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Sample records for suprabony periodontal pockets

  1. Mast cells behavior analysis: non mineralized wall of suprabony periodontal pockets submitted to low intensity laser radiation. (An in anima nobile study)

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    Silveira, Livio de Barros

    2001-01-01

    For this study 20 patients with periodontal disease were selected. The treatment required for all of then was the gingivectomy, a ressective periodontal surgery. This technique consists of removing the whole excess of gingival tissue with the intent of reestablishing the anatomy and the correct function. The gingival area was submitted to 2 different wavelengths and then histologically analysed to search for alterations, mainly concerning mast cells behavior, a blood cell responsible, among other things, for blood vases enlargement. During the surgical procedure each gingival area was submitted to infrared low intensity laser (λ = 785 nm) or to red laser (λ = 688 nm), both with 50 mW of power and fluence of 8 J/cm 2 . A third area was analysed, the control area, in which no laser treatment was employed. The samples were fixated in formol, cut and stained by hematoxyline eosine and toluidine blue. Based on the result we can conclude: the 2 wavelengths used in this study led to the reduction in the number of mast cells present in the tissue as well as to the increase on the degranulation of the remaining mast cells, considered statistically significant taken the degranulation index and; there was no significant difference caused by the action of the two laser wavelengths λ=785 nm and λ=688 nm -50 mW of power and fluence of 8 J/cm 2 -, over the degranulation of the mast cells; the length and width of the randomly chosen blood vases were not statistically different among the analysed groups. (author)

  2. Mast cells behavior analysis: non mineralized wall of suprabony periodontal pockets submitted to low intensity laser radiation. (An in anima nobile study); Verificacao do comportamento de mastocitos na parede nao mineralizada da bolsa periodontal supra-ossea submetida a radiacao laser de baixa intensidade. (Estudo in anima nobile)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Livio de Barros

    2001-07-01

    For this study 20 patients with periodontal disease were selected. The treatment required for all of then was the gingivectomy, a ressective periodontal surgery. This technique consists of removing the whole excess of gingival tissue with the intent of reestablishing the anatomy and the correct function. The gingival area was submitted to 2 different wavelengths and then histologically analysed to search for alterations, mainly concerning mast cells behavior, a blood cell responsible, among other things, for blood vases enlargement. During the surgical procedure each gingival area was submitted to infrared low intensity laser ({lambda} = 785 nm) or to red laser ({lambda} = 688 nm), both with 50 mW of power and fluence of 8 J/cm{sup 2}. A third area was analysed, the control area, in which no laser treatment was employed. The samples were fixated in formol, cut and stained by hematoxyline eosine and toluidine blue. Based on the result we can conclude: the 2 wavelengths used in this study led to the reduction in the number of mast cells present in the tissue as well as to the increase on the degranulation of the remaining mast cells, considered statistically significant taken the degranulation index and; there was no significant difference caused by the action of the two laser wavelengths {lambda}=785 nm and {lambda}=688 nm -50 mW of power and fluence of 8 J/cm{sup 2}-, over the degranulation of the mast cells; the length and width of the randomly chosen blood vases were not statistically different among the analysed groups. (author)

  3. Guiding periodontal pocket recolonization: a proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teughels, W; Newman, M G; Coucke, W; Haffajee, A D; Van Der Mei, H C; Haake, S Kinder; Schepers, E; Cassiman, J-J; Van Eldere, J; van Steenberghe, D; Quirynen, M

    2007-11-01

    The complexity of the periodontal microbiota resembles that of the gastro-intestinal tract, where infectious diseases are treatable via probiotics. In the oropharyngeal region, probiotic or replacement therapies have shown some benefit in the prevention of dental caries, otitis media, and pharyngitis, but their effectiveness in the treatment of periodontitis is unknown. Therefore, this study addressed the hypothesis that the application of selected beneficial bacteria, as an adjunct to scaling and root planing, would inhibit the periodontopathogen recolonization of periodontal pockets. Analysis of the data showed, in a beagle dog model, that when beneficial bacteria were applied in periodontal pockets adjunctively after root planing, subgingival recolonization of periodontopathogens was delayed and reduced, as was the degree of inflammation, at a clinically significant level. The study confirmed the hypothesis and provides a proof of concept for a guided pocket recolonization (GPR) approach in the treatment of periodontitis.

  4. Periodontal Pocket Depth, Hyperglycemia, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jia-Feng; Yeh, Jih-Chen; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Liou, Jian-Chiun; Hsiung, Jing-Ru; Tung, Tao-Hsin

    2017-01-01

    No large epidemiological study has been conducted to investigate the interaction and joint effects of periodontal pocket depth and hyperglycemia on progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with periodontal diseases. Periodontal pocket depth was utilized for the grading severity of periodontal disease in 2831 patients from January 2002 to June 2013. Progression of chronic kidney disease was defined as progression of color intensity in glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria grid of updated Kidney Disease-Improving Global Outcomes guidelines. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) in various models were presented across different levels of periodontal pocket depth and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in forest plots and 3-dimensional histograms. During 7621 person-years of follow-up, periodontal pocket depth and HbA1C levels were robustly associated with incremental risks for progression of chronic kidney disease (aHR 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-4.6 for periodontal pocket depth >4.5 mm, and 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1-5.4 for HbA1C >6.5%, respectively). The interaction between periodontal pocket depth and HbA1C on progression of chronic kidney disease was strong (P periodontal pocket depth (>4.5 mm) and higher HbA1C (>6.5%) had the greatest risk (aHR 4.2; 95% CI, 1.7-6.8) compared with the lowest aHR group (periodontal pocket depth ≤3.8 mm and HbA1C ≤6%). Our study identified combined periodontal pocket depth and HbA1C as a valuable predictor of progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with periodontal diseases. While considering the interaction between periodontal diseases and hyperglycemia, periodontal survey and optimizing glycemic control are warranted to minimize the risk of worsening renal function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Management of a Periodontal Pocket Using a Removable Orthodontic Appliance and Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Köseoğlu, Serhat; Fidancıoğlu, Ahmet; Sağlam, Mehmet; Savran, Levent

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. As documented in the literature, bony defects can be managed by an orthodontic approach. Methods. This case report describes the treatment of a bony defect caused by orthodontic malposition through phase I periodontal therapy and a simple removable orthodontic appliance used for the first time in a 20-year-old girl. Results. The periodontal pocket was reduced from 8 mm to 3 mm shortly after treatment. Conclusion. This case report concludes that orthodontic therapy can be used success...

  6. Management of a Periodontal Pocket Using a Removable Orthodontic Appliance and Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köseoğlu, Serhat; Fidancıoğlu, Ahmet; Sağlam, Mehmet; Savran, Levent

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. As documented in the literature, bony defects can be managed by an orthodontic approach. Methods. This case report describes the treatment of a bony defect caused by orthodontic malposition through phase I periodontal therapy and a simple removable orthodontic appliance used for the first time in a 20-year-old girl. Results. The periodontal pocket was reduced from 8 mm to 3 mm shortly after treatment. Conclusion. This case report concludes that orthodontic therapy can be used successfully in treatment of bony defects caused by mesially tilted molars.

  7. Periodontal pocket as a potential reservoir of high risk human papilloma virus: A pilot study

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    Manjunath Mundoor Dayakar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Human papilloma viruses (HPVs are small DNA viruses that have been identified in periodontal pocket as well as gingival sulcus. High risk HPVs are also associated with a subset of head and neck carcinomas. HPV detection in periodontium has previously involved DNA detection. This study attempts to: (a Detect the presence or absence of high risk HPV in marginal periodontiun by identifying E6/E7 messenger RNA (mRNA in cells from samples obtained by periodontal pocket scraping. (b Detect the percentage of HPV E6/E7 mRNA in cells of pocket scrapings, which is responsible for producing oncoproteins E6 and E7. Materials and Methods: Pocket scrapings from the periodontal pockets of eight subjects with generalized chronic periodontitis were taken the detection of presence or absence of E6, E7 mRNA was performed using in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. Results: HPV E6/E7 mRNA was detected in four of the eight samples. Conclusion: Presence of high risk human papillomaviruses in periodontal pockets patients of diagnosed with chronic periodontitis, not suffering from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in the present day could link periodontitis to HPV related squamous cell carcinoma. Prevalence studies are needed detecting the presence of HPV in marginal periodontium as well as prospective studies of HPV positive periodontitis patients are required to explore this possible link.

  8. Pathological periodontal pockets are associated with raised diastolic blood pressure in obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, Cecilia C; Wondimu, Biniyam; Marcus, Claude; Modéer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    Obesity, a well-known risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), is associated with chronic periodontitis in adults. This cross-sectional pilot study on obese adolescents was designed to investigate whether periodontal disease in terms of pathological periodontal pockets is associated with raised blood pressure and other risk markers for CVD. The study included 75 obese subjects between 12 to 18 years of age, mean 14.5. Subjects answered a questionnaire regarding health, oral hygiene habits and sociodemographic factors. A clinical examination included Visible Plaque Index (VPI %), Gingival inflammation (BOP %) and the occurrence of pathological pockets exceeding 4 mm (PD ≥ 4 mm). Blood serum were collected and analyzed. The systolic and diastolic blood pressures were registered. Adolescents with pathological periodontal pockets (PD ≥ 4 mm; n = 14) had significantly higher BOP >25% (P = 0.002), higher diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.008), higher levels of Interleukin (IL)-6 (P periodontal pockets (PD ≥ 4 mm; n = 61). The bivariate linear regression analysis demonstrated that PD ≥ 4 mm (P = 0.008) and systolic blood pressure (P 25%, IL-6, IL-8, Leptin, MCP-1, TSH and total cholesterol in the multiple regression analysis. In conclusion, this study indicates an association between pathological periodontal pockets and diastolic blood pressure in obese adolescents. The association was unaffected by other risk markers for cardiovascular events or periodontal disease. The results call for collaboration between pediatric dentists and medical physicians in preventing obesity development and its associated disorders.

  9. Analysis of gingival pocket microflora and biochemical blood parameters in dogs suffering from periodontal disease.

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    Polkowska, Izabela; Sobczyńska-Rak, Aleksandra; Gołyńska, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal diseases in dogs are caused by bacteria colonising the oral cavity. The presence of plaque comprising accumulations of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria leads to the development of periodontitis. Due to the fact that in a large percentage of cases periodontal diseases remain undiagnosed, and consequently untreated, they tend to acquire a chronic character, lead to bacteraemia and negatively impact the health of internal organs. The aim of the present study was to perform a qualitative microbiological analysis of gingival pockets and determine the correlations between selected morphological and biochemical blood parameters and the extent periodontal diseases. Twenty-one dogs treated for periodontal diseases were qualified for the study and subsequently divided into two groups: with 3rd and 4th stage of periodontal disease. Swabs from the patients' gingival pockets were taken for bacteriological testing. Blood was tested for parameters including erythrocyte count, haemoglobin concentration, haematocrit values and leukocyte count. Blood serum was analyzed with respect to the concentrations of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AspAT/AST) and urea. The microbiological analysis of gingival pockets indicated the presence of numerous pathogens with a growth tendency in bacterial cultures observed in dogs with advanced-stage periodontal disease. The concentration of biochemical blood markers was significantly higher in dogs with 4th stage of periodontal disease, to compared to the 3rd-stage group. Morphological parameters were not significantly different with the exception of haemoglobin concentration, which was lower in dogs with 4th stage disease. In both groups, elevated leukocyte counts were observed. By conducting a detailed microbiological examination, it is possible to provide a better prognosis, plan adequate treatment and monitor dogs treated for peridontopathy. Copyright © 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G

  10. Guiding periodontal pocket recolonization : a proof of concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teughels, W.; Newman, M. G.; Coucke, W.; Haffajee, A. D.; Van Der Mei, H. C.; Haake, S. Kinder; Schepers, E.; Cassiman, J.-J.; Van Eldere, J.; van Steenberghe, D.; Quirynen, M.

    The complexity of the periodontal microbiota resembles that of the gastro-intestinal tract, where infectious diseases are treatable via probiotics. In the oro-pharyngeal region, probiotic or replacement therapies have shown some benefit in the prevention of dental caries, otitis media, and

  11. Guiding periodontal pocket recolonization : a proof of concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teughels, W.; Newman, M. G.; Coucke, W.; Haffajee, A. D.; Van Der Mei, H. C.; Haake, S. Kinder; Schepers, E.; Cassiman, J.-J.; Van Eldere, J.; van Steenberghe, D.; Quirynen, M.

    2007-01-01

    The complexity of the periodontal microbiota resembles that of the gastro-intestinal tract, where infectious diseases are treatable via probiotics. In the oro-pharyngeal region, probiotic or replacement therapies have shown some benefit in the prevention of dental caries, otitis media, and

  12. Staphylococcus spp. in the oral cavity and periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Loberto,Jussara Cia S.; Martins,Clélia Ap. de Paiva; Santos,Silvana S. Ferreira dos; Cortelli,José Roberto; Jorge,Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2004-01-01

    Staphylococcus spp are not usually isolated from the oral cavity, and when this occurs, they are considered to belong to the transitory microbiota. Individuals with periodontal disease represent possible reservoirs of these opportunistic bacteria in the oral cavity. The use of antibiotics for treatment of periodontal disease or other infections may predispose to the increase of the number of Staphylococcus spp. in the oral cavity. These microorganisms easily become resistant to antibiotics, a...

  13. Effects of 980 diode laser treatment combined with scaling and root planing on periodontal pockets in chronic periodontitis patients

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    Fallah, Alireza

    2010-02-01

    Objective: This study compared the effect of 980 Diode laser + scaling and root planing (SRP) versus SRP alone in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Method: 21 healthy patients with moderate periodontitis with a probing depth of at least 5mm were included in the study. A total of 42 sites were treated during 6weeks with a combination of 980 Diode laser and SRP (21 sites) or SRP alone (21 sites). The gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD) and bleeding on probing (BOP) were examined at the baseline and after 6 weeks after the start of treatment. Results: Both groups showed statistically significant improvements in GI, BOP and PPD after treatment. The results also showed significant improvement from laser+ SRP group to SRP alone group. Conclusion: The present data suggest that treatment of chronic periodontitis with either 980 Diode laser + SRP or SRP alone results in statistically significant improvements in the clinical parameters. The combination of 980 Diode laser irradiation in the gingival sulcus and SRP, was significantly better as compared to SRP alone.

  14. An Injectable System for Local and Sustained Release of Antimicrobial Agents in the Periodontal Pocket.

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    Morelli, Laura; Cappelluti, Martino Alfredo; Ricotti, Leonardo; Lenardi, Cristina; Gerges, Irini

    2017-08-01

    Periodontitis treatments usually require local administration of antimicrobial drugs with the aim to reduce the bacterial load inside the periodontal pocket. Effective pharmaceutical treatments may require sustained local drug release for several days in the site of interest. Currently available solutions are still not able to fulfill the clinical need for high-quality treatments, mainly in terms of release profiles and patients' comfort. This work aims to fill this gap through the development of an in situ gelling system, capable to achieve controlled and sustained release of antimicrobial agents for medium-to-long-term treatments. The system is composed of micrometer-sized β-cyclodextrin-based hydrogel (bCD-Jef-MPs), featured by a strong hydrophilic character, suspended in a synthetic block-co-polymer solution (Poloxamer 407), which is capable to undergo rapid thermally induced sol-gel phase transition at body temperature. The chemical structure of bCD-Jef-MPs was confirmed by cross-correlating data from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, swelling test, and degradation kinetics. The thermally induced sol-gel phase transition is demonstrated by rheometric tests. The effectiveness of the described system to achieve sustained release of antimicrobial agents is demonstrated in vitro, using chlorhexidine digluconate as a drug model. The results achieved in this work disclose the potential of the mentioned system in effectively treating periodontitis lesions. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Interaction Between Immune Cells and Bacteria Associated With Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-22

    Periodontal Diseases; Periodontitis; Aggressive Periodontitis; Immunologic Disease; Microbial Disease; Periodontal Pocket; Inflammation; Inflammation Gum; Dysbiosis; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis; Generalized Chronic Periodontitis; Chronic Periodontitis

  16. Spontaneous correction of pathologic tooth migration and reduced infrabony pockets following nonsurgical periodontal therapy: a case report.

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    Sato, Shuichi; Ujiie, Hisashi; Ito, Koichi

    2004-10-01

    This case report describes the spontaneous correction of pathologic tooth migration and reduced infrabony pockets after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. A 3-mm diastema between the maxillary incisors was closed completely, and the mandibular teeth, which had migrated pathologically, returned to the optimal position. Clinical evaluation showed a significant reduction in probing depth, with increased clinical attachment and bone deposition demonstrated radiologically.

  17. Staphylococcus spp. in the oral cavity and periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis patients Staphylococcus spp. na cavidade bucal e na bolsa periodontal de indivíduos com periodontite crônica

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    Jussara Cia S. Loberto

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus spp are not usually isolated from the oral cavity, and when this occurs, they are considered to belong to the transitory microbiota. Individuals with periodontal disease represent possible reservoirs of these opportunistic bacteria in the oral cavity. The use of antibiotics for treatment of periodontal disease or other infections may predispose to the increase of the number of Staphylococcus spp. in the oral cavity. These microorganisms easily become resistant to antibiotics, and may result in superinfection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence of Staphylococcus spp. in the oral cavity and in periodontal pockets of patients with chronic periodontitis, identify the isolates and verify the relationship between the presence of Staphylococcus spp. in the oral cavity and presence of periodontal pockets. The study included eighty-eight patients, 25-60 years of age, with chronic periodontitis, and at least two sites with probing depth > 5 mm. Individual data examination was assessed. Then, samples were colleted from the periodontal pocket with the aid of paper tips and from the oral cavity through mouth rinses. Out of the total of patients, 37.50% presented Staphylococcus spp. in the periodontal pocket and 61.36% in the oral cavity, 27.27% presented the bacteria in both sites. S. epidermidis was the most prevalent specie in the periodontal pocket (15.9% and oral cavity (27.27%. The occurrence of higher proportions of nonresident's microorganisms in subgingival samples and oral sites may represent significant problem in causing and maintaining periodontal infections.Staphylococcus spp. não são usualmente isolados a partir da cavidade bucal. Quando presentes, são considerados pertencentes à microbiota transitória. Indivíduos que apresentam doença periodontal representam possíveis reservatórios dessas bactérias oportunistas na cavidade bucal. O uso de antibióticos para o tratamento da doença periodontal ou

  18. Comparing clinical attachment level and pocket depth for predicting periodontal disease progression in healthy sites of patients with chronic periodontitis using multi-state Markov models.

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    Mdala, Ibrahimu; Olsen, Ingar; Haffajee, Anne D; Socransky, Sigmund S; Thoresen, Magne; de Blasio, Birgitte Freiesleben

    2014-09-01

    To understand degeneration of healthy sites and identify factors associated with disease progression in patients with chronic periodontitis. Data on healthy sites from 163 American and Swedish subjects were analysed using two-three-state (health, gingivitis, chronic periodontitis) Markov models based on bleeding on probing (BOP), and either clinical attachment level (CAL) + BOP or pocket depth (PD) + BOP. In 2 years, 10% (CAL + BOP) and 3% (PD + BOP) of healthy sites developed chronic periodontitis. On average, healthy sites remained healthy for 32 months before transiting in both models. Most transitions (87-97%) from health were to the gingivitis state. The expected duration of the gingivitis lesion was 4-5 months and sites recovered with a high probability (96-98%). Disease severity as measured by number of sites with CAL/PD > 4 mm at baseline and smoking, were associated with fast progression from health to chronic periodontitis within 6 months as were gingival redness in the PD + BOP model only. With age, the rate of disease progression to gingivitis decreased. Transition probabilities for gingivitis and chronic periodontitis were higher with CAL + BOP than with PD + BOP. Smoking and disease severity were significant predictors for fast progression. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Periodontology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Comparing clinical attachment level and pocket depth for predicting periodontal disease progression in healthy sites of patients with chronic periodontitis using multi-state Markov models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdala, Ibrahimu; Olsen, Ingar; Haffajee, Anne D; Socransky, Sigmund S; Thoresen, Magne; de Blasio, Birgitte Freiesleben

    2014-01-01

    Aim To understand degeneration of healthy sites and identify factors associated with disease progression in patients with chronic periodontitis. Material and Methods Data on healthy sites from 163 American and Swedish subjects were analysed using two-three-state (health, gingivitis, chronic periodontitis) Markov models based on bleeding on probing (BOP), and either clinical attachment level (CAL) + BOP or pocket depth (PD) + BOP. Results In 2 years, 10% (CAL + BOP) and 3% (PD + BOP) of healthy sites developed chronic periodontitis. On average, healthy sites remained healthy for 32 months before transiting in both models. Most transitions (87–97%) from health were to the gingivitis state. The expected duration of the gingivitis lesion was 4–5 months and sites recovered with a high probability (96–98%). Disease severity as measured by number of sites with CAL/PD > 4 mm at baseline and smoking, were associated with fast progression from health to chronic periodontitis within 6 months as were gingival redness in the PD + BOP model only. With age, the rate of disease progression to gingivitis decreased. Conclusion Transition probabilities for gingivitis and chronic periodontitis were higher with CAL + BOP than with PD + BOP. Smoking and disease severity were significant predictors for fast progression. PMID:24888705

  20. Adjunctive Non-Surgical Therapy of Inflamed Periodontal Pockets During Maintenance Therapy Using Diode Laser: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

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    Nguyen, Naomi-Trang; Byarlay, Matthew R; Reinhardt, Richard A; Marx, David B; Meinberg, Trudy A; Kaldahl, Wayne B

    2015-10-01

    Numerous studies have documented the clinical outcomes of laser therapy for untreated periodontitis, but very few have reported on lasers treating inflamed pockets during maintenance therapy. The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of scaling and root planing (SRP) plus the adjunctive use of diode laser therapy to SRP alone on changes in the clinical parameters of disease and on the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) inflammatory mediator interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in patients receiving regular periodontal maintenance therapy. This single-masked and randomized, controlled, prospective study includes 22 patients receiving regular periodontal maintenance therapy who had one or more periodontal sites with a probing depth (PD) ≥ 5 mm with bleeding on probing (BOP). Fifty-six sites were treated with SRP and adjunctive laser therapy (SRP + L). Fifty-eight sites were treated with SRP alone. Clinical parameters, including PD, clinical attachment level (CAL), and BOP, and GCF IL-1β levels were measured immediately before treatment (baseline) and 3 months after treatment. Sites treated with SRP + L and SRP alone resulted in statistically significant reductions in PD and BOP and gains in CAL. These changes were not significantly different between the two therapies. Similarly, differences in GCF IL-1β levels between SRP + L and SRP alone were not statistically significant. In periodontal maintenance patients, SRP + L did not enhance clinical outcomes compared to SRP alone in the treatment of inflamed sites with ≥ 5 mm PD.

  1. Assessment of antibacterial effect of cinnamon on growth of porphyromons gingivalis from chronic periodontitis patients with deep pockets (in vitro

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    Babak Amoian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims : Antibiotics are commonly used for controlling the growth of porphyromons gingivalis (P.g which is one of the most important etiologic factors in the periodontal diseases. Different side effects of synthetics and chemical drugs such as increasing the drug resistancy in the human pathogens have led to study on the herbal antibacterial effect. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of cinnamon on the growth of porphyromons gingivalis in chronic periodontitis patients with deep pockets.   Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, samples were provided from patients having pockets. After culturing the microorganism and diagnosis of P.g by gram staining and biochemical tests, cinnamon in different concentrations (10, 50, 100, 250, 500, 750 and 1500 mg/ml with oil solvent were prepared and placed by disks in the cultures medium. Positive controls were amoxicillin, metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, amikacin and gentamycin . Oil was negative control. Then the plates were incubated for 24 hours in 37 0 C and then non-growth halos by disk diffusion method, MIC (Minimum Inhibitory Concentration and MBC (Minimum Bactericidal Concentration were determined. Data were analyzed using One-way ANOVA test.   Results: The results showed that the cinnamon at the concentration of MIC=750 mg/ml had the inhibitory effects of bacteria and at the concentration of MIC=1500 mg/ml had killing effect. However, this antibacterial effect compared with commonly used antibiotics (amoxicillin, metronidazole, was much weaker (P<0.001.   Conclusion: Cinnamon showed an antimicrobial effect on porphyromonas gingivalis in chronic periodontitis patients with deep pockets.

  2. Laser Supported Reduction of Specific Microorganisms in the Periodontal Pocket with the Aid of an Er,Cr:YSGG Laser: A Pilot Study

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    N. Gutknecht

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a radial firing tip of an Er,Cr:YSGG laser as an adjunct to a nonsurgical periodontal treatment. Methods. Twelve patients with chronic or aggressive periodontitis were treated by conventional periodontal treatment using ultrasonic devices and hand instruments and, additionally, in two quadrants with an Er,Cr:YSGG laser. A new radial firing tip (RFPT 14-5, Biolase was used with 1.5 W, 30 Hz, 11% air, 20% water, and pulse duration 140 μs. Microbiological smears were taken before treatment, one day after lasing, and three and six months after lasing. Pocket depths of all periodontal sites were measured before and six months after treatment. Results. The total bacterial load of Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans inside the pocket was reduced significantly throughout the whole examination time. Greater pocket depth reductions were observed in all groups. There was a slight higher reduction of pocket depth in the lased group after six months. Conclusions. These results support the thesis that Er,Cr:YSGG laser supported periodontal treatment leads to a significant reduction of periopathogenes and thereby helps the maintenance of periodontal health.

  3. A Biofilm Pocket Model to Evaluate Different Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment Modalities in Terms of Biofilm Removal and Reformation, Surface Alterations and Attachment of Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts.

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    Tobias T Hägi

    Full Text Available There is a lack of suitable in vitro models to evaluate various treatment modalities intending to remove subgingival bacterial biofilm. Consequently, the aims of this in vitro-study were: a to establish a pocket model enabling mechanical removal of biofilm and b to evaluate repeated non-surgical periodontal treatment with respect to biofilm removal and reformation, surface alterations, tooth hard-substance-loss, and attachment of periodontal ligament (PDL fibroblasts.Standardized human dentin specimens were colonized by multi-species biofilms for 3.5 days and subsequently placed into artificially created pockets. Non-surgical periodontal treatment was performed as follows: a hand-instrumentation with curettes (CUR, b ultrasonication (US, c subgingival air-polishing using erythritol (EAP and d subgingival air-polishing using erythritol combined with chlorhexidine digluconate (EAP-CHX. The reduction and recolonization of bacterial counts, surface roughness (Ra and Rz, the caused tooth substance-loss (thickness as well as the attachment of PDL fibroblasts were evaluated and statistically analyzed by means of ANOVA with Post-Hoc LSD.After 5 treatments, bacterial reduction in biofilms was highest when applying EAP-CHX (4 log10. The lowest reduction was found after CUR (2 log10. Additionally, substance-loss was the highest when using CUR (128±40 µm in comparison with US (14±12 µm, EAP (6±7 µm and EAP-CHX (11±10 µm. Surface was roughened when using CUR and US. Surfaces exposed to US and to EAP attracted the highest numbers of PDL fibroblasts.The established biofilm model simulating a periodontal pocket combined with interchangeable placements of test specimens with multi-species biofilms enables the evaluation of different non-surgical treatment modalities on biofilm removal and surface alterations. Compared to hand instrumentation the application of ultrasonication and of air-polishing with erythritol prevents from substance-loss and results

  4. Characterization of Streptococcus constellatus strains recovered from a brain abscess and periodontal pockets in an immunocompromised patient.

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    Marques da Silva, Rafael; Caugant, Dominique A; Josefsen, Roger; Tronstad, Leif; Olsen, Ingar

    2004-12-01

    There have been a number of reports of brain abscesses suggesting an odontogenic etiology. However, no efforts have been made to compare brain abscess isolates with isolates from the oral cavity using highly discriminative methods. We report a brain abscess caused by Streptococcus constellatus in an immunocompromised patient where oral infection (periodontitis) was suspected to be implicated. The brain abscess and oral isolates were compared by means of one phenotypic and three genetic (restriction fragment length polymorphism [RFLP], ribotyping, and random amplified polymorphic DNA [RAPD]) fingerprinting techniques. The phenotypic method and RFLP showed identical profiles between brain and periodontal isolates, while ribotyping and RAPD showed very close similarity, with only one band difference in one of the three ribotypes and in one of the three polymorphic RAPD. Gene transfer by genetic recombinational events in the periodontal pocket might have been responsible for the emergence of a strain variant of S. constellatus that had the potential to cause an abscess at a distant site (brain). The importance of odontogenic sources as potential foci of infection for brain abscesses is discussed.

  5. Oral Microbiome of Deep and Shallow Dental Pockets In Chronic Periodontitis

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    Ge, Xiuchun; Rodriguez, Rafael; Trinh, My; Gunsolley, John; Xu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    We examined the subgingival bacterial biodiversity in untreated chronic periodontitis patients by sequencing 16S rRNA genes. The primary purpose of the study was to compare the oral microbiome in deep (diseased) and shallow (healthy) sites. A secondary purpose was to evaluate the influences of smoking, race and dental caries on this relationship. A total of 88 subjects from two clinics were recruited. Paired subgingival plaque samples were taken from each subject, one from a probing site depth >5 mm (deep site) and the other from a probing site depth ≤3mm (shallow site). A universal primer set was designed to amplify the V4–V6 region for oral microbial 16S rRNA sequences. Differences in genera and species attributable to deep and shallow sites were determined by statistical analysis using a two-part model and false discovery rate. Fifty-one of 170 genera and 200 of 746 species were found significantly different in abundances between shallow and deep sites. Besides previously identified periodontal disease-associated bacterial species, additional species were found markedly changed in diseased sites. Cluster analysis revealed that the microbiome difference between deep and shallow sites was influenced by patient-level effects such as clinic location, race and smoking. The differences between clinic locations may be influenced by racial distribution, in that all of the African Americans subjects were seen at the same clinic. Our results suggested that there were influences from the microbiome for caries and periodontal disease and these influences are independent. PMID:23762384

  6. Laser reduction of specific microorganisms in the periodontal pocket using Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers: a randomized controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzech-Leśniak, K; Sculean, A; Gašpirc, Boris

    2018-05-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the microbiological and clinical outcomes following nonsurgical treatment by either scaling and root planing, combination of Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers, or by Er:YAG laser treatment alone. The study involved 60 patients with generalized chronic periodontitis, randomly assigned into one of three treatment groups of 20 patients. The first group received scaling and root planing by hand instruments (SRP group), the second group received Er:YAG laser treatment alone (Er group), and the third group received combined treatment with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers (NdErNd group). Microbiological samples, taken from the periodontal pockets at baseline and 6 months after treatments, were assessed with PET Plus tests. The combined NdErNd laser (93.0%), followed closely by Er:YAG laser (84.9%), treatment resulted in the highest reduction of all bacteria count after 6 months, whereas SRP (46.2%) failed to reduce Treponema denticola, Peptostreptococcus micros, and Capnocytophaga gingivalis. Full-mouth plaque and bleeding on probing scores dropped after 6 months and were the lowest in both laser groups. The combination of NdErNd resulted in higher probing pocket depth reduction and gain of clinical attachment level (1.99 ± 0.23 mm) compared to SRP (0.86 ± 0.13 mm) or Er:YAG laser alone (0.93 ± 0.20 mm) in 4-6 mm-deep pockets. Within their limits, the present results provide support for the combination of Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers to additionally improve the microbiological and clinical outcomes of nonsurgical periodontal therapy in patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis.

  7. Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001059.htm Periodontitis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Periodontitis is inflammation and infection of the ligaments and ...

  8. Clinical attachment level gain and bone regeneration around a glass ionomer restoration on root surface wall of periodontal pocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biniraj, K. R.; Sagir, Mohammed; Sunil, M. M.; Janardhanan, Mahija

    2012-01-01

    A case describing perio-restorative management of an accidental trauma in the mid portion of root on an upper left canine tooth following an ostectomy surgery is presented here. The traumatized root area was undergoing fast resorption and a chronic periodontal abscess had developed in relation to the lesion. The article illustrates the clinical and radiographic photo series of a periodontal flap surgery done to gain access into a subgingival region for the placement of Glass ionomer restoration on the root and its periodic follow up. The clinical condition of the area suggests 8 mm clinical attachment gain over the restoration and the review radiographs at definite intervals up to 18 months revealed evidence of consistent bone regeneration around the restoration. The article also highlights the various other possibilities, where this restorative material can be effectively used in conjunction with periodontal surgical procedures. PMID:23162344

  9. Diagnosis and osseous healing of a lateral periodontal cyst mimicking a deep unusual interdental pocket in a young patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K N Dubey

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old male patient presented for the evaluation of his nonhealing interdental deep pocket in relation to the mandibular second premolar and mandibular first molar. He denied any history of pain. Excessive food lodgment, salty taste, and smell related to the specific region were his chief complaints. The periapical radiograph exhibited well-defined interradicular unilocular radiolucency with sclerotic margins between the vital mandibular second premolar and mandibular first molar. The lesion was completely enucleated with deep curettage and root planning. Histopathologic reports showed a heavy inflammatory infiltrate. Successive radiographs showed excellent bone healing. Teeth were endodontically treated for severe sensitivity to cold. Step-by-step radiographic follow-up showed osseous repair with no evidence of disease till 25 months.

  10. Periodontal status and treatment needs of primary school teachers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Periodontal status and treatment needs of primary school teachers in the absence of ... on probing, periodontal pocketing and treatment needs with CPITN and tooth ... Is In the form of oral prophylaxis and non-surgical periodontal treatment.

  11. Pocket Money

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Laura Perregård

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This is a paper studying, the negotiations and expectations, appearin through the exchange of ‘pocket money’, between the Danish state and the asylum seekers in Avnstrup asylum Centre. The paper presents, the practices that surround the ‘pocket money’ in Avnstrup Asylum Centre and how there are perceive. Furthermore it reflects upon the ‘pocket money’ as a tool of identification Finally it explores the reasons and rationalities for the states funding of the asylum seekers. The analys...

  12. IgG sera levels against a subset of periodontopathogens and severity of disease in aggressive periodontitis patients: a cross-sectional study of selected pocket sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Luciana; Rebeis, Estela S; Martins, Eder de S; Sekiguchi, Ricardo T; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S; Mafra, Carlos Eduardo S; Holzhausen, Marinella; Romito, Giuseppe A; Mayer, Marcia P A

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the association among serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) serotypes a, b and c, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf) and clinical parameters in Aggressive Periodontitis (AP) subjects. Associations between periodontal pathogens and clinical and immunological parameters were also evaluated. Thirty-eight subjects diagnosed with generalized AP (GAP) and localized AP (LAP) were included. Ten healthy controls were also evaluated. Clinical parameters were assessed and percentages of subgingival levels of Aa, Pg and Tf (beyond bacterial load), were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Serum IgG antibody levels against Aa, Pg and Tf were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Percentages of Aa, Pg and Tf were significantly higher in AP than in controls. The response to Aa serotype c was higher in LAP subjects than in controls. There were no differences in microbial composition or antibodies responses between GAP and LAP, except for IgG response to Tf. Pg levels were correlated with probing depth (PD), BoP and CAL in GAP but not in LAP subjects. Tf levels correlated with PD and CAL in GAP subjects. In GAP, the infection levels of Aa and Pg correlated with the corresponding IgG levels to Aa serotype c and Pg. Given the evidences that IgG response in AP patients correlated with bacterial infection level in GAP, but not in LAP, and that LAP patients lack a response to Tf, despite harbouring this species, our data suggest a difference in host immune defence between these two forms of aggressive periodontitis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Periodontal abscess: etiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vályi, Péter; Gorzó, István

    2004-08-01

    The periodontal abscess is an acute destructive process in the periodontium resulting in localized collections of pus communicating with the oral cavity through the gingival sulcus or other periodontal sites and not arising from the tooth pulp. The prevalence of periodontal abscess is relatively high and it affects the prognosis of the tooth. Periodontal abscesses can develop on the base of persisting periodontitis but can also occur in the absence of periodontitis. The cause of the development of periodontal abscess originating from chronic periodontitis is the marginal closure of a periodontal pocket, or the pocket lumen might be too tight to drain the increased suppuration due to changes in the composition of subgingival microflora, alteration of bacterial virulence or host defenses. Diagnosis of a periodontal abscess is based on medical and dental history as well as oral examination (pocket depth, swelling, suppuration, mobility, sensibility of the tooth). The most prevalent group of bacteria: P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, B. forsythus, F. nucleatum and P. micros. Previous studies have suggested that the complete therapy of the periodontitis patients with acute periodontal abscess has to do in two stages: the first stage is the management of acute lesions, then the second stage is the appropriate comprehensive treatment of the original and/or residual lesions. The management of acute lesions includes establishing drainage via pocket lumen, subgingival scaling and root planing, curettage of the lining pocket epithelia and seriously inflamed connective tissue, compressing pocket wall to underlying tooth and periodontal support, and maintaining tissue contact. Some authors recommend the incision or to establish drainage and irrigation, or a flap surgery, or even extraction of hopeless teeth. We recommend the use of systemic antibiotics as a preventive measure of systemic disease or in case of systemic symptoms.

  14. Periodontal tissue damage in smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutojo Djajakusuma

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Dental plaque is the primary etiological factor in periodontal diseases. However, there are many factors that can modify how an individual periodontal tissue will respond to the accumulation of dental plaque. Among such risk factors, there is increasing evidence that smoking tobacco products alters the expression and rate of progression of periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to find out the loss of periodontal tissue adhesion in smokers by measuring pocket depth using probe, and by measuring alveolar bone damage using Bone Loss Score (BLS radiographic methods on teeth 12, 11, 21, 22, 32, 31, 41, 42. Based on T Test statistical analysis, there were significant differences in pocket depth damage of alveolar bone in smokers and non smokers. In conclusion there were increasing pocket depth and alveolar bone damage in smokers.

  15. Efficiency of nonsurgical periodontal therapy in moderate chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlachkova, Antoaneta M; Popova, Christina L

    2014-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is defined as an inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of teeth caused by microorganisms in the dental biofilm, resulting in progressive destruction of the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone with pocket formation and gingival recession. Treatment of chronic periodontitis aims at arresting the inflammation and stopping the loss of attachment by removal and control of the supra- and subgingival biofilm and establishing a local environment and microflora compatible with periodontal health. The AIM of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of non-surgical therapy (scaling and root planning) in the treatment of moderate chronic periodontitis. The study included 30 patients aged between 33 and 75 years, of which 46.7% women and 53.3% men, diagnosed with moderate and, at some sites, severe periodontitis. They were treated with non-surgical periodontal therapy methods (scaling and root planning and curettage if indicated). Additionally, chemical plaque control with rinse water containing chlorhexidine was applied. The diagnostic and reassessment procedures included measuring the periodontal indices of 601 periodontal units before and after the therapy. The indices measured were the papillary bleeding index (PBI), the hygiene index (HI), the probing pocket depth (PPD) and the clinical attachment level (CAL). Significant reduction of plaque and gingival inflammation was found in all treated patients; we also found a statistically significant reduction of periodontal pockets with clinically measured depth 5 mm did not show statistically significant lower incidence rates probably due to the initially small percentage of deep pockets in the patients studied. There was a statistically significant reduction of all sites with attachment loss, the highest significance found at sites where the attachment loss was greater than 5 mm. The results of the study suggest that nonsurgical periodontal therapy is effective in managing the moderate

  16. Periodontal disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shub, Alexis; Swain, Jonathan R; Newnham, John P

    2006-09-01

    Periodontal disease is a common infectious disease in women of reproductive age. The disease is often not diagnosed and in studies of over 10 000 women has been associated with preterm birth, small for gestational age newborns, and preeclampsia. It has been shown in a smaller number of women that treatment of periodontal disease may reduce the rate of preterm birth. The pregnancy complications of periodontal disease may be due to lipopolysaccharide from the periodontal pockets inciting prostaglandin pathways controlling parturition. Three large randomized controlled trials of treatment of periodontal disease are underway and may provide confirmation of the importance of periodontal disease in causing complications of pregnancy.

  17. An overview of periodontal regenerative procedures for the general dental practitioner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Siaili

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The complete regeneration of the periodontal tissues following periodontal disease remains an unmet challenge, and has presented clinicians with a remarkably difficult clinical challenge to solve given the extensive research in this area and our current understanding of the biology of the periodontal tissues. In particular as clinicians we look for treatments that will improve the predictability of the procedure, improve the magnitude of the effect of treatment, and perhaps most importantly in the long term would extend the indications for treatment beyond the need for single enclosed bony defects to allow for suprabony regeneration, preferably with beneficial effects on the gingival soft tissues. A rapid development in both innovative methods and products for the correction of periodontal deficiencies have been reported during the last three decades. For example, guided tissue regeneration with or without the use of bone supplements has been a well-proven treatment modality for the reconstruction of bony defects prior to the tissue engineering era. Active biomaterials have been subsequently introduced to the periodontal community with supporting dental literature suggesting that certain factors should be taken into consideration when undertaking periodontal regenerative procedures. These factors as well as a number of other translational research issues will need to be addressed, and ultimately it is vital that we do not extrapolate results from pre-clinical and animal studies without conducting extensive randomized clinical trials to substantiate outcomes from these procedures. Whatever the outcomes, the pursuit of regeneration of the periodontal tissues remains a goal worth pursuing for our patients. The aim of the review, therefore is to update clinicians on the recent advances in both materials and techniques in periodontal regenerative procedures and to highlight the importance of both patient factors and the technical aspects of

  18. Prevalence of Periodontal Disease in Children with Leukemia and Thalassemia

    OpenAIRE

    Marhamah; Maulidita, Hardianti

    2014-01-01

    Background. Various periodontal disease can occur in children and adolescents. Some can take place quickly and periodontal tissue damage. Several previous studies indicate that systemic diseases associated with periodontal disease in children. Objectives. This study aims to determine the prevalence of periodontal disease in children with leukemia and thalassemia. Methods. The design study is a cross-sectional approach. Periodontal pocket depth measurements performed using the WHO standa...

  19. Periodontal disease and halitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzoman, Hamad

    2008-01-01

    Halitosis is a general term used to describe an unpleasant or offensive odor emanating from the oral cavity. It is a condition that has health and social implications in the life of those who suffer from it. The origin of halitosis is related to both systemic and oral conditions although the oral causes predominate. Volatile sulfur compound is the primary gas responsible for halitosis. They are formed as a result of gram-negative bacterial putrefaction. The major sites for oral halitosis are the dorsum of the tongue and periodontal pockets. There is a correlation between the amount of plaque on the tongue and periodontitis with the severity of halitosis. The aim of this article was to review the data and correlate periodontitis with severity of halitosis and the effect of halitosis- inducing factors on the progress of periodontal diseases. (author)

  20. Lipopolysaccharide: a Link between Periodontitis and Cardiometabolic Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kallio, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is characterized by an inflammatory response to bacterial infection in the supporting tissues of the teeth. The disease manifests with gingival swelling and bleeding, increased periodontal pocket depth, and alveolar bone loss. Intact bacteria or bacterial products, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), may enter the bloodstream through inflamed periodontal tissue or via saliva. Bacterial dissemination, further potentiated by gastrointestinal microbiota, may result in endotoxemia a...

  1. Longitudinal Association Of Alcohol Consumption To Periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Johanne; Hach, Maria; Hvidtfeldt, Ulla Arthur

    pocket depth (PPD) and calculation of clinical attachment level (CAL). Periodontitis was defined according to severe periodontitis as ≥2 interproximal sites with CAL ≥6mm (not on the same tooth) and ≥1 interproximal site with PPD ≥5mm (Page & Eke 2007). Alcohol consumption and relevant covariates were...

  2. Recording and surveillance systems for periodontal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltrán-Aguilar, Eugenio D; Eke, Paul I; Thornton-Evans, Gina

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes tools used to measure periodontal diseases and the integration of these tools into surveillance systems. Tools to measure periodontal diseases at the surveillance level have focussed on current manifestations of disease (e.g. gingival inflammation) or disease sequelae (e.......g. periodontal pocket depth or loss of attachment). All tools reviewed in this paper were developed based on the state of the science of the pathophysiology of periodontal disease at the time of their design and the need to provide valid and reliable measurements of the presence and severity of periodontal...... diseases. Therefore, some of these tools are no longer valid. Others, such as loss of periodontal attachment, are the current de-facto tools but demand many resources to undertake periodical assessment of the periodontal health of populations. Less complex tools such as the Community Periodontal Index...

  3. The periodontal abscess: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, D; Roldán, S; Sanz, M

    2000-06-01

    The periodontal abscess is a frequent periodontal condition in which periodontal tissues may be rapidly destroyed. Its importance is based on the possible need of urgent care, the affectation of tooth prognosis, and the possibility of infection spreading. There is scant information in the scientific literature regarding this condition and most of it has been published as case reports and text books, where conclusions are not evidence-based, but rather empirical observations made by recognised clinicians. The aim of this review was to critically analyse all available information on this subject in the dental and medical literature, including information on its prevalence, proposed etiologies and pathogenesis, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment alternatives. The periodontal abscess is the 3rd most frequent dental emergency, and it is specially prevalent among untreated periodontal patients and periodontal patients during maintenance. Different etiologies have been proposed, and 2 main groups can be distinguished, depending on its relation with periodontal pockets. In the case of a periodontitis-related abscess, the condition may appear as an exacerbation of a non-treated periodontitis or during the course of periodontal therapy. In non-periodontitis related abscesses, impaction of foreign objects, and radicular abnormalities are the 2 main causes. The abscess microflora seems to be similar to that of adult periodontitis, and it is dominated by gram-negative anaerobic rods, including well-known periodontal pathogens. Complications and consequences include tooth loss and the spread of the infection to other body sites. Diagnosis and treatment is mainly based on empiricism, since evidence-based data are not available. The role of systemic antibiotics, in the treatment of periodontal abscesses, is especially controversial.

  4. Impact of Periodontitis Case Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Johanne; Enevold, Christian; Christensen, Lisa Bøge

    2017-01-01

    of The Danish Health Examination Survey (DANHES). METHODS: A total of 4,402 adults aged 18-96 years from the general health examination of DANHES had a periodontal examination consisting of half-mouth registration at 6 sites per tooth including probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL......). Periodontitis was defined according to severe periodontitis, EWP-specific, meanCAL≥2.55mm, CAL-tertile, and PPD-CAL definition. Multivariable logistic regression models fitted the association of age, gender, smoking status, diabetes, educational level, alcohol consumption, body mass index, physical activity...

  5. Microbiological characteristics of subgingival microbiota in adult periodontitis, localized juvenile periodontitis and rapidly progressive periodontitis subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonnenmacher, C; Mutters, R; de Jacoby, L F

    2001-04-01

    To describe the prevalence of the cultivable subgingival microbiota in periodontal diseases and to draw attention to the polymicrobial nature of periodontic infections. The study population consisted of 95 patients, 51 females and 44 males, aged 14-62 years. Twenty-nine patients exhibited adult periodontitis (AP), six localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), and 60 rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP). Two to four pooled bacterial samples were obtained from each patient. Samples were collected with sterile paper points from the deepest periodontal pockets. The samples were cultured under anaerobic and microaerophilic conditions using selective and non-selective media. Isolates were characterized to species level by conventional biochemical tests and by a commercial rapid test system. Prevotella intermedia and Capnocytophaga spp. were the most frequently detected microorganisms in all diagnostic groups. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Peptostreptococcus micros were found more frequently in AP and RPP patients, while Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Eikenella corrodens were associated with AP, LJP and RPP patients. The other bacterial species, including Actinomyces spp., Streptococcus spp. and Eubacterium spp., were detected at different levels in the three disease groups. The data show the complexity of the subgingival microbiota associated with different periodontal disease groups, indicating that the detection frequency and levels of recovery of some periodontal pathogens are different in teeth affected by different forms of periodontal disease.

  6. Combined periodontic-orthodonticendodontic interdisciplinary approach in the treatment of periodontally compromised tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Deepa, D; Mehta, D. S.; Puri, Viren K.; Shetty, Sadashiva

    2010-01-01

    Orthodontic treatment in adult patients is one of the most frequently encountered components involving multidisciplinary approaches. In the present report, a 28-year-old male patient was treated for localized chronic periodontitis with pocket formation, mobility, pathologic migration and malalignment of maxillary left lateral incisor tooth #22. The periodontal therapy included motivation, education and oral-hygiene instructions (O.H.I.), scaling and root planing and periodontal flap surgery. ...

  7. Dental Investigations: Efficiency of Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy in Moderate Chronic Periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mlachkova Antoaneta M.; Popova Christina L.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Chronic periodontitis is defined as an inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of teeth caused by microorganisms in the dental biofilm, resulting in progressive destruction of the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone with pocket formation and gingival recession. Treatment of chronic periodontitis aims at arresting the inflammation and stopping the loss of attachment by removal and control of the supra- and subgingival biofilm and establishing a local environment and mic...

  8. Therapeutic strategies in the treatment of periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liljana Bogdanovska

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory process which affects the tooth - supporting structures of the teeth. The disease is initiated by subgingival periopathogenic bacteria in susceptible periodontal sites. The host immune response towards periodontal pathogens helps to sustain periodontal disease and eventual alveolar bone loss. Although scaling and root planing is the standard treatment modality for periodontitis, it suffers from several drawbacks such as the inability to reach the base of deep pockets and doesn’t arrest migration of periodontal pathogens from other sites in the oral cavity. In order to overcome the limitations of scaling and root planning, adjunctive chemotherapeutics and host modulatory agents to the treatment are used. These therapeutic agents show substantial beneficial effects when compared to scaling and root planning alone. This review will cover an update on chemotherapeutic and past and future host immune modulatory agents used adjunctively to treat and manage periodontal diseases.

  9. Strengthening the prevention of periodontal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the burden of periodontal disease in adult populations worldwide, to emphasize the essential risk factors common to periodontal disease and chronic diseases, to outline important new strategies for effective prevention of periodontal...... disease, and to inform about the role of the World Health Organization (WHO) in developing a national capacity for the prevention of disease. METHODS: Information about periodontal health status as measured by the Community Periodontal Index system is stored in the WHO Global Oral Health Data Bank....... Updated information concerning WHO standard age groups was used to describe the prevalence rates of signs of periodontal disease, i.e., gingival bleeding, periodontal pocketing, and loss of attachment. RESULTS: Gingival bleeding is highly prevalent among adult populations in all regions of the world...

  10. Dental Investigations: Efficiency of Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy in Moderate Chronic Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mlachkova Antoaneta M.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chronic periodontitis is defined as an inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of teeth caused by microorganisms in the dental biofilm, resulting in progressive destruction of the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone with pocket formation and gingival recession. Treatment of chronic periodontitis aims at arresting the inflammation and stopping the loss of attachment by removal and control of the supra- and subgingival biofilm and establishing a local environment and microflora compatible with periodontal health. The AIM of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of non-surgical therapy (scaling and root planning in the treatment of moderate chronic periodontitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included 30 patients aged between 33 and 75 years, of which 46.7% women and 53.3% men, diagnosed with moderate and, at some sites, severe periodontitis. They were treated with non-surgical periodontal therapy methods (scaling and root planning and curettage if indicated. Additionally, chemical plaque control with rinse water containing chlorhexidine was applied. The diagnostic and reassessment procedures included measuring the periodontal indices of 601 periodontal units before and after the therapy. The indices measured were the papillary bleeding index (PBI, the hygiene index (HI, the probing pocket depth (PPD and the clinical attachment level (CAL. RESULTS: Significant reduction of plaque and gingival inflammation was found in all treated patients; we also found a statistically significant reduction of periodontal pockets with clinically measured depth ⋋ 5 mm (PD ⋋ 5 mm. Pockets with PD > 5 mm did not show statistically significant lower incidence rates probably due to the initially small percentage of deep pockets in the patients studied. There was a statistically significant reduction of all sites with attachment loss, the highest significance found at sites where the attachment loss was greater than 5 mm. CONCLUSION

  11. Linkage Between Periodontal Disease and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The past decades have significantly widened the perspectives of the chronic oral infectious disease known as periodontitis. The disease is regarded as a bacterial infection resulting in low-grade inflammation of the periodontal tissues, and both the associated release of pro-inflammatory mediators...... and the presence of bacteria in the periodontal pockets, which, as the result of daily procedures, may spread after penetration of the vasculature, are possible mediators of systemic consequences. The present chapter deals with the possible association of periodontitis with rheumatoid arthritis, which may possess...

  12. Linkage Between Periodontal Disease and Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2016-01-01

    The past decades have significantly widened the perspectives of the chronic oral infectious disease known as periodontitis. The disease is regarded as a bacterial infection resulting in low-grade inflammation of the periodontal tissues, and both the associated release of pro-inflammatory mediators...... and the presence of bacteria in the periodontal pockets, which, as the result of daily procedures, may spread after penetration of the vasculature, are possible mediators of systemic consequences. This chapter deals with the possible association between periodontitis and diabetes mellitus which is believed...

  13. Adhesion of Porphyromonas gingivalis serotypes to pocket epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierickx, K; Pauwels, M; Laine, ML; Van Eldere, J; Cassiman, JJ; van Winkelhoff, AJ; van Steenberghe, D; Quirynen, M

    Background: Porphyromonas gingivalis, a key pathogen in periodontitis, is able to adhere to and invade the pocket epithelium. Different capsular antigens of P gingivalis have been identified (K-serotyping). These P gingivalis capsular types show differences in adhesion capacity to human cell lines

  14. Intraperiodontal pocket: An ideal route for local antimicrobial drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreeja C Nair

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal pockets act as a natural reservoir filled with gingival crevicular fluid for the controlled release delivery of antimicrobials directly. This article reflects the present status of nonsurgical controlled local intrapocket delivery of antimicrobials in the treatment of periodontitis. These sites have specialty in terms of anatomy, permeability, and their ability to retain a delivery system for a desired length of time. A number of antimicrobial products and the composition of the delivery systems, its use, clinical results, and their release are summarized. The goal in using an intrapocket device for the delivery of an antimicrobial agent is the achievement and maintenance of therapeutic drug concentration for the desired period of time. Novel controlled drug delivery system are capable of improving patient compliance as well as therapeutic efficacy with precise control of the rate by which a particular drug dosage is released from a delivery system without the need for frequent administration. These are considered superior drug delivery system because of low cost, greater stability, non-toxicity, biocompatibility, non-immunogenicity, and are biodegradable in nature. This review also focus on the importance and ideal features of periodontal pockets as a drug delivery platform for designing a suitable dosage form along with its potential advantage and limitations. The microbes in the periodontal pocket could destroy periodontal tissues, and a complete knowledge of these as well as an ideal treatment strategy could be helpful in treating this disease.

  15. Signature of Microbial Dysbiosis in Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuric, Vincent; Le Gall-David, Sandrine; Boyer, Emile; Acuña-Amador, Luis; Martin, Bénédicte; Fong, Shao Bing; Barloy-Hubler, Frederique; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine

    2017-07-15

    Periodontitis is driven by disproportionate host inflammatory immune responses induced by an imbalance in the composition of oral bacteria; this instigates microbial dysbiosis, along with failed resolution of the chronic destructive inflammation. The objectives of this study were to identify microbial signatures for health and chronic periodontitis at the genus level and to propose a model of dysbiosis, including the calculation of bacterial ratios. Published sequencing data obtained from several different studies (196 subgingival samples from patients with chronic periodontitis and 422 subgingival samples from healthy subjects) were pooled and subjected to a new microbiota analysis using the same Visualization and Analysis of Microbial Population Structures (VAMPS) pipeline, to identify microbiota specific to health and disease. Microbiota were visualized using CoNet and Cytoscape. Dysbiosis ratios, defined as the percentage of genera associated with disease relative to the percentage of genera associated with health, were calculated to distinguish disease from health. Correlations between the proposed dysbiosis ratio and the periodontal pocket depth were tested with a different set of data obtained from a recent study, to confirm the relevance of the ratio as a potential indicator of dysbiosis. Beta diversity showed significant clustering of periodontitis-associated microbiota, at the genus level, according to the clinical status and independent of the methods used. Specific genera ( Veillonella , Neisseria , Rothia , Corynebacterium , and Actinomyces ) were highly prevalent (>95%) in health, while other genera ( Eubacterium , Campylobacter , Treponema , and Tannerella ) were associated with chronic periodontitis. The calculation of dysbiosis ratios based on the relative abundance of the genera found in health versus periodontitis was tested. Nonperiodontitis samples were significantly identifiable by low ratios, compared to chronic periodontitis samples. When

  16. Pocket Spending Guide

    OpenAIRE

    Poff, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Provides an example for how to set up a pocket spending guide. By filling out the guide and keeping it with you, you can easily see at any time how much money you have available to spend in each category. A pocket spending guide will help you adjust your spending plan to make your money go where you really want it to go.

  17. A novel single-step surgical technique for vestibular deepening using laser in conjunction with periodontal flap surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Bhardwaj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis results in clinical loss of attachment, reduced width of attached gingiva (AG, periodontal pockets beyond mucogingival junction (MGJ, gingival recession, loss of alveolar bone, and decreased vestibular depth (VD. The encroachment of frenal and muscle attachments on marginal gingiva increases the rate of progression of periodontal pockets, prevents healing, and causes their recurrence after therapy. Loss of VD and AG associated with continuous progression of pocket formation and bone loss requires two-stage surgical procedures. In this article, one-stage surgical procedure is being described for the first time, to treat the periodontal pockets extending beyond the MGJ by periodontal flap surgery along with vestibular deepening with diode laser to increase the AG. One-step surgical technique is illustrated whereby pocket therapy with reconstruction of lost periodontal tissues can be done along with gingival augmentation by vestibular deepening.

  18. Poor periodontal health: A cancer risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that chronic infections and inflammation are associated with increased risk of cancer development. There has also been considerable evidence that proves the interrelationship between bacterial and viral infections and carcinogenesis. Periodontitis is a chronic oral infection thought to be caused by gram-negative anaerobic bacteria in the dental biofilm. Periodontal bacteria and viruses may act synergistically to cause periodontitis. Many studies have shown that periodontal pockets may act as reservoirs for human papilloma virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein Barr virus, and suspected agents associated with oral cancer. Periodontitis, characterized by epithelial proliferation and migration, results in a chronic release of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, prostaglandins, and enzymes, all of which are associated with cancer development. This review article intends to shed light on the association between periodontal health and carcinogenesis.

  19. Poor periodontal health: A cancer risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, K S; Thomas, Deepak; Hegde, Shashikanth; Kumar, M S Arun

    2013-11-01

    Evidence indicates that chronic infections and inflammation are associated with increased risk of cancer development. There has also been considerable evidence that proves the interrelationship between bacterial and viral infections and carcinogenesis. Periodontitis is a chronic oral infection thought to be caused by gram-negative anaerobic bacteria in the dental biofilm. Periodontal bacteria and viruses may act synergistically to cause periodontitis. Many studies have shown that periodontal pockets may act as reservoirs for human papilloma virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein Barr virus, and suspected agents associated with oral cancer. Periodontitis, characterized by epithelial proliferation and migration, results in a chronic release of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, prostaglandins, and enzymes, all of which are associated with cancer development. This review article intends to shed light on the association between periodontal health and carcinogenesis.

  20. Pocket pumped image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotov, I.V., E-mail: kotov@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); O' Connor, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Murray, N. [Centre for Electronic Imaging, Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The pocket pumping technique is used to detect small electron trap sites. These traps, if present, degrade CCD charge transfer efficiency. To reveal traps in the active area, a CCD is illuminated with a flat field and, before image is read out, accumulated charges are moved back and forth number of times in parallel direction. As charges are moved over a trap, an electron is removed from the original pocket and re-emitted in the following pocket. As process repeats one pocket gets depleted and the neighboring pocket gets excess of charges. As a result a “dipole” signal appears on the otherwise flat background level. The amplitude of the dipole signal depends on the trap pumping efficiency. This paper is focused on trap identification technique and particularly on new methods developed for this purpose. The sensor with bad segments was deliberately chosen for algorithms development and to demonstrate sensitivity and power of new methods in uncovering sensor defects.

  1. [Relationship between periodontitis and levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Heng-biao; Chen, Hui; Zhou, Na; Jin, Dan; Zhang, Jing; Peng, Chun-mei

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the relationship between periodontitis and the traditional risk factors of coronary heart disease (CHD), as well as the role in the mechanisms responsible for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in the relationship of peridontitis and CHD. A periodontal examination was conducted on a total of 356 subjects, and community periodontal index of treatment needs (CPITN) was obtained from each subject. Periodontal status was categorized into TN periodontal, hsCRP concentration and routinely CHD serological indexes. In the groups of TN periodontal pockets were found in the Group hsCRP > or = 3.0 mg x L(-1) (P periodontal disease.

  2. Canine periodontal disease control using a clindamycin hydrochloride gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Thomas P; Mondal, Pravakar; Pal, Dhananjay; MacGee, Scott; Stromberg, Arnold J; Alur, Hemant

    2011-01-01

    Stabilizing or reducing periodontal pocket depth can have a positive influence on the retention of teeth in dogs. A topical 2% clindamycin hydrochloride gel (CHgel) was evaluated for the treatment of periodontal disease in dogs. The CHgel formulation provides for the sustained erosion of the matrix, but also flows into the periodontal pocket as a viscous liquid, and then rapidly forms a gel that has mucoadhesive properties and also may function as a physical barrier to the introduction of bacteria. A professional teeth cleaning procedure including scaling and root planing was done in dogs with one group receiving CHgel following treatment. Periodontal health was determined before and after the procedure including measurement of periodontal pocket depth, gingival index, gingival bleeding sites, and number of suppurating sites. There was a statistically significant decrease in periodontal pocket depth (19%), gingival index (16%), and the number of bleeding sites (64%) at 90-days in dogs receiving CHgel. Additionally, the number of suppurating sites was lower (93%) at 90-days for the group receiving CHgel. The addition of CHgel effectively controlled the bacterial burden (e.g, Fusobacterium nucleatum) at both day 14 and 90. Gingival cells in culture were shown to rapidly incorporate clindamycin and attain saturation in approximately 20-minutes. In summary, a professional teeth cleaning procedure including root planning and the addition of CHgel improves the gingival index and reduces periodontal pocket depth.

  3. Uncovering the molecular networks in periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Fábio; Oppenheim, Frank G.; Helmerhorst, Eva J.; Amado, Francisco; Gomes, Pedro S.; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a complex immune-inflammatory disease that results from a preestablished infection in gingiva, mainly due to Gram-negative bacteria that colonize deeper in gingival sulcus and latter periodontal pocket. Host inflammatory and immune responses have both protective and destructive roles. Although cytokines, prostaglandins, and proteases struggle against microbial burden, these molecules promote connective tissue loss and alveolar bone resorption, leading to several histopathological changes, namely destruction of periodontal ligament, deepening of periodontal pocket, and bone loss, which can converge to attain tooth loss. Despite the efforts of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics/peptidomics, and metabolomics, there is no available biomarker for periodontitis diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment evaluation, which could assist on the established clinical evaluation. Nevertheless, some genes, transcripts, proteins and metabolites have already shown a different expression in healthy subjects and in patients. Though, so far, ‘omics approaches only disclosed the host inflammatory response as a consequence of microbial invasion in periodontitis and the diagnosis in periodontitis still relies on clinical parameters, thus a molecular tool for assessing periodontitis lacks in current dental medicine paradigm. Saliva and gingival crevicular fluid have been attracting researchers due to their diagnostic potential, ease, and noninvasive nature of collection. Each one of these fluids has some advantages and disadvantages that are discussed in this review. PMID:24828325

  4. C-reactive protein as a systemic marker of inflammation in periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejcic, A; Kesic, L J; Milasin, J

    2011-03-01

    Periodontitis has been identified as a potential risk factor for systemic pathologies such as cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aims of this investigation were to assess the relationship between periodontitis and systemic inflammatory factor, as well as to discover whether there is a relation to the severity of periodontitis and to the periodontopathogens. Periodontal examinations and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level measurements were performed in 50 patients with periodontitis. Periodontal health indicators included the gingival bleeding on probing index and periodontal disease status. The patients with moderate periodontitis had low attachment loss and pocket depth periodontitis had high attachment loss and pocket depth >5 mm. The control group comprised 25 volunteers with healthy gingiva, gingival sulcus periodontal parameters and CRP levels were significantly higher in the patients with periodontitis. Patients who had severe periodontitis, with high levels of mean clinical attachment loss, and subjects with moderate periodontitis had higher mean CRP levels. The percentage of subjects with elevated levels of CRP >5 mg/l was greater in the higher clinical attachment loss group compared to the group with lower attachment loss. The presence of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were also associated with elevated CRP levels and poor periodontal status. Periodontitis and the presence of P. gingivalis are associated with an enhanced inflammatory response expressed by higher CRP levels. The association of periodontitis with CRP levels appears to be a contributing factor for CVD and might be a possible intermediate pathway in this association.

  5. Acute periodontal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, David; Alonso, Bettina; de Arriba, Lorenzo; Santa Cruz, Isabel; Serrano, Cristina; Sanz, Mariano

    2014-06-01

    This review provides updates on acute conditions affecting the periodontal tissues, including abscesses in the periodontium, necrotizing periodontal diseases and other acute conditions that cause gingival lesions with acute presentation, such as infectious processes not associated with oral bacterial biofilms, mucocutaneous disorders and traumatic and allergic lesions. A periodontal abscess is clinically important because it is a relatively frequent dental emergency, it can compromise the periodontal prognosis of the affected tooth and bacteria within the abscess can spread and cause infections in other body sites. Different types of abscesses have been identified, mainly classified by their etiology, and there are clear differences between those affecting a pre-existing periodontal pocket and those affecting healthy sites. Therapy for this acute condition consists of drainage and tissue debridement, while an evaluation of the need for systemic antimicrobial therapy will be made for each case, based on local and systemic factors. The definitive treatment of the pre-existing condition should be accomplished after the acute phase is controlled. Necrotizing periodontal diseases present three typical clinical features: papilla necrosis, gingival bleeding and pain. Although the prevalence of these diseases is not high, their importance is clear because they represent the most severe conditions associated with the dental biofilm, with very rapid tissue destruction. In addition to bacteria, the etiology of necrotizing periodontal disease includes numerous factors that alter the host response and predispose to these diseases, namely HIV infection, malnutrition, stress or tobacco smoking. The treatment consists of superficial debridement, careful mechanical oral hygiene, rinsing with chlorhexidine and daily re-evaluation. Systemic antimicrobials may be used adjunctively in severe cases or in nonresponding conditions, being the first option metronidazole. Once the acute

  6. Periodontitis in patients with focal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandrova Е.А.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to investigate the mechanisms of formation and peculiarities of periodontitis in patients with focal tuberculosis. Patients with periodontitis and focal tuberculosis are proved to develop local inflammatory reaction with increased infection and activation of proinflammatory cytokines in parodontal pockets fluid. The main risk factor of frequent and durable recurrence of parodontal pathology in case of focal tuberculosis was the development of pathologic process as a cause of disbalance of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant system, endotoxicosis syndrome

  7. Periodontal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diseases. The primary research focus was on oral bacteria. Periodontal diseases were thought to begin when chalky white ... tools to target their treatment specifically to the bacteria that trigger periodontal disease. At the same time, because biofilms form ...

  8. Advanced drug delivery approaches against periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Deeksha; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of gums involving the degeneration of periodontal ligaments, creation of periodontal pocket and resorption of alveolar bone, resulting in the disruption of the support structure of teeth. According to WHO, 10-15% of the global population suffers from severe periodontitis. The disease results from the growth of a diverse microflora (especially anaerobes) in the pockets and release of toxins, enzymes and stimulation of body's immune response. Various local or systemic approaches were used for an effective treatment of periodontitis. Currently, controlled local drug delivery approach is more favorable as compared to systemic approach because it mainly focuses on improving the therapeutic outcomes by achieving factors like site-specific delivery, low dose requirement, bypass of first-pass metabolism, reduction in gastrointestinal side effects and decrease in dosing frequency. Overall it provides a safe and effective mode of treatment, which enhances patient compliance. Complete eradication of the organisms from the sites was not achieved by using various surgical and mechanical treatments. So a number of polymer-based delivery systems like fibers, films, chips, strips, microparticles, nanoparticles and nanofibers made from a variety of natural and synthetic materials have been successfully tested to deliver a variety of drugs. These systems are biocompatible and biodegradable, completely fill the pockets, and have strong retention on the target site due to excellent mucoadhesion properties. The review summarizes various available and recently developing targeted delivery devices for the treatment of periodontitis.

  9. Clinical evaluation in periodontitis patient after curettage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widowati Witjaksono

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Curettage is used in periodontics to scrap off the gingival wall of a periodontal pocket, and is needed to reduce loss of attachment (LOA by developing new connective tissue attachment in patients with periodontitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the success of curettage by the formation of tissue attachment. This clinical experiment was done by comparing LOA before curettage, 2 weeks and 3 weeks after curettage on 30 teeth with the indication of curettage. Study population were periodontitis patient who attending dental clinic at Hospital University Science Malaysia (HUSM with inclusion criteria good general health condition, 18 to 55 years old male or female and presented with pocket depth > 3mm. The teeth were thoroughly scaling before intervention and evaluated by measuring the periodontal attachment before curettage, two weeks and three weeks after curettage. Repeated measure ANOVA and Paired T Test were used to analyze the data. The result of the study showed that there was reduction in the periodontal attachment loss in periodontitis patient after curettage either in the anterior or posterior teeth which were supported by statistical analysis. This study concluded that curettage could make reattachment of the tissue

  10. Combined periodontic-orthodonticendodontic interdisciplinary approach in the treatment of periodontally compromised tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, D; Mehta, D S; Puri, Viren K; Shetty, Sadashiva

    2010-04-01

    Orthodontic treatment in adult patients is one of the most frequently encountered components involving multidisciplinary approaches. In the present report, a 28-year-old male patient was treated for localized chronic periodontitis with pocket formation, mobility, pathologic migration and malalignment of maxillary left lateral incisor tooth #22. The periodontal therapy included motivation, education and oral-hygiene instructions (O.H.I.), scaling and root planing and periodontal flap surgery. Subsequently on resolution of periodontal inflammation, orthodontic therapy was carried out using the orthodontic aligner for a period of 6 months. Post-treatment (3 years) results showed complete resolution of infrabony pocket with significant bone fill, reduced tooth mobility and complete alignment of the affected maxillary left lateral incisor, thus restoring the esthetics and function.

  11. Combined periodontic-orthodontic-endodontic interdisciplinary approach in the treatment of periodontally compromised tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment in adult patients is one of the most frequently encountered components involving multidisciplinary approaches. In the present report, a 28-year-old male patient was treated for localized chronic periodontitis with pocket formation, mobility, pathologic migration and malalignment of maxillary left lateral incisor tooth #22. The periodontal therapy included motivation, education and oral-hygiene instructions (O.H.I., scaling and root planing and periodontal flap surgery. Subsequently on resolution of periodontal inflammation, orthodontic therapy was carried out using the orthodontic aligner for a period of 6 months. Post-treatment (3 years results showed complete resolution of infrabony pocket with significant bone fill, reduced tooth mobility and complete alignment of the affected maxillary left lateral incisor, thus restoring the esthetics and function.

  12. Scope of photodynamic therapy in periodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease results from inflammation of the supporting structure of the teeth and in response to chronic infection caused by various periodontopathic bacteria. The mechanical removal of this biofilm and adjunctive use of antibacterial disinfectants and antibiotics have been the conventional methods of periodontal therapy. However, the removal of plaque and the reduction in the number of infectious organisms can be impaired in sites with difficult access. Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a powerful laser-initiated photochemical reaction, involving the use of a photoactive dye (photosensitizer activated by light of a specific wavelength in the presence of oxygen. Application of PDT in periodontics such as pocket debridement, gingivitis, and aggressive periodontitis continue to evolve into a mature clinical treatment modality and is considered as a promising novel approach for eradicating pathogenic bacteria in periodontitis.

  13. Scope of photodynamic therapy in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Sinha, Jolly; Verma, Neelu; Nayan, Kamal; Saimbi, C S; Tripathi, Amitandra K

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease results from inflammation of the supporting structure of the teeth and in response to chronic infection caused by various periodontopathic bacteria. The mechanical removal of this biofilm and adjunctive use of antibacterial disinfectants and antibiotics have been the conventional methods of periodontal therapy. However, the removal of plaque and the reduction in the number of infectious organisms can be impaired in sites with difficult access. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a powerful laser-initiated photochemical reaction, involving the use of a photoactive dye (photosensitizer) activated by light of a specific wavelength in the presence of oxygen. Application of PDT in periodontics such as pocket debridement, gingivitis, and aggressive periodontitis continue to evolve into a mature clinical treatment modality and is considered as a promising novel approach for eradicating pathogenic bacteria in periodontitis.

  14. Efficacy of pharmacotherapy in patients with mild periodontitis by liniment of cycloferon

    OpenAIRE

    Zaitseva Е.М.; Eremin О.V.; Ivaschenko Y.У.; Mekhtieva R.R.; Nelovko Т.V.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study, to improve the quality of treatment of mild periodontitis based on clinical and microbiological studies on the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy by liniment of cycloferon. Research methods. Clinical study included 50 patients aged 20-50 years old with mild periodontitis in the acute stage. Liniment of cycloferon was applied on the gums two times a day in 10-12 hours for 14 days. Microbial picture of oral mucosal and periodontal pockets in patients with periodontitis w...

  15. Microbiomes associated with bovine periodontitis and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsanelli, Ana C; Lappin, David F; Viora, Lorenzo; Bennett, David; Dutra, Iveraldo S; Brandt, Bernd W; Riggio, Marcello P

    2018-05-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious polymicrobial, immuno-inflammatory disease of multifactorial aetiology that has an impact on the health, production and welfare of ruminants. The objective of the present study was to determine the microbial profiles present in the gingival sulcus of cattle considered periodontally healthy and in the periodontal pocket of animals with periodontitis lesions using high-throughput bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Subgingival biofilm samples were collected from 40 cattle with periodontitis and 38 periodontally healthy animals. In total, 1923 OTUs were identified and classified into 395 genera or higher taxa. Microbial profiles in health differed significantly from periodontitis in their composition (p PERMANOVA) but no statistically significant differences were observed in the diversity of healthy and periodontitis microbiomes. The most prevalent taxa in health were Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Actinobacteria, whereas in disease these were Prevotella, Fusobacterium and Porphyromonas. The most discriminative taxa in health were Gastranaerophilales, Planifilum and Burkholderia, and in disease these were Elusimicrobia, Synergistes and Propionivibrio. In conclusion, statistically significant difference exists between the microbiome in bovine oral health and periodontitis, with populations showing 72.6% dissimilarity. The diversity of the bacteria found in health and periodontitis were similar and bacteria recognised as periodontal pathogens showed increased abundance in disease. In this context, the main components of bacterial homeostasis in the biofilm of healthy sites and of dysbiosis in periodontal lesions provide unprecedented indicators for the evolution of knowledge about bovine periodontitis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [The supportive outcome of periodontal non-surgical therapy to severe chronic periodontitis accompanied with malformed lingual groove in lateral incisor for 6 years: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Kang, Jun

    2011-06-01

    To track the initiating and developing process of one case diagnosed as chronic periodontitis accompanied with malformed lingual groove in maxillary lateral incisor and report the long-term prognosis to the periodontal conservative and supportive therapy. The patient was diagnosed with mild chronic periodontitis 6 years ago and accepted routine periodontal scaling and root planning (SRP) plus supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) one time. Two years later the periodontal condition deteriorated by deep pockets in molars and severe bone destruction around the maxillary lateral incisor with malformed lingual groove. After SRP in sites which pocket depth more than 4mm plus root canal therapy and lingual groove plasty of maxillary right lateral incisor, the SPT regularly proceeded at 3rd, 6th and 12th month. At present the whole periodontal tissue was healthy, the bone lesion around maxillary lateral incisor recovered well, the tooth had no mobile, the cosmetic effect andtooth function was in good state, and the patient was very satisfied.

  17. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on C-reactive protein levels in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Farin Kiany; Karimi, Noozhan; Rasouli, Manoochehr; Roozbeh, Jamshid

    2013-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has been implicated as a possible mediator of the association between periodontitis and several systemic diseases. This study evaluated the impact of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on the serum levels of CRP in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients on hemodialysis. A total of 77 CKD patients on hemodialysis were included in this study. At baseline, periodontal examination was assessed for all the patients, and chronic periodontitis was defined through clinical attachment level and probing pocket depth, according to the American Association of Periodontology. Nonsurgical periodontal treatment was performed and serum levels of CRP were evaluated at baseline and 8 weeks after periodontal treatment. Periodontal treatment resulted in significant reductions in CRP levels (p periodontitis. Periodontitis is an important source of systemic inflammation in CKD patients. Nonsurgical periodontal treatment can effectively reduce the serum level of CRP in these patients.

  18. Google Pocket Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Calishain, Tara; Adams, DJ

    2003-01-01

    Beneath its deceptively simple search form, Google is a remarkably powerful and flexible search engine that indexes billions of web pages, handling more than 150 million searches a day. You know that what you're looking for must be in there somewhere, but how do you make Google work for you? Crafted from our best-selling Google Hacks title, the Google Pocket Guide provides exactly the information you need to make your searches faster and more effective, right from the start. The Google Pocket Guide unleashes the power behind that blinking cursor by delivering: A thorough but concise tour o

  19. HTML & XHTML Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    After years of using spacer GIFs, layers of nested tables, and other improvised solutions for building your web sites, getting used to the more stringent standards-compliant design can be intimidating. HTML and XHTML Pocket Reference is the perfect little book when you need answers immediately. Jennifer Niederst-Robbins, author Web Design in a Nutshell, has revised and updated the fourth edition of this pocket guide by taking the top 20% of vital reference information from her Nutshell book, augmenting it judiciously, cross-referencing everything, and organizing it according to the most com

  20. VBScript pocket reference

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Paul; Petrusha, Ron

    2008-01-01

    Microsoft's Visual Basic Scripting Edition (VBScript), a subset of Visual Basic for Applications, is a powerful language for Internet application development, where it can serve as a scripting language for server-side, client-side, and system scripting. Whether you're developing code for Active Server Pages, client-side scripts for Internet Explorer, code for Outlook forms, or scripts for Windows Script Host, VBScript Pocket Reference will be your constant companion. Don't let the pocket-friendly format fool you. Based on the bestsellingVBScript in a Nutshell, this small book details every V

  1. Newnes electrical pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Reeves, E A

    2013-01-01

    Newnes Electrical Pocket Book, Twenty-first Edition, provides engineers with convenient access to various facts, tables, and formulae relating to the particular branch of engineering being dealt with. In the case of electrical engineering, it is essential that the engineer have a clear understanding of the methods by which the various formulae are derived to ensure that any particular formulae is applicable to the conditions being considered. The first section of the Pocket Book is devoted to the theoretical groundwork upon which all the practical applications are based. This covers symbols,

  2. Management of periodontal destruction caused by overhanging dental restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misnova Misnova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal tissue inflammations are occasionally caused by positions of restoration margins, particularly if they are placed subgingivally. A 44-year old male was referred to the Dental and Mouth Hospital of Dentistry Faculty Hasanuddin University with the chief complaint of severe pain at right posterior maxillary. Clinical examinations demonstrate a 7-mm periodontal pocket at buccal aspect of 16 teeth with tooth mobility °2. Overhanging dental composite restorations of Class V were detected at the subgingival areas of 15, 16, and 17. Radiographic results show vertically and horizontally alveolar bone loss. This case report is aimed to describe the management of periodontal tissue destruction as a result of overhanging dental composite restorations. Scaling and root planing were conducted as the initial therapy. The periodontal surgery was performed a week after the initial therapy. A full-thickness flap design with sulcular incision from 14 to 18 was made before the pocket curretage and necrotic tissue debridement along with restoration recontouring. The flap was sutured with simple suture technique. Periodontal dressing was packed for a week. Antibiotics, analgetics and antiinflammatory drugs were prescribed per orally. There was no history of pain a week after the surgical procedure. Tooth mobility was decreased to °1 and the periodontal pocket was reduced to 3 mm. Overhanging dental restorations may lead to periodontal tissue destruction. The subgingivally placement of those restorations should consider the health of periodontal tissues.

  3. Pocket total dose meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1984-10-01

    Laboratory measurements have demonstrated that it is possible to simultaneously measure absorbed dose and dose equivalent using a single tissue equivalent proportional counter. Small, pocket sized instruments are being developed to determine dose equivalent as the worker is exposed to mixed field radiation. This paper describes the electronic circuitry and computer algorithms used to determine dose equivalent in these devices

  4. Data communications pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Tooley, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Data Communications Pocket Book, Second Edition presents information relevant to data communication. The book provides tabulated reference materials with a brief description and diagrams. The coverage of the text includes abbreviations, terminal control codes, and conversion tables. The text will be of great use to individuals involved in the interconnection of computer systems.

  5. C-reactive protein in patients with aggressive periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Mysak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the systemic levels of C-reactive protein (CRP in peripheral blood samples of patients with aggressive periodontitis during the first twelve months of periodontal treatment, at exactly six month interval measurements, and compare them with clinical periodontal parameters. Materials and methods: All patients (N = 45 were examined prior to the initiation of periodontal treatment. Patients were divided into two groups GAgP (Generalised form of aggressive periodontitis, N = 23 and group LAgP (Localised form of aggressive periodontitis, N = 22. Control group (CON included 60 individuals with healthy periodontium. The levels of CRP were determined in both groups GAgP and LAgP three times in 6 month intervals during the periodontal treatment. Results: CRP is a plasma protein that reflects the extent of the acute phase response to inflammation and is one of the markers of choice for monitoring this response. In our study, CRP levels decreased in course of periodontal treatment in both groups (GAgP and LAgP in a similar way as bleeding on probing (BOP and probing pocket depth (PPD indices. Conclusion: Our study results showed that CRP levels, as well as bleeding on probing (BOP and probing pocket depth (PPD, indices decreased in course of periodontal treatment in patients with generalised and localised aggressive periodontitis. Therefore this marker might be exploitable as a means to evaluate periodontal health in patients with aggressive periodontitis. Keywords: aggressive periodontitis, C-reactive protein, periodontal index, cardiovascular diseases

  6. Maternal Periodontitis, Preeclampsia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourandokht Afshari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Preeclampsia is a considerable problem of pregnancy. Endothelial dysfunction and placental hypoxia are the current hypothesis of preeclampsia. Chronic inflammation, including periodontitis may provoke systemic maternal and placental pro-inflammatory endothelial dysfunction, which represent a significant risk factor for diseases of vascular origin. So this study was carried out to evaluate the possible relationship between periodontitis and preeclampsia. Methods: A total of 360 pregnant women were included, corresponding to 180 pregnant women with mild or sever periodotitis in one group and 180 pregnant women with periodontal health in the other group. Periodontitis was determined by the sum of all pockets with pocket probing depth (PPD ≥4mm and bleeding on probing. periodontal health was defined as the absence of PPD≥ 4mm. Then two groups evaluated to determine the presence of preeclampsia. After delivery, Child weight at birth and gestational age was also evaluated. Chi square and t test analysis were used to analyze the data. Results: There was statistically significant difference between two groups in presence of preeclampsia (p=0.003. Women who had a worse periodontal condition were at higher risk for preeclampsia. In addition, birth weight and gestational age was statistically lower in the case group than the control group (p < 0.001. Conclusion: The results indicate that the presence and severity of peridontitis increase the risk for occurrence of preeclampsia and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  7. Orthodontic treatment in patients with aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cássio Volponi; Saraiva, Luciana; Bauer, Flávio Paim Falcão; Kimura, Rui Yoshio; Souto, Maria Luisa Silveira; Bernardo, Carlos Cheque; Pannuti, Cláudio Mendes; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre; Pustiglioni, Francisco Emílio

    2018-04-01

    Aggressive periodontitis (AP) is a condition that promotes breakdown of the periodontal tissues in a short time. In severe cases, pathologic migration of teeth and tooth loss can occur, producing esthetic and functional problems for the patient. Orthodontic treatment may be recommended to restore esthetics and masticatory function. We assessed the effects of orthodontic movement in the periodontal tissues of treated patients with AP. Ten subjects (ages 25.0 ± 5.22 years) with AP received periodontal treatment followed by orthodontic treatment. Maintenance sessions were performed monthly under a strict dental biofilm control. They were compared with 10 periodontally healthy subjects (ages 22.9 ± 5.23 years) who received orthodontic treatment. Probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing, and dental plaque index were measured at baseline, after orthodontic treatment, and after 4 months. Statistical analysis showed improvement in all clinical parameters between baseline and 4 months after orthodontic treatment: probing pocket depth (0.29 mm), clinical attachment level (0.38 mm), bleeding on probing (4.0%), and dental plaque index (11%). The periodontal parameters of the AP patients remained stable during orthodontic treatment under strict biofilm control. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Active matrix metalloproteinase-8 and periodontal bacteria depending on periodontal status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, A; Jäger, J; Krohn-Grimberghe, B; Patschan, S; Kottmann, T; Schmalz, G; Mausberg, R F; Haak, R; Ziebolz, D

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this clinical cross-sectional study was to determine the level of active matrix metalloproteinase-8 (aMMP-8) and periodontal pathogenic bacteria in gingival crevicular fluid in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with varying periodontal conditions. In total, 103 patients with RA and 104 healthy controls (HC) were included. The assessment of periodontal status included periodontal probing depth, bleeding on probing and clinical attachment loss. Periodontal disease was classified as healthy/mild, moderate or severe. For the determination of aMMP-8 levels using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and periodontal pathogenic bacteria using polymerase chain reaction, samples of gingival crevicular fluid were taken from the deepest gingival pockets. The statistical analyses used included a Mann-Whitney U-test, a chi-squared test or a Fisher's exact test, and the significance level was set at α = 5%. We found that 65% of patients with RA and 79% of HC had moderate to severe periodontal disease (p = 0.02). The prevalence of periodontal pathogens was almost equal (p > 0.05). Furthermore, depending on periodontal disease severity only minor differences in bacterial prevalence were detected. With increasing severity of periodontal disease, higher aMMP-8 levels were observed. Accordingly, a significant difference in patients with moderate periodontal disease (RA: 15.3 ± 13.8; HC: 9.1 ± 9.1; p ≤ 0.01) and severe periodontal disease (RA: 21.7 ± 13.3; HC: 13.1 ± 8.6; p = 0.07) was detected, with a greater tendency in the latter group. The increased aMMP-8 levels in the RA group indicate that the presence of RA appears to have an influence on the host response at a comparable level of bacterial load and periodontal disease severity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Repair of experimental plaque-induced periodontal disease in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoukry, M; Ben Ali, L; Abdel Naby, M; Soliman, A

    2007-09-01

    Forty mongrel dogs were used in this study for induction of periodontal disease by placing subgingival silk ligatures affecting maxillary and mandibular premolar teeth during a 12-month period. Experimental premolar teeth received monthly clinical, radiographic, and histometric/pathologic assessments. The results demonstrated significant increases in scores and values of periodontal disease parameters associated with variable degrees of alveolar bone loss. The experimental maxillary premolar teeth exhibited more severe and rapid rates of periodontal disease compared with mandibular premolar teeth. Histometric analysis showed significant reduction in free and attached gingiva of the experimental teeth. Histopathological examination of buccolingual sections from experimental premolar teeth showed the presence of rete pegs within the sulcular epithelium with acanthosis and erosive changes, widening of the periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone resorption. Various methods for periodontal repair were studied in 194 experimental premolar teeth exhibiting different degrees of periodontal disease. The treatment plan comprised non-surgical (teeth scaling, root planing, and oral hygiene) and surgical methods (closed gingival curettage, modified Widman flap, and reconstructive surgery using autogenous bone marrow graft and canine amniotic membrane). The initial non-surgical treatment resulted in a periodontal recovery rate of 37.6% and was found effective for treatment of early periodontal disease based on resolution of gingivitis and reduction of periodontal probing depths. Surgical treatment by closed gingival curettage to eliminate the diseased pocket lining resulted in a recovery rate of 48.8% and proved effective in substantially reducing deep periodontal pockets. Open root planing following flap elevation resulted in a recovery rate of 85.4% and was effective for deep and refractory periodontal pockets. Autogenous bone graft implantation combined with canine amniotic

  10. SQL Pocket Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Gennick, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    If you're a programmer or database administrator who uses SQL in your day-to-day work, this popular pocket guide is the ideal on-the-job reference. You'll find many examples that address the language's complexity, along with key aspects of SQL used in IBM DB2 Release 9.7, MySQL 5.1, Oracle Database 11g Release 2, PostgreSQL 9.0, and Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Release 2. SQL Pocket Guide describes how these database systems implement SQL syntax for querying, managing transactions, and making changes to data. It also shows how the systems use SQL functions, regular expression syntax, and type c

  11. Relationship between invasion of the periodontium by periodontal pathogens and periodontal disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Luzia; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Felino, António; Pinto, Miguel Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of the periodontal tissues has been suggested as a relevant step in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. However, its exact importance remains to be defined. The present systematic review assessed the scientific evidence concerning the relationship between the quality or quantity of periodontal microbiota in periodontal tissues and development of periodontal disease. The databases Medline-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, ISI Web of Knowledge and SCOPUS were searched, up to January 2014. Studies that reported evaluation of periodontal pathogens invasion on human tissues were selected. The screening of 440 title/abstracts elected 26 papers for full-text reading. Twenty three papers were subsequently excluded because of insufficient data or a study protocol not related to the objectives of this systematic review. All included studies were case-control studies that evaluated intracellular or adherent bacteria to epithelial cells from periodontal pockets versus healthy sulci. Study protocols presented heterogeneity regarding case and control definitions and methodological approaches for microbial identification. No consistent significant differences were found related to the presence/absence or proportion of specific periopathogens across the studies, as only one study found statistically significant differences regarding the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.043), T. forsythia (P periodontal pockets vs. healthy sulci. All studies reported a larger unspecific bacterial load in or on the epithelial cells taken from a diseased site compared to a healthy sulcus. The current available data is of low to moderate quality and inconsistent mainly due to study design, poor reporting and methodological diversity. As so, there is insufficient evidence to support or exclude the invasion by periodontal pathogens as a key step in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. Further research is needed.

  12. Relationship between invasion of the periodontium by periodontal pathogens and periodontal disease: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Luzia; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Felino, António; Pinto, Miguel Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of the periodontal tissues has been suggested as a relevant step in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. However, its exact importance remains to be defined. The present systematic review assessed the scientific evidence concerning the relationship between the quality or quantity of periodontal microbiota in periodontal tissues and development of periodontal disease. The databases Medline-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, ISI Web of Knowledge and SCOPUS were searched, up to January 2014. Studies that reported evaluation of periodontal pathogens invasion on human tissues were selected. The screening of 440 title/abstracts elected 26 papers for full-text reading. Twenty three papers were subsequently excluded because of insufficient data or a study protocol not related to the objectives of this systematic review. All included studies were case-control studies that evaluated intracellular or adherent bacteria to epithelial cells from periodontal pockets versus healthy sulci. Study protocols presented heterogeneity regarding case and control definitions and methodological approaches for microbial identification. No consistent significant differences were found related to the presence/absence or proportion of specific periopathogens across the studies, as only one study found statistically significant differences regarding the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.043), T. forsythia (P < 0.001), P. intermedia (P < 0.001), C. ochracea (P < 0.001) and C. rectus (P = 0.003) in epithelial cells from periodontal pockets vs. healthy sulci. All studies reported a larger unspecific bacterial load in or on the epithelial cells taken from a diseased site compared to a healthy sulcus. The current available data is of low to moderate quality and inconsistent mainly due to study design, poor reporting and methodological diversity. As so, there is insufficient evidence to support or exclude the invasion by periodontal pathogens as a key step in the

  13. Software engineer's pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Tooley, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Software Engineer's Pocket Book provides a concise discussion on various aspects of software engineering. The book is comprised of six chapters that tackle various areas of concerns in software engineering. Chapter 1 discusses software development, and Chapter 2 covers programming languages. Chapter 3 deals with operating systems. The book also tackles discrete mathematics and numerical computation. Data structures and algorithms are also explained. The text will be of great use to individuals involved in the specification, design, development, implementation, testing, maintenance, and qualit

  14. Are there differences between partial and total periodontal examination of the mouth?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata S Coelho

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnosis of periodontal disease for epidemiologic survey is difficult due to complexity of periodontal exam. The aim of this study was  to compare data from a full-mouth examination and a partial-mouth examination, observing the agreement between both methods of presenting the Community Periodontal Index (CPI. Methods and Findings: The population comprised of male and female subjects, aged 18 years and over, attending public health centers in the city of Recife, Brazil. A total of 505 patients participated in this study. Each participant completed a form and underwent periodontal examination. Firstly, for each tooth present one of the periodontal conditions was determined: periodontal health, gingival bleeding, dental calculus, shallow periodontal pockets and deep periodontal pockets, according to CPI. Finally, partial data (10 index teeth was recorded derived from the total version of CPI. Bivariate analysis of frequencies and means was performed. Mc Nemar test was used to calculate the level of statistical significance of the association tested. There are significant statistical differences between partial and full-mouth examination (p<0.001. According to gender, men classified as score 1 presented the same prevalence in both methods; partial recording overestimated 0.2% of women classified as score 1; percentile difference among men was higher for subjects classified as score 0. Among subjects with at least one tooth with deep periodontal pocket, percentile difference between different approaches was higher among elders (60 years and over. Conclusions: Considering the variable age, the smaller amount of lost information refers to periodontal pockets in individuals aged 18 to 30 years of age. In older individuals classified as periodontally healthy and with gingival bleeding no loss of information was observed. Partial examination of the mouth underestimated the presence of periodontal pockets and overestimated the presence of

  15. Qat Habit in Yemen Society: A Causative Factor for Oral Periodontal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aiman A.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of a common habit among Yemeni population on the periodontal status was investigated. This cross-sectional study was done on 2500 Yemenis with mean age 27.01 years (1818 males and 682 females). Among these 1528 were qat chewers and 972 were non-chewers. Detailed questionnaire and pre-designed scoring system for the periodontal status were employed for each case. Study results indicated that out of 972 non-chewers 116(12%) had periodontal pocketing and 18 (1.9%) cases had gingival recession. On the other hand, out of 1528 chewers, 468 (31.8%) had periodontal pockets and 98 (6.4%) with gum bleeding, p<0.05. These effects were found to increase with increased frequency and duration of chewing. It was concluded that habit of qat can cause damage to the periodontal ligament as pocketing and gum recession. PMID:17911664

  16. C-reactive protein as a marker of periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaparthy, Rosaiah; Kanaparthy, Aruna; Mahendra, Muktishree

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal subgingival pathogens affect local and systemic immune and inflammatory response and cause the release of cytokines; this results in periodontal destruction and initiation of an acute phase systemic inflammatory response characterized by the release of C-reactive proteins (CRP). This study set out to evaluate the serum concentration of CRP that can be used as a marker of periodontal disease as well as a risk indicator for cardiovascular disease. Based on their periodontal status, 45 patients were divided into three groups. The following clinical parameters were recorded: plaque index, gingival index, bleeding index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment levels. Scoring was done on six tooth surfaces for all teeth. For the CRP assessment, blood samples were collected from subjects at the time of clinical examination. The results indicated an increase in serum CRP levels in patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis as compared to controls.

  17. PAR-2 expression in the gingival crevicular fluid reflects chronic periodontitis severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Henrique; Alves, Vanessa Tubero Euzebio; Carvalho, Verônica Franco de; Ambrósio, Lucas Macedo Batitucci; Eichler, Rosangela Aparecida Dos Santos; Carvalho, Maria Helena Catelli de; Saraiva, Luciana; Holzhausen, Marinella

    2017-01-26

    Recent studies investigating protease-activated receptor type 2 (PAR-2) suggest an association between the receptor and periodontal inflammation. It is known that gingipain, a bacterial protease secreted by the important periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis can activate PAR-2. Previous studies by our group found that PAR-2 is overexpressed in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of patients with moderate chronic periodontitis (MP). The present study aimed at evaluating whether PAR-2 expression is associated with chronic periodontitis severity. GCF samples and clinical parameters, including plaque and bleeding on probing indices, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level, were collected from the control group (n = 19) at baseline, and from MP patients (n = 19) and severe chronic periodontitis (SP) (n = 19) patients before and 6 weeks after periodontal non-surgical treatment. PAR-2 and gingipain messenger RNA (mRNA) in the GCF of 4 periodontal sites per patient were evaluated by Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-qPCR). PAR-2 and gingipain expressions were greater in periodontitis patients than in control group patients. In addition, the SP group presented increased PAR-2 and gingipain mRNA levels, compared with the MP group. Furthermore, periodontal treatment significantly reduced (p periodontitis. In conclusion, PAR-2 is associated with chronic periodontitis severity and with gingipain levels in the periodontal pocket, thus suggesting that PAR-2 expression in the GCF reflects the severity of destruction during periodontal infection.

  18. Oxidative Stress Parameters in Saliva and Its Association with Periodontal Disease and Types of Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almerich-Silla, Jose Manuel; Montiel-Company, Jose María; Pastor, Sara; Serrano, Felipe; Puig-Silla, Miriam; Dasí, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    To determine the association between oxidative stress parameters with periodontal disease, bleeding, and the presence of different periodontal bacteria. A cross-sectional study in a sample of eighty-six patients, divided into three groups depending on their periodontal status. Thirty-three with chronic periodontitis, sixteen with gingivitis, and thirty-seven with periodontal healthy as control. Oxidative stress biomarkers (8-OHdG and MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and the activity of two antioxidant enzymes (GPx and SOD) were determined in saliva. Subgingival plaque samples were obtained from the deepest periodontal pocket and PCR was used to determine the presence of the 6 fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. Periodontal disease was found to be associated with increased oxidative stress parameter levels. These levels rose according to the number and type of different periodontal bacteria found in the periodontal pockets. The presence of different types of periodontal bacteria is predictive independent variables in linear regresion models of oxidative stress parameters as dependent variable, above all 8-OHdG. Oxidative stress parameter levels are correlated with the presence of different types of bacteria. Determination of these levels and periodontal bacteria could be a potent tool for controlling periodontal disease development.

  19. PAR-2 expression in the gingival crevicular fluid reflects chronic periodontitis severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique FUKUSHIMA

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent studies investigating protease-activated receptor type 2 (PAR-2 suggest an association between the receptor and periodontal inflammation. It is known that gingipain, a bacterial protease secreted by the important periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis can activate PAR-2. Previous studies by our group found that PAR-2 is overexpressed in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF of patients with moderate chronic periodontitis (MP. The present study aimed at evaluating whether PAR-2 expression is associated with chronic periodontitis severity. GCF samples and clinical parameters, including plaque and bleeding on probing indices, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level, were collected from the control group (n = 19 at baseline, and from MP patients (n = 19 and severe chronic periodontitis (SP (n = 19 patients before and 6 weeks after periodontal non-surgical treatment. PAR-2 and gingipain messenger RNA (mRNA in the GCF of 4 periodontal sites per patient were evaluated by Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-qPCR. PAR-2 and gingipain expressions were greater in periodontitis patients than in control group patients. In addition, the SP group presented increased PAR-2 and gingipain mRNA levels, compared with the MP group. Furthermore, periodontal treatment significantly reduced (p <0.05 PAR-2 expression in patients with periodontitis. In conclusion, PAR-2 is associated with chronic periodontitis severity and with gingipain levels in the periodontal pocket, thus suggesting that PAR-2 expression in the GCF reflects the severity of destruction during periodontal infection.

  20. Dental health behaviors and periodontal disease indicators in Danish youths. A 10-year epidemiological follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissau, I; Holst, D; Friis-Hasché, E

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyse the epidemiologic relationship between dental health behaviors and periodontal disease. Indicators of periodontal disease in terms of bleeding and calculus were measured dichotomously (absence/presence). Periodontal pockets were as follows: normal......, the calculus index and the pocket index. The participation rate in 1984-85 was 86%, and the study population involved 368 males and 388 females. Information concerning dental health behavior was obtained both in childhood (1974) when the individuals were 9-10 years of age, and in adulthood (1984-85) when...... pockets (0-3 mm), shallow pockets (4-5 mm), and deep pockets (6+ mm). The indicators were measured on 4 surfaces on 6 index teeth (16, 11, 26, 36, 31, 46) in 1984-85. The highest value for each tooth of bleeding (0/1), calculus (0/1) and pockets (0/1/2) was used for calculation of the bleeding index...

  1. Identification of subgingival periodontal pathogens and association with the severity of periodontitis in patients with chronic kidney diseases: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Fidan Bahtiar; Ismail, Gener; Dumitriu, Anca Silvia; Baston, Catalin; Berbecar, Vlad; Jurubita, Roxana; Andronesi, Andreea; Dumitriu, Horia Traian; Sinescu, Ioanel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the subgingival profile of 9 periodontal pathogens, by means of real-time PCR, in a group of predialysis chronic kidney disease patients with and without periodontal disease and to identify the risk factors associated with periodontal disease in these patients. This is a single centre cross-sectional cohort study performed on 70 CKD patients. Patients received a full-mouth periodontal examination and the following parameters were assessed: periodontal pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing, and plaque index; subgingival biofilm samples were collected from the deepest periodontal pocket of each quadrant and were pooled in one transporting unit. Clinical data were drawn from the medical file of the patients. T. denticola (P = 0.001), T. forsythia (P < 0.001), and P. micros (P = 0.003) are significantly associated with periodontal disease in CKD subjects but in a multivariate model only age and T. forsythia remain independent risk factors for periodontal disease in patients with CKD. In our cohort, age and T. forsythia are independently associated with periodontitis in CKD patients. Within the limits of this study, CKD was not significantly associated with a particular subgingival periodontal pathogens profile in periodontitis patients.

  2. Identification of Subgingival Periodontal Pathogens and Association with the Severity of Periodontitis in Patients with Chronic Kidney Diseases: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidan Bahtiar Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of our study was to assess the subgingival profile of 9 periodontal pathogens, by means of real-time PCR, in a group of predialysis chronic kidney disease patients with and without periodontal disease and to identify the risk factors associated with periodontal disease in these patients. Material and Methods. This is a single centre cross-sectional cohort study performed on 70 CKD patients. Patients received a full-mouth periodontal examination and the following parameters were assessed: periodontal pocket depth (PPD, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing, and plaque index; subgingival biofilm samples were collected from the deepest periodontal pocket of each quadrant and were pooled in one transporting unit. Clinical data were drawn from the medical file of the patients. Results. T. denticola (P=0.001, T. forsythia (P<0.001, and P. micros (P=0.003 are significantly associated with periodontal disease in CKD subjects but in a multivariate model only age and T. forsythia remain independent risk factors for periodontal disease in patients with CKD. Conclusions. In our cohort, age and T. forsythia are independently associated with periodontitis in CKD patients. Within the limits of this study, CKD was not significantly associated with a particular subgingival periodontal pathogens profile in periodontitis patients.

  3. Linux Desktop Pocket Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Brickner, David

    2005-01-01

    While Mac OS X garners all the praise from pundits, and Windows XP attracts all the viruses, Linux is quietly being installed on millions of desktops every year. For programmers and system administrators, business users, and educators, desktop Linux is a breath of fresh air and a needed alternative to other operating systems. The Linux Desktop Pocket Guide is your introduction to using Linux on five of the most popular distributions: Fedora, Gentoo, Mandriva, SUSE, and Ubuntu. Despite what you may have heard, using Linux is not all that hard. Firefox and Konqueror can handle all your web bro

  4. Python pocket reference

    CERN Document Server

    Lutz, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This is the book to reach for when you're coding on the fly and need an answer now. It's an easy-to-use reference to the core language, with descriptions of commonly used modules and toolkits, and a guide to recent changes, new features, and upgraded built-ins -- all updated to cover Python 3.X as well as version 2.6. You'll also quickly find exactly what you need with the handy index. Written by Mark Lutz -- widely recognized as the world's leading Python trainer -- Python Pocket Reference, Fourth Edition, is the perfect companion to O'Reilly's classic Python tutorials, also written by Mark

  5. STL pocket reference

    CERN Document Server

    Lischner, Ray

    2003-01-01

    The STL Pocket Reference describes the functions, classes, and templates in that part of the C++ standard library often referred to as the Standard Template Library (STL). The STL encompasses containers, iterators, algorithms, and function objects, which collectively represent one of the most important and widely used subsets of standard library functionality. The C++ standard library, even the subset known as the STL, is vast. It's next to impossible to work with the STL without some sort of reference at your side to remind you of template parameters, function invocations, return types--ind

  6. Regular Expression Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Stubblebine, Tony

    2007-01-01

    This handy little book offers programmers a complete overview of the syntax and semantics of regular expressions that are at the heart of every text-processing application. Ideal as a quick reference, Regular Expression Pocket Reference covers the regular expression APIs for Perl 5.8, Ruby (including some upcoming 1.9 features), Java, PHP, .NET and C#, Python, vi, JavaScript, and the PCRE regular expression libraries. This concise and easy-to-use reference puts a very powerful tool for manipulating text and data right at your fingertips. Composed of a mixture of symbols and text, regular exp

  7. XSLT 10 Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Evan

    2008-01-01

    XSLT is an essential tool for converting XML into other kinds of documents: HTML, PDF file, and many others. It's a critical technology for XML-based platforms such as Microsoft .NET, Sun Microsystems' Sun One, as well as for most web browsers and authoring tools. As useful as XSLT is, however, most people have a difficult time getting used to its peculiar characteristics. The ability to use advanced techniques depends on a clear and exact understanding of how XSLT templates work and interact. The XSLT 1.0 Pocket Reference from O'Reilly wants to make sure you achieve that level of understan

  8. Perl Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Vromans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    If you have a Perl programming question, you'll find the answer quickly in this handy, easy-to-use quick reference. The Perl Pocket Reference condenses and organizes stacks of documentation down to the most essential facts, so you can find what you need in a heartbeat. Updated for Perl 5.14, the 5th edition provides a summary of Perl syntax rules and a complete list of operators, built-in functions, and other features. It's the perfect companion to O'Reilly's authoritative and in-depth Perl programming books, including Learning Perl, Programming Perl, and the Perl Cookbook..

  9. CSS Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Eric

    2011-01-01

    When you're working with CSS and need a quick answer, CSS Pocket Reference delivers. This handy, concise book provides all of the essential information you need to implement CSS on the fly. Ideal for intermediate to advanced web designers and developers, the 4th edition is revised and updated for CSS3, the latest version of the Cascading Style Sheet specification. Along with a complete alphabetical reference to CSS3 selectors and properties, you'll also find a short introduction to the key concepts of CSS. Based on Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive Guide, this reference is an easy-to-us

  10. Electronics pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Parr, E A

    1981-01-01

    Electronics Pocket Book, Fourth Edition is a nonmathematical presentation of the many varied topics covered by electronics. The book tackles electron physics, electronic components (i.e. resistors, capacitors, and conductors), integrated circuits, and the principles of a.c. and d.c. amplifiers. The text also discusses oscillators, digital circuits, digital computers, and optoelectronics (i.e., sensors, emitters, and devices that utilize light). Communications (such as line and radio communications, transmitters, receivers, and digital techniques); the principles and examples of servosystems; a

  11. Newnes microprocessor pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Money, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Newnes Microprocessor Pocket Book explains the basic hardware operation of a microprocessor and describes the actions of the various types of instruction that can be executed. A summary of the characteristics of many of the popular microprocessors is presented. Apart from the popular 8- and 16-bit microprocessors, some details are also given of the popular single chip microcomputers and of the reduced instruction set computer (RISC) type processors such as the Transputer, Novix FORTH processor, and Acorn ARM processor.Comprised of 15 chapters, this book discusses the principles involved in bot

  12. NUnit Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, Bill

    2009-01-01

    The open source NUnit framework is an excellent way to test .NET code as it is written, saving hundreds of QA hours and headaches. Unfortunately, some of those hours saved can be wasted trying to master this popular but under-documented framework. Proof that good things come in small packages, the NUnit Pocket Reference is everything you need to get NUnit up and working for you. It's the only book you'll need on this popular and practical new open source framework.

  13. LINQ Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Albahari, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Ready to take advantage of LINQ with C# 3.0? This guide has the detail you need to grasp Microsoft's new querying technology, and concise explanations to help you learn it quickly. And once you begin to apply LINQ, the book serves as an on-the-job reference when you need immediate reminders. All the examples in the LINQ Pocket Reference are preloaded into LINQPad, the highly praised utility that lets you work with LINQ interactively. Created by the authors and free to download, LINQPad will not only help you learn LINQ, it will have you thinking in LINQ. This reference explains: LINQ's ke

  14. CSS Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Eric A

    2007-01-01

    They say that good things come in small packages, and it's certainly true for this edition of CSS Pocket Reference. Completely revised and updated to reflect the latest Cascading Style Sheet specifications in CSS 2.1, this indispensable little book covers the most essential information that web designers and developers need to implement CSS effectively across all browsers. Inside, you'll find: A short introduction to the key concepts of CSS A complete alphabetical reference to all CSS 2.1 selectors and properties A chart displaying detailed information about CSS support for every style ele

  15. JDBC Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Bales, Donald

    2003-01-01

    JDBC--the Java Database Connectivity specification--is a complex set of application programming interfaces (APIs) that developers need to understand if they want their Java applications to work with databases. JDBC is so complex that even the most experienced developers need to refresh their memories from time to time on specific methods and details. But, practically speaking, who wants to stop and thumb through a weighty tutorial volume each time a question arises? The answer is the JDBC Pocket Reference, a data-packed quick reference that is both a time-saver and a lifesaver. The JDBC P

  16. RTF Pocket Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Burke, Sean

    2008-01-01

    Rich Text Format, or RTF, is the internal markup language used by Microsoft Word and understood by dozens of other word processors. RTF is a universal file format that pervades practically every desktop. Because RTF is text, it's much easier to generate and process than binary .doc files. Any programmer working with word processing documents needs to learn enough RTF to get around, whether it's to format text for Word (or almost any other word processor), to make global changes to an existing document, or to convert Word files to (or from) another format. RTF Pocket Guide is a concise and e

  17. The complement system and its role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian; Holmstrup, Palle; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent inflammatory disease in tooth supporting tissues, induced by bacteria growing in a biofilm on tooth surfaces. Components of the complement system are present in the periodontal tissue and the system is activated in periodontitis. Continuous complement activation...... and modulation by bacteria within the biofilm in periodontal pockets, however, may enhance local tissue destruction, providing the biofilm with both essential nutrients and space to grow. A more profound understanding of the mechanisms involved in complement-derived tissue degradation may facilitate...... with an emphasis on interaction of complement with bacteria from periodontitis-associated biofilm....

  18. Alarm pocket dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, H; Kitamura, S [Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. Ltd., Kadoma, Osaka (Japan)

    1975-04-01

    This instrument is a highly reliable pocket dosimeter which has been developed for personal monitoring use. The dosimeter generates an alarm sound when the exposure dose reaches a preset value. Using a tiny GM tube for a radiation detector and measuring the integrated dose by means of a digital counting method, this new pocket dosimeter has high accuracy and stability. Using a sealed alkali storage battery for the power supply, and with an automatic control charger, this dosimetry system is easy and economical to operate and maintain. Detectable radiation by the dosimeter are X and ..gamma.. rays. Standard preset dose values are 30, 50, 80 and 100 mR. Detection accuracy is betwen +10% and -20%. The dosimeter is continuously usable for more than 14 hours after charging for 2 hours. The dosimeter has the following features; good realiability, shock-proof loud and clear alarm sound, the battery charger also serves as a stock container for the dosimeters, and no switching operation required for the power supply due to the internal automatic switch. Therefore, the dosimetry system is very useful for personal monitoring management in many radiation industry establishments.

  19. Intraoral fiber optic-based diagnostic for periodontal disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P W; Gutierrez, D M; Everett, M J; Brown, S B; Langry, K C; Colston, B W; Roe, J N

    2000-01-21

    The purpose of this initial study was to begin development of a new, objective diagnostic instrument that will allow simultaneous quantitation of multiple proteases within a single periodontal pocket using a chemical fiber optic sensor. This approach could potentially be adapted to use specific antibodies and chemiluminescence to detect and quantitate virtually any compound and compare concentrations of different compounds within the same periodontal pocket. The device could also be used to assay secretions in salivary ducts or from a variety of wounds. The applicability is, therefore, not solely limited to dentistry and the device would be important both for clinical diagnostics and as a research tool.

  20. Intraoral fiber-optic-based diagnostic for periodontal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Gutierrez, Dora M.; Everett, Matthew J.; Brown, Steve B.; Langry, Kevin C.; Cox, Weldon R.; Johnson, Paul W.; Roe, Jeffrey N.

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this initial study was to begin development of a new, objective diagnostic instrument that will allow simultaneous quantitation of multiple proteases within a single periodontal pocket using a chemical fiber optic senor. This approach could potentially be adapted to use specific antibodies and chemiluminescence to detect and quantitate virtually any compound and compare concentrations of different compounds within the same periodontal pocket. The device could also be used to assay secretions in salivary ducts or from a variety of wounds. The applicability is, therefore, not solely limited to dentistry and the device would be important both for clinical diagnostics and as a research too.

  1. Periodontal status in 18-year-old Lithuanian adolescents: An epidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglė Bendoraitienė

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The results of our study showed that the periodontal and oral hygiene status of 18-year-old Lithuanian population could be characterized as poor. In total, 77.1% of the study participants were found to have periodontal conditions such as gum bleeding, dental calculus, and shallow pockets. The anterior teeth of the mandible were most frequently affected.

  2. The effectiveness of mangosteen rind extract as additional therapy on chronic periodontitis (Clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Hendiani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT   Introduction: Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that attacks the periodontal tissue comprises the gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum and alveolar bone caused mainly by plaque bacteriophage or other specific dominant type of bacteria. The purpose of this study was to determine the therapeutic effect of clinical application of mangosteen peel extract gel as adjunctive therapy scaling and root planing in patients with chronic periodontitis. This research was expected to developed new treatment in the field of dentistry, particularly in periodontics, which can be used as supporting material for the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Methods: Quasi-experimental research, split mouth, with as many as 14 chronic periodontitis patients. Mangosteen rind was prepared to be formed into extract gel, dried at room temperature, then the dried samples were macerated by using ethanol, then evaporated and decanted for 3 days until obtained condensed extract. The samples were patients with chronic periodontitis in at least 2 teeth with pockets ≥ 5 mm. Clinical parameters of pocket depth, gingival bleeding, and clinical epithelial attachment level were measured at baseline and 1 month after treatment. Analysis of data using the t-test. Results: The comparison of average gap ratio of pockets depth, gingival index, gingival bleeding and epithelium attachment levels, before and after treatment showed significant differences, such as in the test and control sides. Conclusion: The mangosteen rind gel as adjunctive therapy for scaling and root planing is able to reduce pockets depth, gingival index, and gingival bleeding, and improve clinical epithelial attachment.

  3. The Effects of Mechanical Treatment on Microbiological Parameters in Periodontal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazăr Luminiţa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial plaque has the primary etiologic role in triggering the pathological changes of periodontal disease. A major goal of periodontal therapy is supraand subgingival bacterial flora reduction through scaling and root planning, through local and general antimicrobial treatment. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the mechanical treatment of scaling and root planning in reducing or suppressing bacterial species from the periodontal pockets. In order to conduct this study we collected and analyzed subgingival plaque samples taken from the 50 periodontal pockets with a depth of about 5mm, from 50 subjects with diagnosis of generalized chronic periodontitis, before and after scaling and root planning. The usage of API 20A test allows a quick and easy identification of anaerobic bacteria based on biochemical properties. Additional complementary tests were used, such as examining the culture and the morpho-tinctorial features to confirm and complete the identification. The microbial flora that we were able to isolate from the periodontal pockets before scaling and root planning was very rich. After scaling and root planning the subjects showed clinical improvement in the periodontal status, and the microbiological analysis of the periodontal pockets mostly showed a quantitative and qualitative reduction of bacterial species. A local or general antimicrobial treatment is recommended to assure improved effectiveness because mechanical treatment alone cannot completely suppress bacterial flora.

  4. Incidence of bacteremia after chewing, tooth brushing and scaling in individuals with periodontal inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, F.L.; Kilian, Mogens; Holmstrup, P.

    2006-01-01

    higher in periodontitis than in gingivitis patients and healthy control individuals. In periodontitis patients, the magnitude of bacteremia was associated with gingival index, plaque index and number of sites with bleeding on probing, but not with probing pocket depth measurements. Practical implications...

  5. Periodontal Status of Postmenopausal Women

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    Timur V. Melkumyan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare the periodontal status in postmenopausal women with osteopenia and osteoporosis. Material and Methods: We examined 43 postmenopausal women aged from 55 to 74 years. Material assessment of bones in every patient was performed by means of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA from two points on the skeleton – part of the femur neck and between the first and fourth lumbar vertebrae. A lipid blood test was done for patients of both groups. All patients were divided into two groups (the 1st with osteopenia, and the 2nd with osteoporosis. All patients were subjected to an oral clinical examination: the periodontal examination was composed of Plaque Index (PI, Pocket Score (PS, and Papillary Bleeding Index (PBI. X-ray analysis was performed for every patient. Results: The results of the clinical periodontal examination demonstrated that the mean PBI in patients in the 1st group had no significant differences from the PBI in patients in the 2nd group. PI value and PS findings in patients with general osteoporosis also had no statistical differences from the same parameters in patients with osteopenia. Conclusion: Under the circumstances of these patients’ characteristics and within the limits of the present study, we concluded that there is no significant difference in the periodontal status of postmenopausal women with systemic osteopenia and with osteoporosis.

  6. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Kapoor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP, can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy.

  7. A new methanogen “Methanobrevibacter massiliense” isolated in a case of severe periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Huynh, Hong T. T.; Pignoly, Marion; Drancourt, Michel; Aboudharam, Gérard

    2017-01-01

    Background A few methanogens have been previously recovered from periodontitis lesions, yet their repertoire may not be completed. We recovered a previously unreported methanogen species in this situation. Case presentation A 64-year-old Caucasian woman was diagnosed with chronic, severe generalized periodontitis. In the presence of negative controls, an 18-month culture of periodontal pockets in anaerobe Hungate tube yielded “Methanobrevibacter massiliense” and Pyramidobacter piscolens. Conc...

  8. Word Pocket Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Glenn, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Millions of people use Microsoft Word every day and, chances are, you're one of them. Like most Word users, you've attained a certain level of proficiency--enough to get by, with a few extra tricks and tips--but don't get the opportunity to probe much further into the real power of Word. And Word is so rich in features that regardless of your level of expertise, there's always more to master. If you've ever wanted a quick answer to a nagging question or had the thought that there must be a better way, then this second edition of Word Pocket Guide is just what you need. Updated for Word 2003

  9. Non-oral gram-negative facultative rods in chronic periodontitis microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Winkelhoff, Arie J; Rurenga, Patrick; Wekema-Mulder, Gepke J; Singadji, Zadrach M; Rams, Thomas E

    2016-05-01

    The subgingival prevalence of gram-negative facultative rods not usually inhabiting or indigenous to the oral cavity (non-oral GNFR), as well as selected periodontal bacterial pathogens, were evaluated by culture in untreated and treated chronic periodontitis patients. Subgingival biofilm specimens from 102 untreated and 101 recently treated adults with chronic periodontitis in the Netherlands were plated onto MacConkey III and Dentaid selective media with air-5% CO2 incubation for isolation of non-oral GNFR, and onto enriched Oxoid blood agar with anaerobic incubation for recovery of selected periodontal bacterial pathogens. Suspected non-oral GNFR clinical isolates were identified to a species level with the VITEK 2 automated system. A total of 87 (42.9%) out of 203 patients yielded subgingival non-oral GNFR. Patients recently treated with periodontal mechanical debridement therapy demonstrated a greater prevalence of non-oral GNFR (57.4% vs 28.4%, P chronic periodontitis patients yielded cultivable non-oral GNFR in periodontal pockets, particularly among those recently treated with periodontal mechanical debridement therapy. Since non-oral GNFR species may resist mechanical debridement from periodontal pockets, and are often not susceptible to many antibiotics frequently used in periodontal practice, their subgingival presence may complicate periodontal treatment in species-positive patients and increase risk of potentially dangerous GNFR infections developing at other body sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The relationship between depression and periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, S H; Park, S G

    2018-03-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate whether depression is associated with periodontal diseases in a representative sample of South Korean adults Methods: We used data from the sixth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES VI), conducted in 2014. We included in this study 4328 participants aged over 20 years (1768 males and 2560 females). Depression was assessed with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and history of physician-diagnosed depression. Periodontal diseases were assessed a gingival bleeding, calculus and periodontal pockets. The data were analyzed using the chi-square test and multiple logistic regression. People with any periodontal diseases tended to be old, male, married, low income, poor education, blue-collar occupation, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, overweight, smoking, not using dental floss or interdental brush in univariate analysis. Neither self-reported nor diagnosed depression was associated with the presence of any or severe periodontal disease in the total sample. In participants aged 20-29 years only, the presence of any periodontal disease was associated with self-reported depression (OR, 2.031; 95% CI, 1.011-4.078). In the same age group, the presence of severe periodontal disease was associated with both self-reported depression (OR, 6.532; 95% CI, 2.190-19.483) and diagnosed depression (OR, 7.729; 95% CI, 1.966-30.389). Self-reported depression was significantly associated with the presence of any or severe periodontal disease, and diagnosed depression was significantly associated with severe periodontal diseases only in participants aged 20-29 years. Copyright© 2018 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  11. Periodontal conditions in vegetarians: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staufenbiel, I; Weinspach, K; Förster, G; Geurtsen, W; Günay, H

    2013-08-01

    Investigations about possible correlations between vegetarian diet and periodontal conditions are rare and characterized by small case numbers. The aim of this clinical study was to investigate the influence of a vegetarian diet on periodontal parameters with an appropriate sample size. A total of 200 patients, 100 vegetarians and 100 non-vegetarians, were included in the study. All patients were examined including a full mouth assessment of the periodontal and dental conditions. In addition, a questionnaire was handed out to ask for patients' oral hygiene habits and level of education. For statistical analysis the Mann-Whitney Test (χ(2) for analysis of the questionnaire) was applied (level of significance: Pvegetarians versus 41.72 years non-vegetarians). Vegetarians had significantly lower probing pocket depths (P=0.039), bleeding on probing (P=0.001), periodontal screening index (P=0.012), a better hygiene index (Pvegetarians. Furthermore, vegetarians had a higher level of education (PVegetarians revealed better periodontal conditions (less inflammation signs, less periodontal damage and a better dental home care). However, it should be considered that vegetarians are not only avoiding meat in their nutrition but are also characterized by an overall healthier life style.

  12. Periodontal disease in pregnancy is a risk factor for preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Mamatha; Shetty, Prasanna Kumar; Ramesh, Amitha; Thomas, Biju; Prabhu, Sumathi; Rao, Aruna

    2010-05-01

    Many recent studies have evaluated the relation between periodontitis and pregnancy complications. This study aimed to examine the association between preeclampsia and periodontitis in Indian women. A total of 130 pregnant women were enrolled between 26-32 weeks of gestation. Oral health examinations were performed at recruitment and again within 48 hours of delivery to determine the presence and/or progression of periodontitis in all subjects. Pocket depth, clinical attachment loss (CAL), and gingival index were measured in all subjects. There was significant (p periodontitis both at recruitment and after delivery. Multiple logistic regression demonstrated that periodontitis both at enrolment (OR = 5.78, 95% CI 2.41-13.89) as well as within 48 hours of delivery (OR = 20.15, 95% CI 4.55-89.29), may be associated with an increased risk of preeclampsia.

  13. Periodontal disease burden and pathological changes in organs of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlica, Zlatko; Petelin, Milan; Juntes, Polona; Erzen, Damjan; Crossley, David A; Skaleric, Uros

    2008-06-01

    Bacterial plaque associated periodontal disease is the most common chronic infection in man and dogs. In man, there is an association between periodontal disease and myocardial infarction and stroke, while in dogs it has also been associated with changes in internal organs. Inflamed periodontal tissues present a 'periodontal disease burden' to the host and the extent of this inflammatory disease burden is likely to affect the degree of associated pathological change in distant organs. This hypothesis was investigated in dogs with naturally occurring periodontal disease. Post-mortem investigations including periodontal assessment, standard necropsy, and organ histology were performed on 44 mature toy and miniature Poodles (related, periodontitis predisposed breeds) that died naturally or were euthanized based on clinical disease. Animals with gross primary organ pathology were excluded. The periodontal disease burden was estimated from the total surface area of periodontal pocket epithelium using six measurements of probing depth for each tooth and the tooth circumferences. Ordinal logistic regression (OR) analysis established that for each square centimeter of periodontal disease burden there was a 1.4-times higher likelihood of greater changes being present in the left atrio-ventricular valves (OR = 1.43), plus 1.2 and 1.4 times higher likelihoodfor greater liver and kidney pathology (OR = 1.21; OR = 1.42), respectively The results show that there is a link between the estimated 'periodontal disease burden' resulting from plaque-bacteria associated periodontal disease and the level of internal pathology in this population, implying that periodontitis might contribute to the development of systemic pathology in dogs.

  14. Assessment of lipid profile in Saudi type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic periodontal patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Otaibi, Dalal H.; Babay, Nadir A.; Habib, Syed S.; Almas, K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to study the extent of periodontal disease in diabetic and non-diabetic periodontitis patients and to investigate the relationship of dyslipidemia and periodontal disease, in diabetic and non-diabetic periodontitis patients. This is a cross-sectional study at the Department of Preventive Dental Sciences College of Dentistry and Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, from February 2003 to June 2004. A total of 90 patients was recruited and divided into 3 equal groups of 30 subjects, with age and gender matched, and divided as follows: group 1 healthy group: periodontally and systemically healthy subjects, group 2 periodontitis group: chronic periodontitis patients with no systemic disease, group 3 diabetic group: chronic periodontitis patients with chronic type 2 diabetes mellitus. Plaque index, bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth PPD, and clinical attachment level CAL were measured at the time of initial examination. The glycated hemoglobin, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein LDL, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein were also measured. Periodontal parameters PPD and CAL were of significantly higher value in the diabetic patients, when compared to the periodontitis patients p<0.05. The total cholesterol, LDL, and triglyceride were also found to be significantly higher among the periodontitis patients than the healthy subjects p<0.05. This study indicated that type 2 diabetic patients had a higher risk to developed advanced periodontal disease hat the non-diabetic subjects. It also highlighted the association of dyslipidemia in periodontitis patients. (author)

  15. Assessment of lipid profile in Saudi type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic periodontal patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Otaibi, Dalal H; Babay, Nadir A [Dept. of Preventive Dental Services, Coll. of Dentistry, King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Habib, Syed S [Dept. of Physiology, Habib Coll. of Medicine, King Khalid Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Almas, K [Dept. of Periodontology, Univ. of Connecticut (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Objective was to study the extent of periodontal disease in diabetic and non-diabetic periodontitis patients and to investigate the relationship of dyslipidemia and periodontal disease, in diabetic and non-diabetic periodontitis patients. This is a cross-sectional study at the Department of Preventive Dental Sciences College of Dentistry and Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, from February 2003 to June 2004. A total of 90 patients was recruited and divided into 3 equal groups of 30 subjects, with age and gender matched, and divided as follows: group 1 healthy group: periodontally and systemically healthy subjects, group 2 periodontitis group: chronic periodontitis patients with no systemic disease, group 3 diabetic group: chronic periodontitis patients with chronic type 2 diabetes mellitus. Plaque index, bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth PPD, and clinical attachment level CAL were measured at the time of initial examination. The glycated hemoglobin, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein LDL, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein were also measured. Periodontal parameters PPD and CAL were of significantly higher value in the diabetic patients, when compared to the periodontitis patients p<0.05. The total cholesterol, LDL, and triglyceride were also found to be significantly higher among the periodontitis patients than the healthy subjects p<0.05. This study indicated that type 2 diabetic patients had a higher risk to developed advanced periodontal disease hat the non-diabetic subjects. It also highlighted the association of dyslipidemia in periodontitis patients. (author)

  16. Treatment of periodontal abcess with Class II furcation involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Rahmah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of periodontal abscess with furcation involvement has its own challenges in achieving the success of periodontal treatment. Teeth with periodontal abscesses often indicate the presence of furcation involvement. Most periodontal abscess occurs in approximately 92.5% molar. Furcation involvement on tooth abscesses had a greater challenge to the success of periodontal therapy. A male patient aged 36 years came to the clinic with active periodontal disease. On examination, the teeth are sensitive to percussion and 2o mobility. There is 13 mm deep pockets around the roots of teeth. On radiographic examination, appears severe bone destruction in the root area and furcation. Oral hygiene status was fair. Patients had a history of systemic disease type II diabetes mellitus. The periodontal abscess with furcation involvement with systemic disease type II diabetes mellitus can be treated with open flap and debridement so it can achieve a better prognosis. Systemic disease do not become a hindrance in periodontal treatment as long as the disease is controlled. Prognosis of teeth with abscess depend on the nature and extent of bone loss. Chronic periodontal abscess has a slow progressive bone destruction.

  17. Aggressive periodontitis treatment with diabetes mellitus : A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arni Irawaty Djais

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive periodontitis is a periodontal disease occurring in healthy adolescent which is characterized by rapid loss alveolar bone happened in more than one permanent tooth.This disease has been classified in two types: localized and generalized. Localized aggressive periodontitis is characteristized by bone loss around the first molar and incisal, while generalized aggressive periodontitis is characterized by bone widespread pattern of periodontal distraction. One of the clinical feature aggressive periodonitis is distolabial migration of the maxillary incisors with concomitant diastema  formation. Radiographic findings show alveolar bone loss extending from the distal surface of the second premolar to the mesial surface of the second molar. Diabetes mellitus (DM is one of the predisposition factors that cause infection. DM will increase quantity of bacteria in oral, which will cause destruction in periodontal tissue, and continue to cause tooth mobility. However, well controlled DM patients can decrease the infection. The purpose of this study is to to inform a case with aggressive periodontitis with diabetes mellitus. A male 36 old presented with chief complaint mobile teeth and esthetic problem teeth. Radiographic evidence of severe attachment loss and bone loss around almost all the teeth. Treatment consisted of consulted to internist to control blood glucose level, periodontal pocket treatment with scalling root planing, splinting, flap surgery and antibiotic administration. The patient’s periodontal condition was stablized post treatment. Controlling oral hygiene to preventive disease progression was scheduled every three months. Patient refered to ortodontist to get ortodontic treatment to get esthetic result.

  18. Subgingival temperature and microbiota in initial periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiden, M F; Tanner, A C; Macuch, P J; Murray, L; Kent, R L

    1998-10-01

    The association between subgingival temperature, other clinical characteristics, and the subgingival microbiota was examined in adult subjects with initial periodontitis and differing levels of gingival inflammation. 43 subjects were measured at 6 sites per tooth for pocket depth, attachment level, presence of plaque, gingival redness, bleeding on probing and subgingival temperature at 3-month intervals for 1 year. Subgingival plaque was sampled from 15 initial active periodontitis sites (10 subjects), 121 gingivitis, sites (20 subjects) and 202 healthy sites (13 subjects), and included the 5 hottest and 5 coldest sites in each subject. Plaque samples were analyzed for 13 subgingival species using whole-genomic DNA probes. The major influences on the subgingival microbiota were the clinical status of sites, pocket depth, and the presence of supragingival plaque. No significant association between species and site temperature was observed. Initial active sites were associated with Bacteroides forsythus and Campylobacter rectus, and had a higher mean subgingival temperature and deeper mean pocket depth than inactive sites. A weak association between pocket depth and site temperature was noted. The major influence on subgingival temperature of sites was the anterior to posterior anatomical temperature gradient in the mandible and maxilla.

  19. The Effects of Antimicrobial Peptide Nal-P-113 on Inhibiting Periodontal Pathogens and Improving Periodontal Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease consists of chronic gingival inflammation characterized by both degradation of the periodontal connective tissue and alveolar bone loss. Drug therapy is used as an auxiliary treatment method in severe chronic periodontitis, aggressive periodontitis, and periodontitis-associated systemic disease. Nal-P-113, a modified antimicrobial peptide, specifically replaces the histidine residues of P-113 with the bulky amino acid β-naphthylalanine, and our previous studies have verified that this novel peptide is not toxic to the human body within a certain concentration range. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Nal-P-113 on periodontal pathogens and periodontal status in clinical studies. In a split-mouth clinical trial, the pocket depth and bleeding index values tended to decrease in the experimental group compared with those in the control group. SEM results verified that Nal-P-113 restrained the maturation of plaque. Based on real-time polymerase chain reaction, the levels of Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus gordonii, Treponema denticola, and Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival plaque were decreased when the subjects were given Nal-P-113. Bacterial growth curve analysis and a biofilm susceptibility assay verified that Nal-P-113 at a concentration of 20 μg/mL restrained the growth of S. gordonii, F. nucleatum, and P. gingivalis and biofilm formation. Therefore, Nal-P-113 effectively reduces periodontal pathogens and ameliorates periodontal status.

  20. Comparison of Salivary TIMP-1 Levels in Periodontally Involved and Healthy Controls and the Response to Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Fenol

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the supporting structures of the dentition. Periodontal destruction is an outcome of the imbalance between matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs. We wanted to prove the hypothesis that salivary TIPM-1 level will vary in different people. A decrease in TIMP-1 level could make them more susceptible to periodontitis whereas a normal level could prevent increased tissue destruction thereby inhibiting the progression from gingivitis to periodontitis. This could probably pave the way for TIPM-1 to be a specific salivary biomarker and serve as a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool in periodontitis. Methods. Whole unstimulated saliva of 2 ml was collected from twenty-five periodontally healthy and twenty-seven systemically healthy subjects with periodontitis. Clinical parameters recorded at baseline and reevaluated after four weeks in subjects with periodontitis following nonsurgical periodontal therapy were gingival index (GI, oral hygiene index-Simplified (OHI-S, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level (CAL. Salivary TIMP-1 levels in both were analyzed using a commercially available ELISA kit.

  1. Effect of Periodontal Therapy on Crevicular Fluid Interleukin-18 Level in Periodontal Health and Disease in Central Maharashtra (India) Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajani, Monica J; Jadhao, Varsha A; Wankhade, Pooja S; Samson, Emmanuel; Acharya, Vishwas D; Tekale, Pawankumar D

    2017-11-01

    The incidence and progression of the periodontal disease depend on periodontal microflora and the multifaceted response of the host, and these interactions are mediated by cytokines and chemokines. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a proinflammatory cytokine of the IL-1 superfamily. The aim of the present study was the assessment of the periodontal therapy in IL-18 level in periodontal disease and health. Based on clinical attachment loss (CAL), probing pocket depth (PPD), gingival index (GI), and plaque index (PI) patients were divided into three groups: Group I with healthy patients, group II with chronic periodontitis, and group III with posttreatment patients having periodontitis. Mean PI, PPD, CAL, and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) volume were significantly higher in groups II and III compared with group I. However, there were no significant differences between GI in groups I, II, and III. The total amount of IL-18 in GCF was significantly higher in group II when compared with groups I and III (p periodontally involved patients, and reduced at baseline, 3 and 6 weeks after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. The IL-18 might be hypothetically beneficial in distinguishing health from disease and monitoring periodontal disease activity.

  2. Longitudinal supportive periodontal therapy for severe chronic periodontitis with furcation involvement: a 12-year follow-up report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya-Ito, Akiyo; Tomita, Sachiyo; Kinumatsu, Takashi; Fujimoto, Yoshihiro; Tsunoda, Masatake; Saito, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    We report a case involving a 12-year follow-up after treatment for chronic periodontitis with furcation involvement. A 54-year-old woman presented with the chief complaint of hypersensitivity. Clinical examination at the first visit revealed 15% of sites with a probing depth ≥4 mm and 35% of sites with bleeding on probing. Initial periodontal therapy was implemented based on a clinical diagnosis of severe chronic periodontitis. Surgical periodontal therapy was subsequently performed at selected sites. For #44, regenerative periodontal therapy using enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain(®)) was selected. For #16, which exhibited a 2- to 3-wall vertical bony defect and class III (mesio-distal) furcation involvement, bone graft was scheduled. Other sites with residual periodontal pockets were treated by open flap debridement. For #37, with a gutter-shaped root, odontoplasty was performed. After reevaluation, the patient was placed on supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). During 12 years of SPT, the periodontal condition remained uneventful in most of the teeth. However, bone resorption was observed in the distal aspect of #37, making the prognosis poor. This indicates the need to continuously monitor risk factors, including inflammation and traumatic occlusion, during SPT. Although some problems still remain, severe periodontitis with furcation involvement was successfully maintained longitudinally with an adequate level of patient compliance and careful SPT.

  3. Efficacy of pharmacotherapy in patients with mild periodontitis by liniment of cycloferon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaitseva Е.М.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study, to improve the quality of treatment of mild periodontitis based on clinical and microbiological studies on the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy by liniment of cycloferon. Research methods. Clinical study included 50 patients aged 20-50 years old with mild periodontitis in the acute stage. Liniment of cycloferon was applied on the gums two times a day in 10-12 hours for 14 days. Microbial picture of oral mucosal and periodontal pockets in patients with periodontitis were analyzed twice before the treatment and at 30-31-day of observation according to the detection of microorganisms by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results. The dynamics on the background of pharmacotherapy in patients with mild periodontitis with liniment of cycloferon showed a significant decrease in the frequency of identification of pathogenic flora, compared with conventional therapy of periodontitis, the disappearance of complaints and the main clinical manifestations of periodontitis. Conclusion. The accelerated recovery of patients with periodontitis decreasing frequency of relapses by pharmacotherapy using liniment of cycloferon accompanied by sanogenic effects for microbial associations of periodontal pockets and oral mucosa showed pathogenic focus and efficiency of the drug in periodontitis.

  4. Periodontal and endodontic infectious/inflammatory profile in primary periodontal lesions with secondary endodontic involvement after a calcium hydroxide-based intracanal medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Thais M; Prado, Maira; Herrera, Daniel R; Gomes, Brenda P F A

    2018-03-23

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a calcium hydroxide-based intracanal medication (ICM) on periodontal and endodontic infectious/inflammatory contents and on periodontal clinical parameters in teeth with primary periodontal lesion and secondary endodontic involvement. Ten patients with abnormal pulp test results and deep probing depth derived from primary periodontal disease with secondary endodontic involvement were included. Samples were collected from root canals (RC) and periodontal pockets (PP) in order to investigate the microbiological status, levels of endotoxin (LPS), cytokines, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), before and after ICM. PCR was used for microbiological assessment. The kinetic-chromogenic LAL assay was used for LPS quantification. Quantikine ELISA kits were used for measurement of IL-1 α, IL-1 β, TNF-α, PGE 2 , MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-8, MMP-9, and MMP-13 levels. The statistical analyses were made using the Friedman and Wilcoxon tests (p  0.05); however, the levels of the other MMPs and cytokines were reduced (p < 0.05). After 1 year of the root canal treatment, tooth mobility was significantly reduced (p ≤ 0.05). The use of a calcium hydroxide-based ICM showed positive effects for periodontal treatment prognosis, as it reduced LPS, cytokine, and MMP levels in periodontal pockets. Patients presenting deep probing depth and undergoing periodontal treatment for at least 6 months, with no positive response to periodontal therapy, might benefit with the endodontic treatment.

  5. [The relevance of Candida spp. in chronic periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razina, I N; Chesnokova, M G; Nedoseko, V B

    The aim of the study was to assess the correlation of Candida spp. incidence in periodontal tissues with various clinical manifestations of chronic periodontal disease (CPD). Ninety patients with CPD were included in the study in which Candida spp. was evaluated in periodontal pockets content and gingival biopsy material. In severe CPD more Candida spp. were seen in gingival biopsy than in periodontal pockets (p=0.0006). Candida spp. incidence and quantity correlated directly with the disease grade showing incidence increase from 40 to 73.3% and quantity increase from 0.8±0.18 до 3.6±0.49 lg CFU/ml in light and severe CPD, correspondingly Candida spp. had statistically significant association with cyanotic gingival color (p=0.0018), tongue plaque and swelling (р=0.0042), lip exfoliation (р=0.0030), periodontal pockets depth >5 mm (р=0.0030), oral mucosa hyperemia (р=0.0157), alveolar bone destruction >1/2 of root length (р=0.0157). These data prove the relevance of Candida spp. and mycological assessment of gingival biopsy in CPD patients.

  6. Pocket Guide to Transportation 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) of the Research and Innovative Technology Administration produces the Pocket Guide to Transportation as a compact resource that provides snapshots of the U.S. transportation system and highlights major tr...

  7. Pocket Guide to Transportation 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The 2018 BTS Pocket Guide to Transportation is a quick reference guide that provides transportation statistics at your fingertips. It provides key information and highlights major trends on the U.S. transportation system. This year features a new and...

  8. Periodontal disease in research beagle dogs--an epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortegaard, H E; Eriksen, T; Baelum, V

    2008-12-01

    To estimate the prevalence and describe the extent and severity of periodontal disease and associated periodontal parameters in beagle dogs. A full-mouth, site-specific examination was performed in 98 beagle dogs. Focus was placed on clinical attachment loss, pocket depth and bleeding on probing. The prevalence of clinical attachment loss greater than equal to 1 mm was 20 per cent in the one-year-old dogs, increasing to 84 per cent of the dogs aged more than three years. The number of sites affected with clinical attachment loss greater than equal to 1 mm showed a skewed distribution. The prevalence of clinical attachment loss greater than equal to 4 mm was only seven per cent. A probing pocket depth of 4+ mm was observed in 44 to 81 per cent of the dogs, depending on age. Also, the distribution of the number of deepened pockets/dog was skewed. The teeth most prone to clinical attachment loss greater than equal to 1 mm were the P2, the P3 and the P4 of the maxilla. The teeth most prone to pocket depth greater than equal to 4 mm were the maxillary canines. Periodontal disease in terms of clinical attachment loss greater than equal to 1 mm and pocket depth greater than equal to 4 mm is common in beagle dogs, but the major disease burden is carried by only a few dogs. The prevalence increases with increased age but is high already at the age of two years.

  9. Incidence of bacteremia after chewing, tooth brushing and scaling in individuals with periodontal inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forner, Lone; Larsen, Tove; Kilian, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    SCIENTIFIC RATIONALE FOR STUDY: Bacteremia occurs with various frequency after oral procedures. Periodontal disease may affect the incidence, magnitude, duration and bacterial spectrum of bacteremia. PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: The incidence and magnitude of bacteremia after scaling was significantly......: The prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases appear to be crucial for the prevention of bacteremia associated with oral procedures....... higher in periodontitis than in gingivitis patients and healthy control individuals. In periodontitis patients, the magnitude of bacteremia was associated with gingival index, plaque index and number of sites with bleeding on probing, but not with probing pocket depth measurements. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS...

  10. Periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovski, S

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is the regeneration of the tissues destroyed as a result of periodontal disease. Currently, two clinical techniques, based on the principles of "guided tissue regeneration" (GTR) or utilization of the biologically active agent "enamel matrix derivative" (EMD), can be used for the regeneration of intrabony and Class II mandibular furcation periodontal defects. In cases where additional support and space-making requirements are necessary, both of these procedures can be combined with a bone replacement graft. There is no evidence that the combined use of GTR and EMD results in superior clinical results compared to the use of each material in isolation. Great variability in clinical outcomes has been reported in relation to the use of both EMD and GTR, and these procedures can be generally considered to be unpredictable. Careful case selection and treatment planning, including consideration of patient, tooth, site and surgical factors, is required in order to optimize the outcomes of treatment. There are limited data available for the clinical effectiveness of other biologically active molecules, such as growth factors and platelet concentrates, and although promising results have been reported, further clinical trials are required in order to confirm their effectiveness. Current active areas of research are centred on tissue engineering and gene therapy strategies which may result in more predictable regenerative outcomes in the future.

  11. Periodontal Disease Part IV: Periodontal Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Turnbull, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    In Part IV of this article, the author describes two periodontal infections, acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (trench mouth) and periodontal abscess, both acute painful conditions for which patients may seek advice from their family physician rather than their dentist.

  12. Role of salivary matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) in chronic periodontitis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Namita; Gupta, N D; Gupta, Akash; Khan, Saif; Bansal, Neha

    2015-03-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the periodontium. Any imbalance between the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) secreted by neutrophils and tissue inhibitors initiates the destruction of collagen in gum tissue, leading to chronic periodontitis. This study aimed to correlate salivary levels of MMP-8 and periodontal parameters of chronic periodontitis to establish MMP-8 as a noninvasive marker for the early diagnosis of chronic periodontitis. The study involved 40 subjects visiting the periodontic OPD of Dr. Ziauddin Ahmad Dental College and Hospital, located in Aligarh, U.P., India, from 2011 to 2012. The subjects were divided into two groups: group I consisted of 20 periodontally healthy subjects (controls) while group II consisted of 20 patients with chronic periodontitis. Chronic periodontitis was assessed on the basis of several periodontal parameters, including pocket probing depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL), gingival index (GI), and plaque index (PI). Around 3ml of unstimulated and whole expectorated saliva was collected for MMP-8 estimation by ELISA using Quantikine human total MMP-8 immunoassay kits. Data were analyzed using STATISTICA (Windows version 6) software. Salivary MMP-8 levels of groups I and II were 190.91 ± 143.89 ng/ml and 348.26 ± 202.1 ng/ml, respectively. The MMP-8 levels and periodontal status (PPD, CAL, GI, and PI) of groups I and II showed positive and significant correlations (for PPD, r = 0.63, P chronic periodontitis.

  13. The periodontal abscess (I). Clinical and microbiological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, D; Roldán, S; González, I; Sanz, M

    2000-06-01

    Little information is available regarding the diagnosis and microbiology of periodontal abscesses. The aim of this descriptive clinical and microbiological study was to provide more information in order to help in the characterisation of the periodontal abscess associated to periodontitis. 29 consecutive patients with a periodontal abscess were studied by the assessment of clinical variables, including both subjective (pain, edema, redness and swelling) and objective (bleeding on probing, suppuration, probing pocket depth, tooth mobility and cervical lymphadenopathy) parameters. Microbiological samples were taken for anaerobic microbiology and processed by means of culture. Systemic involvement was also studied through the analysis of blood and urine samples using conventional laboratory standards. 62% of the abscesses affected untreated periodontitis patients, and 69% were associated with a molar tooth. More than 75% of the abscesses had moderate-severe scores related to edema, redness and swelling, and 90% of the patients reported pain. Bleeding occurred in all abscesses, while suppuration on sampling was detected in 66%. Mean associated pocket depth was 7.28 mm, and 79% of teeth presented some degree of mobility. Cervical lymphadenopathy was seen in 10% of patients, while elevated leucocyte counts were observed in 31.6%. The absolute number of neutrophils was elevated in 42% of the patients. High prevalences of putative periodontal pathogens were found, including Fusobacterium nucleatum, Peptostreptococcus micros, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Bacteroides forsythus. The periodontal abscess has clear clinical characteristics and is usually associated with severe periodontal destruction. This condition may cause systemic involvement and the lesion generally has a large bacterial mass with a high prevalence of well-recognised periodontal pathogens.

  14. Periodontal parameters following orthodontic treatment in patients with aggressive periodontitis: A before-after clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorsand, Afshin; Paknejad, Mojgan; Yaghobee, Siamak; Ghahroudi, Amir Alireza Rasouli; Bashizadefakhar, Hourieh; Khatami, Masoomeh; Shirazi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Background: The success of combined periodontal and orthodontic approach in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis patients with the pathologic extruded anterior teeth is a main concern and stability of the treatment results is an important factor to evaluate the treatment. The present study investigated the periodontal parameters at the end of the orthodontic treatment in patients with the aggressive periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Eight patients with an aggressive periodontal disease, extruded maxillary incisors, infrabony defects and probing depth of ≥5 mm were enrolled in this clinical trial (before, after). After periodontal therapy, orthodontic treatment was carried out for intrusion and alignment of teeth. Plaque index (PI), probing pocket depth (PPD), distance between incisal edge and interdental papilla, root length (RL), and defect dimensions (depth and width) were examined at the end of treatment and three as well as 6 months afterward. The data were subjected to repeated measure ANOVA test. P orthodontic approach would be a successful treatment with acceptable stability in the case of regular follow-up visits and controlled oral hygiene habits. PMID:24379862

  15. Orthodontic management of a periodontally compromised dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant K Zaveri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Malocclusion superimposed with severe periodontitis may present a great challenge to clinicians while providing orthodontic treatment due the episodic and site-specific nature of the disease with risk of rapid tissue breakdown. However, orthodontic treatment in such situation may contribute significantly to the overall rehabilitation both functionally and esthetically. In this article, a case report outlines a combined periodontic-orthodontic management of compromised dentition. A 37-year-old female patient with significant medical history was treated for Class II Division 1 type of malocclusion associated with spaced upper and lower anterior teeth, deep overbite, and increased overjet, superimposed with chronic generalized periodontitis and bone loss. Treatment was completed using temporary anchorage devices assisted strategically applied force and modified tandem retraction biomechanics amidst management of acute inflammatory episodes during and mucogingival complication after treatment. Affected areas healed very well after post-orthodontic periodontal treatment with minimal pocket depth, and bleeding on probing, and a healthy zone of attached gingiva at the follow up visits. The orthodontic results lead to improvement in patient's facial profile, lip posture, and correction of protrusion which addressed her main concern. One year follow-up shows good orthodontic and periodontic stability. The report highlights the importance of identifying “at risk” individuals and continuous monitoring of disease status during treatment. Despite all precautionary measures, a flare-up during the treatment can be anticipated.

  16. Effectiveness of a diode laser in addition to non-surgical periodontal therapy: study of intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispino, Antonio; Figliuzzi, Michele Mario; Iovane, Claudio; Del Giudice, Teresa; Lomanno, Simona; Pacifico, Delfina; Fortunato, Leonzio; Del Giudice, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis affects 47% of adult population over the age of 30. The first phase of periodontal treatment is always represented by scaling and root planning (SRP), that is a causal, non-surgical therapy that recognizes as primary aims the control of bacterial infection and the reduction of periodontal plaque-associated inflammation. Yet, another innovative causal therapy is represented by the irradiation of periodontal pockets with laser. To evaluate the effect of a 940-nm diode laser as an adjunct to SRP in patients affected by periodontitis. Sixty-eight adult patients with moderate-to-severe periodontitis were sequentially enrolled and undergone to periodontal examination (V1) in order to detect gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI) and probing depth (PD). The patients were randomly divided into two groups: the first (n=34) received SRP treatment alone, the control group (n=34) received SRP and 940-nm diode laser therapy. Data were analyzed by Student's t-test, with two tails; for all clinical parameters, both groups reported statistically significant differences compared to basal values (pdiode laser was associated with more evident results. Considered the better clinical outcomes, diode laser can be routinely associated with SRP in the treatment of periodontal pockets of patients with moderate-to-severe periodontitis.

  17. The Effect of Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy on HNP1-3 Level in Gingival Crevicular Fluid of Chronic Periodontitis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolińska, Ewa; Skurska, Anna; Pietruska, Małgorzata; Dymicka-Piekarska, Violetta; Milewski, Robert; Pietruski, Jan; Sculean, Anton

    2017-08-01

    The rich bacterial flora of oral cavity is controlled by innate immune response, including antibacterial peptides and among them human neutrophil peptides 1-3 (HNP1-3). The knowledge of the involvement of HNPs in innate and acquired immunity of the periodontium is fragmentary. The aim of the study was to assess alterations in HNP1-3 levels in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of chronic periodontitis patients before and after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Nineteen patients with chronic periodontitis were qualified to the study. After periodontal examination, one site with pocket depth (PD) ≥4 mm was selected. All the patients received periodontal treatment involving scaling and root planing with additional systemic antibiotic therapy (Amoxicillin 375 mg three times daily and Metronidazole 250 mg three times daily for 7 days). Prior to therapy, 3 and 6 months after it, clinical periodontal parameters were measured and GCF was collected from previously chosen site. The level of HNP1-3 in GCF was determined by means of a commercially available enzyme-linked immunoassay kit. The periodontal therapy caused a statistically significant (p periodontal therapy with additional systemic administration of Amoxicillin and Metronidazole increases the level of HNP1-3 in GCF.

  18. Periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Mohanlal Bhandari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report demonstrates an orthodontic method that offers short treatment time and the ability to simultaneously reshape and increase the buccolingual thickness of the supporting alveolar bone. A 23-year-old female with Angle′s Class I moderately to severely crowded malocclusion with periodontal pocket with 31 and reduced thickness of the buccal cortical plate of lower anteriors, requested shortened orthodontic treatment time. This surgery technique included buccal full-thickness flaps, selective partial decortication of the cortical plates, concomitant bone grafting/augmentation, and primary flap closure. Following the surgery, orthodontic adjustments were made approximately every 2 weeks. From bracketing to debracketing, the case was completed in approximately 7 months and 3 weeks. Posttreatment evaluation of patient revealed good results. Preexisting thin labial bony cortical plate with lower anteriors was covered. This finding suggests credence to the incorporation of the bone augmentation procedure into the corticotomy surgery because this made it possible to complete the orthodontic treatment with a more intact periodontium. The rapid expansive tooth movements with no significant apical root resorption may be attributed to the osteoclastic or catabolic phase of the regional acceleratory phenomenon.

  19. The Relationship Between Periodontal Disease and Neoplasms of the Oral Cavity: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourelahi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Context Oral cavity is one of the most common sites for neoplasms with a multifactorial etiology. Tobacco and alcohol are the main risk factors. Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease affecting periodontal tissues such as gingiva, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Periodontal disease is linked to many systemic diseases. Recently a link between periodontal disease and cancer is suggested. The current review article aimed to evaluate the association between periodontal disease and risk of cancer in the oral cavity and some related factors. Evidence Acquisition Evidence suggests that oral cavity cancer is significantly more prevalent in patients with periodontal disease, poor oral hygiene or more missing teeth. Clinically, gingival squamous cell carcinoma (GSCC usually appears as an exophytic mass with a granular, papillary or verrucous surface or presents as an ulcerative lesion. Some reported cases of GSCC mimicking periodontal disease include gingival enlargement with no bone invasion, dentoalveolar abscess, erosive erythematosus lesion with keratotic papules, root exposure and tooth mobility, verrucous leukoplakia, verruciform xanthoma and development of hyperplastic granulation tissue after tooth extraction. Greater burden of oral flora that produce carcinogenic metabolites, human papilloma virus (HPV and other viruses that are residents of periodontal pocket, increased amount of inflammatory mediators and markers and some periodontal pathogens affecting cell cycle leading to mutation and dysplasia are considered as the rational for the relationship between malignant lesions of oral cavity and periodontal disease. Results Cancer of the oral cavity and periodontal disease are related from different aspects. Periodontal disease and tooth loss are considered as independent risk factors for cancer. Gingival squamous cell carcinoma can also mimic periodontal disease leading to misdiagnosis and delayed commencement of appropriate

  20. Pregnancy and periodontal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sağlam, Ebru; Saruhan, Nesrin; Çanakçı, Cenk Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Some maternal immunological changes due to pregnancy increases susceptibility to infections. Periodontal disease, the main cause is plaque, is a common disease which is seen multifactorial and varying severity. There are many clinical criteria for diagnosis of periodontal disease. Correlation between pregnancy and periodontal inflammation is known for many years. Periodontal disease affects pregnant’s systemic condition and also has negative effects on fetus. Periodontal disease increases the...

  1. Quantitative PCR analysis of salivary pathogen burden in periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Aino; Kopra, K. A. Elisa; Hyvärinen, Kati; Paju, Susanna; Mäntylä, Päivi; Buhlin, Kåre; Nieminen, Markku S.; Sinisalo, Juha; Pussinen, Pirkko J.

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the value of salivary concentrations of four major periodontal pathogens and their combination in diagnostics of periodontitis. The Parogene study included 462 dentate subjects (mean age 62.9 ± 9.2 years) with coronary artery disease (CAD) diagnosis who underwent an extensive clinical and radiographic oral examination. Salivary levels of four major periodontal bacteria were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Median salivary concentrations of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia, as well as the sum of the concentrations of the four bacteria, were higher in subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis compared to subjects with no to mild periodontitis. Median salivary Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans concentrations did not differ significantly between the subjects with no to mild periodontitis and subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis. In logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, diabetes, and the number of teeth and implants, high salivary concentrations of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, and P. intermedia were significantly associated with moderate to severe periodontitis. When looking at different clinical and radiographic parameters of periodontitis, high concentrations of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were significantly associated with the number of 4–5 mm periodontal pockets, ≥6 mm pockets, and alveolar bone loss (ABL). High level of T. forsythia was associated also with bleeding on probing (BOP). The combination of the four bacteria, i.e., the bacterial burden index, was associated with moderate to severe periodontitis with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.40 (95% CI 1.39–4.13). When A. actinomycetemcomitans was excluded from the combination of the bacteria, the OR was improved to 2.61 (95% CI 1.51–4.52). The highest OR 3.59 (95% CI 1.94–6.63) was achieved when P. intermedia was further excluded from the combination and only the levels of P. gingivalis and

  2. Enrichment of Multilocus Sequence Typing Clade 1 with Oral Candida albicans Isolates in Patients with Untreated Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Brenda A.; Maguire, Rory; Cashin, Phillipa J.; Claffey, Noel; Flint, Stephen; Abdulrahim, Mohammed H.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence and cell density of Candida species in periodontal pockets, healthy subgingival sites, and oral rinse samples of patients with untreated periodontitis. Twenty-one periodontitis patients underwent sampling at two periodontitis sites, and 19/21 of these patients underwent sampling at one periodontally healthy site. Both paper point and curette sampling techniques were employed. The periodontitis patients and 50 healthy subjects were also sampled by oral rinse. Candida isolates were recovered on CHROMagar Candida medium, and representative isolates were identified. Candida spp. were recovered from 10/21 (46.7%) periodontitis patients and from 16/50 (32%) healthy subjects. C. albicans predominated in both groups and was recovered from all Candida-positive subjects. Candida-positive periodontitis patients yielded Candida from periodontal pockets with average densities of 3,528 and 3,910 CFU/sample from curette and paper point samples, respectively, and 1,536 CFU/ml from oral rinse samples. The majority (18/19) of the healthy sites sampled from periodontitis patients were Candida negative. The 16 Candida-positive healthy subjects yielded an average of 279 CFU/ml from oral rinse samples. C. albicans isolates were investigated by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to determine if specific clonal groups were associated with periodontitis. MLST analysis of 31 C. albicans isolates from periodontitis patients yielded 19 sequence types (STs), 13 of which were novel. Eleven STs belonged to MLST clade 1. In contrast, 16 C. albicans isolates from separate healthy subjects belonged to 16 STs, with 4 isolates belonging to clade 1. The distributions of STs between both groups were significantly different (P = 0.04) and indicated an enrichment of C. albicans isolates in periodontal pockets, which warrants a larger study. PMID:22875886

  3. Reasons not to ''pocket shoot''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarroll, K.A.; Fisher, D.R.; Cawthon, L.A.; Donovan, K.R.; Roszler, M.H.; Kling, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors' large population of intravenous drug abusers (IVDA) has increasingly resorted to supraclavicular central venous injection for vascular access. Few reports of complications associated with the practice of supraclavicular ''pocket'' injection have appeared in the radiologic literature. This exhibit demonstrates the complications associated with this practice, including pneumothorax, mycotic aneurysm, arteriovenous fistual, jugular vein thrombosis, cellulitis, foreign body and neck abscess. In addition, they show examples of sternoclavicular osteomyelities. The anatomy of the ''pocket'' and the pathophysiology and radiographic manifestations of these complications are reviewed

  4. Combination therapy in chronic periodontitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Taherpour

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of periodontal treatment is to provide healthy and functional dentition for the whole life.Cases Report: A 42 year old female with sever chronic periodontitis, treated medically and surgically, is reported. She initially received antibiotic, Scaling and root planning in addition to oral hygiene instruction. After four weeks, periodontal Surgery, root canal Therapy, extraction of excess tooth and restoration of some teeth were performed, because of remaining residual pockets, and bone loss, flap Surgery and Access flap, with papilla preservation flap method, also modified Widmann flap, were done. After one month, favorable clinical improvement was obtained.Conclusion: It can be concluded that high oral hygiene level in accompanied with Suitable medical and surgical treatment, enhanced the success of periodontal treatment outcomes even in sever disease. 

  5. Bacterial analysis of combined periodontal-endodontic lesions by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Minghui; Qi, Qingguo

    2013-01-01

    We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to compare bacterial profiles in periodontium and root canals of teeth with combined periodontal-endodontic lesions. Samples of dental plaque and necrotic pulp were collected from thirteen extracted teeth with advanced periodontitis. Genomic DNA was extracted for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis using universal bacterial primers. The PCR products were then loaded onto DGGE gels to obtain fractionated bands. Characteristic DGGE bands were excised and DNA was cloned and sequenced. The number of bands, which indicates the number of bacterial species, was compared between dental plaques and necrotic pulp tissues from the same tooth. Although the difference was statistically significant (P bacteria species were present in both the periodontal pockets and root canals of the same tooth; however, periodontal bacteria did not always invade the root canals, and some bacteria in root canals were not present in periodontal pockets of the same tooth. In some teeth, unique bacteria in root canals had not passed from periodontal pockets. A basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) sequence search in Genbank indicated that new bacteria species were present in periodontal pockets and root canals. Their characteristics must thus be further analyzed.

  6. Periodontal treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, S; Figueredo, C M; Lemos, C; Bregman, R; Fischer, R G

    2017-04-01

    This pilot cohort study evaluated the effect of periodontal treatment on renal function, metabolic markers and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) in patients with pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) presenting chronic periodontitis. Twenty-six patients with CKD and severe chronic periodontitis were selected. Periodontal parameters included plaque index, bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), triglycerides, total cholesterol, albumin and ADMA levels were evaluated at baseline, 90 and 180 d after periodontal therapy. eGFR was evaluated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. All periodontal clinical parameters significantly improved (p periodontal therapy. There was a significant improvement on the median values (25%; 75% percentiles) of eGFR from 34.6 (27; 44.7) mL/min/1.73 m 2 on baseline to 37.6 (29.7; 57) mL/min/1.73 m 2 on day 90, and to 37.6 (28.6; 56) mL/min/1.73 m 2 (p periodontal treatment. No significant differences were observed at the median values of metabolic markers comparing baseline and 180 d after periodontal treatment. The results point to a link of kidney disease with endothelium dysfunction and periodontitis, suggesting that periodontal treatment may be beneficial to the course of CKD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Degenerative alterations of the cementum-periodontal ligament complex and early tooth loss in a young patient with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruţiu, S A; Buiga, Petronela; Roman, Alexandra; Danciu, Theodora; Mihu, Carmen Mihaela; Mihu, D

    2012-01-01

    Premature exfoliation of primary or permanent teeth in children or adolescents is extremely rare and it can be a manifestation of an underlying systemic disease. This study aims to present the histological aspects associated with early tooth loss in a case of periodontal disease developed without local inflammation and with minimal periodontal pockets and attachment loss. The maxillary left second premolar was extracted together with a gingival collar attached to the root surface. The histological analysis recorded the resorption of the cementum in multiple areas of the entire root surface with the connective tissue of the desmodontium invading the lacunae defects. The connective tissue rich in cells occupied the periodontal ligamentar space and the resorptive areas. No inflammation was obvious in the periodontal ligament connective tissue. This report may warn clinicians about the possibility of the association of cemental abnormalities with early tooth loss.

  8. Orthodontic treatment simultaneous to or after periodontal cause-related treatment in periodontitis susceptible patients. Part I: Clinical outcome. A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasčiurinskienė, Eglė; Basevičienė, Nomeda; Lindsten, Rune; Slotte, Christer; Jansson, Henrik; Bjerklin, Krister

    2018-02-01

    To compare two treatment strategies regarding the effect of orthodontic treatment on periodontal status in patients with plaque-induced periodontitis. This was a randomized clinical trial. Fifty periodontal patients were randomly assigned to the test or control groups according to periodontal treatment timing. All patients received supra- and subgingival debridement following baseline examination. Control group patients received cause-related periodontal treatment before the start of orthodontic treatment and which was performed simultaneous to orthodontic treatment for the test group patients. No difference between the test and control groups was found regarding change of clinical attachment level (CAL) after periodontal-orthodontic treatment. Fewer sites with initial pocket depth (PD) of 4-6 mm healed after periodontal-orthodontic treatment in the test group (20.5%, IQR = 11.9%) in comparison with controls (30.4%, IQR = 27.1%) (p = .03). Anterior teeth [OR 2.5] and teeth in male patients [OR 1.6] had a greater chance for PD improvement ≥2 mm. Total periodontal-orthodontic treatment duration was significantly longer for the control group (p Orthodontic treatment, simultaneously to the periodontal treatment, could be used in the routine treatment of patients with plaque-induced periodontitis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Association between obesity and periodontal risk indicators in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modéer, Thomas; Blomberg, Cecilia; Wondimu, Biniyam; Lindberg, Tülay Yucel; Marcus, Claude

    2011-06-01

    In a cross-sectional study design we test the hypothesis of whether obesity in adolescence is associated with periodontal risk indicators or disease. Obese adolescents (n=52) and normal weight subjects (n=52) with a mean age of 14.5 years were clinically examined with respect to dental plaque, gingival inflammation, periodontal pockets and incipient alveolar bone loss. The subjects answered a questionnaire concerning medical conditions, oral hygiene habits, smoking habits and sociodemographic background. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated and adjusted for age and gender (BMI-SDS). Samples of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) were analyzed for the levels of adiponectin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), interleukin-1β (IL-β), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Obese subjects exhibited more gingival inflammation (Pperiodontal pockets (>4 mm) (Pperiodontal pockets. The study demonstrates an association between obesity and periodontal risk indicators in adolescents that in the long term may lead to oral morbidity. This result further strengthens obesity's negative effect on teenagers' periodontal health and highlights the importance of a close collaboration between dentists and pediatricians in the prevention and treatment of obesity.

  10. Further evidence for periodontal disease as a risk indicator for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, Mervyn; Africa, Charlene W J

    2017-06-01

    Although there is increasing evidence to suggest an association between periodontal disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes, the issue remains controversial. This study tested the hypothesis that periodontal disease is a risk indicator for preterm delivery of low-birthweight infants. The study sample comprised 443 pregnant women with a mean (± standard deviation) age of 24.13 (±5.30) years. At first visit, maternal oral health status was assessed by the measurement of probing pocket depth and clinical attachment loss, and periodontal status was graded as absent, mild, moderate or severe. An association was sought between pregnancy outcomes and maternal periodontal status. While controlling for other factors, significant associations were found between pregnancy outcomes and maternal periodontal index scores. This study provides further evidence that periodontal disease is a risk indicator for adverse pregnancy outcomes. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  11. Serum lipids modify periodontal infection - C-reactive protein association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Anniina; Saxlin, Tuomas; Suominen, Anna-Liisa; Ylöstalo, Pekka; Leiviskä, Jaana; Tervonen, Tellervo; Knuuttila, Matti

    2012-09-01

    To investigate whether low-grade inflammation-related factors such as serum low-density (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) modify the association between periodontal infection and C-reactive protein. This study was based on a subpopulation of the Health 2000 Survey, which consisted of dentate, non-diabetic, non-rheumatic subjects who were 30-49 years old (n = 2710). The extent of periodontal infection was measured by means of the number of teeth with periodontal pocket ≥4 mm and teeth with periodontal pocket ≥6 mm and systemic inflammation using high sensitive C-reactive protein. The extent of periodontal infection was associated with elevated levels of C-reactive protein among those subjects whose HDL-C value was below the median value of 1.3 mmol/l or LDL-C above the median value of 3.4 mmol/l. Among those with HDL-C ≥ 1.3 mmol/l or LDL-C ≤ 3.4 mmol/l, the association between periodontal infection and serum concentrations of C-reactive protein was practically non-existent. This study suggests that the relation of periodontal infection to the systemic inflammatory condition is more complicated than previously presumed. The findings of this study suggest that the possible systemic effect of periodontal infection is dependent on serum lipid composition. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Pocket dictionary of laboratory equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junge, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    This pocket dictionary contains the 2500 most common terms for scientific and technical equipment in chemical laboratories. It is a useful tool for those who are used to communicating in German and English, but have to learn the special terminology in this field. (orig.) [de

  13. Ecology – A Pocket Guide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 8. Ecology – A Pocket Guide. Renee M Borges. Book Review Volume 5 Issue 8 August 2000 pp 99-102. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/08/0099-0102. Author Affiliations.

  14. Newnes electronics assembly pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Produced in association with the Engineering Training Authority with contributions from dozens of people in the electronics industry. The material covers common skills in electrical and electronic engineering and concentrates mainly on wiring and assembly. 'Newnes Electronics Assembly Pocket Book' is for electronics technicians, students and apprentices.

  15. Periodontitis and gingivitis in inflammatory bowel disease: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavricka, Stephan R; Manser, Christine N; Hediger, Sebastian; Vögelin, Marius; Scharl, Michael; Biedermann, Luc; Rogler, Sebastian; Seibold, Frank; Sanderink, René; Attin, Thomas; Schoepfer, Alain; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard; Frei, Pascal

    2013-12-01

    The oral cavity is frequently affected in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Periodontitis is thought to influence systemic autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. We aimed to analyze the relationship of periodontitis and gingivitis markers with specific disease characteristics in patients with IBD and to compare these data with healthy controls. In a prospective 8-month study, systematic oral examinations were performed in 113 patients with IBD, including 69 patients with CD and 44 patients with ulcerative colitis. For all patients, a structured personal history was taken. One hundred thirteen healthy volunteers served as a control group. Oral examination focussed on established oral health markers for periodontitis (bleeding on probing, loss of attachment, and periodontal pocket depth) and gingivitis (papilla bleeding index). Additionally, visible oral lesions were documented. Both gingivitis and periodontitis markers were higher in patients with IBD than in healthy control. In univariate analysis and logistic regression analysis, perianal disease was a risk factor for periodontitis. Nonsmoking decreased the risk of having periodontitis. No clear association was found between clinical activity and periodontitis in IBD. In only the CD subgroup, high clinical activity (Harvey-Bradshaw index > 10) was associated with 1 periodontitis marker, the loss of attachment at sites of maximal periodontal pocket depth. Oral lesions besides periodontitis and gingivitis were not common, but nevertheless observed in about 10% of patients with IBD. IBD, and especially perianal disease in CD, is associated with periodontitis. Optimal therapeutic strategies should probably focus on treating both local oral and systemic inflammation.

  16. Periodontitis and oral human papillomavirus infection among Hispanic adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Patricia Ortiz

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Research on the association between periodontitis and oral human papilloma virus (HPV infection is inconsistent. The cross-sectional association of severe periodontitis with oral HPV infection was investigated in a sample of Hispanic adults. Methods: Data from the 2014–2016 San Juan Overweight Adults Longitudinal Study (n = 740 was analyzed. Periodontitis assessment and self-collection of oral HPV samples followed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey methodology. Periodontitis was defined using the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention/American Academy of Periodontology definition. HPV typing was performed using polymerase chain reaction. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results: 5.7% of participants had oral HPV infection and 20.3% had severe periodontitis. Adults with severe periodontitis had higher odds of oral HPV infection than those with none/mild disease (OR=2.9, 95% CI: 1.0–8.4, p < 0.05 in multivariable analysis. Adults with clinical attachment loss≥ 7 mm and pocket depth PD≥ 6 mm had 2- to 3-fold higher odds of HPV infection. Conclusions: Severe periodontitis was positively associated to oral HPV infection. Longitudinal evaluation of periodontal inflammation's role in acquisition and persistence of oral HPV infection is needed, as periodontitis screening could identify individuals at increased risk of HPV-related oral malignancies. Keywords: Periodontitis, Oral HPV, Hispanics, Adults, Oral health, Puerto Rico

  17. The Relation of Endodontic-Periodontal Lesion and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trijani Suwandi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between endodontic-periodontal lesion has been documented well be researches. Endodontic lesion originates from pulp, while periodontal lesion originates from periodontal tissues. Anatomically they are connected by apical foramen, lateral canal and accessories, as well as dentin tubules. The correlation appeared as the endodontic defect can be from periodontal lesion, or a periodontal defect is from a pulp tissue. Together they can emerge and form a combination lesion. Endodontic infections have been highly correlated with deeper periodontal pockets and furcation involvement in mandibular, the causal relationship between the two pathoses has not yet been established. This consensus supports the influence of degenerated or inflamed pulp that can happen on the periodontium; but not all researchers agree about the effect of periodontal disease on the pulp. Conclusion: The mechanism of endo-perio lesion need to taken care in order to have appropriate diagnostic so that the right therapy would be able to keep the teeth in the oral cavity.

  18. Relationship between maternal periodontal disease and low birth weight babies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Haerian-Ardakani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontal infections, which serve as a reservoir of inflammatory mediators, may pose a threat to the fetal-placental unit and cause adverse pregnancy outcomes. Objective: The aim of this study was assessing the periodontal status of women during puerperium and determining the possible relationship between their periodontal disease and low birth weight delivery. Materials and Methods: This was a case-control study. The sample included 88 ex-pregnant women were seen at maternity hospitals of Yazd, Iran. Half of the mothers had low birth babies (LBW (birth weight below 2500g- case group and the others had normal weight babies (>2500g- control group. The mothers’ data were obtained from medical files, interview and periodontal clinical examination carried out up to 3 days after delivery. Bleeding on probing, presence of supra-gingival calculus and CPITN (Community Periodontal Index for Treatment Needs were used for periodontal assessment Results: Among the known risk factors of LBW babies, history of previous LBW infant among case mothers reached statistical significance (p=0.0081, Student t-test. Mothers of LBW infants had less healthy areas of gingiva (p=0.042, and more deep pockets (p=0.0006, Mann-Whitney test. Conclusion: The maternal periodontal disease can be a potential independent risk factor for LBW.

  19. Monitoring of the periodontal disease using digital image analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taba Junior, Mario.

    1995-01-01

    The radiographs play an important role in the diagnosis and management of periodontal disease although the most appropriate form of assessment vary. The great technologic advance and the easily accessible systems of digital image analyses, specify digitized radiographs, improve the diagnostic power. The studied group was 29 adults (14 female and 15 male) ranging in age from 18 to 45 years. They all had evidence of alveolar bone loss and established periodontitis. They were studied, without treatment, over a six month period with four posterior standardized vertical bite wings radiographs, electronic probing of attachment loss, and bacteriological and temperature analysis of periodontal pocket. The aim of this investigation was to determine the relationship between the loss of radiographic crestal bone height and probing attachment loss in digitized radiographs and show a standardization method for periodontal radiographs. Radiographic and probing attachment change at all sites, dichotomously classified as to not changing or loosing indicated 20.42% of sites were loosing by measurement of radiographic change and 5.29% were loosing by measurement of attachment change. There was concordance between the presence or absence of probing attachment loss and bone loss in 72% to 86% depending on the area. The results, admitting methodological limitations, indicate that when these two methods for the assessment of progressive periodontitis were used they represents measure degrees of different features of periodontitis and that the period of periodontal disease activity was detected in the either the soft tissue attachment or bone. (author)

  20. Periodontal status among adolescents in Georgia. A pathfinder study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liran Levin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the present pathfinder study was to screen and map the periodontal status of Georgian population in accordance with the guidelines of the World Health Organization for population based surveys. Methods. During 2012, a pathfinder study was conducted to collect this data. For the periodontal portion of the study, 15-year-old school children were examined in the capital city of Tbilisi as well as in two other large cities and 4 smaller villages. All participants were examined by a trained dental team in a classroom using a dental mirror and a periodontal probe. Periodontal examination included plaque scores, calculus scores, probing depth measurements and bleeding on probing. These measurements were recorded for the Ramfjord index teeth. Results. A total of 397 15-year-old participants were examined in this pathfinder study. There were 240 females (60.45% and 157 males (39.55%. Of the total participants 196 (49.37% were urban adolescents while 201 (50.63% were from rural communities. Mean probing depth was 3.34 ± 0.57 mm with a range of 1 to 10 mm; a relatively high proportion (34.26% of these subjects presented with at least one site with pockets of 5 mm or deeper. Males presented with greater plaque, calculus and probing depths than females. When urban and rural populations were compared, urban participants presented with more plaque, probing depths and bleeding on probing. Greater pocket depths were found to be related to the presence of plaque calculus and bleeding on probing. Conclusions. Overall, rather high incidences of periodontal pockets ≥ 5 mm were detected in this population. This data should serve to prepare further more detailed epidemiological studies that will serve to plan and implement prevent and treat strategies for periodontal diseases in Georgia and also help make manpower decisions.

  1. Periodontal status among adolescents in Georgia. A pathfinder study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Liran; Margvelashvili, Vladimer; Bilder, Leon; Kalandadze, Manana; Tsintsadze, Nino; Machtei, Eli E

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of the present pathfinder study was to screen and map the periodontal status of Georgian population in accordance with the guidelines of the World Health Organization for population based surveys. Methods. During 2012, a pathfinder study was conducted to collect this data. For the periodontal portion of the study, 15-year-old school children were examined in the capital city of Tbilisi as well as in two other large cities and 4 smaller villages. All participants were examined by a trained dental team in a classroom using a dental mirror and a periodontal probe. Periodontal examination included plaque scores, calculus scores, probing depth measurements and bleeding on probing. These measurements were recorded for the Ramfjord index teeth. Results. A total of 397 15-year-old participants were examined in this pathfinder study. There were 240 females (60.45%) and 157 males (39.55%). Of the total participants 196 (49.37%) were urban adolescents while 201 (50.63%) were from rural communities. Mean probing depth was 3.34 ± 0.57 mm with a range of 1 to 10 mm; a relatively high proportion (34.26%) of these subjects presented with at least one site with pockets of 5 mm or deeper. Males presented with greater plaque, calculus and probing depths than females. When urban and rural populations were compared, urban participants presented with more plaque, probing depths and bleeding on probing. Greater pocket depths were found to be related to the presence of plaque calculus and bleeding on probing. Conclusions. Overall, rather high incidences of periodontal pockets ≥ 5 mm were detected in this population. This data should serve to prepare further more detailed epidemiological studies that will serve to plan and implement prevent and treat strategies for periodontal diseases in Georgia and also help make manpower decisions.

  2. Effect of Periodontal Disease on Preeclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, F; Hoseini, M Sadat; Abbaspour, S

    2011-01-01

    Background: A lot of studies have shown periodontal diseases as a risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes. The association between periodontitis and preeclampsia has been studied recently with controversy. Considering the importance of preventing preeclampsia as a dangerous and life-threatening disease in pregnant women, the present study was carried out. Methods: Two hundred and ten pregnant women participated in this case-control study (105 controls & 105 cases) during years 2007 and 2008. Preeclamptic cases were defined as blood pressure ≥140/90mmHg and proteinuria +1. Control group were pregnant women with normal blood pressure without proteinuria. Both groups were examined during 48 hours after child delivery. Plaque Index (PLI), Pocket Depth (PD), Clinical Attachment Level (CAL), Bleeding On Probing (BOP), Gingival Recession (GR) were measured on all teeth except for third molars and recorded as periodontal examination. Data was analyzed using t-test, chi-square, and Mann-Whitney U statistical tests. Results: There was no significant difference between the two study groups for PD. CAL, GR, BOP significantly increased in the case group (P< 0.02). This study showed that preeclamptic cases were more likely to develop periodontal disease (P< 0.0001). Eighty three percent of the control group and 95% of the case group had periodontal disease (P< 0.005) which had shown that preeclamptic cases were 4.1 times more likely to have periodontal disease (OR= 4.1). Conclusion: Preeclamptic cases significantly had higher attachment loss and gingival recession than the control group. PMID:23113094

  3. Effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on C-reactive protein and serum lipids in Jordanian adults with advanced periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamil, W; Al Habashneh, R; Khader, Y; Al Bayati, L; Taani, D

    2011-10-01

    Data on whether periodontal therapy affects serum CRP levels are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to determine if nonsurgical periodontal therapy has any effect on CRP and serum lipid levels in patients with advanced periodontitis. Thirty-six systemically healthy patients, ≥ 40 years of age and with advanced periodontitis, were recruited for the study. Patients were randomized consecutively to one of two groups: the treatment group (n = 18) or the control group (n = 18). Treated subjects received nonsurgical periodontal therapy, which included oral hygiene instructions and subgingival scaling and root planing. Systemic levels of inflammatory markers [C-reactive protein (CRP) and the lipid profile] were measured at baseline and 3 mo after periodontal therapy. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy in the treatment group resulted in a significant reduction in the serum CRP level. The average CRP level decreased from 2.3 mg/dL at baseline to 1.8 mg/dL (p periodontal therapy. The average reduction (95% confidence interval) in CRP was 0.498 (95% confidence interval = 0.265-0.731). In the treatment group, the reduction in CRP was significantly, linearly and directly correlated with the reduction in the plaque index, the gingival index and the percentage of sites with pocket depth ≥ 7 mm (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.746, 0.425 and 0.621, respectively). Nonsurgical periodontal therapy had no effect on the lipid parameters. This study demonstrated that nonsurgical periodontal therapy results in a significant reduction in the serum CRP level. The effect of this outcome on systemic disease is still unknown. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Effect of Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy on Serum and Salivary Concentrations of Visfatin in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Abolfazli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Visfatin, mainly secreted by visceral adipose tissue, especially by macrophages, plays an impor-tant role in regulating the defense and immune functions, and functions as a growth factor, a cytokine, an enzyme and more importantly as a proinflammatory mediator. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of non-surgical perio-dontal treatment on serum and salivary levels of visfatin in patients with generalized moderate-to-severe chronic periodonti-tis. Materials and methods. Eighteen patients with generalized moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis were selected based on periodontal parameters of gingival index (GI, probing pocket depth (PPD, clinical attachment level (CAL and radio-graphic parameters. Serum and salivary samples were collected at baseline and one month following non-surgical periodon-tal therapy (scaling and root planing ([SRP]. Visfatin levels were measured using an ELISA kit. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15, using paired t-test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results. Mean salivary and serum levels of visfatin significantly decreased after non-surgical periodontal treatment (P<0.05. Changes in salivary visfatin levels were more prominent. Conclusion. According to the findings of this study it seems that there is a direct relationship between periodontal tissue inflammation and disease activity with salivary and serum visfatin levels.

  5. Monitoring of the periodontal disease using digital image analyses; Monitoracao da progressao da doenca periodontal atraves de imagens digitalizadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taba Junior, Mario

    1995-12-31

    The radiographs play an important role in the diagnosis and management of periodontal disease although the most appropriate form of assessment vary. The great technologic advance and the easily accessible systems of digital image analyses, specify digitized radiographs, improve the diagnostic power. The studied group was 29 adults (14 female and 15 male) ranging in age from 18 to 45 years. They all had evidence of alveolar bone loss and established periodontitis. They were studied, without treatment, over a six month period with four posterior standardized vertical bite wings radiographs, electronic probing of attachment loss, and bacteriological and temperature analysis of periodontal pocket. The aim of this investigation was to determine the relationship between the loss of radiographic crestal bone height and probing attachment loss in digitized radiographs and show a standardization method for periodontal radiographs. Radiographic and probing attachment change at all sites, dichotomously classified as to not changing or loosing indicated 20.42% of sites were loosing by measurement of radiographic change and 5.29% were loosing by measurement of attachment change. There was concordance between the presence or absence of probing attachment loss and bone loss in 72% to 86% depending on the area. The results, admitting methodological limitations, indicate that when these two methods for the assessment of progressive periodontitis were used they represents measure degrees of different features of periodontitis and that the period of periodontal disease activity was detected in the either the soft tissue attachment or bone. (author). 116 refs., 17 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in periodontal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna A. Mahale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO 2 has been successfully used in several medical fields. The therapeutic effect is related to elevated partial oxygen pressure in the tissues. The pressure itself enhances oxygen solubility in the tissue fluids. HBO 2 has shown to affect angiogenesis, bone metabolism and bone turnover. Studies have been conducted to analyze the effects of HBO 2 therapy on periodontal disease. HBO 2 increases local oxygen distribution, especially at the base of the periodontal pocket, which inhibits the growth of anaerobic bacteria and allows the ischemic tissues to receive an adequate intake of oxygen sufficient for a rapid recovery of cell metabolism. It is increasingly being accepted as a beneficial adjunct to diverse clinical conditions. Nonhealing ulcers, chronic wounds and refractory osteomyelitis are a few conditions for which HBO therapy (HBOT has been extensively tried out. The dental surgeons have found a good ally in HBOT in managing dental condition.

  7. Differential Measurement Periodontal Structures Mapping System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Companion, John A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to a periodontal structure mapping system employing a dental handpiece containing first and second acoustic sensors for locating the Cemento-Enamel Junction (CEJ) and measuring the differential depth between the CEJ and the bottom of the periodontal pocket. Measurements are taken at multiple locations on each tooth of a patient, observed, analyzed by an optical analysis subsystem, and archived by a data storage system for subsequent study and comparison with previous and subsequent measurements. Ultrasonic transducers for the first and second acoustic sensors are contained within the handpiece and in connection with a control computer. Pressurized water is provided for the depth measurement sensor and a linearly movable probe sensor serves as the sensor for the CEJ finder. The linear movement of the CEJ sensor is obtained by a control computer actuated by the prober. In an alternate embodiment, the CEJ probe is an optical fiber sensor with appropriate analysis structure provided therefor.

  8. Canine stage 1 periodontal disease: a latent pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, A; Bonastre, C; Monteagudo, L V; Les, F; Obon, J; Whyte, J; Tejedor, M T

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the potential health issues associated with periodontal disease (PD) in dogs, 1004 teeth from 25 dogs were examined. The dogs were randomly selected, aged 2-14 years, and had at least 95% of their teeth at the first PD stage. Significant positive correlations between plaque grade (PG) and gum inflammation, gingival regression, periodontal pocket, age and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity were identified. In contrast, PG was negatively correlated to total platelet count. Altogether, these findings suggest that prevention and therapy at the first PD stages can have an important impact on the general health condition of dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Recurrent periodontal abscess associated with “teeth as a tool”

    OpenAIRE

    Bhat, G. Subraya; Singh, Vishal; Bhat, K. Mahalinga

    2012-01-01

    We report an unusual case of recurrent periodontal abscess in a 31-year-old male electrician due to his habit of using his teeth as a tool for stripping electrical wires. The patient was not aware of the consequences of this habit. Clinically, there was presence of moderate depth of periodontal pocket around the tooth and, radiographically, there was a vertical defect mesial to the involved teeth. The patient was educated about the consequences of his habit and surgical treatment was undertak...

  10. Is the presence of Helicobacter pylori in the Dental Plaque of Patients with Chronic Periodontitis a Risk Factor for Gastric Infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al Asqah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is considered to be a pathogen responsible for gastritis and peptic ulcers, and a risk factor for gastric cancer. A periodontal pocket in the teeth of individuals with chronic periodontitis may function as a reservoir for H pylori.

  11. Radiographic bone fill following debridement of a periodontal abscess. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khocht, A; Faldu, M G

    1998-01-01

    A periodontal abscess often develops in association with deepened periodontal pockets. Traditional management is by establishing drainage and prescribing antibiotics. This is usually followed by surgical pocket reduction. This case report discusses the remarkable healing of a periodontal abscess by establishing drainage alone without resorting to surgical pocket reduction. A 42-year-old white male presented with swollen gingivae associated with the mesiolingual of tooth #23. Increased probing depth and suppuration were evident. Radiographic bone loss on mesial #23 was present. A diagnosis of periodontal abscess was established. The abscess was drained through the orifice of the pocket. The patient failed to return for follow-up as instructed. A year later, the patient came back. Clinical evaluation showed healthy gingival tissues with probing depth of 3 mm on the mesiolingual of tooth #23. Radiographic evaluation showed bone fill of the osseous defect on the mesial of #23. The results of this case suggest that sufficient time should be allowed for healing prior to surgical pocket reduction.

  12. [Bacteriological study on juvenile periodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, N

    1991-02-01

    The predominant cultivable microflora of 23 pockets in 15 juvenile periodontitis (JP) patients was studied for the first time in China using the current anaerobic methodology. Samples were taken with sterile paper points and dispersed on a vortex mixer. Then the diluted samples were plated on the non-selective blood agar plates and selective MGB medium which favors the growth of Actinobacillus actimycetemcomitans (Aa) and incubated in anaerobic chamber for 5 days. From each sample 15 or more isolated colonies were picked in sequence without selection and subcultured. The isolates were identified mainly by Schrechenberger's 4 hour rapid methods for biochemical and fermentative tests and the chromatographic analysis of acid end products using ion-chromatography. The results were as follows: 1. The microflora of healthy sulci of 7 healthy young subjects was significantly different from that in the pocket of JP patients. The predominant species in healthy sulci were Streptococcus spp and Capnocytophaga gingivalis. 2. The species increased significantly in JP patients in prevalence and proportions was Eubacterium. Other species in high proportions were Bacteroides oris, B. melaninogenicus, B. gingivalis, Capnocytophaga sputigena, and Actinomyces meyeri, etc. 3. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was not detected in any of the samples.

  13. Modeling susceptibility to periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laine, M.L.; Moustakis, V.; Koumakis, L.; Potamias, G.; Loos, B.G.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases like periodontitis have a complex pathogenesis and a multifactorial etiology, involving complex interactions between multiple genetic loci and infectious agents. We aimed to investigate the influence of genetic polymorphisms and bacteria on chronic periodontitis risk.

  14. Phenotypes, serotypes and antibiotic susceptibility of Swedish Porphyromonas gingivalis isolates from periodontitis and periodontal abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlén, G; Gmür, R; Yoshino, T

    2007-04-01

    This study was conducted to reveal phenotypic, serological subtypes and antibiotic susceptibility among fresh isolates of Porphyromonas gingivalis in a Swedish population with periodontitis and periodontal abscess. Fifty-five subgingival strains were isolated and tentatively designated as P. gingivalis from 55 consecutive paper-point samples taken from 51 patients with periodontitis (at least one site with >6-mm pocket depth) in Sweden and were sent in for microbiological evaluation. Eight P. gingivalis strains from periodontal abscesses were also included. Four P. gingivalis strains served as reference and another four type strains were included. The strains were characterized by colony morphology, biochemical tests, enzyme profile, gas-liquid chromatography and antibiotic susceptibility. The strains were further characterized for whole cell protein profiles using sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and were identified to serotype by specific monoclonal antibodies. Among the 55 P. gingivalis strains 35 had smooth (S), 13 rough (R) and seven semi-rough colony morphologies. All strains were phenotypically homogeneous in biochemical tests, enzyme profile and antibiotic susceptibility. All strains produced phenylacetic acid and alpha-fucosidase. Almost all (96%) of the subgingival strains, but relatively fewer (62%) of the abscess strains, belonged to serotype A. Two subgingival and three abscess strains were classified as serotype B. No specific SDS-PAGE protein profiles were recorded for the two serotypes. The P. gingivalis strains from Swedish periodontitis cases showed homogeneity in terms of biochemical phenotypes and antibiotic susceptibility patterns. The strains fell into two serotypes, of which serotype A predominated in the periodontitis cases and serotype B was overrepresented in periodontal abscesses.

  15. Screening for periodontal disease in research dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortegaard, Hanne Ellen; Eriksen, Thomas; Bælum, Vibeke

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundIt has been shown that the prevalence of both clinical attachment loss (CAL) >1 mm and pocket probing depth (PPD) >4 mm is relatively high even in younger dogs, but also that only a minority of the dogs have such clinical signs of periodontal disease (PD) in more than a few teeth. Hence...... is the central variable in assessing PD extent and severity while PPD is the central variable used in treatment planning which make these two variables obvious in a screening protocol with the dual aim of disease identification and treatment planning. The main purpose of the present study in 98 laboratory Beagle...

  16. TclTk Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Raines, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The Tcl/Tk combination is increasingly popular because it lets you produce sophisticated graphical interfaces with a few easy commands, develop and change scripts quickly, and conveniently tie together existing utilities or programming libraries. The Tcl/Tk Pocket Reference,a handy reference guide to the basic Tcl language elements, Tcl and Tk commands, and Tk widgets, is a companion volume to Tcl/Tk in a Nutshell.

  17. Association between Periodontopathogens and CRP Levels in Patients with Periodontitis in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Pejcic

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that individuals with periodontitis have a significantly higher risk of developing coronary heart disease, which might be attributed to the complex microbiota in the dental plaque. Periodontopathogens have been reported as risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This study evaluated association of chronic periodontitis and periodontopathogens with CRP in systemically healthy Serbian adults. Materials and methods. Serum C-reactive protein levels were measured in 24 patients with moderate periodontitis, 26 patients with severe periodontitis, and 25 periodontally healthy subjects. Periodontal health indicators included gingival bleeding on probing and periodontal disease status. Patients with moderate periodontitis had low attachment loss and pocket depths of 5 mm. The control group with healthy gingiva had gingival sulcus of 5 mol/L was greater in the higher clinical AL group compared to the group with less attachment loss. Presence of periodontopathogens was also associated with elevated CRP levels and poor periodontal status. Conclusions. PD and subgingival periodontopathogens are associated with increased CRP levels. These findings suggest that periodontal infection may contribute to systemic inflammatory burden in otherwise healthy individuals.

  18. Subgingival dysbiosis in smoker and non‑smoker patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coretti, Lorena; Cuomo, Mariella; Florio, Ermanno; Palumbo, Domenico; Keller, Simona; Pero, Raffaela; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Lembo, Francesca; Cafiero, Carlo

    2017-04-01

    Periodontitis is one of the most common oral inflammatory diseases, and results in connective tissue degradation and gradual tooth loss. It manifests with formation of periodontal pockets, in which anaerobic and Gram‑negative bacteria proliferate rapidly. Consequently, alteration of the subgingival microbiota is considered the primary etiologic agent of periodontitis. Previous studies have reported that smokers are at increased risk of periodontal disease, in both prevalence and severity, indicating that smoking is a risk factor for the onset and progression of the pathology. In the present study, 16S rRNA sequencing was employed to assess the subgingival microbiota in 6 smoker patients with chronic periodontitis, 6 non‑smoker patients with chronic periodontitis and 8 healthy controls. The results demonstrated significant alterations in the microbial structure of periodontitis patients. High relative abundance of Parvimonans, Desulfubulbus, Paludibacter, Haemophilus, and Sphaerochaeta genera characterized subgingival microbiota of periodontitis patients, both smokers and non‑smokers. Due to the high precision and sensitivity of the 16S rRNA sequencing method, analysis for low‑abundant genera (including Pedobacter, Granulicatella, Paracoccus, Atopobium, Bifidobacterium, Coprococcus, Oridobacteriu, Peptococcus, Oscillospira and Akkermansia) was feasible, and revealed novel phylotypes associated with periodontitis. Of note, a major microbial community alteration was evident in smoker patients, suggesting an association between smoking and severity of subgingival dysbiosis. The present study confirmed that chronic periodontitis is a polymicrobial disease where changes in the equilibrium of subgingival microbiota contribute to severity of pathology.

  19. Chronic periodontitis and smoking. Prevalence and dose-response relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahrukh; Khalid, Taimur; Awan, Kamran H

    2016-08-01

    To determine the prevalence and dose-response relationship of chronic periodontitis among smokers in Pakistan.   This is a cross-sectional study among participants seeking dental care in Karachi Medical and Dental College, Karachi, Pakistan. A total of 443 participants with a mean age of 44.3 (±6.5) participated in the study from April 2011 to December 2011. Males comprised 64.7%, and females comprised 35.2%. Participants were interviewed on social demographics and oral habits. Participants with shallow pockets (3.5-5.5 mm) and deep pockets (greater than 5.5 mm) were considered suffering from chronic periodontitis. The characteristics of participants were assessed using frequency distribution for categorical variables and mean (standard deviation) for continuous variables.  Among 443 participants, smokers were distributed as 55.1% and non-smokers as 44.9%. Smoking was found to be significantly related to young adults (p less than 0.007), male gender (p less than 0.001), and lower education level (p less than 0.01). Overall prevalence of chronic periodontitis among smokers was estimated at 81.6%. Heavy smoking was found to have significantly high prevalence (p less than 0.001) and severity (p less than 0.001) of periodontitis as compared with moderate and light smokers. The multivariate unadjusted model depicted 3.5 times higher risk of chronic periodontitis among smokers (p less than 0.001). Chronic periodontitis had a high prevalence among smokers. Heavy smoking was found to have a higher risk for having periodontitis.

  20. MINIMALLY INVASIVE SINGLE FLAP APPROACH WITH CONNECTIVE TISSUE WALL FOR PERIODONTAL REGENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamen Kotsilkov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The destructive periodontal diseases are among the most prevalent in the human population. In some cases, bony defects are formed during the disease progression, thus sustaining deep periodontal pockets. The reconstruction of these defects is usually done with the classical techniques of bone substitutes placement and guided tissue regeneration. The clinical and histological data from the recent years, however, demonstrate the relatively low regenerative potential of these techniques. The contemporary approaches for periodontal regeneration rely on minimally invasive surgical protocols, aimed at complete tissue preservation in order to achieve and maintain primary closure and at stimulating the natural regenerative potential of the periodontal tissues. AIM: This presentation demonstrates the application of a new, minimally invasive, single flap surgical technique for periodontal regeneration in a clinical case with periodontitis and a residual deep intrabony defect. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 37 years old patient presented with chronic generalised periodontitis. The initial therapy led to good control of the periodontal infection with a single residual deep periodontal pocket medially at 11 due to a deep intrabony defect. A single flap approach with an enamel matrix derivate application and a connective tissue wall technique were performed. The proper primary closure was obtained. RESULT: One month after surgery an initial mineralisation process in the defect was detected. At the third month, a complete clinical healing was observed. The radiographic control showed finished bone mineralisation and periodontal space recreation. CONCLUSION: In the limitation of the presented case, the minimally invasive surgical approach led to complete clinical healing and new bone formation, which could be proof for periodontal regeneration.

  1. Detection and prevalence of Capnocytophaga in periodontal Health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpa S Pudakalkatti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context/Background: Periodontal disease is a multifactorial disease, in which bacteria play a major role. Capnocytophaga species form a part of human oral flora both in health and disease. They have been implicated as putative periodontal pathogens, and yet, they are less understood members of plaque flora. No studies have been conducted on the association of Capnocytophaga species with periodontal diseases in India. Aim: The aim of this study was to detect the prevalence of Capnocytophaga species in patients with healthy periodontium, gingivitis, and periodontitis using culture method. Methods: Forty patients each with healthy periodontium, gingivitis, and periodontitis were selected. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from all the patients using sterile curettes and transferred to transport medium and sent to the laboratory. The plaque samples were inoculated on blood agar and trypticase-blood-bacitracin-polymyxin agar to grow Capnocytophaga species. Later, Gram-staining and microscopy were done to confirm the presence of Capnocytophaga in each sample. The prevalence of Capnocytophaga species was statistically analyzed using Chi-square test, Kruskal–Wallis analysis of variance, and Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: Capnocytophaga was detected in 21 (52.50% samples out of 40 samples of gingivitis group, 11 (27.50% samples of healthy group, and 12 (30% samples of periodontitis group. Conclusions: Capnocytophaga is more prevalent in gingivitis compared to healthy periodontium and periodontitis. Capnocytophaga has the potential to cause periodontal disease, but as it is less competitive in the periodontal pocket, it is usually overgrown by other rapidly growing bacteria.

  2. Human Memory B Cells in Healthy Gingiva, Gingivitis, and Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanonda, Rangsini; Champaiboon, Chantrakorn; Subbalekha, Keskanya; Sa-Ard-Iam, Noppadol; Rattanathammatada, Warattaya; Thawanaphong, Saranya; Rerkyen, Pimprapa; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Nagano, Keiji; Lang, Niklaus P; Pichyangkul, Sathit

    2016-08-01

    The presence of inflammatory infiltrates with B cells, specifically plasma cells, is the hallmark of periodontitis lesions. The composition of these infiltrates in various stages of homeostasis and disease development is not well documented. Human tissue biopsies from sites with gingival health (n = 29), gingivitis (n = 8), and periodontitis (n = 21) as well as gingival tissue after treated periodontitis (n = 6) were obtained and analyzed for their composition of B cell subsets. Ag specificity, Ig secretion, and expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and granzyme B were performed. Although most of the B cell subsets in healthy gingiva and gingivitis tissues were CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(-) memory B cells, the major B cell component in periodontitis was CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(+)CD138(+)HLA-DR(low) plasma cells, not plasmablasts. Plasma cell aggregates were observed at the base of the periodontal pocket and scattered throughout the gingiva, especially apically toward the advancing front of the lesion. High expression of CXCL12, a proliferation-inducing ligand, B cell-activating factor, IL-10, IL-6, and IL-21 molecules involved in local B cell responses was detected in both gingivitis and periodontitis tissues. Periodontitis tissue plasma cells mainly secreted IgG specific to periodontal pathogens and also expressed receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, a bone resorption cytokine. Memory B cells resided in the connective tissue subjacent to the junctional epithelium in healthy gingiva. This suggested a role of memory B cells in maintaining periodontal homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Association between erectile dysfunction and chronic periodontitis: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Ranjit Singh; Bhandari, Rajat; Singh, Karanparkash

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, evidence has come forth supporting the notion that localized infectious diseases such as periodontal disease may indeed influence a number of systemic diseases. Erectile dysfunction (ED) and chronic periodontitis have common risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, cardiac diseases and smoking etc. The aim was to evaluate the periodontal status of the subjects suffering from ED and to find association between vasculogenic ED and chronic periodontitis, if any. A total of 53 subjects suffering from vasculogenic ED were enrolled for the study and were divided into three groups on the basis of severity of ED. The clinical (probing pocket depth) and radiographic parameters (alveolar bone loss) were recorded and periodontal status of three groups was evaluated, compared and an attempt was made to find an association between ED and chronic periodontitis. Karl Pearson's correlation was used to assess an association between the two conditions. One-way ANOVA and Scheffe's test were used to find the significant difference of chronic periodontitis with severity of ED. Karl Pearson's correlation was used to find an association between chronic periodontitis and ED. Statistically significant mean differences of 1.73 mm, 0.56 mm and 1.17 mm were recorded when comparison was made among Group I and III, Group I and II and Group II and III, respectively. Mean differences in bone loss among three groups were also statistically significant. Both the diseases were positively correlated to each other. It may be concluded that chronic periodontitis and ED are associated with each other. However, further large scale studies with confounder analysis and longitudinal follow-up are warranted to explore the link between these two diseases.

  4. A new methanogen "Methanobrevibacter massiliense" isolated in a case of severe periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Hong T T; Pignoly, Marion; Drancourt, Michel; Aboudharam, Gérard

    2017-12-01

    A few methanogens have been previously recovered from periodontitis lesions, yet their repertoire may not be completed. We recovered a previously unreported methanogen species in this situation. A 64-year-old Caucasian woman was diagnosed with chronic, severe generalized periodontitis. In the presence of negative controls, an 18-month culture of periodontal pockets in anaerobe Hungate tube yielded "Methanobrevibacter massiliense" and Pyramidobacter piscolens. This case report provides evidence of the symbiotic strategy deployed by the methanogens and the anaerobes, and reports the first culture of a new methanogen, "M. massiliense".

  5. Gingival Fibromatosis with Chronic Periodontitis – A Rare Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Sanadi Rizwan M

    2009-01-01

    Gingival fibromatosis is frequently an isolatedcondition of little consequence apart from a cosmeticproblem and occasional associations with uncommonsyndromes. This case report of a 38 year old femalepatient describes the gingival enlargement associatedwith chronic periodontitis. The enlargement extendedbeyond the middle thirds of the clinical crowns of theteeth. It was associated with generalized mobility,pocket formation and bone loss. The patient alsocomplained of bleeding gums and difficu...

  6. Resolution of Localized Chronic Periodontitis Associated with Longstanding Calculus Deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Pin-Chuang; Walters, John D.

    2014-01-01

    This report, which is based on nonstandardized serial radiographs obtained over a period of 15 years, documents a case of localized chronic periodontitis associated with progressive deposition of calculus on the distal aspect of a mandibular second molar. The site was treated by scaling and root planing, followed by a course of adjunctive systemic azithromycin. Treatment yielded favorable reductions in probing depth and clinical inflammation, leaving only few isolated sites with pockets no de...

  7. Periodontal Initial Radiological Findings of Genetically Predisposed Finnish Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Anna Maria; Pakbaznejad Esmaeili, Elmira; Kovanen, Leena; Ruokonen, Hellevi; Kettunen, Kaisa; Haukka, Jari; Tervahartiala, Taina; Sorsa, Timo

    2017-07-01

    Periodontitis is a multifactorial infectious disease of the supporting tissues of teeth in which bacterial, genetic and lifestyle factors such as smoking have an important role. The aim was to examine if Bleeding On Probing (BOP ≥ 20%) and ≥ 4 mm deep pockets correlated with any suspicion of initial radiological findings of periodontitis and bone loss. We also investigated whether any pro-inflammatory-related candidate Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) were associated with any suspicion of radiological findings. Altogether 47 generally healthy adolescent patients of one birth cohort had given their approval for their saliva samples to be used for DNA analysis. One participant was excluded after discrepant gender check. An oral radiologist analysed right and left bitewing radiographs of 47 patients. Clinical parameters such as BOP ≥ 20%, ≥ 4 mm pockets, Visible Plaque Index of all teeth (VPI%), as well as smoking habits were recorded. DNA was extracted and 71 SNPs from candidate genes for initial periodontitis were genotyped. The association between ≥ 4 mm pockets and BOP ≥ 20% with radiological findings and selected SNPs was modelled using logistic regression. Variants in Toll-Like Receptors 4 (TLR4) gene (rs498670) (OR=5.8, {CI95% 1.6-20.7}, p=0.02, FDR q-value=0.13) and TNFSF11 gene (rs2277438, OR=0.3 {CI95% 0.1-0.9}, p=0.002, FDR q-value=0.56) were associated with any suspicious radiological findings; however the significance vanished after False Discovery Rate analysis (FDR). The association between BOP ≥ 20% and any radiographic signs of periodontitis was found to be statistically significant, OR=1.6, CI 95% 1.0-2.4, p=0.04. Only TLR4 (rs498670) and TNFSF11 (rs2277438) genes were found to have a positive correlation with radiological findings suggestive of initial periodontitis after adjustment for smoking and visible plaque.

  8. Newnes electronics engineers pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    This book is packed with information and material which everyone involved in electronics will find indispensable. Now when you need to know a transistor's characteristics, or an integrated circuit's pinout details, simply look it up! The book is full of tables, symbols, formulae, conversions and illustrations.Promotion via the new Newnes Pocket Book catalogue to the electronics trade will drive sales into the book trade Covers component data; encapsulations; pin-outs; symbols & codings Extensive material on conversion factors, formulae; units and relationships

  9. Oracle Data Dictionary Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Kreines, David

    2003-01-01

    If you work with Oracle, then you don't need to be told that the data dictionary is large and complex, and grows larger with each new Oracle release. It's one of the basic elements of the Oracle database you interact with regularly, but the sheer number of tables and views makes it difficult to remember which view you need, much less the name of the specific column. Want to make it simpler? The Oracle Data Dictionary Pocket Reference puts all the information you need right at your fingertips. Its handy and compact format lets you locate the table and view you need effortlessly without stoppin

  10. Electrical engineering a pocket reference

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt-Walter, Heinz

    2007-01-01

    This essential reference offers you a well-organized resource for accessing the basic electrical engineering knowledge you need for your work. Whether you're an experienced engineer who appreciates an occasional refresher in key areas, or a student preparing to enter the field, Electrical Engineering: A Pocket Reference provides quick and easy access to fundamental principles and their applications. You also find an extensive collection of time-saving equations that help simplify your daily projects.Supported with more than 500 diagrams and figures, 60 tables, and an extensive index, this uniq

  11. Perl/Tk Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Lidie, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    The Perl/Tk Pocket Reference is a companion volume to Learning Perl/Tk, an O'Reilly Animal Guide. Learning Perl/Tk is a tutorial for Perl/Tk, the extension to Perl for creating graphical user interfaces. With Tk, Perl programs can be window-based rather than command-line based, with buttons, entry fields, listboxes, menus, scrollbars, balloons, tables, dialogs, and more. And Perl/Tk programs run on UNIX and Windows-based computers. This small book is a handy reference guide geared toward the advanced Perl/Tk programmer. Novice Perl/Tk programmers will find that its compact size gives th

  12. JavaScript Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Flanagan, David

    1998-01-01

    JavaScript is a powerful, object-based scripting language that can be embedded directly in HTML pages. It allows you to create dynamic, interactive Web-based applications that run completely within a Web browser -- JavaScript is the language of choice for developing Dynamic HTML (DHTML) content. JavaScript can be integrated effectively with CGI and Java to produce sophisticated Web applications, although, in many cases, JavaScript eliminates the need for complex CGI scripts and Java applets altogether. The JavaScript Pocket Reference is a companion volume to JavaScript: The Definitive Guide

  13. Windows Vista Administrator's Pocket Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Stanek, William R

    2007-01-01

    Portable and precise, this pocket-sized guide delivers immediate answers for the day-to-day administration of Windows Vista. Zero in on core support and maintenance tasks using quick-reference tables, instructions, and lists. You'll get the precise information you need to solve problems and get the job done-whether you're at your desk or in the field! Get fast facts to: Install and configure Windows Vista-and optimize the user workspaceMaintain operating system components, hardware devices, and driversCreate user and group accounts-and control rights and permissionsAdminister group policy se

  14. Pocket atlas of radiographic anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, T.B.; Reif, E.; Stark, P.

    1993-01-01

    The 'Pocket Atlas of Radiographic Anatomy' presents 170 radiographs of the various body regions of adults, showing only the normal radiographic anatomy. Each radiograph is supplemented on the opposite page by a drawing of the particular body region. There is no commenting text, but the drawings are provided with captions in English. The atlas is a useful guide for interpreting radiographs. The pictures are arranged in chapters entitled as follows: Skeletal Imaging (skull, spine, upper extremity), lower extremity; Miscellaneous Plain Films (chest, mammogram, trachea, lung tomograms); Contrast Examinations (gastrointestinal tract, intravenous contrast examinations, arthrography, angiography); Special Examinations (myelograms, lymphangiograms, bronchograms, sialograms). (UWA). 348 figs [de

  15. Pocket atlas of dental radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasler, F.A. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiology, Dental Institute; Visser, H. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Dental School

    2007-07-01

    In this age of highly specialized medical imaging, an examination of the teeth and alveolar bone is almost unthinkable without the use of radiographs. This highly informative and easy-to-read book with a collection of 798 radiographs, tables, and photos provides a myriad of problem-solving tips concerning the fundamentals of radiographic techniques, quality assurance, image processing, radiographic anatomy, and radiographic diagnosis. Information is easy to find, enabling the reader to literally get a grasp of essential new knowledge in next to no time. The dental practice team now has a pocket 'consultant' at its fingertips, providing practical ways to incorporate new technique into daily practice. (orig.)

  16. Periodontal disease and type I diabetes mellitus: Associations with glycemic control and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajita Meenawat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate periodontal health status in patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1 and to establish a correlation between metabolic control and periodontal health status. Materials and Methods: Periodontal health parameters namely plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, probing pocket depth (PPD and clinical attachment loss (CAL were recorded in 28 patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1 and 20 healthy controls. Diabetes history was recorded based on the information provided by the physician and it included date of diagnosis, duration, age of diagnosis, latest values of glycosylated haemoglobin and existing diabetic complications. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between periodontal parameters and degree of metabolic control, the duration of the disease and the appearance of complications. Results: The periodontal health in the diabetic group was compromised and they had greater bleeding index (P < 0.001, probing pocket depth (P < 0.001 and clinical attachment level (P = 0.001. Patients diagnosed for diabetes for shorter duration of time (4-7 years showed bleeding index-disease severity correlation to be 1.760 ΁ 0.434. Conclusion: Periodontal disease was more evident in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients and periodontal inflammation is greatly increased in subjects with longer disease course, poor metabolic control and diabetic complications.

  17. Isolation and characterization of oral Actinomyces strain from patients with periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshraghi S.

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available "nAbstract: Actinomyces species are normal residents of the mouth cavity, gastrointestinal tract and female genital tract. The genus consists of gram-positive bacteria, strictly anaerobic or microaerophilic. The bacteria are opportunists with a low virulence potential that cause actinomycosis only when the normal mucosal barriers are disrupted. The main purpose of this study was the isolation of Actinomyces strains and determining of their role in periodontal diseases. The present study was carried out on 100 patients with periodontal diseases referred to the Periodontic Department of Faculty of Dentistry. The sampling was done in 6 months with isolation of oral Actinomyces from microbial plaque and periodontal pocket. The samples were selected based on the following criteria: periodontal plaque with deep pocket (>3 mm, no antibiotic therapy for a period of at least two weeks, and lack of systemic diseases. One strain of Actinomyces viscosus and two strains of Actinomyces naeslundii were isolated from the patients with gingivitis and periodontitis. Of the 100 patients with gingivitis and periodontitis, aged between 18-57 years old, 46% were males and 54% were females. The peak incidence of the diseases (35% was in the third age group (31-40 and the lowest incidence (10% was in the first age group (<20. Forty patients (40% complained of gingival disease and its bleeding with lower incidence of (42.5% in female.

  18. Long-term efficacy of microbiology-driven periodontal laser-assisted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, F S; Fanti, E; Rosati, C; Martelli, M; Bacci, G; Martelli, M L; Medico, E

    2016-03-01

    Periodontitis represents a highly prevalent health problem, causing severe functional impairment, reduced quality of life and increased risk of systemic disorders, including respiratory, cardiovascular and osteoarticular diseases, diabetes and fertility problems. It is a typical example of a multifactorial disease, where a polymicrobial infection inducing chronic inflammation of periodontal tissues is favoured by environmental factors, life style and genetic background. Since periodontal pathogens can colonise poorly vascularised niches, antiseptics and antibiotics are typically associated with local treatments to manage the defects, with unstable outcomes especially in early-onset cases. Here, the results of a retrospective study are reported, evaluating the efficacy of a protocol (Periodontal Biological Laser-Assisted Therapy, Perioblast™) by which microbial profiling of periodontal pockets is used to determine the extent and duration of local neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiation plus conventional treatment. The protocol was applied multicentrically on 2683 patients, and found to produce a significant and enduring improvement of all clinical and bacteriological parameters, even in aggressive cases. Microbiome sequencing of selected pockets revealed major population shifts after treatment, as well as strains potentially associated with periodontitis in the absence of known pathogens. This study, conducted for the first time on such a large series, clearly demonstrates long-term efficacy of microbiology-driven non-invasive treatment of periodontal disease.

  19. Characterization of specimens obtained by different sampling methods for evaluation of periodontal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ayako; Sogabe, Kaoru; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Okamoto, Masaaki; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2017-12-27

    Quantitative analysis of periodontal bacteria is considered useful for clinical diagnosis, evaluation and assessment of the risk of periodontal disease. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of sampling of saliva, supragingival and subgingival plaque for evaluation of periodontal bacteria. From each of 12 subjects, i) subgingival plaque was collected from the deepest pocket using a sterile paper point, ii) stimulated whole saliva was collected after chewing gum, and iii) supragingival plaque was collected using a tooth brush. These samples were sent to the medical examination laboratory for quantitative analysis of the counts of three periodontal bacterial species: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia. The proportions of these bacteria in subgingival plaque were higher than those in saliva or supragingival plaque, but lower in subgingival plaque than in saliva or supragingival plaque. In several cases, periodontal bacteria were below the levels of detection in subgingival plaque. We concluded that samples taken from subgingival plaque may be more useful for evaluating the proportion of periodontal bacteria in deep pockets than is the case for other samples. Therefore, for evaluation of periodontal bacteria, clinicians should consider the characteristics of the specimens obtained using different sampling methods.

  20. Role of bacteria in leukocyte adhesion deficiency-associated periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishengallis, George; Moutsopoulos, Niki M

    2016-05-01

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency Type I (LAD-I)-associated periodontitis is an aggressive form of inflammatory bone loss that has been historically attributed to lack of neutrophil surveillance of the periodontal infection. However, this form of periodontitis has proven unresponsive to antibiotics and/or mechanical removal of the tooth-associated biofilm. Recent studies in LAD-I patients and relevant animal models have shown that the fundamental cause of LAD-I periodontitis involves dysregulation of a granulopoietic cytokine cascade. This cascade includes interleukin IL-23 (IL-23) and IL-17 that drive inflammatory bone loss in LAD-I patients and animal models and, moreover, foster a nutritionally favorable environment for bacterial growth and development of a compositionally unique microbiome. Although the lack of neutrophil surveillance in the periodontal pockets might be expected to lead to uncontrolled bacterial invasion of the underlying connective tissue, microbiological analyses of gingival biopsies from LAD-I patients did not reveal tissue-invasive infection. However, bacterial lipopolysaccharide was shown to translocate into the lesions of LAD-I periodontitis. It is concluded that the bacteria serve as initial triggers for local immunopathology through translocation of bacterial products into the underlying tissues where they unleash the dysregulated IL-23-IL-17 axis. Subsequently, the IL-23/IL-17 inflammatory response sustains and shapes a unique local microbiome which, in turn, can further exacerbate inflammation and bone loss in the susceptible host. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ethnic inequalities in periodontal disease among British adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Angulo, Elsa K; Bernabé, Eduardo; Marcenes, Wagner

    2016-11-01

    To explore ethnic inequalities in periodontal disease among British adults, and the role of socioeconomic position (SEP) in those inequalities. We analysed data on 1925 adults aged 16-65 years, from the East London Oral Health Inequality (ELOHI) Study, which included a random sample of adults living in an ethnically diverse and socially deprived area. Participants completed a questionnaire and were clinically examined for the number of teeth with periodontal pocket depth (PPD)≥4 mm and loss of attachment (LOA)≥4 mm. Ethnic inequalities in periodontal measures were assessed in negative binomial regression models before and after adjustment for demographic (gender and age groups) and SEP indicators (education and socioeconomic classification). Compared to White British, Pakistani, Indian, Bangladeshi and Asian Others had more teeth with PPD≥4 mm whereas White East European, Black African and Bangladeshi had more teeth with LOA≥4 mm, after adjustments for demographic and SEP measures. The association of ethnicity with periodontal disease was moderated by education, but not by socioeconomic classification. Stratified analysis showed that ethnic disparities in the two periodontal measures were limited to more educated groups. This study showed considerable ethnic disparities in periodontal disease between and within the major ethnic categories. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Discrimination of periodontal diseases using diffuse reflectance spectral intensity ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra Sekhar, Prasanth; Betsy, Joseph; Presanthila, Janam; Subhash, Narayanan

    2012-02-01

    This clinical study was to demonstrate the applicability of diffuse reflectance (DR) intensity ratio R620/R575 in the quantification and discrimination of periodontitis and gingivitis from healthy gingiva. DR spectral measurements were carried out with white-light illumination from 70 healthy sites in 30 healthy volunteers, and 63 gingivitis- and 58 periodontitis-infected sites in 60 patients. Clinical parameters such as probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, and gingival index were recorded in patient population. Diagnostic accuracies for discrimination of gingivitis and periodontitis from healthy gingiva were determined by comparison of spectral signatures with clinical parameters. Divergence of average DR spectral intensity ratio between control and test groups was studied using analysis of variance. The mean DR spectrum on normalization at 620 nm showed marked differences between healthy tissue, gingivitis, and periodontitis. Hemoglobin concentration and apparent SO2 (oxygen saturation) were also calculated for healthy, gingivitis, and periodontitis sites. DR spectral intensities at 545 and 575 nm showed a decreasing trend with progression of disease. Among the various DR intensity ratios studied, the R620/R575 ratio provided a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94% for discrimination of healthy tissues from gingivitis and a sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 100% for discrimination of gingivitis from periodontitis.

  3. Black-pigmented anaerobic bacteria associated with ovine periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsanelli, Ana C; Gaetti-Jardim, Elerson; Schweitzer, Christiane M; Viora, Lorenzo; Busin, Valentina; Riggio, Marcello P; Dutra, Iveraldo S

    2017-05-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial infectious disease that causes occlusion change, tooth loss, difficulty in rumination, and premature culling of animals. This study aimed to detect species of the genera Porphyromonas and Prevotella present in the periodontal pocket of sheep with lesions deeper than 5mm (n=14) and in the gingival sulcus of animals considered periodontally healthy (n=20). The presence of microorganisms was evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers for Porphyromonas asaccharolytica, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas gulae, Prevotella buccae, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella loescheii, Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella nigrescens, Prevotella oralis, and Prevotella tannerae. Prevalence and risk analysis were performed using Student's t-test and Spearman's correlation. Among the Prevotella and Porphyromonas species detected in the periodontal lesions of sheep, P. melaninogenica (85.7%), P. buccae (64.3%), P. gingivalis (50%), and P. endodontalis (50%) were most prevalent. P. gingivalis (15%) and P. oralis (10%) prevailed in the gingival sulcus. P. gulae and P. tannerae were not detected in the 34 samples studied. Data evaluation by t-test verified that occurrence of P. asaccharolytica, P. endodontalis, P. gingivalis, P. buccae, P. intermedia, P. melalinogenica, and P. nigrescens correlated with sheep periodontitis. The findings of this study will be an important contribution to research on pathogenesis of sheep periodontitis and development of its control measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. ASSOCIATION OF THE BONE LOSS WITH MAIN CLINICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velitchka Dosseva-Panova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Literature data have reported that certain Gram-negative anaerobe bacteria from the subgingival environment are important etiological agents of chronic periodontal disease. Based on published criteria identifying periodontal pathogens, major evidences has been shown for: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia; moderate evidences for: Prevotella intermedia, Peptostreptococcus /Micromonas/ micros, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Eubacterium nodatum, Campylobacter rectus, and spirochetes (Treponema denticola. Microbiological data has been suggested by several studies as a useful indicator of disease progression, selection of an adjunctive antimicrobial administration, healing assessment and disease recurrence. The results of this study demonstrate statistically significant correlation between periodontal attachment loss and the prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Peptostreptococcus (Micromonas micros in deep periodontal pockets of severe chronic periodontitis patients.

  5. The Application of Microencapsulation Techniques in the Treatment of Endodontic and Periodontal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Blanco Méndez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of intracanal and periodontal infections, the local application of antibiotics and other therapeutic agents in the root canal or in periodontal pockets may be a promising approach to achieve sustained drug release, high antimicrobial activity and low systemic side effects. Microparticles made from biodegradable polymers have been reported to be an effective means of delivering antibacterial drugs in endodontic and periodontal therapy. The aim of this review article is to assess recent therapeutic strategies in which biocompatible microparticles are used for effective management of periodontal and endodontic diseases. In vitro and in vivo studies that have investigated the biocompatibility or efficacy of certain microparticle formulations and devices are presented. Future directions in the application of microencapsulation techniques in endodontic and periodontal therapies are discussed.

  6. Estimation of salivary tumor necrosis factor-alpha in chronic and aggressive periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Sheeja S; Thomas, Hima; Jayakumar, N D; Sankari, M; Lakshmanan, Reema

    2015-09-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic bacterial infection characterized by persistent inflammation, connective tissue breakdown and alveolar bone destruction mediated by pro-inflammatory mediators. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is an important pro-inflammatory mediator that produced causes destruction of periodontal tissues. The aim of the study is to estimate the salivary TNF-α in chronic and aggressive periodontitis and control participants and further correlate the levels with clinical parameter such as gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment loss. The study population consisted of 75 subjects age ranging from 25 to 55 years attending the outpatient section of Department of Periodontics, Saveetha Dental College and Hospital. The study groups included Groups 1, 2, and 3 with participants with healthy periodontium (n = 25), generalized chronic periodontitis (n = 25) and generalized aggressive periodontitis (n = 25), respectively. Salivary samples from the participants were used to assess the TNF-α levels using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GI and PI were found to be significantly higher in chronic and aggressive periodontitis compared to the controls. The mean TNF-α value in chronic periodontitis patients (12.92 ± 17.21 pg/ml) was significantly higher than in control subjects (2.15 ± 3.60 pg/ml). Whereas, in aggressive periodontitis patients the mean TNF-α (7.23 ± 7.67) were not significantly different from chronic periodontitis or healthy subjects. Among periodontitis participants, aggressive periodontitis subjects exhibited a significant positive correlation between the salivary TNF-α and PPD. Salivary TNF-α levels are significantly higher in chronic periodontitis than in healthy subjects, but there was no significant correlation with the clinical parameters.

  7. Validity of Self-Reported Periodontal Disease Questionnaire among Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiga, Sakura; Ohba, Takashi; Tanoue, Daisuke; Kawase, Hiromi; Katoh, Takahiko; Katabuchi, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Kumamoto RAINBOW Project, a multifaceted implementation of the prevention of premature labor, we investigated pregnant women's oral health status and assessed the validity of a self-reported periodontal disease questionnaire. We examined the oral health status of pregnant women and asked them for subjective descriptions of symptoms of periodontitis both in the first and the second half of their pregnancy in Kumamoto Prefecture from August 2012 to January 2014. The Community Periodontal Index (CPI) was used to assess the periodontal condition, and women having periodontal pockets with depths of ≥4 mm were catecogorized as having periodontitis. The results were the scores of the self-questionnaire for periodontal disease prepared by the Japan Dental Association. Of the 9,527 pregnant women who received periodontal check- ups during the first half of pregnancy, 32 percent were diagnosed as having periodontitis. The self-questionnaire had a sensitivity of 51.2% and a specificity of 62.9% for pregnant women to predict their periodontal disease. Then, we evaluated the importance of each question by logistic regression analysis and extracted the useful items. An increased sensitivity (79.9%) was obtained with the best of the modified questionnaire. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the evaluation of the usefulness of the self-reported periodontal disease questionnaire for pregnant women. The current self-questonnaire used for the general adult population was less sensitive for pregnant women. Our modified questionnaire showed an improved sensitivity for diagnosing periodontitis, but its specificity remained low. A specialized self-questionnaire for periodontal disease in pregnant women should be designed.

  8. Faktor-Faktor Periodontal yang Harus Dipertimbangkan pada Perawatan dengan Gigi Tiruan Cekat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riemawati A. Lesmana

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the treatment with fixed restoration especially the crowns and bridges is to maintain the remaining teeth of dentition and the whole masticatory system. This treatment can be successful if periodontal consideration of the abutments and the fixed restoration is given. The periodontal of a tooth are gingiva, periodontal ligament, alveolar bone and cementum. The most common type of periodontal disease is gingivitis that usually caused by bacterial plaque attached to tooth or crown surface. The other disease that involve the tooth supporting tissue is called periodontitis, it can be preceded by long standing chronic gingivitis. Trauma from occlusion presents two predominant clinical features, increasing tooth mobility and widening of the periodontal space. Periodontal pocket is a disease of periodontal attachment unit that is caused by the apical migration of the epithelial attachment. Periodontal atrophy occurs as a result of repeated traumatic that cause reduction in height of periodontium. All gingival and periodontal diseases and trauma from occlusion must be eliminated before restorative procedures are begun. Dental fixed restoration and periodontal health are inseparably interrelated. The adaptation of the margins and the contours of the restoration, the surface smoothness, the embrasure and the pontic of a bridge, have a critical biologic impact on the gingiva and supporting periodontal tissue. Dental fixed restoration therefore play a significant role in maintaining gingival and periodontal health. Plaque control must be maintained regularly and the occlusion must be checked at regular intervals after the fixed prosthesis is inserted. The occlusal relationships change with time as the result of micromovement of the natural dentition and the wear of restorative materials.

  9. Tannerella forsythia and the HLA-DQB1 allele are associated with susceptibility to periodontal disease in Japanese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura-Kuroki, Junko; Yamashita, Kie; Shimooka, Shohachi

    2009-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a multiple factor disease caused by genetic factors, environmental factors, and periodontal bacteria (periodontal pathogens). The present study aimed to elucidate the risk factors for periodontal disease in Japanese adolescents. Subjects (11-16 years old) were classified into three groups: localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP), periodontal attachment loss (PAL), and periodontally healthy (PH) groups. Genomic DNA isolated from the buccal mucosa was used for single-nucleotide polymorphism analyses of the candidate genes (interleukin-1alpha-889; interleukin-1alpha +4845; interleukin-1beta +3954; an immunoglobulin G Fc gamma receptor, FcgammaRIIa-R/H131; and a human leukocyte antigen class II allele, HLA-DQB1) of aggressive periodontitis. Subgingival plaque samples obtained from the same subjects were used for 16S rRNAbased polymerase chain reaction analysis of five important periodontal pathogens (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia). Tannerella forsythia was detected in the deepest periodontal pockets in all subjects in the LAP and PAL groups. The prevalence of an atypical BamHI restriction site in HLA-DQB1 of the LAP group was significantly higher than that in the PH and PAL groups. Furthermore, all subjects who had the atypical BamHI restriction site in HLA-DQB1 had T. forsythia infection. These results suggested that T. forsythia is associated with periodontal disease in Japanese adolescents and also suggested that HLA-DQB1 is related to LAP and is associated with T. forsythia infection.

  10. Recurrent periodontal abscess associated with "teeth as a tool".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, G Subraya; Singh, Vishal; Bhat, K Mahalinga

    2012-01-01

    We report an unusual case of recurrent periodontal abscess in a 31-year-old male electrician due to his habit of using his teeth as a tool for stripping electrical wires. The patient was not aware of the consequences of this habit. Clinically, there was presence of moderate depth of periodontal pocket around the tooth and, radiographically, there was a vertical defect mesial to the involved teeth. The patient was educated about the consequences of his habit and surgical treatment was undertaken. A papilla preservation flap with regenerative periodontal surgical procedure was done, orthodontic and restorative treatment was planned at the follow-up. This case highlights the importance of eliciting a proper and complete personal history, including occupational details. In our patient these details helped us correlate the destruction of the periodontium to the unusual etiology.

  11. Recurrent periodontal abscess associated with "teeth as a tool"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Subraya Bhat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of recurrent periodontal abscess in a 31-year-old male electrician due to his habit of using his teeth as a tool for stripping electrical wires. The patient was not aware of the consequences of this habit. Clinically, there was presence of moderate depth of periodontal pocket around the tooth and, radiographically, there was a vertical defect mesial to the involved teeth. The patient was educated about the consequences of his habit and surgical treatment was undertaken. A papilla preservation flap with regenerative periodontal surgical procedure was done, orthodontic and restorative treatment was planned at the follow-up. This case highlights the importance of eliciting a proper and complete personal history, including occupational details. In our patient these details helped us correlate the destruction of the periodontium to the unusual etiology.

  12. A Filifactor alocis-centered co-occurrence group associates with periodontitis across different oral habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Menghui; Wang, Guoyang; Qi, Zhengnan; Bridgewater, Laura; Zhao, Liping; Tang, Zisheng; Pang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent polymicrobial disease worldwide, yet the synergistic pattern of the multiple oral pathogens involved is still poorly characterized. Here, saliva, supragingival and subgingival plaque samples from periodontitis patients and periodontally healthy volunteers were collected and profiled with 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Different oral habitats harbored significantly different microbiota, and segregation of microbiota composition between periodontitis and health was observed as well. Two-step redundancy analysis identified twenty-one OTUs, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Filifactor alocis, as potential pathogens that were significantly associated with periodontitis and with two periodontitis diagnostic parameters (pocket depth and attachment loss) in both saliva and supragingival plaque habitats. Interestingly, pairwise correlation analysis among the 21 OTUs revealed that Filifactor alocis was positively correlated with seven other putative pathogens (R > 0.6, P periodontitis patients. This bacterial cluster showed a higher diagnostic value for periodontitis than did any individual potential pathogens, especially in saliva. Thus, our study identified a potential synergistic ecological pattern involving eight co-infecting pathogens across various oral habitats, providing a new framework for understanding the etiology of periodontitis and developing new diagnoses and therapies. PMID:25761675

  13. The Association between Periodontal Disease and Preterm Low Birthweight in Kosovo

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    Kastriot Meqa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Periodontal diseases have a high prevalence worldwide. Existing evidence support the concept that gingivitis and periodontitis are potentially infectious and they present inflammatory reservoirs that can be threatening to the fetoplacental unit. The objective of this study was to compare the periodontal status between women with normal delivery and those with preterm low-birthweight delivery. Materials and Methods: This study included 200 postpartum women whose periodontal and obstetrical parameters were taken. The periodontal condition was assessed bedside according to the modified criteria established by Machtei, while the birthweight and gestational age were assessed according to the World Health Organization criteria. Results: Women with periodontitis are statistically at 3.2 times higher risk to deliver a child with low weight, and at 3.4 times higher risk to deliver preterm, compared to women without periodontitis. The women with preterm low-birthweight babies had deeper periodontal pockets (2.49mm ± 0.49mm than women with normal delivery (2.26mm ± 0.49mm. Conclusions: Periodontal disease in pregnant women with a reservoir of organisms and their products can be considered a risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcome.

  14. Periodontal microbioma and rheumatoid arthritis: The role of Porhyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzi, L; Rania, S; Vinci, R; Spadari, F; Croveri, F; Scognamiglio, C; Farronato, D; Tettamanti, L; Tagliabue, A; Silvestre-Rangil, J; Bellintani, C

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis is a disease, which can be described as an autoimmune response after molecular mimicry caused by infective agents. The current study aims at evaluating the correlation between Rhematoid Arthritis (RA) and Periodontal Disease (PD), with special attention to the microbioma detected in the gums. Thirty-four patients with RD were recruited into the current study. Among rheumatic parameters, Rheumatoid Factor (RF), anti-citrullinated protein antibody (CCP), HLA-BDR1 and DAS28 were collected. A dental clinician evaluated the periodontal screening record (PSR). Afterwards, 1 paper cone was inserted for 30 seconds into the gingival sulcus then sent to the laboratory for evaluation. Quantitative PCR of 16S rRNA genes was performed with the hydrolysis probes method to identify and evaluate the amount Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythensis, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Campylobacter rectus. There were no statistical differences in the composition of oral microbioma between PSR groups. There were no statistical significant differences between bacterial loads and serum values. On the contrary, a positive correlation was found between the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis in periodontal pockets on one side and RF and CCP on the other. Therefore, the presence of Porhyromonas gingivalis in periodontal pockets is associated to RA inflammatory indices.

  15. Visualizing electron pockets in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tanmoy; Markiewicz, R. S.; Bansil, A.; Balatsky, A. V.

    2012-06-01

    Fingerprints of the electron pocket in cuprates have been obtained only in numerous magnetotransport measurements, but its absence in spectroscopic observations poses a long-standing mystery. We develop a theoretical tool to provide ways to detect electron pockets via spectroscopies including scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) spectra, inelastic neutron scattering (INS), and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). We show that the quasiparticle-interference (QPI) pattern, measured by STM, shows an additional seven q vectors associated with the scattering on the electron pocket than that on the hole pocket. Furthermore, the Bogolyubov quasiparticle scatterings of the electron pocket lead to a second magnetic resonance mode in the INS spectra at a higher resonance energy. Finally, we reanalyze some STM, INS, and ARPES experimental data of several cuprates which dictates the direct fingerprints of electron pockets in these systems.

  16. Association between blood cholesterol level with periodontal status of coronary heart disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valensia, Rosy; Masulili, Sri Lelyati C.; Lessang, Robert; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is an abnormal narrowing of heart arteries associated with local accumulation of lipids, in the form of cholesterol and triglycerides. Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory that suggests link to the development of CHD. In periodontitis have been reported changes in lipid profile, include increased of cholesterol levels of blood. Objective: to analyse correlation between blood cholesterol level with periodontal status of CHD and non CHD subjects. Methods: Periodontal status and blood cholesterol level of 60 CHD and 40 non CHD subjects was measured. Result: Blood cholesterol level in CHD subjects differs from non CHD subjects (p=0.032). Blood cholesterol level correlates with pocket depth (p=0.003) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) (p=0.000) in CHD subjects. Blood cholesterol level correlates with pocket depth (p=0.010) in non CHD subjects. There is no significant correlation between blood cholesterol level and bleeding on probing (BOP) in CHD subjects. There is no significant correlation between blood cholesterol level with BOP and CAL in non CHD subjects. Conclusion: Blood cholesterol level in control group is higher than CHD patients. Blood cholesterol level positively associated with pocket depth (r=0.375) and CAL (r=0.450) in CHD patients. Blood cholesterol level is positively associated with pocket depth (r=0.404) in control group.

  17. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN INITIAL PROBING DEPTH AND CHANGES IN THE CLINICAL PARAMETERS FOLLOWING NON-SURGICAL PERIODONTAL TREATMENT IN CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS

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    Süleyman Emre MESELİ

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between initial probing depth (IPD and changes in clinical parameters following non-surgical periodontal treatment (NPT in chronic periodontitis patients. Subjects and Methods: A total of 1672 periodontal pockets having 3mm≤IPD≤9mm of depth in 15 chronic periodontitis patients were included. NPT consisting of oral hygiene instructions, scaling and root planing was applied in two sessions. Probing depth (PD, clinical attachment level, gingival recessions (GR were measured before and eight weeks after treatment. Pocket sites were grouped according to their IPD and root number as single- or multi-rooted teeth. Results: Other than the sites having 3 mm IPD, PD reduction and GR increase were significant in all groups (p<0.001. Attachment gains (AG were significant in all single-rooted teeth (p<0.001 again except those having IPD=3mm. However, AG was significant in multi-rooted teeth having only 7mm≤IPD≤9mm (p<0.05. Positive correlations were observed between IPD and PD reduction, GR increase and AG in single-rooted teeth (p<0.001. Furthermore, positive correlations were found between IPD and PD reduction and GR increase in multi-rooted teeth (p<0.001, but there was no correlation between IPD and AG. Conclusion: NPT may lead to positive association between IPD and PD reduction as well as GR increase, which is independent from tooth root anatomy.

  18. Ozone therapy in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-02-22

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics.

  19. Relationship between quantitative measurement of Porphyromonas gingivalis on dental plaque with periodontal status of patients with coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwiyanti, Stephani; Soeroso, Yuniarti; Sunarto, Hari; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Coronary heart disease is a narrowing of coronary artery due to plaque build-up. [1] Chronic periodontitis increases risk of cardiovascular disease. P.gingivalis is linked to both diseases. Objective: to analyse quantitative difference of P.gingivalis on dental plaque and its relationship with periodontal status of CHD patient and control. Methods: Periodontal status of 66 CHD patient and 40 control was checked. Subgingival plaque was isolated and P.gingivalis was measured using real-time PCR. Result: P.gingivalis of CHD patient differs from control. P.gingivalis is linked to pocket depth of CHD patient. Conclusion: P.gingivalis count of CHD patient is higher than control. P.gingivalis count is not linked to any periodontal status, except for pocket depth of CHD patient.

  20. The pocket dictionary of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlhaus, O.; Boldt, G.; Gonsior, B.; Klein, K.; Ziburske, H.

    1981-01-01

    The pocket dictionary of energy does not only address the interested amateur but also students, pupils, teachers, scientists, technicians, and polititcians in like manner. The dictionary contains ca. 900 key-words from the fields of energy, consumption, energy types, energy deposits, energy programmes, energy industry, thermal insulation, governmental aids for energy conservation measures, heating cost calculation, energy utilization and energy conservation. The problems of the costs and efficiency of energy conversion, energy pricing, the promotion of research projects, the rentability of heating devices or insulation, the sanitation of old buildings, governmental aids by subsidies or tax abatement according to the modernization and energy conservation law etc., as well as the problem of pollution and the endangering of the environment by exhaust air, waste heat, ash and litter are emphasized particularly. Considering the space available the criterion for the selection of the key-words was not a scientific completeness but the provision of a fundamental understanding of the matter. (orig.) [de

  1. Systemic antibiotics in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slots, Jørgen

    2004-11-01

    This position paper addresses the role of systemic antibiotics in the treatment of periodontal disease. Topical antibiotic therapy is not discussed here. The paper was prepared by the Research, Science and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology. The document consists of three sections: 1) concept of antibiotic periodontal therapy; 2) efficacy of antibiotic periodontal therapy; and 3) practical aspects of antibiotic periodontal therapy. The conclusions drawn in this paper represent the position of the American Academy of Periodontology and are intended for the information of the dental profession.

  2. Chronic stress accelerates ligature-induced periodontitis by suppressing glucocorticoid receptor-α signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huaixiu; Xu, Minguang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shisen; Gu, Jing; Lin, Songshan; Zhao, Lisheng

    2016-03-25

    Periodontitis is a common chronic inflammatory disease. Recent studies have shown that chronic stress (CS) might modulate periodontal disease, but there are few models of CS-induced periodontitis, and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study established a rat model of periodontitis associated with CS induced by nylon thread ligatures. The severity of periodontitis was evaluated in this model by radiographic and pathological examination. The inflammatory reaction indicated by the elevated serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and glucocorticoid receptor-α (GR-α) expressions were detected by reverse transcriptase-PCR and western blotting. Open-field tests and serum corticosterone were used to evaluate CS. The results showed that CS induced behavioral changes and increased corticosterone levels of the animals with periodontitis. CS stimulation markedly increased alveolar bone loss, periodontal pocket depth and the number of plaques. It also enhanced the inflammatory reaction. These results suggest that CS accelerated the ligature-induced pathological changes associated with periodontitis. Further analysis of the mechanisms involved showed that GR-α expression was significantly downregulated in periodontal tissues of the animals undergoing CS. Blocking GR-α signaling in lipopolysaccharide and corticosteroid-treated human periodontal ligament fibroblast cells in vitro significantly upregulated the expression of p-Akt (protein kinase B) and TLR4, promoted nuclear factor-κB activity and increased levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. This research suggests that CS might accelerate the pathological progression of periodontitis by a GR-α signaling-mediated inflammatory response and that this may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of periodontal disease, particularly in patients with CS.

  3. Platelet-rich fibrin in the treatment of periodontal bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Aravindhan T; Chandran, Chitraa R

    2014-05-01

    Periodontitis is characterized by the formation of true pockets, bone loss and attachment loss. Various techniques have been attempted in the past to truly regenerate the lost periodontal structures, albeit with variable outcome. In this evolution, the technique being tried out widely is the use of platelet rich concentrates, namely platelet-rich fibrin (PRF). In this report, we present a case of surgical treatment of osseous bone defects namely two walled crater and dehiscence treated in posterior teeth with autologously prepared platelet rich fibrin mixed with hydroxy apatite bone graft and PRF in the form of a membrane. Our results showed clinical improvements in all the clinical parameters postoperatively namely the pocket depth reduction and gain in attachment level and hence, PRF can be used alone or in combination with the bone graft to yield successful clinical results in treating periodontal osseous defects. Platelet-rich fibrin is an effective alternative to platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in reconstructing bone defects.

  4. ORNL Pocket Meter Program: internal operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.D.; Miller, J.H.; Dunsmore, M.R.

    1984-12-01

    The ORNL Pocket Meter Program is designed for auditing the approximate photon radiation exposure of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) radiation workers. Although pocket meters are considered to be a secondary personnel dosimetry system at ORNL, they are valuable indicators of unplanned exposures if proper procedures are followed for testing, calibrating, deploying, wearing, processing, and recording data. 4 figures, 1 table

  5. Air pocket removal from downward sloping pipes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pothof, I.W.M.; Clemens, F.H.L.R.

    2012-01-01

    Air-water flow is an undesired condition in water pipelines and hydropower tunnels. Water pipelines and wastewater pressure mains in particular are subject to air pocket accumulation in downward sloping reaches, such as inverted siphons or terrain slopes. Air pockets cause energy losses and an

  6. Gingival crevicular fluid tissue/blood vessel-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurgan, Ş; Önder, C; Balcı, N; Fentoğlu, Ö; Eser, F; Balseven, M; Serdar, M A; Tatakis, D N; Günhan, M

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on clinical parameters and gingival crevicular fluid levels of tissue/blood vessel-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) in patients with periodontitis, with or without rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Fifteen patients with RA and chronic periodontitis (RA-P), 15 systemically healthy patients with chronic periodontitis (H-P) and 15 periodontally and systemically healthy volunteers (C) were included in the study. Plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing, gingival crevicular fluid t-PA and PAI-2 levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, serum C-reactive protein and disease activity score were evaluated at baseline and 3 mo after mechanical nonsurgical periodontal therapy. All periodontal clinical parameters were significantly higher in the RA-P and H-P groups compared with the C group (p periodontitis groups (p periodontitis and RA, nonsurgical periodontal therapy reduced the pretreatment gingival crevicular fluid t-PA levels, which were significantly correlated with gingival crevicular fluid PAI-2 levels. The significantly higher t-PA and PAI-2 gingival crevicular fluid levels in periodontal patients, regardless of systemic status, suggest that the plasminogen activating system plays a role in the disease process of periodontitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Detection and clonal analysis of anaerobic bacteria associated to endodontic-periodontal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Cássio V; Stipp, Rafael N; Fonseca, Douglas C; Pereira, Luciano J; Höfling, José F

    2011-12-01

    Microbial agents in root canal systems can induce periodontal inflammation. The aims of this study are to detect anaerobic microorganisms in endodontic-periodontal lesions, determine the genetic diversity among them, and assess the simultaneous colonization of the pulp and periodontal microenvironments by a single clone. Twenty-seven teeth of patients with endodontic-periodontal lesions were selected. Samples were spread on an agar-blood medium, the detection of each species was performed using a polymerase chain reaction, and the determination of the simultaneous presence of the same species in the microenvironments by one or more clones was determined using arbitrarily primed PCR. Prevotella intermedia (Pi) was the most prevalent species of the colonies in periodontal pockets, whereas Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) and Pi were the more prevalent in root canals. Isolates of Pi and Pg were simultaneously identified in root canals and periodontal pockets. Eighteen percent of teeth exhibited the simultaneous colonization by Pg, Tannerella forsythia (previously T. forsythensis), and Porphyromonas endodontalis in the pulp and periodontal microenvironments. The presence of these species was noted even in niches from which no colonies were isolated. Seventeen different genotypes were found in periodontal and pulp sites, with the majority of sites colonized by one or two different genotypes. A high degree of genotype similarity was found for samples of Pg isolated from only one site as well as for those isolated from both microenvironments. Different clones of Pi and Pg with a high intraspecific genotype similarity were found to colonize the same anatomic sites in endodontic-periodontal infections.

  8. A correlative study of the clinical and radiographic signs of periodontal disease in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.M.; Zontine, W.J.; Willits, N.H.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-four dogs admitted for routine teeth cleaning were selected arbitrarily to undergo a periodontal examination and a dental radiographic examination before the dental procedure. Data pertaining to the physical and radiographic manifestations of periodontal disease of 783 teeth were collected. All dogs had lesions consistent with periodontal disease, ranging from mild gingivitis and minimal plaque accumulation to severely inflamed gingiva, exuberant calculus formation, and root exposure. Of the 783 teeth examined, 153 (20%) had a pocket depth greater than or equal to 4 mm and less than or equal to 9 mm. Data regarding these teeth were subjected to statistical analysis. The clinical signs of plaque, calculus, mobility, pocket depth, and furcation were positively associated with radiographic signs of periodonta disease. The association between grossly evident gingivitis and radiographic signs of periodontal disease was not significant. Conditional probability analysis was applied to determine confidence intervals for the probability of a radiographic sign of periodontal disease occurring given that a clinical sign of periodontal disease occurs. (author)

  9. Academic Stress Influences Periodontal Health Condition and Interleukin-1 beta Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra O. Kuswandani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a risk factor for periodontal disease, causing increase levels of interleukin-1 beta that involve in periodontal destruction. Objective: To analyze the relationship between academic stress in residency program students conditions and levels of interleukin-1 beta in gingival crevicular fluid. Methods: Thirty eight subjects filled the questionnaire of Graduate Dental Environtmental Stress (GDES, periodontal examination and samples of gingival crevicular fluid were tested for interleukin-1 beta with the Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA test. Results: There were significant differences between academic stress to periodontal tissue in oral hygiene (p=0.038, bleeding on probing index (p=0.02, but no significant differences in pocket depth and loss of attachment (p=0.972. There were significant differences between academic stress to levels of interleukin-1 beta (p=0.03, but no significant differences between levels of interleukin-1 beta to periodontal tissue in oral hygiene (p=0.465, bleeding on probing index (p=0.826, pocket depth (p=0.968, and loss of attachment (p=0.968. Conclusion: Academic stress influences the periodontal risk factor and level of interleukin-1 beta.

  10. Prevalence of aggressive periodontitis in 15-18 years old schoolgirls in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghi R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Aggressive periodontitis is one of the periodontal diseases, which affects systemically healthy individuals usually under the age of 30 years old. The disease is characterized by rapid bone destruction which is not in accordance with the quantity of bacterial plaque. The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of aggressive periodontitis among 15-18 years old female students in Tehran high schools. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, , 2870 students were selected from all educational areas of Tehran during 1382-83 based on systematic clustered random sampling .Probing pocket depth on 6 areas of incisors and first molars were examined in each subject. Students with pocket depth equal to or more than 4 mm on more than one tooth were referred to Shahed Dental School for radiographic examination. For cases in which the distance between the crest of interdental septa and CEJs were equal to or more than 2 mm, full clinical and radiographic examination was performed. Results: Among the subjects of study, only 4 fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of localized aggressive periodontitis. Nobody was diagnosed with generalized aggressive periodontitis. The prevalence of aggressive periodontitis among 15-18 years old schoolgirls was 0.14%. Conclusion: The results of the present study were similar to previous studies with the same age groups and diagnostic criteria in other countries. For determination of total prevalence in Tehran, similar studies in schoolboys are recommended.

  11. PERIODONTAL CONDITIONS IN EUROPE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PILOT, T; MIYAZAKI, H

    The aim of the present overview is to evaluate the periodontal conditions in European populations. Study was made of a number of extensive surveys of periodontal diseases carried out in a number of European countries, primarily North West Europe. These surveys often provide considerable detail.

  12. Periodontitis and myocardial hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Hiroki; Kaneko, Makoto; Yoshida, Asuka; Aoyama, Norio; Akimoto, Shouta; Wakayama, Kouji; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Izumi, Yuichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Komuro, Issei

    2017-04-01

    There is a deep relationship between cardiovascular disease and periodontitis. It has been reported that myocardial hypertrophy may be affected by periodontitis in clinical settings. Although these clinical observations had some study limitations, they strongly suggest a direct association between severity of periodontitis and left ventricular hypertrophy. However, the detailed mechanisms between myocardial hypertrophy and periodontitis have not yet been elucidated. Recently, we demonstrated that periodontal bacteria infection is closely related to myocardial hypertrophy. In murine transverse aortic constriction models, a periodontal pathogen, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans markedly enhanced cardiac hypertrophy with matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation, while another pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) did not accelerate these pathological changes. In the isoproterenol-induced myocardial hypertrophy model, P.g. induced myocardial hypertrophy through Toll-like receptor-2 signaling. From our results and other reports, regulation of chronic inflammation induced by periodontitis may have a key role in the treatment of myocardial hypertrophy. In this article, we review the pathophysiological mechanism between myocardial hypertrophy and periodontitis.

  13. Genetic susceptibility of periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laine, M.L.; Crielaard, W.; Loos, B.G.

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review, we explore and summarize the peer-reviewed literature on putative genetic risk factors for susceptibility to aggressive and chronic periodontitis. A comprehensive literature search on the PubMed database was performed using the keywords ‘periodontitis’ or ‘periodontal

  14. ELECTRIC PULP TEST OF TEETH WITH PERIODONTAL DISEASE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsonko Uzunov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the research is to investigate the change in pulp vitality of teeth with periodontal disease using electric pulp tester (EPT. Methods: Subjected to observation were 108 patients with chronic periodontitis. Vitality of 805 teeth with periodontal pocket depth greater than 4 mm was studied by EPT. The research was conducted with EPT "Yonovit ". Results: The highest percentage of surveyed teeth (68.4% respond to the norm when they are tested with EPT – values between 3 μA and 10 μA . Teeth that respond to EPT with values ​​below 3 μA and between 35-100 μA are relatively equal - respectively 4.3% and 3.3%. With increased threshold of irritation – 10-35 μA react 23.4% of teeth. Small number of teeth have threshold of irritation over 100 μA - 0.6%. Conclusion: The value of EPT among periodontal damaged teeth depends on many factors - patient's age, extent of periodontal affect, group affiliation of teeth, etc.

  15. Pulpal changes associated with advanced periodontal disease: A histopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Siddharth; Galgali, Sushama R; Sheethal, H S; Priya, N S

    2017-01-01

    Over the past century, the dental literature has consistently reflected a controversy related to the effect of periodontal disease on the dental pulp. Nonetheless, practitioners are of the opinion that teeth having deep periodontal pockets show variable pulpal response, which may necessitate root canal treatment. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the changes in pulp due to advanced periodontal disease. Forty caries-free teeth affected with severe periodontitis were collected from patients aged between 18 and 55 years. The collected teeth were stored in formalin for 24 h and were then decalcified and examined histologically after staining with hematoxylin and eosin to note the changes that occurred in pulp. Pulpal calcification (52.62%) and partial necrosis of pulp (52.62%) were found to be the most common findings. Inflammation, which was found in 47.38% of the cases, ranged from mild to severe in most sections and was always chronic. Pulp with complete necrosis was seen in 26.32% of cases. Fibrosis and pulpal edema were seen in 36.84% of cases. In the presence of moderate to severe chronic periodontitis, degenerative changes such as inflammation, fibrosis, edema, calcification and necrosis were observed to variable degree.

  16. Comparison of periodontal manifestations in amphetamine and opioids' consumers

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    Masoome Eivazi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug abuse is one of the most important etiologic and deteriorating factors in periodontal disease. Amphetamines and opioids, the most commonly used drugs worldwide, play an important role in this regard. The aim of this study was to compare the periodontal status of amphetamines and opioids consumers in Kermanshah city, Iran in 1393. Methods: Three drug rehabilitation clinics were selected randomly in Kermanshah. According to inclusion and exclusion criteria, 20 amphetamine consumers and 20 opioid consumers were selected randomly and participated in this study. A questionnaire for drug use and periodontal variables was designed. The collected data were entered into SPSS-18 software and Mann-Whitney and t-test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Pocket depth, gingival index and gingival bleeding in amphetamines users were more than those in opioids consumers (P<0.021. Plaque index and gingival recession in opioids users were more than those of amphetamines consumers (P<0.001. The number of periodontal disease cases in amphetamines group were 13 persons (65% and in opioids group 8 persons (40%. Conclusion: Our study showed that periodontal hygine in amphetamine consumers was worse than opioid consumers.

  17. Laser technology to manage periodontal disease: a valid concept?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Samuel B; Mott, Angie

    2014-06-01

    Present day dental lasers can create oral environments conducive for periodontal repair. With the bacterial etiology of periodontitis and the resulting host inflammatory reaction, clinicians continue to search for therapeutic modalities to assist in the non-surgical management of periodontal disease. Traditional chairside therapies consist of mechanical debridement with manual and/or ultrasonic instrumentation with the objective of removing calculus, biofilm, and endotoxin from tooth root surfaces. Decreasing the microbial stimuli and associated end products decreases the inflammatory reaction and allows the host an opportunity to regenerate tissue through wound healing. The purpose of this article is to examine whether dental lasers, which have been in use for the past 3 decades, may augment traditional non-surgical periodontal therapy. Review of research publications related to lasers and non-surgical periodontics with attention focused on systematic studies. Studies utilizing laser technology may demonstrate positive effects on 1) selectively decreasing the biofilm environment, 2) removing calculus deposits and neutralizing endotoxin, 3) removing sulcular epithelium to assist in reattachment and decreased pocket depth, and 4) biostimulation for enhanced wound healing. Comparisons of studies to determine the difference between lasers and their respective effects on the periodontium are difficult to assess due to a wide variation of laser protocols. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Maxillary sinusitis and periapical abscess following periodontal therapy: a case report using three-dimensional evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Hao; Brunsvold, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Maxillary sinusitis may develop from the extension of periodontal disease. In this case, reconstructed three-dimensional images from multidetector spiral computed tomographs were helpful in evaluating periodontal bony defects and their relationship with the maxillary sinus. A 42-year-old woman in good general health presented with a chronic deep periodontal pocket on the palatal and interproximal aspects of tooth #14. Probing depths of the tooth ranged from 2 to 9 mm, and it exhibited a Class 1 mobility. Radiographs revealed a close relationship between the root apex and the maxillary sinus. The patient's periodontal diagnosis was localized severe chronic periodontitis. Treatment of the tooth consisted of cause-related therapy, surgical exploration, and bone grafting. A very deep circumferential bony defect at the palatal root of tooth #14 was noted during surgery. After the operation, the wound healed without incidence, but 10 days later, a maxillary sinusitis and periapical abscess developed. To control the infection, an evaluation of sinus and alveolus using computed tomographs was performed, systemic antibiotics were prescribed, and endodontic treatment was initiated. Two weeks after surgical treatment, the infection was relieved with the help of antibiotics and endodontic treatment. Bilateral bony communications between the maxillary sinus and periodontal bony defect of maxillary first molars were shown on three-dimensional computed tomographs. The digitally reconstructed images added valuable information for evaluating the periodontal defects. Three-dimensional images from spiral computed tomographs (CT) aided in evaluating and treating the close relationship between maxillary sinus disease and adjacent periodontal defects.

  19. Manipulation of Neutrophils by Porphyromonas gingivalis in the Development of Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochalska, Maja; Potempa, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the chronic periodontal disease is associated with a skewed host inflammatory response to periodontal pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis , that accounts for the majority of periodontal tissue damage. Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in periodontal pockets and depending on the stage of the disease, also plentiful PMNs are present in the inflamed gingival tissue and the gingival crevice. They are the most efficient phagocytes and eliminate pathogens by a variety of means, which are either oxygen-dependent or -independent. However, these secretory lethal weapons do not strictly discriminate between pathogens and host tissue. Current studies describe conflicting findings about neutrophil involvement in periodontal disease. On one hand literature indicate that hyper-reactive neutrophils are the main immune cell type responsible for this observed tissue damage and disease progression. Deregulation of neutrophil survival and functions, such as chemotaxis, migration, secretion of antimicrobial peptides or enzymes, and production of reactive oxygen species, contribute to observed tissue injury and the clinical signs of periodontal disease. On the other hand neutrophils deficiencies in patients and mice also result in periodontal phenotype. Therefore, P. gingivalis represents a periodontal pathogen that manipulates the immune responses of PMNs, employing several virulence factors, such as gingipains, serine proteases, lipid phosphatases, or fimbriae. This review will sum up studies devoted to understanding different strategies utilized by P. gingivalis to manipulate PMNs survival and functions in order to inhibit killing by a granular content, prolong inflammation, and gain access to nutrient resources.

  20. Manipulation of Neutrophils by Porphyromonas gingivalis in the Development of Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Sochalska

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of the chronic periodontal disease is associated with a skewed host inflammatory response to periodontal pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, that accounts for the majority of periodontal tissue damage. Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in periodontal pockets and depending on the stage of the disease, also plentiful PMNs are present in the inflamed gingival tissue and the gingival crevice. They are the most efficient phagocytes and eliminate pathogens by a variety of means, which are either oxygen-dependent or -independent. However, these secretory lethal weapons do not strictly discriminate between pathogens and host tissue. Current studies describe conflicting findings about neutrophil involvement in periodontal disease. On one hand literature indicate that hyper-reactive neutrophils are the main immune cell type responsible for this observed tissue damage and disease progression. Deregulation of neutrophil survival and functions, such as chemotaxis, migration, secretion of antimicrobial peptides or enzymes, and production of reactive oxygen species, contribute to observed tissue injury and the clinical signs of periodontal disease. On the other hand neutrophils deficiencies in patients and mice also result in periodontal phenotype. Therefore, P. gingivalis represents a periodontal pathogen that manipulates the immune responses of PMNs, employing several virulence factors, such as gingipains, serine proteases, lipid phosphatases, or fimbriae. This review will sum up studies devoted to understanding different strategies utilized by P. gingivalis to manipulate PMNs survival and functions in order to inhibit killing by a granular content, prolong inflammation, and gain access to nutrient resources.

  1. The relationship between recurrent aphthous stomatitis, and periodontal disease and Helicobacter Pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülseren, D; Karaduman, A; Kutsal, D; Nohutcu, R M

    2016-11-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common oral mucosal disease with unknown etiology. This cross-sectional study aimed to test the hypothesis that Helicobacter pylori and periodontal disease might play an etiological role in RAS. Dental plaque samples obtained from 38 patients with RAS and 43 healthy individuals via periodontal examinations were examined for H. pylori colonization. H. pylori was identified using the rapid urease test (RUT). The periodontal status of the patients and controls was based on the following periodontal parameters: periodontal pocket depth (PPD), the plaque index (PI), the gingival index (GI), and clinical attachment loss (CAL). RUT results were positive in 34 (89.5 %) of the 38 patients and 24 (55.8 %) of the 43 controls (P = 0.002). There were not any significant differences in mean PPD, PI, GI, or CAL between the patient and control groups (P > 0.05). Mean PPD, PI, GI, and CAL were higher in the RUT-positive RAS patients than in the RUT-negative patients (P > 0.05, for all). The present findings show that H. pylori might have played an etiological role in RAS and might have caused periodontal disease, but RAS was not associated with any of the periodontal parameters examined in this study. The present study indicates that H. pylori plays a role in the development of RAS, but periodontal diseases have no effect on it. Eradicating H. pylori might be useful to prevent RAS.

  2. CLINICAL CONSIDERATIONS ON THE EVALUATION OF PERIODONTAL THERAPY IN CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS

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    Anca Mihaela Stupu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the periodontal pathology of the pediatric pacient, the therapeutical management depends on an early, as precise as possible diagnosis, as well as on a correct evaluation of the causes and risk factors involved in such processes. The aim of the study: The paper discusses a clinicostatistical study devoted to the evaluation and comparison of the periodontal health condition of a group of children and teenagers subjected to a local etiological treatment. Materials and method: The experimental study was formed of 70 patients selected from the total number of patients having addressed a dentist. Over the whole period of the therapy, oral hygiene, the aspect of marginal gingiva, and the vitality of the teeth under treatment were carefully monitored. Comparisons between the initial and the final moment were based on: periodontal diagnosis, condition of marginal gingiva, number and depth of periodontal pockets, hygiene and dental mobility. Results: Improvement of the periodontal condition or its maintaining at the initial level was observed in patients with good or satisfactory oral hygiene, which was not the case of those with a scarce hygiene, in whom the periodontal problems evolved. Conclusions: Periodontal management should observe the basic principles of the initial causal, corrective and maintainance therapy. The main elements to be here considered are: age, the extent of patient’s involvement, his / her cooperation and motivation, and the support expressed by the family, all of them reflecting the periodontal diagnosis.

  3. Periodontal conditions, low birth weight and preterm birth among postpartum mothers in two tertiary health facilities in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muwazi, Louis; Rwenyonyi, Charles Mugisha; Nkamba, Moses; Kutesa, Annet; Kagawa, Mike; Mugyenyi, Godfrey; Kwizera, Godfrey; Okullo, Isaac

    2014-04-28

    Literature reports have indicated an increase in research evidence suggesting association between periodontal disease and the risk of pre-term birth (PTB) and low birth weight (LBW). Periodontal diseases in Uganda have been documented as a public health problem, but their association to adverse pregnancy outcomes is unknown. This study was conducted to assess the association between periodontital diseases in postpartum mothers and PTB and LBW of babies in Mulago and Mbarara referral hospitals. This was a cross sectional study using medical records, clinical examination and oral interview of mothers at the two tertiary health facilities. Mothers with singleton babies from Mulago (n = 300) and Mbarara Hospital (n = 100) were recruited for the study. The women were clinically examined for periodontal disease by 2 trained and calibrated dentists. Data on PTB and LBW were retrieved from medical records. The data were analyzed to determine the relationship between the four parameters for periodontal disease (bleeding gingiva, periodontal pockets, gingival recession and calculus with plaque deposits) and the adverse pregnancy outcomes. Frequency distribution was used to describe the data. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to study the association between the periodontal diseases and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Approximately 26% and 29% of the postpartum mothers examined had bleeding gingiva and periodontal pockets of 4 mm or more deep, respectively. Advanced periodontitis i.e. pocket depth ≥ 6 mm was recorded in 13 (3.6%) of the mothers. Calculus with plaque deposits were recorded in 86% (n = 343) of the mothers. Gingival recession was recorded in 9.0% of the mothers and significantly and directly related to birth weight (p Periodontal conditions of postpartum mothers in this study were found to be better than previously reported amongst the Ugandan population. Bivariate analysis showed a significant association only between gingival

  4. Periodontal Emergencies in General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadia, Reena; Ide, Mark

    2017-05-01

    Diagnosing and managing periodontal emergencies is a common part of general dental practice. This article summarises the presentation, aetiology and management of the key periodontal emergencies, including gingival abscess, periodontal abscess, peri-coronitis/peri-coronal abscess, perio-endo lesion/ abscess, necrotising gingivitis and periodontitis, acute herpetic gingivostomatitis, acute physical/chemical/thermal injury and subgingival root fracture.

  5. PRACTICAL PERIODONTAL SURGERY: AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna; Chandrashekar; Anuroopa; Senthil; Syed; Sandeep S; Kumuda; Ashwini

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of periodontal surgery in the treatment of periodontal diseases not yet been systematically evaluated. The objective of this review was to systematically evaluate the efficacy of periodontal surgical procedures in the various treatment modalities. Periodontal disease is multifaceted in nature and scope. The problems created due to this inflammatory condition are different eg. gingival enlargement, osseous deformities, mucogingival problem which ultimately may ...

  6. Definition of aggressive periodontitis in periodontal research. A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramírez, Valeria; Hach, Maria; López, Rodrigo

    2018-01-01

    . Consequently, considerable variation in the understanding of aggressive periodontitis can be anticipated. AIM: To systematically asses, the definitions of aggressive periodontitis reported in original periodontal research. METHODS: A systematic review of original research on aggressive periodontitis published.......7% of the publications no information is provided as to how the cases were defined. Many combinations of criteria for case definition were found. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed significant heterogeneity in the understanding and use of the term aggressive periodontitis in original research and poor documentation...

  7. Comorbidity of periodontal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Damgaard, Christian; Olsen, Ingar

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested an independent association between periodontitis and a range of comorbidities, for example cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, psoriasis, and respiratory infections. Shared....... The present article presents an overview of the evidence linking periodontitis with selected systemic diseases and calls for increased cooperation between dentists and medical doctors to provide optimal screening, treatment, and prevention of both periodontitis and its comorbidities....... inflammatory pathways are likely to contribute to this association, but distinct causal mechanisms remain to be defined. Some of these comorbid conditions may improve by periodontal treatment, and a bidirectional relationship may exist, where, for example, treatment of diabetes can improve periodontal status...

  8. Evaluation of nonsurgical periodontal therapy in chronic periodontitis patients with anemia by estimating hematological parameters and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musalaiah, S V V S; Anupama, M; Nagasree, M; Krishna, Ch Murali; Kumar, Aravind; Kumar, P Mohan

    2014-07-01

    Periodontal tissues mount an immune inflammatory response to bacteria and their products. Certain inflammatory cytokines produced during periodontal inflammation increase the production of acute phase proteins like high‑sensitivity C‑reactive protein (hs‑CRP) and can depress erythropoietin production leading to the development of anemia. The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on red blood cell (RBC) parameters and hs-CRP in chronic periodontitis patients with anemia. This is a longitudinal, interventional study with 6-month follow-up. A total of 30 subjects with anemia and chronic periodontitis with age group of 33-55 years were selected by screening hemoglobin (Hb) levels and examining periodontal findings. The clinical parameters plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) were recorded at baseline. Laboratory blood investigations were performed to evaluate RBC count, Hb, packed cell volume (PCV), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and red cell indices, hs-CRP at baseline. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy was performed for all patients. Patients were recalled after 6 months. The clinical and hematological parameters were re-evaluated to analyze the changes after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. The results showed that there was a significant increase in Hb levels, RBC count and PCV from baseline to 6 months after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. There is significant decrease in levels of ESR and hs-CRP levels after nonsurgical periodontal therapy indicating resolution of periodontal inflammation. There is a significant decrease in PPD, scores of PI and GI and significant increase in CAL gain. Minimal changes in mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) and MCH concentration indicated that the lower values of red cell parameters are not due to any vitamin and mineral deficiencies, but secondary to the chronic inflammatory changes

  9. Investigating the Importance of the Pocket-estimation Method in Pocket-based Approaches: An Illustration Using Pocket-ligand Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caumes, Géraldine; Borrel, Alexandre; Abi Hussein, Hiba; Camproux, Anne-Claude; Regad, Leslie

    2017-09-01

    Small molecules interact with their protein target on surface cavities known as binding pockets. Pocket-based approaches are very useful in all of the phases of drug design. Their first step is estimating the binding pocket based on protein structure. The available pocket-estimation methods produce different pockets for the same target. The aim of this work is to investigate the effects of different pocket-estimation methods on the results of pocket-based approaches. We focused on the effect of three pocket-estimation methods on a pocket-ligand (PL) classification. This pocket-based approach is useful for understanding the correspondence between the pocket and ligand spaces and to develop pharmacological profiling models. We found pocket-estimation methods yield different binding pockets in terms of boundaries and properties. These differences are responsible for the variation in the PL classification results that can have an impact on the detected correspondence between pocket and ligand profiles. Thus, we highlighted the importance of the pocket-estimation method choice in pocket-based approaches. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Genetic association in chronic periodontitis through dermatoglyphics: An unsolved link?

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    Sowmya Astekar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Because dermatoglyphic features are strongly affected by genetic and environmental factors, using it as supportive evidence in the diagnosis of hereditary disorders becomes a reality. Offspring of patients suffering from chronic periodontitis have a high prevalence rate of periodontal breakdown, suggesting strong familial influence. Aims: The present study intends to evaluate and compare the dermatoglyphic patterns in controls and periodontally compromised patients. Settings and Design: A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted, including a total of 60 individuals, divided into study and control groups of 30 each. The study group included clinically diagnosed periodontitis patients.Materials and Methods: The digital prints were collected using biometric scanner and palmer prints using digital flatbed scanner. Care was taken to ensure that full prints of ridges were obtained. The periodontal status of all 60 participants was assessed clinically for attachment level and pocket depth. Later, Russell's periodontal index was also calculated. Statistical Analysis: The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis using chi square and Student's t-test. Results: Among the finger ridge patterns, whorl pattern was found to be the most common in the study group whereas loop pattern was the most common in the control group. Mean total finger ridge count in the study group (165.69 ± 25.30 was significantly higher (P = 0.001 than the control group (125.4 ± 16.38. Mean dat angle was significantly higher (P = 0.039 in the study group (60.60 ± 2.76 than the control group (59.20 ± 2.62. Conclusion: Dermatoglyphics may serve as an early predictor in identifying high risk group individuals of developing diseases like periodontitis.

  11. Levels of Candidate Periodontal Pathogens in Subgingival Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, R R D S; Fermiano, D; Feres, M; Figueiredo, L C; Teles, F R F; Soares, G M S; Faveri, M

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, several new periodontal taxa have been associated with the etiology of periodontitis. A recent systematic review provides further support for the pathogenic role of 17 species/phylotypes. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and levels of these species in subjects with generalized chronic periodontitis (GChP; n = 30), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP; n = 30), and periodontal health (PH; n = 30). All subjects underwent clinical and microbiological assessment. Nine subgingival plaque samples were collected from each subject and analyzed for their content of 20 bacterial species/phylotypes through the RNA-oligonucleotide quantification technique. Subjects from the GChP and GAgP groups presented the highest mean values for all clinical parameters in comparison with the PH group (P GChP and GAgP showed significantly higher mean levels of Bacteroidetes sp. human oral taxon (HOT) 274, Fretibacterium sp. HOT 360, and TM7 sp. HOT 356 phylotypes, as well as higher mean levels of Filifactor alocis, Fretibacterium fastidiosum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Selenomonas sputigena species than PH subjects (P GChP subjects (P GChP and GAgP than in PH subjects. Mean levels of P. gingivalis (r = 0.68), T. forsythia (r = 0.62), F. alocis (r = 0.51, P = 0.001), and Fretibacterium sp. HOT 360 (r = 0.41) were correlated with pocket depth (P < 0.001). In conclusion, Bacteroidales sp. HOT 274, Desulfobulbus sp. HOT 041, Fretibacterium sp. HOT 360, Fretibacterium sp. HOT 362, and TM7 sp. HOT 356 phylotypes, in addition to F. alocis, F. fastidiosum, and S. sputigena, seem to be associated with periodontitis, and their role in periodontal pathogenesis should be further investigated. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  12. Effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy on serum lipids and C-reactive protein among hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfig, Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on plasma lipid levels in hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis. After considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 30 hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis in the age group of 30-70 years, undergoing treatment in Ahmed Gasim Cardiac and Renal transplant Centre in north Sudan were recruited for the study. Patients were randomly assigned to the study and control groups. The study group received non-surgical periodontal therapy - oral hygiene instructions, scaling and root planing. The control group participants received only oral hygiene instructions. Lipid profile [total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG)], C-reactive protein (CRP), and periodontal parameters [Plaque index (PI), Gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PD), and attachment loss (ATL)] were measured and compared at baseline and after 3 months of the respective intervention. Between-groups analysis was done using independent "t" test and within-group analysis was done using dependent "t" test. At baseline, groups were comparable based on lipid profile and periodontal parameters. After 3 months, the control group showed significant decrease in the PI and GI scores while there was no significant change in the other parameters. However, the study group showed significant decrease in the LDL and CRP levels along with a significant decrease in PD, ATL, PI, and GI scores, compared to the baseline values. Local non-surgical periodontal therapy resulted in improved periodontal health, with significant decrease in the LDL and CRP levels in hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis. Hence, local non-surgical periodontal therapy may be considered as an adjunct in the control of hyperlipidemia, along with standard care.

  13. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on clinical response and glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients with periodontitis: Controlled clinical trial

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    Ajitha Kanduluru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM and chronic periodontitis are common chronic diseases in adults in the world population. Once periodontal disease is established, the chronic nature of this infection may contribute to worsening of diabetic status leading to more severe diabetes-related complications. It has been proposed that the relation of periodontitis and diabetes is bidirectional. Objectives: The objective was to compare the clinical response and glycemic control in type 2 DM patients with periodontitis, before and after the nonsurgical periodontal treatment with controls. Materials and Methods: A total 70 type 2 DM patients with chronic generalized moderate periodontitis was divided into 2 groups. Treatment group (35 received one stage full mouth scaling and root planning plus oral hygiene instructions; the control group (35 received only oral hygiene instructions. At baseline, 1 st month and 3 rd month, the clinical periodontal parameters (plaque index [PI], gingival index [GI], pocket depth [PD], clinical attachment loss [CAL], gingival recession [GR], and bleeding on probing [BOP] and glycemic parameters (fasting blood sugar [FBS], and postprandial blood sugar [PPBS] were recorded, whereas the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c was recorded only at baseline and 3rd month. The collected data were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: When comparing the mean scores of clinical parameters for both the groups, there was a significant difference in all clinical parameters, that is, mean PI, GI, BOP, PD, CAL scores except mean GR, whereas for the glycemic parameters, there was a significant difference in mean FBS; PPBS values and no significant difference in mean percentage of HbA1c for treatment group at 3 rd month follow-up. Conclusion: Findings of the present study showed that nonsurgical periodontal treatment resulted in lower glycemic levels and the reduction of clinical parameters of periodontal infection, confirming the

  14. Relative abundance of total subgingival plaque-specific bacteria in salivary microbiota reflects the overall periodontal condition in patients with periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Shinya; Takeshita, Toru; Asakawa, Mikari; Shibata, Yukie; Takeuchi, Kenji; Yamanaka, Wataru; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2017-01-01

    Increasing attention is being focused on evaluating the salivary microbiota as a promising method for monitoring oral health; however, its bacterial composition greatly differs from that of dental plaque microbiota, which is a dominant etiologic factor of oral diseases. This study evaluated the relative abundance of subgingival plaque-specific bacteria in the salivary microbiota and examined a relationship between the abundance and severity of periodontal condition in patients with periodontitis. Four samples (subgingival and supragingival plaques, saliva, and tongue coating) per each subject were collected from 14 patients with a broad range of severity of periodontitis before periodontal therapy. The bacterial composition was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing using Ion PGM. Of the 66 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) representing the mean relative abundance of ≥ 1% in any of the four niches, 12 OTUs corresponding to known periodontal pathogens, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, were characteristically predominant in the subgingival plaque and constituted 37.3 ± 22.9% of the microbiota. The total relative abundance of these OTUs occupied only 1.6 ± 1.2% of the salivary microbiota, but significantly correlated with the percentage of diseased sites (periodontal pocket depth ≥ 4 mm; r = 0.78, P periodontal therapy, the total relative abundance of these 12 OTUs was evaluated as well as before periodontal therapy and reductions of the abundance through periodontal therapy were strongly correlated in saliva and subgingival plaque (r = 0.81, P bacteria representing the present condition of periodontal health.

  15. Evaluation of association between psychological stress and serum cortisol levels in patients with chronic periodontitis - Estimation of relationship between psychological stress and periodontal status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Roshni; Shenoy, Nina; Thomas, Biju

    2016-01-01

    Stress classically describes a destructive notion that can have a bearing on one's physical and mental health. It may also add to an increased propensity to periodontal disease. To investigate the association between psychological stress and serum cortisol levels in patients with chronic periodontitis. Forty subjects were recruited from the outpatient department at the Department of Periodontics, from a college in Mangalore, divided into two groups, i.e., twenty as healthy controls and twenty were stressed subjects with chronic periodontitis. The clinical examination included the assessment of probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level and oral hygiene index-simplified. Serum cortisol levels were estimated biochemically using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method and the estimation of psychological stress was done by a questionnaire. Descriptive statistics such as mean and standard deviation was used to review the collected data. Independent sample t -test was used for comparison and correlation was evaluation using Pearson's correlation test. As per our observation, high serum cortisol levels and psychological stress are positively linked with chronic periodontitis establishing a risk profile showing a significant correlation ( P periodontitis patients as it should be considered as an imperative risk factor for periodontal disease.

  16. Evaluation of association between psychological stress and serum cortisol levels in patients with chronic periodontitis - Estimation of relationship between psychological stress and periodontal status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshni Jaiswal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stress classically describes a destructive notion that can have a bearing on one's physical and mental health. It may also add to an increased propensity to periodontal disease. Aim: To investigate the association between psychological stress and serum cortisol levels in patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Forty subjects were recruited from the outpatient department at the Department of Periodontics, from a college in Mangalore, divided into two groups, i.e., twenty as healthy controls and twenty were stressed subjects with chronic periodontitis. The clinical examination included the assessment of probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level and oral hygiene index-simplified. Serum cortisol levels were estimated biochemically using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method and the estimation of psychological stress was done by a questionnaire. Results: Descriptive statistics such as mean and standard deviation was used to review the collected data. Independent sample t-test was used for comparison and correlation was evaluation using Pearson's correlation test. As per our observation, high serum cortisol levels and psychological stress are positively linked with chronic periodontitis establishing a risk profile showing a significant correlation (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Routine serum cortisol assessment may be a reasonable and a valuable investigative indicator to rule out stress in periodontitis patients as it should be considered as an imperative risk factor for periodontal disease.

  17. [Control of generalized chronic periodontitis combined with calcium-antagonist-related gingival overgrowth by a complex periodontal-endodontic-prosthodontic treatment. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szánto, Erika; Gera, István

    2011-12-01

    To day a relatively high percentage of elderly population of the industrialized world suffers with different cardiovascular diseases and are on permanent antihypertensive therapy. One of the most frequently used drugs is the calcium channel blockers prescribed against high blood pressure. The most common oral side effect of these drugs is the gingival enlargement that might develop even on otherwise healthy gingiva. The incidence of chronic periodontitis in this age group is also high and the Ca antagonist medication in those individuals might substantially modify the clinical course of periodontal inflammation leading to gingival enlargement and hypertrophic pocket wall. The case presented here is a 52 years old hypertonic woman with a long history of Ca-antagonist therapy and generalized chronic periodontitis combined with gingival hyperplasia. After the change of medication the 1,5 years comprehensive periodontal endodontic and prosthodontic therapy restored patient's periodontal health and provided complex dental rehabilitation. Nevertheless, only regular periodontal supportive therapy could ensure predictable outcome and guarantee long lasting periodontal health.

  18. Pocket companion to PMI's PMBOK guide

    CERN Document Server

    Snijders, Paul; Zandhuis, Anton

    2010-01-01

    This pocket guide is based on the PMBOK Guide® Fourth Edition.This pocket guide supplies a summary of the PMBOK Guide® , to provide a quick introduction as well as a structured overview of this method for project management.This pocket guide deals with the key issues and themes within project management and PMBOK:A short overview of the activities of PMI Inc., The organization and its standards: PMBOK Guide®, Standard for Project Portfolio Management, Standard for Program Management, OPM3.The essentials of the Project Lifecycle and Organization.What are the key project management knowledge ar

  19. PockDrug: A Model for Predicting Pocket Druggability That Overcomes Pocket Estimation Uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrel, Alexandre; Regad, Leslie; Xhaard, Henri; Petitjean, Michel; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2015-04-27

    Predicting protein druggability is a key interest in the target identification phase of drug discovery. Here, we assess the pocket estimation methods' influence on druggability predictions by comparing statistical models constructed from pockets estimated using different pocket estimation methods: a proximity of either 4 or 5.5 Å to a cocrystallized ligand or DoGSite and fpocket estimation methods. We developed PockDrug, a robust pocket druggability model that copes with uncertainties in pocket boundaries. It is based on a linear discriminant analysis from a pool of 52 descriptors combined with a selection of the most stable and efficient models using different pocket estimation methods. PockDrug retains the best combinations of three pocket properties which impact druggability: geometry, hydrophobicity, and aromaticity. It results in an average accuracy of 87.9% ± 4.7% using a test set and exhibits higher accuracy (∼5-10%) than previous studies that used an identical apo set. In conclusion, this study confirms the influence of pocket estimation on pocket druggability prediction and proposes PockDrug as a new model that overcomes pocket estimation variability.

  20. [Bio-Oss collagen bone grafting in the treatment of endodontic-periodontic lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiang; Liu, Qiong

    2009-09-01

    To study the effect of Bio-Oss collagen for bone grafting in the treatment of endodontic-periodontic lesion. Thirty patients (37 teeth) with endodontic-periodontic lesions received root canal therapy and periodontal treatment. Four weeks after the treatment, Bio-Oss collagen was grafted in these teeth. Clinical examinations were performed 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the surgery. The mobility of these teeth improved 1 month after the surgery. At 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the surgery, the pocket depth reduced obviously good attachment and further improvement of the tooth mobility. Bio-Oss collagen for bone grafting can achieve good therapeutic effect for endodontic-periodontic lesions.

  1. Sequential colonization of periodontal pathogens in induction of periodontal disease and atherosclerosis in LDLRnull mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukkapalli, Sasanka S; Easwaran, Meena; Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes F; Velsko, Irina M; Ambadapadi, Sriram; Dai, Jiayin; Larjava, Hannu; Lucas, Alexandra R; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) and atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD) are both chronic inflammatory diseases with a polymicrobial etiology and have been epidemiologically associated. The purpose is to examine whether periodontal bacteria that infect the periodontium can also infect vascular tissues and enhance pre-existing early aortic atherosclerotic lesions in LDLRnull mice. Mice were orally infected with intermediate bacterial colonizer Fusobacterium nucleatum for the first 12 weeks followed by late bacterial colonizers (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia) for the remaining 12 weeks mimicking the human oral microbiota ecological colonization. Genomic DNA from all four bacterial was detected in gingival plaque by PCR, consistently demonstrating infection of mouse gingival surfaces. Infected mice had significant levels of IgG and IgM antibodies, alveolar bone resorption, and showed apical migration of junctional epithelium revealing the induction of PD. These results support the ability of oral bacteria to cause PD in mice. Detection of bacterial genomic DNA in systemic organs indicates hematogenous dissemination from the gingival pockets. Bacterial infection did not alter serum lipid fractions or serum amyloid A levels and did not induce aortic atherosclerotic plaque. This is the first study examining the causal role of periodontal bacteria in induction of ASVD in LDLRnull mice. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Periodontal bone lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, L.W.J. van der.

    1985-01-01

    In the course of life the periodontum is subject to changes which may be physiological or pathological. Intraoral radiographs give insight into the hard structures of the dentomaxillar region and provides information on lesions in the bone of the periodontum in that they show radiopacities and radiolucencies caused by such lesions. In this thesis the relation is investigated between the true shape and dimensions of periodontal bone lesions and their radiographic images. A method is developed and tested of making standardized and reproducible radiographs suitable for longitudinal studies of periodontal lesions. Also the possibility is demonstrated of an objective and reproducible interpretation of radiographic characteristics of periodontal bone lesions. (Auth.)

  3. Macintosh Troubleshooting Pocket Guide for Mac OS

    CERN Document Server

    Lerner, David; Corporation, Tekserve

    2009-01-01

    The Macintosh Troubleshooting Pocket Guide covers the most common user hardware and software trouble. It's not just a book for Mac OS X (although it includes tips for OS X and Jaguar), it's for anyone who owns a Mac of any type-- there are software tips going back as far as OS 6. This slim guide distills the answers to the urgent questions that Tekserve's employee's answer every week into a handy guide that fits in your back pocket or alongside your keyboard.

  4. Detection of Periodontal Markers in Chronic Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Åsa; Carlén, Anette; Bengtsson, Lisbeth; Dahlén, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to compare the detection frequency of periodontopathogens by using the Pado Test 4.5 and checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique in chronic periodontitis patients. Thirty patients with chronic periodontitis were tested cross-sectionally with DNA/RNA oligogenomic probe method (IAI Pado Test 4.5) and DNA/DNA whole genomic probe (checkerboard) method. Samples were taken by two paper points at the deepest site in each of the four quadrants and pooled into one sample for each of the two methods. The samples were sent to the two laboratories (IAI, Zuchwil, Switzerland, and Oral Microbiology Laboratory, University of Gothenburg, Sweden) and were analyzed in a routine setting for the presence and amount of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola. While Pado Test 4.5 detected the four periodontal pathogens in 11 (36.7%) of the patients, the checkerboard method showed presence in all patients (100%) using the lower score (Score 1 corresponding to 104 bacterial cells) and 16 (53.3%) using a higher treshold (score 3 corresponding to between >105 and 106 cells). The results of the present study showed low agreement for a positive microbiological outcome using the two diagnostic methods. It was also concluded that microbiological analysis in practice should include a larger number of bacterial species to better serve as markers for a diseased associated flora in chronic periodontitis cases. PMID:21769304

  5. Microbial changes in patients with acute periodontal abscess after treatment detected by PadoTest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, T; Koshy, G; Umeda, M; Iwanami, T; Suga, J; Nomura, Y; Kawanami, M; Ishikawa, I

    2008-03-01

    To investigate changes in bacterial counts in subgingival plaque from patients with acute periodontal abscess by IAI-PadoTest. Ninety-one patients were randomly allocated to either test or control groups. In all the patients, pockets with acute periodontal abscess were irrigated with sterilized physiological saline, and in the test group, 2% minocycline hydrochloride ointment was applied once into the pocket in addition. Subgingival plaque samples were collected by paper point before treatment and 7 days after treatment. The total bacterial count was determined and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia, were detected using IAI-PadoTest, a DNA/RNA probe method. The total bacterial count decreased in both groups, with a significant decrease in the test group. The counts and number of sites positive for P. gingivalis, T. forsythia and T. denticola significantly decreased in the test group after treatment, compared with those in the control group. Pocket depth decreased in the both groups, with a statistically significant decrease in the test group. Topical treatment with minocycline in pockets with acute periodontal abscess was effective in reducing the bacterial counts as shown by the microbiological investigation using PadoTest 4.5.

  6. Preparation and evaluation of periodontal films based on polyelectrolyte complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Abeer Ahmed; Ismail, Fatma Ahmed; Naggar, Viviane Fahim; Aboulmagd, Elsayed

    2015-05-01

    Local intra-pocket drug delivery devices can provide an effective concentration of the antimicrobial agent at the site of action with avoidance of undesirable side effects. This study explored the application of chitosan-alginate and chitosan-pectin polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) films as drug release regulators for tetracycline HCl (Tc) to treat periodontal pockets. Periodontal films with 1:1 Tc:PEC ratio were prepared using 1:1 chitosan (Ch) to sodium alginate (A) or 1:3 Ch to pectin (P). The scanning electron microscope showed acceptable film appearance and differential scanning calorimetry analysis confirmed complex formation. The in vitro release studies for both films showed a burst drug release, followed by prolonged release for 70 h. A prolonged antibacterial activity of both films against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 was observed over a period of 21 days. Aging studies indicated that the five months storage period in freezer did not significantly influence the drug release profile or the antibacterial activity of both films. Clinical evaluation showed a significant reduction in pocket depth (p < 0.0001) to their normal values (≤3 mm). PEC films could be exploited as a prolonged drug release devices for treatment of periodontal pockets.

  7. Evaluation of C-Reactive Protein and Fibrinogen in Patients with Chronic and Aggressive Periodontitis: A Clinico-Biochemical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandy, Swaroop; Joseph, Kiran; Sankaranarayanan, Anila; Issac, Annie; Babu, George; Wilson, Bobby; Joseph, Jumol

    2017-03-01

    Periodontal disease is characterised by chronic infection and inflammation in periodontal tissues leading to destruction of alveolar bone with subsequent tooth loss. Periodontal infections are the result of an interaction between tooth associated microbial biofilms and the host defences. Periodontal pathogens can affect local and systemic immune and inflammatory responses. The aim of the present study was to evaluate serum C-Reactive Protein (CRP), plasma fibrinogen and peripheral blood levels in healthy subjects, chronic and aggressive periodontitis patients. A total of 55 subjects, 27 males and 28 females were selected for the study. Blood samples were taken from healthy controls (n=20) and patients with chronic periodontitis (n=20) and aggressive periodontitis (n=15). The periodontal status of each patient was assessed by recording Oral Hygiene Index-Simplified (OHI-S), Bleeding Index (BI), Probing Pocket Depth (PPD) and Clinical Attachment Level (CAL). The levels of serum CRP were measured using high sensitivity Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and levels of plasma fibrinogen were measured using Quantitative Immunoturbidimetric assay. Data description was done in the form of mean and standard deviation and analysis of data was done using one way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) and Students t-test to test the statistical significance between groups. The levels of serum CRP and plasma fibrinogen was increased in patients with chronic and aggressive periodontitis when compared to healthy controls (pperiodontitis and cardiovascular diseases.

  8. Periodontitis in cardiovascular disease patients with or without Marfan syndrome--a possible role of Prevotella intermedia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi Suzuki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although periodontitis is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD, the influence of periodontitis on Marfan syndrome (MFS with CVD is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between periodontal bacterial burden and MSF with CVD. METHODS AND RESULTS: The subjects were patients with MFS with CVD (n = 47; age and gender matched non-MFS CVD patients (n = 48 were employed as controls. Full-mouth clinical measurements, including number of teeth, probing of pocket depth (PD, bleeding on probing (BOP and community periodontal index (CPI were recorded. We also evaluated the existence of three periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Prevotella intermedia using polymerase chain reaction assays. Serum antibody titers against the pathogens were also measured. We revealed that MFS with CVD patients had periodontitis more frequently than the age and gender matched non-MFS CVD control subjects. MFS with CVD patients had significantly severer periodontitis, fewer remaining teeth and deeper PD compared to the non-MFS CVD controls. Furthermore, the serum antibody titer level against Prevotella intermedia was significantly lower in MFS plus CVD patients compared to the non-MFS CVD patients. CONCLUSION: Periodontitis may influence the pathophysiology of cardiovascular complications in MFS patients. A specific periodontal pathogen might be a crucial therapeutic target to prevent CVD development.

  9. Assessment of Photodynamic Inactivation against Periodontal Bacteria Mediated by a Chitosan Hydrogel in a 3D Gingival Model

    OpenAIRE

    Po-Chun Peng; Chien-Ming Hsieh; Chueh-Pin Chen; Tsuimin Tsai; Chin-Tin Chen

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan hydrogels containing hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and toluidine blue O were prepared and assessed for their mucoadhesive property and antimicrobial efficacy of photodynamic inactivation (PDI). Increased HPMC content in the hydrogels resulted in increased mucoadhesiveness. Furthermore, we developed a simple In Vitro 3D gingival model resembling the oral periodontal pocket to culture the biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. ac...

  10. Comparative evaluation of effectiveness of intra-pocket anesthetic gel and injected local anesthesia during scaling and root planing – A split-mouth clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan Chintala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Pain control is an important outcome measure for successful periodontal therapy. Injected local anesthesia has been used to secure anesthesia for scaling and root planing (SRP and continues to be the anesthetic of choice for pain control. Alternatively, intra-pocket anesthetic gel has been used as an anesthetic during SRP. Hence, this clinical trial was done to compare the effectiveness of intra-pocket anesthetic gel and injected local anesthesia during SRP and also to assess the influence of intra-pocket anesthetic gel on treatment outcomes in chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: Fifteen systemically healthy chronic periodontitis patients were recruited. The dental quadrants on right side received either intra-pocket 20% benzocaine gel (Gel group or infiltration/block by 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 adrenaline (injection group. Quadrants on the left side received the alternative. Pain perception and patients preference for the type of anesthesia was recorded. Clinical parameters: plaque index, modified gingival index, modified sulcular bleeding index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level were recorded at baseline and 1 month after treatment. Results: No difference was observed in visual analog scale (P > 0.05 and verbal rating scale (P > 0.05 pain perception between gel group and injection group. A slightly increased preference to gel as anesthesia (53% vs. 47% was observed. The treatment outcome after SRP did not show a significant difference between gel and injection group (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Intra-pocket administration of 20% benzocaine gel may be effective for pain control during SRP and may offer an alternative to conventional injection anesthesia.

  11. Molecular diagnostics of periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Izabela Korona-Głowniak; Radosław Siwiec; Marcin Berger; Anna Malm; Jolanta Szymańska

    2017-01-01

    The microorganisms that form dental plaque are the main cause of periodontitis. Their identification and the understanding of the complex relationships and interactions that involve these microorganisms, environmental factors and the host’s health status enable improvement in diagnostics and targeted therapy in patients with periodontitis. To this end, molecular diagnostics techniques (both techniques based on the polymerase chain reaction and those involving nucleic acid analysis via hybridi...

  12. Evaluation of micronutrient (Zinc, Magnesium, and Copper levels in serum and glycemic status after nonsurgical periodontal therapy in type 2 diabetic patients with chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishnan Sundaram

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To find out the effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on serum zinc (Zn, magnesium (Mg, and copper (Cu concentration and glycemic status in type 2 diabetes with chronic periodontitis (CP. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty patients were included in this study, which was further divided into three groups. Group 1 consisted of forty patients with CP, Group 2 consisted of forty patients of CP with controlled diabetes, and Group 3 consisted of forty patients of CP with uncontrolled diabetes. Periodontal parameters such as plaque index, gingival index, bleeding on probing, pocket depth, and clinical attachment levels (CALs were evaluated. Blood samples were collected to assess the levels of fasting blood sugar, glycosylated hemoglobin, Zn, Mg, and Cu. All parameters were evaluated at baseline and 3 months after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Results: The results showed statistically significant reduction in all the clinical parameters within the groups except for the CAL in group 1 patients (P = 0.05. The glycemic status also showed a statistically significant reduction after treatment (P < 0.001. The intragroup comparison was taken between the values of micronutrients, showed substantial increase in the levels of both Zn and Mg and decrease in the level of Cu after nonsurgical periodontal treatment (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Patients with diabetes and periodontitis had altered metabolism of Zn, Mg, and Cu contributing to the progression and complication of diabetes mellitus and periodontitis. Nonsurgical periodontal treatment improved the variation and concentration of plasma micronutrients and also the periodontal status and glycemic level.

  13. Assessment of oxygen saturation in dental pulp of permanent teeth with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanella, Larissa Bergesch; Barletta, Fernando Branco; Felippe, Wilson Tadeu; Bruno, Kely Firmino; de Alencar, Ana Helena Gonçalves; Estrela, Carlos

    2014-12-01

    In individuals with periodontal disease, dental pulp status should be determined before a treatment plan is made. Pulse oximeters are promising diagnostic tools to evaluate pulp vascularization. This study used pulse oximetry to determine the level of oxygen saturation in dental pulp of intact permanent teeth with periodontal attachment loss (PAL) and gingival recession (GR) and to evaluate the correlation between periodontal disease and level of oxygen saturation in the pulp. This study included 67 anterior teeth of 35 patients; all teeth showed intact crowns, PAL, a periodontal pocket (PP), and GR. The teeth underwent periodontal examination, cold and electric pulp testing, and pulse oximetry measurements. The Pearson correlation coefficient and a linear regression coefficient were calculated to evaluate the degree of correlation between periodontal disease markers (PAL, PP, and GR) and the level of oxygen saturation in dental pulp. These tests also evaluated possible associations between oxygen saturation and cold and electric pulp testing. PAL, PP, and GR had negative correlations with oxygen saturation in dental pulp. Conversely, no statistically significant association was found between oxygen saturation in dental pulp and the response to electric sensibility testing. Oxygen saturation was lower in the pulp of permanent teeth with PAL, PP, and GR, indicating that periodontal disease correlates with the level of oxygen saturation in the pulp. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Subjective pain perception during calculus detection with use of a periodontal endoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Kjersta; Blue, Christine

    2014-04-01

    Periodontal endoscopes are relatively new to the dental field. The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of pain reported by subjects with periodontal disease after experiencing the use of a periodontal endoscope compared with the use of a periodontal probe during calculus detection. A total of 30 subjects with at least 4 sites of 5 to 8 mm pocket depths were treated with scaling and root planing therapy in a split-mouth design. The 2 quadrants were randomly assigned to either S/RP with tactile determination of calculus using an 11/12 explorer, or S/RP treatment with endoscopic detection of calculus. Each subject's pain experience was determined by via a Heft-Parker Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), which measured perceived pain level during periodontal probing and during subgingival visualization via endoscopy. Since subjects expressing some level of dental anxiety generally express increased levels of pain, a pre-treatment survey was also given to determine each subject's level of dental anxiety in order to eliminate dental anxiety as a confounding factor in determining the expressed level of pain. The level of perceived pain was significantly lower with the periodontal endoscope versus the probe (mean VAS 33.0 mm versus 60.2 mm, pdental anxiety did express increased pain levels, but these levels were not statistically significant. Subjects did not find the periodontal endoscope to elicit significant anxiety or pain during subgingival visualization.

  15. The role of probiotic bacteria in managing periodontal disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Victor Haruo; Bandara, H M H N; Ishikawa, Karin Hitomi; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera

    2016-07-01

    The frequent recolonization of treated sites by periodontopathogens and the emergence of antibiotic resistance have led to a call for new therapeutic approaches for managing periodontal diseases. As probiotics are considered a new tool for combating infectious diseases, we systematically reviewed the evidences for their effectiveness in the management of periodontitis. An electronic search was performed in the MEDLINE, SCOPUS and Cochrane Library databases up to March 2016 using the terms 'periodontitis', 'chronic periodontitis', 'probiotic(s)', 'prebiotic(s)', 'symbiotic(s)', 'Bifidobacterium and 'Lactobacillus'. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the present study. Analysis of 12 RCTs revealed that in general, oral administration of probiotics improved the recognized clinical signs of chronic and aggressive periodontitis such as probing pocket depth, bleeding on probing, and attachment loss, with a concomitant reduction in the levels of major periodontal pathogens. Continuous probiotic administration, laced mainly with Lactobacillus species, was necessary to maintain these benefits. Expert commentary: Oral administration of probiotics is a safe and effective adjunct to conventional mechanical treatment (scaling) in the management of periodontitis, specially the chronic disease entity. Their adjunctive use is likely to improve disease indices and reduce the need for antibiotics.

  16. Income inequality and periodontal diseases in rich countries: an ecological cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbah, Wael; Sheiham, Aubrey; Bernabé, Eduardo

    2010-10-01

    There are adverse effects of income inequality on morbidity and mortality. This relationship has not been adequately examined in relation to oral health. To examine the relationship between income inequality and periodontal disease in rich countries. Adults aged 35-44 years in 17 rich countries with populations of more than 2 million. National level data on periodontal disease, income inequality and absolute national income were collected from 17 rich countries with populations of more than 2m. Pearson and partial correlations were used to examine the relationship between income inequality and percentage of 35-44-year-old adults with periodontal pockets > or = 4 mm and > or = 6 mm deep, adjusting for absolute national income. Higher levels of income inequality were significantly associated with higher levels of periodontal disease, independently of absolute national income. Absolute income was not associated with levels of periodontal disease in these 17 rich countries. Income inequality appears to be an important contextual determinant of periodontal disease. The results emphasise the importance of relative income rather than absoluteincome in relation to periodontal disease in rich countries.

  17. Prevalence of periodontal disease in children with leukemia disease and thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardianti Maulidita

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Various periodontal disease can occur in children and adolescents. Some can take place quickly and periodontal tissue damage. Several previous studies indicate that systemic diseases associated with periodontal disease in children. This study aims to determine the prevalence of periodontal disease in children with leukemia and thalassemia. The design study is a cross-sectional approach. Periodontal pocket depth measurements performed using the WHO standard of measurement. The samples in this study were drawn from the entire population using accidental sampling method. Sampled population was pediatric patients with leukemia and thalassemia. These patients were undergoing treatment in hospital Wahidin Sudirohusodo Hospital Makassar. During the study, children with leukemia as many as 18 patients and children with thalassemia by 8 patients. Distribution of pediatric patients suffering from leukemia by CPITN score; score of 2 as many as 10 patients (55.6%, a score of 1 as 6 patients (33.3%, and  score of 0 as many as 2 patients (11.1%. CPITN score in children with thalassemia; scores 2 in 1 patient (12.5%, a score of 1 as 6 patients (75%, and score of 0 by 1 patient (12.5%. Children who have leukemia and thalassemia, showed the rate of occurrence of different periodontal disease. Children with leukemia shows the level of periodontal disease is higher than in children with thalassemia disease.

  18. Periodontal status among type II diabetic and nondiabetic individuals in Chennai, India: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Kesavan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periodontitis is referred to as the sixth complication of diabetes mellitus. If left untreated, periodontitis can lead to tooth loss, thereby compromising a patient's ability to maintain a proper diet and affecting the quality of life. Aim: To assess the periodontal status among type II diabetic and nondiabetic individuals in Chennai city. Materials and Methods: A hospital based cross-sectional comparative study was conducted among diabetics and nondiabetic population attending a government hospital in Chennai city. The WHO Oral Health Assessment Form (1997 was used to assess the periodontal status. The final sample size of the study was 1000 which included 500 diabetics and 500 nondiabetics. Results: This study showed a significant association between the diabetic status and periodontal disease. The severity of periodontal disease was high among diabetics when compared to nondiabetics. The mean number of sextants with shallow pockets was 0.76 ± 1.20 among diabetics and 0.49 ± 0.86 among nondiabetics (P < 0.0001. The mean number of sextants with Loss of Attachment score of 1 (4–5 mm was 0.67 ± 1.05 among diabetics and 0.32 ± 0.70 among nondiabetics. Conclusion: Periodontal disease was more frequent and severe in diabetic patients as compared to nondiabetics although there are a number of questions need to be answered in future research.

  19. Lemongrass essential oil gel as a local drug delivery agent for the treatment of periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaraj B Warad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been long recognized that periodontal diseases are infections of the periodontium, comprising the bacterial etiology, an immune response, and tissue destruction. Treatment strategies aiming primarily at suppressing or eliminating specific periodontal pathogens include adjunct use of local and systemic antibiotics as part of nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Unwanted side effects and resistance of microorganisms toward antibiotics due to their widespread use have modified the general perception about their efficacy. Research in phytosciences has revealed various medicinal plants offering a new choice of optional antimicrobial therapy. Cymbopogon citratus, Stapf. (lemongrass is a popular medicinal plant. At a concentration ≤2%, lemongrass essential oil inhibits the growth of several kinds of microorganisms including periodontal pathogens, especially the reference strains Actinomyces naeslundii and Porphyromonas gingivalis, which were resistant to tetracycline hydrochloride. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of locally delivered 2% lemongrass essential oil in gel form as an adjunct to scaling and root planing, as compared to scaling and root planing alone for the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: 2% Lemongrass essential oil gel was prepared and placed in moderate to deep periodontal pockets after scaling and root planing. Results: Statistically significant reduction in probing depth and gingival index and gain in relative attachment level were noted in the experimental group as compared to the control group at 1 and 3 months. Conclusion: Locally delivered 2% lemongrass essential oil gel offers a new choice of safe and effective adjunct to scaling and root planing in periodontal therapy.

  20. Lemongrass essential oil gel as a local drug delivery agent for the treatment of periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warad, Shivaraj B.; Kolar, Sahana S.; Kalburgi, Veena; Kalburgi, Nagaraj B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: It has been long recognized that periodontal diseases are infections of the periodontium, comprising the bacterial etiology, an immune response, and tissue destruction. Treatment strategies aiming primarily at suppressing or eliminating specific periodontal pathogens include adjunct use of local and systemic antibiotics as part of nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Unwanted side effects and resistance of microorganisms toward antibiotics due to their widespread use have modified the general perception about their efficacy. Research in phytosciences has revealed various medicinal plants offering a new choice of optional antimicrobial therapy. Cymbopogon citratus, Stapf. (lemongrass) is a popular medicinal plant. At a concentration ≤2%, lemongrass essential oil inhibits the growth of several kinds of microorganisms including periodontal pathogens, especially the reference strains Actinomyces naeslundii and Porphyromonas gingivalis, which were resistant to tetracycline hydrochloride. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of locally delivered 2% lemongrass essential oil in gel form as an adjunct to scaling and root planing, as compared to scaling and root planing alone for the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: 2% Lemongrass essential oil gel was prepared and placed in moderate to deep periodontal pockets after scaling and root planing. Results: Statistically significant reduction in probing depth and gingival index and gain in relative attachment level were noted in the experimental group as compared to the control group at 1 and 3 months. Conclusion: Locally delivered 2% lemongrass essential oil gel offers a new choice of safe and effective adjunct to scaling and root planing in periodontal therapy. PMID:24991068

  1. Detection of highly and minimally leukotoxic Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains in patients with periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortelli Sheila Cavalca

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the prevalence of highly and minimally leukotoxic Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in patients with periodontal disease. Pooled subgingival plaque samples from 136 patients with some form of periodontal disease were examined. Subjects were between 14 and 76 years of age. Clinical examinations included periodontal pocket depth (PD, plaque index (PI and bleeding index (BI. The obtained plaque samples were examined for the presence of highly or minimally leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Chi-square and logistic regression were performed to evaluate the results. Forty-seven subjects were diagnosed with gingivitis, 70 with chronic periodontitis and 19 with aggressive periodontitis. According to chi-square there was no significant correlation detected between PD (chi2 = 0.73, PI (chi2 = 0.35, BI (chi2 = 0.09 and the presence of the highly leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans. The highly leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were correlated with subjects that were 28 years of age and younger (chi2 = 7.41. There was a significant correlation between highly leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans and aggressive periodontitis (chi2 = 22.06. This study of a Brazilian cohort confirms the strong association between highly leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains and the presence of aggressive periodontitis.

  2. Relationship between IL1 gene polymorphisms and periodontal disease in Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Keiko; Miyake, Yoshihiro; Hanioka, Takashi; Arakawa, Masashi

    2014-04-01

    Epidemiological evidence on the relationship between IL1A and/or IL1B polymorphisms and periodontal disease is inconsistent. We investigated associations between three IL1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding interleukin (IL) -1α (rs1800587) and IL-1β (rs1143634 and rs16944) and the risk of periodontal disease among young Japanese women. A case-control study was performed with a total of 1150 women, including 131 subjects who had at least one tooth with a probing pocket depth of 4 mm or deeper and 1019 periodontally healthy controls. Compared with a reference group of women with the GG genotype of SNP rs16944, those with the GA genotype had a significantly reduced risk of periodontal disease, while there was no significant relationship between the AA genotype and periodontal disease. No evident relationships were observed between SNP rs1800587 or rs1143634 and periodontal disease. Our study did not reveal any evidence of interaction between the IL1 polymorphisms and smoking. The results of this study showed that the heterozygous variant genotype of the IL1 rs16944 was significantly associated with a reduced risk of periodontal disease in young Japanese women. Smoking did not significantly modify the gene-disease associations under study.

  3. Weight loss after bariatric surgery and periodontal changes: a 12-month prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales-Peres, Silvia Helena de Carvalho; Sales-Peres, Matheus de Carvalho; Ceneviva, Reginaldo; Bernabé, Eduardo

    2017-04-01

    Several longitudinal studies have explored the association of obesity and weight gain with periodontal disease. However, the effect of weight loss on periodontal tissues remains unclear. To explore whether weight loss after bariatric surgery was associated with changes in periodontal measures over 12 months. Two public hospitals in São Paulo, Brazil. We used data from 110 morbidly obese patients (body mass index [BMI]>40 kg/m 2 or≥35 kg/m 2 with co-morbid conditions) who underwent bariatric surgery between April 2011 and March 2013. Data on demographic factors, BMI, smoking habits, and glucose levels were extracted from medical records preoperatively and after 6 and 12 months postsurgery. A full-mouth periodontal examination was conducted by trained examiners to assess probing pocket depth, clinical attachment loss, and bleeding on probing (BOP) at baseline and 6 and 12 months after surgery. Data were analyzed using linear mixed-effects models. BMI was not significantly related to the proportion of sites with BOP at baseline, but it was negatively associated with the rate of change in the proportion of sites with BOP. The greater the BMI loss, the higher the proportion of sites with BOP, particularly 6 months after surgery. However, BMI was not associated with baseline probing pocket depth and clinical attachment loss or rates of changes in these periodontal outcomes. The findings suggest that weight loss was associated with increased gingival bleeding, showing a peak at 6 months after bariatric surgery. Periodontal pocketing and attachment loss remained unchanged during the study period. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Effect of passive immunization by anti-gingipain IgY on periodontal health of dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman A.K.M. Shofiqur

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anti-gingipain IgY (IgY-GP, known as hyperimmune γ-livetin from egg yolk, inhibits the enzyme activity, growth and adherence of Porphyromonas gingivalis to gingival epithelial cells. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of IgY-GP on periodontal health of dogs. IgY-GP was prepared from the egg yolk of hens immunized with the gingipain from Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277. Two in vivo trial models were conducted on 15 adult dogs with periodontitis by giving IgY-GP-supplemented dog feed for 8 weeks and direct application of the IgY in dental ointment to the periodontal pockets at weekly interval for 4 weeks. Clinical parameters including gingivitis, periodontitis, oral health index, bleeding on probe (BOP, pocket depth (PD, and dental calculus removal pattern for selected premolar teeth were recorded at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks post treatment.IgY-GP showed strong cross-reactivity with gingipain from Porphyromonas gulae and inhibited the enzyme activity in vitro. In the dog trials, IgY-GP resulted in significant improvement of oral health parameters including gingivitis and periodontitis scores, BOP, dental calculus removal. No adverse events during and after antibody applications were noted. Oral immunotherapy by using IgY-GP is a new promising alternative to conventional preventive and therapeutic methods to improve oral health status in dogs.

  5. Progressive periodontal disease has a simultaneous incremental elevation of gingival crevicular fluid and serum CRP levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, A R; Manjunath, R G Shiva; Kathariya, Rahul

    2010-11-01

    Increased C-reactive protein levels have been found in all active inflammations, including periodontitis. This study aims to assess the C-reactive protein levels in periodontal disease progression. Forty-five patients were divided into the following three groups (n=15) based on gingival index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level: healthy (group I), gingivitis (group II), and chronic periodontitis (group III). Gingival crevicular fluid and serum samples were quantified for C-reactive protein using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean C-reactive protein concentration in gingival crevicular fluid and serum was found to be highest in group III (1233.33ng/mL for gingival crevicular fluid, 5483.33ng/mL for serum), and least in group I (60 ng/mL and 413 ng/mL for gingival crevicular fluid and serum, respectively) The mean C-reactive protein concentration in group II (453.33ng/mL for gingival crevicular fluid and 3565.33 ng/mL for serum) was found to be intermediate. C-reactive protein levels in gingival crevicular fluid and serum increased proportionately with the severity of periodontal disease. They correlated positively with clinical parameters, including gingival index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level. Thus, it can be considered as a periodontal inflammatory biomarker and deserves further consideration. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Association between Periodontal Condition and Nutritional Status of Brazilian Adolescents: A Population-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Alessandro L; Ramos, Ianny A; Cardoso, Andreia M R; Fernandes, Liege Helena F; Aragão, Amanda S; Santos, Fábio G; Aguiar, Yêska P C; Carvalho, Danielle F; Medeiros, Carla C M; De S C Soares, Renata; Castro, Ricardo D

    2016-12-01

    Obesity is a serious problem of public health and affects all socio-economic groups, irrespective of age, sex or ethnicity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between periodontal condition and nutritional status of adolescents. This was a cross-sectional study using a probability cluster sampling, and the sample was defined by statistical criterion, consisting of 559 students aged 15-19 yr enrolled in public schools of adolescents of Campina Grande, PB, Brazil in 2012. Socioeconomic characteristics were analyzed, as well as self-reported general and oral health, anthropometric data and periodontal condition (CPI and OHI-S). Descriptive and analytical analysis from bivariate and multivariate Poisson regression analysis with 5% significance level was performed. Of the 559 adolescents, 18.6% were overweight and 98.4% had some form of periodontal changes such as: bleeding (34.3%), calculus (38.8%), shallow pocket (22.9%) and deep pocket (2.3%). There was association between presence of periodontal changes with obesity ( P periodontal changes and obesity status in adolescents was indicated.

  7. Periodontal response to all-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress) in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wahadni, A M; Mansour, Y; Khader, Y

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the periodontal response to the presence of all-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress) in general practice patients. The convenience sample included 82 IPS Empress crowns placed in 64 patients. These crowns had been in place for an average of 16.27 (SD 9.26) months and ranged from 6.2 to 48.87 months at the time of clinical examination. Periodontal health status (as determined by dental plaque, gingival health status, periodontal pockets) was assessed around all crowned teeth and around matched contralateral teeth by one calibrated examiner. Periodontal indices utilized included the Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI) and pocket depth (PD) with calibrated probes graduated in millimetres. Plaque, gingival and PD values for crowned teeth were compared with those for control teeth using Wilcoxon signed-rank test for each clinical parameters. Chi-square was used to test the significance of the difference in their distribution between crowns and control teeth. Statistically, PI (0.35), GI (0.41) and mean PD scores (1.42) of IPS Empress crowned teeth compared less favourably with scores of the control teeth (0.27, 0.23 and 0.86 respectively). Teeth with IPS Empress crowns had poorer periodontal health and more clinically evident plaque than uncrowned teeth.

  8. Clinical effectiveness of diode laser therapy as an adjunct to non-surgical periodontal treatment: a randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukić, Walter; Bago, Ivona; Aurer, Andrej; Roguljić, Marija

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this randomized clinical study is to evaluate the effect of a 980-nm diode laser as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) treatment. Thirty-five patients with chronic periodontitis were selected for the split-mouth clinical study. SRP was performed using a sonic device and hand instruments. Quadrants were equally divided between the right and left sides. Teeth were treated with SRP in two control quadrants (control groups [CG]), and the diode laser was used adjunctively with SRP in contralateral quadrants (laser groups [LG]). Diode laser therapy was applied to periodontal pockets on days 1, 3, and 7 after SRP. Baseline data, including approximal plaque index (API), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), and clinical attachment level (CAL), were recorded before the treatment and 6 and 18 weeks after treatment. Changes in PD and CAL were analyzed separately for initially moderate (4 to 6 mm) and deep (7 to 10 mm) pockets. The results were similar for both groups in terms of API, BOP, PD in deep pockets, and CAL. The laser group showed only significant PD gain in moderate pockets during the baseline to 18-week (P 0.05). The present study indicates that, compared to SRP alone, multiple adjunctive applications of a 980-nm diode laser with SRP showed PD improvements only in moderate periodontal pockets (4 to 6 mm).

  9. Periodontal disease in primary Sjögren's Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Morten; Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Petersen, P.E.

    2001-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome, gingivitis, periodontitis, periodontal disease, xerostomia, oral manifestations......Sjögren's syndrome, gingivitis, periodontitis, periodontal disease, xerostomia, oral manifestations...

  10. Squamous cell carcinoma presenting as an endodontic-periodontic lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Paul A; Kim, David M; Harsfield, Scott L; Jacobson, Erica R

    2005-10-01

    Regardless of advances in diagnosis and treatment during the past 40 years, the overall 5-year survival rates for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cancers have only slightly improved and remain around 50%. Thus, the early diagnosis and treatment of carcinoma by health care providers are essential in achieving a good prognosis. We report a case of invasive squamous cell carcinoma that presented as a benign endodontic-periodontic lesion with a 7-mm periodontal pocket on tooth #15 in a 40-year-old, non-smoking woman. The subsequent management of the case is also discussed. The study was conducted in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975, as revised in 2000. Our patient was seen for a comprehensive periodontal examination including a periodontal charting, occlusal analysis, study casts, electronic pulp test for tooth #15, and complete mouth periapical radiographs. As there was a periapical radiolucency, an endodontic consultation was obtained. A periodontal flap surgical procedure was performed on teeth #13 to #15, and as there was bone erosion into the maxillary sinus, a biopsy of the soft tissue was submitted to the local hospital for histological analysis. The biopsied lesion was diagnosed as invasive, moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with focal spindle and clear cell differentiation (grade II to III of IV). Bone invasion was also identified. The treatment of the carcinoma involved a hemimaxillectomy with the removal of the maxillary left posterior teeth. The patient remained free of tumor for 5 years after the initial presentation. Patient education and periodic oral cancer examinations by dental professionals are necessary to reduce diagnostic delay and improve prognosis. This case report emphasizes the important role of dental professionals, especially periodontists and endodontists, of being aware that squamous cell carcinoma may manifest itself clinically and/or radiographically as a common periodontal or endodontic lesion.

  11. Periodontal Disease Status in an Isolated Greek Adult Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Chrysanthakopoulos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine the periodontal condition of an adult population in three isolated regions in Greece and to determine the association of periodontal disease with several demographic, behavioral and environmental factors.Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 640 individuals, aged 20to69 years from three isolated regions. The following indices were assessed: Pocket Depth (PD, Clinical Attachment Level (CAL, Dental Plaque, Calculus and Bleeding on Probing (BOP. Statistical analysis was accomplished by multiple linear regression model which was used to assess the association between the mean clinical attachment loss and clinical, demographic and behavioral parameters.Results: The samples of the study showed high levels of dental plaque, dental calculus and BOP. The final multivariate model showed that age (p=0.000, gender (p=0.016 and presence of calculus (p=0.000 were associated with the mean clinical attachment loss. Age (p=0.000, gender (p=0.000 and dental plaque (p=0.027 were associated with gingival recession, while age (p=0.018 and gender (p=0.000 were associated with probing depth. Bleeding on probing, dental plaque, toothbrush frequency, level of education, tobacco consumption and reasons for dental visits were not associated with the mean clinical attachment loss.Conclusion: Periodontal disease consists of a complicated destructive condition of the Periodontal tissue with a.multi-factorial etiology. Oral hygiene instructions and a regular dental follow-up could play a significant role in the prevention of periodontal disease.Key Words: Periodontal Disease; Epidemiology; Risk Factors

  12. Poor Response to Periodontal Treatment May Predict Future Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmlund, A; Lampa, E; Lind, L

    2017-07-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), but whether the response to the treatment of periodontal disease affects this association has not been investigated in any large prospective study. Periodontal data obtained at baseline and 1 y after treatment were available in 5,297 individuals with remaining teeth who were treated at a specialized clinic for periodontal disease. Poor response to treatment was defined as having >10% sites with probing pocket depth >4 mm deep and bleeding on probing at ≥20% of the sites 1 y after active treatment. Fatal/nonfatal incidence rate of CVD (composite end point of myocardial infarction, stroke, and heart failure) was obtained from the Swedish cause-of-death and hospital discharge registers. Poisson regression analysis was performed to analyze future risk of CVD. During a median follow-up of 16.8 y (89,719 person-years at risk), those individuals who did not respond well to treatment (13.8% of the sample) had an increased incidence of CVD ( n = 870) when compared with responders (23.6 vs. 15.3%, P 4 mm, and number of teeth, the incidence rate ratio for CVD among poor responders was 1.28 (95% CI, 1.07 to 1.53; P = 0.007) as opposed to good responders. The incidence rate ratio among poor responders increased to 1.39 (95% CI, 1.13 to 1.73; P = 0.002) for those with the most remaining teeth. Individuals who did not respond well to periodontal treatment had an increased risk for future CVD, indicating that successful periodontal treatment might influence progression of subclinical CVD.

  13. Effect of hyaluronan on periodontitis: A clinical and histological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Gontiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conventional, non-surgical periodontal therapy consists of supra- and subgingival tooth debridement. However, it is a technically demanding procedure and is not always efficient at eradicating all periodontal pathogens and in reducing inflammation. Therefore, local subgingival application of other chemotherapeutic agents may be used as an adjunct to non-surgical therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and histological outcomes of local subgingival application of 0.2% hyaluronic acid gel (GENGIGEL® as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP in chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty sites were chosen from 26 patients with chronic periodontitis (criteria being periodontal pockets ≥5mm. Experimental sites additionally received HA gel subgingivally at baseline, 1 st , 2 nd , and 3 rd week. Clinical parameters were re-assessed at 4 th , 6 th , and 12 th week. At 4 th week recall, a gingival biopsy was obtained from test and control site for histologic examination. Results: Intra-group analysis of all the clinical parameters at all sites from baseline to 4 th , 6 th , and 12 th week showed statistically significant changes. Experimental sites showed statistically significant improvement in Gingival index and Bleeding index at 6 th and 12 th week when compared with control sites. However, no statistically significant differences were observed in the PPD and RAL between control and experimental sites at 4 th , 6 th , and 12 th week time interval. No statistically significant association was found between the histological grading of the sites that received HA treatment. Conclusion: Subgingival placement of 0.2% HA gel along with SRP provided a significant improvement in gingival parameters. However, no additional benefit was found in periodontal parameters. Histologically, experimental sites showed reduced inflammatory infiltrate, but it was not statistically significant.

  14. Association between periodontitis and lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Rito Macedo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify the association between periodontal disease and lung disease from an epidemiological, case and control survey, in patients who attended the first aid service of the Adriano Jorge Foundation Hospital, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil, from June 2006 to February 2007. Methods: The sample consisted of 140 patients, among whom community-acquired pneumonia was present in 60% (n = 70, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 40% (case-group; and 70 patients without respiratory disease (control group, ranging between 19 and 69 years of ages, with a mean age of 41.3, and standard deviation of 13.6 years. The clinical parameters for evaluating periodontal changes were obtained by means of pocket depth, bleeding on probing, plaque index and clinical attachment loss. Results: Both groups showed no significant difference in any of the control variables (p>0.05. The groups showed significant difference only in the plaque index (p 0.05. Due to the increase in the bacterial plaque index in the oral cavity of patients with respiratory diseases, further studies should be conducted to verify what the relationship between the two diseases is.

  15. Interleukin-6 -174 genotype, periodontal disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashash, M; Nugent, J; Baker, P; Tansinda, D; Blinkhorn, F

    2008-05-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether maternal periodontal disease and variant genotypes of IL-6 gene are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. A total of 145 pregnant women were recruited from St Mary's Hospital, Manchester, UK. Bleeding on probing (BOP) and pocket depth indices were recorded on all teeth. Amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction was used for -174 IL-6 genotyping. Birth weight was assessed using the individualized birth ratio (IBR) with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) defined as an IBR below the fifth percentile. The G/G genotype results in more BOP % sites in Caucasian (P periodontal disease, and IUGR.

  16. Relationship Between IL1 Gene Polymorphisms and Periodontal Disease in Japanese Women

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Keiko; Miyake, Yoshihiro; Hanioka, Takashi; Arakawa, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence on the relationship between IL1A and/or IL1B polymorphisms and periodontal disease is inconsistent. We investigated associations between three IL1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding interleukin (IL) -1α (rs1800587) and IL-1β (rs1143634 and rs16944) and the risk of periodontal disease among young Japanese women. A case–control study was performed with a total of 1150 women, including 131 subjects who had at least one tooth with a probing pocket de...

  17. Replantation of multi-level fingertip amputation using the pocket principle (palmar pocket method).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, J; Ishikawa, K; Soeda, H; Kitayama, T

    2003-07-01

    Two cases of multi-level fingertip amputation are presented. In each case, replantation was achieved in a two-stage procedure, involving reattachment, de-epithelialisation and insertion into a palmar pocket in stage 1, followed by removal from the palmar pocket 16 days later. The cases are described and the technique is discussed.

  18. Deoxyribonucleic Acid Probes Analyses for the Detection of Periodontal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Yahfoufi, Zoubeida; Hadchiti, Wahib; Berberi, Antoine

    2015-09-01

    In clinical microbiology several techniques have been used to identify bacteria. Recently, Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based techniques have been introduced to detect human microbial pathogens in periodontal diseases. Deoxyribonucleic acid probes can detect bacteria at a very low level if we compared with the culture methods. These probes have shown rapid and cost-effective microbial diagnosis, good sensitivity and specificity for some periodontal pathogens in cases of severe periodontitis. Eighty-five patients were recruited for the study. Twenty-one subjects ranging between 22 and 48 years of age fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Seventy-eight samples became available for DNA probe analysis from the deepest pockets in each quadrant. All 21 patients showed positive results for Prevotella intermedia; also, Prevotella gingivalis was identified in 19 subjects, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in 6 subjects. P. intermedia was diagnosed positive in 82% of the subgingival samples taken, 79% for P. gingivalis, and 23% for A. actinomycetemcomitans. This study shows a high frequency of putative periodontal pathogens by using DNA probe technology, which is semi-quantitative in this study. Deoxyribonucleic acid probes can detect bacteria at very low level about 10(3) which is below the detection level of culture methods. The detection threshold of cultural methods. The three types of bacteria can be detected rapidly with high sensitivity by using the DNA probe by general practitioners, and thus can help in the diagnosis process and the treatment.

  19. Small-Scale Fabrication of Biomimetic Structures for Periodontal Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W.; Lee, Jung-Seok; Jung, Han-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The periodontium is the supporting tissues for the tooth organ and is vulnerable to destruction, arising from overpopulating pathogenic bacteria and spirochaetes. The presence of microbes together with host responses can destroy large parts of the periodontium sometimes leading tooth loss. Permanent tissue replacements are made possible with tissue engineering techniques. However, existing periodontal biomaterials cannot promote proper tissue architectures, necessary tissue volumes within the periodontal pocket and a “water-tight” barrier, to become clinically acceptable. New kinds of small-scale engineered biomaterials, with increasing biological complexity are needed to guide proper biomimetic regeneration of periodontal tissues. So the ability to make compound structures with small modules, filled with tissue components, is a promising design strategy for simulating the anatomical complexity of the periodotium attachment complexes along the tooth root and the abutment with the tooth collar. Anatomical structures such as, intima, adventitia, and special compartments such as the epithelial cell rests of Malassez or a stellate reticulum niche need to be engineered from the start of regeneration to produce proper periodontium replacement. It is our contention that the positioning of tissue components at the origin is also necessary to promote self-organizing cell–cell connections, cell–matrix connections. This leads to accelerated, synchronized and well-formed tissue architectures and anatomies. This strategy is a highly effective preparation for tackling periodontitis, periodontium tissue resorption, and to ultimately prevent tooth loss. Furthermore, such biomimetic tissue replacements will tackle problems associated with dental implant support and perimimplantitis. PMID:26903872

  20. Small-Scale Fabrication of Biomimetic Structures for Periodontal Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David William Green

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The periodontium is the supporting tissues for the tooth organ and is vulnerable to destruction, arising from overpopulating pathogenic bacteria and spirochaetes. The presence of microbes together with host responses can destroy large parts of the periodontium sometimes leading tooth loss. Permanent tissue replacements are made possible with tissue engineering techniques. However, existing periodontal biomaterials cannot promote proper tissue architectures, necessary tissue volumes within the periodontal pocket and a water-tight barrier, to become clinically acceptable. New kinds of small-scale engineered biomaterials, with increasing biological complexity are needed to guide proper biomimetic regeneration of periodontal tissues. So the ability to make compound structures with small modules, filled with tissue components, is a promising design strategy for simulating the anatomical complexity of the periodotium attachement complexes along the tooth root and the abutment with the tooth collar. Anatomical structures such as, intima, adventitia and special compartments such as the epithelial cell rests of Malassez or a stellate reticulum niche need to be engineered from the start of regeneration to produce proper periodontium replacement.. It is our contention that the positioning of tissue components at the origin is also necessary to promote self-organising cell-cell connections, cell-matrix connections. This leads to accelerated, synchronized and well-formed tissue architectures and anatomies. This strategy is a highly effective preparation for tackling periodontitis, periodontium tissue resorption and to ultimately prevent tooth loss. Furthermore, such biomimetic tissue replacements will tackle problems associated with dental implant support and perimimplantitis.

  1. Influence of Type 2 Diabetes on Prevalence of Key Periodontal Pathogens, Salivary Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Bone Remodeling Markers in Sudanese Adults with and without Chronic Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasaan Gassim Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the influence of type 2 diabetes on the occurrence of six periodontal pathogens in plaque samples of patients with and without chronic periodontitis. Levels of salivary MMP-8, MMP-9, RANKL, and OPG were also investigated. The study enrolled 31 patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis (DM + CP, 29 with chronic periodontitis (CP, and 20 with type 2 diabetes (DM. Questionnaire-guided interviews were conducted and plaque index, bleeding on probing, and pocket depth were recorded. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was utilized to determine the prevalence of the bacteria. The levels of salivary molecules were determined by enzyme immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The CP group had the highest prevalence of P. gingivalis (81.5%, followed by the DM + CP (59.3% and DM (55.0% groups (P>0.05. Similar trends were observed for P. intermedia and T. denticola. The prevalence of T. forsythia was 100% in both periodontitis groups compared to 90% in the DM group. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding the concentrations of MMP-8, MMP-9, or OPG. RANKL concentrations were below the detection limit. Our data show that type 2 diabetes has no significant influence on the prevalence of the investigated periodontal pathogens, or the levels of salivary MMP-8, MMP-9, and OPG.

  2. Periodontal Disease and Systemic Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Club Program Perio Store Education & Careers Careers in Periodontics Perio Exam for Dental Licensure Recommended Competencies Periodontal ... may also help with the management of other chronic inflammatory conditions. Diabetes heart Disease Other Diseases Members ...

  3. Incisor malalignment and the risk of periodontal disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsulaiman, Ahmed A; Kaye, Elizabeth; Jones, Judith; Cabral, Howard; Leone, Cataldo; Will, Leslie; Garcia, Raul

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association between incisor crowding, irregularity, and periodontal disease progression in the anterior teeth. Data collected over 35 years from men enrolled in the Veterans Affairs Dental Longitudinal Study included information concerning pocket depth and alveolar bone loss. Plaster casts of the maxillary (n = 400) and mandibular (n = 408) arches were available for baseline measurements. Periodontal disease in the anterior teeth was defined as per arch sum of pathologic pocket depth and sum of teeth with any alveolar bone loss in the anterior sextants. Incisor malalignment status was defined by the anterior tooth size-arch length discrepancy index and Little's Irregularity Index. Adjusted mixed effects linear models computed the beta (β) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of the amounts of change in periodontal disease outcomes by the level of malalignment. In the anterior maxillary arch, crowding and spacing were significantly associated with an increased per-arch sum of pathologic pocket depth (β, 0.70 mm; 95% CI, 0.20-1.21, and β, 0.49 mm; 95% CI, 0.06-0.91, respectively). In the anterior mandibular arch, incisor crowding and irregularity were significantly associated with an increased per-arch sum of pathologic pocket depth (mild crowding: β, 0.47 mm; 95% CI, 0.01-0.93; severe irregularity: β, 0.94 mm; 95% CI, 0.50-1.38), and the sum number of teeth with alveolar bone loss (mild and moderate-to-severe crowding: β, 0.45 teeth; 95% CI, 0.08-0.82; and β, 0.45 teeth; 95% CI, 0.13-0.83, respectively; moderate irregularity: β, 0.34 teeth; 95% CI, 0.06-0.62). Certain incisor malalignment traits (ie, maxillary incisor crowding, maxillary incisor spacing, mandibular incisor mild crowding, mandibular incisor moderate-to-severe crowding, mandibular incisor moderate irregularity, and mandibular incisor severe irregularity) are associated with significant periodontal disease progression

  4. Resolution of Localized Chronic Periodontitis Associated with Longstanding Calculus Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin-Chuang Lai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This report, which is based on nonstandardized serial radiographs obtained over a period of 15 years, documents a case of localized chronic periodontitis associated with progressive deposition of calculus on the distal aspect of a mandibular second molar. The site was treated by scaling and root planing, followed by a course of adjunctive systemic azithromycin. Treatment yielded favorable reductions in probing depth and clinical inflammation, leaving only few isolated sites with pockets no deeper than 4 mm. Two years after completion of active treatment, there was radiographic evidence of increased bone density distal to the second molar.

  5. Resolution of localized chronic periodontitis associated with longstanding calculus deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Pin-Chuang; Walters, John D

    2014-01-01

    This report, which is based on nonstandardized serial radiographs obtained over a period of 15 years, documents a case of localized chronic periodontitis associated with progressive deposition of calculus on the distal aspect of a mandibular second molar. The site was treated by scaling and root planing, followed by a course of adjunctive systemic azithromycin. Treatment yielded favorable reductions in probing depth and clinical inflammation, leaving only few isolated sites with pockets no deeper than 4 mm. Two years after completion of active treatment, there was radiographic evidence of increased bone density distal to the second molar.

  6. Role of Low-Level Laser Therapy as an Adjunct to Initial Periodontal Treatment in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Split-Mouth, Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirturk-Gocgun, Oya; Baser, Ulku; Aykol-Sahin, Gokce; Dinccag, Nevin; Issever, Halim; Yalcin, Funda

    2017-02-01

    In this split-mouth clinical trial, we evaluated the clinical benefits of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) as an adjunct to nonsurgical periodontal treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). The impaired wound healing seen in diabetic patients may affect the results of periodontal treatment and may require an additional approach. In total, 22 chronic periodontitis patients with type 2 DM were included. Applying a split-mouth design, two quadrants were treated with only scaling and root planing (SRP) as the control and those in the other two were treated with SRP + LLLT as the test sites in each patient. An 808 nm GaAlAs diode laser was performed in the test sites at the energy density of 4.46 J/cm 2 on days 1, 2, and 7 after SRP. Plaque index (PI), probing depth (PD), bleeding on probing (BOP), and clinical attachment level were measured at baseline and again at 1 and 3 months after treatment. Deep periodontal pockets (PD ≥4 mm) were evaluated separately. Test sites showed significant improvement in PI and BOP in deep pockets at the 1-month follow-up period (p < 0.001 and <0.001, respectively), whereas no difference was found between the control and the test sites in other periodontal parameters. LLLT during periodontal treatment offered minimal short-term additional benefit in deep pocket healing in patients with type 2 DM.

  7. Gene polymorphisms in chronic periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laine, M.L.; Loos, B.G.; Crielaard, W.

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to conduct a review of the literature for gene polymorphisms associated with chronic periodontitis (CP) susceptibility. A comprehensive search of the literature in English was performed using the keywords: periodontitis, periodontal disease, combined with the words genes, mutation, or

  8. Review of Pocket Guide Megaliths [app

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney Harris

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Pocket Guide Megaliths app was developed by Senet Mobile UK in collaboration with The Megalithic Portal website. The app was released in 2016 and is currently available for iOS devices, such as iPhone and iPads. Pocket Guide Megaliths presents the Megalithic Portal's burgeoning worldwide database of ancient and prehistoric sites in a variety of innovative and engaging ways. It aims to act primarily as a guide to enjoying and exploring the rich prehistoric heritage of the world, though offers additional functionality for would-be monument explorers too.

  9. Cell-phone interference with pocket dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djajaputra, David; Nehru, Ramasamy; Bruch, Philip M; Ayyangar, Komanduri M; Raman, Natarajan V; Enke, Charles A

    2005-01-01

    Accurate reporting of personal dose is required by regulation for hospital personnel that work with radioactive material. Pocket dosimeters are commonly used for monitoring this personal dose. We show that operating a cell phone in the vicinity of a pocket dosimeter can introduce large and erroneous readings of the dosimeter. This note reports a systematic study of this electromagnetic interference. We found that simple practical measures are enough to mitigate this problem, such as increasing the distance between the cell phone and the dosimeter or shielding the dosimeter, while maintaining its sensitivity to ionizing radiation, by placing it inside a common anti-static bag. (note)

  10. Cell-phone interference with pocket dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djajaputra, David; Nehru, Ramasamy; Bruch, Philip M; Ayyangar, Komanduri M; Raman, Natarajan V; Enke, Charles A [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 987521 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-7521 (United States)

    2005-05-07

    Accurate reporting of personal dose is required by regulation for hospital personnel that work with radioactive material. Pocket dosimeters are commonly used for monitoring this personal dose. We show that operating a cell phone in the vicinity of a pocket dosimeter can introduce large and erroneous readings of the dosimeter. This note reports a systematic study of this electromagnetic interference. We found that simple practical measures are enough to mitigate this problem, such as increasing the distance between the cell phone and the dosimeter or shielding the dosimeter, while maintaining its sensitivity to ionizing radiation, by placing it inside a common anti-static bag. (note)

  11. Effect of periodontal therapy on metabolic control and an inflammatory mediator in type 2 diabetic subjects: a report on 17 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Carlos; Pérez, Clara; Sabogal, Diego

    2012-04-01

    A reciprocal relationship between diabetes mellitus and chronic periodontitis has been described, whereby chronic periodontal infection could affect diabetic metabolic control. Therefore, periodontal therapy could influence metabolic control or systemic inflammation leading to diabetic complications. This case report series presents the effect of therapy on periodontal indices, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in a group of type 2 diabetic patients. Seventeen diabetic patients diagnosed with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis received periodontal therapy. All patients received a hygienic phase of treatment and were re-examined 3 months later. At re-examination, subjects judged to need periodontal surgery were treated and re-examined after a further 3 months. A complete clinical examination and measurements of HbA1c and hs-CRP were evaluated. Periodontal treatment led to a significant improvement in periodontal indices; only five patients required periodontal surgery. The percentage of bleeding on probing was reduced by nearly 40%; percentage of pockets > or = 5 mm was less than half baseline values; mean pocket depth reduction was 1.21 mm (0.58) and attachment level gain was 0.74 mm (0.69). Nevertheless, no changes were present for HbA1c; a reduction in hs-CRP of 1.37 mg/L (2.67) was present. Periodontal therapy in this case series group produced a significant improvement in the clinical condition, butdid not affect metabolic control. It led to a decrease in hs-CRP.

  12. Caries Experience and Periodontal Status during Pregnancy in a Group of Pregnant Women with HIV+ Infections from Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Lydia M; Guerra, María Elena

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the caries rate and periodontal status in a sample of pregnant women with HIV+ infections from Puerto Rico. A pilot study was conducted on a cross sectional convenience sample of 25 pregnant women with HIV+ infections from Puerto Rico who visit the CEMI clinic (Centro de Estudios Materno Infantil) at the University of Puerto Rico. The women subjects were evaluated for caries, DMFT (D: Decay tooth; M: Missing tooth due to caries; F: Filled tooth) index, oral lesions associated with HIV+/AIDS and periodontal disease parameters, with a Florida probe by a calibrated dentist on periodontal indexes such as as bleeding on probing, CEJ (cemento-enamel junction) and pocket depth. Periodontal disease was classified as having 4 sites with pocket depth greater than 4 mm and caries were identified following the Radike criteria. Data was statistically analyzed using the SSPS Program (Statistical Software Program for Social Sciences) and descriptive statistics were calculated. Mean DT (decayed teeth), MT (missing teeth due to caries), FT (filled teeth) and DMFT (decay, missing and filled teeth) were 4.8, 1.86, 5.3 and 12, respectively; mean sites of bleeding on probing=12.06; mean sites with pocket depth>4 mm=6.95 and mean sites with loss of attachment greater than 4 mm=7.66. [Almost 50% of the patients had generalized chronic periodontitis. A 72% prevalence of periodontal disease was found. No oral lesions related to HIV+/AIDS were reported. CD4 and viral load was statistically associated with bleeding on probing and severe signs of periodontal disease. High levels of dental disease were found in pregnant women with HIV+/AIDS infections from Puerto Rico, and these women were in need of substantial dental services.

  13. A report of laser-assisted modified Widman flap for periodontal regeneration: Clinical and radiographic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar Salaria

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a relatively common disease. Various therapies have been recommended for its treatment which includes nonsurgical, antimicrobial, and surgical therapy. In recent years lasers have been used for all the three above-mentioned purposes. Lasers have been applied for hard and soft tissue debridement, contouring as well as the bacterial load reduction in the pocket. Here we present a case report of chronic periodontitis treated with the help of a new technique, laser-assisted modified Widman flap (LAMWF. The surgical procedure followed with a 980 nm diode laser has been described. The present case report resulted in significant pocket depth reduction, attachment gain, and radiographic evidence of bone fill. The laser-assisted modified Widman flap provided excellent results without complications and high patient as well as clinician satisfaction.

  14. Diabetes and periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease characterized by increased blood glucose levels and abnormalities of lipid metabolism due to absence or decreased level of insulin. It affects all the body organs and their functions either directly or indirectly. Every dentist should have a basic understanding of the etiopathogenesis, oral and systemic manifestations of this disease. The periodontal diseases are a consequence of extension of the gingival inflammation into the underlying supporting structures of the periodontium, initiated by the presence of plaque and its products on the surfaces of the teeth and the adjoining structures. The progression of periodontal disease is influenced by variety of factors like microorganisms, host response, systemic background, and genetic makeup of the host. Amongst them, diabetes mellitus tops the list. Diabetes and periodontitis influence the clinical outcome of each other and control of both influences the clinical improvement of each.

  15. The effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on hemoglobin A1c levels in persons with type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretson, Steven P; Hyman, Leslie G; Michalowicz, Bryan S; Schoenfeld, Elinor R; Gelato, Marie C; Hou, Wei; Seaquist, Elizabeth R; Reddy, Michael S; Lewis, Cora E; Oates, Thomas W; Tripathy, Devjit; Katancik, James A; Orlander, Philip R; Paquette, David W; Hanson, Naomi Q; Tsai, Michael Y

    2013-12-18

    Chronic periodontitis, a destructive inflammatory disorder of the supporting structures of the teeth, is prevalent in patients with diabetes. Limited evidence suggests that periodontal therapy may improve glycemic control. To determine if nonsurgical periodontal treatment reduces levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in persons with type 2 diabetes and moderate to advanced chronic periodontitis. The Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT), a 6-month, single-masked, multicenter, randomized clinical trial. Participants had type 2 diabetes, were taking stable doses of medications, had HbA1c levels between 7% and less than 9%, and untreated chronic periodontitis. Five hundred fourteen participants were enrolled between November 2009 and March 2012 from diabetes and dental clinics and communities affiliated with 5 academic medical centers. The treatment group (n = 257) received scaling and root planing plus chlorhexidine oral rinse at baseline and supportive periodontal therapy at 3 and 6 months. The control group (n = 257) received no treatment for 6 months. Difference in change in HbA1c level from baseline between groups at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included changes in probing pocket depths, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing, gingival index, fasting glucose level, and Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2) score. Enrollment was stopped early because of futility. At 6 months, mean HbA1c levels in the periodontal therapy group increased 0.17% (SD, 1.0), compared with 0.11% (SD, 1.0) in the control group, with no significant difference between groups based on a linear regression model adjusting for clinical site (mean difference, -0.05% [95% CI, -0.23% to 0.12%]; P = .55). Periodontal measures improved in the treatment group compared with the control group at 6 months, with adjusted between-group differences of 0.28 mm (95% CI, 0.18 to 0.37) for probing depth, 0.25 mm (95% CI, 0.14 to 0.36) for clinical attachment loss, 13.1% (95% CI, 8

  16. Occurrence of porphyromonas gingivalis and its antibacterial susceptibility to metronidazole and tetracycline in patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, Fredy; Acosta, Adriana; García, Dabeiba-Adriana; Velosa, Juliana; Araya, Natalia; Ledergerber, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a multifactorial infectious disease associated with Gram-negative strict anaerobes which are immersed in the subgingival biofilm. Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important periodontal pathogen, is frequently detected in patients with chronic periodontitis. Although isolates of P. gingivalis tend to be susceptible to most antimicrobial agents, relatively little information is available on its in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of P. gingivalis in patients with chronic periodontitis and to assess antimicrobial susceptibility in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of clinical isolates to metronidazole and tetracycline. A descriptive, observational study was performed including 87 patients with chronic periodontitis. Samples were taken from the periodontal pocket using paper points, which were placed in thioglycollate broth. Samples were incubated for 4 hours at 37°C in anaerobic conditions and finally replated on Wilkins-Chalgren anaerobic agar (Oxoid). Bacteria were identified using the RapIDTMANAII system (Remel) and antimicrobial susceptibility was determined with the M.I.C. Evaluator test (MICE, Oxoid). P. gingivalis was identified in 30 of the 87 patients with chronic periodontitis, which represents a frequency of 34.5%. All 30 isolates (100%) were sensitive to metronidazole, with MIC values ranging from 0015-4ug/ml. Regarding tetracycline, 27 isolates (90%) were sensitive, with MIC values ranging from periodontitis between the group of patients with chronic periodontitis and P. gingivalis and the group of patients with chronic periodontitis without P. gingivalis. In conclusion, P. gingivalis was found at a frequency of 34.5% in patients with chronic periodontitis and clinical isolates were highly sensitive to metronidazole and tetracycline.

  17. E-mail security a pocket guide

    CERN Document Server

    Furnell, Steven

    2010-01-01

    This pocket guide will help businesses to address the most important issues. Its comprehensive approach covers both the technical and the managerial aspects of the subject, offering valuable insights for IT professionals, managers and executives, as well as for individual users of e-mail.

  18. Oracle PL/SQL Language Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Feuerstein, Steven; Dawes, Chip

    2007-01-01

    The fourth edition of this popular pocket guide provides quick-reference information that will help you use Oracle's PL/SQL language, including the newest Oracle Database 11g features. A companion to Steven Feuerstein and Bill Pribyl's bestselling Oracle PL/SQL Programming, this concise guide boils down the most vital PL/SQL information into an accessible summary

  19. Dermal pocketing following distal finger replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhaindran, Mark E; Paavilainen, Pasi; Tan, David M K; Peng, Yeong Pin; Lim, Aymeric Y T

    2010-08-01

    Replantation is an ideal technique for reconstruction following fingertip amputation as it provides 'like for like' total reconstruction of the nail complex, bone pulp tissue and skin with no donor-site morbidity. However, fingertips are often not replanted because veins cannot be found or are thought to be too small to repair. Attempts at 'cap-plasty' or pocketing of replanted tips with and without microvascular anastomosis have been done in the past with varying degrees of success. We prospectively followed up a group of patients who underwent digital replantation and dermal pocketing in the palm to evaluate the outcome of this procedure. There were 10 patients with 14 amputated digits (two thumbs, five index, four middle, two ring and one little) who underwent dermal pocketing of the amputated digit following replantation. Among the 14 digits that were treated with dermal pocketing, 11 survived completely, one had partial atrophy and two were completely lost. Complications encountered included finger stiffness (two patients) and infection of the replanted fingertip with osteomyelitis of the distal phalanx (one patient). We believe that this technique can help increase the chance of survival for distal replantation with an acceptable salvage rate of 85% in our series. Copyright 2009 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pocket Checklists of Indonesian timber trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prawira, Soewanda A.; Tantra, I.G.M.; Whitmore, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    Indonesia as yet does not have a comprehensive account of the forest trees which reach timber size (35 cm dbh = 14 inch or 105 cm gbh = 42 inch). A project has been started in August 1983 by the Botany Section of the Forest Research Institute in Bogor, Indonesia, to prepare pocket checklists of the

  1. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases.

  2. Lasers in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Naveen, Devisree; Thangavelu, Arthiie

    2012-08-01

    Laser is one of the most captivating technologies in dental practice since Theodore Maiman in 1960 invented the ruby laser. Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three and a half decades of the 20(th) century. Introduced as an alternative to mechanical cutting device, laser has now become an instrument of choice in many dental applications. Evidence suggests its use in initial periodontal therapy, surgery, and more recently, its utility in salvaging implant opens up a wide range of applications. More research with better designs are a necessity before lasers can become a part of dental armamentarium. This paper gives an insight to laser in periodontics.

  3. Probiotics and periodontal health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Periodontitis is one of the most common chronic inflammatory diseases. The etiology is clearly bacterial and a number of putative bacterial pathogens have been associated with the disease, including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythus and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Comparatively, little attention has been paid to the identification of health-associated and potentially beneficial bacterial species that may reside in the gingival sulcus. Probiotic technology represents a breakthrough approach to maintaining oral health by using natural beneficial bacteria, commonly found in healthy mouths, to provide a natural defense against those bacteria which are thought to be harmful to teeth and gums. This article endeavors to introduce the concepts of probiotics in periodontics. PMID:22514571

  4. Probiotics and periodontal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, G

    2011-11-14

    Periodontitis is one of the most common chronic inflammatory diseases. The etiology is clearly bacterial and a number of putative bacterial pathogens have been associated with the disease, including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythus and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Comparatively, little attention has been paid to the identification of health-associated and potentially beneficial bacterial species that may reside in the gingival sulcus. Probiotic technology represents a breakthrough approach to maintaining oral health by using natural beneficial bacteria, commonly found in healthy mouths, to provide a natural defense against those bacteria which are thought to be harmful to teeth and gums. This article endeavors to introduce the concepts of probiotics in periodontics.

  5. Enfermedad periodontal en adolescentes

    OpenAIRE

    Navarro Napóles, Josefa

    2017-01-01

    Introducción: durante mucho tiempo se creyó que la enfermedad periodontal era una afección de la adultez, sin embargo la falta de motivación en la práctica de la higiene oral en la etapa de la adolescencia condiciona su aparición. Objetivo: identificar el estado periodontal en adolescentes de la escuela Secundaria Básica Urbana ¨Raúl Pujols¨, en la ciudad de Santiago de Cuba, en el periodo de septiembre 2014 hasta marzo 2015. Materiales y Métodos: se realizó un estudio observacional, descript...

  6. Defensins in periodontal health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taran Bedi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Defensins are abundant and widely distributed peptides in human and animal tissues that are involved in host defence. Defensins not only have the ability to strengthen the innate immune system but can also enhance the adaptive immune system by chemotaxis of monocytes, T-lymphocytes, dendritic cells and mast cells to the infection site. Defensins also improves the capacity of macrophage phagocytosis. A greater understanding of how these peptides act in the healthy, gingivitis and periodontitis conditions would definitely open new opportunities for identification, prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases. This discussion focuses on recent studies about biological function of defensins in human diseases and animal models.

  7. Periodontal disease characterization in dogs with normal renal function or chronic renal failure

    OpenAIRE

    Barbudo-Selmi,Glenda Ramalho; Carvalho,Marileda Bonafim; Selmi,André Luis; Martins,Silvio Emílio Cuevas

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate periodontal disease (PD) in dogs with chronic renal failure (CRF) and to compare it to PD in dogs with normal renal function (NRF). Twelve dogs with CRF and 24 dogs with NRF, all presenting dental pocket formation, were compared. In all dogs, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, urine specific gravity and total red and white blood cells were determined. A complete oral examination was also performed including evaluation of bacterial plaque, gingivit...

  8. Periodontal disease and systemic complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Vicente Oppermann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal diseases comprise a number of infectious and inflammatory conditions brought about by the interaction between supragingival and subgingival biofilms and the host inflammatory response. Periodontal diseases should be considered systemic conditions. This means that they are both modulated by the body's systems and play a role as a risk factor for systemic derangements. The current evidence supports some of these interactions, such as smoking as a risk factor for periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus, as both influenced by and influencing inflammatory changes in the periodontal tissue. Other potential associations are still being researched, such as obesity, hormonal changes, cardiovascular disease, and adverse outcomes in pregnancy. These, and others, still require further investigation before the repercussions of periodontal disease can be fully elucidated. Nevertheless, at the present time, the treatment of periodontal diseases-and, most importantly, their prevention-enables adequate intervention as a means of ensuring periodontal health.

  9. Fingertip replantation using the subdermal pocket procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsan-Shiun; Jeng, Seng-Feng; Chiang, Yuan-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    Restoration of finger length and function are the goals of replantation after fingertip amputation. Methods include microsurgical replantation and nonmicrosurgical replantation, such as composite graft techniques. To increase the survival rates for composite grafts, the subcutaneous pocket procedure has been used as a salvage procedure. The subdermal pocket procedure, which is a modification of the subcutaneous pocket procedure, was used for replantation of 17 fingertips in 16 consecutive patients. Eight fingertips experienced guillotine injuries and the other nine fingertips experienced crush injuries. Revascularization of one digital artery without available venous outflow was performed for six fingers, and composite graft techniques were used for the other 11 fingers. The success rate was 16 of 17 cases. The difference in success rates for guillotine versus crush injuries was statistically significant. Comparison of patients with arterial anastomoses and patients without arterial anastomoses also indicated a statistically significant difference. Thirteen fingertips survived completely. One finger, demonstrating complete loss and early termination of the pocketing procedure, was amputated on the eighth postoperative day. Two fingers were partially lost because of severe crushing injuries. One finger demonstrated partial loss of more than one quarter of the fingertip, which required secondary revision, because the patient was a heavy smoker. The pocketing period was 8 +/- 1 days (mean +/- SD, n = 6) for the fingers revascularized with one digital arterial anastomosis and 13.3 +/- 1.9 days (n = 10) for the fingers successfully replanted with composite graft techniques. The mean active range of motion of the interphalangeal joint of the three thumbs was 65 +/- 5 degrees, and that of the distal interphalangeal joint of the other 11 fingers was 51 +/- 11 degrees. The static two-point discrimination result was 6.4 +/- 1.0 mm (n = 14) after an average of 11 +/- 5 months

  10. Non-surgical periodontal therapy decreases serum elastase levels in aggressive but not in chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickholz, Peter; Siegelin, Yasemin; Scharf, Susanne; Schacher, Beate; Oremek, Gerhard M; Sauer-Eppel, Hildegund; Schubert, Ralf; Wohlfeil, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Assessment of the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy (SRP) on serum inflammatory parameters in patients with untreated aggressive (AgP) and chronic (ChP) periodontitis. Overall, 31 ChP and 29 AgP were examined clinically prior to and 12 weeks after SRP (subgingival scaling of all pockets within 2 days) with systemic antibiotics for patients positive for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (14 AgP, 9 ChP). Blood was sampled prior to, one day, 6, and 12 weeks after the first SRP visit. Serum elastase, C-reactive protein (CRP), lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), interleukin (IL) 6, 8, and leukocyte counts were assessed. At baseline, serum elastase, CRP, and LBP were significantly (p < 0.01) higher in AgP than ChP. Serum elastase, CRP, LBP, and IL-6 were significantly (p < 0.001) elevated one day after scaling in both groups. Both groups showed significant clinical improvement (p < 0.001). A significant difference was observed regarding change of serum elastase 12 weeks after SRP between AgP and ChP (p = 0.015). Multiple regression analysis revealed AgP, African origin, and bleeding on probing to be associated with more pronounced elastase reduction. CRP reduction was associated with African origin, systemic antibiotics, and baseline probing pocket depth. SRP results in serum elastase reduction in AgP but not in ChP. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Treatment of oral malodor and periodontal disease using an antibiotic rinse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southward, Ken; Bosy, Anne

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of an antibiotic rinse preparation, containing metronidazole and nystatin, in decreasing oral malodor and periodontal disease for individuals whose chief complaint was halitosis. This topical approach to oral biofilm control, by proactively managing the most pathogenic bacteria, differs from the traditional approach of reactively treating the symptoms by attempting to reduce all oral bacteria. The late Dr. Loesche, University of Michigan, School of Dentistry, had previously described these different paradigms as the specific plaque hypothesis and the non-specific plaque hypothesis, respectively. Patients in this study were measured before and after treatment for volatile sulphur compounds using a portable sulphide monitor, a digital gas chromatograph, and organoleptic assessment. The presence of periodontal disease was determined by 6-point periodontal probing, to assess pocket depth and bleeding points. Of the 1000 patient charts sent electronically to the University of Michigan for analysis, 649 participants were selected based on complete pre- and post-treatment data, and statistically analyzed by a statistician, who was an expert in case study analysis. The post-treatment reduction of oral malodor was 80% (P = 0.0001). The difference in bleeding points pre- and post-treatment was 87% (P = 0.0001). There was a decrease in the number of teeth with 6 and 7 mm pockets by 76% and teeth with 5 mm pockets decreased by 84% (P = 0.0001). Treatment with the antibiotic rinse had a positive change in the periodontal status and breath odor of these patients. These data indicate that there is considerable advantage to the use of topical antibiotic rinses. A substantial decrease in both halitosis and periodontal disease markers can be achieved without the risk of the systemic effects of an oral antibiotic.

  12. Salivary Myeloperoxidase, Assessed by 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine Colorimetry, Can Differentiate Periodontal Patients from Nonperiodontal Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klangprapan, Supaporn; Chaiyarit, Ponlatham; Hormdee, Doosadee; Kampichai, Amonrujee; Khampitak, Tueanjit; Daduang, Jureerut; Tavichakorntrakool, Ratree; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Boonsiri, Patcharee

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal diseases, which result from inflammation of tooth supporting tissues, are highly prevalent worldwide. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), from certain white blood cells in saliva, is a biomarker for inflammation. We report our study on the salivary MPO activity and its association with severity of periodontal diseases among Thai patients. Periodontally healthy subjects (n = 11) and gingivitis (n = 32) and periodontitis patients (n = 19) were enrolled. Assessments of clinically periodontal parameters were reported as percentages for gingival bleeding index (GI) and bleeding on probing (BOP), whereas pocket depth (PD) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) were measured in millimeters and then made to index scores. Salivary MPO activity was measured by colorimetry using 3,3'-diaminobenzidine as substrate. The results showed that salivary MPO activity in periodontitis patients was significantly higher than in healthy subjects (p = 0.003) and higher than in gingivitis patients (p = 0.059). No difference was found between gingivitis and healthy groups (p = 0.181). Significant correlations were observed (p < 0.01) between salivary MPO activity and GI (r = 0.632, p < 0.001), BOP (r = 0.599, p < 0.001), PD (r = 0.179, p = 0.164), and CAL (r = 0.357, p = 0.004) index scores. Sensitivity (94.12%), specificity (54.55%), and positive (90.57%) and negative (66.67%) predictive values indicate that salivary MPO activity has potential use as a screening marker for oral health of the Thai community.

  13. Chronic periodontitis is associated with erectile dysfunction. A case-control study in european population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Amada; Bravo, Manuel; Arrabal, Miguel; Magán-Fernández, Antonio; Mesa, Francisco

    2018-07-01

    To determine the association between chronic periodontitis and erectile dysfunction adjusting for biochemical markers and other comorbidities. A case-control study was conducted on 158 male patients; 80 cases with erectile dysfunction according to the International Index of Erectile Function and 78 controls. Sociodemographic data were gathered, and a periodontal examination was performed. Testosterone, lipid profile, C-reactive protein and glycaemic parameters were assessed. All variables were compared between groups, and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. 74% of the cases were diagnosed with chronic periodontitis. Number of sites with pocket probing depth 4-6 mm (p = 0.05) and number of sites with clinical attachment loss >3 mm (p chronic periodontitis were more likely to have erectile dysfunction (OR=2.17; 95% CI (1.06-4.43); p = 0.03) independently of other confounders. Patients with erectile dysfunction showed worse periodontal condition. Chronic periodontitis seems to play a key role as a risk factor in the pathogenesis of erectile dysfunction independently of other morbidities. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A Prospective Cohort Study to Assess and Correlate the Maternal Periodontal Status with Their Pregnancy Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohana, M H; Suragimath, G; Patange, R P; Varma, S; Zope, S A

    2017-02-01

    There is an overwhelming body of evidence strongly suggesting that periodontal infection may have a significant negative impact on pregnancy outcome in some women. The aim of this study was to determine the association between periodontal disease and preterm low birth weight of babies. A total of 300 pregnant women, between 20 and 24 weeks of gestation i.e., second trimester, were considered for the study. The periodontal status was recorded using the following parameters: probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, oral hygiene index and plaque index. After initial examination in the second trimester, the pregnant women were followed till delivery of the baby. Postpartum data i.e., weight of baby, gestational age of pregnancy and type of delivery, were recorded. Out of 300 pregnant women, 248 women had full-term delivery (12 low birth weight and 236 normal birth weight) while 52 had preterm delivery (6 normal birth weight and 46 low birth weight). There was significant association between body mass index and level of periodontal disease severity of pregnant women with birth weight of babies, gestational age of pregnant women and mode of delivery, respectively. As the level of periodontal disease severity increased, the proportion of delivering preterm and low birth weight babies also increased. The conclusions obtained revealed that Periodontal disease is a potential risk factor for preterm low birth weight babies of pregnant women.

  15. Investigation of Entamoeba gingivalis and Trichomonas tenax in Periodontitis or Gingivitis Patients in Kayseri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazar, Süleyman; Çetinkaya, Ülfet; Hamamcı, Berna; Alkan, Arzu; Şişman, Yıldıray; Esen, Çağrı; Kolay, Melike

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Entamoeba gingivalis and Trichomonas tenax in periodontitis and gingivitis patients. The study consisted of 107 periodontitis patients and 68 gingivitis patients. Bacterial plaque samples were collected with a curette from the deepest pocket in each quadrant and placed into separate tubes containing sterile 0.9% saline solution. Samples were examined at a magnification of ×400 by light microscopy. Cultivation for T. tenax was performed using the same samples, and the cultures were examined after 48 hours. E. gingivalis was present in the samples from 38 periodontitis patients, whereas T. tenax was present in samples from only 3 periodontitis patients. Both E. gingivalis and T. tenax were found together in the samples from 2 periodontitis patients. In total, 22 and 2 gingivitis patients were found to be infected with E. gingivalis and with T. tenax, respectively. Only 1 gingivitis patient was found to be infected with both E. gingivalis and T. tenax. In our study, oral protozoa were found in a high percentage in periodontitis and gingivitis patients. We believe that the prevalence of E. gingivalis and T. tenax should be determined via new studies and, in particular, the protection principles should be complied with.

  16. Molecular analyses of two bacterial sampling methods in ligature-induced periodontitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Carla Raquel; Grecco, Clovis; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; de Freitas, Laura Marise; Boussios, Constantinos I; Soukos, Nikolaos S

    2018-02-01

    The prevalence profile of periodontal pathogens in dental plaque can vary as a function of the detection method; however, the sampling technique may also play a role in determining dental plaque microbial profiles. We sought to determine the bacterial composition comparing two sampling methods, one well stablished and a new one proposed here. In this study, a ligature-induced periodontitis model was used in 30 rats. Twenty-seven days later, ligatures were removed and microbiological samples were obtained directly from the ligatures as well as from the periodontal pockets using absorbent paper points. Microbial analysis was performed using DNA probes to a panel of 40 periodontal species in the checkerboard assay. The bacterial composition patterns were similar for both sampling methods. However, detection levels for all species were markedly higher for ligatures compared with paper points. Ligature samples provided more bacterial counts than paper points, suggesting that the technique for induction of periodontitis could also be applied for sampling in rats. Our findings may be helpful in designing studies of induced periodontal disease-associated microbiota.

  17. Exploring association between sleep deprivation and chronic periodontitis: A pilot study

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    Vishakha Grover

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep deprivation has become a global phenomenon, and epidemiologic data indicate that short sleep duration adversely impacts human physical health. Underlying mechanisms involve modulation of immune-inflammatory mechanisms. These changes might contribute to potentiation of destructive periodontal disease. Therefore, the present study aimed to assess if there is an association of sleep deprivation with chronic periodontal diseases. Materials and Methods: Sixty subjects were categorized into 3 groups (n = 20 each viz. clinically healthy, gingivitis and periodontitis. Periodontal status of subjects was assessed by gingival index and pocket probing depth. All the study subjects were administered Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI questionnaire for the assessment of sleep deprivation. Results: Present investigation revealed that mean PSQI was highest in the periodontitis group as compared to other two groups and the difference among three groups was statistically significant. Conclusion: The present study with preliminary results suggestive of the association of sleep deprivation with severity of periodontal disease, definitely calls on for future studies with larger samples.

  18. Thiolated alginate-based multiple layer mucoadhesive films of metformin forintra-pocket local delivery: in vitro characterization and clinical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Abeer Ahmed; Issa, Doaa Ahmed Elsayed; Kotry, Gehan Sherif; Farid, Ragwa Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal disease broadly defines group of conditions in which the supportive structure of the tooth (periodontium) is destroyed. Recent studies suggested that the anti-diabetic drug metformin hydrochloride (MF) has an osteogenic effect and is beneficial for the management of periodontitis. Development of strong mucoadhesive multiple layer film loading small dose of MF for intra-pocket application. Multiple layer film was developed by double casting followed by compression method. Either 6% carboxy methyl cellulose sodium (CMC) or sodium alginate (ALG) constituted the inner drug (0.6%) loaded layer. Thiolated sodium alginate (TSA; 2 or 4%) constituted the outer drug free layers to enhance mucoadhesion and achieve controlled drug release. Optimized formulation was assessed clinically on 20 subjects. Films were uniform, thin and hard enough for easy insertion into periodontal pockets. Based on water uptake and in vitro drug release, CMC based film with 4% TSA as an outer layer was the optimized formulation with enhanced mucoadhesion and controlled drug release (83.73% over 12 h). SEM showed the effective fabrication of the triple layer film in which connective lines between the layers could be observed. FTIR examination suggests possibility of hydrogen bonding between the -NH groups of metformin and -OH groups of CMC. DSC revealed the presence of MF mainly in the amorphous form. Clinical results indicated improvement of all clinical parameters six months post treatment. The results suggested that local application of the mucoadhesive multiple layer films loaded with metformin hydrochloride was able to manage moderate chronic periodontitis.

  19. Root Conditioning and Agents Effect in Regeneration of Periodontal Tissue

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    Kadkhoda Z

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis affected root surfaces are hypermineralized and contaminated with cytotoxic and"nother biologically active substances."nThe instrumented surface will inervitably be coverd by a smear layer following root planing with or without flap."nSmear layer is resistant to saline rinsing, but may be removed with agents such as acids (e.g.citric acid, tetracyclines, EDTA, and laser."nLow pH aqueous solutions such as citric acid have been used in surgical periodontal therapy mainly for two reasons, It dissolves smear layer after a relatively short exposure time and it has been claimed to selectively remove root surface associated mineral exposing collagen to varying degrees. A root surface coated with collagen appears to be a preferred surface for fibroblast attachment, a cellular event fundamental to successful periodontal wound healing."nSeveral studies indicate the potential of tetracycline (TTE-HCL in periodontal regeneration. Its acidic pH suggest that it can be used as a demineralization agent and removing the smear layer and exposing collagen matrix of the dentin."nChalating agent (EDTA working at neutral pH appears preferable with respect to preserving the integrity of exposed collagen fibers, early colonization, and wound healing. In addition, etching at neutral pH has been reported preserve adjacent tissue- vitality, while etching at low pH necrotizes the fiap and adjacent periodontium."nClinical and subclinical studies have demonstrated laser waves can remove calculus and bacterial plaque and pocket epithelium and strile the root surface and can expose the dentin collagen and dentinal tublules, and leads to pronounce reducing of probing depth around teeth diseased with periodontitis.

  20. Carbon dioxide laser for de-epithelialization of periodontal flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centty, I G; Blank, L W; Levy, B A; Romberg, E; Barnes, D M

    1997-08-01

    Regeneration of mineralized and soft connective tissue components of the attachment apparatus is the main goal in the treatment of periodontal diseases. Often, apical migration of epithelium (long junctional epithelium) effectively prevents the formation of bone and connective tissue attachment after periodontal surgery. The purpose of the present study was to compare conventional periodontal surgery combined with carbon dioxide laser and conventional periodontal surgery alone with respect to epithelial elimination and degree of necrosis of mucoperiosteal flaps. After signing a consent form, five patients with at least two comparable bilateral periodontal defects needing pocket elimination surgery participated in this study. The investigators randomly divided each side into test and control sites. Each patient received oral hygiene instruction and initial therapy prior to surgery. At surgery, the test site received a sulcular incision and carbon dioxide laser de-epithelialization of the outer and inner aspects of the flap. The control group received reverse bevel incision only. The surgeon performed open flap debridement on all teeth. At the time of surgery, the surgeon did a biopsy of each site and submitted specimens for histologic evaluation. A matched pairs t-test was used to analyze the data. The results show significant differences between the carbon dioxide laser and reverse bevel incision with respect to sulcular (P test sites, with a predominance of plasma cells. Lining the sulcular and gingival (external) lased areas, investigators found coagulation necrosis covered by fibrin and coagulated blood. The laser appears to effectively remove epithelium at the time of surgery; however, future long-term, well-controlled quantitative histologic studies are needed to evaluate the effect of repeated carbon dioxide laser de-epithelialization of the gingival (external) surface of mucoperiosteal flaps at intervals during the healing period.

  1. Periodontics II: Course Proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dordick, Bruce

    A proposal is presented for Periodontics II, a course offered at the Community College of Philadelphia to give the dental hygiene/assisting student an understanding of the disease states of the periodontium and their treatment. A standardized course proposal cover form is given, followed by a statement of purpose for the course, a list of major…

  2. Defining a periodontitis case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baelum, Vibeke; Lopez, Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    . Conclusions The results indicate that it should be feasible for the periodontal community to reach an agreement over the distinction between a case and a non-case. The classification system proposed by van der Velden is better suited for providing clinicians with a clear image of the case....

  3. Recurrent periodontal abscess associated with “teeth as a tool”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, G. Subraya; Singh, Vishal; Bhat, K. Mahalinga

    2012-01-01

    We report an unusual case of recurrent periodontal abscess in a 31-year-old male electrician due to his habit of using his teeth as a tool for stripping electrical wires. The patient was not aware of the consequences of this habit. Clinically, there was presence of moderate depth of periodontal pocket around the tooth and, radiographically, there was a vertical defect mesial to the involved teeth. The patient was educated about the consequences of his habit and surgical treatment was undertaken. A papilla preservation flap with regenerative periodontal surgical procedure was done, orthodontic and restorative treatment was planned at the follow-up. This case highlights the importance of eliciting a proper and complete personal history, including occupational details. In our patient these details helped us correlate the destruction of the periodontium to the unusual etiology. PMID:22628975

  4. Is self interdental cleaning associated with dental plaque levels, dental calculus, gingivitis and periodontal disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocombe, L A; Brennan, D S; Slade, G D; Loc, D O

    2012-04-01

    To ascertain whether interdental cleaning behaviours of Australian adults were associated with lower levels of plaque, gingivitis and periodontal disease. Data were obtained from the National Survey of Adult Oral Health 2004-06. Outcome variables were three indicators of oral hygiene outcomes (the presence or not of dental plaque, dental calculus and gingivitis) and two of periodontal disease (the presence or not of at least one tooth with a periodontal pocket or clinical attachment loss of ≥ 4 mm). The independent variable was classified into the following three groups: regularly clean interproximally 'at least daily' (daily+); 'less than daily' (dental plaque (dental calculus (dental plaque and gingivitis, although there was no significant association between regular interdental cleaning and clinical attachment loss. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Periodontal conditions in patients with Marfan syndrome - a multicenter case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staufenbiel, Ingmar; Hauschild, Christian; Kahl-Nieke, Bärbel; Vahle-Hinz, Eva; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Berner, Maike; Bauss, Oskar; Geurtsen, Werner; Rahman, Alexander

    2013-10-28

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a disorder of the connective tissues. Alterations of the elastic fibers may manifest in different tissues especially in the skeletal, cardiovascular and ocular system. Oral manifestations like orthodontic or skeletal anomalies and fragility of the temporomandibular joint have been well described by various authors. However, no data are available regarding a possible periodontal involvement of MFS. Hence, the aim of the present study was to investigate for the first time if MFS may increase the susceptibility to periodontitis. A comprehensive periodontal examination including documentation of probing pocket depth, gingival recession, clinical attachment level, and bleeding on probing was conducted in all patients. In addition, dental conditions were assessed by determining the Index for Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth (DMFT) and a self-administered questionnaire was filled out by patients. For statistical analysis, the unpaired t-Test was applied (level of significance: p endocarditis.

  6. Clinical effect of etidronate on alveolar pyorrhoea associated with chronic marginal periodontitis: report of four cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaishi, Y; Miki, T; Nishizawa, Y; Morii, H

    2001-01-01

    Etidronate 200 mg daily was administered to four female patients with periodontitis and resultant alveolar pyorrhoea for periods of 2 weeks, followed by off-periods of 10 weeks or more, for 2-3 years. The macroscopic appearance of gingival mobility of the teeth, depth of periodontal pockets, and X-ray findings of alveolar bones improved markedly during this time. The effects were first observed after 6-12 months of treatment. These findings indicate that bisphosphonates may be effective in the treatment of periodontitis and resultant alveolar pyorrhoea. The effect may be mediated by the inhibitory action on bone resorption and the anti-inflammatory action of etidronate. Concomitant conventional dental management is also required.

  7. Pengembangan Pocket Mobile Learning Berbasis Android

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    Dasmo Dasmo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengembangkan media pembelajaran pocket mobile learning berbasis android. Metode penelitian ini menggunakan model pengembangan ADDIE (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, dan Evaluation. Penelitian ini telah menghasilkan sebuah luaran berupa media pembelajaran pocket mobile learning berbasis android pada mata kuliah fisika. Media ini layak digunakan berdasarkan validasi dari ahli materi, ahli media dan respon mahasiswa terhadap media pembelajaran yang dibuat. Berdasarkan penilaian validasi ahli materi didapatkan rata-rata skor total sebesar 3,22 pada 14 butir pernyataan, dan termasuk pada kriteria “baik”. Sementara itu, berdasarkan validasi ahli media didapatkan rata-rata skor total sebesar 3,43 pada 15 butir pernyataan, dan termasuk pada kriteria “sangat baik”. Dan berdasarkan hasil analisis respon mahasiswa terhadap media pembelajaran diperoleh rata-rata skor total sebesar 4,0 atau 80%, dengan kategori “kuat”. Dengan demikian dapat disimpulkan bahwa media pembelajaran pocket mobile learning berbasis android layak untuk digunakan dan hampir semua mahasiswa menanggapi respon positif.The current research aims to develop the pocket mobile learning android based. It uses the Research and Development (R&D method with the ADDIE model (analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluating. This research has resulted from an outcome of learning media pocket mobile android based on physics subject. This instructional media is feasible to be used based on validation from material experts, media experts, and student responses. Based on the assessment of material expert, the validation obtains an average total score of 3,22 at 14 statements and considered as "good" criteria. Meanwhile, based on the validation of media experts, the average total score reaches 3,43 at 15 statements and considered as "very good" criteria. And based on the analysis of students’ response to learning media, the

  8. Short-term clinical outcomes of laser supported periodontal treatment concept using Er,Cr:YSGG (2780nm) and diode (940 nm): a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odor, Alin A.; Violant, Deborah; Badea, Victoria; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Backgrounds: Er,Cr:YSGG (2780nm) and diode (940 nm) lasers can be used adjacent to the conventional periodontal treatment as minimally invasive non-surgical devices. Aim: To describe the short-term clinical outcomes by combining Er,Cr:YSGG (2780nm) and diode 940 nm lasers in non-surgical periodontal treatment. Materials and methods: A total of 10 patients with periodontal disease (mild, moderate, severe) - 233 teeth and 677 periodontal pockets ranging from 4 mm to 12 mm - were treated with Er,Cr:YSGG (2780nm) and diode (940 nm) lasers in adjunct to manual and piezoelectric scaling and root planning (SRP). Periodontal parameters such as mean probing depth (PD), mean clinical attachment level (CAL) and mean bleeding on probing (BOP) were evaluated at baseline and 6 months after the laser treatment using an electronic periodontal chart. Results: At baseline, the mean PD was 4.06 ± 1.06 mm, mean CAL was 4.56 ± 1.43 mm, and mean BOP was 43.8 ± 23.84 %. At 6 months after the laser supported periodontal treatments the mean PD was 2.6 ± 0.58 mm (p laser wavelengths in adjunct to SRP offers significant improvements of periodontal clinical parameters such as PD, CAL and BOP. Keywords: Laser supported periodontal treatment concept, Er,Cr:YSGG and diode 940nm lasers, Scaling and root planning, Minimally invasive non-surgical device

  9. Clinical case report of long-term follow-up in type-2 diabetes patient with severe chronic periodontitis and nifedipine-induced gingival overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibukawa, Yoshihiro; Fujinami, Koushu; Yamashita, Shuichiro

    2012-01-01

    In this case report, we describe the clinical course over a 14-year follow-up in a 47-year-old diabetes patient with severe chronic periodontitis and nifedipine-induced gingival overgrowth. The patient had a history of hypertension for over 5 years and uncontrolled type 2 diabetes. Overgrown gingiva was observed in most of the teeth and was marked in the upper and lower anterior teeth. A probing pocket depth of ≥ 4 mm and bleeding on probing (BOP) were observed in 94 and 90% of sites examined, respectively. At baseline, his hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was 8.5%. The patient received periodontal and diabetic treatment simultaneously. Medication was changed from nifedipine chloride to an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. After initial therapy and subsequent periodontal surgery, gingival overgrowth disappeared and probing depth and BOP showed a significant improvement. No recurrence was observed during supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). The HbA1c level improved from 8.5 to 6.3% after periodontal treatment, subsequently remaining at a good level during SPT over 10 years. This study demonstrated that periodontal treatment, withdrawal of medication and control of diabetes can result in remarkable improvements in type 2 diabetes patients with chronic periodontitis and nifedipine-induced gingival overgrowth. These results suggest that comprehensive periodontal treatment in combination with treatment for diabetes mellitus can exert a positive influence on blood glucose levels and periodontal condition in diabetic patients.

  10. Evaluation of commercially available biodegradable tetracycline fiber therapy in chronic periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Surinder; Agarwal, Vipin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chronic periodontitis is an inflammatory disorder caused by dental plaque having mixed microbial flora. The different treatment modalities available to treat this disease are aimed at removal of micro-organisms from both hard and soft tissues. Systemic as well as local anti-microbial agents are helpful adjuncts in reducing microbes especially in inaccessible areas along with mechanical debridement therapy. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a split mouth design. Thirty-five patients having at least two non-adjacent sites in different quadrants with periodontal pockets ≥5 mm and with bleeding on probing at initial visit were selected. The selected sites were treated with both scaling and root planing plus tetracycline fibers or with scaling and root planing alone. Baseline and follow-up measurements included plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level. Result: Both treatment modalities were affective in improving clinical parameters over three months’ observation period. The combined antimicrobial and mechanical debridement therapy has shown better results as compared with scaling and root planing alone. Conclusion: Application of tetracycline in modified collagen matrix following scaling and root planing might be beneficial in treatment of chronic periodontitis and improving periodontal parameters for 3-month duration. PMID:21976836

  11. Periodontal disease characterization in dogs with normal renal function or chronic renal failure

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    Barbudo-Selmi Glenda Ramalho

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate periodontal disease (PD in dogs with chronic renal failure (CRF and to compare it to PD in dogs with normal renal function (NRF. Twelve dogs with CRF and 24 dogs with NRF, all presenting dental pocket formation, were compared. In all dogs, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, urine specific gravity and total red and white blood cells were determined. A complete oral examination was also performed including evaluation of bacterial plaque, gingivitis, gingival recession, pocket, calculus, dental mobility, dental loss, and ulcers. These data were used to calculate plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI and periodontal destruction index (PDI. PD was graded as mild, moderate or severe based on the results. Mild, moderate or severe PD was observed in dogs with NRF, whereas dogs with CRF presented either mild or severe PD. Dogs with NRF showed higher involvement of the maxillary teeth, whereas dogs with CRF showed a higher involvement of the mandibular teeth. Plaque index was significantly higher in dogs with NRF. It was concluded that lesion distribution and periodontal disease progression may be altered in dogs with CRF, and gingival inflammatory response differs in dogs with NRF and CRF regarding to the stage of periodontal disease.

  12. Periodontal and microbiological parameters in children and adolescents with cleft lip and /or palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdikogianni, Hariklia; Papaioannou, William; Nakou, Melachrini; Oulis, Constantine; Papagiannoulis, Liza

    2009-11-01

    Objective. To evaluate the oral hygiene and the periodontal condition of children and adolescents with cleft lip and/or palate (CLP). Methods. Forty-one children and adolescents, 4-18 years, with CLP and 41 normal controls participated. Clinical parameters examined were the plaque and gingival index and Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs. For teeth in the cleft area, probing pocket depth, bleeding on probing, and tooth mobility were also evaluated. Samples of subgingival plaque were collected from 21 randomly selected patients of each group. Results. The CLP group had generally poorer oral hygiene (plaque index significantly higher) compared with the control. Children in both groups presented mild degree of gingivitis. Teeth in the cleft area had significantly higher pocket probing depth and tooth mobility, compared with corresponding teeth in the control group. The microbial analysis did not reveal significant differences in the composition of the subgingival microbiota between groups. Teeth in the cleft presented higher isolation frequencies and mean percentages of periodontopathic bacteria. Conclusion. Youngsters with CLP showed poor oral hygiene and worse periodontal condition, compared with controls. The above results advocate their participation in an intensive preventive dental programme that should start at an early age, possibly decreasing the risk of future periodontal disease.

  13. Periodontal disease in a remote Asian population: association between clinical and microbiological parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvarnvik, Christine; Söljegård, Emelie; Charalampakis, Georgios; Suksu-Art, Narong; Dahlén, Gunnar

    2016-08-01

    The aim was to clinically and microbiologically describe the periodontal conditions in a remote adult Asian population with poor oral hygiene. The subjects were 30-60-year-old adults of Karen Hill tribes with no access to dental care. Eighty-six subjects were selected randomly. Clinical registrations included number of remaining teeth, plaque index (PlI), bleeding on probing (BoP), clinical attachment loss (CAL), and probing pocket depth (PPD). Subgingival plaque samples were collected and analyzed with the checkerboard method. Subjects of the study group had mean number of remaining teeth of 26.5 despite the abundant plaque and a high bleeding score. Severe periodontitis (CAL ≥ 7 mm) was recorded in 12.9% of the youngest age group (30-39 years) while it was significantly higher (52%) in the middle group (40-49 years) and (60%) in the eldest age group (50-60 years). Pathological pocketing (PPD ≥ 7 mm) was significantly lower in all age groups. Age, betel chewing, and a microbiological cluster including at least one of Prevotella tannerae, Filifactor alocis and Porphyromonas endodontalis significantly correlated with the severity of periodontal disease. Age, betel chewing, and a new bacterial complex other than the "red complex" correlated to periodontal breakdown in this remote adult Asian population. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Non-surgical approach to advanced chronic periodontitis: a 17.5-year case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, M; Sadamori, S; Okada, M; Sasahara, H; Hamada, T

    2004-03-01

    This 17.5-year longitudinal case report details the treatment of advanced chronic periodontitis in a female patient commencing at 34 years of age. The woman was provided with periodontal care comprising of temporary fixation, scaling and root planing, intra-pocket irrigation using a root canal syringe and regular supervised maintenance. The patient presented with a 10-year history of bleeding gums. Therapy conducted in general practice had included simple curettage and irrigation. However, these treatments proved unsuccessful and the patient often changed dentists seeking better treatment. She presented to the University Dental Hospital, for diagnosis and treatment of her periodontal conditions after her mandibular lateral incisor had exfoliated. On presentation a purulent exudate could be expressed from all of the pockets. All anterior teeth, excluding the maxillary canines, demonstrated +2 to +3 mobility. The patient did not want any surgical treatment or her teeth extracted. It was decided to treat the patient conservatively without surgery. By postponing extraction, the authors were in a better position to determine the prognosis of the remaining teeth after the infection was under control. Although six teeth were extracted during the 17.5 years, this case report suggests that a non-surgical approach is a viable option while maintaining regular visits for periodontal care.

  15. PERIODONTAL DISEASE: LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Baia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The periodontal disease is the most common disorder of oral cavity of the dogs, being characterized by the inflammation of the gingiva (gingivitis and periodontium (periodontitis, as a result of aerobic bacteria accumulation on the tooth surface, shaped as a biofilm, creating a microaerophilic environment that enhances the development of pathogenic anaerobic bacteria. The process of gingivitis can be reversed after proper treatment. If untreated, it progresses to periodontitis, an irreversible condition, because of the loss of epithelial adhesion. Animals with periodontitis have bone loss and consequently tooth mobility. This condition has the feeding as the main modifier factor. This means that the more solid is the food, the more friction with the tooth it will do, helping the removal of the biofilm. There are several predisposing factors of this disease, such as race, age, occlusion problems, immunodeficiency, among others. The clinical signs of periodontal disease may vary, being halitosis and gingivitis the most common findings. The diagnosis is made by direct inspection, where furcation exposure, inflammation and dental calculus can be seen. The best complementary tool to diagnose is the intra-oral radiography, which allows the visualization of bone structures that can not be seen during clinical inspection, helping to manage the treatment. The use of antibiotics is only complementary to treatment and only chosen in special cases. The treatment for this condition is surgical and requires sedation. It basically consists in the complete removal of dental calculus, followed by teeth polishing. The whole procedure is performed using specific techniques and instrumentation. There are various prophylactic methods, although daily brushing and the awareness of the owner about this condition are considered the ideal combination.

  16. Antibiotic Resistance in Human Chronic Periodontitis Microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rams, Thomas E.; Degener, John E.; van Winkelhoff, Arie J.

    Background: Patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) may yield multiple species of putative periodontal bacterial pathogens that vary in their antibiotic drug susceptibility. This study determines the occurrence of in vitro antibiotic resistance among selected subgingival periodontal pathogens in

  17. The Effect of Resveratrol Supplementation in Adjunct with Non-surgical Periodontal Treatment on Blood Glucose, Triglyceride, Periodontal Status and Some Inflammatory Markers in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Periodontal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zare Javid

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease are two chronic and common diseases with close relationship together affecting public health and quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of resveratrol supplementation in adjunct with non-surgical periodontal treatment (NST on blood glucose, triglyceride, periodontal status and inflammatory markers in type 2 diabetic patients with periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: This double-blind clinical trial study was conducted on 43 diabetic patients with periodontitis referred to the Endocrinology Clinic at Golestan Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran. All subjects were randomly assigned into two groups of intervention and control. The intervention and control groups received either 480 mg/d resveratrol or placebo capsules (2 PCs for four weeks. All subjects underwent non-surgical periodontal therapy during the intervention period. Anthropometric parameters, 24-hour dietary recall, fasting blood sugar, insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, triglycerides, pocket depth (PD, IL6 and TNF&alpha were evaluated in all subjects pre- and post-intervention. Results: The mean serum levels of fasting insulin and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR were significantly (P=0.02, P=0.045, respectively lower in the intervention group compared with the control group (10.42 ± 0.28 and 10.92 ± 0.9 3.66 ± 0.97 and 4.49 ± 1.56, respectively . Moreover, significant difference (P < 0.001 was obtained in the mean pocket depth (PD between the intervention and control groups (2.35 ± 0.6 and 3.38 ± 0.5, respectively post-intervention. In the intervention group, the mean serum level of IL6 was reduced significantly (P= 0.039 post-intervention (1.58 ± 1.06 and 2.19± 1.09. No significant differences were seen in the mean levels of fasting blood sugar, triglycerides, IL6 and TNF&alpha between the two groups post-intervention. Conclusions: It is suggested that resveratrol may be recommended as

  18. Poor periodontal health as a risk factor for development of pre-eclampsia in pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Varshney

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Periodontal disease has been considered a systemic exposure implicated in a higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. The aim of the present study was to determine whether maternal oral health is associated with an increased risk of pre-eclampsia. Subjects and Methods: A case-control study was conducted which included 40 pregnant women patients admitted to the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, J.N. Medical College, A.M.U, Aligarh. Pre-eclampsia was defined as classic triad of hypertension, proteinuria and symptoms such as swelling/edema esp. in hands and face, headache, visual changes etc., A periodontal examination was done during 48 h after child delivery. Maternal oral status was evaluated using gingival index by Loe and Silness, oral hygiene index (simplified by greene and vermillion and periodontal pockets and clinical attachment level (CAL. Statistical Analysis: Null hypothesis that no difference exist between the two groups (pre-eclamptic and non-pre-eclamptic Group was calculated using paired t-test, Chi-square and Mann-Whitney U statistical tests using SPSS 11.5 (Statistical Package for Social sciences, Chicago. P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: The amount of gingival inflammation, oral hygiene levels, pocket depth and CALs as measured by their respective indices were higher in the pre-eclamptic group when compared to non-pre-eclamptic group. Furthermore CAL was significantly increased in the test group. This study showed that pre-eclamptic cases were more likely to develop periodontal disease (P < 0.05. 30% of the test group and 65% of the case group had periodontal disease (P < 0.05 which had shown that pre-eclamptic cases were 4.33 times more likely to have periodontal disease (odds ratio = 4.33. Conclusions: Maternal oral status was determined to be associated with an increased risk of pre-eclampsia.

  19. Clinical Evaluation of Periodontal Tissue Status in Prosthodontic Treatment of Patients with Partial Tooth Loss and Generalized Periodontitis

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    A. Kushlyk

    2018-01-01

    . Results and discussion. The application of direct dental prosthetic rehabilitation method after mobile tooth removal in combination treatment of generalized periodontitis allows stabilizing degenerative and inflammatory processes in the periodontium in the initial stages, as well as increasing the resistance of the capillaries and bone mineral density of the interdental septa. The obtained data indicated that the application of the proposed direct fixed sectional dental bridge was more effective as compared to conventional prosthetics methods. Conclusions. 1. Direct fixed prosthodontics using direct fixed sectional dental bridge is essential in combination treatment of generalized periodontitis, especially if mobile tooth extraction is needed. It allows increasing the effectiveness of treatment in comparison with direct removable prosthodontics using direct plastic laminar immediate prosthesis (Group I and traditional treatment methods (Group II. 2. We have proved the advantages of direct fixed prosthodontics in treatment of patients with generalized periodontitis, II-III degree based on the improvement of oral hygiene indices, the gingival bleeding index, the papillary-marginal-alveolar index, the periodontal index and the depth of periodontal pockets 6-12 months after treatment.

  20. Pocket money and child effort at school

    OpenAIRE

    François-Charles Wolff; Christine Barnet-Verzat

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study the relationship between the provision of parental pocket and the level of effort undertaken by the child at school. Under altruism, an increased amount of parental transfer should reduce the child's effort. Our empirical analysis is based on a French data set including about 1,400 parent-child pairs. We find that children do not undertake less effort when their parents are more generous.

  1. Newnes radio and electronics engineer's pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Moorshead, H W; Perry, J

    1978-01-01

    Newnes Radio and Electronics Engineer's Pocket Book, Fifteenth Edition provides reference of the information relevant in radio and electronics engineering. The book presents tables, illustrations, and diagrams of various data used in radio and electronics engineering. The coverage of the text includes abbreviations and symbols, electrical equations, and code conversions. The text will be useful to engineers, technicians, and other professionals who require a reference about the different aspects of radio and electronics.

  2. A pocket type thermoluminescent personnel dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vora, K.G.; Nagpal, J.S.; Pendurkar, H.K.; Gangadharan, P.

    1979-01-01

    A pocket type thermoluminescent personnel dosemeter using CaSO 4 : Dy phosphor is described. Two glass capillaries containing the phosphor are fitted into a plastic tube and covered by a cylindrical filter. The combination is fitted into an ink barrel of a fountain pen. The response of this Dy glass dosimeter was studied for various incident photon energies. A uniform response over the energy range from 33 keV to 1250 keV is achieved. (A.K.)

  3. ISO27001 / ISO27002 a pocket guide

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Information is one of your organisation's most important resources. Keeping it secure is therefore vital to your business. This handy pocket guide is an essential overview of two key information security standards that cover the formal requirements (ISO27001:2013) for creating an Information Security Management System (ISMS), and the best-practice recommendations (ISO27002:2013) for those responsible for initiating, implementing or maintaining it.

  4. Windows® 7 Administrator's Pocket Consultant

    CERN Document Server

    Stanek, William

    2009-01-01

    Portable and precise, this pocket-sized guide delivers immediate answers for the day-to-day administration of Windows 7-from desktop configuration and management to networking and security issues. Zero in on core support and maintenance tasks by using quick-reference tables, instructions, and lists. You'll get the precise information you need to solve problems and get the job done-whether at your desk or in the field!

  5. Comparison of Serum Levels of Endothelin-1 in Chronic Periodontitis Patients Before and After Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Sheeja S; Sankari, M.; Jayakumar, ND.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent vasoconstrictive peptide with multi functional activity in various systemic diseases. Previous studies indicate the detection of ET-1 in gingival tissues and gingival crevicular fluid. Aim The aim of this study was to estimate the serum ET-1 levels in clinically healthy subjects and subjects with chronic periodontitis, before and after treatment, and correlate it with the clinical parameters. Materials and Methods A total of 44 patients were included in the study. Group I comprised of 20 subjects with clinically healthy periodontium. Group II comprised of 24 subjects with chronic periodontitis. Group III comprised of same Group II subjects following periodontal management. Serum samples were collected from the subjects and an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) was done to estimate the ET-1 levels. The ET-1 levels were then correlated among the three groups with the clinical parameters namely, Plaque Index (PI), Sulcus Bleeding Index (SBI), probing pocket depth, clinical attachment loss and Periodontally Inflamed Surface Area (PISA). The independent t-test and paired t-test were used for comparison of clinical parameters and Pearson’s correlation coefficient test was used for correlating the ET-1 levels. Results ET-1 levels in chronic periodontitis subjects were significantly higher compared to healthy subjects (p<0.001). However, the clinical parameters did not statistically correlate with the ET-1 levels. There was a significant decrease in ET-1 levels following treatment (p<0.001). Conclusion Serum ET-1 is increased in chronic periodontitis and reduces after periodontal therapy. Further studies are required to establish ET-1 as a biomarker for periodontal disease. PMID:28571268

  6. Comparative evaluation of serum antioxidant levels in periodontally diseased patients: An interventional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontal disease is an immune-inflammatory disease characterized by connective tissue breakdown, loss of attachment and alveolar bone resorption. In normal physiology, there is a dynamic equilibrium between reactive oxygen species activity and antioxidant defense capacity and when that equilibrium shifts in favor of reactive oxygen species, oxidative stress results. Oxidative stress is thought to play a causative role in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. Catalase (CAT protects cells from hydrogen peroxide generated within them. Even though, CAT is not essential for some cell types under normal conditions, it plays an important role countering the effects of oxidative stress on the cell. Aim: This study was designed to estimate and compare the CAT and total antioxidant capacity (TAOC levels in the serum of periodontitis, gingivitis, and healthy individuals before and after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in the Department of Periodontics, A. B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore. The study was designed as a single blinded interventional study comprising of 75 subjects, inclusive of both sexes and divided into three groups of 25 patients each. Patients were categorized into chronic periodontitis, gingivitis and healthy. The severity of inflammation was assessed by using gingival index and pocket probing depth. Biochemical analysis was done to estimate the TAOC and CAT levels before and after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Results obtained were then statistically analyzed using ANOVA test and paired t-test. Results: The results showed a higher level of serum TAOC and CAT in the healthy group compared with the other groups. The difference was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.0001. The posttreatment levels of TAOC were statistically higher than the pretreatment levels in periodontitis group.

  7. Comparative evaluation of serum superoxide dismutase and glutathione levels in periodontally diseased patients: An interventional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Biju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontal disease is an immune-inflammatory disease characterized by connective tissue breakdown, loss of attachment, and alveolar bone resorption. Under normal physiological conditions, a dynamic equilibrium is maintained between the reactive oxygen species (ROS and antioxidant defense capacity. Oxidative stress occurs when this equilibrium shifts in favor of ROS. Oxidative stress is thought to play a causative role in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. Aim: The present study was designed to estimate and compare the superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione (GSH levels in the serum of periodontitis, gingivitis, and healthy individuals before and after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted in the Department of Periodontics, A. B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore. The study was designed as a single blinded interventional study comprising 75 subjects, inclusive of both sexes and divided into three groups of 25 patients each. Patients were categorized into chronic periodontitis, gingivitis, and healthy. The severity of inflammation was assessed using gingival index and pocket probing depth. Biochemical analysis was done to estimate the SOD and GSH levels before and after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Results obtained were then statistically analyzed using ANOVA test and paired t-test. Results: The results showed a higher level of serum SOD and GSH in the healthy group compared to the other groups. The difference was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.0001. The post-treatment levels of SOD were statistically higher than the pre-treatment levels in periodontitis and gingivitis group.

  8. Comparative evaluation of serum antioxidant levels in periodontally diseased patients: An interventional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Biju; Madani, Shabeer Mohamed; Prasad, B. Rajendra; Kumari, Suchetha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Periodontal disease is an immune-inflammatory disease characterized by connective tissue breakdown, loss of attachment and alveolar bone resorption. In normal physiology, there is a dynamic equilibrium between reactive oxygen species activity and antioxidant defense capacity and when that equilibrium shifts in favor of reactive oxygen species, oxidative stress results. Oxidative stress is thought to play a causative role in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. Catalase (CAT) protects cells from hydrogen peroxide generated within them. Even though, CAT is not essential for some cell types under normal conditions, it plays an important role countering the effects of oxidative stress on the cell. Aim: This study was designed to estimate and compare the CAT and total antioxidant capacity (TAOC) levels in the serum of periodontitis, gingivitis, and healthy individuals before and after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in the Department of Periodontics, A. B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore. The study was designed as a single blinded interventional study comprising of 75 subjects, inclusive of both sexes and divided into three groups of 25 patients each. Patients were categorized into chronic periodontitis, gingivitis and healthy. The severity of inflammation was assessed by using gingival index and pocket probing depth. Biochemical analysis was done to estimate the TAOC and CAT levels before and after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Results obtained were then statistically analyzed using ANOVA test and paired t-test. Results: The results showed a higher level of serum TAOC and CAT in the healthy group compared with the other groups. The difference was found to be statistically significant (P periodontitis group. PMID:25191070

  9. Mast Cell Stabilizers as Host Modulatory Drugs to Prevent and Control Periodontal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhoom Singh Mehta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mast cells are among the first cells to get in-volved in periodontal inflammation. Their numbers have been shown to be in-creased in cases of gingivitis and periodontal disease. The hypothesis: Since mast cell stabilizers like sodium cromogly-cate (SCG and nedocromil sodium (NS have been used in the prophylaxis of bronchial asthma without any significant adverse effects and also the fact that drugs like SCG show significant anti-inflammatory activities, it would be logical to use mast cell stabilizers as host modulating drugs for the treatment and prevention of peri-odontal disease. Evaluation of the hypothesis: Safety and efficacy of both SCG and NS are well documented. So, it will be systemically safe to use in humans. However, oral administration SCG or delivery of the drug by means local irrigation will not be very useful because SCG may not be secreted in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF(as in the case of oral administraion or the drug may get washed out from periodontal pocket due to the constant flow of GCF(as in the case of irrigation. A local or targeted drug delivery of mast cell stabilizers can be used in patients with periodontal disease. Role of mast cells in periodontal disease has been dealt in-depth in many studies and articles. However, limited amount of research has been done on using mast cell stabilizers in the prevention and control of periodontal diseases. More studies are needed to study the efficacy and effective-ness of mast cell stabilizers as an adjunct to phase I therapy in the control of periodontal disease.

  10. Evaluation of serum C-reactive protein levels in subjects with aggressive and chronic periodontitis and comparison with healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaparthy, Aruna; Kanaparthy, Rosaiah; Niranjan, Nandini

    2012-05-01

    Periodontal subgingival pathogens affect local and systemic immune responses and initiate an acute phase systemic inflammatory response characterized by the release of C-reactive proteins (CRPs). This study has been carried out to evaluate the serum concentration of CRPs, which can be used as a marker of periodontal disease as well as a risk indicator for cardiovascular diseases. In a retrospective study a total number of 45 subjects were selected from the outpatient department of periodontics a mean age of 40 years. Based on the periodontal status, the subjects were divided into 3 groups of 15 subjects each. Group I: Control group [with attachment loss (AL) ≤ 2 mm and pocket depth (PD) periodontitis (AL ≤ 5 mm), Group III: chronic periodontitis (AL ≥ 2 mm, PD ≥ 5 mm), which includes moderate and severe periodontitis. The clinical parameters recorded were plaque index,gingival index, bleeding index, probing PD, and clinical attachment levels and scoring was done on 6 surfaces of all teeth. For the CRP assessment, blood samples were collected from subjects at the time of clinical examination. Analysis of covariance was used for comparison of mean values between the groups to adjust the ages (P value periodontitis compared with controls. This was found to be statistically significant. A statistically significant difference (P = 0.012) was found in the CRP level between groups I and II and between groups II and III, and between groups I and III. The results of the present study indicated an increase in serum CRP levels in subjects with generalized aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis as compared with the controls.

  11. Evaluation of serum C-reactive protein levels in subjects with aggressive and chronic periodontitis and comparison with healthy controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaparthy, Aruna; Kanaparthy, Rosaiah; Niranjan, Nandini

    2012-01-01

    Background: Periodontal subgingival pathogens affect local and systemic immune responses and initiate an acute phase systemic inflammatory response characterized by the release of C-reactive proteins (CRPs). This study has been carried out to evaluate the serum concentration of CRPs, which can be used as a marker of periodontal disease as well as a risk indicator for cardiovascular diseases. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective study a total number of 45 subjects were selected from the outpatient department of periodontics a mean age of 40 years. Based on the periodontal status, the subjects were divided into 3 groups of 15 subjects each. Group I: Control group [with attachment loss (AL) ≤ 2 mm and pocket depth (PD) periodontitis (AL ≤ 5 mm), Group III: chronic periodontitis (AL ≥ 2 mm, PD ≥ 5 mm), which includes moderate and severe periodontitis. The clinical parameters recorded were plaque index,gingival index, bleeding index, probing PD, and clinical attachment levels and scoring was done on 6 surfaces of all teeth. For the CRP assessment, blood samples were collected from subjects at the time of clinical examination. Analysis of covariance was used for comparison of mean values between the groups to adjust the ages (P value chronic periodontitis compared with controls. This was found to be statistically significant. A statistically significant difference (P = 0.012) was found in the CRP level between groups I and II and between groups II and III, and between groups I and III. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicated an increase in serum CRP levels in subjects with generalized aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis as compared with the controls. PMID:23087729

  12. Salivary and microbiological parameters of chronic periodontitis subjects with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto CORTELLI

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have investigated the differences in salivary parameters and microbial composition between diabetic and non-diabetic patients, however, specific differences are still not clear mainly due to the effects of confounder. Aim: The aim of this case-control study was to evaluate the salivary and microbial parameters of chronic periodontitis subjects with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus. Material and method: This case-control study included 60 chronic periodontitis subjects, 30 diabetics (case group and 30 non-diabetics (control group, paired according to periodontitis severity, gender and age. Stimulated whole saliva was collected from all volunteers to measure the salivary pH and the salivary flow rate. Bacterial samples were collected with paper points from periodontal sites showing the deepest periodontal pocket depth associated with the highest clinical attachment loss. The frequency of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. intermedia, P. gingivalis, T. forsythia and C. rectus was evaluated by PCR. Data was statistically analyzed by Student's t, Mann-Whitney and Chi-square (p<0.05. Result: Diabetic subjects showed higher salivary glucose levels and lower stimulated flow rates in comparison to non-diabetic controls. P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were the most frequent pathogens (p<0.05. Bacterial frequency did not differ between case and control groups. Conclusion: Diabetes status influenced salivary glucose levels and flow rate. Within the same severity of chronic periodontitis, diabetic subjects did not show higher frequency of periodontal pathogens in comparison to their paired controls.

  13. THE EFFECTS OF POOR GLYCEMIC CONTROL AND OF NON-SURGICAL PERIODONTAL THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia OANȚĂ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between the diabetic status and severity of the periodontal involvement, and also of the non-surgical periodontal therapy on the periodontal status of patients with diabetes mellitus. Materials and method: The study was conducted on 21 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (study group and 10 systemically healthy subjects (control group. We examined: the degree of glycemic control (by measuring the glycated hemoglobin, the periodontal and oral hygiene parameters at the baseline and 4 weeks, 6 months and 12 months after the periodontal treatment (scaling and root planning. Results and discussion: Subjects with a poor glycemic control presented a higher percentage of sites with attachment loss, significantly higher amounts of bacterial plaque, sub-gingival calculus and gingival bleeding - when compared with the control group or with subjects with good or moderated glycemic control. In the same group, a rapid recurrence of the deep periodontal pockets was observed after 12 months. Conclusions: A prolonged poor control of glycemia and the time elapsed from the debut of diabetes were closely related with its complications. The comparison between the diabetes and the control groups demonstrated that diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for the periodontal disease.

  14. Estimation of high sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with periodontal disease and without coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, V; Nair, Sushma; Shivakumar, V; Shanmugam, M; Priya, B Meena; Rajesh, P

    2015-01-01

    HsCRP (Highly sensitive C reactive protein) is a global indicator for future vascular events in adults detected in blood stream 48 hours before the cardiovascular event. Periodontal disease may increase blood levels of inflammatory markers like IL-6, CRP and HsCRP. Hence the aim of the present study is to evaluate the presence of elevated HsCRP levels in chronic periodontitis patients. 100 patients who reported for cardiac master health check up were enrolled in the study. The periodontal status was assessed using periodontal probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level. The decayed, missing and filled tooth was recorded using DMFT index. The venous samples of these patients were obtained for recording HsCRP levels. Pearson correlation was used to analyze the relationship between HsCRP level and probing pocket depth, clinical attachment loss and DMFT. The correlation value was 0.051, 0.025 and 0.101 respectively, the correlation is statistically significant for probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level (P>0.05). Chi-square test was performed to study the association between gender and HsCRP, Diabetes Mellitus and HsCRP and Hypertension and HsCRP; the results showed that there is no significant association between any of the above mentioned factors and HsCRP level in blood. We found an increased level of HsCRP in patients with chronic periodontitis which revealed the susceptibility of these patients to cardiac diseases like myocardial infarction and stroke. Hence present day focus in the line of management of cardiac patient has changed from the periodontal perspective.

  15. Evaluation of periodontitis in hospital outpatients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, A C O; Marques, A H; Pannuti, C M; Lotufo, R F M; Lotufo-Neto, F

    2014-02-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been associated with alterations in the neuroendocrine system and immune function and may be associated with an increased susceptibility to cardiovascular disease, cancer and autoimmune/inflammatory disease. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between periodontitis and MDD in a convenience sample of hospital outpatients. The sample consisted of 72 physically healthy subjects (36 outpatients with MDD and 36 age-matched controls [± 3 years]). Patients with bipolar disorder, eating disorders and psychotic disorders were excluded. Probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level were recorded at six sites per tooth. Depression was assessed by means of Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Extent of clinical attachment level and probing pocket depth were not different between controls and subjects with depression for the following thresholds: ≥ 3 mm (Mann-Whitney, p = 0.927 and 0.756); ≥ 4 mm (Mann-Whitney, p = 0.656 and 0.373); ≥ 5 mm (Mann-Whitney, p = 0.518 and 0.870);, and ≥ 6 mm (Mann-Whitney, p = 0.994 and 0.879). Depression parameters were not associated with clinical attachment level ≥ 5 mm in this sample. Smoking was associated with loss of attachment ≥ 5 mm in the multivariable logistic regression model (odds ratio = 6.99, 95% confidence interval = 2.00-24.43). In this sample, periodontal clinical parameters were not different between patients with MDD and control subjects. There was no association between depression and periodontitis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Scaling-Stimulated Salivary Antioxidant Changes and Oral-Health Behavior in an Evaluation of Periodontal Treatment Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Sheng Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Our goal was to investigate associations among scaling-stimulated changes in salivary antioxidants, oral-health-related behaviors and attitudes, and periodontal treatment outcomes. Materials and Methods. Thirty periodontitis patients with at least 6 pockets with pocket depths of >5 mm and more than 16 functional teeth were enrolled in the study. Patients were divided into three groups: an abandoned group (AB group, a nonprogress outcome group (NP group, and an effective treatment group (ET group. Nonstimulated saliva was collected before and after scaling were received to determine superoxide dismutase (SOD and the total antioxidant capacity (TAOC. Results. Salivary SOD following scaling significantly increased from 83.09 to 194.30 U/g protein in patients who had irregular dental visit patterns (<1 visit per year. After scaling, the TAOC was significantly higher in patients who had regular dental visits than in patients who had irregular dental visits (3.52 versus 0.70 mmole/g protein, P<0.01. The scaling-stimulated increase in SOD was related to a higher severity of periodontitis in the NP group, while the scaling-stimulated increase in the TAOC was inversely related to the severity of periodontitis in the AB group. Conclusions. These results demonstrate the importance of scaling-stimulated salivary antioxidants as prognostic biomarkers of periodontal treatment.

  17. Effect of periodontal therapy on type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with chronic periodontitis with the evaluation of HbA1c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manvi Chandra Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In the recent years, a two-way correlation has been postulated between periodontitis and systemic conditions. One such condition is diabetes mellitus (DM. Several studies have demonstrated a close relationship between DM and chronic periodontitis. Aims: To assess the effect of periodontal therapy and scaling and root planing (SRP on the metabolic control in type 2 DM patients with chronic periodontitis based on the estimation of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c. Settings and Design: A prospective, comparative, clinical study was performed on 50 patients suffering from type 2 DM with moderate, generalized chronic periodontitis. The study period was 6 months. Type 2 moderately controlled diabetic patients with glycated hemoglobin values within the range of 6-8% were selected. Patients with major diabetic complications, history of any antibiotic intake or periodontal treatment within the last 4 months, and smoking habits were excluded. Materials and Methods: The parameters recorded were gingival index (GI, plaque index (PI, sulcus bleeding index (SBI, probing pocket depth (PPD, clinical attachment level (CAL, and glycated hemoglobin. The recordings were done at baseline and 6 months after scaling and root planing procedures. HbA1c was measured by NycoCard Reader. Statistical Analysis Used: Karl-Pearson coefficient test, Z-test, and paired t-test. Results: Reductions in all the clinical parameters were observed and were found to be statistically significant (P < 0.005. Conclusions: Scaling and root planing resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the clinical parameters and HbA1c. So, periodontal treatment should be included in the management of diabetic patients.

  18. [Sensitivity of microbial associations of periodontal lesions to antibacterial agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeeva, I M; Daurova, F Yu; Byakova, S F; Ippolitov, E V; Gostev, M S; Polikushina, A O; Shubin, E V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was the development of approaches to improve the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in dental practice on the basis of determining the sensitivity of pathogenic microorganisms to antibiotics of different groups. The study included determination of the sensitivity of the microbial complexes from wound exudate of periodontal pocket and apical abscess to macrolides, quinolones, penicillins, lincosamides and 5-nitroimidazole. A survey of dentists and dental clinics patients to identify the cause and frequency of use of antibiotics and to identify possible adverse reactions was also conducted. Dentists prefer macrolide antibiotics, protected penicillins, and fluoroquinolone combined with 5-nitroimidazole. All patients have taken antibiotics themselves at least once a year. Microbial complexes in patients with acute and exacerbated apical periodontitis in 79% of cases are susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, to azithromycin - 52%, lincomycin - 36%, 5-nitroimidazole - 68%, ciprofloxacin - 73.7%. In patients with apical abscess high rates of resistance of microbial complexes to all types of antibiotics was revealed (33% for lincomycin 76,1% for ciprofloxacin, 28,6% for 5-nitroimidazole). Patients with moderate to severe periodontitis in 90.5% are sensitive to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and azithromycin, in 62.4% to lincomycin. Sensitivity to ciprofloxacin was detected in 85.7% of patients, in 14.3% - moderate resistance.

  19. Endodontic-periodontic bifurcation lesions: a novel treatment option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaul; Tillinger, Gabriel; Zuckerman, Offer

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this preliminary clinical report is to suggest a novel treatment modality for periodontal bifurcation lesions of endodontic origin. The study consisted of 11 consecutive patients who presented with periodontal bifurcation lesions of endodontic origin (endo-perio lesions). All patients were followed-up for at least 12 months. Treatment included calcium hydroxide with iodine-potassium iodide placed in the root canals for 90 days followed by canal sealing with gutta-percha and cement during a second stage. Dentin bonding was used to seal the furcation floor to prevent the ingress of bacteria and their by-products to the furcation root area through the accessory canals. A radiographic examination showed complete healing of the periradicular lesion in all patients. Probing periodontal pocket depths decreased to 2 to 4 mm (mean 3.5 mm), and resolution of the furcation involvement was observed in post-operative clinical evaluations. The suggested treatment of endo-perio lesions may result in complete healing. Further studies are warranted. This treatment method improves both the disinfection of the bifurcation area and the healing process in endodontically treated teeth considered to be hopeless.

  20. Periodontal pathogenic bacteria and aMMP-8 findings depending on periodontal conditions of patients before and after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebolz, Dirk; Schmalz, Gerhard; Kauffels, Anne; Widmer, Florian; Widmer, Katja; Slotta, Jan E; Mausberg, Rainer F; Kollmar, Otto

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this single-center cross-sectional study was to detect the prevalence of selected periodontal pathogenic bacteria and active matrix metalloproteinase-8 (aMMP-8) level in patients before (preLTx) and after liver transplantation (postLTx). Periodontal pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) were assessed. Subgingival biofilm samples were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect 11 common periodontal pathogens. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine aMMP-8 level and assigned to a scoring system: score 0: 0-8 ng/ml, score 1: 8-20 ng/ml, and score 2: >20 ng/ml. The following were used for the statistical analysis: t test, Mann-Whitney U test, Fishers test (α = 5 %). In total, 110 patients (preLTx: n = 35, postLTx: n = 75) could be included in the study. Periodontal findings were not significantly different between groups. In microbiological analysis, a significantly higher prevalence of Campylobacter rectus in preLTx group was detected (p = 0.03). Significantly more patients with score 0 in postLTx group (p = 0.024) and significantly more patients with score 1 in preLTx group were found (p = 0.004). Furthermore, aMMP-8 concentrations for patients with moderate periodontitis were significantly lower in postLTx group compared to preLTx group (p = 0.045). Additionally, in postLTx group, aMMP-8 concentration was significantly higher in patients with severe periodontitis compared to those with no/mild periodontitis (p = 0.016). LTx appears to affect aMMP-8 level, but not bacterial findings in patients after LTx. Determination of aMMP-8 level in patients after LTx with immunosuppressive medication might lead to wrong interpretation of the results.

  1. Laser therapy for periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efanov, O. I.

    2001-04-01

    An investigation was made of applying pulsed (lambda) equals 0.89 micrometers laser radiation in the treatment for early diagnosed periodontitis. The investigation was made on 65 patients (47 patients constituted the experimental group and 18 patients constituted a control group) affected by periodontitis. Clinical and functional tests revealed that laser therapy produced a string effect on the course of the illness. It reduced bleeding, inflammation, and pruritus. However, it did not produce an affect on electroexcitation. Biomicroscopic examinations and periodontium rheography revealed that the gingival blood flow became normal after the course of laser therapy. The capillary permeability and venous congestion decreased, which was confirmed by the increased time of vacuum tests, raised gingival temperature, reduced tissue clearance, and increased oxygen tension. Apart from that, laser therapy subsided fibrinolysis, proteolytic tissue activity, and decreased the exudative inflammation of periodontium.

  2. [Esthetic reconstruction of the anterior teeth area following a combined periodontic-orthodontic treatment in adult periodontal patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihong, Zhu; Sa, Li; Fei, He; Yong, Wu; Yan, Zhou; Nianhong, Qin; Yi, Ding

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the role of the combined periodontic-orthodontic treatment in the esthetic reconstruc- tion of the anterior teeth area following periodontitis. Thirteen adult patients with anterior teeth displacements were treated. The probing pocket depth (PD; 102 teeth, 612 sites), bleeding on probing (102 teeth, 204 sites), papilla index (PI; 128 papillae), and papillary height (PH; 128 papillae) of each patient were assessed at baseline, 3 months after the initial therapy, and the end of the orthodontic treatment. Non-parametric and paired-sample t tests were carried out for the statistical analysis of the data. Three months after initial therapy, the sites with PD ≤ 3 mm accounted for 79.58% (487/612) of the observed teeth, and 88.73% (181/204) of the buccal and lingual sites of the teeth showed negative bleeding on probing. These findings were better than those at baseline [26.31% (161/612) and 22.06% (45/204), respectively] (P 0.05). Prior to orthodontic treatment, the levels of the PI of 8 and 21 papillae were III and II, respectively, among the 128 observed papillae. After the orthodontic treatment, 51 papillae were at level III and 68 papillae were at level II. The PH of the 102 papillae was 2.84 mm ± 0.62 mm after ortho- dontic treatment. This result indicated significant difference compared with that of pre-orthodontic treatment (1.69 mm ± 0.57 mm) (P periodontal defects.

  3. Reconstruction of the maxillary midline papilla following a combined orthodontic-periodontic treatment in adult periodontal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaropoli, Daniele; Re, Stefania; Corrente, Giuseppe; Abundo, Roberto

    2004-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of a combined orthodontic-periodontic treatment in determining the reconstruction of midline papilla lost following periodontitis. Twenty-eight patients, with infrabony defect and extrusion of one maxillary central incisor, were treated. At baseline, all patients presented opening of the interdental diastema and loss of the papilla. At 7-10 days after open-flap surgery, the intrusive movement started. For each patient, probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and papilla presence index (PI) were assessed at baseline, end of treatment and after 1 year. PI was also evaluated independently in patients with narrow or wide periodontal biotype (NPB-WPB). All parameters showed statistical improvement between the initial and final measurements, and showed no changes at follow-up time. The mean residual PPD was 2.50 mm, with a decrease of 4.29 mm, while the mean CAL gain was 5.93 mm. Twenty-three out of 28 patients improved the PI score at the end of therapy. No statistical difference was recorded in PI values between groups NPB and WPB. The presented clinical protocol resulted in the improvement of all parameters examined. At the end of orthodontic treatment, a predictable reconstruction of the interdental papilla was reported, both in patients with thin or wide gingiva. Copyright Blackwell Munksgaard, 2004.

  4. Longitudinal Relationship between Plasma Reactive Oxygen Metabolites and Periodontal Condition in the Maintenance Phase of Periodontal Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Machida

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The present cohort study describes the longitudinal relationship between plasma oxidative status and periodontitis progression during the maintenance phase of treatment. Materials and Methods. Forty-five patients (mean age 58.8 years were monitored from 2008 to 2013. Periodontal conditions, including probing pocket depth (PPD and clinical attachment level (CAL, were recorded. Measurements of plasma reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM and biologic antioxidant potential (BAP were performed to evaluate plasma oxidative status. The patients were assigned into 2 groups as low and high plasma ROM level using a cut-off value which was median of plasma ROM level at baseline. Results. In the subjects with low plasma ROM level at baseline, changes in mean CAL were positively correlated with changes in plasma ROM levels, bleeding on probing, and plaque control record, but not with PPD. In the subjects with high plasma ROM at baseline, changes in CAL were significantly associated with only PPD at baseline. On the other hands there were no significant associations between changes in CAL and those in plasma BAP levels. Conclusions. When plasma ROM level in periodontitis patients was low, increases in plasma ROM level were associated with those in CAL during the maintenance phase of treatment.

  5. Probiotics and periodontal health

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, G

    2011-01-01

    Periodontitis is one of the most common chronic inflammatory diseases. The etiology is clearly bacterial and a number of putative bacterial pathogens have been associated with the disease, including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythus and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Comparatively, little attention has been paid to the identification of health-associated and potentially beneficial bacterial species that may reside in the gingival sulcus. Probiotic technology represents a ...

  6. Gene therapy in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Singh, Nidhi; Saluja, Mini

    2013-03-01

    GENES are made of DNA - the code of life. They are made up of two types of base pair from different number of hydrogen bonds AT, GC which can be turned into instruction. Everyone inherits genes from their parents and passes them on in turn to their children. Every person's genes are different, and the changes in sequence determine the inherited differences between each of us. Some changes, usually in a single gene, may cause serious diseases. Gene therapy is 'the use of genes as medicine'. It involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working gene copy into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. Thus it may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. It has a promising era in the field of periodontics. Gene therapy has been used as a mode of tissue engineering in periodontics. The tissue engineering approach reconstructs the natural target tissue by combining four elements namely: Scaffold, signaling molecules, cells and blood supply and thus can help in the reconstruction of damaged periodontium including cementum, gingival, periodontal ligament and bone.

  7. Osteoporosis and Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chin-Wei Jeff; McCauley, Laurie K

    2016-12-01

    Osteoporosis and periodontitis are both diseases characterized by bone resorption. Osteoporosis features systemic degenerative bone loss that leads to loss of skeletal cancellous microstructure and subsequent fracture, whereas periodontitis involves local inflammatory bone loss, following an infectious breach of the alveolar cortical bone, and it may result in tooth loss. Most cross-sectional studies have confirmed the association of osteoporosis and periodontitis primarily on radiographic measurements and to a lesser degree on clinical parameters. Multiple shared risk factors include age, genetics, hormonal change, smoking, as well as calcium and vitamin D deficiency. Both diseases could also be risk factors for each other and have a mutual impact that requires concomitant management. Suggested mechanisms underlying the linkage are disruption of the homeostasis concerning bone remodeling, hormonal balance, and inflammation resolution. A mutual interventional approach is emerging with complex treatment interactions. Prevention and management of both diseases require interdisciplinary approaches and warrants future well-controlled longitudinal and interventional studies for evidence-based clinical guidelines.

  8. Impact of Chronic Periodontitis on Levels of Glucoregulatory Biomarkers in Gingival Crevicular Fluid of Adults with and without Type 2 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasaan G Mohamed

    Full Text Available The relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease is bidirectional, but information about the effect of chronic periodontitis on the levels of the glucoregulatory biomarkers locally in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF is limited. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of 10 glucoregulatory biomarkers in GCF, firstly in subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM presenting with and without chronic periodontitis and secondly, in subjects without diabetes, with and without chronic periodontitis. The material comprised a total of 152 subjects, stratified as: 54 with T2DM and chronic periodontitis (G1, 24 with T2DM (G2, 30 with chronic periodontitis (G3 and 44 without T2DM or periodontitis (G4. The levels of the biomarkers were measured using multiplex biometric immunoassays. Periodontal pocket depths were recorded in mm. Subsets G1 and G2 and subsets G3 and G4 were compared independently. Among T2DM subjects, GIP, GLP-1 and glucagon were significantly up-regulated in G1 compared to G2. Moreover, there were no statistical differences between the two groups regarding C-peptide, insulin, ghrelin, leptin and PAI-1. Comparisons among individuals without T2DM revealed significantly lower amounts of C-peptide and ghrelin in G3 than in G4. The number of sites with pocket depth ≥ 4mm correlated negatively with C-peptide (Spearman's correlation co-efficient: -0.240, P < 0.01 and positively with GIP and visfatin (Spearman's correlation co-efficient: 0.255 and 0.241, respectively, P < 0.01. The results demonstrate that chronic periodontitis adversely influences the GCF levels of glucoregulatory biomarkers, as it is associated with disturbed levels of biomarkers related to the onset of T2DM and its medical complications.

  9. Python pocket reference, version 2.4

    CERN Document Server

    Lutz, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Python is optimized for quality, productivity, portability, and integration. Hundreds of thousands of Python developers around the world rely on Python for general-purpose tasks, Internet scripting, systems programming, user interfaces, and product customization. Available on all major computing platforms, including commercial versions of Unix, Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X, Python is portable, powerful and remarkable easy to use. With its convenient, quick-reference format, Python Pocket Reference, 3rd Edition is the perfect on-the-job reference. More importantly, it's now been refreshed

  10. Newnes passive and discrete circuits pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    MARSTON, R M

    2000-01-01

    Newnes Passive and Discrete Circuits Pocket Book is aimed at all engineers, technicians, students and experimenters who can build a design directly from a circuit diagram. In a highly concise form Ray Marston presents a huge compendium of circuits that can be built as they appear, adapted or used as building blocks. The devices used have been carefully chosen for their ease of availability and reasonable price. The selection of devices has been thoroughly updated for the second edition, which has also been expanded to cover the latest ICs.The three sections of the book cover: Moder

  11. Mac OS X Snow Leopard pocket guide

    CERN Document Server

    Seiblod, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Whether you're new to the Mac or a longtime user, this handy book is the quickest way to get up to speed on Snow Leopard. Packed with concise information in an easy-to-read format, Mac OS X Snow Leopard Pocket Guide covers what you need to know and is an ideal resource for problem-solving on the fly. This book goes right to the heart of Snow Leopard, with details on system preferences, built-in applications, and utilities. You'll also find configuration tips, keyboard shortcuts, guides for troubleshooting, lots of step-by-step instructions, and more. Learn about new features and changes s

  12. AIR for Javascript Developers Pocket Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Chambers, Mike; Hoyt, Kevin; Georgita, Dragos

    2009-01-01

    This book is the official guide to Adobe ® AIR[TM], written by members of the AIR team. With Adobe AIR, web developers can use technologies like HTML and JavaScript to build and deploy web applications to the desktop. Packed with examples, this book explains how AIR works and features recipes for performing common runtime tasks. Part of the Adobe Developer Library, this concise pocket guide explains: What Adobe AIR is, and the problems this runtime aims to solveHow to set up your development environmentThe HTML and JavaScript environments within AIRHow to create your first AIR application

  13. Longitudinal study of prognostic factors in established periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machtei, E E; Dunford, R; Hausmann, E; Grossi, S G; Powell, J; Cummins, D; Zambon, J J; Genco, R J

    1997-02-01

    Numerous indicators for disease progression have been described in the last decade. The purpose of this study was to examine, longitudinally, a large battery of clinical, microbiological, and immunological indicators, to try to determine whether the presence of one or a combination of these parameters at baseline, would correlate positively with increased attachment and or bone loss (true prognostic factors). Following initial screening, 79 patients with established periodontitis were monitored longitudinally for one year. Whole mouth clinical measurements, plaque gingival and calculus indices, together with pocket depth and attachment level measurements, were repeated every three months. Full mouth radiographic survey, performed at baseline and 12 months, served to determine changes in crestal bone height using an image enhancement technique. Subgingival plaque samples were taken at baseline and every 3 months. Immunofluorescence assays were performed for the a battery of target microorganisms. Serum and GCF samples for IgG subclasses analysis were obtained at each visit and assayed using ELISA techniques. Likewise blood, samples were also drawn at each visit for a quantitative analysis of serum cotinine level. The overall mean attachment loss (AL) and bone loss (BL) were almost identical (0.159 mm and 0.164 mm, respectively). Individual patients variation was large (-0.733 to +1.004 mm). An overall 6.89% of sites were active; individual patients' means ranged from 0-28.9%. Mean pocket depth (PD) showed minimal change over the study period (-0.033 mm) thus suggesting that most if not all the AL was accompained by concomitant gingival recession. Smokers exhibited greater AL and radiographic BL compared to non-smokers. Likewise, patients' cotinine level showed direct correlation with outcomes of progressive periodontal breakdown. Past severity of periodontal involvement, as reflected in the patients baseline PD, AL and crestal bone height, showed good correlation

  14. Centipeda periodontii in human periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rams, Thomas E.; Hawley, Charles E.; Whitaker, Eugene J.; Degener, John E.; van Winkelhoff, Arie J.

    This study assessed the subgingival occurrence of the flagellated, Gram-negative, anaerobic rod Centipeda periodontii in chronic periodontitis and periodontal health/gingivitis with species-specific nucleic acid probes, and evaluated the in vitro resistance of subgingival isolates to therapeutic

  15. Histological analysis of effects of 24% EDTA gel for nonsurgical treatment of periodontal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vasconcellos, Luana Marotta Reis; Ricardo, Lucilene Hernandes; Balducci, Ivan; de Vasconcellos, Luis Gustavo Oliveira; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate, by means of histological and histomorphometric analysis, the effects of 24% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) gel in periodontal tissue when used in combination with conventional periodontal treatment. Periodontitis was induced in the 2nd upper left permanent molars of 45 male Wistar rats by means of ligature. After 5 weeks, this was removed and debridement was performed. The animals were then randomly divided into 3 groups; group 1: mechanical treatment, group 2: mechanical treatment and EDTA gel application for 2 min, and group 3: mechanical treatment and placebo gel application for 2 min. After the treatment, rinsing was done with 0.9% saline solution for 1 min in all cases, followed by root notching in the deepest part of the pocket. After 4, 10, and 28 days the animals were sacrificed. The averages obtained were evaluated by means of test two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey statistical tests (P 24% EDTA gel did not interfere with periodontal tissue repair when used in combination with conventional periodontal treatment.

  16. The effect of periodontal treatment on C-reactive protein: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Shah, Samir; Budhiraja, Shilpa; Desai, Khushboo; Shah, Chirag; Mehta, Dhaval

    2013-07-01

    Chronic periodontitis in amultifactorial inflammatory disease which is caused by various microorganisms. Many studies have found close association between chronic periodontitis and C-reactive protein (CRP). CRPis an inflammatory marker which increases in all inflammatory condition. The present clinical study was designed to show the effect of periodontal treatment on the CRP levels of gingival crevicular fluid and to determine the effect of nonsurgical therapy in minimizing the CRP levels in chronic generalized periodontitis. Gingival crevicular fluid was collected using a micro capillary pipette that was hand calibrated at every 1 mm till 10 mm, from selected sites in the subjects on the 1st, 14th and 45th days. Decreased CRP levels of gingival crevicular fluid were observed at the end of the study. There was a 37% reduction in probing pocket depth and 45% gain in clinical attachment level and a reduction of about 57% after 14 days and 90% reduction of CRP levels in gingival crevicular fluid after 45 days. Thus, the results show that the presence of CRP level is more significant in gingival crevicular fluid and confirms the underlying inflammatory component of the disease activity in chronic periodontitis.

  17. Peripheral Blood Leukocytes Interleukin-1 Beta (IL-1β) Cytokine Hyper-Reactivity in Chronic Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakalauskiene, Jurgina; Giedrimiene, Dalia; Gleiznys, Darius; Gleiznys, Alvydas; Gleizniene, Rymante; Vitkauskiene, Astra

    2016-11-12

    BACKGROUND Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-1β) released by peripheral blood leukocyte medium (PBLM), isolated from chronic periodontitis patients (P) before therapy and matched to controls, were determined in the presence or absence of non-opsonized Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. MATERIAL AND METHODS In this investigation, 26 patients with untreated, severe, generalized, chronic periodontitis and 26 healthy subjects (H) were enrolled. Periodontal status was assessed by measuring bleeding on probing (BOP), clinical attachment loss (CAL), probing pocket depth (PPD), and Ramfjord index (PDI). The levels of IL-1β (µg/ml) were assayed by a standard Immunoenzymetric Assay Diasource IL-1β ELISA kit in PBLM. RESULTS Our study showed that the values of IL-1β levels in PBLM of the P group (stimulated with non-opsonized E. coli and S. aureus) were significantly higher than in the analogous medium of H group subjects (Pperiodontitis. CONCLUSIONS Levels of IL-1β secreted by leukocytes may help measure severe, generalized, chronic periodontitis, and can be predictive of future detrimental clinical sequelae associated with chronic periodontitis.

  18. Failing to meet the goals of periodontal recall programs. What next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Giles; Asuni, Abisola; Ritchie, Mark; Vernazza, Christopher; Heasman, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Supportive periodontal care is a crucial aspect of the management of chronic periodontitis and peri-implantitis and is inevitably a long-term commitment for both the clinician and the patient. The principal goals of supportive care are to achieve a high standard of plaque control, minimize bleeding and maintain pockets at less than 6 mm. Gain of attachment around natural teeth during supportive periodontal care has been reported, although gain of attachment and of bone during supportive care may be a more pragmatic and aspirational aim in the longer term. Furthermore, we occasionally see patients for whom, despite excellent home and professional care (surgical or nonsurgical), including the management of risk factors, supportive periodontal care appears to be failing and therefore for such patients the clinician needs to consider further management options. This review considers, in particular, the options of using local or systemically delivered antimicrobials to eradicate periodontal and peri-implant disease progression and discusses the extent to which culture and sensitivity testing before the prescription of systemically delivered antimicrobials may be a cost-effective alternative to prescribing 'blind'. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Periodontal status and pathogenic bacteria after gastric bypass: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena de Carvalho; de Moura-Grec, Patrícia Garcia; Yamashita, Joselene Martinelli; Torres, Elza Araujo; Dionísio, Thiago José; Leite, Celso Vieira de Souza; Sales-Peres, Arsenio; Ceneviva, Reginaldo

    2015-06-01

    The aim this study was to evaluate the influence of gastric bypass surgery (GBS) on periodontal disease and quantify the periodontopathogenic bacteria in patients undergoing this surgery. This prospective study was composed of 50 patients who underwent bariatric surgery and the data collection was performed in three periods pre-operative, 6 (6M) and 12 months (12 M) postoperative. The oral clinical examination to assess periodontal disease; gingival fluid sample collection for quantification of the periodontopathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Prevotella intermedia using q-PCR; body mass index (BMI) and for collection of the individual's health-related data from medical files. There was a significant reduction in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and glucose levels after surgery. The mean probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) increased significantly in the postoperative period of 6 months (p = 0.001). In the same period, the amount of P. gingivalis increased (p = 0.028) and the other bacteria decreased slightly (p > 0.050). In the presence of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, T. denticola and P. intermedia, a poor periodontal condition was observed. The periodontal disease increased in severity and P. gingivalis increased after GBS. A systemic inflammation resolution due to bariatric surgery in obese subjects does not seem to affect the course of periodontal disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Presence of Porphyromonas and Prevotella species in the oral microflora of cattle with periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Borsanelli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstratc: Bovine periodontitis is a progressive purulent infectious process associated with the presence of strictly and facultative anaerobic subgingival biofilm and epidemiologically related to soil management in large geographic areas of Brazil. This study aimed to detect species of the genera Porphyromonas and Prevotella, which occurr in periodontal pockets of cattle with lesions deeper than 5mm (n=26 and in gingival sulcus of animals considered periodontally healthy (n=25. Presence of the microorganisms was evaluated by independent-culture medium diagnostic method, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR with specific primers of Porphyromonas asaccharolytica, P. endodontalis, P. gingivalis, P. gulae, Prevotella buccae, P. intermedia, P. loescheii, P. melaninogenica, P. nigrescens, P. oralis and P. tannerae. The species P. endodontalis (80.7%, P. melaninogenica (73.1% and P. intermedia (61.5% were the most predominant in samples of cattle with periodontitis. Regarding non-injured gingival sulcus of cattle, P. endodontalis (40% and P. loeschei (40% prevailed. Porphyromonas gingivalis, P. gulae and Prevotella tannerae were not detected in the 51 samples studied. Data evaluation by T test, enabled to verify that ocorrence of Porphyromonas asaccharolytica (p=0.000003, P. endodontalis (p=0.0023, Prevotella buccae (p=0.0017, P. intermedia (p=0.0020, P. melaninogenica (p=0.00006 and P. oralis (p=0.0028 is correlated with bovine periodontitis.

  1. Dynamic Mechanical and Nanofibrous Topological Combinatory Cues Designed for Periodontal Ligament Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joong-Hyun; Kang, Min Sil; Eltohamy, Mohamed; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Hae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Complete reconstruction of damaged periodontal pockets, particularly regeneration of periodontal ligament (PDL) has been a significant challenge in dentistry. Tissue engineering approach utilizing PDL stem cells and scaffolding matrices offers great opportunity to this, and applying physical and mechanical cues mimicking native tissue conditions are of special importance. Here we approach to regenerate periodontal tissues by engineering PDL cells supported on a nanofibrous scaffold under a mechanical-stressed condition. PDL stem cells isolated from rats were seeded on an electrospun polycaprolactone/gelatin directionally-oriented nanofiber membrane and dynamic mechanical stress was applied to the cell/nanofiber construct, providing nanotopological and mechanical combined cues. Cells recognized the nanofiber orientation, aligning in parallel, and the mechanical stress increased the cell alignment. Importantly, the cells cultured on the oriented nanofiber combined with the mechanical stress produced significantly stimulated PDL specific markers, including periostin and tenascin with simultaneous down-regulation of osteogenesis, demonstrating the roles of topological and mechanical cues in altering phenotypic change in PDL cells. Tissue compatibility of the tissue-engineered constructs was confirmed in rat subcutaneous sites. Furthermore, in vivo regeneration of PDL and alveolar bone tissues was examined under the rat premaxillary periodontal defect models. The cell/nanofiber constructs engineered under mechanical stress showed sound integration into tissue defects and the regenerated bone volume and area were significantly improved. This study provides an effective tissue engineering approach for periodontal regeneration-culturing PDL stem cells with combinatory cues of oriented nanotopology and dynamic mechanical stretch.

  2. Exercise habituation is effective for improvement of periodontal disease status: a prospective intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Shoei; Uchida, Fumihiko; Oh, Sechang; So, Rina; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; Yanagawa, Toru; Sakai, Satoshi; Shoda, Junichi; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Bukawa, Hiroki

    2018-01-01

    Periodontal disease is closely related to lifestyle-related diseases and obesity. It is widely known that moderate exercise habits lead to improvement in lifestyle-related diseases and obesity. However, little research has been undertaken into how exercise habits affect periodontal disease. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of exercise habits on periodontal diseases and metabolic pathology. We conducted a prospective intervention research for 12 weeks. The subjects were 71 obese men who participated in an exercise and/or dietary intervention program. Fifty subjects were assigned to exercise interventions (exercise intervention group) and 21 subjects were assigned to dietary interventions (dietary intervention group). This research was conducted before and after each intervention program. In the exercise intervention group, the number of teeth with a probing pocket depth (PPD) ≥4 mm significantly decreased from 14.4% to 5.6% ( P periodontal disease-causing bacteria and PPD and BOP. Our results are the first to show that exercise might contribute to improvements in periodontal disease.

  3. Experience of application of ascorbate chitosan in the treatment of periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulkina N.V.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the clinical anti-inflammatory effect of gel form 8% ascorbate chitozan in treatment of inflammatory periodontal disease. Material and methods. The study included 30 patients: 10 patients with chronic catarrhal gingivitis, 10 patients with chronic generalized periodontitis mild and 10 moderate. Criteria for inclusion of patients in the study: age between 18 and 45 years old, reliable diagnosis, informed consent of the patient. Case history of the disease duration from one to five years. The state of periodontal tissue was evaluated clinically and radiographically by intraoral radiography. According to treatment methods patients were divided into groups: group 1 underwent traditional treatment, group 2 was treated with the use of applications of 8% of ascorbate chitosan on the area of papillae and marginal gingiva with the capture of 1-2 cm of the mucous membrane of the alveolar process. The duration of treatment was 15 minutes daily for 10 days. Results. The patterns suggest that the therapeutic effect of ascorbate chitazan caused prolonged sanation of periodontal pockets due to the antibacterial activity of chitazan. Conclusion. The data show that regeneration in patients who have a combined treatment included ascorbate chitosan has been more rapid and complete than similar processes in periodontal patients treated in a traditional way.

  4. Association between serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and chronic periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primasari, A.; Sihombing, K. P.

    2018-03-01

    Serum concentration of [25(OH)D] in Indonesia is at low level although Indonesia is one of Asia country which has a tropical climate. Vitamin D as an immunomodulatory agent invitro and in animal studies. However, data from clinical studies involvement vitamin D to chronic periodontitis are still controversy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between serum concentration of [25(OH)D] and chronic periodontitis. Totally 45 chronic periodontitis patients were analyzed. Spearman correlation models adjusted for subject and parameter included periodontal pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), and bleeding on probing (BOP) are analyzed. Totally 51.11% person have serum concentration of [25(OH)D] 21-50ng/mL were called insufficiency, and 15.56% is deficiency. Mean values of PPD >3mm indicating moderate criteria, CAL >4mm meaning severe criteria, and mean grade of BOP >2 degrees means the interdental papilla appears to be filled with little or much blood. Spearman correlation test results showed an inverse correlation between serum concentration of [25(OH)D] to the value of PPD, CAL, and BOP, however, was not statistically significant (r PPD -0.09; r CAL -0.118; r BOP 0.001, p>0.05). Insufficiency serum concentration of 25- hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] was not associated significantly with PPD, CAL, and BOP of chronic periodontitis.

  5. THE RISKS OF SMOKING FILTERED AND NON-FILTERED CLOVE CIGARETTE ON THE PERIODONTAL DISEASE AMONG TANJONG PRIOK HARBOR WORKERS IN JAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Rahardjo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Most studies reported that tobacco negatively affect periodontal tissue, although some authors have failed to demonstrate such relationship. Those studies were done mostly with subjects smoking white cigarette. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between periodontal disease and type of kretek smokers and the risk between filtered and non-filtered smokers on the periodontal diseases. Smokers subjects were 227 healthy man smokers aged 20 – 27 years, who lived in the condominium of Cilinicing. Cross sectional study was designed using questionnaire. A pressure-controlled periodontal probe for assessing the Plaque Index (PI, Bleeding on Probing (BOP, Probing Attachment Level (PAL and Pocket Depth (PD for each tooth (6 sites per tooth except the third molar. The periodontal disease was defined as PAL > 6mm. The results showed that there was no significant differences between filtered smoking and non-filtered smoking with clove cigarette on the periodontal disease measured by BOP (p=0.265. The Prevalence Ration of the clove cigarette and periodontal disease was 1.28 (95% CI, which means that smoking clove cigarette with or without filtered bith have risk to periodontal disease.

  6. Effects of local alendronate sodium gel as an adjunct to scaling and root planing on smokers with chronic periodontitis: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farin Kiany

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemical treatments for the modulation of host response are applied along with mechanical modalities as adjunctive to periodontal treatment. The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of locally-delivered alendronate sodium gel in adjunction to scaling and root planning on periodontal indices and bone formation within vertical defects of smokers with chronic periodontitis. Methods and Materials: In this study vertical defects (n=8 with depth>5 mm have been investigated. After performing the phase I of periodontal treatment, alendronate sodium gel (1% was applied into the periodontal pockets. The whole procedure was repeated after 4 weeks. Periodontal indices (plaque and bleeding, probing depth, gingival recession, and radiographic parameter (depth of bony defect were measured at the beginning and following 6 months. Results: Compared to pre-treatment, the probing depth, radiographic depth of bony defect and bleeding and plaque indices were significantly reduced by local application of alendronate sodium gel (P=0.026; P=0.012 and P=0.007 respectively. Gingival recession showed significant increase (P=0.011. Conclusion: Local alendronate sodium gel (1% plays an important role in the improvement process of periodontal indices and bone formation within vertical bony defects of smoker patients with chronic periodontitis.

  7. Expression patterns of tight junction components induced by CD24 in an oral epithelial cell-culture model correlated to affected periodontal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, P; Yu, H; Simonian, M; Hunter, N

    2014-04-01

    Previously we demonstrated uniformly strong expression of CD24 in the epithelial attachment to the tooth and in the migrating epithelium of the periodontitis lesion. Titers of serum antibodies autoreactive with CD24 peptide correlated with reduced severity of periodontal disease. Ligation of CD24 expressed by oral epithelial cells induced formation of tight junctions that limited paracellular diffusion. In this study, we aimed to reveal that the lack of uniform expression of tight junction components in the pocket epithelium of periodontitis lesions is likely to contribute to increased paracellular permeability to bacterial products. This is proposed as a potential driver of the immunopathology of periodontitis. An epithelial culture model with close correspondence for expression patterns for tight junction components in periodontal epithelia was used. Immunohistochemical staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to analyse patterns of expression of gingival epithelial tight junction components. The minimally inflamed gingival attachment was characterized by uniformly strong staining at cell contacts for the tight junction components zona occludens-1, zona occludens-2, occludin, junction adhesion molecule-A, claudin-4 and claudin-15. In contrast, the pocket epithelium of the periodontal lesion showed scattered, uneven staining for these components. This pattern correlated closely with that of unstimulated oral epithelial cells in culture. Following ligation of CD24 expressed by these cells, the pattern of tight junction component expression of the minimally inflamed gingival attachment developed rapidly. There was evidence for non-uniform and focal expression only of tight junction components in the pocket epithelium. In the cell-culture model, ligation of CD24 induced a tight junction expression profile equivalent to that observed for the minimally inflamed gingival attachment. Ligation of CD24 expressed by gingival epithelial cells by lectin

  8. REAL TIME PCR IDENTIFICATION FOR TARGET ADJUNCTIVE ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY OF SEVERE CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS. PART II - MICROBIOLOGICAL EFFECTIVENESS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamen Kotsilkov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Antibiotic use in chronic periodontitis may result in improvement in periodontal status, although many questions regarding the indications for this therapy remain unanswered. The polymicrobial etiology of the periodontal infection hinders the choice of the proper antibiotic agent. Furthermore the indiscriminate use of antibiotics could lead to high levels of resistance and to various adverse reactions. In the recent years a various molecular diagnostics protocols were proposed in order to facilitate the decision for adjunctive antibiotic administration. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to compare the microbiological effectiveness of adjunctive antibiotic administration with the mechanical periodontal therapy. METHODS: 30 patients with severe chronic periodontitis were enrolled in this study and were divided in 3 groups: Control group – with mechanical debridement only. Test group 1 – with combined adjunctive antibiotic administration using Amoxicillin+ Metronidazole. Test group 2 – with target antibiotic administration according to the resuts from the Real Time PCR identification. RESULTS: The prevalence of all the isolated microorganisms (exept. E.nodatum and C.gingivalis in Test Group 2 demonstrates statistically significant reduction compared with the other treatment approaches. Almost complete elimination was registered for the consensus pathogens from the red and orange complexes (above 99% and 100% for P.intemedia. CONCLUSION: The adjunct antibiotic treatment targeted with Real-Time PCR identification demonstrates almost complete elimination of the putative periodontal pathogens in the deep periodontal pockets in patients with severe chronic periodontitis. This result suggests slower recolonisation of these habitats thus limiting the risk for progression of the periodontal destruction.

  9. Common periodontal diseases of children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghutaimel, Hayat; Riba, Hisham; Al-Kahtani, Salem; Al-Duhaimi, Saad

    2014-01-01

    Background. Since 2000, studies, experiments, and clinical observations revealed high prevalence of periodontal diseases among children and adolescents. Therefore, this paper was designed to provide an update for dental practitioners on epidemiology, microbiology, pathology, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of periodontal diseases in children and adolescents. Methods. This paper reviews the current literature concerning periodontal diseases in pediatric dentistry. It includes MEDLINE database search using key terms: "periodontal diseases in children," "Periodontal diseasesin adolescents," "periodontal diseases risk factors," "microbiology of periodontal diseases," "classification of periodontal diseases," "epidemiology of periodontal diseases," and "treatment of periodontal diseases." Articles were evaluated by title and/or abstract and relevance to pediatric dentistry. Sixty-five citations were selected by this method and by the references within the chosen articles. A review of the comprehensive textbooks on pediatric dentistry and periodontology was done. Some recommendations were based on the opinions of experienced researchers and clinicians, when data were inconclusive.

  10. Antibacterial susceptibility patterns of Porphyromonas gingivalis isolated from chronic periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japoni, Aziz; Vasin, Afsaneh; Noushadi, Sadighah; Kiany, Farin; Japoni, Sara; Alborzi, Abdolvahab

    2011-11-01

    To test the antimicrobial sensitivity of Porphyromonas gingivalis to a panel of eight orally administrable antibiotics in chronic periodontal diseases and to evaluate factors associated with periodontitis in adult patients. A total of fifty strains of P. gingivalis were isolated from one hundred and twenty adult patients with chronic perio-dontitis. Identification of bacteria was carried out by anaerobic culture and biochemical tests. Selected colonies of P. gingivalis were used to evaluate the antibacterial activities of penicillin, metronidazole, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, clindamycin, doxy-cycline, ciprofloxacin and azithromycin. Most of the patients were female, age ranging between 40 to 50 years. Majority of the patients frequently had scaling and depths of periodontal pockets in infected teeth were 5-8 mm and most of them had hemorrhage during sampling. Susceptibility testing revealed a sensitivity of 100% of P. gingivalis to azithromycin, doxycycline and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid but lower susceptibilities were found for the rest of antibiotic agents evaluated. Frequent scaling in women aged between 40-50 years had positive correlation with chronic periodontitis. The application of antibiotics in conjuction with mechanical debridation, may reflect in the level of resistance of P. gingivalis in patients with chronic periodontal infections. This could suggest periodical antibiotic susceptibility testing is necessary to determine the efficacy of antimicrobial agents if the perfect curing of chronic periodontal diseases after mechanical debridation is meant. Further clinical studies are required to confirm the in vitro results. The only limitation in this study was identification of bacteria to species rather than subspecies level.

  11. Relationship Between Prehypertension/Hypertension and Periodontal Disease: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Yuya; Ekuni, Daisuke; Miyai, Hisataka; Kataoka, Kota; Yamane, Mayu; Mizutani, Shinsuke; Irie, Koichiro; Azuma, Tetsuji; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Morita, Manabu

    2016-03-01

    Most cross-sectional studies have found a significant positive relationship between periodontal disease and prehypertension/hypertension. However, these studies had limitations and there are few prospective cohort studies in young adults. The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to investigate whether periodontal disease was related to prehypertension/hypertension in Japanese university students. Students (n = 2,588), who underwent health examinations before entering university and before graduation, were included in the analysis. The association between periodontal disease such as the percentage of bleeding on probing (BOP) and community periodontal index (CPI) scores, and change in blood pressure status was determined. At the reexamination, the numbers of participants with prehypertension (systolic blood pressure 120-139mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure 80-89mm Hg) and hypertension (≥140/90mm Hg) were 882 (34.1%) and 109 (4.2%), respectively. In a logistic regression model, the risk of hypertension was significantly associated with male (odds ratio (OR): 6.31; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.63-15.13; P periodontal disease defined as the presence of both probing pocket depth (PPD) ≥ 4mm and BOP ≥ 30% at baseline (OR: 2.74; 95% CI: 1.19-6.29; P = 0.02) in participants with prehypertension at baseline. On the other hand, the risk of prehypertension was not associated with presence of periodontal disease (OR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.51-1.70; P = 0.82). In the short-term prospective cohort study, a significant association between presence of periodontal disease and hypertension was observed in Japanese university students. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Evaluation of socio-demographic variables affecting the periodontal health of pregnant women in Chandigarh, India

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    Jagjit Singh Dhaliwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The literature is replete with reports that pregnant women have an increased level of periodontal disease as compared with non-pregnant women of the same age. There are many studies correlating the effect of periodontal disease on the adverse pregnancy outcomes. The development of periodontal diseases during pregnancy can be influenced by factors such as preexisting oral conditions, general health, and socio-cultural background. There is very little data studying the effect of socio-demographic factors on the periodontal health of pregnant women. This study evaluated the periodontal status of a sample of pregnant women of Chandigarh and adjoining areas. The study also investigated the relationship between these variables and a series of demographic and clinical variables. Materials and Methods: The participants were 190 pregnant women attending Gynecology and Obstetrics outpatient department of Government Medical College and Hospital, Chandigarh. The participants were examined for their periodontal health and various socio-demographic variables were recorded on performas designed for the purpose of study. Statistical analysis was done. Results: The results revealed that the mean bleeding index scores and probing depth increased with statistical significance when the socio-economic status was lower ( P0.1. The plaque index was not significantly associated with the socio-economic status, profession, place of residence, and trimester of pregnancy ( P>0.1. Conclusion: In the population of pregnant women investigated under this study, the clinical and socio-demographic characteristics showed non-significant correlation except socio-economic status which showed statistically significant correlation with bleeding on probing and pocket depth. Further studies may be required in Indian population to determine the association of periodontal diseases in pregnant women with socio-demographic variables.

  13. Assessment of periodontal status in smokeless tobacco chewers and nonchewers among industrial workers in North Bengaluru

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    Dinta Kathiriya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: More than one-third of the tobacco consumed in India is of smokeless form. While the smokeless tobacco (ST products have been strongly associated with oral cancer, the association between ST and periodontal disease is less clear. The present study was conducted on industrial workers because in premises, there is a ban on smoking tobacco and hence workers tend to consume more of ST products. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess periodontal status in ST chewers and nonchewers among industrial workers in North Bengaluru. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted on 800 industrial workers (400 ST chewers and 400 nonchewers of North Bengaluru. Information regarding ST habits was obtained using the Global Adult Tobacco Survey questionnaire, followed by clinical examination to assess periodontal status using the community periodontal index and attachment loss. The comparison between chewers and nonchewers was done using Pearson's Chi-square test. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the difference of periodontal status and loss of attachment (LOA between chewers and nonchewers. Results: ST chewing habit was observed the maximum (46.5% among age group 25–44 years. Most of male chewers had habit of chewing gutkha followed by khaini, and majority of the female chewers were using khaini followed by betel nut quid. A significantly higher prevalence of bleeding on probing and calculus was found among nonchewers. ST chewers had 2.06 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.55–2.75 times more risk of developing periodontal pockets and 2.23 (95% CI: 1.68–2.98 times more risk of having LOA when compared with nonchewers. Conclusions: ST has deleterious effects on the periodontium. Hence, it is one of the important risk factors for periodontal disease.

  14. Enfermedad periodontal en pacientes infectados por el VIH

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    Caridad Nazco Ríos

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio epidemiológico descriptivo transversal en 22 pacientes seropositivos al VIH ingresados en el Sanatorio Provincial de Villa Clara, con el propósito de determinar la prevalencia y gravedad de la enfermedad periodontal, su relación con las etapas clínicas de la infección por el VIH, la población linfocitaria, la higiene bucal y las infecciones agudas del grupo estudiado. El mayor número de pacientes pertenecían al grupo de edades de 20 a 29 años y el sexo masculino fue el más encontrado; la prevalencia de la enfermedad periodontal fue del 100 %, la destrucción avanzada la lesión más severa (13,6 % en pacientes del grupo II de la enfermedad por VIH, y la gingivitis con bolsa la más frecuente (86,45 %. La higiene bucal fue deficiente en todos los examinados. La estomatitis aftosa fue la infección aguda más frecuente. No se encontraron formas de enfermedad periodontal asociadas con el VIH. La cifra de inmunocompetentes alcanzó el 68,2 % y el 31,8 % presentó una inmunodepresión leve.An epidemiological descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out among 22 HIV seropositive patients admitted at the Provincial Sanatorium of Villa Clara aimed at determining the prevalence and severity of the periodontal disease, its relationship with the clinical stages of the HIV infection, the lymphocitary population, the oral hygiene and the acute infections of the studied group. Most of the patients were between 20 and 29 years old; whereas males were the most affected. There was a prevalence of the periodontal disease of 100 %. The advanced destruction was the most serious lesion (13.6 % in patients from the group II of the disease caused by HIV and the gingivitis with pocket was the most common (86.45 %. Oral hygiene was deficient in all individuals that were examined. The aphthous stomatitis was the most frequent acute infection. There were no forms of periodontal diseases associated with HIV. The figure of

  15. An evaluation on elastase enzyme activity in gingival crevicular fluid in periodontitis

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    Qujeq D

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Changes in protein levels, host calls enzymes and inflammatory mediators in gingival"ncrevicular Fluid (GCF are considered as diagnostic indicators of Periodontitis."nPurpose: he aim of the present study was to measure the elastase enzyme activity in gingival crevicular Fluid"namong patients with periodontitis."nMaterial and Methods: In this study, 52 periodontitis patients (experimental group and 51 healthy subjects"nwithout any gingival inflammatio (control group were participated. Subjects of the periodontitis group"nshowed pockets of 4-5 mm depth without gingival enlargement and recession or pockets of 1-2 mm depth"nwith gingival recession. For enzyme activity measurement, lOOu,! of gingival fluid of each sample was mixed"nwith lOOu! of enzyme substrate on the tube. The mixture was incubated at 34°c for lh with a buffer solution"nof 1ml volume and absorbance was read at 410nm with spectrophotometer. The enzyme activity differences"nbetween two groups were analyzed by student t test."nResults: The elastase enzyme activity in gingival crevicular fluid in subjects with periodontium destruction"nand control subjects was 153±11.3 and 52.7±10.4 enzyme unit in ml per minute, respectively. The difference"nbetween groups was statistically significant (PO.05."nConclusion: Based on the findings of this study, the measurement of elastae enzyme activity could be a useful"nindication of tissue changes that may ultimately manifest clinically as periodontitis.

  16. Periodontal and gingival incisor findings in patients with anterior open bite in the mixed dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, Till Edward; Briegleb, Henning K

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate any association between anterior open bite and periodontal health of the front teeth during mixed dentition. We investigated the periodontal and gingival status of the teeth with dysfunctional and/or subfunctional loading in the open-bite area in 9- to 12-year-old children. We examined 36 subjects with anterior open bite between the ages of 9 and 12 years who had presented for the first time at the Department of Orthodontics, University of Tübingen. A control group of 36 children of the same age with a physiologic incisor relationship--vertical overbite and sagittal overjet were between 1 and 3 mm--were compared. In addition to overjet, the Silness-Löe plaque index, the modified Löe-Silness gingival index, pocket depth and attachment loss were measured and documented at each of the four surfaces (mesial, distal, oral and vestibular) of the upper and lower incisors. The subjects with anterior open bite exhibited significantly more plaque in the malocclusion area than children with a physiologic incisor relationship; the differences were statistically highly significant. The subjects with anterior open bite demonstrated slightly higher degrees of inflammation and a slight increase in periodontal pocket depths than the control group. Periodontal attachment loss was diagnosed in very few areas in both study groups, while attachment loss was slightly more frequent in those with anterior open bite. We observed a higher risk for caries in the malocclusion area in the late mixed dentition phase, as the subjects with anterior open bite presented significantly more plaque accumulation in the incisor area. However, no pathological periodontal anomalies have been detected so far.

  17. Microbiomes of Endodontic-Periodontal Lesions before and after Chemomechanical Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Brenda P F A; Berber, Vanessa B; Kokaras, Alexis S; Chen, Tsute; Paster, Bruce J

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the microbiomes of endodontic-periodontal lesions before and after chemomechanical preparation (CMP). Clinical samples were taken from 15 root canals (RCs) with necrotic pulp tissues and from their associated periodontal pockets (PPs) (n = 15) of teeth with endodontic-periodontal lesions before and after CMP. The Human Oral Microbe Identification using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) protocol and viable culture were used to analyze samples from RCs and PPs. The Mann-Whitney U test and Benjamini-Hochberg corrections were performed to correlate the clinical and radiographic findings with microbial findings (P Bacteria were detected in 100% of the samples in both sites (15/15) using NGS. Firmicutes was the most predominant phylum in both sites using both methods. The most frequently detected species in the RCs before and after CMP using NGS were Enterococcus faecalis, Parvimonas micra, Mogibacterium timidum, Filifactor alocis, and Fretibacterium fastidiosum. The species most frequently detected in the PPs before and after CMP using NGS were P. micra, E. faecalis, Streptococcus constellatus, Eubacterium brachy, Tannerella forsythia, and F. alocis. Associations were found between periapical lesions ≤ 2 mm and Desulfobulbus sp oral taxon 041 and with periodontal pockets ≥ 6 mm and Dialister invisius and Peptostreptococcus stomatis (all P periodontal lesions is complex and more diverse than previously reported. It is important to note that bacteria do survive in some root canals after CMP. Finally, the similarity between the microbiota of both sites, before and after CMP, suggests there may be a pathway of infection between the pulp and periodontium. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Oral conditions, periodontal status and periodontal treatment need of chronic kidney disease patients

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    Modupeoluwa Omotunde Soroye

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Majority of the CKD patients reviewed had poor periodontal status with code 2 TN. We, therefore, recommend nonsurgical periodontal treatment for all CKD patients to improve their oral health and forestall the systemic effects of periodontal pathology.

  19. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteroides forsythus and other putative periodontal pathogens in subjects with and without periodontal destruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Winkelhoff, AJ; Loos, BG; van der Reijden, WA; van der Velden, U

    Background and aims: Bacteria play an essential role in the pathogenesis of destructive periodontal disease. It has been suggested that not all bacteria associated with periodontitis may be normal inhabitants of a periodontally healthy dentition. In particular, Porphyromonas gingivalis and

  20. Antimicrobial profiles of periodontal pathogens isolated from periodontitis patients in the Netherlands and Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Winkelhoff, AJ; Herrera, D; Oteo, A; Sanz, M

    Background and Aim: Antimicrobial resistance of periodontal pathogens towards currently used antibiotics in periodontics has been investigated in a previous study. Microbial resistance in the periodontal microflora was more frequently observed in Spanish patients in comparison with Dutch patients.

  1. Form and deformity: the trouble with Victorian pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Christopher Todd

    2010-01-01

    This essay explores the Victorian debate about the place of pockets in men's and women's clothing. By studying the representation of men as naturally pocketed creatures and the general denial of useful pockets to middle-class women, the essay demonstrates the tenacious cultural logic by which men's and women's pockets were imagined to correspond to sexual differences and to index access, or lack thereof, to public mobility and financial agency. Interconnected readings of visual art, essays, and novels show how the common sense about gendered pockets was utilized and promulgated in Victorian narratives. The question of who gets pockets is thus positioned as part of the history of gendered bodies in public space.

  2. Current switching ratio optimization using dual pocket doping engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Sidhartha; Sahoo, Girija Shankar; Mishra, Guru Prasad

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a smart idea to maximize current switching ratio of cylindrical gate tunnel FET (CGT) by growing pocket layers in both source and channel region. The pocket layers positioned in the source and channel of the device provides significant improvement in ON-state and OFF-state current respectively. The dual pocket doped cylindrical gate TFET (DP-CGT) exhibits much superior performance in term of drain current, transconductance and current ratio as compared to conventional CGT, channel pocket doped CGT (CP-CGT) and source pocket doped CGT (SP-CGT). Further, the current ratio has been optimized w.r.t. width and instantaneous position both the pocket layers. The much improved current ratio and low power consumption makes the proposed device suitable for low-power and high speed application. The simulation work of DP-CGT is done using 3D Sentaurus TCAD device simulator from Synopsys.

  3. The roles of viruses in periodontal diseases

    OpenAIRE

    C C Azodo; P Erhabor

    2015-01-01

    The roles of bacteria in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease are well-understand, but that of the virus found in the periodontal environment are poorly understood. The aim of this literature review was to report the roles of viruses in periodontal diseases. The roles of viruses in periodontal diseases were categorized into the role in disease etiology, role in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases, role in diseases progression and role in response to treatment. Clearer understandin...

  4. The effect of methamphetamine abuse on dental caries and periodontal diseases in an Eastern China city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tao; Sun, Dongliang; Dong, Guangying; Xu, Guangjie; Wang, Ligang; Du, Jinjin; Ren, Pengcheng; Yu, Shibin

    2018-01-10

    Dental diseases are among the most frequently reported health problems in drug abusers. However, few studies have been conducted on oral health of methamphetamine (meth) abusers in China. The aim of the present study was to investigate the caries and periodontal health profile of former meth abusers in Eastern China. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 162 former meth abusers in the male Zhoushan Compulsory Detoxification Center. A standardized questionnaire, which collected information about age, drug-use duration / pattern, oral hygiene habit and systemic diseases, was administered. Then, a dental examination was performed to investigate the severity of dental caries and periodontal diseases. In evaluating dental caries, the prevalence of dental caries, the scores of decayed teeth (DT), missing teeth (MT), filled teeth (FT), and decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT) were recorded. In evaluating periodontal diseases, community periodontal index (CPI), and the prevalence of gingival bleeding, dental calculus, periodontal pocket and loose teeth, were recorded. Additionally, the non-parametric test was adopted to analyze the potential risk factors via SPSS. All the participants abused meth by inhalation. The mean scores of DT, MT, FT and DMFT in the former meth users were 2.72 ± 2.78, 3.07 ± 3.94, 0.33 ± 1.03 and 6.13 ± 5.20 respectively. The prevalence of gingival bleeding, dental calculus, periodontal pocket and loose teeth was 97.53%, 95.68%, 51.23% and 9.26% respectively. The DT, DMFT and CPI scores in those who had abused meth for longer than 4 years were significantly higher than those who abused for less than 4 years (P = 0.039, 0.045, P periodontal diseases among former male meth users in Eastern China was poor. Prolonged drug abuse and lower frequency of tooth brushing may be the risk factors of their poor status of caries and periodontal diseases.

  5. The effect of periodontal therapy on neopterin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 levels in chronic periodontitis patients with and without acute myocardial infarction: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut Çankaya, Zeynep; Bodur, Ayşen; Taçoy, Gülten; Ergüder, Imge; Aktuna, Derya; Çengel, Atiye

    2018-04-05

    The presence of neopterin in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) is a marker for local and acute immune activation, and the presence of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) in GCF is accepted as a marker for chronic vascular inflammation. This study aimed to evaluate effects of periodontal treatment on GCF levels of neopterin and VCAM-1 in patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) compared with systemically healthy CP patients. Sixty subjects (20 CP patients with AMI, 20 healthy CP patients, and 20 healthy controls) were included. GCF samples were analyzed at baseline and after 3 and 6 months, and the probing pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), bleeding on probing, gingival (GI) and plaque (PI) indices were recorded. We determined neopterin and VCAM-1 levels (concentration and total amount) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). No significant differences were seen between the AMI+CP and CP groups for PI, GI, GCF levels of neopterin and VCAM-1 at baseline. The number of teeth with 5 mm≤CALperiodontal inflammation and the presence of neopterin and VCAM-1 in GCF prior to and following periodontal treatment, and between the GCF volume and clinical parameters. Data suggest that the total amount and concentration of neopterin and VCAM-1 in GCF seemed to be closely associated with periodontal disease severity in CP patients with AMI. Moreover, the results of our study demonstrate that the past periodontal status is potentially correlated between groups, with similar periodontal disease severity.

  6. Supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) for maintaining the dentition in adults treated for periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manresa, Carolina; Sanz-Miralles, Elena C; Twigg, Joshua; Bravo, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Periodontitis is a bacterially-induced, chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the connective tissues and bone that support teeth. Active periodontal treatment aims to reduce the inflammatory response, primarily through eradication of bacterial deposits. Following completion of treatment and arrest of inflammation, supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) is employed to reduce the probability of re-infection and progression of the disease; to maintain teeth without pain, excessive mobility or persistent infection in the long term, and to prevent related oral diseases.According to the American Academy of Periodontology, SPT should include all components of a typical dental recall examination, and importantly should also include periodontal re-evaluation and risk assessment, supragingival and subgingival removal of bacterial plaque and calculus, and re-treatment of any sites showing recurrent or persistent disease. While the first four points might be expected to form part of the routine examination appointment for periodontally healthy patients, the inclusion of thorough periodontal evaluation, risk assessment and subsequent treatment - normally including mechanical debridement of any plaque or calculus deposits - differentiates SPT from routine care.Success of SPT has been reported in a number of long-term, retrospective studies. This review aimed to assess the evidence available from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). To determine the effects of supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) in the maintenance of the dentition of adults treated for periodontitis. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 8 May 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2017, Issue 5), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 8 May 2017), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 8 May 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization

  7. Do Danish children and young people receive pocket money?

    OpenAIRE

    Jens Bonke

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the extent to which Danish parents give their children pocket money, including an examination of whether there is a correlation between the amount of pocket money given and children’s income from paid work. We also examine the significance of parents’ income for the amount of pocket money they give to their children, and we consider how children use their income in relation to the amount of their pocket money and earnings. Finally, we examine the relation...

  8. Cavity Versus Ligand Shape Descriptors: Application to Urokinase Binding Pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerisier, Natacha; Regad, Leslie; Triki, Dhoha; Camproux, Anne-Claude; Petitjean, Michel

    2017-11-01

    We analyzed 78 binding pockets of the human urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) catalytic domain extracted from a data set of crystallized uPA-ligand complexes. These binding pockets were computed with an original geometric method that does NOT involve any arbitrary parameter, such as cutoff distances, angles, and so on. We measured the deviation from convexity of each pocket shape with the pocket convexity index (PCI). We defined a new pocket descriptor called distributional sphericity coefficient (DISC), which indicates to which extent the protein atoms of a given pocket lie on the surface of a sphere. The DISC values were computed with the freeware PCI. The pocket descriptors and their high correspondences with ligand descriptors are crucial for polypharmacology prediction. We found that the protein heavy atoms lining the urokinases binding pockets are either located on the surface of their convex hull or lie close to this surface. We also found that the radii of the urokinases binding pockets and the radii of their ligands are highly correlated (r = 0.9).

  9. Epstein-Barr virus is associated with periodontal diseases: A meta-analysis based on 21 case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zilong; Lv, Juan; Wang, Min

    2017-02-01

    Some controversies still exist between the detection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)'s DNA and risks of periodontal diseases. Hence, a comprehensive meta-analysis on all available literatures was performed to clarify the relationship between EBV and preidontitis.A comprehensive search was conducted within the PUBMED, EMBASE, and WANFANG databases up to October 10th, 2016 according to inclusion and exclusion criteria and finally 21 case-control literatures were obtained. The outcomes including odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of associations. Publication bias was determined by Begg or Egger test. Sensitivity analysis was used to investigate reliability and stability of the results.According to the data from included trials, the association between overall increased risks of periodontitis and the detection of EBV was significant (OR = 6.199, 95% CI = 3.119-12.319, P disease-type analysis, the pooled ORs for chronic periodontitis and aggressive periodontitis were 6.586 (95% CI = 3.042-14.262, P diseases. SgP and tissue are available for detecting EBV in patients of periodontitis. At last, our results suggest that detecting EBV of samples in =5 (6) mm sites of periodontal pockets are more sensitive than in ≤3-mm sites.

  10. Salivary Myeloperoxidase, Assessed by 3,3′-Diaminobenzidine Colorimetry, Can Differentiate Periodontal Patients from Nonperiodontal Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klangprapan, Supaporn; Chaiyarit, Ponlatham; Hormdee, Doosadee; Kampichai, Amonrujee; Khampitak, Tueanjit; Daduang, Jureerut; Tavichakorntrakool, Ratree; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Boonsiri, Patcharee

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal diseases, which result from inflammation of tooth supporting tissues, are highly prevalent worldwide. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), from certain white blood cells in saliva, is a biomarker for inflammation. We report our study on the salivary MPO activity and its association with severity of periodontal diseases among Thai patients. Periodontally healthy subjects (n = 11) and gingivitis (n = 32) and periodontitis patients (n = 19) were enrolled. Assessments of clinically periodontal parameters were reported as percentages for gingival bleeding index (GI) and bleeding on probing (BOP), whereas pocket depth (PD) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) were measured in millimeters and then made to index scores. Salivary MPO activity was measured by colorimetry using 3,3′-diaminobenzidine as substrate. The results showed that salivary MPO activity in periodontitis patients was significantly higher than in healthy subjects (p = 0.003) and higher than in gingivitis patients (p = 0.059). No difference was found between gingivitis and healthy groups (p = 0.181). Significant correlations were observed (p < 0.01) between salivary MPO activity and GI (r = 0.632, p < 0.001), BOP (r = 0.599, p < 0.001), PD (r = 0.179, p = 0.164), and CAL (r = 0.357, p = 0.004) index scores. Sensitivity (94.12%), specificity (54.55%), and positive (90.57%) and negative (66.67%) predictive values indicate that salivary MPO activity has potential use as a screening marker for oral health of the Thai community. PMID:27274868

  11. Efficacy of local drug delivery of Achyranthes aspera gel in the management of chronic periodontitis: A clinical study

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    Ramanarayana Boyapati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of microbial origin. Locally delivered antimicrobials reduce subgingival flora. Achyranthes aspera gel has antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunostimulant effects. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of local drug delivery of A. aspera gel in the management of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with chronic periodontitis were considered in the study and categorized into two equal groups (Group A: scaling and root planing (SRP with A. aspera gel, Group B: SRP with placebo gel. Patients were enlisted from the Department of Periodontics, Mamata Dental College and Hospital. The clinical parameters (gingival index, bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level were recorded at baseline and 3 months. Statistical Analysis Used: All the obtained data were sent for statistical analyses using SPSS version 18. Results: The periodontitis and the Achyranthes were statistically analyzed. A comparison of clinical parameters for test group and control group from baseline to 3 months was done using paired t-test. Intergroup comparison for both the groups was done using independent sample t-test. Conclusions: A. aspera gel when delivered locally along with SRP showed a beneficial effect. A. aspera gel as a non-surgical local drug delivery system proved to be without any side effects in the management of periodontitis. A. aspera gel has strong anti-inflammatory effects in addition to its antioxidant activity.

  12. Efficacy of local drug delivery of Achyranthes aspera gel in the management of chronic periodontitis: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyapati, Ramanarayana; Gojja, Prathibha; Chintalapani, Srikanth; Nagubandi, Kirankumar; Ramisetti, Arpita; Salavadhi, Shyam Sunder

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of microbial origin. Locally delivered antimicrobials reduce subgingival flora. Achyranthes aspera gel has antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunostimulant effects. To evaluate the efficacy of local drug delivery of A. aspera gel in the management of chronic periodontitis. Thirty patients with chronic periodontitis were considered in the study and categorized into two equal groups (Group A: scaling and root planing (SRP) with A. aspera gel, Group B: SRP with placebo gel). Patients were enlisted from the Department of Periodontics, Mamata Dental College and Hospital. The clinical parameters (gingival index, bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level) were recorded at baseline and 3 months. All the obtained data were sent for statistical analyses using SPSS version 18. The periodontitis and the Achyranthes were statistically analyzed. A comparison of clinical parameters for test group and control group from baseline to 3 months was done using paired t -test. Intergroup comparison for both the groups was done using independent sample t -test. A. aspera gel when delivered locally along with SRP showed a beneficial effect. A. aspera gel as a non-surgical local drug delivery system proved to be without any side effects in the management of periodontitis. A. aspera gel has strong anti-inflammatory effects in addition to its antioxidant activity.

  13. Hypothyrodism as a risk factor of periodontitis and its relation with vitamin D deficiency: mini-review of literature and a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yussif, Nermin M; El-Mahdi, Fatema Mohammed; Wagih, Rasha

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to investigate the role and efficiency of the intra-ligamentary injection of vitamin D and calcium in the treatment of chronic periodontitis associated with hypothyroidism. A 43-year-old female with suspected hypothyroidism who revealed severe chronic periodontitis with grade III mobility. Pre-operative periodontal and systemic control preceded the used intervention. After 3 months, intra-ligamentary injectable vitamin D with calcium was introduced. Clinical evaluation revealed great improvement of the injected sites. Marked reduction of mobility, pocket depth and bleeding were detected. Injectabe vitamin D is an adjunctive treatment modality that needs to be discovered in another way. It may provide further solutions for the periodontal regeneration problem. Clinical studies with large sample sizes and long term follow up are needed.

  14. Evaluation of efficacy of photodynamic therapy as an adjunct to nonsurgical periodontal therapy in treatment of chronic periodontitis patients: A clinico-microbiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, K Ravi; Musalaiah, Svvs; Nagasri, M; Kumar, P Aravind; Reddy, P Indeevar; Greeshma, M

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a local noninvasive treatment modality without side effects caused by antibiotics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adjunctive use of PDT with scaling and root planing as compared with SRP alone in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Twenty participants with chronic periodontitis having probing pocket depths (PDs) of ≥5 mm were selected for the study. Patients were randomly divided into control group and test group with ten patients in each group. Full-mouth SRP was performed in both the groups, followed by PDT in test group. Assessment of plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), PD, and clinical attachment level (CAL) was done at baseline and after 3 months. Microbiological assessment of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola was done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) at baseline and 3 months after the therapy. There was a significant reduction in PI, GI, PD, CAL, and microbiologic parameters in test group, following SRP and PDT, when compared with SRP alone in control group. PDT in conjunction with SRP has shown additional improvement in periodontal parameters when compared to SRP alone and has a beneficial effect in chronic periodontitis patients.

  15. Treatment of Acute Periodontal Abscesses Using the Biofilm Decontamination Approach: A Case Report Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini-Prato, Giovanpaolo; Magnani, Cristina; Rotundo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary study was to show the treatment effect of the biofilm decontamination approach on acute periodontal abscesses. Clinical cases showing acute periodontitis were treated using an oral tissue decontaminant material that contains a concentrated aqueous mixture of hydroxybenzenesulfonic and hydroxymethoxybenzene acids and sulfuric acid. The material was positioned into the pocket on the root surface and left in the site for 30 seconds. No instrumentation was performed before the treatment. No systemic or local antibiotics were used in any of the cases. A questionnaire was used for each patient to record the pain/discomfort felt when the material was administered. All of the treated cases healed well and very rapidly. The infections were quickly resolved without complications, and the pockets associated with marginal tissue recession were also reduced. The momentary pain upon introduction of the material was generally well tolerated in the nonsurgically treated cases, and it completely disappeared after a few seconds. The biofilm decontamination approach seems to be a very promising technique for the treatment of acute periodontal abscess. The local application of this material avoids the use of systemic or local antibiotics.

  16. Peranan Terapi Awal dan Terapi Pemeliharaan pada Rapidly Progressive Periodontitis Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita H. Joedo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly Progressive Periodontitis (RPP is a severe form of a periodontal disease which starts since a puberty age. The disease if a generalized periodontal destruction without a specific distribution mode: it develops more progressively but does not in accordance to local factors. The first step to the RPP treatment is initial therapy: i.e. DHE, scaling and root planing, and eliminating predisposing local factors and continued with a maintence therapy which will support the success of a surgery later. A study case: a 21-year old RPP woman showed hyperaemia, an abscess, a 10 mm mesial pocket depth, a 5 mm distal pocker depth, a 5 mm buccal pocket depth, a 2nd degree tooth mobility and a 3 mm buccal recession on 25. In the initial therapy she was given an amoxicillin, a metronidazole for killing a supra and subgingival baterial, vitamins B and C, and also a chlorhexidine 0.2% mouth wash for a week. After a week the abscess and the inflammation decreased, but the mobility was still in the same condition and the DHE was still evaluated because of the patient's social factor, the FO was delayed. The next visit was done every 2 monts for a year for maintenance care. The clinical result showed the gingival inflammation and the tooth mobility disappeared. Radiographically, the alveolar bone showed more radiopaque and the lamina dura was seen. In conclusio, the initial and the maintenance therapy was seen to heal the RPP.

  17. Periodontal infection as a risk factor for preterm low birth weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhimadhi D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is an overwhelming body of evidence strongly suggesting that periodontal infection may have a significant negative impact on pregnancy outcome in some women. The aim of this study was to determine the association, if any, between periodontal disease and preterm low birth weight. Materials and Methods : A total of 211 mothers between the ages of 17 and 35 were grouped into two categories based on the gestational age and weight of the baby as cases (< 37 weeks, < 2500 g and controls (>37 weeks, >2500 g. Relevant obstetric history and information on other primary risk factors for preterm low birth weight were obtained. Investigation reports on blood group, Rh factor and hemoglobin (Hb were also gathered. Oral assessments included: simplified oral hygiene index (OHI-S, gingival bleeding index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level (CAL. Results: Cases had significantly more attachment loss and probing pocket depth, poor oral hygiene, more percentage of sites with attachment loss (Extent and more mean attachment loss per site (Severity and less Hb than controls. The number of visits for prenatal care and the percentage of sites with CAL≥2mm (Extent 2 remained significant when compared to other variables. Conclusion: The study indicated that periodontal disease is a contributing factor for preterm low birth weight.

  18. Gingival crevicular fluid in the diagnosis of periodontal and systemic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čakić Saša

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF can be found in the physiologic space (gingival sulcus, as well as in the pathological space (gingival pocket or periodontal pocket between the gums and teeth. In the first case it is a transudate, in the second an exudate. The constituents of GCF originate from serum, gingival tissues, and from both bacterial and host response cells present in the aforementioned spaces and the surrounding tissues. The collection and analysis of GCF are the noninvasive methods for the evaluation of host response in periodontal disease. These analyses mainly focus on inflammatory markers, such as prostaglandin E2, neutrophil elastase and β-glucuronidase, and on the marker of cellular necrosis - aspartat aminotransferase. Further, the analysis of inflammatory markers in the GCF may assist in defining how certain systemic diseases (e.g., diabetes mellitus can modify periodontal disease, and how peridontal disease can influence certain systemic disorders (atherosclerosis, preterm delivery, diabetes mellitus and some chronic respiratory diseases. Major factors which influence the results obtained from the analyses of GCF are not only the methods of these analyses, but the method of GCF collection as well. As saliva collection is less technique-sensitive than GCF collection, some constituents of saliva which originate from the GCF can be analyzed as more amenable to chairside utilization.

  19. Periodontal disease and intra-amniotic complications in women with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radochova, Vladimira; Kacerovska Musilova, Ivana; Stepan, Martin; Vescicik, Peter; Slezak, Radovan; Jacobsson, Bo; Kacerovsky, Marian

    2017-08-04

    Periodontal disease is frequently suggested as a possible causal factor for preterm delivery. The link between periodontal disease and preterm delivery is a possible translocation of periopathogenic bacteria to the placenta and amniotic fluid as well as a systemic response to this chronic inflammatory disease. However, there is a lack of information on whether there is an association between clinical periodontal status in women with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM) and the presence of microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) and intra-amniotic inflammation (IAI). Therefore, the main aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and severity of periodontal disease in women with PPROM. The secondary aim was to characterize an association between periodontal status and the presence of intra-amniotic PPROM complications (MIAC and/or IAI). Seventy-eight women with PPROM at gestational ages between 24 + 0 and 36 + 6 weeks were included in this study. The samples of amniotic fluid were obtained at admission via transabdominal amniocentesis, and amniotic fluid interleukin (IL)-6 concentrations were determined using a point-of-care test. All women had a full-mouth recording to determine the periodontal and oral hygiene status. Probing pocket depth and clinical attachment loss were measured at four sites on each fully erupted tooth. In total, 45% (35/78) of women with PPROM had periodontal disease. Mild, moderate, and severe periodontal disease was present in 19% (15/78), 19% (15/78), and 6% (5/78) of women, respectively. The presence of MIAC and IAI was found in 28% (22/78) and 26% (20/78) of women, respectively. Periopathogenic bacteria (2 × Streptococcus intermedius and 1 × Fusobacterium nucleatum) was found in the amniotic fluid of 4% (3/78) of women. There were no differences in periodontal status between women with MIAC and/or IAI and women without these intra-amniotic complications. The presence of MIAC and IAI was not related

  20. Management of Chronic Periodontitis Using Chlorhexidine Chip and Diode Laser-A Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambooken, Majo; Mathew, Jayan Jacob; Issac, Annie Valayil; Kunju, Ajithkumar Parachalil; Parameshwaran, Renjith Athirkandathil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The use of adjuncts like chlorhexidine local delivery and diode laser decontamination have been found to improve the clinical outcomes of scaling and root planing in non-surgical periodontal therapy in patients with chronic periodontitis. Aim To evaluate the effects of diode laser and chlorhexidine chip as adjuncts to scaling and root planing in the management of chronic periodontitis. The objective is to evaluate the outcome of chlorhexidine chip and diode laser as adjuncts to scaling and root planing on clinical parameters like Plaque Index, Gingival Index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level. Study and Design Department of Periodontics. Randomized clinical trial with split mouth design. Materials and Methods Fifteen chronic periodontitis patients having a probing pocket depth of 5mm-7mm on at least one interproximal site in each quadrant of the mouth were included in the study. After initial treatment, four sites in each patient were randomly subjected to scaling and root planing (control), chlorhexidine chip application (CHX chip group), diode laser (810 nm) decontamination (Diode laser group) or combination of both (Diode laser and chip group). Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) were assessed at baseline, one month and three months. Statistical analysis Results were statistically analysed using paired T test, one-way ANOVA, Tukey’s HSD test and repeated measure ANOVA. Results Post-treatment, the test and control sites showed a statistically significant reduction in PI, GI, PPD, and CAL. After three months, a mean PPD reduction of 1.47±0.52 mm in control group, 1.40±0.83 mm in diode laser group, 2.67±0.62 mm in CHX group, and 2.80± 0.77 mm in combination group was seen. The mean gain in CAL were 1.47±0.52 mm in the control group, 1.40±0.83 mm in diode laser group, 2.67± 0.49 mm in CHX group and 2.67± 0.82 mm in combination group respectively. The

  1. Management of Chronic Periodontitis Using Chlorhexidine Chip and Diode Laser-A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Kachapilly Arun; Ambooken, Majo; Mathew, Jayan Jacob; Issac, Annie Valayil; Kunju, Ajithkumar Parachalil; Parameshwaran, Renjith Athirkandathil

    2016-04-01

    The use of adjuncts like chlorhexidine local delivery and diode laser decontamination have been found to improve the clinical outcomes of scaling and root planing in non-surgical periodontal therapy in patients with chronic periodontitis. To evaluate the effects of diode laser and chlorhexidine chip as adjuncts to scaling and root planing in the management of chronic periodontitis. The objective is to evaluate the outcome of chlorhexidine chip and diode laser as adjuncts to scaling and root planing on clinical parameters like Plaque Index, Gingival Index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level. Department of Periodontics. Randomized clinical trial with split mouth design. Fifteen chronic periodontitis patients having a probing pocket depth of 5mm-7mm on at least one interproximal site in each quadrant of the mouth were included in the study. After initial treatment, four sites in each patient were randomly subjected to scaling and root planing (control), chlorhexidine chip application (CHX chip group), diode laser (810 nm) decontamination (Diode laser group) or combination of both (Diode laser and chip group). Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) were assessed at baseline, one month and three months. Results were statistically analysed using paired T test, one-way ANOVA, Tukey's HSD test and repeated measure ANOVA. Post-treatment, the test and control sites showed a statistically significant reduction in PI, GI, PPD, and CAL. After three months, a mean PPD reduction of 1.47±0.52 mm in control group, 1.40±0.83 mm in diode laser group, 2.67±0.62 mm in CHX group, and 2.80± 0.77 mm in combination group was seen. The mean gain in CAL were 1.47±0.52 mm in the control group, 1.40±0.83 mm in diode laser group, 2.67± 0.49 mm in CHX group and 2.67± 0.82 mm in combination group respectively. The differences in PPD reduction and CAL gain between control group and CHX chip and combination

  2. Molecular diagnostics of periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korona-Głowniak, Izabela; Siwiec, Radosław; Berger, Marcin; Malm, Anna; Szymańska, Jolanta

    2017-01-28

    The microorganisms that form dental plaque are the main cause of periodontitis. Their identification and the understanding of the complex relationships and interactions that involve these microorganisms, environmental factors and the host's health status enable improvement in diagnostics and targeted therapy in patients with periodontitis. To this end, molecular diagnostics techniques (both techniques based on the polymerase chain reaction and those involving nucleic acid analysis via hybridization) come increasingly into use. On the basis of a literature review, the following methods are presented: polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR), 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequencing, checkerboard and reverse-capture checkerboard hybridization, microarrays, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE), as well as terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) and next generation sequencing (NGS). The advantages and drawbacks of each method in the examination of periopathogens are indicated. The techniques listed above allow fast detection of even small quantities of pathogen present in diagnostic material and prove particularly useful to detect microorganisms that are difficult or impossible to grow in a laboratory.

  3. Molecular diagnostics of periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Korona-Głowniak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The microorganisms that form dental plaque are the main cause of periodontitis. Their identification and the understanding of the complex relationships and interactions that involve these microorganisms, environmental factors and the host’s health status enable improvement in diagnostics and targeted therapy in patients with periodontitis. To this end, molecular diagnostics techniques (both techniques based on the polymerase chain reaction and those involving nucleic acid analysis via hybridization come increasingly into use. On the basis of a literature review, the following methods are presented: polymerase chain reaction (PCR, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR, 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequencing, checkerboard and reverse-capture checkerboard hybridization, microarrays, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE, temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE, as well as terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP and next generation sequencing (NGS. The advantages and drawbacks of each method in the examination of periopathogens are indicated. The techniques listed above allow fast detection of even small quantities of pathogen present in diagnostic material and prove particularly useful to detect microorganisms that are difficult or impossible to grow in a laboratory.

  4. Orthodontic–periodontics interdisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod, K.; Reddy, Y. Giridhar; Reddy, Vinay P.; Nandan, Hemant; Sharma, Meenakshi

    2012-01-01

    In this present era, when a significant number of patients seeking orthodontic treatment are adults, importance of multidisciplinary treatment approach cannot be overemphasized. Higher susceptibility of plaque accumulation in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment makes involvement of periodontist almost unavoidable. Also, orthodontic treatment frequently results in undesirable periodontal changes which require immediate attention. More recently, orthodontics has been used as an adjunct to periodontics to increase connective tissue support and alveolar bone height. The purpose of this article is to review the adverse effects of orthodontic treatment on the periodontal tissues and to discuss the mutually beneficial relationship shared between the two specialties. PMID:22628956

  5. Pocket dictionary of energy. Taschenlexikon Energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlhaus, O; Boldt, G; Gonsior, B; Klein, K; Ziburske, H

    1981-01-01

    The pocket dictionary of energy does not only address the interested amateur but also students, pupils, teachers, scientists, technicians, and polititcians in like manner. The dictionary contains ca. 900 key-words from the fields of energy, consumption, energy types, energy deposits, energy programmes, energy industry, thermal insulation, governmental aids for energy conservation measures, heating cost calculation, energy utilization and energy conservation. The problems of the costs and efficiency of energy conversion, energy pricing, the promotion of research projects, the rentability of heating devices or insulation, the sanitation of old buildings, governmental aids by subsidies or tax abatement according to the modernization and energy conservation law etc., as well as the problem of pollution and the endangering of the environment by exhaust air, waste heat, ash and litter are emphasized particularly. Considering the space available the criterion for the selection of the key-words was not a scientific completeness but the provision of a fundamental understanding of the matter.

  6. Oracle PL/SQL Language Pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Feuerstein, Steven; Dawes, Chip

    2004-01-01

    While it's good to have a book with all the answers--like your trusty copy of Oracle PL/SQL Programming-- how often do you need all the answers? More likely, you just need a reminder, a quick answer to a problem you're up against. For these times, nothing's handier than the new edition of the Oracle PL/SQL Language Pocket Reference by PL/SQL experts Stephen Feuerstein, Bill Pribyl, and Chip Dawes. Newly updated for Oracle10g, this little book is always at the ready for the quick problem solving you need. The 3rd edition of this popular mini-reference boils down the most vital information fr

  7. Pocket Guide to NDCs under the UNFCCC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taibi, Fatima-Zahra; Konrad, Susanne

    2018-01-01

    For over a decade, the European Capacity Building Initiative (ecbi) has adopted a two-pronged strategy to create a more level playing field for developing countries in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC): training for new negotiators; and opportunities for senior negotiators from...... with global experts to author policy briefs and background papers. This strategy has proven effective over time. “New” negotiators that trained in our early regional and pre-COP workshops have risen not only to become senior negotiators in the process, but also leaders of regional groups and of UNFCCC bodies...... and committees, and ministers and envoys of their countries. These individuals are still part of our growing alumni, now capacity builders themselves, aiding our efforts POCKET GUIDE TO NDCs UNDER THE UNFCCC iv to train and mentor the next generation of negotiators. Their insights from being “new” negotiators...

  8. Preparation of biodegradable PLA/PLGA membranes with PGA mesh and their application for periodontal guided tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Jin; Kang, Inn-Kyu [Department of Polymer Science, Kyungpook National University, 1370 Sankyuk-dong, Buk-gu, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Suk Joon [Department of Biology, Sookmyung Women' s University, Hyochangwongil 52, Yongsan-gu, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Guw-Dong; Pai, Chaul-Min, E-mail: ikkang@knu.ac.k [Samyang Central R and D Center, 63-2 Hwaam-dong, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    A biodegradable polylactic acid (PLA)/poly(glycolide-co-lactide) copolymer (PLGA) membrane with polyglycolic acid (PGA) mesh was prepared to aid the effective regeneration of defective periodontal tissues. The microporous membrane used in this study consists of biodegradable polymers, and seems to have a structure to provide appropriate properties for periodontal tissue regeneration. Based on the albumin permeation test, it is known that the biodegradable membrane exhibits the suitable permeability of nutrients. The membrane maintained its physical integrity for 6-8 weeks, which could be sufficient to retain space in the periodontal pocket. Cell attachment and cytotoxicity tests were performed with respect to the evaluation of biocompatibility of the membrane. As a result, the membrane did not show any cytotoxicity. The safety and therapeutic efficacies of the biodegradable membranes were confirmed in animal tests.

  9. Long term follow up of idiopathic gingival enlargement associated with chronic periodontitis: A case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish P Nagarale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Idiopathic gingival enlargement is a rare condition characterized by massive enlargement of the gingiva. It may be associated with other diseases/conditions characterizing a syndrome, but rarely associated with periodontitis. Case Description: This case report describes an unusual clinical form of gingival enlargement associated with chronic periodontitis. Clinical examination revealed diffuse gingival enlargement. The lesion was asymptomatic, firm, and pinkish red. Generalized periodontal pockets were observed. Radiographic evaluation revealed generalized severe alveolar bone loss. Histopathological investigations revealed atrophic epithelium with dense fibrocollagenous tissue. Lesions healed successfully following extraction and surgical excision, and no recurrence was observed after 1 year follow-up but recurrence was observed at 3 and 5-years follow-up. Clinical Implications: Successful treatment of idiopathic gingival enlargement depends on proper identification of etiologic factors and improving esthetics and function through surgical excision of the over growth. However, there may be recurrence.

  10. Long term follow up of idiopathic gingival enlargement associated with chronic periodontitis: A case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarale, Girish P; Ravindra, S; Thakur, Srinath; Setty, Swati

    2013-03-01

    Idiopathic gingival enlargement is a rare condition characterized by massive enlargement of the gingiva. It may be associated with other diseases/conditions characterizing a syndrome, but rarely associated with periodontitis. This case report describes an unusual clinical form of gingival enlargement associated with chronic periodontitis. Clinical examination revealed diffuse gingival enlargement. The lesion was asymptomatic, firm, and pinkish red. Generalized periodontal pockets were observed. Radiographic evaluation revealed generalized severe alveolar bone loss. Histopathological investigations revealed atrophic epithelium with dense fibrocollagenous tissue. Lesions healed successfully following extraction and surgical excision, and no recurrence was observed after 1 year follow-up but recurrence was observed at 3 and 5-years follow-up. Successful treatment of idiopathic gingival enlargement depends on proper identification of etiologic factors and improving esthetics and function through surgical excision of the over growth. However, there may be recurrence.

  11. Local adjunct effect of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy for the treatment of chronic periodontitis in type 2 diabetics: split-mouth double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Dos Santos, Nídia Cristina; Andere, Naira Maria Rebelatto Bechara; Araujo, Cássia Fernandes; de Marco, Andrea Carvalho; Dos Santos, Lúcio Murilo; Jardini, Maria Aparecida Neves; Santamaria, Mauro Pedrine

    2016-11-01

    Diabetes has become a global epidemic. Its complications can have a significant impact on quality of life, longevity, and public health costs. The presence of diabetes might impair the prognosis of periodontal treatments due to its negative influence on wound healing. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is a local approach that can promote bacterial decontamination in periodontal pockets. The aim of this study was to investigate the local effect of adjunct aPDT to ultrasonic periodontal debridement (UPD) and compare it to UD only for the treatment of chronic periodontitis in type 2 diabetic patients. Twenty type 2 diabetic patients with moderate to severe generalized chronic periodontitis were selected. Two periodontal pockets with probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) ≥5 mm received UPD only (UPD group) or UPD plus adjunct aPDT (UPD + aPDT group). Periodontal clinical measures were collected and compared at baseline and 30, 90, and 180 days. After 180 days of follow-up, there were statistically significant reductions in PD from 5.75 ± 0.91 to 3.47 ± 0.97 mm in the UPD group and from 6.15 ± 1.27 to 3.71 ± 1.63 mm in the UPD + aPDT group. However, intergroup analysis did not reveal statistically significant differences in any of the evaluated clinical parameters (p > 0.05). The adjunct application of aPDT to UPD did not present additional benefits for the treatment of chronic periodontitis in type 2 diabetic patients. The ClinicalTrials.gov identifier of the present study is NCT02627534.

  12. Effect of a controlled release device containing minocycline microspheres on the treatment of chronic periodontitis: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, V.; Ramakrishnan, T.; Emmadi, Pamela; Ambalavanan, N.; Mammen, Biju; Vijayalakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Adjunctive therapy with locally delivered antimicrobials has resulted in improved clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of locally administered minocycline microspheres (Arestin™) in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 sites from 15 patients in the age group of 35-50 years, who had periodontal pockets measuring 5-8 mm and had been diagnosed with chronic periodontitis, were selected for the study. The selected groups were randomly assigned to either the control group (group A) or the treatment/test group (group B). Only scaling and root planing were done at the base line visit for the control sites followed by local application of Arestin™ (1 mg). Clinical parameters such as plaque index, gingival index, and gingival bleeding index were recorded at baseline, day 30, day 90, and day 180 in the selected sites of both the groups. Probing pocket depth also was recorded at baseline, day 90, and day 180 for both the groups. Results: A statistically significant reduction was observed in both groups. Group B showed better results than Group A and these differences were statistically significant. Conclusion: The results of this study clearly indicate that treatment with scaling and root planing plus minocycline microspheres (Arestin™) is more effective and safer than scaling and root planing alone in reducing the signs of chronic periodontitis. PMID:20407655

  13. Bacteria community study of combined periodontal-endodontic lesions using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Guan, Rui; Sun, Jinghua; Hou, Benxiang

    2014-10-01

    The entire microbial population and predominant microflora of root canals (RCs) and adjacent periodontal pockets (PPs) from teeth with combined periodontal-endodontic lesions were determined and compared. Pooled RC and PP samples were collected from the molars of 20 patients diagnosed with combined periodontal-endodontic lesions. DNA was extracted for polymerase chain reaction-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), cloning, and sequence analysis. A coefficient of similarity (Cs) was used to determine the similarity of the bacterial profiles from RCs and PPs. Significantly fewer bands were produced by PCR-DGGE from RCs (5.9 ± 1.7) than from PPs (8.0 ± 1.8) (P bacteria in both the RC and PP samples were (in descending order) Filifactor alocis, Parvimonas micra, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythia. The high similarity in the sets of organisms present in both RC and PP samples in this study suggests that the pocket could be a source of RC infection. The data also demonstrate that combined periodontal-endodontic lesions consist of a diverse and complex microbial community.

  14. Effect of a controlled release device containing minocycline microspheres on the treatment of chronic periodontitis: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopinath V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adjunctive therapy with locally delivered antimicrobials has resulted in improved clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of locally administered minocycline microspheres (Arestin TM in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 sites from 15 patients in the age group of 35-50 years, who had periodontal pockets measuring 5-8mm and had been diagnosed with chronic periodontitis, were selected for the study. The selected groups were randomly assigned to either the control group (group A or the treatment/test group (group B. Only scaling and root planing were done at the base line visit for the control sites followed by local application of Arestin™ (1mg. Clinical parameters such as plaque index, gingival index, and gingival bleeding index were recorded at baseline, day 30, day 90, and day 180 in the selected sites of both the groups. Probing pocket depth also was recorded at baseline, day 90, and day 180 for both the groups. Results: A statistically significant reduction was observed in both groups. Group B showed better results than Group A and these differences were statistically significant. Conclusion: The results of this study clearly indicate that treatment with scaling and root planing plus minocycline microspheres (Arestin™ is more effective and safer than scaling and root planing alone in reducing the signs of chronic periodontitis.

  15. Periodontal disease, periodontal treatment and systemic nitric oxide in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, A; Verstraete, F J M; Jerin, A; Šentjurc, M; Kass, P H; Petelin, M; Pavlica, Z

    2013-06-01

    Thirty-two client-owned dogs treated for periodontal disease were divided in group 1 if no periodontitis, group 2 if ≤25%, and group 3 if >25% of the teeth present were affected with periodontitis. Blood was tested before and 2 weeks after periodontal therapy for nitrosyl hemoglobin (HbNO), plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) and 3-nitrotyrosine (NT) levels. No HbNO was detected in any of the animals tested. There was no significant difference in the NOx plasma levels within each group or across the groups before and after the treatment, but a noticeable increase in NOx plasma levels was observed in group 3 after the treatment. Plasma NT was detected in only one third of the animals. NO levels varied greatly across individual dogs. The data are suggestive of an overall increase in systemic NO response 2 weeks after periodontal treatment in dogs with advanced periodontal disease, but the response is greatly individually-dependent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inquiry Teaching in Clinical Periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heins, Paul J.; Mackenzie, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    An adaptation of the inquiry method of teaching, which develops skills of information retrieval and reasoning through systematic questioning by the teacher, is proposed for instruction in clinical periodontics. (MSE)

  17. Using risk assessment in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, Alan J

    2014-08-01

    Risk assessment has become a regular feature in both dental practice and society as a whole, and principles used to assess risk in society are similar to those used in a clinical setting. Although the concept of risk assessment as a prognostic indicator for periodontal disease incidence and activity is well established in the management of periodontitis, the use of risk assessment to manage the practical treatment of periodontitis and its sequelae appears to have less foundation. A simple system of initial risk assessment - building on the use of the Basic Periodontal Examination (BPE), clinical, medical and social factors - is described, linked to protocols for delivering care suited to general dental practice and stressing the role of long-term supportive care. The risks of not treating the patient are considered, together with the possible causes of failure, and the problems of successful treatment are illustrated by the practical management of post-treatment recession.

  18. Neopatrimonialism and Development: Pockets of Effectiveness as Drivers of Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Hout (Wil)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This paper focuses on the notion of ‘pockets of effectiveness’ in the light of the theorisation of regulated neopatrimonialism. The attention to pockets of effectiveness – understood as public organisations which deliver public goods and services relatively

  19. An estimate of pocket closure and avoided needs of surgery after scaling and root planing with systemic antibiotics: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolakovic, Mirela; Held, Ulrike; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Sahrmann, Philipp

    2014-12-22

    Relevant benefits of adjunctive medication of antibiotica after conventional root surface debridement in terms of enhanced pocket depth (PD) reduction have been shown. However, means and standard deviations of enhanced reductions are difficult to translate into clinical relevant treatment outcomes such as pocket resolution or avoidance of additional surgical interventions. Accordingly, the aim of this systematic review was to calculate odds ratios for relevant cut-off values of PD after mechanical periodontal treatment with and without antibiotics, specifically the combination of amoxicilline and metronidazol, from published studies. As clinical relevant cut-off values "pocket closure" for PD ≤ 3mm and "avoidance of surgical intervention" for PD ≤ 5 mm were determined. The databases PubMed, Embase and Central were searched for randomized clinical studies assessing the beneficial effect of the combination of amoxicillin and metronidazole after non-surgical mechanical debridement. Titles, abstracts and finally full texts were scrutinized for possible inclusion by two independent investigators. Quality and heterogeneity of the studies were assessed and the study designs were examined. From published means and standard deviations for PD after therapy, odds ratios for the clinically relevant cut-off values were calculated using a specific statistical approach. Meta-analyses were performed for the time points 3 and 6 month after mechanical therapy. Generally, a pronounced chance for pocket closure from 3 to 6 months of healing was shown. The administration of antibiotics resulted in a 3.55 and 4.43 fold higher probability of pocket closure after 3 and 6 months as compared to mechanical therapy alone. However, as the estimated risk for residual pockets > 5 mm was 0 for both groups, no odds ratio could be calculated for persistent needs for surgery. Generally, studies showed a moderate to high quality and large heterogeneity regarding treatment protocol, dose of

  20. A stochastic pocket model for aluminum agglomeration in solid propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallier, Stany [SNPE Materiaux Energetiques, Vert le Petit (France)

    2009-04-15

    A new model is derived to estimate the size and fraction of aluminum agglomerates at the surface of a burning propellant. The basic idea relies on well-known pocket models in which aluminum is supposed to aggregate and melt within pocket volumes imposed by largest oxidizer particles. The proposed model essentially relaxes simple assumptions of previous pocket models on propellant structure by accounting for an actual microstructure obtained by packing. The use of statistical tools from stochastic geometry enables to determine a statistical pocket size volume and hence agglomerate diameter and agglomeration fraction. Application to several AP/Al propellants gives encouraging results that are shown to be superior to former pocket models. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. Gingivitis and periodontitis as a risk factor for stroke: A case-control study in the Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemipour, Maryam Alsadat; Afshar, Afsaneh Jahanshahi; Borna, Roya; Seddighi, Behnas; Motamedi, Amin

    2013-09-01

    Periodontitis and gingivitis are one of the most infectious diseases in human. Several studies have been carried out on dependence of periodontitis and stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate the gingivitis and periodontitis as a risk factor for stroke in Iranian population. A case-control study was conducted on 100 patients suffering from stroke as case group, and 100 hospitalized patients as control group. The case group included 42 males and 58 females, and in control group there were 44 males and 56 females. Using a University of North Carolina-15 manual probe, the clinical attachment level, the distance between the cemento-enamel junction and the probed base of the periodontal pocket, were recorded by gingival and periodontal indexes. The data were analyzed by multiple logistic regressions, Chi-square test, Fisher's test, t-test, Man Whitney, and SPSS11.5 software program. P > 0.05 was considered as significant. The case group included 42 males and 58 females, and in control group 44 males and 56 females were included. In this investigation, the average of gingival index in men and women of case group was 1.22 ± 0.55 and 1.31 ± 0.55, respectively. This study showed that the average of gingival index in case group was more than control group. Periodontal index in both groups in men was more than women. The moderate and severe periodontitis in case group were more than that of control group (P = 0.003, P = 0.001). The result of this study shows that there is a significant relation between stroke and periodontal index; however, there isn't any significant relation between stroke and gingival index.

  2. Periodontal profile classes predict periodontal disease progression and tooth loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Thiago; Moss, Kevin L; Preisser, John S; Beck, James D; Divaris, Kimon; Wu, Di; Offenbacher, Steven

    2018-02-01

    Current periodontal disease taxonomies have limited utility for predicting disease progression and tooth loss; in fact, tooth loss itself can undermine precise person-level periodontal disease classifications. To overcome this limitation, the current group recently introduced a novel patient stratification system using latent class analyses of clinical parameters, including patterns of missing teeth. This investigation sought to determine the clinical utility of the Periodontal Profile Classes and Tooth Profile Classes (PPC/TPC) taxonomy for risk assessment, specifically for predicting periodontal disease progression and incident tooth loss. The analytic sample comprised 4,682 adult participants of two prospective cohort studies (Dental Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study and Piedmont Dental Study) with information on periodontal disease progression and incident tooth loss. The PPC/TPC taxonomy includes seven distinct PPCs (person-level disease pattern and severity) and seven TPCs (tooth-level disease). Logistic regression modeling was used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of these latent classes with disease progression and incident tooth loss, adjusting for examination center, race, sex, age, diabetes, and smoking. To obtain personalized outcome propensities, risk estimates associated with each participant's PPC and TPC were combined into person-level composite risk scores (Index of Periodontal Risk [IPR]). Individuals in two PPCs (PPC-G: Severe Disease and PPC-D: Tooth Loss) had the highest tooth loss risk (RR = 3.6; 95% CI = 2.6 to 5.0 and RR = 3.8; 95% CI = 2.9 to 5.1, respectively). PPC-G also had the highest risk for periodontitis progression (RR = 5.7; 95% CI = 2.2 to 14.7). Personalized IPR scores were positively associated with both periodontitis progression and tooth loss. These findings, upon additional validation, suggest that the periodontal/tooth profile classes and the derived

  3. Examination of the relation between periodontal health status and cardiovascular risk factors: serum total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol, C-reactive protein, and plasma fibrinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T; Trevisan, M; Genco, R J; Falkner, K L; Dorn, J P; Sempos, C T

    2000-02-01

    Using data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994), the authors examined the relation between periodontal health and cardiovascular risk factors: serum total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol, C-reactive protein, and plasma fibrinogen. A total of 10,146 participants were included in the analyses of cholesterol and C-reactive protein and 4,461 in the analyses of fibrinogen. Periodontal health indicators included the gingival bleeding index, calculus index, and periodontal disease status (defined by pocket depth and attachment loss). While cholesterol and fibrinogen were analyzed as continuous variables, C-reactive protein was dichotomized into two levels. The results show a significant relation between indicators of poor periodontal status and increased C-reactive protein and fibrinogen. The association between periodontal status and total cholesterol level is much weaker. No consistent association between periodontal status and high density lipoprotein cholesterol was detectable. Similar patterns of association were observed for participants aged 17-54 years and those 55 years and older. In conclusion, this study suggests that total cholesterol, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen are possible intermediate factors that may link periodontal disease to elevated cardiovascular risk.

  4. Is periodontal health a predictor of drug-induced gingival overgrowth? A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Banthia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gingival overgrowth is a common side-effect of amlodipine regimen on the oral cavity. There is controversy regarding the cause and effect relationship of periodontal health and drug induced gingival overgrowth. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate and to assess the relationship between the periodontal health and the onset and severity of gingival overgrowth in hypertensive patients receiving amlodipine. Materials and Methods: A total of 99 known hypertensive patients on amlodipine regimen were included in this study. Probing pocket depth (PPD and clinical attachment loss (CAL were noted on four sites of maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth. Gingival enlargement scores were assessed for each patient by employing the hyperplastic index. Oral hygiene status was evaluated using the calculus index (CI. Patients were divided into H, E and L groups based on their periodontal status and responders and non-responders based on their hyperplastic index scores. Differences in means of different periodontal variables in different groups were tested for significance by using ANOVA and unpaired Student t-test. Pearson′s correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the correlation between different variables. For all analyses, P < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: All the periodontal parameters were statistically highly significant (P = 0.00 amongst H, E and L groups and between responders and non-responders. Statistically highly significant Pearson correlation coefficients were found between mean PPD and mean hyperplastic score, mean CAL and mean hyperplastic score and mean calculus and mean hyperplastic score. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated a definite association between periodontal health and development and severity of amlodipine-induced gingival overgrowth

  5. Periodontal health of older men: the MrOS dental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Kathy R; Chan, Benjamin K S; Jennings-Holt, Marie; Geurs, Nico C; Reddy, Michael S; Lewis, Cora E; Orwoll, Eric S

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and severity of periodontitis in men of 65+ years and identify demographic and lifestyle factors associated with its presence. Participants were recruited from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study, a longitudinal study of risk factors for fractures in older men. Dental measures included clinical attachment loss (CAL), pocket depth (PD), calculus, plaque and bleeding on a random half-mouth, plus a questionnaire regarding access to care, symptoms and previous diagnosis. 1210 dentate men completed the dental visit. Average age was 75 years, 39% reported some graduate school education, 32% smoked 20 + pack years and 88% reported their overall health as excellent/good. In terms of periodontal health, 38% had sub-gingival calculus, 53% gingival bleeding, 82% CAL > or =5 mm and 34% PD > or =6 mm. The prevalence of severe periodontitis was 38%. Significant demographic and lifestyle factors associated with severe periodontitis in multivariate analyses included age > or =75 (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.7) non-white race (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3-2.8), less than an annual dental visit (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.0), and 20 + pack years (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.6-2.7). A high proportion of healthy older men have evidence of periodontal destruction which could, given the growing ageing population, have a significant impact on the dental profession's ability to provide preventive and therapeutic care. The population at highest risk of periodontitis in MrOS is older minority men who smoke and do not have annual dental visits.

  6. Periodontal and hematological characteristics associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Westergaard, Jytte; Stoltze, Kaj

    2006-01-01

    Periodontitis shares several clinical and pathogenic characteristics with chronic arthritis, and there is some degree of coexistence. The aims of this study were to elucidate whether patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP), juvenile...... idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) share periodontal and hematological characteristics distinguishing them from individuals free of diseases....

  7. Is there a relationship between periodontal disease and causes of death? A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natto, Zuhair S; Aladmawy, Majdi; Alasqah, Mohammed; Papas, Athena

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether there is any correlation between periodontal disease and mortality contributing factors, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus in the elderly population. A dental evaluation was performed by a single examiner at Tufts University dental clinics for 284 patients. Periodontal assessments were performed by probing with a manual UNC-15 periodontal probe to measure pocket depth and clinical attachment level (CAL) at 6 sites. Causes of death abstracted from death certificate. Statistical analysis involved ANOVA, chi-square and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The demographics of the population sample indicated that, most were females (except for diabetes mellitus), white, married, completed 13 years of education and were 83 years old on average. CAL (continuous or dichotomous) and marital status attained statistical significance (p<0.05) in contingency table analysis (Chi-square for independence). Individuals with increased CAL were 2.16 times more likely (OR=2.16, 95% CI=1.47-3.17) to die due to CVD and this effect persisted even after control for age, marital status, gender, race, years of education (OR=2.03, 95% CI=1.35-3.03). CAL (continuous or dichotomous) was much higher among those who died due to diabetes mellitus or out of state of Massachusetts. However, these results were not statistically significant. The same pattern was observed with pocket depth (continuous or dichotomous), but these results were not statistically significant either. CAL seems to be more sensitive to chronic diseases than pocket depth. Among those conditions, cardiovascular disease has the strongest effect.

  8. Periodontal health in a group of industrial employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, T; Due, N A; Abrahamsen, B; Böe, O E

    1988-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dental health conditions of male employees in a large aluminum factory. The present report deals only with the periodontal findings. Five percent of the 181 examined subjects between 25 and 60 yr were edentulous, and all dentate individuals had some degree of periodontal disease. Surfaces harboring stainable plaque were high in all age groups, varying between 65 and 85%. Surfaces without retention factors were 31% and decreased with increasing age. The percentage of sites with bleeding increased from about 40% in the lowest to about 60% in the highest age group. Teeth with probing depths greater than or equal to 4 mm increased from about 30% in the age group 25-29 yr to about 45% in the age group 30-34 yr, after which it increased gradually with increasing age. The difference in bone scores (marginal bone loss) was the most extensive between the ages of 25 and 34 yr, but with a significant increase throughout the age groups. The administrators had a somewhat better oral hygiene, fewer retention factors, less bleeding, fewer pockets and some more marginal bone support than the workers. Still, the administrators had more missing teeth than the workers.

  9. Evaluation of periodontal condition in intruded molars using miniscrews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Ollah Ghanbari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this preliminary study was to evaluate the periodontal condition of intruded molars in various phases of treatments. Methods: 30 patients with at least one overerupted upper first molar were selected. Upper molar bands with brackets were cemented. Two miniscrews were placed in the mesiopalatal and mesiobuccal aspect of the aforementioned teeth. A titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA spring was attached to the head of miniscrew in one end and ligated to the bracket in the other end to reach the predetermined force. Plaque index (PI, probing pocket depth (PPD, keratinized gingiva (KG, The distance between miniscrew (M.S and gingival level (GL, and bleeding on probing (BOP were recorded before loading and 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 months post-loading .Results:  All patients completed the study and no complications were reported. Statistically significant intrusion (2.1 ± 0.9 mm was obtained during active treatment. Inserting miniscrews generally was presented with greater sulcus bleeding, plaque accumulation and plaque formation at follow-up visits. There was a statistically significant increase in PI, PPD and BOP indices. Furthermore, the results showed decrease in KG level and M.S to GL level. Conclusion: Miniscrews can provide a clinical benefit as an absolute anchorage device. However, keeping a good oral hygiene is essential to achieve ideal results, because the presence of miniscrews, as a foreign object in mouth, and intrusion force might be harmful for periodontal tissues

  10. Alveolar Bone Morphology Following Periodontally Accelerated Osteogenic Orthodontics: A Clinical and Radiographic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chackartchi, Tali; Barkana, Idit; Klinger, Avigdor

    The aim of this study was to analyze alveolar bone morphology following periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics. Treated patients were called for a full periodontal examination and a cone beam computed tomography scan. Mean treatment time was 6.08 months. Mean probing pocket depth was 2.7 mm. No gingival recessions were noted. In the maxilla, buccal plate thickness was 0.48 to 2.14 mm. In the mandible, bone thickness was 0.2 to 1.82 mm. Root fenestrations and dehiscences were present in up to 40% of the anterior teeth. Although clinical outcomes were favorable, due to the presence of multiple posttreatment bone fenestrations and dehiscences, a revision of the treatment protocol might be considered.

  11. A full-mouth radiographic survey of periodontal bone loss in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlica, Z.; Erjavec, V.; Erzen, D.; Petelin, M.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between clinically observed periodontal disease indicators and radiographic findings using fullmouth radiographs in poodles. The dogs were divided into three groups according to their age. Upper and lower incisors, canines and premolars/molars were used for clinical and radiographic analyses. The prevalence and severity of periodontal disease increased with age. In addition, the deepest pockets and most severe bone loss were found around the canine teeth. The values obtained from radiographic analysis correlated well with clinical measurements. Fullmouth radiographic surveys show clearly the alveolar bone level around the whole dentition of dogs. It should be performed prior to the institution of any treatment

  12. Prevalence and risk factors of CKD in Chinese patients with periodontal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejin Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Periodontal disease is common among adults and is associated with an increasing risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of CKD in patients with periodontal disease in China. METHODS: In the current cross-sectional study, patients with periodontal disease were included from Guangdong Provincial Stomatological Hospital between March 2011 and August 2011. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2, the presence of albuminuria, or hematuria. All patients with periodontal disease underwent a periodontal examination, including periodontal probing pocket depth, gingival recession, and clinical attachment level by Florida Probe. They completed a questionnaire and had blood and urine samples taken. The adjusted prevalence of indicators of kidney damage was calculated and risk factors associated with CKD were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 1392 patients with periodontal disease were invited to participate this study and 1268 completed the survey and examination. After adjusting for age and sex, the prevalence of reduced eGFR, albuminuria, and hematuria was 2.7% (95% CI 1.7-3.7, 6.7% (95% CI 5.5-8.1 and 10.9% (95% CI 9.2-12.5, respectively. The adjusted prevalence of CKD was 18.2% (95% CI 16.2-20.3. Age, male, diabetes, hypertension, history of CKD, hyperuricemia, and interleukin-6 levels (≥7.54 ng/L were independent risk factors for reduced eGFR. Female, diabetes, hypertension, history of CKD, hyperuricemia, high level of cholesterol, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP (≥ 1.03 mg/L and TNF-α levels (≥ 1.12 ng/L were independently associated with an increased risk of albuminuria. Female, lower education (