhinitis. The percentage of supranuclear stria of ciliated cells with regard to leucocytes was studied by nasal scraping. Four groups of patients were classified according to nasal leucocytic predominance: patients with eosinophilic predominance with eosinophils > 10% in Group A (N=23, patients with abundant neutrophils and eosinophils >10% in Group B (N=15, patients with scant leucocytes in Group C (N=29, patients with neutrophilic predominance without eosinophils in Group D (N=13. An increase of supranuclear stria percentage was correlated to eosinophils > 10% and also correlated to scant leucocytes. Nevertheless, a significant decrease of supranuclear stria percentage was observed in neutrophilic leukocytosis of bacterial etiology.

  7. Bell's Palsy (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Bell's Palsy KidsHealth / For Kids / Bell's Palsy What's in this ... usually goes away on its own. What Is Bell's Palsy? Bell's palsy weakens or paralyzes the muscles on ...

  8. Bell's Palsy (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Bell's Palsy KidsHealth / For Teens / Bell's Palsy What's in this ... Print en español Parálisis de Bell What Is Bell's Palsy? Bell's palsy is a temporary weakness or paralysis ...

  9. Eye Gaze in Creative Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Michiko; Mesch, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the role of eye gaze in creative sign language. Because eye gaze conveys various types of linguistic and poetic information, it is an intrinsic part of sign language linguistics in general and of creative signing in particular. We discuss various functions of eye gaze in poetic signing and propose a classification of gaze…

  10. Gaze Direction Detection in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgeot d'Arc, Baudouin; Delorme, Richard; Zalla, Tiziana; Lefebvre, Aline; Amsellem, Frédérique; Moukawane, Sanaa; Letellier, Laurence; Leboyer, Marion; Mouren, Marie-Christine; Ramus, Franck

    2017-01-01

    Detecting where our partners direct their gaze is an important aspect of social interaction. An atypical gaze processing has been reported in autism. However, it remains controversial whether children and adults with autism spectrum disorder interpret indirect gaze direction with typical accuracy. This study investigated whether the detection of…

  11. Making Agents Gaze Naturally. Does it work?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Es, Ivo; De Marsico, M.; Levialdi, S.; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Panizzi, E.; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effects of varying eye gaze behavior of an embodied conversational agent on the quality of human-agent dialogues. In an experiment we compared three versions of an agent: one with gaze behavior that is typically found to occur in human-human dialogues, one with gaze that is fixed

  12. Mobile gaze input system for pervasive interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A mobile gaze-tracking system is provided. The user operates the system by looking at the gaze tracking unit and at pre-defined regions at the fringe of the tracking unit. The gaze tracking unit may be placed on a smartwatch, a wristband, or woven into a sleeve of a garment. The unit provides...

  13. Referent expressions and gaze: reference type influences real-world gaze cue utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Ross G; Tatler, Benjamin W

    2015-04-01

    Gaze cues are used alongside language to communicate. Lab-based studies have shown that people reflexively follow gaze cue stimuli, however it is unclear whether this affect is present in real interactions. Language specificity influences the extent to which we utilize gaze cues in real interactions, but it is unclear whether the type of language used can similarly affect gaze cue utilization. We aimed to (a) investigate whether automatic gaze following effects are present in real-world interactions, and (b) explore how gaze cue utilization varies depending on the form of concurrent language used. Wearing a mobile eye-tracker, participants followed instructions to complete a real-world search task. The instructor varied the determiner used (featural or spatial) and the presence of gaze cues (absent, congruent, or incongruent). Congruent gaze cues were used more when provided alongside featural references. Incongruent gaze cues were initially followed no more than chance. However, unlike participants in the no-gaze condition, participants in the incongruent condition did not benefit from receiving spatial instructions over featural instructions. We suggest that although participants selectively use informative gaze cues and ignore unreliable gaze cues, visual search can nevertheless be disrupted when inherently spatial gaze cues are accompanied by contradictory verbal spatial references. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. Creating Gaze Annotations in Head Mounted Displays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardanbeigi, Diako; Qvarfordt, Pernilla

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate distributed communication in mobile settings, we developed GazeNote for creating and sharing gaze annotations in head mounted displays (HMDs). With gaze annotations it possible to point out objects of interest within an image and add a verbal description. To create an annota- tion......, the user simply captures an image using the HMD’s camera, looks at an object of interest in the image, and speaks out the information to be associated with the object. The gaze location is recorded and visualized with a marker. The voice is transcribed using speech recognition. Gaze annotations can...... be shared. Our study showed that users found that gaze annotations add precision and expressive- ness compared to annotations of the image as a whole...

  15. Use of eye-pointing by children with cerebral palsy: what are we looking at?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Jenefer; Clarke, Michael; Price, Katie; Griffiths, Tom; Swettenham, John

    2013-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy often show significant communication impairment due to limited or absent speech. Further, motor impairment can restrict the use of movement, including pointing, to signal interest and intent. For some children, controlled gaze can be an effective 'point-substitute': such 'eye-pointing' can be used to request items, establish mutual interest in an event, or select vocabulary within an alternative or augmentative communication (ACC) system. However, in clinical practice there is a lack of clarity about how the term 'eye-pointing' is used, how 'eye-pointing' is recognized or how it relates to social development. To present a clinical description of the term 'eye-pointing' with reference to children with severe cerebral palsy who cannot speak or finger-point. To consider this description within a wider discussion of the importance of gaze in communication development. Cumulative clinical observations during assessment of children referred to a specialist multidisciplinary communication clinic have provoked discussion between the authors on what factors precipitate use of the term 'eye-pointing' in young children with severe cerebral palsy. In particular, discussion has centred on whether use of the term is appropriate in individual cases and whether guidance is available about how gaze should be observed in this developmentally vulnerable group of children. A literature search was also conducted in order to explore whether the use and meaning of the term is established. In interactions with non-speaking children, determining whether a child is using eye-gaze communicatively requires observation and interpretation of several factors. These processes will be informed by reflection on what is known about other aspects of the child's communication and interaction skills. Within the literature, the term 'eye-pointing' is sometimes used when describing the communication functions of individuals using augmentative and alternative communication

  16. Cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Ruth M

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy affects movement and posture causing activity limitation; it is a lifelong condition, with foreseeable complications. There are evidence-based interventions that will prevent participation restriction. Childhood interventions are generally delivered within multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs. Sadly young adults are often not transferred to an appropriate multidisciplinary adult neurodisability service. An unexplained neurological deterioration should warrant further investigation. Pain is an important underreported symptom and musculoskeletal complaints are prevalent. Disabled adults have less participation socially, in employment, marriage, and independent living related to health problems, discrimination, or lack of access to information, support, and equipment. Evidence-based interventions include a variety of modalities at all International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health levels to include support and adaptations. Rehabilitation interventions that have been shown to be effective include surgery in childhood, ankle-foot orthoses, strength training, and electrical stimulation. Management of spasticity is beneficial and has an evidence base. Orthotics and casting are also used. Systematic reviews of upper limb therapies also show the benefit of physical therapy exercise, strengthening, fitness training, and constraint therapy. Occupational therapy has a weaker evidence base than in other disabling conditions but many modalities are transferable. Speech therapy is effective although no specific intervention is better. Psychological wellbeing interventions, including improving self-efficacy, health knowledge, and coping skills, are beneficial. Management of continence, nutrition, and fatigue promote wellbeing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Augmented superior rectus transposition procedure in Duane retraction syndrome compared with sixth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mohammadreza; Shomali, Setareh; Mirmohammadsadeghi, Arash; Fard, Masoud Aghsaei

    2018-01-03

    Superior rectus transposition (SRT) with medial rectus recession has been used for the treatment of sixth nerve palsy and esotropic Duane retraction syndrome (DRS). The purpose of this study was to compare the results of augmented SRT (with scleral fixation) without medial rectus recession in DRS and sixth nerve palsy. Patients with unilateral esotropic DRS (DRS group) and sixth nerve palsy were included in this prospective, comparative study and underwent SRT. Preoperative forced duction testing was negative or slightly positive in both groups. Prospective measurements were compared between the two groups. There were 11 patients in the DRS group and 11 patients in the sixth nerve palsy group. The mean preoperative esotropia decreased from 20.9 ± 6.0 prism diopter (PD) at far to 13.2 ± 5.8 PD in the DRS group (P = 0.003). The same measurement improved from 28.0 ± 8.5 PD to 8.4 ± 7.3 PD in the sixth nerve palsy group (P = 0.003). In the sixth nerve palsy group, the improvement in primary gaze esotropia and abnormal head posture was more than the DRS group (Both P sixth nerve palsy group. Although objective intorsion was significantly induced after SRT, subjective torsion was not significant after surgery in both groups. SRT appears to be more effective in improving primary gaze deviation and head posture in sixth nerve palsy compared with DRS. Subjective torsional and vertical diplopia were rare in both groups.

  18. A direct link between gaze perception and social attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Andrew P; Bartlett, Jessica; Naughtin, Claire K; Kritikos, Ada

    2011-06-01

    How information is exchanged between the cognitive mechanisms responsible for gaze perception and social attention is unclear. These systems could be independent; the "gaze cueing" effect could emerge from the activation of a general-purpose attentional mechanism that is ignorant of the social nature of the gaze cue. Alternatively, orienting to social gaze direction might be directly determined by the operation of cognitive mechanisms specifically dedicated to gaze perception. This second notion is the dominant assumption in the literature, but there is little direct support for this account. Here, we systematically manipulated observers' perception of gaze direction by implementing a gaze adaptation paradigm. Gaze cueing was reduced only in conditions where perception of specific averted gaze stimuli was impaired (Experiment 1). Adaptation to a pointing stimulus failed to impact gaze cueing (Experiment 2). Overall, these data suggest a direct link between the specific operation of gaze perception mechanisms and the consequential orienting of attention.

  19. Culture and Listeners' Gaze Responses to Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianliang; Kalinowski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is frequently observed that listeners demonstrate gaze aversion to stuttering. This response may have profound social/communicative implications for both fluent and stuttering individuals. However, there is a lack of empirical examination of listeners' eye gaze responses to stuttering, and it is unclear whether cultural background…

  20. Gaze-Based Controlling a Vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardanbeigi, Diako; Witzner Hansen, Dan

    Research and applications of gaze interaction has mainly been conducted on a 2 dimensional surface (usually screens) for controlling a computer or controlling the movements of a robot. Emerging wearable and mobile technologies, such as google glasses may shift how gaze is used as an interactive...

  1. Eye gaze adaptation under interocular suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, T.; Peelen, M.V.; Sterzer, P.

    The perception of eye gaze is central to social interaction in that it provides information about another person's goals, intentions, and focus of attention. Direction of gaze has been found to reflexively shift the observer's attention in the corresponding direction, and prolonged exposure to

  2. Off-the-Shelf Gaze Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    San Agustin, Javier

    People with severe motor-skill disabilities are often unable to use standard input devices such as a mouse or a keyboard to control a computer and they are, therefore, in strong need for alternative input devices. Gaze tracking offers them the possibility to use the movements of their eyes...... to interact with a computer, thereby making them more independent. A big effort has been put toward improving the robustness and accuracy of the technology, and many commercial systems are nowadays available in the market. Despite the great improvements that gaze tracking systems have undergone in the last...... of the challenges introduced by the use of low-cost and off-the-shelf components for gaze interaction. The main contributions are: - Development and performance evaluation of the ITU Gaze Tracker, an off-the-shelf gaze tracker that uses an inexpensive webcam or video camera to track the user’s eye. The software...

  3. Paroxysmal tonic upward gaze complicating Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumura, Shinobu; Watanabe, Toshihide; Takayama, Rumiko; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Paroxysmal tonic upward gaze is a childhood oculomotor syndrome characterized by episodes of conjugate upward deviation of the eyes. Its pathogenesis is unknown, and the etiology is heterogeneous. We describe a 2-year-old girl with Angelman syndrome who developed paroxysmal tonic upward gaze at 9 months of age. She presented with developmental delay, blond hair, jerky movements, ataxia, and epilepsy. Genetic testing revealed a maternal deletion of 15q11-13, confirming Angelman syndrome. This is the first report of Angelman syndrome complicated by paroxysmal tonic upward gaze. Both transient paroxysmal tonic upward gaze and Angelman syndrome have been associated with dopaminergic neurons. We speculate that the dopaminergic abnormalities present in Angelman syndrome may cause paroxysmal tonic upward gaze. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Gaze Interactive Textual Smartwatch Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, John Paulin; Biermann, Florian; Askø Madsen, Janus

    2015-01-01

    Mobile gaze interaction is challenged by inherent motor noise. We examined the gaze tracking accuracy and precision of twelve subjects wearing a gaze tracker on their wrist while standing and walking. Results suggest that it will be possible to detect whether people are glancing the watch......, but not where on the screen they are looking. To counter the motor noise we present a word-by-word textual UI that shows temporary command options to be executed by gaze-strokes. Twenty-seven participants conducted a simulated smartwatch task and were able to reliably perform commands that would adjust...... the speed of word presentation or make regressions. We discuss future design and usage options for a textual smartwatch gaze interface....

  5. Frequency of the superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome in unilateral fourth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Andrea; Ugrin, Maria Cristina

    2009-12-01

    Superior oblique palsy is accompanied in most cases by overaction of the muscle's ipsilateral antagonist, the inferior oblique muscle. Overaction and contracture of the ipsilateral superior rectus muscle in patients with unilateral fourth (trochlear) nerve palsy is seldom discussed in the literature. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the frequency of superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome in patients with unilateral trochlear nerve palsy. The records of 198 patients with unilateral trochlear nerve palsy examined by the authors between July 1987 and July 2008 were reviewed retrospectively. All patients underwent complete eye examination with measurement of the deviation in the 9 positions of gaze and with the head tilted to both sides in all cooperative patients. Selection criteria for superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome in these patients were as follows: vertical deviation of 15(Delta) or larger in primary position, equal or larger hypertropia with the ipsilateral forced tilt test than with the eyes looking straight ahead, more than 5(Delta) hypertropia of the affected eye in horizontal gaze to the same side, hypertropia in all upgazes, and overaction of the contralateral superior oblique muscle. Of 198 patients, 33 (16.6%) met the selection criteria for superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome. Superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome frequently occurs in unilateral superior oblique palsy.

  6. Are You Looking at Me? Measuring the Cone of Gaze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamer, Matthias; Hecht, Heiko

    2007-01-01

    The processing of gaze cues plays an important role in social interactions, and mutual gaze in particular is relevant for natural as well as video-mediated communications. Mutual gaze occurs when an observer looks at or in the direction of the eyes of another person. The authors chose the metaphor of a cone of gaze to characterize this range of…

  7. A magnetic resonance imaging study of double elevator palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadera, W; Bloom, J N; Karlik, S; Viirre, E

    1997-06-01

    The pathophysiology of double elevator palsy is poorly understood. We assessed two patients with this condition using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate the appearance of the extraocular muscles. Cross-sectional study. Radiology department of a university-affiliated hospital in London, Ont. Two patients from a private ophthalmology practice who had undergone complete transpositions of the horizontal rectus muscles to treat hypotropia associated with double elevator palsy. MRI. A volume scanning technique was used to obtain maximum information about the muscles. Appearance of the extraocular muscles. In both patients MRI showed decreased volume of the superior rectus muscle on the affected side. The other rectus muscles were normal. This suggested either congenital hypoplasia or paresis of the involved superior rectus muscle. In addition, the full tendon transpositions of the medial and lateral recti did not appreciably change the middle and deep orbital pathways of the transposed horizontal rectus muscles. MRI may be a useful adjunct to saccadic velocity assessments in differentiating between primary inferior rectus restriction, primary superior rectus paresis and congenital supranuclear elevator deficiency.

  8. Wrist-worn pervasive gaze interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, John Paulin; Lund, Haakon; Biermann, Florian

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses gaze interaction for smart home control, conducted from a wrist-worn unit. First we asked ten people to enact the gaze movements they would propose for e.g. opening a door or adjusting the room temperature. On basis of their suggestions we built and tested different versions...... selection. Their subjective evaluations were positive with regard to the speed of the interaction. We conclude that gaze gesture input seems feasible for fast and brief remote control of smart home technology provided that robustness of tracking is improved....

  9. Gaze interaction with textual user interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulin Hansen, John; Lund, Haakon; Madsen, Janus Askø

    2015-01-01

    ” option for text navigation. People readily understood how to execute RSVP command prompts and a majority of them preferred gaze input to a pen pointer. We present the concept of a smartwatch that can track eye movements and mediate command options whenever in proximity of intelligent devices...... that it connects with, i.e. a Gaze-Watch. For instance, standing next to a monitor, it may suggest to turn it on, if you look up at the monitor now. Command suggestions are provided in the RSVP-format, but they only stay active for a limited time, in which the gaze should be moved to apply them....

  10. Bell's palsy and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, A; Gallo, A; Fusconi, M; Marinelli, C; Macri, G F; de Vincentiis, M

    2012-12-01

    To review our current knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of Bell's palsy, including viral infection or autoimmunity, and to discuss disease pathogenesis with respect to pharmacotherapy. Relevant publications on the etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and histopathology of Bell's palsy from 1975 to 2012 were analysed. Bell's palsy is an idiopathic peripheral nerve palsy involving the facial nerve. It accounts for 60 to 75% of all cases of unilateral facial paralysis. The annual incidence of Bell's palsy is 15 to 30 per 100,000 people. The peak incidence occurs between the second and fourth decades (15 to 45 years). The aetiology of Bell's palsy is unknown but viral infection or autoimmune disease has been postulated as possible pathomechanisms. Bell's palsy may be caused when latent herpes viruses (herpes simplex, herpes zoster) are reactivated from cranial nerve ganglia. A cell-mediated autoimmune mechanism against a myelin basic protein has been suggested for the pathogenesis of Bell's palsy. Bell's palsy may be an autoimmune demyelinating cranial neuritis, and in most cases, it is a mononeuritic variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurologic disorder with recognised cell-mediated immunity against peripheral nerve myelin antigens. In Bell's palsy and GBS, a viral infection or the reactivation of a latent virus may provoke an autoimmune reaction against peripheral nerve myelin components, leading to the demyelination of cranial nerves, especially the facial nerve. Given the safety profile of acyclovir, valacyclovir, and short-course oral corticosteroids, patients who present within three days of the onset of symptoms should be offered combination therapy. However it seems logical that in fact, steroids exert their beneficial effect via immunosuppressive action, as is the case in some other autoimmune disorders. It is to be hoped that (monoclonal) antibodies and/or T-cell immunotherapy might provide more specific treatment guidelines in the

  11. Anterior and nasal transposition of inferior oblique muscle in cases of superior oblique palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Rohit; Sharma, Medha; Singh, Digvijay; Sharma, Pradeep

    2017-08-01

    To report long-term outcome of inferior oblique anterior and nasal transposition in superior oblique palsy. The medical records of patients with superior oblique palsy who underwent inferior oblique anterior nasal transposition were reviewed retrospectively. A comprehensive ophthalmic evaluation, including prism bar cover test and measurement of torsion, was performed for all cases. One-year postoperative results were evaluated for alignment in primary gaze, contralateral gaze, and upgaze; reduction in inferior oblique overaction and changes in fundus torsion to assess long-term outcome of the procedure. A total of 12 patients were included. Three cases also underwent horizontal muscle surgery. Mean age at the time of surgery was 20.6 years. The median preoperative hypertropia was 21.5 Δ (range, 12 Δ -36 Δ ), corrected to 4.5 Δ (range, 2 Δ -10 Δ ) at 12 months postoperatively (P = 0.002). Median inferior oblique overaction decreased from +3 (range, +1 to +4) to 0 (range, -1 to +1). Preoperative fundus extorsion was 19.2° ± 6.7°; postoperative, 0.58° ± 1.8° (P Extorsion was eliminated and head tilt improved in all patients. Inferior oblique anterior and nasal transposition resulted in good long-term outcomes in our patients with superior oblique palsy presenting with hypertropia, inferior oblique overaction, and extorsion in primary gaze. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prognosis for sixth nerve palsy arising from paranasal sinus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Craig; Suh, Jeffrey D; Henriquez, Oswaldo A; Schlosser, Rodney J; Ramakrishnan, Vijay R; Chiu, Alexander G

    2013-01-01

    The abducens nerve, cranial nerve VI (CNVI), is the medial-most nerve in the cavernous sinus. Its close proximity to the sphenoid sinus makes it susceptible to injury, invasion, or compression from a sphenoid pathology leading to horizontal gaze diplopia. A wide range of literature describes myriad causes for CNVI palsy, but there is a lack of references that point to paranasal sinus pathology as an etiology, as well as the prognosis and timeline for resolution. Here, we describe a series of patients that presented with CNVI palsy, their management, and prognosis for recovery. This study was designed to evaluate and understand prognostic factors predicting disease course and likelihood of resolution in patients with abducens nerve palsy. A multi-institutional retrospective review was performed of all patients presenting with CNVI palsy between 2009 and 2012. The demographic data, radiological features, treatment regimens, and disease courses were analyzed. Fifteen patients at four institutions were identified. Seven patients had neoplasms originating from the paranasal sinuses, three suffered from allergic fungal sinusitis, three patients had invasive fungal sinusitis, one patient had fibrous skull base dysplasia, and one had chronic bacterial sinusitis. The average follow-up time from presentation was 9 months (range, 1-16 months). Thirteen patients underwent surgery, three received chemotherapy, and four had radiation therapy. CNVI palsy resolved in 50% of the cases, with an average time to resolution of 6 weeks (range, 2-12 weeks). Paranasal sinus pathology is a rare cause of CNVI palsy. A number of factors may help to predict prognosis in these patients. Masses compressing, but not destroying or invading, the cavernous sinus had optimal posttreatment outcomes with full resolution occurring as early as 2 weeks. Destructive lesions that invaded CNVI and its vasculature, i.e., invasive fungus, were negative indicators for recovery. Knowledge of factors that affect

  13. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health ... Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth / For Teens / Cerebral Palsy What's in this article? What Is ...

  14. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth / For Kids / Cerebral Palsy What's in this article? What's CP? ...

  15. Gaze Control in Complex Scene Perception

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henderson, John

    2004-01-01

    .... The aim of the current project was to investigate the influence of semantic factors on human gaze control during the free viewing of complex, natural scenes, focusing on the extent to which initial...

  16. Latvijas Gaze buyback likely to flop

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2003-01-01

    Veerandi Läti gaasifirma Latvijas Gaze omanik Itera kavatseb lähiajal lõpule viia üheksa protsendi Läti firma aktsiate müügi ettevõttele Gazprom. Gazprom'i kontrolli all on praegu 25 protsenti, Ruhrgas'il 28,66 ning E.ON Energie AG-l 18,06 protsenti Latvijas Gaze aktsiatest

  17. Fixation stability of the upward gaze in patients with myasthenia gravis: an eye-tracker study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihara, Miharu; Hayashi, Atsushi; Fujita, Kazuya; Kakeue, Ken; Tamura, Ryoi

    2017-01-01

    To quantify fixation stability of the upward gaze in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) using an eye tracker. In this study, 21 normal subjects, 5 patients with MG with diplopia, 5 patients with MG without diplopia and 6 patients with superior oblique (SO) palsy were included. Subjects fixated on a target in the upward direction for 1 min. The horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) eye positions were recorded using an eye tracker. Fixation stability was first quantified using the bivariate contour ellipse areas (BCEA) of fixation points as an index of whole stability. Then, the SDs of the X and Y eye positions (SDX and SDY, respectively) were quantified as indices of directional stability, with the data divided into three 20 s fractions to detect temporal fixation fluctuation. BCEAs were larger in patients with MG (both with and without diplopia) than normal subjects and patients with SO palsy, without significant differences among the three 20 s fractions. Compared with normal subjects, SDXs were larger only in patients with MG with diplopia; SDYs were larger in both patients with MG with and without diplopia. In addition, SDYs in patients with MG with diplopia were larger than those in patients with MG without diplopia and patients with SO palsy. Furthermore, a significant difference among the three 20 s fractions was detected for SDYs in patients with MG with diplopia. Patients with MG, especially those with diplopia, exhibit fixation instability in the upward gaze. Non-invasive quantification of fixation stability with an eye tracker is useful for precisely identifying MG-specific fatigue characteristics. UMIN000023468; pre-results.

  18. Gaze entropy reflects surgical task load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stasi, Leandro L; Diaz-Piedra, Carolina; Rieiro, Héctor; Sánchez Carrión, José M; Martin Berrido, Mercedes; Olivares, Gonzalo; Catena, Andrés

    2016-11-01

    Task (over-)load imposed on surgeons is a main contributing factor to surgical errors. Recent research has shown that gaze metrics represent a valid and objective index to asses operator task load in non-surgical scenarios. Thus, gaze metrics have the potential to improve workplace safety by providing accurate measurements of task load variations. However, the direct relationship between gaze metrics and surgical task load has not been investigated yet. We studied the effects of surgical task complexity on the gaze metrics of surgical trainees. We recorded the eye movements of 18 surgical residents, using a mobile eye tracker system, during the performance of three high-fidelity virtual simulations of laparoscopic exercises of increasing complexity level: Clip Applying exercise, Cutting Big exercise, and Translocation of Objects exercise. We also measured performance accuracy and subjective rating of complexity. Gaze entropy and velocity linearly increased with increased task complexity: Visual exploration pattern became less stereotyped (i.e., more random) and faster during the more complex exercises. Residents performed better the Clip Applying exercise and the Cutting Big exercise than the Translocation of Objects exercise and their perceived task complexity differed accordingly. Our data show that gaze metrics are a valid and reliable surgical task load index. These findings have potential impacts to improve patient safety by providing accurate measurements of surgeon task (over-)load and might provide future indices to assess residents' learning curves, independently of expensive virtual simulators or time-consuming expert evaluation.

  19. Gliding and Saccadic Gaze Gesture Recognition in Real Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rozado, David; San Agustin, Javier; Rodriguez, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    paradigm in the context of human-machine interaction as low-cost gaze trackers become more ubiquitous. The viability of gaze gestures as an innovative way to control a computer rests on how easily they can be assimilated by potential users and also on the ability of machine learning algorithms...... to discriminate intentional gaze gestures from typical gaze activity performed during standard interaction with electronic devices. In this work, through a set of experiments and user studies, we evaluate the performance of two different gaze gestures modalities, gliding gaze gestures and saccadic gaze gestures......, and their corresponding real-time recognition algorithms, Hierarchical Temporal Memory networks and the Needleman-Wunsch algorithm for sequence alignment. Our results show how a specific combination of gaze gesture modality, namely saccadic gaze gestures, and recognition algorithm, Needleman-Wunsch, allows for reliable...

  20. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... to this condition. Some factors that can cause birth trauma (injury) include: Large baby size (may be ...

  1. Re-Encountering Individuals Who Previously Engaged in Joint Gaze Modulates Subsequent Gaze Cueing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmaso, Mario; Edwards, S. Gareth; Bayliss, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the extent to which previous experience of joint gaze with people (i.e., looking toward the same object) modulates later gaze cueing of attention elicited by those individuals. Participants in Experiments 1 and 2a/b first completed a saccade/antisaccade task while a to-be-ignored face either looked at, or away from, the participants'…

  2. Sixth nerve palsy + ipsilateral Horner's Syndrome = Parkinson's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Roberto N; Ayerza, Dolores Ribero; Aghetoni, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    To present five patients with VIth nerve palsy and ipsilateral Horner's Syndrome (HS), as a result of cavernous sinus alteration. Consecutive case series. Five patients presented abducens palsy with horizontal diplopia (3 in primary position and 2 in lateral gaze only) and ipsilateral HS. Apraclonidine 0.5% drops evidenced sympathetic denervation in all patients 40-60 min after instillation. All 5 cases had neuroimages (MRI in 3 cases, Computerized Tomography - CT in one case and Magnetic Resonance Angiography - MRA in one case) demonstrating cavernous sinus lesions; 2 meningiomas, 1 carotid-cavernous aneurism, 1 foreign body (bullet) and 1 squamous cell carcinoma. Lesions on the cavernous sinus need to be considered in cases of abducens nerve palsy and ipsilateral Horner's Syndrome.

  3. Recurrences of Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirpaciu, D; Goanta, C M; Cirpaciu, M D

    2014-01-01

    Bell's palsy in known as the most common cause of facial paralysis, determined by the acute onset of lower motor neuron weakness of the facial nerve with no detectable cause. With a lifetime risk of 1 in 60 and an annual incidence of 11-40/100,000 population, the condition resolves completely in around 71% of the untreated cases. Clinical trials performed for Bell's palsy have reported some recurrences, ipsilateral or contralateral to the side affected in the primary episode of facial palsy. Only few data are found in the literature. Melkersson-Rosenthal is a rare neuromucocutaneous syndrome characterized by recurrent facial paralysis, fissured tongue (lingua plicata), orofacial edema. We attempted to analyze some clinical and epidemiologic aspects of recurrent idiopathic palsy, and to develop relevant correlations between the existing data in literature and those obtained in this study. This is a retrospective study carried out on a 10-years period for adults and a five-year period for children. A number of 185 patients aged between 4 and 70 years old were analyzed. 136 of them were adults and 49 were children. 22 of 185 patients with Bell's palsy (12%) had a recurrent partial or complete facial paralysis with one to six episodes of palsy. From this group of 22 cases, 5 patients were diagnosed with Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome. The patients' age was between 4 and 70 years old, with a medium age of 27,6 years. In the group studied, fifteen patients, meaning 68%, were women and seven were men. The majority of patients in our group with more than two facial palsy episodes had at least one episode on the contralateral side. Our study found a significant incidence of recurrences of idiopathic facial palsy. Recurrent idiopathic facial palsy and Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome is diagnosed more often in young females. Recurrence is more likely to occur in the first two years from the onset, which leads to the conclusion that we should have a follow up of patients

  4. Visual Foraging With Fingers and Eye Gaze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ómar I. Jóhannesson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A popular model of the function of selective visual attention involves search where a single target is to be found among distractors. For many scenarios, a more realistic model involves search for multiple targets of various types, since natural tasks typically do not involve a single target. Here we present results from a novel multiple-target foraging paradigm. We compare finger foraging where observers cancel a set of predesignated targets by tapping them, to gaze foraging where observers cancel items by fixating them for 100 ms. During finger foraging, for most observers, there was a large difference between foraging based on a single feature, where observers switch easily between target types, and foraging based on a conjunction of features where observers tended to stick to one target type. The pattern was notably different during gaze foraging where these condition differences were smaller. Two conclusions follow: (a The fact that a sizeable number of observers (in particular during gaze foraging had little trouble switching between different target types raises challenges for many prominent theoretical accounts of visual attention and working memory. (b While caveats must be noted for the comparison of gaze and finger foraging, the results suggest that selection mechanisms for gaze and pointing have different operational constraints.

  5. Gaze location prediction for broadcast football video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qin; Agrafiotis, Dimitris; Achim, Alin M; Bull, David R

    2013-12-01

    The sensitivity of the human visual system decreases dramatically with increasing distance from the fixation location in a video frame. Accurate prediction of a viewer's gaze location has the potential to improve bit allocation, rate control, error resilience, and quality evaluation in video compression. Commercially, delivery of football video content is of great interest because of the very high number of consumers. In this paper, we propose a gaze location prediction system for high definition broadcast football video. The proposed system uses knowledge about the context, extracted through analysis of a gaze tracking study that we performed, to build a suitable prior map. We further classify the complex context into different categories through shot classification thus allowing our model to prelearn the task pertinence of each object category and build the prior map automatically. We thus avoid the limitation of assigning the viewers a specific task, allowing our gaze prediction system to work under free-viewing conditions. Bayesian integration of bottom-up features and top-down priors is finally applied to predict the gaze locations. Results show that the prediction performance of the proposed model is better than that of other top-down models that we adapted to this context.

  6. Eye Gaze Tracking using Correlation Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakaya, Mahmut [ORNL; Boehnen, Chris Bensing [ORNL; Bolme, David S [ORNL; Mahallesi, Mevlana [Meliksah University, Turkey; Kayseri, Talas [Meliksah University, Turkey

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we studied a method for eye gaze tracking that provide gaze estimation from a standard webcam with a zoom lens and reduce the setup and calibration requirements for new users. Specifically, we have developed a gaze estimation method based on the relative locations of points on the top of the eyelid and eye corners. Gaze estimation method in this paper is based on the distances between top point of the eyelid and eye corner detected by the correlation filters. Advanced correlation filters were found to provide facial landmark detections that are accurate enough to determine the subjects gaze direction up to angle of approximately 4-5 degrees although calibration errors often produce a larger overall shift in the estimates. This is approximately a circle of diameter 2 inches for a screen that is arm s length from the subject. At this accuracy it is possible to figure out what regions of text or images the subject is looking but it falls short of being able to determine which word the subject has looked at.

  7. Social orienting in gaze leading: a mechanism for shared attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, S Gareth; Stephenson, Lisa J; Dalmaso, Mario; Bayliss, Andrew P

    2015-08-07

    Here, we report a novel social orienting response that occurs after viewing averted gaze. We show, in three experiments, that when a person looks from one location to an object, attention then shifts towards the face of an individual who has subsequently followed the person's gaze to that same object. That is, contrary to 'gaze following', attention instead orients in the opposite direction to observed gaze and towards the gazing face. The magnitude of attentional orienting towards a face that 'follows' the participant's gaze is also associated with self-reported autism-like traits. We propose that this gaze leading phenomenon implies the existence of a mechanism in the human social cognitive system for detecting when one's gaze has been followed, in order to establish 'shared attention' and maintain the ongoing interaction. © 2015 The Author(s).

  8. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. PMID:24204146

  9. The Use of Gaze to Control Drones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, John Paulin; Alapetite, Alexandre; MacKenzie, I. Scott

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of gaze-based control modes for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or “drones”). Ten participants performed a simple flying task. We gathered empirical measures, including task completion time, and examined the user experience for difficulty, reliabil......This paper presents an experimental investigation of gaze-based control modes for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or “drones”). Ten participants performed a simple flying task. We gathered empirical measures, including task completion time, and examined the user experience for difficulty......, reliability, and fun. Four control modes were tested, with each mode applying a combination of x-y gaze movement and manual (keyboard) input to control speed (pitch), altitude, rotation (yaw), and drafting (roll). Participants had similar task completion times for all four control modes, but one combination...

  10. Off-the-Shelf Gaze Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    San Agustin, Javier

    is readily available as open source, offering the possibility to try out gaze interaction for a low price and to analyze, improve and extend the software by modifying the source code. - A novel gaze estimation method based on homographic mappings between planes. No knowledge about the hardware configuration...... years, high prices have prevented gaze interaction from becoming mainstream. The use of specialized hardware, such as industrial cameras or infrared light sources, increases the accuracy of the systems, but also the price, which prevents many potential users from having access to the technology...... the prices down. Such systems are often more flexible, as the components can be placed in different locations, but also less robust, due to the lack of control over the hardware setup and the lower quality of the components compared to commercial systems. The work developed for this thesis deals with some...

  11. The Gaze as constituent and annihilator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Carlsson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to join the contemporary effort to promote a psychoanalytic renaissance within cinema studies, post Post-Theory. In trying to shake off the burden of the 1970s film theory's distortion of the Lacanian Gaze, rejuvenating it with the strength of the Real and fusing it with Freudian thoughts on the uncanny, hopefully this new dawn can be reached. I aspire to conceptualize the Gaze in a straightforward manner. This in order to obtain an instrument for the identification of certain strategies within the filmic realm aimed at depicting the subjective destabilizing of diegetic characters as well as thwarting techniques directed at the spectorial subject. In setting this capricious Gaze against the uncanny phenomena described by Freud, we find that these two ideas easily intertwine into a draft description of a powerful, potentially reconstitutive force worth being highlighted.

  12. Intermediate view synthesis for eye-gazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Eu-Ttuem; Ho, Yo-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Nonverbal communication, also known as body language, is an important form of communication. Nonverbal behaviors such as posture, eye contact, and gestures send strong messages. In regard to nonverbal communication, eye contact is one of the most important forms that an individual can use. However, lack of eye contact occurs when we use video conferencing system. The disparity between locations of the eyes and a camera gets in the way of eye contact. The lock of eye gazing can give unapproachable and unpleasant feeling. In this paper, we proposed an eye gazing correction for video conferencing. We use two cameras installed at the top and the bottom of the television. The captured two images are rendered with 2D warping at virtual position. We implement view morphing to the detected face, and synthesize the face and the warped image. Experimental results verify that the proposed system is effective in generating natural gaze-corrected images.

  13. Gliding and Saccadic Gaze Gesture Recognition in Real Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rozado, David; San Agustin, Javier; Rodriguez, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Eye movements can be consciously controlled by humans to the extent of performing sequences of predefined movement patterns, or ’gaze gestures’. Gaze gestures can be tracked non-invasively employing a video- based eye tracking system. Gaze gestures hold the potential to become an emerging input...

  14. Eye gaze in intelligent user interfaces gaze-based analyses, models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nakano, Yukiko I; Bader, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Remarkable progress in eye-tracking technologies opened the way to design novel attention-based intelligent user interfaces, and highlighted the importance of better understanding of eye-gaze in human-computer interaction and human-human communication. For instance, a user's focus of attention is useful in interpreting the user's intentions, their understanding of the conversation, and their attitude towards the conversation. In human face-to-face communication, eye gaze plays an important role in floor management, grounding, and engagement in conversation.Eye Gaze in Intelligent User Interfac

  15. Towards Wearable Gaze Supported Augmented Cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toshiaki Kurauchi, Andrew; Hitoshi Morimoto, Carlos; Mardanbeigi, Diako

    to reduce the amount of information and provide an appropriate mechanism for low and divided attention interaction. We claim that most current gaze interaction paradigms are not appropriate for wearable computing because they are not designed for divided attention. We have used principles suggested...

  16. Between Gazes: Feminist, Queer, and 'Other' Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elias, Camelia

    In this book Camelia Elias introduces key terms in feminist, queer, and postcolonial/diaspora film. Taking her point of departure in the question, "what do you want from me?" she detours through Lacanian theory of the gaze and reframes questions of subjectivity and representation in an entertaini...

  17. Owners' direct gazes increase dogs' attention-getting behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkita, Midori; Nagasawa, Miho; Kazutaka, Mogi; Kikusui, Takefumi

    2016-04-01

    This study examined whether dogs gain information about human's attention via their gazes and whether they change their attention-getting behaviors (i.e., whining and whimpering, looking at their owners' faces, pawing, and approaching their owners) in response to their owners' direct gazes. The results showed that when the owners gazed at their dogs, the durations of whining and whimpering and looking at the owners' faces were longer than when the owners averted their gazes. In contrast, there were no differences in duration of pawing and likelihood of approaching the owners between the direct and averted gaze conditions. Therefore, owners' direct gazes increased the behaviors that acted as distant signals and did not necessarily involve touching the owners. We suggest that dogs are sensitive to human gazes, and this sensitivity may act as attachment signals to humans, and may contribute to close relationships between humans and dogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Presentation of a patient carrying a progressive supra-nuclear paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arredondo Bruce, Alfredo; Huerta Ramírez, Janet; Domínguez Calderón, Tomás; Pérez Zayas, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    The progressive supra-nuclear paralysis (PSP) or Steele-Richardson-Olszewsky’s syndrome is a strange, degenerative illness produced by the deterioration and gradual death of brain selected areas. We present the case of a female patient, aged 80 years, who refers postural instability, frequent falls and cognitive dysfunctions. She also presents stiffness in retrocollis in the back of the neck, fall of eyelids, left hand shaking, dysarthric and incoherent language, and shaking of both hands in coins counting. The cardiovascular examination showed 2nd increased beat, systolic murmur III/IV in mitral focus, AT 160/90 mm of Hg, edemas in both inferior members, hearth frequency of 110 beats/min., and jugular ingurgitation. The rest of the physical examination was normal. The etiologic diagnosis was progressive supranuclear paralysis and dilated cardiomyopathy. The tau protein is important in the maintenance of the neuronal morphology through microtubules formation, the different proportions and locations, causing the Richardson’s syndrome. The most common symptoms of this entity are postural instability and frequent falls, dysarthria, hypokinesia and visual alterations. Magnetic resonance and functional neuroimaging help the diagnosis. (author)

  19. Gaze interaction in UAS video exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hild, Jutta; Brüstle, Stefan; Heinze, Norbert; Peinsipp-Byma, Elisabeth

    2013-05-01

    A frequently occurring interaction task in UAS video exploitation is the marking or selection of objects of interest in the video. If an object of interest is visually detected by the image analyst, its selection/marking for further exploitation, documentation and communication with the team is a necessary task. Today object selection is usually performed by mouse interaction. As due to sensor motion all objects in the video move, object selection can be rather challenging, especially if strong and fast and ego-motions are present, e.g., with small airborne sensor platforms. In addition to that, objects of interest are sometimes too shortly visible to be selected by the analyst using mouse interaction. To address this issue we propose an eye tracker as input device for object selection. As the eye tracker continuously provides the gaze position of the analyst on the monitor, it is intuitive to use the gaze position for pointing at an object. The selection is then actuated by pressing a button. We integrated this gaze-based "gaze + key press" object selection into Fraunhofer IOSB's exploitation station ABUL using a Tobii X60 eye tracker and a standard keyboard for the button press. Representing the object selections in a spatial relational database, ABUL enables the image analyst to efficiently query the video data in a post processing step for selected objects of interest with respect to their geographical and other properties. An experimental evaluation is presented, comparing gaze-based interaction with mouse interaction in the context of object selection in UAS videos.

  20. Familial diffuse Lewy body disease, eye movement abnormalities, and distribution of pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Francesca M; Henson, Craig; Staunton, Hugh

    2002-03-01

    Familial diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD) is rare and not yet associated with a defect in the synuclein gene. In the differential diagnosis of the parkinsonian syndromes, defects in vertical gaze tend to be identified with progressive supranuclear palsy. False-positive diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy can occur, and defects in vertical gaze have been reported in DLBD, although so far a pure vertical gaze palsy associated with pathological abnormalities in the substrate for vertical gaze has not been described. To report the clinical and pathological findings in 2 siblings with DLBD, and to relate the distribution of the pathological abnormalities in the brainstem to centers for vertical gaze. For several years, 2 Irish siblings experienced a progressive parkinsonism-dementia complex associated in one with a defect in vertical gaze and in both with visual hallucinations. In both patients, results of pathological examination revealed (1) Lewy bodies positive for ubiquitin and alpha-synuclein together with cell loss and gliosis in the substantia nigra, locus ceruleus, and neocortex; and (2) similar findings in the rostral interstitial nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus, the posterior commissure, and the interstitial nucleus of Cajal (substrates for vertical gaze). Familial DLBD (not shown to be genetically as distinct from environmentally transmitted) has been shown to exist in an Irish family. Caution should be enjoined in the interpretation of defects in vertical gaze in the differential diagnosis of the parkinsonian syndromes.

  1. Gaze-down endoscopic practise leads to better novice performance on gaze-up displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, Lawrence E M; Lyons, James L; Dubrowski, Adam

    2013-02-01

    It is well known that precision skills are best learned when they are practised in the sensorimotor context that is present when performance is most important. However, a particular skill may vary with respect to the sensorimotor context in which it is performed. Certain sensorimotor variations can make a task more or less complex than others. Recent accounts of skill learning describe how task difficulty can be manipulated to provide optimised challenges to progress learners beyond their current level of expertise. This study tests the idea that simplified practise contexts lead novice learners to acquire skill proficiency that is more generalisable to new contexts. We present a learning experiment in which the performances of novices who acquired a set level of proficiency in the endoscopic pots-and-beans task through performance-based practise using a gaze-up endoscopic monitor arrangement were compared against the performances of novices who acquired an equivalent level of proficiency using a simplified gaze-down arrangement. Participants returned after 1 week for retention and transfer testing. Time and accuracy analyses revealed that participants in both training groups improved significantly over the practise protocol and maintained this performance after a period of retention. However, the comparisons of the visual display transfer performances (i.e. on the gaze-up arrangement) of the gaze-down trainees against the retention performances (i.e. also on the gaze-up arrangement) of their gaze-up counterparts and vice versa revealed that gaze-down trainees made fewer errors in both performance contexts (F(1,16) = 7.97, p = 0.01 and F(1,16) = 57.05, p = 0.04, respectively). These findings highlight the benefits associated with using simplified sensorimotor practise contexts for novice learners. Beginners will learn best from simplified practise because it allows them to develop good movement strategies for dealing with potential error without being overwhelmed

  2. Perception of stereoscopic direct gaze: The effects of interaxial distance and emotional facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakala, Jussi; Kätsyri, Jari; Takala, Tapio; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2016-07-01

    Gaze perception has received considerable research attention due to its importance in social interaction. The majority of recent studies have utilized monoscopic pictorial gaze stimuli. However, a monoscopic direct gaze differs from a live or stereoscopic gaze. In the monoscopic condition, both eyes of the observer receive a direct gaze, whereas in live and stereoscopic conditions, only one eye receives a direct gaze. In the present study, we examined the implications of the difference between monoscopic and stereoscopic direct gaze. Moreover, because research has shown that stereoscopy affects the emotions elicited by facial expressions, and facial expressions affect the range of directions where an observer perceives mutual gaze-the cone of gaze-we studied the interaction effect of stereoscopy and facial expressions on gaze perception. Forty observers viewed stereoscopic images wherein one eye of the observer received a direct gaze while the other eye received a horizontally averted gaze at five different angles corresponding to five interaxial distances between the cameras in stimulus acquisition. In addition to monoscopic and stereoscopic conditions, the stimuli included neutral, angry, and happy facial expressions. The observers judged the gaze direction and mutual gaze of four lookers. Our results show that the mean of the directions received by the left and right eyes approximated the perceived gaze direction in the stereoscopic semidirect gaze condition. The probability of perceiving mutual gaze in the stereoscopic condition was substantially lower compared with monoscopic direct gaze. Furthermore, stereoscopic semidirect gaze significantly widened the cone of gaze for happy facial expressions.

  3. Look Together: Analyzing Gaze Coordination with Epistemic Network Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean eAndrist

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available When conversing and collaborating in everyday situations, people naturally and interactively align their behaviors with each other across various communication channels, including speech, gesture, posture, and gaze. Having access to a partner's referential gaze behavior has been shown to be particularly important in achieving collaborative outcomes, but the process in which people's gaze behaviors unfold over the course of an interaction and become tightly coordinated is not well understood. In this paper, we present work to develop a deeper and more nuanced understanding of coordinated referential gaze in collaborating dyads. We recruited 13 dyads to participate in a collaborative sandwich-making task and used dual mobile eye tracking to synchronously record each participant's gaze behavior. We used a relatively new analysis technique—epistemic network analysis—to jointly model the gaze behaviors of both conversational participants. In this analysis, network nodes represent gaze targets for each participant, and edge strengths convey the likelihood of simultaneous gaze to the connected target nodes during a given time-slice. We divided collaborative task sequences into discrete phases to examine how the networks of shared gaze evolved over longer time windows. We conducted three separate analyses of the data to reveal (1 properties and patterns of how gaze coordination unfolds throughout an interaction sequence, (2 optimal time lags of gaze alignment within a dyad at different phases of the interaction, and (3 differences in gaze coordination patterns for interaction sequences that lead to breakdowns and repairs. In addition to contributing to the growing body of knowledge on the coordination of gaze behaviors in joint activities, this work has implications for the design of future technologies that engage in situated interactions with human users.

  4. Towards gaze-controlled platform games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, Jorge; Yannakakis, Georgios N.; Mulvey, Fiona

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept of using gaze as a sole modality for fully controlling player characters of fast-paced action computer games. A user experiment is devised to collect gaze and gameplay data from subjects playing a version of the popular Super Mario Bros platform game. The initial...... analysis shows that there is a rather limited grid around Mario where the efficient player focuses her attention the most while playing the game. The useful grid as we name it, projects the amount of meaningful visual information a designer should use towards creating successful player character...... controllers with the use of artificial intelligence for a platform game like Super Mario. Information about the eyes' position on the screen and the state of the game are utilized as inputs of an artificial neural network, which is trained to approximate which keyboard action is to be performed at each game...

  5. Noise Challenges in Monomodal Gaze Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsgaard, Henrik

    of life via dedicated interface tools especially tailored to the users’ needs (e.g., interaction, communication, e-mailing, web browsing and entertainment). Much effort has been put towards robustness, accuracy and precision of modern eye-tracking systems and there are many available on the market. Even...... stream are most wanted. The work in this thesis presents three contributions that may advance the use of low-cost monomodal gaze tracking and research in the field: - An assessment of a low-cost open-source gaze tracker and two eye tracking systems through an accuracy and precision test and a performance...... evaluation. - Development and evaluation of a novel innovative 3D typing system with high tolerance to noise that is based on continuous panning and zooming. - Development and evaluation of novel selection tools that compensate for noisy input during small-target selections in modern GUIs. This thesis may...

  6. Gaze perception in social anxiety and social anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars eSchulze

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical observations suggest abnormal gaze perception to be an important indicator of social anxiety disorder (SAD. Experimental research has yet paid relatively little attention to the study of gaze perception in SAD. In this article we first discuss gaze perception in healthy human beings before reviewing self-referential and threat-related biases of gaze perception in clinical and non-clinical socially anxious samples. Relative to controls, socially anxious individuals exhibit an enhanced self-directed perception of gaze directions and demonstrate a pronounced fear of direct eye contact, though findings are less consistent regarding the avoidance of mutual gaze in SAD. Prospects for future research and clinical implications are discussed.

  7. Anticipatory gaze strategies when grasping moving objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulloch, Melissa C; Prime, Steven L; Marotta, Jonathan J

    2015-12-01

    Grasping moving objects involves both spatial and temporal predictions. The hand is aimed at a location where it will meet the object, rather than the position at which the object is seen when the reach is initiated. Previous eye-hand coordination research from our laboratory, utilizing stationary objects, has shown that participants' initial gaze tends to be directed towards the eventual location of the index finger when making a precision grasp. This experiment examined how the speed and direction of a computer-generated block's movement affect gaze and selection of grasp points. Results showed that when the target first appeared, participants anticipated the target's eventual movement by fixating well ahead of its leading edge in the direction of eventual motion. Once target movement began, participants shifted their fixation to the leading edge of the target. Upon reach initiation, participants then fixated towards the top edge of the target. As seen in our previous work with stationary objects, final fixations tended towards the final index finger contact point on the target. Moreover, gaze and kinematic analyses revealed that it was direction that most influenced fixation locations and grasp points. Interestingly, participants fixated further ahead of the target's leading edge when the direction of motion was leftward, particularly at the slower speed-possibly the result of mechanical constraints of intercepting leftward-moving targets with one's right hand.

  8. Speaker gaze increases information coupling between infant and adult brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Victoria; Byrne, Elizabeth; Clackson, Kaili; Georgieva, Stanimira; Lam, Sarah; Wass, Sam

    2017-12-12

    When infants and adults communicate, they exchange social signals of availability and communicative intention such as eye gaze. Previous research indicates that when communication is successful, close temporal dependencies arise between adult speakers' and listeners' neural activity. However, it is not known whether similar neural contingencies exist within adult-infant dyads. Here, we used dual-electroencephalography to assess whether direct gaze increases neural coupling between adults and infants during screen-based and live interactions. In experiment 1 ( n = 17), infants viewed videos of an adult who was singing nursery rhymes with ( i ) direct gaze (looking forward), ( ii ) indirect gaze (head and eyes averted by 20°), or ( iii ) direct-oblique gaze (head averted but eyes orientated forward). In experiment 2 ( n = 19), infants viewed the same adult in a live context, singing with direct or indirect gaze. Gaze-related changes in adult-infant neural network connectivity were measured using partial directed coherence. Across both experiments, the adult had a significant (Granger) causal influence on infants' neural activity, which was stronger during direct and direct-oblique gaze relative to indirect gaze. During live interactions, infants also influenced the adult more during direct than indirect gaze. Further, infants vocalized more frequently during live direct gaze, and individual infants who vocalized longer also elicited stronger synchronization from the adult. These results demonstrate that direct gaze strengthens bidirectional adult-infant neural connectivity during communication. Thus, ostensive social signals could act to bring brains into mutual temporal alignment, creating a joint-networked state that is structured to facilitate information transfer during early communication and learning. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  9. Noninvasive Corneal Image-Based Gaze Measurement System

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Eunji; Nitschke, Christian; Nakazawa, Atsushi; Rozga, Agata; Rehg, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Gaze tracking is an important technology as the system can give information about a person from what and where the person is seeing. There have been many attempts to make robust and accurate gaze trackers using either monitor or wearable devices. However, those contraptions often require fine individual calibration per session and/or require a person wearing a device, which may not be suitable for certain situations. In this paper, we propose a robust and a completely noninvasive gaze trackin...

  10. Gaze-following behind barriers in domestic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Met, Amandine; Miklósi, Ádám; Lakatos, Gabriella

    2014-11-01

    Although gaze-following abilities have been demonstrated in a wide range of species, so far no clear evidence has been available for dogs. In the current study, we examined whether dogs follow human gaze behind an opaque barrier in two different contexts, in a foraging situation and in a non-foraging situation (food involved vs. food not involved in the situation). We assumed that dogs will spontaneously follow the human gaze and that the foraging context will have a positive effect on dogs' gaze-following behaviour by causing an expectation in the dogs that food might be hidden somewhere in the room and might be communicated by the experimenter. This expectation presumably positively affects their motivational and attentional state. Here, we report that dogs show evidence of spontaneous gaze-following behind barriers in both situations. According to our findings, the dogs gazed earlier at the barrier in the indicated direction in both contexts. However, as we expected, the context also has some effect on dogs' gaze-following behaviour, as more dogs gazed behind the barrier in the indicated direction in the foraging situation. The present results also support the idea that gaze-following is a characteristic skill in mammals which may more easily emerge in certain functional contexts.

  11. A Rare Cause of Isolated Sixth Nerve Palsy in Childhood: Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çağlar Öktem

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A 11-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic complaining of diplopia and strabismus in the right eye. Ophthalmological examination revealed limitation of abduction in the right eye. The best-corrected visual acuity was 1.0 in both eyes. There were no abnormal findings on fundus and anterior chamber examination. After radiological and cerebrospinal fluid investigations, she has received a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS. High-dose (1000 mg daily intravenous methylprednisolone was given for 3 days, and then oral methylprednisolone therapy 2 mg/kg per day was started. After two months from admission to hospital, the ophthalmological examination revealed complete recovery in diplopia and gaze palsy. MS should be kept in mind as a rare etiology in children with isolated sixth nerve palsy and radiological investigations should be performed as soon as possible. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 205-7

  12. Cranial nerve palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, P.; Adelizzi, J.; Modic, M.T.; Ross, J.S.; Tkach, J.; Masaryk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  13. Unilateral sixth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoodehnia, Mehran; Safaei, Arash; Rasooli, Fatemeh; Bahreini, Maryam

    2017-06-01

    The diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis still remains a real challenge. Seizure, unusual headache with sudden onset, unexplained persistently unilateral vascular headache and neurologic deficit-which is difficult to be attributed to a vascular territory are some of the suggestive symptoms. An isolated sixth nerve palsy is discussed as a rare presentation for cerebral venous thrombosis. Following the extensive investigation to rule out other possible diagnoses, magnetic resonance venogram revealed the final etiology of sixth nerve palsy that was ipsilateral left transverse sinus thrombosis; therefore, anticoagulant treatment with low molecular weight heparin was administered. Rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment cause to achieve excellent outcomes for most patients. Considering different clinical features, risk factors and high index of suspicion are helpful to reach the diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cerebral palsy and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Haak, Peterson; Lenski, Madeleine; Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Li, Min; Paneth, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP), the most common major disabling motor disorder of childhood, is frequently thought of as a condition that affects only children. Deaths in children with CP, never common, have in recent years become very rare, unless the child is very severely and multiply disabled. Thus, virtually all children assigned the diagnosis of CP will survive into adulthood. Attention to the adult with CP has been sparse, and the evolution of the motor disorder as the individual moves through ad...

  15. Training for eye contact modulates gaze following in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Lisa J; Range, Friederike; Müller, Corsin A; Serisier, Samuel; Huber, Ludwig; Virányi, Zsófia

    2015-08-01

    Following human gaze in dogs and human infants can be considered a socially facilitated orientation response, which in object choice tasks is modulated by human-given ostensive cues. Despite their similarities to human infants, and extensive skills in reading human cues in foraging contexts, no evidence that dogs follow gaze into distant space has been found. We re-examined this question, and additionally whether dogs' propensity to follow gaze was affected by age and/or training to pay attention to humans. We tested a cross-sectional sample of 145 border collies aged 6 months to 14 years with different amounts of training over their lives. The dogs' gaze-following response in test and control conditions before and after training for initiating eye contact with the experimenter was compared with that of a second group of 13 border collies trained to touch a ball with their paw. Our results provide the first evidence that dogs can follow human gaze into distant space. Although we found no age effect on gaze following, the youngest and oldest age groups were more distractible, which resulted in a higher number of looks in the test and control conditions. Extensive lifelong formal training as well as short-term training for eye contact decreased dogs' tendency to follow gaze and increased their duration of gaze to the face. The reduction in gaze following after training for eye contact cannot be explained by fatigue or short-term habituation, as in the second group gaze following increased after a different training of the same length. Training for eye contact created a competing tendency to fixate the face, which prevented the dogs from following the directional cues. We conclude that following human gaze into distant space in dogs is modulated by training, which may explain why dogs perform poorly in comparison to other species in this task.

  16. Double Elevator Palsy, Subtypes and Outcomes of Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bagheri

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To describe the clinical manifestations of subtypes of double elevator palsy and to report the outcomes of surgery in these patients. METHODS: This retrospective study was conducted on hospital records of patients with double elevator palsy at Labbafinejad Medical Center over a ten-year period from 1994 to 2004. Patients were classified into three subgroups of primary elevator muscle palsy (9 subjects, primary supranuclear palsy with secondary inferior rectus restriction (4 subjects and pure inferior rectus restriction (7 subjects according to forced duction test (FDT, force generation test (FGT and Bell's reflex. Patients in the first group underwent Knapp procedure, the second group received Knapp procedure and inferior rectus recession simultaneously and in the third group vertical recess-resect or mere inferior rectus recess operation was performed. Success was defined as final residual deviation of 5 PD or less and 25% improvement or more in restriction after all operations. RESULTS: Overall 20 subjects including 10 male and 10 female patients with mean age of 12.6±9.3 (range 1.5-32 years were operated during the mentioned period which included 9 cases of

  17. Pseudobulbar palsy associated with trismus.

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, M. M.; Howard, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    A 60 year old patient presented with an acute pseudobulbar palsy associated with trismus. A computed tomography scan revealed low attenuation areas consistent with infarction affecting the genu of the internal capsules bilaterally. Trismus has not previously been described as the presenting feature of a pseudobulbar palsy.

  18. Pseudobulbar palsy associated with trismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, M. M.; Howard, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    A 60 year old patient presented with an acute pseudobulbar palsy associated with trismus. A computed tomography scan revealed low attenuation areas consistent with infarction affecting the genu of the internal capsules bilaterally. Trismus has not previously been described as the presenting feature of a pseudobulbar palsy. Images Figure 1 PMID:7824418

  19. Just one look: Direct gaze briefly disrupts visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J Jessica; Apperly, Ian A

    2017-04-01

    Direct gaze is a salient social cue that affords rapid detection. A body of research suggests that direct gaze enhances performance on memory tasks (e.g., Hood, Macrae, Cole-Davies, & Dias, Developmental Science, 1, 67-71, 2003). Nonetheless, other studies highlight the disruptive effect direct gaze has on concurrent cognitive processes (e.g., Conty, Gimmig, Belletier, George, & Huguet, Cognition, 115(1), 133-139, 2010). This discrepancy raises questions about the effects direct gaze may have on concurrent memory tasks. We addressed this topic by employing a change detection paradigm, where participants retained information about the color of small sets of agents. Experiment 1 revealed that, despite the irrelevance of the agents' eye gaze to the memory task at hand, participants were worse at detecting changes when the agents looked directly at them compared to when the agents looked away. Experiment 2 showed that the disruptive effect was relatively short-lived. Prolonged presentation of direct gaze led to recovery from the initial disruption, rather than a sustained disruption on change detection performance. The present study provides the first evidence that direct gaze impairs visual working memory with a rapidly-developing yet short-lived effect even when there is no need to attend to agents' gaze.

  20. Development of gaze following abilities in wolves (Canis lupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Range

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to coordinate with others' head and eye orientation to look in the same direction is considered a key step towards an understanding of others mental states like attention and intention. Here, we investigated the ontogeny and habituation patterns of gaze following into distant space and behind barriers in nine hand-raised wolves. We found that these wolves could use conspecific as well as human gaze cues even in the barrier task, which is thought to be more cognitively advanced than gazing into distant space. Moreover, while gaze following into distant space was already present at the age of 14 weeks and subjects did not habituate to repeated cues, gazing around a barrier developed considerably later and animals quickly habituated, supporting the hypothesis that different cognitive mechanisms may underlie the two gaze following modalities. More importantly, this study demonstrated that following another individuals' gaze around a barrier is not restricted to primates and corvids but is also present in canines, with remarkable between-group similarities in the ontogeny of this behaviour. This sheds new light on the evolutionary origins of and selective pressures on gaze following abilities as well as on the sensitivity of domestic dogs towards human communicative cues.

  1. Segmentation of object-based video of gaze communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghito, Shankar Manuel; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Forchhammer, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Aspects of video communication based on gaze interaction are considered. The overall idea is to use gaze interaction to control video, e.g. for video conferencing. Towards this goal, animation of a facial mask is demonstrated. The animation is based on images using Active Appearance Models (AAM...

  2. Gaze Behavior, Believability, Likability and the iCat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, Mannes; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Meulemans, M.; Nijholt, Antinus; Stock, O.; Nishida, T.

    2007-01-01

    The iCat is a user-interface robot with the ability to express a range of emotions through its facial features. This paper summarizes our research whether we can increase the believability and likability of the iCat for its human partners through the application of gaze behaviour. Gaze behaviour

  3. Gaze Behavior, Believability, Likability and the iCat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Poel, Mannes; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Stock, O.; Nishida, T.; Meulemans, M.; van Bremen, A.

    2009-01-01

    The iCat is a user-interface robot with the ability to express a range of emotions through its facial features. This paper summarizes our research whether we can increase the believability and likability of the iCat for its human partners through the application of gaze behaviour. Gaze behaviour

  4. Therapeutic interventions in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dilip R

    2005-11-01

    Various therapeutic interventions have been used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. Traditional physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely used interventions and have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of cerebral palsy. Evidence in support of the effectiveness of the neurodevelopmental treatment is equivocal at best. There is evidence to support the use and effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in children with cerebral palsy. The effectiveness of many other interventions used in the treatment of cerebral palsy has not been clearly established based on well-controlled trials. These include: sensory integration, body-weight support treadmill training, conductive education, constraint-induced therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and the Vojta method. This article provides an overview of salient aspects of popular interventions used in the management of children with cerebral palsy.

  5. Modelling Virtual Camera Behaviour Through Player Gaze

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Picardi, Andrea; Burelli, Paolo; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2012-01-01

    In a three-dimensional virtual environment, aspects such as narrative and interaction largely depend on the placement and animation of the virtual camera. Therefore, virtual camera control plays a critical role in player experience and, thereby, in the overall quality of a computer game. Both game...... on the relationship between virtual camera, game-play and player behaviour. We run a game user experiment to shed some light on this relationship and identify relevant dif- ferences between camera behaviours through different game sessions, playing behaviours and player gaze patterns. Re- sults show that users can...... be efficiently profiled in dissimilar clusters according to camera control as part of their game- play behaviour....

  6. Learning to interact with a computer by gaze

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aoki, Hirotaka; Hansen, John Paulin; Itoh, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the learning processes that subjects undertake when they start using gaze as computer input. A 7-day experiment with eight Japanese students was carried out to record novice users’ eye movement data during typing of 110 sentences. The experiment revealed...... that inefficient eye movements was dramatically reduced after only 15 to 25 sentences of typing, equal to approximately 3-4 hours of practice. The performance data fits a general learning model based on the power law of practice. The learning model can be used to estimate further improvements in gaze typing...... performance. Our experimental results encourage the use of gaze-based interfaces for severely disabled people. The paper provides a taxonomy for gaze actions on dwell time-activated keys and it presents a method by which the learnability of gaze interfaces may be documented Udgivelsesdato: Juli 2008...

  7. Computer-implemented gaze interaction method and apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A computer-implemented method of communicating via interaction with a user-interface based on a person's gaze and gestures, comprising: computing an estimate of the person's gaze comprising computing a point-of-regard on a display through which the person observes a scene in front of him; by means...... of a scene camera, capturing a first image of a scene in front of the person's head (and at least partially visible on the display) and computing the location of an object coinciding with the person's gaze; by means of the scene camera, capturing at least one further image of the scene in front of the person......'s head, and monitoring whether the gaze dwells on the recognised object; and while gaze dwells on the recognised object: firstly, displaying a user interface element, with a spatial expanse, on the display face in a region adjacent to the point-of-regard; and secondly, during movement of the display...

  8. Treatment of one case of cerebral palsy combined with posterior visual pathway injury using autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Min

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral palsy is currently one of the major diseases that cause severe paralysis of the nervous system in children; approximately 9–30% of cerebral palsy patients are also visually impaired, for which no effective treatment is available. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs have very strong self-renewal, proliferation, and pluripotent differentiation potentials. Therefore, autologous BMSC transplantation has become a novel method for treating cerebral palsy. Methods An 11-year-old boy had a clear history of dystocia and asphyxia after birth; at the age of 6 months, the family members observed that his gaze roamed and noted that he displayed a lack of attention. A brain MRI examination at the age of 7 years showed that the child had cerebral palsy with visual impairment (i.e., posterior visual pathway injury. The patient was hospitalized for 20 days and was given four infusions of intravenous autologous BMSCs. Before transplantation and 1, 6, and 12 months after transplantation, a visual evoked potential test, an electrocardiogram, routine blood tests, and liver and kidney function tests were performed. Results The patient did not have any adverse reactions during hospitalization or postoperative follow-up. After discharge, the patient could walk more smoothly than he could before transplantation; furthermore, his vision significantly improved 6 months after transplantation, which was also supported by the electrophysiological examinations. Conclusions The clinical application of BMSCs is effective for improving vision in a patient with cerebral palsy combined with visual impairment.

  9. Aberrant face and gaze habituation in fragile x syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Jennifer Lynn; Garrett, Amy S; Quintin, Eve-Marie; Mazaika, Paul K; Reiss, Allan L

    2014-10-01

    The authors sought to investigate neural system habituation to face and eye gaze in fragile X syndrome, a disorder characterized by eye-gaze aversion, among other social and cognitive deficits. Participants (ages 15-25 years) were 30 individuals with fragile X syndrome (females, N=14) and a comparison group of 25 individuals without fragile X syndrome (females, N=12) matched for general cognitive ability and autism symptoms. Functional MRI (fMRI) was used to assess brain activation during a gaze habituation task. Participants viewed repeated presentations of four unique faces with either direct or averted eye gaze and judged the direction of eye gaze. Four participants (males, N=4/4; fragile X syndrome, N=3) were excluded because of excessive head motion during fMRI scanning. Behavioral performance did not differ between the groups. Less neural habituation (and significant sensitization) in the fragile X syndrome group was found in the cingulate gyrus, fusiform gyrus, and frontal cortex in response to all faces (direct and averted gaze). Left fusiform habituation in female participants was directly correlated with higher, more typical levels of the fragile X mental retardation protein and inversely correlated with autism symptoms. There was no evidence for differential habituation to direct gaze compared with averted gaze within or between groups. Impaired habituation and accentuated sensitization in response to face/eye gaze was distributed across multiple levels of neural processing. These results could help inform interventions, such as desensitization therapy, which may help patients with fragile X syndrome modulate anxiety and arousal associated with eye gaze, thereby improving social functioning.

  10. Text Entry by Gazing and Smiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Outi Tuisku

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Face Interface is a wearable prototype that combines the use of voluntary gaze direction and facial activations, for pointing and selecting objects on a computer screen, respectively. The aim was to investigate the functionality of the prototype for entering text. First, three on-screen keyboard layout designs were developed and tested (n=10 to find a layout that would be more suitable for text entry with the prototype than traditional QWERTY layout. The task was to enter one word ten times with each of the layouts by pointing letters with gaze and select them by smiling. Subjective ratings showed that a layout with large keys on the edge and small keys near the center of the keyboard was rated as the most enjoyable, clearest, and most functional. Second, using this layout, the aim of the second experiment (n=12 was to compare entering text with Face Interface to entering text with mouse. The results showed that text entry rate for Face Interface was 20 characters per minute (cpm and 27 cpm for the mouse. For Face Interface, keystrokes per character (KSPC value was 1.1 and minimum string distance (MSD error rate was 0.12. These values compare especially well with other similar techniques.

  11. Evaluating gaze-based interface tools to facilitate point-and-select tasks with small targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsgaard, Henrik; Mateo, Julio C.; Hansen, John Paulin

    2011-01-01

    Gaze interaction affords hands-free control of computers. Pointing to and selecting small targets using gaze alone is difficult because of the limited accuracy of gaze pointing. This is the first experimental comparison of gaze-based interface tools for small-target (e.g. <12 × 12 pixels) point-a...

  12. Effects of Victim Gaze Behavior and Prior Relationship on Rape Culpability Attributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Cynthia E.; Wrightsman, Lawrence S.

    1995-01-01

    Rape victims' gaze behavior when identifying a defendant and the prior relationship between victim and defendant were examined for effects on rape culpability attributions. In comparison with victims who used gaze maintenance or natural gaze behavior, rape victims' gaze avoidance was perceived as indicative of less truthfulness rather than…

  13. Are you looking to teach? Cultural, temporal and dynamic insights into expert teacher gaze

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McIntyre, Nora A.; Mainhard, M. Tim; Klassen, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    We know that teachers' gaze patterns affect student learning, that experts and novices differ in their gaze during teaching and that gaze patterns differ by culture in non-educational settings. However, teacher gaze research is limited to Western cultural contexts and largely to laboratory settings.

  14. Clinical practice guideline: Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Reginald F; Basura, Gregory J; Ishii, Lisa E; Schwartz, Seth R; Drumheller, Caitlin Murray; Burkholder, Rebecca; Deckard, Nathan A; Dawson, Cindy; Driscoll, Colin; Gillespie, M Boyd; Gurgel, Richard K; Halperin, John; Khalid, Ayesha N; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Micco, Alan; Munsell, Debra; Rosenbaum, Steven; Vaughan, William

    2013-11-01

    Bell's palsy, named after the Scottish anatomist, Sir Charles Bell, is the most common acute mono-neuropathy, or disorder affecting a single nerve, and is the most common diagnosis associated with facial nerve weakness/paralysis. Bell's palsy is a rapid unilateral facial nerve paresis (weakness) or paralysis (complete loss of movement) of unknown cause. The condition leads to the partial or complete inability to voluntarily move facial muscles on the affected side of the face. Although typically self-limited, the facial paresis/paralysis that occurs in Bell's palsy may cause significant temporary oral incompetence and an inability to close the eyelid, leading to potential eye injury. Additional long-term poor outcomes do occur and can be devastating to the patient. Treatments are generally designed to improve facial function and facilitate recovery. There are myriad treatment options for Bell's palsy, and some controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of several of these options, and there are consequent variations in care. In addition, numerous diagnostic tests available are used in the evaluation of patients with Bell's palsy. Many of these tests are of questionable benefit in Bell's palsy. Furthermore, while patients with Bell's palsy enter the health care system with facial paresis/paralysis as a primary complaint, not all patients with facial paresis/paralysis have Bell's palsy. It is a concern that patients with alternative underlying etiologies may be misdiagnosed or have unnecessary delay in diagnosis. All of these quality concerns provide an important opportunity for improvement in the diagnosis and management of patients with Bell's palsy. The primary purpose of this guideline is to improve the accuracy of diagnosis for Bell's palsy, to improve the quality of care and outcomes for patients with Bell's palsy, and to decrease harmful variations in the evaluation and management of Bell's palsy. This guideline addresses these needs by encouraging

  15. Pontine haemorrhage disguised as Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadan, Ummer; Manappallil, Robin George; Jayakrishnan, Chellenton; Supreeth, Ramesh Naga

    2018-02-05

    Isolated facial nerve palsy is a common presentation of Bell's palsy, but rarely seen in pontine lesions. The patient being reported is a middle-aged man who developed isolated facial nerve palsy and was initially treated as Bell's palsy. However, on MRI of the brain, he was found to have pontine haemorrhage. He was managed conservatively and improved. Pontine haemorrhage as an aetiology for isolated facial nerve palsy is a rare scenario, which often goes misdiagnosed and treated as Bell's palsy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Learn More About Cerebral Palsy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-03-30

    This podcast describes the causes, preventions, types, and signs and symptoms of cerebral palsy.  Created: 3/30/2008 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities.   Date Released: 3/21/2008.

  17. NEYROPSYCHOLOGICAL CONSECUENCES OF CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MARÍA NAVARRO MELENDRO

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral Palsy is defined as a movement alteration result of a non progressive damage witch is permanent in anencephalon that has not acquired its final maturation. Patients that suffer cerebral palsy present learning disabilities,that varies between being completely normal to severe as a consequence of memory, gnosis, praxis, perceptive andlanguage impairments. Nevertheless the consequences of this disease are not always predictable. This paper pretendsto make a description of the cognitive and behavioral deficits that overcomes along with the manifestation of thecerebral palsy and its possible treatment. We used a complete neuropsychological battery to evaluate a 7 years oldpatient who was diagnosed of cerebral palsy and spastic diplegia finding some cognitive impairment in fields such asmnesic, gnosic and attention processes.

  18. Neurocysticercosis presenting as pseudobulbar palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arinaganahalli Subbanna Praveen Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis (NCC is the most common helminthic infestation of the central nervous system (CNS and a leading cause of acquired epilepsy worldwide. The common manifestations of NCC are seizures and headache. The NCC as a cause of pseudobulbar palsy is very unusual and not reported yet in the literature. A pseudobulbar palsy can occur in any disorder that causes bilateral corticobulbar disease. The common etiologies of pseudobulbar palsy are vascular, demyelinative, or motor neuron disease. We report a 38-year-old female patient who presented with partial seizures and pseudobulbar palsy. The MRI brain showed multiple small cysts with scolex in both the cerebral hemispheres and a giant intraparenchymal cyst. Our patient responded well to standard treatment of neurocysticercosis and antiepileptics.

  19. Eye gaze technology: a South African perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Niekerk, Karin; Tönsing, Kerstin

    2015-07-01

    Based on the bioecological model by Bronfenbrenner, this paper will provide a broad perspective on factors that need to be taken into account in order to facilitate communication and participation in preliterate children making use of electronic Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) systems accessed through eye gaze. Two case studies of children who have been provided with the technology described are presented. The case studies were analysed using the four nested systems of the ecology as a framework to describe not only the environment, but also the processes and interactions between the persons and their context. Risk and opportunity factors are evident at all levels of the ecology. While a good fit between the person and the technology is an essential starting point, additional factors pertaining to the partner, the immediate environment as well as meso-, exo- and macrosystemic issues (such as societal attitudes and funding sources) have a significant influence on benefits derived. In resource-limited environments, the lack of support at more distal levels of the ecology (meso-, exo- and marosystemic levels) seems to be a factor that differentiates these environments from more resourced ones. Implications for Rehabilitation Within resource-limited environments lack of support from wider ecological systems pose a risk to the implementation of eye gaze technology. Attempts to improve collaboration between all role players could provide the opportunity for the establishment of an integrated plan for intervention and set the stage for information sharing and multiskilling between role players. Intervention should not only be aimed at addressing the needs of the individual client and their family, but also focus on building community capacity that could provide support to others.

  20. Convergence palsy secondary to amoxicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Roca, F; Alfaro Juárez, A; Sánchez Merino, C; Navarro Mingorance, A

    2016-12-01

    We present the case of an 11-year-old boy with acute diplopia in near vision secondary to transient convergence palsy, possibly in relation to amoxicillin. Convergence palsy is an uncommon eye disorder. The causes are reviewed, and amoxicilin is identified as presumptive etiologic agent. This is the first case reported. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. MR imaging of cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saginoya, Toshiyuki [Urasoe General Hospital, Okinawa (Japan); Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Kuniyoshi, Kazuhide [and others

    1996-06-01

    We evaluated 35 patients with cerebral palsy on the basis of MR imaging findings in the brain. The types of palsy were spastic quadriplegia (n=11), spastic diplegia (n=9), spastic hemiplegia (n=2), double hemiplegia (n=1), athetosis (n=10) and mixed (n=2). Of all patients, 28 (80%) generated abnormal findings. In spastic quadriplegia, although eight cases revealed severe brain damage, two cases showed no abnormal findings in the brain. One of the three had cervical cord compression caused by atlanto-axial subluxation. In spastic diplegia, the findings were divided according to whether the patient was born at term or preterm. If the patient had been born prematurely, the findings showed periventricular leukomalacia and abnormally high intensity in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule on T2-weighted images. MR imaging in spastic hemiplegia revealed cerebral infarction. In the athetoid type, half of all cases showed either no abnormal findings or slight widening of the lateral ventricle. Three cases showed abnormal signals of the basal ganglia. The reason why athetoid-type palsy did not show severe abnormality is unknown. We believe that MR imaging is a useful diagnostic modality to detect damage in the brain in cerebral palsy and plays an important role in the differentiation of cerebral palsy from the spastic palsy disease. (author)

  2. The Politics of the Gaze Foucault, Lacan and Zizek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Krips

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Joan Copjec accuses orthodox film theory of misrepresenting the Lacanian gaze by assimilating it to Foucauldian panopticon (Copjec 1994: 18-19. Although Copjec is correct that orthodox film theory misrepresents the Lacanian gaze, she, in turn, misrepresents Foucault by choosing to focus exclusively upon those as-pects of his work on the panopticon that have been taken up by orthodox film the-ory (Copjec 1994: 4. In so doing, I argue, Copjec misses key parallels between the Lacanian and Foucauldian concepts of the gaze. More than a narrow academic dispute about how to read Foucault and Lacan, this debate has wider political sig-nificance. In particular, using Slavoj Zizek's work, I show that a correct account of the panoptic gaze leads us to rethink the question of how to oppose modern techniques of surveillance.

  3. Gender moderates the relationship between emotion and perceived gaze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepian, Michael L; Weisbuch, Max; Adams, Reginald B; Ambady, Nalini

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence shows that gender modulates the morphology of facial expressions and might thus alter the meaning of those expressions. Consequently, we hypothesized that gender would moderate the relationship between facial expressions and the perception of direct gaze. In Study 1, participants viewed male and female faces exhibiting joy, anger, fear, and neutral expressions displayed with direct and averted gazes. Perceptions of direct gaze were most likely for male faces expressing anger or joy and for female faces expressing joy. Study 2 established that these results were due to facial morphology and not to gender stereotypes. Thus, the morphology of male and female faces amplifies or constrains emotional signals and accordingly alters gaze perception. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. The Rethorics of Gaze in Luhrmann's "Postmodern Great Gatsby"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Fallerini

    2014-05-01

    Adopting the perspective suggested by the rhetoric of the gaze (Laura Mulvey it is highlighted the metalinguistic and metatextual reflection through which this movie contributes to the critical interpretation of Fitzgerald’s novel.

  5. Latvian government in double jeopardy with EU, Latvijas Gaze

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Läti soovib saada Euroopa Komisjonilt ajapikendust gaasituru liberaliseerimiseks 2010. aastani ning lubab sel juhul sõlmida Latvijas Gaze'ga kokkuleppe, et viimane loobuks gaasitarnete ainuõigusest Lätis

  6. Chromium based Framework to include Gaze Interaction in Web Browser

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Chandan; Menges, Raphael; Müller, Daniel; Staab, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    EnablingWeb interaction by non-conventional input sources like eyes has great potential to enhance Web accessibility. In this paper, we present a Chromium based inclusive framework to adapt eye gaze events in Web interfaces. The frameworkprovides more utility and control to develop a full featured interactive browser, compared to the related approaches of additional mouse and keyboard emulation orbrowser extensions. We demonstrate the framework through a sophisticated gaze driven Web browser,...

  7. The sensation of the look: The gazes in Laurence Anyways

    OpenAIRE

    Schultz, Corey Kai Nelson

    2018-01-01

    This article analyses the gazes, looks, stares and glares in Laurence Anyways (Xavier Dolan, 2012), and examines their affective, interpretive, and symbolic qualities, and their potential to create viewer empathy through affect. The cinematic gaze can produce sensations of shame and fear, by offering a sequence of varied “encounters” to which viewers can react, before we have been given a character onto which we can deflect them, thus bypassing the representational, narrative and even the sym...

  8. 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Button Past Emails 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common motor disability in ...

  9. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the ...

  10. Direct Speaker Gaze Promotes Trust in Truth-Ambiguous Statements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Kreysa

    Full Text Available A speaker's gaze behaviour can provide perceivers with a multitude of cues which are relevant for communication, thus constituting an important non-verbal interaction channel. The present study investigated whether direct eye gaze of a speaker affects the likelihood of listeners believing truth-ambiguous statements. Participants were presented with videos in which a speaker produced such statements with either direct or averted gaze. The statements were selected through a rating study to ensure that participants were unlikely to know a-priori whether they were true or not (e.g., "sniffer dogs cannot smell the difference between identical twins". Participants indicated in a forced-choice task whether or not they believed each statement. We found that participants were more likely to believe statements by a speaker looking at them directly, compared to a speaker with averted gaze. Moreover, when participants disagreed with a statement, they were slower to do so when the statement was uttered with direct (compared to averted gaze, suggesting that the process of rejecting a statement as untrue may be inhibited when that statement is accompanied by direct gaze.

  11. Control of gaze while walking: Task structure, reward, and uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Matthew H.; Zohar, Oran; Hayhoe, Mary M.

    2017-01-01

    While it is universally acknowledged that both bottom up and top down factors contribute to allocation of gaze, we currently have limited understanding of how top-down factors determine gaze choices in the context of ongoing natural behavior. One purely top-down model by Sprague, Ballard, and Robinson (2007) suggests that natural behaviors can be understood in terms of simple component behaviors, or modules, that are executed according to their reward value, with gaze targets chosen in order to reduce uncertainty about the particular world state needed to execute those behaviors. We explore the plausibility of the central claims of this approach in the context of a task where subjects walk through a virtual environment performing interceptions, avoidance, and path following. Many aspects of both walking direction choices and gaze allocation are consistent with this approach. Subjects use gaze to reduce uncertainty for task-relevant information that is used to inform action choices. Notably the addition of motion to peripheral objects did not affect fixations when the objects were irrelevant to the task, suggesting that stimulus saliency was not a major factor in gaze allocation. The modular approach of independent component behaviors is consistent with the main aspects of performance, but there were a number of deviations suggesting that modules interact. Thus the model forms a useful, but incomplete, starting point for understanding top-down factors in active behavior. PMID:28114501

  12. Bases para o cuidado de idosos portadores de Paralisia Supra-Nuclear Progressiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Vilas Boas Oliveira

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Doenças crônico-degenerativas acometem parcela significativa de idosos, constituindo-se em importante problema de saúde pública, considerando-se o envelhecimento populacional em todo o mundo. Em particular, aquelas que trazem limitações e incapacidades funcionais são as que mais comprometem a qualidade de vida, especialmente, quando causam dependência para atividades de vida diária. Com o avanço da ciência, algumas dessas doenças são descobertas recentes, trazendo aos profissionais dúvidas quanto ao seu manejo. A paralisia supra-nuclear progressiva (PSP se constitui em uma delas e é objetode estudo do presente artigo de atualização, cujo objetivo foi descrever a PSP, bem como alguns aspectos que dão base paracuidado de idosos portadores dessa patologia. O texto traz inicialmente informações sobre o histórico da doença, suaprevalência, etiologia, diagnóstico e características clínicas. Em seguida discute a necessidade de uma abordagem multidisciplinar no acompanhamento do portador de PSP, bem como explora algumas questões relacionadas aos cuidados que devem ser dirigidos aos familiares. Considerando-se a natureza rara da doença, fica evidente a necessidade dos profissionais de saúde estar atentos aos sinais de instalação da doença para que seu diagnóstico seja precoce e o acompanhamento iniciado o mais rápido possível, evitando-se assim danos irreversíveis, especialmente relacionados a quedas e aspiração.

  13. Isolated trochlear nerve palsy with midbrain hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain hemorrhage causing isolated fourth nerve palsy is extremely rare. Idiopathic, traumatic and congenital abnormalities are the most common causes of fourth nerve palsy. We report acute isolated fourth nerve palsy in an 18-year-old lady due to a midbrain hemorrhage probably due to a midbrain cavernoma. The case highlights the need for neuroimaging in selected cases of isolated trochlear nerve palsy.

  14. Judgments at Gaze Value: Gaze Cuing in Banner Advertisements, Its Effect on Attention Allocation and Product Judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palcu, Johanna; Sudkamp, Jennifer; Florack, Arnd

    2017-01-01

    Banner advertising is a popular means of promoting products and brands online. Although banner advertisements are often designed to be particularly attention grabbing, they frequently go unnoticed. Applying an eye-tracking procedure, the present research aimed to (a) determine whether presenting human faces (static or animated) in banner advertisements is an adequate tool for capturing consumers' attention and thus overcoming the frequently observed phenomenon of banner blindness, (b) to examine whether the gaze of a featured face possesses the ability to direct consumers' attention toward specific elements (i.e., the product) in an advertisement, and (c) to establish whether the gaze direction of an advertised face influences consumers subsequent evaluation of the advertised product. We recorded participants' eye gaze while they viewed a fictional online shopping page displaying banner advertisements that featured either no human face or a human face that was either static or animated and involved different gaze directions (toward or away from the advertised product). Moreover, we asked participants to subsequently evaluate a set of products, one of which was the product previously featured in the banner advertisement. Results showed that, when advertisements included a human face, participants' attention was more attracted by and they looked longer at animated compared with static banner advertisements. Moreover, when a face gazed toward the product region, participants' likelihood of looking at the advertised product increased regardless of whether the face was animated or not. Most important, gaze direction influenced subsequent product evaluations; that is, consumers indicated a higher intention to buy a product when it was previously presented in a banner advertisement that featured a face that gazed toward the product. The results suggest that while animation in banner advertising constitutes a salient feature that captures consumers' visual attention, gaze

  15. Judgments at Gaze Value: Gaze Cuing in Banner Advertisements, Its Effect on Attention Allocation and Product Judgments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Palcu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Banner advertising is a popular means of promoting products and brands online. Although banner advertisements are often designed to be particularly attention grabbing, they frequently go unnoticed. Applying an eye-tracking procedure, the present research aimed to (a determine whether presenting human faces (static or animated in banner advertisements is an adequate tool for capturing consumers’ attention and thus overcoming the frequently observed phenomenon of banner blindness, (b to examine whether the gaze of a featured face possesses the ability to direct consumers’ attention toward specific elements (i.e., the product in an advertisement, and (c to establish whether the gaze direction of an advertised face influences consumers subsequent evaluation of the advertised product. We recorded participants’ eye gaze while they viewed a fictional online shopping page displaying banner advertisements that featured either no human face or a human face that was either static or animated and involved different gaze directions (toward or away from the advertised product. Moreover, we asked participants to subsequently evaluate a set of products, one of which was the product previously featured in the banner advertisement. Results showed that, when advertisements included a human face, participants’ attention was more attracted by and they looked longer at animated compared with static banner advertisements. Moreover, when a face gazed toward the product region, participants’ likelihood of looking at the advertised product increased regardless of whether the face was animated or not. Most important, gaze direction influenced subsequent product evaluations; that is, consumers indicated a higher intention to buy a product when it was previously presented in a banner advertisement that featured a face that gazed toward the product. The results suggest that while animation in banner advertising constitutes a salient feature that captures consumers

  16. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  17. VII NERVE PALSY — EVALUATION AND MANAGEMENT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    The prevalence of facial palsy in the general population is about 1:5 000, mak- ing it a common-enough clinical entity for all general practitioners to be familiar with.1,2 In most cases no definite aetiology is identified (idiopathic/Bell's palsy). The diagnosis of an idiopathic palsy however can only be made by excluding all.

  18. Perceptual Training in Beach Volleyball Defence: Different Effects of Gaze-Path Cueing on Gaze and Decision-Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André eKlostermann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available For perceptual-cognitive skill training, a variety of intervention methods has been proposed, including the so-called colour-cueing method which aims on superior gaze-path learning by applying visual markers. However, recent findings challenge this method, especially, with regards to its actual effects on gaze behaviour. Consequently, after a preparatory study on the identification of appropriate visual cues for life-size displays, a perceptual-training experiment on decision-making in beach volleyball was conducted, contrasting two cueing interventions (functional vs. dysfunctional gaze path with a conservative control condition (anticipation-related instructions. Gaze analyses revealed learning effects for the dysfunctional group only. Regarding decision-making, all groups showed enhanced performance with largest improvements for the control group followed by the functional and the dysfunctional group. Hence, the results confirm cueing effects on gaze behaviour, but they also question its benefit for enhancing decision-making. However, before completely denying the method’s value, optimisations should be checked regarding, for instance, cueing-pattern characteristics and gaze-related feedback.

  19. Eagle's syndrome with facial palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al-Hashim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eagle's syndrome (ES is a rare disease in which the styloid process is elongated and compressing adjacent structures. We describe a rare presentation of ES in which the patient presented with facial palsy. Facial palsy as a presentation of ES is very rare. A review of the English literature revealed only one previously reported case. Our case is a 39-year-old male who presented with left facial palsy. He also reported a 9-year history of the classical symptoms of ES. A computed tomography scan with three-dimensional reconstruction confirmed the diagnoses. He was started on conservative management but without significant improvement. Surgical intervention was offered, but the patient refused. It is important for otolaryngologists, dentists, and other specialists who deal with head and neck problems to be able to recognize ES despite its rarity. Although the patient responded to a treatment similar to that of Bell's palsy because of the clinical features and imaging, ES was most likely the cause of his facial palsy.

  20. The center of attention: Metamers, sensitivity, and bias in the emergent perception of gaze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeny, Timothy D; Whitney, David

    2017-02-01

    A person's gaze reveals much about their focus of attention and intentions. Sensitive perception of gaze is thus highly relevant for social interaction, especially when it is directed toward the viewer. Yet observers also tend to overestimate the likelihood that gaze is directed toward them. How might the visual system balance these competing goals, maximizing sensitivity for discriminating gazes that are relatively direct, while at the same time allowing many gazes to appear as if they look toward the viewer? Perceiving gaze is an emergent visual process that involves integrating information from the eyes with the rotation of the head. Here, we examined whether the visual system leverages emergent representation to balance these competing goals. We measured perceived gaze for a large range of pupil and head combinations and found that head rotation has a nonlinear influence on a person's apparent direction of looking, especially when pupil rotations are relatively direct. These perceptual distortions could serve to expand representational space and thereby enhance discriminability of gazes that are relatively direct. We also found that the emergent perception of gaze supports an abundance of direct gaze metamers-different combinations of head and pupil rotations that combine to generate the appearance of gaze directed toward the observer. Our results thus demonstrate a way in which the visual system flexibly integrates information from facial features to optimize social perception. Many gazes can be made to look toward you, yet similar gazes need not appear alike. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pattern of facial palsy in a typical Nigerian specialist hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Right sided facial palsy (52.2%) was predominant. Incidence of facial palsy was highest in 2003 (25.3%) and decreased from 2004. Conclusion: It was concluded that the incidence of facial palsy was high and Bell's palsy remains the most common causes of facial (nerve) paralysis. Key words: Incidence, facial palsy, Bell's ...

  2. Transperance Me I Want to be Visible: Gay Gaze in Tom Ford’s film A Single Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selen Gokcem

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Classic gaze theory that was underlined by Laura Mulvey in 1975 which claims the male gaze objectifies woman and turns the woman into a sex object, is lack in the explaining gaze from man to man. In Tom Ford’s A Single Man the gaze is used from man to man different from man to woman and it is not perceived as something negative. By providing a queer gaze analysis, this article will show how homosexual people live their intimate feelings by gaze and how gay gaze can be different from the classic gaze in a way that it does not reduces the other one in an interior position.

  3. [Advances in genetic research of cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang-Fang; Luo, Rong; Qu, Yi; Mu, De-Zhi

    2017-09-01

    Cerebral palsy is a group of syndromes caused by non-progressive brain injury in the fetus or infant and can cause disabilities in childhood. Etiology of cerebral palsy has always been a hot topic for clinical scientists. More and more studies have shown that genetic factors are closely associated with the development of cerebral palsy. With the development and application of various molecular and biological techniques such as chromosome microarray analysis, genome-wide association study, and whole exome sequencing, new achievements have been made in the genetic research of cerebral palsy. Chromosome abnormalities, copy number variations, susceptibility genes, and single gene mutation associated with the development of cerebral palsy have been identified, which provides new opportunities for the research on the pathogenesis of cerebral palsy. This article reviews the advances in the genetic research on cerebral palsy in recent years.

  4. Clinical studies on Bell's palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yoshio

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of the salivary gland scintigraphy using sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate for the prognosis of Bell's palsy. The salivary gland scintigraphy was performed in 40 patients with Bell's palsy and 15 normal subjects. After intravenous injection of 10 mCt of sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate, sequential scintigrams were taken with a scintillation camera every one minute for 25 minutes. At 15 minutes after injection, both of normal subjects and patients were given ascorbic acid to stimulate the secretion of saliva. By the present method, the time activity curve was examined for the regions of interest over the parotid and submandibular glands and backgrounds. In normal subjects, values of the concentration and excretory ratio between the right and left sides of the parotid and submandibular glands were more than 80%. Some patients with Bell's palsy showed a decreased concentration and/or excretory ratio less than 80% between the normal and affected sides of the parotid glands. This suggests a functional involvement of the facial nerve in the salivary secretion from the parotid glands. On examination within 10 days of the onset of Bell's palsy, 31 cases with complete recovery showed values of the concentration ratio and/or excretory ratio more than 80% between the normal and affected sides of the submandibular glands. In contrast, 9 cases with imcomplete recovery showed low values of the concentration ratio and excretory ratio less than 80%. In the latter, more active treatments such as decompression operation should be considerd in the early stage of the palsy. The salivary scintigraphy using sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate is more valuable as an early prognostic indicator for Bell's palsy compared with other prognostic tests such as the lid vibration test, the stapedial reflex test, the electrogustometry, the nerve excitability test and the evoked electromyography. (author)

  5. Eye gaze triggers reflexive attention shifts: evidence from lateralised ERPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qing; Zhang, Xuemin

    2014-11-17

    Social cues, such as another individual׳s eye gaze, provide valuable information regarding the actions and intentions of others. Previous studies have suggested that seeing another׳s gaze automatically orients one׳s attention in the gaze direction. In this event-related potential (ERP) study, a spatial cuing paradigm was combined with a visual search task in which targets were defined by feature conjunctions in order to eliminate effects of target/distractor salience. Participants viewed centrally presented faces with neutral expressions in which eyes looked to the left or right. The participants׳ task was to identify a target object (with or without gap) defined by a combination of shape and orientation, which appeared in either the same (cued) or the opposite (uncued) location as the direction of the eye gaze. There was behavioural evidence of a gaze congruency effect, as reaction times (RTs) were faster when the eyes looked towards the target rather than away from the location of the target. The ERP data indicated the presence of significant gaze-congruent early directing attention negativity (EDAN) and anterior directing attention negativity (ADAN), reflecting attention shifts to the cued location in advance of the target presentation. ERP data did not show evidence of later orienting of attention triggered by gaze cues in the late attention-directing attention positivity (LDAP) at posterior sites. The results disclosed the neural response during reflexive attention shifting triggered by gazes and ascertained the relationship among EDAN, ADAN, LDAP and gaze-elicited attention shifts. After the presentation of the target array without salient stimuli, the presence of the N2-posterior-contralateral (N2pc) in the cued trials and the absence in the uncued trials further supported that attention had been directed to the possible target location prior to the target onset. The ERPs in response to the target array also extend our understanding of the neural

  6. A comparison of facial color pattern and gazing behavior in canid species suggests gaze communication in gray wolves (Canis lupus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Sayoko; Kumagai, Gaku; Otaki, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Shinya; Kohshima, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    As facial color pattern around the eyes has been suggested to serve various adaptive functions related to the gaze signal, we compared the patterns among 25 canid species, focusing on the gaze signal, to estimate the function of facial color pattern in these species. The facial color patterns of the studied species could be categorized into the following three types based on contrast indices relating to the gaze signal: A-type (both pupil position in the eye outline and eye position in the face are clear), B-type (only the eye position is clear), and C-type (both the pupil and eye position are unclear). A-type faces with light-colored irises were observed in most studied species of the wolf-like clade and some of the red fox-like clade. A-type faces tended to be observed in species living in family groups all year-round, whereas B-type faces tended to be seen in solo/pair-living species. The duration of gazing behavior during which the facial gaze-signal is displayed to the other individual was longest in gray wolves with typical A-type faces, of intermediate length in fennec foxes with typical B-type faces, and shortest in bush dogs with typical C-type faces. These results suggest that the facial color pattern of canid species is related to their gaze communication and that canids with A-type faces, especially gray wolves, use the gaze signal in conspecific communication.

  7. A comparison of facial color pattern and gazing behavior in canid species suggests gaze communication in gray wolves (Canis lupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayoko Ueda

    Full Text Available As facial color pattern around the eyes has been suggested to serve various adaptive functions related to the gaze signal, we compared the patterns among 25 canid species, focusing on the gaze signal, to estimate the function of facial color pattern in these species. The facial color patterns of the studied species could be categorized into the following three types based on contrast indices relating to the gaze signal: A-type (both pupil position in the eye outline and eye position in the face are clear, B-type (only the eye position is clear, and C-type (both the pupil and eye position are unclear. A-type faces with light-colored irises were observed in most studied species of the wolf-like clade and some of the red fox-like clade. A-type faces tended to be observed in species living in family groups all year-round, whereas B-type faces tended to be seen in solo/pair-living species. The duration of gazing behavior during which the facial gaze-signal is displayed to the other individual was longest in gray wolves with typical A-type faces, of intermediate length in fennec foxes with typical B-type faces, and shortest in bush dogs with typical C-type faces. These results suggest that the facial color pattern of canid species is related to their gaze communication and that canids with A-type faces, especially gray wolves, use the gaze signal in conspecific communication.

  8. Perceived Gaze Direction Modulates Neural Processing of Prosocial Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Delin; Shao, Robin; Wang, Zhaoxin; Lee, Tatia M C

    2018-01-01

    Gaze direction is a common social cue implying potential interpersonal interaction. However, little is known about the neural processing of social decision making influenced by perceived gaze direction. Here, we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) method to investigate 27 females when they were engaging in an economic exchange game task during which photos of direct or averted eye gaze were shown. We found that, when averted but not direct gaze was presented, prosocial vs. selfish choices were associated with stronger activations in the right superior temporal gyrus (STG) as well as larger functional couplings between right STG and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). Moreover, stronger activations in right STG was associated with quicker actions for making prosocial choice accompanied with averted gaze. The findings suggest that, when the cue implying social contact is absent, the processing of understanding others' intention and the relationship between self and others is more involved for making prosocial than selfish decisions. These findings could advance our understanding of the roles of subtle cues in influencing prosocial decision making, as well as shedding lights on deficient social cue processing and functioning among individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

  9. Investigating gaze of children with ASD in naturalistic settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basilio Noris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual behavior is known to be atypical in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD. Monitor-based eye-tracking studies have measured several of these atypicalities in individuals with Autism. While atypical behaviors are known to be accentuated during natural interactions, few studies have been made on gaze behavior in natural interactions. In this study we focused on i whether the findings done in laboratory settings are also visible in a naturalistic interaction; ii whether new atypical elements appear when studying visual behavior across the whole field of view. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ten children with ASD and ten typically developing children participated in a dyadic interaction with an experimenter administering items from the Early Social Communication Scale (ESCS. The children wore a novel head-mounted eye-tracker, measuring gaze direction and presence of faces across the child's field of view. The analysis of gaze episodes to faces revealed that children with ASD looked significantly less and for shorter lapses of time at the experimenter. The analysis of gaze patterns across the child's field of view revealed that children with ASD looked downwards and made more extensive use of their lateral field of view when exploring the environment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data gathered in naturalistic settings confirm findings previously obtained only in monitor-based studies. Moreover, the study allowed to observe a generalized strategy of lateral gaze in children with ASD when they were looking at the objects in their environment.

  10. Live interaction distinctively shapes social gaze dynamics in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Monte, Olga; Piva, Matthew; Morris, Jason A; Chang, Steve W C

    2016-10-01

    The dynamic interaction of gaze between individuals is a hallmark of social cognition. However, very few studies have examined social gaze dynamics after mutual eye contact during real-time interactions. We used a highly quantifiable paradigm to assess social gaze dynamics between pairs of monkeys and modeled these dynamics using an exponential decay function to investigate sustained attention after mutual eye contact. When monkeys were interacting with real partners compared with static images and movies of the same monkeys, we found a significant increase in the proportion of fixations to the eyes and a smaller dispersion of fixations around the eyes, indicating enhanced focal attention to the eye region. Notably, dominance and familiarity between the interacting pairs induced separable components of gaze dynamics that were unique to live interactions. Gaze dynamics of dominant monkeys after mutual eye contact were associated with a greater number of fixations to the eyes, whereas those of familiar pairs were associated with a faster rate of decrease in this eye-directed attention. Our findings endorse the notion that certain key aspects of social cognition are only captured during interactive social contexts and dependent on the elapsed time relative to socially meaningful events. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Investigating Gaze of Children with ASD in Naturalistic Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noris, Basilio; Nadel, Jacqueline; Barker, Mandy; Hadjikhani, Nouchine; Billard, Aude

    2012-01-01

    Background Visual behavior is known to be atypical in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Monitor-based eye-tracking studies have measured several of these atypicalities in individuals with Autism. While atypical behaviors are known to be accentuated during natural interactions, few studies have been made on gaze behavior in natural interactions. In this study we focused on i) whether the findings done in laboratory settings are also visible in a naturalistic interaction; ii) whether new atypical elements appear when studying visual behavior across the whole field of view. Methodology/Principal Findings Ten children with ASD and ten typically developing children participated in a dyadic interaction with an experimenter administering items from the Early Social Communication Scale (ESCS). The children wore a novel head-mounted eye-tracker, measuring gaze direction and presence of faces across the child's field of view. The analysis of gaze episodes to faces revealed that children with ASD looked significantly less and for shorter lapses of time at the experimenter. The analysis of gaze patterns across the child's field of view revealed that children with ASD looked downwards and made more extensive use of their lateral field of view when exploring the environment. Conclusions/Significance The data gathered in naturalistic settings confirm findings previously obtained only in monitor-based studies. Moreover, the study allowed to observe a generalized strategy of lateral gaze in children with ASD when they were looking at the objects in their environment. PMID:23028494

  12. Perceived Gaze Direction Modulates Neural Processing of Prosocial Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delin Sun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Gaze direction is a common social cue implying potential interpersonal interaction. However, little is known about the neural processing of social decision making influenced by perceived gaze direction. Here, we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI method to investigate 27 females when they were engaging in an economic exchange game task during which photos of direct or averted eye gaze were shown. We found that, when averted but not direct gaze was presented, prosocial vs. selfish choices were associated with stronger activations in the right superior temporal gyrus (STG as well as larger functional couplings between right STG and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC. Moreover, stronger activations in right STG was associated with quicker actions for making prosocial choice accompanied with averted gaze. The findings suggest that, when the cue implying social contact is absent, the processing of understanding others’ intention and the relationship between self and others is more involved for making prosocial than selfish decisions. These findings could advance our understanding of the roles of subtle cues in influencing prosocial decision making, as well as shedding lights on deficient social cue processing and functioning among individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD.

  13. Ocular-muscle surgery for filamentary keratitis that developed in double elevator palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieda, Osamu; Yokoi, Norihiko; Sotozono, Chie

    2017-01-01

    To report a case of filamentary keratitis occurring in the cornea hidden under the eyelids by squint surgery. A 69-year-old female patient with a history of amblyopia was referred for intractable filamentary keratitis in the left eye. The strabismus angle was 35Δ hypertrophic, and ocular motility was within the normal range. Slit-lamp examination of her left eye revealed filamentary keratitis in more than one-third of the upper cornea behind the upper eyelid. Her right eye was diagnosed as supranuclear double elevator palsy. We performed strabismus surgery on her right eye, including inferior rectus muscle recession (5 mm) in combination with superior rectus muscle resection (5 mm) under local anesthesia. Following surgery, the left eye squint angle was improved. The filamentary keratitis of the left eye disappeared, and there was no recurrence over the following 5 years. The squint surgery of paralyzed right eye decreased the strabismus angle, subsequently resulting in the disappearance of the filamentary keratitis in the left eye via the resolution of the relative blepharoptosis. Although the squint operation performed was not for the purpose of improving binocular function, we want to conclude that it can treat the filamentary keratitis behind the eyelid.

  14. [Palsy of the upper limb: Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, arthrogryposis, cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazard, B; Philandrianos, C; Tekpa, B

    2016-10-01

    "Palsy of the upper limb" in children includes various diseases which leads to hypomobility of the member: cerebral palsy, arthrogryposis and obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. These pathologies which differ on brain damage or not, have the same consequences due to the early achievement: negligence, stiffness and deformities. Regular entire clinical examination of the member, an assessment of needs in daily life, knowledge of the social and family environment, are key points for management. In these pathologies, the rehabilitation is an emergency, which began at birth and intensively. Splints and physiotherapy are part of the treatment. Surgery may have a functional goal, hygienic or aesthetic in different situations. The main goals of surgery are to treat: joints stiffness, bones deformities, muscles contractures and spasticity, paresis, ligamentous laxity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Archetypal-Imaging and Mirror-Gazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Giovanni B.

    2013-01-01

    Mirrors have been studied by cognitive psychology in order to understand self-recognition, self-identity, and self-consciousness. Moreover, the relevance of mirrors in spirituality, magic and arts may also suggest that mirrors can be symbols of unconscious contents. Carl G. Jung investigated mirrors in relation to the unconscious, particularly in Psychology and Alchemy. However, the relationship between the conscious behavior in front of a mirror and the unconscious meaning of mirrors has not been clarified. Recently, empirical research found that gazing at one’s own face in the mirror for a few minutes, at a low illumination level, produces the perception of bodily dysmorphic illusions of strange-faces. Healthy observers usually describe huge distortions of their own faces, monstrous beings, prototypical faces, faces of relatives and deceased, and faces of animals. In the psychiatric population, some schizophrenics show a dramatic increase of strange-face illusions. They can also describe the perception of multiple-others that fill the mirror surface surrounding their strange-face. Schizophrenics are usually convinced that strange-face illusions are truly real and identify themselves with strange-face illusions, diversely from healthy individuals who never identify with them. On the contrary, most patients with major depression do not perceive strange-face illusions, or they perceive very faint changes of their immobile faces in the mirror, like death statues. Strange-face illusions may be the psychodynamic projection of the subject’s unconscious archetypal contents into the mirror image. Therefore, strange-face illusions might provide both an ecological setting and an experimental technique for “imaging of the unconscious”. Future researches have been proposed. PMID:25379264

  16. Archetypal-Imaging and Mirror-Gazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni B. Caputo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Mirrors have been studied by cognitive psychology in order to understand self-recognition, self-identity, and self-consciousness. Moreover, the relevance of mirrors in spirituality, magic and arts may also suggest that mirrors can be symbols of unconscious contents. Carl G. Jung investigated mirrors in relation to the unconscious, particularly in Psychology and Alchemy. However, the relationship between the conscious behavior in front of a mirror and the unconscious meaning of mirrors has not been clarified. Recently, empirical research found that gazing at one’s own face in the mirror for a few minutes, at a low illumination level, produces the perception of bodily dysmorphic illusions of strange-faces. Healthy observers usually describe huge distortions of their own faces, monstrous beings, prototypical faces, faces of relatives and deceased, and faces of animals. In the psychiatric population, some schizophrenics show a dramatic increase of strange-face illusions. They can also describe the perception of multiple-others that fill the mirror surface surrounding their strange-face. Schizophrenics are usually convinced that strange-face illusions are truly real and identify themselves with strange-face illusions, diversely from healthy individuals who never identify with them. On the contrary, most patients with major depression do not perceive strange-face illusions, or they perceive very faint changes of their immobile faces in the mirror, like death statues. Strange-face illusions may be the psychodynamic projection of the subject’s unconscious archetypal contents into the mirror image. Therefore, strange-face illusions might provide both an ecological setting and an experimental technique for “imaging of the unconscious”. Future researches have been proposed.

  17. Utilizing Gaze Behavior for Inferring Task Transitions Using Abstract Hidden Markov Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fernando Tello Gamarra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate an improved method for utilizing observed gaze behavior and show that it is useful in inferring hand movement intent during goal directed tasks. The task dynamics and the relationship between hand and gaze behavior are learned using an Abstract Hidden Markov Model (AHMM. We show that the predicted hand movement transitions occur consistently earlier in AHMM models with gaze than those models that do not include gaze observations.

  18. Facial palsy in Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome and Bell's palsy: familial history and recurrence tendency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baochun; Zhou, Chengyong; Han, Zeli

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare genetic predilection and recurrence tendency between facial palsy in Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome (MRS) and Bell's palsy We carried out an investigation on patients with facial palsy in MRS and those with Bell's palsy who visited the outpatient department in our hospital between February 2009 and February 2013. They were asked about familial history and whether it was the first episode, with the results recorded and compared. There were 16 patients with facial palsy in MRS and 860 patients with Bell's palsy involved in the study. Familial history was positive in 5 of 16 patients (31.3%) with facial palsy in MRS and 56 of 860 patients (6.5%) with Bell's palsy (P palsy in MRS and 88 of 860 cases (10.2%) with Bell's palsy had a history of facial palsy in the past (P Bell's palsy, facial palsy in MRS has an obvious genetic predilection and recurrence tendency. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. High affinity radiopharmaceuticals based upon lansoprazole for PET imaging of aggregated tau in Alzheimer's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy: synthesis, preclinical evaluation, and lead selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawaz, Maria V; Brooks, Allen F; Rodnick, Melissa E; Carpenter, Garrett M; Shao, Xia; Desmond, Timothy J; Sherman, Phillip; Quesada, Carole A; Hockley, Brian G; Kilbourn, Michael R; Albin, Roger L; Frey, Kirk A; Scott, Peter J H

    2014-08-20

    Abnormally aggregated tau is the hallmark pathology of tauopathy neurodegenerative disorders and is a target for development of both diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies across the tauopathy disease spectrum. Development of carbon-11- or fluorine-18-labeled radiotracers with appropriate affinity and specificity for tau would allow noninvasive quantification of tau burden using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. We have synthesized [(18)F]lansoprazole, [(11)C]N-methyl lansoprazole, and [(18)F]N-methyl lansoprazole and identified them as high affinity radiotracers for tau with low to subnanomolar binding affinities. Herein, we report radiosyntheses and extensive preclinical evaluation with the aim of selecting a lead radiotracer for translation into human PET imaging trials. We demonstrate that [(18)F]N-methyl lansoprazole, on account of the favorable half-life of fluorine-18 and its rapid brain entry in nonhuman primates, favorable kinetics, low white matter binding, and selectivity for binding to tau over amyloid, is the lead compound for progression into clinical trials.

  20. High Affinity Radiopharmaceuticals Based Upon Lansoprazole for PET Imaging of Aggregated Tau in Alzheimer’s Disease and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: Synthesis, Preclinical Evaluation, and Lead Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Abnormally aggregated tau is the hallmark pathology of tauopathy neurodegenerative disorders and is a target for development of both diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies across the tauopathy disease spectrum. Development of carbon-11- or fluorine-18-labeled radiotracers with appropriate affinity and specificity for tau would allow noninvasive quantification of tau burden using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. We have synthesized [18F]lansoprazole, [11C]N-methyl lansoprazole, and [18F]N-methyl lansoprazole and identified them as high affinity radiotracers for tau with low to subnanomolar binding affinities. Herein, we report radiosyntheses and extensive preclinical evaluation with the aim of selecting a lead radiotracer for translation into human PET imaging trials. We demonstrate that [18F]N-methyl lansoprazole, on account of the favorable half-life of fluorine-18 and its rapid brain entry in nonhuman primates, favorable kinetics, low white matter binding, and selectivity for binding to tau over amyloid, is the lead compound for progression into clinical trials. PMID:24896980

  1. Gaze strategy in the free flying zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Eckmeier

    Full Text Available Fast moving animals depend on cues derived from the optic flow on their retina. Optic flow from translational locomotion includes information about the three-dimensional composition of the environment, while optic flow experienced during a rotational self motion does not. Thus, a saccadic gaze strategy that segregates rotations from translational movements during locomotion will facilitate extraction of spatial information from the visual input. We analysed whether birds use such a strategy by highspeed video recording zebra finches from two directions during an obstacle avoidance task. Each frame of the recording was examined to derive position and orientation of the beak in three-dimensional space. The data show that in all flights the head orientation was shifted in a saccadic fashion and was kept straight between saccades. Therefore, birds use a gaze strategy that actively stabilizes their gaze during translation to simplify optic flow based navigation. This is the first evidence of birds actively optimizing optic flow during flight.

  2. A New Gaze Estimation Method Considering External Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Man Lee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gaze tracking systems usually utilize near-infrared (NIR lights and NIR cameras, and the performance of such systems is mainly affected by external light sources that include NIR components. This is ascribed to the production of additional (imposter corneal specular reflection (SR caused by the external light, which makes it difficult to discriminate between the correct SR as caused by the NIR illuminator of the gaze tracking system and the imposter SR. To overcome this problem, a new method is proposed for determining the correct SR in the presence of external light based on the relationship between the corneal SR and the pupil movable area with the relative position of the pupil and the corneal SR. The experimental results showed that the proposed method makes the gaze tracking system robust to the existence of external light.

  3. The Penetrating Gaze and the Decline of the Autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempsey, William E

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the decline in the autopsy rate can be furthered through analysis of Foucault's idea of the medical gaze and the ancient Greek idea of theoria. The medical gaze has shifted over time from the surface of the body to the inner organs to the cellular and subcellular levels. Physicians and loved ones of the deceased person are not likely to "gaze" at the same levels. Patients' loved ones might not theorize as physicians do; they have different interests, which suggest the need for more attention to informed consent for autopsies. Responding to this need should take priority over efforts to increase the autopsy rate, and it can also be seen as an opportunity to improve autopsy and autopsy consent practices. © 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Towards emotion modeling based on gaze dynamics in generic interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Christensen, Martin; Leimberg, Denis; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2005-01-01

    Gaze detection can be a useful ingredient in generic human computer interfaces if current technical barriers are overcome. We discuss the feasibility of concurrent posture and eye-tracking in the context of single (low cost) camera imagery. The ingredients in the approach are posture and eye regi...... extraction based on active appearance modeling and eye tracking using a new fast and robust heuristic. The eye tracker is shown to perform well for low resolution image segments, hence, making it feasible to estimate gaze using a single generic camera.......Gaze detection can be a useful ingredient in generic human computer interfaces if current technical barriers are overcome. We discuss the feasibility of concurrent posture and eye-tracking in the context of single (low cost) camera imagery. The ingredients in the approach are posture and eye region...

  5. Interacting with Objects in the Environment by Gaze and Hand Gestures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Jeremy; Mardanbeigi, Diako; Rozado, David

    2013-01-01

    A head-mounted wireless gaze tracker in the form of gaze tracking glasses is used here for continuous and mobile monitoring of a subject's point of regard on the surrounding environment. We combine gaze tracking and hand gesture recognition to allow a subject to interact with objects in the envir...

  6. Look together : Using gaze for assisting co-located collaborative search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Pfeuffer, Ken; Chong, Ming Ki; Alexander, Jason; Bulling, Andreas; Gellersen, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Gaze information provides indication of users focus which complements remote collaboration tasks, as distant users can see their partner’s focus. In this paper, we apply gaze for co-located collaboration, where users’ gaze locations are presented on the same display, to help collaboration between

  7. Toddlers' gaze following through attention modulation : Intention is in the eye of the beholder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bordes, Pieter F.; Cox, Ralf F. A.; Hasselman, Fred; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated 20-month-olds' (N = 56) gaze following by presenting toddlers with a female model that displayed either ostensive or no ostensive cues before shifting her gaze laterally toward an object. The results indicated that toddlers reliably followed the model's gaze redirection after mutual

  8. Investigating social gaze as an action-perception online performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grynszpan, Ouriel; Simonin, Jérôme; Martin, Jean-Claude; Nadel, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Gaze represents a major non-verbal communication channel in social interactions. In this respect, when facing another person, one's gaze should not be examined as a purely perceptive process but also as an action-perception online performance. However, little is known about processes involved in the real-time self-regulation of social gaze. The present study investigates the impact of a gaze-contingent viewing window on fixation patterns and the awareness of being the agent moving the window. In face-to-face scenarios played by a virtual human character, the task for the 18 adult participants was to interpret an equivocal sentence which could be disambiguated by examining the emotional expressions of the character speaking. The virtual character was embedded in naturalistic backgrounds to enhance realism. Eye-tracking data showed that the viewing window induced changes in gaze behavior, notably longer visual fixations. Notwithstanding, only half of the participants ascribed the window displacements to their eye movements. These participants also spent more time looking at the eyes and mouth regions of the virtual human character. The outcomes of the study highlight the dissociation between non-volitional gaze adaptation and the self-ascription of agency. Such dissociation provides support for a two-step account of the sense of agency composed of pre-noetic monitoring mechanisms and reflexive processes, linked by bottom-up and top-down processes. We comment upon these results, which illustrate the relevance of our method for studying online social cognition, in particular concerning autism spectrum disorders (ASD) where the poor pragmatic understanding of oral speech is considered linked to visual peculiarities that impede facial exploration.

  9. Ocular defects in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoch Sabita

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a high prevalence of ocular defects in children with developmental disabilities. This study evaluated visual disability in a group of 200 cerebral palsy (CP patients and found that 68% of the children had significant visual morbidity. These findings emphasize the need for an early ocular examination in patients with CP.

  10. Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy: hypoglossal nerve and vocal cord palsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takimoto, Toru; Saito, Yasuo; Suzuki, Masayuki; Nishimura, Toshirou (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-01-01

    Cranial nerve palsies are an unexpected complication of radiotherapy for head and neck tumours. We present a case of this radiation-induced cranial palsy. An 18-year-old female with nasopharyngeal carcinoma developed a right hypoglossal nerve palsy 42 months after cancericidal doses of radiotherapy. In addition, she developed a bilateral vocal cord palsy 62 months after the therapy. Follow-up over four years has demonstrated no evidence of tumour recurrence and no sign of neurological improvement. (author).

  11. Anterior segment ischemia following Hummelsheim procedure in a case of sixth nerve palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh K Bansal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A, 46-year-old Indian male, known hypertensive presented with left esotropia of 25  prism diopters (PD after head injury in a roadside accident 9 months back. The deviation was constant in nature and was associated with complaints of diplopia in left lateral gaze. Traumatic sixth nerve palsy was diagnosed. The patient underwent left medial rectus recession of 5 mm and a split-tendon transposition of the left superior and inferior recti to the lateral rectus insertion (Hummelsheim procedure. On the first postoperative day, the patient developed corneal edema and anterior chamber reaction of flare 2+ and cells 2+. The pupil was semi-dilated and was sluggishly reacting to light. Anterior segment ischemia was diagnosed, which was managed with topical and systemic steroids.

  12. Anterior segment ischemia following Hummelsheim procedure in a case of sixth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Rakesh K; Bamotra, Ravi K

    2015-06-01

    A, 46-year-old Indian male, known hypertensive presented with left esotropia of 25  prism diopters (PD) after head injury in a roadside accident 9 months back. The deviation was constant in nature and was associated with complaints of diplopia in left lateral gaze. Traumatic sixth nerve palsy was diagnosed. The patient underwent left medial rectus recession of 5 mm and a split-tendon transposition of the left superior and inferior recti to the lateral rectus insertion (Hummelsheim procedure). On the first postoperative day, the patient developed corneal edema and anterior chamber reaction of flare 2+ and cells 2+. The pupil was semi-dilated and was sluggishly reacting to light. Anterior segment ischemia was diagnosed, which was managed with topical and systemic steroids.

  13. Are Gaze Shifts a Key to a Translator’s Text Segmentation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke Jakobsen, Arnt

    2016-01-01

    blinks. However, in an experimental setup with tracking of a translator’s gaze movements across a screen showing the source text and (emerging) target text, gaze data show the translator’s shifts of visual attention between the two texts. Can such shifts be seen as an index of content processing units...... the feasibility of identifying segments, understood as processing units, on the basis of gaze shifts, and to inquire into what motivates gaze shifts. It also seeks to illustrate how much our interpretation of gaze representations, not least suboptimal representations, depend on a theory of reading....

  14. Dental characteristics of children with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Stevanović Radoje; Jovičić Olivera

    2004-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is one of the commonest children's physical handicaps with frequency of 1.5-3/1000. Beside many other disturbances, these children may have serious disorders caused by dental diseases. Concerning this fact, the objective of our study was to examine children with cerebral palsy in our country and determine condition of dental health and suggest adequate protective measures. A total of 116 children, 3-18 years old, with cerebral palsy were examined and the results were compared t...

  15. WOMAN AS OBJECT OF MALE GAZE IN SOME WORKS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nkiruka

    and controlling gaze of the „other‟) and narcissistic (self-esteem through identification with the image seen) forms. (18). As Sigmund Freud theory proffers, when a man confronts a female body, the absence of phallus constantly creates tension in his psyche. This void the male viewer interprets as otherness and therefore ...

  16. Self-Monitoring of Gaze in High Functioning Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grynszpan, Ouriel; Nadel, Jacqueline; Martin, Jean-Claude; Simonin, Jerome; Bailleul, Pauline; Wang, Yun; Gepner, Daniel; Le Barillier, Florence; Constant, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Atypical visual behaviour has been recently proposed to account for much of social misunderstanding in autism. Using an eye-tracking system and a gaze-contingent lens display, the present study explores self-monitoring of eye motion in two conditions: free visual exploration and guided exploration via blurring the visual field except for the focal…

  17. Eye gaze tracking based on the shape of pupil image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Qiu, Jian; Luo, Kaiqing; Peng, Li; Han, Peng

    2018-01-01

    Eye tracker is an important instrument for research in psychology, widely used in attention, visual perception, reading and other fields of research. Because of its potential function in human-computer interaction, the eye gaze tracking has already been a topic of research in many fields over the last decades. Nowadays, with the development of technology, non-intrusive methods are more and more welcomed. In this paper, we will present a method based on the shape of pupil image to estimate the gaze point of human eyes without any other intrusive devices such as a hat, a pair of glasses and so on. After using the ellipse fitting algorithm to deal with the pupil image we get, we can determine the direction of the fixation by the shape of the pupil.The innovative aspect of this method is to utilize the new idea of the shape of the pupil so that we can avoid much complicated algorithm. The performance proposed is very helpful for the study of eye gaze tracking, which just needs one camera without infrared light to know the changes in the shape of the pupil to determine the direction of the eye gazing, no additional condition is required.

  18. Attention, Exposure Duration, and Gaze Shifting in Naming Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Ardi

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments are reported in which the role of attribute exposure duration in naming performance was examined by tracking eye movements. Participants were presented with color-word Stroop stimuli and left- or right-pointing arrows on different sides of a computer screen. They named the color attribute and shifted their gaze to the arrow to…

  19. Unobtrusively tracking mammographers' eye gaze direction and pupil diameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, James R.; deParedes, Ellen S.; Dwyer, Samuel J., III; Merickel, Michael B.; Hutchinson, Thomas E.

    1994-04-01

    We developed techniques to unobtrusively track direction and pupil diameter of radiologists reading a wide variety of films. This study concentrated on mammography since the use of mammograms is important for successful treatment of breast cancer, and we wished to determine how previous studies of eye gaze with lung films relate to the specialized field of mammography. Our objective was to identify eye gaze patterns in mammographic experts as they observe features, such as masses and microcalcification clusters: identification of these patterns could lead to improving the rate of early detection of breast cancer. Our near IR light system successfully tracked eye gaze direction and pupil diameter of mammographic experts evaluating films. The association of long eye gaze dwells with diagnostic accuracy varied with the type of object being viewed. In films with masses, false positive diagnoses were associated with long dwells: this is similar to published results of observing lung nodule diagnosis. In mammograms with microcalcifications, true positive diagnoses were associated with long dwells. The association of prolonged dwells with true positive diagnoses of microcalcifications is a new observation.

  20. Strange-face illusions during inter-subjective gazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Giovanni B

    2013-03-01

    In normal observers, gazing at one's own face in the mirror for a few minutes, at a low illumination level, triggers the perception of strange faces, a new visual illusion that has been named 'strange-face in the mirror'. Individuals see huge distortions of their own faces, but they often see monstrous beings, archetypal faces, faces of relatives and deceased, and animals. In the experiment described here, strange-face illusions were perceived when two individuals, in a dimly lit room, gazed at each other in the face. Inter-subjective gazing compared to mirror-gazing produced a higher number of different strange-faces. Inter-subjective strange-face illusions were always dissociative of the subject's self and supported moderate feeling of their reality, indicating a temporary lost of self-agency. Unconscious synchronization of event-related responses to illusions was found between members in some pairs. Synchrony of illusions may indicate that unconscious response-coordination is caused by the illusion-conjunction of crossed dissociative strange-faces, which are perceived as projections into each other's visual face of reciprocal embodied representations within the pair. Inter-subjective strange-face illusions may be explained by the subject's embodied representations (somaesthetic, kinaesthetic and motor facial pattern) and the other's visual face binding. Unconscious facial mimicry may promote inter-subjective illusion-conjunction, then unconscious joint-action and response-coordination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Gaze Aversion during Children's Transient Knowledge and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty-Sneddon, Gwyneth; Phelps, Fiona G.; Calderwood, Lesley

    2009-01-01

    Looking away from an interlocutor's face during demanding cognitive activity can help adults and children answer challenging mental arithmetic and verbal-reasoning questions (Glenberg, Schroeder, & Robertson, 1998; Phelps, Doherty-Sneddon, & Warnock, 2006). While such "gaze aversion" (GA) is used far less by 5-year-old school children, its use…

  2. Gaze patterns of gross anatomy students change with classroom learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumwalt, Ann C; Iyer, Arjun; Ghebremichael, Abenet; Frustace, Bruno S; Flannery, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented that experts exhibit more efficient gaze patterns than those of less experienced individuals. In visual search tasks, experts use fewer, longer fixations to fixate for relatively longer on salient regions of the visual field while less experienced observers spend more time examining nonsalient regions. This study investigates whether changes in gaze patterns reflect learning by students in a medical gross anatomy course. Students were asked to examine photographs of dissections similar to those they experienced in class and to identify the tagged structure in each image. We postulated that, compared to naive behavior (behavior at baseline and when examining unfamiliar content) students would examine familiar content for longer and would direct proportionally more fixation time on cognitively salient regions of the images while using fewer, longer duration fixations. Our students examined familiar images for significantly longer than they did at baseline (P patterns were characterized by more numerous fixations rather than fewer, longer fixations. These individuals are successful learners in a challenging gross anatomy course, but are not experts in anatomy. Therefore we speculate that the gaze pattern they exhibit characterizes an earlier stage of the learning process than has previously been documented in studies of expertise, which have primarily focused on the gaze patterns of true experts. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists.

  3. African penguins follow the gaze direction of conspecifics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trincas, Egle

    2017-01-01

    Gaze following is widespread among animals. However, the corresponding ultimate functions may vary substantially. Thus, it is important to study previously understudied (or less studied) species to develop a better understanding of the ecological contexts that foster certain cognitive traits. Penguins (Family Spheniscidae), despite their wide interspecies ecological variation, have previously not been considered for cross-species comparisons. Penguin behaviour and communication have been investigated over the last decades, but less is known on how groups are structured, social hierarchies are established, and coordination for hunting and predator avoidance may occur. In this article, we investigated how African penguins (Spheniscus demersus) respond to gaze cues of conspecifics using a naturalistic setup in a zoo environment. Our results provide evidence that members of the family Spheniscidae follow gaze of conspecifics into distant space. However, further tests are necessary to examine if the observed behaviour serves solely one specific function (e.g. predator detection) or is displayed in a broader context (e.g. eavesdropping on relevant stimuli in the environment). In addition, our findings can serve as a starting point for future cross-species comparisons with other members of the penguin family, to further explore the role of aerial predation and social structure on gaze following in social species. Overall, we also suggest that zoo-housed animals represent an ideal opportunity to extend species range and to test phylogenetic families that have not been in the focus of animal cognitive research. PMID:28626619

  4. Gaze Embeddings for Zero-Shot Image Classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karessli, N.; Akata, Z.; Schiele, B.; Bulling, A.

    2017-01-01

    Zero-shot image classification using auxiliary information, such as attributes describing discriminative object properties, requires time-consuming annotation by domain experts. We instead propose a method that relies on human gaze as auxiliary information, exploiting that even non-expert users have

  5. Paul Gauguin and the Complexity of the Primitivist Gaze

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welten, R.B.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The article describes the complexity of Paul Gauguin’s primitivism in a philosophical, more precisely, hermeneutical-phenomenological way. Hermeneutical, because it deals with the interpretation of primitivism, and phenomenological, since it focuses on the phenomenological gaze that, in all its

  6. Wearable Gaze Trackers: Mapping Visual Attention in 3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Stets, Jonathan Dyssel; Suurmets, Seidi

    2017-01-01

    The study of visual attention in humans relates to a wide range of areas such as: psychology, cognition, usability, and marketing. These studies have been limited to fixed setups with respondents sitting in front of a monitor mounted with a gaze tracking device. The introduction of wearable mobile...

  7. COGAIN2009 - "Gaze interaction for those who want it most"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welcome to the 5th international COGAIN conference on eye gaze interaction and the first under the auspices of The COGAIN Association. The conference emphasises user needs and future applications of eye tracking technology. Robust gaze interaction methods have been available for some years, with ...... conferences. We believe that the continuing success of the conference, organised for the first time by The COGAIN Association, strongly indicates the sustainability of the association – thereby taking over the long-term responsibility of the COGAIN Network of Excellence......., with substantial amounts of applications to support communication, learning and entertainment already in use. However, there are still some uncertainties about this new technology amongst communication specialists and funding institutions. The 5th COGAIN conference will focus on spreading the experiences of people...... using gaze interaction in their daily life to potential users and specialists who have yet to benefit from it. The theme of the conference is "Gaze interaction for those who want it most". We present a total of 18 papers that have been reviewed and accepted by leading researchers and communication...

  8. Watch out! Magnetoencephalographic evidence for early modulation of attention orienting by fearful gaze cueing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Lachat

    Full Text Available Others' gaze and emotional facial expression are important cues for the process of attention orienting. Here, we investigated with magnetoencephalography (MEG whether the combination of averted gaze and fearful expression may elicit a selectively early effect of attention orienting on the brain responses to targets. We used the direction of gaze of centrally presented fearful and happy faces as the spatial attention orienting cue in a Posner-like paradigm where the subjects had to detect a target checkerboard presented at gazed-at (valid trials or non gazed-at (invalid trials locations of the screen. We showed that the combination of averted gaze and fearful expression resulted in a very early attention orienting effect in the form of additional parietal activity between 55 and 70 ms for the valid versus invalid targets following fearful gaze cues. No such effect was obtained for the targets following happy gaze cues. This early cue-target validity effect selective of fearful gaze cues involved the left superior parietal region and the left lateral middle occipital region. These findings provide the first evidence for an effect of attention orienting induced by fearful gaze in the time range of C1. In doing so, they demonstrate the selective impact of combined gaze and fearful expression cues in the process of attention orienting.

  9. Your attention makes me smile: Direct gaze elicits affiliative facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietanen, Jari K; Helminen, Terhi M; Kiilavuori, Helena; Kylliäinen, Anneli; Lehtonen, Heidi; Peltola, Mikko J

    2018-02-01

    Facial electromyographic responses and skin conductance responses were measured to investigate whether, in a neutral laboratory environment, another individual's direct gaze elicits a positive or negative affective reaction in the observer. The results showed that greater zygomatic responses associated with positive affect were elicited by seeing another person with direct as compared to averted gaze. The zygomatic responses were greater in response to another person's direct gaze both when the participant's own gaze was directed towards the other and when the participant was not looking directly towards the other. Compatible with the zygomatic responses, the corrugator activity (associated with negative affect) was decreased below baseline more in response to another person's direct than averted gaze. Replicating previous research, the skin conductance responses were greater to another person's direct than averted gaze. The results provide evidence that, in a neutral context, another individual's direct gaze is an affiliative, positive signal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Flexible coordination of stationary and mobile conversations with gaze: Resource allocation among multiple joint activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Mayor

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gaze is instrumental in coordinating face-to-face social interactions. But little is known about gaze use when social interactions co-occur with other joint activities. We investigated the case of walking while talking. We assessed how gaze gets allocated among various targets in mobile conversations, whether allocation of gaze to other targets affects conversational coordination, and whether reduced availability of gaze for conversational coordination affects conversational performance and content. In an experimental study, pairs were videotaped in four conditions of mobility (standing still, talking while walking along a straight-line itinerary, talking while walking along a complex itinerary, or walking along a complex itinerary with no conversational task. Gaze to partners was substantially reduced in mobile conversations, but gaze was still used to coordinate conversation via displays of mutual orientation, and conversational performance and content was not different between stationary and mobile conditions. Results expand the phenomena of multitasking to joint activities.

  11. Bell Palsy and Acupuncture Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betul Battaloglu Ižnanc

    2013-08-01

    A 22-year-old female patient, a midwifery student, had treatment with corticosteroid and antiviral agents as soon as Bell Palsy (BP was diagnosed (House-Breckman stage 6. Six weeks later, patient didn’t recover, while in House-Breckman stage 3, acupuncture was perfomed and local and distal acupoints were used with ears, body and face. Ear acupuncture point was used two times with detection. In the course of six sessions body and face points were stimulated by electroacupuncture. After ten acupuncture treatments, the subjective symptoms and the facial motion on the affected side improved. There was an spotting ecchymosis the ST2 points on. The symmetry of the face is a determinant of facial charm and influences interpersonal attraction for adults, children and pregnant women. Medical options for the sequelae of BP are limited. Acupuncture’s effectively in Bell palsy patients’ should be shown with more clinical and electrophysiological studies.

  12. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  13. Case report of a patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Rysová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Title of bachelor's thesis: Case report of a patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy Summary: Teoretical part of bachelor's thesis contains theoretical foundation of peripheral facial nerve palsy. Practical part of bachelor's thesis contains physiotherapeutic case report of patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy. Key words: peripheral facial nerve palsy, casuistry, rehabilitation

  14. CEREBRAL PALSY. PRENTICE-HALL FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY SERIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHANCE, BURTON, JR.; MCDONALD, EUGENE T.

    THIS INTRODUCTORY TEXT ON CEREBRAL PALSY IS DIVIDED INTO TWO SECTIONS. THE FIRST SECTION OF THE BOOK CONTAINS INFORMATION ABOUT UNDERSTANDING THE MEANING OF CEREBRAL PALSY, PROGRAMS FOR THOSE WITH CEREBRAL PALSY, THE NEUROLOGICAL BASES, ETIOLOGY, AND DIAGNOSIS, AND THE CLASSIFICATION OF CEREBRAL PALSY. PROBLEMS OFTEN ASSOCIATED WITH CEREBRAL PALSY…

  15. AICA syndrome with facial palsy following vertigo and acute sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami-Takada, Tomoko; Izumikawa, Masahiko; Doi, Tadashi; Takada, Yohei; Tomoda, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    We report a case of infarction of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) with peripheral facial palsy following vertigo and acute sensorineural hearing loss. A 39-year-old female presented with vertigo and sudden hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness of the right ear. An audiogram revealed a severe hearing loss at all tested frequencies in the right ear. Spontaneous nystagmus toward the left side was also observed. Otoneurological examinations showed sensorineural hearing loss of the right ear and horizontal and rotatory gaze nystagmus toward the left side, and a caloric reflex test demonstrated canal paresis. Initially, we diagnosed the patient for sudden deafness with vertigo. However, right peripheral facial palsy appeared 2 days later. An eye tracking test (ETT) and optokinetic pattern test (OKP) showed centralis abnormality. The patient's brain was examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angioglaphy (MRA) and showed an infarction localized in the pons and cerebellum. MRI and MRA revealed infarction of the right cerebellar hemisphere indicating occlusion of the AICA. Consequently, the patient was diagnosed with AICA syndrome but demonstrated regression following steroid and edaravone treatment. We suggest that performing MRI and MRA in the early stage of AICA syndrome is important for distinguishing cerebellar infarction resulting from vestibular disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical practice guideline: Bell's Palsy executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Reginald F; Basura, Gregory J; Ishii, Lisa E; Schwartz, Seth R; Drumheller, Caitlin Murray; Burkholder, Rebecca; Deckard, Nathan A; Dawson, Cindy; Driscoll, Colin; Gillespie, M Boyd; Gurgel, Richard K; Halperin, John; Khalid, Ayesha N; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Micco, Alan; Munsell, Debra; Rosenbaum, Steven; Vaughan, William

    2013-11-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Bell's Palsy. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 11 recommendations developed encourage accurate and efficient diagnosis and treatment and, when applicable, facilitate patient follow-up to address the management of long-term sequelae or evaluation of new or worsening symptoms not indicative of Bell's palsy. There are myriad treatment options for Bell's palsy; some controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of several of these options, and there are consequent variations in care. In addition, there are numerous diagnostic tests available that are used in the evaluation of patients with Bell's palsy. Many of these tests are of questionable benefit in Bell's palsy. Furthermore, while patients with Bell's palsy enter the health care system with facial paresis/paralysis as a primary complaint, not all patients with facial paresis/paralysis have Bell's palsy. It is a concern that patients with alternative underlying etiologies may be misdiagnosed or have an unnecessary delay in diagnosis. All of these quality concerns provide an important opportunity for improvement in the diagnosis and management of patients with Bell's palsy.

  17. Benign Recurrent Sixth Cranial Nerve Palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective chart review of a cohort of 253 pediatric patients with sixth nerve palsies uncovered 30 cases of benign sixth nerve palsy, of which 9 were recurrent, in a study at University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.

  18. Congenital sixth nerve palsy with associated anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirupama Kasturi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital abduction deficit is most likely due to Duane's retraction syndrome as congenital abducens nerve palsy is very rare. We report two cases of infantile abduction deficit due to sixth nerve palsy associated with other anomalies to highlight the importance of including neuroimaging in the evaluation of an infant presenting with a limitation of abduction.

  19. Congenital sixth nerve palsy with associated anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasturi, Nirupama

    2017-10-01

    Congenital abduction deficit is most likely due to Duane's retraction syndrome as congenital abducens nerve palsy is very rare. We report two cases of infantile abduction deficit due to sixth nerve palsy associated with other anomalies to highlight the importance of including neuroimaging in the evaluation of an infant presenting with a limitation of abduction.

  20. Mobility Experiences of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palisano, Robert J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Stewart, Debra; Lawless, John J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how youth with cerebral palsy experience mobility in their daily lives using a phenomenological approach. The participants were 10 youth with cerebral palsy, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling with maximum variation strategies. A total of 14 interviews were completed. Transcripts…

  1. Multiple cranial nerve palsies complicating tympanomastoiditis: case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Otitis media either acute or chronic, is not uncommon in childhood. Multiple cranial nerve palsies occuring as a complication of either form of otitis media is unusual. A case of a nine year old boy with chronic suppurative otitis media with associated mastoiditis complicated with ipsilateral multiple cranial nerve palsies is ...

  2. MANAGEMENT OF CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    The neurological lesion causing cerebral palsy (CP) is static, but the clinical con- dition changes ... Is it cerebral palsy? There must be evidence of an upper motor neuron (UMN) lesion, with brisk reflexes and possibly clonus; there should also be increased tone or persist- ent primitive ..... are at high risk for hip dislocation.

  3. Enhancing sensorimotor activity by controlling virtual objects with gaze.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristián Modroño

    Full Text Available This fMRI work studies brain activity of healthy volunteers who manipulated a virtual object in the context of a digital game by applying two different control methods: using their right hand or using their gaze. The results show extended activations in sensorimotor areas, not only when participants played in the traditional way (using their hand but also when they used their gaze to control the virtual object. Furthermore, with the exception of the primary motor cortex, regional motor activity was similar regardless of what the effector was: the arm or the eye. These results have a potential application in the field of the neurorehabilitation as a new approach to generate activation of the sensorimotor system to support the recovery of the motor functions.

  4. Influence of Gaze Direction on Face Recognition: A Sensitive Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noémy Daury

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at determining the conditions in which eye-contact may improve recognition memory for faces. Different stimuli and procedures were tested in four experiments. The effect of gaze direction on memory was found when a simple “yes-no” recognition task was used but not when the recognition task was more complex (e.g., including “Remember-Know” judgements, cf. Experiment 2, or confidence ratings, cf. Experiment 4. Moreover, even when a “yes-no” recognition paradigm was used, the effect occurred with one series of stimuli (cf. Experiment 1 but not with another one (cf. Experiment 3. The difficulty to produce the positive effect of gaze direction on memory is discussed.

  5. Unaddressed participants’ gaze in multi-person interaction: optimizing recipiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith eHoller

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most intriguing aspects of human communication is its turn-taking system. It requires the ability to process on-going turns at talk while planning the next, and to launch this next turn without considerable overlap or delay. Recent research has in-vestigated the eye movements of observers of dialogues to gain insight into how we process turns at talk. More specifically, this research has focused on the extent to which we are able to anticipate the end of current and the beginning of next turns. At the same time, there has been a call for shifting experimental paradigms exploring social-cognitive processes away from passive observation towards on-line processing. Here, we present research that responds to this call by situating state-of-the-art tech-nology for tracking interlocutors’ eye movements within spontaneous, face-to-face conversation. Each conversation involved three native speakers of English. The anal-ysis focused on question-response sequences involving just two of those participants, thus rendering the third momentarily unaddressed. Temporal analyses of the un-addressed participants’ gaze shifts from current to next speaker revealed that un-addressed participants are able to anticipate next turns, and moreover, that they often shift their gaze towards the next speaker before the current turn ends. However, an analysis of the complex structure of turns at talk revealed that the planning of these gaze shifts virtually coincides with the points at which the turns first become recog-nizable as possibly complete. We argue that the timing of these eye movements is governed by an organizational principle whereby unaddressed participants shift their gaze at a point that appears interactionally most optimal: It provides unaddressed participants with access to much of the visual, bodily behavior that accompanies both the current speaker’s and the next speaker’s turn, and it allows them to display recipiency with regard to

  6. The gaps in the gaze in South African hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Diana

    2004-11-01

    Analysis of health care systems, especially hospitals, could benefit from Foucault's description of the medical gaze and the panopticon. Foucault's perspective sheds new light on the South African transformation from an oppressive to a more democratic State and is played out in particular ways in hospital settings. Analyses of the South African health care system and its interface with patients in hospitals seldom draw on the work of Foucault, despite its pertinent description of the diffuse and insidious forms of social surveillance (the 'gaze') and processes of 'normalization' brought about in panoptical settings. The gaze has become a metaphor for the processes whereby disciplinary 'technologies', together with the emergence of a normative social science, discipline both the mind and body of the individual, as in my example of a medicalised institutional setting. Transformation from an oppressive State system to a democratic South Africa has impacted in particular ways on the hospital setting. Instead of being subject to the constant surveillance of the gaze of the State or of medicine, there are numerous instances where patients to all intents become 'invisible', and end up beyond its perimeters. In the hospital, as in the heterogeneous South African community, there is a continuous process of adjustment, with patients, services and staff being rotated in an attempt to provide redress and equal access to health services for all. A large, long-standing lack of funds forces the medical staff to make decisions as to who should get access to beds and to optimal care, and this permeates the everyday experience of institutionalisation and care-giving. It also militates against neutral policy objectives, consistent surveillance or a homogenised system of care.

  7. Does the 'P300' speller depend on eye gaze?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, P.; Joshi, S.; Briskin, S.; Wolpaw, J. R.; Bischof, H.; Schalk, G.

    2010-10-01

    Many people affected by debilitating neuromuscular disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brainstem stroke or spinal cord injury are impaired in their ability to, or are even unable to, communicate. A brain-computer interface (BCI) uses brain signals, rather than muscles, to re-establish communication with the outside world. One particular BCI approach is the so-called 'P300 matrix speller' that was first described by Farwell and Donchin (1988 Electroencephalogr. Clin. Neurophysiol. 70 510-23). It has been widely assumed that this method does not depend on the ability to focus on the desired character, because it was thought that it relies primarily on the P300-evoked potential and minimally, if at all, on other EEG features such as the visual-evoked potential (VEP). This issue is highly relevant for the clinical application of this BCI method, because eye movements may be impaired or lost in the relevant user population. This study investigated the extent to which the performance in a 'P300' speller BCI depends on eye gaze. We evaluated the performance of 17 healthy subjects using a 'P300' matrix speller under two conditions. Under one condition ('letter'), the subjects focused their eye gaze on the intended letter, while under the second condition ('center'), the subjects focused their eye gaze on a fixation cross that was located in the center of the matrix. The results show that the performance of the 'P300' matrix speller in normal subjects depends in considerable measure on gaze direction. They thereby disprove a widespread assumption in BCI research, and suggest that this BCI might function more effectively for people who retain some eye-movement control. The applicability of these findings to people with severe neuromuscular disabilities (particularly in eye-movements) remains to be determined.

  8. What Do Eye Gaze Metrics Tell Us about Motor Imagery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Poiroux

    Full Text Available Many of the brain structures involved in performing real movements also have increased activity during imagined movements or during motor observation, and this could be the neural substrate underlying the effects of motor imagery in motor learning or motor rehabilitation. In the absence of any objective physiological method of measurement, it is currently impossible to be sure that the patient is indeed performing the task as instructed. Eye gaze recording during a motor imagery task could be a possible way to "spy" on the activity an individual is really engaged in. The aim of the present study was to compare the pattern of eye movement metrics during motor observation, visual and kinesthetic motor imagery (VI, KI, target fixation, and mental calculation. Twenty-two healthy subjects (16 females and 6 males, were required to perform tests in five conditions using imagery in the Box and Block Test tasks following the procedure described by Liepert et al. Eye movements were analysed by a non-invasive oculometric measure (SMI RED250 system. Two parameters describing gaze pattern were calculated: the index of ocular mobility (saccade duration over saccade + fixation duration and the number of midline crossings (i.e. the number of times the subjects gaze crossed the midline of the screen when performing the different tasks. Both parameters were significantly different between visual imagery and kinesthesic imagery, visual imagery and mental calculation, and visual imagery and target fixation. For the first time we were able to show that eye movement patterns are different during VI and KI tasks. Our results suggest gaze metric parameters could be used as an objective unobtrusive approach to assess engagement in a motor imagery task. Further studies should define how oculomotor parameters could be used as an indicator of the rehabilitation task a patient is engaged in.

  9. Unaddressed participants’ gaze in multi-person interaction: optimizing recipiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holler, Judith; Kendrick, Kobin H.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most intriguing aspects of human communication is its turn-taking system. It requires the ability to process on-going turns at talk while planning the next, and to launch this next turn without considerable overlap or delay. Recent research has investigated the eye movements of observers of dialogs to gain insight into how we process turns at talk. More specifically, this research has focused on the extent to which we are able to anticipate the end of current and the beginning of next turns. At the same time, there has been a call for shifting experimental paradigms exploring social-cognitive processes away from passive observation toward on-line processing. Here, we present research that responds to this call by situating state-of-the-art technology for tracking interlocutors’ eye movements within spontaneous, face-to-face conversation. Each conversation involved three native speakers of English. The analysis focused on question–response sequences involving just two of those participants, thus rendering the third momentarily unaddressed. Temporal analyses of the unaddressed participants’ gaze shifts from current to next speaker revealed that unaddressed participants are able to anticipate next turns, and moreover, that they often shift their gaze toward the next speaker before the current turn ends. However, an analysis of the complex structure of turns at talk revealed that the planning of these gaze shifts virtually coincides with the points at which the turns first become recognizable as possibly complete. We argue that the timing of these eye movements is governed by an organizational principle whereby unaddressed participants shift their gaze at a point that appears interactionally most optimal: It provides unaddressed participants with access to much of the visual, bodily behavior that accompanies both the current speaker’s and the next speaker’s turn, and it allows them to display recipiency with regard to both speakers’ turns. PMID

  10. Eye blinking in an avian species is associated with gaze shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorzinski, Jessica L

    2016-08-30

    Even when animals are actively monitoring their environment, they lose access to visual information whenever they blink. They can strategically time their blinks to minimize information loss and improve visual functioning but we have little understanding of how this process operates in birds. This study therefore examined blinking in freely-moving peacocks (Pavo cristatus) to determine the relationship between their blinks, gaze shifts, and context. Peacocks wearing a telemetric eye-tracker were exposed to a taxidermy predator (Vulpes vulpes) and their blinks and gaze shifts were recorded. Peacocks blinked during the majority of their gaze shifts, especially when gaze shifts were large, thereby timing their blinks to coincide with periods when visual information is already suppressed. They inhibited their blinks the most when they exhibited high rates of gaze shifts and were thus highly alert. Alternative hypotheses explaining the link between blinks and gaze shifts are discussed.

  11. Gazes and Bodies in the Pornographies of Desire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Lino

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Il saggio propone una lettura sociale della pornografia cinematografica usando la categoria dello sguardo e le sue declinazioni di genere. Partendo dal famoso saggio di Laura Mulvey, Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema (1975, si sposterà il centro dell’analisi dal cinema narrativo tradizionale al cinema pornografico, considerando quest’ultimo un modello che fa contrappunto al voyeurismo dello sguardo maschile (male gaze che la Mulvey riscontrava in alcuni film di Sternberg e di Hitckcock. Per dimostrare la natura contrappuntistica del cinema pornografico si metterà a confronto la medesima messa in scena di uno sguardo che desidera in due film molto differenti tra loro, Rear Window (1954 di Hitchcock e Behind the Green Door (1972 dei fratelli Mitchell. La natura contrappuntistica del porn movie si rintraccia anche nel dialogo che instaura con il cinema mainstream riguardo ai limiti del visibile in materia sessuale. Infine, la pornografia soddisfa la rappresentazione del desiderio delle altre identità di genere, mettendo in scena tipologie di sguardo adeguate – female gaze e queer gaze –, che diventano presto strumenti per una affermazione sociale della diversità sessuali.

  12. Gaze-enabled Egocentric Video Summarization via Constrained Submodular Maximization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xut, Jia; Mukherjee, Lopamudra; Li, Yin; Warner, Jamieson; Rehg, James M; Singht, Vikas

    2015-06-01

    With the proliferation of wearable cameras, the number of videos of users documenting their personal lives using such devices is rapidly increasing. Since such videos may span hours, there is an important need for mechanisms that represent the information content in a compact form (i.e., shorter videos which are more easily browsable/sharable). Motivated by these applications, this paper focuses on the problem of egocentric video summarization. Such videos are usually continuous with significant camera shake and other quality issues. Because of these reasons, there is growing consensus that direct application of standard video summarization tools to such data yields unsatisfactory performance. In this paper, we demonstrate that using gaze tracking information (such as fixation and saccade) significantly helps the summarization task. It allows meaningful comparison of different image frames and enables deriving personalized summaries (gaze provides a sense of the camera wearer's intent). We formulate a summarization model which captures common-sense properties of a good summary, and show that it can be solved as a submodular function maximization with partition matroid constraints, opening the door to a rich body of work from combinatorial optimization. We evaluate our approach on a new gaze-enabled egocentric video dataset (over 15 hours), which will be a valuable standalone resource.

  13. DETECTING THE GAZING ATTENTION POINTS OF YOUNG AND ELDERLY CYCLISTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetake, Teruo; Shimoda, Masahiro

    2014-06-01

    This study analyzed the perceived attention represented by "gazing" points of cyclists to expose a latent accidental factor hidden in cyclist behaviour. Eleven elderly people and 23 young people equipped with an eye camera participated in the study. From the camera images, the objects viewed by the cyclists were analyzed. A main road and a community road were used in the experiment. The objects viewed by the cyclists were categorized into nine items that would be indirectly related to the cause of bicycle traffic accidents: gates and porches, parking lots, signals, alleys, other bicycles on the road, pedestrians, signs and painted symbols on the road, schoolyards and houses, and other items. The results of the study indicated that many elderly cyclists always confirmed their safety at alley intersections along both main and community roads, whereas many young people were not so dutiful. The results for unsafe gazing behavior such as looking at a schoolyard or house while cycling were the same for the two groups in that most individuals did not look away from the road while cycling along the main and community roads. Dissimilar results, especially those for alley intersections, resulted from young people not paying due attention to objects, suggesting that such gazing behaviour could be strongly related to traffic accidents involving a bicycle.

  14. Eye and head movements shape gaze shifts in Indian peafowl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorzinski, Jessica L; Patricelli, Gail L; Platt, Michael L; Land, Michael F

    2015-12-01

    Animals selectively direct their visual attention toward relevant aspects of their environments. They can shift their attention using a combination of eye, head and body movements. While we have a growing understanding of eye and head movements in mammals, we know little about these processes in birds. We therefore measured the eye and head movements of freely behaving Indian peafowl (Pavo cristatus) using a telemetric eye-tracker. Both eye and head movements contributed to gaze changes in peafowl. When gaze shifts were smaller, eye movements played a larger role than when gaze shifts were larger. The duration and velocity of eye and head movements were positively related to the size of the eye and head movements, respectively. In addition, the coordination of eye and head movements in peafowl differed from that in mammals; peafowl exhibited a near-absence of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, which may partly result from the peafowl's ability to move their heads as quickly as their eyes. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Real-time gaze estimation via pupil center tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cazzato Dario

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Automatic gaze estimation not based on commercial and expensive eye tracking hardware solutions can enable several applications in the fields of human computer interaction (HCI and human behavior analysis. It is therefore not surprising that several related techniques and methods have been investigated in recent years. However, very few camera-based systems proposed in the literature are both real-time and robust. In this work, we propose a real-time user-calibration-free gaze estimation system that does not need person-dependent calibration, can deal with illumination changes and head pose variations, and can work with a wide range of distances from the camera. Our solution is based on a 3-D appearance-based method that processes the images from a built-in laptop camera. Real-time performance is obtained by combining head pose information with geometrical eye features to train a machine learning algorithm. Our method has been validated on a data set of images of users in natural environments, and shows promising results. The possibility of a real-time implementation, combined with the good quality of gaze tracking, make this system suitable for various HCI applications.

  16. Clinical correlations in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minciu, Ioana

    2012-12-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of persistent (but not necessarily unchanged), movement, posture, muscle tone and motor skills disorders non-progressive, with early onset, due to non-progressive impairments, occurring on an immature brain or a brain under development (prenatal, perinatal, postnatal during the first 3-4 years of life). It is associated to a variable extent with: cognitive disorders, epilepsy, sensory deficits, behaviour disorders. The study of the correlations between the clinical forms/subtypes of CP, comorbidities, and severity of functional impairment. It is a retrospective trial aimed only at patients with the diagnosis of cerebral palsy admitted at Paediatric Neurology Clinic of the "Alexandru Obregia" Clinical Hospital in 2010.Results, discussions and conclusions: Patients with cerebral palsy corresponding with the criteria for inclusion: 379. The spastic CP type has prevailed. Comorbidities like mental retardation, epilepsy, and ophthalmic disorders were found with greater frequency than in the studies in the literature.The unilateral spastic form was statistically correlated with slight functional impairment (GMFCS I), with the absence of comorbidities or mild mental retardation, or with focal epilepsy when there is epilepsy. The bilateral spastic, tetraparetic and dyskinetic forms were correlated significantly with severe functional impairment (GMFCS IV, V), with profound or severe retardation, microcephaly, swallowing disorders, statural, ponderal hypotrophy, blindness and epilepsy. The bilateral spastic paraparetic form, which in the literature is mentioned as having fewer associated disorders (for example strabismus, slight retardation), when there is severe functional impairment, it may have the same comorbidities as the tetraparetic form (similar to the cases studied in the hospital). Comorbidities are the main admission cause and it correlates with the severity and prognosis.

  17. Robot Faces that Follow Gaze Facilitate Attentional Engagement and Increase Their Likeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemse, Cesco; Marchesi, Serena; Wykowska, Agnieszka

    2018-01-01

    Gaze behavior of humanoid robots is an efficient mechanism for cueing our spatial orienting, but less is known about the cognitive-affective consequences of robots responding to human directional cues. Here, we examined how the extent to which a humanoid robot (iCub) avatar directed its gaze to the same objects as our participants affected engagement with the robot, subsequent gaze-cueing, and subjective ratings of the robot's characteristic traits. In a gaze-contingent eyetracking task, participants were asked to indicate a preference for one of two objects with their gaze while an iCub avatar was presented between the object photographs. In one condition, the iCub then shifted its gaze toward the object chosen by a participant in 80% of the trials (joint condition) and in the other condition it looked at the opposite object 80% of the time (disjoint condition). Based on the literature in human-human social cognition, we took the speed with which the participants looked back at the robot as a measure of facilitated reorienting and robot-preference, and found these return saccade onset times to be quicker in the joint condition than in the disjoint condition. As indicated by results from a subsequent gaze-cueing tasks, the gaze-following behavior of the robot had little effect on how our participants responded to gaze cues. Nevertheless, subjective reports suggested that our participants preferred the iCub following participants' gaze to the one with a disjoint attention behavior, rated it as more human-like and as more likeable. Taken together, our findings show a preference for robots who follow our gaze. Importantly, such subtle differences in gaze behavior are sufficient to influence our perception of humanoid agents, which clearly provides hints about the design of behavioral characteristics of humanoid robots in more naturalistic settings.

  18. Robot Faces that Follow Gaze Facilitate Attentional Engagement and Increase Their Likeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemse, Cesco; Marchesi, Serena; Wykowska, Agnieszka

    2018-01-01

    Gaze behavior of humanoid robots is an efficient mechanism for cueing our spatial orienting, but less is known about the cognitive–affective consequences of robots responding to human directional cues. Here, we examined how the extent to which a humanoid robot (iCub) avatar directed its gaze to the same objects as our participants affected engagement with the robot, subsequent gaze-cueing, and subjective ratings of the robot’s characteristic traits. In a gaze-contingent eyetracking task, participants were asked to indicate a preference for one of two objects with their gaze while an iCub avatar was presented between the object photographs. In one condition, the iCub then shifted its gaze toward the object chosen by a participant in 80% of the trials (joint condition) and in the other condition it looked at the opposite object 80% of the time (disjoint condition). Based on the literature in human–human social cognition, we took the speed with which the participants looked back at the robot as a measure of facilitated reorienting and robot-preference, and found these return saccade onset times to be quicker in the joint condition than in the disjoint condition. As indicated by results from a subsequent gaze-cueing tasks, the gaze-following behavior of the robot had little effect on how our participants responded to gaze cues. Nevertheless, subjective reports suggested that our participants preferred the iCub following participants’ gaze to the one with a disjoint attention behavior, rated it as more human-like and as more likeable. Taken together, our findings show a preference for robots who follow our gaze. Importantly, such subtle differences in gaze behavior are sufficient to influence our perception of humanoid agents, which clearly provides hints about the design of behavioral characteristics of humanoid robots in more naturalistic settings. PMID:29459842

  19. How Do We Update Faces? Effects of Gaze Direction and Facial Expressions on Working Memory Updating

    OpenAIRE

    Artuso, Caterina; Palladino, Paola; Ricciardelli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how the biological binding between different facial dimensions, and their social and communicative relevance, may impact updating processes in working memory (WM). We focused on WM updating because it plays a key role in ongoing processing. Gaze direction and facial expression are crucial and changeable components of face processing. Direct gaze enhances the processing of approach-oriented facial emotional expressions (e.g., joy), while averted gaze enh...

  20. Bilateral peroneal palsy after weightlifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyavar, Leila; Heckmann, Josef G

    2013-09-01

    In a 48-year-old otherwise healthy man, a bilateral common peroneal palsy was diagnosed clinically and neurophysiologically. He reported on strength training with weights in both arms, lifting the weights and his upper body from a deep squatting position with broadly positioned legs akimbo in a hitherto unusual intensity. Regarding the pathophysiological mechanisms, 2 options are considered: first, stretching of the nerve at the fascia of the peroneal longus muscle and along the fibula neck, and second, compression of the nerve during squatting with weights loaded and with strongly activated anterior tibial and peroneal muscles.

  1. Social evolution. Oxytocin-gaze positive loop and the coevolution of human-dog bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Miho; Mitsui, Shouhei; En, Shiori; Ohtani, Nobuyo; Ohta, Mitsuaki; Sakuma, Yasuo; Onaka, Tatsushi; Mogi, Kazutaka; Kikusui, Takefumi

    2015-04-17

    Human-like modes of communication, including mutual gaze, in dogs may have been acquired during domestication with humans. We show that gazing behavior from dogs, but not wolves, increased urinary oxytocin concentrations in owners, which consequently facilitated owners' affiliation and increased oxytocin concentration in dogs. Further, nasally administered oxytocin increased gazing behavior in dogs, which in turn increased urinary oxytocin concentrations in owners. These findings support the existence of an interspecies oxytocin-mediated positive loop facilitated and modulated by gazing, which may have supported the coevolution of human-dog bonding by engaging common modes of communicating social attachment. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Simple gaze-contingent cues guide eye movements in a realistic driving simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomarjanschi, Laura; Dorr, Michael; Bex, Peter J.; Barth, Erhardt

    2013-03-01

    Looking at the right place at the right time is a critical component of driving skill. Therefore, gaze guidance has the potential to become a valuable driving assistance system. In previous work, we have already shown that complex gaze-contingent stimuli can guide attention and reduce the number of accidents in a simple driving simulator. We here set out to investigate whether cues that are simple enough to be implemented in a real car can also capture gaze during a more realistic driving task in a high-fidelity driving simulator. We used a state-of-the-art, wide-field-of-view driving simulator with an integrated eye tracker. Gaze-contingent warnings were implemented using two arrays of light-emitting diodes horizontally fitted below and above the simulated windshield. Thirteen volunteering subjects drove along predetermined routes in a simulated environment popu­ lated with autonomous traffic. Warnings were triggered during the approach to half of the intersections, cueing either towards the right or to the left. The remaining intersections were not cued, and served as controls. The analysis of the recorded gaze data revealed that the gaze-contingent cues did indeed have a gaze guiding effect, triggering a significant shift in gaze position towards the highlighted direction. This gaze shift was not accompanied by changes in driving behaviour, suggesting that the cues do not interfere with the driving task itself.

  3. The visual system encodes others' direction of gaze in a first-person frame of reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Colin J; Clifford, Colin W G

    2017-11-01

    The primate visual system contains specialised neural mechanisms for encoding the direction of others' gaze. A foundational question that we can ask in this domain concerns the frame of reference in which another person's gaze is represented. Electrophysiological recordings in macaque monkeys suggest that direction of gaze might be encoded relative to the observer (i.e., in a first person reference frame) or relative to the head or body of the stimulus (i.e., in a second person reference frame). Here we use sensory adaptation to gaze direction as a psychophysical tool to probe how this property of the environment is represented in the human visual system. We find that strong perceptual aftereffects occur following adaptation to images that share a common direction of gaze in the first person reference frame, but vary in their direction of gaze in the second person reference frame. In contrast, sensory aftereffects do not occur following adaptation to images that share a common direction of gaze in the second person reference frame. These findings suggest that the adaptive coding of gaze direction in the human visual system occurs primarily in a first-person coordinate system. These data also provide strong support for perceptual constancy in the context of perceived gaze direction, implying that the direction of others' attention is represented in the brain as a higher-level perceptual property abstracted from lower-level cues (e.g., iris position and head rotation). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Coding gaze tracking data with chromatic gradients for VR Exposure Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbelin, Bruno; Grillon, Helena; De Heras Ciechomski, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a simple and intuitive way to represent the eye-tracking data gathered during immersive virtual reality exposure therapy sessions. Eye-tracking technology is used to observe gaze movements during vir- tual reality sessions and the gaze-map chromatic gradient coding allows...... to collect and use these important informa- tion on the subject’s gaze avoidance behavior. We presents the technological solution and its relevance for therapeu- tic needs, as well as the experiments performed to demonstrate its usability in a medical context. Results show that the gaze-map technique...... is fully compatible with different VR exposure systems and provides clinically meaningful data....

  5. EyeMirror: Mobile Calibration-Free Gaze Approximation using Corneal Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lander, Christian; Gehring, Sven; Löchtefeld, Markus

    2017-01-01

    regularly. We present EyeMirror, a mobile device for calibration-free gaze approximation on surfaces (e.g. displays). It consists of a head-mounted camera, connected to a wearable mini-computer, capturing the environment reflected on the human cornea. The corneal images are analyzed using natural feature......Gaze is a powerful measure of people’s attracted attention and reveals where we are looking at within our current field of view. Hence, gaze-based interfaces are gaining in importance. However, gaze estimation usually requires extensive hardware and depends on a calibration that has to be renewed...

  6. Enhanced MRI in patients with facial palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagida, Masahiro; Kato, Tsutomu; Ushiro, Koichi; Kitajiri, Masanori; Yamashita, Toshio; Kumazawa, Tadami; Tanaka, Yoshimasa

    1991-01-01

    We performed Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations at several stages in 40 patients with peripheral facial nerve palsy (Bell's palsy and Ramsay-Hunt syndrome). In 38 of the 40 patients, one and more enhanced region could be seen in certain portion of the facial nerve in the temporal bone on the affected side, whereas no enhanced regions were seen on the intact side. Correlations between the timing of the MRI examination and the location of the enhanced regions were analysed. In all 6 patients examined by MRI within 5 days after the onset of facial nerve palsy, enhanced regions were present in the meatal portion. In 3 of the 8 patients (38%) examined by MRI 6 to 10 days after the onset of facial palsy, enhanced areas were seen in both the meatal and labyrinthine portions. In 8 of the 9 patients (89%) tested 11 to 20 days after the onset of palsy, the vertical portion was enhanced. In the 12 patients examined by MRI 21 to 40 days after the onset of facial nerve palsy, the meatal portion was not enhanced while the labyrinthine portion, the horizontal portion and the vertical portion were enhanced in 5 (42%), 8 (67%) and 11 (92%), respectively. Enhancement in the vertical portion was observed in all 5 patients examined more than 41 days after the onset of facial palsy. These results suggest that the central portion of the facial nerve in the temporal bone tends to be enhanced in the early stage of facial nerve palsy, while the peripheral portion is enhanced in the late stage. These changes of Gd-DTPA enhanced regions in the facial nerve may suggest dromic degeneration of the facial nerve in peripheral facial nerve palsy. (author)

  7. Effect of Age and Severity of Facial Palsy on Taste Thresholds in Bell's Palsy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Min; Kim, Myung Gu; Jung, Junyang; Kim, Sung Su; Jung, A Ra; Kim, Sang Hoon; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2017-04-01

    To investigate whether taste thresholds, as determined by electrogustometry (EGM) and chemical taste tests, differ by age and the severity of facial palsy in patients with Bell's palsy. This study included 29 patients diagnosed with Bell's palsy between January 2014 and May 2015 in our hospital. Patients were assorted into age groups and by severity of facial palsy, as determined by House-Brackmann Scale, and their taste thresholds were assessed by EGM and chemical taste tests. EGM showed that taste thresholds at four locations on the tongue and one location on the central soft palate, 1 cm from the palatine uvula, were significantly higher in Bell's palsy patients than in controls ( p 0.05). The severity of facial palsy did not affect taste thresholds, as determined by both EGM and chemical taste tests ( p >0.05). The overall mean electrical taste thresholds on EGM were higher in younger Bell's palsy patients than in healthy subjects, with the difference at the back-right area of the tongue differing significantly ( p Bell's palsy patients and healthy subjects ( p >0.05). Electrical taste thresholds were higher in Bell's palsy patients than in controls. These differences were observed in younger, but not in older, individuals.

  8. Bilateral facial palsy associated with leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Alves da Silva

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a zoonosis of worldwide occurrence caused by the spirochete Leptospira interrogans. It is an acute feverish disease with a broad clinical spectrum and follows a characteristic biphasic course. Bilateral facial palsy is a rare clinical condition and the differential diagnosis of its causes is extensive. The objective of this exploratory study, presented as a case report, is to describe the occurrence of bilateral facial palsy as an unusual manifestation of leptospirosis. This suggestion should not be overlooked when analyzing the causes for bilateral facial palsy, and should be considered with other possible differential diagnoses, some of which are potentially fatal.

  9. Orthopedic management of spasticity in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novacheck, Tom F; Gage, James R

    2007-09-01

    This article summarizes our experience with cerebral palsy. The primary and secondary deformities that occur with cerebral palsy are described, followed by a brief overview of the nature and role of gait analysis in the treatment of gait problems in cerebral palsy. The concept of lever-arm dysfunction is introduced. Our current treatment program is then presented and subsequently illustrated by two case examples. Finally, an outcomes analysis of a group of patients with spastic diplegia treated with selective dorsal rhizotomy is presented to illustrate our current method of evaluating treatment outcomes and the need for team management in the treatment of this complex condition.

  10. Validation of a Cerebral Palsy Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Monica; Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Uldall, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse completeness and validity of data in the Cerebral Palsy Register in Denmark, 1979-1982. METHODS: Completeness has been assessed by comparing data from The Danish National Patient Register (DNPR) with the cases included in the Cerebral Palsy Register (CPR). Agreement between......, but gestational age was subject to a systematic error, and urinary infections in pregnancy (kappa = 0.43) and placental abruption (kappa = 0.52) were seriously under-reported in the CPR. CONCLUSIONS: Completeness of the Cerebral Palsy Register in Denmark, 1979-1982, has been assessed to maximal 85%, emphasizing...

  11. "Wolves (Canis lupus) and dogs (Canis familiaris) differ in following human gaze into distant space but respond similar to their packmates' gaze": Correction to Werhahn et al. (2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Reports an error in "Wolves ( Canis lupus ) and dogs ( Canis familiaris ) differ in following human gaze into distant space but respond similar to their packmates' gaze" by Geraldine Werhahn, Zsófia Virányi, Gabriela Barrera, Andrea Sommese and Friederike Range ( Journal of Comparative Psychology , 2016[Aug], Vol 130[3], 288-298). In the article, the affiliations for the second and fifth authors should be Wolf Science Center, Ernstbrunn, Austria, and Comparative Cognition, Messerli Research Institute, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna/ Medical University of Vienna/University of Vienna. The online version of this article has been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2016-26311-001.) Gaze following into distant space is defined as visual co-orientation with another individual's head direction allowing the gaze follower to gain information on its environment. Human and nonhuman animals share this basic gaze following behavior, suggested to rely on a simple reflexive mechanism and believed to be an important prerequisite for complex forms of social cognition. Pet dogs differ from other species in that they follow only communicative human gaze clearly addressed to them. However, in an earlier experiment we showed that wolves follow human gaze into distant space. Here we set out to investigate whether domestication has affected gaze following in dogs by comparing pack-living dogs and wolves raised and kept under the same conditions. In Study 1 we found that in contrast to the wolves, these dogs did not follow minimally communicative human gaze into distant space in the same test paradigm. In the observational Study 2 we found that pack-living dogs and wolves, similarly vigilant to environmental stimuli, follow the spontaneous gaze of their conspecifics similarly often. Our findings suggest that domestication did not affect the gaze following ability of dogs itself. The results raise hypotheses about which other dog skills

  12. A gaze bias with coarse spatial indexing during a gambling task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zommara, Noha Mohsen; Takahashi, Muneyoshi; Ounjai, Kajornvut; Lauwereyns, Johan

    2018-04-01

    Researchers have used eye-tracking methods to infer cognitive processes during decision making in choice tasks involving visual materials. Gaze likelihood analysis has shown a cascading effect, suggestive of a causal role for the gaze in preference formation during evaluative decision making. According to the gaze bias hypothesis, the gaze serves to build commitment gradually towards a choice. Here, we applied gaze likelihood analysis in a two-choice version of the well-known Iowa Gambling Task. This task requires active learning of the value of different choice options. As such, it does not involve visual preference formation, but choice optimization through learning. In Experiment 1 we asked subjects to choose between two decks with different payoff structures, and to give their responses using mouse clicks. Two groups of subjects were exposed to stable versus varying outcome contingencies. The analysis revealed a pronounced gaze bias towards the chosen stimuli in both groups of subjects, plateauing at more than 400 ms before the choice. The early plateauing suggested that the gaze effect partially reflected eye-hand coordination. In Experiment 2 we asked subjects to give responses using a key press. The results again showed a clear gaze bias towards the chosen deck, this time without any influence from eye-hand coordination. In both experiments, there was a clear gaze bias towards the choice even though the gaze fixations did not narrowly focus on the spatial positions of choice options. Taken together, the data suggested a role for gaze in coarse spatial indexing during non-perceptual decision making.

  13. Mirror Neurons of Ventral Premotor Cortex Are Modulated by Social Cues Provided by Others' Gaze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudé, Gino; Festante, Fabrizia; Cilia, Adriana; Loiacono, Veronica; Bimbi, Marco; Fogassi, Leonardo; Ferrari, Pier Francesco

    2016-03-16

    Mirror neurons (MNs) in the inferior parietal lobule and ventral premotor cortex (PMv) can code the intentions of other individuals using contextual cues. Gaze direction is an important social cue that can be used for understanding the meaning of actions made by other individuals. Here we addressed the issue of whether PMv MNs are influenced by the gaze direction of another individual. We recorded single-unit activity in macaque PMv while the monkey was observing an experimenter performing a grasping action and orienting his gaze either toward (congruent gaze condition) or away (incongruent gaze condition) from a target object. The results showed that one-half of the recorded MNs were modulated by the gaze direction of the human agent. These gaze-modulated neurons were evenly distributed between those preferring a gaze direction congruent with the direction where the grasping action was performed and the others that preferred an incongruent gaze. Whereas the presence of congruent responses is in line with the usual coupling of hand and gaze in both executed and observed actions, the incongruent responses can be explained by the long exposure of the monkeys to this condition. Our results reveal that the representation of observed actions in PMv is influenced by contextual information not only extracted from physical cues, but also from cues endowed with biological or social value. In this study, we present the first evidence showing that social cues modulate MNs in the monkey ventral premotor cortex. These data suggest that there is an integrated representation of other's hand actions and gaze direction at the single neuron level in the ventral premotor cortex, and support the hypothesis of a functional role of MNs in decoding actions and understanding motor intentions. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/363145-12$15.00/0.

  14. Pontine stroke presenting as isolated facial nerve palsy mimicking Bell's palsy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saluja Paramveer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated facial nerve palsy usually manifests as Bell's palsy. Lacunar infarct involving the lower pons is a rare cause of solitary infranuclear facial paralysis. The present unusual case is one in which the patient appeared to have Bell's palsy but turned out to have a pontine infarct. Case presentation A 47-year-old Asian Indian man with a medical history of hypertension presented to our institution with nausea, vomiting, generalized weakness, facial droop, and slurred speech of 14 hours' duration. His physical examination revealed that he was conscious, lethargic, and had mildly slurred speech. His blood pressure was 216/142 mmHg. His neurologic examination showed that he had loss of left-sided forehead creases, inability to close his left eye, left facial muscle weakness, rightward deviation of the angle of the mouth on smiling, and loss of the left nasolabial fold. Afferent corneal reflexes were present bilaterally. MRI of the head was initially read as negative for acute stroke. Bell's palsy appeared less likely because of the acuity of his presentation, encephalopathy-like imaging, and hypertension. The MRI was re-evaluated with a neurologist's assistance, which revealed a tiny 4 mm infarct involving the left dorsal aspect of the pons. The final diagnosis was isolated facial nerve palsy due to lacunar infarct of dorsal pons and hypertensive encephalopathy. Conclusion The facial nerve has a predominant motor component which supplies all muscles concerned with unilateral facial expression. Anatomic knowledge is crucial for clinical localization. Bell's palsy accounts for around 72% of facial palsies. Other causes such as tumors and pontine infarcts can also present as facial palsy. Isolated dorsal infarct presenting as isolated facial palsy is very rare. Our case emphasizes that isolated facial palsy should not always be attributed to Bell's palsy. It can be a presentation of a rare dorsal pontine infarct as observed

  15. Botulinum A toxin utilizations in obstetric palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atakan Aydin

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: We conclude that with the help of botulinum A toxin and physyotherapy, obstetrical palsy patient with cocontractions can significantly improve movements and may have less surgery. [Hand Microsurg 2012; 1(3.000: 89-94

  16. A general practice approach to Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Nga T; Panizza, Benedict; Wallwork, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    Bell's palsy is characterised by an acute onset of unilateral, lower motor neuron weakness of the facial nerve in the absence of an identifiable cause. Establishing the correct diagnosis is imperative and choosing the correct treatment options can optimise the likelihood of recovery. This article summarises our understanding of Bell's palsy and the evidence-based management options available for adult patients. The basic assessment should include a thorough history and physical examination as the diagnosis of Bell's palsy is based on exclusion. For confirmed cases of Bell's palsy, corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment and should be initiated within 72 hours of symptom onset. Antiviral therapy in combination with corticosteroid therapy may confer a small benefit and may be offered on the basis of shared decision making. Currently, no recommendations can be made for acupuncture, physical therapy, electrotherapy or surgical decompression because well-designed studies are lacking and available data are of low quality.

  17. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Bell's Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The association between herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1 infection and Bell palsy was determined in 47 children studied at Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, NY. Swabs of saliva and conjunctiva were taken for PCR testing.

  18. Treatment of Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Gül Mete Civelek; Ayçe Atalay

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral palsy diagnosis is a clinical one and it includes motor development delay, abnormal muscle tone and hyperreflexia. Muscle weakness, spasticity, loss of coordination, the continuation of the primitive reflexes and non-developed normal motor control are often seen in children with cerebral palsy. Spasticity is the velocity dependent increase in the resistance against passive muscle stretching. Spasticity treatment program should be established after detailed evaluation of degree an...

  19. Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Finsterer, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell?s palsy). Three quarters of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the presence of typical symptoms and signs, blood chemical investigations, cerebro-spinal-fluid-investigations, X-ray of the...

  20. Are most sixth nerve palsies really paralytic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Ayse Gul; Arifoglu, Hasan Basri; Dal, Derya; Simsek, Saban

    2011-01-01

    Etiology and date of palsy are two important parameters that affect the treatment protocol of sixth nerve palsies. This study evaluated the treatment protocols and outcomes of treatment in sixth nerve palsies. Thirty-four patients who had sixth nerve palsy were included. Botulinum toxin A (BTX) injection was performed on patients with acute sixth nerve palsy and paresis (BTX group), whereas chronic cases received only horizontal surgery (surgery group). All patients in the BTX group received a BTX injection into the ipsilateral medial rectus muscle. Patients in the surgery group underwent either ipsilateral medial rectus recession or recession combined with lateral rectus resection without the transposition procedure. Fifteen patients were treated with a BTX injection to the medial rectus muscle. One patient underwent ipsilateral medial rectus muscle recession and 6 patients received both medial rectus recession and lateral rectus resection in the same session. Measurement of esotropia was 24.9 prism diopters (PD) (range: 18 to 35 PD) before treatment in the BTX group. The recovery rate was 86.6% (13 of 15) without any residual deviation. In the surgery group, the mean preoperative deviation was 35.1 PD (range: 14 to 75 PD), which decreased to mean 2.57 PD (range: 0 to 10 PD) postoperatively. The achievement of orthotropia rate was 85.7%. BTX injection was found to be an effective treatment because it prevented medial rectus contraction in acute sixth nerve palsies. Correction of deviation with the recession of contracted medial rectus muscles and resection of lateral rectus muscles without the need of transposition in chronic sixth nerve palsy testified that most sixth nerve palsies involve partial paralysis rather than complete paralysis. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Surgical outcomes of intermittent exotropia associated with concomitant hypertropia including simulated superior oblique palsy after horizontal muscles surgery only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y A; Kim, S-H

    2007-12-01

    To investigate the clinical features and obtain guideline of treatment in intermittent exotropia associated with hypertropia including simulated superior oblique palsy. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 93 patients of intermittent exotropia aligned with horizontal muscle surgery only, who showed hypertropia more than 2 PD in primary gaze before surgery and disappeared after surgery. They showed forveal extorsion and dysfunction of oblique muscles of 2+ or less and positive Bielschowsky head tilt test. The postoperative changes of deviation angle were analysed at postoperative 1 day, 6 months, and 1 year. Average amount of distant horizontal deviation in primary gaze was 32.3+/-9.58 (25-53) PD, hypertropia was 3.50+/-2.52 (2-14) PD. Average vertical deviation of ipsilateral (hypertropic eye) side was 8.8+/-4.63 PD and contralateral (hypotrophic eye) side was 4.0+/-4.77 PD in Bielschowsky head tilt test. Hypertropic eye was accorded with exotropic eye in 53.4%. After horizontal surgery, the amount of hypertropia was 1.2 PD at postoperative 1 day. On Bielschowsky head tilt test, hypertropia was almost eliminated showing 0.6 PD on the ipsilateral side and 0.2 PD on the contralateral eye at 1 month. This state was maintained up to postoperative 1 year. Small amount of hypertropia up to 14 PD in intermittent exotropia could be disappeared with horizontal muscle surgery only. However, careful examinations for head tilt history, fovea extorsion, oblique dysfunction, and Maddox rod test should be preceded to rule out true superior oblique palsy.

  2. Tumors Presenting as Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cranial nerve palsy could be one of the presenting features of underlying benign or malignant tumors of the head and neck. The tumor can involve the cranial nerves by local compression, direct infiltration or by paraneoplastic process. Cranial nerve involvement depends on the anatomical course of the cranial nerve and the site of the tumor. Patients may present with single or multiple cranial nerve palsies. Multiple cranial nerve involvement could be sequential or discrete, unilateral or bilateral, painless or painful. The presentation could be acute, subacute or recurrent. Anatomic localization is the first step in the evaluation of these patients. The lesion could be in the brain stem, meninges, base of skull, extracranial or systemic disease itself. We present 3 cases of underlying neoplasms presenting as cranial nerve palsies: a case of glomus tumor presenting as cochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus and hypoglossal nerve palsies, clivus tumor presenting as abducens nerve palsy, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal and abducens nerve palsies due to paraneoplastic involvement. History and physical examination, imaging, autoantibodies and biopsy if feasible are useful for the diagnosis. Management outcomes depend on the treatment of the underlying tumor.

  3. Tumors Presenting as Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kishore; Ahmed, Rafeeq; Bajantri, Bharat; Singh, Amandeep; Abbas, Hafsa; Dejesus, Eddy; Khan, Rana Raheel; Niazi, Masooma; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2017-01-01

    Cranial nerve palsy could be one of the presenting features of underlying benign or malignant tumors of the head and neck. The tumor can involve the cranial nerves by local compression, direct infiltration or by paraneoplastic process. Cranial nerve involvement depends on the anatomical course of the cranial nerve and the site of the tumor. Patients may present with single or multiple cranial nerve palsies. Multiple cranial nerve involvement could be sequential or discrete, unilateral or bilateral, painless or painful. The presentation could be acute, subacute or recurrent. Anatomic localization is the first step in the evaluation of these patients. The lesion could be in the brain stem, meninges, base of skull, extracranial or systemic disease itself. We present 3 cases of underlying neoplasms presenting as cranial nerve palsies: a case of glomus tumor presenting as cochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus and hypoglossal nerve palsies, clivus tumor presenting as abducens nerve palsy, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal and abducens nerve palsies due to paraneoplastic involvement. History and physical examination, imaging, autoantibodies and biopsy if feasible are useful for the diagnosis. Management outcomes depend on the treatment of the underlying tumor. PMID:28553221

  4. Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef

    2008-07-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell's palsy). Three quarters of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the presence of typical symptoms and signs, blood chemical investigations, cerebro-spinal-fluid-investigations, X-ray of the scull and mastoid, cerebral MRI, or nerve conduction studies. Bell's palsy may be diagnosed after exclusion of all secondary causes, but causes of secondary FNP and Bell's palsy may coexist. Treatment of secondary FNP is based on the therapy of the underlying disorder. Treatment of Bell's palsy is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but also studies, which show no beneficial effect. Additional measures include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or possibly surgery. Prognosis of Bell's palsy is fair with complete recovery in about 80% of the cases, 15% experience some kind of permanent nerve damage and 5% remain with severe sequelae.

  5. Delayed facial nerve decompression for Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Jong Ha; Byun, Jae Yong; Park, Moon Suh; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2016-07-01

    Incomplete recovery of facial motor function continues to be long-term sequelae in some patients with Bell's palsy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of transmastoid facial nerve decompression after steroid and antiviral treatment in patients with late stage Bell's palsy. Twelve patients underwent surgical decompression for Bell's palsy 21-70 days after onset, whereas 22 patients were followed up after steroid and antiviral therapy without decompression. Surgical criteria included greater than 90 % degeneration on electroneuronography and no voluntary electromyography potentials. This study was a retrospective study of electrodiagnostic data and medical chart review between 2006 and 2013. Recovery from facial palsy was assessed using the House-Brackmann grading system. Final recovery rate did not differ significantly in the two groups; however, all patients in the decompression group recovered to at least House-Brackmann grade III at final follow-up. Although postoperative hearing threshold was increased in both groups, there was no significant between group difference in hearing threshold. Transmastoid decompression of the facial nerve in patients with severe late stage Bell's palsy at risk for a poor facial nerve outcome reduced severe complications of facial palsy with minimal morbidity.

  6. Adaptive Gaze Strategies for Locomotion with Constricted Visual Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colas N. Authié

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In retinitis pigmentosa (RP, loss of peripheral visual field accounts for most difficulties encountered in visuo-motor coordination during locomotion. The purpose of this study was to accurately assess the impact of peripheral visual field loss on gaze strategies during locomotion, and identify compensatory mechanisms. Nine RP subjects presenting a central visual field limited to 10–25° in diameter, and nine healthy subjects were asked to walk in one of three directions—straight ahead to a visual target, leftward and rightward through a door frame, with or without obstacle on the way. Whole body kinematics were recorded by motion capture, and gaze direction in space was reconstructed using an eye-tracker. Changes in gaze strategies were identified in RP subjects, including extensive exploration prior to walking, frequent fixations of the ground (even knowing no obstacle was present, of door edges, essentially of the proximal one, of obstacle edge/corner, and alternating door edges fixations when approaching the door. This was associated with more frequent, sometimes larger rapid-eye-movements, larger movements, and forward tilting of the head. Despite the visual handicap, the trajectory geometry was identical between groups, with a small decrease in walking speed in RPs. These findings identify the adaptive changes in sensory-motor coordination, in order to ensure visual awareness of the surrounding, detect changes in spatial configuration, collect information for self-motion, update the postural reference frame, and update egocentric distances to environmental objects. They are of crucial importance for the design of optimized rehabilitation procedures.

  7. Classification of RNA structure change by 'gazing' at experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Chanin Tolson; Laederach, Alain

    2017-06-01

    Mutations (or Single Nucleotide Variants) in folded RiboNucleic Acid structures that cause local or global conformational change are riboSNitches. Predicting riboSNitches is challenging, as it requires making two, albeit related, structure predictions. The data most often used to experimentally validate riboSNitch predictions is Selective 2' Hydroxyl Acylation by Primer Extension, or SHAPE. Experimentally establishing a riboSNitch requires the quantitative comparison of two SHAPE traces: wild-type (WT) and mutant. Historically, SHAPE data was collected on electropherograms and change in structure was evaluated by 'gel gazing.' SHAPE data is now routinely collected with next generation sequencing and/or capillary sequencers. We aim to establish a classifier capable of simulating human 'gazing' by identifying features of the SHAPE profile that human experts agree 'looks' like a riboSNitch. We find strong quantitative agreement between experts when RNA scientists 'gaze' at SHAPE data and identify riboSNitches. We identify dynamic time warping and seven other features predictive of the human consensus. The classSNitch classifier reported here accurately reproduces human consensus for 167 mutant/WT comparisons with an Area Under the Curve (AUC) above 0.8. When we analyze 2019 mutant traces for 17 different RNAs, we find that features of the WT SHAPE reactivity allow us to improve thermodynamic structure predictions of riboSNitches. This is significant, as accurate RNA structural analysis and prediction is likely to become an important aspect of precision medicine. The classSNitch R package is freely available at http://classsnitch.r-forge.r-project.org . alain@email.unc.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Coding gaze tracking data with chromatic gradients for VR Exposure Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbelin, Bruno; Grillon, Helena; De Heras Ciechomski, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a simple and intuitive way to represent the eye-tracking data gathered during immersive virtual reality exposure therapy sessions. Eye-tracking technology is used to observe gaze movements during vir- tual reality sessions and the gaze-map chromatic gradient coding allows to...... is fully compatible with different VR exposure systems and provides clinically meaningful data....

  9. Face and gaze perception in borderline personality disorder: An electrical neuroimaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchio, Cristina; Piguet, Camille; Gentsch, Kornelia; Küng, Anne-Lise; Rihs, Tonia A; Hasler, Roland; Aubry, Jean-Michel; Dayer, Alexandre; Michel, Christoph M; Perroud, Nader

    2017-11-30

    Humans are sensitive to gaze direction from early life, and gaze has social and affective values. Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a clinical condition characterized by emotional dysregulation and enhanced sensitivity to affective and social cues. In this study we wanted to investigate the temporal-spatial dynamics of spontaneous gaze processing in BPD. We used a 2-back-working-memory task, in which neutral faces with direct and averted gaze were presented. Gaze was used as an emotional modulator of event-related-potentials to faces. High density EEG data were acquired in 19 females with BPD and 19 healthy women, and analyzed with a spatio-temporal microstates analysis approach. Independently of gaze direction, BPD patients showed altered N170 and P200 topographies for neutral faces. Source localization revealed that the anterior cingulate and other prefrontal regions were abnormally activated during the N170 component related to face encoding, while middle temporal deactivations were observed during the P200 component. Post-task affective ratings showed that BPD patients had difficulty to disambiguate neutral gaze. This study provides first evidence for an early neural bias toward neutral faces in BPD independent of gaze direction and also suggests the importance of considering basic aspects of social cognition in identifying biological risk factors of BPD. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Multimodal Language Learner Interactions via Desktop Videoconferencing within a Framework of Social Presence: Gaze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satar, H. Muge

    2013-01-01

    Desktop videoconferencing (DVC) offers many opportunities for language learning through its multimodal features. However, it also brings some challenges such as gaze and mutual gaze, that is, eye-contact. This paper reports some of the findings of a PhD study investigating social presence in DVC interactions of English as a Foreign Language (EFL)…

  11. Impairment of Unconscious, but Not Conscious, Gaze-Triggered Attention Orienting in Asperger's Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Wataru; Uono, Shota; Okada, Takashi; Toichi, Motomi

    2010-01-01

    Impairment of joint attention represents the core clinical features of pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs), including autism and Asperger's disorder. However, experimental studies reported intact gaze-triggered attentional orienting in PDD. Since all previous studies employed supraliminal presentation of gaze stimuli, we hypothesized that…

  12. The contributions of temporal delay and face exposure to the decay of gaze direction aftereffects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloth, Nadine; Pugh, Charlotte; Rhodes, Gillian

    2017-03-01

    Gaze direction is a dynamic social signal that provides real-time insight into another person's focus of attention. Gaze adaptation induces aftereffects in the perception of gaze in subsequent faces, typically biasing it away from the adapted direction. Previous studies found that such gaze direction aftereffects persist for about 7 min when repeatedly tested immediately after adaptation, but can survive at least 24 hr when there is no testing immediately after adaptation. These findings suggest that exposure to test faces after adaptation might affect the persistence of gaze direction aftereffects more than the passing of time. The present study systematically established the contributions of time and intervening testing on the longevity of gaze direction aftereffects. Aftereffects were induced and then traced over six postadaptation tests. Participants were assigned to four groups with a delay of either 30 s, 3 min, 5.5 min, or 8 min between adaptation and the first postadaptation test. Aftereffects were strongly affected by the number of preceding postadaptation tests, but unaffected by the delay between adaptation and test, revealing that face exposure affects the longevity of aftereffects more strongly than the passing of time, at least over the time frame studied here. Our findings suggest that exposure to a substantial number of faces with an unbiased distribution of gaze directions may be necessary to overcome gaze direction aftereffects.

  13. Responding to the direction of the eyes: in search of the masked gaze-cueing effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Janabi, Shahd; Finkbeiner, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that masked gaze cues can produce a cueing effect. Those studies, however, all utilized a localization task and, hence, are ambiguous with respect to whether the previously observed masked gaze-cueing effect reflects the orienting of attention or the preparation of a motor response. The aim of the present study was to investigate this issue by determining whether masked gaze cues can modulate responses in detection and discrimination tasks, both of which isolate spatial attention from response priming. First, we found a gaze-cueing effect for unmasked cues in detection, discrimination, and localization tasks, which suggests that the gaze-cueing effect for visible cues is not task dependent. Second, and in contrast, we found a gaze-cueing effect for masked cues in a localization task, but not in detection or discrimination tasks, which suggests that the gaze-cueing effect for masked cues is task dependent. Therefore, the present study shows that the masked gaze-cueing effect is attributed to response priming, as opposed to the orienting of spatial attention.

  14. How does gaze direction affect facial processing in social anxiety? -An ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Yu, Fengqiong; Ye, Rong; Chen, Xingui; Xie, Xinhui; Zhu, Chunyan; Wang, Kai

    2017-05-01

    Previous behavioral studies have demonstrated an effect of eye gaze direction on the processing of emotional expressions in adults with social anxiety. However, specific brain responses to the interaction between gaze direction and facial expressions in social anxiety remain unclear. The present study aimed to explore the time course of such interaction using event-related potentials (ERPs) in participants with social anxiety. High socially anxious individuals and low socially anxious individuals were asked to identify the gender of angry or neutral faces with direct or averted gaze while their behavioral performance and electrophysiological data were monitored. We found that identification of angry faces with direct but not averted gaze elicited larger N2 amplitude in high socially anxious individuals compared to low socially anxious individuals, while identification of neutral faces did not produce any gaze modulation effect. Moreover, the N2 was correlated with increased anxiety severity upon exposure to angry faces with direct gaze. Therefore, our results suggest that gaze direction modulates the processing of threatening faces in social anxiety. The N2 component elicited by angry faces with direct gaze could be a state-dependent biomarker of social anxiety and may be an important reference biomarker for social anxiety diagnosis and intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Deep Learning-Based Gaze Detection System for Automobile Drivers Using a NIR Camera Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwan Ali Naqvi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A paradigm shift is required to prevent the increasing automobile accident deaths that are mostly due to the inattentive behavior of drivers. Knowledge of gaze region can provide valuable information regarding a driver’s point of attention. Accurate and inexpensive gaze classification systems in cars can improve safe driving. However, monitoring real-time driving behaviors and conditions presents some challenges: dizziness due to long drives, extreme lighting variations, glasses reflections, and occlusions. Past studies on gaze detection in cars have been chiefly based on head movements. The margin of error in gaze detection increases when drivers gaze at objects by moving their eyes without moving their heads. To solve this problem, a pupil center corneal reflection (PCCR-based method has been considered. However, the error of accurately detecting the pupil center and corneal reflection center is increased in a car environment due to various environment light changes, reflections on glasses surface, and motion and optical blurring of captured eye image. In addition, existing PCCR-based methods require initial user calibration, which is difficult to perform in a car environment. To address this issue, we propose a deep learning-based gaze detection method using a near-infrared (NIR camera sensor considering driver head and eye movement that does not require any initial user calibration. The proposed system is evaluated on our self-constructed database as well as on open Columbia gaze dataset (CAVE-DB. The proposed method demonstrated greater accuracy than the previous gaze classification methods.

  16. Gaze Strategies in Skateboard Trick Jumps: Spatiotemporal Constraints in Complex Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klostermann, André; Küng, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to further the knowledge on gaze behavior in locomotion by studying gaze strategies in skateboard jumps of different difficulty that had to be performed either with or without an obstacle. Method: Nine experienced skateboarders performed "Ollie" and "Kickflip" jumps either over an obstacle or over a…

  17. It Takes Time and Experience to Learn How to Interpret Gaze in Mentalistic Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavens, David A.

    2006-01-01

    What capabilities are required for an organism to evince an "explicit" understanding of gaze as a mentalistic phenomenon? One possibility is that mentalistic interpretations of gaze, like concepts of unseen, supernatural beings, are culturally-specific concepts, acquired through cultural learning. These abstract concepts may either require a…

  18. What are you looking at? Automatic estimation and inference of gaze

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valenti, R.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is focused on gaze estimation, that is, providing an automated answer to the question What are you looking at?. To this end, the problem of gaze estimation is divided into three sub problems, namely detection (i.e. extracting the relevant visual cues from the faces), estimation (i.e.

  19. Gaze Cueing of Attention: Visual Attention, Social Cognition, and Individual Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischen, Alexandra; Bayliss, Andrew P.; Tipper, Steven P.

    2007-01-01

    During social interactions, people's eyes convey a wealth of information about their direction of attention and their emotional and mental states. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of past and current research into the perception of gaze behavior and its effect on the observer. This encompasses the perception of gaze direction…

  20. EyeDroid: An Open Source Mobile Gaze Tracker on Android for Eyewear Computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalaliniya, Shahram; Mardanbeigi, Diako; Sintos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we report on development and evaluation of a video-based mobile gaze tracker for eyewear computers. Unlike most of the previous work, our system performs all its processing workload on an Android device and sends the coordinates of the gaze point to an eyewear device through wireless...

  1. Reading pleasure : Light in August and the theory of the gendered gaze

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, [No Value

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses various components of the theory of the gendered gaze, in order to construct a framework for an analysis of how William Faulkner understood and fictionally presented the mechanism of the gaze in Light in August. Linking theory and praxis, this article explores the relationship

  2. Deep Learning-Based Gaze Detection System for Automobile Drivers Using a NIR Camera Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Rizwan Ali; Arsalan, Muhammad; Batchuluun, Ganbayar; Yoon, Hyo Sik; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2018-02-03

    A paradigm shift is required to prevent the increasing automobile accident deaths that are mostly due to the inattentive behavior of drivers. Knowledge of gaze region can provide valuable information regarding a driver's point of attention. Accurate and inexpensive gaze classification systems in cars can improve safe driving. However, monitoring real-time driving behaviors and conditions presents some challenges: dizziness due to long drives, extreme lighting variations, glasses reflections, and occlusions. Past studies on gaze detection in cars have been chiefly based on head movements. The margin of error in gaze detection increases when drivers gaze at objects by moving their eyes without moving their heads. To solve this problem, a pupil center corneal reflection (PCCR)-based method has been considered. However, the error of accurately detecting the pupil center and corneal reflection center is increased in a car environment due to various environment light changes, reflections on glasses surface, and motion and optical blurring of captured eye image. In addition, existing PCCR-based methods require initial user calibration, which is difficult to perform in a car environment. To address this issue, we propose a deep learning-based gaze detection method using a near-infrared (NIR) camera sensor considering driver head and eye movement that does not require any initial user calibration. The proposed system is evaluated on our self-constructed database as well as on open Columbia gaze dataset (CAVE-DB). The proposed method demonstrated greater accuracy than the previous gaze classification methods.

  3. The early markers for later dyskinetic cerebral palsy are different from those for spastic cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einspieler, C; Cioni, G; Paolicelli, PB; Bos, AF; Dressler, A; Ferrari, F; Roversi, MF; Prechtl, HFR

    Qualitative abnormalities of spontaneous motor activity in new-borns and young infants are early predictive markers for later spastic cerebral palsy. Aim of this research was to identify which motor patterns may be specific for later dyskinetic cerebral palsy. In a large, prospectively performed

  4. Mobile gaze-based screen interaction in 3D environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardanbeigi, Diako; Witzner Hansen, Dan

    2011-01-01

    in the field of view of the user is also presented which can be applied in a general scenario in which multiple users can interact with multiple screens. A particular application of using this technique is implemented in a home environment with two big screens and a mobile phone. In this application a user......Head-mounted eye trackers can be used for mobile interaction as well as gaze estimation purposes. This paper presents a method that enables the user to interact with any planar digital display in a 3D environment using a head-mounted eye tracker. An effective method for identifying the screens...

  5. Sexualized Branded Entertainment and the Male Consumer Gaze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. McAllister

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article applies the “male consumer gaze” – integrating work influenced by Erving Goffman and Laura Mulvey – to two branded televised events: the 2011 Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show and the 2012 Hooters International Swimsuit Pageant. Critiqued elements include gendered body positioning, televisual and narrativizing techniques, social and integrated media, and branding strategies that combine to create a flow of consumption-based male gazing. Such trends may intensify with changes in media economics and niche marketing.

  6. A comprehensive gaze stabilization controller based on cerebellar internal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannucci, Lorenzo; Falotico, Egidio; Tolu, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    based on the coordination of VCR and VOR and OKR. The model, inspired by neuroscientific cerebellar theories, is provided with learning and adaptation capabilities based on internal models. We present the results for the gaze stabilization model on three sets of experiments conducted on the SABIAN robot...... and on the iCub simulator, validating the robustness of the proposed control method. The first set of experiments focused on the controller response to a set of disturbance frequencies along the vertical plane. The second shows the performances of the system under three-dimensional disturbances. The last set...

  7. A wearable ergonomic gaze-tracker for infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavone, G; Guglielmelli, E; Keller, F; Zollo, L; Chersi, F

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a low-cost hardware and software solution for monitoring gaze and head movements in infants. The proposed device consists in a webcam and a magneto-inertial sensor mounted on a cap. Signal acquisition and elaboration is carried out on a common PC. Technological choices and calibration procedures rely on a minimally obtrusive and ecological approach. The purpose of this work is to present preliminary in-lab evaluations on a new method that may enable researchers to gain new insights on the contents of visual experience from the child's point of view.

  8. On uniform resampling and gaze analysis of bidirectional texture functions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filip, Jiří; Chantler, M.J.; Haindl, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 3 (2009), s. 1-15 ISSN 1544-3558 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572; GA ČR GA102/08/0593 Grant - others:EC Marie Curie(BE) 41358 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : BTF * texture * eye tracking Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 1.447, year: 2009 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2009/RO/haindl-on uniform resampling and gaze analysis of bidirectional texture functions.pdf

  9. Adult onset supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, cerebellar ataxia, and neurogenic proximal muscle weakness in a brother and sister: another hexosaminidase A deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, A E; Young, E P; Schon, F

    1987-01-01

    An Ashkenazi Jewish brother and sister developed progressive ataxia and proximal neurogenic muscle weakness, associated with supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, in the fourth decade of life. Hexosaminidase A activity, assayed using both synthetic and natural substrates, was severely reduced in the patients' plasma, leukocytes, and skin fibroblasts. Enzyme activity in their parents was in a similar range to that seen in heterozygotes for Tay-Sachs disease. The increasing evidence for marked clinical and molecular heterogeneity in the GM2 gangliosidoses warrants their consideration in the diagnosis of multisystem degenerative neurological disorders, even if onset of symptoms is in adult life. Images PMID:2956362

  10. Role of Gaze Cues in Interpersonal Motor Coordination: Towards Higher Affiliation in Human-Robot Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Khoramshahi

    Full Text Available The ability to follow one another's gaze plays an important role in our social cognition; especially when we synchronously perform tasks together. We investigate how gaze cues can improve performance in a simple coordination task (i.e., the mirror game, whereby two players mirror each other's hand motions. In this game, each player is either a leader or follower. To study the effect of gaze in a systematic manner, the leader's role is played by a robotic avatar. We contrast two conditions, in which the avatar provides or not explicit gaze cues that indicate the next location of its hand. Specifically, we investigated (a whether participants are able to exploit these gaze cues to improve their coordination, (b how gaze cues affect action prediction and temporal coordination, and (c whether introducing active gaze behavior for avatars makes them more realistic and human-like (from the user point of view.43 subjects participated in 8 trials of the mirror game. Each subject performed the game in the two conditions (with and without gaze cues. In this within-subject study, the order of the conditions was randomized across participants, and subjective assessment of the avatar's realism was assessed by administering a post-hoc questionnaire. When gaze cues were provided, a quantitative assessment of synchrony between participants and the avatar revealed a significant improvement in subject reaction-time (RT. This confirms our hypothesis that gaze cues improve the follower's ability to predict the avatar's action. An analysis of the pattern of frequency across the two players' hand movements reveals that the gaze cues improve the overall temporal coordination across the two players. Finally, analysis of the subjective evaluations from the questionnaires reveals that, in the presence of gaze cues, participants found it not only more human-like/realistic, but also easier to interact with the avatar.This work confirms that people can exploit gaze cues to

  11. Role of Gaze Cues in Interpersonal Motor Coordination: Towards Higher Affiliation in Human-Robot Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoramshahi, Mahdi; Shukla, Ashwini; Raffard, Stéphane; Bardy, Benoît G; Billard, Aude

    2016-01-01

    The ability to follow one another's gaze plays an important role in our social cognition; especially when we synchronously perform tasks together. We investigate how gaze cues can improve performance in a simple coordination task (i.e., the mirror game), whereby two players mirror each other's hand motions. In this game, each player is either a leader or follower. To study the effect of gaze in a systematic manner, the leader's role is played by a robotic avatar. We contrast two conditions, in which the avatar provides or not explicit gaze cues that indicate the next location of its hand. Specifically, we investigated (a) whether participants are able to exploit these gaze cues to improve their coordination, (b) how gaze cues affect action prediction and temporal coordination, and (c) whether introducing active gaze behavior for avatars makes them more realistic and human-like (from the user point of view). 43 subjects participated in 8 trials of the mirror game. Each subject performed the game in the two conditions (with and without gaze cues). In this within-subject study, the order of the conditions was randomized across participants, and subjective assessment of the avatar's realism was assessed by administering a post-hoc questionnaire. When gaze cues were provided, a quantitative assessment of synchrony between participants and the avatar revealed a significant improvement in subject reaction-time (RT). This confirms our hypothesis that gaze cues improve the follower's ability to predict the avatar's action. An analysis of the pattern of frequency across the two players' hand movements reveals that the gaze cues improve the overall temporal coordination across the two players. Finally, analysis of the subjective evaluations from the questionnaires reveals that, in the presence of gaze cues, participants found it not only more human-like/realistic, but also easier to interact with the avatar. This work confirms that people can exploit gaze cues to predict

  12. Looking at Eye Gaze Processing and Its Neural Correlates in Infancy--Implications for Social Development and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehl, Stefanie; Reid, Vincent M.; Parise, Eugenio; Handl, Andrea; Palumbo, Letizia; Striano, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    The importance of eye gaze as a means of communication is indisputable. However, there is debate about whether there is a dedicated neural module, which functions as an eye gaze detector and when infants are able to use eye gaze cues in a referential way. The application of neuroscience methodologies to developmental psychology has provided new…

  13. The effects of social pressure and emotional expression on the cone of gaze in patients with social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbort, Johannes; Spiegel, Julia; Witthöft, Michael; Hecht, Heiko

    2017-06-01

    Patients with social anxiety disorder suffer from pronounced fears in social situations. As gaze perception is crucial in these situations, we examined which factors influence the range of gaze directions where mutual gaze is experienced (the cone of gaze). The social stimulus was modified by changing the number of people (heads) present and the emotional expression of their faces. Participants completed a psychophysical task, in which they had to adjust the eyes of a virtual head to gaze at the edge of the range where mutual eye-contact was experienced. The number of heads affected the width of the gaze cone: the more heads, the wider the gaze cone. The emotional expression of the virtual head had no consistent effect on the width of the gaze cone, it did however affect the emotional state of the participants. Angry expressions produced the highest arousal values. Highest valence emerged from happy faces, lowest valence from angry faces. These results suggest that the widening of the gaze cone in social anxiety disorder is not primarily mediated by their altered emotional reactivity. Implications for gaze assessment and gaze training in therapeutic contexts are discussed. Due to interindividual variability, enlarged gaze cones are not necessarily indicative of social anxiety disorder, they merely constitute a correlate at the group level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Processing of gaze direction within the N170/M170 time window: A combined EEG/MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burra, Nicolas; Baker, Sara; George, Nathalie

    2017-06-01

    Gaze direction is an important social signal for human beings. Beside the role of gaze in attention orienting, direct gaze (that is, gaze directed toward an observer) is a highly relevant biological stimulus that elicits attention capture and increases face encoding. Brain imaging studies have emphasized the role of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) in the coding of gaze direction and in the integration of gaze and head cues of social attention. The dynamics of the processing and integration of these cues remains, however, unclear. In order to address this question, we used deviated and frontal faces with averted and direct gaze in a combined electro- and magneto- encephalography (EEG-MEG) study. We showed distinct effects of gaze direction on the N170 and M170 responses. There was an interaction between gaze direction and head orientation between 134 and 162ms in MEG and a main effect of gaze direction between 171 and 186ms in EEG. These effects involved the posterior and anterior regions of the STS respectively. Both effects also emphasized the sensitivity to direct gaze. These data highlight the central role of the STS in gaze processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht

    2009-01-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs...... in 2000. The prevalence of CP in eastern Denmark was approximately 1.7 per 1000. Information on productivity and the use of health care was retrieved from registers. The lifetime cost of CP was about euro860 000 for men and about euro800 000 for women. The largest component was social care costs......, particularly during childhood. A sensitivity analysis found that alterations in social care costs had a small effect, whereas lowering the discount rate from 5 to 3 per cent markedly increased total lifetime costs. Discounting decreases the value of costs in the future compared with the present. The high...

  16. Embodying Investigations of Cerebral Palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Kristian Møller Moltke

    to understand what it means for persons to live with CP and then figure out how we should help them . Based on his method of open - minded cognitive science, Martiny presents data on neuro - physiological, psychological and social aspects of living with CP. From this theoretical work, Martiny develops......The main question of Kristian Martiny’s dissertation is: how do we help persons living with the brain damage, cerebral palsy (CP)? This question is as complex and difficult to answer as any healthcare question. Martiny argues that we need to ‘open up’ how we do ( cognitive ) science in order...... an embodied - based model of intervention for CP, focusing on the experience of self control as a way to help people with CP. In addition, a theatre performance, Humane Liquidation , and a documentary film, Natural Disorder, are developed so as to both communicate what it means to live with CP and empower...

  17. A testimony to Muzil: Hervé Guibert, Foucault, and the medical gaze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendell, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    Testimony to Muzil: Hervé Guibert, Michel Foucault, and the "Medical Gaze" examines the fictional/autobiographical AIDS writings of the French writer Hervé Guibert. Locating Guibert's writings alongside the work of his friend Michel Foucault, the article explores how they echo Foucault's evolving notions of the "medical gaze." The article also explores how Guilbert's narrators and Guibert himself (as writer) resist and challenge the medical gaze; a gaze which particularly in the era of AIDS has subjected, objectified, and even sometimes punished the body of the gay man. It is argued that these resistances to the gaze offer a literary extension to Foucault's later work on power and resistance strategies.

  18. Considerations for the Use of Remote Gaze Tracking to Assess Behavior in Flight Simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalar, Donald J.; Liston, Dorion; Mulligan, Jeffrey B.; Beutter, Brent; Feary, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Complex user interfaces (such as those found in an aircraft cockpit) may be designed from first principles, but inevitably must be evaluated with real users. User gaze data can provide valuable information that can help to interpret other actions that change the state of the system. However, care must be taken to ensure that any conclusions drawn from gaze data are well supported. Through a combination of empirical and simulated data, we identify several considerations and potential pitfalls when measuring gaze behavior in high-fidelity simulators. We show that physical layout, behavioral differences, and noise levels can all substantially alter the quality of fit for algorithms that segment gaze measurements into individual fixations. We provide guidelines to help investigators ensure that conclusions drawn from gaze tracking data are not artifactual consequences of data quality or analysis techniques.

  19. Subjects and Objects of the Embodied Gaze: Abbas Kiarostami and the Real of the Individual Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyenge Zsolt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that Abbas Kiarostami’s cinema revolves around the representation of the gaze. Many critics argue that he should be considered a late modernist who repeats the self-reflexive gestures of modernist European cinema decades after they were first introduced. The present paper will contradict this assertion by investigating the problematic of the Kiarostamian gaze and analyzing the perceptual side of the act of looking. I will argue that instead of focusing on the gaze of the spectator directed towards the filmic image, he exposes a gaze that is fully integrated into the reality to be captured on film. The second part of the paper will explain this by linking the concept of gaze to the Lacanian concept of the order of the Real. Finally, I will contextualize all this by discussing the Iranian director’s position between Eastern and Western traditions of representation.

  20. Incorporating the viewer's point of regard (POR) in gaze-contingent virtual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    1998-04-01

    Awareness of the viewer's gaze position in a virtual environment can lead to significant savings in scene processing if fine detail information is presented `just in time' only at locations corresponding to the participant's gaze, i.e., in a gaze-contingent manner. This paper describes the evolution of a gaze-contingent video display system, `gcv'. Gcv is a multithreaded, real-time program which displays digital video and simultaneously tracks a subject's eye movements. Treating the eye tracker as an ordinary positional sensor, gcv's architecture shares many similarities with contemporary virtual environment system designs. Performance of the present system is evaluated in terms of (1) eye tracker sampling latency and video transfer rates, and (2) measured eye tracker accuracy and slippage. The programming strategies developed for incorporating the viewer's point-of-regard are independent of proprietary eye tracking equipment and are applicable to general gaze- contingent virtual environment designs.

  1. Cerebral palsy in preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demeši-Drljan Čila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Cerebral palsy (CP is one of the leading causes of neurological impairment in childhood. Preterm birth is a significant risk factor in the occurrence of CP. Clinical outcomes may include impairment of gross motor function and intellectual abilities, visual impairment and epilepsy. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships among gestational age, type of CP, functional ability and associated conditions. Methods. The sample size was 206 children with CP. The data were obtained from medical records and included gestational age at birth, clinical characteristics of CP and associated conditions. Clinical CP type was determined according to Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe (SCPE and topographically. Gross motor function abilities were evaluated according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS. Results. More than half of the children with CP were born prematurely (54.4%. Statistically significant difference was noted with respect to the distribution of various clinical types of CP in relation to gestational age (p < 0.001. In the group with spastic bilateral CP type, there is a greater proportion of children born preterm. Statistically significant difference was noted in the functional classification based on GMFCS in terms of gestational age (p = 0.049, children born at earlier gestational age are classified at a higher GMFCS level of functional limitation. The greatest percentage of children (70.0% affected by two or more associated conditions was found in the group that had extremely preterm birth, and that number declined with increasing maturity at birth. Epilepsy was more prevalent in children born at greater gestational age, and this difference in distribution was statistically significant (p = 0.032. Conclusion. The application of antenatal and postnatal protection of preterm children should be a significant component of the CP prevention strategy. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike

  2. Gastrostomy tube feeding of children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlseng, Magnus O; Andersen, Guro L; DA Graca Andrada, Maria

    2012-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of gastrostomy tube feeding (GTF) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in six European countries.......To compare the prevalence of gastrostomy tube feeding (GTF) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in six European countries....

  3. Probability of walking in children with cerebral palsy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckung, E.; Hagberg, G.; Uldall, P.

    2008-01-01

    cerebral palsy, as well as to IQ level, active epilepsy, and severe visual and hearing impairment. Severe cerebral palsy, defined as both the inability to walk and an IQ of ... disability load Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1...

  4. Association between type of cerebral palsy and the cognitive levels

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    Ratna Dewi Kusumaningrum

    2009-07-01

    Conclusion Our data showed that most patients with cerebral palsy had mental retardation of several cognitive level but there was no significant association between each type of cerebral palsy with cognitive levels.

  5. Cavernous sinus subarachnoid diverticulum and sixth nerve palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Negoro, Makoto; Awaya, Shinobu

    1987-05-01

    Metrizamide CT cisternography in a young woman with a chronic sixth nerve palsy demonstrated a cavernous sinus subarachnoid diverticulum originating from the cerebellopontine cistern. The possible etiologic role of this diverticulum in her palsy is discussed.

  6. Cavernous sinus subarachnoid diverticulum and sixth nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Negoro, Makoto; Awaya, Shinobu

    1987-01-01

    Metrizamide CT cisternography in a young woman with a chronic sixth nerve palsy demonstrated a cavernous sinus subarachnoid diverticulum originating from the cerebellopontine cistern. The possible etiologic role of this diverticulum in her palsy is discussed. (orig.)

  7. Clinical Practice Guideline of Acupuncture for Bell's Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Wu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Backgroud: Acupuncture is common used for Bell's palsy in clinic, however, recent systematic reviews all shows that there is no sufficient evidence to support the effectiveness of acupuncture for Bell's palsy because ofthe poor quality and heterogeneity. It's urgently necessary to develop a guideline of acupuncture for Bell's palsy based on principles of evidence-based medicine to optimize acupuncture treating, standardize outcomes evaluating and to improve the quality of acupuncture for patients with Bell's palsy under general circumstances.

  8. Exploring motion VEPs for gaze-independent communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeff, Sulamith; Treder, Matthias Sebastian; Venthur, Bastian; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2012-08-01

    Motion visually evoked potentials (mVEPs) have recently been explored as input features for brain-computer interfaces, in particular for the implementation of visual spellers. Due to low contrast and luminance requirements, motion-based intensification is less discomforting to the user than conventional approaches. So far, mVEP spellers were operated in the overt attention mode, wherein eye movements were allowed. However, the dependence on eye movements limits clinical applicability. Hence, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of mVEPs for gaze-independent communication. Sixteen healthy volunteers participated in an online study. We used a conventional speller layout wherein the possible selections are presented at different spatial locations both in the overt attention mode (fixation of the target) and the covert attention mode (central fixation). Additionally, we tested an alternative speller layout wherein all stimuli are sequentially presented at the same spatial location (foveal stimulation), i.e. eye movements are not required for selection. As can be expected, classification performance breaks down when switching from the overt to the covert operation. Despite reduced performance in the covert setting, conventional mVEP spellers are still potentially useful for users with severely impaired eye movements. In particular, they may offer advantages--such as less visual fatigue--over spellers using flashing stimuli. Importantly, the novel mVEP speller presented here recovers good performance in a gaze-independent setting by resorting to the foveal stimulation.

  9. DIAGNOSIS OF MYASTHENIA GRAVIS USING FUZZY GAZE TRACKING SOFTWARE

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    Javad Rasti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia Gravis (MG is an autoimmune disorder, which may lead to paralysis and even death if not treated on time. One of its primary symptoms is severe muscular weakness, initially arising in the eye muscles. Testing the mobility of the eyeball can help in early detection of MG. In this study, software was designed to analyze the ability of the eye muscles to focus in various directions, thus estimating the MG risk. Progressive weakness in gazing at the directions prompted by the software can reveal abnormal fatigue of the eye muscles, which is an alert sign for MG. To assess the user’s ability to keep gazing at a specified direction, a fuzzy algorithm was applied to images of the user’s eyes to determine the position of the iris in relation to the sclera. The results of the tests performed on 18 healthy volunteers and 18 volunteers in early stages of MG confirmed the validity of the suggested software.

  10. Task relevance predicts gaze in videos of real moving scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Christina J; Gilchrist, Iain D; Troscianko, Tom; Behera, Ardhendu; Hogg, David C

    2011-09-01

    Low-level stimulus salience and task relevance together determine the human fixation priority assigned to scene locations (Fecteau and Munoz in Trends Cogn Sci 10(8):382-390, 2006). However, surprisingly little is known about the contribution of task relevance to eye movements during real-world visual search where stimuli are in constant motion and where the 'target' for the visual search is abstract and semantic in nature. Here, we investigate this issue when participants continuously search an array of four closed-circuit television (CCTV) screens for suspicious events. We recorded eye movements whilst participants watched real CCTV footage and moved a joystick to continuously indicate perceived suspiciousness. We find that when multiple areas of a display compete for attention, gaze is allocated according to relative levels of reported suspiciousness. Furthermore, this measure of task relevance accounted for twice the amount of variance in gaze likelihood as the amount of low-level visual changes over time in the video stimuli.

  11. Exploring motion VEPs for gaze-independent communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeff, Sulamith; Treder, Matthias Sebastian; Venthur, Bastian; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2012-08-01

    Motion visually evoked potentials (mVEPs) have recently been explored as input features for brain-computer interfaces, in particular for the implementation of visual spellers. Due to low contrast and luminance requirements, motion-based intensification is less discomforting to the user than conventional approaches. So far, mVEP spellers were operated in the overt attention mode, wherein eye movements were allowed. However, the dependence on eye movements limits clinical applicability. Hence, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of mVEPs for gaze-independent communication. Sixteen healthy volunteers participated in an online study. We used a conventional speller layout wherein the possible selections are presented at different spatial locations both in the overt attention mode (fixation of the target) and the covert attention mode (central fixation). Additionally, we tested an alternative speller layout wherein all stimuli are sequentially presented at the same spatial location (foveal stimulation), i.e. eye movements are not required for selection. As can be expected, classification performance breaks down when switching from the overt to the covert operation. Despite reduced performance in the covert setting, conventional mVEP spellers are still potentially useful for users with severely impaired eye movements. In particular, they may offer advantages—such as less visual fatigue—over spellers using flashing stimuli. Importantly, the novel mVEP speller presented here recovers good performance in a gaze-independent setting by resorting to the foveal stimulation.

  12. Collaborative gaze channelling for improved cooperation during robotic assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Ka-Wai; Sun, Loi-Wah; Mylonas, George P; James, David R C; Orihuela-Espina, Felipe; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2012-10-01

    The use of multiple robots for performing complex tasks is becoming a common practice for many robot applications. When different operators are involved, effective cooperation with anticipated manoeuvres is important for seamless, synergistic control of all the end-effectors. In this paper, the concept of Collaborative Gaze Channelling (CGC) is presented for improved control of surgical robots for a shared task. Through eye tracking, the fixations of each operator are monitored and presented in a shared surgical workspace. CGC permits remote or physically separated collaborators to share their intention by visualising the eye gaze of their counterparts, and thus recovers, to a certain extent, the information of mutual intent that we rely upon in a vis-à-vis working setting. In this study, the efficiency of surgical manipulation with and without CGC for controlling a pair of bimanual surgical robots is evaluated by analysing the level of coordination of two independent operators. Fitts' law is used to compare the quality of movement with or without CGC. A total of 40 subjects have been recruited for this study and the results show that the proposed CGC framework exhibits significant improvement (p robotic surgery. Detailed experimental validation results demonstrate the potential clinical value of the proposed CGC framework.

  13. Following student gaze patterns in physical science lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengrant, David; Hearrington, Doug; Alvarado, Kerriann; Keeble, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    This study investigates the gaze patterns of undergraduate college students attending a lecture-based physical science class to better understand the relationships between gaze and focus patterns and student attention during class. The investigators used a new eye-tracking product; Tobii Glasses. The glasses eliminate the need for subjects to focus on a computer screen or carry around a backpack-sized recording device, thus giving an investigator the ability to study a broader range of research questions. This investigation includes what students focus on in the classroom (i.e. demonstrations, instructor, notes, board work, and presentations) during a normal lecture, what diverts attention away from being on task as well as what keeps a subject on task. We report on the findings from 8 subjects during physical science lectures designed for future elementary school teachers. We found that students tended not to focus on the instructor for most parts of the lecture but rather the information, particularly new information presented on PowerPoint slides. Finally, we found that location in the classroom also impacted students' attention spans due to more distractors.

  14. Association of Lead Levels and Cerebral Palsy

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    Neha Bansal MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy is a common motor disability in childhood. Raised lead levels affect cognition. Children with cerebral palsy may have raised lead levels, further impairing their residual cognitive motor and behavioral abilities. Environmental exposure and abnormal eating habits may lead to increased lead levels. Aims and Objectives: To measure blood lead levels in children with cerebral palsy and compare them with healthy neurologically normal children. To correlate blood lead levels with environmental factors. Material and Methods: Design: Prospective case-control study. Setting: Tertiary care hospital. Participants: Cases comprised 34 children with cerebral palsy, and controls comprised 34 neurologically normal, age- and sex-matched children. Methods: Clinical and demographic details were recorded as per proforma. Detailed environmental history was recorded to know the source of exposure to lead. These children were investigated and treated as per protocol. Venous blood was collected in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid vials for analysis of blood lead levels. Lead levels were estimated by Schimadzu Flame AA-6800 (atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 17. P < .05 was taken as significant. Results: Mean blood lead levels were 9.20 ± 8.31 µg/dL in cerebral palsy cases and 2.89 ± 3.04 µg/dL in their controls (P < .001. Among children with cerebral palsy, 19 (55.88% children had blood lead levels ≥5 µg/dL. Lead levels in children with pica were 12.33 ± 10.02 µg/dL in comparison to children with no history of pica, 6.70 ± 4.60 µg/dL (P = .029. No correlation was found between hemoglobin and blood lead levels in cases and controls. Conclusion: In our study, blood lead levels are raised in children with cerebral palsy. However, further studies are required to show effects of raised levels in these children.

  15. Sixth Nerve Palsy in Paediatric Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Julia E; Reem, Rachel E; Aylward, Shawn C; Rogers, David L

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the incidence and describe the characteristics of sixth cranial nerve (CN VI) palsy in paediatric patients with intracranial hypertension (IH). A retrospective chart review of central Ohio children diagnosed with IH over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2013 was conducted. IH without identifiable cause was defined as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), whereas IH with identifiable pathologic aetiology was deemed secondary intracranial hypertension (SIH). A subset of patients with CN VI palsy was identified. Data collected included patient age, gender, past medical history, aetiology of SIH, ophthalmic examination, lumbar puncture results, neuroimaging results, and response to treatment. Seventy-eight children with intracranial hypertension were included in the study. Nine (11.5%) children (four males, five females; median age 14, range: 3-18) were found to have a unilateral ( n = 2) or bilateral ( n = 7) CN VI palsy. Five children had IIH; the remaining four had SIH from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis ( n = 2) and infection ( n = 2). The mean lumbar puncture opening pressure for the nine patients with CN VI palsy was 40 cm H 2 O (range: 21-65 cm H 2 O). Papilloedema was present in 8/9 (89%) patients. One patient required a lumboperitoneal shunt, and two others required optic nerve sheath fenestrations in addition to medical management. All cases of CN VI palsy resolved with treatment. In our primary service area, the incidence of CN VI palsy is approximately 12% among paediatric IH patients. The majority of cases with CN VI palsy presented with papilloedema and all cases resolved with treatment of intracranial hypertension.

  16. PRETERM BIRTH ASSOCIATION WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

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    Srinivasa Rao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cerebral palsy ( CP is a group of permanent movement disorders that appear in early childhood. Preterm birth is the birth of baby before 37 completed weeks, a full term birth is birth at 37 to 42 weeks of gestation . AIM: To show the extent of association of preterm deliveries as a risk factor in development of cerebral palsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This r etrospective cohort study was conducted by eliciting history from the mothers of 99 cerebral palsy children who w ere treated in Rani Chandra Mani Devi Hospital, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India. De tailed history was taken from the mothers of 99 cerebral palsy children who were treated in this hospital. History regarding the period of gestation at which the child was born (preterm or full term, any previous history of pre - term delivery or abortions, was obtained from the mothers and the data analyzed . RESULTS: From this study it was observed the proportional association of pre - term births to cerebral palsy is 33 out 99 i.e., about 33.33%, Of these 33 cerebral palsy children highest association being with birth at 28 wks gestation (51 %. This study also shows th at the mothers with a previous history of preterm delivery have 14.4 times higher risk of subsequent pre term delivery; those with previous history of abortions have 5.7 times risk of pre - term delivery than mothers without such history. CONCLUSION: From th is study it was concluded that the pre - term birth plays a major role as a risk factor in the development of cerebral palsy with mothers having previous pre term delivery and previous abortions adding further to this risk.

  17. Simultaneous Bilateral Bell's palsy in a Nigerian man | Owolabi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bilateral Bellfs palsy occurring simultaneously is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a 27.year.old Nigerian man with bilateral Bellfs palsy, that occurred simultaneously, who had remarkable response to steroid and physiotherapy. We emphasized the importance of considering Bellfs palsy and the various differential ...

  18. Profile of children diagnosed with cerebral palsy at Universitas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cerebral palsy is a term used for a group of non-progressive but often changing motor deficits, which are a result of a lesion of the brain occurring at an early developmental stage. Cerebral palsy may be classified physiologically or topographically. Physiologically, there are five types of cerebral palsy1: spastic, dyskinetic, ...

  19. Trait Anxiety Impacts the Perceived Gaze Direction of Fearful But Not Angry Faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhonghua; Gendron, Maria; Liu, Qiang; Zhao, Guang; Li, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Facial expression and gaze direction play an important role in social communication. Previous research has demonstrated the perception of anger is enhanced by direct gaze, whereas, it is unclear whether perception of fear is enhanced by averted gaze. In addition, previous research has shown the anxiety affects the processing of facial expression and gaze direction, but hasn't measured or controlled for depression. As a result, firm conclusions cannot be made regarding the impact of individual differences in anxiety and depression on perceptions of face expressions and gaze direction. The current study attempted to reexamine the effect of the anxiety level on the processing of facial expressions and gaze direction by matching participants on depression scores. A reliable psychophysical index of the range of eye gaze angles judged as being directed at oneself [the cone of direct gaze (CoDG)] was used as the dependent variable in this study. Participants were stratified into high/low trait anxiety groups and asked to judge the gaze of angry, fearful, and neutral faces across a range of gaze directions. The result showed: (1) the perception of gaze direction was influenced by facial expression and this was modulated by trait anxiety. For the high trait anxiety group, the CoDG for angry expressions was wider than for fearful and neutral expressions, and no significant difference emerged between fearful and neutral expressions; For the low trait anxiety group, the CoDG for both angry and fearful expressions was wider than for neutral, and no significant difference emerged between angry and fearful expressions. (2) Trait anxiety modulated the perception of gaze direction only in the fearful condition, such that the fearful CoDG for the high trait anxiety group was narrower than the low trait anxiety group. This demonstrated that anxiety distinctly affected gaze perception in expressions that convey threat (angry, fearful), such that a high trait anxiety level modulated

  20. Trait Anxiety Impacts the Perceived Gaze Direction of Fearful But Not Angry Faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghua Hu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Facial expression and gaze direction play an important role in social communication. Previous research has demonstrated the perception of anger is enhanced by direct gaze, whereas, it is unclear whether perception of fear is enhanced by averted gaze. In addition, previous research has shown the anxiety affects the processing of facial expression and gaze direction, but hasn’t measured or controlled for depression. As a result, firm conclusions cannot be made regarding the impact of individual differences in anxiety and depression on perceptions of face expressions and gaze direction. The current study attempted to reexamine the effect of the anxiety level on the processing of facial expressions and gaze direction by matching participants on depression scores. A reliable psychophysical index of the range of eye gaze angles judged as being directed at oneself [the cone of direct gaze (CoDG] was used as the dependent variable in this study. Participants were stratified into high/low trait anxiety groups and asked to judge the gaze of angry, fearful, and neutral faces across a range of gaze directions. The result showed: (1 the perception of gaze direction was influenced by facial expression and this was modulated by trait anxiety. For the high trait anxiety group, the CoDG for angry expressions was wider than for fearful and neutral expressions, and no significant difference emerged between fearful and neutral expressions; For the low trait anxiety group, the CoDG for both angry and fearful expressions was wider than for neutral, and no significant difference emerged between angry and fearful expressions. (2 Trait anxiety modulated the perception of gaze direction only in the fearful condition, such that the fearful CoDG for the high trait anxiety group was narrower than the low trait anxiety group. This demonstrated that anxiety distinctly affected gaze perception in expressions that convey threat (angry, fearful, such that a high trait anxiety

  1. Steroid plus antiviral treatment for Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H M; Jung, S Y; Byun, J Y; Park, M S; Yeo, S G

    2015-05-01

    The effectiveness of antiviral agents for the treatment of Bell's palsy is uncertain. We evaluated whether a steroid with an antiviral agent (S + A group) provided better recovery outcomes than a steroid alone (S group) in patients with Bell's palsy. A total of 1342 patients diagnosed with Bell's palsy who visited the Kyung Hee Medical Center in Seoul, Korea, from 2002 to 2012 were included in this study. Patients in the S + A group were treated with prednisolone and antiviral agents (n = 569) and those in the S group with prednisolone alone (n = 773). Outcomes were measured using the House-Brackmann (HB) scale according to age, initial disease severity, electroneurography (ENoG) findings and underlying comorbidities. The rate of recovery (HB grades I and II) with initially severe Bell's palsy (HB grades V and VI) was higher in the S + A than in the S group (P = 0.001). However, the rates of recovery were similar with initially moderate palsy (HB grades II-IV) (P = 0.502). In patients classified according to age and ENoG-determined severity of palsy, the overall recovery rate was higher in the S + A than in the S group, but the differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05 for both). The recovery rate without diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN) was higher in the S + A group than in the S group (P = 0.031). But in the patients with HTN and DM, the difference in recovery rates between the S + A and S groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.805). Treatment with a steroid plus antiviral agent resulted in significantly higher recovery rates than steroid therapy alone in patients with initially severe Bell's palsy and without either HTN or DM, and a nonsignificant trend towards higher recovery rates in all patients with Bell's palsy in this study. Antiviral agents may therefore help in the treatment of Bell's palsy. © 2014 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  2. Therapeutic results in sixth nerve palsy

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    Pruna Violeta-Ioana

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Authors aim to assess through a retrospective study the efficiency of different therapeutic methods used in VIth nerve palsy. 60 patients with VIth nerve palsy, admitted and treated in Oftapro Clinic, were divided into two groups: a group with partial dysfunction (paresis of sixth nerve and a group with the complete abolition of neuromuscular function (VIth nerve palsy. Initial examination included assessment of neuromuscular function, binocular vision and existence of medial rectus muscle contracture (ipsi- and contralateral and contralateral lateral rectus inhibitory palsy. Neuromuscular dysfunction was graded from - 8 (paralysis to 0 (normal abduction. Therapeutic modalities ranged from conservative treatment (occlusion, prism correction, botulinum toxin chemodenervation and surgical treatment: medial rectus recession + lateral rectus resection, in cases of paresis, and transposition procedures (Hummelscheim and full tendon transfer in cases of sixth nerve palsy. Functional therapeutic success was defined as absence of diplopia in primary position, with or without prism correction, and surgical success was considered obtaining orthoptic alignment in primary position or a small residual deviation (under 10 PD. 51 patients had unilateral dysfunction, and 9 patients had bilateral VI-th nerve dysfunction. 8 patients had associated fourth or seventh cranial nerves palsy. The most common etiology was traumatic, followed by tumor and vascular causes. There were 18 cases of spontaneous remission, partial or complete (4-8 months after the onset, and 6 cases enhanced by botulinum toxin chemodenervation. 17 paretic eyes underwent surgery, showing a very good outcome, with restoration of binocular single vision. The procedure of choice was recession of medial rectus muscle, combined with resection of lateral rectus muscle. All patients with sixth nerve palsy underwent surgery, except one old female patient, who refused surgery. Hummelscheim procedure was

  3. Epilepsy in children with cerebral palsy

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    Bruck Isac

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence and characteristics of epilepsy in patients with cerebral palsy in a tertiary center. METHODS: a total of 100 consecutive patients with cerebral palsy were retrospectively studied. Criteria for inclusion were follow-up period for at least 2 years. Types and incidence of epilepsy were correlated with the different forms of cerebral palsy. Other factors associated with epilepsy such as age of first seizure, neonatal seizures and family history of epilepsy were also analysed. RESULTS: follow-up ranged between 24 and 151 months (mean 57 months. The overall prevalence of epilepsy was 62%. Incidence of epilepsy was predominant in patients with hemiplegic and tetraplegic palsies: 70.6% and 66.1%, respectively. First seizure occurred during the first year of life in 74.2% of patients with epilepsy. Generalized and partial were the predominant types of epilepsy (61.3% and 27.4%, respectively. Thirty-three (53.2% of 62 patients were seizure free for at least 1 year. Neonatal seizures and family history of epilepsy were associated with a higher incidence of epilepsy. CONCLUSIONS: epilepsy in cerebral palsy can be predicted if seizures occur in the first year of life, in neonatal period and if there is family history of epilepsy.

  4. Spatial Attention Triggered by Eye Gaze: Evidence from a Microsaccade Study

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    Takemasa Yokoyama

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although human spatial attention is elicited toward gaze direction of another, it remains one unanswered question whether shift of spatial attention elicited by gaze direction of another is exogenous or endogenous orienting. The purpose of this study is to examine which type of attentional orienting is related to attentional shift elicited by gaze direction. To pursue this question, we conducted the attentional cuing paradigm and measured microsaccades during the task. In experiment 1, a facial stimulus was positioned in the center of the screen as a gaze cue whose direction showed the validity of the target presentation. We measured microsaccades after presentation of the cue. In the result, microsaccade direction was toward cue direction only in the 200 – 400ms time window after presentation of the cue. In experiment 2, we conducted the anti-saccade task for directionally separating exogenous and endogenous orienting, thus, gaze direction and cue direction were different unlike experiment 1. The result of experiment 2 agreed with the results of experiment 1, therefore, microsaccade direction was toward cue direction, not gaze direction. These results indicate that spatial attention elicited by gaze direction is endogenous orienting, not exogenous orienting.

  5. Investigating the Link Between Radiologists Gaze, Diagnostic Decision, and Image Content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tourassi, Georgia [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Paquit, Vincent C [ORNL; Krupinski, Elizabeth [University of Arizona

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate machine learning for linking image content, human perception, cognition, and error in the diagnostic interpretation of mammograms. Methods: Gaze data and diagnostic decisions were collected from six radiologists who reviewed 20 screening mammograms while wearing a head-mounted eye-tracker. Texture analysis was performed in mammographic regions that attracted radiologists attention and in all abnormal regions. Machine learning algorithms were investigated to develop predictive models that link: (i) image content with gaze, (ii) image content and gaze with cognition, and (iii) image content, gaze, and cognition with diagnostic error. Both group-based and individualized models were explored. Results: By pooling the data from all radiologists machine learning produced highly accurate predictive models linking image content, gaze, cognition, and error. Merging radiologists gaze metrics and cognitive opinions with computer-extracted image features identified 59% of the radiologists diagnostic errors while confirming 96.2% of their correct diagnoses. The radiologists individual errors could be adequately predicted by modeling the behavior of their peers. However, personalized tuning appears to be beneficial in many cases to capture more accurately individual behavior. Conclusions: Machine learning algorithms combining image features with radiologists gaze data and diagnostic decisions can be effectively developed to recognize cognitive and perceptual errors associated with the diagnostic interpretation of mammograms.

  6. Investigating the link between radiologists’ gaze, diagnostic decision, and image content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourassi, Georgia; Voisin, Sophie; Paquit, Vincent; Krupinski, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate machine learning for linking image content, human perception, cognition, and error in the diagnostic interpretation of mammograms. Methods Gaze data and diagnostic decisions were collected from three breast imaging radiologists and three radiology residents who reviewed 20 screening mammograms while wearing a head-mounted eye-tracker. Image analysis was performed in mammographic regions that attracted radiologists’ attention and in all abnormal regions. Machine learning algorithms were investigated to develop predictive models that link: (i) image content with gaze, (ii) image content and gaze with cognition, and (iii) image content, gaze, and cognition with diagnostic error. Both group-based and individualized models were explored. Results By pooling the data from all readers, machine learning produced highly accurate predictive models linking image content, gaze, and cognition. Potential linking of those with diagnostic error was also supported to some extent. Merging readers’ gaze metrics and cognitive opinions with computer-extracted image features identified 59% of the readers’ diagnostic errors while confirming 97.3% of their correct diagnoses. The readers’ individual perceptual and cognitive behaviors could be adequately predicted by modeling the behavior of others. However, personalized tuning was in many cases beneficial for capturing more accurately individual behavior. Conclusions There is clearly an interaction between radiologists’ gaze, diagnostic decision, and image content which can be modeled with machine learning algorithms. PMID:23788627

  7. Gender and facial dominance in gaze cuing: emotional context matters in the eyes that we follow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garian Ohlsen

    Full Text Available Gaze following is a socio-cognitive process that provides adaptive information about potential threats and opportunities in the individual's environment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential interaction between emotional context and facial dominance in gaze following. We used the gaze cue task to induce attention to or away from the location of a target stimulus. In the experiment, the gaze cue either belonged to a (dominant looking male face or a (non-dominant looking female face. Critically, prior to the task, individuals were primed with pictures of threat or no threat to induce either a dangerous or safe environment. Findings revealed that the primed emotional context critically influenced the gaze cuing effect. While a gaze cue of the dominant male face influenced performance in both the threat and no-threat conditions, the gaze cue of the non-dominant female face only influenced performance in the no-threat condition. This research suggests an implicit, context-dependent follower bias, which carries implications for research on visual attention, social cognition, and leadership.

  8. Gender and facial dominance in gaze cuing: emotional context matters in the eyes that we follow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsen, Garian; van Zoest, Wieske; van Vugt, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Gaze following is a socio-cognitive process that provides adaptive information about potential threats and opportunities in the individual's environment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential interaction between emotional context and facial dominance in gaze following. We used the gaze cue task to induce attention to or away from the location of a target stimulus. In the experiment, the gaze cue either belonged to a (dominant looking) male face or a (non-dominant looking) female face. Critically, prior to the task, individuals were primed with pictures of threat or no threat to induce either a dangerous or safe environment. Findings revealed that the primed emotional context critically influenced the gaze cuing effect. While a gaze cue of the dominant male face influenced performance in both the threat and no-threat conditions, the gaze cue of the non-dominant female face only influenced performance in the no-threat condition. This research suggests an implicit, context-dependent follower bias, which carries implications for research on visual attention, social cognition, and leadership.

  9. The effect of gaze direction on sound localization in brain-injured and normal adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Eunhui; Branch Coslett, H

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effects of eye position on sound localization in normal and brain lesion subjects. On the assumption that cerebral lesions may disrupt the representation of or attention to auditory space in the contralesional hemispace, we predicted that subjects with brain lesions would be less accurate in localizing sounds in the contralesional hemispace. In Experiment 1 we showed that gazing to the midline subjects with brain lesions were indeed impaired in localizing sounds in the contralesional hemispace. On the assumption that spatial attention is deployed at the site to which gaze is directed, we predicted that sound localization would be better on the side to which subjects directed their gaze. In Experiment 2, brain lesion subjects performed significantly better in the contralesional hemispace when they directed gaze to that hemispace. This improvement was accompanied by deterioration of performance in the ipsilesional hemispace. When subjects directed gaze to the ipsilesional hemispace, performance in the contralesional hemispace was further impaired. The effect of gaze was also observed in normal subjects in Experiments 2 and 3, independently of response mode (verbal versus pointing responses). These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that sound location may be mapped in eye-centered coordinates and that directing gaze to one hemispace reduces attentional allocation to the other hemispace.

  10. Elevated amygdala response to faces and gaze aversion in autism spectrum disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzig, Margaret E.; Gillespie-Lynch, Kristen; Gilhooly, Tara; Millner, Alexander J.; Casey, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are often associated with impairments in judgment of facial expressions. This impairment is often accompanied by diminished eye contact and atypical amygdala responses to face stimuli. The current study used a within-subjects design to examine the effects of natural viewing and an experimental eye-gaze manipulation on amygdala responses to faces. Individuals with ASD showed less gaze toward the eye region of faces relative to a control group. Among individuals with ASD, reduced eye gaze was associated with higher threat ratings of neutral faces. Amygdala signal was elevated in the ASD group relative to controls. This elevated response was further potentiated by experimentally manipulating gaze to the eye region. Potentiation by the gaze manipulation was largest for those individuals who exhibited the least amount of naturally occurring gaze toward the eye region and was associated with their subjective threat ratings. Effects were largest for neutral faces, highlighting the importance of examining neutral faces in the pathophysiology of autism and questioning their use as control stimuli with this population. Overall, our findings provide support for the notion that gaze direction modulates affective response to faces in ASD. PMID:23596190

  11. Gaze-Contingent Music Reward Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarov, Amit; Pine, Daniel S; Bar-Haim, Yair

    2017-07-01

    Patients with social anxiety disorder exhibit increased attentional dwelling on social threats, providing a viable target for therapeutics. This randomized controlled trial examined the efficacy of a novel gaze-contingent music reward therapy for social anxiety disorder designed to reduce attention dwelling on threats. Forty patients with social anxiety disorder were randomly assigned to eight sessions of either gaze-contingent music reward therapy, designed to divert patients' gaze toward neutral stimuli rather than threat stimuli, or to a control condition. Clinician and self-report measures of social anxiety were acquired pretreatment, posttreatment, and at 3-month follow-up. Dwell time on socially threatening faces was assessed during the training sessions and at pre- and posttreatment. Gaze-contingent music reward therapy yielded greater reductions of symptoms of social anxiety disorder than the control condition on both clinician-rated and self-reported measures. Therapeutic effects were maintained at follow-up. Gaze-contingent music reward therapy, but not the control condition, also reduced dwell time on threat, which partially mediated clinical effects. Finally, gaze-contingent music reward therapy, but not the control condition, also altered dwell time on socially threatening faces not used in training, reflecting near-transfer training generalization. This is the first randomized controlled trial to examine a gaze-contingent intervention in social anxiety disorder. The results demonstrate target engagement and clinical effects. This study sets the stage for larger randomized controlled trials and testing in other emotional disorders.

  12. Photographic but not line-drawn faces show early perceptual neural sensitivity to eye gaze direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra eRossi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Our brains readily decode facial movements and changes in social attention, reflected in earlier and larger N170 event-related potentials (ERPs to viewing gaze aversions vs. direct gaze in real faces (Puce et al. 2000. In contrast, gaze aversions in line-drawn faces do not produce these N170 differences (Rossi et al., 2014, suggesting that physical stimulus properties or experimental context may drive these effects. Here we investigated the role of stimulus-induced context on neurophysiological responses to dynamic gaze. Sixteen healthy adults viewed line-drawn and real faces, with dynamic eye aversion and direct gaze transitions, and control stimuli (scrambled arrays and checkerboards while continuous electroencephalographic (EEG activity was recorded. EEG data from 2 temporo-occipital clusters of 9 electrodes in each hemisphere where N170 activity is known to be maximal were selected for analysis. N170 peak amplitude and latency, and temporal dynamics from event-related spectral perturbations (ERSPs were measured in 16 healthy subjects. Real faces generated larger N170s for averted vs. direct gaze motion, however, N170s to real and direct gaze were as large as those to respective controls. N170 amplitude did not differ across line-drawn gaze changes. Overall, bilateral mean gamma power changes for faces relative to control stimuli occurred between 150-350 ms, potentially reflecting signal detection of facial motion.Our data indicate that experimental context does not drive N170 differences to viewed gaze changes. Low-level stimulus properties, such as the high sclera/iris contrast change in real eyes likely drive the N170 changes to viewed aversive movements.

  13. Speaking and Listening with the Eyes: Gaze Signaling during Dyadic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Simon; Foulsham, Tom; Kingstone, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive scientists have long been interested in the role that eye gaze plays in social interactions. Previous research suggests that gaze acts as a signaling mechanism and can be used to control turn-taking behaviour. However, early research on this topic employed methods of analysis that aggregated gaze information across an entire trial (or trials), which masks any temporal dynamics that may exist in social interactions. More recently, attempts have been made to understand the temporal characteristics of social gaze but little research has been conducted in a natural setting with two interacting participants. The present study combines a temporally sensitive analysis technique with modern eye tracking technology to 1) validate the overall results from earlier aggregated analyses and 2) provide insight into the specific moment-to-moment temporal characteristics of turn-taking behaviour in a natural setting. Dyads played two social guessing games (20 Questions and Heads Up) while their eyes were tracked. Our general results are in line with past aggregated data, and using cross-correlational analysis on the specific gaze and speech signals of both participants we found that 1) speakers end their turn with direct gaze at the listener and 2) the listener in turn begins to speak with averted gaze. Convergent with theoretical models of social interaction, our data suggest that eye gaze can be used to signal both the end and the beginning of a speaking turn during a social interaction. The present study offers insight into the temporal dynamics of live dyadic interactions and also provides a new method of analysis for eye gaze data when temporal relationships are of interest.

  14. Sixth Nerve Palsy from Cholesterol Granuloma of the Petrous Apex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Ségolène; Maeder, Philippe; Daniel, Roy Thomas; Kawasaki, Aki

    2017-01-01

    Herein, we report a patient who had an isolated sixth nerve palsy due to a petrous apex cholesterol granuloma. The sixth nerve palsy appeared acutely and then spontaneously resolved over several months, initially suggesting a microvascular origin of the palsy. Subsequent recurrences of the palsy indicated a different pathophysiologic etiology and MRI revealed the lesion at the petrous apex. Surgical resection improved the compressive effect of the lesion at Dorello's canal and clinical improvement was observed. A relapsing-remitting sixth nerve palsy is an unusual presentation of this rare lesion.

  15. Fusing Eye-gaze and Speech Recognition for Tracking in an Automatic Reading Tutor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten Højfeldt; Tan, Zheng-Hua

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel approach for automatically tracking the reading progress using a combination of eye-gaze tracking and speech recognition. The two are fused by first generating word probabilities based on eye-gaze information and then using these probabilities to augment...... the language model probabilities during speech recognition. Experimental results on a small dataset show that the tracking error rate of the system using only speech recognition is 34.9% whereas the tracking error rate for the system that incorporates eye-gaze tracking into the speech recognizer is 31...

  16. Mutual Disambiguation of Eye Gaze and Speech for Sight Translation and Reading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulkarni, Rucha; Jain, Kritika; Bansal, Himanshu

    2013-01-01

    , the raw data provided by Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) and Eye-Tracking is very noisy and erroneous. This paper describes a technique for reducing the errors of the two modalities, speech and eye-gaze with the help of each other in context of sight translation and reading. Lattice representation...... and composition of the two modalities was used for integration. F-measure for Eye-Gaze and Word Accuracy for ASR were used as metrics to evaluate our results. In reading task, we demonstrated a significant improvement in both Eye-Gaze f-measure and speech Word Accuracy. In sight translation task, significant...

  17. Gaze avoidance and perseverative language in fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder: brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Laura; Sterling, Audra; Barton-Hulsey, Andrea

    2018-02-01

    Gaze avoidance and perseverative language impact pragmatics in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and fragile X syndrome (FXS). We examined these features during conversation samples in boys with ASD (n = 10) and boys with FXS and ASD (FXS+ASD; n = 10). Both groups had similar high rates of gaze avoidance and topic and conversation device perseverations, yet these features were not correlated with one another. Boys with FXS+ASD produced a higher proportion of single utterance perseverations. Results from this study highlight the need for future research to identify potential mechanisms influencing the presence of language perseverations and gaze avoidance.

  18. Using eye gaze to identify reinforcers for individuals with severe multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannella-Malone, Helen I; Sabielny, Linsey M; Tullis, Christopher A

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate Fleming et al. (2010) by examining the use of eye gaze in identifying reinforcers for 3 individuals with severe multiple disabilities. Preference was measured in a paired-choice stimulus preference assessment using duration of eye gaze to determine stimulus selection. A subsequent reinforcer assessment used a reversal design to test the reinforcing effects of the high- and low-preference stimuli. The results replicated Fleming et al., indicating that using eye gaze as a selection method successfully identified reinforcing stimuli. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  19. Attention orienting by eye gaze and arrows reveals flexibility to environmental changes.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Shuo; Uono, Shota; Yoshimura, Sayaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the difference in non-predictive cues between gaze and arrows in attention orienting. Attention orienting was investigated with gaze or arrows as separate cues in a simple condition (i.e., block design) in Experiment 1 and in an unpredictable condition (i.e., randomized design) in Experiment 2. Two kinds of sound (voice and tone) stimuli were used as targets. Results showed that gaze and arrow cues induced enhanced attention orienting to a voice versus tone target...

  20. Capecitabine and sixth cranial nerve palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasgupta Sonali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Capecitabine is an oral chemotherapeutic agent converted to 5 flourouracil (5-FU. Neurotoxicity associated with the medication encompasses both central and peripheral nervous systems. We describe a 60 year old man with colonic carcinoma who developed diplopia due to a sixth nerve palsy following the use of capecitabine which is an orally administered prodrug of 5-FU. An MRI of brain did not reveal a space occupying lesion or vascular insult to account for his cranial nerve palsy. The sixth nerve palsy resolved spontaneously once capecitabine was withdrawn. Physicians in all walks of life are increasingly likely to come across such patients and should familiarize themselves with toxicities consequent to chemotherapy. Further research is needed to elucidate the cause of capecitabine associated neurotoxicity.

  1. Capecitabine and sixth cranial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Sonali; Adilieje, Chineme; Bhattacharya, Amlan; Smith, Bruce; Sheikh, Moeen ul Haq

    2010-01-01

    Capecitabine is an oral chemotherapeutic agent converted to 5 fluorouracil (5-FU). Neurotoxicity associated with the medication encompasses both central and peripheral nervous systems. We describe a 60 year old man with colonic carcinoma who developed diplopia due to a sixth nerve palsy following the use of capecitabine which is an orally administered prodrug of 5-FU. An MRI of brain did not reveal a space occupying lesion or vascular insult to account for his cranial nerve palsy. The sixth nerve palsy resolved spontaneously once capecitabine was withdrawn. Physicians in all walks of life are increasingly likely to come across such patients and should familiarize themselves with toxicities consequent to chemotherapy. Further research is needed to elucidate the cause of capecitabine associated neurotoxicity.

  2. Gaze inspired subtitle position evaluation for MOOCs videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongli; Yan, Mengzhen; Liu, Sijiang; Jiang, Bo

    2017-06-01

    Online educational resources, such as MOOCs, is becoming increasingly popular, especially in higher education field. One most important media type for MOOCs is course video. Besides traditional bottom-position subtitle accompany to the videos, in recent years, researchers try to develop more advanced algorithms to generate speaker-following style subtitles. However, the effectiveness of such subtitle is still unclear. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between subtitle position and the learning effect after watching the video on tablet devices. Inspired with image based human eye tracking technique, this work combines the objective gaze estimation statistics with subjective user study to achieve a convincing conclusion - speaker-following subtitles are more suitable for online educational videos.

  3. [Isolated oculomotor palsy disclosing multiple myeloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feletti, A; Tartaglia, M; Campanini, B; Ferrari, G; Masina, M

    1995-01-01

    Two cases of oculomotor nerves involvement as uncommon initial manifestation of a parasellar extramedullary plasmacytoma are reported. The first patient presented with an isolated left VI cranial nerve palsy; the second one had an incomplete left III cranial nerve palsy. In both cases clinical investigation and computed tomography revealed an intracranial plasmacytoma associated with multiple myeloma. It is important to underline the difference between an intracranial extramedullary plasmacytoma and a plasmacytoma associated with multiple myeloma. In fact the absence of a general associated illness should show a most favourable course.

  4. Pathophysiology of muscle contractures in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathewson, Margie A; Lieber, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy present with a variety of adaptations to muscle structure and function. These pathophysiologic symptoms include functional deficits such as decreased force production and range of motion, in addition to changes in muscle structure such as decreased muscle belly size, increased sarcomere length, and altered extracellular matrix structure and composition. On a cellular level, patients with cerebral palsy have fewer muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells, and altered gene expression. Understanding the nature of these changes may present opportunities for the development of new muscle treatment therapies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Education and employment prospects in cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Uldall, Peter; Kejs, Anne Mette T

    2005-01-01

    Parents and paediatric neurologists need information on the long-term social prognosis of children with cerebral palsy (CP). No large population-based study has been performed on this topic. On 31 December 1999, to find predictors in childhood of subsequent education and employment, 819...... participants with CP born between 1965 and 1978 (471 males; mean age 28y 10 mo, SD 4y, range 21 to 35y) in the Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry were compared with 4406 controls without CP born between 1965 and 1978 (2546 males; mean age 28y 10 mo, SD 4y, range 21 to 35y). Diagnostic subtypes of the 819...

  6. Maternal Infections during Pregnancy and Cerebral Palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Jessica; Pedersen, Lars Henning; Streja, Elani

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a common motor disability in childhood. We examined the association between maternal infections during pregnancy and the risk of congenital CP in the child. METHODS: Liveborn singletons in Denmark between 1997 and 2003 were identified from the Danish National...... the Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry. Adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: Of the 440 564 singletons with follow-up data, 840 were diagnosed with congenital CP. Maternal genito-urinary tract infections (HR 2.1, 95% CI 1.4, 3...

  7. Epidemiology of cerebral palsy in Southern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev-Friis, Christina; Dunkhase-Heinl, Ulrike; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence, subtypes, severity and neuroimaging findings of cerebral palsy (CP) in a cohort of children born in Southern Denmark. Risk factors were analysed and aetiology considered. METHODS: A population-based cohort study covering 17...... prevention of CP is possible if the numbers of preterm births and multiple pregnancies can be reduced. FUNDING: The Danish Cerebral Palsy Follow-up Programme is supported by the foundation "Ludvig og Sara Elsass Fond". TRIAL REGISTRATION: 2008-58-0034....

  8. Sialorrhea in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Leonardo Scofano Dias

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: The most effective treatment that addresses the cause of sialorrhea in children with cerebral palsy is training of sensory awareness and oral motor skills, performed by a speech therapist. Botulinum toxin injection and the use of anticholinergics have a transient effect and are adjuvant to speech therapy; they should be considered in cases of moderate to severe sialorrhea or respiratory complications. Atropine sulfate is inexpensive and appears to have good clinical response combined with good safety profile. The use of trihexyphenidyl for the treatment of sialorrhea can be considered in dyskinetic forms of cerebral palsy or in selected cases.

  9. [Bilateral traumatic abducens nerve palsy without skull fracture or intracranial hematoma-a report of 3 cases and consideration of the mechanism of injury (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, H; Miyasaka, Y; Kuramae, T; Ohwada, T; Tsunoda, M

    1976-10-01

    Three cases of bilateral traumatic abducens nerve palsy were presented and the mechanism of damage to the abducens nerve was discussed in relation to the analysis of traumatic force at the time of impact and topographical anatomy of the abducens nerve in detail. Case 1. A 70 year old man sustained a traffic accident with one hour loss of consciousness. Physical examination revealed a contused area on the medial side of his right forehead. Neurological examination revealed bilateral abducens nerve palsy (Fig. 1). There were no ther cranial nerve abnormalities. Roentgenograms of the skull, including views of the base and orbit showed no fracture. At follow up examination 12 months later, bilateral Duane's retraction syndrome could be noticed with slight increase in size of the pupil on each side of lateral gaze (Fig. 2). Case 2. A 32 year old women sustained a traffic accident with 31 days of loss of consciousness. At the time of admission, bilateral abducens nerve palsy and slight left hemiparesis were noticed in semicomatose condition. Right carotid angiogtam showed no evidence of intracranial hematoma. One month later, the right eye began to abduct and 2 months later, the left eye began to abduct. Three months after the injury, bilateral abducens nerve palsy could no longer be demonstrated. No retraction syndrome was observed during this period. Case 3. A 3 year old boy sustained a traffic accident with 32 days of loss of consciousness. At the time of admission, neurological examination showed bilateral abducens palsy and left sided decerebrate posture in comatose condition. At the time of discharge 3 months after admission, bilateral abducens palsy, right hemiataxia, left spastic hemiparesis and scanning speach were noticed. Three months later, right eye began to abduct and 4 months later, the left eye began to abduct. At follow up examination 6 months later, there was no evidence of abducens nerve palsy. Topographical details of anatomy of the abducens nerve are

  10. Children with ASD Can Use Gaze in Support of Word Recognition and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Karla K.; Rost, Gwyneth; Arenas, Rick; Farris-Trimble, Ashley; Stiles, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Background: Many children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) struggle to understand familiar words and learn unfamiliar words. We explored the extent to which these problems reflect deficient use of probabilistic gaze in the

  11. Gaze recognition in high-functioning autistic patients. Evidence from functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takebayashi, Hiroko; Ogai, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2006-01-01

    We examined whether patients with high-functioning autistic disorder (AD) would exhibit abnormal activation in brain regions implicated in the functioning of theory of mind (TOM) during gaze recognition. We investigated brain activity during gaze recognition in 5 patients with high-functioning AD and 9 normal subjects, using functional magnetic resonance imaging. On the gaze task, more activation was found in the left middle frontal gyrus, the right intraparietal sulcus, and the precentral and inferior parietal gyri bilaterally in controls than in AD patients, whereas the patient group showed more powerful signal changes in the left superior temporal gyrus, the right insula, and the right medial frontal gyrus. These results suggest that high-functioning AD patients have functional abnormalities not only in TOM-related brain regions, but also in widely distributed brain regions that are not normally activated upon the processing of information from another person's gaze. (author)

  12. Deficits in eye gaze during negative social interactions in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Hee; Ku, Jeonghun; Han, Kiwan; Kim, Eosu; Kim, Sun I; Park, Junyoung; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2010-11-01

    Impaired social functioning has been reported in patients with schizophrenia. This study aimed to examine characteristics of interpersonal behaviors in patients with schizophrenia during various social interactions using the virtual reality system. Twenty-six patients and 26 controls engaged in the virtual conversation tasks, including 3 positive and 3 negative emotion-laden conversations. Eye gaze and other behavioral parameters were recorded during the listening and answering phases. The amount of eye gaze was assessed as smaller in the patients than in the controls. A significant interaction effect of group status and emotional type was found for the listening phase. The amount of eye gaze in the patients inversely correlated with self-rated scores of assertiveness for the listening phase. These results suggest that the patients displayed inadequate levels of augmentations in eye gaze during negative emotional situations. These deficits should be considered in the treatment and social skills training for patients with schizophrenia.

  13. Gaze stabilization reflexes in the mouse: New tools to study vision and sensorimotor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van Alphen (Bart)

    2010-01-01

    markdownabstract__abstract__ Gaze stabilization reflexes are a popular model system in neuroscience for connecting neurophysiology and behavior as well as studying the neural correlates of behavioral plasticity. These compensatory eye movements are one of the simplest motor behaviors,

  14. Gaze and the turn: a nonverbal solution to an interactive problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhys, Catrin S

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the use of gaze as one of a number of connected compensatory adaptations to linguistic impairment by a patient with Broca's aphasia. The examination of the import of gaze withdrawal and return of gaze in the context of self cuing by the patient shows how the patient exploits the complex multifaceted nature of meaning making. Consonant with the concept of emergentist pragmatics (Perkins), meaning making is shown to be a distributed process with sufficient "plasticity" to allow the aphasic patient to compensate for their linguistic impairments yet still be sensitive to the interactive needs of their interlocutor. Furthermore, the analysis of the use of gaze during self cuing is also shown to have implications for our conceptualization of the construction of the turn in interaction.

  15. Real-time estimation of horizontal gaze angle by saccade integration using in-ear electrooculography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľuboš Hládek

    Full Text Available The manuscript proposes and evaluates a real-time algorithm for estimating eye gaze angle based solely on single-channel electrooculography (EOG, which can be obtained directly from the ear canal using conductive ear moulds. In contrast to conventional high-pass filtering, we used an algorithm that calculates absolute eye gaze angle via statistical analysis of detected saccades. The estimated eye positions of the new algorithm were still noisy. However, the performance in terms of Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients was significantly better than the conventional approach in some instances. The results suggest that in-ear EOG signals captured with conductive ear moulds could serve as a basis for light-weight and portable horizontal eye gaze angle estimation suitable for a broad range of applications. For instance, for hearing aids to steer the directivity of microphones in the direction of the user's eye gaze.

  16. Noise tolerant selection by gaze-controlled pan and zoom in 3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dan Witzner; Jensen, Henrik Skovsgaard; Hansen, John Paulin

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents StarGazer - a new 3D interface for gaze-based interaction and target selection using continuous pan and zoom. Through StarGazer we address the issues of interacting with graph structured data and applications (i.e. gaze typing systems) using low resolution eye trackers or small......-size displays. We show that it is possible to make robust selection even with a large number of selectable items on the screen and noisy gaze trackers. A test with 48 subjects demonstrated that users who have never tried gaze interaction before could rapidly adapt to the navigation principles of StarGazer. We...... tested three different display sizes (down to PDA-sized displays) and found that large screens are faster to navigate than small displays and that the error rate is higher for the smallest display. Half of the subjects were exposed to severe noise deliberately added on the cursor positions. We found...

  17. Communication ability in cerebral palsy: a study from the CP register of western Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelmann, Kate; Lindh, Karin; Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley

    2013-11-01

    Communication is often impaired in cerebral palsy (CP). Tools are needed to describe this complex function, in order to provide effective support. To study communication ability and the relationship between the Communication Function Classification System (CFCS) and CP subtype, gross motor function, manual ability, cognitive function and neuroimaging findings in the CP register of western Sweden. Sixty-eight children (29 girls), 14 with unilateral spastic CP, 35 with bilateral spastic CP and 19 with dyskinetic CP, participated. The CFCS, Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) and Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) levels, cognitive impairment and neuroimaging findings were recorded. Half the children used speech, 32% used communication boards/books and 16% relied on body movements, eye gaze and sounds. Twenty-eight per cent were at the most functional CFCS level I, 13% at level II, 21% at level III, 10% at level IV and 28% at level V. CFCS levels I-II were found in 71% of children with unilateral spastic CP, 46% in bilateral spastic CP and 11% in dyskinetic CP (p = 0.03). CFCS correlated with the GMFCS, MACS and cognitive function (p CP can be derived from the CFCS, which correlates to gross and fine motor and cognitive function. Good communication ability is associated with lesions acquired early, rather than late, in the third trimester. Copyright © 2013 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute superior oblique palsy in monkeys: III. Relationship to Listing's Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Shan, Xiaoyan; Zee, David S; Ying, Howard; Tamargo, Rafael J; Quaia, Christian; Optican, Lance M; Walker, Mark F

    2007-06-01

    To investigate the three-dimensional orientation of the eye and its relationship to Listing's Law in monkeys with acute acquired superior oblique palsy (SOP). The trochlear nerve was severed intracranially in two rhesus monkeys. Three-axis eye movements (horizontal, vertical, and torsion) were measured with binocular, dual search coils during fixation of targets in a 40 degrees x 40 degrees grid. Rotation vectors were calculated, and Listing's plane (LP) was determined by a least-squares planar fit of eye torsion as a function of horizontal and vertical position. The main findings were: (1) In the paretic eye, there was an immediate and sustained rotation of the orientation plane by approximately 25 degrees in the temporal direction; (2) the thickness of LP, defined as the torsional standard deviation (SD), increased little (by 0.13 degrees in M1 and 0.08 degrees in M2) after SOP, and (3) the SD of intrasaccadic torsion was slightly greater than that during fixation, but there was no change after SOP. Acute SOP in rhesus monkeys leads to a temporal rotation of LP. This is consistent with a relatively increased extorsion in down gaze due to a loss of normal intorsion by the superior oblique muscle. The SD of torsion increased by only a small amount, implying that the validity of Listing's Law is not affected much by complete SOP, despite the large change in the orientation of LP.

  19. Early identification and intervention in cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Anna; Greisen, Gorm; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2015-01-01

    Infants with possible cerebral palsy (CP) are commonly assumed to benefit from early diagnosis and early intervention, but substantial evidence for this is lacking. There is no consensus in the literature on a definition of 'early', but this review focuses on interventions initiated within...

  20. Gait Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as…

  1. Tinjauan Anatomi Klinik dan Manajemen Bell's Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Mujaddidah

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bell's Palsy is a peripheral facial nerve weakness (facial nerve with acute onset on one side of the face. This condition causes the inability of the patient to move half of his face consciously (volunter on the affected side. The Bell's Palsy incidence is 20-30 cases out of 100.000 people and accounts for 60-70% of all cases of unilateral facial paralysis. The disease is self-limited, but causes great suffering for patients who are not treated properly. Controversy in the management is still debated, and the cause is still unknown. The underlying hypothesis is ischemic, vascular, viral, bacterial, hereditary, and immunologic. Therapy done so far is to improve facial nerve function and healing process. The management of the therapy used will be closely related to the structure of the anatomy and its functions and associated abnormalities. The modalities of Bell's Palsy therapy are with corticosteroids and antivirals, facial exercises, electrostimulation, physiotherapy and decompression operations. Approximately 80-90% of patients with Bell's palsy recover completely within 6 months, even in 50-60% of cases improved within 3 weeks. Approximately 10% experienced persistent facial muscle asymmetry, and 5% experienced severe sequelae, and 8% of cases were recurrent.

  2. Bell's palsy syndrome: mimics and chameleons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Geraint; Morgan, Cathy

    2016-12-01

    In this article we will explore the mimics and chameleons of Bell's palsy and in addition argue that we should use the term 'Bell's palsy syndrome' to help guide clinical reasoning when thinking about patients with facial weakness. The diagnosis of Bell's palsy can usually be made on clinical grounds without the need for further investigations. This is because the diagnosis is not one of exclusion (despite this being commonly how it is described), a lower motor neurone facial weakness where all alternative causes have been eliminated, but rather a positive recognition of a clinical syndrome, with a number of exclusions, which are described below. This perhaps would be more accurately referred to a 'Bell's palsy syndrome'. Treatment with corticosteroids improves outcome; adding an antiviral probably reduces the rates of long-term complications. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Cerebral Palsy. NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #2

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral palsy--also known as CP--is a condition caused by injury to the parts of the brain that control the body's ability to use muscles effectively. Often the injury happens before birth, sometimes during delivery or soon after birth. The symptoms will differ from person to person and change as children and their nervous systems mature. This…

  4. Parental infertility and cerebral palsy in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Basso, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Children born after in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) have been reported to have a higher risk of cerebral palsy (CP), perhaps due to the higher frequency of preterm birth, multiple births or vanishing embryo in the pregnancies. However, it has been suggested...

  5. Educational Solutions for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Lynn; Omichinski, Donna Riccio; Miller, Nicole; Sandella, Danielle; Warschausky, Seth

    2010-01-01

    This paper characterizes educational strengths and needs of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and connects research findings from the University of Michigan's Adapted Cognitive Assessment Lab (ACAL) to current special educational requirements. It acknowledges the uniqueness of educating a child with significant motor and communication disabilities…

  6. Pretend Play of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Luzia Iara; Pacciulio, Amanda Mota; dos Santos, Camila Abrao; dos Santos, Jair Licio; Stagnitti, Karen Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Evaluate self-initiated pretend play of children with cerebral palsy. Method: Twenty preschool children participated in the study. Pretend play ability was measured by using the child-initiated pretend play assessment culturally adapted to Brazil. Results: There were significant negative correlations between the children's…

  7. Peripheral nerve involvement in Bell's palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Bueri

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available A group of patients with Bell's palsy were studied in order to disclose the presence of subclinical peripheral nerve involvement. 20 patients, 8 male and 12 female, with recent Bell's palsy as their unique disease were examined, in all cases other causes of polyneuropathy were ruled out. Patients were investigated with CSF examination, facial nerve latencies in the affected and in the sound sides, and maximal motor nerve conduction velocities, as well as motor terminal latencies from the right median and peroneal nerves. CSF laboratory examination was normal in all cases. Facial nerve latencies were abnormal in all patients in the affected side, and they differed significantly from those of control group in the clinically sound side. Half of the patients showed abnormal values in the maximal motor nerve conduction velocities and motor terminal latencies of the right median and peroneal nerves. These results agree with previous reports which have pointed out that other cranial nerves may be affected in Bell's palsy. However, we have found a higher frequency of peripheral nerve involvement in this entity. These findings, support the hypothesis that in some patients Bell's palsy is the component of a more widespread disease, affecting other cranial and peripheral nerves.

  8. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liptak, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    The optimal practice of medicine includes integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available clinical evidence from systematic research. This article reviews nine treatment modalities used for children who have cerebral palsy (CP), including hyperbaric oxygen, the Adeli Suit, patterning, electrical stimulation, conductive education,…

  9. Gaze alternation in dogs and toddlers in an unsolvable task: evidence of an audience effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall-Pescini, S; Colombo, E; Passalacqua, C; Merola, I; Prato-Previde, E

    2013-11-01

    Dogs have been shown to use human-directed gazing behaviour and gaze alternation in numerous contexts; however, it is still unclear whether this behaviour can be considered an intentional and referential communicative act. In the current study, adult dogs and preverbal toddlers were tested using the classic unsolvable task paradigm, but varying the attentional stance of the participating audience (the experimenter and the caregiver). The aims were to assess (1) whether dogs and toddlers would use gaze alternation behaviour in similar manners when the task became unsolvable, and (2) whether both dogs and toddlers would take into account the attentional stance of the audience when initiating a communicative interaction. Results indicated that both toddlers and dogs increased their gaze alternation behaviour between the apparatus and caregiver when the task became unsolvable, and toddlers also showed an increase in pointing behaviour. Furthermore, both species showed a capacity to take into account the attentional stance of the audience when manifesting gaze alternation behaviours towards them. Taken together, these results suggest that gaze alternation is both an intentional and referential communicative act and that both species can take into account the need for audience attention when communicating with them.

  10. Orienting of attention via observed eye gaze is head-centred.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Andrew P; di Pellegrino, Giuseppe; Tipper, Steven P

    2004-11-01

    Observing averted eye gaze results in the automatic allocation of attention to the gazed-at location. The role of the orientation of the face that produces the gaze cue was investigated. The eyes in the face could look left or right in a head-centred frame, but the face itself could be oriented 90 degrees clockwise or anticlockwise such that the eyes were gazing up or down. Significant cueing effects to targets presented to the left or right of the screen were found in these head orientation conditions. This suggests that attention was directed to the side to which the eyes would have been looking towards, had the face been presented upright. This finding provides evidence that head orientation can affect gaze following, even when the head orientation alone is not a social cue. It also shows that the mechanism responsible for the allocation of attention following a gaze cue can be influenced by intrinsic object-based (i.e. head-centred) properties of the task-irrelevant cue.

  11. A Novel Gaze Tracking Method Based on the Generation of Virtual Calibration Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwan Heo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Most conventional gaze-tracking systems require that users look at many points during the initial calibration stage, which is inconvenient for them. To avoid this requirement, we propose a new gaze-tracking method with four important characteristics. First, our gaze-tracking system uses a large screen located at a distance from the user, who wears a lightweight device. Second, our system requires that users look at only four calibration points during the initial calibration stage, during which four pupil centers are noted. Third, five additional points (virtual pupil centers are generated with a multilayer perceptron using the four actual points (detected pupil centers as inputs. Fourth, when a user gazes at a large screen, the shape defined by the positions of the four pupil centers is a distorted quadrangle because of the nonlinear movement of the human eyeball. The gaze-detection accuracy is reduced if we map the pupil movement area onto the screen area using a single transform function. We overcame this problem by calculating the gaze position based on multi-geometric transforms using the five virtual points and the four actual points. Experiment results show that the accuracy of the proposed method is better than that of other methods.

  12. Human-like object tracking and gaze estimation with PKD android

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayasinghe, Indika B.; Miller, Haylie L.; Das, Sumit K.; Bugnariu, Nicoleta L.; Popa, Dan O.

    2016-05-01

    As the use of robots increases for tasks that require human-robot interactions, it is vital that robots exhibit and understand human-like cues for effective communication. In this paper, we describe the implementation of object tracking capability on Philip K. Dick (PKD) android and a gaze tracking algorithm, both of which further robot capabilities with regard to human communication. PKD's ability to track objects with human-like head postures is achieved with visual feedback from a Kinect system and an eye camera. The goal of object tracking with human-like gestures is twofold: to facilitate better human-robot interactions and to enable PKD as a human gaze emulator for future studies. The gaze tracking system employs a mobile eye tracking system (ETG; SensoMotoric Instruments) and a motion capture system (Cortex; Motion Analysis Corp.) for tracking the head orientations. Objects to be tracked are displayed by a virtual reality system, the Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment (CAREN; MotekForce Link). The gaze tracking algorithm converts eye tracking data and head orientations to gaze information facilitating two objectives: to evaluate the performance of the object tracking system for PKD and to use the gaze information to predict the intentions of the user, enabling the robot to understand physical cues by humans.

  13. Direct gaze of photographs of female nudes influences startle in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Schulz, André; Nees, Frauke; Blumenthal, Terry D; Schachinger, Hartmut

    2009-05-01

    Foreground presentation of photographs of opposite sex nudes lowers startle elicited by sudden acoustic stimuli. However, the impact of gaze direction of the presented nudes on this startle modulation has not been investigated. Theoretically, direct gaze of photographs of female nudes could either lead to a larger inhibition of the startle reaction due to a summating valence and arousal effect of direct eye contact, or lead to a smaller inhibition due to an attention capturing effect of the eyes. Two subsets of erotic photographs of female nudes (women looking directly at the observer vs. gazing away) and standard IAPS neutral pictures were viewed by 26 male volunteers, while startle eye blink responses to binaural bursts of white noise (50 ms, 105 dB) were recorded by EMG. Erotic pictures reduced startle eyeblink magnitude as compared to neutral pictures. Furthermore, erotic stimuli without direct gaze at the observer showed a greater startle eyeblink inhibition than erotic stimuli with direct gaze at the observer. Our data suggest that direct gaze of opposite sex nudes may direct attention to the face, thereby reducing the appetitive impact of an attractive body.

  14. Investigating the Association of Eye Gaze Pattern and Diagnostic Error in Mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Pinto, Frank M [ORNL; Xu, Songhua [ORNL; Morin-Ducote, Garnetta [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hudson, Kathy [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tourassi, Georgia [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association between eye-gaze patterns and the diagnostic accuracy of radiologists for the task of assessing the likelihood of malignancy of mammographic masses. Six radiologists (2 expert breast imagers and 4 Radiology residents of variable training) assessed the likelihood of malignancy of 40 biopsy-proven mammographic masses (20 malignant and 20 benign) on a computer monitor. Eye-gaze data were collected using a commercial remote eye-tracker. Upon reviewing each mass, the radiologists were also asked to provide their assessment regarding the probability of malignancy of the depicted mass as well as a rating regarding the perceived difficulty of the diagnostic task. The collected data were analyzed using established algorithms and various quantitative metrics were extracted to characterize the recorded gaze patterns. The extracted metrics were correlated with the radiologists diagnostic decisions and perceived complexity scores. Results showed that the visual gaze pattern of radiologists varies substantially, not only depending on their experience level but also among individuals. However, some eye gaze metrics appear to correlate with diagnostic error and perceived complexity more consistently. These results suggest that although gaze patterns are generally associated with diagnostic error and the human perceived difficulty of the diagnostic task, there are substantially individual differences that are not explained simply by the experience level of the individual performing the diagnostic task.

  15. Viewing condition dependence of the gaze-evoked nystagmus in Arnold Chiari type 1 malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasia, Fatema F; Gulati, Deepak; Westbrook, Edward L; Shaikh, Aasef G

    2014-04-15

    Saccadic eye movements rapidly shift gaze to the target of interest. Once the eyes reach a given target, the brainstem ocular motor integrator utilizes feedback from various sources to assure steady gaze. One of such sources is cerebellum whose lesion can impair neural integration leading to gaze-evoked nystagmus. The gaze evoked nystagmus is characterized by drifts moving the eyes away from the target and a null position where the drifts are absent. The extent of impairment in the neural integration for two opposite eccentricities might determine the location of the null position. Eye in the orbit position might also determine the location of the null. We report this phenomenon in a patient with Arnold Chiari type 1 malformation who had intermittent esotropia and horizontal gaze-evoked nystagmus with a shift in the null position. During binocular viewing, the null was shifted to the right. During monocular viewing, when the eye under cover drifted nasally (secondary to the esotropia), the null of the gaze-evoked nystagmus reorganized toward the center. We speculate that the output of the neural integrator is altered from the bilateral conflicting eye in the orbit position secondary to the strabismus. This could possibly explain the reorganization of the location of the null position. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Gaze-based Technology as a Tool for Surgical Skills Assessment and Training in Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Piedra, Carolina; Sanchez-Carrion, Jose M; Rieiro, Héctor; Di Stasi, Leandro L

    2017-09-01

    To assess the sensitivity of gaze-based metrics in detecting cognitive demands imposed by surgical procedures. We analyzed urologists' gaze entropy and velocity while performing 2 standardized high-fidelity simulated stone procedures with different levels of complexity. Using a wearable eye tracker device (mounted onto an eyeglass frame), we measured gaze entropy and velocity in 15 urologists, members of the Andalusian health-care system, while they performed an extraction of a stone in the bladder (low complexity) and an extraction of a stone in the lumbar ureter (high complexity). We also collected performance and subjective data. Gaze entropy and velocity were significantly higher when surgeons performed the most complex surgical procedure: the visual exploration pattern became less stereotyped (ie, more random) and faster. Surgeons' performance and perceived task complexity differed accordingly, confirming the gaze-based results. Gaze-based metrics might have great potential as objective and nonintrusive indices to assess surgeons' cognitive (over)load, potentially being a complementary assessment tool to quantify the learning curve for surgical procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Trunk movements during gait in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, Michael; Bonnefoy-Mazure, Alice; Lempereur, Mathieu; Lascombes, Pierre; De Coulon, Geraldo; Armand, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Lower limb deficits have been widely studied during gait in cerebral palsy, deficits in upper body have received little attention. The purpose of this research was to describe the characteristics of trunk movement of cerebral palsy children in terms of type of deficits (diplegia/hemiplegia) and gross motor function classification system (1, 2 or 3). Data from 92 cerebral palsy children, which corresponds to 141 clinical gait analysis, were retrospectively selected. Kinematic parameters of trunk were extracted from thorax and spine angles in the sagittal, transverse and coronal planes. The range of motion and the mean positions over the gait cycle were analysed. Intra-group differences between the children with diplegia or hemiplegia, gross motor function classification systems 1 to 3 and typically developing participants were analysed with Kruskal-Wallis tests and post hoc tests. Pearson correlation coefficients between the gait profile score normalised walking speed and kinematic parameters of the thorax were assessed. The results revealed: 1) the range of motion of the thorax and spine exhibited more significant differences between groups than the mean positions; 2) greater levels of impairment were associated with higher thorax range of motion, and 3) the children with diplegia and gross motor function classification system 3 exhibited a greater range of motion for all planes with the exception of spine rotation. This study confirmed that greater levels of impairment in cerebral palsy are associated with greater thorax range of motion during gait. The thorax plays an important role during gait in cerebral palsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The diagnostic yield of neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy - Sankara Nethralaya Abducens Palsy Study (SNAPS: Report 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Gopinathan Nair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim was to assess the etiology of sixth nerve palsy and on the basis of our data, to formulate a diagnostic algorithm for the management in sixth nerve palsy. Design: Retrospective chart review. Results: Of the 104 neurologically isolated cases, 9 cases were attributable to trauma, and 95 (86.36% cases were classified as nontraumatic, neurologically isolated cases. Of the 95 nontraumatic, isolated cases of sixth nerve palsy, 52 cases were associated with vasculopathic risk factors, namely diabetes and hypertension and were classified as vasculopathic sixth nerve palsy (54.7%, and those with a history of sixth nerve palsy from birth (6 cases were classified as congenital sixth nerve palsy (6.3%. Of the rest, neuroimaging alone yielded a cause in 18 of the 37 cases (48.64%. Of the other 19 cases where neuroimaging did not yield a cause, 6 cases were attributed to preceding history of infection (3 upper respiratory tract infection and 3 viral illnesses, 2 cases of sixth nerve palsy were found to be a false localizing sign in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and in 11 cases, the cause was undetermined. In these idiopathic cases of isolated sixth nerve palsy, neuroimaging yielded no positive findings. Conclusions: In the absence of risk factors, a suggestive history, or positive laboratory and clinical findings, neuroimaging can serve as a useful diagnostic tool in identifying the exact cause of sixth nerve palsy. Furthermore, we recommend an algorithm to assess the need for neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy.

  19. The diagnostic yield of neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy - Sankara Nethralaya Abducens Palsy Study (SNAPS): Report 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Ambika, Selvakumar; Noronha, Veena Olma; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The aim was to assess the etiology of sixth nerve palsy and on the basis of our data, to formulate a diagnostic algorithm for the management in sixth nerve palsy. Design: Retrospective chart review. Results: Of the 104 neurologically isolated cases, 9 cases were attributable to trauma, and 95 (86.36%) cases were classified as nontraumatic, neurologically isolated cases. Of the 95 nontraumatic, isolated cases of sixth nerve palsy, 52 cases were associated with vasculopathic risk factors, namely diabetes and hypertension and were classified as vasculopathic sixth nerve palsy (54.7%), and those with a history of sixth nerve palsy from birth (6 cases) were classified as congenital sixth nerve palsy (6.3%). Of the rest, neuroimaging alone yielded a cause in 18 of the 37 cases (48.64%). Of the other 19 cases where neuroimaging did not yield a cause, 6 cases were attributed to preceding history of infection (3 upper respiratory tract infection and 3 viral illnesses), 2 cases of sixth nerve palsy were found to be a false localizing sign in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and in 11 cases, the cause was undetermined. In these idiopathic cases of isolated sixth nerve palsy, neuroimaging yielded no positive findings. Conclusions: In the absence of risk factors, a suggestive history, or positive laboratory and clinical findings, neuroimaging can serve as a useful diagnostic tool in identifying the exact cause of sixth nerve palsy. Furthermore, we recommend an algorithm to assess the need for neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy. PMID:25449936

  20. The diagnostic yield of neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy--Sankara Nethralaya Abducens Palsy Study (SNAPS): Report 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Ambika, Selvakumar; Noronha, Veena Olma; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

    2014-10-01

    The aim was to assess the etiology of sixth nerve palsy and on the basis of our data, to formulate a diagnostic algorithm for the management in sixth nerve palsy. Retrospective chart review. Of the 104 neurologically isolated cases, 9 cases were attributable to trauma, and 95 (86.36%) cases were classified as nontraumatic, neurologically isolated cases. Of the 95 nontraumatic, isolated cases of sixth nerve palsy, 52 cases were associated with vasculopathic risk factors, namely diabetes and hypertension and were classified as vasculopathic sixth nerve palsy (54.7%), and those with a history of sixth nerve palsy from birth (6 cases) were classified as congenital sixth nerve palsy (6.3%). Of the rest, neuroimaging alone yielded a cause in 18 of the 37 cases (48.64%). Of the other 19 cases where neuroimaging did not yield a cause, 6 cases were attributed to preceding history of infection (3 upper respiratory tract infection and 3 viral illnesses), 2 cases of sixth nerve palsy were found to be a false localizing sign in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and in 11 cases, the cause was undetermined. In these idiopathic cases of isolated sixth nerve palsy, neuroimaging yielded no positive findings. In the absence of risk factors, a suggestive history, or positive laboratory and clinical findings, neuroimaging can serve as a useful diagnostic tool in identifying the exact cause of sixth nerve palsy. Furthermore, we recommend an algorithm to assess the need for neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy.

  1. Gaze direction effects on perceptions of upper limb kinesthetic coordinate system axes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, W G; Hondzinski, J M; Harper, J G

    2000-12-01

    The effects of varying gaze direction on perceptions of the upper limb kinesthetic coordinate system axes and of the median plane location were studied in nine subjects with no history of neuromuscular disorders. In two experiments, six subjects aligned the unseen forearm to the trunk-fixed anterior-posterior (a/p) axis and earth-fixed vertical while gazing at different visual targets using either head or eye motion to vary gaze direction in different conditions. Effects of support of the upper limb on perceptual errors were also tested in different conditions. Absolute constant errors and variable errors associated with forearm alignment to the trunk-fixed a/p axis and earth-fixed vertical were similar for different gaze directions whether the head or eyes were moved to control gaze direction. Such errors were decreased by support of the upper limb when aligning to the vertical but not when aligning to the a/p axis. Regression analysis showed that single trial errors in individual subjects were poorly correlated with gaze direction, but showed a dependence on shoulder angles for alignment to both axes. Thus, changes in position of the head and eyes do not influence perceptions of upper limb kinesthetic coordinate system axes. However, dependence of the errors on arm configuration suggests that such perceptions are generated from sensations of shoulder and elbow joint angle information. In a third experiment, perceptions of median plane location were tested by instructing four subjects to place the unseen right index fingertip directly in front of the sternum either by motion of the straight arm at the shoulder or by elbow flexion/extension with shoulder angle varied. Gaze angles were varied to the right and left by 0.5 radians to determine effects of gaze direction on such perceptions. These tasks were also carried out with subjects blind-folded and head orientation varied to test for effects of head orientation on perceptions of median plane location. Constant

  2. The relation of breech presentation at term to cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, L; Topp, M; Langhoff-Roos, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the relation between breech delivery and cerebral palsy, considering the influence of intrauterine growth, low Apgar score at birth, and mode of delivery. DESIGN: Register-based, case-control study. POPULATION: A cohort of infants with cerebral palsy born between 1979 and 1986...... in East Denmark, identified by linkage of the cerebral palsy register with the national birth register. Discharge letters from births of breech infants with cerebral palsy were reviewed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Presentation, mode of delivery, gestational age, birthweight, Apgar score, type of cerebral...... palsy, severity of handicap. RESULTS: Breech presentation at term was associated with a borderline significantly higher risk of cerebral palsy than vertex presentation (OR 1.56; 95% CI 0.9-2.4). Breech presentation infants more often had a lower Apgar score (

  3. Probability of walking in children with cerebral palsy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckung, E.; Hagberg, G.; Uldall, P.

    2008-01-01

    : The collaboration Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe provides a powerful means of monitoring trends in cerebral palsy and its functional consequences. The proportion of nonwalking in children with cerebral palsy seems to be rather stable over years and across centers despite the changes that have occurred......OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this work was to describe walking ability in children with cerebral palsy from the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe common database through 21 years and to examine the association between walking ability and predicting factors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Anonymous data...... on 10042 children with cerebral palsy born between 1976 and 1996 were gathered from 14 European centers; 9012 patients were eligible for the analyses. RESULTS: Unaided walking as the primary way of walking at 5 years of age was reported for 54%, walking with assistive devices was reported for 16...

  4. Bell's palsy: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashika Kushraj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bell's palsy is considered as a disease of exclusion. It is a form of lower motor neuron paralysis affecting the facial muscles. Rapid onset of paralysis causes panic to the patients. For speedy recovery, correct diagnosis and early treatment are crucial. Here a case of Bell's palsy is reported and the literature on Bell's palsy is reviewed. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 581-588

  5. Abducens Nerve Palsy in Pregnancy: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Sayedeh Reyhaneh

    2016-01-01

    Headache, blurring of vision and confusion are neurologic symptoms of preeclampsia. Whereas abducens nerve palsy during pregnancy is an extremely rare condition, we report here a 40-year-old patient with diplopia, blurring of vision and abducens nerve palsy in the 39th week of pregnancy with history of hypertension (HTN). No specific pathology was found. Symptoms of abducens nerve palsy were resolved spontaneously by controlling blood pressure after delivery. PMID:28208948

  6. Race perception and gaze direction differently impair visual working memory for faces: An event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Paola; Dalmaso, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Humans are amazingly experts at processing and recognizing faces, however there are moderating factors of this ability. In the present study, we used the event-related potential technique to investigate the influence of both race and gaze direction on visual working memory (i.e., VWM) face representations. In a change detection task, we orthogonally manipulated race (own-race vs. other-race faces) and eye-gaze direction (direct gaze vs. averted gaze). Participants were required to encode identities of these faces. We quantified the amount of information encoded in VWM by monitoring the amplitude of the sustained posterior contralateral negativity (SPCN) time-locked to the faces. Notably, race and eye-gaze direction differently modulated SPCN amplitude such that other-race faces elicited reduced SPCN amplitudes compared with own-race faces only when displaying a direct gaze. On the other hand, faces displaying averted gaze, independently of their race, elicited increased SPCN amplitudes compared with faces displaying direct gaze. We interpret these findings as denoting that race and eye-gaze direction affect different face processing stages.

  7. Ezra Pound and Du Fu: Gazing at Mt. Tai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent Su

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Confined to a six-by-six-foot outdoor steel cage, Ezra Pound saw a series of mountain hills from a few miles to the east of Pisa. The poet compared one of these small 800-metre hills to the sacred Chinese Mt. Tai, which becomes the most common geographical name in The Pisan Cantos. Pound’s poetic summoning of this particular mountain is related to the fact that Mt. Tai is historically and culturally connected to the philosophy of Confucius, who personally ascended the mountain several times. Pound, as a devout Confucian disciple, closely follows the philosophical doctrines and attempts to mentally trace the footsteps of Confucius. This paper will argue how Pound’s poetic evocation of the mountain shares a striking similarity to an eighth-century Chinese poem called “Gazing at Mt. Tai,” which was written by the famous literatus - Du Fu 杜甫(712 – 770 . In spite of living in two completely different eras and countries, Pound’s and Du Fu’s reference to Mt. Tai demonstrates the confluence of their poetic spirits. Neither of them ascended mountain personally. They instead made use of their poetic imagination to follow the paths of Confucius and perceived the mountain as an earthly paradise, one which represents tranquillity and serenity away from the moral and physical corruption of the external world.

  8. 3D recovery of human gaze in natural environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paletta, Lucas; Santner, Katrin; Fritz, Gerald; Mayer, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    The estimation of human attention has recently been addressed in the context of human robot interaction. Today, joint work spaces already exist and challenge cooperating systems to jointly focus on common objects, scenes and work niches. With the advent of Google glasses and increasingly affordable wearable eye-tracking, monitoring of human attention will soon become ubiquitous. The presented work describes for the first time a method for the estimation of human fixations in 3D environments that does not require any artificial landmarks in the field of view and enables attention mapping in 3D models. It enables full 3D recovery of the human view frustum and the gaze pointer in a previously acquired 3D model of the environment in real time. The study on the precision of this method reports a mean projection error ≈1.1 cm and a mean angle error ≈0.6° within the chosen 3D model - the precision does not go below the one of the technical instrument (≈1°). This innovative methodology will open new opportunities for joint attention studies as well as for bringing new potential into automated processing for human factors technologies.

  9. Gaze-contingent training enhances perceptual skill acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Donghyun; Mann, David L; Abernethy, Bruce; Poolton, Jamie M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether decision-making skill in perceptual-cognitive tasks could be enhanced using a training technique that impaired selective areas of the visual field. Recreational basketball players performed perceptual training over 3 days while viewing with a gaze-contingent manipulation that displayed either (a) a moving window (clear central and blurred peripheral vision), (b) a moving mask (blurred central and clear peripheral vision), or (c) full (unrestricted) vision. During the training, participants watched video clips of basketball play and at the conclusion of each clip made a decision about to which teammate the player in possession of the ball should pass. A further control group watched unrelated videos with full vision. The effects of training were assessed using separate tests of decision-making skill conducted in a pretest, posttest, and 2-week retention test. The accuracy of decision making was greater in the posttest than in the pretest for all three intervention groups when compared with the control group. Remarkably, training with blurred peripheral vision resulted in a further improvement in performance from posttest to retention test that was not apparent for the other groups. The type of training had no measurable impact on the visual search strategies of the participants, and so the training improvements appear to be grounded in changes in information pickup. The findings show that learning with impaired peripheral vision offers a promising form of training to support improvements in perceptual skill.

  10. Bell's palsy at high altitude -- an unsuspected finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K V S Hari; Shijith, K P; Ahmad, F M H

    2016-01-01

    Bell's palsy is a common condition seen in clinical practice. The aetiology of this condition is not clearly defined and neuroimaging is essential to exclude intracranial causes of infra-nuclear facial palsy. We report a young soldier, who presented with Bell's palsy and neuroimaging revealed an unsuspected finding of multiple intracranial calcifications. Detailed evaluation revealed the additional diagnosis of vitamin D deficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism due to lack of sun exposure at high altitude area. The health care practitioners, looking after the soldiers at high altitude areas should be aware of the measures to prevent vitamin D deficiency. Intracranial calcifications are uncommon in hyperparathyroidism and Bell's palsy.

  11. Gaze training improves the retention and transfer of laparoscopic technical skills in novices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, Samuel J; Chaytor, Richard J; McGrath, John S; Masters, Rich S W; Wilson, Mark R

    2013-09-01

    Gaze training is an effective way of training basic laparoscopic skills, resulting in faster acquisition periods and more robust subsequent performance under pressure. The current study is a randomized control trial which examines whether the performance benefits of gaze training stand the test of time (delayed retention) and transfer to more complex skills. Thirty-six medical students were trained to proficiency (50 trials) on a one-handed laparoscopic task (picking and dropping balls) in either a discovery learning (DL) or gaze training (GT) group. Both groups performed the one-handed task in baseline, retention and delayed retention (1 month) tests. They also performed baseline, retention and delayed retention tests of a two-handed task (grasping and cutting). Performance (completion time) and gaze control (target locking) were assessed throughout. For the one-handed task, the GT group displayed superior performance at retention (p retention (p strategies (p retention, the GT group maintained performance at 100% of retention. There were no differences between the groups for the two-handed task at retention (p = .140); however, at delayed retention, the GT group outperformed the DL group (p < .005) and displayed more expert-like gaze control (p < .001). Novices trained to adopt an expert-like gaze control strategy were able to attain higher levels of performance more quickly than novices who learned by discovery alone. Furthermore, these skills were more durable over time and were transferable to more complex skills. Gaze training is a beneficial intervention to aid the acquisition of the basic motor skills required for laparoscopy.

  12. Impact of cognitive and linguistic ability on gaze behavior in children with hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olof eSandgren

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore verbal-nonverbal integration, we investigated the influence of cognitive and linguistic ability on gaze behavior during spoken language conversation between children with mild-to-moderate hearing impairment (HI and normal-hearing (NH peers. Ten HI-NH and ten NH-NH dyads performed a referential communication task requiring description of faces. During task performance, eye movements and speech were tracked. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model associations between performance on cognitive and linguistic tasks and the probability of gaze to the conversational partner’s face. Analyses compare the listeners in each dyad (HI: n = 10, mean age = 12;6 years, SD = 2;0, mean better ear pure-tone average 33.0 dB HL, SD = 7.8; NH: n = 10, mean age = 13;7 years, SD = 1;11. Group differences in gaze behavior – with HI gazing more to the conversational partner than NH – remained significant despite adjustment for ability on receptive grammar, expressive vocabulary, and complex working memory. Adjustment for phonological short term memory, as measured by nonword repetition, removed group differences, revealing an interaction between group membership and nonword repetition ability. Stratified analysis showed a twofold increase of the probability of gaze-to-partner for HI with low phonological short term memory capacity, and a decreased probability for HI with high capacity, as compared to NH peers. The results revealed differences in gaze behavior attributable to performance on a phonological short term memory task. Participants with hearing impairment and low phonological short term memory capacity showed a doubled probability of gaze to the conversational partner, indicative of a visual bias. The results stress the need to look beyond the hearing impairment in diagnostics and intervention. Acknowledgment of the finding requires clinical assessment of children with hearing impairment to be supported by tasks tapping

  13. Variation in the human cannabinoid receptor CNR1 gene modulates gaze duration for happy faces

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    Chakrabarti Bhismadev

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From an early age, humans look longer at preferred stimuli and also typically look longer at facial expressions of emotion, particularly happy faces. Atypical gaze patterns towards social stimuli are common in autism spectrum conditions (ASC. However, it is unknown whether gaze fixation patterns have any genetic basis. In this study, we tested whether variations in the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1 gene are associated with gaze duration towards happy faces. This gene was selected because CNR1 is a key component of the endocannabinoid system, which is involved in processing reward, and in our previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study, we found that variations in CNR1 modulate the striatal response to happy (but not disgust faces. The striatum is involved in guiding gaze to rewarding aspects of a visual scene. We aimed to validate and extend this result in another sample using a different technique (gaze tracking. Methods A total of 30 volunteers (13 males and 17 females from the general population observed dynamic emotional expressions on a screen while their eye movements were recorded. They were genotyped for the identical four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the CNR1 gene tested in our earlier fMRI study. Results Two SNPs (rs806377 and rs806380 were associated with differential gaze duration for happy (but not disgust faces. Importantly, the allelic groups associated with a greater striatal response to happy faces in the fMRI study were associated with longer gaze duration at happy faces. Conclusions These results suggest that CNR1 variations modulate the striatal function that underlies the perception of signals of social reward, such as happy faces. This suggests that CNR1 is a key element in the molecular architecture of perception of certain basic emotions. This may have implications for understanding neurodevelopmental conditions marked by atypical eye contact and facial emotion processing

  14. Variation in the human cannabinoid receptor CNR1 gene modulates gaze duration for happy faces.

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    Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2011-06-29

    From an early age, humans look longer at preferred stimuli and also typically look longer at facial expressions of emotion, particularly happy faces. Atypical gaze patterns towards social stimuli are common in autism spectrum conditions (ASC). However, it is unknown whether gaze fixation patterns have any genetic basis. In this study, we tested whether variations in the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene are associated with gaze duration towards happy faces. This gene was selected because CNR1 is a key component of the endocannabinoid system, which is involved in processing reward, and in our previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we found that variations in CNR1 modulate the striatal response to happy (but not disgust) faces. The striatum is involved in guiding gaze to rewarding aspects of a visual scene. We aimed to validate and extend this result in another sample using a different technique (gaze tracking). A total of 30 volunteers (13 males and 17 females) from the general population observed dynamic emotional expressions on a screen while their eye movements were recorded. They were genotyped for the identical four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CNR1 gene tested in our earlier fMRI study. Two SNPs (rs806377 and rs806380) were associated with differential gaze duration for happy (but not disgust) faces. Importantly, the allelic groups associated with a greater striatal response to happy faces in the fMRI study were associated with longer gaze duration at happy faces. These results suggest that CNR1 variations modulate the striatal function that underlies the perception of signals of social reward, such as happy faces. This suggests that CNR1 is a key element in the molecular architecture of perception of certain basic emotions. This may have implications for understanding neurodevelopmental conditions marked by atypical eye contact and facial emotion processing, such as ASC.

  15. Quantifying the cognitive cost of laparo-endoscopic single-site surgeries: Gaze-based indices.

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    Di Stasi, Leandro L; Díaz-Piedra, Carolina; Ruiz-Rabelo, Juan Francisco; Rieiro, Héctor; Sanchez Carrion, Jose M; Catena, Andrés

    2017-11-01

    Despite the growing interest concerning the laparo-endoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) procedure, LESS presents multiple difficulties and challenges that are likely to increase the surgeon's cognitive cost, in terms of both cognitive load and performance. Nevertheless, there is currently no objective index capable of assessing the surgeon cognitive cost while performing LESS. We assessed if gaze-based indices might offer unique and unbiased measures to quantify LESS complexity and its cognitive cost. We expect that the assessment of surgeon's cognitive cost to improve patient safety by measuring fitness-for-duty and reducing surgeons overload. Using a wearable eye tracker device, we measured gaze entropy and velocity of surgical trainees and attending surgeons during two surgical procedures (LESS vs. multiport laparoscopy surgery [MPS]). None of the participants had previous experience with LESS. They performed two exercises with different complexity levels (Low: Pattern Cut vs. High: Peg Transfer). We also collected performance and subjective data. LESS caused higher cognitive demand than MPS, as indicated by increased gaze entropy in both surgical trainees and attending surgeons (exploration pattern became more random). Furthermore, gaze velocity was higher (exploration pattern became more rapid) for the LESS procedure independently of the surgeon's expertise. Perceived task complexity and laparoscopic accuracy confirmed gaze-based results. Gaze-based indices have great potential as objective and non-intrusive measures to assess surgeons' cognitive cost and fitness-for-duty. Furthermore, gaze-based indices might play a relevant role in defining future guidelines on surgeons' examinations to mark their achievements during the entire training (e.g. analyzing surgical learning curves). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical characteristics and cerebrospinal fluid parameters in patients with peripheral facial palsy caused by Lyme neuroborreliosis compared with facial palsy of unknown origin (Bell's palsy).

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    Bremell, Daniel; Hagberg, Lars

    2011-08-10

    Bell's palsy and Lyme neuroborreliosis are the two most common diagnoses in patients with peripheral facial palsy in areas endemic for Borrelia burgdorferi. Bell's palsy is treated with corticosteroids, while Lyme neuroborreliosis is treated with antibiotics. The diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis relies on the detection of Borrelia antibodies in blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid, which is time consuming. In this study, we retrospectively analysed clinical and cerebrospinal fluid parameters in well-characterised patient material with peripheral facial palsy caused by Lyme neuroborreliosis or Bell's palsy, in order to obtain a working diagnosis and basis for treatment decisions in the acute stage. Hospital records from the Department of Infectious Diseases, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, for patients with peripheral facial palsy that had undergone lumbar puncture, were reviewed. Patients were classified as Bell's palsy, definite Lyme neuroborreliosis, or possible Lyme neuroborreliosis, on the basis of the presence of Borrelia antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid and preceding erythema migrans. One hundred and two patients were analysed; 51 were classified as Bell's palsy, 34 as definite Lyme neuroborreliosis and 17 as possible Lyme neuroborreliosis. Patients with definite Lyme neuroborreliosis fell ill during the second half of the year, with a peak in August, whereas patients with Bell's palsy fell ill in a more evenly distributed manner over the year. Patients with definite Lyme neuroborreliosis had significantly more neurological symptoms outside the paretic area of the face and significantly higher levels of mononuclear cells and albumin in their cerebrospinal fluid. A reported history of tick bite was uncommon in both groups. We found that the time of the year, associated neurological symptoms and mononuclear pleocytosis were strong predictive factors for Lyme neuroborreliosis as a cause of peripheral facial palsy in an area endemic for Borrelia. For

  17. Clinical characteristics and cerebrospinal fluid parameters in patients with peripheral facial palsy caused by Lyme neuroborreliosis compared with facial palsy of unknown origin (Bell's palsy

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    Hagberg Lars

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bell's palsy and Lyme neuroborreliosis are the two most common diagnoses in patients with peripheral facial palsy in areas endemic for Borrelia burgdorferi. Bell's palsy is treated with corticosteroids, while Lyme neuroborreliosis is treated with antibiotics. The diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis relies on the detection of Borrelia antibodies in blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid, which is time consuming. In this study, we retrospectively analysed clinical and cerebrospinal fluid parameters in well-characterised patient material with peripheral facial palsy caused by Lyme neuroborreliosis or Bell's palsy, in order to obtain a working diagnosis and basis for treatment decisions in the acute stage. Methods Hospital records from the Department of Infectious Diseases, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, for patients with peripheral facial palsy that had undergone lumbar puncture, were reviewed. Patients were classified as Bell's palsy, definite Lyme neuroborreliosis, or possible Lyme neuroborreliosis, on the basis of the presence of Borrelia antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid and preceding erythema migrans. Results One hundred and two patients were analysed; 51 were classified as Bell's palsy, 34 as definite Lyme neuroborreliosis and 17 as possible Lyme neuroborreliosis. Patients with definite Lyme neuroborreliosis fell ill during the second half of the year, with a peak in August, whereas patients with Bell's palsy fell ill in a more evenly distributed manner over the year. Patients with definite Lyme neuroborreliosis had significantly more neurological symptoms outside the paretic area of the face and significantly higher levels of mononuclear cells and albumin in their cerebrospinal fluid. A reported history of tick bite was uncommon in both groups. Conclusions We found that the time of the year, associated neurological symptoms and mononuclear pleocytosis were strong predictive factors for Lyme neuroborreliosis as a

  18. The diagnostic yield of neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy - Sankara Nethralaya Abducens Palsy Study (SNAPS): Report 1

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Ambika, Selvakumar; Noronha, Veena Olma; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The aim was to assess the etiology of sixth nerve palsy and on the basis of our data, to formulate a diagnostic algorithm for the management in sixth nerve palsy. Design: Retrospective chart review. Results: Of the 104 neurologically isolated cases, 9 cases were attributable to trauma, and 95 (86.36%) cases were classified as nontraumatic, neurologically isolated cases. Of the 95 nontraumatic, isolated cases of sixth nerve palsy, 52 cases were associated with vasculopathic risk factors,...

  19. Quantitative eye movement recordings in a patient with acquired bilateral superior oblique palsy before and after a bilateral Harada-Ito procedure.

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    Ying, Howard S; Darbandi, Bejan; Shan, Xiaoyan; Barker, Peter; Miller, Neil R; Zee, David S

    2007-01-01

    We examined the effects of the Harada-Ito procedure on static and dynamic alignment in an adult with acquired bilateral superior oblique palsy (SOP). 3D eye movements were recorded before and six weeks after a bilateral Harada-Ito procedure. Superior oblique muscle (SOM) size and contractility were assessed with orbital imaging. On MRI, the left SOM was smaller than the right. Little contractile thickening was present in down gaze for either eye. Preoperatively, the patient had a hypertropia: 1.9 degrees right hypertropia (at down 20 degrees , left 20 degrees ) and 6.4 degrees left hypertropia (at down 20 degrees , right 20 degrees ). Postoperatively, the vertical tropia in all positions was extorsion decreased by 2.2-3.2 degrees for both eyes and for 40 degrees downward saccades by 2.3-3.6 degrees for the RE but was unchanged for the LE. Saccade conjugacy improved and post-saccadic drift lessened for all vertical saccades. The Harada-Ito procedure produced striking improvements in static and dynamic alignment in bilateral SOP. Some changes were binocular (decreased post-saccadic drift, improved saccade conjugacy, less dynamic extorsion for upward saccades) but others were much greater in the less paretic eye (torsional gradients from up to down gaze, less dynamic extorsion for downward saccades). Both central adaptive and peripheral mechanical changes explain these findings. Our results also imply that the Harada-Ito procedure has more effect when there is residual function of the SOM.

  20. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus associated with abducens palsy

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    Nibrass Chaker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraocular muscle palsies associated with herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO are transient, self-limiting conditions, usually seen in elderly patients. There are different treatment recommendations for paralytic complications, but prognosis has generally reported to be favorable. A 75-year-old male patient presented with diplopia. Clinical history revealed left facial vesicular eruptions and pain treated by oral aciclovir 1 week following symptom onset. On examination, we observed cicatricial lesions with crusts involving left hemiface, a limitation in abduction of the left eye, and a superficial punctuate keratitis (SPK with decreased visual acuity (4/10. Examination of the right eye was unremarkable. Hess screen test confirmed left six nerve palsy.