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Sample records for suppressor gene involved

  1. A Genetic Screen for Genes Involved in BRCA 1 Tumor Suppressor Function

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Verma, Inder; Zhu, Quan

    2007-01-01

    Based on our initial screening, we have identified a number of candidates that are involved in DNA damage repair pathway mediated by BRCA1, which is an important aspect of tumor suppression of the molecular...

  2. The chromosome 3p21.3-encoded gene, LIMD1, is a critical tumor suppressor involved in human lung cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Tyson V; Al-Attar, Ahmad; Foxler, Daniel E; Ding, Li; de A Vallim, Thomas Q; Zhang, Yining; Nijmeh, Hala S; Webb, Thomas M; Nicholson, Andrew G; Zhang, Qunyuan; Kraja, Aldi; Spendlove, Ian; Osborne, John; Mardis, Elaine; Longmore, Gregory D

    2008-12-16

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and homozygous deletions at chromosome 3p21.3 are common in both small and nonsmall cell lung cancers, indicating the likely presence of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). Although genetic and epigenetic changes within this region have been identified, the functional significance of these changes has not been explored. Concurrent protein expression and genetic analyses of human lung tumors coupled with functional studies have not been done. Here, we show that expression of the 3p21.3 gene, LIMD1, is frequently down-regulated in human lung tumors. Loss of LIMD1 expression occurs through a combination of gene deletion, LOH, and epigenetic silencing of transcription without evidence for coding region mutations. Experimentally, LIMD1 is a bona fide TSG. Limd1(-/-) mice are predisposed to chemical-induced lung adenocarcinoma and genetic inactivation of Limd1 in mice heterozygous for oncogenic K-Ras(G12D) markedly increased tumor initiation, promotion, and mortality. Thus, we conclude that LIMD1 is a validated chromosome 3p21.3 tumor-suppressor gene involved in human lung cancer development. LIMD1 is a LIM domain containing adapter protein that localizes to E-cadherin cell-cell adhesive junctions, yet also translocates to the nucleus where it has been shown to function as an RB corepressor. As such, LIMD1 has the potential to communicate cell extrinsic or environmental cues with nuclear responses.

  3. Indications for a tumor suppressor gene at 22q11 involved in the pathogenesis of ependymal tumors and distinct from hSNF5/INI1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, J A; de Millas, W; Sörensen, N; Herbold, C; Schichor, C; Tonn, J C; Wiestler, O D; von Deimling, A; Pietsch, T

    2001-07-01

    Ependymomas account for approximately 9% of all neuroepithelial tumors and represent the most frequent neuroepithelial tumors of the spinal cord. In adults, allelic loss of chromosome arm 22q occurs in up to 60% of the cases studied. Some of these tumors show an altered neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene; in others, NF2 appears to be unaffected, indicating the involvement of another tumor suppressor gene. Recently, the tumor suppressor gene hSNF5/INI1, located on 22q11.23, has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of renal and extrarenal rhabdoid tumors. In addition, this gene may be responsible for a new hereditary syndrome predisposing to a variety of tumors designated "rhabdoid predisposition syndrome." In the present study, we analyzed a series of 53 ependymal tumors of 48 patients [4 myxopapillary ependymomas (WHO grade I), 3 subependymomas (WHO grade I), 18 ependymomas (WHO grade II), 21 anaplastic ependymomas (WHO grade III) and 2 ependymoblastomas (WHO grade IV)] for mutations and homozygous deletions in the coding region of the hSNF5/INI1 gene and for allelic loss of its flanking chromosomal regions in 39 ependymal tumors of 35 patients. Allelic loss was detected in 11 of 35 informative primary ependymal tumors (31%) with a common region of overlap covered by the markers D22S257 and D22S310 on 22q11 including the marker D22S301. However, a detailed molecular analysis of 53 ependymal tumors for mutations and homozygous deletion of the hSNF5/INI1 gene revealed no alterations. We conclude that the hSNF5/INI1 gene is not involved in the pathogenesis of human ependymal tumors with allelic loss on chromosome arm 22q and an intact NF2 locus. In addition, our study localizes a putative ependymoma tumor suppressor gene(s) to a domain of chromosome arm 22q flanked by the microsatellite markers D22S257 and D22S310.

  4. Intellectual disability, oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes: the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    disability, the presence of CNV including gene expressed in the brain or with specific brain function is a strong argument. In contrast, CNV affecting only genes involved in oncogen- esis are mostly ignored. However, links between some onco- genes or tumour suppressor genes and intellectual disability deserve attention.

  5. Towards the Identification of New Genes Involved in ABA-Dependent Abiotic Stresses Using Arabidopsis Suppressor Mutants of abh1 Hypersensitivity to ABA during Seed Germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Szarejko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid plays a pivotal role in the abiotic stress response in plants. Although great progress has been achieved explaining the complexity of the stress and ABA signaling cascade, there are still many questions to answer. Mutants are a valuable tool in the identification of new genes or new alleles of already known genes and in elucidating their role in signaling pathways. We applied a suppressor mutation approach in order to find new components of ABA and abiotic stress signaling in Arabidopsis. Using the abh1 (ABA hypersensitive 1 insertional mutant as a parental line for EMS mutagenesis, we selected several mutants with suppressed hypersensitivity to ABA during seed germination. Here, we present the response to ABA and a wide range of abiotic stresses during the seed germination and young seedling development of two suppressor mutants—soa2 (suppressor of abh1 hypersensitivity to ABA 2 and soa3 (suppressor of abh1 hypersensitivity to ABA 3. Generally, both mutants displayed a suppression of the hypersensitivity of abh1 to ABA, NaCl and mannitol during germination. Both mutants showed a higher level of tolerance than Columbia-0 (Col-0—the parental line of abh1 in high concentrations of glucose. Additionally, soa2 exhibited better root growth than Col-0 in the presence of high ABA concentrations. soa2 and soa3 were drought tolerant and both had about 50% fewer stomata per mm2 than the wild-type but the same number as their parental line—abh1. Taking into account that suppressor mutants had the same genetic background as their parental line—abh1, it was necessary to backcross abh1 with Landsberg erecta four times for the map-based cloning approach. Mapping populations, derived from the cross of abh1 in the Landsberg erecta background with each suppressor mutant, were created. Map based cloning in order to identify the suppressor genes is in progress.

  6. RET is a potential tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanxin; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Park, Dong Il; Fausel, Rebecca; Kanngurn, Samornmas; Welcsh, Piri; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Wang, Jianping; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer arises as the consequence of mutations and epigenetic alterations that activate oncogenes and inactivate tumor suppressor genes. Through a genome-wide screen for methylated genes in colon neoplasms, we identified aberrantly methylated RET in colorectal cancer. RET, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase and a receptor for the GDNF-family ligands, was one of the first oncogenes to be identified and has been shown to be an oncogene in thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma. However, unexpectedly, we found RET is methylated in 27% of colon adenomas and in 63% of colorectal cancers, and now provide evidence that RET has tumor suppressor activity in colon cancer. The aberrant methylation of RET correlates with decreased RET expression, whereas the restoration of RET in colorectal cancer cell lines results in apoptosis. Furthermore, in support of a tumor suppressor function of RET, mutant RET has also been found in primary colorectal cancer. We now show that these mutations inactivate RET, which is consistent with RET being a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. These findings suggest that the aberrant methylation of RET and the mutational inactivation of RET promote colorectal cancer formation and that RET can serve as a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. Moreover, the increased frequency of methylated RET in colon cancers compared to adenomas suggests RET inactivation is involved in the progression of colon adenomas to cancer. PMID:22751117

  7. Metformin inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition in prostate cancer cells: Involvement of the tumor suppressor miR30a and its target gene SOX4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing; Shen, Chengwu [Department of Pharmacy, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Wang, Lin [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Research Center for Medicinal Biotechnology, Shandong Academy of Medicinal Sciences, Jinan 250012 (China); Ma, Quanping [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Fourth People’s Hospital of Jinan, Jinan 250031 (China); Xia, Pingtian; Qi, Mei; Yang, Muyi [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Han, Bo, E-mail: boh@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Pathology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Metformin inhibits TGF-β-induced EMT in prostate cancer (PCa) cells. • Metformin upregulates tumor suppressor miR30a and downregulates SOX4 in PCa cells. • SOX4 is a target gene of miR30a. - Abstract: Tumor metastasis is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity of prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in cancer progression and metastasis. Recent evidence suggested that diabetic patients treated with metformin have lower PCa risk and better prognosis. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of metformin on EMT in PCa cells and the possible microRNA (miRNA)-based mechanisms. MiRNAs have been shown to regulate various processes of cancer metastasis. We herein showed that metformin significantly inhibits proliferation of Vcap and PC-3 cells, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibits invasiveness and motility capacity of Vcap cells. Metformin could inhibit TGF-β-induced EMT in Vcap cells, as manifested by inhibition of the increase of N-cadherin (p = 0.013), Vimentin (p = 0.002) and the decrease of E-cadherin (p = 0.0023) and β-catenin (p = 0.034) at mRNA and protein levels. Notably, we demonstrated significant upregulation of miR30a levels by metformin (P < 0.05) and further experiments indicated that miR30a significantly inhibits proliferation and EMT process of Vcap cells. Interestingly, we identified that SOX4, a previously reported oncogenic transcriptional factor and modulator of EMT, is a direct target gene of miR30a. Finally, we screened the expression of miR30a and SOX4 in 84 PCa cases with radical prostatectomy. Of note, SOX4 overexpression is significantly associated with decreased levels of miR30a in PCa cases. In all, our study suggested that inhibition of EMT by metformin in PCa cells may involve upregulation of miR30a and downregulation of SOX4.

  8. The Function of PTEN Tumor Suppressor Gene in Prostate Cancer Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Hong

    2001-01-01

    .... The recently identified tumor suppressor gene PTEN is a promising candidate for being involved in prostate cancer since it is frequently deleted in prostate cancer, especially in advanced or metastatic forms...

  9. The Function of PTEN Tumor Suppressor Gene in Prostate Cancer Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Hong

    2002-01-01

    .... The recently identified tumor suppressor gene PTEN is a promising candidate for being involved in prostate cancer since it is frequently deleted in prostate cancer, especially in advanced or metastatic forms...

  10. PTEN, a Tumor Suppressor Gene for Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ittmann, Michael

    1999-01-01

    .... The PTEN gene is a tumor suppressor gene recently cloned from human chromosome 10q23.3 that encodes a lipid phosphatase which influences a variety of cellular processes that impact on the neoplastic phenotype...

  11. Cellular senescence and tumor suppressor gene p16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayess, Hani; Wang, Marilene B; Srivatsan, Eri S

    2012-04-15

    Cellular senescence is an irreversible arrest of cell growth. Biochemical and morphological changes occur during cellular senescence, including the formation of a unique cellular morphology such as flattened cytoplasm. Function of mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes are affected resulting in the inhibition of lysosomal and proteosomal pathways. Cellular senescence can be triggered by a number of factors including, aging, DNA damage, oncogene activation and oxidative stress. While the molecular mechanism of senescence involves p16 and p53 tumor suppressor genes and telomere shortening, this review is focused on the mechanism of p16 control. The p16-mediated senescence acts through the retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway inhibiting the action of the cyclin dependant kinases leading to G1 cell cycle arrest. Rb is maintained in a hypophosphorylated state resulting in the inhibition of transcription factor E2F1. Regulation of p16 expression is complex and involves epigenetic control and multiple transcription factors. PRC1 (Pombe repressor complex (1) and PRC2 (Pombe repressor complex (2) proteins and histone deacetylases play an important role in the promoter hypermethylation for suppressing p16 expression. While transcription factors YY1 and Id1 suppress p16 expression, transcription factors CTCF, Sp1 and Ets family members activate p16 transcription. Senescence occurs with the inactivation of suppressor elements leading to the enhanced expression of p16. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  12. Tumour suppressor genes in sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Ganesan, Trivadi S

    2002-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most frequent cause of death from gynaecological malignancies in the western world, and sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer is its most predominant form. The aetiology of sporadic ovarian cancer remains unknown. Genetic studies have enabled a better understanding...... of the evolution of tumour progression. A major focus of research has been to identify tumour suppressor genes implicated in sporadic ovarian cancer over the past decade. Several tumour suppressor genes have been identified by strategies such as positional cloning and differential expression display. Further...... research is warranted to understand fully their contribution to the pathogenesis of sporadic ovarian cancer....

  13. Intellectual disability, oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes: the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    associated with Van-Hippel Lindau syndrome, an inherited neoplastic disorder with retinal and central nervous haeman- gioblastomas and high risk of renal cancers (Maher et al. Keywords. array-CGH; mental retardation; oncogenes; tumour suppressor genes; intellectual disability. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 91, No.

  14. Intellectual disability, oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes: the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. array-CGH; mental retardation; oncogenes; tumour suppressor genes; intellectual disability. Author Affiliations. M. Bidart1 2 3 C. Coutton4 5 3. Plateforme Protéomique et Transcriptomique Clinique, Pole Recherche, CHU Grenoble, 38043 Grenoble, France; Equipe, Nanomédecine et Cerveau, Inserm U836, ...

  15. Hypomethylation of tumor suppressor genes in odontogenic myxoma

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira,Paula Rocha; Cardoso,Fabiano Pereira; Brito,João Artur Ricieri; Batista,Aline Carvalho; Gomes,Carolina Cavaliéri; Gomez,Ricardo Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an ectomesenchymal benign odontogenic tumor characterized by spindle or stellate-shaped cells embedded in an abundant myxoid or mucoid extracellular matrix. DNA methylation is characterized by the addition of methyl groups in cytosines within CpG islands in the promoter gene. DNA methylation can decrease the expression of tumor suppressor genes and contribute to the development of neoplastic lesions. The aim of study was to evaluate the methylation pattern of the tu...

  16. Molecular biology III - Oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaccia, Amato J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this course is to introduce to radiation oncologists the basic concepts of tumorigenesis, building on the information that will be presented in the first and second part of this series of lectures. Objective: Our objective is to increase the current understanding of radiation oncologists with the process of tumorigenesis, especially focusing on genes that are altered in many tumor types that are potential candidates for novel molecular strategies. As strategies to treat cancer of cancer are becoming more sophisticated, it will be important for both the practitioner and academician to develop a basic understanding of the function of cancer 'genes'. This will be the third in a series of refresher courses that are meant to address recent advances in Cancer Biology in a way that both clinicians without previous knowledge of molecular biology or experienced researchers will find interesting. The lecture will begin with a basic overview of tumorigenesis; methods of detecting chromosome/DNA alterations, approaches used to isolate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, and their role in cell killing by apoptosis. Special attention will be given to oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that are modulated by ionizing radiation and the tumor microenvironment. We will relate the biology of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes to basic aspects of radiation biology that would be important in clinical practice. Finally, we will review recent studies on the prognostic significance of p53 mutations and apoptosis in tumor specimens. The main point of this lecture is to relate both researcher and clinician what are the therapeutic ramifications of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene mutations found in human neoptasia

  17. Functional involvement of human discs large tumor suppressor in cytokinesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unno, Kenji; Hanada, Toshihiko; Chishti, Athar H.

    2008-01-01

    Cytokinesis is the final step of cell division that completes the separation of two daughter cells. We found that the human discs large (hDlg) tumor suppressor homologue is functionally involved in cytokinesis. The guanylate kinase (GUK) domain of hDlg mediates the localization of hDlg to the midbody during cytokinesis, and over-expression of the GUK domain in U2OS and HeLa cells impaired cytokinesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from dlg mutant mice contained an increased number of multinucleated cells and showed reduced proliferation in culture. A kinesin-like motor protein, GAKIN, which binds directly to the GUK domain of hDlg, exhibited a similar intracellular distribution pattern with hDlg throughout mitosis and localized to the midbody during cytokinesis. However, the targeting of hDlg and GAKIN to the midbody appeared to be independent of each other. The midbody localization of GAKIN required its functional kinesin-motor domain. Treatment of cells with the siRNA specific for hDlg and GAKIN caused formation of multinucleated cells and delayed cytokinesis. Together, these results suggest that hDlg and GAKIN play functional roles in the maintenance of midbody architecture during cytokinesis

  18. TFPI-2 is a putative tumor suppressor gene frequently inactivated by promoter hypermethylation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shumin; Ma, Ning; Murata, Mariko; Huang, Guangwu; Zhang, Zhe; Xiao, Xue; Zhou, Xiaoying; Huang, Tingting; Du, Chunping; Yu, Nana; Mo, Yingxi; Lin, Longde; Zhang, Jinyan

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes play important roles in NPC tumorgenesis. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2), is a protease inhibitor. Recently, TFPI-2 was suggested to be a tumor suppressor gene involved in tumorigenesis and metastasis in some cancers. In this study, we investigated whether TFPI-2 was inactivated epigenetically in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Transcriptional expression levels of TFPI-2 was evaluated by RT-PCR. Methylation status were investigated by methylation specific PCR and bisulfate genomic sequencing. The role of TFPI-2 as a tumor suppressor gene in NPC was addressed by re-introducing TFPI-2 expression into the NPC cell line CNE2. TFPI-2 mRNA transcription was inactivated in NPC cell lines. TFPI-2 was aberrantly methylated in 66.7% (4/6) NPC cell lines and 88.6% (62/70) of NPC primary tumors, but not in normal nasopharyngeal epithelia. TFPI-2 expression could be restored in NPC cells after demethylation treatment. Ectopic expression of TFPI-2 in NPC cells induced apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation and cell migration. Epigenetic inactivation of TFPI-2 by promoter hypermethylation is a frequent and tumor specific event in NPC. TFPI-2 might be considering as a putative tumor suppressor gene in NPC

  19. Molecular studies on the function of tumor suppressor gene in gastrointestinal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, You Cheoul

    1993-01-01

    Cancer of stomach, colon and liver are a group of the most common cancer in Korea. However, results with current therapeutic modalities are still unsatisfactory. The intensive efforts have been made to understand basic pathogenesis and to find better therapeutic tools for the treatment of this miserable disease. We studies the alteration of tumor suppressor gene in various Gastrointestinal cancer in Korea. Results showed that genetic alteration of Rb gene was in 83% of colorectal cancer. Our results suggest that genetic alteration of Rb gene is crucially involved in the tumorigenesis of colorectum in Korea. (Author)

  20. Molecular genetic analysis of tumor suppressor genes in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Je Ho; Park, Sang Yun

    1992-04-01

    To examine the loci of putative tumor suppressor genes in ovarian cancers, we performed the molecular genetic analysis with fresh human ovarian cancers and observed the following data. Frequent allelic losses were observed on chromosomes 4p(42%), 6p(50%), 7p(43%), 8q(31%), 12p(38%), 12q(33%), 16p(33%), 16q(37%), and 19p(34%) in addition to the previously reported 6q, 11p, and 17p in ovarian caroinomas. we have used an additional probe, TCP10 to narrow down the deleted region on chromosome 6q. TCP10 was reported to be mapped to 6q 25-27. Allelic loss was found to be 40% in epithelial ovarian caroinomas. This finding suggests that chromosome 6q 24-27 is one of putative region haboring the tumor suppressor gene of epithelial ovarian cancer (particularly serous type). To examine the association between FAL(Fractional Allelic Loss) and histopathological features, the FAL value on each phenotypically different tumor was calculated as the ratio of the number of allelic losses versus the number of cases informative in each chromosomal arm. The average FALs for each phenotypically different tumor were: serous cystoadenocarcinomas. FAL=0.31 : mucinous 0.12 : and clear cell carcinoma. FAL=0.20. (Author)

  1. p53 tumor suppressor gene: significance in neoplasia - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    p53 is a tumor suppressor gene located on chromosome 17p13.1. Its function includes cell cycle control and apoptosis. Loss of p53 function, either due to decreased level or genetic transformation, is associated with loss of cell cycle control, decrease, apoptosis and genomic modification, such mutation of p53 gene is now assessed and the indicator of neoplasia of cancer of several organs and cell types, p53 has demonstrated to have critical role in defining various progressive stages of neoplasia, therapeutic strategies and clinical application. The present review briefly describes function of p53 in addition to its diagnostic and prognostic significance in detecting several types of neoplasia. (author)

  2. Classical Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes: A Comparative Genomics Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxana K. Pickeral

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available We have curated a reference set of cancer-related genes and reanalyzed their sequences in the light of molecular information and resources that have become available since they were first cloned. Homology studies were carried out for human oncogenes and tumor suppressors, compared with the complete proteome of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, and partial proteomes of mouse and rat and the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Our results demonstrate that simple, semi-automated bioinformatics approaches to identifying putative functionally equivalent gene products in different organisms may often be misleading. An electronic supplement to this article1 provides an integrated view of our comparative genomics analysis as well as mapping data, physical cDNA resources and links to published literature and reviews, thus creating a “window” into the genomes of humans and other organisms for cancer biology.

  3. Warburg tumours and the mechanisms of mitochondrial tumour suppressor genes. Barking up the right tree?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayley, Jean-Pierre; Devilee, Peter

    2010-06-01

    The past decade has seen a revival of interest in the metabolic adaptations of tumours, named for their original discoverer, Otto Warburg. Warburg reported a high rate of glycolysis in tumours, and a concurrent defect in mitochondrial respiration. The rediscovery of Warburg's hypothesis coincided with the discovery of mitochondrial tumours suppressor genes that may conform to Warburg's hypothesis. Succinate dehydrogenase and fumarate hydratase are mitochondrial proteins of the TCA cycle and the respiratory chain and when mutated lead to tumours of the nervous system known as paragangliomas and pheochromocytomas, and in the case of fumarate hydratase, cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas and renal cell cancer. Recently a novel mitochondrial protein, SDHAF2 (SDH5), was also shown to be a paraganglioma-related tumour suppressor gene. Another mitochondrial and TCA cycle-related protein, isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 is, together with IDH1, frequently mutated in the brain tumour glioblastoma. There are currently many competing hypotheses on the role of these genes in tumourigenesis, but frequent themes are the stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor 1 and upregulation of genes involved in angiogenesis, glucose transport and glycolysis. Other postulated mechanisms include the inhibition of developmental apoptosis, altered gene expression due to histone deregulation and the acquisition of novel catalytic properties. Here we discuss these diverse hypotheses and highlight very recent findings on the possible effects of IDH gene mutations.

  4. Methylation of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinugawa, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Takeshi; Sano, Kenji; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Maruyama, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Nakajima, Tomoyuki; Hamano, Hideaki; Kawa, Shigeyuki; Higuchi, Kayoko; Hosaka, Noriko; Shiozawa, Satoshi; Ishigame, Hiroki; Ota, Hiroyoshi

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a representative IgG4-related and inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. To clarify mechanisms of carcinogenesis resulting from AIP, we focused on methylation abnormalities and KRAS mutations in AIP. Six tumor suppressor genes (NPTX2, Cyclin D2, FOXE1, TFPI2, ppENK, and p16) that exhibited hypermethylation in pancreatic carcinoma were selected for quantitative SYBR green methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction in 10 AIP specimens, 10 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases without history of AIP containing carcinoma areas (CAs) and noncarcinoma areas (NCAs), and 11 normal pancreas (NP) samples. KRAS mutation in codons 12, 13, and 61 were also investigated using direct sequencing. Hypermethylation events (≥10%) were identified in NPTX2, Cyclin D2, FOXE1, TFPI2, ppENK, and p16 in 1, 2, 2, 0, 2, and 0 CA cases, respectively, but not in these 6 candidate genes in AIP, NCA, and NP. However, the TFPI2 methylation ratio was significantly higher in AIP than NCA and NP. Direct sequencing results for KRAS showed no single-point mutations in AIP. These are the first studies characterizing methylation abnormalities in AIP. AIP's inflammatory condition may be related to carcinogenesis. Further study will elucidate methylation abnormalities associated with carcinogenesis in AIP.

  5. Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes: Paradigms, puzzles, and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanets, Anna; Shorstova, Tatiana; Hilmi, Khalid; Marques, Maud; Witcher, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Cancer constitutes a set of diseases with heterogeneous molecular pathologies. However, there are a number of universal aberrations common to all cancers, one of these being the epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). The silencing of TSGs is thought to be an early, driving event in the oncogenic process. With this in consideration, great efforts have been made to develop small molecules aimed at the restoration of TSGs in order to limit tumor cell proliferation and survival. However, the molecular forces that drive the broad epigenetic reprogramming and transcriptional repression of these genes remain ill-defined. Undoubtedly, understanding the molecular underpinnings of transcriptionally silenced TSGs will aid us in our ability to reactivate these key anti-cancer targets. Here, we describe what we consider to be the five most logical molecular mechanisms that may account for this widely observed phenomenon: 1) ablation of transcription factor binding, 2) overexpression of DNA methyltransferases, 3) disruption of CTCF binding, 4) elevation of EZH2 activity, 5) aberrant expression of long non-coding RNAs. The strengths and weaknesses of each proposed mechanism is highlighted, followed by an overview of clinical efforts to target these processes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Prediction of DNA methylation in the promoter of gene suppressor tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, Imane; Kasmi, Yassine; Allali, Karam; Ennaji, Moulay Mustapha

    2018-04-20

    The epigenetics methylation of cytosine is the most common epigenetic form in DNA sequences. It is highly concentrated in the promoter regions of the genes, leading to an inactivation of tumor suppressors regardless of their initial function. In this work, we aim to identify the highly methylated regions; the cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) island located on the promoters and/or the first exon gene known for their key roles in the cell cycle, hence the need to study gene-gene interactions. The Frommer and hidden Markov model algorithms are used as computational methods to identify CpG islands with specificity and sensitivity up to 76% and 80%, respectively. The results obtained show, on the one hand, that the genes studied are suspected of developing hypermethylation in the promoter region of the gene involved in the case of a cancer. We then showed that the relative richness in CG results from a high level of methylation. On the other hand, we observe that the gene-gene interaction exhibits co-expression between the chosen genes. This let us to conclude that the hidden Markov model algorithm predicts more specific and valuable information about the hypermethylation in gene as a preventive and diagnostics tools for the personalized medicine; as that the tumor-suppresser-genes have relative co-expression and complementary relations which the hypermethylation affect in the samples studied in our work. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Tumor suppressor gene E-cadherin and its role in normal and malignant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pećina-Šlaus Nives

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract E-cadherin tumor suppressor genes are particularly active area of research in development and tumorigenesis. The calcium-dependent interactions among E-cadherin molecules are critical for the formation and maintenance of adherent junctions in areas of epithelial cell-cell contact. Loss of E-cadherin-mediated-adhesion characterises the transition from benign lesions to invasive, metastatic cancer. Nevertheless, there is evidence that E-cadherins may also play a role in the wnt signal transduction pathway, together with other key molecules involved in it, such as beta-catenins and adenomatous poliposis coli gene products. The structure and function of E-cadherin, gene and protein, in normal as well as in tumor cells are reviewed in this paper.

  8. PHTS, a novel putative tumor suppressor, is involved in the transformation reversion of HeLaHF cells independently of the p53 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dehua; Fan, Wufang; Liu, Guohong; Nguy, Vivian; Chatterton, Jon E.; Long Shilong; Ke, Ning; Meyhack, Bernd; Bruengger, Adrian; Brachat, Arndt; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Li, Qi-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    HeLaHF is a non-transformed revertant of HeLa cells, likely resulting from the activation of a putative tumor suppressor(s). p53 protein was stabilized in this revertant and reactivated for certain transactivation functions. Although p53 stabilization has not conclusively been linked to the reversion, it is clear that the genes in p53 pathway are involved. The present study confirms the direct role of p53 in HeLaHF reversion by demonstrating that RNAi-mediated p53 silencing partially restores anchorage-independent growth potential of the revertant through the suppression of anoikis. In addition, we identified a novel gene, named PHTS, with putative tumor suppressor properties, and showed that this gene is also involved in HeLaHF reversion independently of the p53 pathway. Expression profiling revealed that PHTS is one of the genes that is up-regulated in HeLaHF but not in HeLa. It encodes a putative protein with CD59-like domains. RNAi-mediated PHTS silencing resulted in the partial restoration of transformation (anchorage-independent growth) in HeLaHF cells, similar to that of p53 gene silencing, implying its tumor suppressor effect. However, the observed increased transformation potential by PHTS silencing appears to be due to an increased anchorage-independent proliferation rate rather than suppression of anoikis, unlike the effect of p53 silencing. p53 silencing did not affect PHTS gene expression, and vice versa, suggesting PHTS may function in a new and p53-independent tumor suppressor pathway. Furthermore, over-expression of PHTS in different cancer cell lines, in addition to HeLa, reduces cell growth likely via induced apoptosis, confirming the broad PHTS tumor suppressor properties

  9. Regulation of IAP (Inhibitor of Apoptosis) Gene Expression by the p53 Tumor Suppressor Protein

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murphy, Maureen

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the work proposed in this application, which has just completed Year 1, was to analyze the ability of the p53 tumor suppressor protein to repress the anti-apoptotic genes survivin and cIAP-2...

  10. Suppressor of Hairless and Presenilin phenotypes imply involvement of canonical Notch-signalling in segmentation of the spider Cupiennius salei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoppmeier, Michael; Damen, Wim G M

    2005-04-01

    Arthropods, vertebrates, and annelids all have a segmented body. Our recent discovery of involvement of Notch-signalling in spider segmentation revived the discussion on the origin of segmented body plans and suggests the sharing of a common genetic program in a common ancestor. Here, we analysed the spider homologues of the Suppressor of Hairless and Presenilin genes, which encode components of the canonical Notch-pathway, to further explore the role of Notch-signalling in spider segmentation. RNAi silencing of two spider Suppressor of Hairless homologues and the spider Presenilin homologue causes severe segmentation phenotypes. The most prominent defect is the consistent breakdown of segmentation after the formation of three (Suppressor of Hairless) or five (Presenilin) opisthosomal segments. These phenotypes indicate that Notch-signalling during spider segmentation likely involves the canonical pathway via Presenilin and Suppressor of Hairless. Furthermore, it implies that Notch-signalling influences both the formation and patterning of the spider segments: it is required for the specification of the posterior segments and for proper specification of the segment boundaries. We argue that alternative, partly redundant, pathways might act in the formation of the anterior segments that are not active in the posterior segments. This suggests that at least some differences exist in the specification of anterior and posterior segments of the spider, a finding that may be valid for most short germ arthropods. Our data provide additional evidence for the similarities of Notch-signalling in spider segmentation and vertebrate somitogenesis and strengthen our previous notion that the formation of the segments in arthropods and vertebrates might have shared a genetic program in a common ancestor.

  11. The potential for tumor suppressor gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, Andrew C; Ludwig, Megan L; Spector, Matthew E; Brenner, J Chad

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains a highly morbid and fatal disease. Importantly, genomic sequencing of head and neck cancers has identified frequent mutations in tumor suppressor genes. While targeted therapeutics increasingly are being investigated in head and neck cancer, the majority of these agents are against overactive/overexpressed oncogenes. Therapy to restore lost tumor suppressor gene function remains a key and under-addressed niche in trials for head and neck cancer. Recent advances in gene editing have captured the interest of both the scientific community and the public. As our technology for gene editing and gene expression modulation improves, addressing lost tumor suppressor gene function in head and neck cancers is becoming a reality. This review will summarize new techniques, challenges to implementation, future directions, and ethical ramifications of gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

  12. Analysis of loss of heterozygosity of the tumor suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarial carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Luković Ljiljana; Popović Branka; Atanacković Jasmina; Novaković Ivana; Perović Milica; Petrović Bojana; Petković Spasoje

    2006-01-01

    Background/aim: Among the genes involved in ovarian carcinogenesis, there has been increased interest in tumor-suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1. Both of the genes make control of cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. The p53 is a "genome guardian" inactivated in more than 50% of human cancers, while BRCA1 mutations are found mostly in breast and ovarian cancer. The aim of this investigation was to establish the frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the regions of the genes p53 and BRCA1 ...

  13. Wilms' tumours: about tumour suppressor genes, an oncogene and a chameleon gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Vicki

    2011-02-01

    Genes identified as being mutated in Wilms' tumour include TP53, a classic tumour suppressor gene (TSG); CTNNB1 (encoding β-catenin), a classic oncogene; WTX, which accumulating data indicate is a TSG; and WT1, which is inactivated in some Wilms' tumours, similar to a TSG. However, WT1 does not always conform to the TSG label, and some data indicate that WT1 enhances cell survival and proliferation, like an oncogene. Is WT1 a chameleon, functioning as either a TSG or an oncogene, depending on cellular context? Are these labels even appropriate for describing and understanding the function of WT1?

  14. MIM, a Potential Metastasis Suppressor Gene in Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Goo Lee

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a modified version of the mRNA differential display technique, five human bladder cancer cell lines from low grade to metastatic were analyzed to identify differences in gene expression. A 316-bp cDNA (C11300 was isolated that was not expressed in the metastatic cell line TccSuP. Sequence analysis revealed that this gene was identical to KIAA 0429, has a 5.3-kb transcript that mapped to 8824.1. The protein is predicted to be 356 amino acids in size and has an actin-binding WH2 domain. Northern blot revealed expression in multiple normal tissues, but none in a metastatic breast cancer cell line (SKBR3 or in metastatic prostatic cancer cell lines (LNCaP, PC3. We have named this gene Missing in Metastasis (MIM and our data suggest that it may be involved in cytoskeletal organization.

  15. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Alterations in the tumour suppressor p53 gene are among the most common defects seen in a variety of human cancers. In order ... from Indian patients, we checked 44 untreated primary gliomas for mutations in exons 5–9 of the p53 gene by. PCR-SSCP ... function of p53 is critical to the efficiency of many cancer treatment ...

  16. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alterations in the tumour suppressor p53 gene are among the most common defects seen in a variety of human cancers. In order to study the significance of the p53 gene in the genesis and development of human glioma from Indian patients, we checked 44 untreated primary gliomas for mutations in exons 5–9 of the p53 ...

  17. V2 from a curtovirus is a suppressor of post-transcriptional gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Ana P; Rodríguez-Negrete, Edgar A; Morilla, Gabriel; Wang, Liping; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Castillo, Araceli G; Bejarano, Eduardo R

    2017-10-01

    The suppression of gene silencing is a key mechanism for the success of viral infection in plants. DNA viruses from the Geminiviridae family encode several proteins that suppress transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene silencing (TGS/PTGS). In Begomovirus, the most abundant genus of this family, three out of six genome-encoded proteins, namely C2, C4 and V2, have been shown to suppress PTGS, with V2 being the strongest PTGS suppressor in transient assays. Beet curly top virus (BCTV), the model species for the Curtovirus genus, is able to infect the widest range of plants among geminiviruses. In this genus, only one protein, C2/L2, has been described as inhibiting PTGS. We show here that, despite the lack of sequence homology with its begomoviral counterpart, BCTV V2 acts as a potent PTGS suppressor, possibly by impairing the RDR6 (RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6)/suppressor of gene silencing 3 (SGS3) pathway.

  18. Lack of mutations in the TP53 tumor suppressor gene exons 5 to 8 in Fanconi's anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonveaux, P; Le Coniat, M; Grausz, D; Berger, R

    1991-01-01

    The TP53 gene is considered to be a negative regulator of cell growth whose inactivation is an important step in the development or progression of malignancies. Recently, germ line TP53 mutations have been detected in a familial cancer syndrome, the dominantly inherited Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Using single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of PCR products, we looked for TP53 mutations in DNA of patients with Fanconi anemia, an autosomal recessive disease characterized by increased predisposition to neoplasia. We did not find any TP53 mutation in 13 patients, suggesting that this tumor suppressor gene is not directly involved in the cancer susceptibility observed in Fanconi's anemia.

  19. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    [Phatak P, Selvi S K, Divya T, Hegde A S, Hegde S and Somasundaram K 2002 Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from Indian patients; J. Biosci. 27 673–678]. 1. Introduction. Glioma, a neoplasm of neuroglial cells, is the most common type of brain tumour, constituting more than 50% of all.

  20. Haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding the tumor suppressor Pten predisposes zebrafish to hemangiosarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choorapoikayil, S.; Kuiper, R.V.; de Bruin, A.; den Hertog, J.

    2012-01-01

    PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that antagonizes Akt/PKB signaling. The zebrafish genome encodes two Pten genes, ptena and ptenb. Here, we report that zebrafish mutants that retain a single wild-type copy of ptena or ptenb (ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) or ptena(-/-)ptenb(+/-)) are viable and fertile.

  1. Analyses of tumor-suppressor genes in germline mouse models of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingqiang; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2014-08-01

    Tumor-suppressor genes are critical regulators of growth and functioning of cells, whose loss of function contributes to tumorigenesis. Accordingly, analyses of the consequences of their loss of function in genetically engineered mouse models have provided important insights into mechanisms of human cancer, as well as resources for preclinical analyses and biomarker discovery. Nowadays, most investigations of genetically engineered mouse models of tumor-suppressor function use conditional or inducible alleles, which enable analyses in specific cancer (tissue) types and overcome the consequences of embryonic lethality of germline loss of function of essential tumor-suppressor genes. However, historically, analyses of genetically engineered mouse models based on germline loss of function of tumor-suppressor genes were very important as these early studies established the principle that loss of function could be studied in mouse cancer models and also enabled analyses of these essential genes in an organismal context. Although the cancer phenotypes of these early germline models did not always recapitulate the expected phenotypes in human cancer, these models provided the essential foundation for the more sophisticated conditional and inducible models that are currently in use. Here, we describe these "first-generation" germline models of loss of function models, focusing on the important lessons learned from their analyses, which helped in the design and analyses of "next-generation" genetically engineered mouse models. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  2. Modulation and Expression of Tumor Suppressor Genes by Environmental Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ostrander, Gary Kent

    1996-01-01

    ... in the retinoblastoma gene in retinoblastoma and hepatocarcinomas following induction with known environmental carcinogens. Studies to date suggest the retinoblastoma gene/protein may play a role in oncogenesis in the medaka.

  3. Generation of two modified mouse alleles of the Hic1 tumor suppressor gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíchalová, Vendula; Turečková, Jolana; Fafílek, Bohumil; Vojtěchová, Martina; Krausová, Michaela; Lukáš, Jan; Šloncová, Eva; Takacova, S.; Divoký, V.; Leprince, D.; Plachý, Jiří; Kořínek, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2011), s. 142-151 ISSN 1526-954X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/1567; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Hypermethylated In Cancer 1 * Hic1 tumor suppressor * gene targeting Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.527, year: 2011

  4. A study on tumor suppressor genes mutations associated with different pathological colorectal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matar, S.N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the Western world. In Egypt; there is an increasing incidence of the disease, especially among patients ≤40 years age. While CRC have been reported in low incidence rate in developing countries, it is the third most common tumor in male and the fifth common tumor in females in Egypt. Early diagnosis and surgical interference guarantee long survival of most CRC patients. Early diagnosis is impeded by the disease onset at young age and imprecise symptoms at the initial stages of the disease. As in most solid tumors, the malignant transformation of colonic epithelial cells is to arise through a multistep process during which they acquire genetic changes involving the activation of proto-oncogenes and the loss of tumor suppressor genes. Recently, a candidate tumor suppressor gene, KLF6, which is mapped to chromosome 10p, was found to be frequently mutated in a number of cancers. There are some evidences suggesting that the disruption of the functional activity of KLF6 gene products may be one of the early events in tumor genesis of the colon. The main objective of the present study was to detect mutational changes of KLF6 tumor suppressor gene and to study the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) markers at chromosome 10p15 (KLF6 locus) in colorectal lesions and colorectal cancer in Egyptian patients. The patients included in this study were 83 presented with different indications for colonoscopic examination. Selecting patients with colorectal pre-cancerous lesions or colorectal cancer was done according to the results of tissue biopsy from lesion and adjacent normal. The patients were classified into three main groups; (G I) Cancerous group, (G II) polyps group including patients with adenomatous polyps (AP), familial adenomatous polyps (FAP) and hyperplastic polyps (HP) and (G III) Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) including patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD

  5. Mutational hotspots in the TP53 gene and, possibly, other tumor suppressors evolve by positive selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonin Eugene V

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mutation spectra of the TP53 gene and other tumor suppressors contain multiple hotspots, i.e., sites of non-random, frequent mutation in tumors and/or the germline. The origin of the hotspots remains unclear, the general view being that they represent highly mutable nucleotide contexts which likely reflect effects of different endogenous and exogenous factors shaping the mutation process in specific tissues. The origin of hotspots is of major importance because it has been suggested that mutable contexts could be used to infer mechanisms of mutagenesis contributing to tumorigenesis. Results Here we apply three independent tests, accounting for non-uniform base compositions in synonymous and non-synonymous sites, to test whether the hotspots emerge via selection or due to mutational bias. All three tests consistently indicate that the hotspots in the TP53 gene evolve, primarily, via positive selection. The results were robust to the elimination of the highly mutable CpG dinucleotides. By contrast, only one, the least conservative test reveals the signature of positive selection in BRCA1, BRCA2, and p16. Elucidation of the origin of the hotspots in these genes requires more data on somatic mutations in tumors. Conclusion The results of this analysis seem to indicate that positive selection for gain-of-function in tumor suppressor genes is an important aspect of tumorigenesis, blurring the distinction between tumor suppressors and oncogenes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Sandor Pongor, Christopher Lee and Mikhail Blagosklonny.

  6. The Ras effector RASSF2 is a novel tumor-suppressor gene in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akino, Kimishige; Toyota, Minoru; Suzuki, Hiromu; Mita, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Yasushi; Ohe-Toyota, Mutsumi; Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Hinoda, Yuji; Imai, Kohzoh; Tokino, Takashi

    2005-07-01

    Activation of Ras signaling is a hallmark of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the roles of negative regulators of Ras are not fully understood. Our aim was to address that question by surveying genetic and epigenetic alterations of Ras-Ras effector genes in CRC cells. The expression and methylation status of 6 RASSF family genes were examined using RT-PCR and bisulfite PCR in CRC cell lines and in primary CRCs and colorectal adenomas. Colony formation assays and flow cytometry were used to assess the tumor suppressor activities of RASSF1 and RASSF2. Immunofluorescence microscopy was used to determine the effect of altered RASSF2 expression on cell morphology. Mutations of K- ras , BRAF, and p53 were identified using single-strand conformation analysis and direct sequencing. Aberrant methylation and histone deacetylation of RASSF2 was associated with the gene's silencing in CRC. The activities of RASSF2, which were distinct from those of RASSF1, included induction of morphologic changes and apoptosis; moreover, its ability to prevent cell transformation suggests that RASSF2 acts as a tumor suppressor in CRC. Primary CRCs that showed K- ras /BRAF mutations also frequently showed RASSF2 methylation, and inactivation of RASSF2 enhanced K- ras -induced oncogenic transformation. RASSF2 methylation was also frequently identified in colorectal adenomas. RASSF2 is a novel tumor suppressor gene that regulates Ras signaling and plays a pivotal role in the early stages of colorectal tumorigenesis.

  7. Hypermethylation Of The Tumor Suppressor RASSF1A Gene In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast cancer is the leading cancer among females. There is a critical need for improved molecular biomarkers that are diagnostic, prognostic and also capable of predicting the progression of benign high-risk lesions to invasive carcinoma. RAS association domain family protein 1A (RASSF1A) gene, is a biologically ...

  8. Are there tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 4p in sporadic colorectal carcinoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hai-Tao; Jiang, Li-Xin; Lv, Zhong-Chuan; Li, Da-Peng; Zhou, Chong-Zhi; Gao, Jian-Jun; He, Lin; Peng, Zhi-Hai

    2008-01-07

    To study the candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSG) on chromosome 4p by detecting the high frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in sporadic colorectal carcinoma in Chinese patients. Seven fluorescent labeled polymorphic microsatellite markers were analyzed in 83 cases of colorectal carcinoma and matched normal tissue DNA by PCR. PCR products were electrophoresed on an ABI 377 DNA sequencer. Genescan 3.7 and Genotype 3.7 software were used for LOH scanning and analysis. The same procedure was performed by the other six microsatellite markers spanning D4S3013 locus to make further detailed deletion mapping. Comparison between LOH frequency and clinicopathological factors was performed by c2 test. Data were collected from all informative loci. The average LOH frequency on 4p was 24.25%, and 42.3% and 35.62% on D4S405 and D4S3013 locus, respectively. Adjacent markers of D4S3013 displayed a low LOH frequency (4p15.2) and D4S405 (4p14) locus are detected. Candidate TSG, which is involved in carcinogenesis and progression of sporadic colorectal carcinoma on chromosome 4p, may be located between D4S3017 and D4S2933 (about 1.7 cm).

  9. Role of natural antisense transcripts pertaining to tumor suppressor genes in human carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelicci, G.; Pierotti, M.

    2009-01-01

    Overlapping transcripts in opposite orientations can potentially form perfect sense-antisense duplex RNA. Recently, several studies have revealed the extent of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) and their role in important biological phenomena also in higher organisms. In order to test the hypothesis that the function of NATs in man might represent an essential element in the regulation of gene expression, especially at transcriptional level, in this study we planned to look for, systematically examine, and characterize NATs belonging in the human genome to the tumour suppressor class of genes, so to identify physiological (and potentially pathological) modulators in this gene class

  10. Generation of two modified mouse alleles of the Hic1 tumor suppressor gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíchalová, Vendula; Turečková, Jolana; Fafílek, Bohumil; Vojtěchová, Martina; Krausová, Michaela; Lukáš, Jan; Šloncová, Eva; Takacova, S.; Divoký, V.; Leprince, D.; Plachý, Jiří; Kořínek, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2011), s. 142-151 ISSN 1526-954X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/1567; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Hypermethylated In Cancer 1 * Hic1 tumor suppressor * gene targeting Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.527, year: 2011

  11. The p53 tumour suppressor gene and the tobacco industry: research, debate, and conflict of interest

    OpenAIRE

    Bitton, A; Neuman, M D; Barnoya, J; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumour suppressor gene lead to uncontrolled cell division and are found in over 50% of all human tumours, including 60% of lung cancers. Research published in 1996 by Denissenko and colleagues demonstrated patterned in-vitro mutagenic effects on p53 of benzo[a]pyrene, a carcinogen present in tobacco smoke. We investigated the tobacco industry's response to p53 research linking smoking to cancer. We searched online tobacco document archives, including the Legacy Tobacco Do...

  12. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bressy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virus (OV therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53 or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73 were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  13. Characterize RAP80, a Potential Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    E. Kleiman , J. L. Manley, T. Ouchi, Z. Q. Pan, J. Biol. Chem. 277, 22085 (2002). 9. X. Yu, J. Chen, Mol. Cell. Biol. 24, 9478 (2004). 10. S. B. Cantor...polyubiquitin chains through an unconventional linkage involving lysine residue K6 of ubiquitin. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 34743–34746 (2003). 5. Chen, A., Kleiman

  14. MMP-8, A Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    and RD mutations were generated using the Chameleon double- stranded site-directed mutagenesis kit (Strata- gene). The fragments were released by...receptor TβR-I, the type II receptor TβR- II, the regulatory Smads (Smad2 and Smad3), and Smad4 (8). Most of these components have mutations in several...human cancers. But, mutations in TGF-β receptors or Smads are rare in breast cancer (9, 10). Moreover, for breast cancer cells, TGF-β1 is a crucial

  15. SERPINB5 and AKAP12 -- Expression and promoter methylation of metastasis suppressor genes in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haier Joerg

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early metastasis and infiltration are survival limiting characteristics of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC. Thus, PDAC is likely to harbor alterations in metastasis suppressor genes that may provide novel diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. This study investigates a panel of metastasis suppressor genes in correlation to PDAC phenotype and examines promoter methylation for regulatory influence on metastasis suppressor gene expression and for its potential as a diagnostic tool. Methods Metastatic and invasive potential of 16 PDAC cell lines were quantified in an orthotopic mouse model and mRNA expression of 11 metastasis suppressor genes determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Analysis for promoter methylation was performed using methylation specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing PCR. Protein expression was determined by Western blot. Results In general, higher metastasis suppressor gene mRNA expression was not consistent with less aggressive phenotypes of PDAC. Instead, mRNA overexpression of several metastasis suppressor genes was found in PDAC cell lines vs. normal pancreatic RNA. Of the investigated metastasis suppressor genes, only higher AKAP12 mRNA expression was correlated with decreased metastasis (P SERPINB5 mRNA expression was correlated with increased metastasis scores (P SERPINB5 methylation was associated with loss of mRNA and protein expression (P SERPINB5 methylation was also directly correlated to decreased metastasis scores (P Conclusions AKAP12 mRNA expression was correlated to attenuated invasive and metastatic potential and may be associated with less aggressive phenotypes of PDAC while no such evidence was obtained for the remaining metastasis suppressor genes. Increased SERPINB5 mRNA expression was correlated to increased metastasis and mRNA expression was regulated by methylation. Thus, SERPINB5 methylation was directly correlated to metastasis scores and may provide a diagnostic tool for PDAC.

  16. Is the gene encoding Chibby implicated as a tumour suppressor in colorectal cancer ?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gad, Sophie; Teboul, David; Lièvre, Astrid; Goasguen, Nicolas; Berger, Anne; Beaune, Philippe; Laurent-Puig, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    A novel member of the Wnt signalling pathway, Chibby, was recently identified. This protein inhibits Wnt/β-catenin mediated transcriptional activation by competing with Lef-1 (the transcription factor and target of β-catenin) to bind to β-catenin. This suggests that Chibby could be a tumour suppressor protein. The C22orf2 gene coding Chibby is located on chromosome 22, a region recurrently lost in colorectal cancer. Activation of the Wnt pathway is a major feature of colorectal cancer and occurs through inactivation of APC or activation of β-catenin. All of this led us to analyse the possible implication of Chibby in colorectal carcinogenesis. First, 36 tumour and matched normal colonic mucosa DNA were genotyped with five microsatellite markers located on chromosome 22 to search for loss of heterozygosity. Then, mutation screening of the C22orf2 coding sequence and splice sites was performed in the 36 tumour DNA. Finally, expression of Chibby was analysed by quantitative RT-PCR on 10 patients, 4 with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 22. Loss of heterozygosity involving the C22orf2 region was detected in 11 out of 36 patients (30%). Sequencing analysis revealed a known variant, rs3747174, in exon 5: T321C leading to a silent amino acid polymorphism A107A. Allelic frequencies were 0.69 and 0.31 for T and C variants respectively. No other mutation was detected. Among the 10 patients studied, expression analysis revealed that Chibby is overexpressed in 2 tumours and underexpressed in 1. No correlations were found with 22q LOH status. As no somatic mutation was detected in C22orf2 in 36 colorectal tumour DNA, our results do not support the implication of Chibby as a tumour suppressor in colorectal carcinogenesis. This was supported by the absence of underexpression of Chibby among the tumour samples with 22q LOH. The implication of other Wnt pathway members remains to be identified to explain the part of colorectal tumours without mutation in APC and β-catenin

  17. Dissecting epigenetic silencing complexity in the mouse lung cancer suppressor gene Cadm1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Marie Reamon-Buettner

    Full Text Available Disease-oriented functional analysis of epigenetic factors and their regulatory mechanisms in aberrant silencing is a prerequisite for better diagnostics and therapy. Yet, the precise mechanisms are still unclear and complex, involving the interplay of several effectors including nucleosome positioning, DNA methylation, histone variants and histone modifications. We investigated the epigenetic silencing complexity in the tumor suppressor gene Cadm1 in mouse lung cancer progenitor cell lines, exhibiting promoter hypermethylation associated with transcriptional repression, but mostly unresponsive to demethylating drug treatments. After predicting nucleosome positions and transcription factor binding sites along the Cadm1 promoter, we carried out single-molecule mapping with DNA methyltransferase M.SssI, which revealed in silent promoters high nucleosome occupancy and occlusion of transcription factor binding sites. Furthermore, M.SssI maps of promoters varied within and among the different lung cancer cell lines. Chromatin analysis with micrococcal nuclease also indicated variations in nucleosome positioning to have implications in the binding of transcription factors near nucleosome borders. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that histone variants (H2A.Z and H3.3, and opposing histone modification marks (H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 all colocalized in the same nucleosome positions that is reminiscent of epigenetic plasticity in embryonic stem cells. Altogether, epigenetic silencing complexity in the promoter region of Cadm1 is not only defined by DNA hypermethylation, but high nucleosome occupancy, altered nucleosome positioning, and 'bivalent' histone modifications, also likely contributed in the transcriptional repression of this gene in the lung cancer cells. Our results will help define therapeutic intervention strategies using epigenetic drugs in lung cancer.

  18. The tumor suppressor Rb and its related Rbl2 genes are regulated by Utx histone demethylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terashima, Minoru; Ishimura, Akihiko; Yoshida, Masakazu [Division of Functional Genomics, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192, Ishikawa (Japan); Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Takeshi, E-mail: suzuki-t@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Division of Functional Genomics, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Utx increases expression of Rb and Rbl2 genes through its demethylase activity. {yields} Utx changes histone H3 methylation on the Rb and Rbl2 promoters. {yields} Utx induces decreased cell proliferation of mammalian primary cells. -- Abstract: Utx is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that encodes histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) demethylase. In this study, we found that ectopic expression of Utx enhanced the expression of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene Rb and its related gene Rbl2. This activation was dependent on the demethylase activity of Utx, and was suggested to contribute to the decreased cell proliferation induced by Utx. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that over-expressed Utx was associated with the promoter regions of Rb and Rbl2 resulting in the removal of repressive H3K27 tri-methylation and the increase in active H3K4 tri-methylation. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Utx revealed the recruitment of endogenous Utx protein on the promoters of Rb and Rbl2 genes. These results indicate that Rb and Rbl2 are downstream target genes of Utx and may play important roles in Utx-mediated cell growth control.

  19. Unexpected functional similarities between gatekeeper tumour suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes revealed by systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongzhong; Epstein, Richard J

    2011-05-01

    Familial tumor suppressor genes comprise two subgroups: caretaker genes (CTs) that repair DNA, and gatekeeper genes (GKs) that trigger cell death. Since GKs may also induce cell cycle delay and thus enhance cell survival by facilitating DNA repair, we hypothesized that the prosurvival phenotype of GKs could be selected during cancer progression, and we used a multivariable systems biology approach to test this. We performed multidimensional data analysis, non-negative matrix factorization and logistic regression to compare the features of GKs with those of their putative antagonists, the proto-oncogenes (POs), as well as with control groups of CTs and functionally unrelated congenital heart disease genes (HDs). GKs and POs closely resemble each other, but not CTs or HDs, in terms of gene structure (Pexpression level and breadth (Pimplied suggest a common functional attribute that is strongly negatively selected-that is, a shared phenotype that enhances cell survival. The counterintuitive finding of similar evolutionary pressures affecting GKs and POs raises an intriguing possibility: namely, that cancer microevolution is accelerated by an epistatic cascade in which upstream suppressor gene defects subvert the normal bifunctionality of wild-type GKs by constitutively shifting the phenotype away from apoptosis towards survival. If correct, this interpretation would explain the hitherto unexplained phenomenon of frequent wild-type GK (for example, p53) overexpression in tumors.

  20. SFRP Tumour Suppressor Genes Are Potential Plasma-Based Epigenetic Biomarkers for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Yee Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM is associated with asbestos exposure. Asbestos can induce chronic inflammation which in turn can lead to silencing of tumour suppressor genes. Wnt signaling pathway can be affected by chronic inflammation and is aberrantly activated in many cancers including colon and MPM. SFRP genes are antagonists of Wnt pathway, and SFRPs are potential tumour suppressors in colon, gastric, breast, ovarian, and lung cancers and mesothelioma. This study investigated the expression and DNA methylation of SFRP genes in MPM cells lines with and without demethylation treatment. Sixty-six patient FFPE samples were analysed and have showed methylation of SFRP2 (56% and SFRP5 (70% in MPM. SFRP2 and SFRP5 tumour-suppressive activity in eleven MPM lines was confirmed, and long-term asbestos exposure led to reduced expression of the SFRP1 and SFRP2 genes in the mesothelium (MeT-5A via epigenetic alterations. Finally, DNA methylation of SFRPs is detectable in MPM patient plasma samples, with methylated SFRP2 and SFRP5 showing a tendency towards greater abundance in patients. These data suggested that SFRP genes have tumour-suppresive activity in MPM and that methylated DNA from SFRP gene promoters has the potential to serve as a biomarker for MPM patient plasma.

  1. Expression of the p16{sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in rodent lung tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swafford, D.S.; Tesfaigzi, J.; Belinsky, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    Aberrations on the short arm of chromosome 9 are among the earliest genetic changes in human cancer. p16{sup INK4a} is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that lies within human 9p21, a chromosome region associated with frequent loss of heterozygosity in human lung tumors. The p16{sup INK4a} protein functions as an inhibitor of cyclin D{sub 1}-dependent kinases that phosphorylate the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor gene product enabling cell-cycle progression. Thus, overexpression of cyclin D{sub 1}, mutation of cyclin-dependent kinase genes, or loss of p16{sup INK4a} function, can all result in functional inactivation of Rb. Inactivation of Rb by mutation or deletion can result in an increase in p16{sup INK4a} transcription, suggesting that an increased p16{sup INK4a} expression in a tumor cell signals dysfunction of the pathway. The p16{sup (INK4a)} gene, unlike some tumor suppressor genes, is rarely inactivated by mutation. Instead, the expression of this gene is suppressed in some human cancers by hypermethylation of the CpG island within the first exon or by homozygous deletion: 686. Chromosome losses have been observed at 9p21 syntenic loci in tumors of the mouse and rat, two species often used as animal models for pulmonary carcinogenesis. Expression of p16{sup INK4a} is lost in some mouse tumor cell lines, often due to homozygous deletion. These observations indicate that p16{sup INK4a} dysfunction may play a role in the development of neoplasia in rodents as well as humans. The purpose of the current investigation was to define the extent to which p16{sup INK4a} dysfunction contributes to the development of rodent lung tumors and to determine the mechanism of inactivation of the gene. There is no evidence to suggest a loss of function of the p16{sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in these primary murine lung tumors by mutation, deletion, or methylation.

  2. Utility of P19 Gene-Silencing Suppressor for High Level Expression of Recombinant Human Therapeutic Proteins in Plant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Zangi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The potential of plants, as a safe and eukaryotic system, is considered in the production of recombinant therapeutic human protein today; but the expression level of heterologous proteins is limited by the post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS response in this new technology. The use of viral suppressors of gene silencing can prevent PTGS and improve transient expression level of foreign proteins. In this study, we investigated the effect of p19 silencing suppressor on recombinant human nerve growth factor expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Materials and Methods: The p19 coding region was inserted in the pCAMBIA using NcoI and BstEII recognition sites. Also, the cloned synthesized recombinant human NGF (rhNGF fragment was cloned directly into PVX vector by ClaI and SalI restriction enzymes. The co-agroinfiltration of rhNGF with p19 viral suppressor of gene silencing was evaluated by dot-blot and SDS-PAGE. The amount of expressed rhNGF protein was calculated by AlphaEaseFC software. Results: Co-agroinfiltration of hNGF with P19 suppressor showed about forty-fold increase (8% total soluble protein (TSP when compared to the absence of P19 suppressor (0.2%TSP. Conclusion: The results presented here confirmed that the use of P19 gene silencing suppressor derived from tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV could efficiently increase the transient expression of recombinant proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana manifold.

  3. Remodeling epigenetic modifications at tumor suppressor gene promoters with bovine oocyte extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenfei; Yue, Yongli; Han, Pengyong; Sa, Rula; Ren, Xiaolv; Wang, Jie; Bai, Haidong; Yu, Haiquan

    2013-09-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes by aberrant DNA methylation and histone modifications at their promoter regions plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cancer. The therapeutic effect of the widely used epigenetic drugs, including DNA methyltransferase inhibitors and histone deacetylase inhibitors, remains unsatisfactory. One important underlying factor in the ineffectiveness of these drugs is that their actions lack specificity. To investigate whether oocyte extract can be used for epigenetic re-programming of cancer cells, H460 human lung cancer cells were reversibly permeabilized and incubated with bovine oocyte extract. Bisulfite sequencing showed that bovine oocyte extract induced significant demethylation at hypermethylated promoter CpG islands of the tumor suppressor genes RUNX3 and CDH1; however, the DNA methylation levels of repetitive sequences were not affected. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that bovine oocyte extract significantly reduced transcriptionally repressive histone modifications and increased transcriptionally activating histone modifications at the promoter regions of RUNX3 and CDH1. Bovine oocyte extract reactivated the expression of RUNX3 and CDH1 at both the messenger RNA and the protein levels without up-regulating the transcription of pluripotency-associated genes. At the functional level, anchorage-independent proliferation, migration and invasion of H460 cells was strongly inhibited. These results demonstrate that bovine oocyte extract reactivates epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor genes by remodeling the epigenetic modifications at their promoter regions. Bovine oocyte extract may provide a useful tool for investigating epigenetic mechanisms in cancer and a valuable source for developing novel safe therapeutic approaches that target epigenetic alterations. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tumor Suppressor Genes within Common Fragile Sites Are Active Players in the DNA Damage Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idit Hazan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of common fragile sites (CFSs in cancer remains controversial. Two main views dominate the discussion: one suggests that CFS loci are hotspots of genomic instability leading to inactivation of genes encoded within them, while the other view proposes that CFSs are functional units and that loss of the encoded genes confers selective pressure, leading to cancer development. The latter view is supported by emerging evidence showing that expression of a given CFS is associated with genome integrity and that inactivation of CFS-resident tumor suppressor genes leads to dysregulation of the DNA damage response (DDR and increased genomic instability. These two viewpoints of CFS function are not mutually exclusive but rather coexist; when breaks at CFSs are not repaired accurately, this can lead to deletions by which cells acquire growth advantage because of loss of tumor suppressor activities. Here, we review recent advances linking some CFS gene products with the DDR, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis and discuss how their inactivation might represent a selective advantage for cancer cells.

  5. Evolution of the HIV-1 nef gene in HLA-B*57 Positive Elite Suppressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siliciano Robert F

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Elite controllers or suppressors (ES are HIV-1 infected patients who maintain viral loads of gag and nef in HLA-B*57 positive ES. We previously showed evolution in the gag gene of ES which surprisingly was mostly due to synonymous mutations rather than non-synonymous mutation in targeted CTL epitopes. This finding could be the result of structural constraints on Gag, and we therefore examined the less conserved nef gene. We found slow evolution of nef in plasma virus in some ES. This evolution is mostly due to synonymous mutations and occurs at a rate similar to that seen in the gag gene in the same patients. The results provide further evidence of ongoing viral replication in ES and suggest that the nef and gag genes in these patients respond similarly to selective pressure from the host.

  6. Transcriptomic and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies reveal FOXA2 as a tumor suppressor gene in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorvis, Christina; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Mahurkar-Joshi, Swapna; Koutsioumpa, Marina; Williams, Jennifer; Donahue, Timothy R; Poultsides, George A; Eibl, Guido; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive cancer with low survival rates and limited therapeutic options. Thus elucidation of signaling pathways involved in PDAC pathogenesis is essential for identifying novel potential therapeutic gene targets. Here, we used a systems approach to elucidate those pathways by integrating gene and microRNA profiling analyses together with CRISPR/Cas9 technology to identify novel transcription factors involved in PDAC pathogenesis. FOXA2 transcription factor was found to be significantly downregulated in PDAC relative to control pancreatic tissues. Functional experiments revealed that FOXA2 has a tumor suppressor function through inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth, migration, invasion, and colony formation. In situ hybridization analysis revealed miR-199a to be significantly upregulated in pancreatic cancer. Bioinformatics and luciferase analyses showed that miR-199a negatively but directly regulates FOXA2 expression through binding in its 3'-untranslated region (UTR). Evaluation of the functional importance of miR-199a on pancreatic cancer revealed that miR-199a acts as an inhibitor of FOXA2 expression, inducing an increase in pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Additionally, gene ontology and network analyses in PANC-1 cells treated with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against FOXA2 revealed an enrichment for cell invasion mechanisms through PLAUR and ERK activation. FOXA2 deletion (FOXA2Δ) by using two CRISPR/Cas9 vectors in PANC-1 cells induced tumor growth in vivo resulting in upregulation of PLAUR and ERK pathways in FOXA2Δ xenograft tumors. We have identified FOXA2 as a novel tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer and it is regulated directly by miR-199a, thereby enhancing our understanding of how microRNAs interplay with the transcription factors to affect pancreatic oncogenesis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Functional characterization of duplicated Suppressor of Overexpression of Constans 1-like genes in petunia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill C Preston

    Full Text Available Flowering time is strictly controlled by a combination of internal and external signals that match seed set with favorable environmental conditions. In the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae, many of the genes underlying development and evolution of flowering have been discovered. However, much remains unknown about how conserved the flowering gene networks are in plants with different growth habits, gene duplication histories, and distributions. Here we functionally characterize three homologs of the flowering gene Suppressor Of Overexpression of Constans 1 (SOC1 in the short-lived perennial Petunia hybrida (petunia, Solanaceae. Similar to A. thaliana soc1 mutants, co-silencing of duplicated petunia SOC1-like genes results in late flowering. This phenotype is most severe when all three SOC1-like genes are silenced. Furthermore, expression levels of the SOC1-like genes Unshaven (UNS and Floral Binding Protein 21 (FBP21, but not FBP28, are positively correlated with developmental age. In contrast to A. thaliana, petunia SOC1-like gene expression did not increase with longer photoperiods, and FBP28 transcripts were actually more abundant under short days. Despite evidence of functional redundancy, differential spatio-temporal expression data suggest that SOC1-like genes might fine-tune petunia flowering in response to photoperiod and developmental stage. This likely resulted from modification of SOC1-like gene regulatory elements following recent duplication, and is a possible mechanism to ensure flowering under both inductive and non-inductive photoperiods.

  8. Overexpression of the p53 tumor suppressor gene product in primary lung adenocarcinomas is associated with cigarette smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, W. H.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Goodman, S. N.; Slebos, R. J.; Polak, M.; Baas, I. O.; Rodenhuis, S.; Hruban, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are frequently observed in primary lung adenocarcinomas, suggesting that these mutations are critical events in the malignant transformation of airway cells. These mutations are often associated with stabilization of the p53 gene product, resulting in the

  9. Distinct and competitive regulatory patterns of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhao

    Full Text Available So far, investigators have found numerous tumor suppressor genes (TSGs and oncogenes (OCGs that control cell proliferation and apoptosis during cancer development. Furthermore, TSGs and OCGs may act as modulators of transcription factors (TFs to influence gene regulation. A comprehensive investigation of TSGs, OCGs, TFs, and their joint target genes at the network level may provide a deeper understanding of the post-translational modulation of TSGs and OCGs to TF gene regulation.In this study, we developed a novel computational framework for identifying target genes of TSGs and OCGs using TFs as bridges through the integration of protein-protein interactions and gene expression data. We applied this pipeline to ovarian cancer and constructed a three-layer regulatory network. In the network, the top layer was comprised of modulators (TSGs and OCGs, the middle layer included TFs, and the bottom layer contained target genes. Based on regulatory relationships in the network, we compiled TSG and OCG profiles and performed clustering analyses. Interestingly, we found TSGs and OCGs formed two distinct branches. The genes in the TSG branch were significantly enriched in DNA damage and repair, regulating macromolecule metabolism, cell cycle and apoptosis, while the genes in the OCG branch were significantly enriched in the ErbB signaling pathway. Remarkably, their specific targets showed a reversed functional enrichment in terms of apoptosis and the ErbB signaling pathway: the target genes regulated by OCGs only were enriched in anti-apoptosis and the target genes regulated by TSGs only were enriched in the ErbB signaling pathway.This study provides the first comprehensive investigation of the interplay of TSGs and OCGs in a regulatory network modulated by TFs. Our application in ovarian cancer revealed distinct regulatory patterns of TSGs and OCGs, suggesting a competitive regulatory mechanism acting upon apoptosis and the ErbB signaling pathway through

  10. Generation and characterization of mice carrying a conditional allele of the Wwox tumor suppressor gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H Ludes-Meyers

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available WWOX, the gene that spans the second most common human chromosomal fragile site, FRA16D, is inactivated in multiple human cancers and behaves as a suppressor of tumor growth. Since we are interested in understanding WWOX function in both normal and cancer tissues we generated mice harboring a conditional Wwox allele by flanking Exon 1 of the Wwox gene with LoxP sites. Wwox knockout (KO mice were developed by breeding with transgenic mice carrying the Cre-recombinase gene under the control of the adenovirus EIIA promoter. We found that Wwox KO mice suffered from severe metabolic defect(s resulting in growth retardation and all mice died by 3 wk of age. All Wwox KO mice displayed significant hypocapnia suggesting a state of metabolic acidosis. This finding and the known high expression of Wwox in kidney tubules suggest a role for Wwox in acid/base balance. Importantly, Wwox KO mice displayed histopathological and hematological signs of impaired hematopoiesis, leukopenia, and splenic atrophy. Impaired hematopoiesis can also be a contributing factor to metabolic acidosis and death. Hypoglycemia and hypocalcemia was also observed affecting the KO mice. In addition, bone metabolic defects were evident in Wwox KO mice. Bones were smaller and thinner having reduced bone volume as a consequence of a defect in mineralization. No evidence of spontaneous neoplasia was observed in Wwox KO mice. We have generated a new mouse model to inactivate the Wwox tumor suppressor gene conditionally. This will greatly facilitate the functional analysis of Wwox in adult mice and will allow investigating neoplastic transformation in specific target tissues.

  11. Tumor-suppressor genes that escape from X-inactivation contribute to cancer sex bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Andrew; Weinstock, David M; Savova, Virginia; Schumacher, Steven E; Cleary, John P; Yoda, Akinori; Sullivan, Timothy J; Hess, Julian M; Gimelbrant, Alexander A; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lawrence, Michael S; Getz, Gad; Lane, Andrew A

    2017-01-01

    There is a striking and unexplained male predominance across many cancer types. A subset of X-chromosome genes can escape X-inactivation, which would protect females from complete functional loss by a single mutation. To identify putative 'escape from X-inactivation tumor-suppressor' (EXITS) genes, we examined somatic alterations from >4,100 cancers across 21 tumor types for sex bias. Six of 783 non-pseudoautosomal region (PAR) X-chromosome genes (ATRX, CNKSR2, DDX3X, KDM5C, KDM6A, and MAGEC3) harbored loss-of-function mutations more frequently in males (based on a false discovery rate < 0.1), in comparison to zero of 18,055 autosomal and PAR genes (Fisher's exact P < 0.0001). Male-biased mutations in genes that escape X-inactivation were observed in combined analysis across many cancers and in several individual tumor types, suggesting a generalized phenomenon. We conclude that biallelic expression of EXITS genes in females explains a portion of the reduced cancer incidence in females as compared to males across a variety of tumor types.

  12. Characterization of the tumor suppressor gene WWOX in primary human oral squamous cell carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Flávio J.; Gomes, Dawidson A.; Perdigão, Paolla F.; Barbosa, Alvimar A.; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Gomez, Marcus V.; Aldaz, C. Marcelo; De Marco, Luiz; Gomez, Ricardo S.

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignant neoplasm of the oral cavity, representing ~90% of all oral carcinomas and accounting for 3–5% of all malignancies. The WWOX gene (WW-domain containing oxidoreductase) is a candidate tumor suppressor gene located at 16q23.3–24.1, spanning the second most common fragile site, FRA16D. In this report, the role of the WWOX gene was investigated in 20 tumors and 10 normal oral mucosas, and we demonstrated an altered WWOX gene in 50% (10/20) of OSCCs. Using nested RT-PCR, mRNA transcription was altered in 35% of the tumors, with the complete absence of transcripts in 2 samples as well as absence of exons 6–8 (2 tumors), exon 7 (1 tumor), exon 7 and exon 6–8 (1 tumor) and partial loss of exons 8 and 9 (1 tumor). To determine if the aberrant transcripts were translated, Western blots were performed in all samples; however, only the normal protein was detected. By immunohistochemistry, a reduction in Wwox protein expression was observed, affecting 40% of the tumors when compared with normal mucosa. In addition, a novel somatic mutation (S329F) was found. The presence of alterations in mRNA transcription correlated with the reduced expression of Wwox protein in the tumors. These results show that the WWOX gene is frequently altered in OSCC and may contribute to the carcinogenesis processes in oral cancer. PMID:16152610

  13. ING Genes Work as Tumor Suppressor Genes in the Carcinogenesis of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohan Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the sixth most common cancer in the world. The evolution and progression of HNSCC are considered to result from multiple stepwise alterations of cellular and molecular pathways in squamous epithelium. Recently, inhibitor of growth gene (ING family consisting of five genes, ING1 to ING5, was identified as a new tumor suppressor gene family that was implicated in the downregulation of cell cycle and chromatin remodeling. In contrast, it has been shown that ING1 and ING2 play an oncogenic role in some cancers, this situation being similar to TGF-β. In HNSCC, the ING family has been reported to be downregulated, and ING translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm may be a critical event for carcinogenesis. In this paper, we describe our recent results and briefly summarize current knowledge regarding the biologic functions of ING in HNSCC.

  14. ETS transcription factors control transcription of EZH2 and epigenetic silencing of the tumor suppressor gene Nkx3.1 in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Kunderfranco

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available ETS transcription factors regulate important signaling pathways involved in cell differentiation and development in many tissues and have emerged as important players in prostate cancer. However, the biological impact of ETS factors in prostate tumorigenesis is still debated.We performed an analysis of the ETS gene family using microarray data and real-time PCR in normal and tumor tissues along with functional studies in normal and cancer cell lines to understand the impact in prostate tumorigenesis and identify key targets of these transcription factors. We found frequent dysregulation of ETS genes with oncogenic (i.e., ERG and ESE1 and tumor suppressor (i.e., ESE3 properties in prostate tumors compared to normal prostate. Tumor subgroups (i.e., ERG(high, ESE1(high, ESE3(low and NoETS tumors were identified on the basis of their ETS expression status and showed distinct transcriptional and biological features. ERG(high and ESE3(low tumors had the most robust gene signatures with both distinct and overlapping features. Integrating genomic data with functional studies in multiple cell lines, we demonstrated that ERG and ESE3 controlled in opposite direction transcription of the Polycomb Group protein EZH2, a key gene in development, differentiation, stem cell biology and tumorigenesis. We further demonstrated that the prostate-specific tumor suppressor gene Nkx3.1 was controlled by ERG and ESE3 both directly and through induction of EZH2.These findings provide new insights into the role of the ETS transcriptional network in prostate tumorigenesis and uncover previously unrecognized links between aberrant expression of ETS factors, deregulation of epigenetic effectors and silencing of tumor suppressor genes. The link between aberrant ETS activity and epigenetic gene silencing may be relevant for the clinical management of prostate cancer and design of new therapeutic strategies.

  15. Tumor suppressor gene-based nanotherapy: from test tube to the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker, Manish; Jin, Jiankang; Branch, Cynthia D; Miyamoto, Shinya; Grimm, Elizabeth A; Roth, Jack A; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a major health problem in the world. Advances made in cancer therapy have improved the survival of patients in certain types of cancer. However, the overall five-year survival has not significantly improved in the majority of cancer types. Major challenges encountered in having effective cancer therapy are development of drug resistance by the tumor cells, nonspecific cytotoxicity, and inability to affect metastatic tumors by the chemodrugs. Overcoming these challenges requires development and testing of novel therapies. One attractive cancer therapeutic approach is cancer gene therapy. Several laboratories including the authors' laboratory have been investigating nonviral formulations for delivering therapeutic genes as a mode for effective cancer therapy. In this paper the authors will summarize their experience in the development and testing of a cationic lipid-based nanocarrier formulation and the results from their preclinical studies leading to a Phase I clinical trial for nonsmall cell lung cancer. Their nanocarrier formulation containing therapeutic genes such as tumor suppressor genes when administered intravenously effectively controls metastatic tumor growth. Additional Phase I clinical trials based on the results of their nanocarrier formulation have been initiated or proposed for treatment of cancer of the breast, ovary, pancreas, and metastatic melanoma, and will be discussed.

  16. Tumor Suppressor Gene-Based Nanotherapy: From Test Tube to the Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Shanker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a major health problem in the world. Advances made in cancer therapy have improved the survival of patients in certain types of cancer. However, the overall five-year survival has not significantly improved in the majority of cancer types. Major challenges encountered in having effective cancer therapy are development of drug resistance by the tumor cells, nonspecific cytotoxicity, and inability to affect metastatic tumors by the chemodrugs. Overcoming these challenges requires development and testing of novel therapies. One attractive cancer therapeutic approach is cancer gene therapy. Several laboratories including the authors' laboratory have been investigating nonviral formulations for delivering therapeutic genes as a mode for effective cancer therapy. In this paper the authors will summarize their experience in the development and testing of a cationic lipid-based nanocarrier formulation and the results from their preclinical studies leading to a Phase I clinical trial for nonsmall cell lung cancer. Their nanocarrier formulation containing therapeutic genes such as tumor suppressor genes when administered intravenously effectively controls metastatic tumor growth. Additional Phase I clinical trials based on the results of their nanocarrier formulation have been initiated or proposed for treatment of cancer of the breast, ovary, pancreas, and metastatic melanoma, and will be discussed.

  17. DLC1 tumor suppressor gene inhibits migration and invasion of multiple myeloma cells through RhoA GTPase pathway

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ullmannová-Benson, Veronika; Guan, M.; Zhou, X. G.; Tripathi, V.; Yang, V.; Zimonjic, D. B.; Popescu, C.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 2 (2009), s. 383-390 ISSN 0887-6924 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : multiple myeloma * tumor suppressor gene * promoter methylation Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 8.296, year: 2009

  18. Mutation analysis of suppressor of cytokine signalling 3, a candidate gene in Type 1 diabetes and insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gylvin, T; Nolsøe, R; Hansen, T

    2004-01-01

    Beta cell loss in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus may result from apoptosis and necrosis induced by inflammatory mediators. The suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS)-3 is a natural inhibitor of cytokine signalling and also influences insulin signalling. SOCS3 could therefore be a candidate...... gene in the development of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus....

  19. PCR-RFLP to Detect Codon 248 Mutation in Exon 7 of "p53" Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liming; Ge, Chongtao; Wu, Haizhen; Li, Suxia; Zhang, Huizhan

    2009-01-01

    Individual genome DNA was extracted fast from oral swab and followed up with PCR specific for codon 248 of "p53" tumor suppressor gene. "Msp"I restriction mapping showed the G-C mutation in codon 248, which closely relates to cancer susceptibility. Students learn the concepts, detection techniques, and research significance of point mutations or…

  20. The effect of age at exposure on the inactivating mechanisms and relative contributions of key tumor suppressor genes in radiation-induced mouse T-cell lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunaoshi, Masaaki; Amasaki, Yoshiko; Hirano-Sakairi, Shinobu; Blyth, Benjamin J.; Morioka, Takamitsu; Kaminishi, Mutsumi; Shang, Yi; Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya; Tachibana, Akira

    2015-01-01

    a and Ikaros are a prominent feature of young adult irradiation-induced T-cell lymphoma, tumors arising after irradiation from infancy suffer a second hit in Pten by mis-segregation or recombination. This is the first report showing an influence of age-at-exposure on genomic alterations of tumor suppressor genes and their relative involvement in radiation-induced T-cell lymphoma. These data are important for considering the risks associated with childhood exposure to radiation

  1. The effect of age at exposure on the inactivating mechanisms and relative contributions of key tumor suppressor genes in radiation-induced mouse T-cell lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunaoshi, Masaaki [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Amasaki, Yoshiko; Hirano-Sakairi, Shinobu; Blyth, Benjamin J. [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Morioka, Takamitsu [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kaminishi, Mutsumi [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shang, Yi [Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tachibana, Akira [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); and others

    2015-09-15

    a and Ikaros are a prominent feature of young adult irradiation-induced T-cell lymphoma, tumors arising after irradiation from infancy suffer a second hit in Pten by mis-segregation or recombination. This is the first report showing an influence of age-at-exposure on genomic alterations of tumor suppressor genes and their relative involvement in radiation-induced T-cell lymphoma. These data are important for considering the risks associated with childhood exposure to radiation.

  2. Self-association of the WT1 tumor suppressor gene product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruening, W.; Nakagama, H.: Bardessy, N. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Wilms` tumor (WT), an embryonal malignancy of the kidney, occurs most frequently in children under the age of 5 years, affecting {approximately}1 in 10,000 individuals. The WT1 tumor suppressor gene, residing at 11p13, is structurally altered in {approximately}10-15% of WT cases. Individuals with germline mutations within the WT1 gene suffer from predisposition to WT and developmental defects of the urogenital system. Patients with heterozygous deletions of the WT1 gene, or mutations predicted to cause inactivation of one WT1 allele, suffer relatively mild genital system defects (notably hypospadias and cryptorchidism in males) and a predisposition to WT. These results suggest that developing genital system development is sensitive to the absolute concentrations of the WT1 gene products. Patients with missense mutations within the WT1 gene, however, can suffer from a much more severe disorder known as Denys-Drash syndrome (DDS). This syndrome is characterized by intersex disorders, renal nephropathy, and a predisposition to WTs. The increased severity of the developmental defects associated with DDS, compared to those individuals with mild genital system anomalies and WTs, suggests that mutations defined in patients with DDS behave in a dominant-negative fashion. We have identified a novel WT1 mutation in a patient with DDS. This mutation, predicted to produce a truncated WT1 polypeptide encompassing exons 1, 2, and 3, defines a domain capable of behaving as an antimorph. We have also demonstrated that WT1 can self-associate in vivo using yeast two-hybrid systems. Deletion analysis have mapped the interacting domains to the amino terminus of the WT1 polypeptide, within exons 1 and 2. These results provide a molecular mechanism to explain how WT1 mutations can function in a dominant-negative fashion to eliminate wild-type WT1 activity, leading to DDS.

  3. Tumor suppressor gene P53 in fish species as a target for genotoxic effects monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusser, W.C.; Brand, D.; Glickman, B.W. [Univ. of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Cretney, W.

    1995-12-31

    Analysis of environmentally induced molecular changes in DNA from fish was initiated with a study of tumor suppressor gene p53. This gene was chosen because of the high number of documented mutations in p53 from humans and their relevance in tumorigenesis. Bottom-feeding flatfish (e.g. English sole, Pleuronectes vetulus) and members of the salmonid family (e.g. rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss and chinook salmon, O. tschaaytsha) were chosen, because they are widespread and of commercial and recreational importance. The studies include the use of histopathological, biochemical, and molecular genetic tools in aquatic systems. The authors are currently examining the deposition of DNA damage and mutation in the p53 gene in fish. Parallel histopathology of liver showed idiopathic liver lesions that were strongly dependent on location of capture (0.01 < p(X{sup 2} 0.05, 2 > 6.89) < 0.025) with a prevalence of 30% for fish collected from the vicinity of pulp mills. To assess DNA damage and mutation analysis, DNA was extracted from fish liver. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing of the p53 gene was performed for rainbow trout, chinook and sockeye salmon, O. nerka. Southern blotting with a labeled p53 probe from rainbow trout was performed using genomic DNA from various teleost fish species. The presence of p53 could be shown in all fish species examined, including salmonids and sentinel species for environmental monitoring like English sole and white sucker (Catostomus commersom). To correlate histopathology with molecular analysis the authors initiated the determination of DNA damage, DNA adducts and mutations in the p53 gene (conserved exons 5 to 9).

  4. The tumor suppressors p33ING1 and p33ING2 interact with alien in vivo and enhance alien-mediated gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegers, Inga; Kob, Robert; Eckey, Maren; Schmidt, Oliver; Goeman, Frauke; Papaioannou, Maria; Escher, Niko; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Melle, Christian; Baniahmad, Aria

    2007-11-01

    The tumor suppressor p33ING1 is involved in DNA repair and cell cycle regulation. Furthermore, p33ING1 is a transcriptional silencer that recognizes the histone mark for trimethylated lysine 4 at histone H3. Interestingly, expression of p33ING1 and p33ING2 is able to induce premature senescence in primary human fibroblasts. The corepressor Alien is involved in gene silencing mediated by selected members of nuclear hormone receptors. In addition, Alien acts as a corepressor for E2F1, a member of the E2F cell cycle regulatory family. Furthermore, recent findings suggest that Alien is complexed with transcription factors participating in DNA repair and chromatin. Here, using a proteomic approach by surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization and mass spectrometry (SELDI-MS) combined with immunological techniques, we show that Alien interacts in vivo with the tumor suppressor p33ING1 as well as with the related tumor suppressor candidate p33ING2. The interaction of Alien with p33ING1 and p33ING2 was confirmed in vitro with GST-pull-down, suggesting a direct binding of Alien to these factors. The binding domain was mapped to a central region of Alien. Functionally, the expression of p33ING1 or p33ING2 enhances the Alien-mediated silencing, suggesting that the interaction plays a role in transcriptional regulation. Thus, the findings suggest that the identified interaction between Alien and the tumor suppressors p33ING1 and p33ING2 reveals a novel cellular protein network.

  5. gld-1, a tumor suppressor gene required for oocyte development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, R.; Schedl, T. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Barton, M.K.; Kimble, J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-02-01

    We have characterized 31 mutations in the gld-1 (defective in germline development) gene of Caenorhabditis elegans. In gld-1 (null) hermaphrodites, oogenesis is abolished and a germline tumor forms where oocyte development would normally occur. By contrast, gld-1 (null) males are unaffected. The hermaphrodite germline tumor appears to derive from germ cells that enter the meiotic pathway normally but then exit pachytene and return to the mitotic cycle. Certain gld-1 partial loss-of-function mutations also abolish oogenesis, but germ cells arrest in pachytene rather than returning to mitosis. Our results indicate that gld-1 is a tumor suppressor gene required for oocyte development. The tumorous phenotype suggests that gld-1(+) may function to negatively regulate proliferation during meiotic prophase and/or act to direct progression through meiotic prophase. We also show that gld-1(+) has an additional nonessential role in germline sex determination: promotion of hermaphrodite spermatogenesis. This function of gld-1 is inferred from a haplo-insufficient phenotype and from the properties of gain-of-function gld-1 mutations that cause alterations in the sexual identity of germ cells. 69 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. PU.1 is a major transcriptional activator of the tumour suppressor gene LIMD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxler, Daniel E; James, Victoria; Shelton, Samuel J; Vallim, Thomas Q de A; Shaw, Peter E; Sharp, Tyson V

    2011-04-06

    LIMD1 is a tumour suppressor gene (TSG) down regulated in ∼80% of lung cancers with loss also demonstrated in breast and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. LIMD1 is also a candidate TSG in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Mechanistically, LIMD1 interacts with pRB, repressing E2F-driven transcription as well as being a critical component of microRNA-mediated gene silencing. In this study we show a CpG island within the LIMD1 promoter contains a conserved binding motif for the transcription factor PU.1. Mutation of the PU.1 consensus reduced promoter driven transcription by 90%. ChIP and EMSA analysis demonstrated that PU.1 specifically binds to the LIMD1 promoter. siRNA depletion of PU.1 significantly reduced endogenous LIMD1 expression, demonstrating that PU.1 is a major transcriptional activator of LIMD1. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding the tumor suppressor Pten predisposes zebrafish to hemangiosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suma Choorapoikayil

    2012-03-01

    PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that antagonizes Akt/PKB signaling. The zebrafish genome encodes two Pten genes, ptena and ptenb. Here, we report that zebrafish mutants that retain a single wild-type copy of ptena or ptenb (ptena+/−ptenb−/− or ptena−/−ptenb+/− are viable and fertile. ptena+/−ptenb−/− fish develop tumors at a relatively high incidence (10.2% and most tumors developed close to the eye (26/30. Histopathologically, the tumor masses were associated with the retrobulbar vascular network and diagnosed as hemangiosarcomas. A single tumor was identified in 42 ptena−/−ptenb+/− fish and was also diagnosed as hemangiosarcoma. Immunohistochemistry indicated that the tumor cells in ptena+/−ptenb−/− and ptena−/−ptenb+/− fish proliferated rapidly and were of endothelial origin. Akt/PKB signaling was activated in the tumors, whereas Ptena was still detected in tumor tissue from ptena+/−ptenb−/− zebrafish. We conclude that haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding Pten predisposes to hemangiosarcoma in zebrafish.

  8. The PTEN tumor suppressor gene and its role in lymphoma pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Huang, Huiqiang; Young, Ken H.

    2015-01-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog gene PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancer. Loss of PTEN function occurs in a variety of human cancers via its mutation, deletion, transcriptional silencing, or protein instability. PTEN deficiency in cancer has been associated with advanced disease, chemotherapy resistance, and poor survival. Impaired PTEN function, which antagonizes phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling, causes the accumulation of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate and thereby the suppression of downstream components of the PI3K pathway, including the protein kinase B and mammalian target of rapamycin kinases. In addition to having lipid phosphorylation activity, PTEN has critical roles in the regulation of genomic instability, DNA repair, stem cell self-renewal, cellular senescence, and cell migration. Although PTEN deficiency in solid tumors has been studied extensively, rare studies have investigated PTEN alteration in lymphoid malignancies. However, genomic or epigenomic aberrations of PTEN and dysregulated signaling are likely critical in lymphoma pathogenesis and progression. This review provides updated summary on the role of PTEN deficiency in human cancers, specifically in lymphoid malignancies; the molecular mechanisms of PTEN regulation; and the distinct functions of nuclear PTEN. Therapeutic strategies for rescuing PTEN deficiency in human cancers are proposed. PMID:26655726

  9. Fish Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS): Gene Discovery, Modulation of Expression and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiehui; Gorgoglione, Bartolomeo; Maehr, Tanja; Holland, Jason W.; Vecino, Jose L. González; Wadsworth, Simon; Secombes, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    The intracellular suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family members, including CISH and SOCS1 to 7 in mammals, are important regulators of cytokine signaling pathways. So far, the orthologues of all the eight mammalian SOCS members have been identified in fish, with several of them having multiple copies. Whilst fish CISH, SOCS3, and SOCS5 paralogues are possibly the result of the fish-specific whole genome duplication event, gene duplication or lineage-specific genome duplication may also contribute to some paralogues, as with the three trout SOCS2s and three zebrafish SOCS5s. Fish SOCS genes are broadly expressed and also show species-specific expression patterns. They can be upregulated by cytokines, such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-21, by immune stimulants such as LPS, poly I:C, and PMA, as well as by viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections in member- and species-dependent manners. Initial functional studies demonstrate conserved mechanisms of fish SOCS action via JAK/STAT pathways. PMID:22203897

  10. Haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding the tumor suppressor Pten predisposes zebrafish to hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choorapoikayil, Suma; Kuiper, Raoul V; de Bruin, Alain; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2012-03-01

    PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that antagonizes Akt/PKB signaling. The zebrafish genome encodes two Pten genes, ptena and ptenb. Here, we report that zebrafish mutants that retain a single wild-type copy of ptena or ptenb (ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) or ptena(-/-)ptenb(+/-)) are viable and fertile. ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) fish develop tumors at a relatively high incidence (10.2%) and most tumors developed close to the eye (26/30). Histopathologically, the tumor masses were associated with the retrobulbar vascular network and diagnosed as hemangiosarcomas. A single tumor was identified in 42 ptena(-/-)ptenb(+/-) fish and was also diagnosed as hemangiosarcoma. Immunohistochemistry indicated that the tumor cells in ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) and ptena(-/-)ptenb(+/-) fish proliferated rapidly and were of endothelial origin. Akt/PKB signaling was activated in the tumors, whereas Ptena was still detected in tumor tissue from ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) zebrafish. We conclude that haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding Pten predisposes to hemangiosarcoma in zebrafish.

  11. Analysis of loss of heterozygosity of the tumor suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarial carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luković Ljiljana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/aim: Among the genes involved in ovarian carcinogenesis, there has been increased interest in tumor-suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1. Both of the genes make control of cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. The p53 is a "genome guardian" inactivated in more than 50% of human cancers, while BRCA1 mutations are found mostly in breast and ovarian cancer. The aim of this investigation was to establish the frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH in the regions of the genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarian carcinomas, and to analyze the association of LOH with the disease stage and prognosis. Methods. We analyzed 20 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of epithelilal ovarian carcinoma. DNA for molecular-genetic analysis was extracted from the tumor tissue and blood as normal tissue of each person. Microsatellite markers of the regions of genes p53 and BRCA1 were amplified by PCR method. The determination of allelic status of microsatellites and detection of LOH was performed after PAA gel electroforesis. Results. Both of the analyzed microsatellite markers were informative in 13/20 (65% cases. In the region of gene p53, LOH was established in 4/13 (30.7% tumors. One of them had histological gradus G1, one had gradus G2, and two of them had gradus G3, while all were with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO IIIc stage. In the region of gene BRCA1, LOH was detected in 5/13 (38.5% tumors. Four of them had histological gradus G2, and one had gradus G3, while by the (FIGO classification one was with stage Ib, one was with stage IIIb, while the three were with stage IIIc. LOH in both of the analyzed regions was detected in one tumor (7.7%, with histological gradus G3 and the FIGO IIIc stage. Conclusion. The frequency of LOH in epthelial ovarian carcinomas was 30.7% and 38.5% for p53 and BRCA1 gene regions, respectively. Most of tumors with LOH had histological gradus G2 or G3, and the clinical FIGO stage IIIc, suggesting the

  12. [Analysis of loss of heterozygosity of the tumor suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarial carcinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Bojana; Perović, Milica; Novaković, Ivana; Atanacković, Jasmina; Popović, Branka; Luković, Ljiljana; Petković, Spasoje

    2006-09-01

    Among the genes involved in ovarian carcinogenesis, there has been increased interest in tumor-suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1. Both of the genes make control of cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. The p53 is a "genome guardian" inactivated in more than 50% of human cancers, while BRCA1 mutations are found mostly in breast and ovarian cancer. The aim of this investigation was to establish the frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the regions of the genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarian carcinomas, and to analyze the association of LOH with the disease stage and prognosis. We analyzed 20 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of epithelilal ovarian carcinoma. DNA for molecular-genetic analysis was extracted from the tumor tissue and blood as normal tissue of each person. Microsatellite markers of the regions of genes p53 and BRCA1 were amplified by PCR method. The determination of allelic status of microsatellites and detection of LOH was performed after PAA gel electroforesis. Both of the analyzed microsatellite markers were informative in 13/20 (65%) cases. In the region of gene p53, LOH was established in 4/13 (30.7%) tumors. One of them had histological gradus G1, one had gradus G2, and two of them had gradus G3, while all were with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) IIIc stage. In the region of gene BRCA1, LOH was detected in 5/13 (38.5%) tumors. Four of them had histological gradus G2, and one had gradus G3, while by the (FIGO) classification one was with stage Ib, one was with stage IIIb, while the three were with stage IlIc. LOH in both of the analyzed regions was detected in one tumor (7.70), with histological gradus G3 and the FIGO IIIc stage. The frequency of LOH in epthelial ovarian carcinomas was 30.7% and 38.5% for p53 and BRCA1 gene regions, respectively. Most of tumors with LOH had histological gradus G2 or G3, and the clinical FIGO stage IIIc, suggesting the association of this occurrence with a later phase of the disease.

  13. Inactivation of the FLCN tumor suppressor gene induces TFE3 transcriptional activity by increasing its nuclear localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Beom Hong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in a tumor suppressor gene FLCN lead to development of fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts and renal cell carcinoma (RCC in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome. TFE3 is a member of the MiTF/TFE transcription factor family and Xp11.2 translocations found in sporadic RCC involving TFE3 result in gene fusions and overexpression of chimeric fusion proteins that retain the C-terminal DNA binding domain of TFE3. We found that GPNMB expression, which is regulated by MiTF, was greatly elevated in renal cancer cells harboring either TFE3 translocations or FLCN inactivation. Since TFE3 is implicated in RCC, we hypothesized that elevated GPNMB expression was due to increased TFE3 activity resulting from the inactivation of FLCN.TFE3 knockdown reduced GPNMB expression in renal cancer cells harboring either TFE3 translocations or FLCN inactivation. Moreover, FLCN knockdown induced GPNMB expression in FLCN-restored renal cancer cells. Conversely, wildtype FLCN suppressed GPNMB expression in FLCN-null cells. FLCN inactivation was correlated with increased TFE3 transcriptional activity accompanied by its nuclear localization as revealed by elevated GPNMB mRNA and protein expression, and predominantly nuclear immunostaining of TFE3 in renal cancer cells, mouse embryo fibroblast cells, mouse kidneys and mouse and human renal tumors. Nuclear localization of TFE3 was associated with TFE3 post-translational modifications including decreased phosphorylation.Increased TFE3 activity is a downstream event induced by FLCN inactivation and is likely to be important for renal tumor development. This study provides an important novel mechanism for induction of TFE3 activity in addition to TFE3 overexpression resulting from Xp11.2 translocations, suggesting that TFE3 may be more broadly involved in tumorigenesis.

  14. miR-203 Acts as a Tumor Suppressor Gene in Osteosarcoma by Regulating RAB22A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Yang

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs, small noncoding RNAs of 19-25 nt, play an important roles in the pathological processes of tumorigenesis. The object of this study was to study the expression and function of miR-203 and to found its target gene in osteosarcoma. In our study, we found the expression level of miR-203 was significantly downregulated in osteosarcoma cell lines and tissues. In addition, overexpression of miR-203 inhibited the osteosarcoma cell proliferation and migration and inhibited Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial reversion Transition (MErT. Moreover, we identified RAB22A as a direct target of miR-203 and RAB22A overexpression blocks the roles of miR-203 in osteosarcoma cell. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RAB22A expression was upregulated in human osteosarcoma cell lines and tissues. Take together, our results demonstrated that miR-203 act as a tumor suppressor miRNA through regulating RAB22A expression and suggested its involvement in osteosarcoma progression and carcinogenesis.

  15. ERα Mediates Estrogen-Induced Expression of the Breast Cancer Metastasis Suppressor Gene BRMS1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, estrogen has been reported as putatively inhibiting cancer cell invasion and motility. This information is in direct contrast to the paradigm of estrogen as a tumor promoter. However, data suggests that the effects of estrogen are modulated by the receptor isoform with which it interacts. In order to gain a clearer understanding of the role of estrogen in potentially suppressing breast cancer metastasis, we investigated the regulation of estrogen and its receptor on the downstream target gene, breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 (BRMS1 in MCF-7, SKBR3, TTU-1 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Our results showed that estrogen increased the transcription and expression of BRMS1 in the ERα positive breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. Additionally, the ERα specific agonist PPT also induced the transcription and expression of BRMS1. However, the two remaining estrogen receptor (ER subtype agonists had no effect on BRMS1 expression. In order to further examine the influence of ERα on BRMS1 expression, ERα expression was knocked down using siRNA (siERα. Western blot analysis showed that siERα reduced estrogen-induced and PPT-induced BRMS1 expression. In summary, this study demonstrates estrogen, via its α receptor, positively regulates the expression of BRMS1, providing new insight into a potential inhibitory effect of estrogen on metastasis suppression.

  16. Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and cancer therapy: An evolutionary game theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem, Heydar; Kebriaei, Hamed; Veisi, Zahra

    2017-06-01

    Inactivation of alleles in tumor suppressor genes (TSG) is one of the important issues resulting in evolution of cancerous cells. In this paper, the evolution of healthy, one and two missed allele cells is modeled using the concept of evolutionary game theory and replicator dynamics. The proposed model also takes into account the interaction rates of the cells as designing parameters of the system. Different combinations of the equilibrium points of the parameterized nonlinear system is studied and categorized into some cases. In each case, the interaction rates' values are suggested in a way that the equilibrium points of the replicator dynamics are located on an appropriate region of the state space. Based on the suggested interaction rates, it is proved that the system doesn't have any undesirable interior equilibrium point as well. Therefore, the system will converge to the desirable region, where there is a scanty level of cancerous cells. In addition, the proposed conditions for interaction rates guarantee that, when a trajectory of the system reaches the boundaries, then it will stay there forever which is a desirable property since the equilibrium points have been already located on the boundaries, appropriately. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the suggestions in the elimination of the cancerous cells in different scenarios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hypermethylation of the 16q23.1 Tumor Suppressor Gene ADAMTS18 in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify tumor suppressor genes (TSGs silenced by hypermethylation and discover new epigenetic biomarkers for early cancer detection. ADAMTS18, located at 16q23.1, has been reported to be a critical TSG in multiple primary tumors; however, this has not yet been verified in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC. We explored epigenetic alterations in this gene in ccRCC and analyzed possible clinicopathological associations. We examined ADAMTS18 gene expression and methylation by semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP in 5 ccRCC-derived cell lines before and after treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AzaC. MSP was further performed for 101 ccRCC primary tumors and 20 adjacent normal tissues. Some cell lines and specimens were examined by subsequent bisulfite genomic sequencing (BGS and real-time PCR. Further, we analyzed the relationship between the ADAMTS18 gene methylation and clinicopathological features, including short-term disease-free survival (DFS, in patients with ccRCC. ADAMTS18 down-regulation and hypermethylation were detected in the ccRCC-derived cell lines using RT-PCR and MSP. Treatment with 5-AzaC reversed the hypermethylation of the ADAMTS18 gene and restored its expression. Hypermethylation was further detected in 44 of 101 (43.6% primary tumors and 3 of 20 (15.0% adjacent normal tissues. However, a significant difference between both groups was observed (p = 0.02. BGS analysis and real-time PCR were subsequently performed to confirm the results of RT-PCR and MSP. Furthermore, the methylation status of ADAMTS18 was not significantly associated with gender, age, location, tumor diameter, pathological stage, nuclear grade or short-term DFS in patients with ccRCC (p > 0.05. The ADAMTS18 gene is often down-regulated by hypermethylation in ccRCC-derived cell lines and primary tumors, indicating its critical role as a TSG in ccRCC. We conclude that ADAMTS18

  18. Tumor suppressors: enhancers or suppressors of regeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantz, Jason H.; Blau, Helen M.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor suppressors are so named because cancers occur in their absence, but these genes also have important functions in development, metabolism and tissue homeostasis. Here, we discuss known and potential functions of tumor suppressor genes during tissue regeneration, focusing on the evolutionarily conserved tumor suppressors pRb1, p53, Pten and Hippo. We propose that their activity is essential for tissue regeneration. This is in contrast to suggestions that tumor suppression is a trade-off for regenerative capacity. We also hypothesize that certain aspects of tumor suppressor pathways inhibit regenerative processes in mammals, and that transient targeted modification of these pathways could be fruitfully exploited to enhance processes that are important to regenerative medicine. PMID:23715544

  19. HC-Pro silencing suppressor significantly alters the gene expression profile in tobacco leaves and flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehto Kirsi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA silencing is used in plants as a major defence mechanism against invasive nucleic acids, such as viruses. Accordingly, plant viruses have evolved to produce counter defensive RNA-silencing suppressors (RSSs. These factors interfere in various ways with the RNA silencing machinery in cells, and thereby disturb the microRNA (miRNA mediated endogene regulation and induce developmental and morphological changes in plants. In this study we have explored these effects using previously characterized transgenic tobacco plants which constitutively express (under CaMV 35S promoter the helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro derived from a potyviral genome. The transcript levels of leaves and flowers of these plants were analysed using microarray techniques (Tobacco 4 × 44 k, Agilent. Results Over expression of HC-Pro RSS induced clear phenotypic changes both in growth rate and in leaf and flower morphology of the tobacco plants. The expression of 748 and 332 genes was significantly changed in the leaves and flowers, respectively, in the HC-Pro expressing transgenic plants. Interestingly, these transcriptome alterations in the HC-Pro expressing tobacco plants were similar as those previously detected in plants infected with ssRNA-viruses. Particularly, many defense-related and hormone-responsive genes (e.g. ethylene responsive transcription factor 1, ERF1 were differentially regulated in these plants. Also the expression of several stress-related genes, and genes related to cell wall modifications, protein processing, transcriptional regulation and photosynthesis were strongly altered. Moreover, genes regulating circadian cycle and flowering time were significantly altered, which may have induced a late flowering phenotype in HC-Pro expressing plants. The results also suggest that photosynthetic oxygen evolution, sugar metabolism and energy levels were significantly changed in these transgenic plants. Transcript levels of S

  20. 99: A Novel Myc-Interacting Protein with Features of a Breast Tumor Suppressor Gene Product

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prendergast, George

    1997-01-01

    Bin1 is a novel tumor suppressor-like molecule we identified through its ability to interact with and inhibit the oncogenic activity of the Myc oncoprotein, which is widely deregulated in breast cancer...

  1. Functional Analysis of Chromosome 18 in Pancreatic Cancer: Strong Evidence for New Tumour Suppressor Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu P. Lefter

    2004-04-01

    Conclusion: These data represent strong functional evidence that chromosome 18q encodes strong tumour and metastasis suppressor activity that is able to switch human pancreatic cancer cells to a dormant phenotype.

  2. Analysis of the Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4) tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Sally J; Choong, David YH; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Ryland, Georgina L; Campbell, Ian G; Gorringe, Kylie L

    2011-01-01

    MAP2K4 is a putative tumor and metastasis suppressor gene frequently found to be deleted in various cancer types. We aimed to conduct a comprehensive analysis of this gene to assess its involvement in ovarian cancer. We screened for mutations in MAP2K4 using High Resolution Melt analysis of 149 primary ovarian tumors and methylation at the promoter using Methylation-Specific Single-Stranded Conformation Polymorphism analysis of 39 tumors. We also considered the clinical impact of changes in MAP2K4 using publicly available expression and copy number array data. Finally, we used siRNA to measure the effect of reducing MAP2K4 expression in cell lines. In addition to 4 previously detected homozygous deletions, we identified a homozygous 16 bp truncating deletion and a heterozygous 4 bp deletion, each in one ovarian tumor. No promoter methylation was detected. The frequency of MAP2K4 homozygous inactivation was 5.6% overall, and 9.8% in high-grade serous cases. Hemizygous deletion of MAP2K4 was observed in 38% of samples. There were significant correlations of copy number and expression in three microarray data sets. There was a significant correlation between MAP2K4 expression and overall survival in one expression array data set, but this was not confirmed in an independent set. Treatment of JAM and HOSE6.3 cell lines with MAP2K4 siRNA showed some reduction in proliferation. MAP2K4 is targeted by genetic inactivation in ovarian cancer and restricted to high grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas in our cohort

  3. Role of tumor suppressor genes in the cancer-associated reprogramming of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Chu; Murayama, Yoshinobu; Hashimoto, Koichiro; Nakamura, Yukio; Lin, Chang-Shin; Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Saito, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    Because of their pluripotent characteristics, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) possess great potential for therapeutic application and for the study of degenerative disorders. These cells are generated from normal somatic cells, multipotent stem cells, or cancer cells. They express embryonic stem cell markers, such as OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, and REX1, and can differentiate into all adult tissue types, both in vitro and in vivo. However, some of the pluripotency-promoting factors have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Here, we describe the merits of tumor suppresser genes as reprogramming factors for the generation of iPSCs without tumorigenic activity. The initial step of reprogramming is induction of the exogenous pluripotent factors to generate the oxidative stress that leads to senescence by DNA damage and metabolic stresses, thus inducing the expression of tumor suppressor genes such as p21CIP1 and p16INK4a through the activation of p53 to be the pre-induced pluripotent stem cells (pre-iPSCs). The later stage includes overcoming the barrier of reprogramming-induced senescence or cell-cycle arrest by shutting off the function of these tumor suppressor genes, followed by the induction of endogenous stemness genes for the full commitment of iPSCs (full-iPSCs). Thus, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by oxidative stress might be critical for the induction of endogenous reprogramming-factor genes via epigenetic changes or antioxidant reactions. We also discuss the critical role of tumor suppressor genes in the evaluation of the tumorigenicity of human cancer cell-derived pluripotent stem cells, and describe how to overcome their tumorigenic properties for application in stem cell therapy in the field of regenerative medicine.

  4. Thrombospondin-4 is a putative tumour-suppressor gene in colorectal cancer that exhibits age-related methylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greco, Sonia A; Leggett, Barbara A; Whitehall, Vicki LJ; Chia, June; Inglis, Kelly J; Cozzi, Sarah-Jane; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Buttenshaw, Ronald L; Spring, Kevin J; Boyle, Glen M; Worthley, Daniel L

    2010-01-01

    Thrombospondin-4 (THBS4) is a member of the extracellular calcium-binding protein family and is involved in cell adhesion and migration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential role of deregulation of THBS4 expression in colorectal carcinogenesis. Of particular interest was the possible silencing of expression by methylation of the CpG island in the gene promoter. Fifty-five sporadic colorectal tumours stratified for the CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) were studied. Immunohistochemical staining of THBS4 protein was assessed in normal and tumour specimens. Relative levels of THBS4 transcript expression in matched tumours and normal mucosa were also determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Colony forming ability was examined in 8 cell lines made to overexpress THBS4. Aberrant promoter hypermethylation was investigated as a possible mechanism of gene disruption using MethyLight. Methylation was also assessed in the normal colonic tissue of 99 patients, with samples biopsied from four regions along the length of the colon. THBS4 expression was significantly lower in tumour tissue than in matched normal tissue. Immunohistochemical examination demonstrated that THBS4 protein was generally absent from normal epithelial cells and tumours, but was occasionally expressed at low levels in the cytoplasm towards the luminal surface in vesicular structures. Forced THBS4 over-expression caused a 50-60% repression of tumour colony growth in all eight cell lines examined compared to control cell lines. Tumours exhibited significantly higher levels of methylation than matched normal mucosa, and THBS4 methylation correlated with the CpG island methylator phenotype. There was a trend towards decreased gene expression in tumours exhibiting high THBS4 methylation, but the correlation was not significant. THBS4 methylation was detectable in normal mucosal biopsies where it correlated with increasing patient age and negatively with the occurrence of adenomas elsewhere in the

  5. The Tumor Suppressor Gene, RASSF1A, Is Essential for Protection against Inflammation -Induced Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiteih, Yahya; Law, Jennifer; Volodko, Natalia; Mohamed, Anwar; El-Kadi, Ayman O. S.; Liu, Lei; Odenbach, Jeff; Thiesen, Aducio; Onyskiw, Christina; Ghazaleh, Haya Abu; Park, Jikyoung; Lee, Sean Bong; Yu, Victor C.; Fernandez-Patron, Carlos; Alexander, R. Todd; Wine, Eytan; Baksh, Shairaz

    2013-01-01

    Ras association domain family protein 1A (RASSF1A) is a tumor suppressor gene silenced in cancer. Here we report that RASSF1A is a novel regulator of intestinal inflammation as Rassf1a+/−, Rassf1a−/− and an intestinal epithelial cell specific knockout mouse (Rassf1a IEC-KO) rapidly became sick following dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) administration, a chemical inducer of colitis. Rassf1a knockout mice displayed clinical symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease including: increased intestinal permeability, enhanced cytokine/chemokine production, elevated nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells (NFκB) activity, elevated colonic cell death and epithelial cell injury. Furthermore, epithelial restitution/repair was inhibited in DSS-treated Rassf1a−/− mice with reduction of several makers of proliferation including Yes associated protein (YAP)-driven proliferation. Surprisingly, tyrosine phosphorylation of YAP was detected which coincided with increased nuclear p73 association, Bax-driven epithelial cell death and p53 accumulation resulting in enhanced apoptosis and poor survival of DSS-treated Rassf1a knockout mice. We can inhibit these events and promote the survival of DSS-treated Rassf1a knockout mice with intraperitoneal injection of the c-Abl and c-Abl related protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib/gleevec. However, p53 accumulation was not inhibited by imatinib/gleevec in the Rassf1a−/− background which revealed the importance of p53-dependent cell death during intestinal inflammation. These observations suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of YAP (to drive p73 association and up-regulation of pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax) and accumulation of p53 are consequences of inflammation-induced injury in DSS-treated Rassf1a−/− mice. Mechanistically, we can detect robust associations of RASSF1A with membrane proximal Toll-like receptor (TLR) components to suggest that RASSF1A may function to interfere and restrict TLR

  6. Regulation of the insulin-like developmental pathway of Caenorhabditis elegans by a homolog of the PTEN tumor suppressor gene

    OpenAIRE

    Gil, Elad B.; Malone Link, Elizabeth; Liu, Leo X.; Johnson, Carl D.; Lees, Jacqueline A.

    1999-01-01

    The human PTEN tumor suppressor gene is mutated in a wide variety of sporadic tumors. To determine the function of PTEN in vivo we have studied a PTEN homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans. We have generated a strong loss-of-function allele of the PTEN homolog and shown that the deficient strain is unable to enter dauer diapause. An insulin-like phosphatidylinositol 3-OH kinase (PI3′K) signaling pathway regulates dauer-stage entry. Mutations in either the daf-2 insulin receptor-like (IRL) gene or...

  7. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurayoshi, Kenta [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Ozono, Eiko [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary, University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom); Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Anschutz Medical Campus, 12800 East 19th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Komori, Hideyuki [Center for Stem Cell Biology, Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ohtani, Kiyoshi, E-mail: btm88939@kwansei.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • ARF promoter showed higher responsiveness to deregulated E2F activity than the E2F1 promoter. • ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specificity than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. • HSV-TK driven by ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity than that driven by E2F1 promoter. - Abstract: In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter

  8. Molecular Analysis: Microsatellite Instability and Loss of Heterozygosity of Tumor Suppressor Gene in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Hadžiavdić

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available HNPCC (Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer development is caused by mutation of genes included in system of mismatch repair genes. The mutation exists at 60% of patients in hMSH2 gene, 30% in hMLH1 and 10% both in hPMS1and hPMS2 genes. RER+ exists in about 90% in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer and about 15-28% in sporadic cancers.The purpose of the study was to determine highly sensitive microsatellite markers which can be fast and efficient way of microsatellite screening for detection of HNPCC patients. Moreover, we have analysed the loss of heterozygosity of tumour suppressor genes which could have the diagnostic value in detection of HPNCC patients.

  9. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis identifies MEGF10 as a novel epigenetically repressed candidate tumor suppressor gene in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, Jessica; Tomari, Ayumi; Dallosso, Anthony R; Szemes, Marianna; Kaselova, Martina; Curry, Thomas J; Almutairi, Bader; Etchevers, Heather C; McConville, Carmel; Malik, Karim T A; Brown, Keith W

    2017-04-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer in which many children still have poor outcomes, emphasising the need to better understand its pathogenesis. Despite recent genome-wide mutation analyses, many primary neuroblastomas do not contain recognizable driver mutations, implicating alternate molecular pathologies such as epigenetic alterations. To discover genes that become epigenetically deregulated during neuroblastoma tumorigenesis, we took the novel approach of comparing neuroblastomas to neural crest precursor cells, using genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. We identified 93 genes that were significantly differentially methylated of which 26 (28%) were hypermethylated and 67 (72%) were hypomethylated. Concentrating on hypermethylated genes to identify candidate tumor suppressor loci, we found the cell engulfment and adhesion factor gene MEGF10 to be epigenetically repressed by DNA hypermethylation or by H3K27/K9 methylation in neuroblastoma cell lines. MEGF10 showed significantly down-regulated expression in neuroblastoma tumor samples; furthermore patients with the lowest-expressing tumors had reduced relapse-free survival. Our functional studies showed that knock-down of MEGF10 expression in neuroblastoma cell lines promoted cell growth, consistent with MEGF10 acting as a clinically relevant, epigenetically deregulated neuroblastoma tumor suppressor gene. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Genome‐wide DNA methylation analysis identifies MEGF10 as a novel epigenetically repressed candidate tumor suppressor gene in neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, Jessica; Tomari, Ayumi; Dallosso, Anthony R.; Szemes, Marianna; Kaselova, Martina; Curry, Thomas J.; Almutairi, Bader; Etchevers, Heather C.; McConville, Carmel; Malik, Karim T. A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer in which many children still have poor outcomes, emphasising the need to better understand its pathogenesis. Despite recent genome‐wide mutation analyses, many primary neuroblastomas do not contain recognizable driver mutations, implicating alternate molecular pathologies such as epigenetic alterations. To discover genes that become epigenetically deregulated during neuroblastoma tumorigenesis, we took the novel approach of comparing neuroblastomas to neural crest precursor cells, using genome‐wide DNA methylation analysis. We identified 93 genes that were significantly differentially methylated of which 26 (28%) were hypermethylated and 67 (72%) were hypomethylated. Concentrating on hypermethylated genes to identify candidate tumor suppressor loci, we found the cell engulfment and adhesion factor gene MEGF10 to be epigenetically repressed by DNA hypermethylation or by H3K27/K9 methylation in neuroblastoma cell lines. MEGF10 showed significantly down‐regulated expression in neuroblastoma tumor samples; furthermore patients with the lowest‐expressing tumors had reduced relapse‐free survival. Our functional studies showed that knock‐down of MEGF10 expression in neuroblastoma cell lines promoted cell growth, consistent with MEGF10 acting as a clinically relevant, epigenetically deregulated neuroblastoma tumor suppressor gene. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27862318

  11. Differentially expressed genes and gene networks involved in pig ovarian follicular atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terenina, Elena; Fabre, Stephane; Bonnet, Agnès; Monniaux, Danielle; Robert-Granié, Christèle; SanCristobal, Magali; Sarry, Julien; Vignoles, Florence; Gondret, Florence; Monget, Philippe; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola

    2017-02-01

    Ovarian folliculogenesis corresponds to the development of follicles leading to either ovulation or degeneration, this latter process being called atresia. Even if atresia involves apoptosis, its mechanism is not well understood. The objective of this study was to analyze global gene expression in pig granulosa cells of ovarian follicles during atresia. The transcriptome analysis was performed on a 9,216 cDNA microarray to identify gene networks and candidate genes involved in pig ovarian follicular atresia. We found 1,684 significantly regulated genes to be differentially regulated between small healthy follicles and small atretic follicles. Among them, 287 genes had a fold-change higher than two between the two follicle groups. Eleven genes (DKK3, GADD45A, CAMTA2, CCDC80, DAPK2, ECSIT, MSMB, NUPR1, RUNX2, SAMD4A, and ZNF628) having a fold-change higher than five between groups could likely serve as markers of follicular atresia. Moreover, automatic confrontation of deregulated genes with literature data highlighted 93 genes as regulatory candidates of pig granulosa cell atresia. Among these genes known to be inhibitors of apoptosis, stimulators of apoptosis, or tumor suppressors INHBB, HNF4, CLU, different interleukins (IL5, IL24), TNF-associated receptor (TNFR1), and cytochrome-c oxidase (COX) were suggested as playing an important role in porcine atresia. The present study also enlists key upstream regulators in follicle atresia based on our results and on a literature review. The novel gene candidates and gene networks identified in the current study lead to a better understanding of the molecular regulation of ovarian follicular atresia. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Hypermethylation of the tumor suppressor gene PRDM1/Blimp-1 supports a pathogenetic role in EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, T; Ma, J; Nie, K; Yan, J; Liu, Y; Bacchi, C E; Queiroga, E M; Gualco, G; Sample, J T; Orazi, A; Knowles, D M; Tam, W

    2014-01-01

    PRDM1/Blimp-1 is a tumor suppressor gene in the activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Its inactivation contributes to pathogenesis in this setting by impairing terminal B-cell differentiation induced by constitutive nuclear factor-κB activation. The role of PRDM1 in Burkitt lymphoma (BL) lymphomagenesis is not known. Here we identified hypermethylation of the promoter region and exon 1 of PRDM1 in all six Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-positive BL cell lines and 12 of 23 (52%) primary EBV-positive BL or BL-related cases examined, but in none of the EBV-negative BL cell lines or primary tumors that we assessed, implying a tumor suppressor role for PRDM1 specifically in EBV-associated BL. A direct induction of PRDM1 hypermethylation by EBV is unlikely, as PRDM1 hypermethylation was not observed in EBV-immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines. Treatment of EBV-positive BL cells with 5′ azacytidine resulted in PRDM1 induction associated with PRDM1 demethylation, consistent with transcriptional silencing of PRDM1 as a result of DNA methylation. Overexpression of PRDM1 in EBV-positive BL cell lines resulted in cell cycle arrest. Our results expand the spectrum of lymphoid malignancies in which PRDM1 may have a tumor suppressor role and identify an epigenetic event that likely contributes to the pathogenesis of BL

  13. Hypermethylation of the tumor suppressor gene PRDM1/Blimp-1 supports a pathogenetic role in EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Ma, J; Nie, K; Yan, J; Liu, Y; Bacchi, C E; Queiroga, E M; Gualco, G; Sample, J T; Orazi, A; Knowles, D M; Tam, W

    2014-11-07

    PRDM1/Blimp-1 is a tumor suppressor gene in the activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Its inactivation contributes to pathogenesis in this setting by impairing terminal B-cell differentiation induced by constitutive nuclear factor-κB activation. The role of PRDM1 in Burkitt lymphoma (BL) lymphomagenesis is not known. Here we identified hypermethylation of the promoter region and exon 1 of PRDM1 in all six Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive BL cell lines and 12 of 23 (52%) primary EBV-positive BL or BL-related cases examined, but in none of the EBV-negative BL cell lines or primary tumors that we assessed, implying a tumor suppressor role for PRDM1 specifically in EBV-associated BL. A direct induction of PRDM1 hypermethylation by EBV is unlikely, as PRDM1 hypermethylation was not observed in EBV-immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines. Treatment of EBV-positive BL cells with 5' azacytidine resulted in PRDM1 induction associated with PRDM1 demethylation, consistent with transcriptional silencing of PRDM1 as a result of DNA methylation. Overexpression of PRDM1 in EBV-positive BL cell lines resulted in cell cycle arrest. Our results expand the spectrum of lymphoid malignancies in which PRDM1 may have a tumor suppressor role and identify an epigenetic event that likely contributes to the pathogenesis of BL.

  14. Clinical Utility of promoter methylation of the tumor suppressor genes DKK3, and RASSF1A in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa H. Saied

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: DNA methylation is the commonest known epigenetic change that results in silencing of tumor suppressor genes. Promoter methylation of tumor suppressor genes has the potential for early detection of breast cancer. Aim: Aim is to examine the potential usefulness of blood based methylation specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP of methylated DKK3 and RASSF1A genes in early detection of breast cancer. Method: Methylation status of DKK3 and RASSF1 was investigated in forty breast cancer patients, twenty fibroadenoma patients and twenty healthy ladies as control group using MSP. Results: Methylation of DKK3 promoter was found in 22.5% of breast cancer patients, while DKK3 methylation was absent in both fibroadenoma patients and control group. Similarly, methylation of RASSF1 promoter was found in 17.5% of breast cancer patients and in none of fibroadenoma and control group. Conclusion: Promoter methylation of DKK3 and RASSF1 was found in breast cancer patients while absent in control group suggesting that tumorspecific methylation of the two genes (DKK3 and RASSF1A might be a valuable biomarker for the early detection of breast cancer. Keywords: DNA methylation, Breast cancer, DKK3, RASSF1

  15. Exploring genes and pathways involved in migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eising, E.

    2017-01-01

    The research in this thesis was aimed at identifying genes and molecular pathways involved in migraine. To this end, two gene expression analyses were performed in brain tissue obtained from transgenic mouse models for familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), a monogenic subtype of migraine with aura.

  16. Apolipoprotein gene involved in lipid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Edward; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2007-07-03

    Methods and materials for studying the effects of a newly identified human gene, APOAV, and the corresponding mouse gene apoAV. The sequences of the genes are given, and transgenic animals which either contain the gene or have the endogenous gene knocked out are described. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene are described and characterized. It is demonstrated that certain SNPs are associated with diseases involving lipids and triglycerides and other metabolic diseases. These SNPs may be used alone or with SNPs from other genes to study individual risk factors. Methods for intervention in lipid diseases, including the screening of drugs to treat lipid-related or diabetic diseases are also disclosed.

  17. Grape seed proanthocyanidins reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes in human skin cancer cells by targeting epigenetic regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaid, Mudit; Prasad, Ram; Singh, Tripti; Jones, Virginia [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Katiyar, Santosh K., E-mail: skatiyar@uab.edu [Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) have been shown to have anti-skin carcinogenic effects in in vitro and in vivo models. However, the precise epigenetic molecular mechanisms remain unexplored. This study was designed to investigate whether GSPs reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes following epigenetic modifications in skin cancer cells. For this purpose, A431 and SCC13 human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were used as in vitro models. The effects of GSPs on DNA methylation, histone modifications and tumor suppressor gene expressions were studied in these cell lines using enzyme activity assays, western blotting, dot-blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that treatment of A431 and SCC13 cells with GSPs decreased the levels of: (i) global DNA methylation, (ii) 5-methylcytosine, (iii) DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and (iv) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b in these cells. Similar effects were noted when these cancer cells were treated identically with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. GSPs decreased histone deacetylase activity, increased levels of acetylated lysines 9 and 14 on histone H3 (H3-Lys 9 and 14) and acetylated lysines 5, 12 and 16 on histone H4, and reduced the levels of methylated H3-Lys 9. Further, GSP treatment resulted in re-expression of the mRNA and proteins of silenced tumor suppressor genes, RASSF1A, p16{sup INK4a} and Cip1/p21. Together, this study provides a new insight into the epigenetic mechanisms of GSPs and may have significant implications for epigenetic therapy in the treatment/prevention of skin cancers in humans. -- Highlights: ►Epigenetic modulations have been shown to have a role in cancer risk. ►Proanthocyanidins decrease the levels of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. ►Proanthocyanidins inhibit histone deacetylase activity in skin cancer cells. ►Proanthocyanidins reactivate tumor suppressor genes in skin

  18. Grape seed proanthocyanidins reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes in human skin cancer cells by targeting epigenetic regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaid, Mudit; Prasad, Ram; Singh, Tripti; Jones, Virginia; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2012-01-01

    Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) have been shown to have anti-skin carcinogenic effects in in vitro and in vivo models. However, the precise epigenetic molecular mechanisms remain unexplored. This study was designed to investigate whether GSPs reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes following epigenetic modifications in skin cancer cells. For this purpose, A431 and SCC13 human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were used as in vitro models. The effects of GSPs on DNA methylation, histone modifications and tumor suppressor gene expressions were studied in these cell lines using enzyme activity assays, western blotting, dot-blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that treatment of A431 and SCC13 cells with GSPs decreased the levels of: (i) global DNA methylation, (ii) 5-methylcytosine, (iii) DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and (iv) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b in these cells. Similar effects were noted when these cancer cells were treated identically with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. GSPs decreased histone deacetylase activity, increased levels of acetylated lysines 9 and 14 on histone H3 (H3-Lys 9 and 14) and acetylated lysines 5, 12 and 16 on histone H4, and reduced the levels of methylated H3-Lys 9. Further, GSP treatment resulted in re-expression of the mRNA and proteins of silenced tumor suppressor genes, RASSF1A, p16 INK4a and Cip1/p21. Together, this study provides a new insight into the epigenetic mechanisms of GSPs and may have significant implications for epigenetic therapy in the treatment/prevention of skin cancers in humans. -- Highlights: ►Epigenetic modulations have been shown to have a role in cancer risk. ►Proanthocyanidins decrease the levels of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. ►Proanthocyanidins inhibit histone deacetylase activity in skin cancer cells. ►Proanthocyanidins reactivate tumor suppressor genes in skin

  19. Phytochemical Compositions of Immature Wheat Bran, and Its Antioxidant Capacity, Cell Growth Inhibition, and Apoptosis Induction through Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Jeong Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the phytochemical compositions and antioxidant capacity, cell growth inhibition, and apoptosis induction in extracts of immature wheat bran. Immature wheat bran (IWB was obtained from immature wheat harvested 10 days earlier than mature wheat. The phytochemical compositions of bran extract samples were analyzed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography. The total ferulic acid (3.09 mg/g and p-coumaric acid (75 µg/g in IWB were significantly higher than in mature wheat bran (MWB, ferulic acid: 1.79 mg/g; p-coumaric acid: 55 µg/g. The oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC: 327 µM Trolox equivalents (TE/g and cellular antioxidant activity (CAA: 4.59 µM Quercetin equivalents (QE/g of the IWB were higher than those of the MWB (ORAC: 281 µM TE/g; CAA: 0.63 µM QE/g. When assessing cell proliferation, the IWB extracts resulted in the lowest EC50 values against HT-29 (18.9 mg/mL, Caco-2 (7.74 mg/mL, and HeLa cells (8.17 mg/mL among bran extract samples. Additionally, the IWB extracts increased the gene expression of p53 and PTEN (tumor suppressor genes in HT-29 cells, indicating inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis through tumor suppressor genes.

  20. Evidence of molecular alterations in the tumour suppressor gene WWOX in benign and malignant bone related lesions of the jaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Marina Gonçalves; Borges, Erica Rievrs; Pimenta, Flavio Juliano; De Mesquita Netto, Ana Carolina; De Marco, Luiz; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri

    2011-02-01

    WWOX is a tumour suppressor gene altered in various human neoplasms. Deletion of WWOX is associated with bone metabolic defects and development of osteosarcoma in mice. We hypothesized that alterations of this gene are associated with the development of benign and malignant mesenchymal bone related lesions of the jaws. We investigated WWOX mRNA by nested reverse transcription-PCR and direct sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR in two osteosarcoma, two fibrosarcoma, eight ossifying fibroma and two fibrous dysplasia fresh samples. Malignancy was associated with a decreased WWOX mRNA expression. Aberrant transcription pattern was found in five samples; however, the relative quantification (RQ) of the WWOX mRNA in such lesions was not different from those carrying only the wild-type. We provide new evidence of WWOX alterations in osteosarcomas and demonstrate for the first time alterations of this gene in fibrosarcomas as well as in ossifying fibromas of the jaws.

  1. The oncogenic transcription factor ERG represses the transcription of the tumour suppressor gene PTEN in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Patricia; Porazinski, Sean; Rajatileka, Shavanthi; Jumbe, Samantha; Hagen, Rachel; Cheung, Man-Kim; Wilson, Ian; Ladomery, Michael R

    2017-11-01

    The oncogene ETS-related gene (ERG) encodes a transcription factor with roles in the regulation of haematopoiesis, angiogenesis, vasculogenesis, inflammation, migration and invasion. The ERG oncogene is activated in >50% of prostate cancer cases, generally through a gene fusion with the androgen-responsive promoter of transmembrane protease serine 2. Phosphatase and tensin homologue ( PTEN ) is an important tumour suppressor gene that is often inactivated in cancer. ERG overexpression combined with PTEN inactivation or loss is often associated with aggressive prostate cancer. The present study aimed to determine whether or not ERG regulates PTEN transcription directly. ERG was demonstrated to bind to the PTEN promoter and repress its transcription. ERG overexpression reduced endogenous PTEN expression, whereas ERG knockdown increased PTEN expression. The ability of ERG to repress PTEN may contribute to a more cancer-permissive environment.

  2. Human umbilical cord matrix mesenchymal stem cells suppress the growth of breast cancer by expression of tumor suppressor genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Ohta

    Full Text Available Human and rat umbilical cord matrix mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSC possess the ability to control the growth of breast carcinoma cells. Comparative analyses of two types of UCMSC suggest that rat UCMSC-dependent growth regulation is significantly stronger than that of human UCMSC. Their different tumoricidal abilities were clarified by analyzing gene expression profiles in the two types of UCMSC. Microarray analysis revealed differential gene expression between untreated naïve UCMSC and those co-cultured with species-matched breast carcinoma cells. The analyses screened 17 differentially expressed genes that are commonly detected in both human and rat UCMSC. The comparison between the two sets of gene expression profiles identified two tumor suppressor genes, adipose-differentiation related protein (ADRP and follistatin (FST, that were specifically up-regulated in rat UCMSC, but down-regulated in human UCMSC when they were co-cultured with the corresponding species' breast carcinoma cells. Over-expression of FST, but not ADRP, in human UCMSC enhanced their ability to suppress the growth of MDA-231 cells. The growth of MDA-231 cells was also significantly lower when they were cultured in medium conditioned with FST, but not ADRP over-expressing human UCMSC. In the breast carcinoma lung metastasis model generated with MDA-231 cells, systemic treatment with FST-over-expressing human UCMSC significantly attenuated the tumor burden. These results suggest that FST may play an important role in exhibiting stronger tumoricidal ability in rat UCMSC than human UCMSC and also implies that human UCMSC can be transformed into stronger tumoricidal cells by enhancing tumor suppressor gene expression.

  3. KLF10, transforming growth factor-β-inducible early gene 1, acts as a tumor suppressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ki-Duk; Kim, Duk-Jung; Lee, Jong Eun; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Lee, Woon Kyu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► KLF10 −/− mice exhibited accelerated papilloma development after DMBA/TPA treatment. ► KLF10 −/− keratinocytes showed increased proliferation and apoptosis. ► KLF10 −/− MEFs yielded more colonies than wild-type one with H-Ras transfection. ► KLF10 dose-dependently activated p21 WAF1/CIP1 transcription. ► KLF10 is a tumor suppressor and that it targets p21 WAF1/CIP1 transcription. -- Abstract: Krüppel-like factor 10 (KLF10) has been suggested to be a putative tumor suppressor. In the present study, we generated KLF10 deficient mice to explore this hypothesis in vivo. KLF10 deficient mice exhibited increased predisposition to skin tumorigenesis and markedly accelerated papilloma development after DMBA/TPA treatment. On the other hand, KLF10 deficient keratinocytes showed increased proliferation and apoptosis. In colony formation assays after oncogenic H-Ras transfection, KLF10 deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) yielded more colonies than wild-type MEFs. Furthermore, KLF10 dose-dependently activated p21 WAF1/CIP1 transcription, which was independent of p53 and Sp1 binding sites in p21 WAF1/CIP1 promoter. This study demonstrates that KLF10 is a tumor suppressor and that it targets p21 WAF1/CIP1 transcription.

  4. Retinoid-induced expression and activity of an immediate early tumor suppressor gene in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Streb

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Retinoids are used clinically to treat a number of hyper-proliferative disorders and have been shown in experimental animals to attenuate vascular occlusive diseases, presumably through nuclear receptors bound to retinoic acid response elements (RARE located in target genes. Here, we show that natural or synthetic retinoids rapidly induce mRNA and protein expression of a specific isoform of A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 12 (AKAP12β in cultured smooth muscle cells (SMC as well as the intact vessel wall. Expression kinetics and actinomycin D studies indicate Akap12β is a retinoid-induced, immediate-early gene. Akap12β promoter analyses reveal a conserved RARE mildly induced with atRA in a region that exhibits hyper-acetylation. Immunofluorescence microscopy and protein kinase A (PKA regulatory subunit overlay assays in SMC suggest a physical association between AKAP12β and PKA following retinoid treatment. Consistent with its designation as a tumor suppressor, inducible expression of AKAP12β attenuates SMC growth in vitro. Further, immunohistochemistry studies establish marked decreases in AKAP12 expression in experimentally-injured vessels of mice as well as atheromatous lesions in humans. Collectively, these results demonstrate a novel role for retinoids in the induction of an AKAP tumor suppressor that blocks vascular SMC growth thus providing new molecular insight into how retiniods may exert their anti-proliferative effects in the injured vessel wall.

  5. Cholesterol and phytosterols differentially regulate the expression of caveolin 1 and a downstream prostate cell growth-suppressor gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifere, Godwin O.; Equan, Anita; Gordon, Kereen; Nagappan, Peri; Igietseme, Joseph U.; Ananaba, Godwin A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of our study was to show the distinction between the apoptotic and anti-proliferative signaling of phytosterols and cholesterol enrichment in prostate cancer cell lines, mediated by the differential transcription of caveolin-1, and N-myc downstream regulated gene1 (NDRG1), a pro-apoptotic androgen-regulated tumor suppressor. Methods PC-3 and DU145 cells were treated with sterols (cholesterol and phytosterols) for 72 h, followed by trypan blue dye exclusion measurement of necrosis and cell growth measured with a Coulter counter. Sterol induction of cell growth-suppressor gene expression was evaluated by mRNA transcription using RT-PCR, while cell cycle analysis was performed by FACS analysis. Altered expression of Ndrg1 protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Apoptosis was evaluated by real time RT-PCR amplification of P53, Bcl-2 gene and its related pro- and anti-apoptotic family members. Results Physiological doses (16 µM) of cholesterol and phytosterols were not cytotoxic in these cells. Cholesterol enrichment promoted cell growth (Pphytosterols significantly induced growth-suppression (Pphytosterols decreased mitotic subpopulations. We demonstrated for the first time that cholesterols concertedly attenuated the expression of caveolin-1(cav-1) and NDRG1 genes in both prostate cancer cell lines. Phytosterols had the opposite effect by inducing overexpression of cav-1, a known mediator of androgen-dependent signals that presumably control cell growth or apoptosis. Conclusions Cholesterol and phytosterol treatment differentially regulated the growth of prostate cancer cells and the expression of p53 and cav-1, a gene that regulates androgen-regulated signals. These sterols also differentially regulated cell cycle arrest, downstream pro-apoptotic androgen-regulated tumor-suppressor, NDRG1 suggesting that cav-1 may mediate pro-apoptotic NDRG1 signals. Elucidation of the mechanism for sterol modulation of growth and apoptosis signaling

  6. Analysis of losses of heterozygosity of the candidate tumour suppressor gene DMBT1 in melanoma resection specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deichmann, M; Mollenhauer, J; Helmke, B

    2002-01-01

    Deleted in malignant brain tumours 1 (DMBT1), a candidate tumour suppressor gene located on chromosome 10q25.3-q26.1, has recently been identified and found to be deleted in several different types of human tumours. In melanomas, the chromosomal region 10q22-qter is commonly affected by losses......, hence we screened primary melanoma samples for losses of heterozygosity (LOH), and acquired melanocytic naevi and melanomas for transcription of DMBT1 and protein expression. Of 38 informative melanomas, 1 nodular melanoma and 2 subcutaneous metastases showed LOH of both microsatellites flanking...... the gene, suggesting loss of 1 DMBT1 allele. Three further melanomas showed LOH at 1 informative locus but were heterozygous for the second marker. Applying reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), DMBT1 transcription was not found in melanomas. However, DMBT1 transcription was also absent...

  7. Effect of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene combined with radiation therapy on human lymphoma cells lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zeyang; Fan Wo; Li Dongqing; Zhu Ran; Wan Jianmei; Wang Yongqing; Wu Jinchang

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the inhibitory effect and radiation sensitization of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on human lymphoma cell lines. Human lymphoma cell lines were treated with rAd-p53, radiation therapy and combined treatment, respectively. The cell growth inhibition was assessed by MTF. The cell cycle and apoptosis were detected by flow cytometry, and the p53 protein expression was detected by Western blotting. The results showed that extrinsic p53 gene have expressed to some degree, but not at high level. The role of inhibition and radiation sensitivity of rAd-p53 was not significant to human lymphoma cell lines. (authors)

  8. Analysis of losses of heterozygosity of the candidate tumour suppressor gene DMBT1 in melanoma resection specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deichmann, M; Mollenhauer, J; Helmke, B

    2002-01-01

    , hence we screened primary melanoma samples for losses of heterozygosity (LOH), and acquired melanocytic naevi and melanomas for transcription of DMBT1 and protein expression. Of 38 informative melanomas, 1 nodular melanoma and 2 subcutaneous metastases showed LOH of both microsatellites flanking......Deleted in malignant brain tumours 1 (DMBT1), a candidate tumour suppressor gene located on chromosome 10q25.3-q26.1, has recently been identified and found to be deleted in several different types of human tumours. In melanomas, the chromosomal region 10q22-qter is commonly affected by losses...... the gene, suggesting loss of 1 DMBT1 allele. Three further melanomas showed LOH at 1 informative locus but were heterozygous for the second marker. Applying reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), DMBT1 transcription was not found in melanomas. However, DMBT1 transcription was also absent...

  9. A single mutation in the 15S rRNA gene confers nonsense suppressor activity and interacts with mRF1 the release factor in yeast mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gargouri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the mim3-1 mitochondrial ribosomal suppressor, acting on ochre mitochondrial mutations and one frameshift mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The 15s rRNA suppressor gene contains a G633 to C transversion. Yeast mitochondrial G633 corresponds to G517 of the E.coli 15S rRNA, which is occupied by an invariant G in all known small rRNA sequences. Interestingly, this mutation has occurred at the same position as the known MSU1 mitochondrial suppressor which changes G633 to A. The suppressor mutation lies in a highly conserved region of the rRNA, known in E.coli as the 530-loop, interacting with the S4, S5 and S12 ribosomal proteins. We also show an interesting interaction between the mitochondrial mim3-1 and the nuclear nam3-1 suppressors, both of which have the same action spectrum on mitochondrial mutations: nam3-1 abolishes the suppressor effect when present with mim3-1 in the same haploid cell. We discuss these results in the light of the nature of Nam3, identified by [1] as the yeast mitochondrial translation release factor. A hypothetical mechanism of suppression by "ribosome shifting" is also discussed in view of the nature of mutations suppressed and not suppressed.

  10. Multi-gene epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphoma cells; delayed expression of the p16 protein upon reversal of the silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagasawa, T; Zhang, Q; Raghunath, P N

    2006-01-01

    )-expressing T-cell lymphomas. p16 gene was epigenetically silenced in all but one of the 10 malignant T-cell lines examined, p15 gene silenced in roughly half of the lines, and p14 was the least frequently affected. Extensive methylation of the p16 promoter was seen in six out of 10 cutaneous T-cell lymphoma...... promoter demethylation and required up to 3 weeks to occur, seemingly reflecting late activation of the p16 gene. These findings indicate that epigenetic silencing affects in T-cell malignancies, often simultaneously, several tumor suppressor genes that impact on key cell functions. The observed...... differential silencing of p16 and p14, and to a lesser degree p15 gene, indicates that the silencing is governed by precise, promoter region-specific mechanisms. The study provides also further rationale for treatment of at least some types of T-cell lymphomas with DNA methyltransferase inhibitors to target...

  11. Structure of the Tetrameric p53 Tumor Suppressor Bound to DNA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marmorstein, Ronen

    2002-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor binds DNA as a tetramer to regulate the transcription of genes involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and alterations in the DNA-binding core domain of p53 are the most...

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with decreased expression of SLC5A8, a cancer suppressor gene, in young children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Orellana Manzano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori infects half of the world's population and causes gastric cancer in a subset of infected adults. Previous blood microarray findings showed that apparently healthy children, persistently infected with H. pylori have differential gene expression compared to age-matched, non-infected children. SLC5A8, a cancer suppressor gene with decreased expression among infected children, was chosen for further study based on bioinformatics analysis. Methods: A pilot study was conducted using specific qRT-PCR amplification of SLC5A8 in blood samples from H. pylori infected and non-infected children, followed by a larger, blinded, case-control study. We then analyzed gastric tissue from H. pylori infected and non-infected children undergoing endoscopy for clinical purposes. Results: Demographics, clinical findings and family history were similar between groups. SLC5A8 expression was decreased in infected versus non-infected children in blood, 0.12 (IQR: 0 – 0.89 versus 1.86 (IQR: 0 – 8.94, P=0.002, and in gastric tissue, 0.08 (IQR: 0.04 – 0.15 versus 1.88 (IQR: 0.55 – 2.56; P=0.001. Children who were both stool positive and seropositive for H. pylori had the lowest SLC5A8 expression levels.Conclusions: H. pylori infection is associated with suppression of SCL5A8, a cancer suppressor gene, in both blood and tissue samples from young children.

  13. Differential expression of the klf6 tumor suppressor gene upon cell damaging treatments in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrau, Ricardo C.; D'Astolfo, Diego S.; Andreoli, Veronica; Bocco, Jose L.; Koritschoner, Nicolas P.

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian Krueppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is involved in critical roles such as growth-related signal transduction, cell proliferation and differentiation, development, apoptosis and angiogenesis. Also, KLF6 appears to be an emerging key factor during cancer development and progression. Its expression is thoroughly regulated by several cell-damaging stimuli. DNA damaging agents at lethal concentrations induce a p53-independent down-regulation of the klf6 gene. To investigate the impact of external stimuli on human klf6 gene expression, its mRNA level was analyzed using a cancer cell line profiling array system, consisting in an assortment of immobilized cDNAs from multiple cell lines treated with several cell-damaging agents at growth inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 ). Cell-damaging agents affected the klf6 expression in 62% of the cDNA samples, though the expression pattern was not dependent on the cell origin type. Interestingly, significant differences (p 50 concentrations of physical and chemical stimuli in a p53-dependent manner. Most of these agents are frequently used in cancer therapy. Induction of klf6 expression in the absence of functional p53 directly correlates with cell death triggered by these compounds, whereas it is down-regulated in p53+/+ cells. Hence, klf6 expression level could represent a valuable marker for the efficiency of cell death upon cancer treatment.

  14. Differential expression of the klf6 tumor suppressor gene upon cell damaging treatments in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrau, Ricardo C.; D' Astolfo, Diego S.; Andreoli, Veronica [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Bocco, Jose L., E-mail: jbocco@fcq.unc.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Koritschoner, Nicolas P. [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2011-02-10

    The mammalian Krueppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is involved in critical roles such as growth-related signal transduction, cell proliferation and differentiation, development, apoptosis and angiogenesis. Also, KLF6 appears to be an emerging key factor during cancer development and progression. Its expression is thoroughly regulated by several cell-damaging stimuli. DNA damaging agents at lethal concentrations induce a p53-independent down-regulation of the klf6 gene. To investigate the impact of external stimuli on human klf6 gene expression, its mRNA level was analyzed using a cancer cell line profiling array system, consisting in an assortment of immobilized cDNAs from multiple cell lines treated with several cell-damaging agents at growth inhibitory concentrations (IC{sub 50}). Cell-damaging agents affected the klf6 expression in 62% of the cDNA samples, though the expression pattern was not dependent on the cell origin type. Interestingly, significant differences (p < 0.0001) in KLF6 mRNA levels were observed depending on the cellular p53 status upon cell damage. KLF6 expression was significantly increased in 63% of p53-deficient cells (122/195). Conversely, KLF6 mRNA level decreased nearly 4 fold in more than 70% of p53+/+ cells. In addition, klf6 gene promoter activity was down-regulated by DNA damaging agents in cells expressing the functional p53 protein whereas it was moderately increased in the absence of functional p53. Consistent results were obtained for the endogenous KLF6 protein level. Results indicate that human klf6 gene expression is responsive to external cell damage mediated by IC{sub 50} concentrations of physical and chemical stimuli in a p53-dependent manner. Most of these agents are frequently used in cancer therapy. Induction of klf6 expression in the absence of functional p53 directly correlates with cell death triggered by these compounds, whereas it is down-regulated in p53+/+ cells. Hence, klf6 expression level could represent a valuable

  15. The transformation suppressor gene Reck is required for postaxial patterning in mouse forelimbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mako Yamamoto

    2012-03-01

    The membrane-anchored metalloproteinase-regulator RECK has been characterized as a tumor suppressor. Here we report that mice with reduced Reck-expression show limb abnormalities including right-dominant, forelimb-specific defects in postaxial skeletal elements. The forelimb buds of low-Reck mutants have an altered dorsal ectoderm with reduced Wnt7a and Igf2 expression, and hypotrophy in two signaling centers (i.e., ZPA and AER that are essential for limb outgrowth and patterning. Reck is abundantly expressed in the anterior mesenchyme in normal limb buds; mesenchyme-specific Reck inactivation recapitulates the low-Reck phenotype; and some teratogens downregulate Reck in mesenchymal cells. Our findings illustrate a role for Reck in the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions essential for mammalian development.

  16. Genes involved in cell division in mycoplasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Alarcón, Frank; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro de; Yim, Lucia; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial cell division has been studied mainly in model systems such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, where it is described as a complex process with the participation of a group of proteins which assemble into a multiprotein complex called the septal ring. Mycoplasmas are cell wall-less bacteria presenting a reduced genome. Thus, it was important to compare their genomes to analyze putative genes involved in cell division processes. The division and cell wall (dcw) cluster, which ...

  17. Regulation of the insulin-like developmental pathway of Caenorhabditis elegans by a homolog of the PTEN tumor suppressor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, E B; Malone Link, E; Liu, L X; Johnson, C D; Lees, J A

    1999-03-16

    The human PTEN tumor suppressor gene is mutated in a wide variety of sporadic tumors. To determine the function of PTEN in vivo we have studied a PTEN homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans. We have generated a strong loss-of-function allele of the PTEN homolog and shown that the deficient strain is unable to enter dauer diapause. An insulin-like phosphatidylinositol 3-OH kinase (PI3'K) signaling pathway regulates dauer-stage entry. Mutations in either the daf-2 insulin receptor-like (IRL) gene or the age-1 encoded PI3'K catalytic subunit homolog cause constitutive dauer formation and also affect the life span, brood size, and metabolism of nondauer animals. Strikingly, loss-of-function mutations in the age-1 PI3'K and daf-2 IRL genes are suppressed by loss-of-function mutations in the PTEN homolog. We establish that the PTEN homolog is encoded by daf-18, a previously uncloned gene that has been shown to interact genetically with the DAF-2 IRL AGE-1 PI3'K signaling pathway. This interaction provides clear genetic evidence that PTEN acts to antagonize PI3'K function in vivo. Given the conservation of the PI3'K signaling pathway between C. elegans and mammals, the analysis of daf-18 PTEN mutant nematodes should shed light on the role of human PTEN in the etiology of metabolic disease, aging, and cancer.

  18. Re-expression of methylation-induced tumor suppressor gene silencing is associated with the state of histone modification in gastric cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Chun-Feng; Zhu, Xin-Jiang; Peng, Guo; Dai, Dong-Qiu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To identify the relationship between DNA hyper-methylation and histone modification at a hyperme-thylated, silenced tumor suppressor gene promoter in human gastric cancer cell lines and to elucidate whether alteration of DNA methylation could affect histone modification.

  19. Clinical and pathological associations with p53 tumour-suppressor gene mutations and expression of p21WAF1/Cip1 in colorectal carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slebos, R. J.; Baas, I. O.; Clement, M.; Polak, M.; Mulder, J. W.; van den Berg, F. M.; Hamilton, S. R.; Offerhaus, G. J.

    1996-01-01

    Inactivation of the p53 tumour-suppressor gene is common in a wide variety of human neoplasms. In the majority of cases, single point mutations in the protein-encoding sequence of p53 lead to positive immunohistochemistry (IHC) for the p53 protein, and are accompanied by loss of the wild-type

  20. No evidence for promoter region methylation of the succinate dehydrogenase and fumarate hydratase tumour suppressor genes in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrovic Alexander

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH and fumarate hydratase (FH are tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle enzymes that are also known to act as tumour suppressor genes. Increased succinate or fumarate levels as a consequence of SDH and FH deficiency inhibit hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α prolyl hydroxylases leading to sustained HIF-1α expression in tumours. Since HIF-1α is frequently expressed in breast carcinomas, DNA methylation at the promoter regions of the SDHA, SDHB, SDHC and SDHD and FH genes was evaluated as a possible mechanism in silencing of SDH and FH expression in breast carcinomas. Findings No DNA methylation was identified in the promoter regions of the SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD and FH genes in 72 breast carcinomas and 10 breast cancer cell lines using methylation-sensitive high resolution melting which detects both homogeneous and heterogeneous methylation. Conclusion These results show that inactivation via DNA methylation of the promoter CpG islands of SDH and FH is unlikely to play a major role in sporadic breast carcinomas.

  1. Nuclear pore component Nup98 is a potential tumor suppressor and regulates posttranscriptional expression of select p53 target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Stephan; Zhao, Ruiying; Barsotti, Anthony M; Ouwehand, Anette; Fazollahi, Mina; Coutavas, Elias; Breuhahn, Kai; Neumann, Olaf; Longerich, Thomas; Pusterla, Tobias; Powers, Maureen A; Giles, Keith M; Leedman, Peter J; Hess, Jochen; Grunwald, David; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Singer, Robert H; Schirmacher, Peter; Prives, Carol

    2012-12-14

    The p53 tumor suppressor utilizes multiple mechanisms to selectively regulate its myriad target genes, which in turn mediate diverse cellular processes. Here, using conventional and single-molecule mRNA analyses, we demonstrate that the nucleoporin Nup98 is required for full expression of p21, a key effector of the p53 pathway, but not several other p53 target genes. Nup98 regulates p21 mRNA levels by a posttranscriptional mechanism in which a complex containing Nup98 and the p21 mRNA 3'UTR protects p21 mRNA from degradation by the exosome. An in silico approach revealed another p53 target (14-3-3σ) to be similarly regulated by Nup98. The expression of Nup98 is reduced in murine and human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and correlates with p21 expression in HCC patients. Our study elucidates a previously unrecognized function of wild-type Nup98 in regulating select p53 target genes that is distinct from the well-characterized oncogenic properties of Nup98 fusion proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Polymorphisms rs12998 and rs5780218 in KiSS1 Suppressor Metastasis Gene in Mexican Patients with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edhit Guadalupe Cruz Quevedo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. KiSS1 is a metastasis suppressor gene associated with inhibition of cellular chemotaxis and invasion attenuating the metastasis in melanoma and breast cancer cell lines. Along the KiSS-1 gene at least 294 SNPs have been described; however the association of these polymorphisms as genetic markers for metastasis in breast cancer studies has not been investigated. Here we describe two simple PCR-RFLPs protocols to identify the rs5780218 (9DelT and the rs12998 (E20K KiSS1 polymorphisms and the allelic, genotypic, and haplotypic frequencies in Mexican general population (GP and patients with benign breast disease (BBD or breast cancer (BC. Results. The rs5780218 polymorphism was individually associated with breast cancer (P=0.0332 and the rs12998 polymorphism shows statistically significant differences when GP versus case (BC and BBD groups were compared (P<0.0001. The H1 Haplotype (G/- occurred more frequently in BC group (0.4256 whereas H2 haplotype (G/T was the most prevalent in BBD group (0.4674. Conclusions. Our data indicated that the rs5780218 polymorphism individually confers susceptibility for development of breast cancer in Mexican population and a possible role as a genetic marker in breast cancer metastasis for H1 haplotype (Wt/variant in KiSS1 gene must be analyzed in other populations.

  3. [Construction of Escherichia coli-Bifidobacterium longum shuttle vector and expression of tumor suppressor gene PTEN in B. longum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xin; Liu, Jun-E

    2006-06-01

    It was reported that Bifidobacterium longum accumulated specifically in hypoxic solid tumors, therefore could be used as a delivery system for cancer-specific gene therapy. Furthermore, construction of E.coli-B. longum shuttle vectors was proved by other research to be an efficient way for stable gene expression in B. longum. To obtain a shuttle vector and analyze the inhibition on mice solid tumors by genetically engineered B. longum, 48 primers with mutual overlaps were designed, assisted by software package Oligo 6.0. By PCR with the above primers, a linear plasmid was synthesized, which consists of pMB1 and HU gene promoter, both from B. longum. pMB-HU was constructed by cloning the synthesized linear plasmid into E.coli vector pMD 18-T, and was proved to be stably replicated in both E.coli DH5alpha and B. longum L17. By inserting PTEN cDNA into pMB-HU, expression vector pMB-HU-PTEN was obtained, in which PTEN gene was reported as a major tumor suppressor gene encoding a dual-specificity phosphatase. pMB-HU-PTEN was then transferred into B. longum L17 by electroporation. After transformation, an effective expression of PTEN in B. longum L17 was confirmed by Western blot, and significant inhibition on growth of mice solid tumors was also observed with the above genetically engineered B. longum. Those obtained results have laid foundation for tumor-targeting gene therapy with B. longum.

  4. Down-regulation of SFRP1 as a putative tumor suppressor gene can contribute to human hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jian; Zhang, Yun-Li; Teng, Xiao-Mei; Lin, Yun; Zheng, Da-Li; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Han, Ze-Guang

    2007-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers in the world. SFRP1 (the secreted frizzled-related protein 1), a putative tumor suppressor gene mapped onto chromosome 8p12-p11.1, the frequent loss of heterozygosity (LOH) region in human HCC, encodes a Wingless-type (Wnt) signaling antagonist and is frequently inactivated by promoter methylation in many human cancers. However, whether the down-regulation of SFRP1 can contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis still remains unclear. We investigated the expression of SFRP1 through real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry staining. The cell growth and colony formation were observed as the overexpression and knockdown of SFRP1. The DNA methylation status within SFRP1 promoter was analyzed through methylation-specific PCR or bisulphate-treated DNA sequencing assays. Loss of heterozygosity was here detected with microsatellite markers. SFRP1 was significantly down-regulated in 76.1% (35/46) HCC specimens at mRNA level and in 30% (30/100) HCCs indicated by immunohistochemistry staining, as compared to adjacent non-cancerous livers. The overexpression of SFRP1 can significantly inhibit the cell growth and colony formation of YY-8103, SMMC7721, and Hep3B cells. The RNA interference against the constitutional SFRP1 in the offspring SMMC7721 cells, which were stably transfected by ectopic SFRP1, can markedly promote cell growth of these cells. LOH of both microsatellite markers D8S532 and D8SAC016868 flanking the gene locus was found in 13% (6 of 46 HCCs) and 6.5% (3 of 46 HCCs) of the informative cases, respectively, where 5 of 8 HCC specimens with LOH showed the down-regulation of SFRP1. DNA hypermethylation within SFRP1 promoter was identified in two of three HCC specimens without SFRP1 expression. Moreover, the DNA methylation of SFRP1 promoter was significantly reduced, along with the re-expression of the gene, in those HCC cell lines, Bel7404, QGY7701, and MHCC-H, as treated by DAC. Our data suggested that the

  5. Evolution and origin of merlin, the product of the Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 tumor-suppressor gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omelyanchuk Leonid V

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Merlin, the product of the Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 tumor suppressor gene, belongs to the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM subgroup of the protein 4.1 superfamily, which links cell surface glycoproteins to the actin cytoskeleton. While merlin's functional activity has been examined in mammalian and Drosophila models, little is understood about its evolution, diversity, and overall distribution among different taxa. Results By combining bioinformatic and phylogenetic approaches, we demonstrate that merlin homologs are present across a wide range of metazoan lineages. While the phylogenetic tree shows a monophyletic origin of the ERM family, the origin of the merlin proteins is robustly separated from that of the ERM proteins. The derivation of merlin is thought to be in early metazoa. We have also observed the expansion of the ERM-like proteins within the vertebrate clade, which occurred after its separation from Urochordata (Ciona intestinalis. Amino acid sequence alignment reveals the absence of an actin-binding site in the C-terminal region of all merlin proteins from various species but the presence of a conserved internal binding site in the N-terminal domain of the merlin and ERM proteins. In addition, a more conserved pattern of amino acid residues is found in the region containing the so-called "Blue Box," although some amino acid substitutions in this region exist in the merlin sequences of worms, fish, and Ciona. Examination of sequence variability at functionally significant sites, including the serine-518 residue, the phosphorylation of which modulates merlin's intra-molecular association and function as a tumor suppressor, identifies several potentially important sites that are conserved among all merlin proteins but divergent in the ERM proteins. Secondary structure prediction reveals the presence of a conserved α-helical domain in the central to C-terminal region of the merlin proteins of various species. The

  6. Positive selection of deleterious alleles through interaction with a sex-ratio suppressor gene in African Buffalo: a plausible new mechanism for a high frequency anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooft, Pim; Greyling, Ben J; Getz, Wayne M; van Helden, Paul D; Zwaan, Bas J; Bastos, Armanda D S

    2014-01-01

    Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) population of Kruger National Park, through positive selection of these alleles that is ultimately driven by a sex-ratio suppressor. We have previously shown that one in four Kruger buffalo has a Y-chromosome profile that, despite being associated with low body condition, appears to impart a relative reproductive advantage, and which is stably maintained through a sex-ratio suppressor. Apparently, this sex-ratio suppressor prevents fertility reduction that generally accompanies sex-ratio distortion. We hypothesize that this body-condition-associated reproductive advantage increases the fitness of alleles that negatively affect male body condition, causing genome-wide positive selection of these alleles. To investigate this we genotyped 459 buffalo using 17 autosomal microsatellites. By correlating heterozygosity with body condition (heterozygosity-fitness correlations), we found that most microsatellites were associated with one of two gene types: one with elevated frequencies of deleterious alleles that have a negative effect on body condition, irrespective of sex; the other with elevated frequencies of sexually antagonistic alleles that are negative for male body condition but positive for female body condition. Positive selection and a direct association with a Y-chromosomal sex-ratio suppressor are indicated, respectively, by allele clines and by relatively high numbers of homozygous deleterious alleles among sex-ratio suppressor carriers. This study, which employs novel statistical techniques to analyse heterozygosity-fitness correlations, is the first to demonstrate the abundance of sexually-antagonistic genes in a natural mammal population. It also has important

  7. Positive selection of deleterious alleles through interaction with a sex-ratio suppressor gene in African Buffalo: a plausible new mechanism for a high frequency anomaly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pim van Hooft

    Full Text Available Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer population of Kruger National Park, through positive selection of these alleles that is ultimately driven by a sex-ratio suppressor. We have previously shown that one in four Kruger buffalo has a Y-chromosome profile that, despite being associated with low body condition, appears to impart a relative reproductive advantage, and which is stably maintained through a sex-ratio suppressor. Apparently, this sex-ratio suppressor prevents fertility reduction that generally accompanies sex-ratio distortion. We hypothesize that this body-condition-associated reproductive advantage increases the fitness of alleles that negatively affect male body condition, causing genome-wide positive selection of these alleles. To investigate this we genotyped 459 buffalo using 17 autosomal microsatellites. By correlating heterozygosity with body condition (heterozygosity-fitness correlations, we found that most microsatellites were associated with one of two gene types: one with elevated frequencies of deleterious alleles that have a negative effect on body condition, irrespective of sex; the other with elevated frequencies of sexually antagonistic alleles that are negative for male body condition but positive for female body condition. Positive selection and a direct association with a Y-chromosomal sex-ratio suppressor are indicated, respectively, by allele clines and by relatively high numbers of homozygous deleterious alleles among sex-ratio suppressor carriers. This study, which employs novel statistical techniques to analyse heterozygosity-fitness correlations, is the first to demonstrate the abundance of sexually-antagonistic genes in a natural mammal population. It also has

  8. Identification of genes highly downregulated in pancreatic cancer through a meta-analysis of microarray datasets: implications for discovery of novel tumor-suppressor genes and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonesekere, Nalin C W; Andersen, Wyatt; Smith, Alex; Wang, Xiaosheng

    2018-02-01

    The lack of specific symptoms at early tumor stages, together with a high biological aggressiveness of the tumor contribute to the high mortality rate for pancreatic cancer (PC), which has a 5-year survival rate of about 7%. Recent failures of targeted therapies inhibiting kinase activity in clinical trials have highlighted the need for new approaches towards combating this deadly disease. In this study, we have identified genes that are significantly downregulated in PC, through a meta-analysis of large number of microarray datasets. We have used qRT-PCR to confirm the downregulation of selected genes in a panel of PC cell lines. This study has yielded several novel candidate tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs) including GNMT, CEL, PLA2G1B and SERPINI2. We highlight the role of GNMT, a methyl transferase associated with the methylation potential of the cell, and CEL, a lipase, as potential therapeutic targets. We have uncovered genetic links to risk factors associated with PC such as smoking and obesity. Genes important for patient survival and prognosis are also discussed, and we confirm the dysregulation of metabolic pathways previously observed in PC. While many of the genes downregulated in our dataset are associated with protein products normally produced by the pancreas for excretion, we have uncovered some genes whose downregulation appear to play a more causal role in PC. These genes will assist in providing a better understanding of the disease etiology of PC, and in the search for new therapeutic targets and biomarkers.

  9. Hypoxia Inducible Factor-independent functions for the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Martijn Paul Jung Kyu

    2006-01-01

    Inactivating mutations of the von Hippel-Lindau gene (VHL) on chromosome 3p have been associated with the autosomal dominant VHL disease, characterized by extensively vascularized tumors and cysts in different organs, as well as the majority of conventional kidney cancers. The VHL gene product

  10. Genes involved in cell division in mycoplasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Alarcón

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell division has been studied mainly in model systems such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, where it is described as a complex process with the participation of a group of proteins which assemble into a multiprotein complex called the septal ring. Mycoplasmas are cell wall-less bacteria presenting a reduced genome. Thus, it was important to compare their genomes to analyze putative genes involved in cell division processes. The division and cell wall (dcw cluster, which in E. coli and B. subtilis is composed of 16 and 17 genes, respectively, is represented by only three to four genes in mycoplasmas. Even the most conserved protein, FtsZ, is not present in all mycoplasma genomes analyzed so far. A model for the FtsZ protein from Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma synoviae has been constructed. The conserved residues, essential for GTP/GDP binding, are present in FtsZ from both species. A strong conservation of hydrophobic amino acid patterns is observed, and is probably necessary for the structural stability of the protein when active. M. synoviae FtsZ presents an extended amino acid sequence at the C-terminal portion of the protein, which may participate in interactions with other still unknown proteins crucial for the cell division process.

  11. Heterozygous mutations in the tumor suppressor gene PATCHED provoke basal cell carcinoma-like features in human organotypic skin cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brellier, F; Bergoglio, V; Valin, A; Barnay, S; Chevallier-Lagente, O; Vielh, P; Spatz, A; Gorry, P; Avril, M-F; Magnaldo, T

    2008-11-20

    Basal cell carcinoma of the skin is the most common type of cancer in humans. The majority of these tumors displays aberrant activation of the SONIC HEDGEHOG (SHH)/PATCHED pathway, triggered by mutations in the PATCHED tumor suppressor gene, which encodes a transmembrane receptor of SHH. In this study, we took advantage of the natural genotype (PATCHED(+/-)) of healthy keratinocytes expanded from patients with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma or Gorlin syndrome to mimic heterozygous somatic mutations thought to occur in the PATCHED gene early upon basal cell carcinoma development in the general population. PATCHED(+/-) epidermis developed on a dermal equivalent containing wild-type (WT) PATCHED(+/+) fibroblasts exhibited striking invasiveness and hyperproliferation, as well as marked differentiation impairment. Deciphering the phenotype of PATCHED(+/-) keratinocytes revealed slight increases of the transcriptional activators GLI1 and GLI2-the latter known to provoke basal cell carcinoma-like tumors when overexpressed in transgenic mice. PATCHED(+/-) keratinocytes also showed a substantial increase of the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1. These data show for the first time the physiological impact of constitutive heterozygous PATCHED mutations in primary human keratinocytes and strongly argue for a yet elusive mechanism of haploinsufficiency leading to cancer proneness.

  12. Heterozygous Germline Mutations in the CBL Tumor-Suppressor Gene Cause a Noonan Syndrome-like Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Simone; De Luca, Alessandro; Stellacci, Emilia; Rossi, Cesare; Checquolo, Saula; Lepri, Francesca; Caputo, Viviana; Silvano, Marianna; Buscherini, Francesco; Consoli, Federica; Ferrara, Grazia; Digilio, Maria C.; Cavaliere, Maria L.; van Hagen, Johanna M.; Zampino, Giuseppe; van der Burgt, Ineke; Ferrero, Giovanni B.; Mazzanti, Laura; Screpanti, Isabella; Yntema, Helger G.; Nillesen, Willy M.; Savarirayan, Ravi; Zenker, Martin; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gelb, Bruce D.; Tartaglia, Marco

    2010-01-01

    RAS signaling plays a key role in controlling appropriate cell responses to extracellular stimuli and participates in early and late developmental processes. Although enhanced flow through this pathway has been established as a major contributor to oncogenesis, recent discoveries have revealed that aberrant RAS activation causes a group of clinically related developmental disorders characterized by facial dysmorphism, a wide spectrum of cardiac disease, reduced growth, variable cognitive deficits, ectodermal and musculoskeletal anomalies, and increased risk for certain malignancies. Here, we report that heterozygous germline mutations in CBL, a tumor-suppressor gene that is mutated in myeloid malignancies and encodes a multivalent adaptor protein with E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, can underlie a phenotype with clinical features fitting or partially overlapping Noonan syndrome (NS), the most common condition of this disease family. Independent CBL mutations were identified in two sporadic cases and two families from among 365 unrelated subjects who had NS or suggestive features and were negative for mutations in previously identified disease genes. Phenotypic heterogeneity and variable expressivity were documented. Mutations were missense changes altering evolutionarily conserved residues located in the RING finger domain or the linker connecting this domain to the N-terminal tyrosine kinase binding domain, a known mutational hot spot in myeloid malignancies. Mutations were shown to affect CBL-mediated receptor ubiquitylation and dysregulate signal flow through RAS. These findings document that germline mutations in CBL alter development to cause a clinically variable condition that resembles NS and that possibly predisposes to malignancies. PMID:20619386

  13. Ontogeny of clock and KiSS-1 metastasis-suppressor (Kiss1) gene expression in the prepubertal mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Cassandra C; Mark, Peter J; Waddell, Brendan J; Smith, Jeremy T

    2017-09-01

    Kisspeptin is crucial for the generation of the circadian-gated preovulatory gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-LH surge in female rodents, with expression in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) peaking in the late afternoon of pro-oestrus. Given kisspeptin expression is established before puberty, the aim of the present study was to investigate kisspeptin and clock gene rhythms during the neonatal period. Anterior and posterior hypothalami were collected from C57BL/6J mice on Postnatal Days (P) 5, 15 and 25, at six time points across 24h, for analysis of gene expression by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like gene (Bmal1) and nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 2 (Rev-erbα) in the anterior hypothalamus (containing the suprachiasmatic nucleus) was not rhythmic at P5 or P15, but Bmal1 expression exhibited rhythmicity in P25 females, whereas Rev-erbα expression was rhythmic in P25 males. KiSS-1 metastasis-suppressor (Kiss1) expression did not exhibit time-of-day variation in the anterior (containing the AVPV) or posterior (containing the arcuate nucleus) hypothalami in female and male mice at P5, P15 or P25. The data indicate that the kisspeptin circadian peak in expression observed in the AVPV of pro-oestrous females does not manifest at P5, P15 or P25, likely due to inadequate oestrogenic stimuli, as well as incomplete development of clock gene rhythmicity before puberty.

  14. Tumor suppressor genes that escape from X-inactivation contribute to cancer sex bias

    OpenAIRE

    Dunford, Andrew; Weinstock, David M.; Savova, Virginia; Schumacher, Steven E.; Cleary, John P.; Yoda, Akinori; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Hess, Julian M.; Gimelbrant, Alexander A.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lawrence, Michael S.; Getz, Gad; Lane, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a striking and unexplained male predominance across many cancer types. A subset of X chromosome (chrX) genes can escape X-inactivation, which would protect females from complete functional loss by a single mutation. To identify putative “Escape from X-Inactivation Tumor Suppressor” (EXITS) genes, we compared somatic alterations from >4100 cancers across 21 tumor types for sex bias. Six of 783 non-pseudoautosomal region (PAR) chrX genes (ATRX, CNKSR2, DDX3X, KDM5C, KDM6A, and MAGEC3) ...

  15. Protocadherin-10 acts as a tumor suppressor gene, and is frequently downregulated by promoter methylation in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chan; Bu, Xiaona; Jiang, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Protocadherin-10 (PCDH10), a member of non-clustered protocadherin family which plays important roles in calcium-dependent cell-cell signal transduction and adhesion. PCDH10 functions as a tumor suppressor gene and its expression is downregulated by promoter methylation in many malignances. In the present study, we explored PCDH10 expression and promoter methylation status, and its biological effects in pancreatic cancer cells, and furthermore, we explored the mechanism of PCDH10 preliminary in pancreatic cancer cells. the mRNA level of PCDH10 was detected by semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR and promoter methylation status examined by methylation-specific PCR in the pancreatic cancer cells (Capan-1, Panc-1, AsPC-1 and BxPC-3) as well as the human normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells HPDE6-C7 which was used as a control. The human pancreatic cells were transfected with plasmid pcDNA3.1-PCDH10 or pcDNA3.1 by lipofectamine 2000. The biological function of PCDH10 in pancreatic cancer cells was determined by CCK-8 assay, colony formation assay, flow cytometry, Transwell invasion assay and wound-healing assay. The levels of apoptosis related proteins were examined by western blotting. PCDH10 expression was obviously downregulated in the pancreatic cancer cells (Capan-1, Panc-1, BxPC-3) compared to the normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. PCDH10 promoter methylation was observed in the two pancreatic cancer cells Capan-1 and BxPC-3,and the expression of PCDH10 could be restored after treating with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and trichostatin A in the two cell types. Overexpression of PCDH10 can inhibit the proliferation, migration, invasion ability of pancreatic cancer cells and induce apoptosis. Ectopic expression of PCDH10 could increase the levels of PARP, caspase-3, caspase-9 and decrease the level of bcl-2, AKT and p-AKT. PCDH10 acts as a tumor suppressor gene, and is frequently down-regulated by promoter methylation in pancreatic cancer cells. PCDH

  16. Tumor suppressor genes that escape from X-inactivation contribute to cancer sex bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Andrew; Weinstock, David M.; Savova, Virginia; Schumacher, Steven E.; Cleary, John P.; Yoda, Akinori; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Hess, Julian M.; Gimelbrant, Alexander A.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lawrence, Michael S.; Getz, Gad; Lane, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a striking and unexplained male predominance across many cancer types. A subset of X chromosome (chrX) genes can escape X-inactivation, which would protect females from complete functional loss by a single mutation. To identify putative “Escape from X-Inactivation Tumor Suppressor” (EXITS) genes, we compared somatic alterations from >4100 cancers across 21 tumor types for sex bias. Six of 783 non-pseudoautosomal region (PAR) chrX genes (ATRX, CNKSR2, DDX3X, KDM5C, KDM6A, and MAGEC3) more frequently harbored loss-of-function mutations in males (based on false discovery rate <0.1), compared to zero of 18,055 autosomal and PAR genes (P<0.0001). Male-biased mutations in genes that escape X-inactivation were observed in combined analysis across many cancers and in several individual tumor types, suggesting a generalized phenomenon. We conclude that biallelic expression of EXITS genes in females explains a portion of the reduced cancer incidence compared to males across a variety of tumor types. PMID:27869828

  17. The tumor suppressor gene TRC8/RNF139 is disrupted by a constitutional balanced translocation t(8;22(q24.13;q11.21 in a young girl with dysgerminoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorio Patrizia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNF139/TRC8 is a potential tumor suppressor gene with similarity to PTCH, a tumor suppressor implicated in basal cell carcinomas and glioblastomas. TRC8 has the potential to act in a novel regulatory relationship linking the cholesterol/lipid biosynthetic pathway with cellular growth control and has been identified in families with hereditary renal (RCC and thyroid cancers. Haploinsufficiency of TRC8 may facilitate development of clear cell-RCC in association with VHL mutations, and may increase risk for other tumor types. We report a paternally inherited balanced translocation t(8;22 in a proposita with dysgerminoma. Methods The translocation was characterized by FISH and the breakpoints cloned, sequenced, and compared. DNA isolated from normal and tumor cells was checked for abnormalities by array-CGH. Expression of genes TRC8 and TSN was tested both on dysgerminoma and in the proposita and her father. Results The breakpoints of the translocation are located within the LCR-B low copy repeat on chromosome 22q11.21, containing the palindromic AT-rich repeat (PATRR involved in recurrent and non-recurrent translocations, and in an AT-rich sequence inside intron 1 of the TRC8 tumor-suppressor gene at 8q24.13. TRC8 was strongly underexpressed in the dysgerminoma. Translin is underexpressed in the dysgerminoma compared to normal ovary. TRC8 is a target of Translin (TSN, a posttranscriptional regulator of genes transcribed by the transcription factor CREM-tau in postmeiotic male germ cells. Conclusion A role for TRC8 in dysgerminoma may relate to its interaction with Translin. We propose a model in which one copy of TRC8 is disrupted by a palindrome-mediated translocation followed by complete loss of expression through suppression, possibly mediated by miRNA.

  18. Aberrations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene in human epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J W; Cho, Y H; Kwon, D J; Kim, T E; Park, T C; Lee, J M; Namkoong, S E

    1995-05-01

    Aberrations of the p53 gene in 26 surgical specimens of human epithelial ovarian carcinomas were examined by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. Seven (27%) of the tumors demonstrated a SSCP band shift in exons 4 to 9 of the gene, including 5 in the region encompassing exons 5 and 6, 1 in exon 7, and 1 in the region encompassing exons 8 and 9. Mutations were clustered in exon 5 in highly conserved regions of the p53 gene. All of the abnormal DNA fragments have been further characterized by direct DNA sequencing. These include five missense mutations (five transitions), a one-base-pair deletion introducing, by frameshift, a stop codon further downstream, and a two-base-pair insertion introducing a stop codon downstream by frameshift. Most mutations were base substitutions, and were clustered in exon 5 (71%), especially codons 175 and 179. The aberrations of the p53 gene were only found in tumors of FIGO stages III and IV. Histologic grading was also reviewed with respect to p53 aberrations. The aberrations were absent in well-differentiated carcinomas. The more undifferentiated the primary tumor, the more frequent p53 mutation (P p53 gene were common in epithelial ovarian cancers and p53 aberration may occur late during ovarian cancer evolution.

  19. PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling & its regulator tumour suppressor genes PTEN & LKB1 in human uterine leiomyomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makker, Annu; Goel, Madhu Mati; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Bhatia, Vikram; Das, Vinita; Agarwal, Anjoo; Pandey, Amita

    2016-05-01

    Despite their high occurrence and associated significant level of morbidity manifesting as spectrum of clinical symptoms, the pathogenesis of uterine leiomyomas (ULs) remains unclear. We investigated expression profile of tumour suppressor genes PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten) and LKB1 (liver kinase B1), and key signaling components of P13K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)/Akt (protein kinase B)/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway in leiomyomas and adjacent normal myometrium in women of reproductive age, to explore the possibility of targeting this pathway for future therapeutic implications. Real time PCR (qPCR) was used to quantify relative gene expression levels of PTEN, Akt1, Akt2, mTOR, LKB1 and VEGFA (vascular endothelial growth factor A) in leiomyoma as compared to adjacent normal myometrium. Immunohistochemistry was subsequently performed to analyze expression of PTEN, phospho-Akt, phospho-mTOR, phospho-S6, LKB1 and VEGFA in leiomyoma and adjacent normal myometrium. Significant upregulation of PTEN (2.52 fold; P=0.03) and LKB1 (3.93 fold; P0.01), and downregulation of VEGFA (2.95 fold; P=0.01) genes were observed in leiomyoma as compared to normal myometrium. Transcript levels of Akt1, Akt2 and mTOR did not vary significantly between leiomyoma and myometrium. An increased immunoexpression of PTEN (P=0.015) and LKB1 (PPTEN and LKB1 in concert with negative or low levels of activated Akt, mTOR and S6 indicates that PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway may not play a significant role in pathogenesis of leiomyoma.

  20. The common mechanisms of transformation by the small DNA tumor viruses: The inactivation of tumor suppressor gene products: p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Arnold J

    2009-02-20

    The small DNA tumor viruses, Polyoma virus, Simian Vacuolating Virus 40, the Papilloma viruses and the human Adenoviruses, were first described during a period of intense virus discovery (1930-1960s) and shown to produce tumors in animals. In each of these cases the viral DNA was shown to persist (commonly integrated into a host chromosome) and only a selected portion of this DNA was expressed as m-RNA and proteins in these cancers. The viral encoded tumor antigens were identified and shown to be required to both establish the tumor and maintain the transformed cell phenotype. The functions of these viral tumor antigens were explored and shown to have common features and mechanisms even though they appear to have evolved from diverse genes. The SV40 large tumor antigen, the human Papilloma virus E7 protein and the Adenovirus E1A protein were shown to bind to and inactivate the functions of the Retinoblastoma proteins in transformed cells. This resulted in the activation of the E2F and DP transcription factors and the entry of cells into the S-phase of DNA synthesis which was required for viral DNA replication. These events triggered the activation of p53 which promotes apoptosis of these virus infected cells limiting virus replication and tumor formation. These viruses responded by evolving and producing the SV40 large tumor antigen, the human Papilloma virus E6 protein and the Adenovirus E1b-55Kd protein which binds to and inactivates the p53 functions in both the infected cells and transformed cells. Some of the human Papilloma viruses and one of the Polyoma viruses have been shown to cause selected cancers in humans. Both the p53 tumor suppressor gene, which was uncovered in the studies with these viruses, and the retinoblastoma protein, have been shown to play a central role in the origins of human cancers via both somatic and germ line mutations in those genes.

  1. The tumor suppressor gene hypermethylated in cancer 1 is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenal, Mathias; Trinh, Emmanuelle; Britschgi, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The Hypermethylated in Cancer 1 (HIC1) gene encodes a zinc finger transcriptional repressor that cooperates with p53 to suppress cancer development. We and others recently showed that HIC1 is a transcriptional target of p53. To identify additional transcriptional regulators of HIC1, we screened...

  2. Transcriptional regulation of teleost aicda genes. Pt 1 suppressors of promiscuous promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to better understand antibody affinity maturation in fishes we sought to identify gene regulatory elements that could drive expression of activated B-cell specific fluorescent reporter transgenes in zebrafish. Specifically the promoter and several non-coding regions of the channel catfish (...

  3. Identification of Prostate Cancer Metastasis-Suppressor Genes Using Genomic shRNA Libraries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gelman, Irwin H

    2008-01-01

    .... However, little is known regarding the genetics that control disease recurrence. Our proposed research was to screen for metastasis- inducing genes in LNCaP and LAPC-4 CaP cells using libraries expressing RNAi covering the entire human genome...

  4. Immunohistochemical observations on tumor suppressor gene p53 status in mouse fibrosarcoma following in-vivo photodynamic therapy: the role of xanthine oxidase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziolkowski, Piotr P.; Symonowicz, Krzysztof; Milnerowicz, Artur; Osiecka, Beata J.

    1997-12-01

    Tumor suppressor gene p53 expression in a mouse fibrosarcoma following in-vivo photodynamic therapy has been studied using the immunohistochemical method. Photodynamic treatment involved injections of the well known sensitizer -- hematoporphyrin derivative at the doses 1.25 and 2.5 mg/kg of body weight and irradiations at the doses 25 and 50 J/sq cm. Glass slide preparations from PDT-treated tumors were obtained at different time points (15, 60 minutes, 2 and 24 hours) after therapy, subsequently stained for wild type/mutant p53, and assessed for positive reaction. High PDT doses (HpD -- 2.5 mg/kg; light dose -- 50 J/sq cm) correlated with decreased expression of p53 in tumor cells. The other part of the study was directed to measure the xanthine oxidase (XO) activity in the tumor cells. PDT included injections of HpD and light exposure at the same doses as for p53 study. We observed a complete inhibition of the enzyme activity. The slight increase in XO activity was found following treatment with either light or HpD alone.

  5. The induction of a tumor suppressor gene (p53) expression by low-dose radiation and its biological meaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    1997-01-01

    I report the induced accumulation of wild-type p53 protein of a tumor suppressor gene within 12 h in various organs of rats exposed to X-ray irradiation at low doses (10-50 cGy). The levels of p53 in some organs of irradiated rats were increased about 2- to 3-fold in comparison with the basal p53 levels in non-irradiated rats. Differences in the levels of p53 induction after low-dose X-ray irradiation were observed among the small intestine, bone marrow, brain, liver, adrenal gland, spleen, hypophysis and skin. In contrast, there was no obvious accumulation of p53 protein in the testis and ovary. Thus, the induction of cellular p.53 accumulation by low-dose X-ray irradiation in rats seems to be organ-specific. I consider that cell type, and interactions with other signal transduction pathways of the hormone system, immune system and nervous system may contribute to the variable induction of p53 by low-dose X-ray irradiation. I discussed the induction of p53 by radiation and its biological meaning from an aspect of the defense system for radiation-induced cancer. (author)

  6. Tumor suppressor QM-like gene from disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus): molecular characterization and transcriptional analysis upon immune challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chulhong; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Nikapitiya, Chamilani; Whang, Ilson; Kim, Yu Cheol; Kang, Do-Hyung; Heo, Soo-jin; Choi, Young-Ung; Choi, Cheol Young; Lee, Jae-Seong; Lee, Jehee

    2010-09-01

    We describe molecular characterization and transcriptional analysis of the gene encoding tumor suppressor QM-like protein, AbQM, in the disk abalone Haliotis discus discus. The full-length cDNA (765-bp) of AbQM was found to consist of a 654-bp ORF coding for a 218 amino acid protein of a 25 kDa molecular mass with a 10.2 isoelectric point. Analysis of AbQM sequence revealed the presence of characteristic motifs, including the ribosomal protein L10 signature, SH3-binding motif and two antibiotic binding sites. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that AbQM is closely related to other mollusk QM proteins, and altogether they form a mollusk QM protein sub-family which displays evolutionary conservation from yeast to human. Tissue-specific expression and transcriptional regulation of AbQM was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR in response to bacterial (Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio parahemolyticus, Listeria monocytogenes) and viral (viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, VHSV) challenge. AbQM transcripts were found to be expressed ubiquitously in all examined tissues in a constitutive manner, as similar expression levels were detected in hemocytes, mantle, digestive tract and muscle. Upon bacterial and VHSV challenge, AbQM showed significant up-regulation in gills, but not in hemocytes. Taken together, these findings suggest that AbQM in abalone-like mollusks can respond to and facilitate a defensive effect against pathogenic infection. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The P0 gene of Sugarcane yellow leaf virus encodes an RNA silencing suppressor with unique activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangwende, Tichaona; Wang Mingli; Borth, Wayne; Hu, John; Moore, Paul H.; Mirkov, T. Erik; Albert, Henrik H.

    2009-01-01

    The Sugarcane yellow leaf virus (SCYLV) P0, a member of the highly heterologous proteins of poleroviruses, is a suppressor of posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) and has additional activities not seen in other P0 proteins. The P0 protein in previously tested poleroviruses (Beet western yellows virus and Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus), suppresses local, but not systemic, PTGS induced by both sense GFP and inverted repeat GF using its F-box-like domain to mediate destabilization of the Argonaute1 protein. We now report that the SCYLV P0 protein not only suppressed local PTGS induced by sense GFP and inverted repeat GF in Nicotiana benthamiana, but also triggered a dosage dependent cell death phenotype in infiltrated leaves and suppressed systemic sense GFP-PTGS. Deletion of the first 15 N-terminal amino acid residues of SCYLV P0 abolished suppression of both local and systemic PTGS and the induction of cell death. In contrast, only systemic PTGS and cell death were lost when the 15 C-terminal amino acid residues were deleted. We conclude that the 15 C-terminal amino acid residue region of SCYLV P0 is necessary for suppressing systemic PTGS and inducing cell death, but is not required for suppression of local PTGS

  8. SETDB1 is involved in postembryonic DNA methylation and gene silencing in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Gou

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is fundamental for the stability and activity of genomes. Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrates establish a global DNA methylation pattern of their genome during early embryogenesis. Large-scale analyses of DNA methylation patterns have uncovered revealed that DNA methylation patterns are dynamic rather than static and change in a gene-specific fashion during development and in diseased cells. However, the factors and mechanisms involved in dynamic, postembryonic DNA methylation remain unclear. Methylation of lysine 9 in histone H3 (H3-K9 by members of the Su(var3-9 family of histone methyltransferases (HMTs triggers embryonic DNA methylation in Arthropods and Chordates. Here, we demonstrate that Drosophila SETDB1 (dSETDB1 can mediate DNA methylation and silencing of genes and retrotransposons. We found that dSETDB1 tri-methylates H3-K9 and binds methylated CpA motifs. Tri-methylation of H3-K9 by dSETDB1 mediates recruitment of DNA methyltransferase 2 (Dnmt2 and Su(var205, the Drosophila ortholog of mammalian "Heterochromatin Protein 1", to target genes for dSETDB1. By enlisting Dnmt2 and Su(var205, dSETDB1 triggers DNA methylation and silencing of genes and retrotransposons in Drosophila cells. DSETDB1 is involved in postembryonic DNA methylation and silencing of Rt1b{} retrotransposons and the tumor suppressor gene retinoblastoma family protein 1 (Rb in imaginal discs. Collectively, our findings implicate dSETDB1 in postembryonic DNA methylation, provide a model for silencing of the tumor suppressor Rb, and uncover a role for cell type-specific DNA methylation in Drosophila development.

  9. Alternative polyadenylation of tumor suppressor genes in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Anders Aagaard; Plass, Mireya; Døssing, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    The tumorigenesis of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) is poorly understood. Recent studies have associated alternative polyadenylation (APA) with proliferation, cell transformation, and cancer. Polyadenylation is the process in which the pre-messenger RNA is cleaved at a polyA site...... and a polyA tail is added. Genes with two or more polyA sites can undergo APA. This produces two or more distinct mRNA isoforms with different 3' untranslated regions. Additionally, APA can also produce mRNAs containing different 3'-terminal coding regions. Therefore, APA alters both the repertoire...... and the expression level of proteins. Here, we used high-throughput sequencing data to map polyA sites and characterize polyadenylation genome-wide in three SI-NETs and a reference sample. In the tumors, 16 genes showed significant changes of APA pattern, which lead to either the 3' truncation of mRNA coding regions...

  10. A targeted constitutive mutation in the APC tumor suppressor gene underlies mammary but not intestinal tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gaspar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene are responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP, an autosomal dominant hereditary predisposition to the development of multiple colorectal adenomas and of a broad spectrum of extra-intestinal tumors. Moreover, somatic APC mutations play a rate-limiting and initiating role in the majority of sporadic colorectal cancers. Notwithstanding its multifunctional nature, the main tumor suppressing activity of the APC gene resides in its ability to regulate Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Notably, genotype-phenotype correlations have been established at the APC gene between the length and stability of the truncated proteins encoded by different mutant alleles, the corresponding levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity they encode for, and the incidence and distribution of intestinal and extra-intestinal tumors. Here, we report a novel mouse model, Apc1572T, obtained by targeting a truncated mutation at codon 1572 in the endogenous Apc gene. This hypomorphic mutant allele results in intermediate levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activation when compared with other Apc mutations associated with multifocal intestinal tumors. Notwithstanding the constitutive nature of the mutation, Apc(+/1572T mice have no predisposition to intestinal cancer but develop multifocal mammary adenocarcinomas and subsequent pulmonary metastases in both genders. The histology of the Apc1572T primary mammary tumours is highly heterogeneous with luminal, myoepithelial, and squamous lineages and is reminiscent of metaplastic carcinoma of the breast in humans. The striking phenotype of Apc(+/1572T mice suggests that specific dosages of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity differentially affect tissue homeostasis and initiate tumorigenesis in an organ-specific fashion.

  11. Prediction of functionally significant single nucleotide polymorphisms in PTEN tumor suppressor gene: An in silico approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imran; Ansari, Irfan A; Singh, Pratichi; Dass J, Febin Prabhu

    2017-09-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene plays a crucial role in signal transduction by negatively regulating the PI3K signaling pathway. It is the most frequent mutated gene in many human-related cancers. Considering its critical role, a functional analysis of missense mutations of PTEN gene was undertaken in this study. Thirty five nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) within the coding region of the PTEN gene were selected for our in silico investigation, and five nsSNPs (G129E, C124R, D252G, H61D, and R130G) were found to be deleterious based on combinatorial predictions of different computational tools. Moreover, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was performed to investigate the conformational variation between native and all the five mutant PTEN proteins having predicted deleterious nsSNPs. The results of MD simulation of all mutant models illustrated variation in structural attributes such as root-mean-square deviation, root-mean-square fluctuation, radius of gyration, and total energy; which depicts the structural stability of PTEN protein. Furthermore, mutant PTEN protein structures also showed a significant variation in the solvent accessible surface area and hydrogen bond frequencies from the native PTEN structure. In conclusion, results of this study have established the deleterious effect of the all the five predicted nsSNPs on the PTEN protein structure. Thus, results of the current study can pave a new platform to sort out nsSNPs that can be undertaken for the confirmation of their phenotype and their correlation with diseased status in case of control studies. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. The Role of Tumor Metastases Suppressor Gene, Drg-1, in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watabe, Kounosuke

    2008-01-01

    .... This inhibition leads to down-regulation of the ATF3 gene and thus suppressing metastases. We also found that a combination of NDRGI, PTEN and ATF3 is a good prognostic marker for breast cancer patients. These results suggest that the Wnt and ATF3 pathways are a potential therapeutic target for patients with metastatic disease. We will focus our next year's effort on further clarification of the NDRG1 pathway.

  13. NKL homeobox gene MSX1 acts like a tumor suppressor in NK-cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Stefan; Pommerenke, Claudia; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; MacLeod, Roderick A F; Drexler, Hans G

    2017-09-15

    NKL homeobox gene MSX1 is physiologically expressed in lymphoid progenitors and subsequently downregulated in developing T- and B-cells. In contrast, elevated expression levels of MSX1 persist in mature natural killer (NK)-cells, indicating a functional role in this compartment. While T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) subsets exhibit aberrant overexpression of MSX1, we show here that in malignant NK-cells the level of MSX1 transcripts is aberrantly downregulated. Chromosomal deletions at 4p16 hosting the MSX1 locus have been described in NK-cell leukemia patients. However, NK-cell lines analyzed here showed normal MSX1 gene configurations, indicating that this aberration might be uncommon. To identify alternative MSX1 regulatory mechanisms we compared expression profiling data of primary normal NK-cells and malignant NK-cell lines. This procedure revealed several deregulated genes including overexpressed IRF4, MIR155HG and MIR17HG and downregulated AUTS2, EP300, GATA3 and HHEX. As shown recently, chromatin-modulator AUTS2 is overexpressed in T-ALL subsets where it mediates aberrant transcriptional activation of MSX1. Here, our data demonstrate that in malignant NK-cell lines AUTS2 performed MSX1 activation as well, but in accordance with downregulated MSX1 transcription therein we detected reduced AUTS2 expression, a small genomic deletion at 7q11 removing exons 3 and 4, and truncating mutations in exon 1. Moreover, genomic profiling and chromosomal analyses of NK-cell lines demonstrated amplification of IRF4 at 6p25 and deletion of PRDM1 at 6q21, highlighting their potential oncogenic impact. Functional analyses performed via knockdown or forced expression of these genes revealed regulatory network disturbances effecting downregulation of MSX1 which may underlie malignant development in NK-cells.

  14. Relationship of ultrasonic shear wave velocity with oncogene and tumor suppressor gene expression in primary liver cancer lesions as well as angiogenesis factor contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Yin1

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the relationship of ultrasonic shear wave velocity (SWV with oncogene and tumor suppressor gene expression in primary liver cancer lesions as well as angiogenesis factor contents. Methods: 100 patients with primary liver cancer who underwent surgical treatment in our hospital between March 2014 and September 2016 were collected as observation group, and 50 healthy subjects who received physical examination in our hospital during the same period were collected as normal control group. The ultrasonic SWV levels of two groups of subjects were measured before the operation, and the observation groups were further divided into high SWV group and low SWV group, 50 cases in each group. Intraoperative tumor tissue samples were kept and fluorescence quantitative PCR was used to determine the mRNA expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Enzymelinked immunosorbent assay was used to determine serum contents of angiogenesis factors in observation group before operation. Results: Hepatic ultrasonic SWV level in observation group was significantly higher than that in normal control group; proto-oncogene CK, Ki67, Gly-3, Survivin and Pokemon mRNA expression in tumor tissue of high SWV group were higher than those of low SWV group while tumor suppressor genes Tg737, p16, p27, PTEN and runx3 mRNA expression were lower than those of low SWV group; serum angiogenesis factors VEGF, MMP-9 and IGF-1R contents were higher than those in low SWV group. Conclusion: The hepatic ultrasonic SWV level increases in patients with primary liver cancer, and the SWV level is directly correlated with oncogene and tumor suppressor gene expression as well as angiogenesis factor contents.

  15. Molecular characterization of two suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 genes (SOCS1a and SOCS1b in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue XU,Jiannan ZHANG,Juan LI,Yajun WANG

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1 protein can inhibit the signal transduction triggered by some cytokines or hormones and thus are important in many physiological/pathological processes, including innate and adaptive immunity, inflammation, and development in mammals. However, there is sparse information about their structure, tissue expression, in birds, where their biological functions remain unknown. In this study, we cloned and characterized two SOCS1 genes (named cSOCS1a and cSOCS1b from chickens. SOCS1a is predicted to encode a 207-amino acid protein, which shares high amino acid sequence identity (64%–67% with human and mouse SOCS1. Besides SOCS1a, a novel SOCS1b gene was also identified in chickens and other non-mammalian vertebrates including Xenopus tropicalis. Chicken SOCS1b is predicted to encode a 212-amino acid protein, which shares only 30%–32% amino acid sequence identity with human SOCS1 and cSOCS1a. RT-PCR assay revealed that both cSOCS1a and cSOCS1b are widely expressed in all chicken tissues. Using a luciferase reporter assay system, we further demonstrated that transient expression of cSOCS1a and cSOCS1b can significantly inhibit chicken growth hormone (GH- or prolactin (PRL-induced luciferase activities of Hep G2 cells expressing cGH receptor (or cPRL receptor, indicating that SOCS1a and SOCS1b proteins can negatively regulate GH/PRL signaling. Taken together, these data suggest that both cSOCS1a and cSOCS1b may function as negative regulators of cytokine/hormone actions, such as modulation of GH/PRL actions in chickens.

  16. Alternative exon usage creates novel transcript variants of tumor suppressor SHREW-1 gene with differential tissue expression profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra A. B. Klemmt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Shrew-1, also called AJAP1, is a transmembrane protein associated with E-cadherin-mediated adherence junctions and a putative tumor suppressor. Apart from its interaction with β-catenin and involvement in E-cadherin internalization, little structure or function information exists. Here we explored shrew-1 expression during postnatal differentiation of mammary gland as a model system. Immunohistological analyses with antibodies against either the extracellular or the cytoplasmic domains of shrew-1 consistently revealed the expression of full-length shrew-1 in myoepithelial cells, but only part of it in luminal cells. While shrew-1 localization remained unaltered in myoepithelial cells, nuclear localization occurred in luminal cells during lactation. Based on these observations, we identified two unknown shrew-1 transcript variants encoding N-terminally truncated proteins. The smallest shrew-1 protein lacks the extracellular domain and is most likely the only variant present in luminal cells. RNA analyses of human tissues confirmed that the novel transcript variants of shrew-1 exist in vivo and exhibit a differential tissue expression profile. We conclude that our findings are essential for the understanding and interpretation of future functional and interactome analyses of shrew-1 variants.

  17. Genetic interactions between the Drosophila tumor suppressor gene ept and the stat92E transcription factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Melissa Gilbert

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor Susceptibility Gene-101 (TSG101 promotes the endocytic degradation of transmembrane proteins and is implicated as a mutational target in cancer, yet the effect of TSG101 loss on cell proliferation in vertebrates is uncertain. By contrast, Drosophila epithelial tissues lacking the TSG101 ortholog erupted (ept develop as enlarged undifferentiated tumors, indicating that the gene can have anti-growth properties in a simple metazoan. A full understanding of pathways deregulated by loss of Drosophila ept will aid in understanding potential links between mammalian TSG101 and growth control.We have taken a genetic approach to the identification of pathways required for excess growth of Drosophila eye-antennal imaginal discs lacking ept. We find that this phenotype is very sensitive to the genetic dose of stat92E, the transcriptional effector of the Jak-Stat signaling pathway, and that this pathway undergoes strong activation in ept mutant cells. Genetic evidence indicates that stat92E contributes to cell cycle deregulation and excess cell size phenotypes that are observed among ept mutant cells. In addition, autonomous Stat92E hyper-activation is associated with altered tissue architecture in ept tumors and an effect on expression of the apical polarity determinant crumbs.These findings identify ept as a cell-autonomous inhibitor of the Jak-Stat pathway and suggest that excess Jak-Stat signaling makes a significant contribution to proliferative and tissue architectural phenotypes that occur in ept mutant tissues.

  18. Relevance of miR-21 in regulation of tumor suppressor gene PTEN in human cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Deas, Jessica; Meneses-Acosta, Angélica; De la O-Gómez, Faustino; Fernández-Tilapa, Gloria; Gómez-Cerón, Claudia; Benítez-Boijseauneau, Odelia; Burguete-García, Ana; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo; Madrid-Marina, Vicente; Rodríguez-Dorantes, Mauricio; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the microRNA miR-21 has been found to be altered in almost all types of cancers and it has been classified as an oncogenic microRNA or oncomir. Due to the critical functions of its target proteins in various signaling pathways, miR-21 is an attractive target for genetic and pharmacological modulation in various cancers. Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer in women worldwide and persistent HPV infection is the main etiologic agent. This malignancy merits special attention for the development of new treatment strategies. In the present study we analyze the role of miR-21 in cervical cancer cells. To identify the downstream cellular target genes of upstream miR-21, we silenced endogenous miR-21 expression in a cervical intraepithelial neoplasia-derived cell lines using siRNAs. The effect of miR-21 on gene expression was assessed in cervical cancer cells transfected with the siRNA expression plasmid pSIMIR21. We identified the tumor suppressor gene PTEN as a target of miR-21 and determined the mechanism of its regulation throughout reporter construct plasmids. Using this model, we analyzed the expression of miR-21 and PTEN as well as functional effects such as autophagy and apoptosis induction. In SiHa cells, there was an inverse correlation between miR-21 expression and PTEN mRNA level as well as PTEN protein expression in cervical cancer cells. Transfection with the pSIMIR21 plasmid increased luciferase reporter activity in construct plasmids containing the PTEN-3′-UTR microRNA response elements MRE21-1 and MRE21-2. The role of miR-21 in cell proliferation was also analyzed in SiHa and HeLa cells transfected with the pSIMIR21 plasmid, and tumor cells exhibited markedly reduced cell proliferation along with autophagy and apoptosis induction. We conclude that miR-21 post-transcriptionally down-regulates the expression of PTEN to promote cell proliferation and cervical cancer cell survival. Therefore, it may be a

  19. Discovery of Metastatic Breast Cancer Suppressor Genes Using Functional Genome Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    al., 2008; Cheung,H.W., et al., 2011; Barbie ,D.A., et al., 2009]. To identify genes whose essentiality could be associated specifically with...Reference Barbie ,D.A., Tamayo,P., Boehm,J.S., Kim,S.Y., Moody,S.E., Dunn,I.F., Schinzel,A.C., Sandy,P., Meylan,E., Scholl,C., Frohling,S., Chan,E.M... Barbie ,D.A., Awad,T., Zhou,X., Nguyen,T., Piqani,B., Li,C., Golub,T.R., Meyerson,M., Hacohen,N., Hahn,W.C., Lander,E.S., Sabatini,D.M., and Root

  20. Analysis of the tumour suppressor genes, FHIT and WT-1, and the tumour rejection genes, BAGE, GAGE-1/2, HAGE, MAGE-1, and MAGE-3, in benign and malignant neoplasms of the salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, H; Laskawi, R; Eiffert, H; Schlott, T

    2003-08-01

    Molecular genetic changes involved in tumorigenesis and malignant transformation of human tumours are novel targets of cancer diagnosis and treatment. This study aimed to analyse the expression of putative tumour suppressor genes, FHIT and WT-1, and tumour rejection genes, BAGE, GAGE-1/2, MAGE-1, MAGE-3, and HAGE (which are reported to be important in human cancers), in salivary gland neoplasms. Gene expression was analysed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in normal salivary gland tissue and 44 benign and malignant salivary gland tumours. Aberrant FHIT transcripts were found in one of 38 normal salivary glands, three of 28 adenomas, and two of 16 carcinomas. WT-1 mRNA was detectable in two adenomas and five carcinomas. Immunoblotting showed that WT-1 mRNA expression was associated with raised WT-1 protein concentrations. RT-PCR for detection of BAGE, GAGE, and MAGE gene expression was positive in two adenomas and nine carcinomas, but negative in normal salivary gland tissue. HAGE mRNA was found in two normal salivary glands, 11 benign, and eight malignant tumours. FHIT mRNA splicing does not appear to be involved in the genesis of salivary gland neoplasms. The upregulation of WT-1 mRNA in tumours of epithelial/myoepithelial phenotype may imply a potential role of WT-1 in the genesis and/or cellular differentiation of these salivary gland tumours. The tumour rejection genes were more frequently, but not exclusively, expressed in malignant salivary gland tumours than in benign neoplasms, although none was suitable as a diagnostic marker of malignancy in salivary gland neoplasms.

  1. Molecular cloning, phylogenetic analysis, and expression patterns of LATERAL SUPPRESSOR-LIKE and REGULATOR OF AXILLARY MERISTEM FORMATION-LIKE genes in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fambrini, Marco; Salvini, Mariangela; Pugliesi, Claudio

    2017-03-01

    The wild sunflower (Helianthus annuus) plants develop a highly branched form with numerous small flowering heads. The origin of a no branched sunflower, producing a single large head, has been a key event in the domestication process of this species. The interaction between hormonal factors and several genes organizes the initiation and outgrowth of axillary meristems (AMs). From sunflower, we have isolated two genes putatively involved in this process, LATERAL SUPPRESSOR (LS)-LIKE (Ha-LSL) and REGULATOR OF AXILLARY MERISTEM FORMATION (ROX)-LIKE (Ha-ROXL), encoding for a GRAS and a bHLH transcription factor (TF), respectively. Typical amino acid residues and phylogenetic analyses suggest that Ha-LSL and Ha-ROXL are the orthologs of the branching regulator LS and ROX/LAX1, involved in the growth habit of both dicot and monocot species. qRT-PCR analyses revealed a high accumulation of Ha-LSL transcripts in roots, vegetative shoots, and inflorescence shoots. By contrast, in internodal stems and young leaves, a lower amount of Ha-LSL transcripts was observed. A comparison of transcription patterns between Ha-LSL and Ha-ROXL revealed some analogies but also remarkable differences; in fact, the gene Ha-ROXL displayed a low expression level in all organs analyzed. In situ hybridization (ISH) analysis showed that Ha-ROXL transcription was strongly restricted to a small domain within the boundary zone separating the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and the leaf primordia and in restricted regions of the inflorescence meristem, beforehand the separation of floral bracts from disc flower primordia. These results suggested that Ha-ROXL may be involved to establish a cell niche for the initiation of AMs as well as flower primordia. The accumulation of Ha-LSL transcripts was not restricted to the boundary zones in vegetative and inflorescence shoots, but the mRNA activity was expanded in other cellular domains of primary shoot apical meristem as well as AMs. In addition, Ha

  2. P53 tumor suppressor gene and protein expression is altered in cell lines derived from spontaneous and alpha-radiation-induced canine lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tierney, L.A.; Johnson, N.F.; Lechner, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most frequently occurring gene alterations in malignant human cancers, including lung cancer. In lung cancer, common point mutations within conserved exons of the p53 gene result in a stabilized form of mutant protein which is detectable in most cases by immunohistochemistry. In addition to point mutations, allelic loss, rearrangements, and deletions of the p53 gene have also been detected in both human and rodent tumors. It has been suggested that for at least some epithelial neoplasms, the loss of expression of wild-type p53 protein may be more important for malignant transformation than the acquisition of activating mutations. Mechanisms responsible for the loss of expression of wild-type protein include gene deletion or rearrangement, nonsense or stop mutations, mutations within introns or upstream regulatory regions of the gene, and accelerated rates of degradation of the protein by DNA viral oncoproteins

  3. Cystatin D is a candidate tumor suppressor gene induced by vitamin D in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Díaz, Silvia; Valle, Noelia; García, José Miguel; Peña, Cristina; Freije, José M P; Quesada, Víctor; Astudillo, Aurora; Bonilla, Félix; López-Otín, Carlos; Muñoz, Alberto

    2009-08-01

    The active vitamin D metabolite 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1alpha,25(OH)2D3] has wide but not fully understood antitumor activity. A previous transcriptomic analysis of 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 action on human colon cancer cells revealed cystatin D (CST5), which encodes an inhibitor of several cysteine proteases of the cathepsin family, as a candidate target gene. Here we report that 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 induced vitamin D receptor (VDR) binding to, and activation of, the CST5 promoter and increased CST5 RNA and protein levels in human colon cancer cells. In cells lacking endogenous cystatin D, ectopic cystatin D expression inhibited both proliferation in vitro and xenograft tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, cystatin D inhibited migration and anchorage-independent growth, antagonized the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway, and repressed c-MYC expression. Cystatin D repressed expression of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition inducers SNAI1, SNAI2, ZEB1, and ZEB2 and, conversely, induced E-cadherin and other adhesion proteins. CST5 knockdown using shRNA abrogated the antiproliferative effect of 1alpha,25(OH)2D3, attenuated E-cadherin expression, and increased c-MYC expression. In human colorectal tumors, expression of cystatin D correlated with expression of VDR and E-cadherin, and loss of cystatin D correlated with poor tumor differentiation. Based on these data, we propose that CST5 has tumor suppressor activity that may contribute to the antitumoral action of 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 in colon cancer.

  4. Targeting activating mutations of EZH2 leads to potent cell growth inhibition in human melanoma by derepression of tumor suppressor genes

    OpenAIRE

    Tiffen, Jessamy C.; Gunatilake, Dilini; Gallagher, Stuart J.; Gowrishankar, Kavitha; Heinemann, Anja; Cullinane, Carleen; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Pupo, Gulietta M.; Strbenac, Dario; Yang, Jean Y.; Madore, Jason; Mann, Graham J.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; McArthur, Grant A.; Filipp, Fabian V.

    2015-01-01

    The epigenetic modifier EZH2 is part of the polycomb repressive complex that suppresses gene expression via histone methylation. Activating mutations in EZH2 are found in a subset of melanoma that contributes to disease progression by inactivating tumor suppressor genes. In this study we have targeted EZH2 with a specific inhibitor (GSK126) or depleted EZH2 protein by stable shRNA knockdown. We show that inhibition of EZH2 has potent effects on the growth of both wild-type and EZH2 mutant hum...

  5. Functional interactions between the erupted/tsg101 growth suppressor gene and the DaPKC and rbf1 genes in Drosophila imaginal disc tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Melissa Gilbert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Drosophila gene erupted (ept encodes the fly homolog of human Tumor Susceptibility Gene-101 (TSG101, which functions as part of the conserved ESCRT-1 complex to facilitate the movement of cargoes through the endolysosomal pathway. Loss of ept or other genes that encode components of the endocytic machinery (e.g. synatxin7/avalanche, rab5, and vps25 produces disorganized overgrowth of imaginal disc tissue. Excess cell division is postulated to be a primary cause of these 'neoplastic' phenotypes, but the autonomous effect of these mutations on cell cycle control has not been examined. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that disc cells lacking ept function display an altered cell cycle profile indicative of deregulated progression through the G1-to-S phase transition and express reduced levels of the tumor suppressor ortholog and G1/S inhibitor Rbf1. Genetic reductions of the Drosophila aPKC kinase (DaPKC, which has been shown to promote tumor growth in other fly tumor models, prevent both the ept neoplastic phenotype and the reduction in Rbf1 levels that otherwise occurs in clones of ept mutant cells; this effect is coincident with changes in localization of Notch and Crumbs, two proteins whose sorting is altered in ept mutant cells. The effect on Rbf1 can also be blocked by removal of the gamma-secretase component presenilin, suggesting that cleavage of a gamma-secretase target influences Rbf1 levels in ept mutant cells. Expression of exogenous rbf1 completely ablates ept mutant eye tissues but only mildly affects the development of discs composed of cells with wild type ept. CONCLUSIONS: Together, these data show that loss of ept alters nuclear cell cycle control in developing imaginal discs and identify the DaPKC, presenilin, and rbf1 genes as modifiers of molecular and cellular phenotypes that result from loss of ept.

  6. The essential Escherichia coli msgB gene, a multicopy suppressor of a temperature-sensitive allele of the heat shock gene grpE, is identical to dapE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, B; Georgopoulos, C; Ang, D

    1992-08-01

    The grpE gene product is one of three Escherichia coli heat shock proteins (DnaK, DnaJ, and GrpE) that are essential for both bacteriophage lambda DNA replication and bacterial growth at all temperatures. In an effort to determine the role of GrpE and to identify other factors that it may interact with, we isolated multicopy suppressors of the grpE280 point mutation, as judged by their ability to reverse the temperature-sensitive phenotype of grpE280. Here we report the characterization of one of them, designated msgB. The msgB gene maps at approximately 53 min on the E. coli chromosome. The minimal gene possesses an open reading frame that encodes a protein with a predicted size of 41,269 M(r). This open reading frame was confirmed the correct one by direct amino-terminal sequence analysis of the overproduced msgB gene product. Genetic experiments demonstrated that msgB is essential for E. coli growth in the temperature range of 22 to 37 degrees C. Through a sequence homology search, MsgB was shown to be identical to N-succinyl-L-diaminopimelic acid desuccinylase (the dapE gene product), which participates in the diaminopimelic acid-lysine pathway involved in cell wall biosynthesis. Consistent with this finding, the msgB null allele mutant is viable only when the growth medium is supplemented with diaminopimelic acid. These results suggest that GrpE may have a previously unsuspected function(s) in cell wall biosynthesis in E. coli.

  7. Coverage analysis of lists of genes involved in heterogeneous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genes involved in myopathies: 82 genes, based on the disease groups 'muscular dystrophies', 'congenital muscular dystrophies',. 'congenital ..... Spinal muscular atrophy, lower extremity-predominant, AD. 158600. EGR2 .... Mental retardation, stereotypic movements, epilepsy, and/or cerebral malformations. 613443.

  8. Hormonal Involvement in Breast Cancer Gene Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    and s ubsequently amp lified at the Yale University sequenc ing facility for Illumina sequencing. However, it required a lot of effort to obtain this...and Polyak K. (2008). Genome-wide functi onal synergy between amp lified and mutated genes in human breast cancer. Cancer Res. 68: 9532-9540...east cancer patient samples. Other co-amp lified genes, within the HER2 amplicon and/or at other regions, could serve as additional novel target s for

  9. Sulforaphane Alone and in Combination with Clofarabine Epigenetically Regulates the Expression of DNA Methylation-Silenced Tumour Suppressor Genes in Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubecka-Pietruszewska, Katarzyna; Kaufman-Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Stefanska, Barbara; Cebula-Obrzut, Barbara; Smolewski, Piotr; Fabianowska-Majewska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic breast cancer is frequently associated with aberrant DNA methylation patterns that are reversible and responsive to environmental factors, including diet. In the present study, we investigated the effects of sulforaphane (SFN), a phytochemical from cruciferous vegetables, on the methylation and expression of PTEN and RARbeta2 tumour suppressor genes as well as on the expression of regulators of DNA methylation reaction, DNMT1 , p53 , and p21 , in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells with different invasive potential. We also evaluate the role of SFN epigenetic effects in support of therapy with clofarabine (ClF) that was recently shown to modulate the epigenome as well. Promoter methylation and gene expression were estimated using methylation-sensitive restriction analysis and real-time PCR, respectively. In both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, SFN at IC 50 (22 and 46 μ M , respectively) and a physiologically relevant 10 μ M concentration lead to hypomethylation of PTEN and RARbeta2 promoters with concomitant gene upregulation. The combination of SFN and ClF enhances these effects, resulting in an increase in cell growth arrest and apoptosis at a non-invasive breast cancer stage. Our findings provide evidence that SFN activates DNA methylation-silenced tumour suppressor genes in breast cancer cells and may contribute to SFN-mediated support of therapy with an anti-cancer drug, ClF, increasing its applications in solid tumours.

  10. Allelic loss of the short arm of chromosome 4 in neuroblastoma suggests a novel tumour suppressor gene locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caron, H.; van Sluis, P.; Buschman, R.; Pereira do Tanque, R.; Maes, P.; Beks, L.; de Kraker, J.; Voûte, P. A.; Vergnaud, G.; Westerveld, A.; Slater, R.; Versteeg, R.

    1996-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood neural crest tumour, genetically characterized by frequent deletions of the short arm of chromosome 1 and amplification of N-myc. Here we report the first evidence for a neuroblastoma tumour suppressor locus on 4pter. Cytogenetically we demonstrated rearrangements of 4p

  11. The tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog protein (PTEN) is negatively regulated by NF-κb p50 homodimers and involves histone 3 methylation/deacetylation in UROtsa cells chronically exposed to monomethylarsonous acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-González, C; Uresti-Rivera, E E; Galicia-Cruz, O G; Jasso-Robles, F I; Gandolfi, A J; Escudero-Lourdes, C

    2017-10-05

    UROtsa cells have been accepted as a model to study carcinogenicity mechanisms of arsenic-associated human bladder cancer. In vitro continuous exposure to monomethylarsonous acid (MMA III ), leads UROtsa cells to commit to malignant transformation. In this process, NF-κβ-associated inflammatory response seems to play an important role since this transcription factor activates some minutes after cells are exposed in vitro to MMA III and keeps activated during the cellular malignant transformation. It is known that a slight decrease in the protein phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) gene expression is enough for some cells to become malignantly transformed. Interestingly, this tumor suppressor has been proven to be negatively regulated by NF-κβ through binding to its gene promoter. Based on these observations we propose that NF-κβ may be involved in arsenic associated carcinogenesis through the negative regulation of PTEN gene expression. Changes in PTEN expression and the binding of p50 NF-κβ subunit to PTEN promoter were evaluated in UROtsa cells exposed for 4, 12, 20, or 24 wk to 50nM MMA III . Results showed that MMA III induced a significant decrease in PTEN expression around 20 wk exposure to MMA III ,which correlated with increased binding of p50 subunit to the PTEN promoter. Consistent with these results, ChIP assays also showed a significant decrease in H3 acetylation (H3ac) but an increase in the repression marks H3k9me3 and H327me3 in PTEN promoter when compared with not treated cells. These results suggest that the activation of NF-κβ by MMA III may participate in UROtsa cells malignant transformation through the negative regulation of PTEN expression involving p50 homodimers-mediated chromatin remodeling around the PTEN promoter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Silencing of tumor metastasis suppressor gene 1 promotes invasion of prostate cancer cell in vitro and its molecular mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-yan; You, Jiang-feng; Pei, Fei; Zhang, Bo

    2011-12-18

    , indicating that LASS2 is a novel tumor metastasis suppressor gene.

  13. Moringa oleifera Gold Nanoparticles Modulate Oncogenes, Tumor Suppressor Genes, and Caspase-9 Splice Variants in A549 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiloke, Charlette; Phulukdaree, Alisa; Anand, Krishnan; Gengan, Robert M; Chuturgoon, Anil A

    2016-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP's) facilitate cancer cell recognition and can be manufactured by green synthesis using nutrient rich medicinal plants such as Moringa oleifera (MO). Targeting dysregulated oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes is crucial for cancer therapeutics. We investigated the antiproliferative effects of AuNP synthesized from MO aqueous leaf extracts (MLAuNP ) in A549 lung and SNO oesophageal cancer cells. A one-pot green synthesis technique was used to synthesise MLAuNP . A549, SNO cancer cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were exposed to MLAuNP and CAuNP to evaluate cytotoxicity (MTT assay); apoptosis was measured by phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization, mitochondrial depolarization (ΔΨm) (flow cytometry), caspase-3/7, -9 activity, and ATP levels (luminometry). The mRNA expression of c-myc, p53, Skp2, Fbw7α, and caspase-9 splice variants was determined using qPCR, while relative protein expression of c-myc, p53, SRp30a, Bax, Bcl-2, Smac/DIABLO, Hsp70, and PARP-1 were determined by Western blotting. MLAuNP and CAuNP were not cytotoxic to PBMCs, whilst its pro-apoptotic properties were confirmed in A549 and SNO cells. MLAuNP significantly increased caspase activity in SNO cells while MLAuNP significantly increased PS externalization, ΔΨm, caspase-9, caspase-3/7 activities, and decreased ATP levels in A549 cells. Also, p53 mRNA and protein levels, SRp30a (P = 0.428), Bax, Smac/DIABLO and PARP-1 24 kDa fragment levels were significantly increased. Conversely, MLAuNP significantly decreased Bcl-2, Hsp70, Skp2, Fbw7α, c-myc mRNA, and protein levels and activated alternate splicing with caspase-9a splice variant being significantly increased. MLAuNP possesses antiproliferative properties and induced apoptosis in A549 cells by activating alternate splicing of caspase-9. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2302-2314, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Genetic and Epigenetic Tumor Suppressor Gene Silencing are Distinct Molecular Phenotypes Driven by Growth Promoting Mutations in Non small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsit, C. J.; Kelsey, K. T.; Houseman, E. A.; Kelsey, K. T.; Houseman, E. A.; Nelson, H. H.

    2008-01-01

    Both genetic and epigenetic alterations characterize human non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but the biological processes that create or select these alterations remain incompletely investigated. Our hypothesis posits that a roughly reciprocal relationship between the propensity for promoter hyper methylation and a propensity for genetic deletion leads to distinct molecular phenotypes of lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we examined promoter hyper methylation of 17 tumor suppressor genes, as a marker of epigenetic alteration propensity, and deletion events at the 3p21 region, as a marker of genetic alteration. To model the complex biology between these somatic alterations, we utilized an item response theory model. We demonstrated that tumors exhibiting LOH at greater than 30% of informative alleles in the 3p21 region have a significantly reduced propensity for hyper methylation. At the same time, tumors with activating KRAS mutations showed a significantly increased propensity for hyper methylation of the loci examined, a result similar to what has been observed in colon cancer. These data suggest that NSCLCs have distinct epigenetic or genetic alteration phenotypes acting upon tumor suppressor genes and that mutation of oncogenic growth promoting genes, such as KRAS, is associated with the epigenetic phenotype.

  15. Expression profiles of genes involved in tanshinone biosynthesis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Expression profiles of genes involved in tanshinone biosynthesis of two. Salvia miltiorrhiza genotypes with different tanshinone contents. Zhenqiao Song, Jianhua Wang and Xingfeng Li. J. Genet. 95, 433–439. Table 1. S. miltiorrhiza genes and primer pairs used for qRT-PCR. Gene. GenBank accession. Primer name.

  16. P53 and Rb tumor suppressor gene alterations in gastric cancer Alterações dos genes supressores tumorais p53 e Rb no câncer gástrico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane Mattar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes has been frequently observed in gastric carcinogenesis. Our purpose was to study the involvement of p53, APC, DCC, and Rb genes in gastric carcinoma. METHOD: Loss of heterozygosity of the p53, APC, DCC and Rb genes was studied in 22 gastric cancer tissues using polymerase chain reaction; single-strand conformation polymorphism of the p53 gene exons 5-6 and exons 7-8 was studied using 35S-dATP, and p53 expression was detected using a histological immunoperoxidase method with an anti-p53 clone. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: No loss of heterozygosity was observed in any of these tumor suppressor genes; homozygous deletion was detected in the Rb gene in 23% (3/13 of the cases of intestinal-type gastric carcinoma. Eighteen (81.8% cases showed band mobility shifts in exons 5-6 and/or 7-8 of the p53 gene. The presence of the p53 protein was positive in gastric cancer cells in 14 cases (63.6%. Normal gastric mucosa showed negative staining for p53; thus, the immunoreactivity was likely to represent mutant forms. The correlation of band mobility shift and the immunoreactivity to anti-p53 was not significant (P = .90. There was no correlation of gene alterations with the disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: The inactivation of Rb and p53 genes is involved in gastric carcinogenesis in our environment. Loss of the Rb gene observed only in the intestinal-type gastric cancer should be further evaluated in association with Helicobacter pylori infection. The p53 gene was affected in both intestinal and diffuse histological types of gastric cancer.A inativação de genes supressores tumorais tem sido freqüentemente observada na carcinogênese gástrica. O nosso objetivo foi estudar o envolvimento dos genes p53, APC, DCC e Rb no câncer gástrico. MÉTODO: Vinte e dois casos de câncer gástrico foram estudados por PCR-LOH (reação de polimerase em cadeia- perda de alelo heterozigoto dos genes p53, APC, DCC e Rb; e por PCR-SSCP (rea

  17. miR-7 and miR-218 epigenetically control tumor suppressor genes RASSF1A and Claudin-6 by targeting HoxB3 in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qiaoyan; Zhu, Fufan; Chen, Puxiang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Both miR-7 and miR-218 down-regulates HoxB3 expression by targeting the 3′-UTR of HoxB3 mRNA. ► A reverse correlation between the levels of endogenous miR-7, miR218 and HoxB3 expression. ► Epigenetic changes involve in the reactivation of HoxB3. ► Both miRNAs inhibits the cell cycle and clone formation of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Many microRNAs have been implicated as key regulators of cellular growth and differentiation and have been found to dysregulate proliferation in human tumors, including breast cancer. Cancer-linked microRNAs also alter the epigenetic landscape by way of DNA methylation and post-translational modifications of histones. Aberrations in Hox gene expression are important for oncogene or tumor suppressor during abnormal development and malignancy. Although recent studies suggest that HoxB3 is critical in breast cancer, the putative role(s) of microRNAs impinging on HoxB3 is not yet fully understood. In this study, we found that the expression levels of miR-7 and miR-218 were strongly and reversely associated with HoxB3 expression. Stable overexpression of miR-7 and miR-218 was accompanied by reactivation of tumor suppressor genes including RASSF1A and Claudin-6 by means of epigenetic switches in DNA methylation and histone modification, giving rise to inhibition of the cell cycle and clone formation of breast cancer cells. The current study provides a novel link between overexpression of collinear Hox genes and multiple microRNAs in human breast malignancy.

  18. Primary microcephaly gene MCPH1 shows signatures of tumor suppressors and is regulated by miR-27a in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thejaswini Venkatesh

    Full Text Available Mutations in the MCPH1 (microcephalin 1 gene, located at chromosome 8p23.1, result in two autosomal recessive disorders: primary microcephaly and premature chromosome condensation syndrome. MCPH1 has also been shown to be downregulated in breast, prostate and ovarian cancers, and mutated in 1/10 breast and 5/41 endometrial tumors, suggesting that it could also function as a tumor suppressor (TS gene. To test the possibility of MCPH1 as a TS gene, we first performed LOH study in a panel of 81 matched normal oral tissues and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC samples, and observed that 14/71 (19.72% informative samples showed LOH, a hallmark of TS genes. Three protein truncating mutations were identified in 1/15 OSCC samples and 2/5 cancer cell lines. MCPH1 was downregulated at both the transcript and protein levels in 21/41 (51.22% and 19/25 (76% OSCC samples respectively. A low level of MCPH1 promoter methylation was also observed in 4/40 (10% tumor samples. We further observed that overexpression of MCPH1 decreased cellular proliferation, anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, cell invasion and tumor size in nude mice, indicating its tumor suppressive function. Using bioinformatic approaches and luciferase assay, we showed that the 3'-UTR of MCPH1 harbors two non-overlapping functional seed regions for miR-27a which negatively regulated its level. The expression level of miR-27a negatively correlated with the MCPH1 protein level in OSCC. Our study indicates for the first time that, in addition to its role in brain development, MCPH1 also functions as a tumor suppressor gene and is regulated by miR-27a.

  19. Gene-environment interactions involving functional variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Rudolph, Anja; Hopper, John L

    2017-01-01

    epidemiological breast cancer risk factors in relation to breast cancer. Analyses were conducted on up to 58,573 subjects (26,968 cases and 31,605 controls) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, in one of the largest studies of its kind. Analyses were carried out separately for estrogen receptor (ER.......01. The strongest interaction result in relation to overall breast cancer risk was found between CFLAR-rs7558475 and current smoking (ORint  = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.67-0.88, pint  = 1.8 × 10(-4) ). The interaction with the strongest statistical evidence was found between 5q14-rs7707921 and alcohol consumption (ORint =1.......36, 95% CI: 1.16-1.59, pint  = 1.9 × 10(-5) ) in relation to ER- disease risk. The remaining two gene-environment interactions were also identified in relation to ER- breast cancer risk and were found between 3p21-rs6796502 and age at menarche (ORint  = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.12-1.43, pint =1.8 × 10...

  20. Re-expression of methylation-induced tumor suppressor gene silencing is associated with the state of histone modification in gastric cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chun-Feng; Zhu, Xin-Jiang; Peng, Guo; Dai, Dong-Qiu

    2007-12-14

    To identify the relationship between DNA hyper-methylation and histone modification at a hyperme-thylated, silenced tumor suppressor gene promoter in human gastric cancer cell lines and to elucidate whether alteration of DNA methylation could affect histone modification. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay to assess the status of histone acetylation and methylation in promoter regions of the p16 and mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) genes in 2 gastric cancer cell lines, SGC-7901 and MGC-803. We used methylation-specific PCR (MSP) to evaluate the effect of 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC), trichostatin A (TSA) or their combination treatment on DNA methylation status. We used RT-PCR to determine whether alterations of histone modification status after 5-Aza-dC and TSA treatment are reflected in gene expression. For the p16 and MLH1 genes in two cell lines, silenced loci associated with DNA hypermethylation were characterized by histone H3-K9 hypoacetylation and hypermethylation and histone H3-K4 hypomethylation. Treatment with TSA resulted in moderately increased histone H3-K9 acetylation at the silenced loci with no effect on histone H3-K9 methylation and minimal effects on gene expression. In contrast, treatment with 5-Aza-dC rapidly reduced histone H3-K9 methylation at the silenced loci and resulted in reactivation of the two genes. Combined treatment with 5-Aza-dC and TSA was synergistic in reactivating gene expression at the loci showing DNA hypermethylation. Similarly, histone H3-K4 methylation was not affected after TSA treatment, and increased moderately at the silenced loci after 5-Aza-dC treatment. Hypermethylation of DNA in promoter CpG islands is related to transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressor genes. Histone H3-K9 methylation in different regions of the promoters studied correlates with DNA methylation status of each gene in gastric cancer cells. However, histone H3-K9 acetylation and H3-K4 methylation inversely correlate with DNA methylation

  1. Genes Involved in Oxidation and Prostate Cancer Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Platz, Elizabeth A

    2008-01-01

    We are evaluating whether polymorphisms in genes involved in the genesis of oxidative species, detoxification of oxidative species, or repair of oxidative DNA damage influence risk of prostate cancer...

  2. Host genes involved in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soltani, Jalal

    2009-01-01

    Agrobacterium is the nature’s genetic engineer that can transfer genes across the kingdom barriers to both prokaryotic and eukaryotic host cells. The host genes which are involved in Agrobacterium-mediated transformatiom (AMT) are not well known. Here, I studied in a systematic way to identify the

  3. Temporal expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a large family of endogenous plant growth regulators. Bioactive GAs influence nearly all processes during plant growth and development. In the present study, we cloned and identified 10 unique genes that are potentially involved in the biosynthesis of GAs, including one BpGGDP gene, two BpCPS ...

  4. Sodium butyrate induces cell death by autophagy and reactivates a tumor suppressor gene DIRAS1 in renal cell carcinoma cell line UOK146.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shiv Prakash; Agarwal, Ayushi; Das, Parimal

    2018-04-01

    Sodium butyrate (SB), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, is emerging as a potent anti-cancer drug for different types of cancers. In the present study, anti-cancer activity of SB in Xp11.2 (TFE3) translocated renal cell carcinoma cell line UOK146 was studied. Anti-proliferative effect of SB in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell line UOK146 was evaluated by MTT assay and morphological characteristics were observed by phase contrast microscopy which displayed the cell death after SB treatment. SB induces DNA fragmentation and change in nuclear morphology observed by increased sub-G1 region cell population and nuclear blebbings. Cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase was found after SB treatment. UOK146 cell line shows autophagy mode of cell death as displayed by acridine orange staining and flow cytometry analysis. LC3-II, a protein marker of autophagy, was also found to be upregulated after SB treatment. A tumor suppressor gene DIRAS1 was upregulated after SB treatment, displaying its anti-cancer potential at molecular level. These findings suggest that SB could serve as a novel regulator of tumor suppressors and lead to the discovery of novel therapeutics with better and enhanced anti-cancer activity.

  5. The expression of a tumor suppressor gene JDP2 and its prognostic value in hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao-Li; Chan, Shih-Hsuan; Lin, Ping-Yi; Chu, Pei-Yi

    2017-05-01

    The c-Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2) belongs to the activator protein-1 (AP-1) family and functions as a repressor of the AP-1 complex by dimerizing with other c-Jun proteins. Thus, JDP2 plays an important role in the repression of AP-1-driven biological processes, such as differentiation and proliferation. Recent studies have suggested that JDP2 may function as a tumor suppressor through its suppressive action against the AP-1 complex, which is known to drive oncogenic signals in several human malignancies. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry to examine the JDP2 expression in 211 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and analyzed the potential link of JDP2 expression to the clinicopathological features of HCC patients. Clinical parameter analysis showed that high expression of JDP2 was significantly correlated with smaller tumor size (P=.002) and early stage HCC (P=.039). Moreover, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that high expression of JDP2 was significantly associated with better survival in HCC patients (P=.006). Taken together, our results showed that JDP2 may serve as a tumor suppressor in HCC and could therefore serve as a good prognostic marker for patients with HCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Whole genome in vivo RNAi screening identifies the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor as a novel breast tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorns, Elizabeth; Ward, Toby M; Dean, Sonja; Jegg, Anna; Thomas, Dafydd; Murugaesu, Nirupa; Sims, David; Mitsopoulos, Costas; Fenwick, Kerry; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Naceur-Lombarelli, Cristina; Zvelebil, Marketa; Isacke, Clare M; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan; Hnatyszyn, H James; Pegram, Mark; Lippman, Marc

    2012-08-01

    Cancer is caused by mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, resulting in the deregulation of processes fundamental to the normal behavior of cells. The identification and characterization of oncogenes and tumor suppressors has led to new treatment strategies that have significantly improved cancer outcome. The advent of next generation sequencing has allowed the elucidation of the fine structure of cancer genomes, however, the identification of pathogenic changes is complicated by the inherent genomic instability of cancer cells. Therefore, functional approaches for the identification of novel genes involved in the initiation and development of tumors are critical. Here we report the first whole human genome in vivo RNA interference screen to identify functionally important tumor suppressor genes. Using our novel approach, we identify previously validated tumor suppressor genes including TP53 and MNT, as well as several novel candidate tumor suppressor genes including leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR). We show that LIFR is a key novel tumor suppressor, whose deregulation may drive the transformation of a significant proportion of human breast cancers. These results demonstrate the power of genome wide in vivo RNAi screens as a method for identifying novel genes regulating tumorigenesis.

  7. Lysine demethylase KDM2A inhibits TET2 to promote DNA methylation and silencing of tumor suppressor genes in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J-Y; Luo, C-W; Lai, Y-S; Wu, C-C; Hung, W-C

    2017-08-07

    The coupling between DNA methylation and histone modification contributes to aberrant expression of oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes that leads to tumor development. Our previous study demonstrated that lysine demethylase 2A (KDM2A) functions as an oncogene in breast cancer by promoting cancer stemness and angiogenesis via activation of the Notch signaling. Here, we demonstrate that knockdown of KDM2A significantly increases the 5'-hydroxymethylcytosine (5'-hmc) level in genomic DNA and expression of tet-eleven translocation 2 (TET2) in various breast cancer cell lines. Conversely, ectopic expression of KDM2A inhibits TET2 expression in KDM2A-depleted cells suggesting TET2 is a transcriptional repression target of KDM2A. Our results show that KDM2A interacts with RelA to co-occupy at the TET2 gene promoter to repress transcription and depletion of RelA or KDM2A restores TET2 expression. Upregulation of TET2 in the KDM2A-depleted cells induces the re-activation of two TET downstream tumor suppressor genes, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and E-cadherin, and inhibits migration and invasion. On the contrary, knockdown of TET2 in these cells decreases EpCAM and E-cadherin and increases cell invasiveness. More importantly, TET2 expression is negatively associated KDM2A in triple-negative breast tumor tissues, and its expression predicts a better survival. Taken together, we demonstrate for the first time that TET2 is a direct repression target of KDM2A and reveal a novel mechanism by which KDM2A promotes DNA methylation and breast cancer progression via the inhibition of a DNA demethylase.

  8. High-level HIV-1 Nef transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana using the P19 gene silencing suppressor protein of Artichoke Mottled Crinckle Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianco Linda

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, different HIV antigens have been successfully expressed in plants by either stable transformation or transient expression systems. Among HIV proteins, Nef is considered a promising target for the formulation of a multi-component vaccine due to its implication in the first steps of viral infection. Attempts to express Nef as a single protein product (not fused to a stabilizing protein in transgenic plants resulted in disappointingly low yields (about 0.5% of total soluble protein. In this work we describe a transient expression system based on co-agroinfiltration of plant virus gene silencing suppressor proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana, followed by a two-step affinity purification protocol of plant-derived Nef. Results The effect of three gene silencing viral suppressor proteins (P25 of Potato Virus X, P19 of either Artichoke Mottled Crinckle virus and Tomato Bushy Stunt virus on Nef transient expression yield was evaluated. The P19 protein of Artichoke Mottled Crinckle virus (AMCV-P19 gave the highest expression yield in vacuum co-agroinfiltration experiments reaching 1.3% of total soluble protein, a level almost three times higher than that previously reported in stable transgenic plants. The high yield observed in the co-agroinfiltrated plants was correlated to a remarkable decrease of Nef-specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs indicating an effective modulation of RNA silencing mechanisms by AMCV-P19. Interestingly, we also showed that expression levels in top leaves of vacuum co-agroinfiltrated plants were noticeably reduced compared to bottom leaves. Moreover, purification of Nef from agroinfiltrated tissue was achieved by a two-step immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography protocol with yields of 250 ng/g of fresh tissue. Conclusion We demonstrated that expression level of HIV-1 Nef in plant can be improved using a transient expression system enhanced by the AMCV-P19 gene silencing suppressor

  9. The CREB Coactivator CRTC2 Is a Lymphoma Tumor Suppressor that Preserves Genome Integrity through Transcription of DNA Mismatch Repair Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Minggang; Pak, Magnolia L; Chamberlain, Lynn; Xing, Wei; Yu, Hongbo; Green, Michael R

    2015-06-09

    The CREB-regulated transcription coactivator CRTC2 stimulates CREB target gene expression and has a well-established role in modulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Here, we find, unexpectedly, that loss of CRTC2, as well as CREB1 and its coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP), results in a deficiency in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) and a resultant increased mutation frequency. We show that CRTC2, CREB1, and CBP are transcriptional activators of well-established MMR genes, including EXO1, MSH6, PMS1, and POLD2. Mining of expression profiling databases and analysis of patient samples reveal that CRTC2 and its target MMR genes are downregulated in specific T cell lymphoma subtypes, which are microsatellite unstable. The levels of acetylated histone H3 on the CRTC2 promoter are significantly reduced in lymphoma in comparison to normal tissue, explaining the decreased CRTC2 expression. Our results establish a role for CRTC2 as a lymphoma tumor suppressor gene that preserves genome integrity by stimulating transcription of MMR genes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Physical mapping of chromosome 17p13.3 in the region of a putative tumor suppressor gene important in medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, J.D.; Daneshvar, L.; Willert, J.R. [Univ. of California, San Franciso, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Deletion mapping of a medulloblastoma tumor panel revealed loss of distal chromosome 17p13.3 sequences in tumors from 14 of 32 patients (44%). Of the 14 tumors showing loss of heterozygosity by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, 14 of 14 (100%) displayed loss of the telomeric marker p144-D6 (D17S34), while a probe for the ABR gene on 17p13.3 was lost in 7 of 8 (88%) informative cases. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we localized the polymorphic marker (VNTR-A) of the ABR gene locus to within 220 kb of the p144-D6 locus. A cosmid contig constructed in this region was used to demonstrate by fluorescence in situ hybridization that the ABR gene is oriented transcriptionally 5{prime} to 3{prime} toward the telomere. This report provides new physical mapping data for the ABR gene, which has not been previously shown to be deleted in medulloblastoma. These results provide further evidence for the existence of a second tumor suppressor gene distinct from p53 on distal chromosome 17p. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Tumoral tissue specific promoter hypermethylation of distinct tumor suppressor genes in a case with non--small cell lung carcinoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslan Sulhattin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Non-small cell lung carcinoma is an aggressive phenomenon and the epigenetical alterations of some tumor supressor genes have been reported for the different tumor types. Case Presentation: It is presented a case report concerning a 43 years old male with NSCLC on the lower segment of the right lung. The patient underwent a diag-nostic excisional thin-needle biopsy and after the histological confirmation. We examined the promoter methylation status of some distinct tumor supressor genes in tumoral and blood tissues of the case after sodium bisulfite conversion and DNA amplification with methylation specific multiplex PCR technique. Both tissues were also searched for G to A transitions in codons 12 and 13 of the K-ras proto-oncogene. Results: Tumor specimen showed fully methyl pattern profiles for the SFRP2, p16, DAPK1 and partially hyper-methylated profile for the p53 and MGMT genes in this case with non-small lung carci-noma. Blood speicemen showed normal hypomethylated profiles for all studied TS genes. The K-ras proto-oncogene was in normal structure both in blood and tumoral spiecemens that examined. Conclusion: Results indicate that genes exhibit tumor suppressor activi-ties in blood, but exhibit epigenetic inactivation in carcinoma cell. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that epigenetic mechanisms may play an important role in the non-small cell lung carcinogenesis in human.

  12. Genes involved in sex determination and the influence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review attempts to group the recent hypotheses involved in the complex system of determination and sex differentiation in fish. Based on recent literature, we relate the key genes involved in the genomic cascade as the Cyp19, Dmrt1, Sox9, Foxl2, Esr, Dax1, Sf1 and Amh1, and still little known action of temperature on ...

  13. Abundance of genes involved in mercury methylation in oceanic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, A. V.; Podar, M.; Gilmour, C. C.; Brandt, C. C.; Brown, S. D.; Crable, B. R.; Weighill, D.; Jacobson, D. A.; Somenahally, A. C.; Elias, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    The distribution and diversity of genes involved in mercury methylation in oceanic environments is of interest in determining the source of mercury in ocean environments and may have predictive value for mercury methylation rates. The highly conserved hgcAB genes involved in mercury methylation provide an avenue for evaluating the genetic potential for mercury methylation. The genes are sporadically present in a few diverse groups of bacteria and Archaea including Deltaproteobacteria, Firmicutes and Archaea and of over 7000 sequenced species they are only present in about 100 genomes. Examination of sequence data from methylators and non-methylators indicates that these genes are associated with other genes involved in metal transformations and transport. We examined hgcAB presence in over 3500 microbial metagenomes (from all environments) and found the hgcAB genes were present in anaerobic oceanic environments but not in aerobic layers of the open ocean. The genes were common in sediments from marine, coastal and estuarine sources as well as polluted environments. The genes were rare, found in 7 of 138 samples, in metagenomes from the pelagic water column including profiles though the oxygen minimum zone. Other oxic and sub-oxic coastal waters also demonstrated a lack of hgcAB genes including the OMZ in the Eastern North Pacific Ocean. There were some unique hgcA like unique sequences found in metagenomes from depth in the Pacific and Southern Atlantic Ocean. Coastal "dead zone" waters may be important sources of MeHg as the hgcAB genes were abundant in the anoxic waters of a stratified fjord. The genes were absent in microbiomes from vertebrates but were in invertebrate microbiomes However, oceanic species were underrepresented in these samples. Climate change could provide an additional flux of MeHg to the oceans as we found the most abundant representation of hgcAB genes in arctic permafrost. Thus warming could increase flux of methyl mercury to arctic waters.

  14. Loss of function of the tuberous sclerosis 2 tumor suppressor gene results in embryonic lethality characterized by disrupted neuroepithelial growth and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennebeck, Gabriela; Kleymenova, Elena V.; Anderson, Rebecca; Yeung, Raymond S.; Artzt, Karen; Walker, Cheryl L.

    1998-01-01

    Germline defects in the tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) tumor suppressor gene predispose humans and rats to benign and malignant lesions in a variety of tissues. The brain is among the most profoundly affected organs in tuberous sclerosis (TSC) patients and is the site of development of the cortical tubers for which the hereditary syndrome is named. A spontaneous germline inactivation of the Tsc2 locus has been described in an animal model, the Eker rat. We report that the homozygous state of this mutation (Tsc2Ek/Ek) was lethal in mid-gestation (the equivalent of mouse E9.5–E13.5), when Tsc2 mRNA was highly expressed in embryonic neuroepithelium. During this period homozygous mutant Eker embryos lacking functional Tsc2 gene product, tuberin, displayed dysraphia and papillary overgrowth of the neuroepithelium, indicating that loss of tuberin disrupted the normal development of this tissue. Interestingly, there was significant intraspecies variability in the penetrance of cranial abnormalities in mutant embryos: the Long–Evans strain Tsc2Ek/Ek embryos displayed these defects whereas the Fisher 344 homozygous mutant embryos had normal-appearing neuroepithelium. Taken together, our data indicate that the Tsc2 gene participates in normal brain development and suggest the inactivation of this gene may have similar functional consequences in both mature and embryonic brain. PMID:9861021

  15. Genetic modelling of PIM proteins in cancer: proviral tagging, cooperation with oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and carcinogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enara eAguirre

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The PIM proteins, which were initially discovered as proviral insertion sites in Moloney murine leukemia virus infection, are a family of highly homologous serine/threonine kinases that have been reported to be overexpressed in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. The PIM proteins have also been associated with metastasis and overall treatment responses and implicated in the regulation of apoptosis, metabolism, the cell cycle, and homing and migration, which makes these proteins interesting targets for anticancer drug discovery. The use of retroviral insertional mutagenesis and refined approaches such as complementation tagging has allowed the identification of myc, pim and a third group of genes (including bmi1 and gfi1 as complementing genes in lymphomagenesis. Moreover, mouse modeling of human cancer has provided an understanding of the molecular pathways that are involved in tumor initiation and progression at the physiological level. In particular, genetically modified mice have allowed researchers to further elucidate the role of each of the Pim isoforms in various tumor types. PIM kinases have been identified as weak oncogenes because experimental overexpression in lymphoid tissue, prostate and liver induces tumors at a relatively low incidence and with a long latency. However, very strong synergistic tumorigenicity between Pim1/2 and c-Myc and other oncogenes has been observed in lymphoid tissues. Mouse models have also been used to study whether the inhibition of specific PIM isoforms is required to prevent carcinogen-induced sarcomas, indicating that the absence of Pim2 and Pim3 greatly reduces sarcoma growth and bone invasion; the extent of this effect is similar to that observed in the absence of all 3 isoforms. This review will summarize some of the animal models that have been used to understand the isoform-specific contribution of PIM kinases to tumorigenesis.

  16. Stably Expressed Genes Involved in Basic Cellular Functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejian Wang

    Full Text Available Stably Expressed Genes (SEGs whose expression varies within a narrow range may be involved in core cellular processes necessary for basic functions. To identify such genes, we re-analyzed existing RNA-Seq gene expression profiles across 11 organs at 4 developmental stages (from immature to old age in both sexes of F344 rats (n = 4/group; 320 samples. Expression changes (calculated as the maximum expression / minimum expression for each gene of >19000 genes across organs, ages, and sexes ranged from 2.35 to >109-fold, with a median of 165-fold. The expression of 278 SEGs was found to vary ≤4-fold and these genes were significantly involved in protein catabolism (proteasome and ubiquitination, RNA transport, protein processing, and the spliceosome. Such stability of expression was further validated in human samples where the expression variability of the homologous human SEGs was significantly lower than that of other genes in the human genome. It was also found that the homologous human SEGs were generally less subject to non-synonymous mutation than other genes, as would be expected of stably expressed genes. We also found that knockout of SEG homologs in mouse models was more likely to cause complete preweaning lethality than non-SEG homologs, corroborating the fundamental roles played by SEGs in biological development. Such stably expressed genes and pathways across life-stages suggest that tight control of these processes is important in basic cellular functions and that perturbation by endogenous (e.g., genetics or exogenous agents (e.g., drugs, environmental factors may cause serious adverse effects.

  17. The essential Escherichia coli msgB gene, a multicopy suppressor of a temperature-sensitive allele of the heat shock gene grpE, is identical to dapE.

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, B; Georgopoulos, C; Ang, D

    1992-01-01

    The grpE gene product is one of three Escherichia coli heat shock proteins (DnaK, DnaJ, and GrpE) that are essential for both bacteriophage lambda DNA replication and bacterial growth at all temperatures. In an effort to determine the role of GrpE and to identify other factors that it may interact with, we isolated multicopy suppressors of the grpE280 point mutation, as judged by their ability to reverse the temperature-sensitive phenotype of grpE280. Here we report the characterization of on...

  18. Temporal expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-10

    Oct 10, 2011 ... Gibberellins (GAs) are a large family of endogenous plant growth regulators. Bioactive GAs influence nearly all processes during plant growth and development. In the present study, we cloned and identified 10 unique genes that are potentially involved in the biosynthesis of GAs, including one. BpGGDP ...

  19. Identification of Phytophthora sojae genes involved in asexual ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ual sporulation or germination. But molecular details about asexual spore development in P. sojae are limited (Tyler et al. 2006). In the present study, to understand the molecular basis of asexual spore development in P. sojae, we investigated gene expression changes involved in asexual sporulation after ul- traviolet (UV) ...

  20. MTHFR variants reduce the risk of G:C->A:T transition mutations within the p53 tumor suppressor gene in colon tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, C M; Curtin, K; Samowitz, W; Bigler, J; Potter, J D; Caan, B; Slattery, M L

    2005-10-01

    5,10-Methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme in folate-mediated 1-carbon metabolism. Reduced MTHFR activity has been associated with genomic DNA hypomethylation. Methylated cytosines at CpG sites are easily mutated and have been implicated in G:C-->A:T transitions in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. We investigated 2 polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene (C677T and A1298C) and their associations with colon tumor characteristics, including acquired mutations in Ki-ras and p53 genes and microsatellite instability (MSI). The study population comprised 1248 colon cancer cases and 1972 controls, who participated in a population-based case-control study and had been analyzed previously for MSI, acquired mutations in Ki-ras, p53, and germline MTHFR polymorphisms. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratios are presented. Overall, MTHFR genotypes were not associated with MSI status or the presence of any p53 or Ki-ras mutation. Individuals with homozygous variant MTHFR genotypes had a significantly reduced risk of G:C-->A:T transition mutations within the p53 gene, yet, as hypothesized, only at CpG-associated sites [677TT vs. 677CC (referent group) OR = 0.4 (95% CI: 0.1-0.8) for CpG-associated sites; OR = 1.5 (0.7-3.6) for non-CpG associated sites]. Genotypes conferring reduced MTHFR activity were associated with a decreased risk of acquired G:C-->A:T mutations within the p53 gene occurring at CpG sites. Consistent with evidence on the phenotypic effect of the MTHFR C677T variant, we hypothesize that this relation may be explained by modestly reduced genomic DNA methylation, resulting in a lower probability of spontaneous deamination of methylated cytosine to thymidine. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which MTHFR polymorphisms can affect the risk of colon cancer.

  1. Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is a tumor-suppressor gene frequently inactivated in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Helen L; Narla, Goutham; Ogunbiyi, Olagunju; Haq, Asif I; Katz, Amanda; Benzeno, Sharon; Hod, Eldad; Harpaz, Noam; Goldberg, Shlomit; Tal-Kremer, Sigal; Eng, Francis J; Arthur, Michael J P; Martignetti, John A; Friedman, Scott L

    2004-04-01

    Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is a ubiquitous zinc finger tumor suppressor that is often mutated in prostate cancer. Our aims were to establish the frequency of KLF6 inactivation in sporadic and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-associated colorectal cancers (CRC); to correlate these abnormalities with mutation and/or loss of TP53, APC, and K-RAS; and to characterize the behavior of mutant KLF6 in colon-derived cell lines. We analyzed DNA isolated from 50 microdissected CRC cases, including 35 sporadic and 15 IBD-associated tumors. Microsatellite analysis and direct sequencing were used to establish the incidence of microsatellite instability, KLF6 and TP53 allelic imbalance, and KLF6, K-RAS, TP53, and APC mutation. Loss of growth suppressive function of the CRC-derived KLF6 mutants was characterized by in vitro thymidine incorporation assays and Western blotting. KLF6 was inactivated by loss and/or mutation in most sporadic and IBD-related CRCs. The KLF6 locus was deleted in at least 55% of tumors, and mutations were identified in 44%. Rates of KLF6 loss and mutation were similar to those of TP53 and K-RAS in the same samples. KLF6 mutations were present in tumors with either microsatellite or chromosomal instability and were more common, particularly in the IBD-related cancers, in the presence of wild-type APC. Unlike wild-type KLF6, cancer-derived KLF6 mutants neither suppressed growth nor induced p21 following transfection into cultured cells. Deregulation of KLF6 by a combination of allelic imbalance and mutation may play a role in the development of CRC.

  2. Genes Involved in the Biosynthesis and Transport of Acinetobactin in

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    Tarik Hasan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria survive in iron-limited host environments by using several iron acquisition mechanisms. Acinetobacter baumannii, causing serious infections in compromised patients, produces an iron-chelating molecule, called acinetobactin, which is composed of equimolar quantities of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA, L-threonine, and N-hydroxyhistamine, to compete with host cells for iron. Genes that are involved in the production and transport of acinetobactin are clustered within the genome of A. baumannii. A recent study showed that entA, located outside of the acinetobactin gene cluster, plays important roles in the biosynthesis of the acinetobactin precursor DHBA and in bacterial pathogenesis. Therefore, understanding the genes that are associated with the biosynthesis and transport of acinetobactin in the bacterial genome is required. This review is intended to provide a general overview of the genes in the genome of A. baumannii that are required for acinetobactin biosynthesis and transport.

  3. Tsw gene-based resistance is triggered by a functional RNA silencing suppressor protein of the Tomato spotted wilt virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronde, de D.; Butterbach, P.B.E.; Lohuis, H.; Hedil, M.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Kormelink, R.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    As a result of contradictory reports, the avirulence (Avr) determinant that triggers Tsw gene-based resistance in Capsicum annuum against the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is still unresolved. Here, the N and NSs genes of resistance-inducing (RI) and resistance-breaking (RB) isolates were cloned

  4. Characterisation of Campylobacter jejuni genes potentially involved in phosphonate degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartley Lauren E

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Potential biological roles of the Campylobacter jejuni genes cj0641, cj0774c and cj1663 were investigated. The proteins encoded by these genes showed sequence similarities to the phosphonate utilisation PhnH, K and L gene products of Escherichia coli. The genes cj0641, cj0774c and cj1663 were amplified from the pathogenic C. jejuni strain 81116, sequenced, and cloned into pGEM-T Easy vectors. Recombinant plasmids were used to disrupt each one of the genes by inserting a kanamycin resistance (KmR cassette employing site-directed mutagenesis or inverse PCR. Campylobacter jejuni 81116 isogenic mutants were generated by integration of the mutated genes into the genome of the wild-type strain. The C. jejuni mutants grew on primary isolation plates, but they could not be purified by subsequent passages owing to cell death. The mutant C. jejuni strains survived and proliferated in co-cultures with wild-type bacteria or in media in which wild-type C. jejuni had been previously grown. PCR analyses of mixed wild-type/mutant cultures served to verify the presence of the mutated gene in the genome of a fraction of the total bacterial population. The data suggested that each mutation inactivated a gene essential for survival. Rates of phosphonate catabolism in lysates of E. coli strain DH5α were determined using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Whole-cell lysates of the wild-type degraded phosphonoacetate, phenylphosphonate and aminomethylphosphonate. Significant differences in the rates of phosphonate degradation were observed between lysates of wild-type E. coli, and of bacteria transformed with each one of the vectors carrying one of the C. jejuni genes, suggesting that these genes were involved in phosphonate catabolism.

  5. Genes involved in translation of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma synoviae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica de Oliveira Santos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a report on the analysis of genes involved in translation of the complete genomes of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strain J and 7448 and Mycoplasma synoviae. In both genomes 31 ORFs encoding large ribosomal subunit proteins and 19 ORFs encoding small ribosomal subunit proteins were found. Ten ribosomal protein gene clusters encoding 42 ribosomal proteins were found in M. synoviae, while 8 clusters encoding 39 ribosomal proteins were found in both M. hyopneumoniae strains. The L33 gene of the M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448 presented two copies in different locations. The genes encoding initiation factors (IF-1, IF-2 and IF-3, elongation factors (EF-G, EF-Tu, EF-Ts and EF-P, and the genes encoding the ribosome recycling factor (frr and one polypeptide release factor (prfA were present in the genomes of M. hyopneumoniae and M. synoviae. Nineteen aminoacyl-tRNA synthases had been previously identified in both mycoplasmas. In the two strains of M. hyopneumoniae, J and 7448, only one set of 5S, 16S and 23S rRNAs had been identified. Two sets of 16S and 23S rRNA genes and three sets of 5S rRNA genes had been identified in the M. synoviae genome.

  6. Mutation analysis of the gene involved in adrenoleukodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oost, B.A. van; Ligtenberg, M.J.L. [Univ. Hospital Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kemp, S.; Bolhuis, P.A. [Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1994-09-01

    A gene responsible for the X-linked genetic disorder adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) that is characterized by demyelination of the nervous system and adrenocortical insufficiency has been identified by positional cloning. The gene encodes an ATP-binding transporter which is located in the peroxisomal membrane. Deficiency of the gene leads to accumulation of unsaturated very long chain fatty acids due to impaired peroxisomal {beta}-oxidation. A systematic analysis of the open reading frame of the ALD gene unraveled the mutations in 28 different families using reverse transcriptase-PCR followed by direct sequencing. No entire gene deletions or drastic promoter mutations have been detected. Only in one family did the mutation involved multiple exons. The remaining mutations were subtle alterations leading to missense (about 50%) or nonsense mutations, frameshifts or splice acceptor site defects. In one patient a single codon was missing. Mutations affecting a single amino acid were concentrated in the region between the third and fourth putative membrane spanning fragments and in the ATP-binding domain. This overview of mutations aids in the determination of structural and functional important regions and facilitates the screening for mutations in other ALD patients. The detection of mutations in virtually all ALD families tested indicates that the isolated gene is the only gene responsible for ALD located in Xq28.

  7. The role of UV induced lesions in skin carcinogenesis: an overview of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene modifications in xeroderma pigmentosum skin tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daya-Grosjean, Leela; Sarasin, Alain

    2005-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a rare hereditary syndrome, is characterized by a hypersensitivity to solar irradiation due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair resulting in a predisposition to squamous and basal cell carcinomas as well as malignant melanomas appearing at a very early age. The mutator phenotype of XP cells is evident by the higher levels of UV specific modifications found in key regulatory genes in XP skin tumors compared to those in the same tumor types from the normal population. Thus, XP provides a unique model for the study of unrepaired DNA lesions, mutations and skin carcinogenesis. The high level of ras oncogene activation, Ink4a-Arf and p53 tumor suppressor gene modifications as well as alterations of the different partners of the mitogenic sonic hedgehog signaling pathway (patched, smoothened and sonic hedgehog), characterized in XP skin tumors have clearly demonstrated the major role of the UV component of sunlight in the development of skin tumors. The majority of the mutations are C to T or tandem CC to TT UV signature transitions, occurring at bipyrimidine sequences, the specific targets of UV induced lesions. These characteristics are also found in the same genes modified in sporadic skin cancers but with lower frequencies confirming the validity of studying the XP model. The knowledge gained by studying XP tumors has given us a greater perception of the contribution of genetic predisposition to cancer as well as the consequences of the many alterations which modulate the activities of different genes affecting crucial pathways vital for maintaining cell homeostasis.

  8. p16 Tumor Suppressor Gene Methylation in Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma: A Study of 88 Cases at Two Hospitals in the East Coast of Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Ridah, Lailatul Jalilah; A Talib, Norlelawati; Muhammad, Naznin; Hussain, Faezahtul Arbaeyah; Zainuddin, Norafiza

    2017-10-26

    Introduction: p16 gene plays an important role in the normal cell cycle regulation. Methylation of p16 has been reported to be one of the epigenetic events contributing to the pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) which occurring at varying frequency. DLBCL is an aggressive and high-grade malignancy which accounts for approximately 30% of all non-Hodgkin lymphoma cases. However, little is known regarding the epigenetic alterations of p16 gene in DLBCL cases in Malaysia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the status of p16 methylation in DLBCL. Methods: A total of 88 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded DLBCL tissues retrieved from two hospitals located in the east coast of Malaysia, namely Hospital Tengku Ampuan Afzan (HTAA) Pahang and Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM) Kelantan, were chosen for this study. DNA specimens were isolated and subsequently subjected to bisulfite treatment prior to methylation specific-PCR. Two pairs of primers were used to amplify methylated and unmethylated regions of p16 gene. The PCR products were then separated using agarose gel electrophoresis and visualised under UV illumination. SPSS version 12.0 was utilised to perform all statistical analysis. Result: p16 methylation was detected in 65 of 88 (74%) samples. There was a significant association between p16 methylation status and patients aged >50 years old (p=0.04). Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that methylation of p16 tumor suppressor gene in our DLBCL cases is common and significantly increased among patients aged 50 years and above. Aging is known to be an important risk factor in the development of cancers and we speculate that this might be due to the increased transformation of malignant cells in aging cell population. However, this has yet to be confirmed with further research and correlate the findings with clinicopathological parameters. Creative Commons Attribution License

  9. The role of UV induced lesions in skin carcinogenesis: an overview of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene modifications in xeroderma pigmentosum skin tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daya-Grosjean, Leela; Sarasin, Alain

    2005-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a rare hereditary syndrome, is characterized by a hypersensitivity to solar irradiation due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair resulting in a predisposition to squamous and basal cell carcinomas as well as malignant melanomas appearing at a very early age. The mutator phenotype of XP cells is evident by the higher levels of UV specific modifications found in key regulatory genes in XP skin tumors compared to those in the same tumor types from the normal population. Thus, XP provides a unique model for the study of unrepaired DNA lesions, mutations and skin carcinogenesis. The high level of ras oncogene activation, Ink4a-Arf and p53 tumor suppressor gene modifications as well as alterations of the different partners of the mitogenic sonic hedgehog signaling pathway (patched, smoothened and sonic hedgehog), characterized in XP skin tumors have clearly demonstrated the major role of the UV component of sunlight in the development of skin tumors. The majority of the mutations are C to T or tandem CC to TT UV signature transitions, occurring at bipyrimidine sequences, the specific targets of UV induced lesions. These characteristics are also found in the same genes modified in sporadic skin cancers but with lower frequencies confirming the validity of studying the XP model. The knowledge gained by studying XP tumors has given us a greater perception of the contribution of genetic predisposition to cancer as well as the consequences of the many alterations which modulate the activities of different genes affecting crucial pathways vital for maintaining cell homeostasis

  10. The role of UV induced lesions in skin carcinogenesis: an overview of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene modifications in xeroderma pigmentosum skin tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daya-Grosjean, Leela [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Cancer, UPR2169 CNRS, IFR 54, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)]. E-mail: daya@igr.fr; Sarasin, Alain [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Cancer, UPR2169 CNRS, IFR 54, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)

    2005-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a rare hereditary syndrome, is characterized by a hypersensitivity to solar irradiation due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair resulting in a predisposition to squamous and basal cell carcinomas as well as malignant melanomas appearing at a very early age. The mutator phenotype of XP cells is evident by the higher levels of UV specific modifications found in key regulatory genes in XP skin tumors compared to those in the same tumor types from the normal population. Thus, XP provides a unique model for the study of unrepaired DNA lesions, mutations and skin carcinogenesis. The high level of ras oncogene activation, Ink4a-Arf and p53 tumor suppressor gene modifications as well as alterations of the different partners of the mitogenic sonic hedgehog signaling pathway (patched, smoothened and sonic hedgehog), characterized in XP skin tumors have clearly demonstrated the major role of the UV component of sunlight in the development of skin tumors. The majority of the mutations are C to T or tandem CC to TT UV signature transitions, occurring at bipyrimidine sequences, the specific targets of UV induced lesions. These characteristics are also found in the same genes modified in sporadic skin cancers but with lower frequencies confirming the validity of studying the XP model. The knowledge gained by studying XP tumors has given us a greater perception of the contribution of genetic predisposition to cancer as well as the consequences of the many alterations which modulate the activities of different genes affecting crucial pathways vital for maintaining cell homeostasis.

  11. Polymorphisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in wine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigentini, Ileana; Fracassetti, Daniela; Picozzi, Claudia; Foschino, Roberto

    2009-03-01

    The setting up of new molecular methods for Saccharomyces cerevisiae typing is valuable in enology. Actually, the ability to discriminate different strains in wine making can have a benefit both for the control of the fermentation process and for the preservation of wine typicity. This study focused on the screening of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in wine production that could evolve rapidly considering the selective pressure of the isolation environment. Preliminary screening of 30 genes in silico was performed, followed by the selection of 10 loci belonging to 8 genes. The sequence analysis showed a low polymorphism and a degree of heterozygosity. However, a new potential molecular target was recognized in the TPS1 gene coding for the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase enzyme involved in the ethanol resistance mechanism. This gene showed a 1.42% sequence diversity with seven different nucleotide substitutions. Moreover, classic techniques were applied to a collection of 50 S. cerevisiae isolates, mostly with enologic origin. Our results confirmed that the wine making was not carried out only by the inoculated commercial starter because indigenous strains of S. cerevisiae present during fermentation were detected. In addition, a high genetic relationship among some commercial cultures was found, highlighting imprecision or fraudulent practices by starter manufacturers.

  12. The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene inhibits hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor-induced invasion and branching morphogenesis in renal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koochekpour, S; Jeffers, M; Wang, P H; Gong, C; Taylor, G A; Roessler, L M; Stearman, R; Vasselli, J R; Stetler-Stevenson, W G; Kaelin, W G; Linehan, W M; Klausner, R D; Gnarra, J R; Vande Woude, G F

    1999-09-01

    Loss of function in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene occurs in familial and most sporadic renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). VHL has been linked to the regulation of cell cycle cessation (G(0)) and to control of expression of various mRNAs such as for vascular endothelial growth factor. RCC cells express the Met receptor tyrosine kinase, and Met mediates invasion and branching morphogenesis in many cell types in response to hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF). We examined the HGF/SF responsiveness of RCC cells containing endogenous mutated (mut) forms of the VHL protein (VHL-negative RCC) with that of isogenic cells expressing exogenous wild-type (wt) VHL (VHL-positive RCC). We found that VHL-negative 786-0 and UOK-101 RCC cells were highly invasive through growth factor-reduced (GFR) Matrigel-coated filters and exhibited an extensive branching morphogenesis phenotype in response to HGF/SF in the three-dimensional (3D) GFR Matrigel cultures. In contrast, the phenotypes of A498 VHL-negative RCC cells were weaker, and isogenic RCC cells ectopically expressing wt VHL did not respond at all. We found that all VHL-negative RCC cells expressed reduced levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2) relative to the wt VHL-positive cells, implicating VHL in the regulation of this molecule. However, consistent with the more invasive phenotype of the 786-0 and UOK-101 VHL-negative RCC cells, the levels of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were reduced and levels of the matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 were elevated compared to the noninvasive VHL-positive RCC cells. Moreover, recombinant TIMPs completely blocked HGF/SF-mediated branching morphogenesis, while neutralizing antibodies to the TIMPs stimulated HGF/SF-mediated invasion in vitro. Thus, the loss of the VHL tumor suppressor gene is central to changes that control tissue invasiveness, and a more invasive phenotype requires additional genetic changes seen in some but not all RCC lines. These

  13. Presymptomatic breast cancer in Egypt: role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumor suppressor genes mutations detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashishe Mervat M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is one of the most common diseases affecting women. Inherited susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are considered in breast, ovarian and other common cancers etiology. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have been identified that confer a high degree of breast cancer risk. Objective Our study was performed to identify germline mutations in some exons of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for the early detection of presymptomatic breast cancer in females. Methods This study was applied on Egyptian healthy females who first degree relatives to those, with or without a family history, infected with breast cancer. Sixty breast cancer patients, derived from 60 families, were selected for molecular genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The study also included 120 healthy first degree female relatives of the patients, either sisters and/or daughters, for early detection of presymptomatic breast cancer mutation carriers. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes of all the studied subjects. Universal primers were used to amplify four regions of the BRCA1 gene (exons 2,8,13 and 22 and one region (exon 9 of BRCA2 gene using specific PCR. The polymerase chain reaction was carried out. Single strand conformation polymorphism assay and heteroduplex analysis were used to screen for mutations in the studied exons. In addition, DNA sequencing of the normal and mutated exons were performed. Results Mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were detected in 86.7% of the families. Current study indicates that 60% of these families were attributable to BRCA1 mutations, while 26.7% of them were attributable to BRCA2 mutations. Results showed that four mutations were detected in the BRCA1 gene, while one mutation was detected in the BRCA2 gene. Asymptomatic relatives, 80(67% out of total 120, were mutation carriers. Conclusions BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes mutations are responsible for a significant proportion of breast cancer. BRCA mutations

  14. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS genes are silenced by DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation and regulate response to radiotherapy in cervical cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon-Hong Kim

    Full Text Available Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS family is an important negative regulator of cytokine signaling and deregulation of SOCS has been involved in many types of cancer. All cervical cancer cell lines tested showed lower expression of SOCS1, SOCS3, and SOCS5 than normal tissue or cell lines. The immunohistochemistry result for SOCS proteins in human cervical tissue also confirmed that normal tissue expressed higher level of SOCS proteins than neighboring tumor. Similar to the regulation of SOCS in other types of cancer, DNA methylation contributed to SOCS1 downregulation in CaSki, ME-180, and HeLa cells. However, the expression of SOCS3 or SOCS5 was not recovered by the inhibition of DNA methylation. Histone deacetylation may be another regulatory mechanism involved in SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression, however, SOCS5 expression was neither affected by DNA methylation nor histone deacetylation. Ectopic expression of SOCS1 or SOCS3 conferred radioresistance to HeLa cells, which implied SOCS signaling regulates the response to radiation in cervical cancer. In this study, we have shown that SOCS expression repressed by, in part, epigenetically and altered SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression could contribute to the radiosensitive phenotype in cervical cancer.

  15. Physical mapping of a commonly deleted region, the site of a candidate tumor suppressor gene, at 12q22 in human male germ cell tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murty, V.V.V.S.; Bosl, G.J.; Chaganti, R.S.K. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    A candidate tumor suppressor gene (TSG) site at 12q22 characterized by a high frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and a homozygous deletion has previously (LOH) and a homozygous deletion has previously been reported in human male germ cell tumors (GCTs). In a detailed deletion mapping analysis of 67 normal-tumor DNAs utilizing 20 polymorphic markers mapped to 12q22-q24, we identified the limits of the minimal region of deletion at 12q22 between D12S377 (priximal) and D12S296 (distal). We have constructed a YAC contig map of a 3-cM region of this band between the proximal marker D12S101 and the distal marker D12S346, which contained the minimal region of deletion in GCTs. The map is composed of 53 overlapping YACs and 3 cosmids onto which 25 polymorphic and nonpolymorphic sequence-tagged sites (STSs) were placed in a unique order. The size of the minimal region of deletion was approximately 2 Mb from overlapping, nonchimeric YACs that spanned the region. We also developed a radiation hybrid (RH) map of the region between D12S101 and D12S346 containing 17 loci. The consensus order developed by RH mapping is in good agreement with the YAC STS-content map order. The RH map estimated the distance between D12S101 and D12S346 to be 246 cR{sub 8000} and the minimal region of deletion to be 141 cR{sub 8000}. In addition, four genes that were previously mapped to 12q22 have been excluded as candidate genes. The leads gained from the deletion mapping and physical maps should expedite the isolation and characterization of the TSG at 12q22. 35 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Sulforaphane Reverses the Expression of Various Tumor Suppressor Genes by Targeting DNMT3B and HDAC1 in Human Cervical Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munawwar Ali Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulforaphane (SFN may hinder carcinogenesis by altering epigenetic events in the cells; however, its molecular mechanisms are unclear. The present study investigates the role of SFN in modifying epigenetic events in human cervical cancer cells, HeLa. HeLa cells were treated with SFN (2.5 µM for a period of 0, 24, 48, and 72 hours for all experiments. After treatment, expressions of DNMT3B, HDAC1, RARβ, CDH1, DAPK1, and GSTP1 were studied using RT-PCR while promoter DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs was studied using MS-PCR. Inhibition assays of DNA methyl transferases (DNMTs and histone deacetylases (HDACs were performed at varying time points. Molecular modeling and docking studies were performed to explore the possible interaction of SFN with HDAC1 and DNMT3B. Time-dependent exposure to SFN decreases the expression of DNMT3B and HDAC1 and significantly reduces the enzymatic activity of DNMTs and HDACs. Molecular modeling data suggests that SFN may interact directly with DNMT3B and HDAC1 which may explain the inhibitory action of SFN. Interestingly, time-dependent reactivation of the studied TSGs via reversal of methylation in SFN treated cells correlates well with its impact on the epigenetic alterations accumulated during cancer development. Thus, SFN may have significant implications for epigenetic based therapy.

  17. Effect of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on the growth and radiotherapeutic sensitivity of human lymphoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zeyang; Fan Wo; Li Dongqing; Zhu Ran; Wang Yongqing; Wu Jinchang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the inhibitory effect and radiation sensitization of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on human lymphoma cell lines. Methods: Human lymphoma cell lines Raji and Daudi were treated with rAd-p53, radiation therapy and combined treatment, respectively. The cell growth inhibition was assessed by MTT. The p53 protein expression was detected by Western blotting, and p53 mRNA was detected by BT-PCB. Results: The MTT results showed that the inhibitory effect and radiosensitivity enhancement of rAd-p53 on human lymphoma cell lines were not obvious [Raji: (27.5±4.1)%; Daudi: (28.1±1.6)%]. The results of Western blotting and BT-PCB showed that extrinsic p53 protein and p53 mRNA were expressed to some degree, but not at high-level. In addition, the results didn't demonstrate obvious radiosensitivity enhancement. Conclusions: The role of inhibition and radiosensitivity enhancement of rAd-p53 was not significant on human lymphoma cell lines. (authors)

  18. Genes involved in barley yellow dwarf virus resistance of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Frederike; Habekuß, Antje; Stich, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    The results of our study suggest that genes involved in general resistance mechanisms of plants contribute to variation of BYDV resistance in maize. With increasing winter temperatures in Europe, Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) is expected to become a prominent problem in maize cultivation. Breeding for resistance is the best strategy to control the disease and break the transmission cycle of the virus. The objectives of our study were (1) to determine genetic variation with respect to BYDV resistance in a broad germplasm set and (2) to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers linked to genes that are involved in BYDV resistance. An association mapping population with 267 genotypes representing the world's maize gene pool was grown in the greenhouse. Plants were inoculated with BYDV-PAV using viruliferous Rhopalosiphum padi. In the association mapping population, we observed considerable genotypic variance for the trait virus extinction as measured by double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) and the infection rate. In a genome-wide association study, we observed three SNPs significantly [false discovery rate (FDR) = 0.05] associated with the virus extinction on chromosome 10 explaining together 25 % of the phenotypic variance and five SNPs for the infection rate on chromosomes 4 and 10 explaining together 33 % of the phenotypic variance. The SNPs significantly associated with BYDV resistance can be used in marker assisted selection and will accelerate the breeding process for the development of BYDV resistant maize genotypes. Furthermore, these SNPs were located within genes which were in other organisms described to play a role in general resistance mechanisms. This suggests that these genes contribute to variation of BYDV resistance in maize.

  19. Suppressor of Overexpression of CO 1 Negatively Regulates Dark-Induced Leaf Degreening and Senescence by Directly Repressing Pheophytinase and Other Senescence-Associated Genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junyi; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Ren, Jun; Qiu, Kai; Li, Zhongpeng; Xie, Zuokun; Gao, Jiong; Zhou, Xin; Kuai, Benke

    2017-03-01

    Although the biochemical pathway of chlorophyll (Chl) degradation has been largely elucidated, how Chl is rapidly yet coordinately degraded during leaf senescence remains elusive. Pheophytinase (PPH) is the enzyme for catalyzing the removal of the phytol group from pheophytin a , and PPH expression is significantly induced during leaf senescence. To elucidate the transcriptional regulation of PPH , we used a yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae ) one-hybrid system to screen for its trans-regulators. SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CO 1 (SOC1), a key flowering pathway integrator, was initially identified as one of the putative trans-regulators of PPH After dark treatment, leaves of an SOC1 knockdown mutant ( soc1-6 ) showed an accelerated yellowing phenotype, whereas those of SOC1 -overexpressing lines exhibited a partial stay-green phenotype. SOC1 and PPH expression showed a negative correlation during leaf senescence. Substantially, SOC1 protein could bind specifically to the CArG box of the PPH promoter in vitro and in vivo, and overexpression of SOC1 significantly inhibited the transcriptional activity of the PPH promoter in Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) protoplasts. Importantly, soc1-6 pph-1 (a PPH knockout mutant) double mutant displayed a stay-green phenotype similar to that of pph-1 during dark treatment. These results demonstrated that SOC1 inhibits Chl degradation via negatively regulating PPH expression. In addition, measurement of the Chl content and the maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II of soc1-6 and SOC1-OE leaves after dark treatment suggested that SOC1 also negatively regulates the general senescence process. Seven SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENES ( SAGs ) were thereafter identified as its potential target genes, and NONYELLOWING1 and SAG113 were experimentally confirmed. Together, we reveal that SOC1 represses dark-induced leaf Chl degradation and senescence in general in Arabidopsis. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All

  20. Molecular Cloning, Characterization, and Expression ofMiSOC1: A Homolog of the Flowering Gene SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 from Mango (Mangifera indicaL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Junya; Liu, Debing; Liu, Guoyin; Tang, Jie; Chen, Yeyuan

    2016-01-01

    MADS-box transcription factor plays a crucial role in plant development, especially controlling the formation and development of floral organs. Mango ( Mangifera indica L) is an economically important fruit crop, but its molecular control of flowering is largely unknown. To better understand the molecular basis of flowering regulation in mango, we isolated and characterized the MiSOC1, a putative mango orthologs for the Arabidopsis SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1/AGAMOUS-LIKE 20 (SOC1/AGL20) with homology-based cloning and RACE. The full-length cDNA (GenBank accession No.: KP404094) is 945 bp in length including a 74 bp long 5' UTR and a 189 bp long 3' UTR and the open reading frame was 733 bps, encoding 223 amino acids with molecular weight 25.6 kD. Both sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis all indicated that deduced protein contained a conservative MADS-box and semi-conservative K domain and belonged to the SOC1/TM3 subfamily of the MADS-box family. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to investigate the expression profiles of MiSOC1 gene in different tissues/organs including root, stem, leaves, flower bud, and flower. The result indicated MiSOC1 was widely expressed at different levels in both vegetative and reproductive tissues/organs with the highest expression level in the stems' leaves and inflorescences, low expression in roots and flowers. The expression of MiSOC1 in different flower developmental stages was different while same tissue -specific pattern among different varieties. In addition, MiSOC1 gene expression was affect by ethephon while high concentration ethephon inhibit the expression of MiSOC1. Overexpression of MiSOC1 resulted in early flowering in Arabidopsis . In conclusion, these results suggest that MiSOC1 may act as induce flower function in mango.

  1. Folliculin, the product of the Birt-Hogg-Dube tumor suppressor gene, interacts with the adherens junction protein p0071 to regulate cell-cell adhesion.

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    Doug A Medvetz

    Full Text Available Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD is a tumor suppressor gene syndrome associated with fibrofolliculomas, cystic lung disease, and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. In seeking to elucidate the pathogenesis of BHD, we discovered a physical interaction between folliculin (FLCN, the protein product of the BHD gene, and p0071, an armadillo repeat containing protein that localizes to the cytoplasm and to adherens junctions. Adherens junctions are one of the three cell-cell junctions that are essential to the establishment and maintenance of the cellular architecture of all epithelial tissues. Surprisingly, we found that downregulation of FLCN leads to increased cell-cell adhesion in functional cell-based assays and disruption of cell polarity in a three-dimensional lumen-forming assay, both of which are phenocopied by downregulation of p0071. These data indicate that the FLCN-p0071 protein complex is a negative regulator of cell-cell adhesion. We also found that FLCN positively regulates RhoA activity and Rho-associated kinase activity, consistent with the only known function of p0071. Finally, to examine the role of Flcn loss on cell-cell adhesion in vivo, we utilized keratin-14 cre-recombinase (K14-cre to inactivate Flcn in the mouse epidermis. The K14-Cre-Bhd(flox/flox mice have striking delays in eyelid opening, wavy fur, hair loss, and epidermal hyperplasia with increased levels of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 activity. These data support a model in which dysregulation of the FLCN-p0071 interaction leads to alterations in cell adhesion, cell polarity, and RhoA signaling, with broad implications for the role of cell-cell adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of human disease, including emphysema and renal cell carcinoma.

  2. Frequent loss of heterozygosity and altered expression of the candidate tumor suppressor gene 'FAT' in human astrocytic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chosdol, Kunzang; Misra, Anjan; Puri, Sachin; Srivastava, Tapasya; Chattopadhyay, Parthaprasad; Sarkar, Chitra; Mahapatra, Ashok K; Sinha, Subrata

    2009-01-01

    We had earlier used the comparison of RAPD (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) DNA fingerprinting profiles of tumor and corresponding normal DNA to identify genetic alterations in primary human glial tumors. This has the advantage that DNA fingerprinting identifies the genetic alterations in a manner not biased for locus. In this study we used RAPD-PCR to identify novel genomic alterations in the astrocytic tumors of WHO grade II (Low Grade Diffuse Astrocytoma) and WHO Grade IV (Glioblastoma Multiforme). Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the altered region was studied by microsatellite and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers. Expression study of the gene identified at the altered locus was done by semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR). Bands consistently altered in the RAPD profile of tumor DNA in a significant proportion of tumors were identified. One such 500 bp band, that was absent in the RAPD profile of 33% (4/12) of the grade II astrocytic tumors, was selected for further study. Its sequence corresponded with a region of FAT, a putative tumor suppressor gene initially identified in Drosophila. Fifty percent of a set of 40 tumors, both grade II and IV, were shown to have Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) at this locus by microsatellite (intragenic) and by SNP markers. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed low FAT mRNA levels in a major subset of tumors. These results point to a role of the FAT in astrocytic tumorigenesis and demonstrate the use of RAPD analysis in identifying specific alterations in astrocytic tumors

  3. Molecular Cloning, Characterization, and Expression of MiSOC1: A Homolog of the Flowering Gene SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 from Mango (Mangifera indica L)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Junya; Liu, Debing; Liu, Guoyin; Tang, Jie; Chen, Yeyuan

    2016-01-01

    MADS-box transcription factor plays a crucial role in plant development, especially controlling the formation and development of floral organs. Mango (Mangifera indica L) is an economically important fruit crop, but its molecular control of flowering is largely unknown. To better understand the molecular basis of flowering regulation in mango, we isolated and characterized the MiSOC1, a putative mango orthologs for the Arabidopsis SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1/AGAMOUS-LIKE 20 (SOC1/AGL20) with homology-based cloning and RACE. The full-length cDNA (GenBank accession No.: KP404094) is 945 bp in length including a 74 bp long 5′ UTR and a 189 bp long 3′ UTR and the open reading frame was 733 bps, encoding 223 amino acids with molecular weight 25.6 kD. Both sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis all indicated that deduced protein contained a conservative MADS-box and semi-conservative K domain and belonged to the SOC1/TM3 subfamily of the MADS-box family. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to investigate the expression profiles of MiSOC1 gene in different tissues/organs including root, stem, leaves, flower bud, and flower. The result indicated MiSOC1 was widely expressed at different levels in both vegetative and reproductive tissues/organs with the highest expression level in the stems’ leaves and inflorescences, low expression in roots and flowers. The expression of MiSOC1 in different flower developmental stages was different while same tissue –specific pattern among different varieties. In addition, MiSOC1 gene expression was affect by ethephon while high concentration ethephon inhibit the expression of MiSOC1. Overexpression of MiSOC1 resulted in early flowering in Arabidopsis. In conclusion, these results suggest that MiSOC1 may act as induce flower function in mango. PMID:27965680

  4. The interaction between endogenous 30S ribosomal subunit protein S11 and Cucumber mosaic virus LS2b protein affects viral replication, infection and gene silencing suppressor activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruilin Wang

    Full Text Available Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV is a model virus for plant-virus protein interaction and mechanism research because of its wide distribution, high-level of replication and simple genome structure. The 2b protein is a multifunctional protein encoded by CMV that suppresses RNA silencing-based antiviral defense and contributes to CMV virulence in host plants. In this report, 12 host proteins were identified as CMV LS2b binding partners using the yeast two-hybrid screen system from the Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library. Among the host proteins, 30S ribosomal subunit protein S11 (RPS11 was selected for further studies. The interaction between LS2b and full-length RPS11 was confirmed using the yeast two-hybrid system. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BIFC assays observed by confocal laser microscopy and Glutathione S-transferase (GST pull-down assays were used to verify the interaction between endogenous NbRPS11 and viral CMVLS2b both in vivo and in vitro. TRV-based gene silencing vector was used to knockdown NbRPS11 transcription, and immunoblot analysis revealed a decline in infectious viral RNA replication and a decrease in CMV infection in RPS11 down-regulated Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Thus, the knockdown of RPS11 likely inhibited CMV replication and accumulation. The gene silencing suppressor activity of CMV2b protein was reduced by the RPS11 knockdown. This study demonstrated that the function of viral LS2b protein was remarkably affected by the interaction with host RPS11 protein.

  5. Strategies to identify long noncoding RNAs involved in gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Catherine

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs have been detected in nearly every cell type and found to be fundamentally involved in many biological processes. The characterization of lncRNAs has immense potential to advance our comprehensive understanding of cellular processes and gene regulation, along with implications for the treatment of human disease. The recent ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements study reported 9,640 lncRNA loci in the human genome, which corresponds to around half the number of protein-coding genes. Because of this sheer number and their functional diversity, it is crucial to identify a pool of potentially relevant lncRNAs early on in a given study. In this review, we evaluate the methods for isolating lncRNAs by immunoprecipitation and review the advantages, disadvantages, and applications of three widely used approaches – microarray, tiling array, and RNA-seq – for identifying lncRNAs involved in gene regulation. We also look at ways in which data from publicly available databases such as ENCODE can support the study of lncRNAs.

  6. Candidate Tumor-Suppressor Gene DLEC1 Is Frequently Downregulated by Promoter Hypermethylation and Histone Hypoacetylation in Human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Kwong

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Suppression of ovarian tumor growth by chromosome 3p was demonstrated in a previous study. Deleted in Lung and Esophageal Cancer 1 (DLEC1 on 3p22.3 is a candidate tumor suppressor in lung, esophageal, and renal cancers. The potential involvement of DLEC1 in epithelial ovarian cancer remains unknown. In the present study, DLEC1 downregulation was found in ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian tumors. Focus-expressed DLEC1 in two ovarian cancer cell lines resulted in 41% to 52% inhibition of colony formation. No chromosomal loss of chromosome 3p22.3 in any ovarian cancer cell line or tissue was found. Promoter hypermethylation of DLEC1 was detected in ovarian cancer cell lines with reduced DLEC1 transcripts, whereas methylation was not detected in normal ovarian epithelium and DLEC1-expressing ovarian cancer cell lines. Treatment with demethylating agent enhanced DLEC1 expression in 90% (9 of 10 of ovarian cancer cell lines. DLEC1 promoter methylation was examined in 13 high-grade ovarian tumor tissues with DLEC1 downregulation, in which 54% of the tumors showed DLEC1 methylation. In addition, 80% of ovarian cancer cell lines significantly upregulated DLEC1 transcripts after histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment. Therefore, our results suggested that DLEC1 suppressed the growth of ovarian cancer cells and that its downregulation was closely associated with promoter hypermethylation and histone hypoacetylation.

  7. RPS6KA2, a putative tumour suppressor gene at 6q27 in sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bignone, P A; Lee, K Y; Liu, Y

    2007-01-01

    -activated protein kinase pathway. It is expressed in normal ovarian epithelium, whereas reduced or absent in tumours or cell lines. We show that RPS6KA2 is monoallelically expressed in the ovary suggesting that loss of a single expressed allele is sufficient to cause complete loss of expression in cancer cells....... Further, we have identified two new isoforms of RPS6KA2 with an alternative start codon. Homozygous deletions were identified within the RPS6KA2 gene in two cell lines. Re-expression of RPS6KA2 in ovarian cancer cell lines suppressed colony formation. In UCI101 cells, the expression of RPS6KA2 reduced...

  8. MC1R gene variants involvement in human OCA phenotype

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    Saleha Shamim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA is a genetic disorder of melanin synthesis that results in hypopigmentation in hair, skin and eyes. OCA has been reported in individuals from all ethnic backgrounds but it is more common among those with Europeans ancestry. OCA is heterogeneous group of disorders and seven types of OCA are caused by mutations in TYR (OCA1, OCA2 (OCA2, TYRP1 (OCA3, SLC45A2 (OCA4, SLC24A5 (OCA6 and C10oRF11 (OCA7 genes. However, MC1R gene variants have been reported that modify OCA2 phenotype but the knowledge about the function ofMC1R gene in melanogenesis, and genotype-phenotype association, in case of OCA, is limited. In this review article we present a comprehensive description of classification of OCA, role of MSH-R in melanin synthesis, the sequence variations in MC1R and their association with OCA. This review will enhance our understanding of MC1R gene variants involved in human OCA2 phenotype.

  9. Nitrate reductase gene involvement in hexachlorobiphenyl dechlorination by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, Supriyo; Perkins, Michael; Dutta, Sisir K.

    2006-01-01

    Polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) degradation usually occurs through reductive dechlorination under anaerobic conditions and phenolic ring cleavage under aerobic conditions. In this paper, we provide evidence of nitrate reductase (NaR) mediated dechlorination of hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB-153) in Phanerochaete chrysosporium under non-ligninolytic condition and the gene involved. The NaR enzyme and its cofactor, molybdenum (Mo), were found to mediate reductive dechlorination of PCBs even in aerobic condition. Tungsten (W), a competitive inhibitor of this enzyme, was found to suppress this dechlorination. Chlorine release assay provided further evidence of this nitrate reductase mediated dechlorination. Commercially available pure NaR enzyme from Aspergillus was used to confirm these results. Through homology search using TBLASTN program, NaR gene was identified, primers were designed and the RT-PCR product was sequenced. The NaR gene was then annotated in the P. chrysosporium genome (GenBank accession no. AY700576). This is the first report regarding the presence of nitrate reductase gene in this fungus with the explanation why this fungus can dechlorinate PCBs even in aerobic condition. These fungal inoculums are used commercially as pellets in sawdust for enhanced bioremediation of PCBs at the risk of depleting soil nitrates. Hence, the addition of nitrates to the pellets will reduce this risk as well as enhance its activity

  10. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) Represses Transcription of the Tumor Suppressor Rb Gene via Binding Competition with Sp1 and Recruitment of Co-repressors*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Choong-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-01-01

    FBI-1 (also called Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a BTB/POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc-finger transcription factor. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a proto-oncogenic protein, which represses tumor suppressor ARF gene transcription. The expression of FBI-1 is increased in many cancer tissues. We found that FBI-1 potently represses transcription of the Rb gene, a tumor suppressor gene important in cell cycle arrest. FBI-1 binds to four GC-rich promoter elements (FREs) located at bp –308 to –188 of the Rb promoter region. The Rb promoter also contains two Sp1 binding sites: GC-box 1 (bp –65 to –56) and GC-box 2 (bp –18 to –9), the latter of which is also bound by FBI-1. We found that FRE3 (bp –244 to –236) is also a Sp1 binding element. FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene not only by binding to the FREs, but also by competing with Sp1 at the GC-box 2 and the FRE3. By binding to the FREs and/or the GC-box, FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene through its POZ-domain, which recruits a co-repressor-histone deacetylase complex and deacetylates histones H3 and H4 at the Rb gene promoter. FBI-1 inhibits C2C12 myoblast cell differentiation by repressing Rb gene expression. PMID:18801742

  11. SNHG16 is regulated by the Wnt pathway in colorectal cancer and affects genes involved in lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Lise Lotte; True, Kirsten; Hamilton, Mark P; Nielsen, Morten M; Damas, Nkerorema D; Damgaard, Christian K; Ongen, Halit; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil; Bramsen, Jesper B; Pedersen, Jakob S; Lund, Anders H; Vang, Søren; Stribolt, Katrine; Madsen, Mogens R; Laurberg, Søren; McGuire, Sean E; Ørntoft, Torben F; Andersen, Claus L

    2016-10-01

    It is well established that lncRNAs are aberrantly expressed in cancer where they have been shown to act as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. RNA profiling of 314 colorectal adenomas/adenocarcinomas and 292 adjacent normal colon mucosa samples using RNA-sequencing demonstrated that the snoRNA host gene 16 (SNHG16) is significantly up-regulated in adenomas and all stages of CRC. SNHG16 expression was positively correlated to the expression of Wnt-regulated transcription factors, including ASCL2, ETS2, and c-Myc. In vitro abrogation of Wnt signaling in CRC cells reduced the expression of SNHG16 indicating that SNHG16 is regulated by the Wnt pathway. Silencing of SNHG16 resulted in reduced viability, increased apoptotic cell death and impaired cell migration. The SNHG16 silencing particularly affected expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism. A connection between SNHG16 and genes involved in lipid metabolism was also observed in clinical tumors. Argonaute CrossLinking and ImmunoPrecipitation (AGO-CLIP) demonstrated that SNHG16 heavily binds AGO and has 27 AGO/miRNA target sites along its length, indicating that SNHG16 may act as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) "sponging" miRNAs off their cognate targets. Most interestingly, half of the miRNA families with high confidence targets on SNHG16 also target the 3'UTR of Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase (SCD). SCD is involved in lipid metabolism and is down-regulated upon SNHG16 silencing. In conclusion, up-regulation of SNHG16 is a frequent event in CRC, likely caused by deregulated Wnt signaling. In vitro analyses demonstrate that SNHG16 may play an oncogenic role in CRC and that it affects genes involved in lipid metabolism, possible through ceRNA related mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Loss of heterozygosity in Wilms' tumors, studied for six putative tumor suppressor regions, is limited to chromosome 11

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannens, M.; Devilee, P.; Bliek, J.; Mandjes, I.; de Kraker, J.; Heyting, C.; Slater, R. M.; Westerveld, A.

    1990-01-01

    Studies on the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in human malignancies have shown that a number of different chromosomal regions associated with putative tumor suppressor genes may be involved in any one given tumor. We have carried out a similar study on Wilms' tumor using a range of DNA markers for a

  13. Characterization of the ptr5{sup +} gene involved in nuclear mRNA export in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Nobuyoshi; Ikeda, Terumasa; Mizuki, Fumitaka [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Tani, Tokio, E-mail: ttani@sci.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We cloned the ptr5{sup +} gene involved in nuclear mRNA export in fission yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ptr5{sup +} gene was found to encode nucleoporin 85 (Nup85). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Seh1p and Mlo3p are multi-copy suppressors for the ptr5 mutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ptr5p/Nup85p functions in nuclear mRNA export through the mRNA export factor Rae1p. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ptr5p/Nup85p interacts genetically with pre-mRNA splicing factors. -- Abstract: To analyze the mechanisms of mRNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, we have isolated eleven mutants, ptr [poly(A){sup +} RNA transport] 1 to 11, which accumulate poly(A){sup +} RNA in the nucleus at a nonpermissive temperature in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Of those, the ptr5-1 mutant shows dots- or a ring-like accumulation of poly(A){sup +} RNA at the nuclear periphery after shifting to the nonpermissive temperature. We cloned the ptr5{sup +} gene and found that it encodes a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), nucleoporin 85 (Nup85). The ptr5-1 mutant shows no defects in protein transport, suggesting the specific involvement of Ptr5p/Nup85p in nuclear mRNA export in S. pombe. We identified Seh1p, a nucleoporin interacting with Nup85p, an mRNA-binding protein Mlo3p, and Sac3p, a component of the TREX-2 complex involved in coupling of nuclear mRNA export with transcription, as multi-copy suppressors for the ptr5-1 mutation. In addition, we found that the ptr5-1 mutation is synthetically lethal with a mutation of the mRNA export factor Rae1p, and that the double mutant exaggerates defective nuclear mRNA export, suggesting that Ptr5p/Nup85p is involved in nuclear mRNA export through Rae1p. Interestingly, the ptr5-1 mutation also showed synthetic effects with several prp pre-mRNA splicing mutations, suggesting a functional linkage between the NPCs and the splicing apparatus in the yeast nucleus.

  14. Genetic variability and evolutionary implications of RNA silencing suppressor genes in RNA1 of sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus isolates infecting sweetpotato and related wild species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur K Tugume

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The bipartite single-stranded RNA genome of Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV, genus Crinivirus; Closteroviridae encodes a Class 1 RNase III (RNase3, a putative hydrophobic protein (p7 and a 22-kDa protein (p22 from genes located in RNA1. RNase3 and p22 suppress RNA silencing, the basal antiviral defence mechanism in plants. RNase3 is sufficient to render sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas virus-susceptible and predisposes it to development of severe diseases following infection with unrelated virus. The incidence, strains and gene content of SPCSV infecting wild plant species have not been studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty SPCSV isolates were characterized from 10 wild Ipomoea species, Hewittia sublobata or Lepistemon owariensis (family Convolvulaceae in Uganda and compared with 34 local SPCSV isolates infecting sweetpotatoes. All isolates belonged to the East African (EA strain of SPCSV and contained RNase3 and p7, but p22 was not detected in six isolates. The three genes showed only limited genetic variability and the proteins were under purifying selection. SPCSV isolates lacking p22 synergized with Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV, genus potyvirus; Potyviridae and caused severe symptoms in co-infected sweetpotato plants. One SPCSV isolate enhanced accumulation of SPFMV, but no severe symptoms developed. A new whitefly-transmitted virus (KML33b encoding an RNase3 homolog (<56% identity to SPCSV RNase3 able to suppresses sense-mediated RNA silencing was detected in I. sinensis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SPCSV isolates infecting wild species and sweetpotato in Uganda were genetically undifferentiated, suggesting inter-species transmission of SPCSV. Most isolates in Uganda contained p22, unlike SPCSV isolates characterized from other countries and continents. Enhanced accumulation of SPFMV and increased disease severity were found to be uncoupled phenotypic outcomes of RNase3-mediated viral synergism in

  15. Radiation of different human melanoma cell lines increased expression of RHOB. Level of this tumor suppressor gene in different cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notcovich, C.; Molinari, B.; Duran, H.; Delgado González, D.; Sánchez Crespo, R.

    2013-01-01

    Previous results of our group show that a correlation exists between intrinsic radiosensitivity of human melanoma cells and cell death by apoptosis. RhoB is a small GTPase that regulates cytoskeletal organization. Besides, is related to the process of apoptosis in cells exposed to DNA damage as radiation. Also, RhoB levels decrease in a wide variety of tumors with the tumor stage, being considered a tumor suppressor gene due to its antiproliferative and proapoptotic effect. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of RhoB in different human melanoma cell lines in relation to melanocytes, and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on the expression of RhoB. We used the A375, SB2 and Meljcell lines, and the derived from melanocytes Pig1. It was found for all three tumor lines RhoB expression levels significantly lower than those of Pig1 (p <0.05), as assessed by semiquantitative RT-PCR . When tumor cells were irradiated to a dose of 2Gyinduction was observed at 3 hours RhoB irradiation. RhoB expression increased in all lines relative to non-irradiated control, showing a greater induction ( p< 0.05) for the more radiosensitive line SB2, consistent with apoptosis in response to radiation. The results allow for the first time in melanoma demonstrate that RhoB, as well as in other tumor types, has a lower expression in tumor cells than their normal counterparts. Moreover, induction in the expression of RhoB in irradiated cells may be associated with the process of radiation-induced apoptosis. The modulation of RhoB could be a new tool to sensitize radioresistant melanoma. (author)

  16. MicroRNA-375 Functions as a Tumor-Suppressor Gene in Gastric Cancer by Targeting Recepteur d’Origine Nantais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Lian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence supports a fundamental role for microRNAs (miRNA in regulating cancer metastasis. Recently, microRNA-375 (miR-375 was reported to be downregulated in many types of cancers, including gastric cancer. Increase in the expression of Recepteur d’Origine Nantais (RON, a receptor tyrosine kinase, has been reported in tumors. However, the function of miR-375 and RON expression in gastric cancer metastasis has not been sufficiently studied. In silico analysis identified miR-375 binding sites in the 3′-untranslated regions (3′-UTR of the RON-encoding gene. Expression of miR-375 resulted in reduced activity of a luciferase reporter containing the 3′-UTR fragments of RON-encoding mRNA, confirming that miR-375 directly targets the 3′-UTR of RON mRNA. Moreover, we found that overexpression of miR-375 inhibited mRNA and protein expression of RON, which was accompanied by the suppression of cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in gastric cancer AGS and MKN-28 cells. Ectopic miR-375 expression also induced G1 cell cycle arrest through a decrease in the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, and in the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (Rb. Knockdown of RON by RNAi, similar to miR-375 overexpression, suppressed tumorigenic properties and induced G1 arrest through a decrease in the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, and in the phosphorylation of Rb. Thus, our study provides evidence that miR-375 acts as a suppressor of metastasis in gastric cancer by targeting RON, and might represent a new potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer.

  17. A fine balance: epigenetic control of cellular quiescence by the tumor suppressor PRDM2/RIZ at a bivalent domain in the cyclin a gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheedipudi, Sirisha; Puri, Deepika; Saleh, Amena; Gala, Hardik P; Rumman, Mohammed; Pillai, Malini S; Sreenivas, Prethish; Arora, Reety; Sellathurai, Jeeva; Schrøder, Henrik Daa; Mishra, Rakesh K; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2015-07-27

    Adult stem cell quiescence is critical to ensure regeneration while minimizing tumorigenesis. Epigenetic regulation contributes to cell cycle control and differentiation, but few regulators of the chromatin state in quiescent cells are known. Here we report that the tumor suppressor PRDM2/RIZ, an H3K9 methyltransferase, is enriched in quiescent muscle stem cells in vivo and controls reversible quiescence in cultured myoblasts. We find that PRDM2 associates with >4400 promoters in G0 myoblasts, 55% of which are also marked with H3K9me2 and enriched for myogenic, cell cycle and developmental regulators. Knockdown of PRDM2 alters histone methylation at key promoters such as Myogenin and CyclinA2 (CCNA2), and subverts the quiescence program via global de-repression of myogenesis, and hyper-repression of the cell cycle. Further, PRDM2 acts upstream of the repressive PRC2 complex in G0. We identify a novel G0-specific bivalent chromatin domain in the CCNA2 locus. PRDM2 protein interacts with the PRC2 protein EZH2 and regulates its association with the bivalent domain in the CCNA2 gene. Our results suggest that induction of PRDM2 in G0 ensures that two antagonistic programs-myogenesis and the cell cycle-while stalled, are poised for reactivation. Together, these results indicate that epigenetic regulation by PRDM2 preserves key functions of the quiescent state, with implications for stem cell self-renewal. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Allospecific CD8 T suppressor cells induced by multiple MLC stimulation or priming in the presence of ILT3.Fc have similar gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Xu, Zheng; Chang, Chris; Ho, Sophey; Liu, Zhuoru; Vlad, George; Cortesini, Raffaello; Clynes, Raphael A; Luo, Yun; Suciu-Foca, Nicole

    2014-02-01

    Alloantigen specific CD8 T suppressor cells can be generated in vitro either by multiple stimulations of CD3 T cells with allogeneic APC or by single stimulation in primary MLC containing recombinant ILT3.Fc protein. The aim of the present study was to determine whether multiple MLC stimulation induced in CD8(+) CD28(-) T suppressor cells molecular changes that are similar to those observed in CD8 T suppressor cells from primary MLC containing ILT3.Fc protein. Our study demonstrates that the characteristic signatures of CD8 T suppressor cells, generated by either of these methods are the same consisting of up-regulation of the BCL6 transcriptional repressor and down-regulation of inflammatory microRNAs, miR-21, miR-30b, miR-146a, and miR-155 expression. In conclusion microRNAs which are increased under inflammatory conditions in activated CD4 and CD8 T cells with helper or cytotoxic function show low levels of expression in CD8 T cells which have acquired antigen-specific suppressor activity. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Mxd1 mediates hypoxia-induced cisplatin resistance in osteosarcoma cells by repression of the PTEN tumor suppressor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Datong; Wu, Weiling; Dong, Na; Jiang, Xiuqin; Xu, Jinjin; Zhan, Xi; Zhang, Zhengdong; Hu, Zhenzhen

    2017-10-01

    Hypoxia-induced chemoresistance remains a major obstacle to treating osteosarcoma effectively. Mxd1, a member of the Myc/Max/Mxd family, was shown to be involved in the development of drug resistance under hypoxia. However, the effect of Mxd1 on hypoxia-induced cisplatin (CDDP) resistance and its mechanism in osteosarcoma have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that HIF-1α-induced Mxd1 contributed to CDDP resistance in hypoxic U-2OS and MG-63 cells. The knockdown of Mxd1 expression elevated PTEN expression at both protein and RNA levels in these hypoxic cells. Using Luciferase reporter and ChIP assays, we confirmed that Mxd1 directly bound to the E-box sites within the PTEN promoter region. We further demonstrated that PTEN knockdown decreased CDDP sensitivity in Mxd1 siRNA-transfected U-2OS and MG-63 cells under hypoxia. Our results also showed that Mxd1 deficiency in hypoxic U-2OS and MG-63 cells lead to inactivation of PI3K/AKT signaling, which is the downstream of PTEN. Furthermore, blockade of PI3K/AKT signal re-sensitized hypoxic U-2OS and MG-63 cells to CDDP. Taken together, these findings suggest that HIF-1α-induced Mxd1 up-regulation suppresses the expression of PTEN under hypoxia, which leads to the activation of PI3K/AKT antiapoptotic and survival pathway. As a result CDDP resistance in osteosarcoma cells is induced. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Jasmonic acid influences mycorrhizal colonization in tomato plants by modifying the expression of genes involved in carbohydrate partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda-Sartorius, Miriam; Martínez de la Vega, Octavio; Délano-Frier, John Paul

    2008-06-01

    The role of jasmonic acid (JA) on mycorrhizal colonization by Glomus fasciculatum in tomato plants was examined using mutant plants overexpressing prosystemin (PS) or affected in the synthesis of JA (suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses 2, spr2). The degree of mycorrhizal colonization was determined by measuring frequency (F%) and intensity (M%) of colonization and arbuscule abundance (A%). Gene expression and biochemical analyses were also performed in roots to detect changes in carbon (C) partitioning. Colonization was similar in mycorrhizal PS and wild-type roots, except for a higher A% in the former. Conversely, colonization was severely reduced in roots of spr2 mutants. No association was found between levels of expression of genes coding for systemic wound responsive proteins (or SWRPs) and other defense-related proteins in roots and mycorrhization levels in these plants. On the other hand, the degree of mycorrhizal colonization correlated with changes in the transcriptional regulation of a number of genes involved in sucrose hydrolysis and transport, cell wall invertase activity and mycorrhizal-specific fatty acid content in roots. The results obtained suggest that one of the mechanisms by which JA might operate to modulate the mycorrhization process could be through its influence on the regulation of C partitioning in the plant. The significant colonization increase observed in mycorrhizal spr2 plants supplied with exogenous methyl jasmonate supports its role as a positive regulator of the symbiosis.

  1. HLA genes and other candidate genes involved in susceptibility for (pre)neoplastic cervical disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoodsma, M; Nolte, IM; Meerman, GJT; De Vries, EGE; Van Der Zee, AGJ

    This review focuses on common and genetic risk factors such as HLA and other genes that may be involved in susceptibility for (pre)neoplastic cervical disease. The goal of this review is the evaluation of polymorphisms that are either associated with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and/or

  2. The transcriptional repressor DREAM is involved in thyroid gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, Barbara; Di Palma, Tina; Mascia, Anna; Motti, Maria Letizia; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Nitsch, Lucio; Zannini, Mariastella

    2005-01-01

    Downstream regulatory element antagonistic modulator (DREAM) was originally identified in neuroendocrine cells as a calcium-binding protein that specifically binds to downstream regulatory elements (DRE) on DNA, and represses transcription of its target genes. To explore the possibility that DREAM may regulate the endocrine activity of the thyroid gland, we analyzed its mRNA expression in undifferentiated and differentiated thyroid cells. We demonstrated that DREAM is expressed in the normal thyroid tissue as well as in differentiated thyroid cells in culture while it is absent in FRT poorly differentiated cells. In the present work, we also show that DREAM specifically binds to DRE sites identified in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the thyroid-specific transcription factors Pax8 and TTF-2/FoxE1 in a calcium-dependent manner. By gel retardation assays we demonstrated that thapsigargin treatment increases the binding of DREAM to the DRE sequences present in Pax8 and TTF-2/Foxe1 5' UTRs, and this correlates with a significant reduction of the expression of these genes. Interestingly, in poorly differentiated thyroid cells overexpression of exogenous DREAM strongly inhibits Pax8 expression. Moreover, we provide evidence that a mutated form of DREAM unable to bind Ca 2+ interferes with thyroid cell proliferation. Therefore, we propose that in thyroid cells DREAM is a mediator of the calcium-signaling pathway and it is involved in the regulation of thyroid cell function

  3. The molecular effect of metastasis suppressors on Src signaling and tumorigenesis: new therapeutic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wensheng; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Peng, Zhihai; Jin, Runsen; Wang, Puxiongzhi; Yue, Fei; Zheng, Minhua; Huang, Michael L-H.; Jansson, Patric J.; Richardson, Vera; Kalinowski, Danuta S.; Lane, Darius J.R.; Merlot, Angelica M.; Sahni, Sumit; Richardson, Des R.

    2015-01-01

    A major problem for cancer patients is the metastasis of cancer cells from the primary tumor. This involves: (1) migration through the basement membrane; (2) dissemination via the circulatory system; and (3) invasion into a secondary site. Metastasis suppressors, by definition, inhibit metastasis at any step of the metastatic cascade. Notably, Src is a non-receptor, cytoplasmic, tyrosine kinase, which becomes aberrantly activated in many cancer-types following stimulation of plasma membrane receptors (e.g., receptor tyrosine kinases and integrins). There is evidence of a prominent role of Src in tumor progression-related events such as the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the development of metastasis. However, the precise molecular interactions of Src with metastasis suppressors remain unclear. Herein, we review known metastasis suppressors and summarize recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of how these proteins inhibit metastasis through modulation of Src. Particular emphasis is bestowed on the potent metastasis suppressor, N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) and its interactions with the Src signaling cascade. Recent studies demonstrated a novel mechanism through which NDRG1 plays a significant role in regulating cancer cell migration by inhibiting Src activity. Moreover, we discuss the rationale for targeting metastasis suppressor genes as a sound therapeutic modality, and we review several examples from the literature where such strategies show promise. Collectively, this review summarizes the essential interactions of metastasis suppressors with Src and their effects on progression of cancer metastasis. Moreover, interesting unresolved issues regarding these proteins as well as their potential as therapeutic targets are also discussed. PMID:26431493

  4. Identifying genes and gene networks involved in chromium metabolism and detoxification in Crambe abyssinica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zulfiqar, Asma, E-mail: asmazulfiqar08@yahoo.com [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Paulose, Bibin, E-mail: bpaulose@psis.umass.edu [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Chhikara, Sudesh, E-mail: sudesh@psis.umass.edu [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Dhankher, Om Parkash, E-mail: parkash@psis.umass.edu [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Chromium pollution is a serious environmental problem with few cost-effective remediation strategies available. Crambe abyssinica (a member of Brassicaseae), a non-food, fast growing high biomass crop, is an ideal candidate for phytoremediation of heavy metals contaminated soils. The present study used a PCR-Select Suppression Subtraction Hybridization approach in C. abyssinica to isolate differentially expressed genes in response to Cr exposure. A total of 72 differentially expressed subtracted cDNAs were sequenced and found to represent 43 genes. The subtracted cDNAs suggest that Cr stress significantly affects pathways related to stress/defense, ion transporters, sulfur assimilation, cell signaling, protein degradation, photosynthesis and cell metabolism. The regulation of these genes in response to Cr exposure was further confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Characterization of these differentially expressed genes may enable the engineering of non-food, high-biomass plants, including C. abyssinica, for phytoremediation of Cr-contaminated soils and sediments. - Highlights: > Molecular mechanism of Cr uptake and detoxification in plants is not well known. > We identified differentially regulated genes upon Cr exposure in Crambe abyssinica. > 72 Cr-induced subtracted cDNAs were sequenced and found to represent 43 genes. > Pathways linked to stress, ion transport, and sulfur assimilation were affected. > This is the first Cr transcriptome study in a crop with phytoremediation potential. - This study describes the identification and isolation of differentially expressed genes involved in chromium metabolism and detoxification in a non-food industrial oil crop Crambe abyssinica.

  5. DC-SCRIPT is a novel regulator of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ERα-positive breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ansems (Marleen); J.N. Søndergaard (Jonas Nørskov); A.M. Sieuwerts (Anieta); M.W.G. Looman (Maaike W. G.); M. Smid (Marcel); A.M.A. de Graaf (Annemarie M. A.); V. de Weerd (Vanja); M. Zuidscherwoude (Malou); J.A. Foekens (John); J.W.M. Martens (John); G.J. Adema (Gosse J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBreast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths in women. The estrogen receptor (ERα) is well known for having growth promoting effects in breast cancer. Recently, we have identified DC-SCRIPT (ZNF366) as a co-suppressor of ERα and as a strong and independent

  6. DC-SCRIPT is a novel regulator of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ERalpha-positive breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansems, M.; Sondergaard, J.N.; Sieuwerts, A.M.; Looman, M.W.G.; Smid, M.; Graaf, A.M.A. de; Weerd, V. de; Zuidscherwoude, M.; Foekens, J.A.; Martens, J.W.; Adema, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths in women. The estrogen receptor (ERalpha) is well known for having growth promoting effects in breast cancer. Recently, we have identified DC-SCRIPT (ZNF366) as a co-suppressor of ERalpha and as a strong and independent

  7. A 5'-regulatory region and two coding region polymorphisms modulate promoter activity and gene expression of the growth suppressor gene ZBED6 in cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Zhen Huang

    Full Text Available Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6 is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. Polymorphisms in its promoter and coding regions are likely to impact ZBED6 transcription and growth traits. In this study, rapid amplification of 5' cDNA ends (5'-RACE analysis revealed two transcription start sites (TSS for the bovine ZBED6 starting within exon 1 of the ZC3H11A gene (TSS-1 and upstream of the translation start codon of the ZBED6 gene (TSS-2. There was one SNP in the promoter and two missense mutations in the coding region of the bovine ZBED6 by sequencing of the pooled DNA samples (Pool-Seq, n = 100. The promoter and coding region are the key regions for gene function; polymorphisms in these regions can alter gene expression. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR analysis showed that ZBED6 has a broad tissue distribution in cattle and is highly expressed in skeletal muscle. Eleven promoter-detection vectors were constructed, which enabled the cloning of putative promoter sequences and analysis of ZBED6 transcriptional activity by luciferase reporter gene assays. The core region of the basal promoter of bovine ZBED6 is located within region -866 to -556. The activity of WT-826G-pGL3 in driving reporter gene transcription is significantly higher than that of the M-826A-pGL3 construct (P < 0.01. Analysis of gene expression patterns in homozygous full-sibling Chinese Qinchuan cattle showed that the mutant-type Hap-AGG exhibited a lower mRNA level than the wild-type Hap-GCA (P < 0.05 in longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM. Moreover, ZBED6 mRNA expression was low in C2C12 cells overexpressing the mutant-type ZBED6 (pcDNA3.1(+-Hap-GG (P < 0.01. Our results suggest that the polymorphisms in the promoter and coding regions may modulate the promoter activity and gene expression of bovine ZBED6 in the skeletal muscles of these cattle breeds.

  8. Construction of a multiplex promoter reporter platform to monitor Staphylococcus aureus virulence gene expression and the identification of usnic acid as a potent suppressor of psm gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng GAO

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As antibiotic resistance becomes phenomenal, alternative therapeutic strategies for bacterial infections such as anti-virulence treatments have been advocated. We have constructed a total of 20 gfp-luxABCDE dual-reporter plasmids with selected promoters from S. aureus virulence-associated genes. The plasmids were introduced into various S. aureus strains to establish a gfp-lux based multiplex promoter reporter platform for monitoring S. aureus virulence gene expressions in real time to identify factors or compounds that may perturb virulence of S. aureus. The gene expression profiles monitored by luminescence correlated well with qRT-PCR results and extrinsic factors including carbon dioxide and some antibiotics were shown to suppress or induce the expression of virulence factors in this platform. Using this platform, sub-inhibitory ampicillin was shown to be a potent inducer for the expression of many virulence factors in S. aureus. Bacterial adherence and invasion assays using mammalian cells were employed to measure S. aureus virulence induced by ampicillin. The platform was used for screening of natural extracts that perturb the virulence of S. aureus and usnic acid was identified to be a potent repressor for the expression of psm.

  9. A mutation screening of oncogenes, tumor suppressor gene TP53 and nuclear encoded mitochondrial complex I genes in oncocytic thyroid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelisti, Cecilia; de Biase, Dario; Kurelac, Ivana; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Prokisch, Holger; Meitinger, Thomas; Caria, Paola; Vanni, Roberta; Romeo, Giovanni; Tallini, Giovanni; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Bonora, Elena

    2015-03-21

    Thyroid neoplasias with oncocytic features represent a specific phenotype in non-medullary thyroid cancer, reflecting the unique biological phenomenon of mitochondrial hyperplasia in the cytoplasm. Oncocytic thyroid cells are characterized by a prominent eosinophilia (or oxyphilia) caused by mitochondrial abundance. Although disruptive mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are the most significant hallmark of such tumors, oncocytomas may be envisioned as heterogeneous neoplasms, characterized by multiple nuclear and mitochondrial gene lesions. We investigated the nuclear mutational profile of oncocytic tumors to pinpoint the mutations that may trigger the early oncogenic hit. Total DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissues from 45 biopsies of oncocytic tumors. High-resolution melting was used for mutation screening of mitochondrial complex I subunits genes. Specific nuclear rearrangements were investigated by RT-PCR (RET/PTC) or on isolated nuclei by interphase FISH (PAX8/PPARγ). Recurrent point mutations were analyzed by direct sequencing. In our oncocytic tumor samples, we identified rare TP53 mutations. The series of analyzed cases did not include poorly- or undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas, and none of the TP53 mutated cases had significant mitotic activity or high-grade features. Thus, the presence of disruptive TP53 mutations was completely unexpected. In addition, novel mutations in nuclear-encoded complex I genes were identified. These findings suggest that nuclear genetic lesions altering the bioenergetics competence of thyroid cells may give rise to an aberrant mitochondria-centered compensatory mechanism and ultimately to the oncocytic phenotype.

  10. A fine balance: epigenetic control of cellular quiescence by the tumor suppressor PRDM2/RIZ at a bivalent domain in the cyclin a gene

    OpenAIRE

    Cheedipudi, Sirisha; Puri, Deepika; Saleh, Amena; Gala, Hardik P.; Rumman, Mohammed; Pillai, Malini S.; Sreenivas, Prethish; Arora, Reety; Sellathurai, Jeeva; Schr?der, Henrik Daa; Mishra, Rakesh K.; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2015-01-01

    Adult stem cell quiescence is critical to ensure regeneration while minimizing tumorigenesis. Epigenetic regulation contributes to cell cycle control and differentiation, but few regulators of the chromatin state in quiescent cells are known. Here we report that the tumor suppressor PRDM2/RIZ, an H3K9 methyltransferase, is enriched in quiescent muscle stem cells in vivo and controls reversible quiescence in cultured myoblasts. We find that PRDM2 associates with >4400 promoters in G0 myobla...

  11. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of canine histiocytic sarcoma: A spontaneous model for human histiocytic cancer identifies deletion of tumor suppressor genes and highlights influence of genetic background on tumor behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abadie Jerome

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histiocytic malignancies in both humans and dogs are rare and poorly understood. While canine histiocytic sarcoma (HS is uncommon in the general domestic dog population, there is a strikingly high incidence in a subset of breeds, suggesting heritable predisposition. Molecular cytogenetic profiling of canine HS in these breeds would serve to reveal recurrent DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs that are breed and/or tumor associated, as well as defining those shared with human HS. This process would identify evolutionarily conserved cytogenetic changes to highlight regions of particular importance to HS biology. Methods Using genome wide array comparative genomic hybridization we assessed CNAs in 104 spontaneously occurring HS from two breeds of dog exhibiting a particularly elevated incidence of this tumor, the Bernese Mountain Dog and Flat-Coated Retriever. Recurrent CNAs were evaluated further by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and loss of heterozygosity analyses. Statistical analyses were performed to identify CNAs associated with tumor location and breed. Results Almost all recurrent CNAs identified in this study were shared between the two breeds, suggesting that they are associated more with the cancer phenotype than with breed. A subset of recurrent genomic imbalances suggested involvement of known cancer associated genes in HS pathogenesis, including deletions of the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/B, RB1 and PTEN. A small number of aberrations were unique to each breed, implying that they may contribute to the major differences in tumor location evident in these two breeds. The most highly recurrent canine CNAs revealed in this study are evolutionarily conserved with those reported in human histiocytic proliferations, suggesting that human and dog HS share a conserved pathogenesis. Conclusions The breed associated clinical features and DNA copy number aberrations exhibited by canine HS offer a valuable model

  12. Investigation of yeast genes possibly involved in mtDNA stability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Screening of Caenorhabditis elegans genes possibly involved in the mitochondrial genome maintenance was performed using our previous validated method of RNAi combined with ethidium bromide. This was to knock down C. elegans genes homologous to yeast genes known to be involved in mtDNA stability but of ...

  13. Thioridazine affects transcription of genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mette; Højland, Dorte Heidi; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    2011-01-01

    have previously shown that the expression of some resistance genes is abolished after treatment with thioridazine and oxacillin. To further understand the mechanism underlying the reversal of resistance, we tested the expression of genes involved in antibiotic resistance and cell wall biosynthesis...... reversal of resistance by thioridazine relies on decreased expression of specific genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis....

  14. Identification of sugarcane genes involved in the purine synthesis pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A. Jancso

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide synthesis is of central importance to all cells. In most organisms, the purine nucleotides are synthesized de novo from non-nucleotide precursors such as amino acids, ammonia and carbon dioxide. An understanding of the enzymes involved in sugarcane purine synthesis opens the possibility of using these enzymes as targets for chemicals which may be effective in combating phytopathogen. Such an approach has already been applied to several parasites and types of cancer. The strategy described in this paper was applied to identify sugarcane clusters for each step of the de novo purine synthesis pathway. Representative sequences of this pathway were chosen from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI database and used to search the translated sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database using the available basic local alignment search tool (BLAST facility. Retrieved clusters were further tested for the statistical significance of the alignment by an implementation (PRSS3 of the Monte Carlo shuffling algorithm calibrated using known protein sequences of divergent taxa along the phylogenetic tree. The sequences were compared to each other and to the sugarcane clusters selected using BLAST analysis, with the resulting table of p-values indicating the degree of divergence of each enzyme within different taxa and in relation to the sugarcane clusters. The results obtained by this strategy allowed us to identify the sugarcane proteins participating in the purine synthesis pathway.A via de síntese de purino nucleotídeos é considerada uma via de central importância para todas as células. Na maioria dos organismos, os purino nucleotídeos são sintetizados ''de novo'' a partir de precursores não-nucleotídicos como amino ácidos, amônia e dióxido de carbono. O conhecimento das enzimas envolvidas na via de síntese de purinas da cana-de-açúcar vai abrir a possibilidade do uso dessas enzimas como alvos no desenho

  15. Involvement of p53-EGFR-ERK pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The tumour suppressor gene p53 is mutated in approximately 50% of the human cancers. p53 is involved in genotoxicstress-induced cellular responses. The role of EGFR and ERK in DNA-damage-induced apoptosis is well known. Weinvestigated the involvement of activation of ERK signalling as a consequence of ...

  16. Is Gene Transcription Involved in Seed Dry After-Ripening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meimoun, Patrice; Mordret, Ernest; Langlade, Nicolas B.; Balzergue, Sandrine; Arribat, Sandrine; Bailly, Christophe; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat

    2014-01-01

    Orthodox seeds are living organisms that survive anhydrobiosis and may display dormancy, an inability to germinate at harvest. Seed germination potential can be acquired during a prolonged period of dry storage called after-ripening. The aim of this work was to determine if gene transcription is an underlying regulatory mechanism for dormancy alleviation during after-ripening. To identify changes in gene transcription strictly associated with the acquisition of germination potential but not with storage, we used seed storage at low relative humidity that maintains dormancy as control. Transcriptome profiling was performed using DNA microarray to compare change in gene transcript abundance between dormant (D), after-ripened non-dormant (ND) and after-ripened dormant seeds (control, C). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to confirm gene expression. Comparison between D and ND showed the differential expression of 115 probesets at cut-off values of two-fold change (p<0.05). Comparisons between both D and C with ND in transcript abundance showed that only 13 transcripts, among 115, could be specific to dormancy alleviation. qPCR confirms the expression pattern of these transcripts but without significant variation between conditions. Here we show that sunflower seed dormancy alleviation in the dry state is not related to regulated changes in gene expression. PMID:24466101

  17. Is gene transcription involved in seed dry after-ripening?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Meimoun

    Full Text Available Orthodox seeds are living organisms that survive anhydrobiosis and may display dormancy, an inability to germinate at harvest. Seed germination potential can be acquired during a prolonged period of dry storage called after-ripening. The aim of this work was to determine if gene transcription is an underlying regulatory mechanism for dormancy alleviation during after-ripening. To identify changes in gene transcription strictly associated with the acquisition of germination potential but not with storage, we used seed storage at low relative humidity that maintains dormancy as control. Transcriptome profiling was performed using DNA microarray to compare change in gene transcript abundance between dormant (D, after-ripened non-dormant (ND and after-ripened dormant seeds (control, C. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR was used to confirm gene expression. Comparison between D and ND showed the differential expression of 115 probesets at cut-off values of two-fold change (p<0.05. Comparisons between both D and C with ND in transcript abundance showed that only 13 transcripts, among 115, could be specific to dormancy alleviation. qPCR confirms the expression pattern of these transcripts but without significant variation between conditions. Here we show that sunflower seed dormancy alleviation in the dry state is not related to regulated changes in gene expression.

  18. Contextualizing the Genes Altered in Bladder Neoplasms in Pediatric andTeen Patients Allows Identifying Two Main Classes of Biological ProcessesInvolved and New Potential Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porrello, A; Piergentili, R B

    2016-02-01

    Research on bladder neoplasms in pediatric and teen patients (BNPTP) has described 21 genes, which are variously involved in this disease and are mostly responsible for deregulated cell proliferation. However, due to the limited number of publications on this subject, it is still unclear what type of relationships there are among these genes and which are the chances that, while having different molecular functions, they i) act as downstream effector genes of well-known pro- or anti- proliferative stimuli and/or interplay with biochemical pathways having oncological relevance or ii) are specific and, possibly, early biomarkers of these pathologies. A Gene Ontology (GO)-based analysis showed that these 21 genes are involved in biological processes, which can be split into two main classes: cell regulation-based and differentiation/development-based. In order to understand the involvement/overlapping with main cancer-related pathways, we performed a meta-analysis dependent on the 189 oncogenic signatures of the Molecular Signatures Database (OSMSD) curated by the Broad Institute. We generated a binary matrix with 53 gene signatures having at least one hit; this analysis i) suggests that some genes of the original list show inconsistencies and might need to be experimentally re- assessed or evaluated as biomarkers (in particular, ACTA2) and ii) allows hypothesizing that important (proto)oncogenes (E2F3, ERBB2/HER2, CCND1, WNT1, and YAP1) and (putative) tumor suppressors (BRCA1, RBBP8/CTIP, and RB1-RBL2/p130) may participate in the onset of this disease or worsen the observed phenotype, thus expanding the list of possible molecular targets for the treatment of BNPTP.

  19. RESEARCH NOTE Identification of genes involved in cold-shock ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2017-01-04

    Jan 4, 2017 ... A rapid decline in temperature poses a major challenge for poikilothermic fish, as their entire metabolism depends on ambient temperature. We compared the gene expression of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) having undergone such a cold shock (0 °C) to a control (5 °C) using microarrays and ...

  20. Expression profiles of genes involved in tanshinone biosynthesis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tanshinone biosynthetic gene; quantitative real-time PCR; Salvia miltiorrhiza. Abstract. Author Affiliations. ZHENQIAO SONG1 2 JIANHUA WANG1 2 XINGFENG LI1 2. State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, Shandong Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, a; Agronomy College, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, ...

  1. Genes involved in bovine milk-fat composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schennink, A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research described in this thesis was to identify genes that underlie the genetic variation in bovine milk-fat composition. The fat composition of milk samples from approximately 2,000 Dutch Holstein Friesian cows in their first lactation was measured by gas chromatography.

  2. Coverage analysis of lists of genes involved in heterogeneous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Exome sequencing (ES) has been proven efficient for clinical applications in heterogeneous genetic diseases (Neveling et al. 2013; Biesecker and Green 2014), including ES asso- ciated with data filtering for selected genes (Dias et al. 2012; Bartoli et al. 2014). However, previous reports have been based mainly on the ...

  3. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, L H; Jacobsen, V B; Haderslev, P A

    2008-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves are closely associated with cranial blood vessels. CGRP is the most potent vasodilator known in isolated cerebral blood vessels. CGRP can induce migraine attacks, and two selective CGRP receptor antagonists are effective in the treatment...

  4. MicroRNA-429 induces tumorigenesis of human non-small cell lung cancer cells and targets multiple tumor suppressor genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Yaoguo; Xu, Shidong; Ma, Jianqun; Wu, Jun [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 150 Haping Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Jin, Shi; Cao, Shoubo [Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 150 Haping Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Yu, Yan, E-mail: yuyan@hrbmu.edu.cn [Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 150 Haping Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • MiR-429 expression is upregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). • MiR-429 inhibits PTEN, RASSF8 and TIMP2 expression. • MiR-429 promotes metastasis and proliferation. • We report important regulatory mechanisms involved in NSCLC progression. • MiR-429 is a potential therapeutic target and diagnostic marker. - Abstract: Lung cancer is the major cause of cancer death globally. MicroRNAs are evolutionally conserved small noncoding RNAs that are critical for the regulation of gene expression. Aberrant expression of microRNA (miRNA) has been implicated in cancer initiation and progression. In this study, we demonstrated that the expression of miR-429 are often upregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared with normal lung tissues, and its expression level is also increased in NSCLC cell lines compared with normal lung cells. Overexpression of miR-429 in A549 NSCLC cells significantly promoted cell proliferation, migration and invasion, whereas inhibition of miR-429 inhibits these effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-429 down-regulates PTEN, RASSF8 and TIMP2 expression by directly targeting the 3′-untranslated region of these target genes. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-429 plays an important role in promoting the proliferation and metastasis of NSCLC cells and is a potential target for NSCLC therapy.

  5. Finding candidate genes under positive selection in Non-model species: examples of genes involved in host specialization in pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguileta, G; Lengelle, J; Marthey, S; Chiapello, H; Rodolphe, F; Gendrault, A; Yockteng, R; Vercken, E; Devier, B; Fontaine, M C; Wincker, P; Dossat, C; Cruaud, C; Couloux, A; Giraud, T

    2010-01-01

    Numerous genes in diverse organisms have been shown to be under positive selection, especially genes involved in reproduction, adaptation to contrasting environments, hybrid inviability, and host-pathogen interactions. Looking for genes under positive selection in pathogens has been a priority in efforts to investigate coevolution dynamics and to develop vaccines or drugs. To elucidate the functions involved in host specialization, here we aimed at identifying candidate sequences that could have evolved under positive selection among closely related pathogens specialized on different hosts. For this goal, we sequenced c. 17,000-32,000 ESTs from each of four Microbotryum species, which are fungal pathogens responsible for anther smut disease on host plants in the Caryophyllaceae. Forty-two of the 372 predicted orthologous genes showed significant signal of positive selection, which represents a good number of candidate genes for further investigation. Sequencing 16 of these genes in 9 additional Microbotryum species confirmed that they have indeed been rapidly evolving in the pathogen species specialized on different hosts. The genes showing significant signals of positive selection were putatively involved in nutrient uptake from the host, secondary metabolite synthesis and secretion, respiration under stressful conditions and stress response, hyphal growth and differentiation, and regulation of expression by other genes. Many of these genes had transmembrane domains and may therefore also be involved in pathogen recognition by the host. Our approach thus revealed fruitful and should be feasible for many non-model organisms for which candidate genes for diversifying selection are needed.

  6. Extravirgin olive oil up-regulates CB₁ tumor suppressor gene in human colon cancer cells and in rat colon via epigenetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, Andrea; Falconi, Anastasia; Di Germanio, Clara; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Costa, Antonio; Caramuta, Stefano; Del Carlo, Michele; Compagnone, Dario; Dainese, Enrico; Cifani, Carlo; Maccarrone, Mauro; D'Addario, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Extravirgin olive oil (EVOO) represents the typical lipid source of the Mediterranean diet, an eating habit pattern that has been associated with a significant reduction of cancer risk. Diet is the more studied environmental factor in epigenetics, and many evidences suggest dysregulation of epigenetic pathways in cancer. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of EVOO and its phenolic compounds on endocannabinoid system (ECS) gene expression via epigenetic regulation in both human colon cancer cells (Caco-2) and rats exposed to short- and long-term dietary EVOO. We observed a selective and transient up-regulation of CNR1 gene - encoding for type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB₁) - that was evoked by exposure of Caco-2 cells to EVOO (100 ppm), its phenolic extracts (OPE, 50 μM) or authentic hydroxytyrosol (HT, 50 μM) for 24 h. None of the other major elements of the ECS (i.e., CB₂; GPR55 and TRPV1 receptors; and NAPE-PLD, DAGL, FAAH and MAGL enzymes) was affected at any time point. The stimulatory effect of OPE and HT on CB₁ expression was inversely correlated to DNA methylation at CNR1 promoter and was associated with reduced proliferation of Caco-2 cells. Interestingly, CNR1 gene was less expressed in Caco-2 cells when compared to normal colon mucosa cells, and again this effect was associated with higher level of DNA methylation at CNR1. Moreover, in agreement with the in vitro studies, we also observed a remarkable (~4-fold) and selective increase in CB₁ expression in the colon of rats receiving dietary EVOO supplementation for 10 days. Consistently, CpG methylation of rat Cnr1 promoter, miR23a and miR-301a, previously shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and predicted to target CB₁ mRNA, was reduced after EVOO administration down to ~50% of controls. Taken together, our findings demonstrating CB₁ gene expression modulation by EVOO or its phenolic compounds via epigenetic mechanism, both in vitro and in vivo, may

  7. Identification of Phytophthora sojae genes involved in asexual ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    predicted to encode proteins involved in metabolism, cell cycle, protein biosynthesis, cell signalling, cell defence, and tran- scription regulation. Seven clones were selected for temporal expression ..... idative lipid metabolism was shown necessary for antheridial induction, gametangial fusion, meiosis, and oospore matura-.

  8. Tumor suppressor NDRG2 inhibits glycolysis and glutaminolysis in colorectal cancer cells by repressing c-Myc expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinyuan; Li, Jianying; Sun, Xiang; Guo, Yan; Chu, Dake; Wei, Li; Li, Xia; Yang, Guodong; Liu, Xinping; Yao, Libo; Zhang, Jian; Shen, Lan

    2015-09-22

    Cancer cells use glucose and glutamine as the major sources of energy and precursor intermediates, and enhanced glycolysis and glutamimolysis are the major hallmarks of metabolic reprogramming in cancer. Oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inactivation alter multiple intracellular signaling pathways that affect glycolysis and glutaminolysis. N-Myc downstream regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) is a tumor suppressor gene inhibiting cancer growth, metastasis and invasion. However, the role and molecular mechanism of NDRG2 in cancer metabolism remains unclear. In this study, we discovered the role of the tumor suppressor gene NDRG2 in aerobic glycolysis and glutaminolysis of cancer cells. NDRG2 inhibited glucose consumption and lactate production, glutamine consumption and glutamate production in colorectal cancer cells. Analysis of glucose transporters and the catalytic enzymes involved in glycolysis revealed that glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), hexokinase 2 (HK2), pyruvate kinase M2 isoform (PKM2) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) was significantly suppressed by NDRG2. Analysis of glutamine transporter and the catalytic enzymes involved in glutaminolysis revealed that glutamine transporter ASC amino-acid transporter 2 (ASCT2) and glutaminase 1 (GLS1) was also significantly suppressed by NDRG2. Transcription factor c-Myc mediated inhibition of glycolysis and glutaminolysis by NDRG2. More importantly, NDRG2 inhibited the expression of c-Myc by suppressing the expression of β-catenin, which can transcriptionally activate C-MYC gene in nucleus. In addition, the growth and proliferation of colorectal cancer cells were suppressed significantly by NDRG2 through inhibition of glycolysis and glutaminolysis. Taken together, these findings indicate that NDRG2 functions as an essential regulator in glycolysis and glutaminolysis via repression of c-Myc, and acts as a suppressor of carcinogenesis through coordinately targeting glucose and glutamine transporter, multiple catalytic

  9. Suppressors (scsl-scs7) of CSG2, a Gene Required by Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Growth in Media Containing 10 mMCa(2+), Identify Genes Required for Sphingolipid Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    grew comparably to wild type on YPD medium but failed to grow on the same medium containing 50 mM eal+ [Beeler et al., 1994]. The null allele was...8217 exchanger. The decrease of Ca" in medium can be measured spectrophotometrically. The wild type and suppressor strains were grown in YPD + 100 mM Ca" (pH...4.7), but the csg2i1 strain was grown in YPD (pH 4.7) medium . All suppressors (except scs]·]) showed vacuolar Ca"· uptake comparable to that

  10. Genes involved in yeast survival after irradiation with fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozin, D.; Milosevic, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Life on the Earth has evolved against a continuous background of ionizing radiation. It would be expected, therefore, that all possible mutations have been produced at some time or another; man-made radiation from medical or industrial sources will not result in any new types of mutation but will simply increase the whole spectrum of mutations that occur spontaneously. Any such lesion can be mutagenic and, in principle, lethal. To counteract the consequences of DNA damage, evolution has equipped all living cells with an intricate network of defense and repair systems. Together, these systems act as a kind of nuclear 'immune system' that is able to recognize and eliminate many types of DNA lesions. In the case of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in these processes over 30 RAD genes participate. We tested the survival of haploid and diploid rad1 yeast mutant strains at a dose of 15 Gy of γ or fast neutron radiation. We demonstrated that the lethality of rad1 mutants both haploid and diploid are significantly higher after fast neutron irradiation. The results indicate to the role and position of these genes in the DNA repair of damages specifically induced by fast neutrons. (authors)

  11. MiR-424 Promotes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Progression and Metastasis through Regulating the Tumor Suppressor Gene TNFAIP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to investigate the potential roles of miR-424 expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC metastasis and growth and its underlying mechanism. Methods: The expression of miR-424 in two NSCLC cell lines (A549 and H1975 was altered by transfection with miR-424 mimic and inhibitor. Effects of miR-424 overexpression and suppression on cells migration, invasion and colony formation were analyzed. Target genes for miR-424 were predicted using bioinformatics method and then verified using luciferase assay. Effects of miR-424 expression on cell migration, invasion and proliferation were reanalyzed on the condition of TNFAIP1 was silenced. Moreover, TNFAIP1 silencing and miR-424 modified A549 cells were subcutaneous injected into node BALB/c mice to confirm the regulation of miR-424 on TNFAIP1 in regulating tumor growth. Results: Compared with the control, miR-424 overexpression significantly increased the migrated and invaded cells, as well as the proliferated colonies. TNFAIP1 was a predicted target gene for miR-424, and was negatively regulated by miR-424. TNFAIP1 silence significantly increased the migrated and invaded cells compared to that in control, while these increases were abolished by miR-424 suppression. Animal experiment further evidenced miR-424 affected tumor growth by regulating TNFAIP1. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that miR-424 may be a contributor for NSCLC progression and metastasis through involving in cell migration, invasion and proliferation via inhibiting TNFAIP1. This study may provide theoretical basis for miR-424 in NSCLC target therapeutic treatment.

  12. Enzymes and Genes Involved in Aerobic Alkane Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongze eShao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil. They are also present at low concentrations in diverse non-contaminated because many living organisms produce them as chemo-attractants or as protecting agents against water loss. Alkane degradation is a widespread phenomenon in nature. The numerous microorganisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic, capable of utilizing alkanes as a carbon and energy source, have been isolated and characterized. This review summarizes the current knowledge of how bacteria metabolize alkanes aerobically, with a particular emphasis on the oxidation of long-chain alkanes, including factors that are responsible for chemotaxis to alkanes , transport across cell membrane of alkanes , the regulation of alkane degradation gene and initial oxidation.

  13. The hnRNP 2H9 gene, which is involved in the splicing reaction, is a multiply spliced gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B

    2000-01-01

    The hnRNP 2H9 gene products are involved in the splicing process and participate in early heat shock-induced splicing arrest. By combining low/high stringency hybridisation, database search, Northern and Western blotting it is shown that the gene is alternatively spliced into at least six transcr...

  14. Isolation and Genetic Analysis of Extragenic Suppressors of the Hyper-Deletion Phenotype of the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Hpr1δ Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Santos-Rosa, H.; Aguilera, A.

    1995-01-01

    The HPR1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisae is involved in maintaining low levels of deletions between DNA repeats. To understand how deletions initiate in the absence of the Hpr1 protein and the mechanisms of recombination leading to deletions in S. cerevisiae, we have isolated mutations as suppressors of the hyper-deletion phenotype of the hpr1δ mutation. The mutations defined five different genes called HRS for hyper-recombination suppression. They suppress the hyper-deletion phenotype of hpr...

  15. Tumor suppressors status in cancer cell line Encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonkin, Dmitriy; Hassan, Mehedi; Murphy, Denis J; Tatarinova, Tatiana V

    2013-08-01

    Tumor suppressors play a major role in the etiology of human cancer, and typically achieve a tumor-promoting effect upon complete functional inactivation. Bi-allelic inactivation of tumor suppressors may occur through genetic mechanisms (such as loss of function mutation, copy number (CN) loss, or loss of heterozygosity (LOH)), epigenetic mechanisms (such as promoter methylation or histone modification), or a combination of the two. We report systematically derived status of 69 known or putative tumor suppressors, across 799 samples of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. In order to generate such resource we constructed a novel comprehensive computational framework for the assessment of tumor suppressor functional "status". This approach utilizes several orthogonal genomic data types, including mutation data, copy number, LOH and expression. Through correlation with additional data types (compound sensitivity and gene set activity) we show that this integrative method provides a more accurate assessment of tumor suppressor status than can be inferred by expression, copy number, or mutation alone. This approach has the potential for a more realistic assessment of tumor suppressor genes for both basic and translational oncology research. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. ARS2 is a general suppressor of pervasive transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasillo, Claudia; Schmid, Manfred; Yahia, Yousra; Maqbool, Muhammad A; Descostes, Nicolas; Karadoulama, Evdoxia; Bertrand, Edouard; Andrau, Jean-Christophe; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2017-09-29

    Termination of transcription is important for establishing gene punctuation marks. It is also critical for suppressing many of the pervasive transcription events occurring throughout eukaryotic genomes and coupling their RNA products to efficient decay. In human cells, the ARS2 protein has been implicated in such function as its depletion causes transcriptional read-through of selected gene terminators and because it physically interacts with the ribonucleolytic nuclear RNA exosome. Here, we study the role of ARS2 on transcription and RNA metabolism genome wide. We show that ARS2 depletion negatively impacts levels of promoter-proximal RNA polymerase II at protein-coding (pc) genes. Moreover, our results reveal a general role of ARS2 in transcription termination-coupled RNA turnover at short transcription units like snRNA-, replication-dependent histone-, promoter upstream transcript- and enhancer RNA-loci. Depletion of the ARS2 interaction partner ZC3H18 mimics the ARS2 depletion, although to a milder extent, whereas depletion of the exosome core subunit RRP40 only impacts RNA abundance post-transcriptionally. Interestingly, ARS2 is also involved in transcription termination events within first introns of pc genes. Our work therefore establishes ARS2 as a general suppressor of pervasive transcription with the potential to regulate pc gene expression. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Discovery of a novel gene involved in autolysis of Clostridium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liejian; Bao, Guanhui; Zhu, Yan; Dong, Hongjun; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin

    2013-06-01

    Cell autolysis plays important physiological roles in the life cycle of clostridial cells. Understanding the genetic basis of the autolysis phenomenon of pathogenic Clostridium or solvent producing Clostridium cells might provide new insights into this important species. Genes that might be involved in autolysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum, a model clostridial species, were investigated in this study. Twelve putative autolysin genes were predicted in C. acetobutylicum DSM 1731 genome through bioinformatics analysis. Of these 12 genes, gene SMB_G3117 was selected for testing the in tracellular autolysin activity, growth profile, viable cell numbers, and cellular morphology. We found that overexpression of SMB_G3117 gene led to earlier ceased growth, significantly increased number of dead cells, and clear electrolucent cavities, while disruption of SMB_G3117 gene exhibited remarkably reduced intracellular autolysin activity. These results indicate that SMB_G3117 is a novel gene involved in cellular autolysis of C. acetobutylicum.

  18. [Agrobacterium-mediated sunflower transformation (Helianthus annuus L.) in vitro and in Planta using strain of LBA4404 harboring binary vector pBi2E with dsRNA-suppressor proline dehydrogenase gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishchenko, E N; Komisarenko, A G; Mikhal'skaia, S I; Sergeeva, L E; Adamenko, N I; Morgun, B V; Kochetov, A V

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the efficiency of proline dehydrogenase gene suppression towards increasing of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) tolerance level to water deficit and salinity, we employed strain LBA4404 harboring pBi2E with double-stranded RNA-suppressor, which were prepared on basis arabidopsis ProDH1 gene. The techniques of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in vitro and in planta during fertilization sunflower have been proposed. There was shown the genotype-depended integration of T-DNA in sunflower genome. PCR-analysis showed that ProDH1 presents in genome of inbred lines transformed in planta, as well as in T1- and T2-generations. In trans-genic regenerants the essential accumulation of free L-proline during early stages of in vitro cultivation under normal conditions was shown. There was established the essential accumulation of free proline in transgenic regenerants during cultivation under lethal stress pressure (0.4 M mannitol and 2.0% sea water salts) and its decline upon the recovery period. These data are declared about effectiveness of suppression of sunflower ProDH and gene participation in processes connected with osmotolerance.

  19. Enhancer-Mediated Oncogenic Function of the Menin Tumor Suppressor in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen M.A. Dreijerink

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available While the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1 gene functions as a tumor suppressor in a variety of cancer types, we explored its oncogenic role in breast tumorigenesis. The MEN1 gene product menin is involved in H3K4 trimethylation and co-activates transcription. We integrated ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data to identify menin target genes. Our analysis revealed that menin-dependent target gene promoters display looping to distal enhancers that are bound by menin, FOXA1 and GATA3. In this fashion, MEN1 co-regulates a proliferative breast cancer-specific gene expression program in ER+ cells. In primary mammary cells, MEN1 exerts an anti-proliferative function by regulating a distinct expression signature. Our findings clarify the cell-type-specific functions of MEN1 and inform the development of menin-directed treatments for breast cancer.

  20. Predicting Genes Involved in Human Cancer Using Network Contextual Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmani Hossein

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI networks have been widely used for the task of predicting proteins involved in cancer. Previous research has shown that functional information about the protein for which a prediction is made, proximity to specific other proteins in the PPI network, as well as local network structure are informative features in this respect. In this work, we introduce two new types of input features, reflecting additional information: (1 Functional Context: the functions of proteins interacting with the target protein (rather than the protein itself; and (2 Structural Context: the relative position of the target protein with respect to specific other proteins selected according to a novel ANOVA (analysis of variance based measure. We also introduce a selection strategy to pinpoint the most informative features. Results show that the proposed feature types and feature selection strategy yield informative features. A standard machine learning method (Naive Bayes that uses the features proposed here outperforms the current state-of-the-art methods by more than 5% with respect to F-measure. In addition, manual inspection confirms the biological relevance of the top-ranked features.

  1. New genes involved in osmotic stress tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Gonzalez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation to changes in osmolarity is fundamental for the survival of living cells, and has implications in food and industrial biotechnology. It has been extensively studied in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the Hog1 stress activated protein kinase was discovered about 20 years ago. Hog1 is the core of the intracellular signaling pathway that governs the adaptive response to osmotic stress in this species. The main endpoint of this program is synthesis and intracellular retention of glycerol, as a compatible osmolyte. Despite many details of the signaling pathways and yeast responses to osmotic challenges have already been described, genome-wide approaches are contributing to refine our knowledge of yeast adaptation to hypertonic media. In this work, we used a quantitative fitness analysis approach in order to deepen our understanding of the interplay between yeast cells and the osmotic environment. Genetic requirements for proper growth under osmotic stress showed both common and specific features when hypertonic conditions were induced by either glucose or sorbitol. Tolerance to high-glucose content requires mitochondrial function, while defective protein targeting to peroxisome, GID-complex function (involved in negative regulation of gluconeogenesis, or chromatin dynamics, result in poor survival to sorbitol-induced osmotic stress. On the other side, the competitive disadvantage of yeast strains defective in the endomembrane system is relieved by hypertonic conditions. This finding points to the Golgi-endosome system as one of the main cell components negatively affected by hyperosmolarity. Most of the biological processes highlighted in this analysis had not been previously related to osmotic stress but are probably relevant in an ecological and evolutionary context.

  2. New Genes Involved in Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Ramon; Morales, Pilar; Tronchoni, Jordi; Cordero-Bueso, Gustavo; Vaudano, Enrico; Quirós, Manuel; Novo, Maite; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Valero, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to changes in osmolarity is fundamental for the survival of living cells, and has implications in food and industrial biotechnology. It has been extensively studied in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the Hog1 stress activated protein kinase was discovered about 20 years ago. Hog1 is the core of the intracellular signaling pathway that governs the adaptive response to osmotic stress in this species. The main endpoint of this program is synthesis and intracellular retention of glycerol, as a compatible osmolyte. Despite many details of the signaling pathways and yeast responses to osmotic challenges have already been described, genome-wide approaches are contributing to refine our knowledge of yeast adaptation to hypertonic media. In this work, we used a quantitative fitness analysis approach in order to deepen our understanding of the interplay between yeast cells and the osmotic environment. Genetic requirements for proper growth under osmotic stress showed both common and specific features when hypertonic conditions were induced by either glucose or sorbitol. Tolerance to high-glucose content requires mitochondrial function, while defective protein targeting to peroxisome, GID-complex function (involved in negative regulation of gluconeogenesis), or chromatin dynamics, result in poor survival to sorbitol-induced osmotic stress. On the other side, the competitive disadvantage of yeast strains defective in the endomembrane system is relieved by hypertonic conditions. This finding points to the Golgi-endosome system as one of the main cell components negatively affected by hyperosmolarity. Most of the biological processes highlighted in this analysis had not been previously related to osmotic stress but are probably relevant in an ecological and evolutionary context. PMID:27733850

  3. Identification of genes involved in regulatory mechanism of pigments in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarique, T M; Yang, S; Mohsina, Z; Qiu, J; Yan, Z; Chen, G; Chen, A

    2014-09-05

    Chicken is an important model organism that unites the evolutionary gap between mammals and other vertebrates and provide major source of protein from meat and eggs for all over the world population. However, specific genes underlying the regulatory mechanism of broiler pigmentation have not yet been determined. In order to better understand the genes involved in the mechanism of pigmentation in the muscle tissues of broilers, the Affymetrix microarray hybridization experiment platform was used to identify gene expression profiles at 7 weeks of age. Broilers fed canthaxanthin, natural lutein, and orangeII pigments (100 mg/kg) were used to explore gene expression profiles). Our data showed that the 7th week of age was a very important phase with regard to gene expression profiles. We identified a number of differentially expressed genes; in canthaxanthin, natural lutein, and orangeII, there were 54 (32 upregulated and 22 downregulated), 23 (15 upregulated and 8 downregulated), and 7 (5 upregulated and 2 downregulated) known genes, respectively. Our data indicate that the numbers of differentially expressed genes were more upregulated than downregulated, and several genes showed conserved signaling to previously known functions. Thus, functional characterization of differentially expressed genes revealed several categories that are involved in important biological processes, including pigmentation, growth, molecular mechanisms, fat metabolism, cell proliferation, immune response, lipid metabolism, and protein synthesis and degradation. The results of the present study demonstrate that the genes associated with canthaxanthin, natural lutein, and orangeII are key regulatory genes that control the regulatory mechanisms of pigmentation.

  4. Genes involved in immunity and apoptosis are associated with human presbycusis based on microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yang; Li, Ming; Liu, Puzhao; Song, Haiyan; Zhao, Yuping; Shi, Jianrong

    2014-06-01

    Genes involved in immunity and apoptosis were associated with human presbycusis. CCR3 and GILZ played an important role in the pathogenesis of presbycusis, probably through regulating chemokine receptor, T-cell apoptosis, or T-cell activation pathways. To identify genes associated with human presbycusis and explore the molecular mechanism of presbycusis. Hearing function was tested by pure-tone audiometry. Microarray analysis was performed to identify presbycusis-correlated genes by Illumina Human-6 BeadChip using the peripheral blood samples of subjects. To identify biological process categories and pathways associated with presbycusis-correlated genes, bioinformatics analysis was carried out by Gene Ontology Tree Machine (GOTM) and database for annotation, visualization, and integrated discovery (DAVID). Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to validate the microarray data. Microarray analysis identified 469 up-regulated genes and 323 down-regulated genes. Both the dominant biological processes by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and the enriched pathways by Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) and BIOCARTA showed that genes involved in immunity and apoptosis were associated with presbycusis. In addition, CCR3, GILZ, CXCL10, and CX3CR1 genes showed consistent difference between groups for both the gene chip and qRT-PCR data. The differences of CCR3 and GILZ between presbycusis patients and controls were statistically significant (p < 0.05).

  5. The in vitro and in vivo effects of re-expressing methylated von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene in clear cell renal carcinoma with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleman, Wade G; Tabios, Ray L; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V R; Aprelikova, Olga N; Torres-Cabala, Carlos; Mendoza, Arnulfo; Rogers, Craig; Rodgers, Craig; Sopko, Nikolai A; Linehan, W Marston; Vasselli, James R

    2004-10-15

    Clear cell renal carcinoma (ccRCC) is strongly associated with loss of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene. The VHL gene is functionally lost through hypermethylation in up to 19% of sporadic ccRCC cases. We theorized that re-expressing VHL silenced by methylation in ccRCC cells, using a hypo-methylating agent, may be an approach to treatment in patients with this type of cancer. We test the ability of two hypo-methylating agents to re-express VHL in cell culture and in mice bearing human ccRCC and evaluate the effects of re-expressed VHL in these models. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR was used to evaluate the ability of zebularine and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dCyd) to re-express VHL in four ccRCC cell lines with documented VHL gene silencing through hypermethylation. We evaluated if the VHL re-expressed after hypo-methylating agent treatment could recreate similar phenotypic changes in ccRCC cells observed when the VHL gene is re-expressed via transfection in cell culture and in a xenograft mouse model. Finally we evaluate global gene expression changes occurring in our cells, using microarray analysis. 5-Aza-dCyd was able to re-express VHL in our cell lines both in culture and in xenografted murine tumors. Well described phenotypic changes of VHL expression including decreased invasiveness into Matrigel, and decreased vascular endothelial growth factor and glucose transporter-1 expression were observed in the treated lines. VHL methylated ccRCC xenografted tumors were significantly reduced in size in mice treated with 5-aza-dCyd. Mice bearing nonmethylated but VHL-mutated tumors showed no tumor shrinkage with 5-aza-dCyd treatment. Hypo-methylating agents may be useful in the treatment of patients having ccRCC tumors consisting of cells with methylated VHL.

  6. A novel plasmid-based microarray screen identifies suppressors of ∆rrp6 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Heick

    Genetic screens can provide novel information about interacting genes and pathways in S. cerevisiae.  Conventional approaches are limited, however, because only strong suppressors or enhancers are usually identified.  We describe here a novel Microarray-based Enhancer and Suppressor screening (MES......) strategy that is capable of identifying a large number of genes that exert more modest effects on the mutant phenotype.  MES combines DNA microarray technology with high-copy plasmid expression in liquid media.  We conducted MES on a strain deleted for Rrp6p, a nuclear exosome component involved...... enhancers at high temperature.  They encoded a novel mRNP protein Nab6p and the tRNA transporter Los1p, suggesting that mRNA metabolism or protein synthesis is growth-rate limiting in the ∆rrp6 strain.  Conventional microarray assays, which compare the RNA populations of ∆rrp6 strains containing...

  7. Homozygous Deletions and Recurrent Amplifications Implicate New Genes Involved in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wennuan Liu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer cell lines provide ideal in vitro systems for the identification and analysis of prostate tumor suppressors and oncogenes. A detailed characterization of the architecture of prostate cancer cell line genomes would facilitate the study of precise roles of various genes in prostate tumorigenesis in general. To contribute to such a characterization, we used the GeneChip 500K single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP array for analysis of genotypes and relative DNA copy number changes across the genome of 11 cell lines derived from both normal and cancerous prostate tissues. For comparison purposes, we also examined the alterations observed in the cell lines in tumor/normal pairs of clinical samples from 72 patients. Along with genome-wide maps of DNA copy number changes and loss of heterozygosity for these cell lines, we report previously unreported homozygous deletions and recurrent amplifications in prostate cancers in this study. The homozygous deletions affected a number of biologically important genes, including PPP2R2A and BNIP3L identified in this study and CDKN2A/CDKN2B reported previously. Although most amplified genomic regions tended to be large, amplifications at 8q24.21 were of particular interest because the affected regions are relatively small, are found in multiple cell lines, are located near MYC, an oncogene strongly implicated in prostate tumorigenesis, and are known to harbor SNPs that are associated with inherited susceptibility for prostate cancer. The genomic alterations revealed in this study provide an important catalog of positional information relevant to efforts aimed at deciphering the molecular genetic basis of prostate cancer.

  8. Genes Involved in Initial Follicle Recruitment May Be Associated with Age at Menopause

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorhuis, Marlies; Broekmans, Frank J.; Fauser, Bart C. J. M.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.

    Context: Timing of menopause is largely influenced by genetic factors. Because menopause occurs when the follicle pool in the ovaries has become exhausted, genes involved in primordial follicle recruitment can be considered as candidate genes for timing of menopause. Objective: The aim was to study

  9. Investigation of yeast genes possibly involved in mtDNA stability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phelim Isichei

    large number of possible candidate genes, these approaches most often remains laborious (De Lonlay et ... RNA interference of genes involved in mtDNA replication such as polg-1, encoding the mitochondrial DNA .... adult worms were independently picked up and transferred to fresh. RNAi plates with or without different ...

  10. Identification of four genes involved in suppression of the pre-mRNA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Switching gene swi6, involved in repression of silent mating type loci in fission yeast, encodes a homology of chromatin associated proteins from Drosophila and mammals. Gene. 143, 139–143. Moreno S., Klar A. and Nurse P. 1991 Molecular genetic analysis of fission yeast: guide to yeast genetics and molecu- lar biology.

  11. The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor-suppressor gene is down-regulated by selenium deficiency in Caco-2 cells and rat colon mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    To test the hypothesis that selenium affects DNA methylation and hence gene regulation we employed a methylation array (Panomics) in the human colonic epithelial Caco-2 cell model. The array profiles DNA methylation from promoter regions of 82 human genes. After conditioning cells to repeatedly redu...

  12. TEP1, the yeast homolog of the human tumor suppressor gene PTEN/MMAC1/TEP1, is linked to the phosphatidylinositol pathway and plays a role in the developmental process of sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymont, J; Berenfeld, L; Collins, J; Kaganovich, A; Maynes, B; Moulin, A; Ratskovskaya, I; Poon, P P; Johnston, G C; Kamenetsky, M; DeSilva, J; Sun, H; Petsko, G A; Engebrecht, J

    2000-11-07

    PTEN/MMAC1/TEP1 (PTEN, phosphatase deleted on chromosome ten; MMAC1, mutated in multiple advanced cancers; TEP1, tensin-like phosphatase) is a major human tumor suppressor gene whose suppressive activity operates on the phosphatidylinositol pathway. A single homologue of this gene, TEP1 (YNL128w), exists in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast strains deleted for TEP1 exhibit essentially no phenotype in haploids; however, diploids exhibit resistance to the phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase inhibitor wortmannin and to lithium ions. Although rates of cancer increase with age, neither tep1 haploids nor diploids have altered life spans. TEP1 RNA is present throughout the cell cycle, and levels are dramatically up-regulated during meiotic development. Although homozygous tep1 mutants initiate the meiotic program and form spores with wild-type kinetics, analysis of the spores produced in tep1 mutants indicates a specific defect in the trafficking or deposition of dityrosine, a major component of yeast spore walls, to the surface. Introduction of a common PTEN mutation found in human tumors into the analogous position in Tep1p produces a nonfunctional protein based on in vivo activity. These studies implicate Tep1p in a specific developmental trafficking or deposition event and suggest that Tep1p, like its mammalian counterpart, impinges on the phosphatidylinositol pathway.

  13. Tumor suppressor molecules and methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Peter J.; Barber, Jack R.

    2004-09-07

    The invention provides substantially pure tumor suppressor nucleic acid molecules and tumor suppressor polypeptides. The invention also provides hairpin ribozymes and antibodies selective for these tumor suppressor molecules. Also provided are methods of detecting a neoplastic cell in a sample using detectable agents specific for the tumor suppressor nucleic acids and polypeptides.

  14. Tumor suppressor gene mutation in a patient with a history of hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome and healed generalized osteitis fibrosa cystica: a case report and genetic pathophysiology review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, Joshua; Harris, Malcolm; Wright, John M; Kalamchi, Sabah

    2015-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT) was first observed by Jackson in 1958 in a family who exhibited hyperparathyroidism and recurrent pancreatitis. The author noticed the presence of jaw tumors in the affected family and reported them as fibrous dysplasia. However, it was not until 1990 that a familial variety of hyperparathyroidism with fibro-osseous jaw tumors was recognized as HPT-JT syndrome and reported as a clinically and genetically distinct syndrome. Hyperparathyroidism generally arises from glandular hyperplasia or parathyroid adenomas, with only about 1% of cases resulting from parathyroid carcinoma. However, parathyroid carcinoma develops in about 15% of HPT-JT patients. The true incidence of HPT-JT is unknown, although the prevalence of about 100 published cases suggests its rarity. Twenty percent of HPT-JT cases have renal hamartomas or tumors, and female patients with HPT-JT have been reported to have carcinoma of the uterus. This syndrome appears to arise from a variety of mutations that deactivate the tumor suppressor gene CDC73 (also known as HRPT2) and its production of the tumor suppressor protein parafibromin. Functional parafibromin has 531 amino acids, and mutations result in a short nonfunctional protein. CDC73 disorders exhibit dominant germline gene behavior, with varying degrees of penetration. In most cases an affected person has 1 parent with the condition, which raises the need for family investigation and genetic counseling. We report a case of HPT-JT syndrome in a male patient who presented to the local community hospital 6 years previously with a history of back pain. Investigations showed elevated serum parathyroid hormone and calcium levels, and a technetium 99m sestamibi parathyroid scan showed increased activity at the site of the lower left gland that proved to be a substernal parathyroid carcinoma. The patient's parathyroid hormone level dropped from 126 to 97 pg/mL at 5 minutes and was 65 pg/mL at 10 minutes after excision

  15. Identification of genes directly involved in shell formation and their functions in pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Fang

    Full Text Available Mollusk shell formation is a fascinating aspect of biomineralization research. Shell matrix proteins play crucial roles in the control of calcium carbonate crystallization during shell formation in the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. Characterization of biomineralization-related genes during larval development could enhance our understanding of shell formation. Genes involved in shell biomineralization were isolated by constructing three suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH libraries that represented genes expressed at key points during larval shell formation. A total of 2,923 ESTs from these libraries were sequenced and gave 990 unigenes. Unigenes coding for secreted proteins and proteins with tandem-arranged repeat units were screened in the three SSH libraries. A set of sequences coding for genes involved in shell formation was obtained. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization assays were carried out on five genes to investigate their spatial expression in several tissues, especially the mantle tissue. They all showed a different expression pattern from known biomineralization-related genes. Inhibition of the five genes by RNA interference resulted in different defects of the nacreous layer, indicating that they all were involved in aragonite crystallization. Intriguingly, one gene (UD_Cluster94.seq.Singlet1 was restricted to the 'aragonitic line'. The current data has yielded for the first time, to our knowledge, a suite of biomineralization-related genes active during the developmental stages of P. fucata, five of which were responsible for nacreous layer formation. This provides a useful starting point for isolating new genes involved in shell formation. The effects of genes on the formation of the 'aragonitic line', and other areas of the nacreous layer, suggests a different control mechanism for aragonite crystallization initiation from that of mature aragonite growth.

  16. Identification of Genes Directly Involved in Shell Formation and Their Functions in Pearl Oyster, Pinctada fucata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Dong; Xu, Guangrui; Hu, Yilin; Pan, Cong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2011-01-01

    Mollusk shell formation is a fascinating aspect of biomineralization research. Shell matrix proteins play crucial roles in the control of calcium carbonate crystallization during shell formation in the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. Characterization of biomineralization-related genes during larval development could enhance our understanding of shell formation. Genes involved in shell biomineralization were isolated by constructing three suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries that represented genes expressed at key points during larval shell formation. A total of 2,923 ESTs from these libraries were sequenced and gave 990 unigenes. Unigenes coding for secreted proteins and proteins with tandem-arranged repeat units were screened in the three SSH libraries. A set of sequences coding for genes involved in shell formation was obtained. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization assays were carried out on five genes to investigate their spatial expression in several tissues, especially the mantle tissue. They all showed a different expression pattern from known biomineralization-related genes. Inhibition of the five genes by RNA interference resulted in different defects of the nacreous layer, indicating that they all were involved in aragonite crystallization. Intriguingly, one gene (UD_Cluster94.seq.Singlet1) was restricted to the ‘aragonitic line’. The current data has yielded for the first time, to our knowledge, a suite of biomineralization-related genes active during the developmental stages of P.fucata, five of which were responsible for nacreous layer formation. This provides a useful starting point for isolating new genes involved in shell formation. The effects of genes on the formation of the ‘aragonitic line’, and other areas of the nacreous layer, suggests a different control mechanism for aragonite crystallization initiation from that of mature aragonite growth. PMID:21747964

  17. Identification of Novel Tumor Suppressor Genes in Human Breast Cancer Using Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay Inhibition (NMDI)-Microarray Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnstone, Cameron N

    2007-01-01

    This project sought to identify genes that harbor nonsense mutations in breast cancer cell lines that are commonly used as in vitro models in the study of breast cancer biology, with the ultimate aim...

  18. Genes and Gut Bacteria Involved in Luminal Butyrate Reduction Caused by Diet and Loperamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakwon Hwang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Unbalanced dietary habits and gut dysmotility are causative factors in metabolic and functional gut disorders, including obesity, diabetes, and constipation. Reduction in luminal butyrate synthesis is known to be associated with gut dysbioses, and studies have suggested that restoring butyrate formation in the colon may improve gut health. In contrast, shifts in different types of gut microbiota may inhibit luminal butyrate synthesis, requiring different treatments to restore colonic bacterial butyrate synthesis. We investigated the influence of high-fat diets (HFD and low-fiber diets (LFD, and loperamide (LPM administration, on key bacteria and genes involved in reduction of butyrate synthesis in mice. MiSeq-based microbiota analysis and HiSeq-based differential gene analysis indicated that different types of bacteria and genes were involved in butyrate metabolism in each treatment. Dietary modulation depleted butyrate kinase and phosphate butyryl transferase by decreasing members of the Bacteroidales and Parabacteroides. The HFD also depleted genes involved in succinate synthesis by decreasing Lactobacillus. The LFD and LPM treatments depleted genes involved in crotonoyl-CoA synthesis by decreasing Roseburia and Oscilllibacter. Taken together, our results suggest that different types of bacteria and genes were involved in gut dysbiosis, and that selected treatments may be needed depending on the cause of gut dysfunction.

  19. Genes and Gut Bacteria Involved in Luminal Butyrate Reduction Caused by Diet and Loperamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Nakwon; Eom, Taekil; Gupta, Sachin K; Jeong, Seong-Yeop; Jeong, Do-Youn; Kim, Yong Sung; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Sadowsky, Michael J; Unno, Tatsuya

    2017-11-28

    Unbalanced dietary habits and gut dysmotility are causative factors in metabolic and functional gut disorders, including obesity, diabetes, and constipation. Reduction in luminal butyrate synthesis is known to be associated with gut dysbioses, and studies have suggested that restoring butyrate formation in the colon may improve gut health. In contrast, shifts in different types of gut microbiota may inhibit luminal butyrate synthesis, requiring different treatments to restore colonic bacterial butyrate synthesis. We investigated the influence of high-fat diets (HFD) and low-fiber diets (LFD), and loperamide (LPM) administration, on key bacteria and genes involved in reduction of butyrate synthesis in mice. MiSeq-based microbiota analysis and HiSeq-based differential gene analysis indicated that different types of bacteria and genes were involved in butyrate metabolism in each treatment. Dietary modulation depleted butyrate kinase and phosphate butyryl transferase by decreasing members of the Bacteroidales and Parabacteroides . The HFD also depleted genes involved in succinate synthesis by decreasing Lactobacillus . The LFD and LPM treatments depleted genes involved in crotonoyl-CoA synthesis by decreasing Roseburia and Oscilllibacter . Taken together, our results suggest that different types of bacteria and genes were involved in gut dysbiosis, and that selected treatments may be needed depending on the cause of gut dysfunction.

  20. Pilot morpholino screen in Xenopus tropicalis identifies a novel gene involved in head development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenwrick, Sue; Amaya, Enrique; Papalopulu, Nancy

    2004-02-01

    The diploid frog X. tropicalis has recently been adopted as a model genetic system, but loss-of-function screens in Xenopus have not yet been performed. We have undertaken a pilot functional knockdown screen in X. tropicalis for genes involved in nervous system development by injecting antisense morpholino (MO) oligos directed against X. tropicalis mRNAs. Twenty-six genes with primary expression in the nervous system were selected as targets based on an expression screen previously conducted in X. laevis. Reproducible phenotypes were observed for six and for four of these, a second MO gave a similar result. One of these genes encodes a novel protein with previously unknown function. Knocking down this gene, designated pinhead, results in severe microcephaly, whereas, overexpression results in macrocephaly. Together with the early embryonic expression in the anterior neural plate, these data indicate that pinhead is a novel gene involved in controlling head development. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Identification and expression profiling analysis of TCP family genes involved in growth and development in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Wenbo; Jiang, Pengfei; Huang, Guoyu; Jiang, Haiyang; Li, Xiaoyu

    2017-10-01

    The TCP family is a group of plant-specific transcription factors. TCP genes encode proteins harboring bHLH structure, which is implicated in DNA binding and protein-protein interactions and known as the TCP domain. TCP genes play important roles in plant development and have been evolutionarily and functionally elaborated in various plants, however, no overall phylogenetic analysis or expression profiling of TCP genes in Zea mays has been reported. In the present study, a systematic analysis of molecular evolution and functional prediction of TCP family genes in maize ( Z . mays L.) has been conducted. We performed a genome-wide survey of TCP genes in maize, revealing the gene structure, chromosomal location and phylogenetic relationship of family members. Microsynteny between grass species and tissue-specific expression profiles were also investigated. In total, 29 TCP genes were identified in the maize genome, unevenly distributed on the 10 maize chromosomes. Additionally, ZmTCP genes were categorized into nine classes based on phylogeny and purifying selection may largely be responsible for maintaining the functions of maize TCP genes. What's more, microsynteny analysis suggested that TCP genes have been conserved during evolution. Finally, expression analysis revealed that most TCP genes are expressed in the stem and ear, which suggests that ZmTCP genes influence stem and ear growth. This result is consistent with the previous finding that maize TCP genes represses the growth of axillary organs and enables the formation of female inflorescences. Altogether, this study presents a thorough overview of TCP family in maize and provides a new perspective on the evolution of this gene family. The results also indicate that TCP family genes may be involved in development stage in plant growing conditions. Additionally, our results will be useful for further functional analysis of the TCP gene family in maize.

  2. Examination of Signatures of Recent Positive Selection on Genes Involved in Human Sialic Acid Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jiyun M; Aronoff, David M; Capra, John A; Abbot, Patrick; Rokas, Antonis

    2018-03-28

    Sialic acids are nine carbon sugars ubiquitously found on the surfaces of vertebrate cells and are involved in various immune response-related processes. In humans, at least 58 genes spanning diverse functions, from biosynthesis and activation to recycling and degradation, are involved in sialic acid biology. Because of their role in immunity, sialic acid biology genes have been hypothesized to exhibit elevated rates of evolutionary change. Consistent with this hypothesis, several genes involved in sialic acid biology have experienced higher rates of non-synonymous substitutions in the human lineage than their counterparts in other great apes, perhaps in response to ancient pathogens that infected hominins millions of years ago (paleopathogens). To test whether sialic acid biology genes have also experienced more recent positive selection during the evolution of the modern human lineage, reflecting adaptation to contemporary cosmopolitan or geographically-restricted pathogens, we examined whether their protein-coding regions showed evidence of recent hard and soft selective sweeps. This examination involved the calculation of four measures that quantify changes in allele frequency spectra, extent of population differentiation, and haplotype homozygosity caused by recent hard and soft selective sweeps for 55 sialic acid biology genes using publicly available whole genome sequencing data from 1,668 humans from three ethnic groups. To disentangle evidence for selection from confounding demographic effects, we compared the observed patterns in sialic acid biology genes to simulated sequences of the same length under a model of neutral evolution that takes into account human demographic history. We found that the patterns of genetic variation of most sialic acid biology genes did not significantly deviate from neutral expectations and were not significantly different among genes belonging to different functional categories. Those few sialic acid biology genes that

  3. Pathways and genes involved in steroid hormone metabolism in male pigs: a review and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robic, Annie; Faraut, Thomas; Prunier, Armelle

    2014-03-01

    This paper reviews state-of-the-art knowledge on steroid biosynthesis pathways in the pig and provides an updated characterization of the porcine genes involved in these pathways with particular focus on androgens, estrogens, and 16-androstenes. At least 21 different enzymes appear to be involved in these pathways in porcine tissues together with at least five cofactors. Until now, data on several porcine genes were scarce or confusing. We characterized the complete genomic and transcript sequences of the single porcine CYP11B gene. We analyzed the porcine AKR1 gene cluster and identified four AKR1C, one AKR1C like genes and one AKR1E2 gene. We provide evidence that porcine AKR1C genes are not orthologous to human AKR1C. A new nomenclature is thus needed for this gene family in the pig. Thirty-two genes are now described: transcript (30+2 characterized in this study) and genomic (complete: 18+1 and partial: 12+1) sequences are identified. However, despite increasing knowledge on steroid metabolism in the pig, there is still no explanation of why porcine testes can produce androstenone and epiandrosterone, but not dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which is also a reduced steroid. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Transcriptome analysis reveals key differentially expressed genes involved in wheat grain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonglong Yu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wheat seed development is an important physiological process of seed maturation and directly affects wheat yield and quality. In this study, we performed dynamic transcriptome microarray analysis of an elite Chinese bread wheat cultivar (Jimai 20 during grain development using the GeneChip Wheat Genome Array. Grain morphology and scanning electron microscope observations showed that the period of 11–15 days post-anthesis (DPA was a key stage for the synthesis and accumulation of seed starch. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and significance analysis of microarrays revealed that the period from 11 to 15 DPA was more important than the 15–20 DPA stage for the synthesis and accumulation of nutritive reserves. Series test of cluster analysis of differential genes revealed five statistically significant gene expression profiles. Gene ontology annotation and enrichment analysis gave further information about differentially expressed genes, and MapMan analysis revealed expression changes within functional groups during seed development. Metabolic pathway network analysis showed that major and minor metabolic pathways regulate one another to ensure regular seed development and nutritive reserve accumulation. We performed gene co-expression network analysis to identify genes that play vital roles in seed development and identified several key genes involved in important metabolic pathways. The transcriptional expression of eight key genes involved in starch and protein synthesis and stress defense was further validated by qRT-PCR. Our results provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms of wheat seed development and the determinants of yield and quality.

  5. Deletion lengthening at chromosomes 6q and 16q targets multiple tumor suppressor genes and is associated with an increasingly poor prognosis in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kluth, Martina; Jung, Simon; Habib, Omar

    2017-01-01

    317 patients for 6q and 16q deletion length heterogeneity and found that the deletion expanded within 50-60% of 6q and 16q deleted cancers. Taken together, these data suggest continuous "deletion lengthening" as a key mechanism for prostate cancer progression leading to parallel down regulation......Prostate cancer is characterized by recurrent deletions that can considerably vary in size. We hypothesized that large deletions develop from small deletions and that this "deletion lengthening" might have a "per se" carcinogenic role through a combinatorial effect of multiple down regulated genes.......In vitroknockdown of 37 genes located inside the 6q12-q22 deletion region identified 4 genes with additive tumor suppressive effects, further supporting a role of the deletion size for cancer aggressiveness. Employing fluorescencein-situhybridization analysis on prostate cancer tissue microarrays, we determined...

  6. Abnormal P-53 suppressor gene expression predicts for a poorer outcome in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated by external beam radiation therapy with or without pre-radiation androgen ablation: results based on RTOG study 86-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, Colleen A.; Grignon, David; Caplan, Richard; Sarkar, Fazlul; Forman, Jeffrey; Mesic, John; Fu, Karen K.; Abrams, Ross

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The purpose of this study is to establish the effect of the abnormal expression of the P-53 suppressor gene on the results of locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with radiation therapy with or without pre-radiation therapy androgen ablation. Materials and Methods: Patients evaluated were part of a RTOG phase III multi-institutional trial. This trial assessed the value of pre-radiation therapy androgen ablation on patients with locally advanced disease (bulky stage B and stage C). Of the 471 patients registered, pre-treatment pathological material was available for 129 patients. P-53 status was determined immunohistochemically utilizing a commercially available antibody (D07). Clinical endpoints evaluated were overall survival and development of metastases. Results: Twenty-three of the 129 patients had abnormal expression of the P-53 suppressor gene. Presence of this abnormal expression significantly correlated with lower overall survival (p=0.03) and the development of distant metastases (p=0.03). Abnormal expression of the P-53 gene was an independent prognostic indicator when evaluated against clinical stage and Gleason score. Conclusion: This data from patients entered on a phase III multi-institutional, randomized clinical trial shows that abnormal P-53 suppressor gene expression as determined immunohistochemically is an independent predictor of poorer survival and the development of distant metastases in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with radiation therapy with or without pre-radiation therapy androgen ablation

  7. DNA repair and damage pathway related cancer suppressor genes in low-dose-rate irradiated AKR/J an IR mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Hyun Soon; Bong, Jin Jong; Kang, Yumi; Choi, Moo Hyun; Lee, Hae Un; Yoo, Jae Young; Choi, Seung Jin; Kim, Hee Sun [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Mi [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    It has been reported that low-dose-rate radiation stimulates the immune response, prolongs life span and inhibits carcinogenesis. The high dose-rate radiation influences the expression of DNA repair and damage-related genes. In contrast, DNA repair and damage signaling triggered by low-dose-rate irradiation remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the differential expression of DNA repair and damage pathway related genes in the thymus of AKR/J and ICR mice after 100th day low-dose-rate irradiation. Our findings demonstrated that low-dose-rate γ -radiation suppressed tumorigenesis.

  8. Transcription profiling provides insights into gene pathways involved in horn and scurs development in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehnert Sigrid A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two types of horns are evident in cattle - fixed horns attached to the skull and a variation called scurs, which refers to small loosely attached horns. Cattle lacking horns are referred to as polled. Although both the Poll and Scurs loci have been mapped to BTA1 and 19 respectively, the underlying genetic basis of these phenotypes is unknown, and so far, no candidate genes regulating these developmental processes have been described. This study is the first reported attempt at transcript profiling to identify genes and pathways contributing to horn and scurs development in Brahman cattle, relative to polled counterparts. Results Expression patterns in polled, horned and scurs tissues were obtained using the Agilent 44 k bovine array. The most notable feature when comparing transcriptional profiles of developing horn tissues against polled was the down regulation of genes coding for elements of the cadherin junction as well as those involved in epidermal development. We hypothesize this as a key event involved in keratinocyte migration and subsequent horn development. In the polled-scurs comparison, the most prevalent differentially expressed transcripts code for genes involved in extracellular matrix remodelling, which were up regulated in scurs tissues relative to polled. Conclusion For this first time we describe networks of genes involved in horn and scurs development. Interestingly, we did not observe differential expression in any of the genes present on the fine mapped region of BTA1 known to contain the Poll locus.

  9. Deciphering the onychophoran 'segmentation gene cascade': Gene expression reveals limited involvement of pair rule gene orthologs in segmentation, but a highly conserved segment polarity gene network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E

    2013-10-01

    The hallmark of the arthropods is their segmented body, although origin of segmentation, however, is unresolved. In order to shed light on the origin of segmentation we investigated orthologs of pair rule genes (PRGs) and segment polarity genes (SPGs) in a member of the closest related sister-group to the arthropods, the onychophorans. Our gene expression data analysis suggests that most of the onychophoran PRGs do not play a role in segmentation. One possible exception is the even-skipped (eve) gene that is expressed in the posterior end of the onychophoran where new segments are likely patterned, and is also expressed in segmentation-gene typical transverse stripes in at least a number of newly formed segments. Other onychophoran PRGs such as runt (run), hairy/Hes (h/Hes) and odd-skipped (odd) do not appear to have a function in segmentation at all. Onychophoran PRGs that act low in the segmentation gene cascade in insects, however, are potentially involved in segment-patterning. Most obvious is that from the expression of the pairberry (pby) gene ortholog that is expressed in a typical SPG-pattern. Since this result suggested possible conservation of the SPG-network we further investigated SPGs (and associated factors) such as Notum in the onychophoran. We find that the expression patterns of SPGs in arthropods and the onychophoran are highly conserved, suggesting a conserved SPG-network in these two clades, and indeed also in an annelid. This may suggest that the common ancestor of lophotrochozoans and ecdysozoans was already segmented utilising the same SPG-network, or that the SPG-network was recruited independently in annelids and onychophorans/arthropods. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Novel Cryptic Three-Way Translocation t(2;9;18(p23.2;p21.3;q21.33 with Deletion of Tumor Suppressor Genes in 9p21.3 and 13q14 in a T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moneeb A. K. Othman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia often presents with pure chromosomal resolution; thus, aberrations may not be detected by banding cytogenetics. Here, a case of 26-year-old male diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL and a normal karyotype after standard GTG-banding was studied retrospectively in detail by molecular cytogenetic and molecular approaches. Besides fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA and high resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH were applied. Thus, cryptic chromosomal aberrations not observed before were detected: three chromosomes were involved in a cytogenetically balanced occurring translocation t(2;9;18(p23.2;p21.3;q21.33. Besides a translocation t(10;14(q24;q11 was identified, an aberration known to be common in T-ALL. Due to the three-way translocation deletion of tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/INK4A/p16, CDKN2B/INK4B/p15, and MTAP/ARF/p14 in 9p21.3 took place. Additionally RB1 in 13q14 was deleted. This patient, considered to have a normal karyotype after low resolution banding cytogenetics, was treated according to general protocol of anticancer therapy (ALL-BFM 95.

  11. Classification of suppressor additives based on synergistic and antagonistic ensemble effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broekmann, P.; Fluegel, A.; Emnet, C.; Arnold, M.; Roeger-Goepfert, C.; Wagner, A.; Hai, N.T.M.; Mayer, D.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Three fundamental types of suppressor additives for copper electroplating could be identified by means of potential transient measurements. → These suppressor additives differ in their synergistic and antagonistic interplay with anions that are chemisorbed on the metallic copper surface during electrodeposition. → In addition these suppressor chemistries reveal different barrier properties with respect to cupric ions and plating additives (Cl, SPS). - Abstract: Three fundamental types of suppressor additives for copper electroplating could be identified by means of potential transient measurements. These suppressor additives differ in their synergistic and antagonistic interplay with anions that are chemisorbed on the metallic copper surface during electrodeposition. In addition these suppressor chemistries reveal different barrier properties with respect to cupric ions and plating additives (Cl, SPS). While the type-I suppressor selectively forms efficient barriers for copper inter-diffusion on chloride-terminated electrode surfaces we identified a type-II suppressor that interacts non-selectively with any kind of anions chemisorbed on copper (chloride, sulfate, sulfonate). Type-I suppressors are vital for the superconformal copper growth mode in Damascene processing and show an antagonistic interaction with SPS (Bis-Sodium-Sulfopropyl-Disulfide) which involves the deactivation of this suppressor chemistry. This suppressor deactivation is rationalized in terms of compositional changes in the layer of the chemisorbed anions due to the competition of chloride and MPS (Mercaptopropane Sulfonic Acid) for adsorption sites on the metallic copper surface. MPS is the product of the dissociative SPS adsorption within the preexisting chloride matrix on the copper surface. The non-selectivity in the adsorption behavior of the type-II suppressor is rationalized in terms of anion/cation pairing effects of the poly-cationic suppressor and the anion

  12. Tumor suppressor gene p16/INK4A/CDKN2A-dependent regulation into and out of the cell cycle in a spontaneous canine model of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Payal; Sandey, Maninder; DeInnocentes, Patricia; Bird, R Curtis

    2013-06-01

    p16/INK4A/CDKN2A is an important tumor suppressor gene that arrests cell cycle in G1 phase inhibiting binding of CDK4/6 with cyclin D1, leaving the Rb tumor suppressor protein unphosphorylated and E2F bound and inactive. We hypothesized that p16 has a role in exit from cell cycle that becomes defective in cancer cells. Well characterized p16-defective canine mammary cancer cell lines (CMT28, CMT27, and CMT12), derived stably p16-transfected CMT cell clones (CMT27A, CMT27H, CMT28A, and CMT28F), and normal canine fibroblasts (NCF), were used to investigate expression of p16 after serum starvation into quiescence followed by re-feeding to induce cell cycle re-entry. The parental CMT cell lines used lack p16 expression either at the mRNA or protein expression levels, while p27 and other p16-associated proteins, including CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D1, and Rb, were expressed. We have successfully demonstrated cell cycle arrest and relatively synchronous cell cycle re-entry in parental CMT12, CMT28 and NCF cells as well as p16 transfected CMT27A, CMT27H, CMT28A, and CMT28F cells and confirmed this by (3)H-thymidine incorporation and flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle phase distribution. p16-transfected CMT27A and CMT27H cells exited cell cycle post-serum-starvation in contrast to parental CMT27 cells. NCF, CMT27A, and CMT28F cells expressed upregulated levels of p27 and p16 mRNA, post-serum starvation, as cells exited cell cycle and entered quiescence. Because quiescence and differentiation are associated with increased levels of p27, our data demonstrating that p16 was upregulated along with p27 during quiescence, suggests a potential role for p16 in maintaining these non-proliferative states. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The genomic structure of the DMBT1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollenhauer, J; Holmskov, U; Wiemann, S

    1999-01-01

    Increasing evidence has accumulated for an involvement of the inactivation of tumour suppressor genes at chromosome 10q in the carcinogenesis of brain tumours, melanomas, and carcinomas of the lung, the prostate, the pancreas, and the endometrium. The gene DMBT1 (Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumour...

  14. Suppressors of DnaAATP imposed overinitiation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Riber, Leise; Cohen, Malene

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is limited by the supply of DnaA associated with ATP. Cells deficient in RIDA (Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA) due to a deletion of the hda gene accumulate suppressor mutations (hsm) to counteract the overinitiation caused by an elevated DnaAATP level...

  15. Identification of key genes involved in polysaccharide bioflocculant synthesis in Bacillus licheniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Liu, Peize; Li, Zhipeng; Yu, Wencheng; Wang, Zhi; Yao, Haosheng; Wang, Yuanpeng; Li, Qingbiao; Deng, Xu; He, Ning

    2017-03-01

    The present study reports the sequenced genome of Bacillus licheniformis CGMCC 2876, which is composed of a 4,284,461 bp chromosome that contains 4,188 protein-coding genes, 72 tRNA genes, and 21 rRNA genes. Additional analysis revealed an eps gene cluster with 16 open reading frames. Conserved Domains Database analysis combined with qPCR experiments indicated that all genes in this cluster were involved in polysaccharide bioflocculant synthesis. Phosphoglucomutase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase were supposed to be key enzymes in polysaccharide secretion in B. licheniformis. A biosynthesis pathway for the production of polysaccharide bioflocculant involving the integration of individual genes was proposed based on functional analysis. Overexpression of epsDEF from the eps gene cluster in B. licheniformis CGMCC 2876 increased the flocculating activity of the recombinant strain by 90% compared to the original strain. Similarly, the crude yield of polysaccharide bioflocculant was enhanced by 27.8%. Overexpression of the UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene not only increased the flocculating activity by 71% but also increased bioflocculant yield by 13.3%. Independent of UDP-N-acetyl-D-mannosamine dehydrogenase gene, flocculating activity, and polysaccharide yield were negatively impacted by overexpression of the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase gene. Overall, epsDEF and gtaB2 were identified as key genes for polysaccharide bioflocculant synthesis in B. licheniformis. These results will be useful for further engineering of B. licheniformis for industrial bioflocculant production. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 645-655. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Genomic Analyses Reveal Global Functional Alterations That Promote Tumor Growth and Novel Tumor Suppressor Genes in Natural Killer-Cell Malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucuk, Can; Iqbal, Javeed; J. deLeeuw, Ronald

    in the gene expression profile, we performed GEP and array-CGH studies on seven clinically well defined cases and eight well characterized cell lines derived from NKL patients. Methods: Array-CGH was performed on a tiling BAC array and GEP on an Affymetrix 133 plus2 array.The two data sets were correlated...... to identify functional alterations associated with the genetic abnormalities.Candidate genes on del 6q21 were identified and further studied for mutations and promoter methylation. Results: Our aCGH study identified frequent recurrent gains (> 25 %) in 1q, 2p, 7q, 13q, 17q and 20pter-qter. Regions of loss...

  17. Differential Splicing of Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes in African- and Caucasian-American Populations: Contributing Factor in Prostate Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Sciences, Washington, District of Columbia. 3Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, NIH, Bethesda...5Department of Surgery ,Center for Prostate Disease Research, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland. 6Department of...each biopsy core was purified using the RNeasy Micro Kit (Qiagen) and interrogated with the Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST GeneChip. For miRNA

  18. Extragenic suppressor mutations in ΔripA disrupt stability and function of LpxA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cheryl N; Steele, Shaun P; Brunton, Jason C; Jenkins, Ronald J; LoVullo, Eric D; Taft-Benz, Sharon A; Romanchuk, Artur; Jones, Corbin D; Dotson, Garry D; Collins, Edward J; Kawula, Thomas H

    2014-12-31

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects hundreds of species including humans, and has evolved to grow efficiently within a plethora of cell types. RipA is a conserved membrane protein of F. tularensis, which is required for growth inside host cells. As a means to determine RipA function we isolated and mapped independent extragenic suppressor mutants in ∆ripA that restored growth in host cells. Each suppressor mutation mapped to one of two essential genes, lpxA or glmU, which are involved in lipid A synthesis. We repaired the suppressor mutation in lpxA (S102, LpxA T36N) and the mutation in glmU (S103, GlmU E57D), and demonstrated that each mutation was responsible for the suppressor phenotype in their respective strains. We hypothesize that the mutation in S102 altered the stability of LpxA, which can provide a clue to RipA function. LpxA is an UDP-N-acetylglucosamine acyltransferase that catalyzes the transfer of an acyl chain from acyl carrier protein (ACP) to UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) to begin lipid A synthesis. LpxA was more abundant in the presence of RipA. Induced expression of lpxA in the ΔripA strain stopped bacterial division. The LpxA T36N S102 protein was less stable and therefore less abundant than wild type LpxA protein. These data suggest RipA functions to modulate lipid A synthesis in F. tularensis as a way to adapt to the host cell environment by interacting with LpxA.

  19. Transducer of ERBB2.1 (TOB1 as a Tumor Suppressor: A Mechanistic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun Seok Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Transducer of ERBB2.1 (TOB1 is a tumor-suppressor protein, which functions as a negative regulator of the receptor tyrosine-kinase ERBB2. As most of the other tumor suppressor proteins, TOB1 is inactivated in many human cancers. Homozygous deletion of TOB1 in mice is reported to be responsible for cancer development in the lung, liver, and lymph node, whereas the ectopic overexpression of TOB1 shows anti-proliferation, and a decrease in the migration and invasion abilities on cancer cells. Biochemical studies revealed that the anti-proliferative activity of TOB1 involves mRNA deadenylation and is associated with the reduction of both cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK expressions and the induction of CDK inhibitors. Moreover, TOB1 interacts with an oncogenic signaling mediator, β-catenin, and inhibits β-catenin-regulated gene transcription. TOB1 antagonizes the v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene (AKT signaling and induces cancer cell apoptosis by activating BCL2-associated X (BAX protein and inhibiting the BCL-2 and BCL-XL expressions. The tumor-specific overexpression of TOB1 results in the activation of other tumor suppressor proteins, such as mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 4 (SMAD4 and phosphatase and tensin homolog-10 (PTEN, and blocks tumor progression. TOB1-overexpressing cancer cells have limited potential of growing as xenograft tumors in nude mice upon subcutaneous implantation. This review addresses the molecular basis of TOB1 tumor suppressor function with special emphasis on its regulation of intracellular signaling pathways.

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection and family history of gastric cancer decrease expression of FHIT tumor suppressor gene in gastric mucosa of dyspeptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stec-Michalska, Krystyna; Peczek, Lukasz; Michalski, Blazej; Wisniewska-Jarosinska, Maria; Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Nawrot, Barbara

    2009-10-01

    The expression of a fragile histidine triad (FHIT) protein is lost in stomach tumors. The study aimed at determining whether FHIT expression is affected by Helicobacter pylori infection, strain virulence (vacA and cagA genes) and histopathological changes in the gastric mucosa of patients with functional dyspepsia having first-degree relatives with gastric cancer. Eighty-eight never-smoking patients with functional dyspepsia were selected for the study, and 48 of them had first-degree relatives with gastric cancer. Bacterial DNA amplification was used to identify H. pylori colonization. The level of FHIT gene expression was determined by qRT-PCR (mRNA) and Western blot (FHIT protein) analyses. For patients having first-degree relatives with gastric cancer FHIT expression was lower (mRNA by ca. 40-45% and protein by 30%) compared with the control patients (p pylori infection decreased the FHIT mRNA level by 10-35% and the protein level by 10-20%. Bacterial strain vacA(+)cagA(+) lowered FHIT mRNA by ca. 30-35% in the antrum samples of both groups and in corpus samples of patients with first-degree relatives with gastric cancer (p pylori-negative patients with intestinal metaplasia, compared with those with non-atrophic gastritis. The decreased FHIT gene expression associated with hereditary factors and with H. pylori infection, especially with vacA(+)cagA(+)-positive strains, may be related to gastric carcinoma development.

  1. sugE: A gene involved in tributyltin (TBT) resistance of Aeromonas molluscorum Av27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Andreia; Micaelo, Nuno; Félix, Vitor; Song, Jun-Young; Kitamura, Shin-Ichi; Suzuki, Satoru; Mendo, Sónia

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of bacterial resistance to tributyltin (TBT) is still unclear. The results herein presented contribute to clarify that mechanism in the TBT-resistant bacterium Aeromonas molluscorum Av27. We have identified and cloned a new gene that is involved in TBT resistance in this strain. The gene is highly homologous (84%) to the Aeromonas hydrophila-sugE gene belonging to the small multidrug resistance gene family (SMR), which includes genes involved in the transport of lipophilic drugs. In Av27, expression of the Av27-sugE was observed at the early logarithmic growth phase in the presence of a high TBT concentration (500 μM), thus suggesting the contribution of this gene for TBT resistance. E. coli cells transformed with Av27-sugE become resistant to ethidium bromide (EtBr), chloramphenicol (CP) and tetracycline (TE), besides TBT. According to the Moriguchi logP (miLogP) values, EtBr, CP and TE have similar properties and are substrates for the sugE-efflux system. Despite the different miLogP of TBT, E. coli cells transformed with Av27-sugE become resistant to this compound. So it seems that TBT is also a substrate for the SugE protein. The modelling studies performed also support this hypothesis. The data herein presented clearly indicate that sugE is involved in TBT resistance of this bacterium.

  2. Molecular characterization of genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase involved in proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in apple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuepeng eHan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins (PAs are the major component of phenolics in apple, but mechanisms involved in PA biosynthesis remain unclear. Here, the relationship between the PA biosynthesis and the expression of genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR and anthocyanidin reductase (ANR was investigated in fruit skin of one apple cultivar and three crabapples. Transcript levels of LAR1 and ANR2 genes were significantly correlated with the contents of catechin and epicatechin, respectively, which suggests their active roles in PA synthesis. Surprisingly, transcript levels for both LAR1 and LAR2 genes were almost undetectable in two crabapples that accumulated both flavan-3-ols and PAs. This contradicts the previous finding that LAR1 gene is a strong candidate regulating the accumulation of metabolites such as epicatechin and PAs in apple. Ectopic expression of apple MdLAR1 gene in tobacco suppresses expression of the late genes in anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway, resulting in loss of anthocyanin in flowers. Interestingly, a decrease in PA biosynthesis was also observed in flowers of transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing the MdLAR1 gene, which could be attributed to decreased expression of both the NtANR1 and NtANR2 genes. Our study not only confirms the in vivo function of apple LAR1 gene, but it is also helpful for understanding the mechanism of PA biosynthesis.

  3. Using yeast to determine the functional consequences of mutations in the human p53 tumor suppressor gene: An introductory course-based undergraduate research experience in molecular and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmat-Scafe, Daria S; Brownell, Sara E; Seawell, Patricia Chandler; Malladi, Shyamala; Imam, Jamie F Conklin; Singla, Veena; Bradon, Nicole; Cyert, Martha S; Stearns, Tim

    2017-03-04

    The opportunity to engage in scientific research is an important, but often neglected, component of undergraduate training in biology. We describe the curriculum for an innovative, course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE) appropriate for a large, introductory cell and molecular biology laboratory class that leverages students' high level of interest in cancer. The course is highly collaborative and emphasizes the analysis and interpretation of original scientific data. During the course, students work in teams to characterize a collection of mutations in the human p53 tumor suppressor gene via expression and analysis in yeast. Initially, student pairs use both qualitative and quantitative assays to assess the ability of their p53 mutant to activate expression of reporter genes, and they localize their mutation within the p53 structure. Through facilitated discussion, students suggest possible molecular explanations for the transactivation defects displayed by their p53 mutants and propose experiments to test these hypotheses that they execute during the second part of the course. They use a western blot to determine whether mutant p53 levels are reduced, a DNA-binding assay to test whether recognition of any of three p53 target sequences is compromised, and fluorescence microscopy to assay nuclear localization. Students studying the same p53 mutant periodically convene to discuss and interpret their combined data. The course culminates in a poster session during which students present their findings to peers, instructors, and the greater biosciences community. Based on our experience, we provide recommendations for the development of similar large introductory lab courses. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(2):161-178, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. Analysis of aberrant methylation on promoter sequences of tumor suppressor genes and total DNA in sputum samples: a promising tool for early detection of COPD and lung cancer in smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzmán Leda

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a disorder associated to cigarette smoke and lung cancer (LC. Since epigenetic changes in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs are clearly important in the development of LC. In this study, we hypothesize that tobacco smokers are susceptible for methylation in the promoter region of TSGs in airway epithelial cells when compared with non-smoker subjects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of detection of genes promoter methylation in sputum specimens, as a complementary tool to identify LC biomarkers among smokers with early COPD. Methods We determined the amount of DNA in induced sputum from patients with COPD (n = 23, LC (n = 26, as well as in healthy subjects (CTR (n = 33, using a commercial kit for DNA purification, followed by absorbance measurement at 260 nm. The frequency of CDKN2A, CDH1 and MGMT promoter methylation in the same groups was determined by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP. The Fisher’s exact test was employed to compare frequency of results between different groups. Results DNA concentration was 7.4 and 5.8 times higher in LC and COPD compared to the (CTR (p  Conclusions We provide evidence that aberrant methylation of TSGs in samples of induced sputum is a useful tool for early diagnostic of lung diseases (LC and COPD in smoker subjects. Virtual slides The abstract MUST finish with the following text: Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1127865005664160

  5. Identification and Heterologous Expression of Genes Involved in Anaerobic Dissimilatory Phosphite Oxidation by Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonova, Diliana Dancheva; Wilson, Marlena Marie; Metcalf, William W.; Schink, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans is a strictly anaerobic, Gram-negative bacterium that utilizes phosphite as the sole electron source for homoacetogenic CO2 reduction or sulfate reduction. A genomic library of D. phosphitoxidans, constructed using the fosmid vector pJK050, was screened for clones harboring the genes involved in phosphite oxidation via PCR using primers developed based on the amino acid sequences of phosphite-induced proteins. Sequence analysis of two positive clones revealed a putative operon of seven genes predicted to be involved in phosphite oxidation. Four of these genes (ptxD-ptdFCG) were cloned and heterologously expressed in Desulfotignum balticum, a related strain that cannot use phosphite as either an electron donor or as a phosphorus source. The ptxD-ptdFCG gene cluster was sufficient to confer phosphite uptake and oxidation ability to the D. balticum host strain but did not allow use of phosphite as an electron donor for chemolithotrophic growth. Phosphite oxidation activity was measured in cell extracts of D. balticum transconjugants, suggesting that all genes required for phosphite oxidation were cloned. Genes of the phosphite gene cluster were assigned putative functions on the basis of sequence analysis and enzyme assays. PMID:20622064

  6. Identification and heterologous expression of genes involved in anaerobic dissimilatory phosphite oxidation by Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonova, Diliana Dancheva; Wilson, Marlena Marie; Metcalf, William W; Schink, Bernhard

    2010-10-01

    Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans is a strictly anaerobic, Gram-negative bacterium that utilizes phosphite as the sole electron source for homoacetogenic CO2 reduction or sulfate reduction. A genomic library of D. phosphitoxidans, constructed using the fosmid vector pJK050, was screened for clones harboring the genes involved in phosphite oxidation via PCR using primers developed based on the amino acid sequences of phosphite-induced proteins. Sequence analysis of two positive clones revealed a putative operon of seven genes predicted to be involved in phosphite oxidation. Four of these genes (ptxD-ptdFCG) were cloned and heterologously expressed in Desulfotignum balticum, a related strain that cannot use phosphite as either an electron donor or as a phosphorus source. The ptxD-ptdFCG gene cluster was sufficient to confer phosphite uptake and oxidation ability to the D. balticum host strain but did not allow use of phosphite as an electron donor for chemolithotrophic growth. Phosphite oxidation activity was measured in cell extracts of D. balticum transconjugants, suggesting that all genes required for phosphite oxidation were cloned. Genes of the phosphite gene cluster were assigned putative functions on the basis of sequence analysis and enzyme assays.

  7. Differential Gene Expression by Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 in Response to Phenolic Compounds Reveals New Genes Involved in Tannin Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverón, Inés; Jiménez, Natalia; Curiel, José Antonio; Peñas, Elena; López de Felipe, Félix; de Las Rivas, Blanca; Muñoz, Rosario

    2017-04-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a lactic acid bacterium that can degrade food tannins by the successive action of tannase and gallate decarboxylase enzymes. In the L. plantarum genome, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of gallate decarboxylase ( lpdC , or lp_2945 ) is only 6.5 kb distant from the gene encoding inducible tannase ( L. plantarum tanB [ tanB Lp ], or lp_2956 ). This genomic context suggests concomitant activity and regulation of both enzymatic activities. Reverse transcription analysis revealed that subunits B ( lpdB , or lp_0271 ) and D ( lpdD , or lp_0272 ) of the gallate decarboxylase are cotranscribed, whereas subunit C ( lpdC , or lp_2945 ) is cotranscribed with a gene encoding a transport protein ( gacP , or lp_2943 ). In contrast, the tannase gene is transcribed as a monocistronic mRNA. Investigation of knockout mutations of genes located in this chromosomal region indicated that only mutants of the gallate decarboxylase (subunits B and C), tannase, GacP transport protein, and TanR transcriptional regulator ( lp_2942 ) genes exhibited altered tannin metabolism. The expression profile of genes involved in tannin metabolism was also analyzed in these mutants in the presence of methyl gallate and gallic acid. It is noteworthy that inactivation of tanR suppresses the induction of all genes overexpressed in the presence of methyl gallate and gallic acid. This transcriptional regulator was also induced in the presence of other phenolic compounds, such as kaempferol and myricetin. This study complements the catalog of L. plantarum expression profiles responsive to phenolic compounds, which enable this bacterium to adapt to a plant food environment. IMPORTANCE Lactobacillus plantarum is a bacterial species frequently found in the fermentation of vegetables when tannins are present. L. plantarum strains degrade tannins to the less-toxic pyrogallol by the successive action of tannase and gallate decarboxylase enzymes. The genes encoding these enzymes are

  8. Von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene loss in renal cell carcinoma promotes oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor signaling via Akt-1 and MEK-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S Justin; Lattouf, Jean-Baptiste; Xanthopoulos, Julie; Linehan, W Marston; Bottaro, Donald P; Vasselli, James R

    2008-10-01

    Clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most prevalent form of kidney cancer and is frequently associated with loss of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene function, resulting in the aberrant transcriptional activation of genes that contribute to tumor growth and metastasis, including transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), a ligand of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase. To determine the functional impact of EGFR activation on RCC, we suppressed critical components of this pathway: EGFR, Akt-1, and MEK-1. Stable transfection of RCC cells with plasmids bearing shRNA directed against each of these genes was used to individually suppress their expression. Transfectants were characterized for growth and invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. RCC cell transfectants displayed significantly reduced growth rate and matrix invasion in vitro and RCC tumor xenograft growth rate in vivo. Analysis of tumor cells that emerged after extended periods in each model showed that significant EGFR suppression was sustained, whereas Akt-1 and MEK-1 knock-down cells had escaped shRNA suppression. EGFR, Akt-1, and MEK-1 are individually critical for RCC cell invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, and even partial suppression of each can have a significant impact on tumor progression. The emergence of transfectants that had escaped Akt-1 and MEK-1 suppression during tumorigenicity experiments suggests that these effectors may each be more critical than EGFR for RCC tumorigenesis, consistent with results from clinical trials of EGFR inhibitors for RCC, where durable clinical responses have not been seen.

  9. Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Gene Loss in Renal Cell Carcinoma Promotes Oncogenic Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling via Akt-1 and MEK1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. Justin; Lattouf, Jean-Baptiste; Xanthopoulos, Julie; Linehan, W. Marston; Bottaro, Donald P.; Vasselli, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most prevalent form of kidney cancer and is frequently associated with loss of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene function, resulting in the aberrant transcriptional activation of genes that contribute to tumor growth and metastasis, including transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α), a ligand of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase. To determine the functional impact of EGFR activation on RCC, we suppressed critical components of this pathway: EGFR, Akt-1, and MEK-1. Methods Stable transfection of RCC cells with plasmids bearing shRNA directed against each of these genes was used to individually suppress their expression. Transfectants were characterized for growth and invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Results RCC cell transfectants displayed significantly reduced growth rate and matrix invasion in vitro and RCC tumor xenograft growth rate in vivo. Analysis of tumor cells that emerged after extended periods in each model showed that significant EGFR suppression was sustained, whereas Akt-1 and MEK-1 knockdown cells had escaped shRNA suppression. Conclusions EGFR, Akt-1, and MEK-1 are individually critical for RCC cell invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, and even partial suppression of each can have a significant impact on tumor progression. The emergence of transfectants that had escaped Akt-1 and MEK-1 suppression during tumorigenicity experiments suggests that these effectors may each be more critical than EGFR for RCC tumorigenesis, consistent with results from clinical trials of EGFR inhibitors for RCC, where durable clinical responses have not been seen. PMID:18243508

  10. ESTs analysis reveals putative genes involved in symbiotic seed germination in Dendrobium officinale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ming Zhao

    Full Text Available Dendrobiumofficinale (Orchidaceae is one of the world's most endangered plants with great medicinal value. In nature, D. officinale seeds must establish symbiotic relationships with fungi to germinate. However, the molecular events involved in the interaction between fungus and plant during this process are poorly understood. To isolate the genes involved in symbiotic germination, a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH cDNA library of symbiotically germinated D. officinale seeds was constructed. From this library, 1437 expressed sequence tags (ESTs were clustered to 1074 Unigenes (including 902 singletons and 172 contigs, which were searched against the NCBI non-redundant (NR protein database (E-value cutoff, e(-5. Based on sequence similarity with known proteins, 579 differentially expressed genes in D. officinale were identified and classified into different functional categories by Gene Ontology (GO, Clusters of orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways. The expression levels of 15 selected genes emblematic of symbiotic germination were confirmed via real-time quantitative PCR. These genes were classified into various categories, including defense and stress response, metabolism, transcriptional regulation, transport process and signal transduction pathways. All transcripts were upregulated in the symbiotically germinated seeds (SGS. The functions of these genes in symbiotic germination were predicted. Furthermore, two fungus-induced calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs, which were upregulated 6.76- and 26.69-fold in SGS compared with un-germinated seeds (UGS, were cloned from D. officinale and characterized for the first time. This study provides the first global overview of genes putatively involved in D. officinale symbiotic seed germination and provides a foundation for further functional research regarding symbiotic relationships in orchids.

  11. Modulator of apoptosis 1 (MOAP-1) is a tumor suppressor protein linked to the RASSF1A protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jennifer; Salla, Mohamed; Zare, Alaa; Wong, Yoke; Luong, Le; Volodko, Natalia; Svystun, Orysya; Flood, Kayla; Lim, Jonathan; Sung, Miranda; Dyck, Jason R B; Tan, Chong Teik; Su, Yu-Chin; Yu, Victor C; Mackey, John; Baksh, Shairaz

    2015-10-02

    Modulator of apoptosis 1 (MOAP-1) is a BH3-like protein that plays key roles in cell death or apoptosis. It is an integral partner to the tumor suppressor protein, Ras association domain family 1A (RASSF1A), and functions to activate the Bcl-2 family pro-apoptotic protein Bax. Although RASSF1A is now considered a bona fide tumor suppressor protein, the role of MOAP-1 as a tumor suppressor protein has yet to be determined. In this study, we present several lines of evidence from cancer databases, immunoblotting of cancer cells, proliferation, and xenograft assays as well as DNA microarray analysis to demonstrate the role of MOAP-1 as a tumor suppressor protein. Frequent loss of MOAP-1 expression, in at least some cancers, appears to be attributed to mRNA down-regulation and the rapid proteasomal degradation of MOAP-1 that could be reversed utilizing the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Overexpression of MOAP-1 in several cancer cell lines resulted in reduced tumorigenesis and up-regulation of genes involved in cancer regulatory pathways that include apoptosis (p53, Fas, and MST1), DNA damage control (poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase and ataxia telangiectasia mutated), those within the cell metabolism (IR-α, IR-β, and AMP-activated protein kinase), and a stabilizing effect on microtubules. The loss of RASSF1A (an upstream regulator of MOAP-1) is one of the earliest detectable epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor proteins in cancer, and we speculate that the additional loss of function of MOAP-1 may be a second hit to functionally compromise the RASSF1A/MOAP-1 death receptor-dependent pathway and drive tumorigenesis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Modulator of Apoptosis 1 (MOAP-1) Is a Tumor Suppressor Protein Linked to the RASSF1A Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jennifer; Salla, Mohamed; Zare, Alaa; Wong, Yoke; Luong, Le; Volodko, Natalia; Svystun, Orysya; Flood, Kayla; Lim, Jonathan; Sung, Miranda; Dyck, Jason R. B.; Tan, Chong Teik; Su, Yu-Chin; Yu, Victor C.; Mackey, John; Baksh, Shairaz

    2015-01-01

    Modulator of apoptosis 1 (MOAP-1) is a BH3-like protein that plays key roles in cell death or apoptosis. It is an integral partner to the tumor suppressor protein, Ras association domain family 1A (RASSF1A), and functions to activate the Bcl-2 family pro-apoptotic protein Bax. Although RASSF1A is now considered a bona fide tumor suppressor protein, the role of MOAP-1 as a tumor suppressor protein has yet to be determined. In this study, we present several lines of evidence from cancer databases, immunoblotting of cancer cells, proliferation, and xenograft assays as well as DNA microarray analysis to demonstrate the role of MOAP-1 as a tumor suppressor protein. Frequent loss of MOAP-1 expression, in at least some cancers, appears to be attributed to mRNA down-regulation and the rapid proteasomal degradation of MOAP-1 that could be reversed utilizing the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Overexpression of MOAP-1 in several cancer cell lines resulted in reduced tumorigenesis and up-regulation of genes involved in cancer regulatory pathways that include apoptosis (p53, Fas, and MST1), DNA damage control (poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase and ataxia telangiectasia mutated), those within the cell metabolism (IR-α, IR-β, and AMP-activated protein kinase), and a stabilizing effect on microtubules. The loss of RASSF1A (an upstream regulator of MOAP-1) is one of the earliest detectable epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor proteins in cancer, and we speculate that the additional loss of function of MOAP-1 may be a second hit to functionally compromise the RASSF1A/MOAP-1 death receptor-dependent pathway and drive tumorigenesis. PMID:26269600

  13. Tumor Suppressor RARRES1 Regulates DLG2, PP2A, VCP, EB1, and Ankrd26

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad J. Sahab, Michael D. Hall, Lihua Zhang, Amrita K. Cheema, Stephen W. Byers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinoic Acid Receptor Responder (RARRES1 initially identified as a novel retinoic acid receptor regulated gene in the skin is a putative tumor suppressor of unknown function. RARRES1 was knocked down in immortalized human prostatic epithelial cell line PWR-1E cells and differential protein expression was identified using differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI mass spectrometry and western Blot analysis excluding highly abundant proteins routinely identified in almost all proteomics projects. Knock-down of RARRES1: 1- down-regulates PP2A, an enzyme involved in the negative regulation of the growth hormone-stimulated signal transduction pathways; 2- down-regulates Valosin-containing protein causing impaired autophagy; 3- up-regulates the tumor suppressor disks large 2; 4- up-regulates Ankrd26 that belongs to the POTE family of genes that are highly expressed in cancer patients with poor outcome; and 5- down-regulates EB1, a protein that is involved in spindle dynamics and chromosome alignment during mitosis.

  14. Cold Shock as a Screen for Genes Involved in Cold Acclimatization in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Michael K; Manzanilla, Victor; Howell, Holly; Mehreteab, Alexander; Rose, Erik; Walters, Nicole; Seitz, Nicholas; Nava, Jacob; Kekelik, Sienna; Knuth, Laura; Scivinsky, Brianna

    2018-03-21

    When subjected to rapid drops of temperature (cold shock), Neurospora responds with a temporary shift in its morphology. This report is the first to examine this response genetically. We report here the results of a screen of selected mutants from the Neurospora knockout library for alterations in their morphological response to cold shock. Three groups of knockouts were selected to be subject to this screen: genes previously suspected to be involved in hyphal development as well as knockouts resulting in morphological changes; transcription factors; and genes homologous to E. coli genes known to alter their expression in response to cold shock. A total of 344 knockout strains were subjected to cold shock. Of those, 118 strains were identified with altered responses. We report here the cold shock morphologies and GO categorizations of strains subjected to this screen. Of strains with knockouts in genes associated with hyphal growth or morphology, 33 of 131 tested (25%) showed an altered response to cold shock. Of strains with knockouts in transcription factor genes, 30 of 145 (20%) showed an altered response to cold shock. Of strains with knockouts in genes homologous to E. coli genes which display altered levels of transcription in response to cold shock, a total of 55 of 68 tested (81%) showed an altered cold shock response. This suggests that the response to cold shock in these two organisms is largely shared in common. Copyright © 2018, G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics.

  15. Insertional Mutagenesis for Genes involved in Otic/Vestibular Development and Function in Xenopus Tropicalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrejon, Marcela; Li, Erica; Nguyen, Minh; Winfree, Seth; Wang, Esther; Reinsch, Sigrid; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Sensitivity to gravity is essential for spatial orientation. Consequently, the gravity receptor system is one of the phylogenetically oldest sensory systems, and the special adaptations that enhance sensitivity to gravity are highly conserved. The main goal of this project is to use Xenopus (frog) to identify genes expressed during vestibular and auditory development. These studies will lead a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in vestibular and auditory development and function. We are using a gene-trap approach in Xenopus tropicalis with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene as the transgene reporter. GFP expression occurs only when the GFP gene is correctly integrated in actively transcribed genes. Using the GFP as a tag we can easily identify and clone the mutated gene. In addition, we can study the function of the mutated gene by analyzing the defects generated by insertion of the GFP transgene. To date we have tissue specific GFP expression in X. tropicalis including expression in ear, neural tube, kidney, muscle, eyes and nose. Our transgenic animals will soon reach maturity so that we can outcross them and analyze their progeny. Our next goal is to isolate RNA from our transgenics and clone the tagged genes using RACE-PCR. Currently we are optimizing the RACE-PCR method using transgenics with crystallin GFP expression.

  16. Transcriptome analysis of genes involved in defence response in Polyporus umbellatus with Armillaria mellea infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng-Meng; Xing, Yong-Mei; Zhang, Da-Wei; Guo, Shun-Xing

    2015-11-03

    Polyporus umbellatus, a species symbiotic with Armillaria mellea and it also exhibits substantial defence response to Armillaria mellea infection. There are no genomics resources databases for understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the infection stress of P. umbellatus. Therefore, we performed a large-scale transcriptome sequencing of this fungus with A. mellea infection using Illumina sequencing technology. The assembly of the clean reads resulted in 120,576 transcripts, including 38,444 unigenes. Additionally, we performed a gene expression profiling analysis upon infection treatment. The results indicated significant differences in the gene expression profiles between the control and the infection group. In total, 10933 genes were identified between the two groups. Based on the differentially expressed genes, a Gene Ontology annotation analysis showed many defence-relevant categories. Meanwhile, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis uncovered some important pathways. Furthermore, the expression patterns of 13 putative genes that are involved in defence response resulting from quantitative real-time PCR were consistent with their transcript abundance changes as identified by RNA-seq. The sequenced genes covered a considerable proportion of the P. umbellatus transcriptome, and the expression results may be useful to strengthen the knowledge on the defence response of this fungus defend against Armillaria mellea invasion.

  17. Alcohol-induced histone acetylation reveals a gene network involved in alcohol tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Ghezzi

    Full Text Available Sustained or repeated exposure to sedating drugs, such as alcohol, triggers homeostatic adaptations in the brain that lead to the development of drug tolerance and dependence. These adaptations involve long-term changes in the transcription of drug-responsive genes as well as an epigenetic restructuring of chromosomal regions that is thought to signal and maintain the altered transcriptional state. Alcohol-induced epigenetic changes have been shown to be important in the long-term adaptation that leads to alcohol tolerance and dependence endophenotypes. A major constraint impeding progress is that alcohol produces a surfeit of changes in gene expression, most of which may not make any meaningful contribution to the ethanol response under study. Here we used a novel genomic epigenetic approach to find genes relevant for functional alcohol tolerance by exploiting the commonalities of two chemically distinct alcohols. In Drosophila melanogaster, ethanol and benzyl alcohol induce mutual cross-tolerance, indicating that they share a common mechanism for producing tolerance. We surveyed the genome-wide changes in histone acetylation that occur in response to these drugs. Each drug induces modifications in a large number of genes. The genes that respond similarly to either treatment, however, represent a subgroup enriched for genes important for the common tolerance response. Genes were functionally tested for behavioral tolerance to the sedative effects of ethanol and benzyl alcohol using mutant and inducible RNAi stocks. We identified a network of genes that are essential for the development of tolerance to sedation by alcohol.

  18. Lactose metabolism in Lactobacillus bulgaricus: analysis of the primary structure and expression of the genes involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong-Morgenthaler, P; Zwahlen, M C; Hottinger, H

    1991-01-01

    The genes coding for the lactose permease and beta-galactosidase, two proteins involved in the metabolism of lactose by Lactobacillus bulgaricus, have been cloned, expressed, and found functional in Escherichia coli. The nucleotide sequences of these genes and their flanking regions have been determined, showing the presence of two contiguous open reading frames (ORFs). One of these ORFs codes for the lactose permease gene, and the other codes for the beta-galactosidase gene. The lactose permease gene is located in front of the beta-galactosidase gene, with 3 bp in the intergenic region. The two genes are probably transcribed as one operon. Primer extension studies have mapped a promoter upstream from the lactose permease gene but not the beta-galactosidase gene. This promoter is similar to those found in E. coli with general characteristics of GC-rich organisms. In addition, the sequences around the promoter contain a significantly higher number of AT base pairs (80%) than does the overall L. bulgaricus genome, which is rich in GC (GC content of 54%). The amino acid sequences obtained from translation of the ORFs are found to be highly homologous (similarity of 75%) to those from Streptococcus thermophilus. The first 460 amino acids of the lactose permease shows homology to the melibiose transport protein of E. coli. Little homology was found between the lactose permease of L. bulgaricus and E. coli, but the residues which are involved in the binding and the transport of lactose are conserved. The carboxy terminus is similar to that of the enzyme III of several phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems. Images PMID:1705929

  19. Promoter polymorphisms in genes involved in porcine myogenesis influence their transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiorni, Silvia; Tilesi, Francesca; Bicorgna, Silvia; Iacoponi, Francesca; Willems, Daniela; Gargani, Maria; D'Andrea, MariaSilvia; Pilla, Fabio; Valentini, Alessio

    2014-11-07

    Success of meat production and selection for improvement of meat quality is among the primary aims in animal production. Meat quality traits are economically important in swine; however, the underlying genetic nature is very complex. Therefore, an improved pork production strongly depends on identifying and studying how genetic variations contribute to modulate gene expression. Promoters are key regions in gene modulation as they harbour several binding motifs to transcription regulatory factors. Therefore, polymorphisms in these regions are likely to deeply affect RNA levels and consequently protein synthesis. In this study, we report the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in promoter regions of candidate genes involved in development, cellular differentiation and muscle growth in Sus scrofa. We identified SNPs in the promoter regions of genes belonging to the Myogenic Regulatory Factors (MRF) gene family (the Myogenic Differentiation gene, MYOD1) and to Growth and Differentiation Factors (GDF) gene family (Myostatin gene, MSTN, GDF8), in Casertana and Large White breeds. The purpose of this study was to investigate if polymorphisms in the promoters could affect the transcriptional activity of these genes. With this aim, we evaluated in vitro the functional activity of the luciferase reporter gene luc2 activity, driven by two constructs carrying different promoter haplotypes. We tested the effects of the G302A (U12574) transition on the promoter efficiency in MYOD1 gene. We ascertained a difference in transcription efficiency for the two variants. A stronger activity of the A-carrying construct is more evident in C2C12. The luciferase expression driven by the MYOD1-A allelic variant displayed a 3.8-fold increased transcriptional activity. We investigated the activity of two haplotype variants (AY527152) in the promoter of GDF8 gene. The haploptype-1 (A435-A447-A879) up-regulated the expression of the reporter gene by a two-fold increase, and

  20. A novel contiguous deletion involving NDP, MAOB and EFHC2 gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 6. A novel contiguous deletion involving NDP, MAOBand EFHC2gene in a patient with familial Norrie disease: bilateral blindness and leucocoria without other deficits. BEI JIA LIPING HUANG YAOYU CHEN SIPING LIU CUIHUA CHEN KE XIONG LANLIN SONG YULAI ...

  1. Modulation of genes involved in inflammation and cell death in atherosclerosis-susceptible mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadelaar, Anna Susanne Maria

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis we focus on atherosclerosis as the main cause of cardiovascular disease. Since inflammation and cell death are important processes in the onset and progression of atherosclerosis, we investigate the role of several genes involved in inflammation and cell death in the vessel wall and

  2. Positional cloning of genes involved in the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, hemihypertrophy, and associated childhood tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannens, M.; Alders, M.; Redeker, B.; Bliek, J.; Steenman, M.; Wiesmeyer, C.; de Meulemeester, M.; Ryan, A.; Kalikin, L.; Voûte, T.; de Kraker, J.; Hoovers, J.; Slater, R.; Feinberg, A.; Little, P.; Westerveld, A.

    1996-01-01

    The Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth malformation syndrome that occurs with an incidence of 1:13,700 births. There is a striking incidence of childhood tumors found in BWS patients. Various lines of investigation have localized "imprinted" genes involved in BWS and associated

  3. A novel contiguous deletion involving NDP, MAOB and EFHC2 gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 6. A novel contiguous deletion involving NDP, MAOBitalic> and EFHC2italic> gene in a patient with familial Norrie disease: bilateral blindness and leucocoria without other deficits. BEI JIA LIPING HUANG YAOYU CHEN SIPING LIU CUIHUA CHEN KE XIONG LANLIN ...

  4. The Tumor Suppressor Protein TEP1/PTEN/MMAC1 and Human Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Hong

    2002-01-01

    PTEN is an important tumor suppressor. Both inherited mutations and somatic mutations in the PTEN gene have been frequently found in a variety of human cancers, including the breast cancer, PTEN protein has been shown to possess...

  5. Evidence for the involvement of the Gli gene family in embryonic mouse lung development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindley, J C; Bellusci, S; Perkins, D; Hogan, B L

    1997-08-15

    Murine Gli, Gli2, and Gli3 are zinc finger genes related to Drosophila cubitus interuptus, a component of the hedgehog signal transduction pathway. In the embryonic lung, all three Gli genes are strongly expressed at the pseudoglandular stage, in distinct but overlapping domains of the mesoderm. Expression of Gli and Gli3, but not of Gli2, is subsequently downregulated at the canalicular stage, coincident with a decline in the expression of sonic hedgehog (Shh) and the hedgehog receptor gene, patched (Ptc). Overexpression of Shh in the lung results in increased levels of Ptc mRNA. Gli, but not Gli2, is also upregulated, suggesting a differential involvement of the Gli genes in the regulation of Ptc by SHH during lung development. Gli3 is not upregulated by Shh overexpression. However, its importance for lung development is shown by the finding that Gli3XtJ embryos, homozygous for a mutation involving a deletion of the Gli3 gene, have a stereotypic pattern of abnormalities in lung morphogenesis. The pulmonary defects in these embryos, consisting of localized shape changes and size reductions, correlate with normal Gli3 expression. Thus, our data indicate that one of the Gli genes, Gli3, is essential for normal lung development, and that another, Gli, can be placed downstream of Shh signaling in the lung.

  6. Identification and characterization of nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis in Populus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The gap between the real and potential photosynthetic rate under field conditions suggests that photosynthesis could potentially be improved. Nuclear genes provide possible targets for improving photosynthetic efficiency. Hence, genome-wide identification and characterization of the nuclear genes affecting photosynthetic traits in woody plants would provide key insights on genetic regulation of photosynthesis and identify candidate processes for improvement of photosynthesis. Results Using microarray and bulked segregant analysis strategies, we identified differentially expressed nuclear genes for photosynthesis traits in a segregating population of poplar. We identified 515 differentially expressed genes in this population (FC ≥ 2 or FC ≤ 0.5, P photosynthesis by the nuclear genome mainly involves transport, metabolism and response to stimulus functions. Conclusions This study provides new genome-scale strategies for the discovery of potential candidate genes affecting photosynthesis in Populus, and for identification of the functions of genes involved in regulation of photosynthesis. This work also suggests that improving photosynthetic efficiency under field conditions will require the consideration of multiple factors, such as stress responses. PMID:24673936

  7. Characterization of Genes Encoding Key Enzymes Involved in Anthocyanin Metabolism of Kiwifruit during Storage Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Boqiang; Xia, Yongxiu; Wang, Yuying; Qin, Guozheng; Tian, Shiping

    2017-01-01

    'Hongyang' is a red fleshed kiwifruit with high anthocyanin content. In this study, we mainly investigated effects of different temperatures (25 and 0°C) on anthocyanin biosynthesis in harvested kiwifruit, and characterized the genes encoding key enzymes involved in anthocyanin metabolism, as well as evaluated the mode of the action, by which low temperature regulates anthocyanin accumulation in 'Hongyang' kiwifruit during storage period. The results showed that low temperature could effectively enhance the anthocyanin accumulation of kiwifruit in the end of storage period (90 days), which related to the increase in mRNA levels of ANS1, ANS2, DRF1, DRF2 , and UGFT2 . Moreover, the transcript abundance of MYBA1-1 and MYB5-1 , the genes encoding an important component of MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) complex, was up-regulated, possibly contributing to the induction of specific anthocyanin biosynthesis genes under the low temperature. To further investigate the roles of AcMYB5-1/5-2/A1-1 in regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis, genes encoding the three transcription factors were transiently transformed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Overexpression of AcMYB5-1/5-2/A1-1 activated the gene expression of NtANS and NtDFR in tobacco. Our results suggested that low temperature storage could stimulate the anthocyanin accumulation in harvested kiwifruit via regulating several structural and regulatory genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis.

  8. FOXP3 as X-linked Tumor Suppressor

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lizhong; Liu, Runhua; Ribick, Mark; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2010-01-01

    The FOXP3 gene was initially identified because its mutation caused lethal autoimmune diseases in mouse and human. Mice with heterozygous mutation of Foxp3 succumb to mammary tumor spontaneously, while those with prostate-specific deletion develop prostate intraepithelial neoplasia. Somatic mutations, deletion and epigenetic inactivation of FOXP3 are widespread among human breast and prostate cancers. Unlike autosomal tumor suppressor genes that were usually inactivated by mutations in both a...

  9. Identification of new genes involved in human adipogenesis and fat storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörn Söhle

    Full Text Available Since the worldwide increase in obesity represents a growing challenge for health care systems, new approaches are needed to effectively treat obesity and its associated diseases. One prerequisite for advances in this field is the identification of genes involved in adipogenesis and/or lipid storage. To provide a systematic analysis of genes that regulate adipose tissue biology and to establish a target-oriented compound screening, we performed a high throughput siRNA screen with primary (preadipocytes, using a druggable siRNA library targeting 7,784 human genes. The primary screen showed that 459 genes affected adipogenesis and/or lipid accumulation after knock-down. Out of these hits, 333 could be validated in a secondary screen using independent siRNAs and 110 genes were further regulated on the gene expression level during adipogenesis. Assuming that these genes are involved in neutral lipid storage and/or adipocyte differentiation, we performed InCell-Western analysis for the most striking hits to distinguish between the two phenotypes. Beside well known regulators of adipogenesis and neutral lipid storage (i.e. PPARγ, RXR, Perilipin A the screening revealed a large number of genes which have not been previously described in the context of fatty tissue biology such as axonemal dyneins. Five out of ten axonemal dyneins were identified in our screen and quantitative RT-PCR-analysis revealed that these genes are expressed in preadipocytes and/or maturing adipocytes. Finally, to show that the genes identified in our screen are per se druggable we performed a proof of principle experiment using an antagonist for HTR2B. The results showed a very similar phenotype compared to knock-down experiments proofing the "druggability". Thus, we identified new adipogenesis-associated genes and those involved in neutral lipid storage. Moreover, by using a druggable siRNA library the screen data provides a very attractive starting point to identify anti

  10. Identification and expression analysis of candidate genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis in chickpea seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kazem Rezaei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant carotenoids have a key role in preventing various diseases in human because of their antioxidant and provitamin A properties. Chickpea is a good source of carotenoid among legumes and its diverse germplasm and genome accessibility makes it a good model for carotenogenesis studies. The structure, location and copy numbers of genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis were retrieved from the chickpea genome. The majority of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs within these genes across five diverse chickpea cultivars was synonymous mutation. We examined the expression of the carotenogenesis genes and their association with carotenoid concentration at different seed development stages of five chickpea cultivars. Total carotenoid concentration ranged from 22 μg g-1 in yellow cotyledon kabuli to 44 μg g-1 in green cotyledon desi at 32 days post anthesis (DPA. The majority of carotenoids in chickpea seeds consists of lutein and zeaxanthin. The expression of the selected 19 genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis pathway showed common pattern across five cultivars with higher expression at 8 and/or 16 DPA then dropped considerably at 24 and 32 DPA. Almost all genes were up-regulated in CDC Jade cultivar. Correlation analysis between gene expression and carotenoid concentration showed that the genes involved in the primary step of carotenoid biosynthesis pathway including carotenoid desaturase and isomerase positively correlated with various carotenoid components in chickpea seeds. A negative correlation was found between hydroxylation activity and provitamin A concentration in the seeds. The highest provitamin A concentration including β-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin were found in green cotyledon chickpea cultivars.

  11. Transcriptome profiling of the Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) ovary reveals genes involved in oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lu; Wang, Lei; Yang, Yi-Fan; Zou, Ming-Min; He, Wei-Yi; Wang, Yue; Wang, Qing; Vasseur, Liette; You, Min-Sheng

    2017-12-30

    As a specialized organ, the insect ovary performs valuable functions by ensuring fecundity and population survival. Oogenesis is the complex physiological process resulting in the production of mature eggs, which are involved in epigenetic programming, germ cell behavior, cell cycle regulation, etc. Identification of the genes involved in ovary development and oogenesis is critical to better understand the reproductive biology and screening for the potential molecular targets in Plutella xylostella, a worldwide destructive pest of economically major crops. Based on transcriptome sequencing, a total of 7.88Gb clean nucleotides was obtained, with 19,934 genes and 1861 new transcripts being identified. Expression profiling indicated that 61.7% of the genes were expressed (FPKM≥1) in the P. xylostella ovary. GO annotation showed that the pathways of multicellular organism reproduction and multicellular organism reproduction process, as well as gamete generation and chorion were significantly enriched. Processes that were most likely relevant to reproduction included the spliceosome, ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, endocytosis, PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, insulin signaling pathway, cAMP signaling pathway, and focal adhesion were identified in the top 20 'highly represented' KEGG pathways. Functional genes involved in oogenesis were further analyzed and validated by qRT-PCR to show their potential predominant roles in P. xylostella reproduction. Our newly developed P. xylostella ovary transcriptome provides an overview of the gene expression profiling in this specialized tissue and the functional gene network closely related to the ovary development and oogenesis. This is the first genome-wide transcriptome dataset of P. xylostella ovary that includes a subset of functionally activated genes. This global approach will be the basis for further studies on molecular mechanisms of P. xylostella reproduction aimed at screening potential molecular targets for integrated pest

  12. Involvement of plastid, mitochondrial and nuclear genomes in plant-to-plant horizontal gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Virginia Sanchez-Puerta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on plant-to-plant horizontal gene transfer (HGT involving the three DNA-containing cellular compartments. It highlights the great incidence of HGT in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA of angiosperms, the increasing number of examples in plant nuclear genomes, and the lack of any convincing evidence for HGT in the well-studied plastid genome of land plants. Most of the foreign mitochondrial genes are non-functional, generally found as pseudogenes in the recipient plant mtDNA that maintains its functional native genes. The few exceptions involve chimeric HGT, in which foreign and native copies recombine leading to a functional and single copy of the gene. Maintenance of foreign genes in plant mitochondria is probably the result of genetic drift, but a possible evolutionary advantage may be conferred through the generation of genetic diversity by gene conversion between native and foreign copies. Conversely, a few cases of nuclear HGT in plants involve functional transfers of novel genes that resulted in adaptive evolution. Direct cell-to-cell contact between plants (e.g. host-parasite relationships or natural grafting facilitate the exchange of genetic material, in which HGT has been reported for both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and in the form of genomic DNA, instead of RNA. A thorough review of the literature indicates that HGT in mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of angiosperms is much more frequent than previously expected and that the evolutionary impact and mechanisms underlying plant-to-plant HGT remain to be uncovered.

  13. Parallel Gene Expression Changes in Sarcoidosis Involving the Lacrimal Gland, Orbital Tissue, or Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, James T; Choi, Dongseok; Wilson, David J; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Harrington, Christina A; Sibley, Cailin H; Dailey, Roger A; Ng, John D; Steele, Eric A; Czyz, Craig N; Foster, Jill A; Tse, David; Alabiad, Chris; Dubovy, Sander; Parekh, Prashant; Harris, Gerald J; Kazim, Michael; Patel, Payal; White, Valerie; Dolman, Peter; Korn, Bobby S; Kikkawa, Don; Edward, Deepak P; Alkatan, Hind; Al-Hussain, Hailah; Yeatts, R Patrick; Selva, Dinesh; Stauffer, Patrick; Planck, Stephen R

    2015-07-01

    -response factor 2, and nuclear factor κB, were strongly implicated in the expression of messenger RNA upregulated in common in the 3 tissues. Gene expression in sarcoidosis involving the orbit or lacrimal gland can be distinguished from gene expression patterns in control tissue and overlaps with many transcripts upregulated or downregulated in the peripheral blood of patients with sarcoidosis. These observations suggest that common pathogenic mechanisms contribute to sarcoidosis in different sites. The observations support the hypothesis that a pattern of gene expression profiles could provide diagnostic information in patients with sarcoidosis.

  14. Phenotype Analysis Method for Identification of Gene Functions Involved in Asymmetric Division of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sihai; Han, Xianhua; Tohsato, Yukako; Kyoda, Koji; Onami, Shuichi; Nishikawa, Ikuko; Chen, Yenwei

    2017-05-01

    In gene function analysis, it is arduous to identify gene function individually, and the way to screen out all involved genes according to a particular phenotype or disease usually shows us little information for a specific problem. We present a data-driven analysis system based on wild type (WT) embryos to study the concrete function of each gene associated with certain category of abnormal phenotypes. It can be applied to genes with very few RNAi embryos. Instead of presupposing the particular function of a gene, its function is confirmed by the statistical testing of built models. The scheme includes the following five: first, verify the to be detected genes and determine related recognized features according to the given category; second, compute the value of each feature based on WT embryos and merge them by principal component analysis (PCA); third, for each of the selected components of PCA, build a normal distribution and verify its normality; fourth, project the RNAi embryos to each component and probe them; and finally, analyze the more detailed functions of each gene based on the physical or biological meaning of each component. Choosing the first-round asymmetric division process of Caenorhabditis elegans as the phenotype, experimental results show that on the different aspects of the asymmetric division process, par-2, par-3, and let-754 are related to scalar differences; dcn-1 and mcm-5 are associated with the divergences of scalar variation, which may reflect the disaccord in development; and dcn-1, par-2, and par-3 are involved with morphological discrepancies.

  15. Genes involved in complex adaptive processes tend to have highly conserved upstream regions in mammalian genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohane Isaac

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in genome sequencing suggest a remarkable conservation in gene content of mammalian organisms. The similarity in gene repertoire present in different organisms has increased interest in studying regulatory mechanisms of gene expression aimed at elucidating the differences in phenotypes. In particular, a proximal promoter region contains a large number of regulatory elements that control the expression of its downstream gene. Although many studies have focused on identification of these elements, a broader picture on the complexity of transcriptional regulation of different biological processes has not been addressed in mammals. The regulatory complexity may strongly correlate with gene function, as different evolutionary forces must act on the regulatory systems under different biological conditions. We investigate this hypothesis by comparing the conservation of promoters upstream of genes classified in different functional categories. Results By conducting a rank correlation analysis between functional annotation and upstream sequence alignment scores obtained by human-mouse and human-dog comparison, we found a significantly greater conservation of the upstream sequence of genes involved in development, cell communication, neural functions and signaling processes than those involved in more basic processes shared with unicellular organisms such as metabolism and ribosomal function. This observation persists after controlling for G+C content. Considering conservation as a functional signature, we hypothesize a higher density of cis-regulatory elements upstream of genes participating in complex and adaptive processes. Conclusion We identified a class of functions that are associated with either high or low promoter conservation in mammals. We detected a significant tendency that points to complex and adaptive processes were associated with higher promoter conservation, despite the fact that they have emerged

  16. IS21-558 Insertion Sequences Are Involved in the Mobility of the Multiresistance Gene cfr▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrenberg, Corinna; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Schwarz, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    During a study of florfenicol-resistant porcine staphylococci from Denmark, the genes cfr and fexA were detected in the chromosomal DNA or on plasmids of Staphylococcus hyicus, Staphylococcus warneri, and Staphylococcus simulans. A novel variant of the phenicol resistance transposon Tn558 was detected on the ca. 43-kb plasmid pSCFS6 in S. warneri and S. simulans isolates. Sequence analysis of a 22,010-bp segment revealed that the new Tn558 variant harbored an additional resistance gene region integrated into the tnpC reading frame. This resistance gene region consisted of the clindamycin exporter gene lsa(B) and the gene cfr for combined resistance to phenicols, lincosamides, oxazolidinones, pleuromutilins, and streptogramin A antibiotics bracketed by IS21-558 insertion sequences orientated in the same direction. A 6-bp target site duplication was detected at the integration site within tnpC. Transpositionally active forms of the IS21-558 element, known as minicircles, were detected by PCR and suggest that this insertion sequence is involved in the mobility of the multiresistance gene cfr. Based on the knowledge of the transposition pathways of IS21-like insertion sequences and the sequence features detected, the resistance gene region of plasmid pSCFS6 is believed to have developed via IS21-558-mediated cointegrate formation. The data obtained in this study identified the multiresistance gene cfr not only in three novel host species but also in a novel genetic context whose further analysis suggested that insertion sequences of the type IS21-558 are likely to be involved in the dissemination of cfr. PMID:17145796

  17. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis to Reveal Genes Involved in Wheat Hybrid Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wheat hybrid necrosis is an interesting genetic phenomenon that is found frequently and results in gradual death or loss of productivity of wheat. However, the molecular basis and mechanisms of this genetic phenomenon are still not well understood. In this study, the transcriptomes of wheat hybrid necrosis F1 and its parents (Neimai 8 and II469 were investigated using digital gene expression (DGE. A total of 1300 differentially expressed genes were identified, indicating that the response to hybrid necrosis in wheat is complicated. The assignments of the annotated genes based on Gene Ontology (GO revealed that most of the up-regulated genes belong to “universal stress related”, “DNA/RNA binding”, “protein degradation” functional groups, while the down-regulated genes belong to “carbohydrate metabolism” and “translation regulation” functional groups. These findings suggest that these pathways were affected by hybrid necrosis. Our results provide preliminarily new insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of hybrid necrosis and will help to identify important candidate genes involved in wheat hybrid necrosis.

  18. Comparative transcriptome analysis to reveal genes involved in wheat hybrid necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Cheng, Yan; Guo, Jiahui; Yang, Ennian; Liu, Cheng; Zheng, Xuelian; Deng, Kejun; Zhou, Jianping

    2014-12-16

    Wheat hybrid necrosis is an interesting genetic phenomenon that is found frequently and results in gradual death or loss of productivity of wheat. However, the molecular basis and mechanisms of this genetic phenomenon are still not well understood. In this study, the transcriptomes of wheat hybrid necrosis F1 and its parents (Neimai 8 and II469) were investigated using digital gene expression (DGE). A total of 1300 differentially expressed genes were identified, indicating that the response to hybrid necrosis in wheat is complicated. The assignments of the annotated genes based on Gene Ontology (GO) revealed that most of the up-regulated genes belong to "universal stress related", "DNA/RNA binding", "protein degradation" functional groups, while the down-regulated genes belong to "carbohydrate metabolism" and "translation regulation" functional groups. These findings suggest that these pathways were affected by hybrid necrosis. Our results provide preliminarily new insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of hybrid necrosis and will help to identify important candidate genes involved in wheat hybrid necrosis.

  19. Characterization of Pneumococcal Genes Involved in Bloodstream Invasion in a Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layla K Mahdi

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus continues to account for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis, as well as less serious infections such as sinusitis, conjunctivitis and otitis media. Current polysaccharide vaccines are strictly serotype-specific and also drive the emergence of non-vaccine serotype strains. In this study, we used microarray analysis to compare gene expression patterns of either serotype 4 or serotype 6A pneumococci in the nasopharynx and blood of mice, as a model to identify genes involved in invasion of blood in the context of occult bacteremia in humans. In this manner, we identified 26 genes that were significantly up-regulated in the nasopharynx and 36 genes that were significantly up-regulated in the blood that were common to both strains. Gene Ontology classification revealed that transporter and DNA binding (transcription factor activities constitute the significantly different molecular functional categories for genes up-regulated in the nasopharynx and blood. Targeted mutagenesis of selected genes from both niches and subsequent virulence and pathogenesis studies identified the manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (SodA as most likely to be essential for colonization, and the cell wall-associated serine protease (PrtA as important for invasion of blood. This work extends our previous analyses and suggests that both PrtA and SodA warrant examination in future studies aimed at prevention and/or control of pneumococcal disease.

  20. Mapping of Candidate Genes Involved in Bud Dormancy and Flowering Time in Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castède, Sophie; Campoy, José Antonio; Le Dantec, Loïck; Quero-García, José; Barreneche, Teresa; Wenden, Bénédicte; Dirlewanger, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    The timing of flowering in perennial plants is crucial for their survival in temperate climates and is regulated by the duration of bud dormancy. Bud dormancy release and bud break depend on the perception of cumulative chilling during endodormancy and heat during the bud development. The objectives of this work were to identify candidate genes involved in dormancy and flowering processes in sweet cherry, their mapping in two mapping progenies 'Regina' × 'Garnet' and 'Regina' × 'Lapins', and to select those candidate genes which co-localized with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with temperature requirements for bud dormancy release and flowering. Based on available data on flowering processes in various species, a list of 79 candidate genes was established. The peach and sweet cherry orthologs were identified and primers were designed to amplify sweet cherry candidate gene fragments. Based on the amplified sequences of the three parents of the mapping progenies, SNPs segregations in the progenies were identified. Thirty five candidate genes were genetically mapped in at least one of the two progenies and all were in silico mapped. Co-localization between candidate genes and QTLs associated with temperature requirements and flowering date were identified for the first time in sweet cherry. The allelic composition of the candidate genes located in the major QTL for heat requirements and flowering date located on linkage group 4 have a significant effect on these two traits indicating their potential use for breeding programs in sweet cherry to select new varieties adapted to putative future climatic conditions.

  1. Erythropoietin Increases Myelination in Oligodendrocytes: Gene Expression Profiling Reveals Early Induction of Genes Involved in Lipid Transport and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Gyetvai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that erythropoietin (EPO has neuroprotective or neuroreparative actions on diseases of the nervous system and that improves oligodendrocyte (OL differentiation and myelination in vivo and in vitro. This study aims at investigating the early molecular mechanisms for the pro-myelinating action of EPO at the gene expression level. For this purpose, we used a differentiating OL precursor cell line, rat central glia-4 cells. Cells were differentiated or not, and then treated with EPO for 1 or 20 h. RNA was extracted and changes in the gene expression profile were assessed using microarray analysis. Experiments were performed in biological replicates of n = 4. Differentiation alone changed the expression of 11% of transcripts (2,663 out of 24,272, representing 2,436 genes, half of which were upregulated and half downregulated. At 20 h of treatment, EPO significantly affected the expression of 99 genes that were already regulated by differentiation and of 150 genes that were not influenced by differentiation alone. Analysis of the transcripts most upregulated by EPO identified several genes involved in lipid transport (e.g., Cd36 and lipid metabolism (Ppargc1a/Pgc1alpha, Lpin1, Pnlip, Lpin2, Ppard, Plin2 along with Igf1 and Igf2, growth factors known for their pro-myelinating action. All these genes were only induced by EPO and not by differentiation alone, except for Pnlip which was highly induced by differentiation and augmented by EPO. Results were validated by quantitative PCR. These findings suggest that EPO might increase remyelination by inducing insulin-like growth factors and increasing lipid metabolism.

  2. Identification of putative candidate genes involved in cuticle formation in Prunus avium (sweet cherry) fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkio, Merianne; Jonas, Uwe; Sprink, Thorben; van Nocker, Steven; Knoche, Moritz

    2012-07-01

    The cuticular membrane (CM) of Prunus avium (sweet cherry) and other fleshy fruit is under stress. Previous research indicates that the resultant strain promotes microscopic cuticular cracking. Microcracks impair the function of the CM as a barrier against pathogens and uncontrolled water loss/uptake. Stress and strain result from a cessation of CM deposition during early development, while the fruit surface continues to expand. The cessation of CM deposition, in turn, may be related to an early downregulation of CM-related genes. The aims of this study were to identify genes potentially involved in CM formation in sweet cherry fruit and to quantify their expression levels. Fruit growth and CM deposition were quantified weekly from anthesis to maturity and rates of CM deposition were calculated. Sequences of genes expressed in the sweet cherry fruit skin (exocarp) were generated using high-throughput sequencing of cDNA and de novo assembly and analysed using bioinformatics tools. Relative mRNA levels of selected genes were quantified in the exocarp and fruit flesh (mesocarp) weekly using reverse transcriptase-quantitative real-time PCR and compared with the calculated CM deposition rate over time. The rate of CM deposition peaked at 93 (±5) μg per fruit d(-1) about 19 d after anthesis. Based on sequence analyses, 18 genes were selected as potentially involved in CM formation. Selected sweet cherry genes shared up to 100 and 98 % similarity with the respective Prunus persica (peach) and Arabidopsis thaliana genes. Expression of 13 putative CM-related genes was restricted to the exocarp and correlated positively with the CM deposition rate. The results support the view that the cessation of CM deposition during early sweet cherry fruit development is accounted for by a downregulation of genes involved in CM deposition. Genes that merit further investigation include PaWINA, PaWINB, PaLipase, PaLTPG1, PaATT1, PaLCR, PaGPAT4/8, PaLACS2, PaLACS1 and PaCER1.

  3. Evaluation of common variants in 16 genes involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release in ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Mora, Cristina; Cormand, Bru; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Hervás, Amaia; Bosch, Rosa; Palomar, Glòria; Nogueira, Mariana; Gómez-Barros, Núria; Richarte, Vanesa; Corrales, Montse; Garcia-Martinez, Iris; Corominas, Roser; Guijarro, Silvina; Bigorra, Aitana; Bayés, Mònica; Casas, Miguel; Ribasés, Marta

    2013-06-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurobehavioral disorder characterized by inappropriate difficulties to sustain attention, control impulses and modulate activity level. Although ADHD is one of the most prevalent childhood psychiatric disorders, it also persists into adulthood in around 30-50% of the cases. Based on the effect of psychostimulants used in the pharmacological treatment of ADHD, dysfunctions in neuroplasticity mechanisms and synapses have been postulated to be involved in the pathophysiology of ADHD. With this background, we evaluated, both in childhood and adulthood ADHD, the role of several genes involved in the control of neurotransmitter release through synaptic vesicle docking, fusion and recycling processes by means of a population-based association study. We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms across 16 genes in a clinical sample of 950 ADHD patients (506 adults and 444 children) and 905 controls. Single and multiple-marker analyses identified several significant associations after correcting for multiple testing with a false discovery rate (FDR) of 15%: (i) the SYT2 gene was strongly associated with both adulthood and childhood ADHD (p=0.001, OR=1.49 (1.18-1.89) and p=0.007, OR=1.37 (1.09-1.72), respectively) and (ii) STX1A was found associated with ADHD only in adults (p=0.0041; OR=1.28 (1.08-1.51)). These data provide preliminary evidence for the involvement of genes that participate in the control of neurotransmitter release in the genetic predisposition to ADHD through a gene-system association study. Further follow-up studies in larger cohorts and deep-sequencing of the associated genomic regions are required to identify sequence variants directly involved in ADHD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  4. An evolutionary genomic approach to identify genes involved in human birth timing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevon Plunkett

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Coordination of fetal maturation with birth timing is essential for mammalian reproduction. In humans, preterm birth is a disorder of profound global health significance. The signals initiating parturition in humans have remained elusive, due to divergence in physiological mechanisms between humans and model organisms typically studied. Because of relatively large human head size and narrow birth canal cross-sectional area compared to other primates, we hypothesized that genes involved in parturition would display accelerated evolution along the human and/or higher primate phylogenetic lineages to decrease the length of gestation and promote delivery of a smaller fetus that transits the birth canal more readily. Further, we tested whether current variation in such accelerated genes contributes to preterm birth risk. Evidence from allometric scaling of gestational age suggests human gestation has been shortened relative to other primates. Consistent with our hypothesis, many genes involved in reproduction show human acceleration in their coding or adjacent noncoding regions. We screened >8,400 SNPs in 150 human accelerated genes in 165 Finnish preterm and 163 control mothers for association with preterm birth. In this cohort, the most significant association was in FSHR, and 8 of the 10 most significant SNPs were in this gene. Further evidence for association of a linkage disequilibrium block of SNPs in FSHR, rs11686474, rs11680730, rs12473870, and rs1247381 was found in African Americans. By considering human acceleration, we identified a novel gene that may be associated with preterm birth, FSHR. We anticipate other human accelerated genes will similarly be associated with preterm birth risk and elucidate essential pathways for human parturition.

  5. Identification and analysis of novel genes involved in gravitropism of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Miyo T.; Tasaka, Masao; Masatoshi Taniguchi, .

    2012-07-01

    Gravitropism is a continuous control with regard to the orientation and juxtaposition of the various parts of the plant body in response to gravity. In higher plants, the relative directional change of gravity is mainly suscepted in specialized cells called statocytes, followed by signal conversion from physical information into physiological information within the statocytes. We have studied the early process of shoot gravitropism, gravity sensing and signaling process, mainly by molecular genetic approach. In Arabidopsis shoot, statocytes are the endodermal cells. sgr1/scarcrow (scr) and sgr7/short-root (shr) mutants fail to form the endodermis and to respond to gravity in their inflorescence stems. Since both SGR1/SCR and SGR7/SHR are transcriptional factors, at least a subset of their downstream genes can be expected to be involved in gravitropism. In addition, eal1 (endodermal-amyloplast less 1), which exhibits no gravitropism in inflorescence stem but retains ability to form endodermis, is a hypomorphic allele of sgr7/shr. Take advantage of these mutants, we performed DNA microarray analysis and compared gene expression profiles between wild type and the mutants. We found that approx. 40 genes were commonly down-regulated in these mutants and termed them DGE (DOWN-REGULATED GENE IN EAL1) genes. DGE1 has sequence similarity to Oryza sativa LAZY1 that is involved in shoot gravitropism of rice. DGE2 has a short region homologous to DGE1. DTL (DGE TWO-LIKE}) that has 54% identity to DGE2 is found in Arabidopsis genome. All three genes are conserved in angiosperm but have no known functional domains or motifs. We analyzed T-DNA insertion for these genes in single or multiple combinations. In dge1 dge2 dtl triple mutant, gravitropic response of shoot, hypocotyl and root dramatically reduced. Now we are carrying out further physiological and molecular genetic analysis of the triple mutant.

  6. Growth rate regulated genes and their wide involvement in the Lactococcus lactis stress responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redon Emma

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of transcriptomic tools has allowed exhaustive description of stress responses. These responses always superimpose a general response associated to growth rate decrease and a specific one corresponding to the stress. The exclusive growth rate response can be achieved through chemostat cultivation, enabling all parameters to remain constant except the growth rate. Results We analysed metabolic and transcriptomic responses of Lactococcus lactis in continuous cultures at different growth rates ranging from 0.09 to 0.47 h-1. Growth rate was conditioned by isoleucine supply. Although carbon metabolism was constant and homolactic, a widespread transcriptomic response involving 30% of the genome was observed. The expression of genes encoding physiological functions associated with biogenesis increased with growth rate (transcription, translation, fatty acid and phospholipids metabolism. Many phages, prophages and transposon related genes were down regulated as growth rate increased. The growth rate response was compared to carbon and amino-acid starvation transcriptomic responses, revealing constant and significant involvement of growth rate regulations in these two stressful conditions (overlap 27%. Two regulators potentially involved in the growth rate regulations, llrE and yabB, have been identified. Moreover it was established that genes positively regulated by growth rate are preferentially located in the vicinity of replication origin while those negatively regulated are mainly encountered at the opposite, thus indicating the relationship between genes expression and their location on chromosome. Although stringent response mechanism is considered as the one governing growth deceleration in bacteria, the rigorous comparison of the two transcriptomic responses clearly indicated the mechanisms are distinct. Conclusion This work of integrative biology was performed at the global level using transcriptomic analysis

  7. Identification of Bradyrhizobium elkanii Genes Involved in Incompatibility with Vigna radiata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hien P. Nguyen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of a root nodule symbiosis between a leguminous plant and a rhizobium requires complex molecular interactions between the two partners. Compatible interactions lead to the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules, however, some legumes exhibit incompatibility with specific rhizobial strains and restrict nodulation by the strains. Bradyrhizobium elkanii USDA61 is incompatible with mung bean (Vigna radiata cv. KPS1 and soybean cultivars carrying the Rj4 allele. Here, we explored genetic loci in USDA61 that determine incompatibility with V. radiata KPS1. We identified five novel B. elkanii genes that contribute to this incompatibility. Four of these genes also control incompatibility with soybean cultivars carrying the Rj4 allele, suggesting that a common mechanism underlies nodulation restriction in both legumes. The fifth gene encodes a hypothetical protein that contains a tts box in its promoter region. The tts box is conserved in genes encoding the type III secretion system (T3SS, which is known for its delivery of virulence effectors by pathogenic bacteria. These findings revealed both common and unique genes that are involved in the incompatibility of B. elkanii with mung bean and soybean. Of particular interest is the novel T3SS-related gene, which causes incompatibility specifically with mung bean cv. KPS1.

  8. New Genes Involved in Mild Stress Response Identified by Transposon Mutagenesis in Lactobacillus paracasei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Palud

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are associated with various plant, animal, and human niches and are also present in many fermented foods and beverages. Thus, they are subjected to several stress conditions and have developed advanced response mechanisms to resist, adapt, and grow. This work aimed to identify the genes involved in some stress adaptation mechanisms in LAB. For this purpose, global reverse genetics was applied by screening a library of 1287 Lactobacillus paracasei transposon mutants for mild monofactorial stresses. This library was submitted independently to heat (52°C, 30 min, ethanol (170 g.L−1, 30 min, salt (NaCl 0.8 M, 24 h, acid (pH 4.5, 24 h, and oxidative (2 mM H2O2, 24 h perturbations which trigger mild monofactorial stresses compatible with bacterial adaptation. Stress sensitivity of mutants was determined either by evaluating viability using propidium iodide (PI staining, or by following growth inhibition through turbidity measurement. The screening for heat and ethanol stresses lead respectively to the identification of 63 and 27 genes/putative promoters whose disruption lead to an increased sensitivity. Among them, 14 genes or putative promoters were common for both stresses. For salt, acid and oxidative stresses, respectively 8, 6, and 9 genes or putative promoters were identified as essential for adaptation to these unfavorable conditions, with only three genes common to at least two stresses. Then, RT-qPCR was performed on selected stress response genes identified by mutant screenings in order to evaluate if their expression was modified in response to stresses in the parental strain. Eleven genes (membrane, transposase, chaperone, nucleotide and carbohydrate metabolism, and hypothetical protein genes were upregulated during stress adaptation for at least two stresses. Seven genes, encoding membrane functions, were upregulated in response to a specific stress and thus could represent potential transcriptomic biomarkers

  9. Relation between the changes of oncogene versus tumor suppressor gene interaction and the transition of cancer risk from female dominance through no sex discrimination to male dominance, as investigated by the reciprocal regression analysis of 5 human neoplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, M; Murakami, M; Kodama, T

    1998-01-01

    We have been investigating the mathematical nature of intercancer linkage that underlies the mutual regulation of cancer risks between any 2 tumors in their variations in time and space. Applications of both sequential regression test and topological manipulation of age-adjusted incidence rate (AAIR) data set enabled us to prepare the oncogene (Onc) activation profile and the tumor suppressor gene (TSG) inactivation profile for each tumor. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between the changes of 2 cancer gene profiles and the sex discrimination of cancer risk in 7 human neoplasias. Results obtained are as follows: i) The sex discrimination of cancer risk could better be defined by the use of log-transformed AAIR data rather than of untransformed AAIR data. ii) The sex discrimination of cancer risk, as calculated with the AAIR data of 47 population units of the world, is as follows: a) breast cancer (Br), M:F=1:120.2; b) thyroid cancer (Thy), M:F=1:2. 64; c) colon cancer (Co), M:F=1.18:1; d) liver cancer (Li), M:F=2. 63:1; e) lung cancer (Lu), M:F=3.66:1; f) esophageal cancer (Eso), M:F=3.68:1; g) laryngeal cancer (Lar), M:F=7.26:1. iii) Female-dominant cancers were associated with inversion (Br) or defectiveness (Thy) of male oncogene profile, whereas male-dominant cancers were associated with inversion (Lar) or defectiveness (Li, Lu and Eso) of female Onc profiles. Sex-indifferent cancer, Co, was distinguished from other tumors by the emergence of defectiveness in the TSG profiles of both sexes. TSG defectiveness was also detectable in female (Br, Thy) and bisexual (Lu) tumors. iv) The Onc vs TSG interaction, as assessed in terms of r value of the reciprocal regression analysis, was increasing in its positivity rate from the top of the female-dominant family (Br) through the sex-indifferent tumor (Co) to the bottom of the male-dominant family (Lar). In conclusion, the emergence of sex discrimination of cancer risk was positively correlated

  10. Gestational diabetes mellitus epigenetically affects genes predominantly involved in metabolic diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchat, Stephanie-May; Houde, Andrée-Anne; Voisin, Grégory; St-Pierre, Julie; Perron, Patrice; Baillargeon, Jean-Patrice; Gaudet, Daniel; Hivert, Marie-France; Brisson, Diane; Bouchard, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Offspring exposed to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have an increased risk for chronic diseases, and one promising mechanism for fetal metabolic programming is epigenetics. Therefore, we postulated that GDM exposure impacts the offspring’s methylome and used an epigenomic approach to explore this hypothesis. Placenta and cord blood samples were obtained from 44 newborns, including 30 exposed to GDM. Women were recruited at first trimester of pregnancy and followed until delivery. GDM was assessed after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test at 24–28 weeks of pregnancy. DNA methylation was measured at > 485,000 CpG sites (Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was conducted to identify metabolic pathways epigenetically affected by GDM. Our results showed that 3,271 and 3,758 genes in placenta and cord blood, respectively, were potentially differentially methylated between samples exposed or not to GDM (p-values down to 1 × 10−06; none reached the genome-wide significance levels), with more than 25% (n = 1,029) being common to both tissues. Mean DNA methylation differences between groups were 5.7 ± 3.2% and 3.4 ± 1.9% for placenta and cord blood, respectively. These genes were likely involved in the metabolic diseases pathway (up to 115 genes (11%), p-values for pathways = 1.9 × 10−13 < p < 4.0 × 10−03; including diabetes mellitus p = 4.3 × 10−11). Among the differentially methylated genes, 326 in placenta and 117 in cord blood were also associated with newborn weight. Our results therefore suggest that GDM has epigenetic effects on genes preferentially involved in the metabolic diseases pathway, with consequences on fetal growth and development, and provide supportive evidence that DNA methylation is involved in fetal metabolic programming. PMID:23975224

  11. UFO: an Arabidopsis gene involved in both floral meristem and floral organ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, J Z; Meyerowitz, E M

    1995-05-01

    We describe the role of the UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene in Arabidopsis floral development based on a genetic and molecular characterization of the phenotypes of nine ufo alleles. UFO is required for the proper identity of the floral meristem and acts in three different aspects of the process that distinguishes flowers from shoots. UFO is involved in establishing the whorled pattern of floral organs, controlling the determinacy of the floral meristem, and activating the APETALA3 and PISTILLATA genes required for petal and stamen identity. In many respects, UFO acts in a manner similar to LEAFY, but the ufo mutant phenotype also suggests an additional role for UFO in defining boundaries within the floral primordia or controlling cell proliferation during floral organ growth. Finally, genetic interactions that prevent flower formation and lead to the generation of filamentous structures implicate UFO as a member of a new, large, and diverse class of genes in Arabidopsis necessary for flower formation.

  12. Association analysis of schizophrenia on 18 genes involved in neuronal migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kähler, Anna K; Djurovic, Srdjan; Kulle, Bettina

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence support the theory of schizophrenia (SZ) being a neurodevelopmental disorder. The structural, cytoarchitectural and functional brain abnormalities reported in patients with SZ, might be due to aberrant neuronal migration, since the final position of neurons affects...... neuronal function, morphology, and formation of synaptic connections. We have investigated the putative association between SZ and gene variants engaged in the neuronal migration process, by performing an association study on 839 cases and 1,473 controls of Scandinavian origin. Using a gene-wide approach...... significant. Further studies in independent samples are needed, including upcoming genome wide association study results, but our data suggest that MDGA1 is a new SZ susceptibility gene, and that altered neuronal migration is involved in SZ pathology....

  13. Association analysis of schizophrenia on 18 genes involved in neuronal migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kähler, Anna K; Djurovic, Srdjan; Kulle, Bettina

    2008-01-01

    , tagSNPs in 18 candidate genes have been genotyped, with gene products involved in the neuron-to-glial cell adhesion, interactions with the DISC1 protein and/or rearrangements of the cytoskeleton. Of the 289 markers tested, 19 markers located in genes MDGA1, RELN, ITGA3, DLX1, SPARCL1, and ASTN1......, attained nominal significant P-values (P glial cells. Eight markers obtained nominal significance in both tests, and were located......Several lines of evidence support the theory of schizophrenia (SZ) being a neurodevelopmental disorder. The structural, cytoarchitectural and functional brain abnormalities reported in patients with SZ, might be due to aberrant neuronal migration, since the final position of neurons affects...

  14. Identification of genes involved in the biology of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours using Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeibmann, Astrid; Eikmeier, Kristin; Linge, Anna; Kool, Marcel; Koos, Björn; Schulz, Jacqueline; Albrecht, Stefanie; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Frühwald, Michael C.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Paulus, Werner; Hasselblatt, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours (AT/RT) are malignant brain tumours. Unlike most other human brain tumours, AT/RT are characterized by inactivation of one single gene, SMARCB1. SMARCB1 is a member of the evolutionarily conserved SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex, which has an important role in the control of cell differentiation and proliferation. Little is known, however, about the pathways involved in the oncogenic effects of SMARCB1 inactivation, which might also represent targets for treatment. Here we report a comprehensive genetic screen in the fruit fly that revealed several genes not yet associated with loss of snr1, the Drosophila homologue of SMARCB1. We confirm the functional role of identified genes (including merlin, kibra and expanded, known to regulate hippo signalling pathway activity) in human rhabdoid tumour cell lines and AT/RT tumour samples. These results demonstrate that fly models can be employed for the identification of clinically relevant pathways in human cancer.

  15. Identification of Genes Involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm-Specific Resistance to Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li; Fritsch, Meredith; Hammond, Lisa; Landreville, Ryan; Slatculescu, Cristina; Colavita, Antonio; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key opportunistic pathogen characterized by its biofilm formation ability and high-level multiple antibiotic resistance. By screening a library of random transposon insertion mutants with an increased biofilm-specifc antibiotic susceptibility, we previously identified 3 genes or operons of P. aeruginosa UCBPP-PA14 (ndvB, PA1875-1877 and tssC1) that do not affect biofilm formation but are involved in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance. In this study, we demonstr...

  16. Identification of Listeria monocytogenes Genes Involved in Salt and Alkaline-pH Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Gardan, Rozenn; Cossart, Pascale; Labadie, Jean

    2003-01-01

    The capacity of Listeria monocytogenes to tolerate salt and alkaline stresses is of particular importance, as this pathogen is often exposed to such environments during food processing and food preservation. We screened a library of Tn917-lacZ insertional mutants in order to identify genes involved in salt and/or alkaline tolerance. We isolated six mutants sensitive to salt stress and 12 mutants sensitive to salt and alkaline stresses. The position of the insertion of the transposon was locat...

  17. Characterization of Genes Encoding Key Enzymes Involved in Anthocyanin Metabolism of Kiwifruit during Storage Period

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Boqiang; Xia, Yongxiu; Wang, Yuying; Qin, Guozheng; Tian, Shiping

    2017-01-01

    ‘Hongyang’ is a red fleshed kiwifruit with high anthocyanin content. In this study, we mainly investigated effects of different temperatures (25 and 0°C) on anthocyanin biosynthesis in harvested kiwifruit, and characterized the genes encoding key enzymes involved in anthocyanin metabolism, as well as evaluated the mode of the action, by which low temperature regulates anthocyanin accumulation in ‘Hongyang’ kiwifruit during storage period. The results showed that low temperature could effectiv...

  18. Simultaneous loss of the DLC1 and PTEN tumor suppressors enhances breast cancer cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heering, Johanna; Erlmann, Patrik; Olayioye, Monilola A.

    2009-01-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene is a tumor suppressor frequently deleted or mutated in sporadic tumors of the breast, prostate, endometrium and brain. The protein acts as a dual specificity phosphatase for lipids and proteins. PTEN loss confers a growth advantage to cells, protects from apoptosis and favors cell migration. The deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1) gene has emerged as a novel tumor suppressor downregulated in a variety of tumor types including those of the breast. DLC1 contains a Rho GTPase activating domain that is involved in the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion. To investigate how simultaneous loss of PTEN and DLC1 contributes to cell transformation, we downregulated both proteins by RNA interference in the non-invasive MCF7 breast carcinoma cell line. Joint depletion of PTEN and DLC1 resulted in enhanced cell migration in wounding and chemotactic transwell assays. Interestingly, both proteins were found to colocalize at the plasma membrane and interacted physically in biochemical pulldowns and coimmunoprecipitations. We therefore postulate that the concerted local inactivation of signaling pathways downstream of PTEN and DLC1, respectively, is required for the tight control of cell migration.

  19. Simultaneous loss of the DLC1 and PTEN tumor suppressors enhances breast cancer cell migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heering, Johanna; Erlmann, Patrik [University of Stuttgart, Institute of Cell Biology and Immunology, Allmandring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Olayioye, Monilola A., E-mail: monilola.olayioye@izi.uni-stuttgart.de [University of Stuttgart, Institute of Cell Biology and Immunology, Allmandring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-09-10

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene is a tumor suppressor frequently deleted or mutated in sporadic tumors of the breast, prostate, endometrium and brain. The protein acts as a dual specificity phosphatase for lipids and proteins. PTEN loss confers a growth advantage to cells, protects from apoptosis and favors cell migration. The deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1) gene has emerged as a novel tumor suppressor downregulated in a variety of tumor types including those of the breast. DLC1 contains a Rho GTPase activating domain that is involved in the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion. To investigate how simultaneous loss of PTEN and DLC1 contributes to cell transformation, we downregulated both proteins by RNA interference in the non-invasive MCF7 breast carcinoma cell line. Joint depletion of PTEN and DLC1 resulted in enhanced cell migration in wounding and chemotactic transwell assays. Interestingly, both proteins were found to colocalize at the plasma membrane and interacted physically in biochemical pulldowns and coimmunoprecipitations. We therefore postulate that the concerted local inactivation of signaling pathways downstream of PTEN and DLC1, respectively, is required for the tight control of cell migration.

  20. Polymorphisms of genes involved in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons' biotransformation and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinković, Natalija; Pasalić, Daria; Potocki, Slavica

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are among the most prevalent environmental pollutants and result from the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons (coal and gasoline, fossil fuel combustion, byproducts of industrial processing, natural emission, cigarette smoking, etc.). The first phase of xenobiotic biotransformation in the PAH metabolism includes activities of cytochrome P450 from the CYP1 family and microsomal epoxide hydrolase. The products of this biotransformation are reactive oxygen species that are transformed in the second phase through the formation of conjugates with glutathione, glucuronate or sulphates. PAH exposure may lead to PAH-DNA adduct formation or induce an inflammatory atherosclerotic plaque phenotype. Several genetic polymorphisms of genes encoded for enzymes involved in PAH biotransformation have been proven to lead to the development of diseases. Enzyme CYP P450 1A1, which is encoded by the CYP1A1 gene, is vital in the monooxygenation of lipofilic substrates, while GSTM1 and GSTT1 are the most abundant isophorms that conjugate and neutralize oxygen products. Some single nucleotide polymorphisms of the CYP1A1 gene as well as the deletion polymorphisms of GSTT1 and GSTM1 may alter the final specific cellular inflammatory respond. Occupational exposure or conditions from the living environment can contribute to the production of PAH metabolites with adverse effects on human health. The aim of this study was to obtain data on biotransformation and atherosclerosis, as well as data on the gene polymorphisms involved in biotransformation, in order to better study gene expression and further elucidate the interaction between genes and the environment.

  1. Identification of Host Genes Involved in Geminivirus Infection Using a Reverse Genetics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Ana P.; Bejarano, Eduardo R.

    2011-01-01

    Geminiviruses, like all viruses, rely on the host cell machinery to establish a successful infection, but the identity and function of these required host proteins remain largely unknown. Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV), a monopartite geminivirus, is one of the causal agents of the devastating Tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD). The transgenic 2IRGFP N. benthamiana plants, used in combination with Virus Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS), entail an important potential as a tool in reverse genetics studies to identify host factors involved in TYLCSV infection. Using these transgenic plants, we have made an accurate description of the evolution of TYLCSV replication in the host in both space and time. Moreover, we have determined that TYLCSV and Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) do not dramatically influence each other when co-infected in N. benthamiana, what makes the use of TRV-induced gene silencing in combination with TYLCSV for reverse genetic studies feasible. Finally, we have tested the effect of silencing candidate host genes on TYLCSV infection, identifying eighteen genes potentially involved in this process, fifteen of which had never been implicated in geminiviral infections before. Seven of the analyzed genes have a potential anti-viral effect, whereas the expression of the other eleven is required for a full infection. Interestingly, almost half of the genes altering TYLCSV infection play a role in postranslational modifications. Therefore, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying geminivirus infections, and at the same time reveal the 2IRGFP/VIGS system as a powerful tool for functional reverse genetics studies. PMID:21818318

  2. Positional cloning of genes involved in the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, hemihypertrophy, and associated childhood tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannens, M; Alders, M; Redeker, B; Bliek, J; Steenman, M; Wiesmeyer, C; de Meulemeester, M; Ryan, A; Kalikin, L; Voûte, T; De Kraker, J; Hoovers, J; Slater, R; Feinberg, A; Little, P; Westerveld, A

    1996-11-01

    The Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth malformation syndrome that occurs with an incidence of 1:13,700 births. There is a striking incidence of childhood tumors found in BWS patients. Various lines of investigation have localized "imprinted" genes involved in BWS and associated childhood tumors to 11p15. High resolution mapping of 8 rare balanced chromosomal BWS rearrangements enabled us to identify three distinct regions on chromosome 11p15 that might harbor genes involved in the above-mentioned disorders. These results suggest genetic heterogeneity that correlates with the clinical heterogeneity seen in the patients studied. Expressed candidate gene sequences from these regions have been cloned and partly sequenced. These transcripts are either disrupted by or are at least within a few kb of these BWS chromosome breakpoints. So far, zinc-finger sequences and one Kruppel-associated box (KRAB) domain were found in independent candidate genes which are compatible with a regulating function of growth promoting genes. The abundance of expression of these genes varies from low abundant in all adult and fetal tissues tested to detectable on Northern blots of adult tissues. In addition to our 11p15 studies we have analyzed additional chromosome regions, in particular 1p. Cytogenetic, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) studies have identified 1p35 as a region of interest. A positional cloning effort to identify a balanced 1p35 translocation found in a Wilms tumor has led to the isolation of a YAC, crossing this breakpoint.

  3. Polymorphisms of genes involved in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons’ biotransformation and atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinković, Natalija; Pašalić, Daria; Potočki, Slavica

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are among the most prevalent environmental pollutants and result from the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons (coal and gasoline, fossil fuel combustion, byproducts of industrial processing, natural emission, cigarette smoking, etc.). The first phase of xenobiotic biotransformation in the PAH metabolism includes activities of cytochrome P450 from the CYP1 family and microsomal epoxide hydrolase. The products of this biotransformation are reactive oxygen species that are transformed in the second phase through the formation of conjugates with glutathione, glucuronate or sulphates. PAH exposure may lead to PAH-DNA adduct formation or induce an inflammatory atherosclerotic plaque phenotype. Several genetic polymorphisms of genes encoded for enzymes involved in PAH biotransformation have been proven to lead to the development of diseases. Enzyme CYP P450 1A1, which is encoded by the CYP1A1 gene, is vital in the monooxygenation of lipofilic substrates, while GSTM1 and GSTT1 are the most abundant isophorms that conjugate and neutralize oxygen products. Some single nucleotide polymorphisms of the CYP1A1 gene as well as the deletion polymorphisms of GSTT1 and GSTM1 may alter the final specific cellular inflammatory respond. Occupational exposure or conditions from the living environment can contribute to the production of PAH metabolites with adverse effects on human health. The aim of this study was to obtain data on biotransformation and atherosclerosis, as well as data on the gene polymorphisms involved in biotransformation, in order to better study gene expression and further elucidate the interaction between genes and the environment. PMID:24266295

  4. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Identifies Putative Genes Involved in the Biosynthesis of Xanthanolides in Xanthium strumarium L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanjun Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Xanthium strumarium L. is a traditional Chinese herb belonging to the Asteraceae family. The major bioactive components of this plant are sesquiterpene lactones, which include the xanthanolides. To date, the biogenesis of xanthanolides, especiallytheir downstream pathway, remains largely unknown. In X. strumarium, xanthanolides primarily accumulate in its glandular trichomes. To identify putative gene candidates involved in the biosynthesis of xanthanolides, three X. strumarium transcriptomes, which were derived from the young leaves of two different cultivars and the purified glandular trichomes from one of the cultivars, were constructed in this study. In total, 157 million clean reads were generated and assembled into 91,861 unigenes, of which 59,858 unigenes were successfully annotated. All the genes coding for known enzymes in the upstream pathway to the biosynthesis of xanthanolides were present in the X. strumarium transcriptomes. From a comparative analysis of the X. strumarium transcriptomes, this study identified a number of gene candidates that are putatively involved in the downstream pathway to the synthesis of xanthanolides, such as four unigenes encoding CYP71 P450s, 50 unigenes for dehydrogenases, and 27 genes for acetyltransferases. The possible functions of these four CYP71 candidates are extensively discussed. In addition, 116 transcription factors that were highly expressed in X. strumarium glandular trichomes were also identified. Their possible regulatory roles in the biosynthesis of sesquiterpene lactones are discussed. The global transcriptomic data for X. strumarium should provide a valuable resource for further research into the biosynthesis of xanthanolides.

  5. Identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Genes Involved in Virulence and Anaerobic Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiatrault, Melanie J.; Picardo, Kristin F.; Ngai, Helen; Passador, Luciano; Iglewski, Barbara H.

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen and a significant cause of acute and chronic infections in patients with compromised host defenses. Evidence suggests that within infections P. aeruginosa encounters oxygen limitation and exists in microbial aggregates known as biofilms. However, there is little information that describes genes involved in anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and their association with virulence of this pathogen. To identify genes required for anaerobic growth, random transposon (Tn) mutagenesis was used to screen for mutants that demonstrated the inability to grow anaerobically using nitrate as a terminal electron acceptor. Of approximately 35,000 mutants screened, 57 mutants were found to exhibit no growth anaerobically using nitrate. Identification of the genes disrupted by the Tn revealed 24 distinct loci required for anaerobic growth on nitrate, including several genes not previously associated with anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa. Several of these mutants were capable of growing anaerobically using nitrite and/or arginine, while five mutants were unable to grow anaerobically under any of the conditions tested. Three mutants were markedly attenuated in virulence in the lettuce model of P. aeruginosa infection. These studies have identified novel genes important for anaerobic growth and demonstrate that anaerobic metabolism influences virulence of P. aeruginosa. PMID:16790798

  6. Transcriptomic analysis illuminates genes involved in chlorophyll synthesis after nitrogen starvation in Acaryochloris sp. CCMEE 5410.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Aki; Wittmann, Bruce J; King, Jeremy D; Blankenship, Robert E; Dantas, Gautam

    2016-08-01

    Acaryochloris species are a genus of cyanobacteria that utilize chlorophyll (chl) d as their primary chlorophyll molecule during oxygenic photosynthesis. Chl d allows Acaryochloris to harvest red-shifted light, which gives them the ability to live in filtered light environments that are depleted in visible light. Although genomes of multiple Acaryochloris species have been sequenced, their analysis has not revealed how chl d is synthesized. Here, we demonstrate that Acaryochloris sp. CCMEE 5410 cells undergo chlorosis by nitrogen depletion and exhibit robust regeneration of chl d by nitrogen repletion. We performed a time course RNA-Seq experiment to quantify global transcriptomic changes during chlorophyll recovery. We observed upregulation of numerous known chl biosynthesis genes and also identified an oxygenase gene with a similar transcriptional profile as these chl biosynthesis genes, suggesting its possible involvement in chl d biosynthesis. Moreover, our data suggest that multiple prochlorophyte chlorophyll-binding homologs are important during chlorophyll recovery, and light-independent chl synthesis genes are more dominant than the light-dependent gene at the transcription level. Transcriptomic characterization of this organism provides crucial clues toward mechanistic elucidation of chl d biosynthesis.

  7. Modulation of Type III Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Involvement of the PA4857 Gene Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Miao; Zhao, Jingru; Kang, Huaping; Kong, Weina; Zhao, Yuanyu; Wu, Min; Liang, Haihua

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes serious acute or chronic infections in humans. Acute infections typically involve the type III secretion systems (T3SSs) and bacterial motility, whereas chronic infections are often associated with biofilm formation and the type VI secretion system. To identify new genes required for pathogenesis, a transposon mutagenesis library was constructed and the gene PA4857, named tspR, was found to modulate T3SS gene expression. Deletion of P. aeruginosa tspR reduced the virulence in a mouse acute lung infection model and diminished cytotoxicity. Suppression of T3SS gene expression in the tspR mutant resulted from compromised translation of the T3SS master regulator ExsA. TspR negatively regulated two small RNAs, RsmY and RsmZ, which control RsmA. Our data demonstrated that defects in T3SS expression and biofilm formation in retS mutant could be partially restored by overexpression of tspR. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the newly identified retS-tspR pathway is coordinated with the retS-gacS system, which regulates the genes associated with acute and chronic infections and controls the lifestyle choice of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26858696

  8. Identification of substituent groups and related genes involved in salecan biosynthesis in Agrobacterium sp. ZX09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linxiang; Cheng, Rui; Li, Jing; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Bin; Ma, Shihong; Zhang, Weiming; Dong, Wei; Wang, Shiming; Zhang, Jianfa

    2017-01-01

    Salecan, a soluble β-1,3-D-glucan produced by a salt-tolerant strain Agrobacterium sp. ZX09, has been the subject of considerable interest in recent years because of its multiple bioactivities and unusual rheological properties in solution. In this study, both succinyl and pyruvyl substituent groups on salecan were identified by an enzymatic hydrolysis following nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), HPLC, and MS analysis. The putative succinyltransferase gene (sleA) and pyruvyltransferase gene (sleV) were determined and cloned. Disruption of the sleA gene resulted in the absence of succinyl substituent groups on salecan. This defect could be complemented by expressing the sleA cloned in a plasmid. Thus, the sleA and sleV genes located in a 19.6-kb gene cluster may be involved in salecan biosynthesis. Despite the lack of succinyl substituents, the molecular mass of salecan generated by the sleA mutant did not substantially differ from that generated by the wild-type strain. Loss of succinyl substituents on salecan changed its rheological characteristics, especially a decrease in intrinsic viscosity.

  9. Involvement of the Gli3 (Extra-Toes Gene Region in Body Weight in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Martin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The mutation extra-toes (Gli3Xt-J on chromosome (Chr 13 of the mouse is known to be involved in the development of the skeleton. The only visible manifestation is the presence of an extra digit on each hind foot. Here we report evidence from several experiments that Gli3XtJ/+ mice weigh more than littermate Gli3+/+ mice, suggesting an effect on body weight of Gli3 or of a gene tightly linked to it on Chr 13. Four independent experiments in different environments were conducted on mice with different genetic backgrounds derived from the C3XtEso Gli3Xt-J/+ Eso/+ linkage testing strain and the JE/Le strain at adult age. The analyses have shown an association between the Gli3Xt-J allele and a body weight increase of about 6.5%. This effect is genetically dominant. It would appear that if the gene of interest is not Gli3 itself, it must be very close to this locus. Indeed, the expected size for this fragment is 7.9 ± 5.3 cM. The manifestation of this gene, observed in two animal facilities and on different genetic backgrounds, is consistent with the idea that the effect of the gene(s is displayed in a stable manner. It accounts for a variation of 6.5% of body weight.

  10. Identification of genes involved in the drought adaptation and recovery in Portulaca oleracea by differential display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Rodrigo Matías; Triassi, Agustina; Casas, María Isabel; Andreo, Carlos Santiago; Lara, María Valeria

    2015-05-01

    Portulaca oleracea is one of the richest plant sources of ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids and other compounds potentially valuable for nutrition. It is broadly established in arid, semiarid and well-watered fields, thus making it a promising candidate for research on abiotic stress resistance mechanisms. It is capable of withstanding severe drought and then of recovering upon rehydration. Here, the adaptation to drought and the posterior recovery was evaluated at transcriptomic level by differential display validated by qRT-PCR. Of the 2279 transcript-derived fragments amplified, 202 presented differential expression. Ninety of them were successfully isolated and sequenced. Selected genes were tested against different abiotic stresses in P. oleracea and the behavior of their orthologous genes in Arabidopsis thaliana was also explored to seek for conserved response mechanisms. In drought adapted and in recovered plants changes in expression of many protein metabolism-, lipid metabolism- and stress-related genes were observed. Many genes with unknown function were detected, which also respond to other abiotic stresses. Some of them are also involved in the seed desiccation/imbibition process and thus would be of great interest for further research. The potential use of candidate genes to engineer drought tolerance improvement and recovery is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. eRNAs are required for p53-dependent enhancer activity and gene transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo, C.A.; Drost, J.; Wijchers, P.J.; van de Werken, H.; de Wit, E.; Oude Vrielink, J.A.; Elkon, R.; Melo, S.A.; Leveille, N.; Kalluri, R.; de Laat, W.; Agami, R.

    2013-01-01

    Binding within or nearby target genes involved in cell proliferation and survival enables the p53 tumor suppressor gene to regulate their transcription and cell-cycle progression. Using genome-wide chromatin-binding profiles, we describe binding of p53 also to regions located distantly from any

  12. Characterization of Aldehyde Oxidase (AO Genes Involved in the Accumulation of Carotenoid Pigments in Wheat Grain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualina Colasuonno

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aldehyde Oxidase (AO enzyme (EC 1.2.3.1 catalyzes the final steps of carotenoid catabolism and it is a key enzyme in the abscisic acid (ABA biosynthesis. AO isoforms are located in the cytosolic compartment of tissues in many plants, where induce the oxidation of aldehydes into carboxylic acid, and in addition, catalyze the hydroxylation of some heterocycles. The goal of the present study was to characterize the AO genes involved in the accumulation of carotenoid pigments in wheat grain, an important quantitative trait controlled by multiple genes. The cDNAs corresponding to the four AO isoforms from Arabidopsis thaliana and five AO isoforms from Brachypodium distachyon were used as query in 454 sequence assemblies data for Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Spring (https://urgi.versailles.inra.fr/blast/blast.php to obtain the partial or whole orthologous wheat AO sequences. Three wheat isoforms, designated AO1, AO2, and AO3 were located on the chromosome groups 2, 5, and 7, respectively, and mapped on two consensus wheat maps by SNP markers located within the AO gene sequences. To validate the possible relationships between AO3 genes and carotenoid accumulation in wheat, the expression levels of AO-A3 and AO-B3 gene were determined during the kernel maturation stage of two durum wheat cultivars, Ciccio and Svevo, characterized by a low and high carotenoid content, respectively. Different AO-A3 gene expression values were observed between the two cultivars indicating that the AO-A3 allele present in Ciccio was more active in carotenoid degradation. A gene marker was developed and can be used for marker-assisted selection in wheat breeding programs.

  13. Transcriptomic analysis using olive varieties and breeding progenies identify candidate genes involved in plant architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José eGonzález Plaza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant architecture is a critical trait in fruit crops that can significantly influence yield, pruning, planting density and harvesting. Little is known about how plant architecture is genetically determined in olive, were most of the existing varieties are traditional with an architecture poorly suited for modern growing and harvesting systems. In the present study, we have carried out microarray analysis of meristematic tissue to compare expression profiles of olive varieties displaying differences in architecture, as well as seedlings from their cross pooled on the basis of their sharing architecture-related phenotypes. The microarray used, previously developed by our group has already been applied to identify candidates genes involved in regulating juvenile to adult transition in the shoot apex of seedlings. Varieties with distinct architecture phenotypes and individuals from segregating progenies displaying opposite architecture features were used to link phenotype to expression. Here, we identify 2,252 differentially expressed genes associated to differences in plant architecture. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR carried out on genes with functional annotation likely related to plant architecture. Twelve of these genes were further analyzed in individual seedlings of the corresponding pool. We also examined Arabidopsis mutants in putative orthologs of these targeted candidate genes, finding altered architecture for most of them. This supports a functional conservation between species and potential biological relevance of the candidate genes identified. This study is the first to identify genes associated to plant architecture in olive, and the results obtained could be of great help in future programs aimed at selecting phenotypes adapted to modern cultivation practices in this species.

  14. Characterization of Aldehyde Oxidase (AO) Genes Involved in the Accumulation of Carotenoid Pigments in Wheat Grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colasuonno, Pasqualina; Marcotuli, Ilaria; Lozito, Maria L; Simeone, Rosanna; Blanco, Antonio; Gadaleta, Agata

    2017-01-01

    Aldehyde Oxidase (AO) enzyme (EC 1.2.3.1) catalyzes the final steps of carotenoid catabolism and it is a key enzyme in the abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis. AO isoforms are located in the cytosolic compartment of tissues in many plants, where induce the oxidation of aldehydes into carboxylic acid, and in addition, catalyze the hydroxylation of some heterocycles. The goal of the present study was to characterize the AO genes involved in the accumulation of carotenoid pigments in wheat grain, an important quantitative trait controlled by multiple genes. The cDNAs corresponding to the four AO isoforms from Arabidopsis thaliana and five AO isoforms from Brachypodium distachyon were used as query in 454 sequence assemblies data for Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Spring (https://urgi.versailles.inra.fr/blast/blast.php) to obtain the partial or whole orthologous wheat AO sequences. Three wheat isoforms, designated AO1, AO2 , and AO3 were located on the chromosome groups 2, 5, and 7, respectively, and mapped on two consensus wheat maps by SNP markers located within the AO gene sequences. To validate the possible relationships between AO3 genes and carotenoid accumulation in wheat, the expression levels of AO-A3 and AO-B3 gene were determined during the kernel maturation stage of two durum wheat cultivars, Ciccio and Svevo, characterized by a low and high carotenoid content, respectively. Different AO-A3 gene expression values were observed between the two cultivars indicating that the AO-A3 allele present in Ciccio was more active in carotenoid degradation. A gene marker was developed and can be used for marker-assisted selection in wheat breeding programs.

  15. Transcriptomic Analysis Using Olive Varieties and Breeding Progenies Identifies Candidate Genes Involved in Plant Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Plaza, Juan J; Ortiz-Martín, Inmaculada; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; García-López, Carmen; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Luque, Francisco; Trelles, Oswaldo; Bejarano, Eduardo R; De La Rosa, Raúl; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2016-01-01

    Plant architecture is a critical trait in fruit crops that can significantly influence yield, pruning, planting density and harvesting. Little is known about how plant architecture is genetically determined in olive, were most of the existing varieties are traditional with an architecture poorly suited for modern growing and harvesting systems. In the present study, we have carried out microarray analysis of meristematic tissue to compare expression profiles of olive varieties displaying differences in architecture, as well as seedlings from their cross pooled on the basis of their sharing architecture-related phenotypes. The microarray used, previously developed by our group has already been applied to identify candidates genes involved in regulating juvenile to adult transition in the shoot apex of seedlings. Varieties with distinct architecture phenotypes and individuals from segregating progenies displaying opposite architecture features were used to link phenotype to expression. Here, we identify 2252 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated to differences in plant architecture. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR carried out on genes with functional annotation likely related to plant architecture. Twelve of these genes were further analyzed in individual seedlings of the corresponding pool. We also examined Arabidopsis mutants in putative orthologs of these targeted candidate genes, finding altered architecture for most of them. This supports a functional conservation between species and potential biological relevance of the candidate genes identified. This study is the first to identify genes associated to plant architecture in olive, and the results obtained could be of great help in future programs aimed at selecting phenotypes adapted to modern cultivation practices in this species.

  16. Involvement of TSC genes and differential expression of other members of the mTOR signaling pathway in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Sanjukta; Mohiyuddin, SM Azeem; Gopinath, KS; Kumar, Arun

    2008-01-01

    Despite extensive research, the five-year survival rate of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients has not improved. Effective treatment of OSCC requires the identification of molecular targets and signaling pathways to design appropriate therapeutic strategies. Several genes from the mTOR signaling pathway are known to be dysregulated in a wide spectrum of cancers. However, not much is known about the involvement of this pathway in tumorigenesis of OSCC. We therefore investigated the role of the tumor suppressor genes, TSC1 and TSC2, and other members of this pathway in tumorigenesis of OSCC. Expression of genes at the RNA and protein levels was examined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analyses, respectively. Loss of heterozygosity was studied using matched blood and tumor DNA samples and microsatellite markers from the TSC1, TSC2 and PTEN candidate regions. The effect of promoter methylation on TSC gene expression was studied by treating cells with methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine. Methylation status of the TSC2 promoter in tissue samples was examined by combined bisulfite restriction analysis (COBRA). The semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed downregulation of TSC1, TSC2, EIF4EBP1 and PTEN, and upregulation of PIK3C2A, AKT1, PDPK1, RHEB, FRAP1, RPS6KB1, EIF4E and RPS6 in tumors. A similar observation was made for AKT1 and RPS6KB1 expression in tumors at the protein level. Investigation of the mechanism of downregulation of TSC genes identified LOH in 36.96% and 39.13% of the tumors at the TSC1 and TSC2 loci, respectively. No mutation was found in TSC genes. A low LOH rate of 13% was observed at the PTEN locus. Treatment of an OSCC cell line with the methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine showed a significant increase in the expression of TSC genes, suggesting methylation of their promoters. However, the 5-azacytidine treatment of non-OSCC HeLa cells showed a significant increase in the expression of the TSC2 gene only. In order

  17. Gene-environment interaction involving recently identified colorectal cancer susceptibility loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, Elizabeth D.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Minnier, Jessica; Berndt, Sonja I.; Brenner, Hermann; Caan, Bette J.; Campbell, Peter T.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Du, Mengmeng; Duggan, David; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Gong, Jian; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Jiao, Shuo; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lemire, Mathieu; Ma, Jing; Newcomb, Polly A.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Pflugeisen, Bethann M.; Potter, John D.; Rudolph, Anja; Schoen, Robert E.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Stelling, Deanna L.; Thomas, Fridtjof; Thornquist, Mark; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Warnick, Greg S.; Zanke, Brent W.; Peters, Ulrike; Hsu, Li; White, Emily

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genome-wide association studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Prior research has evaluated the presence of gene-environment interaction involving the first 10 identified susceptibility loci, but little work has been conducted on interaction involving SNPs at recently identified susceptibility loci, including: rs10911251, rs6691170, rs6687758, rs11903757, rs10936599, rs647161, rs1321311, rs719725, rs1665650, rs3824999, rs7136702, rs11169552, rs59336, rs3217810, rs4925386, and rs2423279. METHODS Data on 9160 cases and 9280 controls from the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO) and Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR) were used to evaluate the presence of interaction involving the above-listed SNPs and sex, body mass index (BMI), alcohol consumption, smoking, aspirin use, post-menopausal hormone (PMH) use, as well as intake of dietary calcium, dietary fiber, dietary folate, red meat, processed meat, fruit, and vegetables. Interaction was evaluated using a fixed-effects meta-analysis of an efficient Empirical Bayes estimator, and permutation was used to account for multiple comparisons. RESULTS None of the permutation-adjusted p-values reached statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS The associations between recently identified genetic susceptibility loci and CRC are not strongly modified by sex, BMI, alcohol, smoking, aspirin, PMH use, and various dietary factors. IMPACT Results suggest no evidence of strong gene-environment interactions involving the recently identified 16 susceptibility loci for CRC taken one at a time. PMID:24994789

  18. Intellectual disability, oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Bidart1 2 3 C. Coutton4 5 3. Plateforme Protéomique et Transcriptomique Clinique, Pole Recherche, CHU Grenoble, 38043 Grenoble, France; Equipe, Nanomédecine et Cerveau, Inserm U836, Grenoble Institut Neurosciences, 38000 Grenoble, France; Université Joseph Fourier, 38000 Grenoble, France; Département ...

  19. Genes and genetic variations involved in the development of hypertension: focusing on a Greek patient cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouremenos, Nikolaos; Zacharopoulou, Ioanna V; Triantafyllidi, Helen; Zacharopoulos, Georgios V; Mornos, Cristian; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Lekakis, John; Kremastinos, Dimitrios; Manolis, Athanasios I; Gavras, Haralambos

    2014-01-01

    Essential hypertension (HTN) is a multifactorial disease involving environmental, genetic and other factors. Over the past years, genetic studies of essential HTN have increased dramatically but the molecular mechanisms involved are still unknown. As part of a research program coordinated by Boston university (USA), we studied the role of various genes and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the inheritance or the onset of HTN in African-American, Caucasian-American and Greek families. Among 128 Greek families with a history of HTN, we studied 1474 people. Of the total examined, 273 men and 286 women were hypertensive. Based on 410 DNA samples from the hypertensive subjects, different SNPs were examined. An overall meta-analysis of the results from the Greek families, as well as a comparison with the 2 other groups (African-Americans and Caucasian-Americans), was performed. We report SNPs that are associated with the inheritance of HTN and are located either at the promoters of N-methyltransferase and catalase genes, or within the coding region of NEDD4L ubiquitin ligase gene, or SNPs in mitochondrial DNA of hypertensive probands. Furthermore, we clarified the role of hereditary predisposition in the development of HTN, showing that the presence of maternal HTN was significantly higher in African-Americans and Greeks compared to Caucasian-Americans (81.7%, 84.8%, and 65%), while the paternal HTN showed no such difference (50%, 48.3% and 44.9%), respectively. Although genetic factors that were correlated with HTN were identified, it was not possible to identify a single gene that should be targeted for the treatment of HTN. Nevertheless, the important role of the maternal hereditary predisposition to HTN in the Greek patients and the responsible genetic factors involved should be further examined.

  20. Expression profiling of Crambe abyssinica under arsenate stress identifies genes and gene networks involved in arsenic metabolism and detoxification

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    Kandasamy Suganthi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic contamination is widespread throughout the world and this toxic metalloid is known to cause cancers of organs such as liver, kidney, skin, and lung in human. In spite of a recent surge in arsenic related studies, we are still far from a comprehensive understanding of arsenic uptake, detoxification, and sequestration in plants. Crambe abyssinica, commonly known as 'abyssinian mustard', is a non-food, high biomass oil seed crop that is naturally tolerant to heavy metals. Moreover, it accumulates significantly higher levels of arsenic as compared to other species of the Brassicaceae family. Thus, C. abyssinica has great potential to be utilized as an ideal inedible crop for phytoremediation of heavy metals and metalloids. However, the mechanism of arsenic metabolism in higher plants, including C. abyssinica, remains elusive. Results To identify the differentially expressed transcripts and the pathways involved in arsenic metabolism and detoxification, C. abyssinica plants were subjected to arsenate stress and a PCR-Select Suppression Subtraction Hybridization (SSH approach was employed. A total of 105 differentially expressed subtracted cDNAs were sequenced which were found to represent 38 genes. Those genes encode proteins functioning as antioxidants, metal transporters, reductases, enzymes involved in the protein degradation pathway, and several novel uncharacterized proteins. The transcripts corresponding to the subtracted cDNAs showed strong upregulation by arsenate stress as confirmed by the semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusions Our study revealed novel insights into the plant defense mechanisms and the regulation of genes and gene networks in response to arsenate toxicity. The differential expression of transcripts encoding glutathione-S-transferases, antioxidants, sulfur metabolism, heat-shock proteins, metal transporters, and enzymes in the ubiquitination pathway of protein degradation as well as several unknown

  1. Characterization, expression, and mutation of the Lactococcus lactis galPMKTE genes, involved in galactose utilization via the Leloir pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groossiord, B.P.; Luesink, E.J.; Vaughan, E.E.; Arnaud, A.; Vos, de W.M.

    2003-01-01

    A cluster containing five similarly oriented genes involved in the metabolism of galactose via the Leloir pathway in Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 was cloned and characterized. The order of the genes is galPMKTE, and these genes encode a galactose permease (GalP), an aldose I-epimerase

  2. Association of Polymorphisms in BDNF, MTHFR, and Genes Involved in the Dopaminergic Pathway with Memory in a Healthy Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Hu, Chung-Yi; Yeh, Ting-Chi; Lin, Pei-Jung; Wu, Chung-Hsin; Lee, Po-Lei; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of genetic factors to the memory is widely acknowledged. Research suggests that these factors include genes involved in the dopaminergic pathway, as well as the genes for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). The activity of the products of these genes is affected by single…

  3. Genes involved in meso-diaminopimelate synthesis in Bacillus subtilis: identification of the gene encoding aspartokinase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roten, C A; Brandt, C; Karamata, D

    1991-04-01

    Thermosensitive mutants of Bacillus subtilis deficient in peptidoglycan synthesis were screened for mutations in the meso-diaminopimelate (LD-A2pm) metabolic pathway. Mutations in two out of five relevant linkage groups, lssB and lssD, were shown to induce, at the restrictive temperature, a deficiency in LD-A2pm synthesis and accumulation of UDP-MurNAc-dipeptide. Group lssB is heterogeneous; it encompasses mutations that confer deficiency in the deacylation of N-acetyl-LL-A2pm and accumulation of this precursor. Accordingly, these mutations are assigned to the previously identified locus dapE. Mutations in linkage group lssD entail a thermosensitive aspartokinase 1. Therefore, they are most likely to affect the structural gene of this enzyme, which we propose to designate dapG. Mutation pyc-1476, previously reported to affect the pyruvate carboxylase, was shown to confer a deficiency in aspartokinase 1, not in the carboxylase, and to belong to the dapG locus, dapG is closely linked to spoVF, the putative gene of dipicolinate synthase. In conclusion, mutations affecting only two out of eight steps known to be involved in LD-A2pm synthesis were uncovered in a large collection of thermosensitive mutants obtained by indirect selection. We propose that this surprisingly restricted distribution of the thermosensitive dap mutations isolated so far is due to the existence, in each step of the pathway, of isoenzymes encoded by separate genes. The biological role of different aspartokinases was investigated with mutants deficient in dapE and dapG genes. Growth characteristics of these mutants in the presence of various combinations of aspartate family amino acids allow a reassessment of a metabolic channel hypothesis, i.e. the proposed existence of multienzyme complexes, each specific for a given end product.

  4. Evaluation of Different Normalization and Analysis Procedures for Illumina Gene Expression Microarray Data Involving Small Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Moscato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available While Illumina microarrays can be used successfully for detecting small gene expression changes due to their high degree of technical replicability, there is little information on how different normalization and differential expression analysis strategies affect outcomes. To evaluate this, we assessed concordance across gene lists generated by applying different combinations of normalization strategy and analytical approach to two Illumina datasets with modest expression changes. In addition to using traditional statistical approaches, we also tested an approach based on combinatorial optimization. We found that the choice of both normalization strategy and analytical approach considerably affected outcomes, in some cases leading to substantial differences in gene lists and subsequent pathway analysis results. Our findings suggest that important biological phenomena may be overlooked when there is a routine practice of using only one approach to investigate all microarray datasets. Analytical artefacts of this kind are likely to be especially relevant for datasets involving small fold changes, where inherent technical variation—if not adequately minimized by effective normalization—may overshadow true biological variation. This report provides some basic guidelines for optimizing outcomes when working with Illumina datasets involving small expression changes.

  5. Brownie, a gene involved in building complex respiratory devices in insect eggshells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Irles

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insect eggshells must combine protection for the yolk and embryo with provisions for respiration and for the entry of sperm, which are ensured by aeropyles and micropyles, respectively. Insects which oviposit the eggs in an egg-case have a double problem of respiration as gas exchange then involves two barriers. An example of this situation is found in the cockroach Blattella germanica, where the aeropyle and the micropyle are combined in a complex structure called the sponge-like body. The sponge-like body has been well described morphologically, but nothing is known about how it is built up. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a library designed to find genes expressed during late chorion formation in B. germanica, we isolated the novel sequence Bg30009 (now called Brownie, which was outstanding due to its high copy number. In the present work, we show that Brownie is expressed in the follicle cells localized in the anterior pole of the oocyte in late choriogenesis. RNA interference (RNAi of Brownie impaired correct formation of the sponge-like body and, as a result, the egg-case was also ill-formed and the eggs were not viable. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results indicate that the novel gene Brownie plays a pivotal role in building up the sponge-like body. Brownie is the first reported gene involved in the construction of complex eggshell respiratory structures.

  6. Early Involvement of Immune/Inflammatory Response Genes in Retinal Degeneration in DBA/2J Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Fan

    2010-03-01

    , representative of different functions/pathways, were validated with RT-PCR, and changes in glial responses were visualized in the retina with immunocytochemistry. Conclusions: The results showed that the expression of genes related to the immune response and acute stress were altered independently of the development of elevated IOP, and indicated early involvement of the immune system in the onset of the disease. The later development of elevated IOP, observed in this animal model, was coincident with continued changes in expression of genes observed at earlier time points. Further studies are warranted to identify the roles of specific genes identified here with respect to the death of the RGCs.

  7. INVOLVEMENT OF SYNAPTIC GENES IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS: THE CASE OF SYNAPSINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eGiovedi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by deficits in social interaction and social communication, restricted interests and repetitive behaviors. Many synaptic protein genes are linked to the pathogenesis of ASDs, making them prototypical synaptopathies. An array of mutations in the synapsin (Syn genes in humans have been recently associated with ASD and epilepsy, diseases that display a frequent comorbidity. Synapsins are presynaptic proteins regulating synaptic vesicle traffic, neurotransmitter release and short-term synaptic plasticity. In doing so, Syn isoforms control the tone of activity of neural circuits and the balance between excitation and inhibition. As ASD pathogenesis is believed to result from dysfunctions in the balance between excitatory and inhibitory transmissions in neocortical areas, Syns are novel ASD candidate genes. Accordingly, deletion of single Syn genes in mice, in addition to epilepsy, causes core symptoms of ASD by affecting social behavior, social communication and repetitive behaviors. Thus, Syn knockout mice represent a good experimental model to define synaptic alterations involved in the pathogenesis of ASD and epilepsy.

  8. BRCA1 haploinsufficiency leads to altered expression of genes involved in cellular proliferation and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet E Feilotter

    Full Text Available The assessment of BRCA1 and BRCA2 coding sequences to identify pathogenic mutations associated with inherited breast/ovarian cancer syndrome has provided a method to identify high-risk individuals, allowing them to seek preventative treatments and strategies. However, the current test is expensive, and cannot differentiate between pathogenic variants and those that may be benign. Focusing only on one of the two BRCA partners, we have developed a biological assay for haploinsufficiency of BRCA1. Using a series of EBV-transformed cell lines, we explored gene expression patterns in cells that were BRCA1 wildtype compared to those that carried (heterozygous BRCA1 pathogenic mutations. We identified a subset of 43 genes whose combined expression pattern is a sensitive predictor of BRCA1 status. The gene set was disproportionately made up of genes involved in cellular differentiation, lending credence to the hypothesis that single copy loss of BRCA1 function may impact differentiation, rendering cells more susceptible to undergoing malignant processes.

  9. Key genes involved in desiccation tolerance and dormancy across life forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Maria Cecília D; Farrant, Jill M; Oliver, Melvin J; Ligterink, Wilco; Buitink, Julia; Hilhorst, Henk M W

    2016-10-01

    Desiccation tolerance (DT, the ability of certain organisms to survive severe dehydration) was a key trait in the evolution of life in terrestrial environments. Likely, the development of desiccation-tolerant life forms was accompanied by the acquisition of dormancy or a dormancy-like stage as a second powerful adaptation to cope with variations in the terrestrial environment. These naturally stress tolerant life forms may be a good source of genetic information to generate stress tolerant crops to face a future with predicted higher occurrence of drought. By mining for key genes and mechanisms related to DT and dormancy conserved across different species and life forms, unique candidate key genes may be identified. Here we identify several of these putative key genes, shared among multiple organisms, encoding for proteins involved in protection, growth and energy metabolism. Mutating a selection of these genes in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in clear DT-, dormancy- and other seed-associated phenotypes, showing the efficiency and power of our approach and paves the way for the development of drought-stress tolerant crops. Our analysis supports a co-evolution of DT and dormancy by shared mechanisms that favour survival and adaptation to ever-changing environments with strong seasonal fluctuations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Conservation in the involvement of heterochronic genes and hormones during developmental transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunes, Fernando; Larraín, Juan

    2016-08-01

    Developmental transitions include molting in some invertebrates and the metamorphosis of insects and amphibians. While the study of Caenorhabditis elegans larval transitions was crucial to determine the genetic control of these transitions, Drosophila melanogaster and Xenopus laevis have been classic models to study the role of hormones in metamorphosis. Here we review how heterochronic genes (lin-4, let-7, lin-28, lin-41), hormones (dafachronic acid, ecdysone, thyroid hormone) and the environment regulate developmental transitions. Recent evidence suggests that some heterochronic genes also regulate transitions in higher organisms that they are controlled by hormones involved in metamorphosis. We also discuss evidence demonstrating that heterochronic genes and hormones regulate the proliferation and differentiation of embryonic and neural stem cells. We propose the hypothesis that developmental transitions are regulated by an evolutionary conserved mechanism in which heterochronic genes and hormones interact to control stem/progenitor cells proliferation, cell cycle exit, quiescence and differentiation and determine the proper timing of developmental transitions. Finally, we discuss the relevance of these studies to understand post-embryonic development, puberty and regeneration in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of the SAAT Gene Involved in Strawberry Flavor Biogenesis by Use of DNA Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharoni, Asaph; Keizer, Leopold C. P.; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Sun, Zhongkui; Alvarez-Huerta, Mayte; Verhoeven, Harrie A.; Blaas, Jan; van Houwelingen, Adèle M. M. L.; De Vos, Ric C. H.; van der Voet, Hilko; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Guis, Monique; Mol, Jos; Davis, Ronald W.; Schena, Mark; van Tunen, Arjen J.; O'Connell, Ann P.

    2000-01-01

    Fruit flavor is a result of a complex mixture of numerous compounds. The formation of these compounds is closely correlated with the metabolic changes occurring during fruit maturation. Here, we describe the use of DNA microarrays and appropriate statistical analyses to dissect a complex developmental process. In doing so, we have identified a novel strawberry alcohol acyltransferase (SAAT) gene that plays a crucial role in flavor biogenesis in ripening fruit. Volatile esters are quantitatively and qualitatively the most important compounds providing fruity odors. Biochemical evidence for involvement of the SAAT gene in formation of fruity esters is provided by characterizing the recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli. The SAAT enzyme showed maximum activity with aliphatic medium-chain alcohols, whose corresponding esters are major components of strawberry volatiles. The enzyme was capable of utilizing short- and medium-chain, branched, and aromatic acyl-CoA molecules as cosubstrates. The results suggest that the formation of volatile esters in fruit is subject to the availability of acyl-CoA molecules and alcohol substrates and is dictated by the temporal expression pattern of the SAAT gene(s) and substrate specificity of the SAAT enzyme(s). PMID:10810141

  12. Candidate genes and pathways downstream of PAX8 involved in ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Di Palma, Tina; Soriano, Amata Amy; Monticelli, Antonella; Affinito, Ornella; Cocozza, Sergio; Zannini, Mariastella

    2016-07-05

    Understanding the biology and molecular pathogenesis of ovarian epithelial cancer (EOC) is key to developing improved diagnostic and prognostic indicators and effective therapies. Although research has traditionally focused on the hypothesis that high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) arises from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE), recent studies suggest that additional sites of origin exist and a substantial proportion of cases may arise from precursor lesions located in the Fallopian tubal epithelium (FTE). In FTE cells, the transcription factor PAX8 is a marker of the secretory cell lineage and its expression is retained in 96% of EOC. We have recently reported that PAX8 is involved in the tumorigenic phenotype of ovarian cancer cells. In this study, to uncover genes and pathways downstream of PAX8 involved in ovarian carcinoma we have determined the molecular profiles of ovarian cancer cells and in parallel of Fallopian tube epithelial cells by means of a silencing approach followed by an RNA-seq analysis. Interestingly, we highlighted the involvement of pathways like WNT signaling, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, p53 and apoptosis. We believe that our analysis has led to the identification of candidate genes and pathways regulated by PAX8 that could be additional targets for the therapy of ovarian carcinoma.

  13. Transgenic rice plants expressing human p450 genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism for phytoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahigashi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Sakiko; Ohkawa, Hideo; Ohkawa, Yasunobu

    2008-01-01

    Phytoremediation is the use of plants to remove xenobiotic compounds from the environment. Plants have the inherent ability to detoxify xenobiotic pollutants, but they are generally poor at degrading them. The introduction of genes involved in xenobiotic degradation is aimed at enhancing plants' potential further. Rice (Oryza sativa) is a good candidate for this purpose and has been transformed with genes encoding cytochrome P450 monooxygenases CYP1A1, CYP2B6, and CYP2C19. The transgenic plants were more tolerant to various herbicides than nontransgenic Nipponbare rice plants, owing to enhanced metabolism by the introduced P450 enzymes. Transgenic plants were able to remove atrazine and metolachlor from soil. Field testing and risk assessment are very important for developing transgenic plants for phytoremediation. Transgenic rice plants should become useful as herbicide-tolerant crops and for phytoremediation of xenobiotic pollutants in future. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Silicon Regulates Potential Genes Involved in Major Physiological Processes in Plants to Combat Stress

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    Abinaya Manivannan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Silicon (Si, the quasi-essential element occurs as the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. Biological importance of Si in plant kingdom has become inevitable particularly under stressed environment. In general, plants are classified as high, medium, and low silicon accumulators based on the ability of roots to absorb Si. The uptake of Si directly influence the positive effects attributed to the plant but Si supplementation proves to mitigate stress and recover plant growth even in low accumulating plants like tomato. The application of Si in soil as well as soil-less cultivation systems have resulted in the enhancement of quantitative and qualitative traits of plants even under stressed environment. Silicon possesses several mechanisms to regulate the physiological, biochemical, and antioxidant metabolism in plants to combat abiotic and biotic stresses. Nevertheless, very few reports are available on the aspect of Si-mediated molecular regulation of genes with potential role in stress tolerance. The recent advancements in the era of genomics and transcriptomics have opened an avenue for the determination of molecular rationale associated with the Si amendment to the stress alleviation in plants. Therefore, the present endeavor has attempted to describe the recent discoveries related to the regulation of vital genes involved in photosynthesis, transcription regulation, defense, water transport, polyamine synthesis, and housekeeping genes during abiotic and biotic stress alleviation by Si. Furthermore, an overview of Si-mediated modulation of multiple genes involved in stress response pathways such as phenylpropanoid pathway, jasmonic acid pathway, ABA-dependent or independent regulatory pathway have been discussed in this review.

  15. Silicon Regulates Potential Genes Involved in Major Physiological Processes in Plants to Combat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, Abinaya; Ahn, Yul-Kuyn

    2017-01-01

    Silicon (Si), the quasi-essential element occurs as the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. Biological importance of Si in plant kingdom has become inevitable particularly under stressed environment. In general, plants are classified as high, medium, and low silicon accumulators based on the ability of roots to absorb Si. The uptake of Si directly influence the positive effects attributed to the plant but Si supplementation proves to mitigate stress and recover plant growth even in low accumulating plants like tomato. The application of Si in soil as well as soil-less cultivation systems have resulted in the enhancement of quantitative and qualitative traits of plants even under stressed environment. Silicon possesses several mechanisms to regulate the physiological, biochemical, and antioxidant metabolism in plants to combat abiotic and biotic stresses. Nevertheless, very few reports are available on the aspect of Si-mediated molecular regulation of genes with potential role in stress tolerance. The recent advancements in the era of genomics and transcriptomics have opened an avenue for the determination of molecular rationale associated with the Si amendment to the stress alleviation in plants. Therefore, the present endeavor has attempted to describe the recent discoveries related to the regulation of vital genes involved in photosynthesis, transcription regulation, defense, water transport, polyamine synthesis, and housekeeping genes during abiotic and biotic stress alleviation by Si. Furthermore, an overview of Si-mediated modulation of multiple genes involved in stress response pathways such as phenylpropanoid pathway, jasmonic acid pathway, ABA-dependent or independent regulatory pathway have been discussed in this review.

  16. The HP0256 gene product is involved in motility and cell envelope architecture of Helicobacter pylori

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Douillard, Francois P

    2010-04-08

    Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is the causative agent for gastritis, and peptic and duodenal ulcers. The bacterium displays 5-6 polar sheathed flagella that are essential for colonisation and persistence in the gastric mucosa. The biochemistry and genetics of flagellar biogenesis in H. pylori has not been fully elucidated. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that the gene HP0256, annotated as hypothetical, was a FliJ homologue. In Salmonella, FliJ is a chaperone escort protein for FlgN and FliT, two proteins that themselves display chaperone activity for components of the hook, the rod and the filament. Results Ablation of the HP0256 gene in H. pylori significantly reduced motility. However, flagellin and hook protein synthesis was not affected in the HP0256 mutant. Transmission electron transmission microscopy revealed that the HP0256 mutant cells displayed a normal flagellum configuration, suggesting that HP0256 was not essential for assembly and polar localisation of the flagella in the cell. Interestingly, whole genome microarrays of an HP0256 mutant revealed transcriptional changes in a number of genes associated with the flagellar regulon and the cell envelope, such as outer membrane proteins and adhesins. Consistent with the array data, lack of the HP0256 gene significantly reduced adhesion and the inflammatory response in host cells. Conclusions We conclude that HP0256 is not a functional counterpart of FliJ in H. pylori. However, it is required for full motility and it is involved, possibly indirectly, in expression of outer membrane proteins and adhesins involved in pathogenesis and adhesion.

  17. Noise suppressor for turbo fan jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, D. Y. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A noise suppressor is disclosed for installation on the discharge or aft end of a turbo fan engine. Within the suppressor are fixed annular airfoils which are positioned to reduce the relative velocity between the high temperature fast moving jet exhaust and the low temperature slow moving air surrounding it. Within the suppressor nacelle is an exhaust jet nozzle which constrains the shape of the jet exhaust to a substantially uniform elongate shape irrespective of the power setting of the engine. Fixed ring airfoils within the suppressor nacelle therefore have the same salutary effects irrespective of the power setting at which the engine is operated.

  18. Expression profiling of rainbow trout testis development identifies evolutionary conserved genes involved in spermatogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esquerré Diane

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spermatogenesis is a late developmental process that involves a coordinated expression program in germ cells and a permanent communication between the testicular somatic cells and the germ-line. Current knowledge regarding molecular factors driving male germ cell proliferation and differentiation in vertebrates is still limited and mainly based on existing data from rodents and human. Fish with a marked reproductive cycle and a germ cell development in synchronous cysts have proven to be choice models to study precise stages of the spermatogenetic development and the germ cell-somatic cell communication network. In this study we used 9K cDNA microarrays to investigate the expression profiles underlying testis maturation during the male reproductive cycle of the trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. Results Using total testis samples at various developmental stages and isolated spermatogonia, spermatocytes and spermatids, 3379 differentially expressed trout cDNAs were identified and their gene activation or repression patterns throughout the reproductive cycle were reported. We also performed a tissue-profiling analysis and highlighted many genes for which expression signals were restricted to the testes or gonads from both sexes. The search for orthologous genes in genome-sequenced fish species and the use of their mammalian orthologs allowed us to provide accurate annotations for trout cDNAs. The analysis of the GeneOntology terms therefore validated and broadened our interpretation of expression clusters by highlighting enriched functions that are consistent with known sequential events during male gametogenesis. Furthermore, we compared expression profiles of trout and mouse orthologs and identified a complement of genes for which expression during spermatogenesis was maintained throughout evolution. Conclusion A comprehensive study of gene expression and associated functions during testis maturation and germ cell differentiation in

  19. Study of the Genes and Mechanism Involved in the Radioadaptive Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Pushan R.

    2009-01-01

    The radioadaptive response is a phenomenon where exposure to a prior low dose of radiation reduces the level of damage induced by a subsequent high radiation dose. The molecular mechanism behind this is still not well understood. Learning more about the radioadaptive response is critical for long duration spaceflight since astronauts are exposed to low levels of cosmic radiation. The micronucleus assay was used to measure the level of damage caused by radiation. Although cells which were not washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) after a low priming dose of 5cGy did not show adaptation to the challenge dose, washing the cells with PBS and giving the cells fresh media after the low dose did allow radioadaptation to occur. This is consistent with the results of a previous publication by another research group. In the present study, genes involved in DNA damage signaling and the oxidative stress response were studied using RT PCR techniques in order to look at changes in expression level after the low dose with or without washing. Our preliminary results indicate that upregulation of oxidative stress response genes ANGPTL7, NCF2, TTN, and SRXN1 may be involved in the radioadaptive response. The low dose of radiation alone was found to activate the oxidative stress response genes GPR156 and MTL5, whereas, washing the cells alone caused relatively robust upregulation of the oxidative stress response genes DUSP1 and PTGS2. Washing after the priming dose showed some changes in the expression level of several DNA damage signaling genes. In addition, we studied whether washing the cells after the priming dose has an effect on the level of nitric oxide in both the media and cells, since nitric oxide levels are known to increase in the media of the cells after a high dose of radiation only if the cells were already exposed to a low priming dose. Based on this preliminary study, we propose that washing the cells after priming exposure actually eliminates some factor

  20. Suppressors made from intermetallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, James W; Muth, Thomas R; Cler, Dan L

    2014-11-04

    Disclosed are several examples of apparatuses for suppressing the blast and flash produced as a projectile is expelled by gases from a firearm. In some examples, gases are diverted away from the central chamber to an expansion chamber by baffles. The gases are absorbed by the expansion chamber and desorbed slowly, thus decreasing pressure and increasing residence time of the gases. In other examples, the gases impinge against a plurality of rods before expanding through passages between the rods to decrease the pressure and increase the residence time of the gases. These and other exemplary suppressors are made from an intermetallic material composition for enhanced strength and oxidation resistance at high operational temperatures.

  1. In planta assays involving epigenetically silenced genes reveal inhibition of cytosine methylation by genistein

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    Arase Sachiko

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytosine methylation is involved in epigenetic control of gene expression in a wide range of organisms. An increasing number of examples indicate that changing the frequency of cytosine methylation in the genome is a feasible tool to engineer novel traits in plants. Although demethylating effects of compounds have been analyzed in human cultured cells in terms of suppressing cancer, their effect in plant cells has not been analyzed extensively. Here, we developed in planta assay systems to detect inhibition of cytosine methylation using plants that contain a transgene transcriptionally silenced by an epigenetic mechanism. Results Seeds of two transgenic plants were used: a petunia line that has been identified as a revertant of the co-suppression of the chalcone synthase-A (CHS-A gene and contains CHS-A transgenes whose transcription is repressed; Nicotiana benthamiana plants that contain the green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter gene whose transcription is repressed through virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing. Seeds of these plants were sown on a medium that contained a demethylating agent, either 5-azacytidine or trichostatin A, and the restoration of the transcriptionally active state of the transgene was detected in seedlings. Using these systems, we found that genistein, a major isoflavonoid compound, inhibits cytosine methylation, thus restoring transgene transcription. Genistein also restored the transcription of an epigenetically silenced endogenous gene in Arabidopsis plants. Conclusions Our assay systems allowed us to assess the inhibition of cytosine methylation, in particular of maintenance of methylation, by compounds in plant cells. These results suggest a novel role of flavonoids in plant cells and that genistein is useful for modifying the epigenetic state of plant genomes.

  2. Child abuse, depression, and methylation in genes involved with stress, neural plasticity, and brain circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weder, Natalie; Zhang, Huiping; Jensen, Kevin; Yang, Bao Zhu; Simen, Arthur; Jackowski, Andrea; Lipschitz, Deborah; Douglas-Palumberi, Heather; Ge, Margrat; Perepletchikova, Francheska; O'Loughlin, Kerry; Hudziak, James J; Gelernter, Joel; Kaufman, Joan

    2014-04-01

    To determine whether epigenetic markers predict dimensional ratings of depression in maltreated children. A genome-wide methylation study was completed using the Illumina 450K BeadChip array in 94 maltreated and 96 healthy nontraumatized children with saliva-derived DNA. The 450K BeadChip does not include any methylation sites in the exact location as sites in candidate genes previously examined in the literature, so a test for replication of prior research findings was not feasible. Methylation in 3 genes emerged as genome-wide-significant predictors of depression: DNA-Binding Protein Inhibitor ID-3 (ID3); Glutamate Receptor, Ionotropic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) 1 (GRIN1); and Tubulin Polymerization Promoting Protein (TPPP) (p plasticity, and TPPP involved in neural circuitry development. Methylation in CpG sites in candidate genes were not predictors of depression at significance levels corrected for whole genome testing, but maltreated and control children did have significantly different β values after Bonferroni correction at multiple methylation sites in these candidate genes (e.g., BDNF, NR3C1, FKBP5). This study suggests that epigenetic changes in ID3, GRIN1, and TPPP genes, in combination with experiences of maltreatment, may confer risk for depression in children. The study adds to a growing body of literature supporting a role for epigenetic mechanisms in the pathophysiology of stress-related psychiatric disorders. Although epigenetic changes are frequently long lasting, they are not necessarily permanent. Consequently, interventions to reverse the negative biological and behavioral sequelae associated with child maltreatment are briefly discussed. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Radiation and Dietary Iron on Expression of Genes and Proteins Involved in Drug Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, K. M.; Wotring, V. E.

    2014-01-01

    Liver function, especially the rate of metabolic enzyme activities, determines the concentration of circulating drugs and the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand any effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Dietary factors and exposure to radiation are aspects of spaceflight that are potential oxidative stressors and both can be modeled in ground experiments. In this experiment, we examined the effects of high dietary iron and low dose gamma radiation (individually and combined) on the gene expression of enzymes involved in drug metabolism, redox homeostasis, and DNA repair. METHODS All procedures were approved by the JSC Animal Care and Use Committee. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups (n=8); control, high Fe diet (650 mg iron/kg), radiation (fractionated 3 Gy exposure from a Cs- 137 source) and combined high Fe diet + radiation exposure. Animals were euthanized 24h after the last treatment of radiation; livers were removed immediately and flash -frozen in liquid nitrogen. Expression of genes thought to be involved in redox homeostasis, drug metabolism and DNA damage repair was measured by RT-qPCR. Where possible, protein expression of the same genes was measured by western blotting. All data are expressed as % change in expression normalized to reference gene expression; comparisons were then made of each treatment group to the sham exposed/ normal diet control group. Data was considered significant at pprotein

  4. Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions Involving HLA-DRB1, PTPN22, and Smoking in Two Subsets of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källberg, Henrik; Padyukov, Leonid; Plenge, Robert M.; Rönnelid, Johan; Gregersen, Peter K.; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; Toes, Rene E. M.; Huizinga, Tom W.; Klareskog, Lars; Alfredsson, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions are key features in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other complex diseases. The aim of this study was to use and compare three different definitions of interaction between the two major genetic risk factors of RA—the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE) alleles and the PTPN22 R620W allele—in three large case-control studies: the Swedish Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (EIRA) study, the North American RA Consortium (NARAC) study, and the Dutch Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic study (in total, 1,977 cases and 2,405 controls). The EIRA study was also used to analyze interactions between smoking and the two genes. “Interaction” was defined either as a departure from additivity, as interaction in a multiplicative model, or in terms of linkage disequilibrium—for example, deviation from independence of penetrance of two unlinked loci. Consistent interaction, defined as departure from additivity, between HLA-DRB1 SE alleles and the A allele of PTPN22 R620W was seen in all three studies regarding anti-CCP–positive RA. Testing for multiplicative interactions demonstrated an interaction between the two genes only when the three studies were pooled. The linkage disequilibrium approach indicated a gene-gene interaction in EIRA and NARAC, as well as in the pooled analysis. No interaction was seen between smoking and PTPN22 R620W. A new pattern of interactions is described between the two major known genetic risk factors and the major environmental risk factor concerning the risk of developing anti-CCP–positive RA. The data extend the basis for a pathogenetic hypothesis for RA involving genetic and environmental factors. The study also raises and illustrates principal questions concerning ways to define interactions in complex diseases. PMID:17436241

  5. Identification of genes involved in interactions between Biomphalaria glabrata and Schistosoma mansoni by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockyer, Anne E; Spinks, Jennifer; Noble, Leslie R; Rollinson, David; Jones, Catherine S

    2007-01-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata is an intermediate snail host for Schistosoma mansoni, a medically important schistosome. In order to identify transcripts involved in snail-schistosome interactions, subtractive cDNA libraries were prepared, using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) between a parasite-exposed schistosome-resistant and a susceptible strain of B. glabrata, and also between schistosome-exposed and unexposed snails from the resistant snail line. Separate libraries were made from both haemocytes and the haemopoietic organ. Subtraction was performed in both directions enriching for cDNAs differentially expressed between parasite-exposed resistant and susceptible samples and up or down-regulated in the resistant line after challenge. The resulting eight libraries were screened and eight genes, differentially expressed between the haemocytes of resistant and susceptible snail strains, were identified and confirmed with reverse transcriptase PCR, including two transcripts expected to be involved in the stress response mechanism for regulating the damaging oxidative burst pathways involved in cytotoxic killing of the parasite: the iron-storage and immunoregulatory molecule, ferritin, and HtrA2, a serine protease involved in the cellular stress response. Transcripts with elevated levels in the resistant strain, had the same expression patterns in the subtracted libraries and unsubtracted controls; higher levels in exposed resistant snails compared to susceptible ones and down-regulated in exposed compared with unexposed resistant snails. Differential expression of two of the transcripts with no known function from the susceptible strain, was independently confirmed in a repeat exposure experiment.

  6. Genes and Pathways Involved in Adult Onset Disorders Featuring Muscle Mitochondrial DNA Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghia Ahmed

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Replication and maintenance of mtDNA entirely relies on a set of proteins encoded by the nuclear genome, which include members of the core replicative machinery, proteins involved in the homeostasis of mitochondrial dNTPs pools or deputed to the control of mitochondrial dynamics and morphology. Mutations in their coding genes have been observed in familial and sporadic forms of pediatric and adult-onset clinical phenotypes featuring mtDNA instability. The list of defects involved in these disorders has recently expanded, including mutations in the exo-/endo-nuclease flap-processing proteins MGME1 and DNA2, supporting the notion that an enzymatic DNA repair system actively takes place in mitochondria. The results obtained in the last few years acknowledge the contribution of next-generation sequencing methods in the identification of new disease loci in small groups of patients and even single probands. Although heterogeneous, these genes can be conveniently classified according to the pathway to which they belong. The definition of the molecular and biochemical features of these pathways might be helpful for fundamental knowledge of these disorders, to accelerate genetic diagnosis of patients and the development of rational therapies. In this review, we discuss the molecular findings disclosed in adult patients with muscle pathology hallmarked by mtDNA instability.

  7. Involvement of Multiple Gene-Silencing Pathways in a Paramutation-like Phenomenon in Arabidopsis

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    Zhimin Zheng

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Paramutation is an epigenetic phenomenon that has been observed in a number of multicellular organisms. The epigenetically silenced state of paramutated alleles is not only meiotically stable but also “infectious” to active homologous alleles. The molecular mechanism of paramutation remains unclear, but components involved in RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM are required. Here, we report a multi-copy pRD29A-LUC transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana that behaves like a paramutation locus. The silent state of LUC is induced by mutations in the DNA glycosylase gene ROS1. The silent alleles of LUC are not only meiotically stable but also able to transform active LUC alleles into silent ones, in the absence of ros1 mutations. Maintaining silencing at the LUC gene requires action of multiple pathways besides RdDM. Our study identified specific factors that are involved in the paramutation-like phenomenon and established a model system for the study of paramutation in Arabidopsis.

  8. Identification of gene expression patterns crucially involved in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin M. Herrmann

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available After encounter with a central nervous system (CNS-derived autoantigen, lymphocytes leave the lymph nodes and enter the CNS. This event leads only rarely to subsequent tissue damage. Genes relevant to CNS pathology after cell infiltration are largely undefined. Myelin-oligodendrocyte-glycoprotein (MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS, a chronic autoimmune disease of the CNS that results in disability. To assess genes that are involved in encephalitogenicity and subsequent tissue damage mediated by CNS-infiltrating cells, we performed a DNA microarray analysis from cells derived from lymph nodes and eluted from CNS in LEW.1AV1 (RT1av1 rats immunized with MOG 91-108. The data was compared to immunizations with adjuvant alone or naive rats and to immunizations with the immunogenic but not encephalitogenic MOG 73-90 peptide. Here, we show involvement of Cd38, Cxcr4 and Akt and confirm these findings by the use of Cd38-knockout (B6.129P2-Cd38tm1Lnd/J mice, S1P-receptor modulation during EAE and quantitative expression analysis in individuals with MS. The hereby-defined underlying pathways indicate cellular activation and migration pathways mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors as crucial events in CNS tissue damage. These pathways can be further explored for novel therapeutic interventions.

  9. Cloning and Characterization of Farnesyl Diphosphate Synthase Gene Involved in Triterpenoids Biosynthesis from Poria cocos

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    Jianrong Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Poria cocos (P. cocos has long been used as traditional Chinese medicine and triterpenoids are the most important pharmacologically active constituents of this fungus. Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPS is a key enzyme of triterpenoids biosynthesis. The gene encoding FPS was cloned from P. cocos by degenerate PCR, inverse PCR and cassette PCR. The open reading frame of the gene is 1086 bp in length, corresponding to a predicted polypeptide of 361 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 41.2 kDa. Comparison of the P. cocos FPS deduced amino acid sequence with other species showed the highest identity with Ganoderma lucidum (74%. The predicted P. cocos FPS shares at least four conserved regions involved in the enzymatic activity with the FPSs of varied species. The recombinant protein was expressed in Pichia pastoris and purified. Gas chromatography analysis showed that the recombinant FPS could catalyze the formation of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP from geranyl diphosphate (GPP and isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP. Furthermore, the expression profile of the FPS gene and content of total triterpenoids under different stages of development and methyl jasmonate treatments were determined. The results indicated that there is a positive correlation between the activity of FPS and the amount of total triterpenoids produced in P. cocos.

  10. HOXC13 is involved in the regulation of human hair keratin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jave-Suarez, Luis Felipe; Winter, Hermelita; Langbein, Lutz; Rogers, Michael A; Schweizer, Jürgen

    2002-02-01

    At present, HOXC13 is the only member of the HOX multigene family that produces a fragile hair phenotype when mutated or overexpressed in mice. To determine whether hair keratin genes are targets for this transcription factor, we analyzed the HOXC13 responsiveness of human hair keratin genes, whose expression matched that of nuclear HOXC13, immunologically revealed in cells of the lower hair-forming compartment of the human anagen hair follicle. We show that HOXC13, but not a homeobox-deleted HOXC13, strongly activated the promoters of the genes, with the respective proximal promoter regions being sufficient for optimal activation. The hair keratin promoters contained numerous putative Hox binding core motifs TAAT, TTAT, and TTAC. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that HOXC13 bound exclusively to distinct TAAT and TTAT core motifs that were clearly concentrated in the proximal promoter regions. A comparison of the sequences flanking HOXC13 binding and nonbinding core motifs, respectively, allowed the deduction of an extended 8-bp HOXC13 consensus binding sequence TT(A/T)ATNPuPu. Thus, the DNA binding conditions for HOXC13 were distinct from those of other members of the paralogous group 13, i.e. murine Hoxb13 and HOXd13, for which previous investigations yielded the consensus binding sequence TTTA(T/C)NPuPu. Collectively, our data speak for a direct involvement of HOXC13 in the control of hair keratin expression during early trichocyte differentiation.

  11. Platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGFRs) fusion genes involvement in hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appiah-Kubi, Kwaku; Lan, Ting; Wang, Ying; Qian, Hai; Wu, Min; Yao, Xiaoyuan; Wu, Yan; Chen, Yongchang

    2017-01-01

    To investigate oncogenic platelet-derived growth factor receptor(PDGFR) fusion genes involvement in hematological malignancies, the advances in the PDGFR fusion genes diagnosis and development of PDGFR fusions inhibitors. Literature search was done using terms "PDGFR and Fusion" or "PDGFR and Myeloid neoplasm" or 'PDGFR and Lymphoid neoplasm' or "PDGFR Fusion Diagnosis" or "PDGFR Fusion Targets" in databases including PubMed, ASCO.org, and Medscape. Out of the 36 fusions detected, ETV6(TEL)-PDGFRB and FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusions were frequently detected, 33 are as a result of chromosomal translocation, FIP1L1-PDGFRA and EBF1-PDGFRB are the result of chromosomal deletion and CDK5RAP2- PDGFRΑ is the result of chromosomal insertion. Seven of the 34 rare fusions have detectable reciprocals. RNA aptamers are promising therapeutic target of PDGFRs and diagnostic tools of PDGFRs fusion genes. Also, PDGFRs have variable prospective therapeutic strategies including small molecules, RNA aptamers, and interference therapeutics as well as development of adaptor protein Lnk mimetic drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Parallel analysis of tagged deletion mutants efficiently identifies genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robin; Parrish, Mark L; Cadera, Emily; Larson, Lynnelle; Matson, Clinton K; Garrett-Engele, Philip; Armour, Chris; Lum, Pek Yee; Shoemaker, Daniel D

    2003-07-30

    Increased levels of HMG-CoA reductase induce cell type- and isozyme-specific proliferation of the endoplasmic reticulum. In yeast, the ER proliferations induced by Hmg1p consist of nuclear-associated stacks of smooth ER membranes known as karmellae. To identify genes required for karmellae assembly, we compared the composition of populations of homozygous diploid S. cerevisiae deletion mutants following 20 generations of growth with and without karmellae. Using an initial population of 1,557 deletion mutants, 120 potential mutants were identified as a result of three independent experiments. Each experiment produced a largely non-overlapping set of potential mutants, suggesting that differences in specific growth conditions could be used to maximize the comprehensiveness of similar parallel analysis screens. Only two genes, UBC7 and YAL011W, were identified in all three experiments. Subsequent analysis of individual mutant strains confirmed that each experiment was identifying valid mutations, based on the mutant's sensitivity to elevated HMG-CoA reductase and inability to assemble normal karmellae. The largest class of HMG-CoA reductase-sensitive mutations was a subset of genes that are involved in chromatin structure and transcriptional regulation, suggesting that karmellae assembly requires changes in transcription or that the presence of karmellae may interfere with normal transcriptional regulation. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Identification of genes involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm-specific resistance to antibiotics.

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    Li Zhang

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key opportunistic pathogen characterized by its biofilm formation ability and high-level multiple antibiotic resistance. By screening a library of random transposon insertion mutants with an increased biofilm-specifc antibiotic susceptibility, we previously identified 3 genes or operons of P. aeruginosa UCBPP-PA14 (ndvB, PA1875-1877 and tssC1 that do not affect biofilm formation but are involved in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that PA0756-0757 (encoding a putative two-component regulatory system, PA2070 and PA5033 (encoding hypothetical proteins of unknown function display increased expression in biofilm cells and also have a role in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, deletion of each of PA0756, PA2070 and PA5033 resulted in a significant reduction of lethality in Caenorhabditis elegans, indicating a role for these genes in both biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance and persistence in vivo. Together, these data suggest that these genes are potential targets for antimicrobial agents.

  14. Identification of Genes Involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm-Specific Resistance to Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Fritsch, Meredith; Hammond, Lisa; Landreville, Ryan; Slatculescu, Cristina; Colavita, Antonio; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key opportunistic pathogen characterized by its biofilm formation ability and high-level multiple antibiotic resistance. By screening a library of random transposon insertion mutants with an increased biofilm-specifc antibiotic susceptibility, we previously identified 3 genes or operons of P. aeruginosa UCBPP-PA14 (ndvB, PA1875–1877 and tssC1) that do not affect biofilm formation but are involved in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that PA0756–0757 (encoding a putative two-component regulatory system), PA2070 and PA5033 (encoding hypothetical proteins of unknown function) display increased expression in biofilm cells and also have a role in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, deletion of each of PA0756, PA2070 and PA5033 resulted in a significant reduction of lethality in Caenorhabditis elegans, indicating a role for these genes in both biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance and persistence in vivo. Together, these data suggest that these genes are potential targets for antimicrobial agents. PMID:23637868

  15. Identification of Bicarbonate as a Trigger and Genes Involved with Extracellular DNA Export in Mycobacterial Biofilms

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    Sasha J. Rose

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA (eDNA is an integral biofilm matrix component of numerous pathogens, including nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM. Cell lysis is the source of eDNA in certain bacteria, but the source of eDNA remains unidentified for NTM, as well as for other eDNA-containing bacterial species. In this study, conditions affecting eDNA export were examined, and genes involved with the eDNA export mechanism were identified. After a method for monitoring eDNA in real time in undisturbed biofilms was established, different conditions affecting eDNA were investigated. Bicarbonate positively influenced eDNA export in a pH-independent manner in Mycobacterium avium, M. abscessus, and M. chelonae. The surface-exposed proteome of M. avium in eDNA-containing biofilms revealed abundant carbonic anhydrases. Chemical inhibition of carbonic anhydrases with ethoxzolamide significantly reduced eDNA export. An unbiased transposon mutant library screen for eDNA export in M. avium identified many severely eDNA-attenuated mutants, including one not expressing a unique FtsK/SpoIIIE-like DNA-transporting pore, two with inactivation of carbonic anhydrases, and nine with inactivation of genes belonging to a unique genomic region, as well as numerous mutants involved in metabolism and energy production. Complementation of nine mutants that included the FtsK/SpoIIIE and carbonic anhydrase significantly restored eDNA export. Interestingly, several attenuated eDNA mutants have mutations in genes encoding proteins that were found with the surface proteomics, and many more mutations are localized in operons potentially encoding surface proteins. Collectively, our data strengthen the evidence of eDNA export being an active mechanism that is activated by the bacterium responding to bicarbonate.

  16. Absence of linkage between MHC and a gene involved in susceptibility to human schistosomiasis

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    Chiarella J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Six hundred million people are at risk of infection by Schistosoma mansoni. MHC haplotypes have been reported to segregate with susceptibility to schistosomiasis in murine models. In humans, a major gene related to susceptibility/resistance to infection by S. mansoni (SM1 and displaying the mean fecal egg count as phenotype was detected by segregation analysis. This gene displayed a codominant mode of inheritance with an estimated frequency of 0.20-0.25 for the deleterious allele and accounted for more than 50% of the variance of infection levels. To determine if the SM1 gene segregates with the human MHC chromosomal region, we performed a linkage study by the lod score method. We typed for HLA-A, B, C, DR and DQ antigens in 11 informative families from an endemic area for schistosomiasis in Bahia, Brazil, by the microlymphocytotoxicity technique. HLA-DR typing by the polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP and HLA-DQ were confirmed by PCR-sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (PCR-SSOP. The lod scores for the different q values obtained clearly indicate that there is no physical linkage between HLA and SM1 genes. Thus, susceptibility or resistance to schistosomiasis, as defined by mean fecal egg count, is not primarily dependent on the host's HLA profile. However, if the HLA molecule plays an important role in specific immune responses to S. mansoni, this may involve the development of the different clinical aspects of the disease such as granuloma formation and development of hepatosplenomegaly.

  17. Multifactor-dimensionality reduction reveals interaction of important gene variants involved in allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guia, R M; Echavez, M D J; Gaw, E L C; Gomez, M R R; Lopez, K A J; Mendoza, R C M; Rapsing, J M C; Retreta, D P; Tubog, C M B; Ventolero, M H; Yao, C L; Ramos, J D A

    2015-06-01

    Elevated IgE levels in the atopic triad of asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis is a multifactorial condition whose genetic component involves interaction of several gene loci. One hundred and two matched pairs of allergic and nonallergic individuals were phenotyped for total serum IgE level using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Atopic status was defined by serum IgE concentration ≥100 IU mL(-1) . SNPs genotyped include the IL4 -590C>T (rs2243250), FCER1B E237G (rs569108), CD14 -159C>T (rs2569190), IL4RA Q551R (rs1801275) and ADRB2 R16G (rs1042713). Gene-gene interaction was analysed using multifactor-dimensionality reduction (MDR). Significant association between atopic allergy and the IL4 -590C>T polymorphism was confirmed in three genetic models. Interaction among the 5 gene variants was validated by MDR. The five-locus model was chosen as the best to describe the interaction of the SNPs within the context of atopy. The strongest interaction was between IL4 -590C>T and IL4RA Q551R and between FCER1B E237G and ADRB2 R16G. The IL4 variant also interacts synergistically with the FCER1B and ADRB2 coding variants. CD14 -159C>T, in general, interacts antagonistically with the rest of the SNPs. In conclusion, a five-locus interaction exists among IL4 -590C>T, FCER1B E237G, CD14 -159C>T, IL4RA Q551R and ADRB2 R16G in Filipino cases of atopic allergy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Involvement of Three Esterase Genes from Panonychus citri (McGregor in Fenpropathrin Resistance

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    Xiao-Min Shen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The citrus red mite, Panonychus citri (McGregor, is a major citrus pest with a worldwide distribution and an extensive record of pesticide resistance. However, the underlying molecular mechanism associated with fenpropathrin resistance in this species have not yet been reported. In this study, synergist triphenyl phosphate (TPP dramatically increased the toxicity of fenpropathrin, suggesting involvement of carboxylesterases (CarEs in the metabolic detoxification of this insecticide. The subsequent spatiotemporal expression pattern analysis of PcE1, PcE7 and PcE9 showed that three CarEs genes were all over-expressed after insecticide exposure and higher transcripts levels were observed in different field resistant strains of P. citri. Heterologous expression combined with 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetra-zolium bromide (MTT cytotoxicity assay in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9 cells revealed that PcE1-, PcE7- or PcE9-expressing cells showed significantly higher cytoprotective capability than parental Sf9 cells against fenpropathrin, demonstrating that PcEs probably detoxify fenpropathrin. Moreover, gene silencing through the method of leaf-mediated dsRNA feeding followed by insecticide bioassay increased the mortalities of fenpropathrin-treated mites by 31% (PcE1, 27% (PcE7 and 22% (PcE9, respectively, after individual PcE gene dsRNA treatment. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that PcE1, PcE7 and PcE9 are functional genes mediated in fenpropathrin resistance in P. citri and enrich molecular understanding of CarEs during the resistance development of the mite.

  19. Cloning and characterization of a potato StAN11 gene involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wang; Wang, Bing; Wang, Man; Chen, Min; Yin, Jing-Ming; Kaleri, Ghullam Murtaza; Zhang, Rui-Jie; Zuo, Tie-Niu; You, Xiong; Yang, Qing

    2014-04-01

    Anthocyanins are a class of products of plant secondary metabolism and are responsible for tubers color in potato. The biosynthesis of anthocyanins is a complex biological process, in which multiple genes are involved including structural genes and regulatory genes. In this study, StAN11, a WD40-repeat gene, was cloned from potato cultivar Chieftain (Solanum tuberosum L.). StAN11 (HQ599506) contained no intron and its open reading frame (ORF) was 1,029 bp long, encoding a putative protein of 342 amino acids. In order to verify its role in anthocyanin biosynthesis, StAN11 was inserted behind the CaMV-35S promoter of pCMBIA1304 and the recombination vector was introduced into the potato cultivar Désirée plants by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The color of transgenic tuber skin was significantly deepened, compared to the wild-type control, which was highly consistent with the accumulation of anthocyanin and expression of StAN11 in transgenic lines tuber skin. Further analysis on the expression of Flavonone-3-hydroxylase (F3H), Dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR), Anthocyanidin synthase (ANS), and Flavonoid 3-O-glucosyl transferase (3GT) in transgenic plants revealed that only DFR was upregulated. This result suggested that StAN11 regulated anthocyanin biosynthesis in potato by controlling DFR expression and accumulation of anthocyanin could be increased through overexpression of StAN11 in the tubers with the genetic background of anthocyanin biosynthesis. © 2013 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  20. Genes involved in alkane degradation in the Alcanivorax hongdengensis strain A-11-3

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    Wang, Wanpeng [State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen (China). Key Lab. of Marine Biogenetic Resources; Xiamen Univ. (China). School of Life Sciences; Shao, Zongze [State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen (China). Key Lab. of Marine Biogenetic Resources

    2012-04-15

    Alcanivorax hongdengensis A-11-3 is a newly identified type strain isolated from the surface water of the Malacca and Singapore Straits that can degrade a wide range of alkanes. To understand the degradation mechanism of this strain, the genes encoding alkane hydroxylases were obtained by PCR screening and shotgun sequencing of a genomic fosmid library. Six genes involved in alkane degradation were found, including alkB1, alkB2, p450-1, p450-2, p450-3 and almA. Heterogeneous expression analysis confirmed their functions as alkane oxidases in Pseudomonas putida GPo12 (pGEc47{delta}B) or Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2{delta}1. Q-PCR revealed that the transcription of alkB1 and alkB2 was enhanced in the presence of n-alkanes C{sub 12} to C{sub 24}; three p450 genes were up-regulated by C{sub 8}-C{sub 16} n-alkanes at different levels, whereas enhanced expression of almA was observed when strain A-11-3 grew with long-chain alkanes (C{sub 24} to C{sub 36}). In the case of branched alkanes, pristane significantly enhanced the expression of alkB1, p450-3 and almA. The six genes enable strain A-11-3 to degrade short (C{sub 8}) to long (C{sub 36}) alkanes that are straight or branched. The ability of A. hongdengensis A-11-3 to thrive in oil-polluted marine environments may be due to this strain's multiple systems for alkane degradation and its range of substrates. (orig.)

  1. Inhibition of corticosteroid-binding globulin gene expression by glucocorticoids involves C/EBPβ.

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    Nicolette Verhoog

    Full Text Available Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG, a negative acute phase protein produced primarily in the liver, is responsible for the transport of glucocorticoids (GCs. It also modulates the bioavailability of GCs, as only free or unbound steroids are biologically active. Fluctuations in CBG levels therefore can directly affect GC bioavailability. This study investigates the molecular mechanism whereby GCs inhibit the expression of CBG. GCs regulate gene expression via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, which either directly binds to DNA or acts indirectly via tethering to other DNA-bound transcription factors. Although no GC-response elements (GRE are present in the Cbg promoter, putative binding sites for C/EBPβ, able to tether to the GR, as well as HNF3α involved in GR signaling, are present. C/EBPβ, but not HNF3α, was identified as an important mediator of DEX-mediated inhibition of Cbg promoter activity by using specific deletion and mutant promoter reporter constructs of Cbg. Furthermore, knockdown of C/EBPβ protein expression reduced DEX-induced repression of CBG mRNA, confirming C/EBPβ's involvement in GC-mediated CBG repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP after DEX treatment indicated increased co-recruitment of C/EBPβ and GR to the Cbg promoter, while C/EBPβ knockdown prevented GR recruitment. Together,