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Sample records for supracoronary aortic banding

  1. Subcoronary versus supracoronary aortic stenosis. an experimental evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasenkam J Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Valvular aortic stenosis is the most common cause of left ventricular hypertrophy due to gradually increasing pressure work. As the stenosis develop the left ventricular hypertrophy may lead to congestive heart failure, increased risk of perioperative complications and also increased risk of sudden death. A functional porcine model imitating the pathophysiological nature of valvular aortic stenosis is very much sought after in order to study the geometrical and pathophysiological changes of the left ventricle, timing of surgery and also pharmacological therapy in this patient group. Earlier we developed a porcine model for aortic stenosis based on supracoronary aortic banding, this model may not completely imitate the pathophysiological changes that occurs when valvular aortic stenosis is present including the coronary blood flow. It would therefore be desirable to optimize this model according to the localization of the stenosis. Methods In 20 kg pigs subcoronary (n = 8, supracoronary aortic banding (n = 8 or sham operation (n = 4 was preformed via a left lateral thoracotomy. The primary endpoint was left ventricular wall thickness; secondary endpoints were heart/body weight ratio and the systolic/diastolic blood flow ratio in the left anterior descending coronary. Statistical evaluation by oneway anova and unpaired t-test. Results Sub- and supracoronary banding induce an equal degree of left ventricular hypertrophy compared with the control group. The coronary blood flow ratio was slightly but not significantly higher in the supracoronary group (ratio = 0.45 compared with the two other groups (subcoronary ratio = 0.36, control ratio = 0.34. Conclusions A human pathophysiologically compatible porcine model for valvular aortic stenosis was developed by performing subcoronary aortic banding. Sub- and supracoronary aortic banding induce an equal degree of left ventricular hypertrophy. This model may be valid for experimental

  2. Subcoronary versus supracoronary aortic stenosis. An experimental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Mette; Hasenkam, J Michael; Jensen, Henrik; Sloth, Erik

    2011-08-22

    Valvular aortic stenosis is the most common cause of left ventricular hypertrophy due to gradually increasing pressure work. As the stenosis develop the left ventricular hypertrophy may lead to congestive heart failure, increased risk of perioperative complications and also increased risk of sudden death. A functional porcine model imitating the pathophysiological nature of valvular aortic stenosis is very much sought after in order to study the geometrical and pathophysiological changes of the left ventricle, timing of surgery and also pharmacological therapy in this patient group. Earlier we developed a porcine model for aortic stenosis based on supracoronary aortic banding, this model may not completely imitate the pathophysiological changes that occurs when valvular aortic stenosis is present including the coronary blood flow. It would therefore be desirable to optimize this model according to the localization of the stenosis. In 20 kg pigs subcoronary (n = 8), supracoronary aortic banding (n = 8) or sham operation (n = 4) was preformed via a left lateral thoracotomy. The primary endpoint was left ventricular wall thickness; secondary endpoints were heart/body weight ratio and the systolic/diastolic blood flow ratio in the left anterior descending coronary. Statistical evaluation by oneway anova and unpaired t-test. Sub- and supracoronary banding induce an equal degree of left ventricular hypertrophy compared with the control group. The coronary blood flow ratio was slightly but not significantly higher in the supracoronary group (ratio = 0.45) compared with the two other groups (subcoronary ratio = 0.36, control ratio = 0.34). A human pathophysiologically compatible porcine model for valvular aortic stenosis was developed by performing subcoronary aortic banding. Sub- and supracoronary aortic banding induce an equal degree of left ventricular hypertrophy. This model may be valid for experimental investigations of aortic valve stenosis but studies of left

  3. Aortic root geometry in aortic stenosis patients (a SEAS substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahlmann, Edda; Nienaber, Christoph A; Cramariuc, Dana

    2011-01-01

    with asymptomatic AS (mean age 67 years, 39% women) in the Simvastatin Ezetimibe in AS study were used. The inner aortic diameter was measured at four levels: annulus, sinus of Valsalva, sinotubular junction and supracoronary, and sinus height as the annulo-junctional distance. Analyses were based on vendor...... diameters (all P SEAS study, 27% of women and 19% of men did not have aortic root geometry fulfilling current requirements for TAVI....

  4. Successful Aortic Banding for Type IA Endoleak Due to Neck Dilatation after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashima, Yasushi; Tamai, Koichi; Shirasugi, Takehiro; Sato, Kenichiro; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Imamura, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo; Kobinata, Toshiyuki

    2017-09-25

    A 69-year-old man with a type IA endoleak that developed approximately 21 months after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) of a 46 mm diameter aneurysm was referred to our department. He had impaired renal function, Parkinson's disease, and previous cerebral infarction. Computed tomography angiography showed a type IA endoleak with neck dilatation and that the aneurysm had grown to 60 mm in diameter. We decided to perform aortic banding. The type IA endoleak disappeared after banding and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 10. Aortic banding may be effective for type IA endoleak after EVAR and less invasive for high-risk patients in particular.

  5. Fate of remnant sinuses of Valsalva in patients with bicuspid and trileaflet valves undergoing aortic valve, ascending aorta, and aortic arch replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Rita Karianna; Habertheuer, Andreas; Bavaria, Joseph E; Siki, Mary; Szeto, Wilson Y; Krause, Eric; Korutla, Varun; Desai, Nimesh D; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth

    2017-08-01

    In patients presenting with aortic valvulopathy with concomitant ascending aortic aneurysm, surgical management of the sinus of Valsalva segment remains undefined, especially for moderately dilated aortic roots. In patients with this pathology undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, we assessed the fate of the remnant preserved sinus of Valsalva segment stratified by aortic valve morphology and pathology. From 2002 to 2015, 428 patients underwent elective aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement. Patients were stratified on the basis of valvular morphology (bicuspid aortic valve [n = 254] and tricuspid aortic valve [n = 174]), valvular pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 178], bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 76], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 61], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 113]), and preoperative sinus of Valsalva dimensions (45 mm). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed no significant difference in freedom from reoperation in tricuspid aortic valve versus bicuspid aortic valve (P = .576). Multivariable Cox regression model performed with sinus of Valsalva dimensions at baseline and follow-up as time-varying covariates did not adversely affect survival. A repeated-measure, mixed-effects model constructed to assess longitudinal sinus of Valsalva trends revealed that the retained sinus of Valsalva dimensions remain stable over long-term follow-up (discharge to ≥10 years), irrespective of valvular morphology/pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis) and preoperative sinus of Valsalva groups (45 mm). In patients with nonaneurysmal sinuses of Valsalva undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, the sinus segment can be preserved irrespective of

  6. Myocardial infarction with aortic banding - A combined rat model of heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anthonio, RL; vanVeldhuisen, DJ; vanBekkum, C; deBoer, E; vanGilst, WH

    The effect of additional abdominal aortic banding on parameters of heart failure was studied in male Wistar rats with myocardial infarction. Contractile function was studied 8-9 weeks after operation, with an isoprenaline dose response protocol, in a retrograde Langendorff perfusion. Also, plasma

  7. Decreasing Compensatory Ability of Concentric Ventricular Hypertrophy in Aortic-Banded Rat Hearts

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    Alexandre Lewalle

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac system compensates for variations in physiological and pathophysiological conditions through a dynamic remodeling at the organ, tissue, and intracellular levels in order to maintain function. However, on longer time scales following the onset of ventricular pressure overload, such remodeling may begin to inhibit physiological function and ultimately lead to heart failure. This progression from compensatory to decompensatory behavior is poorly understood, in particular owing to the absence of a unified perspective of the concomitantly remodeling subsystems. To address this issue, the present study investigates the evolution of compensatory mechanisms, in response to overload, by integrating diffusion-tensor MRI, echocardiography, and intracellular and hemodynamic measurements within consistent computational simulations of aortic-banded rat hearts. This approach allows a comparison of the relative leverage of different cardiac properties (geometry, passive mechanical stiffness, fiber configuration, diastolic and peak calcium concentrations, calcium-binding affinity, and aortic impedance to affect cardiac contraction. Measurements indicate that, following aortic banding, an ejection fraction (EF of 75% was maintained, relative to control rats, despite significant remodeling of the left-ventricular wall thickness (increasing by ~90% over 4 weeks. Applying our framework, we identified the left-ventricular wall thickness (concentric hypertrophy and the intracellular calcium dynamics as playing the dominant roles in preserving EF acutely, whereas the significance of hypertrophy decreased subsequently. This trend suggests an increasing reliance on intracellular mechanisms (average increase ~50%, rather than on anatomical features (average decrease ~60%, to achieve compensation of pump function in the early phase of heart failure.

  8. Internal right ventricular band for multiple ventricular septal defects in a neonate undergoing arterial switch and aortic arch repair.

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    Carroll, William W; Shirali, Girish S; Bradley, Scott M

    2011-01-01

    A neonate presented with d-transposition of the great arteries, aortic arch hypoplasia, aortic coarctation, and multiple ventricular septal defects. During the arterial switch procedure and the aortic arch repair, a fenestrated Gore-Tex disk (W.L. Gore & Assoc, Flagstaff, AZ) was sewn into the right ventricular outflow tract to restrict pulmonary blood flow. The internal right ventricular band successfully controlled the pulmonary blood flow, maintaining a systemic oxygen saturation of 88% to 92%, and allowing growth from 3.5 to 10.5 kg. At 8 months of age, the internal band in the patient was removed, and the ventricular septal defects were successfully closed. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Type A aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome: extent of initial surgery determines long-term outcome.

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    Rylski, Bartosz; Bavaria, Joseph E; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Branchetti, Emanuela; Desai, Nimesh D; Milewski, Rita K; Szeto, Wilson Y; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth; Siepe, Matthias; Kari, Fabian A

    2014-04-01

    Data on outcomes after Stanford type A aortic dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome are limited. We investigated the primary surgery and long-term results in patients with Marfan syndrome who suffered aortic dissection. Among 1324 consecutive patients with aortic dissection type A, 74 with Marfan syndrome (58% men; median age, 37 years [first and third quartiles, 29 and 48 years]) underwent surgical repair (85% acute dissections; 68% DeBakey I; 55% composite valved graft, 30% supracoronary ascending replacement, 15% valve-sparing aortic root replacement; 12% total arch replacement; 3% in-hospital mortality) at 2 tertiary centers in the United States and Europe over the past 25 years. The rate of aortic reintervention with resternotomy was 24% (18 of 74) and of descending aorta (thoracic+abdominal) intervention was 30% (22 of 74) at a median follow-up of 8.4 years (first and third quartiles, 2.2 and 12.7 years). Freedom from need for aortic root reoperation in patients who underwent primarily a composite valved graft or valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedure was 95±3%, 88±5%, and 79±5% and in patients who underwent supracoronary ascending replacement was 83±9%, 60±13%, 20±16% at 5, 10, and 20 years. Secondary aortic arch surgery was necessary only in patients with initial hemi-arch replacement. Emergency surgery for type A dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome is associated with low in-hospital mortality. Failure to extend the primary surgery to aortic root or arch repair leads to a highly complex clinical course. Aortic root replacement or repair is highly recommended because supracoronary ascending replacement is associated with a high need (>40%) for root reintervention.

  10. Early results of valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement in type A aortic dissection and aortic insufficiency

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    М. Л. Гордеев

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was designed to investigate predictors of effective valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement in patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection combined with aortic insufficiency and to analyze efficacy and safety of this kind of surgery.Methods: From January 2010 to December 2015, 49 patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection combined with aortic insufficiency underwent ascending aortic replacement. All patients were divided into 3 groups: valve-sparing procedures (group 1, n = 11, combined aortic valve and supracoronary ascending aortic replacement (group 2, n = 12, and Bentall procedure (group 3, n = 26. We assessed the initial status of patients, incidence of complications and efficacy of valve-sparing ascending aortic replacement.Results: The hospital mortality rate was 8.2% (4/49 patients. The amount of surgical correction correlated with the initial diameter of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva. During the hospital period, none of patients from group 1 developed aortic insufficiency exceeding Grade 2 and the vast majority of patients had trivial aortic regurgitation. The parameters of cardiopulmonary bypass, cross-clamp time and circulatory arrest time did not correlate with the initial size of the ascending aorta and aortic valve blood flow impairment, neither did they influence significantly the incidence and severity of neurological complications. The baseline size of the ascending aorta and degree of aortic regurgitation did not impact the course of the early hospital period.Conclusions: Supracoronary ascending aortic replacement combined with aortic valve repair in ascending aortic dissection and aortic regurgitation is effective and safe. The initial size of the ascending aorta and aortic arch do not influence immediate results. The diameter of the aorta at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva and the condition of aortic valve leaflets could be considered as the limiting factors. Further long

  11. Successful Repair of Type a Aortic Dissection in a Term Pregnancy: A Case Report

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    Kambiz Alizadeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stanford type A acute aortic dissection (AAD is a very rare complication, with potentially lethal consequences in pregnancy. In fact, pregnancy has been regularly associated with the possibility of aortic. dissection in almost half of young women. Herein, we present the case of a 38-year-old woman in her 37th week of pregnancy. The patient’s medical history was indicative of G4L2Ab1(4 gestaitions,2 lives, 1 abortion. She developed persistent chronic pain in the neck, chest, and back, without nausea or vomiting while waking in the morning. The computed tomography angiogram was indicative of AAD. The medical decision was to perform a combination of cesarean section under general anesthesia and median sternotomy for the open aortic valve. The term newborn showed an Apgar score of 9-10. The coronary arteries were preserved and the valve was repaired at commissural positions. Dacron supracoronary tube graft was attached to the aortic anastomotic site and subsequently to the aortic arch. The patient was discharged on day three after surgery with a good general condition. Moreover, the results indicated that she and one of her brothers suffered from Marfan syndrome.

  12. Aortic dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... made in the chest or abdomen. Endovascular aortic repair. This surgery is done without any major surgical ... needed. If the heart arteries are involved, a coronary bypass is also performed. Outlook ... aneurysm - dissecting; Chest pain - aortic dissection; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - ...

  13. Aortic Dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Follow a low-salt diet with plenty of fruits, vegetables and whole grains and exercise regularly. Wear a seat belt. This reduces the risk of traumatic injury to your chest area. Work with your doctor. If you have a family history of aortic dissection, a connective tissue disorder or ...

  14. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement

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    ... gov/ency/article/007684.htm Transcatheter aortic valve replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is surgery to replace the aortic valve. ...

  15. Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correct direction. These valves include the mitral valve, tricuspid valve, pulmonary valve and aortic valve. Each valve has ... Causes of aortic valve regurgitation include: Congenital heart valve disease. You may have been born with an aortic ...

  16. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). ...

  17. Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    with tricuspid aortic valves matched for age, gender and grade of valvular disease . These studies suggest that the predisposition for aortic...enlargement in healthy patients with normally functioning BAV when compared to healthy subjects with normally functioning tricuspid aortic valves ...ascending aorta but also in the pulmonary arteries of patients with BAV, compared to that of patients with tricuspid aortic valves . These studies

  18. Quadricuspid Aortic Valve Combined with Moderate Ascending Aortic Dilatation

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    Uspenskiy, Vladimir E.; Osadchii, Alexei M.; Gordeev, Mikhail L.

    2015-01-01

    The quadricuspid aortic valve is a very uncommon malformation associated with aortic insufficiency, aortic stenosis, endocarditis, and ascending aortic dilatation. We report four cases of this aortic valve malformation. One patient with severe aortic regurgitation and moderate aortic dilatation required aortic valve replacement. Three patients had mild or moderate aortic insufficiency combined with moderate ascending aortic dilatation. These patients were referred to follow-up. The presented cases demonstrate that this aortic valve malformation may not be as rare as it appears and that attention must be paid to any quadricuspid findings during computed tomographic angiography and echocardiography. PMID:27390747

  19. Aortic Annular Enlargement during Aortic Valve Replacement

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    Selman Dumani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the surgery of aortic valve replacement is always attempted, as much as possible, to implant the larger prosthesis with the mains goals to enhance the potential benefits, to minimise transvalvular gradient, decrease left ventricular size and avoid the phenomenon of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Implantation of an ideal prosthesis often it is not possible, due to a small aortic annulus. A variety of aortic annulus enlargement techniques is reported to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch. We present the case that has submitted four three times open heart surgery. We used Manouguian technique to enlarge aortic anulus with excellent results during the fourth time of surgery.

  20. Acute aortic syndromes: current status.

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    Ridge, Carole A; Litmanovich, Diana E

    2015-05-01

    The term acute aortic syndrome comprises aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer. The most recent developments in acute aortic syndromes include (1) a change in the mindset that each entity is pathologically distinct, with a shift toward considering the acute aortic syndromes as points along a spectrum of aortic disease, (2) the optimization of aortic imaging quality and radiation dose, and (3) surgical or endovascular management. This review article focuses on how these developments pertain to thoracic radiologists.

  1. Primary metastasizing aortic endothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, E; Port, S J; Carroll, R M; Friedman, N B

    1984-10-01

    An instance of malignant endothelioma, primary in the aorta, metastasizing to intestine and bone, is reported. The aortic tumor was successfully resected. The unexpected finding of a large hepatic growth at autopsy raised the possibility that the aortic neoplasm was a metastasis. Histochemical, immunologic, and ultrastructural studies supported the diagnosis of an endothelial neoplasm. Although a number of malignant aortic and large vessel tumors have been reported, only four previous instances appear to be endotheliomatous.

  2. Aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS OF THE STUDY: Prompted by anecdotal evidence and observations by surgeons, an investigation was undertaken into the potential differences in implanted aortic valve prosthesis sizes, during aortic valve replacement (AVR) procedures, between northern and southern European...... assigned to the 'small' aortic size subset. Effective orifice area indices were calculated for all patients to assess the geographic distribution of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses adjusting for possible confounding variables were performed. RESULTS...

  3. Aortic valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... while you are connected to this machine. This machine does the work of your heart while your heart is stopped. If your aortic valve is too damaged, you will need a new valve. This is called replacement surgery. Your surgeon will remove your aortic valve ...

  4. Imaging in aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu-Qing Liu, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a catastrophic aortic disease. Imaging techniques play an invaluable role in the diagnostic evaluation and management of patients with AD. Major signs of AD with different imaging modalities are described in this article with a pertinent discussion on guidelines for the optimized approach of imaging study (13 refs.)

  5. Aortic arch malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellenberger, Christian J.

    2010-01-01

    Although anomalies of the aortic arch and its branches are relatively uncommon malformations, they are often associated with congenital heart disease. Isolated lesions may be clinically significant when the airways are compromised by a vascular ring. In this article, the development and imaging appearance of the aortic arch system and its various malformations are reviewed. (orig.)

  6. [Traumatic aortic valve insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, J; Lemos, C; Marques, A M; Antunes, M J; Gonsalves, A

    1996-02-01

    The traumatic aortic valvular insufficiency (TAVI), through less frequent after a non-penetrating thoracic traumatism, is a serious entity with a very reserved prognosis. So it must be suspected in every patients with signs or symptoms of de novo heart failure post-traumatism. The transthoracic echocardiography and eventually transesophageal echocardiography have a fundamental role in the confirmation of the diagnosis. The clinical picture of traumatic aortic regurgitation is quickly evolutionary and the non efficacy of medical therapy has placed the valvular substitution surgery as the best succeeded treatment. With the advent of the aortic valve repairing surgery some TAVI cases has been submitted to this procedure. Nevertheless, the development of residual aortic regurgitation in these situations, usually requiring later valvular replacement surgery, make the aortic valvuloplasty a controversial surgical technique. The AA describe a recent clinical case of aortic regurgitation after a non-penetrant thoracic traumatism, discussing the aspects connected with physiopathology, diagnosis and therapy. The singularity of this case was based on the fact that the initial clinical diagnosis had been prejudiced by the context of a polytraumatism and there had been a time free of symptoms between the traumatism and the beginning of the symptomatology of left ventricular failure. Even though the identification of the problem allowed an intensive treatment of this serious situation that ended with the replacement of the aortic valve by mechanical aortic prosthesis, with the patient's total recovery.

  7. Circumferential ascending aortic strain and aortic stenosis.

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    Teixeira, Rogério; Moreira, Nádia; Baptista, Rui; Barbosa, António; Martins, Rui; Castro, Graça; Providência, Luís

    2013-07-01

    Two-dimensional speckle tracking (2D-ST) echocardiography for the measurement of circumferential ascending thoracic aortic strain (CAAS) in the context of aortic stenosis (AS) is not elucidated. Purpose This study assesses the thoracic ascending aortic deformation using 2D-ST echocardiography in AS patients. Population and methods Forty-five consecutive patients with an aortic valvular area (AVA) ≤0.85 cm(2)/m(2) were included. Regarding aortic deformation, the global peak CAAS was the parameter used, and an average of six segments of arterial wall deformation was calculated. The corrected CAAS was calculated as the global CAAS/pulse pressure (PP). Aortic stiffness (β2) index was assessed according to ln(Ps/Pd)/CAAS. The sample was stratified according to the stroke volume index (SVI) as: Group A (low flow, SVI ≤35 mL/m(2); n = 19) and Group B (normal flow, SVI >35 mL/m(2); n = 26). The mean age was 76.8 ± 10.3 years, 53.3% were male, the mean indexed AVA was 0.43 ± 0.15 cm(2)/m(2), and the mean CAAS was 6.3 ± 3.0%. The CAAS was predicted by SVI (β = 0.31, P < 0.01) and by valvulo-arterial impedance (Zva). The corrected CAAS was correlated with the M-mode guided aortic stiffness index (β1) (r = -0.39, P < 0.01), and was predicted by SVI, Zva, and systemic arterial compliance (β = 0.15, P < 0.01). The β2 index was significantly higher for the low-flow patients (16.1 ± 4.8 vs. 9.8 ± 5.3, P < 0.01), and was predicted by SVI (β -0.58, P < 0.01) and PP (β = 0.17, P < 0.01). Global CAAS was more accurate to predict low flow than Zva, systolic function and systemic vascular resistance. In patients with moderate-to-severe aortic stenosis, SVI and LV afterload-related variables were the most important determinants of 2S-ST global CAAS.

  8. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people with inherited connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, get thoracic aortic aneurysms. ... Smoking . Some inherited connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, can also increase your ...

  9. Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is then replaced with an artificial valve (prosthesis). There are two valve options for aortic valve ... place, the catheter will be withdrawn from your body through the original access point. Because not all ...

  10. Traumatic Aortic Injury

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    Brianna Miner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 48-year-old male with unknown past medical history presents as a trauma after being hit by a car traveling approximately 25 miles per hour. On initial presentation, the patient is confused, combative, and not answering questions appropriately. The patient is hypotensive with a blood pressure of 68/40 and a heart rate of 50 beats per minute, with oxygen saturation at 96% on room air. FAST scan is positive for fluid in Morrison’s pouch, splenorenal space, and pericardial space. Significant findings: The initial chest x-ray showed an abnormal superior mediastinal contour (blue line, suggestive of a possible aortic injury. The CT angiogram showed extensive circumferential irregularity and outpouching of the distal aortic arch (red arrows compatible with aortic transection. In addition, there was a circumferential intramural hematoma, which extended through the descending aorta to the proximal infrarenal abdominal aorta (green arrow. There was also an extensive surrounding mediastinal hematoma extending around the descending aorta and supraaortic branches (purple arrows. Discussion: Traumatic aortic injury is a life-threatening event. The incidence of blunt thoracic aortic injury is low, between 1 to 2 percent of those patients with blunt thoracic trauma.1 However, approximately 80% of patients with traumatic aortic injury die at the scene.2 Therefore it is imperative to diagnose traumatic aortic injury in a timely fashion. The diagnosis can be difficult due to the non-specific signs and symptoms and other distracting injuries. Clinical suspicion should be based on the mechanism of the injury and the hemodynamic status of the patient. In any patient with blunt or penetrating trauma to the chest that is hemodynamically unstable, traumatic aortic injury should be on the differential. Chest x-ray can be used as a screening tool. A normal chest x-ray has a negative predictive value of approximately 97%. CTA chest is the

  11. Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysms

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    Ali Azizzadeh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 50 years, significant progress has been made in the surgical repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA.  Improvements in perioperative care and surgical techniques have resulted in reductions in complication and mortality rates. Adjunctive use of distal aortic perfusion and cerebrospinal fluid drainage has been especially helpful, reducing the incidence of neurological deficits to 2.4%. Current research is aimed at improving organ preservation. This review focuses on the current diagnosis and management of TAAA.

  12. Pathogenetic Basis of Aortopathy and Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-19

    Aortopathies; Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm; Aortic Valve Disease; Thoracic Aortic Disease; Thoracic Aortic Dissection; Thoracic Aortic Rupture; Ascending Aortic Disease; Descending Aortic Disease; Ascending Aortic Aneurysm; Descending Aortic Aneurysm; Marfan Syndrome; Loeys-Dietz Syndrome; Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; Shprintzen-Goldberg Syndrome; Turner Syndrome; PHACE Syndrome; Autosomal Recessive Cutis Laxa; Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly; Arterial Tortuosity Syndrome

  13. [Aortic arch advancement surgery as treatment for aortic coarctation with hypoplastic aortic arch in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Macedo-Quenot, Alexis; Urencio, Miguel; Ponce-De-León-Rosales, Sergio; López-Terrazas, Javier; Castañuela-Sánchez, Violeta; March-Mifsut, Almudena; López-Magallón, Alejandro; Pérez-Juárez, Fabiola; Cedillo-Rendón, Irma; Tamariz-Cruz, Orlando

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of aortic coarctation with hypoplastic aortic arch is still a surgical challenge. The aortic arch advancement surgery has shown less re-coarctation frequency. To determine the re-coarctation frequency in patients who underwent aortic arch advancement technique for aortic coarctation with hypoplastic aortic arch and analyze the results. Retrospective and observational study of 38 patients who underwent aortic arch advancement in a third level Institution from 2002 to 2010. Twenty four males and 14 females all with aortic arch Z index diameter of coarctation was O%. With the previously mentioned technique the recoarctation frequency on medium and long term basis was 0%. From the anatomical and functional point of view, we believe this technique offers the best possible results.

  14. Quadricuspid Aortic Valve Combined with Moderate Ascending Aortic Dilatation: A Report of Four Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskiy, Vladimir E; Osadchii, Alexei M; Gordeev, Mikhail L

    2015-12-01

    The quadricuspid aortic valve is a very uncommon malformation associated with aortic insufficiency, aortic stenosis, endocarditis, and ascending aortic dilatation. We report four cases of this aortic valve malformation. One patient with severe aortic regurgitation and moderate aortic dilatation required aortic valve replacement. Three patients had mild or moderate aortic insufficiency combined with moderate ascending aortic dilatation. These patients were referred to follow-up. The presented cases demonstrate that this aortic valve malformation may not be as rare as it appears and that attention must be paid to any quadricuspid findings during computed tomographic angiography and echocardiography.

  15. Unoperated aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Nørgaard, M; Herzog, T M

    1995-01-01

    From 1984 to 1993, 1,053 patients were admitted with aortic aneurysm (AA) and 170 (15%) were not operated on. The most frequent reason for nonoperative management was presumed technical inoperability. Survivals for patients with thoracic, thoracoabdominal, and abdominal AA were comparable. No sig...

  16. Double aortic arch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery can be done to fix double aortic arch. The surgeon ties off the smaller branch and separates it from the larger branch. Then the surgeon closes the ends of the aorta with stitches. This relieves pressure on the esophagus and windpipe.

  17. Bicuspid aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... females. A BAV often exists in babies with coarctation of the aorta (narrowing of the aorta). BAV is also seen ... to view the blood vessels of the heart Treatment ... to the heart and into the narrow opening of the aortic valve. A balloon attached to the end of ...

  18. Tissue engineered aortic valve

    OpenAIRE

    Dohmen, P M

    2012-01-01

    Several prostheses are available to replace degenerative diseased aortic valves with unique advantages and disadvantages. Bioprotheses show excellent hemodynamic behavior and low risk of thromboembolic complications, but are limited by tissue deterioration. Mechanical heart valves have extended durability, but permanent anticoagulation is mandatory. Tissue engineering created a new generation heart valve, which overcome limitations of biological and mechanical heart valves due to remodelling,...

  19. Impact of Aortic Insufficiency on Ascending Aortic Dilatation and Adverse Aortic Events After Isolated Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With a Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongshi; Wu, Boting; Li, Jun; Dong, Lili; Wang, Chunsheng; Shu, Xianhong

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant flow pattern and congenital fragility bestows bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) with a propensity toward ascending aorta dilatation, aneurysm, and dissection. Whether isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) can prevent further dilatation in BAV ascending aorta and what indicates concurrent aortic intervention in the case of valve operation remain controversial. From June 2006 to January 2009, patients with a BAV who underwent isolated AVR were consecutively included and categorized into aortic insufficiency (BAV-AI, n = 84) and aortic stenosis (n = 112) groups, and another population of patients with a tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency (n = 149) was also recruited during the same period for comparison of annual aortic dilatation rate and adverse aortic events after isolated AVR. With a median follow-up period of 72 months (interquartile range, 66 to 78 months), ascending aorta dilatation rates were faster in the BAV-AI group than the BAV plus aortic stenosis and tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency groups (both p regression analysis identified aortic insufficiency (hazard ratio, 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 11.1; p = 0.019) as an independent risk factor for adverse aortic events among patients with BAV in general, whereas preoperative ascending aortic diameter larger than 45 mm (hazard ratio, 13.8; 95% confidence interval, 3.0 to 63.3; p = 0.001) served as a prognostic indicator in the BAV-AI group. An aggressive policy of preventive aortic interventions seemed appropriate in patients with BAV-AI during AVR, and BAV phenotype presenting as either insufficiency or stenosis should be taken into consideration when contemplating optimal surgical strategies for BAV aortopathy. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Computed tomography of aortic wall calcifications in aortic dissection patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pim A de Jong

    Full Text Available To investigate the frequency of aortic calcifications at the outer edge of the false lumen and the frequency of fully circular aortic calcifications in a consecutive series of patients with aortic dissection who underwent contrast-enhanced CT.The study population compromised of 69 consecutive subjects aged 60 years and older with a contrast-enhanced CT scan demonstrating an aortic dissection. All CT scans were evaluated for the frequency of aortic calcifications at the outer edge of the false lumen and the frequency of fully circular aortic calcifications by two experienced observers. Between observer reliability was evaluated by using Cohen's Kappa. Differences between groups were tested using unpaired T test and Chi-square test.Presumed media calcifications were observed in 22 (32% patients of 60 years and older and were found more frequently in chronic aortic dissection (N = 12/23, 52% than in acute aortic dissection (N = 10/46, 22%.As the intima has been torn away by the aortic dissection it is highly likely that CT scans can visualize the calcifications in the tunica media of the aorta.

  1. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J; Bieliauskas, Gintautas; Chow, Danny H F; De Backer, Ole; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has evolved from a novel technology to an established therapy for high/intermediate-risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). Although TAVR is used to treat bicuspid severe AS, the large randomized trials typically excluded bicuspid AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a "gothic aortic arch"; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled a sharply angulated aortic arch. This life-threatening complication was successfully treated by thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hypoplasia of the aortic arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ю. С. Синельников

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An aggressive surgical approach to early repair of aortic coarctation and concomitant arch hypoplasia results in considerable improvement of the long-term outcomes of surgical treatment by reducing the number of aortic re-coarctation and arterial hypertension persistence events. At present, there exist some methods of determining the degree of aortic arch hypoplasia, which allow for arch reconstruction planning. Our review focuses on the analysis of modern methods of determination of the aortic arch hypoplasia and the outcomes of surgical treatment of this disease.

  3. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J.; Bieliauskas, Gintautas

    2017-01-01

    AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a “gothic aortic arch”; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled...

  4. Acute Type II Aortic Dissection with Severe Aortic Regurgitation and Chronic Descending Aortic Dissection in Pregnant Patient with Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok-Soo; Jung, Tae-Eun; Lee, Dong Hyup

    2012-12-01

    Aortic dilatation and dissection are severe complications during pregnancy that can be fatal to both the mother and the fetus. The risks of these complications are especially high in pregnant patients with Marfan syndrome; however, incidents of descending aortic dissection are very rare. This case report involves a successful Bentall procedure for and recovery from a rare aortic dissection in a pregnant Marfan patient who developed acute type II aortic dissection with severe aortic regurgitation and chronic descending aortic dissection immediately after Cesarean section. Regular follow-up will be needed to monitor the descending aortic dissection.

  5. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Kjaergard, Henrik K

    2009-01-01

    In this descriptive prospective study, we evaluate the outcomes of surgery in 98 patients who were scheduled to undergo minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. These patients were compared with a group of 50 patients who underwent scheduled aortic valve replacement through a full sternotomy...... operations were completed as mini-sternotomies, 4 died later of noncardiac causes. The aortic cross-clamp and perfusion times were significantly different across all groups (P replacement...... is an excellent operation in selected patients, but its true advantages over conventional aortic valve replacement (other than a smaller scar) await evaluation by means of randomized clinical trial. The "extended mini-aortic valve replacement" operation, on the other hand, is a risky procedure that should...

  6. Posttraumatic abdominal aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahmann, M.; Richter, G.M.; Kauffmann, G.W.; Schuhmacher, H.; Allenberg, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    Dissections due to deceleration trauma are rarely limited to the infradiaphragmal aorta (only 2-3%) and are usually lethal. Here we report the unusual course of an abdominal aortic dissection with aneurysmatic enlargement of the false lumen. Based on diagnostic imaging, a therapeutic stent application was planed in order to close the entry and to prevent rupture. During the intervention sondation of the false lumen revealed that the left renal artery had a reentry. Due to the complexity of the entry - reentry situation of the left renal artery the intervention was not possible, and the patient had to undergo vascular surgery. (orig.) [de

  7. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553......, 78% stated that their quality of life had improved or was unchanged after surgery and had resumed working. These data justify a therapeutically aggressive approach, including ICU therapy following AAA surgery, despite failure of one or more organ systems....

  8. Abdominal Aortic Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Christie; Swaminathan, Anand

    2017-11-01

    This article discusses abdominal aortic emergencies. There is a common thread of risk factors and causes of these diseases, including age, male gender, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and connective tissue disorders. The most common presenting symptom of these disorders is pain, usually in the chest, flank, abdomen, or back. Computed tomography scan is the gold standard for diagnosis of pathologic conditions of the aorta in the hemodynamically stable patient. Treatment consists of a combination of blood pressure and heart rate control and, in many cases, emergent surgical intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute Type II Aortic Dissection with Severe Aortic Regurgitation and Chronic Descending Aortic Dissection in Pregnant Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seok-Soo; Jung, Tae-Eun; Lee, Dong Hyup

    2012-01-01

    Aortic dilatation and dissection are severe complications during pregnancy that can be fatal to both the mother and the fetus. The risks of these complications are especially high in pregnant patients with Marfan syndrome; however, incidents of descending aortic dissection are very rare. This case report involves a successful Bentall procedure for and recovery from a rare aortic dissection in a pregnant Marfan patient who developed acute type II aortic dissection with severe aortic regurgitat...

  10. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement and aortic valve repair in a patient with acromegaly and aortic root dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Van Praet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aortic regurgitation and dilatation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are severe complications of acromegaly. The current trend for management of an aortic root aneurysm is valve-sparing root replacement as well as restoring the diameter of the aortic sinotubular junction (STJ and annulus. Our case report supports the recommendation that in patients with acromegaly, severe aortic root involvement may indicate the need for surgery.

  11. Aortic elasticity and size are associated with aortic regurgitation and left ventricular dysfunction in tetralogy of Fallot after pulmonary valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grotenhuis, H.B.; Ottenkamp, J.; de Bruijn, L.; Westenberg, J.J.M.; Vliegen, H.W.; Kroft, L.J.M.; de Roos, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Aortic wall pathology and concomitant aortic dilatation have been described in tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) patients, which may negatively affect aortic valve and left ventricular systolic function. Objective: To assess aortic dimensions, aortic elasticity, aortic valve competence and

  12. Reinforced aortic root reconstruction for acute type A aortic dissection involving the aortic root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Qing-qi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: There are debates regarding the optimal approach for AAAD involving the aortic root. We described a modified reinforced aortic root reconstruction approach for treating AAAD involving the aortic root. METHODS: A total of 161 patients with AAAD involving the aortic root were treated by our modified reinforced aortic root reconstruction approach from January 1998 to December 2008. Key features of our modified approach were placement of an autologous pericardial patch in the false lumen, lining of the sinotubular junction lumen with a polyester vascular ring, and wrapping of the vessel with Teflon strips. Outcome measures included post-operative mortality, survival, complications, and level of aortic regurgitation. RESULTS: A total of 161 patients were included in the study (mean age: 43.3 1 15.5 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 5.1 1 2.96 years (2-12 years. A total of 10 (6.2% and 11 (6.8% patients died during hospitalization and during follow-up, respectively. Thirty-one (19.3% patients experienced postoperative complications. The 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 99.3%, 98%, 93.8%, and 75.5%, respectively. There were no instances of recurrent aortic dissection, aortic aneurysm, or pseudoaneurysm during the entire study period. The severity of aortic regurgitation dramatically decreased immediately after surgery (from 28.6% to 0% grade 3-4 and thereafter slightly increased (from 0% to 7.2% at 5 years and 9.1% at 10 years. CONCLUSION: This modified reinforced aortic root reconstruction was feasible, safe and durable/effective, as indicated by its low mortality, low postoperative complications and high survival rate.

  13. Aortic root replacement after previous surgical intervention on the aortic valve, aortic root, or ascending aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, E W Matthias; Radu, N Costin; Mekontso-Dessap, Armand; Hillion, Marie-Line; Loisance, Daniel

    2006-03-01

    Aortic root replacement after a previous operation on the aortic valve, aortic root, or ascending aorta remains a major challenge. Records of 56 consecutive patients (44 men; mean age, 56.4 +/- 13.6 years) undergoing reoperative aortic root replacement between June 1994 and June 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Reoperation was performed 9.4 +/- 6.7 years after the last cardiac operation. Indications for reoperation were true aneurysm (n = 14 [25%]), false aneurysm (n = 10 [18%]), dissection or redissection (n = 9 [16%]), structural or nonstructural valve dysfunction (n = 10 [18%]), prosthetic valve-graft infection (n = 12 [21%]), and miscellaneous (n = 1 [2%]). Procedures performed were aortic root replacement (n = 47 [84%]), aortic root replacement plus mitral valve procedure (n = 5 [9%]), and aortic root replacement plus arch replacement (n = 4 [7%]). In 14 (25%) patients coronary artery bypass grafting had to be performed unexpectedly during the same procedure or immediately after the procedure to re-establish coronary perfusion. Hospital mortality reached 17.9% (n = 10). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed the need for unplanned perioperative coronary artery bypass grafting as the sole independent risk factor for hospital death (P = .005). Actuarial survival was 83.8% +/- 4.9% at 1 month, 73.0% +/- 6.3% at 1 year, and 65.7% +/- 9.0% at 5 years after the operation. One patient had recurrence of endocarditis 6.7 months after the operation and required repeated homograft aortic root replacement. Reoperative aortic root replacement remains associated with a high postoperative mortality. The need to perform unplanned coronary artery bypass grafting during reoperative aortic root replacement is a major risk factor for hospital death. The optimal technique for coronary reconstruction in this setting remains to be debated.

  14. Aortic stenosis: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathaniel, Sangeetha; Saligram, Shreyas; Innasimuthu, Antony Leslie

    2010-06-26

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular heart disease in the world. It is a disease of the elderly and as our population is getting older in both the developed and the developing world, there has been an increase in the prevalence of AS. It is impacting the mortality and morbidity of our elderly population. It is also causing a huge burden on the healthcare system. There has been tremendous progress in our understanding of AS in recent years. Lately, studies have shown that AS is not just a disease of the aortic valve but it affects the entire systemic vasculature. There are studies looking at more sophisticated measures of disease severity that might better predict the optimal timing of valve replacement. The improvement in our understanding in etiology and pathophysiology of the disease process has led to a number of trials with possible treatment options for AS. In this review, we talk about our understanding of the disease and latest developments in disease assessment and management. We look forward to a time when there will be medical treatment for AS.

  15. Tobacco smoking and aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Birgitte F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Grønbæk, Morten

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We determined the predictive power of tobacco smoking on aortic aneurysm as opposed to other risk factors in the general population. METHODS: We recorded tobacco smoking and other risk factors at baseline, and assessed hospitalization and death from aortic aneurysm in 15,072 individuals...... aneurysm in males and females consuming above 20g tobacco daily was 3.5% and 1.3%, among those >60years with plasma cholesterol >5mmol/L and a systolic blood pressure >140mmHg. CONCLUSIONS: Tobacco smoking is the most important predictor of future aortic aneurysm outcomes in the general population...

  16. Psychological consequences of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm and conservative treatment of small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Vammen, Sten; Fasting, H

    2000-01-01

    To describe the potential psychological consequences of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs).......To describe the potential psychological consequences of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs)....

  17. Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Andrusaitis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 69-year-old male with poorly controlled hypertension presented with 1 hour of severe low back pain that radiated to his abdomen. The patient was tachycardic and had an initial blood pressure of 70/40. He had a rigid and severely tender abdomen. The patient’s history of hypertension, abnormal vital signs, severity and location of his pain were suspicious for a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Therefore, a computed tomography angiogram (CTA was ordered. Significant findings: CTA demonstrated a ruptured 7.4 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm with a large left retroperitoneal hematoma. Discussion: True abdominal aortic aneurysm is defined as at least a 3cm dilatation of all three layers of the arterial wall of the abdominal aorta.1 An estimated 15,000 people die per year in the US of this condition.2 Risk factors for AAA include males older than 65, tobacco use, and hypertension.1,3,4 There are also congenital, mechanical, traumatic, inflammatory, and infectious causes of AAA.3 Rupture is often the first manifestation of the disease. The classic triad of abdominal pain, pulsatile mass, and hypotension is seen in only 50% of ruptured AAAs.5 Pain (abdominal, groin, or back is the most common symptom. The most common misdiagnoses of ruptured AAAs are renal colic, diverticulitis, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage.6 Bedside ultrasonography is the fastest way to detect this condition and is nearly 100% sensitive.1 One study showed that bedside ultrasounds performed by emergency physicians had a sensitivity of .94 [95% CI = .86-1.0] and specificity of 1 [95% CI = .98-1.0] for detecting AAAs.7 CTA has excellent sensitivity (approximately 100% and yields the added benefit of facilitating surgical planning and management.1 Without surgical treatment, a ruptured AAA is almost uniformly fatal, and 50% of those who undergo surgery do not survive.1 Early resuscitation and coordination with vascular surgery should be

  18. Reoperative Aortic Root Replacement in Patients with Previous Aortic Root or Aortic Valve Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Kwon Chong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Generalization of standardized surgical techniques to treat aortic valve (AV and aortic root diseases has benefited large numbers of patients. As a consequence of the proliferation of patients receiving aortic root surgeries, surgeons are more frequently challenged by reoperative aortic root procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of redo-aortic root replacement (ARR. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 66 patients (36 male; mean age, 44.5±9.5 years who underwent redo-ARR following AV or aortic root procedures between April 1995 and June 2015. Results: Emergency surgeries comprised 43.9% (n=29. Indications for the redo-ARR were aneurysm (n=12, pseudoaneurysm (n=1, or dissection (n=6 of the residual native aortic sinus in 19 patients (28.8%, native AV dysfunction in 8 patients (12.1%, structural dysfunction of an implanted bioprosthetic AV in 19 patients (28.8%, and infection of previously replaced AV or proximal aortic grafts in 30 patients (45.5%. There were 3 early deaths (4.5%. During follow- up (median, 54.65 months; quartile 1–3, 17.93 to 95.71 months, there were 14 late deaths (21.2%, and 9 valve-related complications including reoperation of the aortic root in 1 patient, infective endocarditis in 3 patients, and hemorrhagic events in 5 patients. Overall survival and event-free survival rates at 5 years were 81.5%±5.1% and 76.4%±5.4%, respectively. Conclusion: Despite technical challenges and a high rate of emergency conditions in patients requiring redo-ARR, early and late outcomes were acceptable in these patients.

  19. The bicuspid aortic valve and its relation to aortic dilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is a common congenital heart disease, which affects 1-2% of the population. However, the relationship between BAVs and aortic dilation has not been sufficiently elucidated. METHODS: A total of 241 BAV patients who were referred to this hospital for cardiac surgey over a 4.75-year period were included in this study. In addition to the clinical characteristics of the included patients, the morphological features of the aortic valve and aorta, the length of the left main coronary artery, and the laboratory findings (the coagulation and hematological parameters as well as the total cholesterol concentration were determined and compared with those of the tricuspid aortic valve (TAV patients. RESULTS: The BAV patients were younger than the TAV patients for a valve surgery in the last 3 months of the study period. The BAV patients were predominantly male. Most of the BAVs that were surgically treated were stenotic, regurgitant, or combined, and only 19 (7.88% were normally functioning valves. According to echocardiography or operative records, 148 (78.31% were type A, 31 (16.40% were type B, and 10 (5.29% were type C. The left main coronary artery was much shorter in the BAV patients than it was in the TAV patients. There was no significant difference between BAV and TAV patients in the total cholesterol concentrations; whereas differences were noted between patients receiving lipid-lowering therapy and those not receiving lipid-lowering therapy. The dimensions of the aortic root, sinotubular junction, and ascending aorta were beyond normal limits, while they were significantly smaller in the BAV patients than in the TAV patients. They were also much smaller in patients receiving statin therapy than those not receiving statin therapy in both groups. Moreover, the aortic dilation in the BAV group was found to be significantly associated with patient age. CONCLUSIONS: The BAV patients developed aortic wall and

  20. Cellular Mechanisms of Aortic Valve Calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiduleva, E V; Irtyuga, O B; Shishkova, A A; Ignat'eva, E V; Kostina, A S; Levchuk, K A; Golovkin, A S; Rylov, A Yu; Kostareva, A A; Moiseeva, O M; Malashicheva, A B; Gordeev, M L

    2018-01-01

    Comparative in vitro study examined the osteogenic potential of interstitial cells of aortic valve obtained from the patients with aortic stenosis and from control recipients of orthotopic heart transplantation with intact aortic valve. The osteogenic inductors augmented mineralization of aortic valve interstitial cells (AVIC) in patients with aortic stenosis in comparison with the control level. Native AVIC culture of aortic stenosis patients demonstrated overexpression of osteopontin gene (OPN) and underexpression of osteoprotegerin gene (OPG) in comparison with control levels. In both groups, AVIC differentiation was associated with overexpression of RUNX2 and SPRY1 genes. In AVIC of aortic stenosis patients, expression of BMP2 gene was significantly greater than the control level. The study revealed an enhanced sensitivity of AVIC to osteogenic inductors in aortic stenosis patients, which indicates probable implication of OPN, OPG, and BMP2 genes in pathogenesis of aortic valve calcification.

  1. Imaging techniques in transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaife RA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Robert A Quaife, Jennifer Dorosz, John C Messenger, Ernesto E Salcedo Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Calcific aortic stenosis is now understood as a complex valvular degenerative process sharing many risk factors with atherosclerosis. Once patients develop symptomatic calcific aortic stenosis, the only effective treatment is aortic valve replacement. In the past decade, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR has been developed as an alternative to surgery to treat severe calcific aortic stenosis. Cardiac imaging plays a pivotal role in the contemporary management of patients with calcific aortic stenosis, and particularly in patients being considered for TAVR, who demand detailed imaging of the aortic valve apparatus. In this review, we highlight the role of cardiac imaging for patient selection, procedural guidance, and evaluation of results of TAVR. Keywords: aortic stenosis, cardiovascular imaging, transcutaneous aortic valve replacement

  2. Adult thoracic and abdominal aortic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randa O. Kaddah

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Aortic COA could be found in any segment of the aorta. Proper identification of the anatomical details and pressure gradient studies are important factors affecting the plan of management.

  3. Unoperated aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Nørgaard, M; Herzog, T M

    1995-01-01

    From 1984 to 1993, 1,053 patients were admitted with aortic aneurysm (AA) and 170 (15%) were not operated on. The most frequent reason for nonoperative management was presumed technical inoperability. Survivals for patients with thoracic, thoracoabdominal, and abdominal AA were comparable....... No significant differences in survival for patients with dissecting and nondissecting AA were detected. In all, 132 patients (78%) died and 78 (59%) of them died of rupture. Mean time to rupture was 1,300 +/- 8 days. Cumulative 5-year hazard of rupture for the dissecting AA was twice that of the nondissecting (p...... A dissections. The results suggest that type B dissections may have a more favorable course if operated on, but a prospective, randomized study is necessary to confirm this observation. We believe that older patients and those with a small aneurysm may benefit from early, elective operation....

  4. Results of aortic root reimplantation in patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and concomitant aortic insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Чернявский

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The research was designed to evaluate the results of valve-sparing operations: aortic root reimplantation versus aortic valve reimplantation when repairing an ascending aortic aneurysm with concomitant aortic insufficiency.Methods. Within a blind prospective randomized study conducted over a period from 2011 to 2015, 64 patients underwent aortic valve-sparing surgery. The inclusion criteria were the presence of an aortic aneurysm of the ascending aorta exceeding 4.5 cm and concomitant aortic insufficiency. All patients were divided into two groups: FS-group, aortic root reimplantation (modified Florida Sleeve technique (n = 32 and D-group, aortic valve reimplantation (David procedure (n = 32. The average age of patients was 57±13 (23–73 years in the FS-group and 55±11 (15–72 years in the D-group (p = 0.54. Both groups had 78% of males (p>0.99. A Marfan syndrome was identified in 6% and 9% in the FS-group and D-group respectively (p>0.99. Mean diameter of the sinuses of Valsalva was 51±7 mm and 56±10 mm (p = 0.09, aortic insufficiency 2.6±0.7 and 2.8±0.8 (p = 0.15 in the FS-group and D-group respectively. In the FS-group and D-group LVEDD amounted to 5.5±0.7 mm and 5.9±1.0 mm (p = 0.09 respectively. All patients took echocardiography in the preoperative, postoperative and follow-up periods.Results. In the long-term period, the degree of aortic regurgitation was 1.2±0.1 in the FS-group and 1.3±0.6 in the D-group (p = 0.72. LVEDD was 123±23 mm in the FS-group and 139.6±80 mm in the D-group at follow-up (p = 0.77. There were no statistically significant differences in the analysis of complications. Overall 30-day in-hospital mortality was 7.8%. There were 2 (6.3% deaths in the FS-group and 3 (9.4% in the D-group (p = 0.5.Late mortality was 6.3% in the FS-group and 3.1% in the D-group (p>0.99. Cumulative survival at 4 years was 84.3% and 84.8% in the FS-group and the D-group respectively (p = 0.94. Cumulative freedom from

  5. Aortic Wall Injury Related to Endovascular Therapy for Aortic Coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretter, Justin T; Jones, Thomas K; McElhinney, Doff B

    2015-09-01

    Aortic wall complications can occur in unrepaired aortic coarctation (CoA) and after surgical repair or endovascular treatment. This review summarizes the available literature and current understanding of aortic wall injury (AWI) surrounding the management of CoA, focusing specifically on acute and follow-up AWI after endovascular treatment. There have been 23 reported cases of aortic rupture after endovascular treatment for CoA, including angioplasty alone, bare metal stenting, and primary covered stent therapy. Even if these published cases represent only a minority of ruptures that have actually occurred, the incidence is substantially treatment of CoA seems to be declining in frequency with increasing experience and improving technology, it remains one of the most important potential adverse outcomes. Long-term surveillance for new AWI and monitoring of existing AWI is mandatory, with institution of appropriate treatment when necessary. A central research focus in this population should be determination of the appropriate treatment for both native and recurrent CoA across various ages with regard to limiting recurrent CoA and preventing associated aortic wall complications, in addition to determining the appropriate treatment of various AWI. Consistent definitions and reporting are necessary to truly understand the incidence of, risk factors for, and measures protective against AWI after angioplasty or stent implantation for CoA. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Endoluminal treatment of aortic dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavan, Ajay; Lotz, Joachim; Galanski, Michael [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl Neuberg Strasse 1, 30625, Hannover (Germany); Oelert, Frank; Haverich, Axel; Karck, Matthias [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Carl Neuberg Strasse 1, 30625, Hannover (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    Aortic dissection is most often a catastrophic medical emergency which, if untreated, can be potentially fatal. The intention of therapy in patients with aortic dissection is to prevent aortic rupture or aneurysm formation as well as to relieve branch vessel ischaemia. Patients with aortic dissection are often poor candidates for anaesthesia and surgery and the surgical procedure itself is challenging requiring thoracotomy, aortic cross clamping, blood transfusion as well as prolonged hospital stay in some cases. Operative mortality is especially high in patients with critical mesenteric or renal ischaemia. The past decade has experienced the emergence of a number of interventional radiological or minimally invasive techniques which have significantly improved the management of patients with aortic dissection. These include stent grafting for entry site closure to prevent aneurysmatic widening of the false lumen as well as percutaneous techniques such as balloon fenestration of the intimal flap and aortic true lumen stenting to alleviate branch vessel ischaemia. False lumen thrombosis following entry closure with stent grafts has been observed in 86-100% of patients, whereas percutaneous interventions are able to effectively relieve organ ischaemia in approximately 90% of the cases. In the years to come, it is to be expected that these endoluminal techniques will become the method of choice for treating most type-B dissections and will assist in significantly reducing the number of open surgical procedures required for type-A dissections. The intention of this article is to provide an overview of the current status of these endoluminal techniques based on our own experience as well as on a review of the relevant literature. (orig.)

  7. Endoluminal treatment of aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavan, Ajay; Lotz, Joachim; Galanski, Michael; Oelert, Frank; Haverich, Axel; Karck, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    Aortic dissection is most often a catastrophic medical emergency which, if untreated, can be potentially fatal. The intention of therapy in patients with aortic dissection is to prevent aortic rupture or aneurysm formation as well as to relieve branch vessel ischaemia. Patients with aortic dissection are often poor candidates for anaesthesia and surgery and the surgical procedure itself is challenging requiring thoracotomy, aortic cross clamping, blood transfusion as well as prolonged hospital stay in some cases. Operative mortality is especially high in patients with critical mesenteric or renal ischaemia. The past decade has experienced the emergence of a number of interventional radiological or minimally invasive techniques which have significantly improved the management of patients with aortic dissection. These include stent grafting for entry site closure to prevent aneurysmatic widening of the false lumen as well as percutaneous techniques such as balloon fenestration of the intimal flap and aortic true lumen stenting to alleviate branch vessel ischaemia. False lumen thrombosis following entry closure with stent grafts has been observed in 86-100% of patients, whereas percutaneous interventions are able to effectively relieve organ ischaemia in approximately 90% of the cases. In the years to come, it is to be expected that these endoluminal techniques will become the method of choice for treating most type-B dissections and will assist in significantly reducing the number of open surgical procedures required for type-A dissections. The intention of this article is to provide an overview of the current status of these endoluminal techniques based on our own experience as well as on a review of the relevant literature. (orig.)

  8. Aortic compliance in patients with aortic regurgitation. Evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murai, Sachiko; Hamada, Seiki; Ueguchi, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess by means of cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) aortic compliance before and after aortic valve replacement (AVR with SJM (St. Jude Medical, St paul, MN) valve) in patients with aortic regurgitation (AR). Two groups (healthy controls and patients with severe isolated AR) of 10 subjects each were included in this study. Cine MRI was performed at three locations of the aorta, and aortic compliance was calculated by dividing the maximum change in the aortic area by pulse pressure. Cine MRI is useful to assess abnormalities of aortic compliance in patients with AR. Compared with the control group, aortic compliance in the AR group was significantly less in the ascending aorta (p<0.05), decreasing in order of aortic location. After AVR, aortic compliance improved for all locations. Cine MRI enables assessment of aortic biophysical properties such as a compliance for evaluating the progression of AR and the efficacy of treatment. (author)

  9. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  10. A History of Thoracic Aortic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Paul Michael; Wiggins, Luke M; Boys, Joshua A

    2017-08-01

    Ancient historical texts describe the presence of aortic pathology conditions, although the surgical treatment of thoracic aortic disease remained insurmountable until the 19th century. Surgical treatment of thoracic aortic disease then progressed along with advances in surgical technique, conduit production, cardiopulmonary bypass, and endovascular technology. Despite radical advances in aortic surgery, principles established by surgical pioneers of the 19th century hold firm to this day. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. Aortic root replacement with a pulmonary autograft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B. Hokken (Raymond)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAortic valve disease in the pediatric age group is usually a consequence of congenital aortic stenosis, which may be isolated or may be a part of an anomaly of the left ventricular outflow tract or the aortic root. Management of these patients is difficult. Neonates and infants

  13. Chylothorax complicating thoracic aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakis, Meletios A; Misthos, Panagiotis; Kokotsakis, John N; Lioulias, Achilleas G

    2011-07-01

    Chylothorax is a very rare complication of patients undergoing thoracic aortic aneurysm repair. Possible mechanisms of this condition during thoracic aorta operations and current therapeutic strategies are analyzed according to our experience and thorough search of the English literature. Current experience with chylothorax occurring during thoracic aortic surgery is analyzed in this review by collecting data retrieved from English literature research. Significant risk factors for postoperative chylothorax development after thoracic aorta surgical procedures are thoracic aortic reoperations and descending thoracic repairs. Various treatment modalities from conservative to operative intervention have been proposed. Currently, the morbidity and mortality have improved due to prompt management. Surgical intervention is needed when response to conservative treatment has failed.  © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. MMP-2 Isoforms in Aortic Tissue and Serum of Patients with Ascending Aortic Aneurysms and Aortic Root Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscheuschler, Anke; Meffert, Philipp; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Heilmann, Claudia; Kocher, Nadja; Uffelmann, Xenia; Discher, Philipp; Siepe, Matthias; Kari, Fabian A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The need for biological markers of aortic wall stress and risk of rupture or dissection of ascending aortic aneurysms is obvious. To date, wall stress cannot be related to a certain biological marker. We analyzed aortic tissue and serum for the presence of different MMP-2 isoforms to find a connection between serum and tissue MMP-2 and to evaluate the potential of different MMP-2 isoforms as markers of high wall stress. Methods Serum and aortic tissue from n = 24 patients and serum from n = 19 healthy controls was analyzed by ELISA and gelatin zymography. 24 patients had ascending aortic aneurysms, 10 of them also had aortic root aneurysms. Three patients had normally functioning valves, 12 had regurgitation alone, eight had regurgitation and stenosis and one had only stenosis. Patients had bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valves (9/15). Serum samples were taken preoperatively, and the aortic wall specimen collected during surgical aortic repair. Results Pro-MMP-2 was identified in all serum and tissue samples. Pro-MMP-2 was detected in all tissue and serum samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms, irrespective of valve morphology or other clinical parameters and in serum from healthy controls. We also identified active MMP-2 in all tissue samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms. None of the analyzed serum samples revealed signals relatable to active MMP-2. No correlation between aortic tissue total MMP-2 or tissue pro-MMP-2 or tissue active MMP-2 and serum MMP-2 was found and tissue MMP-2/pro-MMP-2/active MMP-2 did not correlate with aortic diameter. This evidence shows that pro-MMP-2 is the predominant MMP-2 species in serum of patients and healthy individuals and in aneurysmatic aortic tissue, irrespective of aortic valve configuration. Active MMP-2 species are either not released into systemic circulation or not detectable in serum. There is no reliable connection between aortic tissue—and serum MMP-2

  15. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Perceval Sutureless Aortic Valve Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Ankur; Reyes, Manuel; Yang, Eric Y; Little, Stephen H; Nabi, Faisal; Barker, Colin M; Ramchandani, Mahesh; Reul, Ross M; Reardon, Michael J; Kleiman, Neal S

    2017-06-01

    As experience with Perceval aortic prosthesis and valve-in-valve TAVR grows, it will be crucial to meticulously document short- and long-term follow-up for establishment of real-world safety and durability of these new technologies.

  16. Aortic Root Enlargement or Sutureless Valve Implantation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos G. Baikoussis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aortic valve replacement (AVR in patients with a small aortic annulus is a challenging issue. The importance of prosthesis–patient mismatch (PPM post aortic valve replacement (AVR is controversial but has to be avoided. Many studies support the fact that PPM has a negative impact on short and long term survival. In order to avoid PPM, aortic root enlargement may be performed. Alternatively and keeping in mind that often some comorbidities are present in old patients with small aortic root, the Perceval S suturelles valve implantation could be a perfect solution. The Perceval sutureless bioprosthesis provides reasonable hemodynamic performance avoiding the PPM and providing the maximum of aortic orifice area. We would like to see in the near future the role of the aortic root enlargement techniques in the era of surgical implantation of the sutureless valve (SAVR and the transcatheter valve implantation (TAVI.

  17. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation due to severe aortic regurgitation in a degenerated aortic homograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Engstrøm, Thomas; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in severe aortic stenosis has proven to be a feasible and effective treatment modality for inoperable patients. Until now, neither aortic regurgitation nor degenerated bioprostheses has been an indication for TAVI. However, this article reports...... a successful valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis through the right subclavian artery in a case of severe aortic regurgitation within a degenerated aortic homograft. The case exemplifies the possibilities of expanding the indications for TAVI, as well as other vascular access...

  18. HYBASE : HYperspectral BAnd SElection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwering, P.B.W.; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Seijen, H.H. van

    2009-01-01

    Band selection is essential in the design of multispectral sensor systems. This paper describes the TNO hyperspectral band selection tool HYBASE. It calculates the optimum band positions given the number of bands and the width of the spectral bands. HYBASE is used to assess the minimum number of

  19. Statins for aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiago, Luciana; Tsuji, Selma Rumiko; Nyong, Jonathan; Puga, Maria Eduarda Dos Santos; Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira de; Macedo, Cristiane Rufino; Valente, Orsine; Atallah, Álvaro Nagib

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of valvular heart disease in the USA and Europe. Aortic valve stenosis is considered similar to atherosclerotic disease. Some studies have evaluated statins for aortic valve stenosis. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of statins in aortic valve stenosis. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS - IBECS, Web of Science and CINAHL Plus. These databases were searched from their inception to 24 November 2015. We also searched trials in registers for ongoing trials. We used no language restrictions.Selection criteria: Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) comparing statins alone or in association with other systemic drugs to reduce cholesterol levels versus placebo or usual care. Data collection and analysis: Primary outcomes were severity of aortic valve stenosis (evaluated by echocardiographic criteria: mean pressure gradient, valve area and aortic jet velocity), freedom from valve replacement and death from cardiovascular cause. Secondary outcomes were hospitalization for any reason, overall mortality, adverse events and patient quality of life.Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The GRADE methodology was employed to assess the quality of result findings and the GRADE profiler (GRADEPRO) was used to import data from Review Manager 5.3 to create a 'Summary of findings' table. We included four RCTs with 2360 participants comparing statins (1185 participants) with placebo (1175 participants). We found low-quality evidence for our primary outcome of severity of aortic valve stenosis, evaluated by mean pressure gradient (mean difference (MD) -0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.88 to 0.80; participants = 1935; studies = 2), valve area (MD -0.07, 95% CI -0.28 to 0.14; participants = 127; studies = 2), and aortic jet velocity (MD -0.06, 95% CI -0.26 to 0

  20. HIV infection and aortic stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Luisa Helena Maia; Cohen, Ariel; Boccara, Franck

    People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and receiving antiretroviral therapy now have the same life expectancy as the general population. However, they have a higher risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular events because of a complex and polyfactorial vasculopathy, combining the effects of antiretroviral therapy, the HIV virus itself, immune activation, chronic inflammation and metabolic disturbances. Whether people living with HIV infection experience increased vascular aging compared with the general population remains controversial. To summarize current knowledge of the association between HIV infection and aortic stiffness as a marker of vascular aging. This review included 18 clinical studies in adult populations, published between 2009 and 2016, and identified on PubMed/MEDLINE or other databases. Search terms were aortic stiffness, arterial stiffness, vascular aging, pulse wave velocity and HIV. All 18 studies were observational, and compared groups infected (HIV+) and not infected (HIV-) with HIV. Ten studies (55%) reported no significant differences in aortic stiffness between HIV+ groups and age-matched HIV- control groups. The main reported determinants of aortic stiffness were age, blood pressure, smoking, metabolic syndrome and HIV-related variables, including CD4/CD8 ratio, current T-CD4 count CD4+ count < 200/mm 3 . We found discordant results regarding whether HIV+ patients had increased aortic stiffness compared with HIV- controls. However, HIV-related conditions were associated with vascular health. This association has been confirmed in recent prospective studies. There is emerging evidence that HIV itself and immune activity affect vascular health and the large arteries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Aortic intramural hematoma : assessment of clinical and radiological features in comparison to acute aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Kwon Ha; Hwang, Jae Cheol; Lee, Jin Seong; Kang, Duk Hyun; Song, Jae Kwan; Song, Koun Sik; Lim, Tae Hwan

    1996-01-01

    To compare the clinical and radiological features of aortic intramural hematoma(IMH) to those of acute aortic dissection(AD). We analyzed the clinical and radiological features of 12 patients with aortic IMH and 43 patients with acute AD. In aortic IMH, the diagnoses were made by means of both CT and transesophageal echocardiography(TEE) and included two surgically proven cases. In acute AD, the diagnoses were made by means of CT and TEE and included 21 surgically proven cases. We compared patients ages, etiologies, the extent of the disease, the presence or absence of aortic branch involvement, complications, and outcomes. Aortic IMH tended to develop in older patients (67.8±7.9 vs. 50.4±13.4, P .05). In aortic IMH, there was no involvement of aortic branches, whereas in acute AD, 14(33%) patients showed involvement of one or more aortic branches. Complications of aortic IMH included pericardial effusion (n=2) and pleural effusion (n=4);in acute AD, pericardial effusion (n=7), pleural effusion (n=4), aortic insufficiency (n=8), cerebral infarction (n=3), renal infarction (n=4) and spinal infarction (n=1) were seen. There was one (8%) death due to aortic IMH and ten (23%) deaths due to acute AD (p<.01). Aortic IMH is characterized by its occurrence in older patients with hypertension, a less frequent incidence of complications, and a more favorable outcome than acute AD

  2. One stage surgical treatment of aortic valve disease and aortic coarctation with aortic bypass grafting through the diaphragm and aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zipu; Wu, Shengjun; Li, Chengchen; Zou, Yu; Ma, Liang

    2015-11-10

    To validate ascending aorta-lower abdominal aorta bypass grafting treatment for patients with descending aortic coarctation and an aortic valve disease. The three patients in whom a descending atypical aortic coarctation was associated with an aortic valve disease were treated with one stage surgical treatment with aortic bypass grafting through the diaphragm and aortic valve replacement in our heart center. Operative technique consisted of performing ascending aorta-lower abdominal aorta bypass grafting through diaphragm muscle and implementing aortic valve replacement. The mean time for extracorporeal circulation and occluding clamp of aorta was recorded. Blood pressure data for pre- and post-operation was measured in the limbs. Computer-enhanced transvenous angiograms of pre- and post-operation were applied for detection of aortic stenosis. The other adverse events were noticed in outpatient service during a follow-up period. The mean extracorporeal circulation time was 54 ± 11 min. The mean time for occluding clamp of aorta was 34 ± 6 min. An arterial pressure gradient was totally corrected after surgical treatment. Post-operation computer-enhanced transvenous angiograms showed the grafts to be open with a fluent flow. The patients had no gastrointestinal tract complications. No adverse event was noticed during a follow-up period in outpatient service. Treatment of ascending aorta-lower abdominal aorta bypass is advisable for patients with descending aortic coarctation and an aortic valve disease.

  3. Abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2010-12-01

    Although the number of elective operations for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is increasing, the sex- and age-standardised mortality rate of AAAs continues to rise, especially among men aged 65 years or more. The lethality of ruptured AAA continues to be 80-95%, compared with 5-7% by elective surgery of symptomfree AAA. In order to fulfil all WHO, European, and Danish criteria for screening, a randomised hospitalbased screening trial of 12,639 65-73 year old men in Viborg County (Denmark) was initiated in 1994. It seemed that US screening is a valid, suitable and acceptable method of screening. The acceptance rate was 77%, and 95% accept control scans. Furthermore, persons at the highest risk of having an AAA attend screening more frequently. We found that 97% of the interval cases developed from aortas that initially measured 2.5-2.9 cm - i.e. approx. only 5% attenders need re-screening at 5-year intervals. Two large RCTs have given clear indications of operation. Survivors of surgery enjoy the same quality of life as the background population, and only 2-5% of patients refuse an offer of surgery. Early detection seems relevant since the cardiovascular mortality is more than 4 times higher in AAA patients without previous hospital discharge diagnoses due to cardiovascular disease than among similar men without AAA. The absolute risk difference after 5 years was 16%. So, they will benefit from general cardiovascular preventive action as smoking cessation, statins and low-dose aspirin, which could inhibit further AAA progression. All 4 existing RCTs point in the same direction, viz. in favour of screening of men aged 65 and above. We found that screening significantly reduced AAA-related mortality by 67% within the first five years (NNT = 352). Restriction of screening to men with previous cardiovascular or pulmonary hospital discharge diagnoses would request only 27% of the relevant male population study to be invited, but would only have prevented 46.7% of the

  4. Aorto-aortic intrathoracic bypass in surgical treatment of aortic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Perez, F.; Duran Reyes, A.; Bigalli, D.; Filgueira Berobide, J.

    1998-01-01

    The prevalence of coarctation of the aorta is 6.5 percent of all congenital heart defects, according to national and international data. There is a restenosis rate of patients after surgery. Factors that influence this evolution depends on the age at which patients underwent surgery for the first time the anatomy of the aortic arch and type of surgical technique. Several procedures can be used to correct the coarctation, which include surgery and balloon catheter dilation. We present here a case of a patient of 22 years old, with a recurrent coarctation of the aorta studied by echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging. The patient underwent surgery a third time. We used an anterior approach (median sternotomy) and performed an aortic bypass graft, intrathoracic, under cardiopulmonary bypass. Evolved favorably and was discharged on the sixth day of post operative day (Author) [es

  5. Indexing aortic valve area by body surface area increases the prevalence of severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Bahlmann, Edda

    2014-01-01

    To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are......To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are...

  6. Large aortic root pseudoaneurysm occurring late after aortic root repair and valve replacement for endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Panduranga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 68-year-old male presented with Group B Streptococcus aortic valve (AV endocarditis with aortic root abscess and refractory sepsis. An emergency cardiac surgery was performed with root abscess drainage, excision and debridement of necrotic tissue, reconstruction of annulus, and AV replacement. Fifteen months later he presented with a huge aortic root pseudoaneurysm (PA. This case illustrates late occurrence of aortic root PA following AV surgery for endocarditis.

  7. Aortic valvuloplasty of calcific aortic stenosis with monofoil and trefoil balloon catheters: practical considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Plante (Sylvain); M.J.B.M. van den Brand (Marcel); L.C.P. van Veen; C. di Mario (Carlo); C.E. Essed; K.J. Beatt (Kevin); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractIn order to evaluate the relation between balloon design (monofoil, trefoil) and valvular configuration, experimental aortic valvuloplasty was performed in four post-mortem hearts with calcific aortic stenosis of various morphology. The degree of obstruction of the aortic orifice was

  8. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation due to severe aortic regurgitation in a degenerated aortic homograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Engstrøm, Thomas; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-01-01

    a successful valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis through the right subclavian artery in a case of severe aortic regurgitation within a degenerated aortic homograft. The case exemplifies the possibilities of expanding the indications for TAVI, as well as other vascular access...

  9. Cervical aortic arch and a new type of double aortic arch. Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornali, M; Reginato, E; Azzolina, G

    1976-09-01

    A case of cervical aortic arch is reported. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first to be associated with a serious intracardiac anomaly. In addition, it is part of a new type of double aortic arch, caused by failure of reabsorption of both dorsal aortic roots and persistence of the fourth right and second (or third) left branchial arches.

  10. Ascending aortic diameters in congenital aortic stenosis: cardiac magnetic resonance versus transthoracic echocardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linde, D. van der; Rossi, A. de; Yap, S.C.; McGhie, J.S.; Bosch, A.E. van den; Kirschbaum, S.W.; Russo, B.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Moelker, A.; Krestin, G.P.; Geuns, R.J. van; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/BACKGROUND: Congenital aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common obstructive left heart lesion in the young adult population and often complicated by aortic dilatation. Our objective was to evaluate accuracy of aortic imaging with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) compared with cardiac

  11. Hybrid treatment of penetrating aortic ulcer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, Juan Antonio Herrero; Martins-Romeo, Daniela de Araujo; Escudero, Carlos Caparros; Falcon, Maria del Carmen Prieto; Batista, Vinicius Bianchi, E-mail: jaherrero5@hotmail.com [Unidade de Gestao Clinica (UGC) de Diagnostico por Imagem - Hosppital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilha (Spain); Vazquez, Rosa Maria Lepe [Unit of Radiodiagnosis - Hospital Nuestra Senora de la Merced, Osuna, Sevilha (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer is a rare entity with poor prognosis in the setting of acute aortic syndrome. In the literature, cases like the present one, located in the aortic arch, starting with chest pain and evolving with dysphonia, are even rarer. The present report emphasizes the role played by computed tomography in the diagnosis of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer as well as in the differentiation of this condition from other acute aortic syndromes. Additionally, the authors describe a new therapeutic approach represented by a hybrid endovascular surgical procedure for treatment of the disease. (author)

  12. Hybrid treatment of penetrating aortic ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, Juan Antonio Herrero; Martins-Romeo, Daniela de Araujo; Escudero, Carlos Caparros; Falcon, Maria del Carmen Prieto; Batista, Vinicius Bianchi; Vazquez, Rosa Maria Lepe

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer is a rare entity with poor prognosis in the setting of acute aortic syndrome. In the literature, cases like the present one, located in the aortic arch, starting with chest pain and evolving with dysphonia, are even rarer. The present report emphasizes the role played by computed tomography in the diagnosis of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer as well as in the differentiation of this condition from other acute aortic syndromes. Additionally, the authors describe a new therapeutic approach represented by a hybrid endovascular surgical procedure for treatment of the disease. (author)

  13. A prospective, randomised trial of transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation vs. surgical aortic valve replacement in operable elderly patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller; Klaaborg, Kaj E; Nissen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    In a prospective randomised trial we aimed to compare transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (a-TAVI) with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in operable elderly patients.......In a prospective randomised trial we aimed to compare transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (a-TAVI) with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in operable elderly patients....

  14. Stent implantation to ductus arteriosus in a patient with interrupted aortic arch guided by CT image overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goreczny, Sebastian; Dryzek, Pawel; Moszura, Tomasz

    2017-08-01

    A 15-day-old premature patient with ventricular septal defect and interrupted aortic arch type B underwent "hybrid" initial treatment consisting of bilateral pulmonary artery banding followed by stenting of the ductus arteriosus. A pre-registered CT scan was re-purposed with a new three-dimensional image fusion software (VesselNavigator) to create a roadmap for stent delivery.

  15. Surgery for acute Type I aortic dissection without resection of supra-aortic entry sites leads to unfavourable aortic remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Woon; Song, Suk-Won; Lee, Kwang-Hun; Lee, Shin-Young; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Baek, Min-Young; Yoo, Kyung-Jong

    2018-01-29

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of remnant re-entries in arch branches on postoperative change in the aortic arch and descending aortic diameters and the rate of major adverse aortic events. Between January 2010 and December 2016, 249 patients underwent surgery for acute Type I aortic dissection. Patients who underwent total arch replacement, had Marfan syndrome or had intramural haematoma were excluded. Seventy-two patients with predischarge and follow-up computed tomography scans were enrolled. Patients with and without re-entries in the arch branches after surgery were assigned to the supra-aortic entry (SAE, n = 21) and no supra-aortic entry (n = 51) groups, respectively. Diameters were measured at 7 levels: the innominate artery, left common carotid artery, left subclavian artery, 20 mm distal to the left subclavian artery, pulmonary artery bifurcation, coeliac axis and maximal diameter of the descending thoracic aorta. Growth rates at the levels of the pulmonary artery bifurcation and 20 mm distal to the left subclavian artery were significantly higher in the SAE group than in the no supra-aortic entry group. The rate of freedom from major adverse aortic events (annual growth >5 mm or maximal diameter of the descending thoracic aorta >50 mm) at 5 years was significantly higher in the no supra-aortic entry group than in the SAE group. Remnant SAE leads to unfavourable aortic remodelling after acute Type I aortic dissection repair. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  16. Aortic dilatation in patients with prosthetic aortic valve: comparison of MRI and echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Rudolph, André; Wassmuth, Ralf; Abdel-Aty, Hassan; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette

    2010-05-01

    Patients with prosthetic aortic valve have an increased risk for aortic dissection, which rises further with growing aortic diameters. Thus, accurate aortic monitoring is required. As transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), the current clinical standard, is frequently restricted to the proximal ascending aorta, the use of two-dimensional cardiovascular magnetic resonance (2D-CMR) in transverse orientation was investigated as a screening tool to assess ascending aortic dimensions. Fast, non-contrast-enhanced, non-breath-hold, steady-state free-precession (SSFP) sequences (1.5 Tesla, slice thickness 7 mm, gap 1.8 mm, scan time 10-15 s) were applied to image the thorax in transverse planes. To test the accuracy of aortic dimensions obtained in this way, comparison was made to contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography (3D-MRA) as the 'gold standard' in 30 patients with aortic or aortic valve disease. After validation, transverse 2D-CMR was used to assess ascending aortic dimensions in 65 patients with aortic bioprostheses, and the results were compared to those acquired with TTE. Data acquired with both 2D-CMR and 3D-MRA agreed well when assessing ascending aortic diameters (r = 0.99; p 2.1 cm/m2) was present in 38.5% of 2D-CMR cases and in 11.5% of TTE cases. The intra- and inter-observer variabilities to assess aortic dimensions by 2D-CMR were 2.1 +/- 1.9% and 4.3 +/- 3.7%, respectively. Imaging of the complete thorax in transverse orientation using fast, non-contrast-enhanced SSFP images provided an accurate and reliable approach to screen for aortic dilatation. In patients with aortic bioprostheses, 2D-CMR revealed a high prevalence of aortic dilatation, which was considerably underestimated by TTE.

  17. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation vs. surgical aortic valve replacement for treatment of severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siontis, George C M; Praz, Fabien; Pilgrim, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: In view of the currently available evidence from randomized trials, we aimed to compare the collective safety and efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) vs. surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) across the spectrum of risk and in important subgroups. METHODS AND RESULTS......: Trials comparing TAVI vs. SAVR were identified through Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases. The primary outcome was death from any cause at 2 years. We performed random-effects meta-analyses to combine the available evidence and to evaluate the effect in different subgroups. This systematic review...... and meta-analysis is registered with PROSPERO (CRD42016037273). We identified four eligible trials including 3806 participants, who were randomly assigned to undergo TAVI (n = 1898) or SAVR (n = 1908). For the primary outcome of death from any cause, TAVI when compared with SAVR was associated...

  18. [Metabolic syndrome and aortic stiffness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simková, A; Bulas, J; Murín, J; Kozlíková, K; Janiga, I

    2010-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of risk factors that move the patient into higher level of risk category of cardiovascular disease and the probability of type 2 diabetes mellitus manifestation. Definition of MS is s based on the presence of selected risk factors as: abdominal obesity (lager waist circumpherence), atherogenic dyslipidemia (low value of HDL-cholesterol and increased level of triglycerides), increased fasting blood glucose (or type 2 DM diagnosis), higher blood pressure or antihypertensive therapy. In 2009 there were created harmonizing criteria for MS definition; the condition for assignment of MS is the presence of any 3 criteria of 5 mentioned above. The underlying disorder of MS is an insulin resistance or prediabetes. The patients with MS more frequently have subclinical (preclinical) target organ disease (TOD) which is the early sings of atherosclerosis. Increased aortic stiffness is one of the preclinical diseases and is defined by pathologically increased carotidofemoral pulse wave velocity in aorta (PWV Ao). With the aim to assess the influence of MS on aortic stiffness we examined the group of women with arterial hypertension and MS and compare them with the group of women without MS. The aortic stiffness was examined by Arteriograph--Tensiomed, the equipment working on the oscillometric principle in detection of pulsations of brachial artery. This method determines the global aortic stiffness based on the analysis of the shape of pulse curve of brachial artery. From the cohort of 49 pts 31 had MS, the subgroups did not differ in age or blood pressure level. The mean number of risk factors per person in MS was 3.7 comparing with 1.7 in those without MS. In the MS group there was more frequently abdominal obesity present (87% vs 44%), increased fasting blood glucose (81% vs 22%) and low HDL-cholesterol level. The pulse wave velocity in aorta, PWV Ao, was significantly higher in patients with MS (mean value 10,19 m/s vs 8,96 m

  19. [Unicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis Combined with Aortic Coarctation;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Takehiro; Wakasa, Satoru; Shingu, Yasushige; Matsui, Yoshiro

    2016-06-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve in an adult is extremely rare. In addition, 90% of the patients with aortic coarctation are reported to die before the age 50. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for further examination of exertional dyspnea which had begun one year before. She had been under medical treatment for hypertension since early thirties, and had been also diagnosed with moderate aortic stenosis at 50 years of age. She was at 1st diagnosed with aortic coarctation combined with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis. The aortic valve was then found unicuspid and was replaced under cardiopulmonary bypass with perfusion to both the ascending aorta and the femoral artery. Repair of aortic coarctation was performed 3 months later through left thoracotomy without extracorporeal circulation due to the rich collateral circulation. She had no postoperative complications, and hypertension as well as ankle-brachial index improved to the normal levels.

  20. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylotte, Darren; Osnabrugge, Ruben L J; Windecker, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy.......The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy....

  1. Intermittent mechanical and clinical intravalvar regurgitation aortic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    due to intravalvar occlusion caused by thrombosis and/or tissue ingrowth or to periprosthetic regurgitation. .... position). A. The tilting disc of the prosthetic aortic valve is in the normal closed position during diastole. B. The disc is 'stuck' in the open position during diastole. Intermittent AR in patients with aortic prosthetic ...

  2. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement†

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolbergen, David R.; Manshanden, Johan S. J.; Bouma, Berto J.; Blom, Nico A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Hazekamp, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate our results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement and associated (multiple) valve repair. From September 2003 to September 2013, 97 patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedures. Patient records and preoperative, postoperative and recent echocardiograms were reviewed.

  3. Thoracic aortic catastrophes : towards the endovascular solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, F.H.W.

    2010-01-01

    Descending thoracic aortic catastrophes include a variety of acute pathologies of the descending thoracic aorta, which are all associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, requiring immediate intervention. For this thesis, we explored the management and outcomes of several thoracic aortic

  4. Graft infections after surgical aortic reconstructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, P.

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic vascular grafts are frequently used to reconstruct (part) of the aorta. Every surgical procedure caries a certain risk for infection and when a prosthetic aortic graft is implanted, this may lead to an aortic graft infection (AGI). Endovascular techniques have gradually replaced open

  5. Band structure of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Tsidilkovski, I M

    2013-01-01

    Band Structure of Semiconductors provides a review of the theoretical and experimental methods of investigating band structure and an analysis of the results of the developments in this field. The book presents the problems, methods, and applications in the study of band structure. Topics on the computational methods of band structure; band structures of important semiconducting materials; behavior of an electron in a perturbed periodic field; effective masses and g-factors for the most commonly encountered band structures; and the treatment of cyclotron resonance, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillatio

  6. [Modern aortic surgery in Marfan syndrome--2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenbach, K; Schwill, S; Karck, M

    2011-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a hereditary disease with a prevalence of 2-3 in 10,000 births, leading to a fibrillin connective tissue disorder with manifestations in the skeleton, eye, skin, dura mater and in particular the cardiovascular system. Since other syndromes demonstrate similar vascular manifestations, but therapy may differ significantly, diagnosis should be established using the revised Ghent nosology in combination with genotypic analysis in specialized Marfan centres. The formation of aortic root aneurysms with the subsequent risk of acute aortic dissection type A (AADA) or aortic rupture limits life expectancy in patients with Marfan syndrome. Therefore, prophylactic replacement of the aortic root needs to be performed before the catastrophic event of AADA can occur. The goal of surgery is the complete resection of pathological aortic tissue. This can be achieved with excellent results by using a (mechanically) valved conduit that replaces both the aortic valve and the aortic root (Bentall operation). However, the need for lifelong anticoagulation with Coumadin can be avoided using the aortic valve sparing reimplantation technique according to David. The long-term durability of the reconstructed valve is favourable, and further technical improvements may improve longevity. Although results of prospective randomised long-term studies comparing surgical techniques are lacking, the David operation has become the surgical method of choice for aortic root aneurysms, not only at the Heidelberg Marfan Centre. Replacement of the aneurysmal dilated aortic arch is performed under moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest combined with antegrade cerebral perfusion using a heart-lung machine, which we also use in thoracic or thoracoabdominal aneurysms. Close post-operative follow-up in a Marfan centre is pivotal for the early detection of pathological changes on the diseased aorta.

  7. Imaging techniques in aortic valve and root surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regeer, M.V.

    2017-01-01

    Aortic valve sparing surgery for aortic regurgitation and/or aortopathy serves as an alternative to aortic valve and root replacement. One of the advantages of aortic valve sparing surgery over conventional replacement is that there is no need for life-long anticoagulation, which is particularly

  8. Leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sing, T.M.Y.; Young, N.; O'Rourke, I.C.; Tomlinson, P.

    1994-01-01

    A case of leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm is reported, with a brief review of the literature. A 58 year old female presented with shoulder and abdominal pain associated with diarrhea, vomiting and fever with leucocytosis. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed pooling of contrast in the retroperitoneum anterior to a non-dilated abdominal aorta. There was considerable retroperitoneal blood accumulating in a mass-like lesion in the right lower abdomen and pelvis obstructing the right renal collecting system. Laparotomy revealed a 4 cm diameter saccular aneurysm of the abdominal aorta, with a 1 cm diameter neck. Culture of the thrombus grew Streptococcus pyogens. 11 refs., 2 figs

  9. FELINE AORTIC THROMBOEMBOLISM: CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Figueroa A., Lizbeth; Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.; Paz M., Ricardo; Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.; Díaz C., Diego; Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.; Dávila F., Roberto; Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.

    2014-01-01

    Se presenta el caso de un felino Siamés de 13 años con tromboembolismo aórtico. Esta es una complicación asociada a una cardiomiopatía hipertrófica (CMH), enfermedad cardiaca más común del gato y que se caracteriza por la hipertrofia concéntrica ventricular izquierda. A case of a 13 year old Siamese cat whit feline aortic thromboembolism is presented. This is a devastating complication associated to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), one of the most common heart disease in cats characteriz...

  10. Subacute Aortic Regurgitation as a Rare Presentation of Latrogenic Aortic Valve Leaflet Perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Teimouri

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of literature regarding iatrogenic aortic valve perforation after cardiac operation is performed in the vicinity of the aortic valve. This report describes the clinical, echocardiographic, and angiocardiographic recognition of iatrogenic aortic valve perforation in a patient who had previously under gone membranous ventricular septal defect and pulmonary stenosis. Five days after the operation, the patient showed subacute signs and symptoms of congestive heart failure in surgical ward. Echocardiographic examination revealed free aortic regurgitation. The patient was scheduled for operation, which was performed using cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest. During the operation, exploration of the aortic root revealed tearing non-coronary aortic cusp at the level of the aortic ring and slightly dilated the left sinus. Despite close examination, no suture could be identified. It was reasoned that the tension created by the dacron patch pulled on the adjacent tissue and caused the separation of the non-coronary cusp from its ring and the patient was treated by aortic valve replacement with prosthetic aortic valve. We did not have the facility to use transesophaseal echocardiography for the examination of aortic valve repair and the poor condition of the patient did not permit us to repair the valve. Precise preoperative diagnosis of this lesion allows optimal surgical planning and treatment.

  11. Aortic root surgery in Marfan syndrome: Comparison of aortic valve-sparing reimplantation versus composite grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karck, Matthias; Kallenbach, Klaus; Hagl, Christian; Rhein, Christine; Leyh, Rainer; Haverich, Axel

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the results of aortic valve-sparing reimplantation and aortic root replacement with mechanical valve conduits in patients with Marfan syndrome undergoing operation for aortic root aneurysms. Patients and methods Between March 1979 and April 2002, 119 patients with clinical evidence of Marfan syndrome underwent composite graft replacement with mechanical valve conduits (n = 74) or aortic valve-sparing reimplantation according to David (n = 45). The underlying causes were aortic dissection type A (43 patients) and aneurysms (76 patients). Patients undergoing aortic valve reimplantation were younger compared with patients undergoing composite grafting (28 vs 35 years, P =.002) and had longer intraoperative aortic crossclamp times (125 vs 78 minutes, P valve reimplantation (P =.15). Mean follow-up was 30 months for patients undergoing aortic valve reimplantation and 114 months for patients undergoing composite grafting. Freedom from reoperation and death after 5 years postoperatively was 92% and 89% in patients undergoing composite grafting and 84% and 96% in patients undergoing aortic valve reimplantation (P =.31; P =.54), respectively. Thromboembolic complications or late postoperative bleeding occurred in 17 patients undergoing composite grafting, and an early postoperative event occurred in 1 patient undergoing aortic valve reimplantation. The results of aortic valve reimplantation and composite grafting of the aortic valve and ascending aorta with mechanical valve conduits are similar with regard to early and mid-term postoperative mortality and to the incidence of late reoperations in patients with Marfan syndrome. The low risk of thromboembolic or bleeding complications favors aortic valve reimplantation in these patients.

  12. Repetitive complications after prosthetic graft for inflammatory aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Takeda

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of retroperitoneal fibrosis after an aortic graft replacement is a marker of poor prognosis following aortic graft replacement. Herein we report the case of a 39-year-old man with retroperitoneal fibrosis that had been causing ureteral obstruction. The man had undergone repeated aortic graft replacement due to bacteremia and aortic graft–small intestinal fistula that occurred 4 years after initial aortic grafting for an inflammatory aortic aneurysm. The patient was discharged after 4 weeks of intravenous antibiotic therapy following the latest aortic graft replacement.

  13. Two-Year Outcomes in Patients With Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis Randomized to Transcatheter Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lars; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Nordic Aortic Valve Intervention (NOTION) trial was the first to randomize all-comers with severe native aortic valve stenosis to either transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with the CoreValve self-expanding bioprosthesis or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR...

  14. Factors Affecting Optimal Aortic Remodeling After Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair of Type B (IIIb) Aortic Dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, I-Ming [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine (China); Chen, Po-Lin; Huang, Chun-Yang [National Yang Ming University, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine (China); Weng, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Wei-Yuan; Shih, Chun-Che, E-mail: ccshih@vghtpe.gov.tw [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine (China)

    2017-05-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with entire aortic remodeling after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with type B dissection.Materials and MethodsThe patients with type B (IIIb) dissections who underwent TEVAR from 2006 to 2013 with minimum of 2 years of follow-up computed tomography data were retrospectively reviewed. Based on the status of false lumen remodeling of entire aorta, patients were divided into three groups: complete regression, total thrombosis, and inadequate regression with patent abdominal false lumen.ResultsA total of 90 patients (72 males, 18 females; mean age 56.6 ± 16.4 years) were included and divided into the complete regression (n = 22), total thrombosis (n = 18), and inadequate regression (n = 50) groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that dissection extension to iliac arteries, increased preoperative number of dissection tear over abdominal aorta, and decreased preoperative abdominal aorta bifurcation true lumen ratio, as compared between the inadequate and complete regression groups, were associated with a persistent false lumen (odds ratio = 33.33, 2.304, and 0.021; all, p ≤ 0.012). Comparison of 6, 12, and 24 months postoperative data revealed no significant differences at any level, suggesting that the true lumen area ratio might not change after 6 months postoperatively.ConclusionsIncreased preoperative numbers of dissection tear around the abdominal visceral branches, dissection extension to the iliac arteries, and decreased preoperative true lumen area ratio of abdominal aorta are predictive of entire aortic remodeling after TEVAR in patients with type B dissection.Level of EvidenceIII.

  15. Aortography following subdiaphragmal aortic biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmler, J.

    1982-01-01

    A juxtaposition of the subdiaphragmal and infrarenal translumbar aortic biopsy sites showed decisive advantages in favour of the higher site: a more stable position because of better anatomic fixation and rarer incidence of vascular alterations, a wider vascular lumen. Disadvantages lie in the fact that the large visceral arteries (especially Tr. coeliacus) branch off nearly and in the close anatomic relationship to large abdominal organs and the thoracal region. Evaluation of the radiographical image of the vascular tree after subdiaphragmal aortic biopsy showed an average 82% of the vessels to the area of the Knees to be assessable (renal arteries approximately 93%, popliteal arteries approximately 70%). Beyong, the method proved unsatisfactory: 52% of the vessels could not, or not safety, be evaluated. A relatively broad spectrum of indications by comparison with transfemoral catheter aortography had no influence on the rate of complications with reference to either method. A comparison of the topographic conditions shows the need for even more scrupulons observation of the technique in subdiaphragmal biopsy than in the infrarenal one. To sum up the results obtained, subdiaphregmal translumbar aortography is to be preferred to the infrarenal one where transfemoral catheter aortography is contra-indicated, within the limits mentioned. (orig.) [de

  16. Aortic reconstruction with bovine pericardial grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silveira Lindemberg Mota

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Glutaraldehyde-treated crimped bovine pericardial grafts are currently used in aortic graft surgery. These conduits have become good options for these operations, available in different sizes and shapes and at a low cost. OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the results obtained with bovine pericardial grafts for aortic reconstruction, specially concerning late complications. METHOD: Between January 1995 and January 2002, 57 patients underwent different types of aortic reconstruction operations using bovine pericardial grafts. A total of 29 (50.8% were operated on an urgent basis (mostly acute Stanford A dissection and 28 electively. Thoracotomy was performed in three patients for descending aortic replacement (two patients and aortoplasty with a patch in one. All remaining 54 underwent sternotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic resection. Deep hypothermia and total circulatory arrest was used in acute dissections and arch operations. RESULTS: Hospital mortality was 17.5%. Follow-up was 24.09 months (18.5 to 29.8 months confidence interval and complication-free actuarial survival curve was 92.3% (standard deviation ± 10.6. Two patients lately developed thoracoabdominal aneurysms following previous DeBakey II dissection and one died from endocarditis. One "patch" aortoplasty patient developed local descending aortic pseudoaneurysm 42 months after surgery. All other patients are asymptomatic and currently clinically evaluated with echocardiography and CT scans, showing no complications. CONCLUSION: Use of bovine pericardial grafts in aortic reconstruction surgery is adequate and safe, with few complications related to the conduits.

  17. Ascending aortic injuries following blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiumei; Hong, Jenny; Lowery, Robert; Goldstein, Steven; Wang, Zuyue; Lindsay, Joseph; Hill, Peter C; Corso, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    The diagnosis and the management of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries have undergone significant changes due to new technology and improved prehospital care. Most of the discussions have focused on descending aortic injuries. In this review, we discuss the recent management of ascending aortic injuries. We found 5 cohort studies on traumatic aortic injuries and 11 case reports describing ascending aortic injuries between 1998 to the present through Medline research. Among case reports, 78.9% of cases were caused by motor vehicle accidents (MVA). 42.1% of patients underwent emergent open repair and the operative mortality was 12.5%. 36.8% underwent delayed repair. Associated injuries occurred in 84.2% of patients. Aortic valve injury was concurrent in 26.3% of patients. The incidence of ascending aortic injury ranged 1.9-20% in cohort studies. Traumatic injuries to the ascending aorta are relatively uncommon among survivors following blunt trauma. Aortography has been replaced by computed tomography and echocardiography as a diagnostic tool. Open repair, either emergent or delayed, remains the treatment of choice. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The bicuspid aortic valve and related disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is the most common congenital cardiac malformation, affecting 1-2% of the population, with strong male predominance. Individuals may have a normally functioning BAV, and may be unaware of its presence and the potential risk of complications. However, they may easily develop aortic valve disorders: either stenotic or regurgitant, or both. Today, BAV is recognized as a syndrome incorporating aortic valve disorders and aortic wall abnormalities, including aortic dilation, dissection or rupture. Congenital or hereditary diseases such as ventricular septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, Turner's syndrome, Marfan's syndrome etc., may frequently be associated with BAV. Infective endocarditis and occasionally thrombus formation may develop during the lives of BAV patients. Elevated cholesterol or C-reactive protein may be seen in laboratory findings of these patients. Beta-blockers and statins are the possibilities for medical treatment, and aortic valve repair/replacement and ascending aorta replacement are indicated for patients with a severely diseased aortic valve and aorta. Rigorous follow-up throughout life is mandatory after BAV has been diagnosed. The aim of the present article was to describe the implications of BAV and its associated disorders, and to discuss diagnostic and treatment strategies.

  19. Concepts to optimize stent-grafting of abdominal aortic aneurysms based on results of experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavan, A.; Kirchhoff, T.; Baus, S.; Galanski, M.; Pichlmaier, M.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose. In the endoluminal therapy of abdominal aortic aneurysms, a short proximal aneurysm neck, endoleaks and the large size and stiffness of the introducer systems are responsible for many of the complications and sub-optimal outcomes. The purpose of the present review article is to to suggest strategies to minimize these complications based on the results of experimental studies in animals. Material and methods. After implanting various types of stents across the renal artery origins, the functional and morphological changes in the kidneys and renal vessels were studied by various authors. In order to prevent progressive widening of the proximal aneurysmal neck and graft dislocation, Sonesson et al. performed a laparoscopic banding around the proximal neck in pigs. To study the effects of endoleaks, Marty, Schurink and Pitton carried out pressure measurements in experimental aneurysms with and without endoleaks. Sakaguchi and Pavcnik developed the 'Twin-tube endografts' (TTEG) and the 'Bifurcated drum occluder endografts' (BDOEG) and tested them in dogs. Results. Up to 3 months after suprarenal stent placement, Chavan et al. detected no significant fall in the mean inulin clearance in sheep (140±46 ml/min before, 137±58 ml/min after). Nasim et al. and Malina et al. reported similar observations with respect to renal function. Suprarenal fixation may result in isolated thrombotic occlusions of the renal arteries and microinfarcts in the kidneys. Mean aortic diameters at the level of banding were significantly smaller in the animals with aortic banding as opposed to those in the control group without banding (8 mm vs 11 mm, p=0.004). The banding caused a secure proximal fixation of the stent-graft. Persistent endoleaks resulted in significantly higher intraaneurysmal pressures. Although the TTEG and the BDOEG stent-grafts required smaller sheaths, occlusions were observed in 8% (TTEG) and 60% (BDOEG) of the graft limbs. (orig.) [de

  20. Combined Repair of Ascending Aortic Pseudoaneurysm and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kokotsakis, John N.; Lioulias, Achilleas G.; Foroulis, Christophoros N.; Skouteli, Eleni Anna T.; Milonakis, Michael K.; Bastounis, Elias A.; Boulafendis, Dimitrios G.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta after the original inclusion/wrap technique of the Bentall procedure present a difficult surgical management problem and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Patients with Marfan syndrome frequently develop aneurysms and dissections that involve multiple aortic segments. We present the case of a Marfan patient who successfully underwent repair of a giant ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and concomitant repair of an abdominal aortic ane...

  1. Altered aortic shape in bicuspid aortic valve relatives influences blood flow patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Susanne; Smith, Danielle A; Barker, Alex J; Entezari, Pegah; Honarmand, Amir R; Carr, Maria L; Malaisrie, S Chris; McCarthy, Patrick M; Collins, Jeremy; Carr, James C; Markl, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is known to exhibit familial inheritance and is associated with aortopathy and altered aortic haemodynamics. However, it remains unclear whether BAV-related aortopathy can be inherited independently of valve morphology. Four-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging for the in vivo assessment of thoracic aortic 3D blood flow was performed in 24 BAV relatives with trileaflet aortic valves (age = 40 ± 14 years) and 15 healthy controls (age = 37 ± 10 years). Data analysis included aortic dimensions, shape (round/gothic/cubic), and 3D blood flow characteristics (semi-quantitative vortex/helix grading and peak velocities). Cubic and gothic aortic shapes were markedly more prevalent in BAV relatives compared with controls (38 vs. 7%). Ascending aorta (AAo) vortex flow in BAV relatives was significantly increased compared with controls (grading = 1.5 ± 1.0 vs. 0.6 ± 0.9, P = 0.015). Aortic haemodynamics were influenced by aortic shape: peak velocities were reduced for gothic aortas vs. round aortas (P = 0.003); vortex flow was increased for cubic aortas in the AAo (P gothic aortas in the AAo and descending aorta (P = 0.003, P = 0.029). Logistic regression demonstrated significant associations of shape with severity of vortex flow in AAo (P < 0.001) and aortic arch (P = 0.016) in BAV relatives. BAV relatives expressed altered aortic shape and increased vortex flow despite the absence of valvular disease or aortic dilatation. These data suggest a heritable component of BAV-related aortopathy affecting aortic shape and aberrant blood flow, independent of valve morphology. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Surgical anatomy of the aortic root: Implication for valve-sparing reimplantation and aortic valve annuloplasty

    OpenAIRE

    de Kerchove, Laurent; Jashari, Ramadan; Boodhwani, Munir; Duy, Khanh Tran; Lengelé, Benoit; Gianello, Pierre; Nezhad, Zahra Mozala; Astarci, Parla; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To enhance the reproducibility of aortic valve-sparing reimplantation and annuloplasty, we analyzed the topographic relationship between the ventriculoaortic junction (VAJ), basal ring (BR), and sinotubular junction (STJ). The root base thickness is also quantified. METHOD: Fifty-eight fresh human aortic valves were analyzed. The root was dissected to the limit where the aortic wall terminates into the cardiac structures (VAJ). Root height was measured externally from the STJ t...

  3. Mycotic Aneurysm of the Aortic Arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hye Seo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A mycotic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta is rare. We report a case of mycotic aneurysm that developed in the aortic arch. An 86-year-old man was admitted with fever and general weakness. Blood culture yielded methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Chest X-ray showed an enlarged aortic arch, and computed tomography scan revealed an aneurysm in the aortic arch. The patient was treated only with antibiotics and not surgically. The size of the aneurysm increased rapidly, resulting in bronchial obstruction and superimposed pneumonia. The patient died of respiratory failure.

  4. The future of aortic surgery in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czerny, Martin; Bachet, Jean; Bavaria, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    the interested reader with an overview of how aortic surgery and (perhaps more accurately) aortic medicine has evolved in Europe, and its present standing; also to provide a glimpse into the future, trying to disseminate the thoughts of a group of people actively involved in the development of aortic medicine......At least every ten years, each specialty should reflect upon its past, its present and its future, in order to be able to reconfirm the direction in which it is headed, to adopt suggestions from inside and outside and, consequently, to improve. As such, the aim of this manuscript is to provide...

  5. Aortic root reimplantation procedure: a new milestone in aortic valve-sparing operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Чернявский

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Emphasis in this study was placed on clinical and functional assessment of a modified "Florida Sleeve" procedure during surgical correction of ascending aorta aneurysms with concomitant aortic insufficiency.Methods: 32 patients with an aneurysm of the ascending aorta and aortic insufficiency underwent a modified "Florida Sleeve" procedure. The average follow-up was 17 (0-60 months. The average age of patients was 57±13 (23-73 years 56±13 years.Results: The expected 4-year cumulative survival rate was 84.3%. Overall freedom from aortic insufficiency in the late period was 88.9%. Median aortic regurgitation was 1+ (1; 2. Long-term follow-up revealed no valve-associated complications.Conclusion: The aortic root reimplantation procedure enables optimal correction of the existing lesions of the aortic root without performing aortic valve replacement and demonstrates stable clinical and functional outcomes in the long-term period.Key words: aortic aneurysm; aortic valve; valve-sparing operations.FundingThe study had no sponsorship.Conflict of interestThe authors declare no conflict of interest.

  6. Endovascular management of the juxtarenal aortic aneurysm: can uncovered stents safely cross the renal arteries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, M; Brunkwall, J; Lindblad, B; Resch, T; Ivancev, K

    1999-09-01

    A short or otherwise suboptimal neck precludes the use of endovascular repair in 30% to 50% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Stent-graft fixation in an unsuitable neck carries the risk of technical failure owing to development of a proximal endoleak or stent-graft migration. Furthermore, in some patients, the neck dilates postoperatively. Endovascular healing with tissue incorporation into the graft material seems in and of itself insufficient to fixate the stent-graft adequately or to prevent neck dilation. Therefore, neck dilation is often associated with detachment of the stent-graft from the aortic wall, which is followed by the development of a proximal endoleak or stent-graft migration. Fixation of stent-grafts can be improved by placing the proximal stent above one or both of the renal artery orifices. Current experimental and clinical data suggest that renal function is not impaired by suprarenal aortic stents during the first year; however, this finding may not apply to all types of stents. Fixation of stent-grafts also may be improved by using stents with barbs that pierce the aortic wall. Additionally, the force that is exerted on the anchoring device may well be reduced by fully stented grafts with an associated increase in column strength. In the future, the risk of neck dilation and stent-graft dislodgement might also be limited by novel techniques such as laparoscopic banding of the neck or endoluminal stapling devices.

  7. Circulating matrix metalloproteinase patterns in association with aortic dilatation in bicuspid aortic valve patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongshi; Wu, Boting; Dong, Lili; Wang, Chunsheng; Wang, Xiaolin; Shu, Xianhong

    2016-02-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) exhibits a clinical incline toward aortopathy, in which aberrant tensile and shear stress generated by BAV can induce differential expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their endogenous tissue inhibitors (TIMPs). Whether stenotic BAV, which exhibits additional eccentric high-velocity flow jet upon ascending aorta and further worsens circumferential systolic wall shear stress than BAV with echocardiographically normal aortic valve, can lead to unique plasma MMP/TIMP patterns is still unknown. According to their valvulopathy and aortic dilatation status, 93 BAV patients were included in the present study. Group A (n = 37) and B (n = 28) comprised severely stenotic patients with or without ascending aorta dilatation; Group C (n = 12) and D (n = 16) comprised echocardiographically normal BAV patients with or without ascending aorta dilatation. Plasma MMP/TIMP levels (MMP-1, -2, -3, -8, -9, -10, -13 and TIMP-1, -2, -4) were determined via a multiplex ELISA detection system in a single procedure. Among patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis, plasma levels of MMP-2 and -9 were significantly elevated when ascending aortic dilatation was present (p = 0.001 and p = 0.002, respectively). MMP-2, however, remained as the single elevated plasma component among echocardiographically normal BAV patients with dilated ascending aorta (p = 0.027). Multivariate analysis revealed that MMP-2 and MMP-9 could both serve as independent risk factor for aortic dilatation in the case of isolated severe stenosis (p = 0.003 and p = 0.001, respectively), and MMP-2 in echocardiographically normal patients (p = 0.002). In conclusion, BAV patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis demonstrated a distinct plasma MMP/TIMP pattern, which might be utilized as circulating biomarkers for early detection of aortic dilatation.

  8. Aortic stiffness and the balance between cardiac oxygen supply and demand: the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guelen, Ilja; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U. S.; van Popele, Nicole M.; Westerhof, Berend E.; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Bos, Willem Jan W.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Aortic stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We investigated whether aortic stiffness, estimated as aortic pulse wave velocity, is associated with decreased perfusion pressure estimated as the cardiac oxygen supply potential. METHODS: Aortic

  9. [Aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction in Marfan syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, H; Sasaki, H; Hanafusa, Y; Hirata, M; Numata, S; Ando, M; Yagihara, T; Kitamura, S

    2002-07-01

    The outcome of aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction in Marfan syndrome was reviewed. Thirteen patients with Marfan syndrome underwent aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction for annuloaortic ectasia or aortic root dissection between 1994 and 1999. The grade of preoperative aortic regurgitation was I in 4, II in 2, III in 5, IV in 2 patients. The procedures of aortic valve-sparing were reimplantation in 7 and remodeling in 5 patients. There was no hospital and late death. Recurrence of aortic regurgitation greater than moderate grade developed in 1 patient immediately after the surgery and in the other 4 patients in the late stage. One patient of them required aortic valve replacement for it. Aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction is applicable in Marfan patients, although the indication should be cautious. Close observation is needed for recurrence of aortic regurgitation.

  10. Aortic aneurysm secondary to umbilical artery catheterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brill, P.W.; Winchester, P.; Griffith, A.Y.; Kazam, E.; Zirinsky, K.; Levin, A.R.

    1985-02-01

    A 14-month-girl presented with an asymptomatic posterior mediastinal mass. She had a history of prematurity, umbilical artery catheterization, and sepsis. The diagnosis of aortic aneurysm was made by dynamic computed tomography. The aneurysm was successfully resected.

  11. Successful Thrombolysis of Aortic Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    threatening. Standard surgical treatment using cardiopulmonary bypass carries high maternal and fetal complications. Here we report a case of an antenatal female in first trimester with aortic prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT), who was successfully ...

  12. Lipedema is associated with increased aortic stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szolnoky, G; Nemes, A; Gavallér, H; Forster, T; Kemény, L

    2012-06-01

    Lipedema is a disproportional obesity due to unknown pathomechanism. Its major hallmark is frequent hematoma formation related to increased capillary fragility and reduced venoarterial reflex. Beyond microangiopathy, both venous and lymphatic dysfunction have also been documented. However, arterial circulation in lipedema has not been examined, and therefore we explored aortic elastic properties by echocardiography. Fourteen women with and 14 without lipedema were included in the study. Each subject consented to blood pressure measurement, physical examination, and transthoracic echocardiography. Aortic stiffness index (beta), distensibility, and strain were evaluated from aortic diameter and blood pressure data. Mean systolic (30.0 +/- 3.2 vs. 25.5 +/- 3.6, P lipedema is characterized with increased aortic stiffness.

  13. Telomere Biology and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Aschacher

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ascending aortic aneurysms are mostly asymptomatic and present a great risk of aortic dissection or perforation. Consequently, ascending aortic aneurysms are a source of lethality with increased age. Biological aging results in progressive attrition of telomeres, which are the repetitive DNA sequences at the end of chromosomes. These telomeres play an important role in protection of genomic DNA from end-to-end fusions. Telomere maintenance and telomere attrition-associated senescence of endothelial and smooth muscle cells have been indicated to be part of the pathogenesis of degenerative vascular diseases. This systematic review provides an overview of telomeres, telomere-associated proteins and telomerase to the formation and progression of aneurysms of the thoracic ascending aorta. A better understanding of telomere regulation in the vascular pathology might provide new therapeutic approaches. Measurements of telomere length and telomerase activity could be potential prognostic biomarkers for increased risk of death in elderly patients suffering from an aortic aneurysm.

  14. Dissecting aortic aneurysm in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ounissi M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The dissecting aortic aneurysm (DAA is a rare pathology that may result in fatal outcome. We report follow up of three cases of DAA patients undergoing maintenance hemo-dialysis who were managed conservatively.

  15. Comparison of ascending aortic cohesion between patients with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis and regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedik, Jaroslav; Dohle, Daniel S; Wendt, Daniel; Pilarczyk, Kevin; Price, Vivien; Mourad, Fanar; Zykina, Elizaveta; Stebner, Ferdinand; Tsagakis, Konstantinos; Jakob, Heinz

    2014-12-01

    A bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is commonly associated with aortic wall abnormalities, including dilatation of the ascending aorta and increased potential for aortic dissection. We compared the mechanical properties of the aortic wall of BAV patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS) and regurgitation (AR) using a dissectometer, a device mimicking transverse aortic wall shear stress. Between March 2010 and February 2013, 85 consecutive patients with bicuspid aortic valve undergoing open aortic valve replacement at our institution were prospectively enrolled, presenting either with stenosis (Group 1, n = 58) or regurgitation (Group 2, n = 27). Aortic wall cohesion measured by the dissectometer (Parameters P7, P8 and P9), aortic diameters measured by transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) and thickness of the wall were compared. One patient presenting with the Marfan syndrome was excluded from the study. Patients with aortic regurgitation were significantly younger (48.2 ± 15.8 vs 64.7 ± 10.7, P group (27.3 ± 3.6 vs 25.5 ± 2.4, P = 0.008; 41.1 ± 7.7 vs 36.7 ± 8.0, P = 0.011; 37.6 ± 9.7 vs 33.8 ± 9.1, P = 0.049). The ascending aortic diameter did not differ (43.2 ± 10.6 vs 40.3 ± 9.1, P = 0.292). Patients with AR had significantly worse aortic cohesion, as measured by shear stress testing (P7: 97.2 ± 45.0 vs 145.5 ± 84.9, P = 0.015; P8: 2.00 ± 0.65 vs 3.82 ± 1.56, P cohesion, a thicker aortic wall and a larger aortic root in patients presenting with bicuspid AR compared with patients with AS. These results suggest that bicuspid AR represents a different disease process with possible involvement of the ascending aorta, as demonstrated by dissectometer examination. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  16. CT diagnosis of acute aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Noriko; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    1989-01-01

    Sixteen (47.5%) of 35 patients with acute aortic dissection showed a non-opacified crescent in the aorta on an initial contrast CT. Seven of these 16 patients underwent cineangiography soon after the initial CT, and in all 7 patients, neither an intimal tear nor an intimal flap was obtained. All but one of above 16 patients were followed by CT. Mean duration of follow-up was 9.6 months. In 10 of 15 patients with non-opacified false lumen, the false lumen remained non-opacified until the last examination. Moreover, in 6 of these 10 patients, the false lumen shrunk, and in the other 3, it disappeared completely on follow-up CT. On the other hand, in remaining 5 of these 15 patients who were initially diagnosed to have non-opacified false lumen, the false lumen became opacified and enlarged in size on follow-up CT performed in the first 14 weeks. Moreover, in 4 of these 5 patients, the false lumen became opacified in the only first 6 weeks. No matter how intensive care should be paid at least for the first 6 weeks, it seems that patients with aortic dissection which have non-opacified false lumen had good prognosis in comparison to patients with ordinary aortic dissections which have opacified false lumen. We believe aortic dissection with non-opacified false lumen may consist of two type of aortic dissection, one has no intimal tear, the other has some intimal tears and a thrombosed false lumen. In conclusion, CT is the most useful modality in diagnosing acute aortic dissection. The reasons are the incidence of acute aortic dissection with non-opacified false lumen was high, patients with non-opacified false lumen had good prognosis, and it was difficult to diagnose aortic dissection with non-opacified false lumen by conventional cineangiography and/or DSA. (author)

  17. Surveillance intervals for small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bown, Matthew J; Sweeting, Michael J; Brown, Louise C

    2013-01-01

    Small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs [3.0 cm-5.4 cm in diameter]) are monitored by ultrasound surveillance. The intervals between surveillance scans should be chosen to detect an expanding aneurysm prior to rupture.......Small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs [3.0 cm-5.4 cm in diameter]) are monitored by ultrasound surveillance. The intervals between surveillance scans should be chosen to detect an expanding aneurysm prior to rupture....

  18. Graft infections after surgical aortic reconstructions

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, P.

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic vascular grafts are frequently used to reconstruct (part) of the aorta. Every surgical procedure caries a certain risk for infection and when a prosthetic aortic graft is implanted, this may lead to an aortic graft infection (AGI). Endovascular techniques have gradually replaced open surgical reconstructions as first line of treatment for aorto-iliac diseases. Nowadays, open reconstructions are primarily reserved for patients unsuitable for endovascular reconstructions or for redo ...

  19. Aortic dissection. Basic aspects and endovascular management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaramillo, Nicolas I; Alviar, Carlos I

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of thoracic aortic pathology is complicated by the morbidity associated to the surgical procedure and to the frailty of an elderly and difficult population. Surgical operation in this kind of population frequently bears a significant incidence of death and long-term disability. In an effort to reduce the incidence of negative outcomes, minimally invasive techniques in the form of endovascular stenting have been introduced during the past decade. The technology, originally described by Parodi, and initially designed for its use in abdominal aortic aneurysms, has been adapted for the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Furthermore, an improved understanding of the pathophysiology and the natural history of thoracic aortic disease as well as the analysis of the outcomes have facilitated our treatment decisions in terms of the timing for an appropriate intervention. Treatment of thoracic aortic dissection using endovascular Stent is one of the more recent advances in this condition and is receiving increasing attention, as it is a less invasive alternative to an open surgical repair. Although this technology is still innovative, significant improvements have been made lately in the design and deployment of the endovascular Stent-grafts. These prostheses have been increasingly used to treat aneurysms, dissections and traumatic ruptures, as well as giant penetrating ulcers and intramural hematomas of the descending thoracic aorta with good early and mid-term outcomes. The rareness, complexity and severity of the pathology and the theoretically high risk of complications should render the surgeon extremely cautious especially with young patients. Conceptually, the endo luminal treatment in the acute phase seems to be the solution and will probably become a preferred therapy while technical refinement is under way. Worldwide experience is growing and with this a better understanding of the indications and limitations of this innovative therapy will be

  20. Retrograde ascending aortic dissection during or after thoracic aortic stent graft placement: insight from the European registry on endovascular aortic repair complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggebrecht, Holger; Thompson, Matt; Rousseau, Hervé

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Single-center reports have identified retrograde ascending aortic dissection (rAAD) as a potentially lethal complication of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). METHODS AND RESULTS: Between 1995 and 2008, 28 centers participating in the European Registry on Endovascular Aortic...

  1. Aortic Dissection Type A in Alpine Skiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schachner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients and Methods. 140 patients with aortic dissection type A were admitted for cardiac surgery. Seventy-seven patients experienced their dissection in the winter season (from November to April. We analyzed cases of ascending aortic dissection associated with alpine skiing. Results. In 17 patients we found skiing-related aortic dissections. Skiers were taller (180 (172–200 cm versus 175 (157–191 cm, and heavier (90 (68–125 kg versus 80 (45–110 kg, than nonskiers. An extension of aortic dissection into the aortic arch, the descending thoracic aorta, and the abdominal aorta was found in 91%, 74%, and 69%, respectively, with no significant difference between skiers and nonskiers. Skiers experienced RCA ostium dissection requiring CABG in 17.6% while this was true for 5% of nonskiers (. Hospital mortality of skiers was 6% versus 13% in nonskiers (. The skiers live at an altitude of 170 (0–853 m.a.s.l. and experience their dissection at 1602 (1185–3105; m.a.s.l. In 82% symptom start was during recreational skiing without any trauma. Conclusion. Skiing associated aortic dissection type A is usually nontraumatic. The persons affected live at low altitudes and practice an outdoor sport at unusual high altitude at cold temperatures. Postoperative outcome is good.

  2. Aortic Dissection Type A in Alpine Skiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachner, Thomas; Fischler, Nikolaus; Dumfarth, Julia; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Krapf, Christoph; Schobersberger, Wolfgang; Grimm, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Patients and Methods. 140 patients with aortic dissection type A were admitted for cardiac surgery. Seventy-seven patients experienced their dissection in the winter season (from November to April). We analyzed cases of ascending aortic dissection associated with alpine skiing. Results. In 17 patients we found skiing-related aortic dissections. Skiers were taller (180 (172–200) cm versus 175 (157–191) cm, P = 0.008) and heavier (90 (68–125) kg versus 80 (45–110) kg, P = 0.002) than nonskiers. An extension of aortic dissection into the aortic arch, the descending thoracic aorta, and the abdominal aorta was found in 91%, 74%, and 69%, respectively, with no significant difference between skiers and nonskiers. Skiers experienced RCA ostium dissection requiring CABG in 17.6% while this was true for 5% of nonskiers (P = 0.086). Hospital mortality of skiers was 6% versus 13% in nonskiers (P = 0.399). The skiers live at an altitude of 170 (0–853) m.a.s.l. and experience their dissection at 1602 (1185–3105; P < 0.001) m.a.s.l. In 82% symptom start was during recreational skiing without any trauma. Conclusion. Skiing associated aortic dissection type A is usually nontraumatic. The persons affected live at low altitudes and practice an outdoor sport at unusual high altitude at cold temperatures. Postoperative outcome is good. PMID:23971024

  3. Long-Term Risk for Aortic Complications After Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve Versus Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, Shinobu; Chikwe, Joanna P; Chiang, Yuting P; Egorova, Natalia N; Adams, David H

    2015-06-09

    Bicuspid aortic valves are associated with valve dysfunction, ascending aortic aneurysm and dissection. Management of the ascending aorta at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR) in these patients is controversial and has been extrapolated from experience with Marfan syndrome, despite the absence of comparative long-term outcome data. This study sought to assess whether the natural history of thoracic aortopathy after AVR in patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease is substantially different from that seen in patients with Marfan syndrome. In this retrospective comparison, outcomes of 13,205 adults (2,079 with bicuspid aortic valves, 73 with Marfan syndrome, and 11,053 control patients with acquired aortic valve disease) who underwent primary AVR without replacement of the ascending aorta in New York State between 1995 and 2010 were compared. The median follow-up time was 6.6 years. The long-term incidence of thoracic aortic dissection was significantly higher in patients with Marfan syndrome (5.5 ± 2.7%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (0.55 ± 0.21%) and control group patients (0.41 ± 0.08%, p Marfan syndrome (10.8 ± 4.4%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (4.8 ± 0.8%) and control group patients (1.4 ± 0.2%) (p Marfan syndrome were significantly more likely to undergo thoracic aortic surgery in late follow-up (10.4 ± 4.3%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (2.5 ± 0.6%) and control group patients (0.50 ± 0.09%) (p Marfan syndrome compared with those with bicuspid aortic valves confirm that operative management of patients with bicuspid aortic valves should not be extrapolated from Marfan syndrome and support discrete treatment algorithms for these different clinical entities. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Geometric Deformations of the Thoracic Aorta and Supra-Aortic Arch Branch Vessels Following Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullery, Brant W; Suh, Ga-Young; Hirotsu, Kelsey; Zhu, David; Lee, Jason T; Dake, Michael D; Fleischmann, Dominik; Cheng, Christopher P

    2018-04-01

    To utilize 3-D modeling techniques to better characterize geometric deformations of the supra-aortic arch branch vessels and descending thoracic aorta after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Eighteen patients underwent endovascular repair of either type B aortic dissection (n = 10) or thoracic aortic aneurysm (n = 8). Computed tomography angiography was obtained pre- and postprocedure, and 3-D geometric models of the aorta and supra-aortic branch vessels were constructed. Branch angle of the supra-aortic branch vessels and curvature metrics of the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and stented thoracic aortic lumen were calculated both at pre- and postintervention. The left common carotid artery branch angle was lower than the left subclavian artery angles preintervention ( P Supra-aortic branch vessel angulation remains relatively static when proximal landing zones are distal to the left common carotid artery.

  5. Wide Band to ''Double Band'' upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasper, P.; Currier, R.; Garbincius, P.; Butler, J.

    1988-06-01

    The Wide Band beam currently uses electrons obtained from secondary photon conversions to produce the photon beam incident on the experimental targets. By transporting the positrons produced in these conversions as well as the electrons it is possible to almost double the number of photons delivered to the experiments per primary beam proton. 11 figs

  6. Aortic events in a nationwide Marfan syndrome cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Kristian A; Krag, Kirstine Stochholm; Hove, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Marfan syndrome is associated with morbidity and mortality due to aortic dilatation and dissection. Preventive aortic root replacement has been the standard treatment in Marfan syndrome patients with aortic dilatation. In this study, we present aortic event data from a nationwide Marfan...... syndrome cohort. METHOD: The nationwide cohort of Danish Marfan syndrome patients was established from the Danish National Patient Registry and the Cause of Death Register, where we retrieved information about aortic surgery and dissections. We associated aortic events with age, sex, and Marfan syndrome...

  7. Infantile Aortic Coarctation in an Adult with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumiz, Eva; Valero, Ernesto; Vilar, Juan Vicente; Santas, Enrique; Haba, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to highlight the importance of excluding aortic coarctation in a patient with a bicuspid aortic valve. A 56-year-old woman with hypertension was admitted complaining of progressive dyspnea. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a calcified, bicuspid aortic valve with severe stenosis. Aortography revealed the presence of severe narrowing of the aorta between the carotid and subclavian arteries. The patient was referred for cardiovascular surgery in which successful aortic valve replacement and aortic correction were performed. This case report shows an uncommon finding of infantile aortic coarctation in an adult patient admitted with heart failure. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Systematic review of the outcome of aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, Umesh C.; Barenbrug, Paul; Pokharel, Saraswati; Dassen, Willem R. M.; Pinto, Yigal M.; Maessen, Jos G.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After the establishment of aortic valve replacement procedure for aortic stenosis, there are heterogeneous studies and varying reports on outcome. An analysis that compares individual studies to summarize the overall effect is still lacking. This study systematically analyzes the change

  9. Effect of candesartan treatment on left ventricular remodeling after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbaek, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2010-01-01

    In hypertension, angiotensin receptor blockers can augment regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. It is not known whether this also is the case after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). To test the hypothesis that treatment with candesartan in addition...

  10. General Considerations of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chung Won; Bae, Miju; Chung, Sung Woon

    2015-01-01

    Although development of surgical technique and critical care, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm still carries a high mortality. In order to obtain good results, various efforts have been attempted. This paper reviews initial management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and discuss the key point open surgical repair and endovascular aneurysm repair.

  11. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With Early- and New-Generation Devices in Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Sung Han; Lefèvre, Thierry; Ahn, Jung Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated the clinical outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis (AS). Particularly, limited data exist comparing the results of TAVR with new-generation devices versus early-generation devices.  Objective...

  12. Outcomes in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Bicuspid Versus Tricuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Sung-Han; Bleiziffer, Sabine; De Backer, Ole

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is being increasingly performed in patients with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis (AS). OBJECTIVES: This study sought to compare the procedural and clinical outcomes in patients with bicuspid versus tricuspid AS from the Bicuspid AS TAVR mul...

  13. Aortic stiffness and diameter predict progressive aortic dilatation in patients with Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nollen, Gijs J.; Groenink, Maarten; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; van der Wall, Ernst E.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2004-01-01

    Aim Patients with Marfan syndrome may develop dissection due to progressive dilatation in the entire aorta, which is not always predictable by mere anatomic assessment of the aortic diameter, especially of the descending aorta. The aim of this study was to identify the predictive value of aortic

  14. Aortic valve regurgitation and the congenitally bicuspid aortic valve: a clinico-pathological correlation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadee, A. S.; Becker, A. E.; Verheul, H. A.; Bouma, B.; Hoedemaker, G.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the morphology of congenitally bicuspid aortic valves causing pure valve regurgitation. A case series collected over five years. An academic hospital. One hundred and forty eight excised congenitally bicuspid aortic valves. The morphological findings were correlated with sex, age,

  15. [Comparison of aortic annular diameter defined by different measurement mordalities before transcatheter aortic valve implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, R X; You, X D; Pu, Z X; Yang, Q; Huang, Z X; Zhou, L M; Huang, P T

    2017-05-24

    Objective: To compare aortic annular diameter measured by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), and multislice computed tomography (MSCT) in patients with severe aortic stenosis, and to evaluate the impact on selection of prosthetic valve type in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Methods: Clinical data of 138 patients with severe aortic stenosis referred for TAVI between January 2014 and June 2016 in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed.The difference of aortic annular diameter measured by TTE, TEE, and MSCT were compared.TTE was performed after TAVI to evaluate the accuracy of measurement before TAVI. Results: (1) Aortic annular diameter was (23.37±2.22) mm by TTE and (23.52±1.70) mm by TEE ( P =0.12). Pearson correlation analysis showed that aortic annular diameter measured by TTE was correlated to that measured by TEE ( r =0.87, P TTE and TTE (all P TTE and TEE measurements are smaller than that from MSCT.In the absence of a gold standard, selection of prosthetic valve type in TAVI procedure should rely on comprehensive considerations, which is of importance to get good clinical results for severe aortic stenosis patients underwent TAVI.

  16. Abdominal Aortic Diameter Is Increased in Males with a Family History of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejnert Jørgensen, Trine; Houlind, K; Green, A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate, at a population level, whether a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is independently related to increased aortic diameter and prevalence of AAA in men, and to elucidate whether the mean aortic diameter and the prevalence of AAA are different between...... participants with male and female relatives with AAA. DESIGN: Observational population-based cross-sectional study. MATERIALS: 18,614 male participants screened for AAA in the VIVA-trial 2008-2011 with information on both family history of AAA and maximal aortic diameter. METHODS: Standardized ultrasound scan...... measurement of maximum antero-posterior aortic diameter. Family history obtained by questionnaire. Multivariate regression analysis was used to test for confounders: age, sex, smoking, comorbidity and medication. RESULTS: From the screened cohort, 569 participants had at least one first degree relative...

  17. Band - Weg interactie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Andries; ter Huerne, Henderikus L.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.; Schipper, Dirk J.; prof.dr.ir. Molenaar, A.A.A.

    2008-01-01

    De huidige infrastructuur van wegen waarover men zich snel en comfortabel kan verplaatsen is niet meer weg te denken uit onze maatschappij. Twee “componenten” die hierbij een belangrijke rol spelen zijn het wegdek en de band. Het contact tussen band en wegdek is mede bepalend voor de veiligheid. De

  18. Photonic band structure computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, D; Frank, M; Busch, K; Wolfle, P

    2001-01-29

    We introduce a novel algorithm for band structure computations based on multigrid methods. In addition, we demonstrate how the results of these band structure calculations may be used to compute group velocities and effective photon masses. The results are of direct relevance to studies of pulse propagation in such materials.

  19. ZEBRAFISH CHROMOSOME-BANDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PIJNACKER, LP; FERWERDA, MA

    1995-01-01

    Banding techniques were carried out on metaphase chromosomes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The karyotypes with the longest chromosomes consist of 12 metacentrics, 26 submetacentrics, and 12 subtelocentrics (2n = 50). All centromeres are C-band positive. Eight chromosomes have a pericentric

  20. A novel system for the treatment of aortic annular dilation: an ex vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pallav; Romagnoni, Claudia; Jaworek, Michal; Lucherini, Federico; Contino, Monica; Menkis, Alan; Gelpi, Guido; Fiore, Gianfranco B; Antona, Carlo; Vismara, Riccardo

    2017-12-01

    The main reason for aortic repair failures is recurrent annular dilatation. The fibrous portion of left ventricular outflow tract dilates. A novel device was designed to tackle this problem. The device consists of an internal ring applied at the aortic annulus plus an external flexible band at the level of the aortic root. The internal ring has a semi-rigid portion (40%, placed at ventriculo-arterial junction) and a flexible portion to allow it to conform along the curves of the non-coronary/right coronary leaflet and right coronary/left coronary leaflet commissures. The external band acts as a reinforcement to the internal ring. A pulsatile mock loop capable of housing porcine aortic valve was used. Working conditions were 60 bpm of heart rate, 75 of stroke volumes and 120-80 mmHg of simulated pressure. Mean gradient, effective orifice area, annular diameter, coaptation height and length were recorded on 11 aortic root units (ARUs). High-speed video and standard echocardiographic images were also recorded. All data were acquired in the following conditions: (i) basal (untreated ARU); (ii) pathological condition (left coronary/non-coronary triangle was dilated by suturing an aortic patch); and (iii) ARU treated with the device. Gradients and effective orifice area were respectively 0.9 ± 0.64 mmHg and 3.1 ± 0.7cm2 (pathological) and 3.7 ± 1.1 mmHg and 1.5 ± 0.2cm2 (treated, P < 0.05). Left coronary/non-coronary diameter decreased from 2.4 ± 0.2 cm (pathological) to 2.0 ± 0.2 (treated, P < 0.05). Coaptation length and height were fully restored to basal values following treatment. Visual inspection showed proper dynamics of the leaflet, confirmed by high-speed video and echocardiography. The device allowed for restoring physiologic-like coaptation in the experimental model, without inducing clinically relevant worsening of the haemodynamics of the treated ARU. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on

  1. Artificial aortic valves: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsi, Y S; Birchall, I E; Rosenfeldt, F L

    2004-06-01

    This review discusses strategies that may address some of the limitations associated with replacing diseased or dysfunctional aortic valves with mechanical or tissue valves. These limitations range from structural failure and thromboembolic complications associated with mechanical valves to a limited durability and calcification with tissue valves. In pediatric patients there is an issue with the inability of substitutes to grow with the recipient. The emerging science of tissue engineering potentially provides an attractive alternative by creating viable tissue structures based on a resorbable scaffold. Morphometrically precise, biodegradable polymer scaffolds may be fabricated from data obtained from scans of natural valves by rapid prototyping technologies such as fused deposition modelling. The scaffold provides a mechanical profile until seeded cells produce their own extra cellular matrix. The microstructure of the forming tissue may be aligned into predetermined spatial orientations via fluid transduction in a bioreactor. Although there are many technical obstacles that must be overcome before tissue engineered heart valves are introduced into routine surgical practice these valves have the potential to overcome many of the shortcomings of current heart valve substitutes.

  2. Rapid prototyping in aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangeas, Petros; Voulalas, Grigorios; Ktenidis, Kiriakos

    2016-04-01

    3D printing provides the sequential addition of material layers and, thus, the opportunity to print parts and components made of different materials with variable mechanical and physical properties. It helps us create 3D anatomical models for the better planning of surgical procedures when needed, since it can reveal any complex anatomical feature. Images of abdominal aortic aneurysms received by computed tomographic angiography were converted into 3D images using a Google SketchUp free software and saved in stereolithography format. Using a 3D printer (Makerbot), a model made of polylactic acid material (thermoplastic filament) was printed. A 3D model of an abdominal aorta aneurysm was created in 138 min, while the model was a precise copy of the aorta visualized in the computed tomographic images. The total cost (including the initial cost of the printer) reached 1303.00 euros. 3D imaging and modelling using different materials can be very useful in cases when anatomical difficulties are recognized through the computed tomographic images and a tactile approach is demanded preoperatively. In this way, major complications during abdominal aorta aneurysm management can be predicted and prevented. Furthermore, the model can be used as a mould; the development of new, more biocompatible, less antigenic and individualized can become a challenge in the future. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  3. Band parameters of phosphorene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a two-dimensional nanomaterial with a direct band-gap at the Brillouin zone center. In this paper, we present a recently derived effective-mass theory of the band structure in the presence of strain and electric field, based upon group theory. Band parameters for this theory...... are computed using a first-principles theory based upon the generalized-gradient approximation to the density-functional theory. These parameters and Hamiltonian will be useful for modeling physical properties of phosphorene....

  4. Research of Customized Aortic Stent Graft Manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xin; Liu, Muhan

    2017-03-01

    Thoracic descending aorta diseases include aortic dissection and aortic aneurysm, of which the natural mortality rate is extremely high. At present, endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has been widely used as an effective means for the treatment of descending aortic disease. Most of the existing coating stents are standard design, which are unable to meet the size or structure of different patients. As a result, failure of treatment would be caused by dimensional discrepancy between stent and vessels, which could lead to internal leakage or rupture of blood vessels. Therefore, based on rapid prototyping sacrificial core - coating forming (RPSC-CF), a customized aortic stent graft manufactured technique has been proposed in this study. The aortic stent graft consists of film and metallic stent, so polyether polyurethane (PU) and nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy with good biocompatibility were chosen. To minimum film thickness without degrading performance, effect of different dip coating conditions on the thickness of film were studied. To make the NiTi alloy exhibit super-elasticity at body temperature (37°C), influence of different heat treatment conditions on austenite transformation temperature (Af) and mechanical properties were studied. The results show that the customized stent grafts could meet the demand of personalized therapy, and have good performance in blasting pressure and radial support force, laying the foundation for further animal experiment and clinical experiment.

  5. Impact of bicuspid aortic valve on complications and death in infective endocarditis of native aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahveci, Gokhan; Bayrak, Fatih; Pala, Selcuk; Mutlu, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated the impact of bicuspid aortic valve on the prognosis of patients who had definite infective endocarditis of the native aortic valve.Of 51 patients, a bicuspid aortic valve was present in 22 (43%); the other 29 had tricuspid aortic valves. On average, the patients who had bicuspid valves were younger than those who had tricuspid valves. Patients with a tricuspid valve had larger left atrial diameters and were more likely to have severe mitral regurgitation.Periannular complications, which we detected in 19 patients (37%), were much more common in the patients who had a bicuspid valve (64% vs 17%, P = 0.001). The presence of a bicuspid valve was the only significant independent predictor of periannular complications. The in-hospital mortality rate in the bicuspid group was lower than that in the tricuspid group; however, this figure did not reach statistical significance (9% vs 24%, P = 0.15). In multivariate analysis, left atrial diameter was the only independent predictor associated with an increased risk of death (hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-4.5; P = 0.031).In our study, patients with infective endocarditis in a bicuspid aortic valve were younger and had a higher incidence of periannular complications. Although a worse prognosis has been reported previously, we found that infective endocarditis in a native bicuspid aortic valve is not likely to increase the risk of death in comparison with infective endocarditis in native tricuspid aortic valves.

  6. Challenging Friesian horse diseases : aortic rupture and megaesophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic rupture is quite rare in Warmblood horses and is best known as an acute and fatal rupture of the aortic root in older breeding stallions. It has now become clear that aortic rupture, which is diagnosed around an age of 4 years, is more frequent in the Friesian breed than in others. The high

  7. Total Endovascular Aortic Repair in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amako, Mau; Spear, Rafaëlle; Clough, Rachel E; Hertault, Adrien; Azzaoui, Richard; Martin-Gonzalez, Teresa; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Haulon, Stéphan

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a total endovascular aortic repair with branched and fenestrated endografts in a young patient with Marfan syndrome and a chronic aortic dissection. Open surgery is the gold standard to treat aortic dissections in patients with aortic disease and Marfan syndrome. In 2000, a 38-year-old man with Marfan syndrome underwent open ascending aorta repair for an acute type A aortic dissection. One year later, a redo sternotomy was performed for aortic valve replacement. In 2013, the patient presented with endocarditis and pulmonary infection, which necessitated tracheostomy and temporary dialysis. In 2014, the first stage of the endovascular repair was performed using an inner branched endograft to exclude a 77-mm distal arch and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. In 2015, a 63-mm thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm was excluded by implantation of a 4-fenestrated endograft. Follow-up after both endovascular repairs was uneventful. Total aortic endovascular repair was successfully performed to treat a patient with arch and thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with chronic aortic dissection and Marfan syndrome. The postoperative images confirmed patency of the endograft and its branches, and complete exclusion of the aortic false lumen. Endovascular repair is a treatment option in patients with connective tissue disease who are not candidates for open surgery. Long-term follow-up is required to confirm these favorable early outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mitral Valve Aneurysm: A Rare Complication of Aortic Valve Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Moaref

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old intravenous drug abuser man, refered to our hospital with dyspnea and orthopnea. Tranesophagealechocardiography revealed severe aortic regurgitation, healed vegetation of aortic valve and an aneurysm of theanterior leaflet of the mitral valve. The patient was discharged after aortic valve replacement and mitral valverepair.

  9. Acute Abdominal Mobile Aortic Thrombus Post Chemotherapy: Two Cases Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Jun Ho; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu; Jeon, Yong Sun [Dept. of Radiology, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    An acute abdominal mobile aortic thrombus is a very unusual finding, and this is a potential source of arterial embolism. Mobile aortic thrombus mostly occurs in a diffuse atherosclerotic and aneurysmal aorta. Chemotherapy agents have been documented as a possible rare cause of acute arterial thrombus. We report acute abdominal mobile aortic thrombus post-chemotherapy for pancreatic and stomach cancer.

  10. Local repair of distal thoracal aortic dissections (Locus minoris resistencia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Iu V; Komarov, R N; Stepanenko, A B; Gens, A P; Charchian, E R

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents the method of local repair of distal aortic dissections. Local aortic grafting for surgical correction of type B dissecting aortic aneurysms helped to decrease hospital mortality up to 15.4%, the rate of paraparesis and multiorgan failure - up to 11.5%.

  11. Aortic regurgitation after valve-sparing aortic root replacement: modes of failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Takanori; Okita, Yutaka; Matsumori, Masamichi; Okada, Kenji; Minami, Hitoshi; Munakata, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akiko; Sakamoto, Toshihito; Omura, Atsushi; Nomura, Takuo

    2011-11-01

    Despite the positive clinical results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement, little is known about the causes of reoperations and the modes of failure. From October 1999 to June 2010, 101 patients underwent valve-sparing aortic root replacement using the David reimplantation technique. The definition of aortic root repair failure included the following: (1) intraoperative conversion to the Bentall procedure; (2) reoperation performed because of aortic regurgitation; and (3) aortic regurgitation equal to or greater than a moderate degree at the follow-up. Sixteen patients were considered to have repair failure. Three patients required intraoperative conversion to valve replacement, 3 required reoperation within 3 months, and another 8 required reoperation during postoperative follow-up. At initial surgery 5 patients had moderate to severe aortic regurgitation, 6 patients had acute aortic dissections, 3 had Marfan syndrome, 2 had status post Ross operations, 3 had bicuspid aortic valves, and 1 had aortitis. Five patients had undergone cusp repair, including Arantius plication in 3 and plication at the commissure in 2. The causes of early failure in 6 patients included cusp perforation (3), cusp prolapse (3), and severe hemolysis (1). The causes of late failure in 10 patients included cusp prolapse (4), commissure dehiscence (3), torn cusp (2), and cusp retraction (1). Patients had valve replacements at a mean of 23 ± 20.9 months after reimplantation and survived. Causes of early failure after valve-sparing root replacement included technical failure, cusp lesions, and steep learning curve. Late failure was caused by aortic root wall degeneration due to gelatin-resorcin-formalin glue, cusp degeneration, or progression of cusp prolapse. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. In situ total aortic arch replacement for infected distal aortic arch aneurysms with penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kenji; Yamanaka, Katsuhiro; Sakamoto, Toshihito; Inoue, Takeshi; Matsumori, Masamichi; Kawakami, Fumi; Okita, Yutaka

    2014-11-01

    We present a series of patients who underwent in situ total aortic arch replacement for infected distal aortic arch aneurysms. Between 2002 and 2013, 9 patients with infected distal aortic arch aneurysms underwent total aortic arch replacement using antegrade selective cerebral perfusion. There were 4 male and 5 female patients with a mean age of 72.7±9.0 years. All patients had penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer in the distal aortic arch, which formed saccular aneurysms. Four patients had preoperative hoarseness. Maximum preoperative white blood cell count was 10,211±4375/μL, and mean serum C-reactive protein concentration was 12.7±7.2 mg/dL. Causative microorganisms were identified by blood culture or aortic wall culture and were as follows: Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus (2 cases), and unknown (2 cases). Radical debridement with in situ total aortic arch replacement was performed in all patients, followed by the omental flap grafting in 7 patients. All surgery was performed on an urgent or emergency basis. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time and lower body circulatory arrest time were 199.7±50.7 minutes and 66.6±13.8 minutes, respectively. There was no in-hospital mortality, but 1 patient died of asphyxia 5 months after hospital discharge. Freedom from recurrence of infection was 100%. Surgical treatment with the combination of radical debridement with in situ total aortic arch replacement using antegrade selective cerebral perfusion and omental flap grafting was a reliable procedure for the treatment of infected distal aortic arch aneurysms. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Blunt traumatic aortic injuries of the ascending aorta and aortic arch: a clinical multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Victor X; Marini, Milagros; Muñiz, Javier; Gulias, Daniel; Asorey-Veiga, Vanesa; Adrio-Nazar, Belen; Herrera, José M; Pradas-Montilla, Gonzalo; Cuenca, José J

    2013-09-01

    To report the clinical and radiological characteristics, management and outcomes of traumatic ascending aorta and aortic arch injuries. Historic cohort multicentre study including 17 major trauma patients with traumatic aortic injury from January 2000 to January 2011. The most common mechanism of blunt trauma was motor-vehicle crash (47%) followed by motorcycle crash (41%). Patients sustaining traumatic ascending aorta or aortic arch injuries presented a high proportion of myocardial contusion (41%); moderate or greater aortic valve regurgitation (12%); haemopericardium (35%); severe head injuries (65%) and spinal cord injury (23%). The 58.8% of the patients presented a high degree aortic injury (types III and IV). Expected in-hospital mortality was over 50% as defined by mean TRISS 59.7 (SD 38.6) and mean ISS 48.2 (SD 21.6) on admission. Observed in-hospital mortality was 53%. The cause of death was directly related to the ATAI in 45% of cases, head and abdominal injuries being the cause of death in the remaining 55% cases. Long-term survival was 46% at 1 year, 39% at 5 years, and 19% at 10 years. Traumatic aortic injuries of the ascending aorta/arch should be considered in any major thoracic trauma patient presenting cardiac tamponade, aortic valve regurgitation and/or myocardial contusion. These aortic injuries are also associated with a high incidence of neurological injuries, which can be just as lethal as the aortic injury, so treatment priorities should be modulated on an individual basis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Aortic Dissection and Aortic Aneurysms Associated with Fluoroquinolones: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sonal; Nautiyal, Amit

    2017-12-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the association between fluoroquinolone use and aortic dissection or aortic aneurysm in a systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched Medline, Embase, and Scopus from inception to February 15, 2017. We selected controlled studies for inclusion if they reported data on aortic dissection and aortic aneurysm associated with fluoroquinolones exposure versus no exposure. Data were extracted by 2 independent reviewers, with disagreements resolved through further discussion. We assessed the quality of studies using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale for observational studies and the strength of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. The odds ratios (ORs) from observational studies were pooled using the fixed-effect inverse variance method, and statistical heterogeneity was assessed using the I 2 statistic. After a review of 714 citations, we included 2 observational studies in the meta-analysis. Current use of fluoroquinolones was associated with a statistically significantly increased risk of aortic dissection (OR, 2.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.31-3.37; I 2  = 0%) and aortic aneurysm (OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 2.03-2.49; I 2  = 0%) in a fixed-effects meta-analysis. The unadjusted OR estimates and sensitivity analysis using a random-effects model showed similar results. We rated the strength of evidence to be of moderate quality. The number needed to treat to harm for aortic aneurysm for elderly patients aged more than 65 years who were current users of fluoroquinolones was estimated to be 618 (95% CI, 518-749). Evidence from a small number of studies suggests that exposure to fluoroquinolones is consistently associated with a small but significantly increased risk of aortic dissection and aortic aneurysm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Incidence and progression of mild aortic regurgitation after Tirone David reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Elizabeth H; Liang, David H; Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar; Kari, Fabian A; Fischbein, Michael P; Mitchell, R Scott; Miller, D Craig

    2014-01-01

    The study objective was to determine whether recurrent or residual mild aortic regurgitation, which occurs after valve-sparing aortic root replacement, progresses over time. Between 2003 and 2008, 154 patients underwent Tirone David-V valve-sparing aortic root replacement; 96 patients (62%) had both 1-year (median, 12 ± 4 months) and mid-term (62 ± 22 months) transthoracic echocardiograms available for analysis. Age of patients averaged 38 ± 13 years, 71% were male, 31% had a bicuspid aortic valve, 41% had Marfan syndrome, and 51% underwent aortic valve repair, predominantly cusp free margin shortening. Forty-one patients (43%) had mild aortic regurgitation on 1-year echocardiogram. In 85% of patients (n = 35), mild aortic regurgitation remained stable on the most recent echocardiogram (median, 57 ± 20 months); progression to moderate aortic regurgitation occurred in 5 patients (12%) at a median of 28 ± 18 months and remained stable thereafter; severe aortic regurgitation developed in 1 patient, eventually requiring reoperation. Five patients (5%) had moderate aortic regurgitation at 1 year, which did not progress subsequently. Two patients (2%) had more than moderate aortic regurgitation at 1 year, and both ultimately required reoperation. Although mild aortic regurgitation occurs frequently after valve-sparing aortic root replacement, it is unlikely to progress over the next 5 years and should not be interpreted as failure of the valve-preservation concept. Further, we suggest that mild aortic regurgitation should not be considered nonstructural valve dysfunction, as the 2008 valve reporting guidelines would indicate. We need 10- to 15-year follow-up to learn the long-term clinical consequences of mild aortic regurgitation early after valve-sparing aortic root replacement. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eat by making you feel full after eating small amounts of food. After surgery, your doctor can adjust the band ... You will feel full after eating just a small amount of food. The food in the small upper pouch will ...

  17. Decay of superdeformed bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, M.P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the study of superdeformation is to directly connect the large number of superdeformed bands now known to the yrast states. In this way, excitation energies, spins and parities can be assigned to the levels in the second well which is essential to establish the collective and single-particle components of these bands. This paper will review some of the progress which has been made to understand the decay of superdeformed bands using the new arrays including the measurement of the total decay spectrum and the establishment of direct one-step decays from the superdeformed band to the yrast line in 194 Hg. 42 refs., 5 figs

  18. HYBASE - HYperspectral BAnd SElection tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwering, P.B.W.; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Seijen, H.H. van

    2008-01-01

    Band selection is essential in the design of multispectral sensor systems. This paper describes the TNO hyperspectral band selection tool HYBASE. It calculates the optimum band positions given the number of bands and the width of the spectral bands. HYBASE is used to calculate the minimum number of

  19. Hurricane Spiral Bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinn, Thomas A.; Schubert, Wayne H.

    1993-10-01

    The spiral bands that occur in tropical cyclones can be conveniently divided into two classes-outer bands and inner bands. Evidence is presented here that the outer bands form as the result of nonlinear effects during the breakdown of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) through barotropic instability. In this process a zonal strip of high potential vorticity (the ITCZ shear zone or monsoon trough) begins to distort in a varicose fashion, with the potential vorticity (PV) becoming pooled in local regions that are connected by filaments of high PV. As the pooled regions become more axisymmetric, the filaments become thinner and begin to wrap around the PV centers.It is argued that inner bands form in a different manner. As a tropical cyclone intensifies due to latent heat release, the PV field becomes nearly circular with the highest values of PV in the cyclone center. The radial gradient of PV provides a state on which PV waves (the generalization of Rossby waves) can propagate. The nonlinear breaking of PV waves then leads to an irreversible distortion of the PV contours and a downgradient flux of PV. The continuation of this proem tends to erode the high PV core of the tropical cyclone, to produce a surrounding surf zone, and hence to spread the PV horizontally. In a similar fashion, inner bands can also form by the merger of a vortex with a patch of relatively high PV air. As the merger proem occurs the patch of PV is quickly elongated and wrapped around the vortex. The resulting vortex is generally larger in horizontal extent and exhibits a spiral band of PV.When the formation of outer and inner bands is interpreted in the context of a normal-mode spectral model, they emerge as slow manifold phenomena; that is, they have both rotational and (balanced or slaved) gravitational mode aspects. In this sense, regarding them as simply gravity waves leads to an incomplete dynamical picture.

  20. New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation After Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...... (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy...

  1. New-onset atrial fibrillation after surgical aortic valve replacement and transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...... (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy...

  2. Combined Repair of Ascending Aortic Pseudoaneurysm and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, John N.; Lioulias, Achilleas G.; Foroulis, Christophoros N.; Skouteli, Eleni Anna T.; Milonakis, Michael K.; Bastounis, Elias A.; Boulafendis, Dimitrios G.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta after the original inclusion/wrap technique of the Bentall procedure present a difficult surgical management problem and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Patients with Marfan syndrome frequently develop aneurysms and dissections that involve multiple aortic segments. We present the case of a Marfan patient who successfully underwent repair of a giant ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and concomitant repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. An aggressive surgical strategy followed by life-long cardiovascular monitoring is warranted in order to prolong the survival of these patients. (Tex Heart Inst J 2003;30:233–5) PMID:12959210

  3. Tailored endovascular repair of traumatic aortic disruptions with "stacked" abdominal aortic extension cuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Keith B; Borkon, A Michael; Laster, Steven B; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Davis, John R; Pak, Alexander F; Stewart, James R; Stuart, R Scott

    2012-01-01

    The management paradigm for traumatic aortic disruptions has evolved from open to endovascular repair. Thoracic stent grafts designed to treat aneurysmal disease, however, have disadvantages, including size mismatch in younger trauma patients and current standard lengths, which may needlessly necessitate coverage of at least 10 cm of thoracic aorta, increasing the risk of spinal cord ischemia. The "off-label" use of abdominal aortic extension cuffs to treat traumatic aortic disruptions may provide an advantage in this regard by better size matching for the younger trauma patient, reduced thoracic aortic coverage, and less cost to the institution. From 2008 to 2011, a total of 16 traumatic aortic disruptions were evaluated and managed with endovascular techniques. The last six were treated with abdominal aortic extensions cuffs (Excluder Extension Cuffs; W.L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) rather than traditional thoracic stent grafts. In addition to demographics and trauma-related data, additional endpoints evaluated in this retrospective review included operative time, number of cuffs used, stent cost data, procedural complications, and follow-up. All six patients (five men/one woman) with traumatic aortic disruption were successfully treated with complete exclusion of the disruption using abdominal aortic cuffs. There were no complications including death or spinal cord ischemia. The average age was 27 years (range, 18-44 years). The average number of cuffs used to cover the traumatic tear was 2.6 per patient (range, 2-3 cuffs per patient), covering an average of 5.3 cm of thoracic aorta (range, 4-6 cm). Mean procedure time was 70 minutes. Hospital cost for each cuff was $2200 (average total stent cost per patient, $5720). For comparison, a single 10-cm conformable thoracic aortic graft (CTAG) (Gore) costs $14,500. Average follow-up of all six patients for up to 3 years demonstrates no complications or migration of the stent grafts. Traumatic aortic

  4. Combined repair of ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and abdominal aortic aneurysm: in a patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, John N; Lioulias, Achilleas G; Foroulis, Christophoros N; Skouteli, Eleni Anna T; Milonakis, Michael K; Bastounis, Elias A; Boulafendis, Dimitrios G

    2003-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta after the original inclusion/wrap technique of the Bentall procedure present a difficult surgical management problem and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Patients with Marfan syndrome frequently develop aneurysms and dissections that involve multiple aortic segments. We present the case of a Marfan patient who successfully underwent repair of a giant ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and concomitant repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. An aggressive surgical strategy followed by life-long cardiovascular monitoring is warranted in order to prolong the survival of these patients.

  5. Refractory pulmonary edema secondary to severe aortic valvular stenosis - aortic valvuloplasty as bridge therapy to surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, Salazar; Hanna, Franklin; Capasso, Aminta

    2009-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is a progressive disease; when it is severe and symptomatic has a bleak prognosis that affects adversely the patient survival. In these cases, the treatment of choice is valve replacement surgery that under certain circumstances can bear a huge risk that forces the physician to consider less aggressive management alternatives to solve the problem. The case of a 65 years old male with severe aortic valve stenosis is reported. He developed pulmonary edema refractory to medical treatment that was solved by aortic valvuloplasty as bridge therapy to surgery.

  6. Digital substraction angiography in aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadzhidekov, V.; Mircheva, M.; Genov, P.

    1993-01-01

    Regardless of the technical progress in new noninvasive methods, aortography is still regarded as a method providing the necessary information for cases of aortic dissection, especially those requiring emergency operative management. Twenty-four DS-aortographies of patients suspected for aortic dissection are reviewed. Intraarterial DSA is less hazardous owing to the reduced flow rate and quantity of contrast medium required. The relative share of inadequate images is rather high, and conventional cineaortography cannot be invariably replaced by the digital subtracted one. However, angiographic examination in cases suspected for aortic dissection may start with intraarterial digital substraction, and provided the latter proves inconclusive, conventional cineaortography may be resorted to. 6 refs., 3 figs. (orig.)

  7. Bentall Procedure Using Cryopreserved Valved Aortic Homografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Jan T.; Sierra, Jorge; Trindade, Pedro T.; Didier, Dominique; Kalangos, Afksendiyos

    2004-01-01

    The Bentall procedure is the standard operation for patients who have lesions of the ascending aorta associated with aortic valve disease. In many cases, however, mechanical prosthetic conduits are not suitable. There are few reports in the English-language medical literature concerning the mid- to long-term outcome of Bentall operations with cryopreserved homografts. Therefore, we reviewed our experience with this procedure and valved homografts. From January 1997 through December 2002, 21 patients underwent a Bentall operation with cryopreserved homografts at our institution. There were 14 males and 7 females; the mean age was 36 ± 21 years (range, 15–74 years). Eleven patients had undergone previous aortic valve surgery. All patients had aortic dilatation or aneurysms involving the ascending aorta. Indications for surgery included aortic valve stenosis or insufficiency, and aortic valve endocarditis (native valve or prosthetic). One patient had Takayasu's arteritis and 3 had Marfan syndrome. There was 1 hospital death (due to sepsis), but no other major postoperative complications. The mean hospital stay was 14 ± 7 days. Follow-up echocardiographic and computed tomographic scans were performed yearly. The mean follow-up was 34 months (6–72 months). Follow-up imaging revealed no calcifications or degenerative processes related to the homograft. Four patients had minimal valve regurgitation. Two patients died during follow-up. The 3-year actuarial survival rate was 85.7%. Our data suggest that the Bentall procedure with a valved homograft conduit is a safe procedure with excellent mid- to long-term results, comparable to results reported with aortic valve replacement with a homograft. PMID:15745290

  8. Diagnostic imaging of acute aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohya, Tohru; Kumazaki, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    One hundred and nineteen patients with aortic dissection who underwent diagnostic imaging were reviewed and angiographic findings as well as those of CT were analysed. Thirty eight cases (43.1%) had non-contrast opacified false lumen, the type of which we call 'thrombosed type aortic dissection'. A comparative study of the thrombosed type with the patent type of false lumens was made particularly from the stand point of the characteristic diagnostic imagings (CT and angiography). At the same time, the pitfalls of these imagings in thrombosed type aortic dissection were studied. At the onset the average age of thrombosed type was 62.3 years old, while that of the patent type was 57.3. A statistical significance between the two groups was p<0.05. Thrombosed type in all cases was caused by atherosclerosis, whereas patent type was caused by the Marfan's syndrome in 11 cases. Other clinical findings, such as initial symptoms and blood pressure revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Pre-contrast CT in acute thrombosed type aortic dissection showed 'hyperdense crescent sign' in 89.4%. However, in 3 cases with thrombosed type in which the pre-contrast CT showed 'hyperdense crescent sign' contrast-enhanced CT detected no clear evidence of aortic dissection in the same site. This was due to obscurity induced by contrast medium. Angiographic findings of thrombosed type were classified into 3 groups: normal type, stenosed true lumen type and ulcer-like projection type. The incidence of normal type was estimated to be 48.4%, whereas stenosed true lumen type was 24.2% and ulcer-like projection was 27.7%. The present study concluded that thrombosed type is not rare in acute aortic dissection and contrast-enhanced CT as well as pre-contrast CT, is of great value in diagnosing thrombosed type. 'Hyperdense crescent sign' in pre-contrast CT is characteristic of intramural hematoma. (author)

  9. Aortic root surgery in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheick-Yousif, Basheer; Sheinfield, Ami; Tager, Salis; Ghosh, Probal; Priesman, Sergey; Smolinsky, Aram K; Raanani, Ehud

    2008-03-01

    As the shortcomings of the Bentall operation and its variants in the Marfan syndrome have become apparent, the recent cusp-sparing techniques (remodeling or reimplantation) bear promise of better mid-term and long-term outcomes. To examine the results of aortic root surgery in patients with Marfan syndrome. During the period March 1994 to September 2007, 220 patients underwent aortic valve-sparing surgery; 20 were Marfan patients (group 1) who were compared with another 20 Marfan patients undergoing composite aortic root replacement (group 2). Fourteen patients had aortic dissection and 26 had thoracic aortic aneurysm. There were 31 males and 9 females with a mean age of 37.9 +/- 13.8 years. In group 1, reimplantation was used in 13 patients, remodeling in 4, and aortic valve repair with sinotubular junction replacement in 3. In group 2, a mechanical valve conduit was used. Mean logistic Euroscore was 12.27 +/- 14.6% for the whole group, five of whom were emergent cases Group 2 had more previous cardiac procedures compared to group 1 (9 vs. 2, P = 0.03) and shorter cross-clamp time (122 +/- 27.1 vs. 153.9 +/- 23.7 minutes, P = 0.0004). Overall mortality was 10%. Early mortality was 10% in group 2 and 5% in group 1 (NS). Mean follow-up time was 25 months for group 2 and 53 months for group 1. Three patients were reoperated; all had undergone the remodeling. Five year freedom from reoperation and death was 86% and 90% in group 2 and 70% and 95% in group 1 (P = 0.6, P = 0.6), respectively. Late survival of patients with Marfan syndrome was similar in both groups. Root reconstruction tends towards a higher incidence of late reoperations if the remodeling technique is used. We now prefer to use the reimplantation technique.

  10. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Siordia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR is a novel therapeutic intervention for the replacement of severely stenotic aortic valves in high-risk patients for standard surgical procedures. Since the initial PARTNER trial results, use of TAVR has been on the rise each year. New delivery methods and different valves have been developed and modified in order to promote the minimally invasive procedure and reduce common complications, such as stroke. This review article focuses on the current data on the indications, risks, benefits, and future directions of TAVR. Recently, TAVR has been considered as a standard-of-care procedure. While this technique is used frequently in high-risk surgical candidates, studies have been focusing on the application of this method for younger patients with lower surgical risk. Moreover, several studies have proposed promising results regarding the use of valve-in-valve technique or the procedure in which the valve is placed within a previously implemented bioprosthetic valve. However, ischemic strokes and paravalvular leak remain a matter of debate in these surgeries. New methods and devices have been developed to reduce the incidence of post-procedural stroke. While the third generation of TAVR valves (i.e., Edwards Sapien 3 and Medtronic Evolut R addresses the issue of paravalvular leak structurally, results on their efficacy in reducing the risk of paravalvular leak are yet to be obtained. Furthermore, TAVR enters the field of hybrid methods in the treatment of cardiac issues via both surgical and catheter-based approaches. Finally, while TAVR is primarily performed on cases with aortic stenosis, new valves and methods have been proposed regarding the application of this technique in aortic regurgitation, as well as other aortic pathologies. TAVR is a suitable therapeutic approach for the treatment of aortic stenosis in high-risk patients. Considering the promising results in the current patient population

  11. Anesthesia Approach in Endovascular Aortic Reconstruction

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    Ayşin Alagöl

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We have analyzed our initial results of our anesthesia techniques in our new-onset endovascular aortic reconstruction cases.Patients and Methods: The perioperative data of 15 elective and emergent endovascular aortic reconstruction cases that were operated in 2010-2011 were collected in a database. The choice of anesthesia was made by the risk factors, surgical team’s preferences, type and location of the aortic pathology and by the predicted operation duration. The data of local and general anesthesia cases were compared.Results: Thirteen (86.7% cases were male and 2 (13.3% female. Eleven patients were in ASA Class III. The demographic parameters, ASA classifications, concurrent diseases were similar in both groups. Thirteen (86.7% cases had infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and 2 (13.3% had Type III aortic dissection. The diastolic arterial pressures were lower in general anesthesia group in 20th and 40th minutes’ measurements just like the mean arterial pressure measurements at the 40th, 100th minutes and during the deployment of the graft. Postoperative mortality occurred in 3 (20.0% patients and they all had general anesthesia and they were operated on emergency basis. Postoperative morbidity occurred in four patients that had general anesthesia (acute renal failure, multi-organ failure and pneumonia. The other patient had atrial fibrillation on the 1st postoperative day and was converted to sinus rhythm with amiodarone infusion.Conclusion: Edovascular aortic reconstruction procedures can safely be performed with both general and local anesthesia less invasively compared to open surgery. General anesthesia may be preferred for the better hemodynamic control.

  12. Preventative Valve-Sparing Aortic Root Replacement and Pregnancy Outcome in Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sokol, Vesna; Zlopaša, Gordan; Herman, Mislav; Planinić, Pavao; Micevska, Ana

    2012-01-01

    In Marfan syndrome, with dilatation of the aortic root secondary to an underlying connective tissue defect, pregnancy can cause hemodynamic stress leading to the development of an aortic aneurysm and even a fatal aortic dissection. In the presence of existing aortic root enlargement and a family history of aortic dissection, preventative elective surgery is suggested. Aortic root replacement with or without a valve-sparing procedure is superior to total aortic root replacement with ...

  13. Aortic valve replacement in octogenarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dark John H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Aims As our population ages and life expectancy increases the number of people aged over 80 and more referred for cardiac surgery is growing. This study sought to identify the outcome of aortic valve replacement (AVR in octogenarians. Methods 68 patients aged 80 years or more underwent AVR at the Freeman Hospital, between April 2001 and April 2004. A retrospective review of the notes and outcomes from the patients' GP and the NHS strategic tracking service was performed. 54% (37 underwent isolated AVR whilst 46% (31 underwent combined AVR and CABG. Results Follow up was 100% complete. The mean age was 83.1 ± s.d. 2.9 years, a mean gradient of 83 ± s.d. 31 mmHg and mean AVA of 0.56 cm2. The mean additive EuroSCORE was 8.6 ± s.d. 1.2, the logistic EuroSCORE mean 12.0 ± s.d. 5.9. In hospital 30 day mortality was 13 %. Survival was 80% at 1 year and 78% at 2 years. Median follow up was for 712 days. Stepwise logistic regression identified chronic obstructive airways disease as an independent predictor of mortality (p Conclusion Our study demonstrates that the operative mortality for AVR in the over eighties is good, whilst the mid to long term outcome is excellent There is a very low attrition rate with those undergoing the procedure living as long than their age matched population. This study confirms AVR is a safe, acceptable treatment for octogenarians with excellent mid term outcomes.

  14. Global Strain in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Global longitudinal systolic strain (GLS) is often reduced in aortic stenosis despite normal ejection fraction. The importance of reduced preoperative GLS on long-term outcome after aortic valve replacement (AVR) is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: -A total of 125 patients with severe...... quartile 49% (n=15), p=0.04. Patients with increased age, left ventricular hypertrophy and left atrial dilatation were at increased risk. In Cox regression analysis after correcting for standard risk factors and ejection fraction, GLS was found to be significantly associated with cardiac morbidity...

  15. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolbergen, David R; Manshanden, Johan S J; Bouma, Berto J; Blom, Nico A; Mulder, Barbara J M; de Mol, Bas A J M; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate our results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement and associated (multiple) valve repair. From September 2003 to September 2013, 97 patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedures. Patient records and preoperative, postoperative and recent echocardiograms were reviewed. Median age was 40.3 (range: 13.4-68.6) years and 67 (69.1%) were male. Seven (7.2%) patients were younger than 18 years, the youngest being 13.4 years. Fifty-four (55.7%) had Marfan syndrome, 2 (2.1%) other fibrous tissue diseases, 15 (15.5%) bicuspid aortic valve and 3 (3.1%) had earlier Fallot repair. The reimplantation technique was used in all, with a straight vascular prosthesis in 11 (26-34 mm) and the Valsalva prosthesis in 86 (26-32 mm). Concomitant aortic valve repair was performed in 43 (44.3%), mitral valve repair in 10 (10.3%), tricuspid valve repair in 5 (5.2%) and aortic arch replacement in 3 (3.1%). Mean follow-up was 4.2 ± 2.4 years. Follow-up was complete in all. One 14-year old patient died 1.3 years post-surgery presumably of ventricular arrhythmia. One patient underwent reoperation for aneurysm of the proximal right coronary artery after 4.9 years and 4 patients required aortic valve replacement, 3 of which because of endocarditis after 0.1, 0.8 and 1.3 years and 1 because of cusp prolapse after 3.8 years. No thrombo-embolic complications occurred. Mortality, root reoperation and aortic regurgitation were absent in 88.0 ± 0.5% at 5-year follow-up. Results of valve-sparing root replacement are good, even in association with a high incidence of concomitant valve repair. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement can be performed at a very young age as long as an adult size prosthesis can be implanted. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  16. Supravalvular aortic stenosis with sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Vaideeswar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death (SCD most commonly results from previously undiagnosed congenital, acquired, or hereditary cardiac diseases. Congenital aortic valvular, subvalvular, and supravalvular disease with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is an important preventable cause of sudden death. This report documents sudden death presumably due to acute myocardial ischemia in a young male with an undiagnosed supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS due to a rare association of isolation of coronary sinuses of Valsalva. Congenital supravalvular pulmonary stenosis and mitral valvular dysplasia were also present.

  17. Flow measurement at the aortic root

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Litten; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Køber, Lars

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is considered the gold standard of cardiac volumetric measurements. Flow in the aortic root is often measured at the sinotubular junction, even though placing the slice just above valve level may be more precise. It is unknown how much flow...... measurements vary at different levels in the aortic root and which level corresponds best to left ventricle volumetry. METHODS: All patients were older than 70 years presenting with at least one of the following diagnoses: diabetes, hypertension, prior stroke and/or heart failure. Patients with arrhythmias...

  18. First transcatheter aortic valve implantation for severe pure aortic regurgitation in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiam, Paul Toon-Lim; Ewe, See Hooi; Chua, Yeow Leng; Lim, Yean Teng

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become the standard of care for inoperable patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS), and an alternative to open aortic valve replacement for patients at high surgical risk. TAVI has also been performed in several groups of patients with off-label indications such as severe bicuspid AS, and as a valve-in-valve therapy for a degenerated surgical bioprosthesis. Although TAVI with CoreValve® prosthesis is technically challenging, and global experience in the procedure is limited, the procedure could be a treatment option for well-selected patients with severe pure aortic regurgitation (AR). Herein, we report Asia's first case of TAVI for severe pure AR in a patient who was at extreme surgical risk, with good clinical outcome at six months. PMID:24570320

  19. Hybrid aortic repair with antegrade supra-aortic and renovisceral debranching from ascending aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castro-Madrazo, José Antonio; Rivas-Domínguez, Margarita; Fernández-Prendes, Carlota; Zanabili Al-Sibbai, Amer; Llaneza-Coto, José Manuel; Alonso-Pérez, Manuel

    2017-05-01

    Aortic dissection is a life threatening condition. Hybrid repair has been described for the treatment of complex aortic pathology such as thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) and type A and B dissections, although open and total endovascular repair are also possible. Open surgery is still associated with substantial perioperative morbi-mortality rates, thus less invasive techniques such as endovascular repair and hybrid procedures can achieve good results in centers with experience. We present the case of a patient with a chronic type B dissection and TAAA degeneration that was treated in a single stage hybrid procedure with antegrade supra-aortic and renovisceral debranching from the ascending aorta and TEVAR. At three-year follow up, the patient is free of intervention-related complications.

  20. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Severe Aortic Regurgitation With Acute Refractory Cardiogenic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achkouty, Guy; Amabile, Nicolas; Zannis, Konstantinos; Veugeois, Aurélie; Caussin, Christophe

    2018-03-01

    From January 2013 to January 2017, 686 consecutive patients were referred to our centre for transcatheter aortic valve replacement, including 5 subjects with severe aortic regurgitation and acute refractory cardiogenic shock. These patients were contraindicated for surgical treatment by the heart team because of high surgical risk (median logistic EuroSCORE: 74.6/Society of Thoracic Surgeons score: 37.9). The success rate of valve implantation was 100% through transfemoral access with self-expandable devices. The observed 30-day mortality rate was 20%. Hence, the transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedure might represent a successful and life-saving intervention for treatment of patients with severe aortic regurgitation who present with acute refractory cardiogenic shock. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Aortic root and ascending aortic aneurysm in an adult with a repaired tetralogy of fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Sik; Na, Chan-Young; Baek, Jong Hyun; Yang, Jin Sung

    2011-08-01

    Surgical repair of the tetralogy of Fallot is one of the most successful operations in the treatment of congenital heart diseases. We report the case of a 65-year-old man who had an aortic valve replacement at the time of complete repair of the tetralogy of Fallot at the age of forty-three. He subsequently had progressive aortic root and ascending aorta dilation to 9 cm. The aortic root and ascending aorta replacement was done using a composite valve-graft and was performed along with other procedures. Thus, meticulous follow-up of aortic root and ascending aorta after corrective surgery for tetralogy of Fallot is recommended following initial curative surgery.

  2. Strategy to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch: aortic root enlargement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Dharmendra Kumar; Sanki, Prokash; Bhattacharya, Subhankar; Siddique, Javed Veqar

    2014-02-01

    The choice of a valve with an effective orifice area matching the body surface area and providing efficient hemodynamics is an important factor affecting mortality and morbidity in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement. Our preventative strategy was to implant a larger prosthetic valve by aortic root enlargement using the Nunez procedure in 17 patients between February 2010 and January 2011. The decision to enlarge the aortic root was taken when the 19-mm sizer could not be negotiated easily through the aortic root, or on the basis of body surface area of the patient or type of prosthesis available. Postoperative reductions in peak and mean pressure gradients across aortic valve of 12.8-16.5 and 10.2-12.6 mm Hg, respectively, were observed. Postoperative effective orifice areas of the aortic valves were 1.1-1.5 cm(2). By upsizing the aortic valve, we were able to eliminate patient-prosthesis mismatch in 5 patients, and reduce severe patient-prosthesis mismatch to moderate in 11. Aortic root enlargement is a safe procedure. Therefore, cardiac surgeons should not be reluctant to enlarge the aortic root with an autologous pericardial patch to permit implantation of an adequate size of aortic valve prosthesis, with minimal additional aortic crossclamp time and no added cost.

  3. Aortic valve ochronosis: a rare manifestation of alkaptonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Christina Maria

    2011-01-01

    Alkaptonuric ochronosis is a heritable disorder of tyrosine metabolism, with various systemic abnormalities related to pigment deposition and degeneration of collagen and other tissues, including the heart and aorta. A 65-year-old woman with alkaptonuric ochronosis and a history of four joint replacements required aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis. Operative findings included ochronosis of a partly calcified aortic valve and the aortic intima. The aortic valve was removed at surgery and histologically investigated. Light microscopic examination of the aortic valve revealed intracellular and extracellular deposits of ochronotic pigment and a chronic inflammatory infiltrate. Beside the case representation, the disease history, aetiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation and treatment of aortic valve ochronosis are reviewed. PMID:22689837

  4. Risk of Aortic Dissection and Aortic Aneurysm in Patients Taking Oral Fluoroquinolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Chang; Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Lee, Shih-Hao; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Chen, Shyr-Chyr; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2015-11-01

    Fluoroquinolones have been associated with collagen degradation, raising safety concerns related to more serious collagen disorders with use of these antibiotics, including aortic aneurysm and dissection. To examine the relationship between fluoroquinolone therapy and the risk of developing aortic aneurysm and dissection. We conducted a nested case-control analysis of 1477 case patients and 147 700 matched control cases from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) from among 1 million individuals longitudinally observed from January 2000 through December 2011. Cases patients were defined as those hospitalized for aortic aneurysm or dissection. One hundred control patients were matched for each case based on age and sex. Current, past, or any prior-year use of fluoroquinolone. Current use was defined as a filled fluoroquinolone prescription within 60 days of the aortic aneurysm or dissection; past use refers to a filled fluoroquinolone prescription between 61 and 365 days prior to the aortic aneurysm; and any prior-year use refers to having a fluoroquinolone prescription filled for 3 or more days any time during the 1-year period before the aortic aneurysm or dissection. Risk of developing aortic aneurysm or dissection. A total of 1477 individuals who experienced aortic aneurysm or dissection were matched to 147 700 controls. After propensity score adjustment, current use of fluoroquinolones was found to be associated with increased risk for aortic aneurysm or dissection (rate ratio [RR], 2.43; 95% CI, 1.83-3.22), as was past use, although this risk was attenuated (RR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.18-1.86). Sensitivity analysis focusing on aortic aneurysm and dissection requiring surgery also demonstrated an increased risk associated with current fluoroquinolone use, but the increase was not statistically significant (propensity score-adjusted RR, 2.15; 95% CI, 0.97-4.60). Use of fluoroquinolones was associated with an increased risk of aortic aneurysm and

  5. Influence of distal entry tears in acute type B aortic dissection after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenmou; Huang, Bin; Zhao, Jichun; Ma, Yukui; Yuan, Ding; Yang, Yi; Xiong, Fei; Wang, Tiehao

    2017-08-01

    This study evaluated the clinical influence of distal entry tears in acute type B aortic dissection (ATBAD) after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). From August 2009 to December 2014, the clinical outcomes of 130 patients who underwent TEVAR for ATBAD were retrospectively analyzed. According to whether distal entry tears existed after TEVAR, patients were divided into group A (n = 25, absence of distal entry tears) and group B (n = 105, presence of distal entry tears). We evaluated clinical outcomes, including mortality and morbidity in early and late follow-up, as well as aortic remolding. Late aortic events were defined as aortic dissection-related events occurring >30 days from the initial TEVAR procedures, which consisted of endoleak, retrograde type A aortic dissection, aortic enlargement, late rupture, repeat dissection, and stent-induced new entry tear. The study comprised 130 patients (114 men [87.7%] and 16 women [12.3%)] with a mean age of 53.71 years. The 30-day mortality was 3.1%, and early morbidity included type I endoleak, 3.1%, organ failure, 3.8%; stroke, 3.1%; spinal cord ischemia, 0%; and early rupture 1.5%. The overall survival rate by Kaplan-Meier analysis at 1, 3, and 5 years was 93.8%, 89.5%, and 79.2%, respectively. There were no significant differences in early morbidity and 30-day mortality and late survival between group A and group B. However, group A had a significantly lower rate of late aortic events than group B (P = .028 by log-rank test). Meanwhile, group A had better aortic remolding than group B in complete thrombosis of the thoracic aorta at 12 months postoperatively (100% vs 83.5%; P = .029). This study demonstrated that TEVAR for ATBAD had low perioperative morbidity and mortality and satisfactory midterm outcome. Distal entry tears increase the occurrence of late aortic events and inhibit aortic remolding but do not have a significantly negative effect on late survival. Repairing all entry tears to restore

  6. Photonic band gap materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassagne, D.

    Photonic band gap materials Photonic band gap materials are periodic dielectric structures that control the propagation of electromagnetic waves. We describe the plane wave method, which allows to calculate the band structures of photonic crystals. By symmetry analysis and a perturbative approach, we predict the appearance of the low energy photonic band gaps of hexagonal structures. We propose new two-dimensional structures called graphite and boron nitride. Using a transfer matrix method, we calculate the transmission of the graphite structure and we show the crucial role of the coupling with external modes. We study the appearance of allowed modes in the photonic band gap by the introduction of localized defects in the periodicity. Finally, we discuss the properties of opals formed by self-organized silica microspheres, which are very promising for the fabrication of three-dimensional photonic crystals. Les matériaux à bandes interdites photoniques sont des structures diélectriques périodiques qui contrôlent la propagation des ondes électromagnétiques. Nous décrivons la méthode des ondes planes qui permet de calculer les structures de bandes des cristaux photoniques. Par une analyse de la symétrie et une approche perturbative, nous précisons les conditions d'existence des bandes interdites de basse énergie. Nous proposons de nouvelles structures bidimensionnelles appelées graphite et nitrure de bore. Grâce à une méthode de matrices de transfert, nous calculons la transmission de la structure graphite et nous mettons en évidence le rôle fondamental du couplage avec les modes extérieurs. Nous étudions l'apparition de modes permis dans la bande interdite grâce à l'introduction de défauts dans la périodicité. Enfin, nous discutons les propriétés des opales constituées de micro-billes de silice auto-organisées, qui sont très prometteuses pour la fabrication de cristaux photoniques tridimensionnels.

  7. Restrictive techniques: gastric banding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Cristina da Cunha

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Surgery for the treatment of severe obesity has a definite role onthe therapeutic armamentarium all over the world. Initiated 40years ago, bariatric surgery has already a long way thanks tohundred of surgeons, who had constantly searched for the besttechnique for the adequate control of severe obesity. Among theimportant breakthroughs in obesity surgery there is theadjustable gastric band. It is a sylastic band, inflatable andadjustable, which is placed on the top of the stomach in order tocreate a 15-20 cc pouch, with an outlet of 1.3cm. The adjustablegastric band has also a subcutaneous reservoir through whichadjustments can be made, according to the patient evolution.The main feature of the adjustable gastric band is the fact thatis minimal invasive, reversible, adjustable and placedlaparoscopically. Then greatly diminishing the surgical traumato the severe obese patient. Belachew and Favretti’s techniqueof laparoscopic application of the adjustable gastric band isdescribed and the evolution of the technique during this years,as we has been practiced since 1998. The perioperative care ofthe patient is also described, as well as the follow-up and shortand long term controls.

  8. New predictor of aortic enlargement in uncomplicated type B aortic dissection based on elliptic Fourier analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Ito, Toshiro; Kuroda, Yosuke; Uchiyama, Hiroki; Watanabe, Toshitaka; Yasuda, Naomi; Nakazawa, Junji; Harada, Ryo; Kawaharada, Nobuyoshi

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to re-examine the conventional predictive factors for dissected aortic enlargement, such as the aortic and false lumen diameter and to consider whether the morphological elements of the dissected aorta could be predictors by quantifying the 'shape' of the true lumen based on elliptic Fourier analysis. A total of 80 patients with uncomplicated type B aortic dissection were included. The patients were divided into 'Enlargement group' and 'No Change group.' Between the 2 groups, the mean systolic blood pressure during follow-up, aortic and false lumen maximum diameters, and analysed morphological data were compared using each statistical method. The maximum aortic and false lumen diameters were significantly larger in the Enlargement group than in the No Change group (39.3 vs 35.9 mm; P = 0.0058) (23.5 vs 18.2 mm; P = 0.000095). The principal component 1, which is the data calculated by elliptic Fourier analysis, was significantly lower in the Enlargement group than in the No Change group (0.020 vs - 0.072; P = 0.000049). The mean systolic blood pressure ≥130 mmHg, aortic diameter, false lumen diameter and principal component 1 were included in the Cox proportional hazard model as covariates to determine the significant predictive variable. Principal component 1 demonstrated the only significance with aortic enlargement on multivariate analysis (odds ratio = 0.32; P = 0.048). The analysed and calculated morphological data of the shape of the true lumen can be more effective predictive factors of aortic enlargement of type B dissection than the conventional factors. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. Modelling of aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection through 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Daniel; Squelch, Andrew; Sun, Zhonghua

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess if the complex anatomy of aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection can be accurately reproduced from a contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan into a three-dimensional (3D) printed model. Contrast-enhanced cardiac CT scans from two patients were post-processed and produced as 3D printed thoracic aorta models of aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection. The transverse diameter was measured at five anatomical landmarks for both models, compared across three stages: the original contrast-enhanced CT images, the stereolithography (STL) format computerised model prepared for 3D printing and the contrast-enhanced CT of the 3D printed model. For the model with aortic dissection, measurements of the true and false lumen were taken and compared at two points on the descending aorta. Three-dimensional printed models were generated with strong and flexible plastic material with successful replication of anatomical details of aortic structures and pathologies. The mean difference in transverse vessel diameter between the contrast-enhanced CT images before and after 3D printing was 1.0 and 1.2 mm, for the first and second models respectively (standard deviation: 1.0 mm and 0.9 mm). Additionally, for the second model, the mean luminal diameter difference between the 3D printed model and CT images was 0.5 mm. Encouraging results were achieved with regards to reproducing 3D models depicting aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection. Variances in vessel diameter measurement outside a standard deviation of 1 mm tolerance indicate further work is required into the assessment and accuracy of 3D model reproduction. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  10. Association of aortic valve calcification severity with the degree of aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koos, Ralf; Mahnken, Andreas Horst; Dohmen, Guido; Brehmer, Kathrin; Günther, Rolf W; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Marx, Nikolaus; Hoffmann, Rainer

    2011-07-15

    This study sought to examine a possible relationship between the severity of aortic valve calcification (AVC), the distribution of AVC and the degree of aortic valve regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). 57 patients (22 men, 81 ± 5 years) with symptomatic AS and with a logistic EuroSCORE of 24 ± 12 were included. 38 patients (67%) received a third (18F)-generation CoreValve® aortic valve prosthesis, in 19 patients (33%) an Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis was implanted. Prior to TAVI dual-source computed tomography for assessment of AVC was performed. To determine the distribution of AVC the percentage of the calcium load of the most severely calcified cusp was calculated. After TAVI the degree of AR was determined by angiography and echocardiography. The severity of AR after TAVI was related to the severity and distribution of AVC. There was no association between the distribution of AVC and the degree of paravalvular AR after TAVI as assessed by angiography (r = -0.02, p = 0.88). Agatston AVC scores were significantly higher in patients with AR grade ≥ 3 (5055 ± 1753, n = 3) than in patients with AR grade AVC scores > 3000 were associated with a relevant paravalvular AR and showed a trend for increased need for second manoeuvres. There was a significant correlation between the severity of AVC and the degree of AR after AVR (r = 0.50, p AVC have an increased risk for a relevant AR after TAVI as well as a trend for increased need for additional procedures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. COMPARISON OF PREOPERATIVE NONINVASIVE AND INTRAOPERATIVE MEASUREMENTS OF AORTIC ANNULUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Hinduja

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Precise preoperative assessment of aortic annulus diameter is essential for sizing of aortic valve especially in patients planned for transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Computed Tomographic (CT and echocardiographic measurements of the aortic annulus vary because of elliptical shape of aortic annulus. This study was undertaken to compare the measurement of aortic annulus intraoperatively with preoperative noninvasive methods in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement. MATERIALS AND METHODS Aortic annulus diameter was measured with cardiac CT and Transesophageal Echocardiography (TEE prior to open aortic valve replacement in 30 patients with aortic valve stenosis. In CT, aortic annulus dimensions were measured in coronal plane, sagittal oblique plane and by planimetry. Both 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional TEE were used. These were compared with intraoperative measurements done by valve sizers and Hegar dilators. Pearson analysis was applied to test for degree of correlation. RESULTS CT in coronal and sagittal oblique plane tends to overestimate the diameter of aortic annulus when compared with intraoperative measurements (coefficient of relation, r = 0.798 and 0.749, respectively. CT measurements in single oblique plane showed a weaker correlation with intraoperative measurements than 3D TEE and 2D TEE (r = 0.917 and 0.898, respectively. However, CT measurements by planimetry method were most correlating with the intraoperative measurements (r = 0.951. CONCLUSION Noninvasive investigations with 3-dimensional views (CT-based measurement employing calculated average diameter assessment by planimetry and 3-dimensional TEE showed better correlation with intraoperative measurement of aortic annulus. CT-based aortic annulus measurement by planimetry seems to provide adequate dimensions most similar to operative measurements.

  12. Increased stiffness is the major early abnormality in a pig model of severe aortic stenosis and predisposes to congestive heart failure in the absence of systolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Aguero, Jaume; Oh, Jae Gyun; Hammoudi, Nadjib; Fish, Lauren A; Leonardson, Lauren; Picatoste, Belén; Santos-Gallego, Carlos G; Fish, Kenneth M; Hajjar, Roger J

    2015-05-20

    It remains unclear whether abnormal systolic function and relaxation are essential for developing heart failure in pathophysiology of severe aortic stenosis. Yorkshire pigs underwent surgical banding of the ascending aorta. The animals were followed for up to 5 months after surgery, and cardiac function was assessed comprehensively by invasive pressure-volume measurements, 3-dimensional echocardiography, echocardiographic speckle-tracking strain, and postmortem molecular and histological analyses. Pigs with aortic banding (n=6) exhibited significant left ventricular hypertrophy with increased stiffness compared with the control pigs (n=7) (end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship β: 0.053±0.017 versus 0.028±0.009 mm Hg/mL, P=0.007); however, all other parameters corresponding to systolic function, including ejection fraction, end-systolic pressure-volume relationship, preload recruitable stroke work, echocardiographic circumferential strain, and longitudinal strain, were not impaired in pigs with aortic banding. Relaxation parameters were also similar between groups. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium (Ca(2+)) ATPase protein levels in the left ventricle were similar. There were significant increases in 3-dimensional echocardiographic left atrial volumes, suggesting the usefulness of these indexes to detect increased stiffness. Right atrial pacing with a heart rate of 120 beats per minute induced increased end-diastolic pressure in pigs with aortic banding in contrast to decreased end-diastolic pressure in the control pigs. Histological evaluation revealed that increased stiffness was accompanied by cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and increased perimysial and perivascular fibrosis. Increased stiffness is the major early pathological process that predisposes to congestive heart failure without abnormalities in systolic function and relaxation in a clinically relevant animal model of aortic stenosis. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart

  13. Extended aortic repair using frozen elephant trunk technique for Marfan syndrome with acute aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Naomichi; Katayama, Akira; Kuraoka, Masatsugu; Katayama, Keijiro; Takahashi, Shinya; Takasaki, Taiichi; Sueda, Taijiro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze midterm results of frozen elephant trunk technique for Marfan syndrome with acute aortic dissection. Between February 1999 and August 2011 we performed arch replacement uisng frozen elephant trunk technique for acute aortic dissection in 8 patients with Marfan syndrome containing two complicated type B dissections and six type A dissections.Five patients compromised annulo-aortic ectasia who performed Bentall operation. No patients died in the initial operation. Fate of false lumen on the stent graft border was expressed by CT scan follow-up that were patent in 0, thrombosis in 5 and absorption in 3 patients. One patient who had new aortic dissection 8 years after initial surgery required the Crawford V operation. Ten-years-survival rate was 100% and ten years-event free rate was 67%. Frozen elephant trunk technique was feasible for Marfan syndrome with acute aortic dissection and might become alternative prophylactic treatment to the downstream aorta for acute aortic dissection.

  14. Quantitative Aortic Distensibility Measurement Using CT in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Reproducibility and Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Zha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the reproducibility of aortic distensibility (D measurement using CT and assess its clinical relevance in patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Methods. 54 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm were studied to determine their distensibility by using 64-MDCT. Aortic cross-sectional area changes were determined at two positions of the aorta, immediately below the lowest renal artery (level 1. and at the level of its maximal diameter (level 2. by semiautomatic segmentation. Measurement reproducibility was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and Bland-Altman analyses. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed to assess linear associations between aortic D and anthropometric and biochemical parameters. Results. A mean distensibility of Dlevel  1.=(1.05±0.22×10-5  Pa-1 and Dlevel  2.=(0.49±0.18×10-5  Pa-1 was found. ICC proved excellent consistency between readers over two locations: 0.92 for intraobserver and 0.89 for interobserver difference in level 1. and 0.85 and 0.79 in level 2. Multivariate analysis of all these variables showed sac distensibility to be independently related (R2=0.68 to BMI, diastolic blood pressure, and AAA diameter. Conclusions. Aortic distensibility measurement in patients with AAA demonstrated high inter- and intraobserver agreement and may be valuable when choosing the optimal dimensions graft for AAA before endovascular aneurysm repair.

  15. Aorto-right atrial fistula after ascending aortic replacement or aortic value replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi Aihua; Dai Ruping; Jiang Shiliang; Lu Bin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the CT features of aorto-right atrial fistula after aortic valve replacement (AVR) or ascending aortic replacement. Methods: Eighty-seven patients with aortic-right atrial fistula underwent CT after operation. The CT features were retrospectively analyzed. Fistula was measured according to maximum width of the shunt. Results: Aorto-right atrial fistula was detected in 87 patients after aortic valve replacement or ascending aortic replacement by CT scan. Among them, 25 patients were diagnosed as mild aorto-right atrial fistula, 47 patients as moderate, and 15 patients as severe. Thirty-seven patients underwent follow-up CT.Among them, 10 patients with mild to moderate aorto-right atrial fistula were considered to have complete regression, 8 patients with mild aorto-right atrial fistula considered to have incomplete regression, 14 patients with mild to moderate aorto-right atrial fistula considered to have stable condition, and 5 patients with moderate aorto-right atrial fistula considered to have progression at the 3-month follow-up. Conclusion: CT is a useful tool for defining aorto-right atrial fistula after AVR or ascending aortic replacement and for evaluating it in follow-up. (authors)

  16. Analysis of aortic root surgery with composite mechanical aortic valve conduit and valve-sparing reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Ricardo Ribeiro; Mejia, Omar Asdrubal Vilca; Fiorelli, Alfredo Inácio; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Dias, Altamiro Ribeiro; Mady, Charles; Stolf, Noedir Antonio Groppo

    2010-01-01

    Comparative analysis of early and late results of aortic root reconstruction with aortic valve sparing operations and the composite mechanical valve conduit replacement. From November 2002 to September 2009, 164 consecutive patients with mean age 54 ± 15 years, 115 male, underwent the aortic root reconstruction (125 mechanical valve conduit replacements and 39 valve sparing operations). Sixteen percent of patients had Marfan syndrome and 4.3% had bicuspid aortic valve. One hundred and forty-four patients (88%) were followed for a mean period of 41.1 ± 20.8 months. The hospital mortality was 4.9%, 5.6% in operations with valved conduits and 2.6% in the valve sparing procedures (P valve sparing operations, respectively (95% CI = 70% - 95%, P = 0.001), (95% CI = 82% - 95% P = 0.03) and (95% CI = 81% - 95%, P = 0.03). Multivariate analysis showed that creatinine greater than 1.4 mg/dl, Cabrol operation and renal dialysis were predictors of mortality, respectively, with occurrence chance of 6 (95% CI = 1.8 - 19.5, P = 0.003), 12 (95% CI = 3 - 49.7, P = 0.0004) and 16 (95% CI = 3.6 - 71.3, P = 0.0002). The aortic root reconstruction has a low early and late mortality, high survival free of complications and low need for reoperation. During the late follow-up, valve sparing aortic root reconstructions presented fewer incidences of bleeding, thromboembolic events and endocarditis.

  17. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  18. Fatal Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Aortic Graft Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Smith, Davey; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Fierer, Joshua

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a yeast commonly used in baking and a frequent colonizer of human mucosal surfaces. It is considered relatively nonpathogenic in immunocompetent adults. We present a case of S. cerevisiae fungemia and aortic graft infection in an immunocompetent adult. This is the first reported case of S. cerevisiue fungemia where the identity of the pathogen was confirmed by rRNA sequencing.

  19. Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kesteren, F.; Wiegerinck, E. M. A.; Rizzo, S.; Baan, J.; Planken, R. N.; von der Thüsen, J. H.; Niessen, H. W. M.; van Oosterhout, M. F. M.; Pucci, A.; Thiene, G.; Basso, C.; Sheppard, M. N.; Wassilew, K.; van der Wal, A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new field of interest in cardiovascular pathology. To identify the cause of death, it is important to be familiar with specific findings related to the time interval between the procedure and death. We aimed to provide an overview of

  20. [Aortic debris in cerebrovascular ischemic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curatolo, L M; Melcón, C M; Lourido, M A; Torres-Lynch, M F; Parisi, V L; Fernández, G G; Rubachin, S; Hernández, G; Rotta-Escalante, R

    The aortic atherosclerotic debris is considered a high risk embolic source, being an independent predictor for cerebrovascular ischemia. The incidence is higher in the elderly and in patients with coronary artery disease. Transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) is an important diagnostic tool that allows its detection. To describe characteristics of patients with ischemic stroke and echocardiographic diagnosis of aortic debris. We analyzed the group of patients with debris diagnosis in 209 TEE performed between 01/01/99 and 31/05/02, in 835 consecutive ischemic events. The information was collected from the Stroke Database of the Neurology Department of Policlinica Bancaria. TEE was accomplished in 25% of all assisted events. The mean age was 66.56 years (SD 11.22). In 30 studies (14%) aortic debris was detected. In this group of patients, 26 men and 4 women, was also found: plaques grade IV 60%, left atrial dilatation 40% and spontaneous echo contrast 20%. The most frequent risk factors were hypertension, dislipemia and smoking, with no significative difference compared to the group without debris. 40% had a prior cerebrovascular event. They presented with clinical subtype LACI 53%, PACI 27%, POCI 17%. 63% of patients had lacunar infarct (53% anterior and 10% posterior). The contribution of TTE for detection of embolic sources is relevant. A high percentage of the population with echocardiographic diagnosis of aortic debris, had a lacunar infarct, defined radiologically and by clinical features.

  1. Severe aortic valve stenosis and nosebleed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoedel, Johannes; Obergfell, Achim; Maass, Alexander H.; Schodel, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is known to be associated with loss of high molecular von Willebrand multimers. This can lead to gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with gastrointestinal angiodysplasia, the Heyde syndrome. Here we present a case of anaemia and severe epistaxis associated with acquired von

  2. Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement in Octogenarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Tasoglu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study analyzes the long-term outcomes of mechanical aortic valve replacement in octogenarian patients. Material and Method: A retrospective review was performed on 23 octogenarian patients who underwent mechanical aortic valve replacement. Hospital mortality, postoperative intensive care unit stay, hospital stay and long-term results was examined. Estimates of the cumulative event mortality rate were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The mean age of all patients was 82.9±2.3 years and most were men (65.22%. The median ejection fraction was 45%. 73.91% of patients were in New York Heart Association class III-IV. Thirteen patients (56.52% in this study underwent combined procedure, the remaining 10 (43.48% patients underwent isolated aortic valve replacement. The most common valve size was 23 mm. The mean intensive care unit stay was 1.76±1.14 days. The mean hospital stay was 9.33±5.06 days. No complications were observed in 56.52% patients during their hospital stay. The overall hospital mortality was 8.7%. Follow-up was completed for all 23 patients. Median follow-up time was 33 months (1-108 months. Actuarial survival among discharged from hospital was 59% at 5 years. Discussion: Mechanical aortic valve replacement is a safe procedure in octogenarian patients and can be performed safely even in combined procedure.

  3. Natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Schroeder, T V; Olsen, P S

    1993-01-01

    During a 10-year period in which 735 patients presented with abdominal aortic aneurysms to our clinic, 63 were not offered operative treatment. The primary reason for choosing conservative treatment was concomitant diseases that increased the risk of operation. After 2 years of followup, half...

  4. Endovascular aortic repair: First twenty years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Končar Igor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular aortic/aneurysm repair (EVAR was introduced into clinical practice at the beginning of the nineties. Its fast development had a great influence on clinicians, vascular surgeons and interventional radiologists, educational curriculums, patients, industry and medical insurance. The aim of this paper is to present the contribution of clinicians and industry to the development and advancement of endovascular aortic repair over the last 20 years. This review article presents the development of EVAR by focusing on the contribution of physicians, surgeons and interventional radiologists in the creation of the new field of vascular surgery termed hybrid vascular surgery, and also the contribution of technological advancement by a significant help of industrial representatives – engineers and their counselors. This article also analyzes studies conducted in order to compare the successfulness of EVAR with up-to-now applied open surgical repair of aortic aneurysms, and some treatment techniques of other aortic diseases. During the first two decades of its development the EVAR method was rapidly progressing and was adopted concurrently with the expansion of technology. Owing to large randomized studies, early and long-term results indicate specific complications of this method, thus influencing further technological improvement and defining risk patients groups in whom the use of the technique should be avoided. Good results are insured only in centers, specialized in vascular surgery, which have on their disposal adequate conditions for solving all complications associated with this method.

  5. Abdominal aortic calcification in patients with CKD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, Mieke J; van den Brand, Jan Ajg; van Zuilen, Arjan D; Koster, Yelka; Bots, Michiel L; Vervloet, Marc G; Blankestijn, Peter J; Wetzels, Jack Fm

    BACKGROUND: Abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) is independently associated with cardiovascular events in dialysis patients and in the general population. However, data in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are limited. We analyzed determinants and prognostic value of AAC in

  6. Abdominal aortic calcification in patients with CKD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M.J.; Brand, J. van den; Zuilen, A.D. van; Koster, Y.; Bots, M.L.; Vervloet, M.G.; Blankestijn, P.J.; Wetzels, J.F.M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) is independently associated with cardiovascular events in dialysis patients and in the general population. However, data in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are limited. We analyzed determinants and prognostic value of AAC in

  7. Aortic root reconstruction by aortic valve-sparing operation (David type I reimplantation) in Marfan syndrome accompanied by annuloaortic ectasia and acute type-A aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamura, Shunichi; Furuya, Hidekazu; Yagi, Kentarou; Ikeya, Eriko; Yamaguchi, Masaomi; Fujimura, Takabumi; Kanabuchi, Kazuo

    2006-09-20

    To reconstruct the aortic root for aneurysm of the ascending aorta accompanied by aortic regurgitation, annuloaortic ectasia (AAE) and acute type-A dissection with root destruction, the Bentall operation using a prosthetic valve still is the standard procedure today. Valve-sparing procedures have actively been used for aortic root lesions, and have also been attempted in aortic root reconstruction for Marfan syndrome which may have abnormalities in the valve leaflets. We conducted a valve-sparing procedure in a female patient with Marfan syndrome who had AAE accompanied by type-A acute aortic dissection. The patient was a 37-year-old woman complaining of severe pain from the chest to the back. The limbs were long, and funnel breast was observed. Diastolic murmurs were heard. On chest computed tomography, a dissection cavity was present from the ascending aorta to the left common iliac artery, and the root dilated to 55 mm. Grade II aortic regurgitation was observed on ultrasound cardiography. Regarding her family history, her father had died suddenly at 54 years of age. She was diagnosed with type-A acute dissection concurrent with Marfan syndrome and AAE. The structure of the aortic valve was normal, and root reconstruction by a valve-sparing operation and total replacement of the aortic arch was conducted. On postoperative ultrasound cardiography, the aortic regurgitation was within the allowable range, and the shortterm postoperative results were good.

  8. Multimodality Imaging Approach towards Primary Aortic Sarcomas Arising after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Case Series Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamran, Mudassar, E-mail: kamranm@mir.wustl.edu; Fowler, Kathryn J., E-mail: fowlerk@mir.wustl.edu; Mellnick, Vincent M., E-mail: mellnickv@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States); Sicard, Gregorio A., E-mail: sicard@wudosis.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery (United States); Narra, Vamsi R., E-mail: narrav@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Primary aortic neoplasms are rare. Aortic sarcoma arising after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a scarce subset of primary aortic malignancies, reports of which are infrequent in the published literature. The diagnosis of aortic sarcoma is challenging due to its non-specific clinical presentation, and the prognosis is poor due to delayed diagnosis, rapid proliferation, and propensity for metastasis. Post-EVAR, aortic sarcomas may mimic other more common aortic processes on surveillance imaging. Radiologists are rarely knowledgeable about this rare entity for which multimodality imaging and awareness are invaluable in early diagnosis. A series of three pathologically confirmed cases are presented to display the multimodality imaging features and clinical presentations of aortic sarcoma arising after EVAR.

  9. Aortic aneurysm disease vs. aortic occlusive disease - differences in outcome and intensive care resource utilisation after elective surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Jannie; Gilsaa, Torben; Rønholm, Ebbe

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT: Abdominal aortic surgery is a high-risk procedure, with aortic aneurysm and aortic occlusive diseases being the main indications. These groups are often regarded as having equal perioperative risk profiles. Previous reports suggest that the haemodynamic and inflammatory response to aortic...... clamping is more pronounced in patients with aortic aneurysm disease, which may affect outcome. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this observational cohort study was to evaluate outcome after open elective abdominal aortic surgery, hypothesising a higher 30-day mortality, a higher incidence of postoperative organ...... January 2007 to 1 March 2010. PATIENTS: One thousand two hundred and ninety-three patients scheduled for primary open elective, aortoiliac bypass or aortofemoral bypass procedures or abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mechanical ventilation, acute dialysis, use of vasopressors...

  10. Operative Strategies and Outcomes in Type A Aortic Dissection After the Enactment of a Multidisciplinary Aortic Surgery Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, Jared P; Scheinerman, Joshua A; Balsam, Leora B; Ursomanno, Patricia; DeAnda, Abe

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare operative strategies and patient outcomes in acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) repairs before and after the implementation of a multidisciplinary aortic surgery team. Between May 2005 and July 2014, 101 patients underwent ATAAD repair at our institution. A dedicated multidisciplinary aortic surgery team (experienced aortic surgeon, perfusionists, cardiac anesthesiologists, nurses, and radiologists) was formed in 2010. We retrospectively compared ATAAD repair outcomes in patients before (2005-2009, N = 39) and after (2010-2014, N = 62) implementation of our program. Expected operative mortality was calculated using the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection preoperative predictive model. This study demonstrated a significant reduction in operative mortality after implementation of the aortic surgery program (30.8% vs. 9.7%; P = 0.014). There was also an increase in the complexity of surgical technique and perfusion strategies with fewer postoperative complications related to respiratory (P multidisciplinary aortic surgery team.

  11. Vitamins and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya

    2017-02-01

    To summarize the association of vitamins (B6, B12, C, D, and E) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), we reviewed clinical studies with a comprehensive literature research and meta-analytic estimates. To identify all clinical studies evaluating the association of vitamins B6/B12/C/D/E and AAA, databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched through April 2015, using Web-based search engines (PubMed and OVID). For each case-control study, data regarding vitamin levels in both the AAA and control groups were used to generate standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Pooled analyses of the 4 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower circulating vitamin B6 levels (SMD, -0.33; 95% CI, -0.55 to -0.11; P=0.003) but non-significantly lower vitamin B12 levels (SMD, -0.42; 95% CI, -1.09 to 0.25; P=0.22) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. Pooled analyses of the 2 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower levels of circulating vitamins C (SMD, -0.71; 95% CI, -1.23 to -0.19; P=0.007) and E (SMD, -1.76; 95% CI, -2.93 to 0.60; P=0.003) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. Another pooled analysis of the 3 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower circulating vitamin D (25-hydroxyvitamin D) levels (SMD, -0.25; 95% CI, -0.50 to -0.01; P=0.04) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. In a double-blind controlled trial, 4.0-year treatment with a high-dose folic acid and vitamin B6/B12 multivitamin in kidney transplant recipients did not reduce a rate of AAA repair despite significant reduction in homocysteine level. In another randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 5.8-year supplementation with α-tocopherol (vitamin E) had no preventive effect on large AAA among male smokers. In clinical setting, although low circulating vitamins B6/C/D/E (not B12) levels are associated with AAA presence, vitamins B6/B12/E

  12. Ultra wide band antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Begaud, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Ultra Wide Band Technology (UWB) has reached a level of maturity that allows us to offer wireless links with either high or low data rates. These wireless links are frequently associated with a location capability for which ultimate accuracy varies with the inverse of the frequency bandwidth. Using time or frequency domain waveforms, they are currently the subject of international standards facilitating their commercial implementation. Drawing up a complete state of the art, Ultra Wide Band Antennas is aimed at students, engineers and researchers and presents a summary of internationally recog

  13. Aortic valve-sparing operations in aortic root aneurysms: remodeling or reimplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnavardi, Mohammad; Yan, Tristan D; Bannon, Paul G; Wilson, Michael K

    2011-08-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether the reimplantation (David) technique or the remodeling (Yacoub) technique provides the optimum event free survival in patients with an aortic root aneurysm suitable for an aortic valve-sparing operation. In total, 392 papers were found using the reported search criteria, of which 14 papers provided the best evidence to answer the clinical question. A total of 1338 patients (Yacoub technique in 606 and David technique in 732) from 13 centres were included. In most series, cardiopulmonary bypass time and aortic cross-clamp time were longer for the David technique compared to the Yacoub technique. Early mortality was comparable between the two techniques (0-6.9% for the Yacoub technique and 0-6% for the David technique). There is a tendency for a higher freedom from significant long-term aortic insufficiency in the David group than the Yacoub group, which does not necessarily result in a higher reoperation rate in the Yacoub group. In the largest series reported, freedom from a moderate-to-severe aortic insufficiency at 12 years was 82.6 ± 6.2% in the Yacoub and 91.0 ± 3.8% in the David group (P=0.035). Freedom from reoperation at the same time point was 90.4 ± 4.7% in the Yacoub group and 97.4 ± 2.2% in the David group (P=0.09). In another series, freedom from reoperation at a follow-up time of about four years was 89 ± 4% in the Yacoub group and 98 ± 2% in the David group. Although some authors merely preferred the Yacoub technique for a bicuspid aortic valve, the accumulated evidence in the current review indicates comparable results for both techniques in a bicuspid aortic valve. Current evidence is in favour of the David rather than the Yacoub technique in pathologies such as Marfan syndrome, acute type A aortic dissection, and excessive annular dilatation that may impair aortic root integrity. Careful selection of patients for each technique and

  14. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair migration and aortic elongation differentiated using dual reference point analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta, Hillary B; Takayama, Toshio; Panthofer, Annalise; Cambria, Richard P; Farber, Mark A; Jordan, William D; Matsumura, Jon S

    2018-02-01

    We evaluated images of patients undergoing a thoracic endovascular aortic repair procedure using two reference points as a means for differentiating stent graft migration from aortic elongation. Conventional standards define migration of a stent graft as an absolute change in the distance from the distal graft ring to a distal landmark ≥10 mm compared with a baseline measurement. Aortic elongation occurs over time in both healthy individuals and patients with aortic disease. Aortic elongation in patients with stent grafts may result in increased distal thoracic aortic lengths over time. False-positive stent graft migration would be defined when these patients meet the standard definition for migration, even if the stent has not moved in relation to the elongating aorta. This retrospective study evaluated the aortic length of 23 patients treated with the conformable GORE TAG thoracic endoprosthesis (W. L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz) in three clinical trials (dissection, traumatic injury, and aneurysm). Patients who met the standard definition for migration were selected. A standardized protocol was used to measure aortic centerline lengths, including the innominate artery (IA) to the most distal device ring, the IA to the celiac artery (CA), and the distal ring to the CA. Baseline lengths obtained from the first postoperative image were compared with length measurements obtained from the first interval at which they met the standard definition for migration. The conventional standards for migration using a single reference point were compared with the use of dual reference points. Of the 23 patients with endograft changes, 20 were deemed to have aortic elongation rather than true migration. The remaining three patients were deemed to have migration on the basis of the IA to distal ring position compared with the IA to CA length change. The IA to CA interval length change was markedly greater in those with elongation compared with migration (23.8 ± 8.4

  15. Preoperative computer tomography evaluation in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groudeva, V.; Stoynova, V.; Trendafilova, D.; Dzhorgova, Y.; Nachev, G.

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is rapidly emerging technique alternative to surgery in high risk patients. Imaging and especially computer tomography is important in preoperative assessment of the aortic ring and the prosthetic valve choice. The aim of this study is to share authors initial experience in CT assessment of the aortic ring prior to Transcatheter aortic valve replacement. 49 patients (mean age 76,55) underwent 320 rows MDCT (Acquilon One) prior TAVI. Protocol involved scanning from thoracic inlet to common femoral arteries. Aortic root size, aortic diameter at the level of coronary sinuses and the sinotubular junction and distance to coronary ostia were evaluated on a Vitrea work station. MDCT established maximal aortic ring diameter from 18 to 31 mm mean 25,04 mm while the lesser rate was from 16 to 21 mm. Accordingly positioned prostheses were in 34,75% No. 23, in 49% - No. 26 and in16,3% - No. 29. MDCT is crucial in aortic valve assessment prior to TAVI in experienced hands and multidisciplinary team. (authors) Key words: TRANSCATHETER AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT (TAVI). MDCT AORTIC VALVE ASSESSMENT

  16. The risk for type B aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Alexander W; Franken, Romy; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Timmermans, Janneke; Scholte, Arthur J; van den Berg, Maarten P; de Waard, Vivian; Pals, Gerard; Mulder, Barbara J M; Groenink, Maarten

    2015-01-27

    Aortic dissections involving the descending aorta are a major clinical problem in patients with Marfan syndrome. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical parameters associated with type B aortic dissection and to develop a risk model to predict type B aortic dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome. Patients with the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome and magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic imaging of the aorta were followed for a median of 6 years for the occurrence of type B dissection or the combined end point of type B aortic dissection, distal aortic surgery, and death. A model using various clinical parameters as well as genotyping was developed to predict the risk for type B dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome. Between 1998 and 2013, 54 type B aortic dissections occurred in 600 patients with Marfan syndrome (mean age 36 ± 14 years, 52% male). Independent variables associated with type B aortic dissection were prior prophylactic aortic surgery (hazard ratio: 2.1; 95% confidence interval: 1.2 to 3.8; p = 0.010) and a proximal descending aorta diameter ≥27 mm (hazard ratio: 2.2; 95% confidence interval: 1.1 to 4.3; p = 0.020). In the risk model, the 10-year occurrence of type B aortic dissection in low-, moderate-, and high-risk patients was 6%, 19%, and 34%, respectively. Angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy was associated with fewer type B aortic dissections (hazard ratio: 0.3; 95% confidence interval: 0.1 to 0.9; p = 0.030). Patients with Marfan syndrome with prior prophylactic aortic surgery are at substantial risk for type B aortic dissection, even when the descending aorta is only slightly dilated. Angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy may be protective in the prevention of type B aortic dissections. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Aortic events in a nationwide Marfan syndrome cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Kristian A; Stochholm, Kirstine; Hove, Hanne; Kyhl, Kasper; Gregersen, Pernille A; Vejlstrup, Niels; Østergaard, John R; Gravholt, Claus H; Andersen, Niels H

    2017-02-01

    Marfan syndrome is associated with morbidity and mortality due to aortic dilatation and dissection. Preventive aortic root replacement has been the standard treatment in Marfan syndrome patients with aortic dilatation. In this study, we present aortic event data from a nationwide Marfan syndrome cohort. The nationwide cohort of Danish Marfan syndrome patients was established from the Danish National Patient Registry and the Cause of Death Register, where we retrieved information about aortic surgery and dissections. We associated aortic events with age, sex, and Marfan syndrome diagnosis prior or after the first aortic event. From the total cohort of 412 patients, 150 (36.4 %) had an aortic event. Fifty percent were event free at age 49.6. Eighty patients (53.3 %) had prophylactic surgery and seventy patients (46.7 %) a dissection. The yearly event rate was 0.02 events/year/patient in the period 1994-2014. Male patients had a significant higher risk of an aortic event at a younger age with a hazard ratio of 1.75 (CI 1.26-2.42, p = 0.001) compared with women. Fifty-three patients (12.9 %) were diagnosed with MFS after their first aortic event which primarily was aortic dissection [n = 44 (83.0 %)]. More than a third of MFS patients experienced an aortic event and male patients had significantly more aortic events than females. More than half of the total number of dissections was in patients undiagnosed with MFS at the time of their event. This emphasizes that diagnosing MFS is lifesaving and improves mortality risk by reducing the risk of aorta dissection.

  18. Band-notched spiral antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jae; Chang, John

    2018-03-13

    A band-notched spiral antenna having one or more spiral arms extending from a radially inner end to a radially outer end for transmitting or receiving electromagnetic radiation over a frequency range, and one or more resonance structures positioned adjacent one or more segments of the spiral arm associated with a notch frequency band or bands of the frequency range so as to resonate and suppress the transmission or reception of electromagnetic radiation over said notch frequency band or bands.

  19. Selective Aortic Arch and Root Replacement in Repair of Acute Type A Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, Fernando; Elsayed, Ramsey S; Cohen, Robbin G; Tatum, James M; Kumar, S Ram; Kazerouni, Kayvan; Mack, Wendy J; Barr, Mark L; Cunningham, Mark J; Hackmann, Amy E; Baker, Craig J; Starnes, Vaughn A; Bowdish, Michael E

    2018-02-01

    Controversy exists regarding the optimal extent of repair for type A aortic dissection. Our approach is to replace the ascending aorta, and only replace the aortic root or arch when intimal tears are present in those areas. We examined intermediate outcomes with this approach to acute type A aortic dissection repair. Between March 2005 and October 2016, 195 patients underwent repair of acute type A aortic dissection. Repair was categorized by site of proximal and distal anastomosis and extent of repair. Mean follow-up was 31.0 ± 30.9 months. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess survival. Multiple variable Cox proportional hazards modeling was utilized to identify factors associated with overall mortality. Overall survival was 85.1%, 83.9%, 79.1%, and 74.4% at 6, 12, 36, and 60 months, respectively. Eight patients required reintervention. The cumulative incidence of aortic reintervention at 1 year with death as a competing outcome was 3.95%. Multiple variable regression analysis identified factors such as age, preoperative renal failure, concomitant thoracic endograft, postoperative myocardial infarction and sepsis, and need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as predictive of overall mortality. Neither proximal or distal extent of repair, nor need for reintervention affected overall survival (proximal: hazard ratio 1.63, 95% confidence interval: 0.75 to 3.51, p = 0.22; distal: hazard ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval: 0.43 to 2.97, p = 0.81; reintervention: hazard ratio 0.03, 95% confidence interval: 0.002 to 0.490, p < 0.01). A selective approach to root and arch repair in acute type A aortic dissection is safe. If aortic reintervention is needed, survival does not appear to be affected. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Percutaneous implantation of the first repositionable aortic valve prosthesis in a patient with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buellesfeld, Lutz; Gerckens, Ulrich; Grube, Eberhard

    2008-04-01

    Percutaneous aortic valve replacement is a new less-invasive alternative for high-risk surgical candidates with aortic stenosis. However, the clinical experience is still limited, and the currently available 'first-generation devices' revealed technical shortcomings, such as lack of repositionability and presence of paravalvular leakages. We report the first-in-man experience with the new self-expanding Lotus Valve prosthesis composed of a nitinol frame with implemented bovine pericardial leaflets which is designed to address these issues, being repositionable and covered by a flexible membrane to seal paravalvular gaps. We implanted this prosthesis in a 93-year old patient presenting with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (valve area: 0.6 cm(2)). Surgical valve replacement had been declined due to comorbidities. We used a retrograde approach for insertion of the 21-French Lotus catheter loaded with the valve prosthesis via surgical cut-down to the external iliac artery. Positioning of the valve was guided by transesophageal echo and supra-aortic angiograms. The prosthesis was successfully inserted and deployed within the calcified native valve. Echocardiography immediately after device deployment showed a significant reduction of the transaortic mean pressure gradient (32 to 9 mmHg; final valve area 1.7 cm(2)) without evidence of residual aortic regurgitation. The postprocedural clinical status improved from NYHA-IV to NYHA-II. These results remained unchanged up to the 3 month follow-up. Successful percutaneous aortic valve replacement can be performed using the new self-expanding and repositionable Lotus valve for treatment of high-risk patients with aortic valve stenosis. Further studies are mandatory to assess device safety and efficacy in larger patient populations. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Detecting atheromatous plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries for more accurate stroke subtype classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoyang; Wu, Simiao; Zeng, Quantao; Xiao, Jiahe; Liu, Ming

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the correlations of atheromatous plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries with intracranial arterial stenosis and carotid plaques in stroke patients, and to determine whether taking these plaques into account will reduce the proportion of patients in the undetermined etiology group. We prospectively enrolled 308 ischemic stroke patients, whose clinical characteristics and A-S-C-O classifications were compared with analyses of intracranial arteries, carotid arteries, aortic arch, and supra-aortic arteries. 125(40.6%) patients had plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries, of which 106 (84.8%) had complex plaques. No correlations were observed between these plaques and carotid plaques ( p = 0.283) or intracranial arterial stenosis ( p = 0.097). After detecting the mobile thrombi in the aortic arch and supra-aortic arteries, the proportion of patients in the atherothrombosis group was increased from 33.8% to 55.5% ( p = 0.00), whereas the proportion of patients in stroke of undetermined etiology group was decreased from 19.2% to 11.0% ( p = 0.00). Examining only the carotid and intracranial arteries may not provide adequate information about large arteries in stroke patients. Therefore, it would be better to include a search for relevant plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries in modern stroke workup, for it may lead to more accurate stroke subtype classification and guide secondary prevention.

  2. Abnormalities of aortic arch shape, central aortic flow dynamics, and distensibility predispose to hypertension after successful repair of aortic coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donazzan, Luca; Crepaz, Robert; Stuefer, Josef; Stellin, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    Systemic hypertension (HT) is a major long-term complication even after successful repair of aortic coarctation (CoA), and many factors are involved in this pathophysiology. To investigate the role of abnormalities in the aortic arch shape, central aortic flow dynamics, and distensibility in developing HT after successful repair of CoA. We selected a group of 26 normotensive patients (mean age 16.9±7.3 years, range 9-32 years) with anatomically successful repair of CoA among 140 patients regularly followed after repair of CoA and analyzed their last clinical and echocardiographic data. Bicycle exercise test and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) were also obtained. Mean age at surgical repair was 3.2±3.9 years (range 10 days-15 years); 12 patients underwent surgical correction during the first year of life. Repair of CoA was performed by end-to-end anastomosis (TT) in 23 patients (extended TT in 6 patients with arch hypoplasia), patch aortoplasty in 2, and subcalvian flap aortoplasty in 1. The postsurgical follow-up was 13.8±7.2 years (range 3.5-29.4 years). The shape of the aortic arch was defined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on this global geometry (normal-gothic-crenel), ratio of the height-transverse diameter (A/T), percentage of residual stenosis, and growth index of the transverse arch segments. Flow mapping by phase-contrast imaging in the ascending and descending aorta was performed in order to measure the systolic waveforms and central aortic distensibility. Twenty normal age-matched patients submitted to the same MRI protocol were used as controls. Six patients were found to have a gothic and 20 a normal aortic arch shape. Patients with gothic aortic arch shape had an increased A/T ratio (0.80±0.07 vs 0.58±0.05, P135 mm Hg on ABPM were higher in the gothic than in the normal arch group. There was a correlation between nocturnal SBP, 24 hours pulse pressure on ABPM in the whole group, and different MRI variables (A/T, distensibility of

  3. Risk factors for incisional hernia repair after aortic reconstructive surgery in a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Nadia A; Helgstrand, Frederik; Vogt, Katja C

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm disease has been hypothesized as associated with the development of abdominal wall hernia. We evaluated the risk factors for incisional hernia repair after open elective aortic reconstructive surgery for aortoiliac occlusive disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm....

  4. 3D echocardiographic analysis of aortic annulus for transcatheter aortic valve replacement using novel aortic valve quantification software: Comparison with computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediratta, Anuj; Addetia, Karima; Medvedofsky, Diego; Schneider, Robert J; Kruse, Eric; Shah, Atman P; Nathan, Sandeep; Paul, Jonathan D; Blair, John E; Ota, Takeyoshi; Balkhy, Husam H; Patel, Amit R; Mor-Avi, Victor; Lang, Roberto M

    2017-05-01

    With the increasing use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS), computed tomography (CT) remains the standard for annulus sizing. However, 3D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been an alternative in patients with contraindications to CT. We sought to (1) test the feasibility, accuracy, and reproducibility of prototype 3DTEE analysis software (Philips) for aortic annular measurements and (2) compare the new approach to the existing echocardiographic techniques. We prospectively studied 52 patients who underwent gated contrast CT, procedural 3DTEE, and TAVR. 3DTEE images were analyzed using novel semi-automated software designed for 3D measurements of the aortic root, which uses multiplanar reconstruction, similar to CT analysis. Aortic annulus measurements included area, perimeter, and diameter calculations from these measurements. The results were compared to CT-derived values. Additionally, 3D echocardiographic measurements (3D planimetry and mitral valve analysis software adapted for the aortic valve) were also compared to the CT reference values. 3DTEE image quality was sufficient in 90% of patients for aortic annulus measurements using the new software, which were in good agreement with CT (r-values: .89-.91) and small (software can accurately measure aortic annulus in patients with severe AS undergoing TAVR, in better agreement with CT than the existing methodology. Accordingly, intra-procedural TEE could potentially replace CT in patients where CT carries significant risk. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Adjusting parameters of aortic valve stenosis severity by body size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minners, Jan; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa; Kaufmann, Beat A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adjustment of cardiac dimensions by measures of body size appears intuitively convincing and in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is commonly adjusted by body surface area (BSA). However, there is little evidence to support such an approach. OBJECTIVE: To identify...... the adequate measure of body size for the adjustment of aortic stenosis severity. METHODS: Parameters of aortic stenosis severity (jet velocity, mean pressure gradient (MPG) and AVA) and measures of body size (height, weight, BSA and body mass index (BMI)) were analysed in 2843 consecutive patients with aortic...... stenosis (jet velocity ≥2.5 m/s) and related to outcomes in a second cohort of 1525 patients from the Simvastatin/Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. RESULTS: Whereas jet velocity and MPG were independent of body size, AVA was significantly correlated with height, weight, BSA and BMI (Pearson...

  6. Two stage hybrid approach for complex aortic coarctation repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crockett James

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Management of an adult patient with aortic coarctation and an associated cardiac pathology poses a great surgical challenge since there are no standard guidelines for the therapy of such complex pathology. Debate exists not only on which lesion should be corrected first, but also upon the type and timing of the procedure. Surgery can be one- or two-staged. Both of these strategies are accomplice with elevate morbidity and mortality. Case report In the face of such an extended surgical approach, balloon dilatation seems preferable for treatment of severe aortic coarctation. We present an adult male patient with aortic coarctation combined with ascending aorta aneurysm and concomitant aortic valve regurgitation. The aortic coarctation was corrected first, using percutaneous balloon dilatation; and in a second stage the aortic regurgitation and ascending aorta aneurysm was treated by Bentall procedure. The patients' postoperative period was uneventful. Three years after the operation he continues to do well.

  7. Two stage hybrid approach for complex aortic coarctation repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koletsis, Efstratios; Ekonomidis, Stella; Panagopoulos, Nikolaos; Tsaousis, George; Crockett, James; Panagiotou, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Background Management of an adult patient with aortic coarctation and an associated cardiac pathology poses a great surgical challenge since there are no standard guidelines for the therapy of such complex pathology. Debate exists not only on which lesion should be corrected first, but also upon the type and timing of the procedure. Surgery can be one- or two-staged. Both of these strategies are accomplice with elevate morbidity and mortality. Case report In the face of such an extended surgical approach, balloon dilatation seems preferable for treatment of severe aortic coarctation. We present an adult male patient with aortic coarctation combined with ascending aorta aneurysm and concomitant aortic valve regurgitation. The aortic coarctation was corrected first, using percutaneous balloon dilatation; and in a second stage the aortic regurgitation and ascending aorta aneurysm was treated by Bentall procedure. The patients' postoperative period was uneventful. Three years after the operation he continues to do well. PMID:19239693

  8. Collagen analysis of the ascending aortic dilatation associated with bicuspid aortic valve disease compared with tricuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete Santos, Alexander; Yan, Junfeng; Lochmann, Peter; Pfeil, Heike; Petersen, Michael; Simm, Andreas; Treede, Hendrik; Sievers, Hans H; Mohamed, Salah A

    2016-12-01

    Dilatation of the ascending aorta is a common occurrence in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). The aim of the current study was to characterize collagen content in advanced glycation end products (AGEs) of dilated aortic tissue from two distinct areas, concave and convex aortic sites in patients with BAV and TAV. Collagen contents extracted from 100 mg tissue was isolated by enzymatic digestion using pepsin and the nondigested material was further digested using cyanogen bromide, insoluble collagen fraction (ICF) was extracted by hydrochloric acid hydrolysis. BAV tissue showed diminished fluorescence of the pepsin extracted fraction (PEF) compared with TAV tissue (12.4 ± 1.0% vs 32.9 ± 7.6%, p = 0.05). Patients with BAV had PEF of collagens significantly diminished in the dilated ascending aorta, especially in its convex portion, in course of aging and increment of dilated diameters. It is suggestible that BAV patients present more highly AGE-modified collagens in their ascending aorta.

  9. Factors associated with the development of aortic valve regurgitation over time after two different techniques of valve-sparing aortic root surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Thorsten; Charitos, Efstratios I; Stierle, Ulrich; Robinson, Derek; Gorski, Armin; Sievers, Hans-H; Misfeld, Martin

    2009-02-01

    Early results after aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction are excellent. Longer-term follow-up, especially with regard to aortic valve function, is required for further judgment of these techniques. Between July of 1993 and September of 2006, 108 consecutive patients (mean age 53.0 +/- 15.8 years) underwent the Yacoub operation (group Y) and 83 patients underwent the David operation (group D). Innovative multilevel hierarchic modeling methods were used to analyze aortic regurgitation over time. In general, aortic regurgitation increased with time in both groups. Factors associated with the development of a significant increase in aortic regurgitation were Marfan syndrome, concomitant cusp intervention, and preoperative aortic anulus dimension. In Marfan syndrome, the initial aortic regurgitation was higher in group Y versus group D (0.56 aortic regurgitation vs 0.29 aortic regurgitation, P = .049), whereas the mean annual progression rate of aortic regurgitation was marginally higher in group Y (0.132 aortic regurgitation vs 0.075 aortic regurgitation, P = .1). Concomitant cusp intervention was associated with a significant aortic regurgitation increase in both groups (P Marfan syndrome and a large preoperative aortic annulus diameter were better treated with the reimplantation technique, whereas those with a smaller diameter were better treated with the remodeling technique. Concomitant free-edge plication of prolapsing cusps was disadvantageous in both groups. Considering these factors may serve to improve the aortic valve longevity after valve-sparing aortic root surgery.

  10. Aortic Graft at Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery as a Source of Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostina, Daria; Zverev, Dmitry; Grebennik, Vadim; Gordeev, Mikhail; Ignatieva, Elena; Voronkina, Irina; Kostareva, Anna; Malashicheva, Anna

    2017-10-01

    One of the serious obstacles of the aortopathies research is a considerable shortage of human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs), which can be used to model the disease. SMC in most cases come from the whole aorta of transplant donors, which are rather difficult to access. In the course of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, a fragment of aortic tissue is excised to make a bypass root. In this study, we show a possibility to use CABG leftover fragments of thoracic aorta as a source of human SMC for in vitro research. We isolated SMC from the fragments of aortic tissues obtained during CABG procedure and compared these cells to the cells that were isolated from aortic tissue of transplant donors. The content of key SMC contractile markers (SMA, SM22α, and vimentin) as well as proliferation and migration rates, metalloproteases MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities were similar in CABG-derived SMC and in transplant donor-derived SMC. In conclusion, leftovers of ascending thoracic aorta obtained during CABG can be used as a source of human aortic SMCs for in vitro research.

  11. 'Generalizability' of a radial-aortic transfer function for the derivation of central aortic waveform parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Sarah A; Meredith, Ian T; Tay, David; Cameron, James D

    2007-09-01

    Arterial transfer functions (TFs) describe the relationship between the pressure waveform at different arterial sites. Generalized TFs are used to reconstruct central aortic waveforms from non-invasively obtained peripheral waveforms and have been promoted as potentially clinically useful. A limitation is the paucity of information on their 'generalizability' with no information existing on the number of subjects required to construct a satisfactory TF, nor is adequate prospective validation available. We therefore investigated the uniformity of radial-aortic TFs and prospectively estimated the capacity of a generalized TF to reconstruct individual central blood pressure parameters. Ninety-three subjects (64 male) were studied by simultaneous radial applanation and high-fidelity (Millar Mikro-tip catheter) direct measurement of central aortic BP during elective coronary procedures. Subjects were prospectively randomized to either a derivation or validation group. Increasing numbers of individual TFs from the derivation group were averaged to form a generalized TF. There was minimal change with greater than 20 TFs averaged. In the validation group, the error in most reconstructed parameters related to the absolute value of the directly measured parameter [systolic blood pressure (SBP) and pulse pressure, Pcentral aortic SBP and pulse pressure (negatively) and time to peak systole (positively) (all PInclusion of more than 20 individual TFs in the construction of a generalized TF does not improve 'generalizability'. There appear to be systematic errors in derived central pressure waveforms and derived aortic augmentation index is inaccurate compared to the directly measured value.

  12. Can early aortic root surgery prevent further aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hideyuki; Kasahara, Hirofumi; Nemoto, Atsushi; Yamabe, Kentaro; Ueda, Toshihiko; Yozu, Ryohei

    2012-02-01

    We reviewed 50 patients with Marfan syndrome who underwent surgery for aortic root pathologies comprising a root aneurysm without (n = 25; group A) and with (n = 25; group B) dissection. Aortic root repair included Bentall (n = 37) and valve-sparing (n = 13) procedures. Hospital mortality was 4.0%. Twenty-two patients required 36 repeat surgeries on the distal aorta. The main indication for re-intervention was the dilation of the false lumen. In group A, the distal aorta was stable for up to 7 years, but new dissection developed in 5 (33.3%) of the 15 patients who were followed up for >7 years after the root repair. Actuarial survival including operative mortality was 88.1 and 65.0% at 10 and 20 years, respectively; groups A and B did not significantly differ. Rates of freedom from all-cause death, new dissection or repeated aortic surgery were 60.1, 44.5 and 26.0% at 5, 10 and 15 years, respectively. Group A was significantly better than group B. Prophylactic aortic root repair apparently reduces the likelihood of overall adverse events, but it cannot guarantee the prevention of further aortic dissection. A multidisciplinary approach is needed for patients with Marfan syndrome.

  13. Endovascular Treatment of Late Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms after Surgical Repair of Congenital Aortic Coarctation in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszkat, Robert; Perek, Bartlomiej; Zabicki, Bartosz; Trojnarska, Olga; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Smoczyk, Wiesław; Pukacki, Fryderyk

    2013-01-01

    Background In some patients, local surgery-related complications are diagnosed many years after surgery for aortic coarctation. The purposes of this study were: (1) to systematically evaluate asymptomatic adults after Dacron patch repair in childhood, (2) to estimate the formation rate of secondary thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) and (3) to assess outcomes after intravascular treatment for TAAs. Methods This study involved 37 asymptomatic patients (26 female and 11 male) who underwent surgical repair of aortic coarctation in the childhood. After they had reached adolescence, patients with secondary TAAs were referred to endovascular repair. Results Follow-up studies revealed TAA in seven cases (19%) (including six with the gothic type of the aortic arch) and mild recoarctation in other six (16%). Six of the TAA patients were treated with stentgrafts, but one refused to undergo an endovascular procedure. In three cases, stengrafts covered the left subclavian artery (LSA), in another the graft was implanted distally to the LSA. In two individuals, elective hybrid procedures were performed with surgical bypass to the supraaortic arteries followed by stengraft implantation. All subjects survived the secondary procedures. One patient developed type Ia endoleak after stentgraft implantation that was eventually treated with a debranching procedure. Conclusions The long-term course of clinically asymptomatic patients after coarctation patch repair is not uncommonly complicated by formation of TAAs (particularly in individuals with the gothic pattern of the aortic arch) that can be treated effectively with stentgrafts. However, in some patients hybrid procedures may be necessary. PMID:24386233

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Aortic Thrombus Formation Following Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauta, Foeke J H; Lau, Kevin D; Arthurs, Christopher J; Eagle, Kim A; Williams, David M; Trimarchi, Santi; Patel, Himanshu J; Figueroa, Carlos A

    2017-06-01

    We present the possible utility of computational fluid dynamics in the assessment of thrombus formation and virtual surgical planning illustrated in a patient with aortic thrombus in a kinked ascending aortic graft following thoracic endovascular aortic repair. A patient-specific three-dimensional model was built from computed tomography. Additionally, we modeled 3 virtual aortic interventions to assess their effect on thrombosis potential: (1) open surgical repair, (2) conformable endografting, and (3) single-branched endografting. Flow waveforms were extracted from echocardiography and used for the simulations. We used the computational index termed platelet activation potential (PLAP) representing accumulated shear rates of fluid particles within a fluid domain to assess thrombosis potential. The baseline model revealed high PLAP in the entire arch (119.8 ± 42.5), with significantly larger PLAP at the thrombus location (125.4 ± 41.2, p fluid dynamics may assist in the prediction of aortic thrombus formation in hemodynamically complex cases and help guide repair strategies. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Endovascular treatment of late thoracic aortic aneurysms after surgical repair of congenital aortic coarctation in childhood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Juszkat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In some patients, local surgery-related complications are diagnosed many years after surgery for aortic coarctation. The purposes of this study were: (1 to systematically evaluate asymptomatic adults after Dacron patch repair in childhood, (2 to estimate the formation rate of secondary thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs and (3 to assess outcomes after intravascular treatment for TAAs. METHODS: This study involved 37 asymptomatic patients (26 female and 11 male who underwent surgical repair of aortic coarctation in the childhood. After they had reached adolescence, patients with secondary TAAs were referred to endovascular repair. RESULTS: Follow-up studies revealed TAA in seven cases (19% (including six with the gothic type of the aortic arch and mild recoarctation in other six (16%. Six of the TAA patients were treated with stentgrafts, but one refused to undergo an endovascular procedure. In three cases, stengrafts covered the left subclavian artery (LSA, in another the graft was implanted distally to the LSA. In two individuals, elective hybrid procedures were performed with surgical bypass to the supraaortic arteries followed by stengraft implantation. All subjects survived the secondary procedures. One patient developed type Ia endoleak after stentgraft implantation that was eventually treated with a debranching procedure. CONCLUSIONS: The long-term course of clinically asymptomatic patients after coarctation patch repair is not uncommonly complicated by formation of TAAs (particularly in individuals with the gothic pattern of the aortic arch that can be treated effectively with stentgrafts. However, in some patients hybrid procedures may be necessary.

  16. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacemen....... We report the first case of surgical valve replacement in a patient with a dysfunctional transcatheter-implanted aortic valve prosthesis 4 months after implantation....

  17. Combined coronary artery bypass surgery and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Black, J J; Desai, J B

    1995-01-01

    The proper management of patients with asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms and significant coexistent coronary artery disease is still debatable. The most common approach has been to perform the coronary artery bypass surgery some weeks before the abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in the hope of reducing the cardiac morbidity and mortality. We report our initial experience of three consecutive elective cases where the coronary artery bypass surgery and the abdominal aortic aneurysm repair ...

  18. Suprarenal Abdominal Aortic Coarctation Diagnosed During Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Hajsadeghi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Coarctation of the abdominal aorta is an extremely rare vascular defect inwhich congenital or acquired etiologies have been described. This case concernsa 30-year-old pregnant woman with 15-years history of uncontrolled hypertensionand lower limb claudication presented with worsened hypertension during herfirst pregnancy. Magnetic resonance angiography study of aorta revealed astenosis in abdominal aorta about 12mm from the origin of celiac axisaccompanied by left sided aortic arch and right aberrant subclavian artery. Thiscase highlights the importance of a throughout physical examination in patientspresented with hypertension and it emphasizes considering the coarctation of theabdominal aorta during the diagnostic workup of hypertension, especially inyoung patients. In such cases magnetic resonance angiography of the aorta is auseful tool to reach a definitive diagnosis especially in pregnant women.Also to our knowledge, this patient is the first one found to have aortic archmalformation combined with an abdominal coarctation.

  19. Spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulineau, Theresa Marie; Andrews-Jones, Lydia; Van Alstine, William

    2005-09-01

    This report describes 2 cases of spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in young Border Collie and Border Collie crossbred dogs. Histology was performed in one of the cases involving an unusual splitting of the elastin present within the wall of the aorta, consistent with elastin dysplasia as described in Marfan syndrome in humans. The first case involved a young purebred Border Collie that died suddenly and the second case involved a Border Collie crossbred dog that died after a 1-month history of seizures. Gross lesions included pericardial tamponade with dissection of the ascending aorta in the former case and thoracic cavity hemorrhage, mediastinal hematoma, and aortic dissection in the latter. Histologic lesions in the case of the Border Collie crossbred dog included a dissecting hematoma of the ascending aorta with elastin dysplasia and right axillary arterial intimal proliferation.

  20. Glucose Suppresses Biological Ferroelectricity in Aortic Elastin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanming; Wang, Yunjie; Chow, Ming-Jay; Chen, Nataly Q.; Ma, Feiyue; Zhang, Yanhang; Li, Jiangyu

    2013-04-01

    Elastin is an intriguing extracellular matrix protein present in all connective tissues of vertebrates, rendering essential elasticity to connective tissues subjected to repeated physiological stresses. Using piezoresponse force microscopy, we show that the polarity of aortic elastin is switchable by an electrical field, which may be associated with the recently discovered biological ferroelectricity in the aorta. More interestingly, it is discovered that the switching in aortic elastin is largely suppressed by glucose treatment, which appears to freeze the internal asymmetric polar structures of elastin, making it much harder to switch, or suppressing the switching completely. Such loss of ferroelectricity could have important physiological and pathological implications from aging to arteriosclerosis that are closely related to glycation of elastin.

  1. Multislice CT angiography of interrupted aortic arch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dong Hyun; Goo, Hyun Woo [Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Seo, Dong-Man; Yun, Tae-Jin; Park, Jeong-Jun [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Cardiac Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Park, In-Sook; Ko, Jae Kon; Kim, Young Hwee [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Cardiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2008-01-15

    Interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is defined as complete luminal and anatomic discontinuity between the ascending and descending aorta. Because almost all patients with IAA become critically ill during the neonatal period, they should undergo urgent corrective surgery. This clinical urgency necessitates a fast and accurate noninvasive diagnostic method. Although echocardiography remains the primary imaging tool for this purpose, it is not always sufficient for planning surgical correction of IAA, principally due to a limited acoustic window and the inexperience of imagers. In this context, multislice CT angiography is regarded as an appropriate imaging technique complementary to echocardiography because it is fast, accurate, and objective for the diagnosis of IAA. In this article we describe what cardiac radiologists should know about IAA in their clinical practice, including clinicopathological features, CT features with contemporary surgical methods and postoperative complications, and differentiation from coarctation of the aorta and aortic arch atresia. (orig.)

  2. Diagnosis and management of aortic mycotic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Luis R; Mills, Joseph L

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed all papers most recently reported in the literature (January-December 2008) with regard to infected arterial aneurysms (IAAs) affecting the aorta. Most of the recently reported knowledge is limited to case reports and small series of aortic mycotic aneurysms. Most patients are elderly men and have comorbidities at presentation. Aneurysms were most commonly associated to Salmonella and Staphylococcus. However, several cases of aortic IAAs caused by atypical pathogens were also reported, likely due to an increase in immunosuppressive illnesses, increased life expectancy, improved diagnostic methods, and increasing medical awareness. Open surgical therapy of IAAs remains the gold standard. Some have reported successful outcomes with endovascular methodologies for patients medically compromised or for particular challenging clinical or anatomical scenarios. However, at this time, conclusive evidence is lacking and it should be in general considered a bridge to open repair. The latter should be planned at the earliest possible, when medically permissible.

  3. Theoretical band alignment in an intermediate band chalcopyrite based material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos Águila, J. E.; Palacios, P.; Conesa, J. C.; Arriaga, J.; Wahnón, P.

    2017-12-01

    Band alignment is key to enhance the performance of heterojunction for chalcopyrite thin film solar cells. In this paper we report ab initio calculations of the electronic structures of CuGaS2:Cr with various Cr compositions, CuAlSe2 and ZnSe and the band alignment between their interfaces. We use density functional theory and the more accurate self-consistent GW scheme to obtain improved bulk band-gaps and band offsets. Band alignments of the interfacial region for CuGaS2:Cr/CuAlSe2 and CuGaS2:Cr/ZnSe systems were aligned with respect of an average electrostatic potential. Our results are in good agreement with experimental values for the bulk band-gaps. These theoretical band alignments show a characteristic staggered band alignment for the design of heterojunction devices in photovoltaic applications.

  4. Vascular complications associated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, M Rizwan; Goldsweig, Andrew M; Abbott, J Dawn; Sharaf, Barry L; Gordon, Paul C; Ehsan, Afshin; Aronow, Herbert D

    2017-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is now an accepted pathway for aortic valve replacement for patients who are at prohibitive, severe and intermediate risk for traditional aortic valve surgery. However, with this rising uptrend and adaptation of this new technology, vascular complications and their management remain an Achilles heel for percutaneous aortic valve replacement. The vascular complications are an independent predictor of mortality for patients undergoing TAVR. Early recognition of these complications and appropriate management is paramount. In this article, we review the most commonly encountered vascular complications associated with currently approved TAVR devices and their optimal percutaneous management techniques.

  5. FOXE3 mutations predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Medina-Martinez, Olga; Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S.; Reynolds, Corey L.; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Kwartler, Callie S.; Zhu, Lawrence Yang; Peters, Andrew M.; Duan, Xue-Yan; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Dong, Xiurong; Leal, Suzanne M.; Majesky, Mark W.; Swindell, Eric C.; Jamrich, Milan; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2016-01-01

    The ascending thoracic aorta is designed to withstand biomechanical forces from pulsatile blood. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAADs) occur as a result of genetically triggered defects in aortic structure and a dysfunctional response to these forces. Here, we describe mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXE3 that predispose mutation-bearing individuals to TAAD. We performed exome sequencing of a large family with multiple members with TAADs and identified a rare variant in FOXE3 with an altered amino acid in the DNA-binding domain (p.Asp153His) that segregated with disease in this family. Additional pathogenic FOXE3 variants were identified in unrelated TAAD families. In mice, Foxe3 deficiency reduced smooth muscle cell (SMC) density and impaired SMC differentiation in the ascending aorta. Foxe3 expression was induced in aortic SMCs after transverse aortic constriction, and Foxe3 deficiency increased SMC apoptosis and ascending aortic rupture with increased aortic pressure. These phenotypes were rescued by inhibiting p53 activity, either by administration of a p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-α), or by crossing Foxe3–/– mice with p53–/– mice. Our data demonstrate that FOXE3 mutations lead to a reduced number of aortic SMCs during development and increased SMC apoptosis in the ascending aorta in response to increased biomechanical forces, thus defining an additional molecular pathway that leads to familial thoracic aortic disease. PMID:26854927

  6. Challenging Friesian horse diseases : aortic rupture and megaesophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Ploeg, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic rupture is quite rare in Warmblood horses and is best known as an acute and fatal rupture of the aortic root in older breeding stallions. It has now become clear that aortic rupture, which is diagnosed around an age of 4 years, is more frequent in the Friesian breed than in others. The high prevalence in Friesians may be due to increased genetic susceptibility Whereas Friesian horses with aortic rupture may develop acute forms, the majority of Friesians will display a subacute or chron...

  7. The Effects of Fetuin-A Levels on Aortic Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tutuncu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We aimed to investigate the relation between fetuin-A and calcific aortic stenosis in non diabetic patients whose renal function were normal. Material and Method: 26 patients followed for aortic stenosis by our cardiology clinic for outpatients and 25 voluntary healthy subjects were included in the study. The fetuin%u2013A levels were measured from the venous blood samples of the study population. All patients underwent transthorasic echocardiography, the aortic valvular area and left ventricular parameters of the patients were measured. Results: The average age of the patients in degenerative aortic stenosis group was significantly higher than the control group. The parameters related to aortic valve were naturally higher in patients with dejenerative aortic valve. There was no siginificant difference between two groups about fetuin-A levels. Further more there was no significant relation between fetuin-a levels and aortic stenosis severity. Discussion: In conclusion fetuin-A is a multifunctional glycoprotein that plays important role in systemic calcification inhibition and valvular calcification. Finally aortic stenosis is an active process and larger studies that investigate the relation between fetuin-a and the progression and prognosis of aortic stenosis are needed.

  8. The diagnosis of atherosclerotic aortic ulcer by electron beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi Aihua; Dai Ruping; Jiang Shiliang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) in the diagnosis of atherosclerotic aortic ulcer. Methods: Sixty-eight consecutive patients (55 men and 13 women, aged 40-85 years, mean 65.12 ± 9.55 years) with atherosclerotic aortic ulcer, who underwent EBCT scans from December 2001 to December 2004, were studied retrospectively. Contrast-enhanced continuous volume scanning (CVS) was performed by Imatron C-150XP EBCT scanner with 6 mm or 3 mm slice thickness and 100 milliseconds acquisition time. The scan was started 18-30 s after the injection of 80-100 ml contrast medium at the rate of 3.5-4.5 ml/s. Results: In sixty-eight patients with atherosclerotic aortic ulcer, 50 patients had acute aortic syndromes, 36 had intramural hematomas, 15 had atherosclerotic aortic aneurysms, 3 had aortic dissections. 46 patients with progresive ulcer usually had acute aortic syndrome while 22 patients with stable ulcer didn't (P<0.01). Atherosclerotic aortic ulcer was seen more frequently in the aorta arch than other portions of the aorta (P<0.01). Conclusion: EBCT is a very useful tool for the detection and follow-up of atherosclerotic aortic ulcer. (authors)

  9. Asendan Desendan Aortic Bypass: Atan Kalpte Mediyan Sternotomi Yoluyla Onarim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Akyuz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 9-month-old patient presenting for redo aortic arch surgery because of recoarctation. In present case, ascending-to-descending aortic bypass via median sternotomy was performed without cardiopulmonary bypass with good result. In spite of the fact that the different surgical and intervention treatment options of aortic coarctation are quite satisfactory, a certain group of patients need reoperation because of recoarctation. The recoarctation repair of the aorta with the extra-anatomic aortic bypass is considered a low-risk procedure with high success rate.

  10. Aortic Disease in the Young: Genetic Aneurysm Syndromes, Connective Tissue Disorders, and Familial Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many genetic syndromes associated with the aortic aneurysmal disease which include Marfan syndrome (MFS, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS, Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS, familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD, bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV, and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. In the absence of familial history and other clinical findings, the proportion of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and dissections resulting from a genetic predisposition is still unknown. In this study, we propose the review of the current genetic knowledge in the aortic disease, observing, in the results that the causative genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm disease remain undiscovered and continue to be an area of intensive research.

  11. Endovascular Stent Grafting for Aortic Arch Aneurysm in Aortoiliac Occlusive Disease following Aortic Arch Debranching and Aortobifemoral Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didem Melis Oztas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms constitutes high mortality and morbidity rates despite improvements in surgery, anesthesia, and technology. Endovascular stent grafting may be an alternative therapy with lower risks when compared with conventional techniques. However, sometimes the branches of the aortic arch may require transport to the proximal segments prior to successful thoracic aortic endovascular stent grafting. Atherosclerosis is accounted among the etiology of both aneurysms and occlusive diseases that can coexist in the same patient. In these situations stent grafting may even be more complicated. In this report, we present the treatment of a 92-year-old patient with aortic arch aneurysm and proximal descending aortic aneurysm. For successful thoracic endovascular stent grafting, the patient needed an alternative route other than the native femoral and iliac arteries for the deployment of the stent graft. In addition, debranching of left carotid and subclavian arteries from the aortic arch was also required for successful exclusion of the thoracic aneurysm.

  12. Blunt thoracic aortic injuries: an autopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Pedro G R; Inaba, Kenji; Barmparas, Galinos; Georgiou, Chrysanthos; Toms, Carla; Noguchi, Thomas T; Rogers, Christopher; Sathyavagiswaran, Lakshmanan; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the incidence and patterns of thoracic aortic injuries in a series of blunt traumatic deaths and describe their associated injuries. All autopsies performed by the Los Angeles County Department of Coroner for blunt traumatic deaths in 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who had a traumatic thoracic aortic (TTA) injury were compared with the victims who did not have this injury for differences in baseline characteristics and patterns of associated injuries. During the study period, 304 (35%) of 881 fatal victims of blunt trauma received by the Los Angeles County Department of Coroner underwent a full autopsy and were included in the analysis. The patients were on average aged 43 years±21 years, 71% were men, and 39% had a positive blood alcohol screen. Motor vehicle collision was the most common mechanism of injury (50%), followed by pedestrian struck by auto (37%). A TTA injury was identified in 102 (34%) of the victims. The most common site of TTA injury was the isthmus and descending thoracic aorta, occurring in 67 fatalities (66% of the patients with TTA injuries). Patients with TTA injuries were significantly more likely to have other associated injuries: cardiac injury (44% vs. 25%, p=0.001), hemothorax (86% vs. 56%, pinjury (74% vs. 49%, pinjury. Patients with a TTA injury were significantly more likely to die at the scene (80% vs. 63%, p=0.002). Thoracic aortic injuries occurred in fully one third of blunt traumatic fatalities, with the majority of deaths occurring at the scene. The risk for associated thoracic and intra-abdominal injuries is significantly increased in patients with thoracic aortic injuries.

  13. Preventative valve-sparing aortic root replacement and pregnancy outcome in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Vesna; Zlopasa, Gordan; Herman, Mislav; Planinić, Pavao; Micevska, Ana

    2012-06-01

    In Marfan syndrome, with dilatation of the aortic root secondary to an underlying connective tissue defect, pregnancy can cause hemodynamic stress leading to the development of an aortic aneurysm and even a fatal aortic dissection. In the presence of existing aortic root enlargement and a family history of aortic dissection, preventative elective surgery is suggested. Aortic root replacement with or without a valve-sparing procedure is superior to total aortic root replacement with prosthetic valve/tube graft. It provides excellent survival with low rates of aortic - valve related complications.

  14. [Stanford type B aortic dissection associated with coarctation of the aorta].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senaha, Shigenobu; Uezu, Toru; Shimoji, Mitsuyoshi; Akasaki, Mitsuru

    2015-03-01

    We report a rare case of type B aortic dissection associated with coarctation of the aorta. A 35-year-old man had sudden dyspnea and severe back pain. Computed tomography revealed aortic coarctation at the distal aortic arch, and aortic dissection below the coarctation. The diameter of proximal descending aorta was enlarged to 52 mm. We electively performed excision of aortic coarctation and descending aortic graft replacement. Coarctation of the aorta has a poor prognosis, The risk of aortic rupture due to aortic dissection is very high, and the histological abnormality is also pointed out. Therefore we should perform aggressive surgical treatment.

  15. Supra-aortic interventions for endovascular exclusion of the entire aortic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrási, Terézia B; Grossmann, Marius; Zenker, Dieter; Danner, Bernhard C; Schöndube, Friedrich A

    2017-07-01

    Our aim was to analyze the outcomes of endovascular exclusion of the entire aortic arch (proximal landing in zone 0, distal landing in zone III or beyond, after Ishimaru) in which complete surgical debranching of the supra-aortic vessels (I), endovascular supra-aortic revascularization (chimney, fenestrated, or branched grafts) with partial surgical debranching (II), or total endovascular supra-aortic revascularization (III) was additionally performed. Publications describing endovascular repair of the aortic arch (2000-2016) were systematically searched and reviewed. From a total of 53 relevant studies including 1853 patients, only 1021 patients undergoing 35 different total aortic arch procedures were found eligible for further evaluation and included in group I, II, or III (429, 190, and 402 patients, respectively). Overall early mortality was higher in group I vs groups II and III (P = .001; 1 - β = 95.6%) but exceeded in group III (18.6%) and group II (14.0%) vs group I (8.0%; P = .044; 1 - β = 57.4%) for diseases involving zone 0. Mortality was higher in all subgroups treated for zone 0 disease compared with corresponding subgroups treated for zone I to zone III disease. The incidence of cerebral ischemic events was increased in groups I and II vs group III (7.5% and 11% vs 1.7%; P = .0001) and correlated with early mortality (R 2  = .20; P = .033). The incidence of type II endoleaks and endovascular reintervention was similar between groups and correlated with each other (R 2  = .37; P = .004). Type Ia endoleak occurred more often in groups II and III than in group I (7.1% and 12.1% vs 5.8%; P = .023) and correlated with midterm mortality (R 2  = .53; P = .005). Retrograde type A dissection was low in all groups, whereas aneurysm growth was higher in group III (2.6%, 4.2%, 10.7%; P = .002), correlating with midterm mortality (R 2  = .311; P = .009). Surgical revision slightly correlated with surgical complications (R 2  = .18; P = .044

  16. Ascending Aorta Stenting After Off-Pump Aortic Wrapping in Stanford A Retrograde Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verscheure, Dorian; Ramadan, Ramzi; Azmoun, Alexandre; Guihaire, Julien; Angel, Claude; Brenot, Philippe; Deleuze, Philippe

    2017-08-01

    We report 4 cases of off-pump ascending aorta wrapping combined with ascending aorta stenting in retrograde Stanford A acute aortic dissection (SAAD). Since 2008, 18 patients have undergone wrapping of the ascending aorta at our institution. Four patients had a persistent circulating false lumen in the ascending aorta after wrapping, with a threat to the aortic root. We chose an endovascular approach with ascending aorta stenting. Follow-up computed tomography showed a reapplication of the intimal flap in the reinforced aorta. Ascending aorta stenting after aortic wrapping for retrograde SAAD is a safe and efficient technique to prevent proximal progression of the dissection. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Transcatheter Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2015-01-01

    clinical trial compared TAVR with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in an all-comers patient cohort. METHODS: Patients ≥ 70 years old with severe aortic valve stenosis and no significant coronary artery disease were randomized 1:1 to TAVR using a self-expanding bioprosthesis versus SAVR. The primary...... difference in the primary endpoint was found (13.1% vs. 16.3%; p = 0.43 for superiority). The result did not change in the as-treated population. No difference in the rate of cardiovascular death or prosthesis reintervention was found. Compared with SAVR-treated patients, TAVR-treated patients had more...... conduction abnormalities requiring pacemaker implantation, larger improvement in effective orifice area, more total aortic valve regurgitation, and higher New York Heart Association functional class at 1 year. SAVR-treated patients had more major or life-threatening bleeding, cardiogenic shock, acute kidney...

  18. Delirium After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuseffi, Jennifer L; Borges, Nyal E; Boehm, Leanne M; Wang, Li; McPherson, John A; Fredi, Joseph L; Ahmad, Rashid M; Ely, E Wesley; Pandharipande, Pratik P

    2017-07-01

    Postoperative delirium is associated with increased mortality. Patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement are at risk for delirium because of comorbid conditions. To compare the incidence, odds, and mortality implications of delirium between patients undergoing transcatheter replacement and patients undergoing surgical replacement. The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale and the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit were used to assess arousal level and delirium prospectively in all patients with severe aortic stenosis who had transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement at an academic medical center. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between procedure type and occurrence of delirium. Cox regression was used to assess the association between postoperative delirium and 6-month mortality. A total of 105 patients had transcatheter replacement and 121 had surgical replacement. Patients in the transcatheter group were older (median age, 81 vs 68 years; P replacement. Delirium is less likely to develop in the transcatheter group but is associated with higher mortality in both groups. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  19. [Current results of the aortic valve changes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Soriano, F; Barnet, J C; Quijano Pitman, F

    1979-01-01

    The prosthetic substitution of the aortic valve has experienced a great advance over the last years in relation with the surgical and hospital mortality. In the personal experience of one of the authors (F. López Soriano), the mortality rate was 0% in 40 patients in which an aortic valve change was performed, isolated or associated to other pathology. Between 1973 and 1978, 167 patients were operated at the "Instituto Nacional de Cardiología", with an early mortality of 11.3%; these results were superior to those previously published. The percentage of myocardic infarction following surgery was similar in both groups 8% less, than the 15% reported in other statistics. 25 patients of the total group needed second surgery due to prosthetic malfunction. A Starr Edward Model 2320 had been implanted on most patients, known for the high percentage of malfunction which is being discarted at present. Thromboembolic phenomena occurred in 9 patients (5.3%) from which five were located in the brain, none of them being fatal. The present results justify early surgery in moderately sinthomatic aortic valve disease, when comparing these results with the natural history of the disease and the evolution of said patients operated in later stages.

  20. Multiple subfailures characterize blunt aortic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemper, Brian D; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Brasel, Karen J

    2007-05-01

    Blunt aortic injuries result from rapid deceleration of the thorax as may occur during automotive impacts and falls from extreme heights. Pathological findings can range from failure of specific vessel layers to immediate vessel wall rupture. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the sequence of local structural events that may lead to aortic wall disruption. Fourteen porcine aorta specimens were opened to expose the intima and longitudinally distracted until rupture. Longitudinal mechanics were quantified and subfailures were identified. Histology was used to examine internal layer subfailure. Videography demonstrated that subfailures propagated into complete vessel wall rupture. Subfailures occurred before complete vessel rupture in 93% of specimens. Intimal and medial subfailures were present at 74% of the stress and 82% of the strain to rupture. Multiple subfailures were evident in 79% of specimens. Present results supported the clinical theory that nonimmediate death as a result of blunt aortic injury is commonly caused by propagation of lesser lesions, initiating on the intimal layer, into complete vessel rupture including the adventitial layer. This finding, along with histologic evidence of subfailure pathological findings, confirms the presence of an acute window during which recognition and initiation of permissive hypotension may be lifesaving.

  1. Acute aortic dissection: be aware of misdiagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asteri Theodora

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute aortic dissection (AAD is a life-threatening condition requiring immediate assessment and therapy. A patient suffering from AAD often presents with an insignificant or irrelevant medical history, giving rise to possible misdiagnosis. The aim of this retrospective study is to address the problem of misdiagnosing AD and the different imaging studies used. Methods From January 2000 to December 2004, 49 patients (41 men and 8 women, aged from 18–75 years old presented to the Emergency Department of our hospital for different reasons and finally diagnosed with AAD. Fifteen of those patients suffered from arterial hypertension, one from giant cell arteritis and another patient from Marfan's syndrome. The diagnosis of AAD was made by chest X-ray, contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT, transthoracic echocardiography (TTE and coronary angiography. Results Initial misdiagnosis occurred in fifteen patients (31% later found to be suffering from AAD. The misdiagnosis was myocardial infarction in 12 patients and cerebral infarction in another three patients. Conclusion Aortic dissection may present with a variety of clinical manifestations, like syncope, chest pain, anuria, pulse deficits, abdominal pain, back pain, or acute congestive heart failure. Nearly a third of the patients found to be suffering from AD, were initially otherwise diagnosed. Key in the management of acute aortic dissection is to maintain a high level of suspicion for this diagnosis.

  2. Aortic annulus eccentricity before and after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: Comparison of balloon-expandable and self-expanding prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhbaeck, Annika, E-mail: annika.schuhbaeck@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Weingartner, Christina [Department of Cardiology, University of Gießen, Giessen (Germany); Arnold, Martin; Schmid, Jasmin; Pflederer, Tobias; Marwan, Mohamed [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Rixe, Johannes; Nef, Holger [Department of Cardiology, University of Gießen, Giessen (Germany); Schneider, Christian [Department of Radiology, University of Gießen, Giessen (Germany); Lell, Michael; Uder, Michael [Department of Radiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Ensminger, Stephan [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Heart and Diabetes Center NRW, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Feyrer, Richard; Weyand, Michael [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, Stephan [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses is influenced by aortic valve calcification. • Balloon-expandable prostheses are more circular as compared to self-expanding prostheses. • The impact of post-implant geometry on valve function needs to be investigated. - Abstract: Introduction: The geometry of the aortic annulus and implanted transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis might influence valve function. We investigated the influence of valve type and aortic valve calcification on post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses. Methods: Eighty consecutive patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (mean age 82 ± 6 years) underwent computed tomography before and after TAVI. Aortic annulus diameters were determined. Influence of prosthesis type and degree of aortic valve calcification on post-implant eccentricity were analysed. Results: Aortic annulus eccentricity was reduced in patients after TAVI (0.21 ± 0.06 vs. 0.08 ± 0.06, p < 0.0001). Post-TAVI eccentricity was significantly lower in 65 patients following implantation of a balloon-expandable prosthesis as compared to 15 patients who received a self-expanding prosthesis (0.06 ± 0.05 vs. 0.15 ± 0.07, p < 0.0001), even though the extent of aortic valve calcification was not different. After TAVI, patients with a higher calcium amount retained a significantly higher eccentricity compared to patients with lower amounts of calcium. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TAVI with a balloon-expandable prosthesis show a more circular shape of the implanted prosthesis as compared to patients with a self-expanding prosthesis. Eccentricity of the deployed prosthesis is affected by the extent of aortic valve calcification.

  3. Longitudinal strain predicts left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis and preserved left ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelsomino, Sandro; Lucà, Fabiana; Parise, Orlando; Lorusso, Roberto; Rao, Carmelo Massimiliano; Vizzardi, Enrico; Gensini, Gian Franco; Maessen, Jos G

    2013-11-01

    We explored the influence of global longitudinal strain (GLS) measured with two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography on left ventricular mass regression (LVMR) in patients with pure aortic stenosis (AS) and normal left ventricular function undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). The study population included 83 patients with severe AS (aortic valve area regression (all P regression in patients with pure AS undergoing AVR. Our findings must be confirmed by further larger studies.

  4. Effect of personalized external aortic root support on aortic root motion and distension in Marfan syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izgi, Cemil; Nyktari, Evangelia; Alpendurada, Francisco; Bruengger, Annina Studer; Pepper, John; Treasure, Tom; Mohiaddin, Raad

    2015-10-15

    Personalized external aortic root support (PEARS) is a novel surgical approach with the aim of stabilizing the aortic root size and decreasing risk of dissection in Marfan syndrome patients. A bespoke polymer mesh tailored to each patient's individual aorta shape is produced by modeling and then surgically implanted. The aim of this study is to assess the mechanical effects of PEARS on the aortic root systolic downward motion (an important determinant of aortic wall stress), aortic root distension and on the left ventricle (LV). A cohort of 27 Marfan patients had a prophylactic PEARS surgery between 2004 and 2012 with 24 having preoperative and follow-up cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging studies. Systolic downward aortic root motion, aortic root distension, LV volumes/mass and mitral annular systolic excursion before the operation and in the latest follow-up were measured randomly and blinded. After a median follow-up of 50.5 (IQR 25.5-72) months following implantation of PEARS, systolic downward motion of aortic root was significantly decreased (12.6±3.6mm pre-operation vs 7.9±2.9mm latest follow-up, p<0.00001). There was a tendency for a decrease in systolic aortic root distension but this was not significant (median 4.5% vs 2%, p=0.35). There was no significant change in LV volumes, ejection fraction, mass and mitral annular systolic excursion in follow-up. PEARS surgery decreases systolic downward aortic root motion which is an important determinant of longitudinal aortic wall stress. Aortic wall distension and Windkessel function are not significantly impaired in the follow-up after implantation of the mesh which is also supported by the lack of deterioration of LV volumes or mass. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Aortic annulus eccentricity before and after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: Comparison of balloon-expandable and self-expanding prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuhbaeck, Annika; Weingartner, Christina; Arnold, Martin; Schmid, Jasmin; Pflederer, Tobias; Marwan, Mohamed; Rixe, Johannes; Nef, Holger; Schneider, Christian; Lell, Michael; Uder, Michael; Ensminger, Stephan; Feyrer, Richard; Weyand, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses is influenced by aortic valve calcification. • Balloon-expandable prostheses are more circular as compared to self-expanding prostheses. • The impact of post-implant geometry on valve function needs to be investigated. - Abstract: Introduction: The geometry of the aortic annulus and implanted transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis might influence valve function. We investigated the influence of valve type and aortic valve calcification on post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses. Methods: Eighty consecutive patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (mean age 82 ± 6 years) underwent computed tomography before and after TAVI. Aortic annulus diameters were determined. Influence of prosthesis type and degree of aortic valve calcification on post-implant eccentricity were analysed. Results: Aortic annulus eccentricity was reduced in patients after TAVI (0.21 ± 0.06 vs. 0.08 ± 0.06, p < 0.0001). Post-TAVI eccentricity was significantly lower in 65 patients following implantation of a balloon-expandable prosthesis as compared to 15 patients who received a self-expanding prosthesis (0.06 ± 0.05 vs. 0.15 ± 0.07, p < 0.0001), even though the extent of aortic valve calcification was not different. After TAVI, patients with a higher calcium amount retained a significantly higher eccentricity compared to patients with lower amounts of calcium. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TAVI with a balloon-expandable prosthesis show a more circular shape of the implanted prosthesis as compared to patients with a self-expanding prosthesis. Eccentricity of the deployed prosthesis is affected by the extent of aortic valve calcification

  6. Aortic distensibility after aortic root replacement assessed with cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melina, Giovanni; Rajappan, Kim; Amrani, Mohamed; Khaghani, Asghar; Pennell, Dudley J; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2002-01-01

    The changes in geometry of the aortic root during the cardiac cycle are thought to be essential for optimal valve function, both in terms of leaflet stress and dynamic behavior. Using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), the study aim was to determine aortic root distensibility of the homograft (group H) and the Medtronic Freestyle xenograft (group F) after aortic root replacement, from a prospective randomized trial. CMR was performed in 15 patients (six homografts, nine Freestyle) at six months and one year after surgery. Percentage change in aortic radius (PCR) and pressure strain elastic modulus (PSEM) were measured as indices of distensibility, and results related to left ventricular mass (LVM). At six months after surgery, mean PCR was 12+/-2.5 in group H and 12.9+/-6.1 in group F (p = NS), and PSEM was 428.5+/-69.8 and 493.5+/-72.7 g/cm2, respectively (p = NS). PCR was reduced to 10+/-1.7% in group H, and by 8.5+/-2.8% in group F (p = NS), while PSEM was increased to 520.5+/-87.3 and 825+/-420.4, respectively (p = NS) at the one-year follow up. Regression analysis showed a correlation between PCR and LVM (r = 0.52, p = 0.08) and LVM index (r = 0.46, p = 0.14), respectively. In addition, there was a relationship between PSEM, LVM and LVM index, suggesting that the stiffer the root wall, the higher the postoperative LVM. Up to one year after aortic root replacement, the wall of both the allogenic and xenogenic valves retained near-normal distensibility. For the first time, a correlation was demonstrated between the elastic properties of the aortic root and LVM. The longer-term behavior and clinical implications of these findings require further investigation.

  7. Acute Traumatic Aortic Disruption and Right Aortic Arch: A Fatal Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirvan Salaminia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute traumatic aortic disruption occurs after forceful deceleration and usually due to motor accidents. Only 10 % to 15 % reach a treatment facility alive and a highly suspicious state is needed for timely diagnosis. Most time they suffer multiple associated lethal injuries. Asymptomatic and isolated right aortic arch is a rare anomaly of the aorta with a prevalence of 0.5% [3]. Its diagnosis is by radiologic studies. We present this patient to remember that the incidental right aortic arch and disruption may interpreted as the left side mediastinal rotation in radiography and so inadvertently lead to late diagnosis and a futile outcome. A 24-year old man was brought to emergency room following a motor accident. He had Glascow Coma Scale Score: 14-15/15 but with stable vital signs. After primary survey chest radiography, emergency abdominal sonography (eFAST and brain CT scanning were requested. Spiral thoracoabdominal CT was also requested about seven hours after admission and when the patient entered an unstable hemodynamic phase. The primary survey was unremarkable. His chest radiography had left mediastinal rotation, which is opposite to what is seen pathologically in the condition of the traumatic aortic disruption, the right mediastinal rotation. His eFAST and brain CT were normal. The patient remained stable until seven hours after admission when the patient becomes unstable. Massive pleural effusion with aortic disruption and a right aortic arch was seen in thoracoabdominal CT. He transferred to the operation room but arrested during transfer. Massive hemothorax was seen during open cardiac massage. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was unsuccessful. This may raises that in any blunt trauma patient with highly suspicious history for the great vessel injury, it may be better to consider the spiral chest CT scanning as the primary radiologic test for evaluation of the chest trauma and not waste the time or resources with rely simply on a

  8. Can early aortic root surgery prevent further aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Hideyuki; Kasahara, Hirofumi; Nemoto, Atsushi; Yamabe, Kentaro; Ueda, Toshihiko; Yozu, Ryohei

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed 50 patients with Marfan syndrome who underwent surgery for aortic root pathologies comprising a root aneurysm without (n = 25; group A) and with (n = 25; group B) dissection. Aortic root repair included Bentall (n = 37) and valve-sparing (n = 13) procedures. Hospital mortality was 4.0%. Twenty-two patients required 36 repeat surgeries on the distal aorta. The main indication for re-intervention was the dilation of the false lumen. In group A, the distal aorta was stable for up to ...

  9. Mechanisms of recurrent aortic regurgitation after aortic valve repair: predictive value of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoît; Pouleur, Anne-Catherine; Robert, Annie; Pasquet, Agnès; Gerber, Bernhard L; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gébrine; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the intraoperative echocardiographic features associated with recurrent severe aortic regurgitation (AR) after an aortic valve repair surgery. Surgical valve repair for AR has significant advantages over valve replacement, but little is known about the predictors and mechanisms of its failure. We blindly reviewed all clinical, pre-operative, intraoperative, and follow-up transesophageal echocardiographic data of 186 consecutive patients who underwent valve repair for AR during a 10-year period and in whom intraoperative and follow-up echo data were available. After a median follow-up duration of 18 months, 41 patients had recurrent 3+ AR, 23 patients presented with residual 1+ to 2+ AR, and 122 had no or trivial AR. In patients with recurrent 3+ AR, the cause of recurrent AR was the rupture of a pericardial patch in 3 patients, a residual cusp prolapse in 26 patients, a restrictive cusp motion in 9 patients, an aortic dissection in 2 patients, and an infective endocarditis in 1 patient. Pre-operatively, all 3 groups were similar for aortic root dimensions and prevalence of bicuspid valve (overall 37%). Patients with recurrent AR were more likely to display Marfan syndrome or type 3 dysfunction pre-operatively. At the opposite end, patients with continent AR repair at follow-up were more likely to have type 2 dysfunction pre-operatively. After cardiopulmonary bypass, a shorter coaptation length, the degree of cusp billowing, a lower level of coaptation (relative to the annulus), a larger diameter of the aortic annulus and the sino-tubular junction, the presence of a residual AR, and the width of its vena contracta were associated with the presence of AR at follow-up. Multivariate Cox analysis identified a shorter coaptation length (odds ratio [OR]: 0.8, p = 0.05), a coaptation occurring below the level of the aortic annulus (OR: 7.9, p < 0.01), a larger aortic annulus (OR: 1.2, p = 0.01), and residual aortic regurgitation

  10. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation with Core Valve: First Indian experience of three high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Seth

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of aortic stenosis is increasing with aging population. However with multiple co-morbidities and prior procedures in this aging population, more and more patients are being declared unfit for the ‘Gold Standard’ treatment i.e. surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR. Among the patients who are unfit or high risk for aortic valve replacement (AVR by open heart surgery, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI has been proven to be a valuable alternative improving survival and quality of life. We report first Indian experience of Core Valve (Medtronic Inc. implantation in three high surgical risk patients performed on 22nd and 23rd February 2012.

  11. When operable patients become inoperable: conversion of a surgical aortic valve replacement into transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Arendrup, Henrik; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a relatively new treatment option for inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). This case describes how a planned conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) on a 73-year-old woman was successfully converted to a TAVI procedure....... On extracorporal circulation it was reconized that the aortic annulus, the coronary ostiae and the proximal part of the ascending aorta were severely calcified making valve implantation impossible. Surgical closure without valve substitution was estimated to be associated with a high risk of mortality due...

  12. Asymptomatic Interrupted Aortic Arch, Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation, and Bicuspid Aortic Valve in a 76-Year-Old Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajdini, Masih; Sardari, Akram; Forouzannia, Seyed Khalil; Baradaran, Abdolvahab; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim

    2016-10-01

    Interrupted aortic arch is a rare congenital abnormality with a high infancy mortality rate. The principal finding is loss of luminal continuity between the ascending and descending portions of the aorta. Because of the high mortality rate in infancy, interrupted aortic arch is very rare among adults. In this report, we describe the case of a 76-year-old woman with asymptomatic interrupted aortic arch, severe tricuspid regurgitation, and bicuspid aortic valve. To our knowledge, she is the oldest patient ever reported with this possibly unique combination of pathologic conditions. In addition to reporting her case, we review the relevant medical literature.

  13. Postoperative Reverse Remodeling and Symptomatic Improvement in Normal-Flow Low-Gradient Aortic Stenosis After Aortic Valve Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Møller, Jacob E; Christensen, Nicolaj L

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe aortic stenosis (AS) most often presents with reduced aortic valve area (benefit of aortic valve...... replacement (AVR) among NFLG patients is controversial. We compared the impact of NFLG condition on preoperative left ventricular (LV) remodeling and myocardial fibrosis and postoperative remodeling and symptomatic benefit. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eighty-seven consecutive patients with reduced aortic valve area...... and normal stroke volume index undergoing AVR underwent echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, a 6-minute walk test, and measurement of natriuretic peptides before and 1 year after AVR. Myocardial fibrosis was assessed from magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were stratified as NFLG or normal...

  14. Aortic ruptures in seat belt wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arajärvi, E; Santavirta, S; Tolonen, J

    1989-09-01

    Several investigations have indicated that rupture of the thoracic aorta is one of the leading causes of immediate death in victims of road traffic accidents. In Finland in 1983, 92% of front-seat passengers were seat belt wearers on highways and 82% in build-up areas. The mechanisms of rupture of the aorta have been intensively investigated, but the relationship between seat belt wearing and injury mechanisms leading to aortic rupture is still largely unknown. This study comprises 4169 fatally injured victims investigated by the Boards of Traffic Accident Investigation of Insurance Companies during the period 1972 to 1985. Chest injuries were recorded as the main cause of death in 1121 (26.9%) victims, 207 (5.0%) of those victims having worn a seat belt. Aortic ruptures were found at autopsy in 98 victims and the exact information of the location of the aortic tears was available in 68. For a control group, we analyzed 72 randomly chosen unbelted victims who had a fatal aortic rupture in similar accidents. The location of the aortic rupture in unbelted victims was more often in the ascending aorta, especially in drivers, whereas in seat belt wearers the distal descending aorta was statistically more often ruptured, especially in right-front passengers (p less than 0.05). The steering wheel predominated statistically as the part of the car estimated to have caused the injury in unbelted victims (37/72), and some interior part of the car was the most common cause of fatal thoracic impacts in seat belt wearers (48/68) (p less than 0.001). The mechanism of rupture of the aorta in the classic site just distal to the subclavian artery seems to be rapid deceleration, although complex body movements are also responsible in side impact collisions. The main mechanism leading to rupture of the ascending aorta seems to be severe blow to the bony thorax. This also often causes associated thoracic injuries, such as heart rupture and sternal fracture. Injuries in the ascending

  15. Early Outcomes of Sutureless Aortic Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Onur Hanedan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In elderly high-risk surgical patients, sutureless aortic valve replacement (AVR should be an alternative to standard AVR. The potential advantages of sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamping and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB time and facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, while maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low rates of paravalvular leakage. The current study reports our single-center experience regarding the early outcomes of sutureless aortic valve implantation. Methods: Between October 2012 and June 2015, 65 patients scheduled for surgical valve replacement with symptomatic aortic valve disease and New York Heart Association function of class II or higher were included to this study. Perceval S (Sorin Biomedica Cardio Srl, Sallugia, Italy and Edwards Intuity (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA valves were used. Results: The mean age of the patients was 71.15±8.60 years. Forty-four patients (67.7% were female. The average preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction was 56.9±9.93. The CPB time was 96.51±41.27 minutes and the cross-clamping time was 60.85±27.08 minutes. The intubation time was 8.95±4.19 hours, and the intensive care unit and hospital stays were 2.89±1.42 days and 7.86±1.42 days, respectively. The mean quantity of drainage from chest tubes was 407.69±149.28 mL. The hospital mortality rate was 3.1%. A total of five patients (7.69% died during follow-up. The mean follow-up time was 687.24±24.76 days. The one-year survival rate was over 90%. Conclusion: In the last few years, several models of valvular sutureless bioprostheses have been developed. The present study evaluating the single-center early outcomes of sutureless aortic valve implantation presents the results of an innovative surgical technique, finding that it resulted in appropriate hemodynamic conditions with acceptable ischemic time.

  16. Semiconductors bonds and bands

    CERN Document Server

    Ferry, David K

    2013-01-01

    As we settle into this second decade of the twenty-first century, it is evident that the advances in micro-electronics have truly revolutionized our day-to-day lifestyle. The technology is built upon semiconductors, materials in which the band gap has been engineered for special values suitable to the particular application. This book, written specifically for a one semester course for graduate students, provides a thorough understanding of the key solid state physics of semiconductors. It describes how quantum mechanics gives semiconductors unique properties that enabled the micro-electronics revolution, and sustain the ever-growing importance of this revolution.

  17. Outcomes of Aortic Valve-Sparing Operations in Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Tirone E; David, Carolyn M; Manlhiot, Cedric; Colman, Jack; Crean, Andrew M; Bradley, Timothy

    2015-09-29

    In many cardiac units, aortic valve-sparing operations have become the preferred surgical procedure to treat aortic root aneurysm in patients with Marfan syndrome, based on relatively short-term outcomes. This study examined the long-term outcomes of aortic valve-sparing operations in patients with Marfan syndrome. All patients with Marfan syndrome operated on for aortic root aneurysm from 1988 through 2012 were followed prospectively for a median of 10 years. Follow-up was 100% complete. Time-to-event analyses were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank test for comparisons. A total of 146 patients with Marfan syndrome had aortic valve-sparing operations. Reimplantation of the aortic valve was performed in 121 and remodeling of the aortic root was performed in 25 patients. Mean age was 35.7 ± 11.4 years and two-thirds were men. Nine patients had acute, 2 had chronic type A, and 3 had chronic type B aortic dissections before surgery. There were 1 operative and 6 late deaths, 5 caused by complications of dissections. Mortality rate at 15 years was 6.8 ± 2.9%, higher than the general population matched for age and sex. Five patients required reoperation on the aortic valve: 2 for endocarditis and 3 for aortic insufficiency. Three patients developed severe, 4 moderate, and 3 mild-to-moderate aortic insufficiency. Rate of aortic insufficiency at 15 years was 7.9 ± 3.3%, lower after reimplantation than remodeling. Nine patients developed new distal aortic dissections during follow-up. Rate of dissection at 15 years was 16.5 ± 3.4%. Aortic valve-sparing operations in patients with Marfan syndrome were associated with low rates of valve-related complications in long-term follow-up. Residual and new aortic dissections were the leading cause of death. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Microstrip microwave band gap structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microwave band gap structures exhibit certain stop band characteristics based on the periodicity, impedance contrast and effective refractive index contrast. These structures though formed in one-, two- and three-dimensional periodicity, are huge in size. In this paper, microstrip-based microwave band gap structures are ...

  19. Renal Infarction from Type B Aortic Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Tweet

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 69-year-old-female with a medical history of hypertension presented to the emergency department (ED complaining of sudden onset of lower back and abdominal pain. Eight hours prior to presentation she reported turning to grab something on another counter and felt a sudden onset sharp pain in her lower back. She began to notice ill-defined abdominal pain, although she denied any shortness of breath, chest pain, numbness, weakness, or urologic symptoms. Her vital signs on presentation to the ED were temperature 36.5˚C, blood pressure 143/88, heart rate 84, respiratory rate 14, and oxygen saturation 93% on room air. On arrival, the patient was in significant discomfort and was rolling on the bed due to pain. Although she appeared to be in moderate distress she had minimal, if any, tenderness on abdominal exam, and only mild left lower back tenderness to palpation. This disconnect between the patient’s apparent discomfort and the lack of physical exam findings prompted the ordering of a computed tomography angiography (CTA of the abdomen/pelvis with greatest suspicion for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Significant findings: Initial abdominal images demonstrated a dissection flap; therefore, a CTA of the chest was also obtained. These images revealed a Stanford type B aortic dissection beginning just distal to the left subclavian artery and extending to the origin of the inferior mesenteric artery. The right renal artery arose from the true lumen of the dissection while the left renal artery arose from the false lumen. This case is interesting as imaging shows the lack of perfusion to the left kidney, residing in the retroperitoneum, which correlates with her non-descript abdominal and left flank pain. Discussion: Aortic dissection is defined as a tear within the wall of the aorta that allows blood to track between intima and media layers. A dissection is classified as Stanford Type A if it involves any portion of the

  20. Pre- and Postoperative Imaging of the Aortic Root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Frandics P.; Mitchell, R. Scott; Miller, D. Craig; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional datasets acquired using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are ideally suited for characterization of the aortic root. These modalities offer different advantages and limitations, which must be weighed according to the clinical context. This article provides an overview of current aortic root imaging, highlighting normal anatomy, pathologic conditions, imaging techniques, measurement thresholds, relevant surgical procedures, postoperative complications and potential imaging pitfalls. Patients with a range of clinical conditions are predisposed to aortic root disease, including Marfan syndrome, bicuspid aortic valve, vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Various surgical techniques may be used to repair the aortic root, including placement of a composite valve graft, such as the Bentall and Cabrol procedures; placement of an aortic root graft with preservation of the native valve, such as the Yacoub and David techniques; and implantation of a biologic graft, such as a homograft, autograft, or xenograft. Potential imaging pitfalls in the postoperative period include mimickers of pathologic processes such as felt pledgets, graft folds, and nonabsorbable hemostatic agents. Postoperative complications that may be encountered include pseudoaneurysms, infection, and dehiscence. Radiologists should be familiar with normal aortic root anatomy, surgical procedures, and postoperative complications, to accurately interpret pre- and postoperative imaging performed for evaluation of the aortic root. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26761529

  1. Sequential transcatheter aortic valve implantation due to valve dislodgement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campante Teles, Rui; Costa, Cátia; Almeida, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an important treatment in high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), whose complications need to be managed promptly. The authors report the case of an 86-year-old woman presenting with severe symptomatic AS, rejected fo...

  2. Aortic pulse wave velocity improves cardiovascular event prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Spears, Melissa; Boustred, Chris

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) improves prediction of cardiovascular (CVD) events beyond conventional risk factors.......To determine whether aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) improves prediction of cardiovascular (CVD) events beyond conventional risk factors....

  3. Intensive lipid lowering with simvastatin and ezetimibe in aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossebø, Anne B; Pedersen, Terje R; Boman, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperlipidemia has been suggested as a risk factor for stenosis of the aortic valve, but lipid-lowering studies have had conflicting results. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind trial involving 1873 patients with mild-to-moderate, asymptomatic aortic stenosis. The patient...

  4. Possible Subclinical Leaflet Thrombosis in Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makkar, Raj R; Fontana, Gregory; Jilaihawi, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A finding of reduced aortic-valve leaflet motion was noted on computed tomography (CT) in a patient who had a stroke after transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) during an ongoing clinical trial. This finding raised a concern about possible subclinical leaflet thrombosis and pr...

  5. Aortic valve-sparing surgery in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachum, Eyal; Shinfeld, Amichay; Kogan, Alexander; Preisman, Sergey; Levin, Shany; Raanani, Ehud

    2013-08-01

    Patients with Marfan syndrome are referred for cardiac surgery due to root aneurysm with or without aortic valve regurgitation. Because these patients are young and frequently present with normal-appearing aortic cusps, valve sparing is often recommended. However, due to the genetic nature of the disease, the durability of such surgery remains uncertain. Between February 2004 and June 2012, 100 patients in our department suffering from aortic aneurysm with aortic valve regurgitation underwent elective aortic valve-sparing surgery. Of them, 30 had Marfan syndrome, were significantly younger (30 +/- 13 vs. 53 +/- 16 years), and had a higher percentage of root aneurysm, compared with ascending aorta aneurysm in their non-Marfan counterparts. We evaluated the safety, durability, clinical and echocardiographic mid-term results of these patients. While no early deaths were reported in either group, there were a few major early complications in both groups. At follow-up (reaching 8 years with a mean of 34 +/- 26 months) there were no late deaths, and few major late complications in the Marfan group. Altogether, 96% and 78% of the patients were in New York Heart Association functional class I-II in the Marfan and non-Marfan groups respectively. None of the Marfan patients needed reoperation on the aortic valve. Freedom from recurrent aortic valve regurgitation > 3+ was 94% in the Marfan patients. Aortic valve-sparing surgery in Marfan symdrome patients is safe and yields good mid-term clinical outcomes.

  6. [Surgical results for aortic involvement in Marfan syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiiya, N; Matsuzaki, K; Maruyama, R; Kunihara, T; Murashita, T; Aoki, H; Yasuda, K

    2002-07-01

    From 1991 through 2001, 21 Marfan patients underwent aortic operations in our hospital. They received a total of 36 aortic operations, 31 by ourselves including 4 non-elective operations and 2 operations before 1991. Extent of replacement was Bentall + total arch (4), Bentall (8), valve sparing aortic root (reimplantation) (2), re-anastomosis + coronary aortic bypass grafting (CABG) after Bentall (1), ascending + total arch (3), ascending (1), total arch (1), total thoracoabdominal (10), thoracoabdominal (1), descending thoracic (2), distal arch (1), abdominal (2). Multiple operations were required in 11 patients (2 operations in 7, 3 operations in 4). Eight reoperations in 6 patients were for adjacent lesion, 5 reoperations were for remote lesion, and 2 others were for complication of Bentall (initial operation elsewhere). Among the 8 reoperations for adjacent lesion, 3 were scheduled operation (2 with elephant trunk), 4 were for residual dissection, and 1 was for annulo-aortic ectasia (AAE). Total aortic replacement was achieved in 4 and subtotal replacement excluding the root in 2. There was no hospital mortality. Paraparesis occurred in 1 who died 4.7 years after operation. The remaining patients are currently alive. No other aortic event occurred. Aortic reoperation-free survival was 83% at 5 year and 28% at 10 year.

  7. Aortic Root Diameter and Longitudinal Blood Pressure Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Ingelsson, Erik; Pencina, Michael J.; Levy, Daniel; Aragam, Jayashri; Mitchell, Gary F.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.

    2008-01-01

    Proximal aortic diameter, including aortic root (AoR) diameter, has been inversely related to pulse pressure (PP) in cross-sectional studies. So, investigators have hypothesized that a smaller AoR diameter may increase risk of developing hypertension. Prospective studies are lacking to test this hypothesis.

  8. MDCT angiography after open thoracic aortic surgery: pearls and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Jenny K; Martinez, Santiago; Hurwitz, Lynne M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review open thoracic aortic surgical techniques and to describe the range of postoperative findings on CT angiography (CTA). An understanding of surgical thoracic aortic procedures will allow appropriate differentiation of normal from abnormal CTA findings on postoperative imaging.

  9. Incidental necropsy finding of a quadricuspid aortic valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijswijk, Jan Willem; Willemink, Martin; Kluin, Jolanda; Vink, Aryan

    2015-01-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valve is a rare congenital cardiac malformation often associated with abnormal valve function. In this article, we present a case of quadricuspid aortic valve only diagnosed at the time of post-mortem examination. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome after endovascular aortic repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De La Motte, L; Vogt, K; Jensen, Leif Panduro

    2011-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of the post-implantation syndrome/systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) after endovascular aortic repair. METHODS: All patients, undergoing elective primary endovascular repair of an asymptomatic infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm...

  11. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacemen...

  12. Diagnosis, imaging and clinical management of aortic coarctation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkema, Elles J; Leiner, Tim; Grotenhuis, Heynric B

    2017-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) is a well-known congenital heart disease (CHD), which is often associated with several other cardiac and vascular anomalies, such as bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), ventricular septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus and aortic arch hypoplasia. Despite echocardiographic

  13. Percutaneous treatment of native aortic coarctation in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijendijk, P.; Boekholdt, S. M.; Blom, N. A.; Groenink, M.; Backx, A. P.; Bouma, B. J.; Mulder, B. J. M.; de Winter, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    Aortic coarctation is a common congenital cardiac defect, which can be diagnosed over a wide range of ages and with varying degrees of severity. We present two cases of patients diagnosed with aortic coarctation in adulthood. Both patients were treated by an endovascular approach. These cases

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cost effectiveness analysis of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms based on four year results from randomized controlled trial. BMJ 2002; 325:1135-114.1. 9. Lindholt JS, Juul 5, Fasting H, Henneberg EW. Hospital costs and benefits of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Results from a randomized population ...

  15. Morphologies of omega band auroras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Natsuo; Yukimatu, Akira Sessai; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Hori, Tomoaki

    2017-08-01

    We examined the morphological signatures of 315 omega band aurora events observed using the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorm ground-based all-sky imager network over a period of 8 years. We find that omega bands can be classified into the following three subtypes: (1) classical (O-type) omega bands, (2) torch or tongue (T-type) omega bands, and (3) combinations of classical and torch or tongue (O/T-type) omega bands. The statistical results show that T-type bands occur the most frequently (45%), followed by O/T-type bands (35%) and O-type bands (18%). We also examined the morphologies of the omega bands during their formation, from the growth period to the declining period through the maximum period. Interestingly, the omega bands are not stable, but rather exhibit dynamic changes in shape, intensity, and motion. They grow from small-scale bumps (seeds) at the poleward boundary of preexisting east-west-aligned auroras, rather than via the rotation or shear motion of preexisting east-west-aligned auroras, and do not exhibit any shear motion during the periods of auroral activity growth. Furthermore, the auroral luminosity is observed to increase during the declining period, and the total time from the start of the growth period to the end of the declining period is found to be about 20 min. Such dynamical signatures may be important in determining the mechanism responsible for omega band formation.

  16. Aortic root and proximal aortic arch replacement (performed by a left-handed surgeon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    We present our standard technique of composite graft replacement performed by a left-handed surgeon. This procedure is performed with a 30-day mortality comparable to that of elective isolated aortic valve replacement. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  17. Combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Lönn, Lars; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    valve stenosis (AS) who are considered at high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement. In this report, we describe the combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of an extensive TAA and AS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of hybrid TAA repair combined with TAVR....

  18. Chronic inflammation, immune response, and infection in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Shi, G-P

    2006-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are associated with atherosclerosis, transmural degenerative processes, neovascularization, decrease in content of vascular smooth muscle cells, and a chronic infiltration, mainly located in the outer aortic wall. The chronic infiltration consists mainly of macrop......Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are associated with atherosclerosis, transmural degenerative processes, neovascularization, decrease in content of vascular smooth muscle cells, and a chronic infiltration, mainly located in the outer aortic wall. The chronic infiltration consists mainly...... matrix metalloproteases and cysteine proteases for aortic matrix remodeling. The lymphocyte activation may be mediated by microorganisms as well as autoantigens generated from vascular structural proteins, perhaps through molecular mimicry. As in autoimmune diseases, the risk of AAA is increased...

  19. Wide band ENDOR spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca Filho, C.

    1973-01-01

    The construction of an ENDOR spectrometer operating from 0,5 to 75 MHz within a single band, with ore Klystron and homodine detection, and no fundamental changes on the electron spin resonance spectrometer was described. The ENDOR signal can be detected both by amplitude modulation of the frequency field, or direct detection of the ESR output, which is taken to a signal analyser. The signal-to-noise ratio is raised by averaging rather than filtering avoiding the use of long time constants, providing natural line widths. The experimental apparatus and the spectra obtained are described. A discussion, relating the ENDOR line amplitudes with the experimental conditions is done and ENDOR mechanism, in which there is a relevant presence of cross relaxation is proposed

  20. Wide Band Artificial Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Zackary

    2017-01-01

    The Wide Band Artificial Pulsar (WBAP) is an instrument verification device designed and built by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virgina. The site currently operates the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument (GUPPI) and the Versatile Green Bank Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) digital backends for their radio telescopes. The commissioning and continued support for these sophisticated backends has demonstrated a need for a device capable of producing an accurate artificial pulsar signal. The WBAP is designed to provide a very close approximation to an actual pulsar signal. This presentation is intended to provide an overview of the current hardware and software implementations and to also share the current results from testing using the WBAP.

  1. Clinical Implication of Aortic Wall Biopsy in Aortic Valve Disease with Bicuspid Valve Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Han Kim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although unique aortic pathology related to bicuspid aortic valve (BAV has been previously reported, clinical implications of BAV to aortopathy risk have yet to be investigated. We looked for potential differences in matrix protein expressions in the aortic wall in BAV patients. Methods: Aorta specimens were obtained from 31 patients: BAV group (n=27, tricuspid aortic valve (TAV group (n=4. The BAV group was categorized into three subgroups: left coronary sinus-right coronary sinus (R+L group; n=13, 42%, right coronary sinus-non-coronary sinus (R+N group; n=8, 26%, and anteroposterior (AP group; n=6, 19%. We analyzed the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP-2. Results: Based on the mean value of the control group, BAV group showed decreased expression of eNOS in 72.7% of patients, increased MMP-9 in 82.3%, and decreased TIMP in 79.2%. There was a higher tendency for aortopathy in the BAV group: eNOS (BAV:TAV= 53%±7%:57%±11%, MMP-9 (BAV:TAV=48%±10%:38%±1%. The AP group showed lower expression of eNOS than the fusion (R+L, R+N group did; 48%±5% vs. 55%±7% (p=0.081. Conclusion: Not all patients with BAV had expression of aortopathy; however, for patients who had a suspicious form of bicuspid valve, aortic wall biopsy could be valuable to signify the presence of aortopathy.

  2. Long-term Follow-up After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Pablo; Moreno, Raúl; Calvo, Luis; Sánchez-Recalde, Ángel; Jiménez-Valero, Santiago; Galeote, Guillermo; López-Fernández, Teresa; Ramírez, Ulises; Riera, Luis; Plaza, Ignacio; Moreno, Isidro; Mesa, José María; López-Sendón, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is used as an alternative to surgical valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are considered high-surgical-risk or inoperable. Two of the main areas of uncertainty in this field are valve durability and long-term survival. This prospective single-center registry study from a tertiary hospital included all consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous aortic valve implantation between 2008 and 2012. Clinical follow-up lasted a minimum of 2.5 years and a maximum of 6.5 years. Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 definitions were used. Seventy-nine patients were included, with an immediate success rate of 94.9%. The median survival was 47.6 months (95% confidence intervals, 37.4-57.9 months), ie, 4 years. One quarter of deaths occurred in the first month, and most were of cardiovascular cause. After the first month, most deaths were due to noncardiovascular causes. The mean values of valve gradients did not increase during follow-up. The cumulative rate of prosthetic valve dysfunction was 15.3%, with no cases of repeat valve replacement. Half of the patients with aortic stenosis who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation were alive 4 years after the procedure. There was a 15.3% prosthetic valve dysfunction rate in cumulative follow-up, with no cases of repeat valve replacement. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Characteristics of aortic valve dysfunction and ascending aorta dimensions according to bicuspid aortic valve morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hong Ju [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Kim, Jun Suk [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sung Min [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    To characterize aortic valve dysfunction and ascending aorta dimensions according to bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) morphology using computed tomography (CT) and surgical findings. We retrospectively enrolled 209 patients with BAVs who underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and CT. BAVs were classified as anterior-posterior (BAV-AP) or lateral (BAV-LA) orientation of the cusps and divided according to the presence (raphe+) or absence (raphe-) of a raphe. Ascending aortic dimensions were measured by CT at four levels. BAV-AP was present in 129 patients (61.7 %) and raphe+ in 120 (57.4 %). Sixty-nine patients (33.0 %) had aortic regurgitation (AR), 70 (33.5 %) had aortic stenosis (AS), and 58 (27.8 %) had combined AS and AR. AR was more common in patients with BAV-AP and raphe+; AS was more common with BAV-LA and raphe-.Annulus/body surface area and tubular portion/body surface area diameters in patients with BAV-AP (17.1 ± 2.3 mm/m{sup 2} and 24.2 ± 5.3 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) and raphe+ (17.3 ± 2.2 mm/m{sup 2} and 24.2 ± 5.5 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) were significantly different from those with BAV-LA (15.8 ± 1.9 mm/m{sup 2} and 26.4 ± 5.5 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) and raphe- (15.7 ± 1.9 mm/m{sup 2} and 26.2 ± 5.4 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively). The morphological characteristics of BAV might be associated with the type of valvular dysfunction, and degree and location of an ascending aorta dilatation. (orig.)

  4. Valve mediated hemodynamics and their association with distal ascending aortic diameter in bicuspid aortic valve subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghav, Vrishank; Barker, Alex J; Mangiameli, Daniel; Mirabella, Lucia; Markl, Michael; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2018-01-01

    Valve mediated hemodynamics have been postulated to contribute to pathology of the ascending aorta (AAo). The objective of this study is to assess the association of aortic valve morphology and hemodynamics with downstream AAo size in subjects with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease. Four-dimensional flow MRI at 1.5 or 3 Tesla was used to evaluate the hemodynamics in the proximal AAo of 52 subjects: size-matched controls with tricuspid aortic valves (n = 24, mid ascending aorta [MAA] diameter = 38.0 ± 4.9 mm) and BAV patients with aortic dilatation (n = 14 right and left coronary leaflet fusion [RL]-BAV, MAA diameter = 38.1 ± 5.3 mm; n = 14 right and noncoronary leaflet fusion [RN]-BAV, MAA diameter = 36.5 ± 6.6 mm). A validated semi-automated technique was used to evaluate hemodynamic metrics (flow angle, flow displacement, and jet quadrant) and valve morphology (orifice circularity) for all subjects. Regression analysis of these metrics to AAo diameter was performed. RN-BAV subjects displayed a stronger correlation between hemodynamic metrics in the proximal AAo with diameter in the distal AAo compared with size-matched tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) controls and RL-BAV subjects. The distal AAo diameter was found to be strongly correlated to the upstream flow displacement (R 2 adjusted = 0.75) and flow angle (R 2 adjusted = 0.66) measured at the sino-tubular junction (STJ). Orifice circularity was also strongly correlated (R 2 adjusted = 0.53) to the distal AAo diameter in RN-BAV subjects. For TAV controls and RL-BAV subjects, correlations were weaker (R 2 adjusted valve morphology metrics. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:246-254. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Echocardiographic aortic valve calcification and outcomes in women and men with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomassen, Henrik K; Cioffi, Giovanni; Gerdts, Eva; Einarsen, Eigir; Midtbø, Helga Bergljot; Mancusi, Costantino; Cramariuc, Dana

    2017-10-01

    Sex differences in risk factors of aortic valve calcification (AVC) by echocardiography have not been reported from a large prospective study in aortic stenosis (AS). AVC was assessed using a prognostically validated visual score and grouped into none/mild or moderate/severe AVC in 1725 men and women with asymptomatic AS in the Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study. The severity of AS was assessed by the energy loss index (ELI) taking pressure recovery in the aortic root into account. More men than women had moderate/severe AVC at baseline despite less severe AS by ELI (pAVC at baseline was independently associated with lower aortic compliance and more severe AS in both sexes, and with increased high-sensitive C reactive protein (hs-CRP) only in men (all pAVC at baseline was associated with a 2.5-fold (95% CI 1.64 to 3.80) higher hazard rate of major cardiovascular events in women, and a 2.2-fold higher hazard rate in men (95% CI 1.54 to 3.17) (both pAVC at baseline also predicted a 1.8-fold higher hazard rate of all-cause mortality in men (95% CI 1.04 to 3.06, pAVC scored by echocardiography has sex-specific characteristics in AS. Moderate/severe AVC is associated with higher cardiovascular morbidity in both sexes, and with higher all-cause mortality in men. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00092677. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Sex differences in aortic valve calcification measured by multidetector computed tomography in aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Shivani R; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Cueff, Caroline; Malouf, Joseph; Araoz, Philip A; Mankad, Rekha; Michelena, Hector; Vahanian, Alec; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is the intrinsic mechanism of valvular obstruction leading to aortic stenosis (AS) and is measurable by multidetector computed tomography. The link between sex and AS is controversial and that with AVC is unknown. We prospectively performed multidetector computed tomography in 665 patients with AS (aortic valve area, 1.05±0.35 cm(2); mean gradient, 39±19 mm Hg) to measure AVC and to assess the impact of sex on the AVC-AS severity link in men and women. AS severity was comparable between women and men (peak aortic jet velocity: 4.05±0.99 versus 3.93±0.91 m/s, P=0.11; aortic valve area index: 0.55±0.20 versus 0.56±0.18 cm(2)/m(2); P=0.46). Conversely, AVC load was lower in women versus men (1703±1321 versus 2694±1628 arbitrary units; PAVC load were much greater in men than in women (odds ratio, 5.07; PAVC showed good associations with hemodynamic AS severity in men and women (all r>0.67; PAVC load, absolute or indexed, was higher in men versus women (all P≤0.01). In this large AS population, women incurred similar AS severity than men for lower AVC loads, even after indexing for their smaller body size. Hence, the relationship between valvular calcification process and AS severity differs in women and men, warranting further pathophysiological inquiry. For AS severity diagnostic purposes, interpretation of AVC load should be different in men and in women.

  7. Hyperattenuating aortic wall on postmortem computed tomography (PMCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiotani, Seiji; Kohno, Mototsugu; Ohashi, Noriyoshi; Yamazaki, Kentaroh; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Kaga, Kazunori; Ebashi, Toshio; Itai, Yuji

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the finding of hyperattenuating aortic wall on postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) and investigate its causes. Our subjects were 50 PMCT of non-traumatic deaths and 50 CT of living persons (live CT). The ascending aorta at the level of the carina was visually assessed regarding the presence or absence of hyperattenuating aortic wall and hematocrit effect on PMCT and live CT. The diameter, thickness of the aortic wall, and CT number (HU) of the aortic wall and the lumen were also measured. Hyperattenuating aortic wall was detected in 100% of PMCT and 2% of live CT. The diameter of the aortic wall was 2.9±0.5 cm on PMCT and 3.5±0.5 cm on live CT, showing a significant difference. The thickness of the aortic wall was 2 mm on PMCT. Hematocrit effect was observed in 46% of PMCT and in none of live CT. With PMCT, there was a significant difference between the CT numbers of the upper and lower half portions of the lumen (19.6±11.7/30.9±12.9), whereas, with live CT, there was no such significant difference (37.4±7.6/38.9±6.7), with the overall value of 38.2±6.7. The CT number of the aortic wall was 49.9±10.9 on PMCT. The causes of hyperattenuating aortic wall on PMCT are considered to be increased attenuation due to contraction of the aortic wall, a lack of motion artifact, and decreased attenuation of the lumen due to dilution of blood after massive infusion at the time of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. (author)

  8. Hyperattenuating aortic wall on postmortem computed tomography (PMCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiotani, Seiji; Kohno, Mototsugu; Ohashi, Noriyoshi; Yamazaki, Kentaroh; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Kaga, Kazunori; Ebashi, Toshio [Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan); Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the finding of hyperattenuating aortic wall on postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) and investigate its causes. Our subjects were 50 PMCT of non-traumatic deaths and 50 CT of living persons (live CT). The ascending aorta at the level of the carina was visually assessed regarding the presence or absence of hyperattenuating aortic wall and hematocrit effect on PMCT and live CT. The diameter, thickness of the aortic wall, and CT number (HU) of the aortic wall and the lumen were also measured. Hyperattenuating aortic wall was detected in 100% of PMCT and 2% of live CT. The diameter of the aortic wall was 2.9{+-}0.5 cm on PMCT and 3.5{+-}0.5 cm on live CT, showing a significant difference. The thickness of the aortic wall was 2 mm on PMCT. Hematocrit effect was observed in 46% of PMCT and in none of live CT. With PMCT, there was a significant difference between the CT numbers of the upper and lower half portions of the lumen (19.6{+-}11.7/30.9{+-}12.9), whereas, with live CT, there was no such significant difference (37.4{+-}7.6/38.9{+-}6.7), with the overall value of 38.2{+-}6.7. The CT number of the aortic wall was 49.9{+-}10.9 on PMCT. The causes of hyperattenuating aortic wall on PMCT are considered to be increased attenuation due to contraction of the aortic wall, a lack of motion artifact, and decreased attenuation of the lumen due to dilution of blood after massive infusion at the time of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. (author)

  9. Comparing American, European and Asian practice guidelines for aortic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozado, Jose; Martin, Maria; Pascual, Isaac; Hernandez-Vaquero, Daniel; Moris, Cesar

    2017-05-01

    The aortic disease comprises a group of different pathologies of high prevalence, seriousness and ever changing by the medical and surgical investigations. Therefore cardiovascular scientific societies in USA, Europe and Asia have created Task Force on practice guidelines (PG) to develop, update and revise PG for aortic diseases. These documents issue recommendations on the diagnosis and management of different aortic diseases. The three societies agree on the recommendations about diagnostic tests and on the value of computed tomography and magnetic resonance as the main tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of aortic disease. Concerning to acute aortic syndromes (AAS), American and European GPs recognize intramural hematoma (IMH) as a type of AAS with surgery indication; however Asian guidelines consider IMH a pathological process different from AAS and indicate medical treatment. In thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA), all express the need for an adequate control of cardiovascular risk factors, emphasizing strict control of blood pressure, smoking cessation and recommend the use of beta-blockers and statins. The threshold for asymptomatic repair is 5.5 cm in European and American and 6 cm for Asian PG, with lower thresholds in Marfan and bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). As regards the abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), the PGs recognize the adequate control of cardiovascular risk factors, but there are differences in class of recommendation on statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or beta-blockers to prevent progression of AAA. For intervention, the threshold diameter in asymptomatic is 5.5 cm but can be reduced to 5 cm in women as recommended by Asian PG. Moreover the specific diseases such as Marfan, BAV, pregnancy or atherosclerosis aortic present specific recommendations with small differences between PGs. In conclusion, PGs are interesting and appropriate documents at present. They issue recommendations based on evidence that help the clinician and

  10. New Fibrillin Gene Mutation - Possible Cause of Ascending Aortic Dilation in Patients with Aortic Valve Disease: Preliminary Results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dudra, J.; Lindner, J.; Vaněk, I.; Šímová, Jana; Mazura, Ivan; Miler, I.; Čiháková, J.; Čapek, P.; Belák, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2009), s. 99-102 ISSN 1061-1711 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : aortic valve disease * ascending aortic dilatation * fibrilin gene mutation Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology

  11. Outcomes in patients with contained ruptures of the aortic annulus after transcatheter aortic valve implantation with balloon-expandable devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breitbart, Philipp; Minners, Jan; Pache, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    ) at three centers in Germany and Denmark. CR were identified in 12 patients (1.2%, 80.7+5.0 years, STS-Score 4.1+1.4%). All 12 patients had received a balloon-expandable valve. In 3 patients periprocedural transesophageal echocardiography revealed findings suggestive of aortic dissection, an aortic...

  12. Aortic valve calcification as a predictor of location and severity of paravalvular regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koh, Ezra Y.; Lam, Kayan Y.; Bindraban, Navin R.; Cocchieri, Riccardo; Planken, R. Nils; Koch, Karel T.; Baan, Jan; de Mol, Bas A.; Marquering, Henk A.

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether the location of aortic valve calcium (AVC) influences the location of paravalvular regurgitation (PR). PR is an adverse effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with a negative effect on long-term patient survival. The relationship between AVC and the occurrence

  13. Music decreases aortic stiffness and wave reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Aggelakas, Angelos; Ioakeimidis, Nikolaos; Xaplanteris, Panagiotis; Terentes-Printzios, Dimitrios; Abdelrasoul, Mahmoud; Lazaros, George; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2015-05-01

    Music has been related to cardiovascular health and used as adjunct therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease. Aortic stiffness and wave reflections are predictors of cardiovascular risk. We investigated the short-term effect of classical and rock music on arterial stiffness and wave reflections. Twenty healthy individuals (22.5±2.5 years) were studied on three different occasions and listened to a 30-min music track compilation (classical, rock, or no music for the sham procedure). Both classical and rock music resulted in a decrease of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) immediately after the end of music listening (all pclassical or rock music in a more sustained way (nadir by 6.0% and 5.8%, respectively, at time zero post-music listening, all pmusic preference was taken into consideration, both classical and rock music had a more potent effect on PWV in classical aficionados (by 0.20 m/s, p=0.003 and 0.13 m/s, p=0.015, respectively), whereas there was no effect in rock aficionados (all p=NS). Regarding wave reflections, classical music led to a more potent response in classical aficionados (AIx decrease by 9.45%), whereas rock led to a more potent response to rock aficionados (by 10.7%, all pMusic, both classical and rock, decreases aortic stiffness and wave reflections. Effect on aortic stiffness lasts for as long as music is listened to, while classical music has a sustained effect on wave reflections. These findings may have important implications, extending the spectrum of lifestyle modifications that can ameliorate arterial function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. ADAMTS-1 in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emina Vorkapic

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix degradation is a hallmark of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Among proteases that are capable of degrading extracellular matrix are a disintegrin and metalloproteases with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS. Pathogenesis of these proteases in AAA has not been investigated until date.Human aneurysmal and control aortas were collected and analyzed with RT-PCR measuring the ADAMTS-1, 4,5,6,8,9,10,13,17 and ADAMTSL-1. Expression of a majority of the investigated ADAMTS members on mRNA level was decreased in aneurysm compared to control aorta. ADAMTS-1 was one of the members that was reduced most. Protein analysis using immunohistochemistry and western blot for localization and expression of ADAMTS-1 revealed that ADAMTS-1 was present predominantly in areas of SMCs and macrophages in aneurysmal aorta and higher expressed in AAA compared to control aortas. The role of ADAMTS-1 in AAA disease was further examined using ADAMTS-1 transgenic/apoE-/- mice with the experimental angiotensin II induced aneurysmal model. Transgenic mice overexpressing ADAMTS-1 showed to be similar to ADAMTS-1 wild type mice pertaining collagen, elastin content and aortic diameter.Several of the ADAMTS members, and especially ADAMTS-1, are down regulated at mRNA level in AAA, due to unknown mechanisms, at the same time ADAMTS-1 protein is induced. The cleavage of its substrates, don't seem to be crucial for the pathogenesis of AAA but rather more important in the development of thoracic aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis as shown in previous studies.

  15. Outcomes after treatment of acute aortic occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Varona Frolov, Serguei R; Acosta Silva, Marcela P; Volo Pérez, Guido; Fiuza Pérez, Maria D

    2015-11-01

    Acute aortic occlusion (AAO) is a rare disease with high morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to describe the results of surgical treatment of acute aortic occlusion and risk factors for mortality. Retrospective review of the clinical history of 29 patients diagnosed and operated on for AAO during 28 years. The following variables were analysed: age, sex, tabaco use, diabetes, chronic renal insufficiency, chronic heart failure, atrial fibrillation, arterial hypertension, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment, 30-day mortality and long-term survival. A univariant analysis was performed of variables related to mortality. Twenty-nine patients were included (18 male) with a mean age of 66,2 years. The aetiology was: embolism (EM) in 11 cases and Thrombosis (TR) in 18 cases. The surgical procedures performed included bilateral transfemoral thrombectomy (14 cases), aorto-bifemoral by-pass (8 cases), axilo uni/bifemoral by-pass (5 cases) and aortoiliac and renal tromboendarterectomy (2 cases). Morbidity included: renal failure (14 cases), mesenteric ischemia (4 cases), cardiac complications (7 cases), respiratory complications (5 cases) and loss of extremity (2 cases). The in-hospital mortality was 21% (EM 0%, TR 21%). The estimated survival at 1.3 and 5 years was 60, 50 and 44% respectively. Age (p=0.032), arterial hypertension (p=0.039) and aetiology of the AAO (p=0.039) were related to mortality. Acute aortic occlusion is a medical emergency with high mortality rates. Acute renal failure is the most common postoperative complication. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Aortic root asymmetry in marfan patients; evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging and comparison with standard echocardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijboom, L. J.; Groenink, M.; van der Wall, E. E.; Romkes, H.; Stoker, J.; Mulder, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with Marfan syndrome may develop aortic root dissection despite only mild aortic root dilation as shown by standard echocardiography, which may be due to aortic root asymmetry. Purpose of the present study was to investigate aortic root asymmetry by magnetic resonance (MR)

  17. Shape of the dilated aorta in children with bicuspid aortic valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mart, Christopher R; McNerny, Bryn E

    2013-01-01

    The dilated aorta in adults with bicuspid aortic valve has been shown to have different shapes, but it is not known if this occurs in children. This observational study was performed to determine if there are different shapes of the dilated aorta in children with bicuspid aortic valve and their association with age, gender, hemodynamic alterations, and degree of aortic enlargement. One hundred and eighty-seven echocardiograms done on pediatric patients (0 – 18 years) for bicuspid aortic valve, during 2008, were reviewed. Aortic valve morphology, shape/size of the aorta, and pertinent hemodynamic alterations were documented. Aortic dilation was felt to be present when at least one aortic segment had a z-score > 2.0; global aortic enlargement was determined by summing the aortic segment z-scores. The aortic shape was assessed by age, gender, valve morphology, and hemodynamic alterations. Aortic dilation was present in 104/187 patients. The aorta had six different shapes designated from S1 through S6. There was no association between the aortic shape and gender, aortic valve morphology, or hemodynamic abnormalities. S3 was the most common after the age of six years and was associated with the most significant degree of global aortic enlargement. The shape of the dilated aorta in children with bicuspid aortic valve does not occur in a uniform manner and multiple shapes are seen. S2 and S3 are most commonly seen. As aortic dilation becomes more significant, a single shape (S3) becomes the dominant pattern

  18. A multicentre observational study of the outcomes of screening detected sub-aneurysmal aortic dilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wild, J B; Stather, P W; Biancari, F

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Currently most abdominal aortic aneurysm screening programmes discharge patients with aortic diameter of less than 30 mm. However, sub-aneurysmal aortic dilatation (25 mm-29 mm) does not represent a normal aortic diameter. This observational study aimed to determine the outcomes of pa...

  19. Fractured cervical spine and aortic transection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Griffin, M J

    2012-02-03

    A 17-year-old victim of a road traffic accident presented. Following investigation diagnoses of fractured first cervical vertebra, aortic transection, diffuse cerebral oedema, fractured right ribs 2-4 and pubic rami were made. Management of this case presented a number of anaesthetic dilemmas: management of the airway, use of cross-clamp vs. shunting or heparinization and bypass, cardiovascular and neurological monitoring, maintenance of cardiovascular stability during and post cross-clamp, minimizing the risk of post-operative renal and neurological dysfunction.

  20. Simulation for transthoracic echocardiography of aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin C Nanda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation allows interactive transthoracic echocardiography (TTE learning using a virtual three-dimensional model of the heart and may aid in the acquisition of the cognitive and technical skills needed to perform TTE. The ability to link probe manipulation, cardiac anatomy, and echocardiographic images using a simulator has been shown to be an effective model for training anesthesiology residents in transesophageal echocardiography. A proposed alternative to real-time reality patient-based learning is simulation-based training that allows anesthesiologists to learn complex concepts and procedures, especially for specific structures such as aortic valve.

  1. THE PROGNOSIS IN TRANSCATHETER AORTIC VALVE IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Imaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI, performed by different types of prostheses and various surgical access, on the prognosis of patients with critical aortic stenosis and comorbidities.Material and methods. Patients (n=130 that had consistently performed 80 TAVI by Edwards valve transfemoral (n=50 and transapical (n=30 access, as well as 50 transcatheter aortic valve replacement by CoreValve system were included into the study. Complications including perioperative mortality, total 30-day mortality, as well as post-hospital mortality were registered during aortic valve replacement, immediately after surgery, before the expiry of 30 days. Mean follow-up was 2.2 years (range 0.2 to 5.2 years.Results. Hospital mortality was on average 6.9%. 121 patients had been discharged from the department after the surgery. The number of deaths in the post-hospital period was 14.8%. Valve type and the type of access had no effect on post-hospital mortality. Men died more than 2.5 times often than women, regardless of age. Atrioventricular block, pacemaker implantation, and history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were the most significant prognostic factors. An important role of minor stroke and renal failure should be noted. Mortality did not depend on the surgical access or valve type. All parameters characterizing the intervention were significantly associated with mortality, both during and after surgery. The proportion of survivors at the end of the first year of observation using Corvalve system was 86.9%, Edwards valve by transfemoral access - 88% and Edwards valve by transapical access – 85.4% (insignificant differences for all groups, p>0.05. Two-year survival was 77.5%, 82.5% and 82.7%, respectively (also insignificant differences for all groups, p>0.05.Conclusion. TAVI is the method of choice, reasonable alternative approach for surgical valve replacement in patients with high surgical risk, although

  2. Antithrombotic therapy after bioprosthetic aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafiq, Sulman; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas; Lilleør, Nikolaj Bang

    2017-01-01

    Background The optimal medical strategy for prevention of thromboembolic events after surgical bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement (BAVR) is still debated. The objective of this study was to compare warfarin therapy (target INR of 2.0 to 3.0) with aspirin 150 mg daily as antithrombotic therapy...... for the first three months after BAVR with or without concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The aim was to evaluate thromboembolic complications, major bleeding complications and death. Materials and methods Prospective, single-centre, open-label, randomized controlled trial. 370 patients were...

  3. [Single coronary artery and right aortic arch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Coronary anomalies are mostly asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally during coronary angiography or echocardiography. However, they must be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of angina, dyspnea, syncope, acute myocardial infarction or sudden death in young patients. The case is presented of two rare anomalies, single coronary artery originating from right sinus of Valsalva and right aortic arch, in a 65 year-old patient with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease treated percutaneously. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Simulation for transthoracic echocardiography of aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Navin C.; Kapur, K. K.; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Simulation allows interactive transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) learning using a virtual three-dimensional model of the heart and may aid in the acquisition of the cognitive and technical skills needed to perform TTE. The ability to link probe manipulation, cardiac anatomy, and echocardiographic images using a simulator has been shown to be an effective model for training anesthesiology residents in transesophageal echocardiography. A proposed alternative to real-time reality patient-based learning is simulation-based training that allows anesthesiologists to learn complex concepts and procedures, especially for specific structures such as aortic valve. PMID:27397455

  5. A correlative study of aortic valve rotation angle and thoracic aortic sizes using ECG gated CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saremi, Farhood, E-mail: fsaremi@usc.edu; Cen, Steven; Tayari, Nazila; Alizadeh, Houman; Emami, Amir; Lin, Leah; Fleischman, Fernando

    2017-04-15

    Objective: Various degrees of aortic valve rotation may be seen in individuals with no history of congenital cardiovascular malformations, but its association with aortic sizes has not been studied. Methods: Gated computed tomographic (CT angiograms in 217 patients were studied (66.7 ± 15; 22–97 years old)). Aortic diameters were determined at 5 anatomic locations. The length of the aorta from sinus to left subclavian artery was measured. The angle of valve rotation was recorded by measuring the angle between a line connecting the midpoint of the non-coronary sinus to the anterior commissure and another line along the interatrial septum. Rotation angles were correlated with aortic measurements. Patients were separated into two groups based on aortic sizes and into three groups based on age. The threshold for aortic dilatation was set at maximum ascending aorta diameter ≥40 mm (≥21 mm body surface area [BSA] indexed). Results: No significant difference in rotation angles was seen between the three age groups or between genders. Rotation angles were significantly correlated with maximal, average, and BSA adjustment of the aortic root and ascending aortic measurements. The aortic root angles were significantly different between the dilated versus nondilated aortas. There was no significant association between the rotation angles and age, length of ascending aorta, or diameters of descending aorta. Multivariate adaptive regression splines showed 25° of aortic root rotation as the diagnostic cut off for ascending aorta dilation. Above the 25° rotation, every 10° of increasing rotation was associated with a 3.78 ± 0.87 mm increase in aortic diameter (p < 0.01) and a 1.73 ± 0.25 times increased risk for having a dilated aorta (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Rotation angles of the aortic valve may be an independent non-invasive imaging marker for dilatation of the ascending aorta. Patients with increased rotation angle of the aortic valve may have higher risk for

  6. Increased hsCRP is associated with higher risk of aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blyme, Adam; Nielsen, Olav W.; Asferg, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate relations between inflammation and aortic valve stenosis (AS) by measuring high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, at baseline (hsCRP0) and after 1 year (hsCRP1) and exploring associations with aortic valve replacement (AVR). Design We examined 1423 patients from the Simvast......Objective To investigate relations between inflammation and aortic valve stenosis (AS) by measuring high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, at baseline (hsCRP0) and after 1 year (hsCRP1) and exploring associations with aortic valve replacement (AVR). Design We examined 1423 patients from...... the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study. Results During first year of treatment, hsCRP was reduced both in patients later receiving AVR (2.3 [0.9–4.9] to 1.8 [0.8–5.4] mg/l, p regression analyses, hsCRP1...

  7. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for a failed bio-bentall in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigel, Roy; Siegel, Robert J; Kahlon, Ravi S; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Cheng, Wen; Makkar, Raj R

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Marfan syndrome are at risk for ascending aortic dilation and dissection at the level of the aortic sinuses, making aortic root and valve replacement common. Patients undergoing an aortic root replacement with concomitant replacement of the aortic valve with a bioprosthesis (Bio-Bentall) are predisposed to bioprosthesis failure. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an option for aortic valve replacement, avoiding cardiopulmonary bypass and/or median sternotomy. We present the first 2 reported patients with Marfan syndrome who underwent a valve-in-valve TAVI in the setting of a prior Bio-Bentall. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. A comparison of minimally invasive and standard aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliński, Jarosław; Plicner, Dariusz; Grudzień, Grzegorz; Wąsowicz, Marcin; Musiał, Robert; Andres, Janusz; Kapelak, Bogusław

    2016-10-01

    The study objective was to compare aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy with aortic valve replacement through a median sternotomy. With propensity score matching, we selected 211 patients after aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy and 211 patients after aortic valve replacement who underwent operation between January 2010 and December 2013. Perioperative outcomes were analyzed, and multivariable logistic regression analysis of risk factors of postoperative morbidity was performed. For propensity score-matched patients, hospital mortality was 1.0% in the aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy group and 1.4% in the aortic valve replacement group (P = 1.000). Stroke occurred in 0.5% versus 1.4% (P = .615), myocardial infarction occurred in 1.4% versus 1.9% (P = 1.000), and new onset of atrial fibrillation occurred in 12.8% versus 24.2% (P = .003) of patients in the aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy and aortic valve replacement groups, respectively. Postoperative drainage was 353.5 ± 248.6 mL versus 544.3 ± 324.5 mL (P replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy and aortic valve replacement groups, respectively. Mediastinitis occurred in 2.8% of patients after aortic valve replacement and in 0.0% of patients after aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy surgery (P = .040). Intensive care unit stay (1.3 ± 1.2 days vs 2.6 ± 2.6 days) and hospital stay (5.7 ± 1.6 days vs 8.7 ± 4.4 days) were statistically significantly shorter in the aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy group. Aortic valve replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy surgery resulted in reduced postoperative morbidity (odds ratio, 0.4; P replacement through a right anterior minithoracotomy surgery resulted in a reduced infection rate, diminished postoperative bleeding and blood

  9. Cardiac tamponade associated with delayed ascending aortic perforation after blunt chest trauma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Dae Woong; Lee, Mi Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiac tamponade due to aortic injury after blunt trauma is a rare and potentially fatal injury. Most aortic injuries caused by blunt trauma present as aortic dissection or rupture of the aortic isthmus. Several cases of delayed aortic injury have been reported. However, all of these injuries were observed in the descending aorta because they had been caused by a posterior rib fracture. Case presentation We report the first case of cardiac tamponade associated with delayed ascendi...

  10. The future of surgical aortic valve replacement and the role of sutureless technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbir, Selim

    2018-04-01

    Aortic valve stenosis has become the most frequent type of valve disease in worldwide. Surgical aortic valve replacement is still the gold standard therapy. More recently transcatheter aortic valve implantation has been demonstrated to be not inferior in patients with high and intermediate risk patients. Sutureless aortic valves were designed to simplify the surgical aortic valve replacement. With the aid of this new technology, the invasiveness of surgery can be reduced with potential improvements in outcome.

  11. Futility, benefit, and transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindman, Brian R; Alexander, Karen P; O'Gara, Patrick T; Afilalo, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a transformative innovation that provides treatment for high or prohibitive surgical risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who either were previously not referred for or were denied operative intervention. Trials have demonstrated improvements in survival and symptoms after TAVR versus medical therapy; however, there remains a sizable group of patients who die or lack improvement in quality of life soon after TAVR. This raises important questions about the need to identify and acknowledge the possibility of futility in some patients considered for TAVR. In this very elderly population, a number of factors in addition to traditional risk stratification need to be considered including multimorbidity, disability, frailty, and cognition in order to assess the anticipated benefit of TAVR. Consideration by a multidisciplinary heart valve team with broad areas of expertise is critical for assessing likely benefit from TAVR. Moreover, these complicated decisions should take place with clear communication around desired health outcomes on behalf of the patient and provider. The decision that treatment with TAVR is futile should include alternative plans to optimize the patient's health state or, in some cases, discussions related to end-of-life care. We review issues to be considered when making and communicating these difficult decisions. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Changes in abdominal aortic aneurysm epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Fredrik; Wanhainen, Anders; Mani, Kevin

    2017-12-01

    The epidemiology and treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) has changed over the past 30 years. This review aims to give the reader an overview of these changes and current trends in AAA epidemiology, management and outcome. In the past decades there have been three changes in AAA management and epidemiology: 1) introduction of endovascular aortic repair (EVAR); 2) population screening; and 3) a markedly reduced prevalence of the disease. These developments have resulted in an increased incidence of intact AAA-repair and reduced incidence of ruptured AAA-repair. Overall, survival after both intact and ruptured AAA repair has improved, much thanks to the broad introduction of EVAR. Additionally, both elective and rupture repair in the elderly population has increased, with octogenarians constituting >20% of intact AAA repairs performed in several countries. International analyses of vascular registries indicate that important variations remain in AAA management and results. The changes in AAA epidemiology and management have led to a situation where most AAAs today are treated with EVAR electively. The incidence of ruptured AAA-repair continues to decrease. These changes are accompanied by improvements in both short- and long-term survival.

  13. [Right lung cancer with right aortic arch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Noriyuki, T; Kuroda, Y; Kuranishi, F; Nakahara, M; Fukuda, T; Ishizaki, Y; Hotta, R; Akimoto, E; Mori, H

    2008-02-01

    An abnormal shadow was detected on chest X-ray mass screening in an asymptomatic 63-year-old man. The further examinations revealed the shadow to be primary lung cancer (Rt. S6. adenocarcinoma, cT2N0M0, c-stage IB) with right aortic arch. We used 3 dimentional-computed tomography (3D-CT) to assess an anatomical feature of vessels in detail. The right lower lobectomy and the dissection of medi astinal lymph nodes was performed. We confirmed no abnormal anatomy of pulmonary artery and vein at surgery, and it was possible to perform right lower lobectomy with the common procedure. Since lymph node was found by intraopetrative pathological examination, since no metastasis from interlobar to subcarinal lymph node was found, we did not perform dissection of upper mediastinal dissection, which was equivalent to ND2a lymph nodes dissection of the left lung cancer in General Rule for Clinical and Pathological Record of Lung Cancer. The patient with right aortic arch is known to have variant anatomy of other intrathoracic vessels occasionally. 3D-CT was quite useful in assessing anatomical feature, and enabled us to perform safe operation.

  14. Magnetic resonance diagnosis of aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukohara, Nobuhiko; Yoshida, Yutaka; Nakamura, Kazuo

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in thirty-one patients with aortic dissection to evaluate its usefulness in diagnosing the site of communicating orifice between the true and false lumens and the presence of retrograde dissection. 1. MRI revealed the site of the entry as a defect in the intimal flap in the images of 12 of 15 patients (80 %). 2. The site of the communicating orifice between the true and false lumens in the abdominal aorta could be determined in six of eight patients (75 %). 3. MRI diagnosis of retrograde dissection was successful in three patients. 4. Cross-sectional analysis of the abdominal aorta based on the location of the true lumen revealed that the celiac and superior mesenteric arteries tended to arise from the true lumen when the latter was situated in the anterior part of the abdominal aorta. The right and left renal arteries arose from the true lumen when it was positioned anterolaterally. In conclusion, MRI was a useful diagnostic method for aortic dissection, especially for determining the site of entry in the thoracic aorta. The changes in signal intensity in the false lumen provided useful information for locating the communicating orifice between the true and false lumens and for diagnosis of retrograde dissection. Cross-sectional analysis of dissection in the abdominal aorta was useful for predicting the branching of the main arteries from the true or false lumen. (author)

  15. Atypical Presentation of Traumatic Aortic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Fu Wah Ho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Blunt thoracic aorta injury (BAI is second only to head injury as cause of mortality in blunt trauma. While most patients do not survive till arrival at the hospital, for the remainder, prompt diagnosis and treatment greatly improve outcomes. We report an atypical presentation of BAI, highlighting the diagnostic challenges of this condition in the emergency department. Case Presentation. A previously well 25-year-old male presented 15 hours after injury hemodynamically stable with delirium. There were no signs or symptoms suggestive of BAI. Sonography showed small bilateral pleural effusions. Chest radiograph showed a normal mediastinum. Eventually, CT demonstrated a contained distal aortic arch disruption. The patient underwent percutaneous endovascular thoracic aortic repair and recovered well. Conclusion. This catastrophic lesion may present with few reliable signs and symptoms; hence, a high index of suspicion is crucial for early diagnosis and definitive surgical management. This paper discusses the diagnostic utility of clinical features, injury mechanism, and radiographic modalities. Consideration of mechanism of injury, clinical features, and chest radiograph findings should prompt advanced chest imaging.

  16. Diagnostic imaging of acute aortic dissection; Evaluation of thrombosed type aortic dissection by CT and angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohya, Tohru; Kumazaki, Tatsuo (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    One hundred and nineteen patients with aortic dissection who underwent diagnostic imaging were reviewed and angiographic findings as well as those of CT were analysed. Thirty eight cases (43.1%) had non-contrast opacified false lumen, the type of which we call 'thrombosed type aortic dissection'. A comparative study of the thrombosed type with the patent type of false lumens was made particularly from the stand point of the characteristic diagnostic imagings (CT and angiography). At the same time, the pitfalls of these imagings in thrombosed type aortic dissection were studied. At the onset the average age of thrombosed type was 62.3 years old, while that of the patent type was 57.3. A statistical significance between the two groups was p<0.05. Thrombosed type in all cases was caused by atherosclerosis, whereas patent type was caused by the Marfan's syndrome in 11 cases. Other clinical findings, such as initial symptoms and blood pressure revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Pre-contrast CT in acute thrombosed type aortic dissection showed 'hyperdense crescent sign' in 89.4%. However, in 3 cases with thrombosed type in which the pre-contrast CT showed 'hyperdense crescent sign' contrast-enhanced CT detected no clear evidence of aortic dissection in the same site. This was due to obscurity induced by contrast medium. Angiographic findings of thrombosed type were classified into 3 groups: normal type, stenosed true lumen type and ulcer-like projection type. The incidence of normal type was estimated to be 48.4%, whereas stenosed true lumen type was 24.2% and ulcer-like projection was 27.7%. The present study concluded that thrombosed type is not rare in acute aortic dissection and contrast-enhanced CT as well as pre-contrast CT, is of great value in diagnosing thrombosed type. 'Hyperdense crescent sign' in pre-contrast CT is characteristic of intramural hematoma. (author).

  17. Early Results of Chimney Technique for Type B Aortic Dissections Extending to the Aortic Arch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chen [Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Department of General Surgery (China); Tang, Hanfei; Qiao, Tong; Liu, Changjian; Zhou, Min, E-mail: 813477618@qq.com [The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Department of Vascular Surgery, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital (China)

    2016-01-15

    ObjectiveTo summarize our early experience gained from the chimney technique for type B aortic dissection (TBAD) extending to the aortic arch and to evaluate the aortic remodeling in the follow-up period.MethodsFrom September 2011 to July 2014, 27 consecutive TBAD patients without adequate proximal landing zones were retrograde analyzed. Chimney stent-grafts were deployed parallel to the main endografts to reserve flow to branch vessels while extending the landing zones. In the follow-up period, aortic remodeling was observed with computed tomography angiography.ResultsThe technical success rate was 100 %, and endografts were deployed in zone 0 (n = 3, 11.1 %), zone 1 (n = 18, 66.7 %), and zone 2 (n = 6, 22.2 %). Immediately, proximal endoleaks were detected in 5 patients (18.5 %). During a mean follow-up period of 17.6 months, computed tomography angiography showed all the aortic stent-grafts and chimney grafts to be patent. Favorable remodeling was observed at the level of maximum descending aorta and left subclavian artery with expansion of true lumen (from 18.4 ± 4.8 to 25 ± 0.86 mm, p < 0.001 and 27.1 ± 0.62 to 28.5 ± 0.37 mm, p < 0.001) and depressurization of false lumen (from 23.7 ± 2.7 to 8.7 ± 3.8 mm, p < 0.001, from 5.3 ± 1.2 to 2.1 ± 2.1 mm, p < 0.001). While at the level of maximum abdominal aorta, suboptimal remodeling of the total aorta (from 24.1 ± 0.4 to 23.6 ± 1.5 mm, p = 0.06) and true lumen (from 13.8 ± 0.6 to 14.5 ± 0.4 mm, p = 0.08) was observed.ConclusionBased on our limited experience, the chimney technique with thoracic endovascular repair is demonstrated to be promising for TBAD extending to the arch with favorable aortic remodeling.

  18. Reproducibility of aortic annulus measurements by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhbaeck, Annika; Achenbach, Stephan [University of Erlangen, Department of Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany); University of Giessen, Department of Cardiology, Giessen (Germany); Pflederer, Tobias; Marwan, Mohamed; Schmid, Jasmin; Arnold, Martin [University of Erlangen, Department of Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany); Nef, Holger; Rixe, Johannes; Hecker, Franziska [University of Giessen, Department of Cardiology, Giessen (Germany); Schneider, Christian [University of Giessen, Department of Radiology, Giessen (Germany); Lell, Michael; Uder, Michael [University of Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    To evaluate a systematic approach for measurement of aortic annulus dimensions by cardiac computed tomography. CT data sets of 64 patients were evaluated. An oblique cross-section aligned with the aortic root was created by systematically identifying the caudal insertion points of the three aortic cusps and sequentially aligning them in a double oblique plane. Aortic annulus dimensions, distances of coronary ostia and a suitable fluoroscopic projection angle were independently determined by two observers. Interobserver intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for aortic annulus diameters were excellent (ICC 0.89-0.93). Agreement for prosthesis size selection was excellent (k = 0.86 for mean, k = 0.84 for area-derived and k = 0.91 for circumference-derived diameter). Mean distances of the left/right coronary ostium were 13.4 ± 2.4/14.4 ± 2.8 mm for observer 1 and 13.2 ± 2.7/13.5 ± 3.2 mm for observer 2 (p = 0.30 and p = 0.0001, respectively; ICC 0.76/0.77 for left/right coronary artery). A difference of less than 10 for fluoroscopic projection angle was achieved in 84.3 % of patients. A systematic approach to generate a double oblique imaging plane exactly aligned with the aortic annulus demonstrates high interobserver and intraobserver agreements for derived measurements which are not influenced by aortic root calcification. (orig.)

  19. Video assisted right mini-thoracotomy for aortic root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carl A; Wood, Katherine L; Melvin, Amber L; Lebow, Brandon F; Knight, Peter A

    2018-01-01

    Aortic root replacement is typically performed through a median sternotomy. The right anterior mini-thoracotomy approach has been shown to decrease hospital length of stay in aortic valve surgery when compared to sternotomy. This approach is rare in ascending aortic surgery due to technical challenges which include exposure and annular suture placement. Automated suturing technology is now available to facilitate the placement of annular sutures. The use of a camera greatly enhances visualization of the aortic root. A right anterior mini-thoracotomy is performed via a 5 cm incision in the right second intercostal space with a camera port placed lateral to the incision. Peripheral arterial and venous cannulation are performed. The aortic cross clamp is placed through a 5 mm incision in the third interspace anterior to mid axillary line. Histidine tryptophan ketoglutarate (HTK) cardioplegia is administered and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest is achieved followed by completion of the distal anastomosis with a 4-0 polypropylene running suture. After aortic leaflet removal, annular and prosthetic sutures are placed with shafted instruments or with automated suturing technology. Coronary button suturing and graft-to-graft anastomoses are performed with shafted instruments. Aortic root procedures can be performed safely through a right anterior mini-thoracotomy. The use of a camera and automated suturing technology may further facilitate this procedure, enabling more surgeons to offer this less invasive approach to patients.

  20. Debranching Solutions in Endografting for Complex Thoracic Aortic Dissections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goksel, Onur Selcuk, E-mail: onurgokseljet@gmail.com [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey); Guven, Koray [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Karatepe, Celalettin [Mustafa Kemal Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey); Gok, Emre [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey); Acunas, Bulent [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Cinar, Bayer [Medical Park Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Alpagut, Ufuk [Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2014-08-15

    Conventional surgical repair of thoracic aortic dissections is a challenge due to mortality and morbidity risks. We analyzed our experience in hybrid aortic arch repair for complex dissections of the aortic arch. Between 2009 and 2013, 18 patients (the mean age of 67 ± 8 years-old) underwent hybrid aortic arch repair. The procedural strategy was determined on the individual patient. Thirteen patients had type I repair using trifurcation and another patient with bifurcation graft. Two patients had type II repair with replacement of the ascending aorta. Two patients received extra-anatomic bypass grafting to left carotid artery allowing covering of zone 1. Stent graft deployment rate was 100%. No patients experienced stroke. One patient with total debranching of the aortic arch following an acute dissection of the proximal arch expired 3 months after TEVAR due to heart failure. There were no early to midterm endoleaks. The median follow-up was 20 ± 8 months with patency rate of 100%. Various debranching solutions for different complex scenarios of the aortic arch serve as less invasive procedures than conventional open surgery enabling safe and effective treatment of this highly selected subgroup of patients with complex aortic pathologies.

  1. Consumption coagulopathy in acute aortic dissection: principles of management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuyong; Han, Lu; Li, Jiachen; Gong, Ming; Zhang, Hongjia; Guan, Xinliang

    2017-06-12

    The effect of acute aortic dissection itself on coagulopathy or surgery-related coagulopathy has never been specifically studied. The aim of the present study was to perioperatively describe consumption coagulopathy in patients with acute aortic dissection. Sixty-six patients with acute type A aortic dissection were enrolled in this study from January 2015 to September 2016. Thirty-six patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms were used as a control group during the same period. Consumption coagulopathy was evaluated using standard laboratory tests, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and thromboelastograghy at five perioperative time-points. A significant reduction in clotting factors and fibrinogen was observed at the onset of acute aortic dissection. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and thromboelastograghy also revealed a persistent systemic activation of the coagulation system and the consumption of clotting factors. In contrast, although platelet counts were consistently low, we did not find that platelet function was more impaired in the acute aortic dissection group than the control group. After surgery, clotting factors and fibrinogen were more impaired than platelet function. Thus, we proposed that hemostatic therapy should focus on the rapid and sufficient supplementation of clotting factors and fibrinogen to improve consumption coagulopathy in patients with acute aortic dissection.

  2. Cauda equina syndrome: an uncommon symptom of aortic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fuliang; Xing, Tong; Yu, Fang; Li, Hongchuan; Fang, Xiutong; Song, Hongxing

    2015-01-01

    In order to help diagnose and deal with the fetal aortic diseases in time, we retrospectively reviewed 8 patients who presented with cauda equina syndrome (CES) but actually suffered from low spinal nerve ischemia due to aortic diseases. 8 patients were initially diagnosed as CES. 7 patients were confirmed with aortic diseases. 1 patient was confirmed with aortic saddle embolism post emergent laminectomy. Relief of CES symptoms was evaluated during preoperation and follow-up period. 1 patient was diagnosed as aortic dissection and 5 patients as AAA. These 6 patients underwent endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). The CES was relieved in 5-10 d post procedure. The 7th patient was diagnosed with acute abdominal aortic occlusion and then underwent catheter directed thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) for 20 h and CES disappeared. The JOA scores of the 7 patients were recovered from preoperative 15.14±1.21 to 21.00±2.16 within 5-10 d (P<0.01), and evaluated to be 24.12±1.34, 25.88±1.21 and 26.29±1.11 at 3 m-, 6 m- and 12 m-follow-up point, respectively. The 8th patient was initially diagnosed as lumbar spinal stenosis and lumbar disc herniation. The patient underwent emergent vertebral canal decompression and presented with serious CES symptoms. CTA confirmed that the patient had been suffered from aortic saddle embolism (ASE). CES caused by abdominal aortic diseases is a special event with fetal consequences if it is not recognized and treated promptly. Orthopedists and neurosurgeons should pay attentions particularly to this issue to preserve the cauda equina functions to their maximums.

  3. Blunt abdominal aortic injury: a Western Trauma Association multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalhub, Sherene; Starnes, Benjamin W; Brenner, Megan L; Biffl, Walter L; Azizzadeh, Ali; Inaba, Kenji; Skiada, Dimitra; Zarzaur, Ben; Nawaf, Cayce; Eriksson, Evert A; Fakhry, Samir M; Paul, Jasmeet S; Kaups, Krista L; Ciesla, David J; Todd, S Rob; Seamon, Mark J; Capano-Wehrle, Lisa M; Jurkovich, Gregory J; Kozar, Rosemary A

    2014-12-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic injury (BAAI) is a rare injury. The objective of the current study was to examine the presentation and management of BAAI at a multi-institutional level. The Western Trauma Association Multi-Center Trials conducted a study of BAAI from 1996 to 2011. Data collected included demographics, injury mechanism, associated injuries, interventions, and complications. Of 392,315 blunt trauma patients, 113 (0.03%) presented with BAAI at 12 major trauma centers (67% male; median age, 38 years; range, 6-88; median Injury Severity Score [ISS], 34; range, 16-75). The leading cause of injury was motor vehicle collisions (60%). Hypotension was documented in 47% of the cases. The most commonly associated injuries were spine fractures (44%) and pneumothorax/hemothorax (42%). Solid organ, small bowel, and large bowel injuries occurred in 38%, 35%, and 28% respectively. BAAI presented as free aortic rupture (32%), pseudoaneurysm (16%), and injuries without aortic external contour abnormality on computed tomography such as large intimal flaps (34%) or intimal tears (18%). Open and endovascular repairs were undertaken as first-choice therapy in 43% and 15% of cases, respectively. Choice of management varied by type of BAAI: 89% of intimal tears were managed nonoperatively, and 96% of aortic ruptures were treated with open repair. Overall mortality was 39%, the majority (68%) occurring in the first 24 hours because of hemorrhage or cardiac arrest. The highest mortality was associated with Zone II aortic ruptures (92%). Follow-up was documented in 38% of live discharges. This is the largest BAAI series reported to date. BAAI presents as a spectrum of injury ranging from minimal aortic injury to aortic rupture. Nonoperative management is successful in uncomplicated cases without external aortic contour abnormality on computed tomography. Highest mortality occurred in free aortic ruptures, suggesting that alternative measures of early noncompressible torso hemorrhage

  4. Ascending Aortic Wall Cohesion: Comparison of Bicuspid and Tricuspid Valves

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    Jaroslav Benedik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Bicuspid aortic valve (AV represents the most common form of congenital AV malformation, which is frequently associated with pathologies of the ascending aorta. We compared the mechanical properties of the aortic wall between patients with bicuspid and tricuspid AV using a new custom-made device mimicking transversal aortic wall shear stress. Methods. Between 03/2010 and 07/2011, 190 consecutive patients undergoing open aortic valve replacement at our institution were prospectively enrolled, presenting either with a bicuspid (group 1, n=44 or a tricuspid (group 2, n=146 AV. Aortic wall specimen were examined with the “dissectometer” resulting in nine specific aortic-wall parameters derived from tensile strength curves (TSC. Results. Patients with a bicuspid AV showed significantly more calcified valves (43.2% versus 15.8%, P<0.001, and a significantly thinner aortic wall (2.04±0.42 mm versus 2.24±0.41 mm, P=0.008. Transesophageal echocardiography diameters (annulus, aortic sinuses, and sinotubular junction were significantly larger in the bicuspid group (P=0.003, P=0.02, P=0.01. We found no difference in the aortic wall cohesion between both groups as revealed by shear stress testing (P=0.72, P=0.40, P=0.41. Conclusion. We observed no differences of TSC in patients presenting with tricuspid or bicuspid AVs. These results may allow us to assume that the morphology of the AV and the pathology of the ascending aorta are independent.

  5. An easy miss: aortic dissection in a 'healthy' male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co, Michael Lawrenz F; Agdamag, Arianne Clare; Mateo, Roselyn Cristelle; Williams, Kim A

    2017-08-07

    Aortic dissection is an uncommon cause of chest discomfort that can be rapidly fatal without early diagnosis and prompt treatment. In this report, we present a man with no risk factors who presented with chest discomfort not typical of a dissection, absent pulse and blood pressure differential and a normal chest radiograph. He eventually was diagnosed with an extensive Type-A aortic dissection. We discuss diagnostic clues, classification of aortic dissection and possible treatment options. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Para-aortic lymph node radiation in advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emami, B.; Watring, W.G.; Tak, W.; Anderson, B.; Piro, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-six patients with advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix and with iliac or para-aortic nodes interpreted as un-equivocally positive on lymphangiography have received radiation therapy to the para-aortic area at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology at Tufts-New England Medical Center Hospital. Of 29 patients who received para-aortic area irradiation as part of their initial treatment, local control was achieved in 18 patients (62%). Overall, four patients developed major complications requiring surgical intervention. Detailed results and our current pre-treatment evaluation policy including lymphangiography, percutaneous needle biopsy and selective extra-peritoneal lymph node biopsy will be discussed

  7. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in the elderly: who to refer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Matthew; Green, Philip

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, experience with transcatheter aortic valve implantation has led to improved outcomes in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who may not have previously been considered for intervention. These patients are often frail with significant comorbid conditions. As the prevalence of AS increases, there is a need for improved assessment parameters to determine the patients most likely to benefit from this novel procedure. This review discusses the diagnostic criteria for severe AS and the trials available to aid in the decision to refer for aortic valve procedures in the elderly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Delayed Death from Complete Aortic Transection: Case Report

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    Sakda Sathirareuangchai, M.D.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Blunt chest trauma is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in road traffic accident. One of the life- threatening injuries is traumatic aortic injury. The authors reported a case of delayed death from blunt chest trauma in a young Thai male, who had a traffic accident 2 weeks prior to his death. The autopsy revealed complete transection of thoracic aorta at the isthmus and false aneurysm formation. The clinical findings and mechanism of traumatic aortic injury are reviewed. Traumatic aortic injury is a fatal blunt chest trauma in which the victims rarely survive to the hospital. Prompt diagnosis and early surgical treatment can decrease morbidity and mortality.

  9. Aortic Valve Leaflet Perforation after Mitral Valve Repair

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    M. Aboelnasr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available  A 32-year-old patient with symptomatic severe aortic regurge, 6 weeks after mitral valve repair, was admitted for aortic valve surgery. No preoperative clinical data consistent with infective endocarditis could be detected. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography showed aortic leaflet perforation affecting non coronary cusp. During operation, leaflet perforation was detected and closed completely with autologous pericardial patch. No vegetations or abscess could be seen during operation. Iatrogenic aetiology of leaflet perforation after mitral repair was suspected in  this case. Recognition of this complication will help in  avoiding it during mitral valve surgery and expecting it as a possible complication during intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography.

  10. Extensive spinal epidural hematoma: a rare complication of aortic coarctation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zizka, J.; Elias, P.; Michl, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Harrer, J. [Dept. of Cardiac Surgery, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Cesak, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Herman, A. [1. Dept. of Internal Medicine, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2001-07-01

    Development of collateral circulation belongs among the typical signs of aortic coarctation. Cerebral or spinal artery aneurysm formation with increased risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage represent the most common neurovascular complication of this disease. We report a case of a 20-year-old sportsman who developed acute non-traumatic paraplegia as a result of extensive spinal epidural hemorrhage from collateral vessels accompanying aortic coarctation which was unrecognized up to that time. To the best of our knowledge, acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of aortic coarctation has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  11. Extensive spinal epidural hematoma: a rare complication of aortic coarctation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zizka, J.; Elias, P.; Michl, A.; Harrer, J.; Cesak, T.; Herman, A.

    2001-01-01

    Development of collateral circulation belongs among the typical signs of aortic coarctation. Cerebral or spinal artery aneurysm formation with increased risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage represent the most common neurovascular complication of this disease. We report a case of a 20-year-old sportsman who developed acute non-traumatic paraplegia as a result of extensive spinal epidural hemorrhage from collateral vessels accompanying aortic coarctation which was unrecognized up to that time. To the best of our knowledge, acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of aortic coarctation has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  12. Mitral-aortic annular enlargement: modification of Manouguian's technique

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    Costa Mario Gesteira

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We hereby present a technical modification for mitral-aortic annular enlargement. The mitral valve is replaced through the retro-septal approach, avoiding patches for left atrial roof closure. We report a mitral-aortic valve replacement in a patient whose original annuli would preclude adequate prostheses. The simultaneous annular enlargement may be necessary for avoiding patient-prosthesis mismatch and for reconstructing destroyed mitral and aortic annuli. The technique may minimize the risk of bleeding and of paravalvular leakage, using an approach well known to cardiac surgeons.

  13. MDCT evaluation of aortic root and aortic valve prior to TAVI. What is the optimal imaging time point in the cardiac cycle?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurencak, T.; Turek, J.; Kietselaer, B.L.; Mihl, C.; Kok, M. de; Ommen, V.G. van; Garsse, L.A. van; Nijssen, E.C.; Wildberger, J.E.; Das, M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the optimal imaging time point for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) therapy planning by comprehensive evaluation of the aortic root. METHODS: Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) examination with retrospective ECG gating was retrospectively performed in 64 consecutive

  14. 5B.05: MARFAN SYNDROME: ASSESSMENT OF AORTIC DISSECTION RISK BY ANALYSIS OF AORTIC VISCOELASTIC PROPERTIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, A; Pini, A; Marelli, S; Gan, L; Giuliano, A; Trifirò, G; Santini, F; Salvi, L; Salvi, P; Viecca, F; Carretta, R; Parati, G

    2015-06-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by an abnormal fibrillin-1 synthesis. Aortic root dilation and dissection are the main problems affecting patients prognosis in these patients. Their pharmacological prophylaxis with losartan or with a beta-blocker counteracts the aortic root dilation, but a close follow-up is required to assess therapeutic response rate and to identify non-responders. Unfortunately genotype-phenotype studies do not allow to determine the exact risk profile in these patients and there is no reliable method to accurately predict their risk of aortic dissection. Aim of this study was to evaluate non-invasive markers for identification of Marfan patients at higher risk of aortic complications. We studied 187 Marfan patients (identified according to 2010 Revised Ghent Criteria and positive genetic analysis), age 32.3 ± 16.5 yrs (mean ± SD). 52 patients (27.8%) had undergone surgical ascending aorta replacement (David or Bentall procedure). Central pressure curves were recorded by PulsePen tonometer, and the aortic viscoelastic aortic properties were studied by determination of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV). With reference to the age related distribution of PWV values in a normal population, defined according to Arterial-Stiffness-Collaboration, PWV mean values in Marfan patients corresponded to 60th percentile in non- operated patients and to the 67th percentile in those operated. Adult Marfan patients (n = 146) generally displayed a low blood pressure, because of the pharmacological prophylaxis, and were compared with a population of 189 adult healthy subjects (81 males), matched by age (38 ± 13 vs 38 ± 16 yrs.), heart rate (64 ± 9 bpm vs 64 ± 11 bpm) and blood pressure (mean BP = 78 ± 9 mmHg vs 79 ± 4 mmHg) values. Average PWV value was higher than in healthy controls (PWV = 7.0 ± 1.7) both in not operated (PWV = 7.6 ± 1.6; p = 0

  15. Successful Delayed Aortic Surgery for a Patient with Ischemic Stroke Secondary to Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morihara, Ryuta; Yamashita, Toru; Deguchi, Kentaro; Tsunoda, Keiichiro; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Yunoki, Taijun; Sato, Kota; Nakano, Yumiko; Kono, Syoichiro; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Abe, Koji

    2017-09-01

    The diagnosis of aortic dissection (AD) is sometimes difficult within the limited time window of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for ischemic stroke (IS). A 60-year-old man developed sudden left hemiparesis due to IS. During tPA infusion, his blood pressure dropped and consciousness declined. After transfer to our hospital, carotid duplex ultrasonography led to a diagnosis of AD. Emergency surgery was postponed because of the risk of hemorrhagic transformation. The patient successfully underwent aortic surgery on day 5 and was discharged with a remarkable improvement in his symptoms. Delayed surgery may avoid hemorrhagic transformation in patients with AD-induced IS who have received tPA.

  16. Activation of coagulation and hyperfibrinolysis in patients with aortic arch atheromatosis (Aortic AA) as a risk factor for cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemens, Hans-Joachim G; Mirau, Wladimir; Brueckner, Sabine; Jahn, Juergen; Roth-Isigkeit, Angela; Gutsche, Sven; Mitusch, Rolf; Sheikhzadeh, Abdolhamid

    2005-04-01

    In patients with cerebral ischemia, a frequent finding is atheromatous plaques in the ascending aorta and the aortic arch. Since we were able to demonstrate that patients with atrial fibrillation have an increased coagulatory activity, we wanted to evaluate a potential systemic activation of the coagulatory system in patients with aortic arch atheromatosis (Aortic AA). In 134 consecutive patients, we determined several parameters of the coagulatory and fibrinolytic systems as well as several thrombophilia risk factors and compared the results with 134 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. In 90 of the 134 patients, transesophageal echocardiography showed Aortic AA, and in the remaining 44 patients, there were no aortic findings. The Aortic AA group showed higher concentrations of thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) and plasmin-antiplasmin complexes (PAP). Further division into 4 subgroups of different severity (grade I: no plaques; grade II: plaques 2-5 mm, grade III: plaques > 5 mm, grade IV: mobile plaques), revealed increasing concentrations of fibrinogen, D-dimers and tissue-type plasminogen activator. The grade IV-group displayed the highest values in comparison to all other groups. In conclusion, Aortic AA as such is a risk factor for cerebral ischemia. It causes a systemically detectable activation of coagulation which substantially exceeds the values for controls. This observation is in accordance with our findings in patients with atrial fibrillation.

  17. The ascending aortic image quality and the whole aortic radiation dose of high-pitch dual-source CT angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Jian; Li, Jian; Ren, Jing; Liu, Hongtao; Xu, Junqing; Wei, Mengqi; Hao, Yuewen; Zheng, Minwen

    2013-12-12

    Aortic dissection is a lift-threatening medical emergency associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The incidence rate of aortic dissection is estimated at 5 to 30 per 1 million people per year. The prompt and correct diagnosis of aortic dissection is critical. This study was to compare the ascending aortic image quality and the whole aortic radiation dose of high-pitch dual-source CT angiography and conventional dual-source CT angiography. A total of 110 consecutive patients with suspected aortic dissection and other aortic disorders were randomly divided into two groups. Group A underwent traditional scan mode and Group B underwent high-pitch dual-source CT scan mode. The image quality and radiation dose of two groups were compared. Close interobserver agreement was found for image quality scores (κ = 0.87). The image quality of ascending aorta was significantly better in the high-pitch group than in the conventional group (2.78 ± 0.46 vs 1.57 ± 0.43, P source CT angiography of the whole aorta can provide motion-artifact-free imaging of the ascending aorta at a low radiation dose compared to conventional protocol.

  18. Early impact of aortic wrapping on patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with mild to moderate ascending aorta dilatation

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    Sosnowski Andrzej

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of mild to moderate dilatation of the ascending aorta of less than 5 cm is controversial, particularly when concomitant surgical correction of aortic valve is required. We investigate the impact of a simple method of aorta reduction using Dacron graft wrapping during aortic valve replacement on the rest of the aorta. Methods We studied 14 patients who had ascending aorta dilatation of 4-5 cm before undergoing aortic wrapping during their aortic valve replacement and compared with their post-operative imaging within a month. Results The diameters of the ascending aorta wrapped with the Dacron graft were significantly reduced within 4 weeks after surgery from 44.7 ± 2.6 to 33.6 ± 3.9 mm (p Conclusions Reduction of ascending aortic dilatation by wrapping with a Dacron graft in this preliminary study is associated with favourable early reversed aortic remodelling. This supports the hypothesis that correction of mild-moderate dilatation of the ascending aorta with Dacron wrapping at the time of aortic valve surgery may prevent the progression of the dilatation, although the long-term study on a larger population is needed to confirm its benefits.

  19. Surgical management of ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm in a 2-year-old boy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiyah, Merna; Mohsin, Shazia; Al Faraidi, Lama; Al-Hawri, Khaled; Al Otay, Abdulmajeed; Al Najashi, Khalid

    2018-04-17

    Aortic pseudoaneurysms are rare but life-threatening complications usually seen after cardiac surgery. The causes could be multifactorial such as infection or trauma. We report the surgical management of a postoperative pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a 2-year-old Middle Eastern boy who had undergone ventricular septal defect closure, subaortic membrane resection, and pulmonary artery de-banding. He was immediately operated on for resection of the aneurysm. A computed tomography scan at 2 months following surgery showed no aneurysm. Antibiotics were continued for 6 weeks and our patient was discharged with negative blood cultures. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of such rare complication can be lifesaving.

  20. Aortic wrapping for stanford type A acute aortic dissection: short and midterm outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demondion, Pierre; Ramadan, Ramzi; Azmoun, Alexandre; Raoux, François; Angel, Claude; Nottin, Rémi; Deleuze, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Conventional surgical treatment of Stanford type A acute aortic dissection (AAD) is associated with considerable in-hospital mortality. As regards very elderly or high-risk patients with type A AAD, some may meet the criteria for less invasive surgery likely to prevent the complications associated with aortic replacement. We have retrospectively analyzed a cohort of patients admitted to our center for Stanford type A AAD and having undergone surgery between 2008 and 2012. The outcomes of the patients having had an aortic replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass (group A) have been compared with the outcomes of the patients who underwent off-pump wrapping of the ascending aorta (group B). Among the 54 patients admitted for Stanford type A AAD, 15 with a mean age of 77 years [46 to 94] underwent wrapping of the aorta. Regarding the new standard European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation (EuroSCORE II), the median result in our group B patients was 10.47 [5.02 to 30.07]. In-hospital mortality was 12.80% in group A and 6.6% in group B (p=0.66). For patients who underwent external wrapping of the ascending aorta, follow-up mortality rate was 13.3% with a median follow-up of 15 months [range 0 to 47]. The gold standard in cases of Stanford type A AAD consists of emergency surgical replacement of the dissected ascending aorta. In some cases in which the aortic root is not affected a less invasive surgical approach consisting of wrapping the dissected ascending aorta can be suggested as an alternative. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Takayasu arteritis with middle aortic syndrome and mesenteric ischemia treated by aortic stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Morrissey, MD, MA, FRCSC

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A 48-year-old woman suffering from Takayasu arteritis presented with middle aortic syndrome consisting of abdominal pain, refractory hypertension with pulmonary edema and pleural effusions, and lower limb ischemia. She failed to improve with high-dose steroid therapy and underwent endovascular stenting of two severe stenoses in the supraceliac and infrarenal aorta. Her symptoms resolved and hypertension improved after the procedure.

  2. Acute type A aortic dissection: characteristics and outcomes comparing patients with bicuspid versus tricuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etz, Christian D; von Aspern, Konstantin; Hoyer, Alexandro; Girrbach, Felix F; Leontyev, Sergey; Bakhtiary, Farhad; Misfeld, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the clinical characteristics and postoperative outcome of patients with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) suffering acute dissection in comparison with their tricuspid peers. Between 1995 and 2011, 460 consecutive patients underwent emergency repair for acute type A aortic dissection. In 379 patients without connective tissue disease, the aortic valve morphology could clearly be specified (91.6% tricuspid and 8.4% bicuspid). At the time of dissection, patients with a bicuspid valve were younger (46.7 ± 13 vs 61.6 ± 12 years, P tricuspid valve (bicuspid: 31.3% vs tricuspid: 6.3%, P tricuspid valve patients (P tricuspid patients (P = 0.166). Hospital mortality was 20.3% and not significantly different between the two valve morphologies, even despite the younger age of bicuspid patients: 28.1% among bicuspids vs 19.6% among tricuspids (P = 0.255). Survival after discharge was 63.3% at 10 years for all patients. BAV patients had a significantly better survival with 100% at 10 years compared with 60.2% in tricuspid valve patients (P = 0.011). Mean follow-up among survivors was comparable for bicuspid and tricuspid patients (3.7 and 4.1 years, respectively). Patients with BAV have a distinctive dissection pattern with the entry tear frequently located in the aortic root and-despite their younger age-are subject to substantial hospital mortality. For bicuspid patients suffering from dissection, composite root replacement yields an excellent outcome equal to an age- and gender-matched normal population. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  3. Aortic valve replacement and prosthesis-patient mismatch in the era of trans-catheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Shigeki

    2016-08-01

    The treatment strategy for aortic stenosis (AS) has been changing due to newly developed valvular prostheses and trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). To determine the role of new modalities for AS with a small aortic root, papers using the concept of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) were reviewed. First, to determine the cut-off value of the indexed effective orifice area (IEOA) for defining PPM, the studies of surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) with a follow-up longer than 5 years and a patient number larger than 500 were reviewed. Second, the papers comparing TAVI and SAVR were reviewed. Furthermore, the prevalence of PPM was reviewed, with the addition of papers on aortic root enlargement, sutureless AVR, and aortic valve reconstruction with autologous pericardium. The results of the long-term survival after aortic valve replacement (AVR) have indicated that an IEOA less than 0.65 cm(2)/m(2) should be avoided in all cases, whereas the indications for patients with an IEOA between 065 and 0.85 cm(2)/m(2) should be determined by considering multiple factors. A large body size and younger age have a significantly negative influence on the long-term survival. In Asian population, the prevalence of PPM was low, despite the fact that the size of the aortic annulus was small. The IEOA after TAVI was larger than after surgical AVR in population-matched studies. To evaluate the role of TAVI and other modalities for a small aortic root, studies with a longer follow-up and larger volume are thus warranted.

  4. Will Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR be the Primary Therapy for Aortic Stenosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose F. Condado, MD, MS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR is increasingly used for the treatment of high or very high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS or failing surgical bioprosthesis (valve-in-valve, VIV-TAVR. In TAVR, the collapsed transcatheter heart valve (THV is introduced using the delivery system inserted from the femoral artery (preferred or other alternative accesses (transapical, transaortic, transcarotid, subclavian/transinnominate or transcaval. The delivery system is then advanced until coaxially aligned with the aortic annulus, where the THV is deployed. This procedure can be associated with complications such as access site injury (vascular complication, paravalvar leak, cerebrovascular events and conduction disturbances. However, the rapid acceptance and successes observed with TAVR have been made possible through careful patient selection, preprocedural planning (i.e. MDCT annular sizing, THV technology (i.e. new generation valves, and procedural techniques (i.e. minimalist TF-TAVR and alternative percutaneous access options, as well as a decrease in complications as TAVR experience grows. Though the results or ongoing clinical trials evaluating TAVR in intermediate surgical risk patients are pending, it is likely that TAVR will soon be approved for lower risk patients as well.

  5. Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair into the False Lumen in Chronic Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamman, Arnoud V; Williams, David M; Patel, Himanshu J

    2017-07-01

    Deployment of a stent graft for the treatment of aortic dissections is normally performed in the true lumen. However, in some rare occasions landing in the false lumen may be appropriate. We present 2 different cases of chronic aortic dissection, where we opted to land the stent graft into the false lumen to treat the associated aneurysm. For the first case, the goal of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) was to exclude the aneurysm from within the false lumen because of a slit-like true lumen. In the second case, the visceral arteries came off the false lumen, with the renal vessels from the true lumen. False lumen TEVAR was performed, and the infrarenal aorta fenestrated, as to ensure adequate perfusion. These different clinical scenarios show how false lumen TEVAR for chronic dissections with associated aneurysms can be an alternative treatment approach and highlight the importance of assessing the origin of branch vessels and the possible necessity of reperfusion of these, before TEVAR is performed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dual-band infrared camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, H.; Schlemmer, H.

    2005-10-01

    Every year, numerous accidents happen on European roads due to bad visibility (fog, night, heavy rain). Similarly, the dramatic aviation accidents of year 2001 in Milan and Zurich have reminded us that aviation safety is equally affected by reduced visibility. A dual-band thermal imager was developed in order to raise human situation awareness under conditions of reduced visibility especially in the automotive and aeronautical context but also for all transportation or surveillance tasks. The chosen wavelength bands are the Short Wave Infrared SWIR and the Long Wave Infrared LWIR band which are less obscured by reduced visibility conditions than the visible band. Furthermore, our field tests clearly show that the two different spectral bands very often contain complementary information. Pyramidal fusion is used to integrate complementary and redundant features of the multi-spectral images into a fused image which can be displayed on a monitor to provide more and better information for the driver or pilot.

  7. Midterm outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Shahram; Dohmen, Guido; Götzenich, Andreas; Haushofer, Marcus; Spillner, Jan Wilhelm; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Hoffmann, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a therapeutic option for high-risk or nonoperable patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. The best known and most frequently implanted prostheses are the CoreValve and SAPIEN prostheses. We report our experiences and analyze the results of our TAVI program. A total of 357 patients underwent transfemoral (TF) and transapical (TA) TAVI in our center between January 2008 and October 2012. The procedure was performed in 190 patients with CoreValve, in 155 patients with SAPIEN, and in 12 patients with ACURATE TA prostheses. Transfemoral access was used in 190 patients. In 167 patients, TA access was used. The mean age was 80.2 ± 6.4 years. All patients were nonoperable or had a high risk for a conventional aortic valve replacement. The mean logistic EuroSCORE I was 25.92 ± 14.51%. The TF/CoreValve (190 patients) and TA/SAPIEN (155 patients) groups showed significant difference in the patients' mean age (81.7 ± 6.3 years vs. 79.5 ± 6.6 years, P = 0.002) and in mean logistic EuroSCORE I (22.16 ± 13.05% vs. 31.04 ± 16.40, P < 0.001). The overall 30-day mortality (357 patients) was 9.80% (TF, 8.42%; TA, 11.37%); overall 1-year mortality (275 patients), 21.45% (TF, 23.74%; TA, 19.12%); overall 2-year mortality (199 patients), 29.15% (TF, 35.96%; TA, 23.64%); overall 3-year mortality (133 patients), 37.59% (TF, 43.86%; TA, 32.89%); and overall 4-year mortality (38 patients), 39.47% (TF, 45%; TA, 33.33%). The rate of pacemaker implantation after TAVI was significantly higher in the CoreValve group than in the SAPIEN group: 44.74% (85/190 patients) versus 6.45% (10/155 patients), P < 0.001. Stroke rate was higher in the TF-CoreValve group than in the TA-SAPIEN group: 4.21% versus 0.64%, P = 0.045. Outcomes after TAVI were, in our population of nonoperable and high-risk patients, encouraging. The differences in midterm outcomes between the TF-CoreValve TAVI and the TA-SAPIEN TAVI were not significant.

  8. Choice of Treatment for Aortic Valve Stenosis in the Era of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Eastern Denmark (2005 to 2015)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Luk, Ngai H V; Olsen, Niels T

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the choice of treatment for severe aortic valve stenosis in the era of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Eastern Denmark. BACKGROUND: Until the early 21st century, the only therapeutic option for aortic valve stenosis was surgical a...

  9. Association Between Diverticular Disease and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark-Christensen, Anders; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Diederichsen, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Background The aetiology of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is multifactorial, and many risk factors are shared with diverticular disease. It is unknown whether an independent association exists between these conditions. Methods Individuals enrolled in two Danish population based randomised AAA ...

  10. Spondylodiscitis and an aortic aneurysm due to Campylobacter coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bournet Béatrice

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Campylobacter coli is a rare cause of bacteremia. We report here the first case of C.coli spondylodiscitis complicated by an aortic aneurysm. Outcome was favourable with surgery and antibiotic therapy.

  11. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Degenerative Bioprosthetic Surgical Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvir, Danny; Webb, John; Brecker, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is an emerging therapeutic alternative for patients with a failed surgical bioprosthesis and may obviate the need for reoperation. We evaluated the clinical results of this technique using a large, worldwide registry....

  12. Transcaval Access for TAVR Across a Polyester Aortic Graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Robert J.; O’Neill, William W.; Greenbaum, Adam B.

    2015-01-01

    Transcaval access to the aorta allows transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients without other good access options. The resulting aortocaval fistula is closed with a nitinol cardiac occluder device. There is no experience traversing a synthetic aortic graft to perform transcaval access and closure. We describe a patient who underwent successful traversal of a polyester aortic graft using radiofrequency energy applied from the tip of a guidewire, to allow retrograde transcatheter aortic valve replacement from a femoral vein, along with details of our technique. The patient did well and was discharged home after 3 days. There was residual aortocaval fistulous flow immediately after implantation of a polyester-seeded nitinol muscular ventricular septal defect occluder device, but this fistula spontaneously occluded within one month. PMID:25510917

  13. Computerized tomographic evaluation of aortic prosthetic graft complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, D.; Kalmar, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Computerized tomography has been found to be an accurate and sensitive method of diagnosing complications of synthetic aortic grafts. Complications in this series of four cases included aortoesophageal fistula, aortoduodenal fistula, pseudoaneurysm, and retroperitoneal hematoma. 6 references, 5 figures

  14. DEGENERATIVE AORTIC STENOSIS: PATHOGENESIS AND NEW PRINCIPLES OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Andropova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To reveal of markers of inflammation and progression of calcification in patients with degenerative aortic stenosis (DAS. Material and methods. A single-stage study was done in 85 patients with degenerative calcification of aortic valve (42 patients with DAS and 43 patients without DAS. The techniques for assessing the severity of aortic valve calcification included ultrasonic diagnostics and multislice spiral computed tomography. Markers of inflammation and lipid profile were investigated.    Results. Higher blood levels of total holesterol and holesterol of low density lipoprotein were revealed in patients with DAS in comparison with patients without DAS. They also had higher levels of inflammation markers: C-reactive protein and interleukin-6. There were significant correlations between DAS severity, lipid metabolism disturbances and inflammation markers. Conclusion. Atherogenesis and inflammation may have pathogenic influence on progression of aortic valve calcification and DAS development by lipid infiltration and endothelium cells damage.

  15. Postmortem Aortic Dissection: An Artifact of the Embalming Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Guenevere; Husain, Mujtaba; McGoey, Robin; Swartz, William

    2016-01-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a serious condition that affects 3/100,000 individuals a year. Recently, a case report was published describing an embalmed patient with an aortic dissection. The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of AD among 80 embalmed cadavers and confirm the AD with histopathologic evaluation. In seven cases of grossly identified AD, six were determined to be due to the embalming procedure and only one case of true antemortem AD was confirmed. These results suggest that aortic morphology can be altered by administration of the embalming fluid and that alterations can mimic AD, not only on gross inspection but also on postmortem imaging. Awareness of this embalming artifact may prevent misdiagnosis of an aortic dissection in an embalmed patient, a point particularly useful for autopsy pathology that may include postmortem examination of an embalmed patient. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  16. Atypical aortic coarctation as a cause of a cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Alsemgeest, F.; Kamp, O.; Marcu, C.B.

    2015-01-01

    Atypical locations for aortic coarctation have been previously described. However, to our knowledge, no case has been described of a rapidly progressive dilated cardiomyopathy caused by an atypical coarctation, with a rapid normalisation of ventricular function after treatment.

  17. IDIOPATHIC NEONATAL AORTIC ARCH THROMBOSIS: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignazio Lofù

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonatal aortic arch thrombosis is a rare but life threatening condition. A correct diagnosis and an appropriate therapeutic approach are fundamental to prevent death or severe injuries. Case presentation: we report a case of spontaneous aortic arch thrombosis in a term newborn, who presented with suggestive signs of aortic coarctation immediately after birth. Despite the initiation of anticoagulant therapy, a massive increase in size of thrombus with evidence of coronary involvement was noted. Thrombolytic treatment was performed with thrombus resolution. Death occurred after a few days due to widespread brain haemorrhage. Conclusion: To date, no definitive guidelines have been published for the treatment of neonatal aortic arch thrombosis, and only anecdotal reports are available. A multidisciplinary approach is fundamental in order to evaluate the risk:benefit ratio of proposed medical and surgical interventions. Further studies are needed to improve consensus evidence based guidelines and ensure appropriate approaches to this condition.

  18. Giant Dissecting Aortic Aneurysm in an Asymptomatic Young Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyank Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant aortic aneurysm is defined as aneurysm in the aorta greater than 10 cm in diameter. It is a rare finding since most patients will present with complications of dissection or rupture before the size of aneurysm reaches that magnitude. Etiological factors include atherosclerosis, Marfan’s syndrome, giant cell arteritis, tuberculosis, syphilis, HIV-associated vasculitis, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and medial agenesis. Once diagnosed, prompt surgical intervention is the treatment of choice. Although asymptomatic unruptured giant aortic aneurysm has been reported in the literature, there has not been any case of asymptomatic giant dissecting aortic aneurysm reported in the literature thus far. We report a case of giant dissecting ascending aortic aneurysm in an asymptomatic young male who was referred to our institution for abnormal findings on physical exam.

  19. Prosthetic aortic arch replacement. A new experimental technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodman, R F; Estner, S; Passik, C; Goldman, M

    1990-01-01

    An experimental method for rapid replacement of the transverse aortic arch is presented. Branched intraluminal prostheses were fashioned of varying sizes containing ascending and descending aortic limbs and branches for the brachiocephalic and subclavian vessels. Rigid rings were sewn into the ends to allow rapid fixation of the grafts using extraluminal ligatures. In 31 dogs, arch prostheses were inserted using inflow occlusion at normothermia. Twenty-seven animals successfully underwent aortic arch replacement during periods of circulatory arrest from 2.5 to 6.5 minutes. One animal was electively sacrificed 3 years after arch replacement. Various sized aortic arch prostheses manufactured for clinical use would have the potential advantages of technical simplicity of insertion and reduced cardiopulmonary bypass. Alternatively, varying sized tubular grafts for the brachiocephalic branches could be attached to the currently available tubular intraluminal grafts.

  20. Reevaluation of chest radiography in aortic rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, F. Jr.; Gutierrez, O.H.; Burgener, F.A.; Yee, W.K.; Katzberg, R.W.; Morris, T.W.

    1989-01-01

    Mediastinal widths in 50 volunteers with varying inspiration and positioning were compared with values obtained in 17 patients with known aortic rupture. Mediastinal width was significantly affected by the degree of inspiration and positioning in control subjects. Mediastinal width after rupture was outside normal 95% confidence limits in 12 of 17 cases (71%), as compared with inspiration-matched controls. Fourteen of seventeen patients with rupture (82%) had mediastina wider than 8.0 cm, but so did 23 of 150 controls (15%), all on expiratory films. On average, patients with rupture had wider mediastina for all degrees of inspiration, but deeper inspiration helped accentuate differences in width between these patients and normal controls

  1. Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kesteren, F; Wiegerinck, E M A; Rizzo, S

    2017-01-01

    Autopsy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new field of interest in cardiovascular pathology. To identify the cause of death, it is important to be familiar with specific findings related to the time interval between the procedure and death. We aimed to provide an overview...... of the autopsy findings in patients with TAVI in their medical history divided by the timing of death with specific interest in the added value of autopsy over a solely clinically determined cause of death. In 8 European centres, 72 cases with autopsy reports were available. Autopsies were divided according...... (22.6%) and respiratory failure (9.7%). Of the nine patients with death >30 days, 88.9% died of sepsis, caused by infective endocarditis in half of them. At total of 12 patients revealed cerebrovascular complications. Autopsy revealed unexpected findings in 61.1% and resulted in a partly or completely...

  2. Mast Cells in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Guo-Ping; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2013-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are proinflammatory cells that play important roles in allergic responses, tumor growth, obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Although the presence and function of MCs in atherosclerotic lesions have been thoroughly studied in human specimens......, in primary cultured vascular cells, and in atherosclerosis in animals, their role in AAA was recognized only recently. Via multiple activation pathways, MCs release a spectrum of mediators � including histamine, inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, proteoglycans, and proteases � to activate...... neighboring cells, degrade extracellular matrix proteins, process latent bioactive molecules, promote angiogenesis, recruit additional inflammatory cells, and stimulate vascular cell apoptosis. These activities associate closely with medial elastica breakdown, medial smooth-muscle cell loss and thinning...

  3. Aortitis and aortic occlusion in Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delay, Charline; Schwein, Adeline; Lejay, Anne; Gaertner, Sébastien; Aleil, Boris; Thaveau, Fabien; Georg, Yannick; Chakfe, Nabil

    2015-02-01

    Patients with Crohn disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis are known to be at increased risk of arterial thromboembolic complications. We report the case of a 33-year-old woman suffering from CD for 19 years who presented lower limb claudication. Computed tomography scan revealed an aortoiliac occlusion extending from the level of the inferior mesenteric artery to both iliac bifurcations. Endovascular recanalization was attempted as a first option but failed. We then performed an aortobi-femoral bypass through a left retroperitoneal approach that allowed a total relief of the symptoms. Histologic study of the aorta demonstrated a nonspecific aortitis with lymphohistiocytic cell infiltration in the media and adventitia tunica. There was no signs of associated vasculitis. At the light of a literature review, we discussed our surgical strategy and the inflammation of the aortic wall as local factor of thrombosis that has never been previously described. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Noncardiac Surgery in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Jørgensen, Mads Emil; Martinsson, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    (MACE) and all-cause mortality were investigated in a contemporary Danish cohort. HYPOTHESIS: AS is not an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes in noncardiac surgery. METHODS: All patients with and without diagnosed AS who underwent noncardiac surgery in 2005 to 2011 were identified through......BACKGROUND: Past research has identified aortic stenosis (AS) as a major risk factor for adverse outcomes in noncardiac surgery; however, more contemporary studies have questioned the grave prognosis. To further our understanding of this, the risks of a 30-day major adverse cardiovascular event...... nationwide administrative registers. AS patients (n = 2823; mean age, 75.5 years, 53% female) were matched with patients without AS (n = 2823) on propensity score for AS and surgery type. RESULTS: In elective surgery, MACE (ie, nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or cardiovascular death...

  5. Management of intra-aortic balloon pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Christopher A-J; Weyker, Paul D; Flynn, Brigid C

    2015-06-01

    Intra-aortic balloon pumps (IABPs) continue to be the most widely used cardiac support devices with an annual estimate of 200 000 IABPs placed worldwide. IABPs enhance myocardial function by maximizing oxygen supply and minimizing oxygen demand. The use of IABPs is not without risk, with major vascular injury, ischemia, and infection being the most common complications, especially in high-risk patients. While recent studies have questioned the use of IABPs in patients with cardiogenic shock secondary to myocardial infarction, these studies have limitations making it difficult to formulate definitive conclusions. This review will focus on the mechanisms of counterpulsation, the management of IABPs and the evidence supporting this ventricular support therapy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Mast Cells in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Guo-Ping; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2013-01-01

    neighboring cells, degrade extracellular matrix proteins, process latent bioactive molecules, promote angiogenesis, recruit additional inflammatory cells, and stimulate vascular cell apoptosis. These activities associate closely with medial elastica breakdown, medial smooth-muscle cell loss and thinning......Mast cells (MCs) are proinflammatory cells that play important roles in allergic responses, tumor growth, obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Although the presence and function of MCs in atherosclerotic lesions have been thoroughly studied in human specimens......, in primary cultured vascular cells, and in atherosclerosis in animals, their role in AAA was recognized only recently. Via multiple activation pathways, MCs release a spectrum of mediators � including histamine, inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, proteoglycans, and proteases � to activate...

  7. An 18-cm unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan M. Droz, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a significant source of morbidity and ranked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as the 15th leading cause of death among adults aged 60 to 64 years. Size confers the largest risk factor for aneurysm rupture, with aneurysms >6 cm having an annual rupture risk of 14.1%. We present the case of a 60-year-old man found on ultrasound imaging at a health fair screening to have a 15-cm AAA. Follow-up computed tomography angiography revealed an 18-cm × 10-cm unruptured, infrarenal, fusiform AAA. Giant AAAs, defined as >11 cm, are rarely described in the literature. Our patient underwent successful transperitoneal AAA repair with inferior mesenteric artery reimplantation and was discharged home on operative day 6. We believe this case represents one of the largest unruptured AAAs in the literature and demonstrates the feasible approach for successful repair.

  8. Computed Tomography Aortic Valve Calcium Scoring in Patients With Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawade, Tania; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Dreyfus, Julien; Mathieu, Tiffany; Tastet, Lionel; Renard, Cedric; Gun, Mesut; Jenkins, William Steven Arthur; Macron, Laurent; Sechrist, Jacob W; Lacomis, Joan M; Nguyen, Virginia; Galian Gay, Laura; Cuéllar Calabria, Hug; Ntalas, Ioannis; Cartlidge, Timothy Robert Graham; Prendergast, Bernard; Rajani, Ronak; Evangelista, Arturo; Cavalcante, João L; Newby, David E; Pibarot, Philippe; Messika Zeitoun, David; Dweck, Marc R

    2018-03-01

    Computed tomography aortic valve calcium scoring (CT-AVC) holds promise for the assessment of patients with aortic stenosis (AS). We sought to establish the clinical utility of CT-AVC in an international multicenter cohort of patients. Patients with AS who underwent ECG-gated CT-AVC within 3 months of echocardiography were entered into an international, multicenter, observational registry. Optimal CT-AVC thresholds for diagnosing severe AS were determined in patients with concordant echocardiographic assessments, before being used to arbitrate disease severity in those with discordant measurements. In patients with long-term follow-up, we assessed whether CT-AVC thresholds predicted aortic valve replacement and death. In 918 patients from 8 centers (age, 77±10 years; 60% men; peak velocity, 3.88±0.90 m/s), 708 (77%) patients had concordant echocardiographic assessments, in whom CT-AVC provided excellent discrimination for severe AS (C statistic: women 0.92, men 0.89). Our optimal sex-specific CT-AVC thresholds (women 1377 Agatston unit and men 2062 Agatston unit) were nearly identical to those previously reported (women 1274 Agatston unit and men 2065 Agatston unit). Clinical outcomes were available in 215 patients (follow-up 1029 [126-2251] days). Sex-specific CT-AVC thresholds independently predicted aortic valve replacement and death (hazard ratio, 3.90 [95% confidence interval, 2.19-6.78]; P <0.001) after adjustment for age, sex, peak velocity, and aortic valve area. Among 210 (23%) patients with discordant echocardiographic assessments, there was considerable heterogeneity in CT-AVC scores, which again were an independent predictor of clinical outcomes (hazard ratio, 3.67 [95% confidence interval, 1.39-9.73]; P =0.010). Sex-specific CT-AVC thresholds accurately identify severe AS and provide powerful prognostic information. These findings support their integration into routine clinical practice. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT

  9. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Versus Aortic Valve Bypass: A Comparison of Outcomes and Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, John W; Boyd, Jack H; Patel, Parth M; Baker, Mary L; Syed, Amjad; Ladowski, Joe; Corvera, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is currently offered to patients who are high-risk candidates for conventional surgical aortic valve replacement. For the past 37 years, off-pump aortic valve bypass (AVB) has been used in elderly patients at our center for this similarly high-risk group. Although TAVR and AVB were offered to similar patients at our center, comparisons of clinical outcomes and hospital economics for each strategy were not reported. We reviewed the clinical and financial records of 53 consecutive AVB procedures performed since 2008 with the records of 51 consecutive TAVR procedures performed since 2012. Data included demographics, hemodynamics, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) risk score, extent of coronary disease, and ventricular function. Follow-up was 100% in both groups. Hospital financial information for both cohorts was obtained. Mean risk score for the TAVR group was 10.1% versus 17.6% for AVB group (p < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier hospital rates of 3- and 6-month survival and of 1-year survival were 88%, 86%, 81%, and 61% and 89%, 83%, 83%, and 70% for the TAVR and AVB groups, respectively (p = 0.781). Two patients who had undergone TAVR had a procedure-related stroke. The one stroke in an AVB recipient was late and not procedure related. At discharge, mild and moderate perivalvular and central aortic insufficiency were present in 31% and 16% of TAVR recipients, respectively; no AVB valve leaked. Transvalvular gradients were reduced to less than 10 mm Hg in both groups. The average hospital length of stay for the AVB-treated patients was 13 days, and it was 9 days for the TAVR-treated patients. Median hospital charges were $253,000 for TAVR and $158,000 for AVB. Mean payment to the hospital was $65,000 (TAVR) versus $64,000 (AVB), and the mean positive contribution margin (profit) to the hospital was $14,000 for TAVR versus $29,000 for AVB. TAVR and AVB relieve aortic stenosis and have similar and acceptable procedural mortality

  10. Decreased aortic growth and middle aortic syndrome in patients with neuroblastoma after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, Elizabeth J. [Harvard University, Department of Radiology, Mount Auburn Hospital, Cambridge, MA (United States); University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Tong, Ricky T. [Stanford University, Department of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Gillis, Amy M.; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Henning, Tobias D.; Boddington, Sophie; Sha, Vinil; Gooding, Charles; Coakley, Fergus V.; Daldrup-Link, Heike [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Weinberg, Vivian A. [University of California, San Francisco, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Biostatistics Core, San Francisco, CA (United States); Matthay, Katherine [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Pediatrics, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Long-term CT follow-up studies are required in pediatric patients who have received intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to assess vascular toxicities and to determine the exact complication rate. To analyze with CT the effects of radiation therapy (RT) on the growth of the aorta in neuroblastoma patients. Abdominal CT scans of 31 patients with intraabdominal neuroblastoma (stage II-IV), treated with RT (20 IORT{+-}EBRT, 11 EBRT alone), were analyzed retrospectively. The diameter of the abdominal aorta was measured before and after RT. These data were compared to normal and predicted normal aortic diameters of children, according to the model of Fitzgerald, Donaldson and Poznanski (aortic diameter in centimeters = 0.844+0.0599 x age in years), and to the diameters of a control group of children who had not undergone RT. Statistical analyses for the primary aims were performed using the chi-squared test, t-test, Mann-Whitney test, nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs test and analysis of variance for repeated measures. Clinical files and imaging studies were evaluated for signs of late vascular complications of neuroblastoma patients who had received RT. The mean diameter before and after RT and the growth of the aorta were significantly lower than expected in patients with neuroblastoma (P<0.05 for each) and when compared to the growth in a control group with normal and nonirradiated aortas. Among the patients who had received RT, there was no difference due to the type of RT. Seven patients from the IORT{+-}EBRT group developed vascular complications, which included hypertension (five), middle aortic syndrome (two), death due to mesenteric ischemia (one) and critical aortic stenosis, which required aortic bypass surgery (two). Patients with neuroblastoma who had received RT showed impaired growth of the abdominal aorta. Significant long-term vascular complications occurred in seven patients who received IORT

  11. SINGLE-BAND, TRIPLE-BAND, OR MULTIPLE-BAND HUBBARD MODELS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ESKES, H; SAWATZKY, GA

    1991-01-01

    The relevance of different models, such as the one-band t-J model and the three-band Emery model, as a realistic description of the electronic structure of high-T(c) materials is discussed. Starting from a multiband approach using cluster calculations and an impurity approach, the following

  12. Sex, pregnancy and aortic disease in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Marjolijn; Muiño-Mosquera, Laura; Manalo, Elise C; Tufa, Sara; Carlson, Eric J; Keene, Douglas R; De Backer, Julie; Sakai, Lynn Y

    2017-01-01

    Sex-related differences as well as the adverse effect of pregnancy on aortic disease outcome are well-established phenomena in humans with Marfan syndrome (MFS). The underlying mechanisms of these observations are largely unknown. In an initial (pilot) step we aimed to confirm the differences between male and female MFS patients as well as between females with and without previous pregnancy. We then sought to evaluate whether these findings are recapitulated in a pre-clinical model and performed in-depth cardiovascular phenotyping of mutant male and both nulliparous and multiparous female Marfan mice. The effect of 17β-estradiol on fibrillin-1 protein synthesis was compared in vitro using human aortic smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. Our small retrospective study of aortic dimensions in a cohort of 10 men and 20 women with MFS (10 pregnant and 10 non-pregnant) confirmed that aortic root growth was significantly increased in the pregnant group compared to the non-pregnant group (0.64mm/year vs. 0.12mm/year, p = 0.018). Male MFS patients had significantly larger aortic root diameters compared to the non-pregnant and pregnant females at baseline and follow-up (p = 0.002 and p = 0.007, respectively), but no significant increase in aortic root growth was observed compared to the females after follow-up (p = 0.559 and p = 0.352). In the GT-8/+ MFS mouse model, multiparous female Marfan mice showed increased aortic diameters when compared to nulliparous females. Aortic dilatation in multiparous females was comparable to Marfan male mice. Moreover, increased aortic diameters were associated with more severe fragmentation of the elastic lamellae. In addition, 17β-estradiol was found to promote fibrillin-1 production by human aortic smooth muscle cells. Pregnancy-related changes influence aortic disease severity in otherwise protected female MFS mice and patients. There may be a role for estrogen in the female sex protective effect.

  13. Left ventricular function in chronic aortic regurgitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Hakki, A.H.; Manno, B.; Amenta, A.; Kane, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    Left ventricular performance was determined in 42 patients with moderate or severe aortic regurgitation during upright exercise by measuring left ventricular ejection fraction and volume with radionuclide ventriculography. Classification of the patients according to exercise tolerance showed that patients with normal exercise tolerance (greater than or equal to 7.0 minutes) had a significantly higher ejection fraction at rest (probability [p] . 0.02) and during exercise (p . 0.0002), higher cardiac index at exercise (p . 0.0008) and lower exercise end-systolic volume (p . 0.01) than did patients with limited exercise tolerance. Similar significant differences were noted in younger patients compared with older patients in ejection fraction at rest and exercise (both p . 0.001) and cardiac index at rest (p . 0.03) and exercise (p . 0.0005). The end-diastolic volume decreased during exercise in 60% of the patients. The patients with a decrease in volume were significantly younger and had better exercise tolerance and a larger end-diastolic volume at rest than did patients who showed an increase in volume. The mean corrected left ventricular end-diastolic radius/wall thickness ratio was significantly greater in patients with abnormal than in those with normal exercise reserve (mean +/- standard deviation 476 +/- 146 versus 377 +/- 92 mm Hg, p less than 0.05). Thus, in patients with chronic aortic regurgitation: 1) left ventricular systolic function during exercise was related to age, exercise tolerance and corrected left ventricular end-diastolic radius/wall thickness ratio, and 2) the end-diastolic volume decreased during exercise, especially in younger patients and patients with normal exercise tolerance or a large volume at rest

  14. Aortic Endograft Infection by Pasteurella multocida: A Rare Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakrishnan, Thejus T; Keyashian, Brian; Amene, Juliet; Malinowski, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Infection of an aortic endograft is a rare complication following endovascular aneurysm repair. These patients have been treated with explantation of the graft to obtain source control followed by an extra-anatomic bypass to restore circulation. The present case study describes an interesting case of Pasteurella infection involving an aortic endograft managed nonoperatively by percutaneous drainage and graft preservation. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Influence of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Shape on Hemodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-19

    An incompressible fluid with Newtonian properties is assumed. The governing equations for the conserva- tion of mass and momentum, in a Cartesian... equations . To ensure the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) num- ber < 1, the time step is fixed at ∆t = 0.5 × 10−4 s during a pulse. The simulation is...Supraceliac and infrarenal aortic flow in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms: mean flows, waveforms, and allometric scaling relation- ships, Card. Eng

  16. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs are associated with increased aortic stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Claridge

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Martin Claridge1, Simon Hobbs1, Clive Quick2, Nick Day3, Andrew Bradbury1, Teun Wilmink11Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Birmingham, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital Birmingham, UK; 2Department of Surgery, Hinchingbrooke Hospital, Huntingdon, UK; 3Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UKObjectives: Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDS have been shown to retard aneurysm growth in animal models. In vitro studies have shown an inhibitory effect of NSAIDS on matrix metalloproteinase-9, interleukin-1β, and IL-6 mediated arterial wall elastolysis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of NSAIDs on arterial stiffness, a surrogate marker of elastolysis.Methods: 447 subjects enrolled in a community-based abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA screening program were assessed for age, blood pressure, smoking status, and drug history. Aortic diameter and stiffness were measured by M-Mode ultrasound. The concentration of the amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen was used as a proxy measurement of type III collagen turnover.Results: NSAID ingestion was significantly (p = 0.006 associated with increased aortic wall stiffness after adjusting for age, aortic diameter, blood pressure, and smoking status. No such effect was seen for β-blockers, calcium channel antagonists, nitrates, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, diuretics, or antiplatelet agents.Discussion: These novel data show that NSAIDS are associated with increased aortic stiffness, possibly through the effects of cytokine mediated elastolysis. This in turn may prevent aortic expansion and the development of AAA.Keywords: nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, abdominal aortic aneurysm, aortic stiffness, elastolysis

  17. Predictors of exercise capacity and symptoms in severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Pecini, Redi

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the association between invasive and non-invasive estimates of left ventricular (LV) filling pressure and exercise capacity, in order to find new potential candidates for risk markers in severe aortic valve stenosis (AS).......This study investigated the association between invasive and non-invasive estimates of left ventricular (LV) filling pressure and exercise capacity, in order to find new potential candidates for risk markers in severe aortic valve stenosis (AS)....

  18. Unicuspid aortic valve disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debl, K.; Buchner, S.; Heinicke, N.; Riegger, G.; Luchner, A. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Innere Medizin II, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Djavidani, B.; Poschenrieder, F.; Feuerbach, S. [Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Schmid, C.; Kobuch, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Herz-, Thorax- und herznahe Gefaesschirurgie, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: congenitally malformed aortic valves are a common finding in adults with aortic valve disease. Most of these patients have bicuspid aortic valve disease. Unicuspid aortic valve disease (UAV) is rare. The aim of our study was to describe valve morphology and the dimensions of the proximal aorta in a cohort of 12 patients with UAV in comparison to tricuspid aortic valve disease (TAV) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods/results: MRI studies were performed on a 1.5 T scanner in a total of 288 consecutive patients with aortic valve disease. 12 aortic valves were retrospectively classified as UAV. Annulus areas and dimensions of the thoracic aorta were retrospectively compared to a cohort of 103 patients with TAV. In UAV, valve morphology was unicuspid unicommissural with a posterior commissure in all patients. Mean annulus areas and mean diameters of the ascending aorta were significantly greater in UAV compared to TAV (12.6 {+-} 4.7 cm{sup 2} vs. 8.7 {+-} 2.3 cm{sup 2}, p < 0.01 and 4.6 {+-} 0.7 cm vs. 3.6 {+-} 0.5 cm, p < 0.0001, respectively), while no differences were observed in the mean diameters of the aortic arch (2.3 {+-} 0.6 cm vs. 2.3 {+-} 0.4 cm, p = 0.69). The diameters of the descending aorta were slightly smaller in UAV compared to TAV (2.2 {+-} 0.5 cm vs. 2.6 {+-} 0.3 cm, p < 0.05). (orig.)

  19. Endovascular Treatment for Pseudoaneurysms after Surgical Correction of Aortic Coarctation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rabellino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Late complications after surgical repair of aortic coarctation are not uncommon. Among these complications pseudoaneurysms are the most frequent complications, occurring between 3 and 38%. Reoperation in these patients is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In the last decade, endovascular techniques emerged as an alternative to conventional surgery with excellent results. We report the case of two patients who presented with pseudoaneurysms after surgical correction for aortic coarctation, which were treated by endovascular means.

  20. Endovascular Treatment for Pseudoaneurysms after Surgical Correction of Aortic Coarctation

    OpenAIRE

    Rabellino, M.; Zander, T.; González, G.; Baldi, S.; Cheves, H.; Estigarribia, A.; Llorens, R.; Carreira, J. M.; Maynar, M.

    2011-01-01

    Late complications after surgical repair of aortic coarctation are not uncommon. Among these complications pseudoaneurysms are the most frequent complications, occurring between 3 and 38%. Reoperation in these patients is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In the last decade, endovascular techniques emerged as an alternative to conventional surgery with excellent results. We report the case of two patients who presented with pseudoaneurysms after surgical correction for aortic coar...

  1. Severe aortic coarctation in a patient with refractory hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiram Tápanes Daumy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic hypertension is common in adults, and some patients are considered resistant or refractory to treatment. In such cases it is often associated with a patho-logical process which hinders its control, in spite of changes in lifestyle and the proper use of drugs. This article is about an adult female patient with refractory hypertension due to aortic coarctation. CT scan and angiographic images are shown.Key words: Hypertension, Treatment, Aortic coarctation

  2. Is screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm acceptable to the population?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Juul, Søren; Henneberg, E W

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse whether the selection and recruitment for hospital-based mass screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is acceptable for the population according to the criteria from the Council of Europe.......The aim of the study was to analyse whether the selection and recruitment for hospital-based mass screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is acceptable for the population according to the criteria from the Council of Europe....

  3. Band-notched ultrawide band antenna loaded with ferrite slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Zong, Weihua; Sun, Nian X.; Lin, Hwaider; Li, Shandong

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a novel technique to design a band-notched UWB antenna by using Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) ferrite is proposed. A printed slot UWB antenna with size of 21mm×26 mm×0.8 mm is adopted as a basic antenna. A piece of ferrite slab with size of 5 mm×10 mm×2 mm is attached on the feeding layer of the antenna to achieve band-notched characteristics. The measured -10 dB bandwidth of the antenna without ferrite slab is 2.91-10.98 GHz. With loading of ferrite slab, the bandwidth turns to 2.73-5.12 and 5.87-10.78 GHz. A band notch of 5.12- 5.87 GHz is achieved to filter WLAN 5 GHz (5.15-5.825 GHz) band. The proposed technique has virtue of easy fabrication and keeping antenna miniaturization.

  4. Band-to-Band Tunneling Transistors: Scalability and Circuit Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    55* MEDICI ...3.2.1 Tunneling Theory 3.3 Simulation Methods 3.3.1 MEDICI 3.3.2 Sentaurus Local Tunneling 3.3.3 Sentaurus Nonlocal Tunneling 3.4 Sentaurus...tunneling current. 3.3.1 MEDICI MEDICI is a one and two-dimensional simulator created by Synopsys, Inc. [18]. It contains a band-to-band

  5. [Aortic valve preservation in Marfan syndrome. Initial experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forteza, Alberto; Cortina, Jose M; Sánchez, Violeta; Centeno, Jorge; López, M Jesús; Pérez de la Sota, Enrique; Rufilanchas, Juan J

    2007-05-01

    Preservation of the aortic valve using the technique described by David has been shown to be as effective as the Bentall-De Bono procedure. It avoids both the need for long-term anticoagulation and the complications associated with mechanical prostheses. We report our initial experience using this technique in patients with Marfan syndrome. Between April 2004 and April 2006, we used the David reimplantation technique in 40 patients with an aortic root aneurysm. Eighteen patients had Marfan syndrome. Their median age was 29 years (13-55 years). Echocardiography showed that the median diameter of the aortic sinus was 53 mm (46-59 mm). In 17 patients, aortic valve preservation was possible. No patient died during hospitalization and there were no significant complications. On echocardiography at discharge, no patient had greater than grade-II aortic regurgitation. During a median follow-up period of 8 months (1-24 months), one patient died due to rupture of an abdominal aneurysm. The others are all in New York Heart Association class I. Preservation of the aortic valve by means of valve reimplantation produced excellent results. It avoided both the thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications associated with prostheses and the need for long-term anticoagulation. If reimplanted valves continue to function adequately over the long term, this technique should become the treatment of choice for aneurysms of the ascending aorta in patients with Marfan syndrome.

  6. Radiotherapy-induced aortic valve disease associated with porcelain aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Fukui, Kozo; Ichinoseki, Ikkoh; Munakata, Mamoru; Takahashi, Shoichi; Fukuda Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    Mediastinal irradiation has been reported to induce cardiac disease such as pericarditis, valvular dysfunction, conduction abnormalities, accelerated arteriosclerosis of the coronary arteries, and also calcifications of the ascending aorta. We herein describe a case of radiotherapy-induced porcelain aorta and aortic valve disease and their surgical treatment. The patient was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis (MG) in 1965 (Osserman's type II), and mediastinal irradiation was performed in 1970 for treatment of thymic tumor associated with MG. Thirty years after radiation therapy, complete atrioventricular block and aortic valve disease with severe calcification of the ascending aorta and aortic arch (porcelain aorta) were detected on echo cardiogram and cardiac catheterization. A permanent pacemaker was implanted via the left subclavian vein and aortic valve replacement was performed under extracorporeal circulation established by selective cerebral perfusion and balloon occlusion instead of aortic cross-clamping. As no risk factors of arteriosclerosis such as hypercholesterolemia, hyperglycemia and hypertension were apparent, we concluded that the aortic valve disease and porcelain aorta were primarily induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  7. Application of Clinical Intelligence to Streamline Care in Aortic Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moats, Susan K; Richard, B Jeffery

    2017-10-01

    This article discusses the lessons learned by an interdisciplinary team in a large metropolitan specialty hospital during the implementation of the Code Aorta protocol for aortic emergencies and the subsequent application of technological enhancements to improve data transfer. Aortic dissections require rapid diagnosis and surgical treatment; thus, in order to optimize patient outcomes, clinicians must be accessible, data must be readily available, and proper prompts and notifications must be made to alert and ready teams. An interdisciplinary team reviewed our hospital's processes and architecture of systems to define how we provide care during aortic emergencies. Based on this insight into patient flow, we ultimately developed a Code Aorta protocol to streamline provision of care during aortic emergencies. This process focused on protocol development, human-technology interfaces, and outcome-oriented metrics. The team also aimed to heighten awareness of the emergent process and to understand relevant outcomes data. After introduction of the Code Aorta protocol, a 78% reduction was achieved in time-to-treatment from the previous year's average time. In addition, the average length of stay was reduced by 2.4 days (18%). The team's efforts focused on clinical communication, aiming to link technology to maximize clinical efficiency. The initial results of our Code Aorta protocol show promise that continual refinement of patient care processes during aortic emergencies will improve outcomes for patients suffering aortic dissection.

  8. Single-port laparoscopic extraperitoneal para-aortic lymphadenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacoponi, Sara; De Santiago, Javier; Diestro, Maria D; Hernandez, Alicia; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and the safety of single-port extraperitoneal laparoscopic para-aortic lymphadenectomy for patients with gynecologic cancer. From July 2012 to January 2013, a total of 7 patients with gynecologic cancer underwent a laparoscopic pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy with a single-port device. An extraperitoneal approach was performed for para-aortic lymphadenectomy using only one 2.5-cm incision on the left side. In 6 patients, additionally, hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy with conventional laparoscopy were performed to complete the treatment. Aortic dissection was complete in all cases without complications. The median age of the patients was 63 years (range, 48-78 years), and the median patient body mass index was 31 kg/m(2) (range, 19-38 kg/m(2)). The median number of para-aortic nodes was 17 (range, 10-25); the median operative time was 204 minutes (range, 120-300 minutes). The median hospital stay was 4 days (range, 3-6 days). No patient encountered postoperative complications. This study demonstrates the feasibility of single-port laparoscopic extraperitoneal para-aortic lymphadenectomy.

  9. Acute aortic dissection diagnosed after embalming: macroscopic and microscopic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savall, Frédéric; Dedouit, Fabrice; Piercecchi-Marti, Marie-Dominique; Leonetti, Georges; Rougé, Daniel; Telmon, Norbert

    2014-09-01

    A 58-year-old man died suddenly in Madagascar and poisoning was suspected. The body was embalmed after death and the general state of preservation was good. We found a major aortic dissection with a large false lumen from the aortic root to the common iliac arteries and a hemopericardium with formalinized blood clot. The intimal tear was on the ascending aorta, and an intramural hemorrhage was noted at the right coronary artery, attesting to a retrograde dissection. Microscopic studies confirmed aortic dissection with extensive intramural hemorrhage and also confirmed the retrograde dissection to the right coronary artery with a reduction of 90% of the true lumen. Classically, aortic dissection occurs in individuals with hypertension and individuals with genetic disorders of collagen formation. The diagnosis is often first established at the postmortem examination. Aortic dissection is therefore dealt with largely in necropsy studies. The usual cause of death is rupture into the pericardial sac. One case of bloodless dissection has been reported but the sudden death was explained by acute myocardial ischemia secondary to dissection of the left coronary artery. In our case, we found major hemopericardium and also intramural hemorrhage at the right coronary artery. We were able to make the diagnosis of aortic dissection and exclude the suspicion of homicide 15 days after death and after embalming. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm: Three Patient Populations, Two Disease Phenotypes, and One Shared Genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Hinton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA are two discrete cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by latent progressive disease states. There is a clear association between BAV and TAA; however the nature and extent of this relationship is unclear. There are both distinct and overlapping developmental pathways that have been established to contribute to the formation of the aortic valve and the aortic root, and the mature anatomy of these different tissue types is intimately intertwined. Likewise, human genetics studies have established apparently separate and common contributions to these clinical phenotypes, suggesting complex inheritance and a shared genetic basis and translating 3 patient populations, namely, BAV, TAA, or both, into a common but diverse etiology. A better understanding of the BAV-TAA association will provide an opportunity to leverage molecular information to modify clinical care through more sophisticated diagnostic testing, improved counseling, and ultimately new pharmacologic therapies.

  11. Brain strokes related to aortic aneurysma – the analysis of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastuszak Żanna

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain stroke connected with aortic blood flow disturbances is a rare disease and its incidence is difficult to assume. Nevertheless, 10-50% of patients with aortic dissection may not experience any pain. In case of 18-30% patients with aortic dissection neurological signs are first disease presentation and among them ischemic stroke is the most common. The most popular aortic dissection classification is with use of Stanford system. Type A involves the ascending aorta and type B is occurring distal to the subclavian artery. Aortic dissection risk factors include hypertension, cystic medionecrosis, bicuspid aortic valve and Marfan’s or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  12. Tissue Velocities and Myocardial Deformation in Asymptomatic and Symptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    was to compare velocity (color Doppler tissue imaging) and deformation (two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography) in relation to global and regional longitudinal function in asymptomatic and severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. METHODS: In a cross-sectional design, 231 patients with aortic stenosis were...... divided into four groups: asymptomatic moderate aortic stenosis (aortic valve area, 1.0-1.5 cm(2); n = 38), asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (aortic valve area reduced (... to be symptomatic (odds ratio, 4.97; 95% CI, 2.6-9.4; P velocity...

  13. Surgical Treatment for Aortic Coarctation with Chronic Type B Dissection: Report of a Case

    OpenAIRE

    Yanase, Yohsuke; Kawaharada, Nobuyoshi; Hagiwara, Takayuki; Nakazawa, Junji; Maeda, Toshiyuki; Koyanagi, Tetsuya; Ito, Toshiro; Kurimoto, Yoshihiko; Higami,, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to report a rare case of aortic coarctation with type B aortic dissection. A 37 year-old man had sudden, intense back pain. Enhanced computed tomography revealed aortic coarctation (CoA) at the proximal descending aorta and acute type B aortic dissection just distal to the CoA. The dissecting, descending aortic aneurysm had expanded to a maximal diameter of 52 mm. The aortic coarctation was resected and then the descending aorta was replaced with prosth...

  14. Fibrin glue on an aortic cusp detected by transesophageal echocardiography after valve-sparing aortic valve replacement: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahira, Junko; Ishii, Hisanari; Sawai, Toshiyuki; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-03-07

    Fibrin glue is used commonly during cardiac surgery but can behave as an intracardiac abnormal foreign body following surgery. There have been few such cases reported, and they were typically noticed only because of the resulting catastrophic cardiac conditions, such as valvular malfunction. We report a case where, for the first time, transesophageal echocardiography was used to detected fibrin glue that was adherent to the ventricular side of a patient's aortic valve immediately after aortic declamping. A 45-year-old Japanese man with Marfan syndrome underwent an aortic valve-sparing operation to treat moderate aortic valve regurgitation resulting from enlargement of his right coronary cusp. Fibrin glue was lightly applied to the suture line between the previous and new grafts. Transesophageal echocardiography performed prior to weaning from the cardiopulmonary bypass revealed mild aortic valve regurgitation in addition to a mobile membranous structure attached to the ventricular side of his aortic valve. It was identified as fibrin glue. We resolved the regurgitation by removing the fibrin glue and repeating the aortic cusp plication. The patient had no complications during recovery. Fibrin glue can act as an intracardiac foreign body and lead to a potentially fatal embolism. We demonstrated the use of transesophageal echocardiography to detect a fibrin glue-derived intracardiac abnormal foreign body and to confirm its removal. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case where fibrin glue adherent to the aortic valve was detected by transesophageal echocardiography. These findings demonstrate the importance of using transesophageal echocardiography during cardiac surgery that involves using biological glues.

  15. Risk factors of pre-operational aortic rupture in acute and subacute Stanford type A aortic dissection patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuo-Dong; Liu, Yang; Zhu, Jiang; Wang, Jun; Lu, Fang-Lin; Han, Lin; Xu, Zhi-Yun

    2017-12-01

    Aortic rupture is one of the main causes of early death in acute and subacute Stanford type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) patients. This study aimed to analyze potential risk factors for pre-operational aortic rupture in ATAAD patients. We retrospectively reviewed aortic dissection cases treated between May 2013 and May 2016 in Changhai Hospital, Shanghai. A total of 329 patients with ATAAD were included in the final analysis, and 31 patients died of aortic rupture before surgery. Clinical data on basic characteristics, clinical presentation, and biochemical measurements for all 329 patients were analyzed. The in-hospital aortic rupture rate was 9.4% (31/329), and the rupture accounted for 47% (31/66) of all in-hospital deaths of ATAAD patients. Patients who experienced rupture were significantly older (Prisk factors: shock [odds ratio (OR): 8.12; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10-59.85, P=0.040], pain requiring medication (OR: 12.67; 95% CI, 2.43-66.09; P=0.003), troponin level >0.7 ng/mL (OR: 9.28; 95% CI, 1.72-50.06; P=0.010), and D-dimer level ≥10 µg/mL (OR: 13.37; 95% CI, 2.18-81.97; P=0.005). Aortic rupture accounted for 47% of all in-hospital deaths among patient with ATAAD. Shock, pain requiring medication, a troponin level >0.7 ng/mL and a D-dimer level ≥10 µg/mL are independent risk factors for aortic rupture in these patients.

  16. Neurotrophin 3 upregulates proliferation and collagen production in human aortic valve interstitial cells: a potential role in aortic valve sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qingzhou; Song, Rui; Ao, Lihua; Cleveland, Joseph C; Fullerton, David A; Meng, Xianzhong

    2017-06-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a leading cardiovascular disorder in the elderly. Diseased aortic valves are characterized by sclerosis (fibrosis) and nodular calcification. Sclerosis, an early pathological change, is caused by aortic valve interstitial cell (AVIC) proliferation and overproduction of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. However, the mechanism of aortic valve sclerosis remains unclear. Recently, we observed that diseased human aortic valves overexpress growth factor neurotrophin 3 (NT3). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that NT3 is a profibrogenic factor to human AVICs. AVICs isolated from normal human aortic valves were cultured in M199 growth medium and treated with recombinant human NT3 (0.10 µg/ml). An exposure to NT3 induced AVIC proliferation, upregulated the production of collagen and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), and augmented collagen deposition. These changes were abolished by inhibition of the Trk receptors. NT3 induced Akt phosphorylation and increased cyclin D1 protein levels in a Trk receptor-dependent fashion. Inhibition of Akt abrogated the effect of NT3 on cyclin D1 production. Furthermore, inhibition of either Akt or cyclin D1 suppressed NT3-induced cellular proliferation and MMP-9 and collagen production, as well as collagen deposition. Thus, NT3 upregulates cellular proliferation, ECM protein production, and collagen deposition in human AVICs. It exerts these effects through the Trk-Akt-cyclin D1 cascade. NT3 is a profibrogenic mediator in human aortic valve, and overproduction of NT3 by aortic valve tissue may contribute to the mechanism of valvular sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. The thoracic aortography by Gd-DTPA enhanced ultrafast cine MR imaging. Assessment of thoracic aortic dilatation in aging and in patients with hypertension and aortic valve disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Kentaro; Nakase, Emiko; Kawai, Ichiyoshi; Saito, Takayuki; Kikkawa, Nobutada; Haiyama, Toru

    1995-01-01

    To assess the morphology of thoracic aorta, we had a trial of Gd-DTPA enhanced ultrafast cine MR imaging on the thoracic aorta. This method was provided with high quality thoracic aortogram during 15-20 seconds. In patients without hypertension and aortic valve disease, dimensions of ascending aorta and aortic arch were significantly correlated with aging. In patients with hypertension, dimensions of ascending aorta and aortic arch were significantly dilated. In patients with aortic valve disease, thoracic aorta was diffusely enlarged, especially in ascending aorta. Gd-DTPA enhanced ultrafact cine MR imaging was useful to assess the thoracic aortic anatomy and diseases. (author)

  18. Bicuspid aortic valves: Diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, David J., E-mail: david.murphy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); McEvoy, Sinead H., E-mail: s.mcevoy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Iyengar, Sri, E-mail: sri.iyengar@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Feuchtner, Gudrun, E-mail: Gudrun.Feuchtner@i-med.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Cury, Ricardo C., E-mail: r.cury@baptisthealth.net [Department of Radiology, Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute, 8900 North Kendall Drive, Miami, FL 33176 (United States); Roobottom, Carl, E-mail: carl.roobottom@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry (United Kingdom); Baumueller, Stephan, E-mail: Hatem.Alkadhi@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem, E-mail: stephan.baumueller@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Dodd, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonniedodd@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT for bicuspid aortic valves. Materials and methods: The standard axial chest CT scans of 20 patients with known bicuspid aortic valves were blindly, randomly analyzed for (i) the appearance of the valve cusps, (ii) the largest aortic sinus area, (iii) the longest aortic cusp length, (iv) the thickest aortic valve cusp and (v) valve calcification. A second blinded reader independently analyzed the appearance of the valve cusps. Forty-two age- and sex-matched patients with known tricuspid aortic valves were used as controls. Retrospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT multiphase reconstructions of the aortic valve were used as the gold-standard. Results: Fourteen (21%) scans were scored as unevaluable (7 bicuspid, 7 tricuspid). Of the remainder, there were 13 evaluable bicuspid valves, ten of which showed an aortic valve line sign, while the remaining three showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance owing to fused valve cusps. The 35 evaluable tricuspid aortic valves all showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance (P = 0.001). Kappa analysis = 0.62 indicating good interobserver agreement for the aortic valve cusp appearance. Aortic sinus areas, aortic cusp lengths and aortic cusp thicknesses of ≥3.8 cm{sup 2}, 3.2 cm and 1.6 mm respectively on standard axial chest CT best distinguished bicuspid from tricuspid aortic valves (P < 0.0001 for all). Of evaluable scans, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of standard axial chest CT in diagnosing bicuspid aortic valves was 77% (CI 0.54–1.0), 100%, 100% and 70% respectively. Conclusion: The aortic valve is evaluable in approximately 80% of standard chest 64-slice CT scans. Bicuspid aortic valves may be diagnosed on evaluable scans with good diagnostic accuracy. An aortic valve line sign, enlarged aortic sinuses and elongated, thickened valve cusps are specific CT

  19. Extra-Thoracic Supra-aortic Bypass Surgery Is Safe in Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair and Arterial Occlusive Disease Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombert, Alexander; van Issum, Lea; Barbati, Mohammad E; Grommes, Jochen; Keszei, Andras; Kotelis, Drosos; Jalaie, Houman; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael J; Kalder, Johannes

    2018-04-20

    The safety and feasibility of supra-aortic debranching as part of endovascular aortic surgery or as a treatment option for arterial occlusive disease (AOD) remains controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of this surgery. This single centre, retrospective study included 107 patients (mean age 69.2 years, 38.4% women) who underwent supra-aortic bypass surgery (carotid-subclavian bypass, carotid-carotid bypass, and carotid-carotid-subclavian bypass) because of thoracic or thoraco-abdominal endovascular aortic repair (57%; 61/107) or as AOD treatment (42.9%; 46/107) between January 2006 and January 2015. Mortality, morbidity with a focus on neurological complications, and patency rate were assessed. Twenty-six of 107 (14.2%) of the debranching patients were treated under emergency conditions because of acute type B dissection or symptomatic aneurysm. Follow up, conducted by imaging interpretation and telephone interviews, continued till March 2017 (mean 42.1, 0-125, months). The in hospital mortality rate was 10.2% (11/107), all of these cases from the debranching group and related to emergency procedures (p supra-aortic bypass surgery involves low complication rates and high mid-term bypass patency rates. It is a safe and feasible treatment option in the form of debranching in combination with endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and in AOD. Copyright © 2018 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Aortic endothelial and smooth muscle histamine metabolism. Relationship to aortic 125I-albumin accumulation in experimental diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollis, T.M.; Gallik, S.G.; Orlidge, A.; Yost, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    We studied rat aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cell de novo histamine synthesis mediated by histidine decarboxylase (HD) and the effects of its inhibition by alpha-hydrazinohistidine on the intracellular histamine content and intraaortic albumin accumulation in streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Diabetes was induced by a single jugular vein injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, pH 4.5, ether anesthesia), with animals held 4 weeks following the overt manifestation of diabetes. Additional diabetic and nondiabetic rats received alpha-hydrazinohistidine (25 mg/kg, i.p. every 12 hours) during the last week; this had no effect on the severity of diabetes in any animal receiving streptozotocin. Data indicate that the aortic endothelial (EC) HD activity was increased more than 130% in the untreated diabetic group but was similar to control values in the diabetic group receiving alpha-hydrazinohistidine; similarily, the EC histamine content from diabetic aortas increased 127% over control values, but in EC from diabetic animals receiving alpha-hydrazinohistidine it was comparable to control values. Similar trends were observed for the subjacent aortic smooth muscle. In untreated diabetic animals the aortic 125I-albumin mass transfer rate was increased 60% over control values, while in diabetic animals receiving alpha-hydrazinohistidine the 125I-albumin mass transfer rate was essentially identical to controls. These data indicate that in streptozotocin diabetes there is an expansion of the inducible aortic histamine pool, and that this expansion is intimately related to the increased aortic albumin accumulation

  1. Intensity formulas for triplet bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budo, A.

    1982-01-01

    Previous work in this area is surveyed and the mathematics involved in determining the quantitative intensity measurements in triplet bands is presented. Explicit expressions for the intensity distribution in the branches of the 3 Sigma-3 Pi and 1 Sigma-3Pi bands valid for all values of the coupling constant Y of the 3 Pi terms are given. The intensity distribution calculated according to the formulas given is compared with measurements of PH, 3 Pi-3 Sigma. Good quantitative agreement is obtained.

  2. Aortic Annulus Enlargement: Early and Long-Terms Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumani, Selman; Likaj, Ermal; Dibra, Laureta; Beca, Vera; Kuci, Saimir; Refatllari, Ali

    2017-03-15

    Patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) is a common occurrence in aortic valve surgery. Even the discussions about the impact of this phenomenon on the results of aortic valve surgery, the management of this problem remain one of the main topics in this kind of surgery. One of the ways of a solution is aortic annulus enlargement. The main topic of this study is to evaluate the early and longterm results of this technique in our country. During the period January 2010 -January 2015, 641 patients performed aortic valve surgery. In ten patients we performed aortic annulus enlargement according to Manouguian technique to avoid severe patient-prothesis mismatch. Operative mortality and perioperative complications (low cardiac output, pulmonary complications, etc..) were considered the indicators of the early results. Survival, clinical presentation according to NYHA, quality of life were the indicators to evaluate long-term results. Preoperative and postoperative echocardiographic data were also used to evaluate our results. We collected the data from hospital registrations and periodical clinical visit and echographic examination after hospital discharge. In our group, 6 of 10 patients were diagnosed with stenotic aortic valve, two patients had aortic valve regurgitation and two mixed valve pathology. Four patients had concomitant cardiac surgery procedure, mitral or CABG. In all cases, aortic valve pathology was the primary diagnose. In the preoperative echocardiographic examination mean transvalvular gradient was 54.3 ± 6.42. We had no death during early or late postoperative period. Only one patient had pulmonary complications and long time of respiratory assistance because of his pulmonary pathology. The same patient had low cardiac output and wound infection. Early after surgery mean transprostethic gradient was 16.2 ± 3.44 and late postoperative was 15.9 ± 4.3. No patient had the severe patient-prothesis mismatch. Mean follow-up was 49 ± 20.26 months. During follow

  3. Clinical testing of Belarusian aortic stent graft system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. П. Шкет

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The study looks at the results of clinical testing of the first Belarusian aortic stent graft system developed and manufactured by a team of specialists from RSPC "Cardiology", Minsk, Belarus, and Belarusian Technical University.Methods. The original system of aortic stent graft includes a delivery system and an aortic stent graft itself. It is used in surgical treatment of complicated and common aneurysms of the thoracic aorta, as well as in cases of concomitant thoracic aneurysms and heart pathology to be treated under cardiopulmonary bypass. Clinical testing of the stent graft was carried out according to the requirements of Ministry of Health of the Republic of Belarus on the basis of three different cardiac hospitals of the country. Results. All the three hospitals treated one patient each. The first patient underwent implantation of the stent graft into the descending thoracic aorta, with the thoracic aorta aneurysm isolated and the aortic valve replaced with bioprosthesis. The second patient underwent ascending aorta and aortic valve replacement with a conduit and implantation of aortic stent graft into the descending thoracic aorta. In the third patient the domestic aortic stent graft was implanted into the descending thoracic aorta with isolation of the thoracic aneurysm; aortic valve and ascending aorta were replaced with ‘MedEng' conduit and the aortic arch was also replaced, with the brachiocephalic arteries re-implanted in place. All the patients were followed-up for both early and long-term outcomes for more than 1 year and were examined by using CT angiography in the early postoperative period and after 1 year. Uncomplicated postoperative course was observed in all the patients. There were no complications in the long-term follow-up as well. CT angiography data confirmed good positioning of the stent graft and good isolation of the aneurysm lumen. Preoperative and postoperative СТ data of one patient are presented in the

  4. Wall Stress and Geometry of the Thoracic Aorta in Patients With Aortic Valve Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Barry J; Norman, Paul E; Hoskins, Peter R; Newby, David E; Dweck, Marc R

    2018-04-01

    Aortic valve disease increases velocity and changes the way blood enters the aorta. Over time, the biomechanical environment can cause aortic remodelling. We hypothesized that aortic geometry and wall stress would be different in patients with aortic valve disease compared with controls. We examined 40 patients with aortic sclerosis (n = 10) or mild (n = 10), moderate (n = 10), and severe (n = 10) aortic stenosis, and also 10 control individuals. The thoracic aorta of each individual was reconstructed into a three-dimensional model from computed tomography. We measured geometric variables and used finite element analysis to compute aortic wall stress. Statistical analyses were performed to test our hypothesis. Aortic wall stress was significantly associated with tortuosity of the descending aorta (r = 0.35, p = 0.01), arch radius (r = 0.49, p < 0.01), ascending aortic diameter (r = 0.59, p < 0.01), and aortic centerline length (r = 0.39, p < 0.01). Wall stress was highest in patients with severe stenosis (p = 0.02), although elevations in wall stress were also noted in those with mild stenosis (p = 0.02), and aortic sclerosis (p = 0.02) compared with controls. Similar trends were observed when we corrected for difference in blood pressure. Total centerline tortuosity was higher in patients with severe aortic stenosis than in controls (p = 0.04), as was descending aorta tortuosity (p = 0.04). Aortic geometry is associated with aortic wall stress. Patients with aortic valve disease have higher aortic wall stress than controls, and those with severe aortic stenosis have more tortuous aortas. However, increases in geometric measures and wall stress are not stepwise with increasing disease severity. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Interobserver variability of CT angiography for evaluation of aortic annulus dimensions prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)

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    Schmidkonz, C., E-mail: christian.schmidkonz@gmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Marwan, M.; Klinghammer, L.; Mitschke, M.; Schuhbaeck, A.; Arnold, M. [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Lell, M. [Radiological Institute, University of Erlangen, Maximiliansplatz 1, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, S.; Pflederer, T. [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Cardiac CT provides highly reproducible measurements of aortic annulus and root dimensions prior to TAVI. • The perimeter-derived aortic annulus diameter shows the lowest interobserver variability. • If all three CT sizing methods are considered and stated as a “consensus result”, mismatches in prosthesis size selection can be further reduced. - Abstract: Objective: Assessment of aortic annulus dimensions prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is crucial for accurate prosthesis sizing in order to avoid prosthesis–annulus-mismatch possibly resulting in complications like valve dislodgement, paravalvular regurgitation or annulus rupture. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography allows 3-dimensional assessment of aortic annulus dimensions. Only limited data exist about its interobserver variability. Methods: In 100 consecutive patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (51 male, BMI 27 ± 5 kg/m{sup 2}, age 81 ± 7 years, heart rate 72 ± 15 bpm, Logistic Euroscore 31 ± 14%, STS-Score 7 ± 4%), pre-interventional aortic annulus assessment was performed by dual source computed tomography (collimation 2 × 128 × 0.6 mm, high pitch spiral data acquisition mode, 40–60 ml contrast agents, radiation dose 3.5 ± 0.9 mSv). The following aortic annulus characteristics were determined by three independent observers: aortic annulus maximum, minimum and mean diameters (D{sub max}, D{sub min}, D{sub mean}), eccentricity index (EI), effective aortic annulus diameter according to its circumference (D{sub circ}), effective aortic annulus diameter according to its area (D{sub area}), distance from the aortic annulus plane to the left (LCA) and right coronary artery (RCA) ostia, maximum (D{sub max}AR) and minimum aortic root diameter (D{sub min}AR), maximum (D{sub max}STJ) and minimum diameter of the sinotubular junction (D{sub min}STJ). Subsequently, interobserver variabilities were assessed. Results: Correlation between

  6. Does altered aortic flow in marfan syndrome relate to aortic root dilatation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hung-Hsuan; Chiu, Hsin-Hui; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac; Peng, Hsu-Hsia

    2016-08-01

    To examine possible hemodynamic alterations in adolescent to adult Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients with aortic root dilatation. Four-dimensional flow MRI was performed in 20 MFS patients and 12 age-matched normal subjects with a 3T system. The cross-sectional areas of 10 planes along the aorta were segmented for calculating the axial and circumferential wall shear stress (WSSaxial , WSScirc ), oscillatory shear index (OSIaxial , OSIcirc ), and the nonroundness (NR), presenting the asymmetry of segmental WSS. Pearson's correlation analysis was performed to present the correlations between the quantified indices and the body surface area (BSA), aortic root diameter (ARD), and Z score of the ARD. P < 0.05 indicated statistical significance. Patients exhibited lower WSSaxial in the aortic root and the WSScirc in the arch (P < 0.05-0.001). MFS patients exhibited higher OSIaxial and OSIcirc in the sinotubular junction and arch, but lower OSIcirc in the descending aorta (all P < 0.05). The NR values were lower in patients (P < 0.05). The WSSaxial or WSScirc exhibited moderate to strong correlations with BSA, ARD, or Z score (R(2)  = 0.50-0.72) in MFS patients. The significant differences in the quantified indices, which were associated with BSA, ARD, or Z score, in MFS were opposite to previous reports for younger MFS patients, indicating that altered flows in MFS patients may depend on the disease progress. The possible time dependency of hemodynamic alterations in MFS patients strongly suggests that longitudinal follow-up of 4D Flow is needed to comprehend disease progress. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:500-508. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Results in Improvement of Pulmonary Function in Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Richard C; Thourani, Vinod H; Jensen, Hanna A; Condado, Jose; Binongo, José Nilo G; Sarin, Eric L; Devireddy, Chandan M; Leshnower, Bradley; Mavromatis, Kreton; Syed, Amjad; Guyton, Robert A; Block, Peter C; Simone, Amy; Keegan, Patricia; Stewart, James; Rajaei, Mohammad; Kaebnick, Brian; Lerakis, Stamatios; Babaliaros, Vasilis C

    2015-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been identified as a risk factor for morbidity and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We hypothesized that a portion of pulmonary dysfunction in patients with severe aortic stenosis may be of cardiac origin, and has potential to improve after TAVR. A retrospective analysis was made of consecutive TAVR patients from April 2008 to October 2014. Of patients who had pulmonary function testing and serum B-type natriuretic peptide data available before and after TAVR, 58 were found to have COPD (26 mild, 14 moderate, and 18 severe). Baseline variables and operative outcomes were explored along with changes in pulmonary function. Multiple regression analyses were performed to adjust for preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction and glomerular filtration rate. Comparison of pulmonary function testing before and after the procedure among all COPD categories showed a 10% improvement in forced vital capacity (95% confidence interval: 4% to 17%) and a 12% improvement in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (95% confidence interval: 6% to 19%). There was a 29% decrease in B-type natriuretic peptide after TAVR (95% confidence interval: -40% to -16%). An improvement of at least one COPD severity category was observed in 27% of patients with mild COPD, 64% of patients with moderate COPD, and 50% of patients with severe COPD. There was no 30-day mortality in any patient group. In patients with severe aortic stenosis, TAVR is associated with a significant improvement of pulmonary function and B-type natriuretic peptide. After TAVR, the reduction in COPD severity was most evident in patients with moderate and severe pulmonary dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Outcomes for Low-Risk Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement: A Benchmark for Aortic Valve Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lily E; Downs, Emily A; Hawkins, Robert B; Quader, Mohammed A; Speir, Alan M; Rich, Jeffrey B; Ghanta, Ravi K; Yarboro, Leora T; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2017-10-01

    Two large, randomized trials are underway evaluating transcatheter aortic valve replacement (AVR) against conventional surgical AVR. We analyzed contemporary, real-world outcomes of surgical AVR in low-risk patients to provide a practical benchmark of outcomes and cost for evaluating current and future transapical AVR technology. From 2010 to 2015, 2,505 isolated AVR operations were performed for severe aortic stenosis at 18 statewide cardiac institutions. Of these, 2,138 patients had a Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted risk of mortality of less than 4%, and 1,119 met other clinical and hemodynamic criteria as outlined in the PARTNER 3 (The Placement of Transcatheter Aortic Valves) protocol. Patients with endocarditis, end-stage renal disease, ejection fraction of less than 0.45, bicuspid valves, and previous valve replacements were excluded. Outcomes of interest included operative death and postoperative adverse events. The median Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted risk of mortality for the study-eligible patients was 1.44%, with a median age of 72 years (interquartile range [IQR], 65 to 78 years). Operative mortality was 1.3%, permanent stroke was 1.3%, and pacemaker requirement was 4.2%. The most common adverse events were transfusion of 2 or more units of red blood cells (18%) and atrial fibrillation (28%). The median length of stay was 6 days (IQR, 5 to 8 days). Median total hospital cost was $37,999 (IQR, $30,671 to $46,138). Examination of complications by age younger than 65 vs 65 or older demonstrated a significantly lower need for transfusion (11.2%, p risk patients undergoing surgical AVR in the current era have excellent results. The most common complications were atrial fibrillation and bleeding. These real-world results should provide additional context for upcoming transcatheter clinical trial data. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [The cost of innovation in treating aortic stenosis: transcatheter aortic valve implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Simona; Saia, Francesco; Marrozzini, Cinzia; Berti, Elena; Guastaroba, Paolo; Fortuna, Daniela; Ciuca, Cristina; Moretti, Carolina; Marzocchi, Antonio; De Palma, Rossana

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) represents a promising therapeutic option for patients affected by severe aortic stenosis, but it is currently associated with high costs. Therefore, the assessment of its economic impact becomes urgent to support decision-makers' choices about its use, patient access to treatment and reimbursement mechanisms. A retrospective, observational, single-center (the teaching hospital located in Bologna, Italy) study was conducted. All patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis undergoing TAVI during the enrolment period (February 2008-August 2010) were included. The procedures were performed with both bioprostheses approved for clinical use and through different vascular access: CoreValve transfemoral (CV-TF), CoreValve transsubclavian (CV-TS), Edwards Sapien transapical (ES-TA), Edwards Sapien transfemoral (ES-TF). Costs of the whole index hospitalization have been calculated from the hospital perspective. Healthcare resource consumption was measured at patient level and assessed using unit costs (micro-costing approach). Overall, 87 consecutive patients (48 CV-TF, 12 CV-TS, 20 ES-TA, 7 ES-TF) were included in the study. They presented a high-risk profile (age 83.3 ± 5.4 years; logistic EuroSCORE 23.3 ± 12.3%) and important comorbidity. In-hospital mortality was 3.4%. Total cost of hospitalization was, on average, €35.841 (range €27.267-69.744) of which 68% was attributable to the procedure. A huge variation in costs was observed among different treatment groups. Patients treated with transfemoral implant (CV-TF: €33.977; ES-TF: €31.442) were on average less expensive than others (CV-TS: €37.035; ES-TA: €41.139). Our findings show that treating patients with TAVI places a heavy burden on hospital budget. Hence, due to the shortage of financial resources, affordability of TAVI requires further attention.

  10. Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair in a Patient with Mobile Aortic Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham M. Lohrmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old female presented with acute arterial insufficiency to her left leg. Following cardiovascular evaluation using multimodality imaging, it was discovered that she had mobile thoracic thrombi overlying a normal descending thoracic aorta which had also caused a splenic infarction. This patient was treated with unfractionated heparin for three days and underwent subsequent thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR uneventfully with no subsequent complications at one-year followup. This case highlights the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in treating patients with this uncommon challenging clinical scenario.

  11. Diagnosis of Aortic Dissection in Emergency Department Patients is Rare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M. Alter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aortic dissection is a rare event. While the most frequent symptom is chest pain, that is a common emergency department (ED chief complaint and other diseases causing chest pain occur much more often. Furthermore, 20% of dissections are without chest pain and 6% are painless. For these reasons, diagnosing dissections may be challenging. Our goal was to determine the number of total ED and atraumatic chest pain patients for every aortic dissection diagnosed by emergency physicians. Methods: Design: Retrospective cohort. Setting: 33 suburban and urban New York and New Jersey EDs with annual visits between 8,000 and 80,000. Participants: Consecutive patients seen by emergency physicians from 1-1-1996 through 12-31-2010. Observations: We identified aortic dissection and atraumatic chest pain patients using the International Classification of Diseases 9th Revision and Clinical Modification codes. We then calculated the number of total ED and atraumatic chest pain patients for every aortic dissection, along with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results: From a database of 9.5 million ED visits, we identified 782 aortic dissections or one for every 12,200 (95% CI [11,400-13,100] visits. The mean age of dissection patients was 66±16 years and 38% were female. There were 763,000 (8% with atraumatic chest pain diagnoses. Thus, there is one dissection for every 980 (95% CI [910-1,050] atraumatic chest pain patients. Conclusion: The diagnosis of aortic dissections by emergency physicians is rare and challenging. An emergency physician seeing 3,000 to 4,000 patients a year would diagnose an aortic dissection approximately every three to four years.

  12. Reoperative aortic root replacement: Outcome in a contemporary series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, Jiro; Leshnower, Bradley G; Binongo, Jose N; Lasanajak, Yi; McPherson, LaRonica; Thourani, Vinod H; Chen, Edward P

    2017-09-01

    Reoperative aortic root replacement is a challenging procedure associated with significant mortality and morbidity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the outcomes of reoperative aortic root replacement when performed in a number of complex clinical settings and to identify risk factors for operative mortality and long-term survival. From 2006 to 2015, 280 consecutive patients at an academic center underwent reoperative aortic root replacement after a variety of previous aortic or cardiac operations. Logistic regression and extended Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to determine risk factors for operative mortality and long-term survival, respectively. The mean age of patients was 52.5 ± 14.1 years. Prior operations included proximal aortic replacement in 113 patients, valve surgery in 162 patients, and coronary artery bypass grafting in 46 patients. Concomitant procedures included arch replacement in 135 patients, coronary artery bypass grafting in 68 patients, and mitral valve repair/replacement in 18 patients. Operative mortality was 14.3%. Five-year survival was 74.0%. Univariable analysis did not find previous root replacement, prior proximal aortic surgery, and concomitant arch replacement to be risk factors for operative mortality. In the multivariable analysis, chronic lung disease, prior myocardial infarction, and concomitant mitral valve surgery were risk factors for operative mortality. Age, peripheral artery disease, emergency, and concomitant mitral valve surgery were risk factors for mortality in the late phase. Reoperative aortic root replacement represents complex procedures carrying significant morbidity and mortality. Chronic lung disease, prior myocardial infarction, and concomitant mitral valve surgery were risk factors for operative mortality. Age, peripheral artery disease, emergency, and concomitant mitral valve surgery were risk factors for long-term mortality. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for

  13. Possible extracardiac predictors of aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background According to previous studies, aortic diameter alone seems to be insufficient to predict the event of aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome (MFS). Determining the optimal schedule for preventive aortic root replacement (ARR) aortic growth rate is of importance, as well as family history, however, none of them appear to be decisive. Thus, the aim of this study was to search for potential predictors of aortic dissection in MFS. Methods A Marfan Biobank consisting of 79 MFS patients was established. Thirty-nine MFS patients who underwent ARR were assigned into three groups based on the indication for surgery (dissection, annuloaortic ectasia and prophylactic surgery). The prophylactic surgery group was excluded from the study. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) serum levels were measured by ELISA, relative expression of c-Fos, matrix metalloproteinase 3 and 9 (MMP-3 and −9) were assessed by RT-PCR. Clinical parameters, including anthropometric variables - based on the original Ghent criteria were also analyzed. Results Among patients with aortic dissection, TGF-β serum level was elevated (43.78 ± 6.51 vs. 31.64 ± 4.99 ng/l, p < 0.0001), MMP-3 was up-regulated (Ln2α = 1.87, p = 0.062) and striae atrophicae were more common (92% vs. 41% p = 0.027) compared to the annuloaortic ectasia group. Conclusions We found three easily measurable parameters (striae atrophicae, TGF-β serum level, MMP-3) that may help to predict the risk of aortic dissection in MFS. Based on these findings a new classification of MFS, that is benign or malignant is also proposed, which could be taken into consideration in determining the timing of prophylactic ARR. PMID:24720641

  14. [Outcomes of acute type A aortic dissection repairs in Iceland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geirsson, Arnar; Melvinsdottir, Inga Hlif; Arnorsson, Thorarinn; Myrdal, Gunnar; Gudbjartsson, Tomas

    2016-02-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection is a life-threatening disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Treatment is challenging and requires emergency surgery. This study presents for the first time the short- and long-term outcome of acute type A aortic dissection repairs in Iceland. A retrospective review of 45 patients (mean age 60.7 ± 13.9 years, 68.9% male) treated for type A aortic dissection at Landspitali University Hospital between 1992 and 2014. Data was gathered from medical records about known risk factors, presenting symptoms, type of procedure, complications and operative mortality. Out of 45 operations the majority (73.3%) was performed in the second half of the study period. Nearly all patients presented with chest pain and 46.7% were in shock on arrival. Malperfusion syndrome was apparent in 26.7% of cases. A variety of operative methods were used, including hypothermic circulatory arrest in 31.1% of the cases and one-third of patients needed aortic root replacement. Reoperation rate for postoperative bleeding was 29.3% and perioperative stroke occurred in 14.6% of patients. The 30-day mortality rate was 22.2% (10 patients) and 5- and 10-year survival was 71.4 ± 8.2% and 65.4 ± 9.4%, respectively. The short-term outcomes of surgical repair for acute type A aortic dissection in Iceland is comparable to neighbouring countries, including 30-day mortality and long-term survival. Complications, however, are common, especially reoperations for bleeding. 1Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Landspitali University Hospital, 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland. Aortic dissection type A, aortic aneurysm, open heart surgery, complications, operative mortality, survival. Correspondence: Arnar Geirsson, arnarge@landspitali.is.

  15. Mild aerobic exercise blocks elastin fiber fragmentation and aortic dilatation in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome associated aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Christine; Nielsen, Cory; Alex, Ramona; Cooper, Kimbal; Farney, Michael; Gaufin, Douglas; Cui, Jason Z; van Breemen, Cornelis; Broderick, Tom L; Vallejo-Elias, Johana; Esfandiarei, Mitra

    2017-07-01

    Regular low-impact physical activity is generally allowed in patients with Marfan syndrome, a connective tissue disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene. However, being above average in height encourages young adults with this syndrome to engage in high-intensity contact sports, which unfortunately increases the risk for aortic aneurysm and rupture, the leading cause of death in Marfan syndrome. In this study, we investigated the effects of voluntary (cage-wheel) or forced (treadmill) aerobic exercise at different intensities on aortic function and structure in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome. Four-week-old Marfan and wild-type mice were subjected to voluntary and forced exercise regimens or sedentary lifestyle for 5 mo. Thoracic aortic tissue was isolated and subjected to structural and functional studies. Our data showed that exercise improved aortic wall structure and function in Marfan mice and that the beneficial effect was biphasic, with an optimum at low intensity exercise (55-65% V̇o 2max ) and tapering off at a higher intensity of exercise (85% V̇o 2max ). The mechanism underlying the reduced elastin fragmentation in Marfan mice involved reduction of the expression of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 within the aortic wall. These findings present the first evidence of potential beneficial effects of mild exercise on the structural integrity of the aortic wall in Marfan syndrome associated aneurysm. Our finding that moderate, but not strenuous, exercise protects aortic structure and function in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome could have important implications for the medical care of young Marfan patients. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The present study provides conclusive scientific evidence that daily exercise can improve aortic health in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome associated aortic aneurysm, and it establishes the threshold for the exercise intensity beyond which exercise may not be as protective. These findings establish a platform

  16. Non-contrast MR angiography at 1.5 Tesla for aortic monitoring in Marfan patients after aortic root surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhoen, Simon; Behzadi, Cyrus; Lenz, Alexander; Henes, Frank Oliver; Rybczynski, Meike; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Bley, Thorsten Alexander; Adam, Gerhard; Bannas, Peter

    2017-10-30

    Contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance angiography (CE-CMRA) is the established imaging modality for patients with Marfan syndrome requiring life-long annual aortic imaging before and after aortic root replacement. Contrast-free CMRA techniques avoiding side-effects of contrast media are highly desirable for serial imaging but have not been evaluated in the postoperative setup of Marfan patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of non-contrast balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) magnetic resonance imaging for aortic monitoring of postoperative patients with Marfan syndrome. Sixty-four adult Marfan patients after aortic root replacement were prospectively included. Fourteen patients (22%) had a residual aortic dissection after surgical treatment of type A dissection. bSSFP imaging and CE-CMRA were performed at 1.5 Tesla. Two radiologists evaluated the images regarding image quality (1 = poor, 4 = excellent), artifacts (1 = severe, 4 = none) and aortic pathologies. Readers measured the aortic diameters at defined levels in both techniques. Statistics included observer agreement for image scoring and diameter measurements and ROC analyses for comparison of the diagnostic performance of bSSFP and CE-CMRA. Both readers observed no significant differences in image quality between bSSFP and CE-CMRA and found a median image quality score of 4 for both techniques (all p > .05). No significant differences were found regarding the frequency of image artifacts in both sequences (all p > .05). Sensitivity and specificity for detection of aortic dissections was 100% for both readers and techniques. Compared to bSSFP imaging, CE-CMRA resulted in higher diameters (mean bias, 0.9 mm; p  .05), except for the distal graft anastomosis (p = .001). Using both techniques, the readers correctly identified a graft suture dehiscence with aneurysm formation requiring surgery. Unenhanced bSSFP CMR imaging allows for riskless

  17. Epidemiology of aortic disease - aneurysm, dissection, occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steckmeier, B.

    2001-01-01

    The physiological infrarenal aortic diameter varies between 12.4 mm in women an 27.6 mm in men. As defined, an aneurysmatic dilatation begins with 29 mm. According to that, 9% of all people above the age of 65 are affected by an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Compared with the female sex, the male sex predominates at a rate of about 5:1. The disease is predominant in men of the white race. In black men, black and white women the incidence of AAA is identical. 38 to 50 percent of the AAA patients (patients) suffer from hypertension, 33 to 60% from coronary, 28% from cerebrovascular and 25% from peripheral occlusive disease. The AAA expansion rate varies between 0.2 and 0.8 cm per year and is exponential from a diameter of 5 cm on. In autopsy studies, the rupture rates with AAA diameters of 7 cm were below 5%, 39% and 65%, respecitvely. 70% of the AAA patients do not die of a rupture, but of a cardiac disease. Serum markers, such as metalloproteinases and procollagen peptides are significantly increased in AAA patients. Thoraco-abdominal aneurysms (TAA) make up only 2 to 5% of all degenerative aneurysms. 20 to 30% of the TAA patients are also affected by an AAA. 80% of the TAA are degenerative, 15 to 20% are a consequence of the chronic dissection - including 5% of Marfan patients -, 2% occur in case of infections and 1 to 2% in case of aortitis. The TAA incidence in 100,000 person-years is 5.9% during a monitoring period of 30 years. In case of TAA, an operation is indicated with a maximum diameter of 5.5 to 6 cm and more and, in case of a Marfan's syndrome (incidence of 1:10,000), with a maximum diameter of 5.5 cm and more. With regard to aorto-iliac occlusive diseases, there are defined 3 types of distribution. Type I refers to the region of the bifurcation itself. Type II defines the diffuse aortoiliac spread of the disease. Type III designates multiple-level occlusions also beyond the inguinal ligament. Type I patients in most cases are female and more

  18. Safety considerations during transapical aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, Thorsten; Pasic, Miralem; Juran, Ralf; Unbehaun, Axel; Dreysse, Stephan; Kukucka, Marian; Mladenow, Alexander; Hetzer, Roland; Buz, Semih

    2014-05-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new method for the treatment of very high-risk patients with aortic valve stenosis. The radiation dose to which the patient and each member of the heart team are exposed during this new fluoroscopically guided intervention is unknown. Between April 2008 and August 2013, 1177 consecutive patients underwent transapical TAVI (TA-TAVI). In 22 consecutive patients undergoing TA-TAVI, the radiation doses to the cardiothoracic surgeon, cardiologist, anaesthesiologist (performing echocardiography examination), surgical assistant and nurse were measured. The radiation dose measurements were performed during TAVI using thermoluminescence and film dosimeters positioned on seven parts of the body: (i) chest above the lead apron, (ii) pelvic area below the apron, (iii) chest below the apron, (iv) thyroid gland above the apron, (v) near eyes, (vi) hands (using rings) and (vii) the feet. The results were compared with the values given in the international literature on recommended radiation dose limits for workers. The mean radiation time was 6.1 min and the mean dose-area product for the patients was 8.661 µGy · m(2). Analysis of the dosimeters and the calculation of the effective dose showed a per intervention dose of 0.03 mSv for the surgeon, 0.05 mSv for the assistant, 0.02 mSv for the cardiologist and the anaesthesiologist and 0.001 mSv for the nurse. The maximum ionizing radiation per intervention was 0.5 mSv at the right hand of the surgeon (holding the introducer sheet) and 0.7 mSv at the left hand of the surgical assistant. Additionally, the analysis of the body dose shows a maximum dose to the lower leg of the surgeon (0.3 mSv) and the genital area of the assistant (0.06 mSv). During a TA-TAVI procedure, the patients receive a higher X-ray dose than during coronary angiography with intervention. After 100 TAVI procedures, the members of the heart team sustain a comparable dose of ionizing radiation to the annual dose

  19. Polygonal deformation bands in sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonellini, Marco; Nella Mollema, Pauline

    2017-04-01

    We report for the first time the occurrence of polygonal faults in sandstone, which is compelling given that layer-bound polygonal fault systems have been observed so far only in fine-grained sediments such as clay and chalk. The polygonal faults are dm-wide zones of shear deformation bands that developed under shallow burial conditions in the lower portion of the Jurassic Entrada Fm (Utah, USA). The edges of the polygons are 1 to 5 meters long. The shear deformation bands are organized as conjugate faults along each edge of the polygon and form characteristic horst-like structures. The individual deformation bands have slip magnitudes ranging from a few mm to 1.5 cm; the cumulative average slip magnitude in a zone is up to 10 cm. The deformation bands heaves, in aggregate form, accommodate a small isotropic horizontal extension (strain Crosscutting relationships are rare. The interactions of the deformation bands are similar to those of mode I opening fractures. Density inversion, that takes place where under-compacted and over-pressurized layers (Carmel Fm) lay below normally compacted sediments (Entrada Sandstone), may be an important process for polygonal deformation bands formation. The gravitational sliding and soft sediment structures typically observed within the Carmel Fm support this hypothesis. Soft sediment deformation may induce polygonal faulting in the section of the Entrada Sandstone just above the Carmel Fm. The permeability of the polygonal deformation bands is approximately 10-14 to 10-13 m2, which is less than the permeability of the host, Entrada Sandstone (range 10-12 to 10-11 m2). The documented fault networks have important implications for evaluating the geometry of km-scale polygonal fault systems in the subsurface, top seal integrity, as well as constraining paleo-tectonic stress regimes.

  20. Coronary artery disease, revascularization, and clinical outcomes in transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J; Lønborg, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has become an established therapeutic option for patients with symptomatic, severe aortic stenosis. The optimal treatment strategy for concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been tested prospectively in a randomized clinical trial. This study...

  1. Association of ischemic heart disease to global and regional longitudinal strain in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    independent of aortic valve area, stroke volume index, pro-BNP, valvulo-arterial impedance, body mass index and heart rate. In linear regression models with both aortic valve area and significant coronary stenosis, apical (p

  2. Laparoscopic diagnosis and treatment of aortic vascular prosthetic graft infections in a porcine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Hongding; Lund, L; Prag, J

    2008-01-01

    To study the feasibility and efficacy of experimental laparoscopy in the diagnosis of aortic graft infection in pigs.......To study the feasibility and efficacy of experimental laparoscopy in the diagnosis of aortic graft infection in pigs....

  3. Cardiac tamponade associated with delayed ascending aortic perforation after blunt chest trauma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Dae Woong; Lee, Mi Kyung

    2017-06-17

    Cardiac tamponade due to aortic injury after blunt trauma is a rare and potentially fatal injury. Most aortic injuries caused by blunt trauma present as aortic dissection or rupture of the aortic isthmus. Several cases of delayed aortic injury have been reported. However, all of these injuries were observed in the descending aorta because they had been caused by a posterior rib fracture. We report the first case of cardiac tamponade associated with delayed ascending aortic perforation 2 weeks after blunt trauma. The patient was an 81-year-old man. In cases of blunt chest trauma, delayed ascending aortic injury causing cardiac tamponade is possible associated with various causes such as direct injury by fractured rib or delayed aortic perforation of initial blunt injury.

  4. Contemporary Management Strategies for Chronic Type B Aortic Dissections: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamman, Arnoud V.; de Beaufort, Hector W. L.; van Bogerijen, Guido H W; Nauta, FJH; Heijmen, Robin H.; Moll, Frans L.; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Trimarchi, Santi

    2016-01-01

    Background Currently, the optimal management strategy for chronic type B aortic dissections (CBAD) is unknown. Therefore, we systematically reviewed the literature to compare results of open surgical repair (OSR), standard thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) or branched and fenestrated TEVAR

  5. Aortic Pulsatile Distention in Young Healthy Volunteers is Asymmetric : Analysis with ECG-gated MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Prehn, J.; Vincken, K. L.; Sprinkhuizen, S. M.; Viergever, M. A.; van Keulen, J. W.; van Herwaarden, J. A.; Moll, F. L.; Bartels, L. W.

    Objective: Knowledge of aortic shape changes throughout the cardiac cycle can offer improved understanding of vascular pathophysiology and may have crucial impact on stentgraft design and EVAR durability. To understand underlying mechanisms of dynamic changes in aortic aneurysm (neck) morphology,

  6. William Band at Yenching University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Danian

    2008-04-01

    William Band (1906-1993) has been widely remembered by his American colleagues and students as ``a fine physicist and teacher,'' who taught at Washington State University in Pullman between 1949 and 1971 and authored Introduction to Quantum Statistics (1954) and Introduction to Mathematical Physics (1959). Not many, however, knew much about Band's early career, which was very ``uncommon and eventful.'' Born in England, Band graduated from University of Liverpool in 1927 with an MsSc degree in physics. Instead of pursuing his Ph.D. at Cambridge, he chose to teach physics at Yenching University, a prestigious Christian university in Beijing, China. Arriving in 1929, Band established his career at Yenching, where he taught and researched the theory of relativity and quantum mechanics, pioneered the study on low-temperature superconductivity in China, founded the country's first graduate program in physics, and chaired the Physics Department for 10 years until he fled from Yenching upon hearing of the attack on Pearl Harbor. It took him two years to cross Japanese occupied areas under the escort of the Communist force; he left China in early 1945. This presentation will explore Band's motivation to work in China and his contributions to the Chinese physics research and education.

  7. Asymmetric septal hypertrophy - a marker of hypertension in aortic stenosis (a SEAS substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuseth, Nora; Cramariuc, Dana; Rieck, Ashild E

    2010-01-01

    Some patients with aortic stenosis develop asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH) that may influence the surgical approach and is associated with higher perioperative morbidity. The aim of this analysis was to characterize further this subtype of aortic stenosis patients.......Some patients with aortic stenosis develop asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH) that may influence the surgical approach and is associated with higher perioperative morbidity. The aim of this analysis was to characterize further this subtype of aortic stenosis patients....

  8. A rare case of discrete aortic coarctation in Williams-Beuren syndrome. Diagnostic and therapeutic considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Savina Mannarino; Eitan Keizman; Michele Pasotti; Alessia Claudia Codazzi; Elisabetta De Sando; Alessandro Giamberti

    2015-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a genetic disorder caused by elastin gene deletions, and is characterized by cardiovascular malformations, primarily including supravalvular aortic stenosis and peripheral pulmonary stenosis. We report a case of a neonate who developed severe discrete aortic coarctation, underwent multiple surgical interventions, and was subsequently diagnosed with WBS. Severe discrete aortic coarctation is a rare event in WBS newborns. An abnormally thick aortic wall is pres...

  9. Elevated plasma D-dimer and hypersensitive C-reactive protein levels may indicate aortic disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Shi-Min; Shi, Yong-Hui; Wang, Jun-Jun; Lü, Fang-Qi; Gao, Song

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: D-dimer and C-reactive protein are of diagnostic and predictive values in patients have thrombotic tendency, such as vascular thrombosis, coronary artery disease and aortic dissection. However, the comparative study in these biomarkers between the patients with acute aortic dissection and coronary artery disease has not been sufficiently elucidated. METHODS: Consecutive surgical patients for acute type A aortic dissection (20 patients), aortic aneurysm (nine patients) or coronary a...

  10. Valve Sparing Aortic Root Replacement in Children with Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Tae Sim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder that is characterized by aggressive arterial and aortic disease, often involving the formation of aortic aneurysms. We describe the cases of two children with LDS who were diagnosed with aortic root aneurysms and successfully treated by valve-sparing aortic root replacement (VSRR with a Valsalva graft. VSRR is a safe and suitable operation for children that avoids prosthetic valve replacement.

  11. Survival and freedom from aortic valve-related reoperation after valve-sparing aortic root replacement in 1015 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari, Fabian A; Doll, Kai-Nicolas; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Liebrich, Markus; Sievers, Hans-Hinrich; Richardt, Doreen; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Detter, Christian; Siepe, Matthias; Czerny, Martin; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize mortality and aortic valve replacement after valve-sparing aortic root replacement (V-SARR) in a multicentre cohort. Between 1994 and 2014, 1015 patients had V-SARR with (n = 288, 28%) or without cusp/commissure repair (n = 727, 72%) at the centres of Lübeck (n = 343, 34%), Stuttgart (n = 346, 34%), Hamburg (n = 109, 11%) and Freiburg (n = 217, 21%), Germany. Comparative survival of an age- and gender-matched general population was calculated. Log-rank tests and multiple logistic regression were used to identify risk factors. The mean follow-up was 5.2 ± 3.9 years. Cumulative follow-up comprised 2933 patient-years. Early survival was 98%. NYHA status and aneurysm size were predictive of death during mid-term follow-up (P = 0.025). Freedom from aortic valve replacement was 90% at 8 years, with the type of V-SARR (root remodelling, David II) being a risk factor (P = 0.015). Bicuspid aortic valve (P = 0.26) and initial valve function (P = 0.4) did not impact reoperation. The need of additional valve repair (cusps/commissures) was not linked to reoperation: freedom from aortic valve replacement at 8 years was 84% if cusp repair was performed versus 90% if V-SARR alone was performed (P = 0.218). Marfan syndrome had no impact on survival or on aortic valve replacement. Mid-term survival of patients after V-SARR is comparable with that of a matched general population. The regurgitant bicuspid aortic valve is a favourable substrate for V-SARR. Prophylactic surgery should be performed before symptoms or large aneurysms are present to achieve optimal mid-term outcomes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  12. Risk factors for prolonged mechanical ventilation after total aortic arch replacement for acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Nan; Chen, Lei; Ge, Yi-Peng; Zhu, Jun-Ming; Liu, Yong-Min; Zheng, Jun; Liu, Wei; Ma, Wei-Guo; Sun, Li-Zhong

    2014-09-01

    EuroSCORE II is an objective risk scoring model. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of EuroSCORE II in the prediction of prolonged mechanical ventilation following total aortic arch replacement for acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection and evaluate the risk factors for prolonged mechanical ventilation. Between February 2009 to February 2012, data from 240 patients who underwent total aortic arch replacement for acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection were collected retrospectively. Mechanical ventilation after the surgery longer than 48 hours was defined as postoperative prolonged mechanical ventilation. EuroSCORE II was applied to predict prolonged mechanical ventilation. A C statistic (receiver operating characteristic curve) was used to test discrimination of the model. Calibration was assessed with a Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit statistic. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify the final risk factors of prolonged mechanical ventilation. The overall mortality was 10%. The mean length of mechanical ventilation after total aortic arch replacement was 42.72 ± 51.45 hours. Total 74 patients needed prolonged mechanical ventilation. EuroSCORE II showed poor discriminatory ability (C statistic 0.52) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow, pmechanical ventilation. On multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for postoperative prolonged mechanical ventilation were age ≥ 48.5 years (pmechanical ventilation following total aortic arch replacement for acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection. Preoperative high level of leukocyte, age and surgical period from symptom onset are risk factors for prolonged mechanical ventilation. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Characteristics and Outcomes of Ascending Versus Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vapnik, Joshua S; Kim, Joon Bum; Isselbacher, Eric M; Ghoshhajra, Brian B; Cheng, Yisha; Sundt, Thoralf M; MacGillivray, Thomas E; Cambria, Richard P; Lindsay, Mark E

    2016-05-15

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAs) occur in reproducible patterns, but etiologic factors determining the anatomic distribution of these aneurysms are not well understood. This study sought to gain insight into etiologic differences and clinical outcomes associated with repetitive anatomic distributions of TAs. From 3,247 patients registered in an institutional Thoracic Aortic Center database from July 1992 to August 2013, we identified 844 patients with full aortic dimensional imaging by computerized axial tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scan (mean age 62.8 ± 14 years, 37% women, median follow-up 40 months) with TA diameter >4.0 cm and without evidence of previous aortic dissection. Patient demographic and imaging data were analyzed in 3 groups: isolated ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (AAs; n = 628), isolated descending TAs (DTAs; n = 130), and combined AA and DTA (mixed thoracic aortic aneurysm, MTA; n = 86). Patients with DTA had more hypertension (82% vs 59%, p <0.001) and a higher burden of atherosclerosis (88% vs 9%, p <0.001) than AA. Conversely, patients with isolated AA were younger (59.5 ± 13.5 vs 71.0 ± 11.8 years, p <0.001) and contained almost every case of overt, genetically triggered TA. Patients with isolated DTA were demographically indistinguishable from patients with MTA. In follow-up, patients with DTA/MTA experienced more aortic events (aortic dissection/rupture) and had higher mortality than patients with isolated AA. In multivariate analysis, aneurysm size (odds ratio 1.1, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.16, p <0.001) and the presence of atherosclerosis (odds ratio 5.7, 95% CI 2.02 to 16.15, p <0.001) independently predicted adverse aortic events. We find that DTA with or without associated AA appears to be a disease more highly associated with atherosclerosis, hypertension, and advanced age. In contrast, isolated AA appears to be a clinically distinct entity with a greater burden of genetically triggered disease. Copyright © 2016

  14. Molecular structure of human aortic valve by μSR- FTIR microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowska, Anna M.; Nowakowski, Michał; Lis, Grzegorz J.; Wehbe, Katia; Cinque, Gianfelice; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.

    2017-11-01

    Aortic valve is a part of the heart most frequently affected by pathological processes in humans what constitute a very serious health problem. Therefore, studies of morphology and molecular microstructure of the AV are needed. μSR- FTIR spectroscopy and microscopy represent unique tools to study chemical composition of the tissue and to identify spectroscopic markers characteristic for structural and functional features. Normal AV reveals a multi-layered structure and the compositional and structural changes within particular layers may trigger degenerative processes within the valve. Thus, deep insight into the structure of the valve to understand pathological processes occurring in AV is needed. In order to identify differences between three layers of human AV, tissue sections of macroscopically normal AV were studied using μSR- FTIR spectroscopy in combination with histological and histochemical stainings. Tissue sections deposited onto CaF2 substrates were mapped and representative set of IR spectra collected from fibrosa, spongiosa and ventricularis were analysed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) in the spectral range between 1850-1000 cm-1 and 3050-2750 cm-1. PCA revealed a layered molecular structure of the valve and it was possible to identify IR bands associated to different tissue parts. Spongiosa layer was well differentiated from other two layers mainly based on IR bands characteristic for the distribution of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the tissue - like 1170 cm-1 (υas(C-O-S)) and 1380 cm-1 (acetyl amino group). Additionally, it was distinguished from fibrosa and ventricularis based on 1085 cm-1 and 1240 cm-1 bands characteristic for GAGs and for carbohydrates- ν(C-O) and ν(C-O-C) respectively and nucleic acids -νsym(PO2-) and νasym(PO2-) respectively, which were less specific for this layer. The use of μSR- FTIR spectroscopy demonstrated co-localization of GAGs and lipids in spongiosa layer what may indicate their contribution in the very

  15. Percutaneous Zenith endografting for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyer, Kamaldeep S; Resnick, Scott A; Matsumura, Jon S; Amaranto, Daniel; Eskandari, Mark K

    2009-03-01

    A completely percutaneous approach to infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) endografting has the theoretic benefits of being minimally invasive and more expedient. Our goal was to demonstrate the utility of this approach using a suprarenal fixation device and a suture-mediated closure system. We conducted a single-institution, retrospective review of 14 patients who underwent percutaneous AAA repair with the Zenith device between August 2003 and March 2007. Immediate and delayed access-related outcomes were examined over a mean follow-up of 12.1+/-2.0 months. Mean AAA size was 5.6 cm. Immediate arterial closure and technical success rate was 96% (27/28 vessels). One immediate hemostatic failure required open surgical repair. Over follow-up, one vessel required operative repair for new-onset claudication. No other immediate or delayed complications (thrombosis, pseudoaneurysm, infection, or deep venous thrombosis) were detected. A percutaneous approach for the treatment of AAA has several advantages over femoral artery cutdown but also has its own unique set of risks in the immediate and late postoperative period. Ultimately, the "preclose technique" can be safely applied for the Zenith device despite its large-bore delivery system.

  16. Mechanical versus bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Stuart J; Çelik, Mevlüt; Kappetein, A Pieter

    2017-07-21

    Mechanical valves used for aortic valve replacement (AVR) continue to be associated with bleeding risks because of anticoagulation therapy, while bioprosthetic valves are at risk of structural valve deterioration requiring reoperation. This risk/benefit ratio of mechanical and bioprosthetic valves has led American and European guidelines on valvular heart disease to be consistent in recommending the use of mechanical prostheses in patients younger than 60 years of age. Despite these recommendations, the use of bioprosthetic valves has significantly increased over the last decades in all age groups. A systematic review of manuscripts applying propensity-matching or multivariable analysis to compare the usage of mechanical vs. bioprosthetic valves found either similar outcomes between the two types of valves or favourable outcomes with mechanical prostheses, particularly in younger patients. The risk/benefit ratio and choice of valves will be impacted by developments in valve designs, anticoagulation therapy, reducing the required international normalized ratio, and transcatheter and minimally invasive procedures. However, there is currently no evidence to support lowering the age threshold for implanting a bioprosthesis. Physicians in the Heart Team and patients should be cautious in pursuing more bioprosthetic valve use until its benefit is clearly proven in middle-aged patients. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelberger, Stephan; Rosso, Raffaele; Sarti, Manuela; Del Grande, Filippo; Canevascini, Reto; van den Berg, Jos C; Prouse, Giorgio; Giovannacci, Luca

    2017-03-21

    This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility, acceptance and costs of an ultrasound scan screening programme for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in the elderly male population resident in Canton Ticino, Switzerland. The target population were male patients aged 65-80 years who attended the outpatient clinics of the Lugano Regional Hospital in 2013. The patients showing interest were contacted by phone to verify their eligibility and fix the appointment for the ultrasound scan of the abdominal aorta. Patients with recent examinations suitable for AAA detection were excluded. Aneurysm was defined as an abdominal aorta with sagittal and/or axial diameter  30 mm. Patients' characteristics and study results were presented as descriptive statistics. The chi-squared test was used to compare categorical variables with p rate was 68.3%. A previously unknown AAA was diagnosed in 31 patients (4.2%, 95% confidence interval 2.8-5.9%). Age and area of residence had a statistically significant impact on patient's acceptance rate (p <0.05). The mean cost per screened patient was CHF 88. AAA screening of male patients aged 65-80 years is feasible with limited financial and organisational effort. Adherence might be improved by a larger community-based programme and involvement of general practitioners.

  18. Blood groups and acute aortic dissection type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatic, Nikola; Nikolic, Aleksandar; Vukmirovic, Mihailo; Radojevic, Nemanja; Zornic, Nenad; Banzic, Igor; Ilic, Nikola; Kostic, Dusan; Pajovic, Bogdan

    2017-04-01

    Acute aortic type III dissection is one of the most catastrophic events, with in-hospital mortality ranging between 10% and 12%. The majority of patients are treated medically, but complicated dissections, which represent 15% to 20% of cases, require surgical or thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). For the best outcomes adequate blood transfusion support is required. Interest in the relationship between blood type and vascular disease has been established. The aim of our study is to evaluate distribution of blood groups among patients with acute aortic type III dissection and to identify any kind of relationship between blood type and patient's survival. From January 2005 to December 2014, 115 patients with acute aortic type III dissection were enrolled at the Clinic of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery in Belgrade, Serbia and retrospectively analyzed. Patients were separated into two groups. The examination group consisted of patients with a lethal outcome, and the control group consisted of patients who survived. The analysis of the blood groups and RhD typing between groups did not reveal a statistically significant difference ( p = 0.220). Our results indicated no difference between different blood groups and RhD typing with respect to in-hospital mortality of patients with acute aortic dissection type III.

  19. Passive aortic counterpulsation: biomechanical rationale and bench validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, Ivan; Bianchini, David; Marcelli, Emanuela; Cercenelli, Laura; Zannoli, Romano

    2014-05-07

    Aortic counterpulsation (IABP) consists in an ECG-controlled forced deflation and inflation of a balloon positioned in the aorta. The device is designed to decrease the ventricular afterload during systole and to increase the coronary driving pressure during diastole. In biomechanical terms, the IABP improves the mechanical matching between the pump and the load, facilitating the transfer of ventricular energy. This paper describes a completely passive aortic counterpulsation solution, with an intra-aortic balloon without a pumping system, designed to improve the mechanical matching between the ventricle and the artery at very low cost and complexity. The only requirement is an external reservoir to amplify the balloon pulsations due to physiologic arterial pressure pulse. Using a cardiovascular simulator and changing the reservoir pressure, a systolic not negligible (7.8ml) gas volume exchange between the intra-aortic balloon and the reservoir was measured. The same cardiovascular simulator was used to demonstrate an increase in stroke volume in three conditions of progressive ventricular failure, by detecting a change in systolic and diastolic arterial pressures and stroke volume (SV). The maximal arterial pressure always decreased and the diastolic pressure increased. The SV increased up to 7.8%, demonstrating an arterial elastance reduction and better ventricular-aortic mechanical matching and energy transfer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. THE IMPACT OF DIAGNOSTIC DISCREPANCIES IN AORTIC DISSECTION MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic dissection is uncommon with high mortality rate if untreated. We report a challenging case of long segment aortic dissection in which the dissection type was very difficult to identify due to limitations of the available imaging studies. 66-year-old male presented to us with 3 days history of chest pain and difficulty breathing. He is known to be hypertensive. In the emergency room, patient has systolic blood pressure >190. Chest X-ray showed widening of mediastinum. CT angiography of chest and abdomen showed an acute dissection of the thoracic aorta extending from the mid ascending aorta to the infra-renal aorta suggestive of Stanford type A aortic dissection. Transthoracic and Trans-esophageal echocardiography revealed a partially calcified intimal flap in the distal portion of the arch and in the descending thoracic aorta suggestive of Stanford type B aortic dissection. Medical treatment started, and repeated CT angiography was obtained and it confirmed type B aortic dissection. One week after discharge, patient was readmitted with severe neck pain and difficulty breathing. CT chest without contrast showed grossly stable appearance of type A dissection consistent with the first CT angiography. Cardiothoracic surgery immediately reevaluated the situation and recommended surgical intervention.

  1. Does atorvastatin induce aortic smooth muscle cell apoptosis in vivo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyon, Marielle; Hale, Taben Mary; Huot-Marchand, Julie-Emilie; Wu, Rong; de Champlain, Jacques; DeBlois, Denis

    2011-01-01

    It has been reported that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors such as atorvastatin induce vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) apoptosis in vitro. However, this effect remains to be demonstrated in vivo. The present studies were designed to test the ability of atorvastatin to induce SMC apoptosis in vivo, using the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) as a well-known reference model of SMC apoptosis induction in vivo by cardiovascular drugs including the calcium channel blocker amlodipine. Atorvastatin was administered to SHR for 3 or 6 weeks either alone or together with amlodipine, a drug combination clinically available to patients. Primary endpoints included aortic medial hypertrophy and aortic SMC hyperplasia, internucleosomal DNA fragmentation and expression of the apoptosis regulatory proteins Bax and Bcl-2. The SHR aorta showed no evidence of SMC apoptosis induction by atorvastatin, even at the high dose of 50 mg kg(-1) day(-1), although the statin significantly reduced oxidative stress after 3 weeks and blood pressure after 6 weeks of administration. Amlodipine-induced regression of aortic hypertophy and aortic SMC hyperplasia were dose- and time-dependent, but there was no interaction between atorvastatin and amlodipine in modulating the primary endpoints. These results do not support the notion that atorvastatin induces SMC apoptosis in the aortic media in vivo. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Aortic valve sparing root surgery for Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalanis, George; Perera, Nisal K

    2017-11-01

    Aortic valve sparing root surgery (AVSRS) is a safe and durable alternative for patients with dilated roots or pure aortic regurgitation (AR), which avoids the risks of anticoagulation or valvular degeneration with prosthetic valves. Notwithstanding the theoretical challenges of greater tissue fragility in Marfan syndrome (MFS), AVSRS has been demonstrated to have equal outcomes in this condition as it does in those without MFS. The benefits of retaining the native aortic valve in this generally younger age group extend beyond those of avoiding the inconvenience and complications of prolonged exposure to anticoagulants and include ease of management for future aortic, cardiac and non-cardiac procedures which are the norm for these patients. The essential principles of AVSRS in MFS do not differ from those for the rest of the population. Successful repair and durable valve function depend on a sound understanding of the close interaction between the structure and function of this exquisitely designed piece of engineering. We are fortunate to have numerous tools in our surgical armamentarium to preserve these valves. It is the purpose of this paper to demystify the complex structure-function interactions of the aortic valve, thereby gaining an intuition for AVSRS. We will also elaborate on specific technical details of established techniques that we have found successful in preserving the normal function of these valves in the long term.

  3. Uremia modulates the phenotype of aortic smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Marie; Pedersen, Annemarie Aarup; Albinsson, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    the phenotype of aortic SMCs in vivo. METHODS: Moderate uremia was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy in apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(-/-)) and wildtype C57Bl/6 mice. Plasma analysis, gene expression, histology, and myography were used to determine uremia-mediated changes in the arterial wall. RESULTS: Induction...... of moderate uremia in ApoE(-/-) mice increased atherosclerosis in the aortic arch en face 1.6 fold (p = 0.04) and induced systemic inflammation. Based on histological analyses of aortic root sections, uremia increased the medial area, while there was no difference in the content of elastic fibers or collagen...... in the aortic media. In the aortic arch, mRNA and miRNA expression patterns were consistent with a uremia-mediated phenotypic modulation of SMCs; e.g. downregulation of myocardin, α-smooth muscle actin, and transgelin; and upregulation of miR146a. Notably, these expression patterns were observed after acute (2...

  4. Midterm Results of Aortic Valve Replacement with Cryopreserved Homografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Özker

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the midterm clinical results of aortic valve replacement with cryopreserved homografts.Materials and Methods: Aortic valve replacement was performed in 40 patients with cryopreserved homograft. The indications were aortic valve endocarditis in 20 patients (50%, truncus arteriosus in 6 patients (15%, and re-stenosis or regurtitation after aortic valve reconstruction in 14 (35% patients. The valve sizes ranged from 10 to 27mm. A full root replacement technique was used for homograft replacement in all patients.Results: The 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 12.5% (5 patients. There were four late deaths. Only one of them was related to cardiac events. Overall mortality was 22.5%. Thirty-three patients were followed up for 67±26 months. Two patients needed reoperation due to aortic aneurysm caused by endocarditis. The mean transvalvular gradient significantly decreased after valve replacement (p<0.003. The last follow up showed that the 27 (82% patients had a normal left ventricular function.Conclusion: Cryopreserved homografts are safe alternatives to mechanical valves that can be used when there are proper indications. Although it has a high perioperative mortality rate, cryopreserved homograft implantation is an alternative for valve replacement, particularly in younger patients and for complex surgical problems such as endocarditis that must be minimalized.

  5. Bicuspid Aortic Valve: Unresolved Issues and Role of Imaging Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common congenital heart disease with marked heterogeneity in many aspects. Fusion patterns of the aortic cusp are quite variable with different type and severity of valvular dysfunction. Moreover, non-valvular cardiovascular abnormalities are associated with BAV. Among them, aortic aneurysm/dissection is the most serious clinical condition with variable patterns of segmental aortic dilatation. Potential association between BAV phenotype and valvulopathy or aortopathy has been suggested, but needs to be tested further. A lack of long-term outcome data at this moment is responsible for unresolved debate regarding appropriate management of patients with BAV, specifically to prevent development of aortic dissection. Long-term follow-up data of a well-characterized cohort or registry based on standardized classification of BAV phenotype and aortopathy are necessary for evidence-based medical practice. Advanced imaging techniques such as computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging offer better opportunities for accurate phenotype classification and imaging specialists should play a central role to establish a collaborative multicenter cohort or registry. PMID:25883749

  6. Aortic Atherosclerosis: A Common Source of Cerebral Emboli, Often Overlooked!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Imtiaz; Agarwal, Anushree; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Al-Khafaji, Nawfal; Gupta, Navdeep; Badi, Hani; Chopra, Aashish; Khosla, Sandeep; Arora, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Aortic atherosclerotic plaques are usually seen in males older than 55 years who are known to have risk factors of atherosclerosis. Recent large series of consecutive stroke patients reported that the prevalence of aortic atheromatous plaques in patients with stroke is about 21%-27%, which is in the same magnitude when compared with the prevalence of carotid disease (10%-13%) and atrial fibrillation (18%-30%). Atheromatous plaques are composed of a lipid pool, a fibrous cap, smooth muscle cells, and mononuclear cell infiltration with calcification. Aortic plaques can cause embolization to brain, extremities, or visceral organs. Atheroembolization can occur spontaneously or as a result of manipulation during cardiac or vascular surgery. Only few cases of cerebral embolization from an aortic plaque in the absence of any manipulation have been described. Although few atherosclerotic plaques can be visualized on the aortogram, transesophageal echocardiogram remains a preferred modality for diagnosis in such cases. We present a case of cerebral embolism arising from a mobile noncalcified complex aortic arch plaque diagnosed on a transesophageal echocardiogram and review the literature on its diagnosis, clinical implications, and management.

  7. A planning system for transapical aortic valve implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessat, Michael; Merk, Denis R.; Falk, Volkmar; Walther, Thomas; Jacobs, Stefan; Nöttling, Alois; Burgert, Oliver

    2009-02-01

    Stenosis of the aortic valve is a common cardiac disease. It is usually corrected surgically by replacing the valve with a mechanical or biological prosthesis. Transapical aortic valve implantation is an experimental minimally invasive surgical technique that is applied to patients with high operative risk to avoid pulmonary arrest. A stented biological prosthesis is mounted on a catheter. Through small incisions in the fifth intercostal space and the apex of the heart, the catheter is positioned under flouroscopy in the aortic root. The stent is expanded and unfolds the valve which is thereby implanted into the aortic root. Exact targeting is crucial, since major complications can arise from a misplaced valve. Planning software for the perioperative use is presented that allows for selection of the best fitting implant and calculation of the safe target area for that implant. The software uses contrast enhanced perioperative DynaCT images acquired under rapid pacing. In a semiautomatic process, a surface segmentation of the aortic root is created. User selected anatomical landmarks are used to calculate the geometric constraints for the size and position of the implant. The software is integrated into a PACS network based on DICOM communication to query and receive the images and implants templates from a PACS server. The planning results can be exported to the same server and from there can be rertieved by an intraoperative catheter guidance device.

  8. Optimal timing of aortic valve replacement in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marumoto, Akira; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Kishimoto, Yuichiro; Saiki, Munehiro; Nishimura, Motonobu

    2014-01-01

    The elderly population with severe aortic stenosis (AS) requiring aortic valve replacement (AVR) is increasing. The optimal timing of AVR in these patients has been under discussion. We retrospectively reviewed the data from severe AS patients (n = 84) who underwent AVR with/without concomitant procedures from 2005 to 2010. The symptom status, preoperative data, operative outcome, late survival and freedom from cardiac events were compared between elderly patients (age ≥80 years [n = 31]) and younger patients (age <80 years [n = 53]). The operative mortality in elderly patients (3.2 %) and younger patients (3.8 %) was comparable. The symptoms in elderly patients were more severe and hospitalized heart failure (HF) was more frequently noted as the primary symptom (p = 0.017). Patients with and without hospitalized HF differed significantly in late survival and freedom from cardiac events (p = 0.001), but advanced age had no significant effect. The results of a Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that hospitalized HF was a significant predictor for cardiac events after AVR, irrespective of age (hazard ratio 6.93, 95 % confidence interval 1.83-26.26, p < 0.004). In elderly patients with severe AS, surgery should be recommended even in the presence of minimal symptoms and should be performed before the onset of life-threatening HF.

  9. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With Different Valve Types in Elliptic Aortic Annuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeno, Yoshio; Abramowitz, Yigal; Yoon, Sung-Han; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Raul, Sharma; Israr, Sharjeel; Miyasaka, Masaki; Kawamori, Hiroyuki; Kazuno, Yoshio; Rami, Tanya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Mangat, Geeteshwar; Kashif, Mohammad; Chakravarty, Tarun; Nakamura, Mamoo; Cheng, Wen; Makkar, Raj R

    2017-06-23

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of an elliptic annulus on acute device success rates following self-expanding (SE) transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) vs. balloon-expandable (BE) TAVR.Methods and Results:Outcomes were assessed using Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 definitions. Aortic annulus ratio (AAR) was measured as short axis diameter/long axis diameter. Mean AAR was 0.81±0.06. Patients were therefore divided into 2 groups: AAR elliptic annuli, SE-TAVR was an independent predictor of unsuccessful device implantation (OR, 6.34, Pelliptic annuli was associated with an exponential rise in device success (threshold ≥17.5%; area under the curve, 0.83) but not for BE-TAVR. Furthermore, optimally oversized SE valves and BE valves had a similarly high device success for elliptic annuli (SE valve, 96.2% vs. BE valve, 95.3%). For circular annuli, similarly high device success was achieved for the 2 valve types. Conversely, for elliptic annuli, SE valves had a lower device success than BE valves. Device success following optimal oversizing of SE valves, however, was similar to that for BE valves.

  10. Transesophageal echocardiographic guidance of transcatheter closure of the aortic valve in a patient with left ventricular assist device-related severe aortic regurgitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetham R Muskala

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A 68-year-old man with a severe ischemic cardiomyopathy underwent left ventricular assist device (LVAD implantation (Heart Mate II device for destination therapy. He presented 49 months after LVAD implantation with worsening heart failure symptoms and new severe aortic regurgitation. Given high risk for both surgical and transcatheter aortic valve replacement, he was admitted for transcatheter closure of the aortic valve under transesophageal echocardiographic (TEE guidance. TEE imaging revealed severe aortic regurgitation (Fig. 1A and B and Videos 1 and 2. Under TEE and fluoroscopic guidance, a 25 mm Amplatzer cribriform atrial septal defect closure device was advanced across the aortic valve (Fig. 1C and D and Videos 3 and 4. Immediately after device deployment, TEE revealed a well-seated device with complete aortic valve closure and trivial aortic regurgitation (Fig. 2A, B, C and D and Videos 5, 6, 7 and 8. Subsequent transthoracic echocardiograms obtained from 74 to 172 days after the procedure revealed no residual aortic regurgitation. The patient awoke with diffuse urticaria 244 days after the procedure and died en route to the emergency department, presumably secondary to a systemic allergic reaction. De novo aortic regurgitation is increasingly recognized in patients with LVADs (1. TEE-guided transcatheter aortic valve closure is an option in these high-risk patients (2.

  11. Assessment of altered three-dimensional blood characteristics in aortic disease by velocity distribution analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, Julio; Barker, Alex J.; van Ooij, Pim; Schnell, Susanne; Puthumana, Jyothy; Bonow, Robert O.; Collins, Jeremy D.; Carr, James C.; Markl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo test the feasibility of velocity distribution analysis for identifying altered three-dimensional (3D) flow characteristics in patients with aortic disease based on 4D flow MRI volumetric analysis. MethodsForty patients with aortic (Ao) dilation (mid ascending aortic diameter MAA=407 mm,

  12. Spontaneous Thrombosis of a Bicuspid Aortic valve due to Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Farrell

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 51-year-old man who was admitted as an emergency with spontaneous thrombosis of the aortic valve and ascending aorta. At operation he was found to have a congenitally bicuspid aortic valve and subsequent investigation revealed primary antiphospholipid syndrome. He underwent successful removal of the thrombus combined with mechanical replacement of the aortic valve.

  13. Left ventricular hypertrophy in valvular aortic stenosis: mechanisms and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Florian; Sachdev, Esha; Arsanjani, Reza; Siegel, Robert J

    2015-04-01

    Valvular aortic stenosis is the second most prevalent adult valve disease in the United States and causes progressive pressure overload, invariably leading to life-threatening complications. Surgical aortic valve replacement and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve replacement effectively relieve the hemodynamic burden and improve the symptoms and survival of affected individuals. However, according to current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the management of valvular heart disease, the indications for aortic valve replacement, including transcatheter aortic valve replacement, are based primarily on the development of clinical symptoms, because their presence indicates a dismal prognosis. Left ventricular hypertrophy develops in a sizeable proportion of patients before the onset of symptoms, and a growing body of literature demonstrates that regression of left ventricular hypertrophy resulting from aortic stenosis is incomplete after aortic valve replacement and associated with adverse early postoperative outcomes and worse long-term outcomes. Thus, reliance on the development of symptoms alone without consideration of structural abnormalities of the myocardium for optimal timing of aortic valve replacement potentially constitutes a missed opportunity to prevent postoperative morbidity and mortality from severe aortic stenosis, especially in the face of the quickly expanding indications of lower-risk transcatheter aortic valve replacement. The purpose of this review is to discuss the mechanisms and clinical implications of left ventricular hypertrophy in severe valvular aortic stenosis, which may eventually move to center stage as an indication for aortic valve replacement in the asymptomatic patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Persistent Fifth Aortic Arch Associated with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Luen Lee

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: Congenital conotruncal malformations, including tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia or stenosis, and aortic arch anomalies including a persistent fifth aortic arch or a right aortic arch, should lead to suspicion of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion when manifested together with any one of the other four cardinal phenotypic features.

  15. The nordic aortic valve intervention (NOTION) trial comparing transcatheter versus surgical valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Søndergaard, Lars; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative aortic valve (AV) stenosis is the most prevalent heart valve disease in the western world. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) has until recently been the standard of treatment for patients with severe AV stenosis. Whether transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can...

  16. Our experience in the diagnosis of aortic dissection by multislice computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llerena Rojas, Luis R; Mendoza Rodriguez, Vladimir; Olivares Aquiles, Eddy

    2011-01-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is the most frequent and life-threatening acute aortic syndrome. Currently the more used method for the aortic study is the multislice computed tomography. The purpose of this paper is to expose the more relevant features in 22 patients with AD consecutively studied by multislice computed tomography

  17. Thoracic Aortic Rupture and Aortopulmonary Fistulation in the Friesian Horse : Histomorphologic Characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, M; Saey, V; Delesalle, C; Gröne, A; Ducatelle, R; de Bruijn, M; Back, W; van Weeren, P R; van Loon, G; Chiers, K

    Aortic rupture in horses is a rare condition. Although it is relatively common in the Friesian breed, only limited histopathologic information is available. Twenty Friesian horses (1-10 years old) were diagnosed with aortic rupture by postmortem examination. Ruptured aortic walls were analyzed with

  18. Photoionization bands of rubidium molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakić, M.; Pichler, G.

    2018-03-01

    We studied the absorption spectrum of dense rubidium vapor generated in a T-type sapphire cell with a special emphasis on the structured photoionization continuum observed in the 200-300 nm spectral region. The photoionization spectrum has a continuous atomic contribution with a pronounced Seaton-Cooper minimum at about 250 nm and a molecular photoionization contribution with many broad bands. We discuss the possible origin of the photoionization bands as stemming from the absorption from the ground state of the Rb2 molecule to excited states of Rb2+* and to doubly excited autoionizing states of Rb2** molecule. All these photoionization bands are located above the Rb+ and Rb2+ ionization limits.

  19. Band-in-band segregation of multidisperse granular mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newey, M.; Ozik, J.; van der Meer, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Radial and axial segregation is investigated experimentally in polydisperse mixtures of granular materials rotated in a long, partly filled, horizontal cylinder. Radial segregation by size is observed in all polydisperse mixtures. Axial segregation, with smaller-size particles forming bands within

  20. Overexpression of interleukin-1β and interferon-γ in type I thoracic aortic dissections and ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms: possible correlation with matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and apoptosis of aortic media cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Liao, Ming-fang; Tian, Lei; Zou, Si-li; Lu, Qing-sheng; Bao, Jun-min; Pei, Yi-fei; Jing, Zai-ping

    2011-07-01

    To examine the expression of interleukin-1β and interferon-γ and their possible roles in aortic dissections and aneurysms. Aortic specimens were obtained from patients with type I thoracic aortic dissection, ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms, and control organ donors. The expression of interleukin-1β, interferon-γ, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and signal transduction factors phospho-p38 and phosphorylated c-jun N-terminal kinase (phospho-JNK) were detected by real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real time RT-PCR), Western blot, and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining was performed to detect apoptosis of media cells. The correlation of these factors and apoptosis was also studied. Apoptosis in the media of thoracic aortic dissection and in ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms was dramatically higher than in the control group. The expression of interleukin-1β gradually increased from the control group, thoracic aortic dissection to ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (p matrix metalloproteinase-9 was significantly increased in the media of thoracic aortic dissection and ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms compared with the control group (p correlations between interleukin-1β versus matrix metalloproteinase-9, interleukin-1β versus phospho-p38 in thoracic aortic dissection (p matrix metalloproteinase-9, interferon-γ versus phospho-JNK, interferon-γ versus apoptosis, and interleukin-1β versus apoptosis in ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (p = 0.02, 0.02, p matrix metalloproteinase-9 and the apoptosis of media cells in humans. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.