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Sample records for suppressor gene function

  1. Unexpected functional similarities between gatekeeper tumour suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes revealed by systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongzhong; Epstein, Richard J

    2011-05-01

    Familial tumor suppressor genes comprise two subgroups: caretaker genes (CTs) that repair DNA, and gatekeeper genes (GKs) that trigger cell death. Since GKs may also induce cell cycle delay and thus enhance cell survival by facilitating DNA repair, we hypothesized that the prosurvival phenotype of GKs could be selected during cancer progression, and we used a multivariable systems biology approach to test this. We performed multidimensional data analysis, non-negative matrix factorization and logistic regression to compare the features of GKs with those of their putative antagonists, the proto-oncogenes (POs), as well as with control groups of CTs and functionally unrelated congenital heart disease genes (HDs). GKs and POs closely resemble each other, but not CTs or HDs, in terms of gene structure (Pexpression level and breadth (Pimplied suggest a common functional attribute that is strongly negatively selected-that is, a shared phenotype that enhances cell survival. The counterintuitive finding of similar evolutionary pressures affecting GKs and POs raises an intriguing possibility: namely, that cancer microevolution is accelerated by an epistatic cascade in which upstream suppressor gene defects subvert the normal bifunctionality of wild-type GKs by constitutively shifting the phenotype away from apoptosis towards survival. If correct, this interpretation would explain the hitherto unexplained phenomenon of frequent wild-type GK (for example, p53) overexpression in tumors.

  2. Functional characterization of duplicated Suppressor of Overexpression of Constans 1-like genes in petunia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill C Preston

    Full Text Available Flowering time is strictly controlled by a combination of internal and external signals that match seed set with favorable environmental conditions. In the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae, many of the genes underlying development and evolution of flowering have been discovered. However, much remains unknown about how conserved the flowering gene networks are in plants with different growth habits, gene duplication histories, and distributions. Here we functionally characterize three homologs of the flowering gene Suppressor Of Overexpression of Constans 1 (SOC1 in the short-lived perennial Petunia hybrida (petunia, Solanaceae. Similar to A. thaliana soc1 mutants, co-silencing of duplicated petunia SOC1-like genes results in late flowering. This phenotype is most severe when all three SOC1-like genes are silenced. Furthermore, expression levels of the SOC1-like genes Unshaven (UNS and Floral Binding Protein 21 (FBP21, but not FBP28, are positively correlated with developmental age. In contrast to A. thaliana, petunia SOC1-like gene expression did not increase with longer photoperiods, and FBP28 transcripts were actually more abundant under short days. Despite evidence of functional redundancy, differential spatio-temporal expression data suggest that SOC1-like genes might fine-tune petunia flowering in response to photoperiod and developmental stage. This likely resulted from modification of SOC1-like gene regulatory elements following recent duplication, and is a possible mechanism to ensure flowering under both inductive and non-inductive photoperiods.

  3. The Function of PTEN Tumor Suppressor Gene in Prostate Cancer Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Hong

    2001-01-01

    .... The recently identified tumor suppressor gene PTEN is a promising candidate for being involved in prostate cancer since it is frequently deleted in prostate cancer, especially in advanced or metastatic forms...

  4. The Function of PTEN Tumor Suppressor Gene in Prostate Cancer Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Hong

    2002-01-01

    .... The recently identified tumor suppressor gene PTEN is a promising candidate for being involved in prostate cancer since it is frequently deleted in prostate cancer, especially in advanced or metastatic forms...

  5. Functional Analysis of Chromosome 18 in Pancreatic Cancer: Strong Evidence for New Tumour Suppressor Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu P. Lefter

    2004-04-01

    Conclusion: These data represent strong functional evidence that chromosome 18q encodes strong tumour and metastasis suppressor activity that is able to switch human pancreatic cancer cells to a dormant phenotype.

  6. Fish Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS): Gene Discovery, Modulation of Expression and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiehui; Gorgoglione, Bartolomeo; Maehr, Tanja; Holland, Jason W.; Vecino, Jose L. González; Wadsworth, Simon; Secombes, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    The intracellular suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family members, including CISH and SOCS1 to 7 in mammals, are important regulators of cytokine signaling pathways. So far, the orthologues of all the eight mammalian SOCS members have been identified in fish, with several of them having multiple copies. Whilst fish CISH, SOCS3, and SOCS5 paralogues are possibly the result of the fish-specific whole genome duplication event, gene duplication or lineage-specific genome duplication may also contribute to some paralogues, as with the three trout SOCS2s and three zebrafish SOCS5s. Fish SOCS genes are broadly expressed and also show species-specific expression patterns. They can be upregulated by cytokines, such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-21, by immune stimulants such as LPS, poly I:C, and PMA, as well as by viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections in member- and species-dependent manners. Initial functional studies demonstrate conserved mechanisms of fish SOCS action via JAK/STAT pathways. PMID:22203897

  7. Molecular studies on the function of tumor suppressor gene in gastrointestinal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, You Cheoul

    1993-01-01

    Cancer of stomach, colon and liver are a group of the most common cancer in Korea. However, results with current therapeutic modalities are still unsatisfactory. The intensive efforts have been made to understand basic pathogenesis and to find better therapeutic tools for the treatment of this miserable disease. We studies the alteration of tumor suppressor gene in various Gastrointestinal cancer in Korea. Results showed that genetic alteration of Rb gene was in 83% of colorectal cancer. Our results suggest that genetic alteration of Rb gene is crucially involved in the tumorigenesis of colorectum in Korea. (Author)

  8. Prediction of functionally significant single nucleotide polymorphisms in PTEN tumor suppressor gene: An in silico approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imran; Ansari, Irfan A; Singh, Pratichi; Dass J, Febin Prabhu

    2017-09-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene plays a crucial role in signal transduction by negatively regulating the PI3K signaling pathway. It is the most frequent mutated gene in many human-related cancers. Considering its critical role, a functional analysis of missense mutations of PTEN gene was undertaken in this study. Thirty five nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) within the coding region of the PTEN gene were selected for our in silico investigation, and five nsSNPs (G129E, C124R, D252G, H61D, and R130G) were found to be deleterious based on combinatorial predictions of different computational tools. Moreover, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was performed to investigate the conformational variation between native and all the five mutant PTEN proteins having predicted deleterious nsSNPs. The results of MD simulation of all mutant models illustrated variation in structural attributes such as root-mean-square deviation, root-mean-square fluctuation, radius of gyration, and total energy; which depicts the structural stability of PTEN protein. Furthermore, mutant PTEN protein structures also showed a significant variation in the solvent accessible surface area and hydrogen bond frequencies from the native PTEN structure. In conclusion, results of this study have established the deleterious effect of the all the five predicted nsSNPs on the PTEN protein structure. Thus, results of the current study can pave a new platform to sort out nsSNPs that can be undertaken for the confirmation of their phenotype and their correlation with diseased status in case of control studies. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Intellectual disability, oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes: the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    disability, the presence of CNV including gene expressed in the brain or with specific brain function is a strong argument. In contrast, CNV affecting only genes involved in oncogen- esis are mostly ignored. However, links between some onco- genes or tumour suppressor genes and intellectual disability deserve attention.

  10. Hypoxia Inducible Factor-independent functions for the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Martijn Paul Jung Kyu

    2006-01-01

    Inactivating mutations of the von Hippel-Lindau gene (VHL) on chromosome 3p have been associated with the autosomal dominant VHL disease, characterized by extensively vascularized tumors and cysts in different organs, as well as the majority of conventional kidney cancers. The VHL gene product

  11. Discovery of Metastatic Breast Cancer Suppressor Genes Using Functional Genome Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    al., 2008; Cheung,H.W., et al., 2011; Barbie ,D.A., et al., 2009]. To identify genes whose essentiality could be associated specifically with...Reference Barbie ,D.A., Tamayo,P., Boehm,J.S., Kim,S.Y., Moody,S.E., Dunn,I.F., Schinzel,A.C., Sandy,P., Meylan,E., Scholl,C., Frohling,S., Chan,E.M... Barbie ,D.A., Awad,T., Zhou,X., Nguyen,T., Piqani,B., Li,C., Golub,T.R., Meyerson,M., Hacohen,N., Hahn,W.C., Lander,E.S., Sabatini,D.M., and Root

  12. RET is a potential tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanxin; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Park, Dong Il; Fausel, Rebecca; Kanngurn, Samornmas; Welcsh, Piri; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Wang, Jianping; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer arises as the consequence of mutations and epigenetic alterations that activate oncogenes and inactivate tumor suppressor genes. Through a genome-wide screen for methylated genes in colon neoplasms, we identified aberrantly methylated RET in colorectal cancer. RET, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase and a receptor for the GDNF-family ligands, was one of the first oncogenes to be identified and has been shown to be an oncogene in thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma. However, unexpectedly, we found RET is methylated in 27% of colon adenomas and in 63% of colorectal cancers, and now provide evidence that RET has tumor suppressor activity in colon cancer. The aberrant methylation of RET correlates with decreased RET expression, whereas the restoration of RET in colorectal cancer cell lines results in apoptosis. Furthermore, in support of a tumor suppressor function of RET, mutant RET has also been found in primary colorectal cancer. We now show that these mutations inactivate RET, which is consistent with RET being a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. These findings suggest that the aberrant methylation of RET and the mutational inactivation of RET promote colorectal cancer formation and that RET can serve as a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. Moreover, the increased frequency of methylated RET in colon cancers compared to adenomas suggests RET inactivation is involved in the progression of colon adenomas to cancer. PMID:22751117

  13. Functional interactions between the erupted/tsg101 growth suppressor gene and the DaPKC and rbf1 genes in Drosophila imaginal disc tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Melissa Gilbert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Drosophila gene erupted (ept encodes the fly homolog of human Tumor Susceptibility Gene-101 (TSG101, which functions as part of the conserved ESCRT-1 complex to facilitate the movement of cargoes through the endolysosomal pathway. Loss of ept or other genes that encode components of the endocytic machinery (e.g. synatxin7/avalanche, rab5, and vps25 produces disorganized overgrowth of imaginal disc tissue. Excess cell division is postulated to be a primary cause of these 'neoplastic' phenotypes, but the autonomous effect of these mutations on cell cycle control has not been examined. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that disc cells lacking ept function display an altered cell cycle profile indicative of deregulated progression through the G1-to-S phase transition and express reduced levels of the tumor suppressor ortholog and G1/S inhibitor Rbf1. Genetic reductions of the Drosophila aPKC kinase (DaPKC, which has been shown to promote tumor growth in other fly tumor models, prevent both the ept neoplastic phenotype and the reduction in Rbf1 levels that otherwise occurs in clones of ept mutant cells; this effect is coincident with changes in localization of Notch and Crumbs, two proteins whose sorting is altered in ept mutant cells. The effect on Rbf1 can also be blocked by removal of the gamma-secretase component presenilin, suggesting that cleavage of a gamma-secretase target influences Rbf1 levels in ept mutant cells. Expression of exogenous rbf1 completely ablates ept mutant eye tissues but only mildly affects the development of discs composed of cells with wild type ept. CONCLUSIONS: Together, these data show that loss of ept alters nuclear cell cycle control in developing imaginal discs and identify the DaPKC, presenilin, and rbf1 genes as modifiers of molecular and cellular phenotypes that result from loss of ept.

  14. Molecular biology III - Oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaccia, Amato J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this course is to introduce to radiation oncologists the basic concepts of tumorigenesis, building on the information that will be presented in the first and second part of this series of lectures. Objective: Our objective is to increase the current understanding of radiation oncologists with the process of tumorigenesis, especially focusing on genes that are altered in many tumor types that are potential candidates for novel molecular strategies. As strategies to treat cancer of cancer are becoming more sophisticated, it will be important for both the practitioner and academician to develop a basic understanding of the function of cancer 'genes'. This will be the third in a series of refresher courses that are meant to address recent advances in Cancer Biology in a way that both clinicians without previous knowledge of molecular biology or experienced researchers will find interesting. The lecture will begin with a basic overview of tumorigenesis; methods of detecting chromosome/DNA alterations, approaches used to isolate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, and their role in cell killing by apoptosis. Special attention will be given to oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that are modulated by ionizing radiation and the tumor microenvironment. We will relate the biology of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes to basic aspects of radiation biology that would be important in clinical practice. Finally, we will review recent studies on the prognostic significance of p53 mutations and apoptosis in tumor specimens. The main point of this lecture is to relate both researcher and clinician what are the therapeutic ramifications of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene mutations found in human neoptasia

  15. Loss of function of the tuberous sclerosis 2 tumor suppressor gene results in embryonic lethality characterized by disrupted neuroepithelial growth and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennebeck, Gabriela; Kleymenova, Elena V.; Anderson, Rebecca; Yeung, Raymond S.; Artzt, Karen; Walker, Cheryl L.

    1998-01-01

    Germline defects in the tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) tumor suppressor gene predispose humans and rats to benign and malignant lesions in a variety of tissues. The brain is among the most profoundly affected organs in tuberous sclerosis (TSC) patients and is the site of development of the cortical tubers for which the hereditary syndrome is named. A spontaneous germline inactivation of the Tsc2 locus has been described in an animal model, the Eker rat. We report that the homozygous state of this mutation (Tsc2Ek/Ek) was lethal in mid-gestation (the equivalent of mouse E9.5–E13.5), when Tsc2 mRNA was highly expressed in embryonic neuroepithelium. During this period homozygous mutant Eker embryos lacking functional Tsc2 gene product, tuberin, displayed dysraphia and papillary overgrowth of the neuroepithelium, indicating that loss of tuberin disrupted the normal development of this tissue. Interestingly, there was significant intraspecies variability in the penetrance of cranial abnormalities in mutant embryos: the Long–Evans strain Tsc2Ek/Ek embryos displayed these defects whereas the Fisher 344 homozygous mutant embryos had normal-appearing neuroepithelium. Taken together, our data indicate that the Tsc2 gene participates in normal brain development and suggest the inactivation of this gene may have similar functional consequences in both mature and embryonic brain. PMID:9861021

  16. PTEN, a Tumor Suppressor Gene for Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ittmann, Michael

    1999-01-01

    .... The PTEN gene is a tumor suppressor gene recently cloned from human chromosome 10q23.3 that encodes a lipid phosphatase which influences a variety of cellular processes that impact on the neoplastic phenotype...

  17. Tsw gene-based resistance is triggered by a functional RNA silencing suppressor protein of the Tomato spotted wilt virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronde, de D.; Butterbach, P.B.E.; Lohuis, H.; Hedil, M.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Kormelink, R.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    As a result of contradictory reports, the avirulence (Avr) determinant that triggers Tsw gene-based resistance in Capsicum annuum against the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is still unresolved. Here, the N and NSs genes of resistance-inducing (RI) and resistance-breaking (RB) isolates were cloned

  18. p53 tumor suppressor gene: significance in neoplasia - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    p53 is a tumor suppressor gene located on chromosome 17p13.1. Its function includes cell cycle control and apoptosis. Loss of p53 function, either due to decreased level or genetic transformation, is associated with loss of cell cycle control, decrease, apoptosis and genomic modification, such mutation of p53 gene is now assessed and the indicator of neoplasia of cancer of several organs and cell types, p53 has demonstrated to have critical role in defining various progressive stages of neoplasia, therapeutic strategies and clinical application. The present review briefly describes function of p53 in addition to its diagnostic and prognostic significance in detecting several types of neoplasia. (author)

  19. The potential for tumor suppressor gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, Andrew C; Ludwig, Megan L; Spector, Matthew E; Brenner, J Chad

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains a highly morbid and fatal disease. Importantly, genomic sequencing of head and neck cancers has identified frequent mutations in tumor suppressor genes. While targeted therapeutics increasingly are being investigated in head and neck cancer, the majority of these agents are against overactive/overexpressed oncogenes. Therapy to restore lost tumor suppressor gene function remains a key and under-addressed niche in trials for head and neck cancer. Recent advances in gene editing have captured the interest of both the scientific community and the public. As our technology for gene editing and gene expression modulation improves, addressing lost tumor suppressor gene function in head and neck cancers is becoming a reality. This review will summarize new techniques, challenges to implementation, future directions, and ethical ramifications of gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

  20. Classical Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes: A Comparative Genomics Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxana K. Pickeral

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available We have curated a reference set of cancer-related genes and reanalyzed their sequences in the light of molecular information and resources that have become available since they were first cloned. Homology studies were carried out for human oncogenes and tumor suppressors, compared with the complete proteome of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, and partial proteomes of mouse and rat and the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Our results demonstrate that simple, semi-automated bioinformatics approaches to identifying putative functionally equivalent gene products in different organisms may often be misleading. An electronic supplement to this article1 provides an integrated view of our comparative genomics analysis as well as mapping data, physical cDNA resources and links to published literature and reviews, thus creating a “window” into the genomes of humans and other organisms for cancer biology.

  1. MicroRNA-375 Functions as a Tumor-Suppressor Gene in Gastric Cancer by Targeting Recepteur d’Origine Nantais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Lian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence supports a fundamental role for microRNAs (miRNA in regulating cancer metastasis. Recently, microRNA-375 (miR-375 was reported to be downregulated in many types of cancers, including gastric cancer. Increase in the expression of Recepteur d’Origine Nantais (RON, a receptor tyrosine kinase, has been reported in tumors. However, the function of miR-375 and RON expression in gastric cancer metastasis has not been sufficiently studied. In silico analysis identified miR-375 binding sites in the 3′-untranslated regions (3′-UTR of the RON-encoding gene. Expression of miR-375 resulted in reduced activity of a luciferase reporter containing the 3′-UTR fragments of RON-encoding mRNA, confirming that miR-375 directly targets the 3′-UTR of RON mRNA. Moreover, we found that overexpression of miR-375 inhibited mRNA and protein expression of RON, which was accompanied by the suppression of cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in gastric cancer AGS and MKN-28 cells. Ectopic miR-375 expression also induced G1 cell cycle arrest through a decrease in the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, and in the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (Rb. Knockdown of RON by RNAi, similar to miR-375 overexpression, suppressed tumorigenic properties and induced G1 arrest through a decrease in the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, and in the phosphorylation of Rb. Thus, our study provides evidence that miR-375 acts as a suppressor of metastasis in gastric cancer by targeting RON, and might represent a new potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer.

  2. Cellular senescence and tumor suppressor gene p16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayess, Hani; Wang, Marilene B; Srivatsan, Eri S

    2012-04-15

    Cellular senescence is an irreversible arrest of cell growth. Biochemical and morphological changes occur during cellular senescence, including the formation of a unique cellular morphology such as flattened cytoplasm. Function of mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes are affected resulting in the inhibition of lysosomal and proteosomal pathways. Cellular senescence can be triggered by a number of factors including, aging, DNA damage, oncogene activation and oxidative stress. While the molecular mechanism of senescence involves p16 and p53 tumor suppressor genes and telomere shortening, this review is focused on the mechanism of p16 control. The p16-mediated senescence acts through the retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway inhibiting the action of the cyclin dependant kinases leading to G1 cell cycle arrest. Rb is maintained in a hypophosphorylated state resulting in the inhibition of transcription factor E2F1. Regulation of p16 expression is complex and involves epigenetic control and multiple transcription factors. PRC1 (Pombe repressor complex (1) and PRC2 (Pombe repressor complex (2) proteins and histone deacetylases play an important role in the promoter hypermethylation for suppressing p16 expression. While transcription factors YY1 and Id1 suppress p16 expression, transcription factors CTCF, Sp1 and Ets family members activate p16 transcription. Senescence occurs with the inactivation of suppressor elements leading to the enhanced expression of p16. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  3. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Alterations in the tumour suppressor p53 gene are among the most common defects seen in a variety of human cancers. In order ... from Indian patients, we checked 44 untreated primary gliomas for mutations in exons 5–9 of the p53 gene by. PCR-SSCP ... function of p53 is critical to the efficiency of many cancer treatment ...

  4. Tumour suppressor genes in sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Ganesan, Trivadi S

    2002-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most frequent cause of death from gynaecological malignancies in the western world, and sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer is its most predominant form. The aetiology of sporadic ovarian cancer remains unknown. Genetic studies have enabled a better understanding...... of the evolution of tumour progression. A major focus of research has been to identify tumour suppressor genes implicated in sporadic ovarian cancer over the past decade. Several tumour suppressor genes have been identified by strategies such as positional cloning and differential expression display. Further...... research is warranted to understand fully their contribution to the pathogenesis of sporadic ovarian cancer....

  5. Analyses of tumor-suppressor genes in germline mouse models of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingqiang; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2014-08-01

    Tumor-suppressor genes are critical regulators of growth and functioning of cells, whose loss of function contributes to tumorigenesis. Accordingly, analyses of the consequences of their loss of function in genetically engineered mouse models have provided important insights into mechanisms of human cancer, as well as resources for preclinical analyses and biomarker discovery. Nowadays, most investigations of genetically engineered mouse models of tumor-suppressor function use conditional or inducible alleles, which enable analyses in specific cancer (tissue) types and overcome the consequences of embryonic lethality of germline loss of function of essential tumor-suppressor genes. However, historically, analyses of genetically engineered mouse models based on germline loss of function of tumor-suppressor genes were very important as these early studies established the principle that loss of function could be studied in mouse cancer models and also enabled analyses of these essential genes in an organismal context. Although the cancer phenotypes of these early germline models did not always recapitulate the expected phenotypes in human cancer, these models provided the essential foundation for the more sophisticated conditional and inducible models that are currently in use. Here, we describe these "first-generation" germline models of loss of function models, focusing on the important lessons learned from their analyses, which helped in the design and analyses of "next-generation" genetically engineered mouse models. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  6. Wilms' tumours: about tumour suppressor genes, an oncogene and a chameleon gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Vicki

    2011-02-01

    Genes identified as being mutated in Wilms' tumour include TP53, a classic tumour suppressor gene (TSG); CTNNB1 (encoding β-catenin), a classic oncogene; WTX, which accumulating data indicate is a TSG; and WT1, which is inactivated in some Wilms' tumours, similar to a TSG. However, WT1 does not always conform to the TSG label, and some data indicate that WT1 enhances cell survival and proliferation, like an oncogene. Is WT1 a chameleon, functioning as either a TSG or an oncogene, depending on cellular context? Are these labels even appropriate for describing and understanding the function of WT1?

  7. Intellectual disability, oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes: the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    associated with Van-Hippel Lindau syndrome, an inherited neoplastic disorder with retinal and central nervous haeman- gioblastomas and high risk of renal cancers (Maher et al. Keywords. array-CGH; mental retardation; oncogenes; tumour suppressor genes; intellectual disability. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 91, No.

  8. Intellectual disability, oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes: the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. array-CGH; mental retardation; oncogenes; tumour suppressor genes; intellectual disability. Author Affiliations. M. Bidart1 2 3 C. Coutton4 5 3. Plateforme Protéomique et Transcriptomique Clinique, Pole Recherche, CHU Grenoble, 38043 Grenoble, France; Equipe, Nanomédecine et Cerveau, Inserm U836, ...

  9. Hypomethylation of tumor suppressor genes in odontogenic myxoma

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira,Paula Rocha; Cardoso,Fabiano Pereira; Brito,João Artur Ricieri; Batista,Aline Carvalho; Gomes,Carolina Cavaliéri; Gomez,Ricardo Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an ectomesenchymal benign odontogenic tumor characterized by spindle or stellate-shaped cells embedded in an abundant myxoid or mucoid extracellular matrix. DNA methylation is characterized by the addition of methyl groups in cytosines within CpG islands in the promoter gene. DNA methylation can decrease the expression of tumor suppressor genes and contribute to the development of neoplastic lesions. The aim of study was to evaluate the methylation pattern of the tu...

  10. Suppressor cell function is preserved in pemphigus and pemphigoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, A.J.; Schwartz, S.A.; Lopatin, D.; Voorhees, J.J.; Diaz, L.A.

    1982-09-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) are activated to become suppressor T cells (S-T-C) by incubation with Concanavalin-A (Con-A). This has become the standard method for evaluation of suppressor function in patients. S-T-C function has been found to be impaired in several autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Using this assay, we have investigated suppressor-cell function in 2 autoimmune disorders, bullous pemphigoid (BP) and pemphigus vulgaris (PV), studying 6 patients from each group. Three patients with active SLE (positive controls), and 11 normal donors (negative controls) were also included. None of these patients had received systemic therapy with the exception of 2 patients with PV who were treated with gold in the past. PBL from these patients were incubated with and without 40 micrograms/ml Con-A for 72 hr to generate suppressor cells. Both groups of PBL were then irradiated wih 1500 r cobalt. Co-cultures were set up in sextuplicate using normal PBL as responders. Responder PBL were stimulated with 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 micrograms/ml of phytohemagglutin (PHA) and 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 micrograms/ml of Con-A. Cultures were pulsed on day 3 with /sup 3/H-thymidine and harvested on day 4. Data were analyzed using Student's t-test. S-T-C function was found to be significantly impaired in SLE vs normal (p . 0.0316). No statistically significant difference was seen in BP (p . 0.5883) and PV (p . 0.0921) as compared with normals. A defect in suppressor cell function may still be present in patients with PV and BP for the defect may be antigen-specific and therefore remain undetected by the Con-A suppressor assay.

  11. Suppressor cell function is preserved in pemphigus and pemphigoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, A.J.; Schwartz, S.A.; Lopatin, D.; Voorhees, J.J.; Diaz, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) are activated to become suppressor T cells (S-T-C) by incubation with Concanavalin-A (Con-A). This has become the standard method for evaluation of suppressor function in patients. S-T-C function has been found to be impaired in several autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Using this assay, we have investigated suppressor-cell function in 2 autoimmune disorders, bullous pemphigoid (BP) and pemphigus vulgaris (PV), studying 6 patients from each group. Three patients with active SLE (positive controls), and 11 normal donors (negative controls) were also included. None of these patients had received systemic therapy with the exception of 2 patients with PV who were treated with gold in the past. PBL from these patients were incubated with and without 40 micrograms/ml Con-A for 72 hr to generate suppressor cells. Both groups of PBL were then irradiated wih 1500 r cobalt. Co-cultures were set up in sextuplicate using normal PBL as responders. Responder PBL were stimulated with 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 micrograms/ml of phytohemagglutin (PHA) and 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 micrograms/ml of Con-A. Cultures were pulsed on day 3 with 3 H-thymidine and harvested on day 4. Data were analyzed using Student's t-test. S-T-C function was found to be significantly impaired in SLE vs normal (p . 0.0316). No statistically significant difference was seen in BP (p . 0.5883) and PV (p . 0.0921) as compared with normals. A defect in suppressor cell function may still be present in patients with PV and BP for the defect may be antigen-specific and therefore remain undetected by the Con-A suppressor assay

  12. Molecular genetic analysis of tumor suppressor genes in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Je Ho; Park, Sang Yun

    1992-04-01

    To examine the loci of putative tumor suppressor genes in ovarian cancers, we performed the molecular genetic analysis with fresh human ovarian cancers and observed the following data. Frequent allelic losses were observed on chromosomes 4p(42%), 6p(50%), 7p(43%), 8q(31%), 12p(38%), 12q(33%), 16p(33%), 16q(37%), and 19p(34%) in addition to the previously reported 6q, 11p, and 17p in ovarian caroinomas. we have used an additional probe, TCP10 to narrow down the deleted region on chromosome 6q. TCP10 was reported to be mapped to 6q 25-27. Allelic loss was found to be 40% in epithelial ovarian caroinomas. This finding suggests that chromosome 6q 24-27 is one of putative region haboring the tumor suppressor gene of epithelial ovarian cancer (particularly serous type). To examine the association between FAL(Fractional Allelic Loss) and histopathological features, the FAL value on each phenotypically different tumor was calculated as the ratio of the number of allelic losses versus the number of cases informative in each chromosomal arm. The average FALs for each phenotypically different tumor were: serous cystoadenocarcinomas. FAL=0.31 : mucinous 0.12 : and clear cell carcinoma. FAL=0.20. (Author)

  13. Role of natural antisense transcripts pertaining to tumor suppressor genes in human carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelicci, G.; Pierotti, M.

    2009-01-01

    Overlapping transcripts in opposite orientations can potentially form perfect sense-antisense duplex RNA. Recently, several studies have revealed the extent of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) and their role in important biological phenomena also in higher organisms. In order to test the hypothesis that the function of NATs in man might represent an essential element in the regulation of gene expression, especially at transcriptional level, in this study we planned to look for, systematically examine, and characterize NATs belonging in the human genome to the tumour suppressor class of genes, so to identify physiological (and potentially pathological) modulators in this gene class

  14. Genomic Analyses Reveal Global Functional Alterations That Promote Tumor Growth and Novel Tumor Suppressor Genes in Natural Killer-Cell Malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucuk, Can; Iqbal, Javeed; J. deLeeuw, Ronald

    in the gene expression profile, we performed GEP and array-CGH studies on seven clinically well defined cases and eight well characterized cell lines derived from NKL patients. Methods: Array-CGH was performed on a tiling BAC array and GEP on an Affymetrix 133 plus2 array.The two data sets were correlated...... to identify functional alterations associated with the genetic abnormalities.Candidate genes on del 6q21 were identified and further studied for mutations and promoter methylation. Results: Our aCGH study identified frequent recurrent gains (> 25 %) in 1q, 2p, 7q, 13q, 17q and 20pter-qter. Regions of loss...

  15. Mutational hotspots in the TP53 gene and, possibly, other tumor suppressors evolve by positive selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonin Eugene V

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mutation spectra of the TP53 gene and other tumor suppressors contain multiple hotspots, i.e., sites of non-random, frequent mutation in tumors and/or the germline. The origin of the hotspots remains unclear, the general view being that they represent highly mutable nucleotide contexts which likely reflect effects of different endogenous and exogenous factors shaping the mutation process in specific tissues. The origin of hotspots is of major importance because it has been suggested that mutable contexts could be used to infer mechanisms of mutagenesis contributing to tumorigenesis. Results Here we apply three independent tests, accounting for non-uniform base compositions in synonymous and non-synonymous sites, to test whether the hotspots emerge via selection or due to mutational bias. All three tests consistently indicate that the hotspots in the TP53 gene evolve, primarily, via positive selection. The results were robust to the elimination of the highly mutable CpG dinucleotides. By contrast, only one, the least conservative test reveals the signature of positive selection in BRCA1, BRCA2, and p16. Elucidation of the origin of the hotspots in these genes requires more data on somatic mutations in tumors. Conclusion The results of this analysis seem to indicate that positive selection for gain-of-function in tumor suppressor genes is an important aspect of tumorigenesis, blurring the distinction between tumor suppressors and oncogenes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Sandor Pongor, Christopher Lee and Mikhail Blagosklonny.

  16. Expression of the p16{sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in rodent lung tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swafford, D.S.; Tesfaigzi, J.; Belinsky, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    Aberrations on the short arm of chromosome 9 are among the earliest genetic changes in human cancer. p16{sup INK4a} is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that lies within human 9p21, a chromosome region associated with frequent loss of heterozygosity in human lung tumors. The p16{sup INK4a} protein functions as an inhibitor of cyclin D{sub 1}-dependent kinases that phosphorylate the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor gene product enabling cell-cycle progression. Thus, overexpression of cyclin D{sub 1}, mutation of cyclin-dependent kinase genes, or loss of p16{sup INK4a} function, can all result in functional inactivation of Rb. Inactivation of Rb by mutation or deletion can result in an increase in p16{sup INK4a} transcription, suggesting that an increased p16{sup INK4a} expression in a tumor cell signals dysfunction of the pathway. The p16{sup (INK4a)} gene, unlike some tumor suppressor genes, is rarely inactivated by mutation. Instead, the expression of this gene is suppressed in some human cancers by hypermethylation of the CpG island within the first exon or by homozygous deletion: 686. Chromosome losses have been observed at 9p21 syntenic loci in tumors of the mouse and rat, two species often used as animal models for pulmonary carcinogenesis. Expression of p16{sup INK4a} is lost in some mouse tumor cell lines, often due to homozygous deletion. These observations indicate that p16{sup INK4a} dysfunction may play a role in the development of neoplasia in rodents as well as humans. The purpose of the current investigation was to define the extent to which p16{sup INK4a} dysfunction contributes to the development of rodent lung tumors and to determine the mechanism of inactivation of the gene. There is no evidence to suggest a loss of function of the p16{sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in these primary murine lung tumors by mutation, deletion, or methylation.

  17. Methylation of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinugawa, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Takeshi; Sano, Kenji; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Maruyama, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Nakajima, Tomoyuki; Hamano, Hideaki; Kawa, Shigeyuki; Higuchi, Kayoko; Hosaka, Noriko; Shiozawa, Satoshi; Ishigame, Hiroki; Ota, Hiroyoshi

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a representative IgG4-related and inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. To clarify mechanisms of carcinogenesis resulting from AIP, we focused on methylation abnormalities and KRAS mutations in AIP. Six tumor suppressor genes (NPTX2, Cyclin D2, FOXE1, TFPI2, ppENK, and p16) that exhibited hypermethylation in pancreatic carcinoma were selected for quantitative SYBR green methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction in 10 AIP specimens, 10 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases without history of AIP containing carcinoma areas (CAs) and noncarcinoma areas (NCAs), and 11 normal pancreas (NP) samples. KRAS mutation in codons 12, 13, and 61 were also investigated using direct sequencing. Hypermethylation events (≥10%) were identified in NPTX2, Cyclin D2, FOXE1, TFPI2, ppENK, and p16 in 1, 2, 2, 0, 2, and 0 CA cases, respectively, but not in these 6 candidate genes in AIP, NCA, and NP. However, the TFPI2 methylation ratio was significantly higher in AIP than NCA and NP. Direct sequencing results for KRAS showed no single-point mutations in AIP. These are the first studies characterizing methylation abnormalities in AIP. AIP's inflammatory condition may be related to carcinogenesis. Further study will elucidate methylation abnormalities associated with carcinogenesis in AIP.

  18. Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes: Paradigms, puzzles, and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanets, Anna; Shorstova, Tatiana; Hilmi, Khalid; Marques, Maud; Witcher, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Cancer constitutes a set of diseases with heterogeneous molecular pathologies. However, there are a number of universal aberrations common to all cancers, one of these being the epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). The silencing of TSGs is thought to be an early, driving event in the oncogenic process. With this in consideration, great efforts have been made to develop small molecules aimed at the restoration of TSGs in order to limit tumor cell proliferation and survival. However, the molecular forces that drive the broad epigenetic reprogramming and transcriptional repression of these genes remain ill-defined. Undoubtedly, understanding the molecular underpinnings of transcriptionally silenced TSGs will aid us in our ability to reactivate these key anti-cancer targets. Here, we describe what we consider to be the five most logical molecular mechanisms that may account for this widely observed phenomenon: 1) ablation of transcription factor binding, 2) overexpression of DNA methyltransferases, 3) disruption of CTCF binding, 4) elevation of EZH2 activity, 5) aberrant expression of long non-coding RNAs. The strengths and weaknesses of each proposed mechanism is highlighted, followed by an overview of clinical efforts to target these processes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhancer-Mediated Oncogenic Function of the Menin Tumor Suppressor in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen M.A. Dreijerink

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available While the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1 gene functions as a tumor suppressor in a variety of cancer types, we explored its oncogenic role in breast tumorigenesis. The MEN1 gene product menin is involved in H3K4 trimethylation and co-activates transcription. We integrated ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data to identify menin target genes. Our analysis revealed that menin-dependent target gene promoters display looping to distal enhancers that are bound by menin, FOXA1 and GATA3. In this fashion, MEN1 co-regulates a proliferative breast cancer-specific gene expression program in ER+ cells. In primary mammary cells, MEN1 exerts an anti-proliferative function by regulating a distinct expression signature. Our findings clarify the cell-type-specific functions of MEN1 and inform the development of menin-directed treatments for breast cancer.

  20. Tumor Suppressor Genes within Common Fragile Sites Are Active Players in the DNA Damage Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idit Hazan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of common fragile sites (CFSs in cancer remains controversial. Two main views dominate the discussion: one suggests that CFS loci are hotspots of genomic instability leading to inactivation of genes encoded within them, while the other view proposes that CFSs are functional units and that loss of the encoded genes confers selective pressure, leading to cancer development. The latter view is supported by emerging evidence showing that expression of a given CFS is associated with genome integrity and that inactivation of CFS-resident tumor suppressor genes leads to dysregulation of the DNA damage response (DDR and increased genomic instability. These two viewpoints of CFS function are not mutually exclusive but rather coexist; when breaks at CFSs are not repaired accurately, this can lead to deletions by which cells acquire growth advantage because of loss of tumor suppressor activities. Here, we review recent advances linking some CFS gene products with the DDR, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis and discuss how their inactivation might represent a selective advantage for cancer cells.

  1. RASSF10 is epigenetically silenced and functions as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Ziran [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Chen, Xia [Urology Department, Minhang District Central Hospital, Shanghai (China); Chen, Ji; Wang, Weimin [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Xu, Xudong [Urology Department, Minhang District Central Hospital, Shanghai (China); Cai, Qingping, E-mail: qingping_caicz@163.com [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► Epigenetic silencing of RASSF10 gene expression in GC cells. ► RASSF10 overexpression inhibits cell growth in vitro and in vivo. ► RASSF10 induces apoptosis in GC cells. ► RASSF10 inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. -- Abstract: Ras association domain family (RASSF) proteins are encoded by several tumor suppressor genes that are frequently silenced in human cancers. In this study, we investigated RASSF10 as a target of epigenetic inactivation and examined its functions as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer. RASSF10 was silenced in six out of eight gastric cancer cell lines. Loss or downregulation of RASSF10 expression was associated with promoter hypermethylation, and could be restored by a demethylating agent. Overexpression of RASSF10 in gastric cancer cell lines (JRST, BGC823) suppressed cell growth and colony formation, and induced apoptosis, whereas RASSF10 depletion promoted cell growth. In xenograft animal experiments, RASSF10 overexpression effectively repressed tumor growth. Mechanistic investigations revealed that RASSF10 inhibited tumor growth by blocking activation of β-catenin and its downstream targets including c-Myc, cyclinD1, cyclinE1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ, transcription factor 4, transcription factor 1 and CD44. In conclusion, the results of this study provide insight into the role of RASSF10 as a novel functional tumor suppressor in gastric cancer through inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  2. Remodeling epigenetic modifications at tumor suppressor gene promoters with bovine oocyte extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenfei; Yue, Yongli; Han, Pengyong; Sa, Rula; Ren, Xiaolv; Wang, Jie; Bai, Haidong; Yu, Haiquan

    2013-09-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes by aberrant DNA methylation and histone modifications at their promoter regions plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cancer. The therapeutic effect of the widely used epigenetic drugs, including DNA methyltransferase inhibitors and histone deacetylase inhibitors, remains unsatisfactory. One important underlying factor in the ineffectiveness of these drugs is that their actions lack specificity. To investigate whether oocyte extract can be used for epigenetic re-programming of cancer cells, H460 human lung cancer cells were reversibly permeabilized and incubated with bovine oocyte extract. Bisulfite sequencing showed that bovine oocyte extract induced significant demethylation at hypermethylated promoter CpG islands of the tumor suppressor genes RUNX3 and CDH1; however, the DNA methylation levels of repetitive sequences were not affected. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that bovine oocyte extract significantly reduced transcriptionally repressive histone modifications and increased transcriptionally activating histone modifications at the promoter regions of RUNX3 and CDH1. Bovine oocyte extract reactivated the expression of RUNX3 and CDH1 at both the messenger RNA and the protein levels without up-regulating the transcription of pluripotency-associated genes. At the functional level, anchorage-independent proliferation, migration and invasion of H460 cells was strongly inhibited. These results demonstrate that bovine oocyte extract reactivates epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor genes by remodeling the epigenetic modifications at their promoter regions. Bovine oocyte extract may provide a useful tool for investigating epigenetic mechanisms in cancer and a valuable source for developing novel safe therapeutic approaches that target epigenetic alterations. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Tumor suppressors: enhancers or suppressors of regeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantz, Jason H.; Blau, Helen M.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor suppressors are so named because cancers occur in their absence, but these genes also have important functions in development, metabolism and tissue homeostasis. Here, we discuss known and potential functions of tumor suppressor genes during tissue regeneration, focusing on the evolutionarily conserved tumor suppressors pRb1, p53, Pten and Hippo. We propose that their activity is essential for tissue regeneration. This is in contrast to suggestions that tumor suppression is a trade-off for regenerative capacity. We also hypothesize that certain aspects of tumor suppressor pathways inhibit regenerative processes in mammals, and that transient targeted modification of these pathways could be fruitfully exploited to enhance processes that are important to regenerative medicine. PMID:23715544

  4. Prediction of DNA methylation in the promoter of gene suppressor tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, Imane; Kasmi, Yassine; Allali, Karam; Ennaji, Moulay Mustapha

    2018-04-20

    The epigenetics methylation of cytosine is the most common epigenetic form in DNA sequences. It is highly concentrated in the promoter regions of the genes, leading to an inactivation of tumor suppressors regardless of their initial function. In this work, we aim to identify the highly methylated regions; the cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) island located on the promoters and/or the first exon gene known for their key roles in the cell cycle, hence the need to study gene-gene interactions. The Frommer and hidden Markov model algorithms are used as computational methods to identify CpG islands with specificity and sensitivity up to 76% and 80%, respectively. The results obtained show, on the one hand, that the genes studied are suspected of developing hypermethylation in the promoter region of the gene involved in the case of a cancer. We then showed that the relative richness in CG results from a high level of methylation. On the other hand, we observe that the gene-gene interaction exhibits co-expression between the chosen genes. This let us to conclude that the hidden Markov model algorithm predicts more specific and valuable information about the hypermethylation in gene as a preventive and diagnostics tools for the personalized medicine; as that the tumor-suppresser-genes have relative co-expression and complementary relations which the hypermethylation affect in the samples studied in our work. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Regulation of IAP (Inhibitor of Apoptosis) Gene Expression by the p53 Tumor Suppressor Protein

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murphy, Maureen

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the work proposed in this application, which has just completed Year 1, was to analyze the ability of the p53 tumor suppressor protein to repress the anti-apoptotic genes survivin and cIAP-2...

  6. Tumor suppressor gene E-cadherin and its role in normal and malignant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pećina-Šlaus Nives

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract E-cadherin tumor suppressor genes are particularly active area of research in development and tumorigenesis. The calcium-dependent interactions among E-cadherin molecules are critical for the formation and maintenance of adherent junctions in areas of epithelial cell-cell contact. Loss of E-cadherin-mediated-adhesion characterises the transition from benign lesions to invasive, metastatic cancer. Nevertheless, there is evidence that E-cadherins may also play a role in the wnt signal transduction pathway, together with other key molecules involved in it, such as beta-catenins and adenomatous poliposis coli gene products. The structure and function of E-cadherin, gene and protein, in normal as well as in tumor cells are reviewed in this paper.

  7. Extragenic suppressor mutations in ΔripA disrupt stability and function of LpxA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cheryl N; Steele, Shaun P; Brunton, Jason C; Jenkins, Ronald J; LoVullo, Eric D; Taft-Benz, Sharon A; Romanchuk, Artur; Jones, Corbin D; Dotson, Garry D; Collins, Edward J; Kawula, Thomas H

    2014-12-31

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects hundreds of species including humans, and has evolved to grow efficiently within a plethora of cell types. RipA is a conserved membrane protein of F. tularensis, which is required for growth inside host cells. As a means to determine RipA function we isolated and mapped independent extragenic suppressor mutants in ∆ripA that restored growth in host cells. Each suppressor mutation mapped to one of two essential genes, lpxA or glmU, which are involved in lipid A synthesis. We repaired the suppressor mutation in lpxA (S102, LpxA T36N) and the mutation in glmU (S103, GlmU E57D), and demonstrated that each mutation was responsible for the suppressor phenotype in their respective strains. We hypothesize that the mutation in S102 altered the stability of LpxA, which can provide a clue to RipA function. LpxA is an UDP-N-acetylglucosamine acyltransferase that catalyzes the transfer of an acyl chain from acyl carrier protein (ACP) to UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) to begin lipid A synthesis. LpxA was more abundant in the presence of RipA. Induced expression of lpxA in the ΔripA strain stopped bacterial division. The LpxA T36N S102 protein was less stable and therefore less abundant than wild type LpxA protein. These data suggest RipA functions to modulate lipid A synthesis in F. tularensis as a way to adapt to the host cell environment by interacting with LpxA.

  8. LARG at chromosome 11q23 has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, Danny C.T.; Rudduck, Christina; Chin, Koei; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lie, Daniel K.H.; Chua, Constance L.M.; Wong, Chow Yin; Hong, Ga Sze; Gray, Joe; Lee, Ann S.G.

    2008-05-06

    Deletion of 11q23-q24 is frequent in a diverse variety of malignancies, including breast and colorectal carcinoma, implicating the presence of a tumor suppressor gene at that chromosomal region. We show here that LARG, from 11q23, has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor. We examined a 6-Mb region on 11q23 by high-resolution deletion mapping, utilizing both loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis and microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). LARG (also called ARHGEF12), identified from the analyzed region, was underexpressed in 34% of primary breast carcinomas and 80% of breast cancer cell lines including the MCF-7 line. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification on 30 primary breast cancers and six breast cancer cell lines showed that LARG had the highest frequency of deletion compared to the BCSC-1 and TSLC1 genes, two known candidate tumor suppressor genes from 11q. In vitro analysis of breast cancer cell lines that underexpress LARG showed that LARG could be reactivated by trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, but not by 5-Aza-2{prime}-deoxycytidine, a demethylating agent. Bisulfite sequencing and quantitative high-throughput analysis of DNA methylation confirmed the lack of CpG island methylation in LARG in breast cancer. Restoration of LARG expression in MCF-7 cells by stable transfection resulted in reduced proliferation and colony formation, suggesting that LARG has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor gene.

  9. Tumor-suppressor genes that escape from X-inactivation contribute to cancer sex bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Andrew; Weinstock, David M; Savova, Virginia; Schumacher, Steven E; Cleary, John P; Yoda, Akinori; Sullivan, Timothy J; Hess, Julian M; Gimelbrant, Alexander A; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lawrence, Michael S; Getz, Gad; Lane, Andrew A

    2017-01-01

    There is a striking and unexplained male predominance across many cancer types. A subset of X-chromosome genes can escape X-inactivation, which would protect females from complete functional loss by a single mutation. To identify putative 'escape from X-inactivation tumor-suppressor' (EXITS) genes, we examined somatic alterations from >4,100 cancers across 21 tumor types for sex bias. Six of 783 non-pseudoautosomal region (PAR) X-chromosome genes (ATRX, CNKSR2, DDX3X, KDM5C, KDM6A, and MAGEC3) harbored loss-of-function mutations more frequently in males (based on a false discovery rate < 0.1), in comparison to zero of 18,055 autosomal and PAR genes (Fisher's exact P < 0.0001). Male-biased mutations in genes that escape X-inactivation were observed in combined analysis across many cancers and in several individual tumor types, suggesting a generalized phenomenon. We conclude that biallelic expression of EXITS genes in females explains a portion of the reduced cancer incidence in females as compared to males across a variety of tumor types.

  10. Generation and characterization of mice carrying a conditional allele of the Wwox tumor suppressor gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H Ludes-Meyers

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available WWOX, the gene that spans the second most common human chromosomal fragile site, FRA16D, is inactivated in multiple human cancers and behaves as a suppressor of tumor growth. Since we are interested in understanding WWOX function in both normal and cancer tissues we generated mice harboring a conditional Wwox allele by flanking Exon 1 of the Wwox gene with LoxP sites. Wwox knockout (KO mice were developed by breeding with transgenic mice carrying the Cre-recombinase gene under the control of the adenovirus EIIA promoter. We found that Wwox KO mice suffered from severe metabolic defect(s resulting in growth retardation and all mice died by 3 wk of age. All Wwox KO mice displayed significant hypocapnia suggesting a state of metabolic acidosis. This finding and the known high expression of Wwox in kidney tubules suggest a role for Wwox in acid/base balance. Importantly, Wwox KO mice displayed histopathological and hematological signs of impaired hematopoiesis, leukopenia, and splenic atrophy. Impaired hematopoiesis can also be a contributing factor to metabolic acidosis and death. Hypoglycemia and hypocalcemia was also observed affecting the KO mice. In addition, bone metabolic defects were evident in Wwox KO mice. Bones were smaller and thinner having reduced bone volume as a consequence of a defect in mineralization. No evidence of spontaneous neoplasia was observed in Wwox KO mice. We have generated a new mouse model to inactivate the Wwox tumor suppressor gene conditionally. This will greatly facilitate the functional analysis of Wwox in adult mice and will allow investigating neoplastic transformation in specific target tissues.

  11. ING Genes Work as Tumor Suppressor Genes in the Carcinogenesis of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohan Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the sixth most common cancer in the world. The evolution and progression of HNSCC are considered to result from multiple stepwise alterations of cellular and molecular pathways in squamous epithelium. Recently, inhibitor of growth gene (ING family consisting of five genes, ING1 to ING5, was identified as a new tumor suppressor gene family that was implicated in the downregulation of cell cycle and chromatin remodeling. In contrast, it has been shown that ING1 and ING2 play an oncogenic role in some cancers, this situation being similar to TGF-β. In HNSCC, the ING family has been reported to be downregulated, and ING translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm may be a critical event for carcinogenesis. In this paper, we describe our recent results and briefly summarize current knowledge regarding the biologic functions of ING in HNSCC.

  12. Functional involvement of human discs large tumor suppressor in cytokinesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unno, Kenji; Hanada, Toshihiko; Chishti, Athar H.

    2008-01-01

    Cytokinesis is the final step of cell division that completes the separation of two daughter cells. We found that the human discs large (hDlg) tumor suppressor homologue is functionally involved in cytokinesis. The guanylate kinase (GUK) domain of hDlg mediates the localization of hDlg to the midbody during cytokinesis, and over-expression of the GUK domain in U2OS and HeLa cells impaired cytokinesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from dlg mutant mice contained an increased number of multinucleated cells and showed reduced proliferation in culture. A kinesin-like motor protein, GAKIN, which binds directly to the GUK domain of hDlg, exhibited a similar intracellular distribution pattern with hDlg throughout mitosis and localized to the midbody during cytokinesis. However, the targeting of hDlg and GAKIN to the midbody appeared to be independent of each other. The midbody localization of GAKIN required its functional kinesin-motor domain. Treatment of cells with the siRNA specific for hDlg and GAKIN caused formation of multinucleated cells and delayed cytokinesis. Together, these results suggest that hDlg and GAKIN play functional roles in the maintenance of midbody architecture during cytokinesis

  13. Distinct and competitive regulatory patterns of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhao

    Full Text Available So far, investigators have found numerous tumor suppressor genes (TSGs and oncogenes (OCGs that control cell proliferation and apoptosis during cancer development. Furthermore, TSGs and OCGs may act as modulators of transcription factors (TFs to influence gene regulation. A comprehensive investigation of TSGs, OCGs, TFs, and their joint target genes at the network level may provide a deeper understanding of the post-translational modulation of TSGs and OCGs to TF gene regulation.In this study, we developed a novel computational framework for identifying target genes of TSGs and OCGs using TFs as bridges through the integration of protein-protein interactions and gene expression data. We applied this pipeline to ovarian cancer and constructed a three-layer regulatory network. In the network, the top layer was comprised of modulators (TSGs and OCGs, the middle layer included TFs, and the bottom layer contained target genes. Based on regulatory relationships in the network, we compiled TSG and OCG profiles and performed clustering analyses. Interestingly, we found TSGs and OCGs formed two distinct branches. The genes in the TSG branch were significantly enriched in DNA damage and repair, regulating macromolecule metabolism, cell cycle and apoptosis, while the genes in the OCG branch were significantly enriched in the ErbB signaling pathway. Remarkably, their specific targets showed a reversed functional enrichment in terms of apoptosis and the ErbB signaling pathway: the target genes regulated by OCGs only were enriched in anti-apoptosis and the target genes regulated by TSGs only were enriched in the ErbB signaling pathway.This study provides the first comprehensive investigation of the interplay of TSGs and OCGs in a regulatory network modulated by TFs. Our application in ovarian cancer revealed distinct regulatory patterns of TSGs and OCGs, suggesting a competitive regulatory mechanism acting upon apoptosis and the ErbB signaling pathway through

  14. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alterations in the tumour suppressor p53 gene are among the most common defects seen in a variety of human cancers. In order to study the significance of the p53 gene in the genesis and development of human glioma from Indian patients, we checked 44 untreated primary gliomas for mutations in exons 5–9 of the p53 ...

  15. V2 from a curtovirus is a suppressor of post-transcriptional gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Ana P; Rodríguez-Negrete, Edgar A; Morilla, Gabriel; Wang, Liping; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Castillo, Araceli G; Bejarano, Eduardo R

    2017-10-01

    The suppression of gene silencing is a key mechanism for the success of viral infection in plants. DNA viruses from the Geminiviridae family encode several proteins that suppress transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene silencing (TGS/PTGS). In Begomovirus, the most abundant genus of this family, three out of six genome-encoded proteins, namely C2, C4 and V2, have been shown to suppress PTGS, with V2 being the strongest PTGS suppressor in transient assays. Beet curly top virus (BCTV), the model species for the Curtovirus genus, is able to infect the widest range of plants among geminiviruses. In this genus, only one protein, C2/L2, has been described as inhibiting PTGS. We show here that, despite the lack of sequence homology with its begomoviral counterpart, BCTV V2 acts as a potent PTGS suppressor, possibly by impairing the RDR6 (RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6)/suppressor of gene silencing 3 (SGS3) pathway.

  16. Tumor Suppressor Function of CYLD in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Masoumi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-related proteins posttranslationally modify substrates, and thereby alter the functions of their targets. The ubiquitination process is involved in various physiological responses, and dysregulation of components of the ubiquitin system has been linked to many diseases including skin cancer. The ubiquitin pathways activated among skin cancers are highly diverse and may reflect the various characteristics of the cancer type. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, the most common types of human skin cancer, are instances where the involvement of the deubiquitination enzyme CYLD has been recently highlighted. In basal cell carcinoma, the tumor suppressor protein CYLD is repressed at the transcriptional levels through hedgehog signaling pathway. Downregulation of CYLD in basal cell carcinoma was also shown to interfere with TrkC expression and signaling, thereby promoting cancer progression. By contrast, the level of CYLD is unchanged in squamous cell carcinoma, instead, catalytic inactivation of CYLD in the skin has been linked to the development of squamous cell carcinoma. This paper will focus on the current knowledge that links CYLD to nonmelanoma skin cancers and will explore recent insights regarding CYLD regulation of NF-κB and hedgehog signaling during the development and progression of these types of human tumors.

  17. Regulation of the insulin-like developmental pathway of Caenorhabditis elegans by a homolog of the PTEN tumor suppressor gene

    OpenAIRE

    Gil, Elad B.; Malone Link, Elizabeth; Liu, Leo X.; Johnson, Carl D.; Lees, Jacqueline A.

    1999-01-01

    The human PTEN tumor suppressor gene is mutated in a wide variety of sporadic tumors. To determine the function of PTEN in vivo we have studied a PTEN homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans. We have generated a strong loss-of-function allele of the PTEN homolog and shown that the deficient strain is unable to enter dauer diapause. An insulin-like phosphatidylinositol 3-OH kinase (PI3′K) signaling pathway regulates dauer-stage entry. Mutations in either the daf-2 insulin receptor-like (IRL) gene or...

  18. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bressy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virus (OV therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53 or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73 were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  19. gld-1, a tumor suppressor gene required for oocyte development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, R.; Schedl, T. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Barton, M.K.; Kimble, J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-02-01

    We have characterized 31 mutations in the gld-1 (defective in germline development) gene of Caenorhabditis elegans. In gld-1 (null) hermaphrodites, oogenesis is abolished and a germline tumor forms where oocyte development would normally occur. By contrast, gld-1 (null) males are unaffected. The hermaphrodite germline tumor appears to derive from germ cells that enter the meiotic pathway normally but then exit pachytene and return to the mitotic cycle. Certain gld-1 partial loss-of-function mutations also abolish oogenesis, but germ cells arrest in pachytene rather than returning to mitosis. Our results indicate that gld-1 is a tumor suppressor gene required for oocyte development. The tumorous phenotype suggests that gld-1(+) may function to negatively regulate proliferation during meiotic prophase and/or act to direct progression through meiotic prophase. We also show that gld-1(+) has an additional nonessential role in germline sex determination: promotion of hermaphrodite spermatogenesis. This function of gld-1 is inferred from a haplo-insufficient phenotype and from the properties of gain-of-function gld-1 mutations that cause alterations in the sexual identity of germ cells. 69 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Promoter hypermethylation of KLF4 inactivates its tumor suppressor function in cervical carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ting Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The KLF4 gene has been shown to be inactivated in cervical carcinogenesis as a tumor suppressor. However, the mechanism of KLF4 silencing in cervical carcinomas has not yet been identified. DNA methylation plays a key role in stable suppression of gene expression. METHODS: The methylation status of the KLF4 promoter CpG islands was analyzed by bisulfite sequencing (BSQ in tissues of normal cervix and cervical cancer. KLF4 gene expression was detected by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot. KLF4 promoter methylation in cervical cancer cell line was determined by BSQ and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR. Cell proliferation ability was detected by cell growth curve and MTT assay. RESULTS: The methylated allele was found in 41.90% of 24 cervical cancer tissues but only in 11.11% of 11 normal cervix tissues (P<0.005. KLF4 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in cervical cancer tissues compared with normal cervix tissues (P<0.01 and KLF4 mRNA expression showed a significant negative correlation with the promoter hypermethylation (r = -0.486, P = 0.003. Cervical cancer cell lines also showed a significant negative correlation between KLF4 expression and hypermethylation. After treatment with the demethylating agent 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza, the expression of KLF4 in the cervical cancer cell lines at both mRNA and protein levels was drastically increased, the cell proliferation ability was inhibited and the chemosensitivity for cisplatin was significantly increased. CONCLUSION: KLF4 gene is inactivated by methylation-induced silencing mechanisms in a large subset of cervical carcinomas and KLF4 promoter hypermethylation inactivates the gene's function as a tumor suppressor in cervical carcinogenesis.

  1. The PTEN tumor suppressor gene and its role in lymphoma pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Huang, Huiqiang; Young, Ken H.

    2015-01-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog gene PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancer. Loss of PTEN function occurs in a variety of human cancers via its mutation, deletion, transcriptional silencing, or protein instability. PTEN deficiency in cancer has been associated with advanced disease, chemotherapy resistance, and poor survival. Impaired PTEN function, which antagonizes phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling, causes the accumulation of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate and thereby the suppression of downstream components of the PI3K pathway, including the protein kinase B and mammalian target of rapamycin kinases. In addition to having lipid phosphorylation activity, PTEN has critical roles in the regulation of genomic instability, DNA repair, stem cell self-renewal, cellular senescence, and cell migration. Although PTEN deficiency in solid tumors has been studied extensively, rare studies have investigated PTEN alteration in lymphoid malignancies. However, genomic or epigenomic aberrations of PTEN and dysregulated signaling are likely critical in lymphoma pathogenesis and progression. This review provides updated summary on the role of PTEN deficiency in human cancers, specifically in lymphoid malignancies; the molecular mechanisms of PTEN regulation; and the distinct functions of nuclear PTEN. Therapeutic strategies for rescuing PTEN deficiency in human cancers are proposed. PMID:26655726

  2. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    [Phatak P, Selvi S K, Divya T, Hegde A S, Hegde S and Somasundaram K 2002 Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from Indian patients; J. Biosci. 27 673–678]. 1. Introduction. Glioma, a neoplasm of neuroglial cells, is the most common type of brain tumour, constituting more than 50% of all.

  3. Haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding the tumor suppressor Pten predisposes zebrafish to hemangiosarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choorapoikayil, S.; Kuiper, R.V.; de Bruin, A.; den Hertog, J.

    2012-01-01

    PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that antagonizes Akt/PKB signaling. The zebrafish genome encodes two Pten genes, ptena and ptenb. Here, we report that zebrafish mutants that retain a single wild-type copy of ptena or ptenb (ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) or ptena(-/-)ptenb(+/-)) are viable and fertile.

  4. TFPI-2 is a putative tumor suppressor gene frequently inactivated by promoter hypermethylation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shumin; Ma, Ning; Murata, Mariko; Huang, Guangwu; Zhang, Zhe; Xiao, Xue; Zhou, Xiaoying; Huang, Tingting; Du, Chunping; Yu, Nana; Mo, Yingxi; Lin, Longde; Zhang, Jinyan

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes play important roles in NPC tumorgenesis. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2), is a protease inhibitor. Recently, TFPI-2 was suggested to be a tumor suppressor gene involved in tumorigenesis and metastasis in some cancers. In this study, we investigated whether TFPI-2 was inactivated epigenetically in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Transcriptional expression levels of TFPI-2 was evaluated by RT-PCR. Methylation status were investigated by methylation specific PCR and bisulfate genomic sequencing. The role of TFPI-2 as a tumor suppressor gene in NPC was addressed by re-introducing TFPI-2 expression into the NPC cell line CNE2. TFPI-2 mRNA transcription was inactivated in NPC cell lines. TFPI-2 was aberrantly methylated in 66.7% (4/6) NPC cell lines and 88.6% (62/70) of NPC primary tumors, but not in normal nasopharyngeal epithelia. TFPI-2 expression could be restored in NPC cells after demethylation treatment. Ectopic expression of TFPI-2 in NPC cells induced apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation and cell migration. Epigenetic inactivation of TFPI-2 by promoter hypermethylation is a frequent and tumor specific event in NPC. TFPI-2 might be considering as a putative tumor suppressor gene in NPC

  5. Modulation and Expression of Tumor Suppressor Genes by Environmental Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ostrander, Gary Kent

    1996-01-01

    ... in the retinoblastoma gene in retinoblastoma and hepatocarcinomas following induction with known environmental carcinogens. Studies to date suggest the retinoblastoma gene/protein may play a role in oncogenesis in the medaka.

  6. Gadd45a functions as a promoter or suppressor of breast cancer dependent on the oncogenic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tront, Jennifer S; Huang, Yajue; Fornace, Albert J; Fornace, Albert A; Hoffman, Barbara; Liebermann, Dan A

    2010-12-01

    Gadd45a plays a pivotal role as a stress sensor that modulates cellular responses to various stress stimuli including oncogenic stress. We reported that the stress sensor Gadd45a gene functions as a tumor suppressor in Ras-driven breast tumorigenesis via increasing JNK-mediated apoptosis and p38-mediated senescence. In contrast, here, we show that Gadd45a promotes Myc-driven breast cancer by negatively regulating MMP10 via GSK3 β/β-catenin signaling, resulting in increased tumor vascularization and growth. These novel findings indicate that Gadd45a functions as either tumor promoter or suppressor, is dependent on the oncogenic stress, and is mediated via distinct signaling pathways. Collectively, these novel findings highlight the significance of the type of oncogenic alteration on how stress response genes function during initiation and progression of tumorigenesis. Because Gadd45a is a target for BRCA1 and p53, these findings have implications regarding BRCA1/p53 tumor suppressor functions.

  7. Generation of two modified mouse alleles of the Hic1 tumor suppressor gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíchalová, Vendula; Turečková, Jolana; Fafílek, Bohumil; Vojtěchová, Martina; Krausová, Michaela; Lukáš, Jan; Šloncová, Eva; Takacova, S.; Divoký, V.; Leprince, D.; Plachý, Jiří; Kořínek, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2011), s. 142-151 ISSN 1526-954X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/1567; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Hypermethylated In Cancer 1 * Hic1 tumor suppressor * gene targeting Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.527, year: 2011

  8. Role of tumor suppressor genes in the cancer-associated reprogramming of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Chu; Murayama, Yoshinobu; Hashimoto, Koichiro; Nakamura, Yukio; Lin, Chang-Shin; Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Saito, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    Because of their pluripotent characteristics, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) possess great potential for therapeutic application and for the study of degenerative disorders. These cells are generated from normal somatic cells, multipotent stem cells, or cancer cells. They express embryonic stem cell markers, such as OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, and REX1, and can differentiate into all adult tissue types, both in vitro and in vivo. However, some of the pluripotency-promoting factors have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Here, we describe the merits of tumor suppresser genes as reprogramming factors for the generation of iPSCs without tumorigenic activity. The initial step of reprogramming is induction of the exogenous pluripotent factors to generate the oxidative stress that leads to senescence by DNA damage and metabolic stresses, thus inducing the expression of tumor suppressor genes such as p21CIP1 and p16INK4a through the activation of p53 to be the pre-induced pluripotent stem cells (pre-iPSCs). The later stage includes overcoming the barrier of reprogramming-induced senescence or cell-cycle arrest by shutting off the function of these tumor suppressor genes, followed by the induction of endogenous stemness genes for the full commitment of iPSCs (full-iPSCs). Thus, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by oxidative stress might be critical for the induction of endogenous reprogramming-factor genes via epigenetic changes or antioxidant reactions. We also discuss the critical role of tumor suppressor genes in the evaluation of the tumorigenicity of human cancer cell-derived pluripotent stem cells, and describe how to overcome their tumorigenic properties for application in stem cell therapy in the field of regenerative medicine.

  9. Using yeast to determine the functional consequences of mutations in the human p53 tumor suppressor gene: An introductory course-based undergraduate research experience in molecular and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmat-Scafe, Daria S; Brownell, Sara E; Seawell, Patricia Chandler; Malladi, Shyamala; Imam, Jamie F Conklin; Singla, Veena; Bradon, Nicole; Cyert, Martha S; Stearns, Tim

    2017-03-04

    The opportunity to engage in scientific research is an important, but often neglected, component of undergraduate training in biology. We describe the curriculum for an innovative, course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE) appropriate for a large, introductory cell and molecular biology laboratory class that leverages students' high level of interest in cancer. The course is highly collaborative and emphasizes the analysis and interpretation of original scientific data. During the course, students work in teams to characterize a collection of mutations in the human p53 tumor suppressor gene via expression and analysis in yeast. Initially, student pairs use both qualitative and quantitative assays to assess the ability of their p53 mutant to activate expression of reporter genes, and they localize their mutation within the p53 structure. Through facilitated discussion, students suggest possible molecular explanations for the transactivation defects displayed by their p53 mutants and propose experiments to test these hypotheses that they execute during the second part of the course. They use a western blot to determine whether mutant p53 levels are reduced, a DNA-binding assay to test whether recognition of any of three p53 target sequences is compromised, and fluorescence microscopy to assay nuclear localization. Students studying the same p53 mutant periodically convene to discuss and interpret their combined data. The course culminates in a poster session during which students present their findings to peers, instructors, and the greater biosciences community. Based on our experience, we provide recommendations for the development of similar large introductory lab courses. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(2):161-178, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  10. Self-association of the WT1 tumor suppressor gene product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruening, W.; Nakagama, H.: Bardessy, N. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Wilms` tumor (WT), an embryonal malignancy of the kidney, occurs most frequently in children under the age of 5 years, affecting {approximately}1 in 10,000 individuals. The WT1 tumor suppressor gene, residing at 11p13, is structurally altered in {approximately}10-15% of WT cases. Individuals with germline mutations within the WT1 gene suffer from predisposition to WT and developmental defects of the urogenital system. Patients with heterozygous deletions of the WT1 gene, or mutations predicted to cause inactivation of one WT1 allele, suffer relatively mild genital system defects (notably hypospadias and cryptorchidism in males) and a predisposition to WT. These results suggest that developing genital system development is sensitive to the absolute concentrations of the WT1 gene products. Patients with missense mutations within the WT1 gene, however, can suffer from a much more severe disorder known as Denys-Drash syndrome (DDS). This syndrome is characterized by intersex disorders, renal nephropathy, and a predisposition to WTs. The increased severity of the developmental defects associated with DDS, compared to those individuals with mild genital system anomalies and WTs, suggests that mutations defined in patients with DDS behave in a dominant-negative fashion. We have identified a novel WT1 mutation in a patient with DDS. This mutation, predicted to produce a truncated WT1 polypeptide encompassing exons 1, 2, and 3, defines a domain capable of behaving as an antimorph. We have also demonstrated that WT1 can self-associate in vivo using yeast two-hybrid systems. Deletion analysis have mapped the interacting domains to the amino terminus of the WT1 polypeptide, within exons 1 and 2. These results provide a molecular mechanism to explain how WT1 mutations can function in a dominant-negative fashion to eliminate wild-type WT1 activity, leading to DDS.

  11. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis identifies MEGF10 as a novel epigenetically repressed candidate tumor suppressor gene in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, Jessica; Tomari, Ayumi; Dallosso, Anthony R; Szemes, Marianna; Kaselova, Martina; Curry, Thomas J; Almutairi, Bader; Etchevers, Heather C; McConville, Carmel; Malik, Karim T A; Brown, Keith W

    2017-04-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer in which many children still have poor outcomes, emphasising the need to better understand its pathogenesis. Despite recent genome-wide mutation analyses, many primary neuroblastomas do not contain recognizable driver mutations, implicating alternate molecular pathologies such as epigenetic alterations. To discover genes that become epigenetically deregulated during neuroblastoma tumorigenesis, we took the novel approach of comparing neuroblastomas to neural crest precursor cells, using genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. We identified 93 genes that were significantly differentially methylated of which 26 (28%) were hypermethylated and 67 (72%) were hypomethylated. Concentrating on hypermethylated genes to identify candidate tumor suppressor loci, we found the cell engulfment and adhesion factor gene MEGF10 to be epigenetically repressed by DNA hypermethylation or by H3K27/K9 methylation in neuroblastoma cell lines. MEGF10 showed significantly down-regulated expression in neuroblastoma tumor samples; furthermore patients with the lowest-expressing tumors had reduced relapse-free survival. Our functional studies showed that knock-down of MEGF10 expression in neuroblastoma cell lines promoted cell growth, consistent with MEGF10 acting as a clinically relevant, epigenetically deregulated neuroblastoma tumor suppressor gene. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Genome‐wide DNA methylation analysis identifies MEGF10 as a novel epigenetically repressed candidate tumor suppressor gene in neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, Jessica; Tomari, Ayumi; Dallosso, Anthony R.; Szemes, Marianna; Kaselova, Martina; Curry, Thomas J.; Almutairi, Bader; Etchevers, Heather C.; McConville, Carmel; Malik, Karim T. A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer in which many children still have poor outcomes, emphasising the need to better understand its pathogenesis. Despite recent genome‐wide mutation analyses, many primary neuroblastomas do not contain recognizable driver mutations, implicating alternate molecular pathologies such as epigenetic alterations. To discover genes that become epigenetically deregulated during neuroblastoma tumorigenesis, we took the novel approach of comparing neuroblastomas to neural crest precursor cells, using genome‐wide DNA methylation analysis. We identified 93 genes that were significantly differentially methylated of which 26 (28%) were hypermethylated and 67 (72%) were hypomethylated. Concentrating on hypermethylated genes to identify candidate tumor suppressor loci, we found the cell engulfment and adhesion factor gene MEGF10 to be epigenetically repressed by DNA hypermethylation or by H3K27/K9 methylation in neuroblastoma cell lines. MEGF10 showed significantly down‐regulated expression in neuroblastoma tumor samples; furthermore patients with the lowest‐expressing tumors had reduced relapse‐free survival. Our functional studies showed that knock‐down of MEGF10 expression in neuroblastoma cell lines promoted cell growth, consistent with MEGF10 acting as a clinically relevant, epigenetically deregulated neuroblastoma tumor suppressor gene. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27862318

  13. MIM, a Potential Metastasis Suppressor Gene in Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Goo Lee

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a modified version of the mRNA differential display technique, five human bladder cancer cell lines from low grade to metastatic were analyzed to identify differences in gene expression. A 316-bp cDNA (C11300 was isolated that was not expressed in the metastatic cell line TccSuP. Sequence analysis revealed that this gene was identical to KIAA 0429, has a 5.3-kb transcript that mapped to 8824.1. The protein is predicted to be 356 amino acids in size and has an actin-binding WH2 domain. Northern blot revealed expression in multiple normal tissues, but none in a metastatic breast cancer cell line (SKBR3 or in metastatic prostatic cancer cell lines (LNCaP, PC3. We have named this gene Missing in Metastasis (MIM and our data suggest that it may be involved in cytoskeletal organization.

  14. The Ras effector RASSF2 is a novel tumor-suppressor gene in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akino, Kimishige; Toyota, Minoru; Suzuki, Hiromu; Mita, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Yasushi; Ohe-Toyota, Mutsumi; Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Hinoda, Yuji; Imai, Kohzoh; Tokino, Takashi

    2005-07-01

    Activation of Ras signaling is a hallmark of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the roles of negative regulators of Ras are not fully understood. Our aim was to address that question by surveying genetic and epigenetic alterations of Ras-Ras effector genes in CRC cells. The expression and methylation status of 6 RASSF family genes were examined using RT-PCR and bisulfite PCR in CRC cell lines and in primary CRCs and colorectal adenomas. Colony formation assays and flow cytometry were used to assess the tumor suppressor activities of RASSF1 and RASSF2. Immunofluorescence microscopy was used to determine the effect of altered RASSF2 expression on cell morphology. Mutations of K- ras , BRAF, and p53 were identified using single-strand conformation analysis and direct sequencing. Aberrant methylation and histone deacetylation of RASSF2 was associated with the gene's silencing in CRC. The activities of RASSF2, which were distinct from those of RASSF1, included induction of morphologic changes and apoptosis; moreover, its ability to prevent cell transformation suggests that RASSF2 acts as a tumor suppressor in CRC. Primary CRCs that showed K- ras /BRAF mutations also frequently showed RASSF2 methylation, and inactivation of RASSF2 enhanced K- ras -induced oncogenic transformation. RASSF2 methylation was also frequently identified in colorectal adenomas. RASSF2 is a novel tumor suppressor gene that regulates Ras signaling and plays a pivotal role in the early stages of colorectal tumorigenesis.

  15. Hypermethylation Of The Tumor Suppressor RASSF1A Gene In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast cancer is the leading cancer among females. There is a critical need for improved molecular biomarkers that are diagnostic, prognostic and also capable of predicting the progression of benign high-risk lesions to invasive carcinoma. RAS association domain family protein 1A (RASSF1A) gene, is a biologically ...

  16. A study on tumor suppressor genes mutations associated with different pathological colorectal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matar, S.N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the Western world. In Egypt; there is an increasing incidence of the disease, especially among patients ≤40 years age. While CRC have been reported in low incidence rate in developing countries, it is the third most common tumor in male and the fifth common tumor in females in Egypt. Early diagnosis and surgical interference guarantee long survival of most CRC patients. Early diagnosis is impeded by the disease onset at young age and imprecise symptoms at the initial stages of the disease. As in most solid tumors, the malignant transformation of colonic epithelial cells is to arise through a multistep process during which they acquire genetic changes involving the activation of proto-oncogenes and the loss of tumor suppressor genes. Recently, a candidate tumor suppressor gene, KLF6, which is mapped to chromosome 10p, was found to be frequently mutated in a number of cancers. There are some evidences suggesting that the disruption of the functional activity of KLF6 gene products may be one of the early events in tumor genesis of the colon. The main objective of the present study was to detect mutational changes of KLF6 tumor suppressor gene and to study the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) markers at chromosome 10p15 (KLF6 locus) in colorectal lesions and colorectal cancer in Egyptian patients. The patients included in this study were 83 presented with different indications for colonoscopic examination. Selecting patients with colorectal pre-cancerous lesions or colorectal cancer was done according to the results of tissue biopsy from lesion and adjacent normal. The patients were classified into three main groups; (G I) Cancerous group, (G II) polyps group including patients with adenomatous polyps (AP), familial adenomatous polyps (FAP) and hyperplastic polyps (HP) and (G III) Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) including patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD

  17. Repression of estrogen receptor {beta} function by putative tumor suppressor DBC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Satoshi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Wada-Hiraike, Osamu, E-mail: osamuwh-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Tanikawa, Michihiro; Hiraike, Haruko; Miyamoto, Yuichiro; Sone, Kenbun; Oda, Katsutoshi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Fukuhara, Hiroshi [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Nakagawa, Keiichi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Kato, Shigeaki [SORST, Japan Science and Technology, Honcho 4-1-8, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi 1-1-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0034 (Japan); Yano, Tetsu; Taketani, Yuji [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan)

    2010-02-12

    It has been well established that estrogen is involved in the pathophysiology of breast cancer. Estrogen receptor (ER) {alpha} appears to promote the proliferation of cancer tissues, while ER{beta} can protect against the mitogenic effect of estrogen in breast tissue. The expression status of ER{alpha} and ER{beta} may greatly influence on the development, treatment, and prognosis of breast cancer. Previous studies have indicated that the deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1/KIAA1967) gene product has roles in regulating functions of nuclear receptors. The gene encoding DBC1 is a candidate for tumor suppressor identified by genetic search for breast cancer. Caspase-dependent processing of DBC1 promotes apoptosis, and depletion of the endogenous DBC1 negatively regulates p53-dependent apoptosis through its specific inhibition of SIRT1. In addition, DBC1 modulates ER{alpha} expression and promotes breast cancer cell survival by binding to ER{alpha}. Here we report an ER{beta}-specific repressive function of DBC1. Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence studies show that ER{beta} and DBC1 interact in a ligand-independent manner similar to ER{alpha}. In vitro pull-down assays revealed a direct interaction between DBC1 amino-terminus and activation function-1/2 domain of ER{beta}. Although DBC1 shows no influence on the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation function of ER{alpha}, the expression of DBC1 negatively regulates the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation function of ER{beta}in vivo, and RNA interference-mediated depletion of DBC1 stimulates the transactivation function of ER{beta}. These results implicate the principal role of DBC1 in regulating ER{beta}-dependent gene expressions.

  18. Generation of two modified mouse alleles of the Hic1 tumor suppressor gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíchalová, Vendula; Turečková, Jolana; Fafílek, Bohumil; Vojtěchová, Martina; Krausová, Michaela; Lukáš, Jan; Šloncová, Eva; Takacova, S.; Divoký, V.; Leprince, D.; Plachý, Jiří; Kořínek, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2011), s. 142-151 ISSN 1526-954X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/1567; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Hypermethylated In Cancer 1 * Hic1 tumor suppressor * gene targeting Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.527, year: 2011

  19. The p53 tumour suppressor gene and the tobacco industry: research, debate, and conflict of interest

    OpenAIRE

    Bitton, A; Neuman, M D; Barnoya, J; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumour suppressor gene lead to uncontrolled cell division and are found in over 50% of all human tumours, including 60% of lung cancers. Research published in 1996 by Denissenko and colleagues demonstrated patterned in-vitro mutagenic effects on p53 of benzo[a]pyrene, a carcinogen present in tobacco smoke. We investigated the tobacco industry's response to p53 research linking smoking to cancer. We searched online tobacco document archives, including the Legacy Tobacco Do...

  20. MMP-8, A Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    and RD mutations were generated using the Chameleon double- stranded site-directed mutagenesis kit (Strata- gene). The fragments were released by...receptor TβR-I, the type II receptor TβR- II, the regulatory Smads (Smad2 and Smad3), and Smad4 (8). Most of these components have mutations in several...human cancers. But, mutations in TGF-β receptors or Smads are rare in breast cancer (9, 10). Moreover, for breast cancer cells, TGF-β1 is a crucial

  1. SERPINB5 and AKAP12 -- Expression and promoter methylation of metastasis suppressor genes in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haier Joerg

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early metastasis and infiltration are survival limiting characteristics of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC. Thus, PDAC is likely to harbor alterations in metastasis suppressor genes that may provide novel diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. This study investigates a panel of metastasis suppressor genes in correlation to PDAC phenotype and examines promoter methylation for regulatory influence on metastasis suppressor gene expression and for its potential as a diagnostic tool. Methods Metastatic and invasive potential of 16 PDAC cell lines were quantified in an orthotopic mouse model and mRNA expression of 11 metastasis suppressor genes determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Analysis for promoter methylation was performed using methylation specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing PCR. Protein expression was determined by Western blot. Results In general, higher metastasis suppressor gene mRNA expression was not consistent with less aggressive phenotypes of PDAC. Instead, mRNA overexpression of several metastasis suppressor genes was found in PDAC cell lines vs. normal pancreatic RNA. Of the investigated metastasis suppressor genes, only higher AKAP12 mRNA expression was correlated with decreased metastasis (P SERPINB5 mRNA expression was correlated with increased metastasis scores (P SERPINB5 methylation was associated with loss of mRNA and protein expression (P SERPINB5 methylation was also directly correlated to decreased metastasis scores (P Conclusions AKAP12 mRNA expression was correlated to attenuated invasive and metastatic potential and may be associated with less aggressive phenotypes of PDAC while no such evidence was obtained for the remaining metastasis suppressor genes. Increased SERPINB5 mRNA expression was correlated to increased metastasis and mRNA expression was regulated by methylation. Thus, SERPINB5 methylation was directly correlated to metastasis scores and may provide a diagnostic tool for PDAC.

  2. Cellular senescence and tumor suppressor gene p16

    OpenAIRE

    Rayess, Hani; Wang, Marilene B.; Srivatsan, Eri S.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence is an irreversible arrest of cell growth. Biochemical and morphological changes occur during cellular senescence, including the formation of a unique cellular morphology such as flattened cytoplasm. Function of mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes are affected resulting in the inhibition of lysosomal and proteosomal pathways. Cellular senescence can be triggered by a number of factors including, aging, DNA damage, oncogene activation and oxidative stress. Whil...

  3. The tumor suppressor Rb and its related Rbl2 genes are regulated by Utx histone demethylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terashima, Minoru; Ishimura, Akihiko; Yoshida, Masakazu [Division of Functional Genomics, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192, Ishikawa (Japan); Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Takeshi, E-mail: suzuki-t@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Division of Functional Genomics, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Utx increases expression of Rb and Rbl2 genes through its demethylase activity. {yields} Utx changes histone H3 methylation on the Rb and Rbl2 promoters. {yields} Utx induces decreased cell proliferation of mammalian primary cells. -- Abstract: Utx is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that encodes histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) demethylase. In this study, we found that ectopic expression of Utx enhanced the expression of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene Rb and its related gene Rbl2. This activation was dependent on the demethylase activity of Utx, and was suggested to contribute to the decreased cell proliferation induced by Utx. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that over-expressed Utx was associated with the promoter regions of Rb and Rbl2 resulting in the removal of repressive H3K27 tri-methylation and the increase in active H3K4 tri-methylation. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Utx revealed the recruitment of endogenous Utx protein on the promoters of Rb and Rbl2 genes. These results indicate that Rb and Rbl2 are downstream target genes of Utx and may play important roles in Utx-mediated cell growth control.

  4. Warburg tumours and the mechanisms of mitochondrial tumour suppressor genes. Barking up the right tree?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayley, Jean-Pierre; Devilee, Peter

    2010-06-01

    The past decade has seen a revival of interest in the metabolic adaptations of tumours, named for their original discoverer, Otto Warburg. Warburg reported a high rate of glycolysis in tumours, and a concurrent defect in mitochondrial respiration. The rediscovery of Warburg's hypothesis coincided with the discovery of mitochondrial tumours suppressor genes that may conform to Warburg's hypothesis. Succinate dehydrogenase and fumarate hydratase are mitochondrial proteins of the TCA cycle and the respiratory chain and when mutated lead to tumours of the nervous system known as paragangliomas and pheochromocytomas, and in the case of fumarate hydratase, cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas and renal cell cancer. Recently a novel mitochondrial protein, SDHAF2 (SDH5), was also shown to be a paraganglioma-related tumour suppressor gene. Another mitochondrial and TCA cycle-related protein, isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 is, together with IDH1, frequently mutated in the brain tumour glioblastoma. There are currently many competing hypotheses on the role of these genes in tumourigenesis, but frequent themes are the stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor 1 and upregulation of genes involved in angiogenesis, glucose transport and glycolysis. Other postulated mechanisms include the inhibition of developmental apoptosis, altered gene expression due to histone deregulation and the acquisition of novel catalytic properties. Here we discuss these diverse hypotheses and highlight very recent findings on the possible effects of IDH gene mutations.

  5. SFRP Tumour Suppressor Genes Are Potential Plasma-Based Epigenetic Biomarkers for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Yee Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM is associated with asbestos exposure. Asbestos can induce chronic inflammation which in turn can lead to silencing of tumour suppressor genes. Wnt signaling pathway can be affected by chronic inflammation and is aberrantly activated in many cancers including colon and MPM. SFRP genes are antagonists of Wnt pathway, and SFRPs are potential tumour suppressors in colon, gastric, breast, ovarian, and lung cancers and mesothelioma. This study investigated the expression and DNA methylation of SFRP genes in MPM cells lines with and without demethylation treatment. Sixty-six patient FFPE samples were analysed and have showed methylation of SFRP2 (56% and SFRP5 (70% in MPM. SFRP2 and SFRP5 tumour-suppressive activity in eleven MPM lines was confirmed, and long-term asbestos exposure led to reduced expression of the SFRP1 and SFRP2 genes in the mesothelium (MeT-5A via epigenetic alterations. Finally, DNA methylation of SFRPs is detectable in MPM patient plasma samples, with methylated SFRP2 and SFRP5 showing a tendency towards greater abundance in patients. These data suggested that SFRP genes have tumour-suppresive activity in MPM and that methylated DNA from SFRP gene promoters has the potential to serve as a biomarker for MPM patient plasma.

  6. Multi-gene epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphoma cells; delayed expression of the p16 protein upon reversal of the silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagasawa, T; Zhang, Q; Raghunath, P N

    2006-01-01

    )-expressing T-cell lymphomas. p16 gene was epigenetically silenced in all but one of the 10 malignant T-cell lines examined, p15 gene silenced in roughly half of the lines, and p14 was the least frequently affected. Extensive methylation of the p16 promoter was seen in six out of 10 cutaneous T-cell lymphoma...... promoter demethylation and required up to 3 weeks to occur, seemingly reflecting late activation of the p16 gene. These findings indicate that epigenetic silencing affects in T-cell malignancies, often simultaneously, several tumor suppressor genes that impact on key cell functions. The observed...... differential silencing of p16 and p14, and to a lesser degree p15 gene, indicates that the silencing is governed by precise, promoter region-specific mechanisms. The study provides also further rationale for treatment of at least some types of T-cell lymphomas with DNA methyltransferase inhibitors to target...

  7. Dissecting epigenetic silencing complexity in the mouse lung cancer suppressor gene Cadm1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Marie Reamon-Buettner

    Full Text Available Disease-oriented functional analysis of epigenetic factors and their regulatory mechanisms in aberrant silencing is a prerequisite for better diagnostics and therapy. Yet, the precise mechanisms are still unclear and complex, involving the interplay of several effectors including nucleosome positioning, DNA methylation, histone variants and histone modifications. We investigated the epigenetic silencing complexity in the tumor suppressor gene Cadm1 in mouse lung cancer progenitor cell lines, exhibiting promoter hypermethylation associated with transcriptional repression, but mostly unresponsive to demethylating drug treatments. After predicting nucleosome positions and transcription factor binding sites along the Cadm1 promoter, we carried out single-molecule mapping with DNA methyltransferase M.SssI, which revealed in silent promoters high nucleosome occupancy and occlusion of transcription factor binding sites. Furthermore, M.SssI maps of promoters varied within and among the different lung cancer cell lines. Chromatin analysis with micrococcal nuclease also indicated variations in nucleosome positioning to have implications in the binding of transcription factors near nucleosome borders. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that histone variants (H2A.Z and H3.3, and opposing histone modification marks (H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 all colocalized in the same nucleosome positions that is reminiscent of epigenetic plasticity in embryonic stem cells. Altogether, epigenetic silencing complexity in the promoter region of Cadm1 is not only defined by DNA hypermethylation, but high nucleosome occupancy, altered nucleosome positioning, and 'bivalent' histone modifications, also likely contributed in the transcriptional repression of this gene in the lung cancer cells. Our results will help define therapeutic intervention strategies using epigenetic drugs in lung cancer.

  8. The human LIS1 is downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma and plays a tumor suppressor function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Zhen; Tang, Xin; Gao, Yuan; Da, Liang; Song, Hai; Wang, Suiquan [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Tiollais, Pierre [Unite' d' Organisation Nucleaire et Oncogenese, INSERM U.579, Institut Pasteur, Paris (France); Li, Tsaiping [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Zhao, Mujun, E-mail: mjzhao@sibs.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} LIS1 mRNA and protein levels are decreased in 70% HCC tissues. {yields} Downregulation of LIS1 expression induces oncogenic transformation of QSG7701 and NIH3T3 cells in vitro and in vivo. {yields} LIS1 downregulation leads to mitotic errors including spindle and chromosome defects. {yields} Ectopic expression of LIS1 could significantly inhibit HCC cell proliferation and colony formation. {yields} Our results suggest that LIS1 plays a potential tumor suppressor role in the development and progression of HCC. -- Abstract: The human lissencephaly-1 gene (LIS1) is a disease gene responsible for Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome (MDL). LIS1 gene is located in the region of chromosome 17p13.3 that is frequency deleted in MDL patients and in human liver cancer cells. However, the expression and significance of LIS1 in liver cancer remain unknown. Here, we investigated the expression of LIS1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues by real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that the mRNA and protein levels of LIS1 were downregulated in about 70% of HCC tissues, and this downregulation was significantly associated with tumor progression. Functional studies showed that the reduction of LIS1 expression in the normal human liver cell line QSG7701 or the mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 by shRNA resulted in colony formation in soft agar and xenograft tumor formation in nude mice, demonstrating that a decrease in the LIS1 level can promote the oncogenic transformation of cells. We also observed that the phenotypes of LIS1-knockdown cells displayed various defective mitotic structures, suggesting that the mechanism by which reduced LIS1 levels results in tumorigenesis is associated with its role in mitosis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of LIS1 could significantly inhibit HCC cell proliferation and colony formation. Our results suggest that LIS1 plays a potential tumor suppressor role in the

  9. The human LIS1 is downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma and plays a tumor suppressor function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Zhen; Tang, Xin; Gao, Yuan; Da, Liang; Song, Hai; Wang, Suiquan; Tiollais, Pierre; Li, Tsaiping; Zhao, Mujun

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → LIS1 mRNA and protein levels are decreased in 70% HCC tissues. → Downregulation of LIS1 expression induces oncogenic transformation of QSG7701 and NIH3T3 cells in vitro and in vivo. → LIS1 downregulation leads to mitotic errors including spindle and chromosome defects. → Ectopic expression of LIS1 could significantly inhibit HCC cell proliferation and colony formation. → Our results suggest that LIS1 plays a potential tumor suppressor role in the development and progression of HCC. -- Abstract: The human lissencephaly-1 gene (LIS1) is a disease gene responsible for Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome (MDL). LIS1 gene is located in the region of chromosome 17p13.3 that is frequency deleted in MDL patients and in human liver cancer cells. However, the expression and significance of LIS1 in liver cancer remain unknown. Here, we investigated the expression of LIS1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues by real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that the mRNA and protein levels of LIS1 were downregulated in about 70% of HCC tissues, and this downregulation was significantly associated with tumor progression. Functional studies showed that the reduction of LIS1 expression in the normal human liver cell line QSG7701 or the mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 by shRNA resulted in colony formation in soft agar and xenograft tumor formation in nude mice, demonstrating that a decrease in the LIS1 level can promote the oncogenic transformation of cells. We also observed that the phenotypes of LIS1-knockdown cells displayed various defective mitotic structures, suggesting that the mechanism by which reduced LIS1 levels results in tumorigenesis is associated with its role in mitosis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of LIS1 could significantly inhibit HCC cell proliferation and colony formation. Our results suggest that LIS1 plays a potential tumor suppressor role in the development and

  10. Utility of P19 Gene-Silencing Suppressor for High Level Expression of Recombinant Human Therapeutic Proteins in Plant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Zangi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The potential of plants, as a safe and eukaryotic system, is considered in the production of recombinant therapeutic human protein today; but the expression level of heterologous proteins is limited by the post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS response in this new technology. The use of viral suppressors of gene silencing can prevent PTGS and improve transient expression level of foreign proteins. In this study, we investigated the effect of p19 silencing suppressor on recombinant human nerve growth factor expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Materials and Methods: The p19 coding region was inserted in the pCAMBIA using NcoI and BstEII recognition sites. Also, the cloned synthesized recombinant human NGF (rhNGF fragment was cloned directly into PVX vector by ClaI and SalI restriction enzymes. The co-agroinfiltration of rhNGF with p19 viral suppressor of gene silencing was evaluated by dot-blot and SDS-PAGE. The amount of expressed rhNGF protein was calculated by AlphaEaseFC software. Results: Co-agroinfiltration of hNGF with P19 suppressor showed about forty-fold increase (8% total soluble protein (TSP when compared to the absence of P19 suppressor (0.2%TSP. Conclusion: The results presented here confirmed that the use of P19 gene silencing suppressor derived from tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV could efficiently increase the transient expression of recombinant proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana manifold.

  11. microRNA-184 functions as tumor suppressor in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhengming; Chen, Duqun; Li, Yifan; Zhang, Enpu; Yu, Zuhu; Chen, Ting; Jiang, Zhimao; Ni, Liangchao; Yang, Shangqi; Gui, Yaoting; Ye, Jiongxian; Lai, Yongqing

    2015-03-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are evolutionarily conserved, endogenous, small, noncoding RNA molecules of approximately 22 nucleotides in length that function as post-transcriptional gene regulators. Their aberrant expression may be involved in human diseases, including cancer. Although miRNA-184 (miR-184) has been reported in other tumors, its function in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of miR-184 in RCC. The impacts of miR-184 on cell migration, proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated using migration scratch, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and flow cytometry assay. Our studies revealed that miR-184 mimic significantly inhibits cell migration, suppresses cell proliferation and induces renal cancer cell apoptosis in vitro when compared with the negative control (P184 played a significant role as a tumor suppressor in RCC. Therefore, miR-184 may be a promising therapeutic target for renal cancer treatment in the future.

  12. Regulation of the insulin-like developmental pathway of Caenorhabditis elegans by a homolog of the PTEN tumor suppressor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, E B; Malone Link, E; Liu, L X; Johnson, C D; Lees, J A

    1999-03-16

    The human PTEN tumor suppressor gene is mutated in a wide variety of sporadic tumors. To determine the function of PTEN in vivo we have studied a PTEN homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans. We have generated a strong loss-of-function allele of the PTEN homolog and shown that the deficient strain is unable to enter dauer diapause. An insulin-like phosphatidylinositol 3-OH kinase (PI3'K) signaling pathway regulates dauer-stage entry. Mutations in either the daf-2 insulin receptor-like (IRL) gene or the age-1 encoded PI3'K catalytic subunit homolog cause constitutive dauer formation and also affect the life span, brood size, and metabolism of nondauer animals. Strikingly, loss-of-function mutations in the age-1 PI3'K and daf-2 IRL genes are suppressed by loss-of-function mutations in the PTEN homolog. We establish that the PTEN homolog is encoded by daf-18, a previously uncloned gene that has been shown to interact genetically with the DAF-2 IRL AGE-1 PI3'K signaling pathway. This interaction provides clear genetic evidence that PTEN acts to antagonize PI3'K function in vivo. Given the conservation of the PI3'K signaling pathway between C. elegans and mammals, the analysis of daf-18 PTEN mutant nematodes should shed light on the role of human PTEN in the etiology of metabolic disease, aging, and cancer.

  13. Evolution of the HIV-1 nef gene in HLA-B*57 Positive Elite Suppressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siliciano Robert F

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Elite controllers or suppressors (ES are HIV-1 infected patients who maintain viral loads of gag and nef in HLA-B*57 positive ES. We previously showed evolution in the gag gene of ES which surprisingly was mostly due to synonymous mutations rather than non-synonymous mutation in targeted CTL epitopes. This finding could be the result of structural constraints on Gag, and we therefore examined the less conserved nef gene. We found slow evolution of nef in plasma virus in some ES. This evolution is mostly due to synonymous mutations and occurs at a rate similar to that seen in the gag gene in the same patients. The results provide further evidence of ongoing viral replication in ES and suggest that the nef and gag genes in these patients respond similarly to selective pressure from the host.

  14. Positive selection of deleterious alleles through interaction with a sex-ratio suppressor gene in African Buffalo: a plausible new mechanism for a high frequency anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooft, Pim; Greyling, Ben J; Getz, Wayne M; van Helden, Paul D; Zwaan, Bas J; Bastos, Armanda D S

    2014-01-01

    Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) population of Kruger National Park, through positive selection of these alleles that is ultimately driven by a sex-ratio suppressor. We have previously shown that one in four Kruger buffalo has a Y-chromosome profile that, despite being associated with low body condition, appears to impart a relative reproductive advantage, and which is stably maintained through a sex-ratio suppressor. Apparently, this sex-ratio suppressor prevents fertility reduction that generally accompanies sex-ratio distortion. We hypothesize that this body-condition-associated reproductive advantage increases the fitness of alleles that negatively affect male body condition, causing genome-wide positive selection of these alleles. To investigate this we genotyped 459 buffalo using 17 autosomal microsatellites. By correlating heterozygosity with body condition (heterozygosity-fitness correlations), we found that most microsatellites were associated with one of two gene types: one with elevated frequencies of deleterious alleles that have a negative effect on body condition, irrespective of sex; the other with elevated frequencies of sexually antagonistic alleles that are negative for male body condition but positive for female body condition. Positive selection and a direct association with a Y-chromosomal sex-ratio suppressor are indicated, respectively, by allele clines and by relatively high numbers of homozygous deleterious alleles among sex-ratio suppressor carriers. This study, which employs novel statistical techniques to analyse heterozygosity-fitness correlations, is the first to demonstrate the abundance of sexually-antagonistic genes in a natural mammal population. It also has important

  15. Positive selection of deleterious alleles through interaction with a sex-ratio suppressor gene in African Buffalo: a plausible new mechanism for a high frequency anomaly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pim van Hooft

    Full Text Available Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer population of Kruger National Park, through positive selection of these alleles that is ultimately driven by a sex-ratio suppressor. We have previously shown that one in four Kruger buffalo has a Y-chromosome profile that, despite being associated with low body condition, appears to impart a relative reproductive advantage, and which is stably maintained through a sex-ratio suppressor. Apparently, this sex-ratio suppressor prevents fertility reduction that generally accompanies sex-ratio distortion. We hypothesize that this body-condition-associated reproductive advantage increases the fitness of alleles that negatively affect male body condition, causing genome-wide positive selection of these alleles. To investigate this we genotyped 459 buffalo using 17 autosomal microsatellites. By correlating heterozygosity with body condition (heterozygosity-fitness correlations, we found that most microsatellites were associated with one of two gene types: one with elevated frequencies of deleterious alleles that have a negative effect on body condition, irrespective of sex; the other with elevated frequencies of sexually antagonistic alleles that are negative for male body condition but positive for female body condition. Positive selection and a direct association with a Y-chromosomal sex-ratio suppressor are indicated, respectively, by allele clines and by relatively high numbers of homozygous deleterious alleles among sex-ratio suppressor carriers. This study, which employs novel statistical techniques to analyse heterozygosity-fitness correlations, is the first to demonstrate the abundance of sexually-antagonistic genes in a natural mammal population. It also has

  16. Transcriptomic and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies reveal FOXA2 as a tumor suppressor gene in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorvis, Christina; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Mahurkar-Joshi, Swapna; Koutsioumpa, Marina; Williams, Jennifer; Donahue, Timothy R; Poultsides, George A; Eibl, Guido; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive cancer with low survival rates and limited therapeutic options. Thus elucidation of signaling pathways involved in PDAC pathogenesis is essential for identifying novel potential therapeutic gene targets. Here, we used a systems approach to elucidate those pathways by integrating gene and microRNA profiling analyses together with CRISPR/Cas9 technology to identify novel transcription factors involved in PDAC pathogenesis. FOXA2 transcription factor was found to be significantly downregulated in PDAC relative to control pancreatic tissues. Functional experiments revealed that FOXA2 has a tumor suppressor function through inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth, migration, invasion, and colony formation. In situ hybridization analysis revealed miR-199a to be significantly upregulated in pancreatic cancer. Bioinformatics and luciferase analyses showed that miR-199a negatively but directly regulates FOXA2 expression through binding in its 3'-untranslated region (UTR). Evaluation of the functional importance of miR-199a on pancreatic cancer revealed that miR-199a acts as an inhibitor of FOXA2 expression, inducing an increase in pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Additionally, gene ontology and network analyses in PANC-1 cells treated with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against FOXA2 revealed an enrichment for cell invasion mechanisms through PLAUR and ERK activation. FOXA2 deletion (FOXA2Δ) by using two CRISPR/Cas9 vectors in PANC-1 cells induced tumor growth in vivo resulting in upregulation of PLAUR and ERK pathways in FOXA2Δ xenograft tumors. We have identified FOXA2 as a novel tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer and it is regulated directly by miR-199a, thereby enhancing our understanding of how microRNAs interplay with the transcription factors to affect pancreatic oncogenesis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. The Tumor Suppressor Gene, RASSF1A, Is Essential for Protection against Inflammation -Induced Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiteih, Yahya; Law, Jennifer; Volodko, Natalia; Mohamed, Anwar; El-Kadi, Ayman O. S.; Liu, Lei; Odenbach, Jeff; Thiesen, Aducio; Onyskiw, Christina; Ghazaleh, Haya Abu; Park, Jikyoung; Lee, Sean Bong; Yu, Victor C.; Fernandez-Patron, Carlos; Alexander, R. Todd; Wine, Eytan; Baksh, Shairaz

    2013-01-01

    Ras association domain family protein 1A (RASSF1A) is a tumor suppressor gene silenced in cancer. Here we report that RASSF1A is a novel regulator of intestinal inflammation as Rassf1a+/−, Rassf1a−/− and an intestinal epithelial cell specific knockout mouse (Rassf1a IEC-KO) rapidly became sick following dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) administration, a chemical inducer of colitis. Rassf1a knockout mice displayed clinical symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease including: increased intestinal permeability, enhanced cytokine/chemokine production, elevated nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells (NFκB) activity, elevated colonic cell death and epithelial cell injury. Furthermore, epithelial restitution/repair was inhibited in DSS-treated Rassf1a−/− mice with reduction of several makers of proliferation including Yes associated protein (YAP)-driven proliferation. Surprisingly, tyrosine phosphorylation of YAP was detected which coincided with increased nuclear p73 association, Bax-driven epithelial cell death and p53 accumulation resulting in enhanced apoptosis and poor survival of DSS-treated Rassf1a knockout mice. We can inhibit these events and promote the survival of DSS-treated Rassf1a knockout mice with intraperitoneal injection of the c-Abl and c-Abl related protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib/gleevec. However, p53 accumulation was not inhibited by imatinib/gleevec in the Rassf1a−/− background which revealed the importance of p53-dependent cell death during intestinal inflammation. These observations suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of YAP (to drive p73 association and up-regulation of pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax) and accumulation of p53 are consequences of inflammation-induced injury in DSS-treated Rassf1a−/− mice. Mechanistically, we can detect robust associations of RASSF1A with membrane proximal Toll-like receptor (TLR) components to suggest that RASSF1A may function to interfere and restrict TLR

  18. The Drosophila Netrin receptor frazzled/DCC functions as an invasive tumor suppressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duman-Scheel Molly

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of heterozygosity at 18q, which includes the Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC gene, has been linked to many human cancers. However, it is unclear if loss of DCC is the specific underlying cause of these cancers. The Drosophila imaginal discs are excellent systems in which to study DCC function, as it is possible to model human tumors through the generation of somatic clones of cells bearing multiple genetic lesions. Here, these attributes of the fly system were utilized to investigate the potential tumor suppressing functions of the Drosophila DCC homologue frazzled (fra during eye-antennal disc development. Results Most fra loss of function clones are eliminated during development. However, when mutant clone cells generated in the developing eye were rescued from death, partially differentiated eye cells were found outside of the normal eye field, and in extreme cases distant sites of the body. Characterization of these cells during development indicates that fra mutant cells display characteristics of invasive tumor cells, including increased levels of phospho-ERK, phospho-JNK, and Mmp-1, changes in cadherin expression, remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, and loss of polarity. Mutation of fra promotes basement membrane degradation and invasion which are repressed by inhibition of Rho1 signaling. Although inhibition of JNK signaling blocks invasive phenotypes in some metastatic cancer models in flies, blocking JNK signaling inhibits fra mutant cell death, thereby enhancing the fra mutant phenotype. Conclusions The results of this investigation provide the first direct link between point mutations in fra/DCC and metastatic phenotypes in an animal model and suggest that Fra functions as an invasive tumor suppressor during Drosophila development.

  19. Checkpoint Functions of the BRCA1/BARD1 Tumor Suppressor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Modi, Ami

    2007-01-01

    .... To study the function of mitotic BARD1 phosphorylation, I used an siRNA-mediated approach to knockdown endogenous BARD1 expression and then restore expression with siRNA-resistant exogenous forms of BARD1...

  20. Overexpression of the p53 tumor suppressor gene product in primary lung adenocarcinomas is associated with cigarette smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, W. H.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Goodman, S. N.; Slebos, R. J.; Polak, M.; Baas, I. O.; Rodenhuis, S.; Hruban, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are frequently observed in primary lung adenocarcinomas, suggesting that these mutations are critical events in the malignant transformation of airway cells. These mutations are often associated with stabilization of the p53 gene product, resulting in the

  1. Structural Basis of Merlin Tumor Suppressor Functions in Neurofibromatosis-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis-2 PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Tina Izard CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Scripps Research Institute Jupiter , FL 33458...Functions in Neurofibromatosis-2 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0451 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Dr. Tina...ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER The Scripps Research Institute 130 Scripps Way, #2C1 Jupiter , FL 33458

  2. Emotional functioning of patients with neurofibromatosis tumor suppressor syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daphne L; Smith, Kelly B; Esparza, Sonia; Leigh, Fawn A; Muzikansky, Alona; Park, Elyse R; Plotkin, Scott R

    2012-12-01

    Although patients with neurofibromatosis are predisposed to multiple nerve sheath tumors that can develop anywhere in the body and cause significant morbidity (e.g., hearing loss; pain), little research has examined emotional correlates of neurofibromatosis. The purpose of this study was to examine emotional functioning among adult patients with neurofibromatosis. A total of 248 patients with neurofibromatosis (neurofibromatosis 1, neurofibromatosis 2, or schwannomatosis) who received care at a specialized clinic completed validated measures to assess symptoms of depression and anxiety, level of perceived stress, and self-esteem. Patients with neurofibromatosis reported significantly more symptoms of depression and anxiety, higher levels of perceived stress, and lower levels of self-esteem as compared with general population norms. No significant differences were found among patients with neurofibromatosis 1, neurofibromatosis 2, and schwannomatosis, and emotional functioning was not significantly associated with disease severity. However, increased symptoms of depression and anxiety, higher levels of perceived stress, and lower levels of self-esteem were associated with a higher frequency of self-reported medical visits in the past year (P values ≤0.05). Neurofibromatosis appears to be associated with reduced emotional functioning. Although further research is needed, these findings suggest a role for a multidisciplinary treatment approach to address emotional distress among adult patients with neurofibromatosis.

  3. Critical tumor suppressor function mediated by epithelial Mig-6 in endometrial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Dong-Kee; Cho, Sung-Nam; Orvis, Grant D.; Behringer, Richard R.; Lydon, John P.; Ku, Bon Jeong; McCampbell, Adrienne S.; Broaddus, Russell R.; Jeong, Jae-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is preceded by endometrial hyperplasia, unopposed estrogen exposure and genetic alterations, but the precise causes of endometrial cancer remain uncertain. Mig-6, mainly known as a negative regulator of the EGF receptor, is an important mediator of progesterone signaling in the uterus, where it mediates tumor suppression by modulating endometrial stromal-epithelial communications. In this study, we investigated the function of Mig-6 in the uterine epithelium using a tissue-specific gene knockout strategy, in which floxed Mig-6 (Mig-6f/f) mice were crossed to Wnt7a-Cre mice (Wnt7acre+ Mig-6f/f). Wnt7acre+ Mig-6f/f mice developed endometrial hyperplasia and estrogen-dependent endometrial cancer, exhibiting increased proliferation in epithelial cells as well as apoptosis in sub-epithelial stromal cells. We documented increased expression of NOTCH1 and BIRC3 in epithelial cells of Wnt7acre+ Mig-6f/f mice and decreased expression of the progesterone receptor (PR) in stromal cells. Progesterone therapy controls endometrial growth and prevents endometrial cancer, but the effectiveness of progesterone as a treatment for women with endometrial cancer is less clear. We noted that the hyperplasic phenotype of Wnt7acre+ Mig-6f/f mice was prevented by progesterone treatment, whereas this treatment had no effect in PRcre/+ Mig-6f/f mice where Mig-6 was deleted in both the epithelial and stromal compartments of the uterus. In contrast, activation of progesterone signaling in the stroma regulated proliferation and apoptosis in the epithelium via suppression of ERα signaling there. In summary, our results establish that epithelial Mig-6 functions as a critical tumor suppressor that mediates the ability of progesterone to prevent the development of endometrial cancer. PMID:23811943

  4. TRIM26 functions as a novel tumor suppressor of hepatocellular carcinoma and its downregulation contributes to worse prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi, E-mail: wangyichenben@163.com [Department of General Surgery, The Affiliated Baoan Hospital of Southern Medical University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, 518101 (China); He, Du, E-mail: hdu1234@163.com [Department of Oncology, The Central Hospital of Enshi Autonomous of Prefecture, Enshi Clinical College of Wuhan University, Enshi, Hubei, 445000 (China); Yang, Liang, E-mail: yliang0689@163.com [Department of Oncology, Qianjiang Central Hospital, Qianjiang, Hubei, 433100 (China); Wen, Bo, E-mail: tjwb001@126.com [Department of Urology, The Affiliated Baoan Hospital of Southern Medical University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, 518101 (China); Dai, Jinfen, E-mail: brilliant_510@126.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, 430060 (China); Zhang, Qian, E-mail: anny9655@126.com [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, 430071 (China); Kang, Jian, E-mail: 984190619@qq.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, 430060 (China); He, Weiyang, E-mail: 996114664@qq.com [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, 430071 (China); Ding, Qianshan, E-mail: iamdqs@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, 430060 (China); He, De, E-mail: 18938027146@126.com [Department of General Surgery, The Affiliated Baoan Hospital of Southern Medical University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, 518101 (China)

    2015-07-31

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the one of the most common malignancies worldwide and its prognosis is extremely poor. Tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins play crucial roles in cancer cell biology but the function of tripartite motif 26 (TRIM26) has not been investigated. We demonstrated that low expression level of TRIM26 in tumor samples was significantly correlated with worse prognosis in HCC patients. We also demonstrated its expression level was associated with several clinicopathologic features such as AFP level and T stage of HCC patients. Furthermore, we validated that TRIM26 was significantly downregulated in HCC tissue compared with normal liver tissue. To further clarify the functional role of TRIM26 in HCC, We confirmed that TRIM26 silencing can promote cancer cell proliferation, colony forming, migration and invasion in vitro with HCC cell lines HepG2 and Bel-7402. Then we utilized bioinformatic tool to predict gene influenced by TRIM26, showing TRIM26 could modulate gene sets about cancer cell metabolism. In conclusion, we proved that TRIM26 is a novel tumor suppressor modulating multiple metabolism-related pathways in HCC. To our best knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the function of TRIM26 in cancer biology. Our findings provide useful insight into the mechanism of HCC origin and progression. Moreover, TRIM26 may represent a novel therapeutic target for HCC. - Highlights: • TRIM26 is down-regulated in liver cancer samples and functions as a novel tumor suppressor. • Down-regulation of TRIM26 is associated with worse prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). • Knockdown of TRIM26 promotes the proliferation and metastasis of HCC cells. • TRIM26 may function in abnormal metabolic progress of HCC.

  5. Evolution and origin of merlin, the product of the Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 tumor-suppressor gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omelyanchuk Leonid V

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Merlin, the product of the Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 tumor suppressor gene, belongs to the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM subgroup of the protein 4.1 superfamily, which links cell surface glycoproteins to the actin cytoskeleton. While merlin's functional activity has been examined in mammalian and Drosophila models, little is understood about its evolution, diversity, and overall distribution among different taxa. Results By combining bioinformatic and phylogenetic approaches, we demonstrate that merlin homologs are present across a wide range of metazoan lineages. While the phylogenetic tree shows a monophyletic origin of the ERM family, the origin of the merlin proteins is robustly separated from that of the ERM proteins. The derivation of merlin is thought to be in early metazoa. We have also observed the expansion of the ERM-like proteins within the vertebrate clade, which occurred after its separation from Urochordata (Ciona intestinalis. Amino acid sequence alignment reveals the absence of an actin-binding site in the C-terminal region of all merlin proteins from various species but the presence of a conserved internal binding site in the N-terminal domain of the merlin and ERM proteins. In addition, a more conserved pattern of amino acid residues is found in the region containing the so-called "Blue Box," although some amino acid substitutions in this region exist in the merlin sequences of worms, fish, and Ciona. Examination of sequence variability at functionally significant sites, including the serine-518 residue, the phosphorylation of which modulates merlin's intra-molecular association and function as a tumor suppressor, identifies several potentially important sites that are conserved among all merlin proteins but divergent in the ERM proteins. Secondary structure prediction reveals the presence of a conserved α-helical domain in the central to C-terminal region of the merlin proteins of various species. The

  6. Characterization of the tumor suppressor gene WWOX in primary human oral squamous cell carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Flávio J.; Gomes, Dawidson A.; Perdigão, Paolla F.; Barbosa, Alvimar A.; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Gomez, Marcus V.; Aldaz, C. Marcelo; De Marco, Luiz; Gomez, Ricardo S.

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignant neoplasm of the oral cavity, representing ~90% of all oral carcinomas and accounting for 3–5% of all malignancies. The WWOX gene (WW-domain containing oxidoreductase) is a candidate tumor suppressor gene located at 16q23.3–24.1, spanning the second most common fragile site, FRA16D. In this report, the role of the WWOX gene was investigated in 20 tumors and 10 normal oral mucosas, and we demonstrated an altered WWOX gene in 50% (10/20) of OSCCs. Using nested RT-PCR, mRNA transcription was altered in 35% of the tumors, with the complete absence of transcripts in 2 samples as well as absence of exons 6–8 (2 tumors), exon 7 (1 tumor), exon 7 and exon 6–8 (1 tumor) and partial loss of exons 8 and 9 (1 tumor). To determine if the aberrant transcripts were translated, Western blots were performed in all samples; however, only the normal protein was detected. By immunohistochemistry, a reduction in Wwox protein expression was observed, affecting 40% of the tumors when compared with normal mucosa. In addition, a novel somatic mutation (S329F) was found. The presence of alterations in mRNA transcription correlated with the reduced expression of Wwox protein in the tumors. These results show that the WWOX gene is frequently altered in OSCC and may contribute to the carcinogenesis processes in oral cancer. PMID:16152610

  7. ETS transcription factors control transcription of EZH2 and epigenetic silencing of the tumor suppressor gene Nkx3.1 in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Kunderfranco

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available ETS transcription factors regulate important signaling pathways involved in cell differentiation and development in many tissues and have emerged as important players in prostate cancer. However, the biological impact of ETS factors in prostate tumorigenesis is still debated.We performed an analysis of the ETS gene family using microarray data and real-time PCR in normal and tumor tissues along with functional studies in normal and cancer cell lines to understand the impact in prostate tumorigenesis and identify key targets of these transcription factors. We found frequent dysregulation of ETS genes with oncogenic (i.e., ERG and ESE1 and tumor suppressor (i.e., ESE3 properties in prostate tumors compared to normal prostate. Tumor subgroups (i.e., ERG(high, ESE1(high, ESE3(low and NoETS tumors were identified on the basis of their ETS expression status and showed distinct transcriptional and biological features. ERG(high and ESE3(low tumors had the most robust gene signatures with both distinct and overlapping features. Integrating genomic data with functional studies in multiple cell lines, we demonstrated that ERG and ESE3 controlled in opposite direction transcription of the Polycomb Group protein EZH2, a key gene in development, differentiation, stem cell biology and tumorigenesis. We further demonstrated that the prostate-specific tumor suppressor gene Nkx3.1 was controlled by ERG and ESE3 both directly and through induction of EZH2.These findings provide new insights into the role of the ETS transcriptional network in prostate tumorigenesis and uncover previously unrecognized links between aberrant expression of ETS factors, deregulation of epigenetic effectors and silencing of tumor suppressor genes. The link between aberrant ETS activity and epigenetic gene silencing may be relevant for the clinical management of prostate cancer and design of new therapeutic strategies.

  8. Tumor suppressor gene-based nanotherapy: from test tube to the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker, Manish; Jin, Jiankang; Branch, Cynthia D; Miyamoto, Shinya; Grimm, Elizabeth A; Roth, Jack A; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a major health problem in the world. Advances made in cancer therapy have improved the survival of patients in certain types of cancer. However, the overall five-year survival has not significantly improved in the majority of cancer types. Major challenges encountered in having effective cancer therapy are development of drug resistance by the tumor cells, nonspecific cytotoxicity, and inability to affect metastatic tumors by the chemodrugs. Overcoming these challenges requires development and testing of novel therapies. One attractive cancer therapeutic approach is cancer gene therapy. Several laboratories including the authors' laboratory have been investigating nonviral formulations for delivering therapeutic genes as a mode for effective cancer therapy. In this paper the authors will summarize their experience in the development and testing of a cationic lipid-based nanocarrier formulation and the results from their preclinical studies leading to a Phase I clinical trial for nonsmall cell lung cancer. Their nanocarrier formulation containing therapeutic genes such as tumor suppressor genes when administered intravenously effectively controls metastatic tumor growth. Additional Phase I clinical trials based on the results of their nanocarrier formulation have been initiated or proposed for treatment of cancer of the breast, ovary, pancreas, and metastatic melanoma, and will be discussed.

  9. Tumor Suppressor Gene-Based Nanotherapy: From Test Tube to the Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Shanker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a major health problem in the world. Advances made in cancer therapy have improved the survival of patients in certain types of cancer. However, the overall five-year survival has not significantly improved in the majority of cancer types. Major challenges encountered in having effective cancer therapy are development of drug resistance by the tumor cells, nonspecific cytotoxicity, and inability to affect metastatic tumors by the chemodrugs. Overcoming these challenges requires development and testing of novel therapies. One attractive cancer therapeutic approach is cancer gene therapy. Several laboratories including the authors' laboratory have been investigating nonviral formulations for delivering therapeutic genes as a mode for effective cancer therapy. In this paper the authors will summarize their experience in the development and testing of a cationic lipid-based nanocarrier formulation and the results from their preclinical studies leading to a Phase I clinical trial for nonsmall cell lung cancer. Their nanocarrier formulation containing therapeutic genes such as tumor suppressor genes when administered intravenously effectively controls metastatic tumor growth. Additional Phase I clinical trials based on the results of their nanocarrier formulation have been initiated or proposed for treatment of cancer of the breast, ovary, pancreas, and metastatic melanoma, and will be discussed.

  10. DLC1 tumor suppressor gene inhibits migration and invasion of multiple myeloma cells through RhoA GTPase pathway

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ullmannová-Benson, Veronika; Guan, M.; Zhou, X. G.; Tripathi, V.; Yang, V.; Zimonjic, D. B.; Popescu, C.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 2 (2009), s. 383-390 ISSN 0887-6924 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : multiple myeloma * tumor suppressor gene * promoter methylation Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 8.296, year: 2009

  11. Mutation analysis of suppressor of cytokine signalling 3, a candidate gene in Type 1 diabetes and insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gylvin, T; Nolsøe, R; Hansen, T

    2004-01-01

    Beta cell loss in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus may result from apoptosis and necrosis induced by inflammatory mediators. The suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS)-3 is a natural inhibitor of cytokine signalling and also influences insulin signalling. SOCS3 could therefore be a candidate...... gene in the development of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus....

  12. PCR-RFLP to Detect Codon 248 Mutation in Exon 7 of "p53" Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liming; Ge, Chongtao; Wu, Haizhen; Li, Suxia; Zhang, Huizhan

    2009-01-01

    Individual genome DNA was extracted fast from oral swab and followed up with PCR specific for codon 248 of "p53" tumor suppressor gene. "Msp"I restriction mapping showed the G-C mutation in codon 248, which closely relates to cancer susceptibility. Students learn the concepts, detection techniques, and research significance of point mutations or…

  13. Nuclear pore component Nup98 is a potential tumor suppressor and regulates posttranscriptional expression of select p53 target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Stephan; Zhao, Ruiying; Barsotti, Anthony M; Ouwehand, Anette; Fazollahi, Mina; Coutavas, Elias; Breuhahn, Kai; Neumann, Olaf; Longerich, Thomas; Pusterla, Tobias; Powers, Maureen A; Giles, Keith M; Leedman, Peter J; Hess, Jochen; Grunwald, David; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Singer, Robert H; Schirmacher, Peter; Prives, Carol

    2012-12-14

    The p53 tumor suppressor utilizes multiple mechanisms to selectively regulate its myriad target genes, which in turn mediate diverse cellular processes. Here, using conventional and single-molecule mRNA analyses, we demonstrate that the nucleoporin Nup98 is required for full expression of p21, a key effector of the p53 pathway, but not several other p53 target genes. Nup98 regulates p21 mRNA levels by a posttranscriptional mechanism in which a complex containing Nup98 and the p21 mRNA 3'UTR protects p21 mRNA from degradation by the exosome. An in silico approach revealed another p53 target (14-3-3σ) to be similarly regulated by Nup98. The expression of Nup98 is reduced in murine and human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and correlates with p21 expression in HCC patients. Our study elucidates a previously unrecognized function of wild-type Nup98 in regulating select p53 target genes that is distinct from the well-characterized oncogenic properties of Nup98 fusion proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Wolf–Hirschhorn Syndrome Candidate 1 (whsc1 Functions as a Tumor Suppressor by Governing Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Wolf–Hirschhorn syndrome candidate 1 (WHSC1 is a histone 3 lysine 36 (H3K36 specific methyltransferase that is frequently deleted in Wolf–Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS. Whsc1 is also found mutated in a subgroup of B-cell derived malignant diseases by genomic translocation or point mutation, both of which resulted in hyperactivity of WHSC1 mediated H3K36 methylation and uncontrolled cell proliferation, suggesting that whsc1 functions as an oncogene. However, here we provided evidences to show that whsc1 also has tumor suppressor functions. We used zebrafish as an in vivo model and generated homozygous whsc1 mutant lines via clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated protein Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Then western-blot (WB and immunofluorescence (IF were performed to analysis the expression level of H3K36Me2 and H3K36Me3, and we identified the diseased tissue via hematoxylin–eosin (HE staining, IF staining or immunohistochemistry (IHC. Whsc1 lose-of-function led to significant decrease in di- and tri-methylation of H3K36. A series of WHS related phenotypes were found in whsc1−/− zebrafish, including growth retardation, neural development defects and heart failure. In addition, loss of function of whsc1 led to defects in the development of swim bladder, possibly through the dis-regulation of key genes in swim bladder organogenesis and inhibition of progenitor cell differentiation, which was correlated with its expression in this organ during embryonic development. At later stage, these whsc1−/− zebrafishes are inclined to grow tumors in the swim bladder. Our work suggested that whsc1 may function as a tumor suppressor by governing progenitor cell differentiation.

  15. The chromosome 3p21.3-encoded gene, LIMD1, is a critical tumor suppressor involved in human lung cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Tyson V; Al-Attar, Ahmad; Foxler, Daniel E; Ding, Li; de A Vallim, Thomas Q; Zhang, Yining; Nijmeh, Hala S; Webb, Thomas M; Nicholson, Andrew G; Zhang, Qunyuan; Kraja, Aldi; Spendlove, Ian; Osborne, John; Mardis, Elaine; Longmore, Gregory D

    2008-12-16

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and homozygous deletions at chromosome 3p21.3 are common in both small and nonsmall cell lung cancers, indicating the likely presence of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). Although genetic and epigenetic changes within this region have been identified, the functional significance of these changes has not been explored. Concurrent protein expression and genetic analyses of human lung tumors coupled with functional studies have not been done. Here, we show that expression of the 3p21.3 gene, LIMD1, is frequently down-regulated in human lung tumors. Loss of LIMD1 expression occurs through a combination of gene deletion, LOH, and epigenetic silencing of transcription without evidence for coding region mutations. Experimentally, LIMD1 is a bona fide TSG. Limd1(-/-) mice are predisposed to chemical-induced lung adenocarcinoma and genetic inactivation of Limd1 in mice heterozygous for oncogenic K-Ras(G12D) markedly increased tumor initiation, promotion, and mortality. Thus, we conclude that LIMD1 is a validated chromosome 3p21.3 tumor-suppressor gene involved in human lung cancer development. LIMD1 is a LIM domain containing adapter protein that localizes to E-cadherin cell-cell adhesive junctions, yet also translocates to the nucleus where it has been shown to function as an RB corepressor. As such, LIMD1 has the potential to communicate cell extrinsic or environmental cues with nuclear responses.

  16. Tumor suppressor gene P53 in fish species as a target for genotoxic effects monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusser, W.C.; Brand, D.; Glickman, B.W. [Univ. of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Cretney, W.

    1995-12-31

    Analysis of environmentally induced molecular changes in DNA from fish was initiated with a study of tumor suppressor gene p53. This gene was chosen because of the high number of documented mutations in p53 from humans and their relevance in tumorigenesis. Bottom-feeding flatfish (e.g. English sole, Pleuronectes vetulus) and members of the salmonid family (e.g. rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss and chinook salmon, O. tschaaytsha) were chosen, because they are widespread and of commercial and recreational importance. The studies include the use of histopathological, biochemical, and molecular genetic tools in aquatic systems. The authors are currently examining the deposition of DNA damage and mutation in the p53 gene in fish. Parallel histopathology of liver showed idiopathic liver lesions that were strongly dependent on location of capture (0.01 < p(X{sup 2} 0.05, 2 > 6.89) < 0.025) with a prevalence of 30% for fish collected from the vicinity of pulp mills. To assess DNA damage and mutation analysis, DNA was extracted from fish liver. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing of the p53 gene was performed for rainbow trout, chinook and sockeye salmon, O. nerka. Southern blotting with a labeled p53 probe from rainbow trout was performed using genomic DNA from various teleost fish species. The presence of p53 could be shown in all fish species examined, including salmonids and sentinel species for environmental monitoring like English sole and white sucker (Catostomus commersom). To correlate histopathology with molecular analysis the authors initiated the determination of DNA damage, DNA adducts and mutations in the p53 gene (conserved exons 5 to 9).

  17. PU.1 is a major transcriptional activator of the tumour suppressor gene LIMD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxler, Daniel E; James, Victoria; Shelton, Samuel J; Vallim, Thomas Q de A; Shaw, Peter E; Sharp, Tyson V

    2011-04-06

    LIMD1 is a tumour suppressor gene (TSG) down regulated in ∼80% of lung cancers with loss also demonstrated in breast and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. LIMD1 is also a candidate TSG in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Mechanistically, LIMD1 interacts with pRB, repressing E2F-driven transcription as well as being a critical component of microRNA-mediated gene silencing. In this study we show a CpG island within the LIMD1 promoter contains a conserved binding motif for the transcription factor PU.1. Mutation of the PU.1 consensus reduced promoter driven transcription by 90%. ChIP and EMSA analysis demonstrated that PU.1 specifically binds to the LIMD1 promoter. siRNA depletion of PU.1 significantly reduced endogenous LIMD1 expression, demonstrating that PU.1 is a major transcriptional activator of LIMD1. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding the tumor suppressor Pten predisposes zebrafish to hemangiosarcoma

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    Suma Choorapoikayil

    2012-03-01

    PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that antagonizes Akt/PKB signaling. The zebrafish genome encodes two Pten genes, ptena and ptenb. Here, we report that zebrafish mutants that retain a single wild-type copy of ptena or ptenb (ptena+/−ptenb−/− or ptena−/−ptenb+/− are viable and fertile. ptena+/−ptenb−/− fish develop tumors at a relatively high incidence (10.2% and most tumors developed close to the eye (26/30. Histopathologically, the tumor masses were associated with the retrobulbar vascular network and diagnosed as hemangiosarcomas. A single tumor was identified in 42 ptena−/−ptenb+/− fish and was also diagnosed as hemangiosarcoma. Immunohistochemistry indicated that the tumor cells in ptena+/−ptenb−/− and ptena−/−ptenb+/− fish proliferated rapidly and were of endothelial origin. Akt/PKB signaling was activated in the tumors, whereas Ptena was still detected in tumor tissue from ptena+/−ptenb−/− zebrafish. We conclude that haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding Pten predisposes to hemangiosarcoma in zebrafish.

  19. Haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding the tumor suppressor Pten predisposes zebrafish to hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choorapoikayil, Suma; Kuiper, Raoul V; de Bruin, Alain; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2012-03-01

    PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that antagonizes Akt/PKB signaling. The zebrafish genome encodes two Pten genes, ptena and ptenb. Here, we report that zebrafish mutants that retain a single wild-type copy of ptena or ptenb (ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) or ptena(-/-)ptenb(+/-)) are viable and fertile. ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) fish develop tumors at a relatively high incidence (10.2%) and most tumors developed close to the eye (26/30). Histopathologically, the tumor masses were associated with the retrobulbar vascular network and diagnosed as hemangiosarcomas. A single tumor was identified in 42 ptena(-/-)ptenb(+/-) fish and was also diagnosed as hemangiosarcoma. Immunohistochemistry indicated that the tumor cells in ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) and ptena(-/-)ptenb(+/-) fish proliferated rapidly and were of endothelial origin. Akt/PKB signaling was activated in the tumors, whereas Ptena was still detected in tumor tissue from ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) zebrafish. We conclude that haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding Pten predisposes to hemangiosarcoma in zebrafish.

  20. The common mechanisms of transformation by the small DNA tumor viruses: The inactivation of tumor suppressor gene products: p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Arnold J

    2009-02-20

    The small DNA tumor viruses, Polyoma virus, Simian Vacuolating Virus 40, the Papilloma viruses and the human Adenoviruses, were first described during a period of intense virus discovery (1930-1960s) and shown to produce tumors in animals. In each of these cases the viral DNA was shown to persist (commonly integrated into a host chromosome) and only a selected portion of this DNA was expressed as m-RNA and proteins in these cancers. The viral encoded tumor antigens were identified and shown to be required to both establish the tumor and maintain the transformed cell phenotype. The functions of these viral tumor antigens were explored and shown to have common features and mechanisms even though they appear to have evolved from diverse genes. The SV40 large tumor antigen, the human Papilloma virus E7 protein and the Adenovirus E1A protein were shown to bind to and inactivate the functions of the Retinoblastoma proteins in transformed cells. This resulted in the activation of the E2F and DP transcription factors and the entry of cells into the S-phase of DNA synthesis which was required for viral DNA replication. These events triggered the activation of p53 which promotes apoptosis of these virus infected cells limiting virus replication and tumor formation. These viruses responded by evolving and producing the SV40 large tumor antigen, the human Papilloma virus E6 protein and the Adenovirus E1b-55Kd protein which binds to and inactivates the p53 functions in both the infected cells and transformed cells. Some of the human Papilloma viruses and one of the Polyoma viruses have been shown to cause selected cancers in humans. Both the p53 tumor suppressor gene, which was uncovered in the studies with these viruses, and the retinoblastoma protein, have been shown to play a central role in the origins of human cancers via both somatic and germ line mutations in those genes.

  1. Analysis of loss of heterozygosity of the tumor suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarial carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Luković Ljiljana; Popović Branka; Atanacković Jasmina; Novaković Ivana; Perović Milica; Petrović Bojana; Petković Spasoje

    2006-01-01

    Background/aim: Among the genes involved in ovarian carcinogenesis, there has been increased interest in tumor-suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1. Both of the genes make control of cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. The p53 is a "genome guardian" inactivated in more than 50% of human cancers, while BRCA1 mutations are found mostly in breast and ovarian cancer. The aim of this investigation was to establish the frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the regions of the genes p53 and BRCA1 ...

  2. Biochemical and genetic functional dissection of the P38 viral suppressor of RNA silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iki, Taichiro; Tschopp, Marie-Aude; Voinnet, Olivier

    2017-05-01

    Phytoviruses encode viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) to counteract the plant antiviral silencing response, which relies on virus-derived small interfering (si)RNAs processed by Dicer RNaseIII enzymes and subsequently loaded into ARGONAUTE (AGO) effector proteins. Here, a tobacco cell-free system was engineered to recapitulate the key steps of antiviral RNA silencing and, in particular, the most upstream double-stranded (ds)RNA processing reaction, not kinetically investigated thus far in the context of plant VSR studies. Comparative biochemical analyses of distinct VSRs in the reconstituted assay showed that in all cases tested, VSR interactions with siRNA duplexes inhibited the loading, but not the activity, of antiviral AGO1 and AGO2. Turnip crinkle virus P38 displayed the additional and unique property to bind both synthetic and RNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase-generated long dsRNAs, and inhibited the processing into siRNAs. Single amino acid substitutions in P38 could dissociate dsRNA-processing from AGO-loading inhibition in vitro and in vivo, illustrating dual-inhibitory strategies discriminatively deployed within a single viral protein, which, we further show, are bona fide suppressor functions that evolved independently of the conserved coat protein function of P38. © 2017 Iki et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  3. Protocadherin-10 acts as a tumor suppressor gene, and is frequently downregulated by promoter methylation in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chan; Bu, Xiaona; Jiang, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Protocadherin-10 (PCDH10), a member of non-clustered protocadherin family which plays important roles in calcium-dependent cell-cell signal transduction and adhesion. PCDH10 functions as a tumor suppressor gene and its expression is downregulated by promoter methylation in many malignances. In the present study, we explored PCDH10 expression and promoter methylation status, and its biological effects in pancreatic cancer cells, and furthermore, we explored the mechanism of PCDH10 preliminary in pancreatic cancer cells. the mRNA level of PCDH10 was detected by semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR and promoter methylation status examined by methylation-specific PCR in the pancreatic cancer cells (Capan-1, Panc-1, AsPC-1 and BxPC-3) as well as the human normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells HPDE6-C7 which was used as a control. The human pancreatic cells were transfected with plasmid pcDNA3.1-PCDH10 or pcDNA3.1 by lipofectamine 2000. The biological function of PCDH10 in pancreatic cancer cells was determined by CCK-8 assay, colony formation assay, flow cytometry, Transwell invasion assay and wound-healing assay. The levels of apoptosis related proteins were examined by western blotting. PCDH10 expression was obviously downregulated in the pancreatic cancer cells (Capan-1, Panc-1, BxPC-3) compared to the normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. PCDH10 promoter methylation was observed in the two pancreatic cancer cells Capan-1 and BxPC-3,and the expression of PCDH10 could be restored after treating with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and trichostatin A in the two cell types. Overexpression of PCDH10 can inhibit the proliferation, migration, invasion ability of pancreatic cancer cells and induce apoptosis. Ectopic expression of PCDH10 could increase the levels of PARP, caspase-3, caspase-9 and decrease the level of bcl-2, AKT and p-AKT. PCDH10 acts as a tumor suppressor gene, and is frequently down-regulated by promoter methylation in pancreatic cancer cells. PCDH

  4. ERα Mediates Estrogen-Induced Expression of the Breast Cancer Metastasis Suppressor Gene BRMS1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, estrogen has been reported as putatively inhibiting cancer cell invasion and motility. This information is in direct contrast to the paradigm of estrogen as a tumor promoter. However, data suggests that the effects of estrogen are modulated by the receptor isoform with which it interacts. In order to gain a clearer understanding of the role of estrogen in potentially suppressing breast cancer metastasis, we investigated the regulation of estrogen and its receptor on the downstream target gene, breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 (BRMS1 in MCF-7, SKBR3, TTU-1 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Our results showed that estrogen increased the transcription and expression of BRMS1 in the ERα positive breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. Additionally, the ERα specific agonist PPT also induced the transcription and expression of BRMS1. However, the two remaining estrogen receptor (ER subtype agonists had no effect on BRMS1 expression. In order to further examine the influence of ERα on BRMS1 expression, ERα expression was knocked down using siRNA (siERα. Western blot analysis showed that siERα reduced estrogen-induced and PPT-induced BRMS1 expression. In summary, this study demonstrates estrogen, via its α receptor, positively regulates the expression of BRMS1, providing new insight into a potential inhibitory effect of estrogen on metastasis suppression.

  5. Are there tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 4p in sporadic colorectal carcinoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hai-Tao; Jiang, Li-Xin; Lv, Zhong-Chuan; Li, Da-Peng; Zhou, Chong-Zhi; Gao, Jian-Jun; He, Lin; Peng, Zhi-Hai

    2008-01-07

    To study the candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSG) on chromosome 4p by detecting the high frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in sporadic colorectal carcinoma in Chinese patients. Seven fluorescent labeled polymorphic microsatellite markers were analyzed in 83 cases of colorectal carcinoma and matched normal tissue DNA by PCR. PCR products were electrophoresed on an ABI 377 DNA sequencer. Genescan 3.7 and Genotype 3.7 software were used for LOH scanning and analysis. The same procedure was performed by the other six microsatellite markers spanning D4S3013 locus to make further detailed deletion mapping. Comparison between LOH frequency and clinicopathological factors was performed by c2 test. Data were collected from all informative loci. The average LOH frequency on 4p was 24.25%, and 42.3% and 35.62% on D4S405 and D4S3013 locus, respectively. Adjacent markers of D4S3013 displayed a low LOH frequency (4p15.2) and D4S405 (4p14) locus are detected. Candidate TSG, which is involved in carcinogenesis and progression of sporadic colorectal carcinoma on chromosome 4p, may be located between D4S3017 and D4S2933 (about 1.7 cm).

  6. Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and cancer therapy: An evolutionary game theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem, Heydar; Kebriaei, Hamed; Veisi, Zahra

    2017-06-01

    Inactivation of alleles in tumor suppressor genes (TSG) is one of the important issues resulting in evolution of cancerous cells. In this paper, the evolution of healthy, one and two missed allele cells is modeled using the concept of evolutionary game theory and replicator dynamics. The proposed model also takes into account the interaction rates of the cells as designing parameters of the system. Different combinations of the equilibrium points of the parameterized nonlinear system is studied and categorized into some cases. In each case, the interaction rates' values are suggested in a way that the equilibrium points of the replicator dynamics are located on an appropriate region of the state space. Based on the suggested interaction rates, it is proved that the system doesn't have any undesirable interior equilibrium point as well. Therefore, the system will converge to the desirable region, where there is a scanty level of cancerous cells. In addition, the proposed conditions for interaction rates guarantee that, when a trajectory of the system reaches the boundaries, then it will stay there forever which is a desirable property since the equilibrium points have been already located on the boundaries, appropriately. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the suggestions in the elimination of the cancerous cells in different scenarios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mast cells down-regulate CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cell suppressor function via histamine H1 receptor interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forward, Nicholas A; Furlong, Suzanne J; Yang, Yongjun; Lin, Tong-Jun; Hoskin, David W

    2009-09-01

    Mast cells promote both innate and acquired immune responses, but little is known about the effect of mast cells on T regulatory (T(reg)) cell function. In this study, we show for the first time that the capacity of murine CD4(+)CD25(+) T(reg) cells to suppress in vitro proliferation by CD4(+)CD25(-) T responder (T(resp)) cells in response to anti-CD3/anti-CD28 mAb-coated beads was reduced in the presence of syngeneic bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) activated by FcepsilonR cross-linking. Activated BMMC culture supernatants or exogenous histamine also inhibited T(reg) cell suppressor function while the histamine H1 receptor-specific antagonist loratadine, but not the H2 receptor-specific antagonist famotidine, restored T(reg) cell suppressor function in the presence of activated BMMC or activated BMMC culture supernatants. Moreover, treatment of T(reg) cells with loratadine, but not famotidine, rescued T(reg) cell suppressor function in the presence of exogenous histamine. In addition, the H1 receptor-specific agonist 2-pyridylethylamine dihydrochloride inhibited T(reg) cell suppressor function to an extent that was comparable to histamine, whereas the H2 receptor-specific agonist amthamine dihydrobromide was without effect. Both T(reg) cells and T(resp) cells expressed H1 receptors. Exposure to histamine caused T(reg) cells to express lower levels of CD25 and the T(reg) cell-specific transcription factor Foxp3. Taken together, these data indicate that BMMC-elaborated histamine inhibited T(reg) cell suppressor function by signaling through the H1 receptor. We suggest that histamine released as a result of mast cell activation by microbial products might cause a transient decrease in T(reg) cell suppressor function, thereby enhancing the development of protective immunity.

  8. Is the gene encoding Chibby implicated as a tumour suppressor in colorectal cancer ?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gad, Sophie; Teboul, David; Lièvre, Astrid; Goasguen, Nicolas; Berger, Anne; Beaune, Philippe; Laurent-Puig, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    A novel member of the Wnt signalling pathway, Chibby, was recently identified. This protein inhibits Wnt/β-catenin mediated transcriptional activation by competing with Lef-1 (the transcription factor and target of β-catenin) to bind to β-catenin. This suggests that Chibby could be a tumour suppressor protein. The C22orf2 gene coding Chibby is located on chromosome 22, a region recurrently lost in colorectal cancer. Activation of the Wnt pathway is a major feature of colorectal cancer and occurs through inactivation of APC or activation of β-catenin. All of this led us to analyse the possible implication of Chibby in colorectal carcinogenesis. First, 36 tumour and matched normal colonic mucosa DNA were genotyped with five microsatellite markers located on chromosome 22 to search for loss of heterozygosity. Then, mutation screening of the C22orf2 coding sequence and splice sites was performed in the 36 tumour DNA. Finally, expression of Chibby was analysed by quantitative RT-PCR on 10 patients, 4 with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 22. Loss of heterozygosity involving the C22orf2 region was detected in 11 out of 36 patients (30%). Sequencing analysis revealed a known variant, rs3747174, in exon 5: T321C leading to a silent amino acid polymorphism A107A. Allelic frequencies were 0.69 and 0.31 for T and C variants respectively. No other mutation was detected. Among the 10 patients studied, expression analysis revealed that Chibby is overexpressed in 2 tumours and underexpressed in 1. No correlations were found with 22q LOH status. As no somatic mutation was detected in C22orf2 in 36 colorectal tumour DNA, our results do not support the implication of Chibby as a tumour suppressor in colorectal carcinogenesis. This was supported by the absence of underexpression of Chibby among the tumour samples with 22q LOH. The implication of other Wnt pathway members remains to be identified to explain the part of colorectal tumours without mutation in APC and β-catenin

  9. HC-Pro silencing suppressor significantly alters the gene expression profile in tobacco leaves and flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehto Kirsi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA silencing is used in plants as a major defence mechanism against invasive nucleic acids, such as viruses. Accordingly, plant viruses have evolved to produce counter defensive RNA-silencing suppressors (RSSs. These factors interfere in various ways with the RNA silencing machinery in cells, and thereby disturb the microRNA (miRNA mediated endogene regulation and induce developmental and morphological changes in plants. In this study we have explored these effects using previously characterized transgenic tobacco plants which constitutively express (under CaMV 35S promoter the helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro derived from a potyviral genome. The transcript levels of leaves and flowers of these plants were analysed using microarray techniques (Tobacco 4 × 44 k, Agilent. Results Over expression of HC-Pro RSS induced clear phenotypic changes both in growth rate and in leaf and flower morphology of the tobacco plants. The expression of 748 and 332 genes was significantly changed in the leaves and flowers, respectively, in the HC-Pro expressing transgenic plants. Interestingly, these transcriptome alterations in the HC-Pro expressing tobacco plants were similar as those previously detected in plants infected with ssRNA-viruses. Particularly, many defense-related and hormone-responsive genes (e.g. ethylene responsive transcription factor 1, ERF1 were differentially regulated in these plants. Also the expression of several stress-related genes, and genes related to cell wall modifications, protein processing, transcriptional regulation and photosynthesis were strongly altered. Moreover, genes regulating circadian cycle and flowering time were significantly altered, which may have induced a late flowering phenotype in HC-Pro expressing plants. The results also suggest that photosynthetic oxygen evolution, sugar metabolism and energy levels were significantly changed in these transgenic plants. Transcript levels of S

  10. 99: A Novel Myc-Interacting Protein with Features of a Breast Tumor Suppressor Gene Product

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prendergast, George

    1997-01-01

    Bin1 is a novel tumor suppressor-like molecule we identified through its ability to interact with and inhibit the oncogenic activity of the Myc oncoprotein, which is widely deregulated in breast cancer...

  11. The tumor suppressors p33ING1 and p33ING2 interact with alien in vivo and enhance alien-mediated gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegers, Inga; Kob, Robert; Eckey, Maren; Schmidt, Oliver; Goeman, Frauke; Papaioannou, Maria; Escher, Niko; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Melle, Christian; Baniahmad, Aria

    2007-11-01

    The tumor suppressor p33ING1 is involved in DNA repair and cell cycle regulation. Furthermore, p33ING1 is a transcriptional silencer that recognizes the histone mark for trimethylated lysine 4 at histone H3. Interestingly, expression of p33ING1 and p33ING2 is able to induce premature senescence in primary human fibroblasts. The corepressor Alien is involved in gene silencing mediated by selected members of nuclear hormone receptors. In addition, Alien acts as a corepressor for E2F1, a member of the E2F cell cycle regulatory family. Furthermore, recent findings suggest that Alien is complexed with transcription factors participating in DNA repair and chromatin. Here, using a proteomic approach by surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization and mass spectrometry (SELDI-MS) combined with immunological techniques, we show that Alien interacts in vivo with the tumor suppressor p33ING1 as well as with the related tumor suppressor candidate p33ING2. The interaction of Alien with p33ING1 and p33ING2 was confirmed in vitro with GST-pull-down, suggesting a direct binding of Alien to these factors. The binding domain was mapped to a central region of Alien. Functionally, the expression of p33ING1 or p33ING2 enhances the Alien-mediated silencing, suggesting that the interaction plays a role in transcriptional regulation. Thus, the findings suggest that the identified interaction between Alien and the tumor suppressors p33ING1 and p33ING2 reveals a novel cellular protein network.

  12. miR-203 Acts as a Tumor Suppressor Gene in Osteosarcoma by Regulating RAB22A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Yang

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs, small noncoding RNAs of 19-25 nt, play an important roles in the pathological processes of tumorigenesis. The object of this study was to study the expression and function of miR-203 and to found its target gene in osteosarcoma. In our study, we found the expression level of miR-203 was significantly downregulated in osteosarcoma cell lines and tissues. In addition, overexpression of miR-203 inhibited the osteosarcoma cell proliferation and migration and inhibited Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial reversion Transition (MErT. Moreover, we identified RAB22A as a direct target of miR-203 and RAB22A overexpression blocks the roles of miR-203 in osteosarcoma cell. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RAB22A expression was upregulated in human osteosarcoma cell lines and tissues. Take together, our results demonstrated that miR-203 act as a tumor suppressor miRNA through regulating RAB22A expression and suggested its involvement in osteosarcoma progression and carcinogenesis.

  13. Primary microcephaly gene MCPH1 shows signatures of tumor suppressors and is regulated by miR-27a in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thejaswini Venkatesh

    Full Text Available Mutations in the MCPH1 (microcephalin 1 gene, located at chromosome 8p23.1, result in two autosomal recessive disorders: primary microcephaly and premature chromosome condensation syndrome. MCPH1 has also been shown to be downregulated in breast, prostate and ovarian cancers, and mutated in 1/10 breast and 5/41 endometrial tumors, suggesting that it could also function as a tumor suppressor (TS gene. To test the possibility of MCPH1 as a TS gene, we first performed LOH study in a panel of 81 matched normal oral tissues and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC samples, and observed that 14/71 (19.72% informative samples showed LOH, a hallmark of TS genes. Three protein truncating mutations were identified in 1/15 OSCC samples and 2/5 cancer cell lines. MCPH1 was downregulated at both the transcript and protein levels in 21/41 (51.22% and 19/25 (76% OSCC samples respectively. A low level of MCPH1 promoter methylation was also observed in 4/40 (10% tumor samples. We further observed that overexpression of MCPH1 decreased cellular proliferation, anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, cell invasion and tumor size in nude mice, indicating its tumor suppressive function. Using bioinformatic approaches and luciferase assay, we showed that the 3'-UTR of MCPH1 harbors two non-overlapping functional seed regions for miR-27a which negatively regulated its level. The expression level of miR-27a negatively correlated with the MCPH1 protein level in OSCC. Our study indicates for the first time that, in addition to its role in brain development, MCPH1 also functions as a tumor suppressor gene and is regulated by miR-27a.

  14. Molecular characterization of two suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 genes (SOCS1a and SOCS1b in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue XU,Jiannan ZHANG,Juan LI,Yajun WANG

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1 protein can inhibit the signal transduction triggered by some cytokines or hormones and thus are important in many physiological/pathological processes, including innate and adaptive immunity, inflammation, and development in mammals. However, there is sparse information about their structure, tissue expression, in birds, where their biological functions remain unknown. In this study, we cloned and characterized two SOCS1 genes (named cSOCS1a and cSOCS1b from chickens. SOCS1a is predicted to encode a 207-amino acid protein, which shares high amino acid sequence identity (64%–67% with human and mouse SOCS1. Besides SOCS1a, a novel SOCS1b gene was also identified in chickens and other non-mammalian vertebrates including Xenopus tropicalis. Chicken SOCS1b is predicted to encode a 212-amino acid protein, which shares only 30%–32% amino acid sequence identity with human SOCS1 and cSOCS1a. RT-PCR assay revealed that both cSOCS1a and cSOCS1b are widely expressed in all chicken tissues. Using a luciferase reporter assay system, we further demonstrated that transient expression of cSOCS1a and cSOCS1b can significantly inhibit chicken growth hormone (GH- or prolactin (PRL-induced luciferase activities of Hep G2 cells expressing cGH receptor (or cPRL receptor, indicating that SOCS1a and SOCS1b proteins can negatively regulate GH/PRL signaling. Taken together, these data suggest that both cSOCS1a and cSOCS1b may function as negative regulators of cytokine/hormone actions, such as modulation of GH/PRL actions in chickens.

  15. Regulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) tumor suppressor function by PME-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amanpreet; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-12-15

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays a major role in maintaining cellular signaling homeostasis by dephosphorylation of a variety of signaling proteins and acts as a tumor suppressor. Protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) negatively regulates PP2A activity by highly complex mechanisms that are reviewed here. Importantly, recent studies have shown that PME-1 promotes oncogenic MAPK/ERK and AKT pathway activities in various cancer types. In human glioma, high PME-1 expression correlates with tumor progression and kinase inhibitor resistance. We discuss the emerging cancer-associated function of PME-1 and its potential clinical relevance. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  16. Lack of mutations in the TP53 tumor suppressor gene exons 5 to 8 in Fanconi's anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonveaux, P; Le Coniat, M; Grausz, D; Berger, R

    1991-01-01

    The TP53 gene is considered to be a negative regulator of cell growth whose inactivation is an important step in the development or progression of malignancies. Recently, germ line TP53 mutations have been detected in a familial cancer syndrome, the dominantly inherited Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Using single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of PCR products, we looked for TP53 mutations in DNA of patients with Fanconi anemia, an autosomal recessive disease characterized by increased predisposition to neoplasia. We did not find any TP53 mutation in 13 patients, suggesting that this tumor suppressor gene is not directly involved in the cancer susceptibility observed in Fanconi's anemia.

  17. A functional dissection of PTEN N-terminus : Implications in PTEN subcellular targeting and tumor suppressor activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gil, Anabel; Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Stumpf, Miriam; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J.; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Spatial regulation of the tumor suppressor PTEN is exerted through alternative plasma membrane, cytoplasmic, and nuclear subcellular locations. The N-terminal region of PTEN is important for the control of PTEN subcellular localization and function. It contains both an active nuclear localization

  18. Methylation of the tumor suppressor protein, BRCA1, influences its transcriptional cofactor function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Guendel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately half of hereditary breast cancers have mutations in either BRCA1 or BRCA2. BRCA1 is a multifaceted tumor suppressor protein that has implications in processes such as cell cycle, transcription, DNA damage response and chromatin remodeling. This multifunctional nature of BRCA1 is achieved by exerting its many effects through modulation of transcription. Many cellular events are dictated by covalent modification of proteins, an important mechanism in regulating protein and genome function; of which protein methylation is an important posttranslational modification with activating or repressive effects. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate for the first time that BRCA1 is methylated both in breast cancer cell lines and breast cancer tumor samples at arginine and lysine residues through immunoprecipitation and western blot analysis. Arginine methylation by PRMT1 was observed in vitro and the region of BRCA1 504-802 shown to be highly methylated. PRMT1 was detected in complex with BRCA1 504-802 through in vitro binding assays and co-immunoprecipitated with BRCA1. Inhibition of methylation resulted in decreased BRCA1 methylation and alteration of BRCA1 binding to promoters in vivo as shown through chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Knockdown of PRMT1 also resulted in increased BRCA1 binding to particular promoters in vivo. Finally, following methylation inhibition, Sp1 was found to preferentially associate with hypo-methylated BRCA1 and STAT1 was found to preferentially associate with hyper-methylated BRCA1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that methylation may influence either the ability of BRCA1 to bind to specific promoters or protein-protein interactions which alters the recruitment of BRCA1 to these promoters. Thus, given the importance of BRCA1 to genomic stability, methylation of BRCA1 may ultimately affect the tumor suppressor ability of BRCA1.

  19. PTEN functions as a melanoma tumor suppressor by promoting host immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Y; Richards, J-Ae; Gupta, R; Aung, P P; Emley, A; Kluger, Y; Dogra, S K; Mahalingam, M; Wajapeyee, N

    2014-09-18

    Cancer cells acquire several traits that allow for their survival and progression, including the ability to evade the host immune response. However, the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade host immune responses remain largely elusive. Here we study the phenomena of immune evasion in malignant melanoma cells. We find that the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is an important regulator of the host immune response against melanoma cells. Mechanistically, PTEN represses the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines by blocking the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. In melanoma cells lacking PTEN, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activates the transcription of immunosuppressive cytokines in a PI3K-dependent manner. Furthermore, conditioned media from PTEN-deficient, patient-derived short-term melanoma cultures and established melanoma cell lines blocked the production of the interleukin-12 (IL-12) in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Inhibition of IL-12 production was rescued by restoring PTEN or using neutralizing antibodies against the immunosuppressive cytokines. Furthermore, we report that PTEN, as an alternative mechanism to promote the host immune response against cancer cells, represses the expression of programmed cell death 1 ligand, a known repressor of the host immune response. Finally, to establish the clinical significance of our results, we analyzed malignant melanoma patient samples with or without brisk host responses. These analyses confirmed that PTEN loss is associated with a higher percentage of malignant melanoma samples with non-brisk host responses compared with samples with brisk host responses. Collectively, these results establish that PTEN functions as a melanoma tumor suppressor in part by regulating the host immune response against melanoma cells and highlight the importance of assessing PTEN status before recruiting melanoma patients for immunotherapies.

  20. Relevance of miR-21 in regulation of tumor suppressor gene PTEN in human cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Deas, Jessica; Meneses-Acosta, Angélica; De la O-Gómez, Faustino; Fernández-Tilapa, Gloria; Gómez-Cerón, Claudia; Benítez-Boijseauneau, Odelia; Burguete-García, Ana; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo; Madrid-Marina, Vicente; Rodríguez-Dorantes, Mauricio; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the microRNA miR-21 has been found to be altered in almost all types of cancers and it has been classified as an oncogenic microRNA or oncomir. Due to the critical functions of its target proteins in various signaling pathways, miR-21 is an attractive target for genetic and pharmacological modulation in various cancers. Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer in women worldwide and persistent HPV infection is the main etiologic agent. This malignancy merits special attention for the development of new treatment strategies. In the present study we analyze the role of miR-21 in cervical cancer cells. To identify the downstream cellular target genes of upstream miR-21, we silenced endogenous miR-21 expression in a cervical intraepithelial neoplasia-derived cell lines using siRNAs. The effect of miR-21 on gene expression was assessed in cervical cancer cells transfected with the siRNA expression plasmid pSIMIR21. We identified the tumor suppressor gene PTEN as a target of miR-21 and determined the mechanism of its regulation throughout reporter construct plasmids. Using this model, we analyzed the expression of miR-21 and PTEN as well as functional effects such as autophagy and apoptosis induction. In SiHa cells, there was an inverse correlation between miR-21 expression and PTEN mRNA level as well as PTEN protein expression in cervical cancer cells. Transfection with the pSIMIR21 plasmid increased luciferase reporter activity in construct plasmids containing the PTEN-3′-UTR microRNA response elements MRE21-1 and MRE21-2. The role of miR-21 in cell proliferation was also analyzed in SiHa and HeLa cells transfected with the pSIMIR21 plasmid, and tumor cells exhibited markedly reduced cell proliferation along with autophagy and apoptosis induction. We conclude that miR-21 post-transcriptionally down-regulates the expression of PTEN to promote cell proliferation and cervical cancer cell survival. Therefore, it may be a

  1. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurayoshi, Kenta [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Ozono, Eiko [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary, University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom); Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Anschutz Medical Campus, 12800 East 19th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Komori, Hideyuki [Center for Stem Cell Biology, Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ohtani, Kiyoshi, E-mail: btm88939@kwansei.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • ARF promoter showed higher responsiveness to deregulated E2F activity than the E2F1 promoter. • ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specificity than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. • HSV-TK driven by ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity than that driven by E2F1 promoter. - Abstract: In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter

  2. Molecular Analysis: Microsatellite Instability and Loss of Heterozygosity of Tumor Suppressor Gene in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Hadžiavdić

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available HNPCC (Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer development is caused by mutation of genes included in system of mismatch repair genes. The mutation exists at 60% of patients in hMSH2 gene, 30% in hMLH1 and 10% both in hPMS1and hPMS2 genes. RER+ exists in about 90% in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer and about 15-28% in sporadic cancers.The purpose of the study was to determine highly sensitive microsatellite markers which can be fast and efficient way of microsatellite screening for detection of HNPCC patients. Moreover, we have analysed the loss of heterozygosity of tumour suppressor genes which could have the diagnostic value in detection of HPNCC patients.

  3. Tumor suppressor function of Syk in human MCF10A in vitro and normal mouse mammary epithelium in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, You Me; Xu, Xuehua; Sun, Junfeng; Mueller, Duane; Sentissi, Kinza; Johnson, Peter; Urbach, Elana; Seillier-Moiseiwitsch, Françoise; Johnson, Michael D; Mueller, Susette C

    2009-10-15

    The normal function of Syk in epithelium of the developing or adult breast is not known, however, Syk suppresses tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis in breast cancer cells. Here, we demonstrate that in the mouse mammary gland, loss of one Syk allele profoundly increases proliferation and ductal branching and invasion of epithelial cells through the mammary fat pad during puberty. Mammary carcinomas develop by one year. Syk also suppresses proliferation and invasion in vitro. siRNA or shRNA knockdown of Syk in MCF10A breast epithelial cells dramatically increased proliferation, anchorage independent growth, cellular motility, and invasion, with formation of functional, extracellular matrix-degrading invadopodia. Morphological and gene microarray analysis following Syk knockdown revealed a loss of luminal and differentiated epithelial features with epithelial to mesenchymal transition and a gain in invadopodial cell surface markers CD44, CD49F, and MMP14. These results support the role of Syk in limiting proliferation and invasion of epithelial cells during normal morphogenesis, and emphasize the critical role of Syk as a tumor suppressor for breast cancer. The question of breast cancer risk following systemic anti-Syk therapy is raised since only partial loss of Syk was sufficient to induce mammary carcinomas.

  4. Tumor suppressor function of Syk in human MCF10A in vitro and normal mouse mammary epithelium in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Me Sung

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The normal function of Syk in epithelium of the developing or adult breast is not known, however, Syk suppresses tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis in breast cancer cells. Here, we demonstrate that in the mouse mammary gland, loss of one Syk allele profoundly increases proliferation and ductal branching and invasion of epithelial cells through the mammary fat pad during puberty. Mammary carcinomas develop by one year. Syk also suppresses proliferation and invasion in vitro. siRNA or shRNA knockdown of Syk in MCF10A breast epithelial cells dramatically increased proliferation, anchorage independent growth, cellular motility, and invasion, with formation of functional, extracellular matrix-degrading invadopodia. Morphological and gene microarray analysis following Syk knockdown revealed a loss of luminal and differentiated epithelial features with epithelial to mesenchymal transition and a gain in invadopodial cell surface markers CD44, CD49F, and MMP14. These results support the role of Syk in limiting proliferation and invasion of epithelial cells during normal morphogenesis, and emphasize the critical role of Syk as a tumor suppressor for breast cancer. The question of breast cancer risk following systemic anti-Syk therapy is raised since only partial loss of Syk was sufficient to induce mammary carcinomas.

  5. Tumor suppressor genes that escape from X-inactivation contribute to cancer sex bias

    OpenAIRE

    Dunford, Andrew; Weinstock, David M.; Savova, Virginia; Schumacher, Steven E.; Cleary, John P.; Yoda, Akinori; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Hess, Julian M.; Gimelbrant, Alexander A.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lawrence, Michael S.; Getz, Gad; Lane, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a striking and unexplained male predominance across many cancer types. A subset of X chromosome (chrX) genes can escape X-inactivation, which would protect females from complete functional loss by a single mutation. To identify putative “Escape from X-Inactivation Tumor Suppressor” (EXITS) genes, we compared somatic alterations from >4100 cancers across 21 tumor types for sex bias. Six of 783 non-pseudoautosomal region (PAR) chrX genes (ATRX, CNKSR2, DDX3X, KDM5C, KDM6A, and MAGEC3) ...

  6. Hypermethylation of the tumor suppressor gene PRDM1/Blimp-1 supports a pathogenetic role in EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, T; Ma, J; Nie, K; Yan, J; Liu, Y; Bacchi, C E; Queiroga, E M; Gualco, G; Sample, J T; Orazi, A; Knowles, D M; Tam, W

    2014-01-01

    PRDM1/Blimp-1 is a tumor suppressor gene in the activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Its inactivation contributes to pathogenesis in this setting by impairing terminal B-cell differentiation induced by constitutive nuclear factor-κB activation. The role of PRDM1 in Burkitt lymphoma (BL) lymphomagenesis is not known. Here we identified hypermethylation of the promoter region and exon 1 of PRDM1 in all six Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-positive BL cell lines and 12 of 23 (52%) primary EBV-positive BL or BL-related cases examined, but in none of the EBV-negative BL cell lines or primary tumors that we assessed, implying a tumor suppressor role for PRDM1 specifically in EBV-associated BL. A direct induction of PRDM1 hypermethylation by EBV is unlikely, as PRDM1 hypermethylation was not observed in EBV-immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines. Treatment of EBV-positive BL cells with 5′ azacytidine resulted in PRDM1 induction associated with PRDM1 demethylation, consistent with transcriptional silencing of PRDM1 as a result of DNA methylation. Overexpression of PRDM1 in EBV-positive BL cell lines resulted in cell cycle arrest. Our results expand the spectrum of lymphoid malignancies in which PRDM1 may have a tumor suppressor role and identify an epigenetic event that likely contributes to the pathogenesis of BL

  7. Hypermethylation of the tumor suppressor gene PRDM1/Blimp-1 supports a pathogenetic role in EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Ma, J; Nie, K; Yan, J; Liu, Y; Bacchi, C E; Queiroga, E M; Gualco, G; Sample, J T; Orazi, A; Knowles, D M; Tam, W

    2014-11-07

    PRDM1/Blimp-1 is a tumor suppressor gene in the activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Its inactivation contributes to pathogenesis in this setting by impairing terminal B-cell differentiation induced by constitutive nuclear factor-κB activation. The role of PRDM1 in Burkitt lymphoma (BL) lymphomagenesis is not known. Here we identified hypermethylation of the promoter region and exon 1 of PRDM1 in all six Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive BL cell lines and 12 of 23 (52%) primary EBV-positive BL or BL-related cases examined, but in none of the EBV-negative BL cell lines or primary tumors that we assessed, implying a tumor suppressor role for PRDM1 specifically in EBV-associated BL. A direct induction of PRDM1 hypermethylation by EBV is unlikely, as PRDM1 hypermethylation was not observed in EBV-immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines. Treatment of EBV-positive BL cells with 5' azacytidine resulted in PRDM1 induction associated with PRDM1 demethylation, consistent with transcriptional silencing of PRDM1 as a result of DNA methylation. Overexpression of PRDM1 in EBV-positive BL cell lines resulted in cell cycle arrest. Our results expand the spectrum of lymphoid malignancies in which PRDM1 may have a tumor suppressor role and identify an epigenetic event that likely contributes to the pathogenesis of BL.

  8. Clinical Utility of promoter methylation of the tumor suppressor genes DKK3, and RASSF1A in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa H. Saied

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: DNA methylation is the commonest known epigenetic change that results in silencing of tumor suppressor genes. Promoter methylation of tumor suppressor genes has the potential for early detection of breast cancer. Aim: Aim is to examine the potential usefulness of blood based methylation specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP of methylated DKK3 and RASSF1A genes in early detection of breast cancer. Method: Methylation status of DKK3 and RASSF1 was investigated in forty breast cancer patients, twenty fibroadenoma patients and twenty healthy ladies as control group using MSP. Results: Methylation of DKK3 promoter was found in 22.5% of breast cancer patients, while DKK3 methylation was absent in both fibroadenoma patients and control group. Similarly, methylation of RASSF1 promoter was found in 17.5% of breast cancer patients and in none of fibroadenoma and control group. Conclusion: Promoter methylation of DKK3 and RASSF1 was found in breast cancer patients while absent in control group suggesting that tumorspecific methylation of the two genes (DKK3 and RASSF1A might be a valuable biomarker for the early detection of breast cancer. Keywords: DNA methylation, Breast cancer, DKK3, RASSF1

  9. Tumor suppressor genes that escape from X-inactivation contribute to cancer sex bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Andrew; Weinstock, David M.; Savova, Virginia; Schumacher, Steven E.; Cleary, John P.; Yoda, Akinori; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Hess, Julian M.; Gimelbrant, Alexander A.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lawrence, Michael S.; Getz, Gad; Lane, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a striking and unexplained male predominance across many cancer types. A subset of X chromosome (chrX) genes can escape X-inactivation, which would protect females from complete functional loss by a single mutation. To identify putative “Escape from X-Inactivation Tumor Suppressor” (EXITS) genes, we compared somatic alterations from >4100 cancers across 21 tumor types for sex bias. Six of 783 non-pseudoautosomal region (PAR) chrX genes (ATRX, CNKSR2, DDX3X, KDM5C, KDM6A, and MAGEC3) more frequently harbored loss-of-function mutations in males (based on false discovery rate <0.1), compared to zero of 18,055 autosomal and PAR genes (P<0.0001). Male-biased mutations in genes that escape X-inactivation were observed in combined analysis across many cancers and in several individual tumor types, suggesting a generalized phenomenon. We conclude that biallelic expression of EXITS genes in females explains a portion of the reduced cancer incidence compared to males across a variety of tumor types. PMID:27869828

  10. miR-199a-3p displays tumor suppressor functions in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minna, Emanuela; Romeo, Paola; De Cecco, Loris; Dugo, Matteo; Cassinelli, Giuliana; Pilotti, Silvana; Degl'Innocenti, Debora; Lanzi, Cinzia; Casalini, Patrizia; Pierotti, Marco A; Greco, Angela; Borrello, Maria Grazia

    2014-05-15

    Thyroid cancer incidence is rapidly increasing. Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (PTC), the most frequent hystotype, usually displays good prognosis, but no effective therapeutic options are available for the fraction of progressive PTC patients. BRAF and RET/PTC are the most frequent driving genetic lesions identified in PTC. We developed two complementary in vitro models based on RET/PTC1 oncogene, starting from the hypothesis that miRNAs modulated by a driving PTC-oncogene are likely to have a role in thyroid neoplastic processes. Through this strategy, we identified a panel of deregulated miRNAs. Among these we focused on miR-199a-3p and showed its under-expression in PTC specimens and cell lines. We demonstrated that miR-199a-3p restoration in PTC cells reduces MET and mTOR protein levels, impairs migration and proliferation and, more interesting, induces lethality through an unusual form of cell death similar to methuosis, caused by macropinocytosis dysregulation. Silencing MET or mTOR, both involved in survival pathways, does not recapitulate miR-199a-3p-induced cell lethality, thus suggesting that the cooperative regulation of multiple gene targets is necessary. Integrated analysis of miR-199a-3p targets unveils interesting networks including HGF and macropinocytosis pathways. Overall our results indicate miR-199a-3p as a tumor suppressor miRNA in PTC.

  11. MicroRNA-140 mediates RB tumor suppressor function to control stem cell-like activity through interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Akiyo; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Li, Fengkai; Cheng, Chaoyang; Takegami, Yujiro; Kohno, Susumu; Wan, Yuan Song; Hayashi, Naoyuki; Muranaka, Hayato; Nishimoto, Yuuki; Nagatani, Naoko; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Thai, Tran C; Suzuki, Sawako; Nakao, Shinji; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Hirose, Osamu; Barbie, David A; Takahashi, Chiaki

    2017-02-21

    We established an in vitro cell culture system to determine novel activities of the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein during tumor progression. Rb depletion in p53-null mouse-derived soft tissue sarcoma cells induced a spherogenic phenotype. Cells retrieved from Rb-depleted spheres exhibited slower proliferation and less efficient BrdU incorporation, however, much higher spherogenic activity and aggressive behavior. We discovered six miRNAs, including mmu-miR-18a, -25, -29b, -140, -337, and -1839, whose expression levels correlated tightly with the Rb status and spherogenic activity. Among these, mmu-miR-140 appeared to be positively controlled by Rb and to antagonize the effect of Rb depletion on spherogenesis and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, among genes potentially targeted by mmu-miR-140, Il-6 was upregulated by Rb depletion and downregulated by mmu-mir-140 overexpression. Altogether, we demonstrate the possibility that mmu-mir-140 mediates the Rb function to downregulate Il-6 by targeting its 3'-untranslated region. Finally, we detected the same relationship among RB, hsa-miR-140 and IL-6 in a human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Because IL-6 is a critical modulator of malignant features of cancer cells and the RB pathway is impaired in the majority of cancers, hsa-miR-140 might be a promising therapeutic tool that disrupts linkage between tumor suppressor inactivation and pro-inflammatory cytokine response.

  12. Grape seed proanthocyanidins reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes in human skin cancer cells by targeting epigenetic regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaid, Mudit; Prasad, Ram; Singh, Tripti; Jones, Virginia [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Katiyar, Santosh K., E-mail: skatiyar@uab.edu [Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) have been shown to have anti-skin carcinogenic effects in in vitro and in vivo models. However, the precise epigenetic molecular mechanisms remain unexplored. This study was designed to investigate whether GSPs reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes following epigenetic modifications in skin cancer cells. For this purpose, A431 and SCC13 human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were used as in vitro models. The effects of GSPs on DNA methylation, histone modifications and tumor suppressor gene expressions were studied in these cell lines using enzyme activity assays, western blotting, dot-blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that treatment of A431 and SCC13 cells with GSPs decreased the levels of: (i) global DNA methylation, (ii) 5-methylcytosine, (iii) DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and (iv) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b in these cells. Similar effects were noted when these cancer cells were treated identically with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. GSPs decreased histone deacetylase activity, increased levels of acetylated lysines 9 and 14 on histone H3 (H3-Lys 9 and 14) and acetylated lysines 5, 12 and 16 on histone H4, and reduced the levels of methylated H3-Lys 9. Further, GSP treatment resulted in re-expression of the mRNA and proteins of silenced tumor suppressor genes, RASSF1A, p16{sup INK4a} and Cip1/p21. Together, this study provides a new insight into the epigenetic mechanisms of GSPs and may have significant implications for epigenetic therapy in the treatment/prevention of skin cancers in humans. -- Highlights: ►Epigenetic modulations have been shown to have a role in cancer risk. ►Proanthocyanidins decrease the levels of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. ►Proanthocyanidins inhibit histone deacetylase activity in skin cancer cells. ►Proanthocyanidins reactivate tumor suppressor genes in skin

  13. Grape seed proanthocyanidins reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes in human skin cancer cells by targeting epigenetic regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaid, Mudit; Prasad, Ram; Singh, Tripti; Jones, Virginia; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2012-01-01

    Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) have been shown to have anti-skin carcinogenic effects in in vitro and in vivo models. However, the precise epigenetic molecular mechanisms remain unexplored. This study was designed to investigate whether GSPs reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes following epigenetic modifications in skin cancer cells. For this purpose, A431 and SCC13 human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were used as in vitro models. The effects of GSPs on DNA methylation, histone modifications and tumor suppressor gene expressions were studied in these cell lines using enzyme activity assays, western blotting, dot-blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that treatment of A431 and SCC13 cells with GSPs decreased the levels of: (i) global DNA methylation, (ii) 5-methylcytosine, (iii) DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and (iv) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b in these cells. Similar effects were noted when these cancer cells were treated identically with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. GSPs decreased histone deacetylase activity, increased levels of acetylated lysines 9 and 14 on histone H3 (H3-Lys 9 and 14) and acetylated lysines 5, 12 and 16 on histone H4, and reduced the levels of methylated H3-Lys 9. Further, GSP treatment resulted in re-expression of the mRNA and proteins of silenced tumor suppressor genes, RASSF1A, p16 INK4a and Cip1/p21. Together, this study provides a new insight into the epigenetic mechanisms of GSPs and may have significant implications for epigenetic therapy in the treatment/prevention of skin cancers in humans. -- Highlights: ►Epigenetic modulations have been shown to have a role in cancer risk. ►Proanthocyanidins decrease the levels of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. ►Proanthocyanidins inhibit histone deacetylase activity in skin cancer cells. ►Proanthocyanidins reactivate tumor suppressor genes in skin

  14. Phytochemical Compositions of Immature Wheat Bran, and Its Antioxidant Capacity, Cell Growth Inhibition, and Apoptosis Induction through Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Jeong Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the phytochemical compositions and antioxidant capacity, cell growth inhibition, and apoptosis induction in extracts of immature wheat bran. Immature wheat bran (IWB was obtained from immature wheat harvested 10 days earlier than mature wheat. The phytochemical compositions of bran extract samples were analyzed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography. The total ferulic acid (3.09 mg/g and p-coumaric acid (75 µg/g in IWB were significantly higher than in mature wheat bran (MWB, ferulic acid: 1.79 mg/g; p-coumaric acid: 55 µg/g. The oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC: 327 µM Trolox equivalents (TE/g and cellular antioxidant activity (CAA: 4.59 µM Quercetin equivalents (QE/g of the IWB were higher than those of the MWB (ORAC: 281 µM TE/g; CAA: 0.63 µM QE/g. When assessing cell proliferation, the IWB extracts resulted in the lowest EC50 values against HT-29 (18.9 mg/mL, Caco-2 (7.74 mg/mL, and HeLa cells (8.17 mg/mL among bran extract samples. Additionally, the IWB extracts increased the gene expression of p53 and PTEN (tumor suppressor genes in HT-29 cells, indicating inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis through tumor suppressor genes.

  15. Evidence of molecular alterations in the tumour suppressor gene WWOX in benign and malignant bone related lesions of the jaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Marina Gonçalves; Borges, Erica Rievrs; Pimenta, Flavio Juliano; De Mesquita Netto, Ana Carolina; De Marco, Luiz; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri

    2011-02-01

    WWOX is a tumour suppressor gene altered in various human neoplasms. Deletion of WWOX is associated with bone metabolic defects and development of osteosarcoma in mice. We hypothesized that alterations of this gene are associated with the development of benign and malignant mesenchymal bone related lesions of the jaws. We investigated WWOX mRNA by nested reverse transcription-PCR and direct sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR in two osteosarcoma, two fibrosarcoma, eight ossifying fibroma and two fibrous dysplasia fresh samples. Malignancy was associated with a decreased WWOX mRNA expression. Aberrant transcription pattern was found in five samples; however, the relative quantification (RQ) of the WWOX mRNA in such lesions was not different from those carrying only the wild-type. We provide new evidence of WWOX alterations in osteosarcomas and demonstrate for the first time alterations of this gene in fibrosarcomas as well as in ossifying fibromas of the jaws.

  16. The oncogenic transcription factor ERG represses the transcription of the tumour suppressor gene PTEN in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Patricia; Porazinski, Sean; Rajatileka, Shavanthi; Jumbe, Samantha; Hagen, Rachel; Cheung, Man-Kim; Wilson, Ian; Ladomery, Michael R

    2017-11-01

    The oncogene ETS-related gene (ERG) encodes a transcription factor with roles in the regulation of haematopoiesis, angiogenesis, vasculogenesis, inflammation, migration and invasion. The ERG oncogene is activated in >50% of prostate cancer cases, generally through a gene fusion with the androgen-responsive promoter of transmembrane protease serine 2. Phosphatase and tensin homologue ( PTEN ) is an important tumour suppressor gene that is often inactivated in cancer. ERG overexpression combined with PTEN inactivation or loss is often associated with aggressive prostate cancer. The present study aimed to determine whether or not ERG regulates PTEN transcription directly. ERG was demonstrated to bind to the PTEN promoter and repress its transcription. ERG overexpression reduced endogenous PTEN expression, whereas ERG knockdown increased PTEN expression. The ability of ERG to repress PTEN may contribute to a more cancer-permissive environment.

  17. Human umbilical cord matrix mesenchymal stem cells suppress the growth of breast cancer by expression of tumor suppressor genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Ohta

    Full Text Available Human and rat umbilical cord matrix mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSC possess the ability to control the growth of breast carcinoma cells. Comparative analyses of two types of UCMSC suggest that rat UCMSC-dependent growth regulation is significantly stronger than that of human UCMSC. Their different tumoricidal abilities were clarified by analyzing gene expression profiles in the two types of UCMSC. Microarray analysis revealed differential gene expression between untreated naïve UCMSC and those co-cultured with species-matched breast carcinoma cells. The analyses screened 17 differentially expressed genes that are commonly detected in both human and rat UCMSC. The comparison between the two sets of gene expression profiles identified two tumor suppressor genes, adipose-differentiation related protein (ADRP and follistatin (FST, that were specifically up-regulated in rat UCMSC, but down-regulated in human UCMSC when they were co-cultured with the corresponding species' breast carcinoma cells. Over-expression of FST, but not ADRP, in human UCMSC enhanced their ability to suppress the growth of MDA-231 cells. The growth of MDA-231 cells was also significantly lower when they were cultured in medium conditioned with FST, but not ADRP over-expressing human UCMSC. In the breast carcinoma lung metastasis model generated with MDA-231 cells, systemic treatment with FST-over-expressing human UCMSC significantly attenuated the tumor burden. These results suggest that FST may play an important role in exhibiting stronger tumoricidal ability in rat UCMSC than human UCMSC and also implies that human UCMSC can be transformed into stronger tumoricidal cells by enhancing tumor suppressor gene expression.

  18. KLF10, transforming growth factor-β-inducible early gene 1, acts as a tumor suppressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ki-Duk; Kim, Duk-Jung; Lee, Jong Eun; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Lee, Woon Kyu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► KLF10 −/− mice exhibited accelerated papilloma development after DMBA/TPA treatment. ► KLF10 −/− keratinocytes showed increased proliferation and apoptosis. ► KLF10 −/− MEFs yielded more colonies than wild-type one with H-Ras transfection. ► KLF10 dose-dependently activated p21 WAF1/CIP1 transcription. ► KLF10 is a tumor suppressor and that it targets p21 WAF1/CIP1 transcription. -- Abstract: Krüppel-like factor 10 (KLF10) has been suggested to be a putative tumor suppressor. In the present study, we generated KLF10 deficient mice to explore this hypothesis in vivo. KLF10 deficient mice exhibited increased predisposition to skin tumorigenesis and markedly accelerated papilloma development after DMBA/TPA treatment. On the other hand, KLF10 deficient keratinocytes showed increased proliferation and apoptosis. In colony formation assays after oncogenic H-Ras transfection, KLF10 deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) yielded more colonies than wild-type MEFs. Furthermore, KLF10 dose-dependently activated p21 WAF1/CIP1 transcription, which was independent of p53 and Sp1 binding sites in p21 WAF1/CIP1 promoter. This study demonstrates that KLF10 is a tumor suppressor and that it targets p21 WAF1/CIP1 transcription.

  19. Retinoid-induced expression and activity of an immediate early tumor suppressor gene in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Streb

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Retinoids are used clinically to treat a number of hyper-proliferative disorders and have been shown in experimental animals to attenuate vascular occlusive diseases, presumably through nuclear receptors bound to retinoic acid response elements (RARE located in target genes. Here, we show that natural or synthetic retinoids rapidly induce mRNA and protein expression of a specific isoform of A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 12 (AKAP12β in cultured smooth muscle cells (SMC as well as the intact vessel wall. Expression kinetics and actinomycin D studies indicate Akap12β is a retinoid-induced, immediate-early gene. Akap12β promoter analyses reveal a conserved RARE mildly induced with atRA in a region that exhibits hyper-acetylation. Immunofluorescence microscopy and protein kinase A (PKA regulatory subunit overlay assays in SMC suggest a physical association between AKAP12β and PKA following retinoid treatment. Consistent with its designation as a tumor suppressor, inducible expression of AKAP12β attenuates SMC growth in vitro. Further, immunohistochemistry studies establish marked decreases in AKAP12 expression in experimentally-injured vessels of mice as well as atheromatous lesions in humans. Collectively, these results demonstrate a novel role for retinoids in the induction of an AKAP tumor suppressor that blocks vascular SMC growth thus providing new molecular insight into how retiniods may exert their anti-proliferative effects in the injured vessel wall.

  20. Cholesterol and phytosterols differentially regulate the expression of caveolin 1 and a downstream prostate cell growth-suppressor gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifere, Godwin O.; Equan, Anita; Gordon, Kereen; Nagappan, Peri; Igietseme, Joseph U.; Ananaba, Godwin A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of our study was to show the distinction between the apoptotic and anti-proliferative signaling of phytosterols and cholesterol enrichment in prostate cancer cell lines, mediated by the differential transcription of caveolin-1, and N-myc downstream regulated gene1 (NDRG1), a pro-apoptotic androgen-regulated tumor suppressor. Methods PC-3 and DU145 cells were treated with sterols (cholesterol and phytosterols) for 72 h, followed by trypan blue dye exclusion measurement of necrosis and cell growth measured with a Coulter counter. Sterol induction of cell growth-suppressor gene expression was evaluated by mRNA transcription using RT-PCR, while cell cycle analysis was performed by FACS analysis. Altered expression of Ndrg1 protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Apoptosis was evaluated by real time RT-PCR amplification of P53, Bcl-2 gene and its related pro- and anti-apoptotic family members. Results Physiological doses (16 µM) of cholesterol and phytosterols were not cytotoxic in these cells. Cholesterol enrichment promoted cell growth (Pphytosterols significantly induced growth-suppression (Pphytosterols decreased mitotic subpopulations. We demonstrated for the first time that cholesterols concertedly attenuated the expression of caveolin-1(cav-1) and NDRG1 genes in both prostate cancer cell lines. Phytosterols had the opposite effect by inducing overexpression of cav-1, a known mediator of androgen-dependent signals that presumably control cell growth or apoptosis. Conclusions Cholesterol and phytosterol treatment differentially regulated the growth of prostate cancer cells and the expression of p53 and cav-1, a gene that regulates androgen-regulated signals. These sterols also differentially regulated cell cycle arrest, downstream pro-apoptotic androgen-regulated tumor-suppressor, NDRG1 suggesting that cav-1 may mediate pro-apoptotic NDRG1 signals. Elucidation of the mechanism for sterol modulation of growth and apoptosis signaling

  1. Cancer Stem Cell-Secreted Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Stimulates Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cell Function and Facilitates Glioblastoma Immune Evasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otvos, Balint; Silver, Daniel J; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E

    2016-01-01

    populations, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which serve to suppress immune system function. We have identified immune-suppressive MDSCs in the brains of GBM patients and found that they were in close proximity to self-renewing cancer stem cells (CSCs). MDSCs were selectively depleted...... that MIF is primarily an indirect promoter of GBM progression, working to suppress immune rejection by activating and protecting immune suppressive MDSCs within the GBM tumor microenvironment. Stem Cells 2016;34:2026-2039....

  2. Analysis of losses of heterozygosity of the candidate tumour suppressor gene DMBT1 in melanoma resection specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deichmann, M; Mollenhauer, J; Helmke, B

    2002-01-01

    Deleted in malignant brain tumours 1 (DMBT1), a candidate tumour suppressor gene located on chromosome 10q25.3-q26.1, has recently been identified and found to be deleted in several different types of human tumours. In melanomas, the chromosomal region 10q22-qter is commonly affected by losses......, hence we screened primary melanoma samples for losses of heterozygosity (LOH), and acquired melanocytic naevi and melanomas for transcription of DMBT1 and protein expression. Of 38 informative melanomas, 1 nodular melanoma and 2 subcutaneous metastases showed LOH of both microsatellites flanking...... the gene, suggesting loss of 1 DMBT1 allele. Three further melanomas showed LOH at 1 informative locus but were heterozygous for the second marker. Applying reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), DMBT1 transcription was not found in melanomas. However, DMBT1 transcription was also absent...

  3. Effect of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene combined with radiation therapy on human lymphoma cells lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zeyang; Fan Wo; Li Dongqing; Zhu Ran; Wan Jianmei; Wang Yongqing; Wu Jinchang

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the inhibitory effect and radiation sensitization of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on human lymphoma cell lines. Human lymphoma cell lines were treated with rAd-p53, radiation therapy and combined treatment, respectively. The cell growth inhibition was assessed by MTF. The cell cycle and apoptosis were detected by flow cytometry, and the p53 protein expression was detected by Western blotting. The results showed that extrinsic p53 gene have expressed to some degree, but not at high level. The role of inhibition and radiation sensitivity of rAd-p53 was not significant to human lymphoma cell lines. (authors)

  4. Analysis of losses of heterozygosity of the candidate tumour suppressor gene DMBT1 in melanoma resection specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deichmann, M; Mollenhauer, J; Helmke, B

    2002-01-01

    , hence we screened primary melanoma samples for losses of heterozygosity (LOH), and acquired melanocytic naevi and melanomas for transcription of DMBT1 and protein expression. Of 38 informative melanomas, 1 nodular melanoma and 2 subcutaneous metastases showed LOH of both microsatellites flanking......Deleted in malignant brain tumours 1 (DMBT1), a candidate tumour suppressor gene located on chromosome 10q25.3-q26.1, has recently been identified and found to be deleted in several different types of human tumours. In melanomas, the chromosomal region 10q22-qter is commonly affected by losses...... the gene, suggesting loss of 1 DMBT1 allele. Three further melanomas showed LOH at 1 informative locus but were heterozygous for the second marker. Applying reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), DMBT1 transcription was not found in melanomas. However, DMBT1 transcription was also absent...

  5. Lysine demethylase KDM2A inhibits TET2 to promote DNA methylation and silencing of tumor suppressor genes in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J-Y; Luo, C-W; Lai, Y-S; Wu, C-C; Hung, W-C

    2017-08-07

    The coupling between DNA methylation and histone modification contributes to aberrant expression of oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes that leads to tumor development. Our previous study demonstrated that lysine demethylase 2A (KDM2A) functions as an oncogene in breast cancer by promoting cancer stemness and angiogenesis via activation of the Notch signaling. Here, we demonstrate that knockdown of KDM2A significantly increases the 5'-hydroxymethylcytosine (5'-hmc) level in genomic DNA and expression of tet-eleven translocation 2 (TET2) in various breast cancer cell lines. Conversely, ectopic expression of KDM2A inhibits TET2 expression in KDM2A-depleted cells suggesting TET2 is a transcriptional repression target of KDM2A. Our results show that KDM2A interacts with RelA to co-occupy at the TET2 gene promoter to repress transcription and depletion of RelA or KDM2A restores TET2 expression. Upregulation of TET2 in the KDM2A-depleted cells induces the re-activation of two TET downstream tumor suppressor genes, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and E-cadherin, and inhibits migration and invasion. On the contrary, knockdown of TET2 in these cells decreases EpCAM and E-cadherin and increases cell invasiveness. More importantly, TET2 expression is negatively associated KDM2A in triple-negative breast tumor tissues, and its expression predicts a better survival. Taken together, we demonstrate for the first time that TET2 is a direct repression target of KDM2A and reveal a novel mechanism by which KDM2A promotes DNA methylation and breast cancer progression via the inhibition of a DNA demethylase.

  6. Towards the Identification of New Genes Involved in ABA-Dependent Abiotic Stresses Using Arabidopsis Suppressor Mutants of abh1 Hypersensitivity to ABA during Seed Germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Szarejko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid plays a pivotal role in the abiotic stress response in plants. Although great progress has been achieved explaining the complexity of the stress and ABA signaling cascade, there are still many questions to answer. Mutants are a valuable tool in the identification of new genes or new alleles of already known genes and in elucidating their role in signaling pathways. We applied a suppressor mutation approach in order to find new components of ABA and abiotic stress signaling in Arabidopsis. Using the abh1 (ABA hypersensitive 1 insertional mutant as a parental line for EMS mutagenesis, we selected several mutants with suppressed hypersensitivity to ABA during seed germination. Here, we present the response to ABA and a wide range of abiotic stresses during the seed germination and young seedling development of two suppressor mutants—soa2 (suppressor of abh1 hypersensitivity to ABA 2 and soa3 (suppressor of abh1 hypersensitivity to ABA 3. Generally, both mutants displayed a suppression of the hypersensitivity of abh1 to ABA, NaCl and mannitol during germination. Both mutants showed a higher level of tolerance than Columbia-0 (Col-0—the parental line of abh1 in high concentrations of glucose. Additionally, soa2 exhibited better root growth than Col-0 in the presence of high ABA concentrations. soa2 and soa3 were drought tolerant and both had about 50% fewer stomata per mm2 than the wild-type but the same number as their parental line—abh1. Taking into account that suppressor mutants had the same genetic background as their parental line—abh1, it was necessary to backcross abh1 with Landsberg erecta four times for the map-based cloning approach. Mapping populations, derived from the cross of abh1 in the Landsberg erecta background with each suppressor mutant, were created. Map based cloning in order to identify the suppressor genes is in progress.

  7. NKL homeobox gene MSX1 acts like a tumor suppressor in NK-cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Stefan; Pommerenke, Claudia; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; MacLeod, Roderick A F; Drexler, Hans G

    2017-09-15

    NKL homeobox gene MSX1 is physiologically expressed in lymphoid progenitors and subsequently downregulated in developing T- and B-cells. In contrast, elevated expression levels of MSX1 persist in mature natural killer (NK)-cells, indicating a functional role in this compartment. While T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) subsets exhibit aberrant overexpression of MSX1, we show here that in malignant NK-cells the level of MSX1 transcripts is aberrantly downregulated. Chromosomal deletions at 4p16 hosting the MSX1 locus have been described in NK-cell leukemia patients. However, NK-cell lines analyzed here showed normal MSX1 gene configurations, indicating that this aberration might be uncommon. To identify alternative MSX1 regulatory mechanisms we compared expression profiling data of primary normal NK-cells and malignant NK-cell lines. This procedure revealed several deregulated genes including overexpressed IRF4, MIR155HG and MIR17HG and downregulated AUTS2, EP300, GATA3 and HHEX. As shown recently, chromatin-modulator AUTS2 is overexpressed in T-ALL subsets where it mediates aberrant transcriptional activation of MSX1. Here, our data demonstrate that in malignant NK-cell lines AUTS2 performed MSX1 activation as well, but in accordance with downregulated MSX1 transcription therein we detected reduced AUTS2 expression, a small genomic deletion at 7q11 removing exons 3 and 4, and truncating mutations in exon 1. Moreover, genomic profiling and chromosomal analyses of NK-cell lines demonstrated amplification of IRF4 at 6p25 and deletion of PRDM1 at 6q21, highlighting their potential oncogenic impact. Functional analyses performed via knockdown or forced expression of these genes revealed regulatory network disturbances effecting downregulation of MSX1 which may underlie malignant development in NK-cells.

  8. A single mutation in the 15S rRNA gene confers nonsense suppressor activity and interacts with mRF1 the release factor in yeast mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gargouri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the mim3-1 mitochondrial ribosomal suppressor, acting on ochre mitochondrial mutations and one frameshift mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The 15s rRNA suppressor gene contains a G633 to C transversion. Yeast mitochondrial G633 corresponds to G517 of the E.coli 15S rRNA, which is occupied by an invariant G in all known small rRNA sequences. Interestingly, this mutation has occurred at the same position as the known MSU1 mitochondrial suppressor which changes G633 to A. The suppressor mutation lies in a highly conserved region of the rRNA, known in E.coli as the 530-loop, interacting with the S4, S5 and S12 ribosomal proteins. We also show an interesting interaction between the mitochondrial mim3-1 and the nuclear nam3-1 suppressors, both of which have the same action spectrum on mitochondrial mutations: nam3-1 abolishes the suppressor effect when present with mim3-1 in the same haploid cell. We discuss these results in the light of the nature of Nam3, identified by [1] as the yeast mitochondrial translation release factor. A hypothetical mechanism of suppression by "ribosome shifting" is also discussed in view of the nature of mutations suppressed and not suppressed.

  9. Differential expression of the klf6 tumor suppressor gene upon cell damaging treatments in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrau, Ricardo C.; D' Astolfo, Diego S.; Andreoli, Veronica [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Bocco, Jose L., E-mail: jbocco@fcq.unc.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Koritschoner, Nicolas P. [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2011-02-10

    The mammalian Krueppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is involved in critical roles such as growth-related signal transduction, cell proliferation and differentiation, development, apoptosis and angiogenesis. Also, KLF6 appears to be an emerging key factor during cancer development and progression. Its expression is thoroughly regulated by several cell-damaging stimuli. DNA damaging agents at lethal concentrations induce a p53-independent down-regulation of the klf6 gene. To investigate the impact of external stimuli on human klf6 gene expression, its mRNA level was analyzed using a cancer cell line profiling array system, consisting in an assortment of immobilized cDNAs from multiple cell lines treated with several cell-damaging agents at growth inhibitory concentrations (IC{sub 50}). Cell-damaging agents affected the klf6 expression in 62% of the cDNA samples, though the expression pattern was not dependent on the cell origin type. Interestingly, significant differences (p < 0.0001) in KLF6 mRNA levels were observed depending on the cellular p53 status upon cell damage. KLF6 expression was significantly increased in 63% of p53-deficient cells (122/195). Conversely, KLF6 mRNA level decreased nearly 4 fold in more than 70% of p53+/+ cells. In addition, klf6 gene promoter activity was down-regulated by DNA damaging agents in cells expressing the functional p53 protein whereas it was moderately increased in the absence of functional p53. Consistent results were obtained for the endogenous KLF6 protein level. Results indicate that human klf6 gene expression is responsive to external cell damage mediated by IC{sub 50} concentrations of physical and chemical stimuli in a p53-dependent manner. Most of these agents are frequently used in cancer therapy. Induction of klf6 expression in the absence of functional p53 directly correlates with cell death triggered by these compounds, whereas it is down-regulated in p53+/+ cells. Hence, klf6 expression level could represent a valuable

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with decreased expression of SLC5A8, a cancer suppressor gene, in young children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Orellana Manzano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori infects half of the world's population and causes gastric cancer in a subset of infected adults. Previous blood microarray findings showed that apparently healthy children, persistently infected with H. pylori have differential gene expression compared to age-matched, non-infected children. SLC5A8, a cancer suppressor gene with decreased expression among infected children, was chosen for further study based on bioinformatics analysis. Methods: A pilot study was conducted using specific qRT-PCR amplification of SLC5A8 in blood samples from H. pylori infected and non-infected children, followed by a larger, blinded, case-control study. We then analyzed gastric tissue from H. pylori infected and non-infected children undergoing endoscopy for clinical purposes. Results: Demographics, clinical findings and family history were similar between groups. SLC5A8 expression was decreased in infected versus non-infected children in blood, 0.12 (IQR: 0 – 0.89 versus 1.86 (IQR: 0 – 8.94, P=0.002, and in gastric tissue, 0.08 (IQR: 0.04 – 0.15 versus 1.88 (IQR: 0.55 – 2.56; P=0.001. Children who were both stool positive and seropositive for H. pylori had the lowest SLC5A8 expression levels.Conclusions: H. pylori infection is associated with suppression of SCL5A8, a cancer suppressor gene, in both blood and tissue samples from young children.

  11. The expression of a tumor suppressor gene JDP2 and its prognostic value in hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao-Li; Chan, Shih-Hsuan; Lin, Ping-Yi; Chu, Pei-Yi

    2017-05-01

    The c-Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2) belongs to the activator protein-1 (AP-1) family and functions as a repressor of the AP-1 complex by dimerizing with other c-Jun proteins. Thus, JDP2 plays an important role in the repression of AP-1-driven biological processes, such as differentiation and proliferation. Recent studies have suggested that JDP2 may function as a tumor suppressor through its suppressive action against the AP-1 complex, which is known to drive oncogenic signals in several human malignancies. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry to examine the JDP2 expression in 211 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and analyzed the potential link of JDP2 expression to the clinicopathological features of HCC patients. Clinical parameter analysis showed that high expression of JDP2 was significantly correlated with smaller tumor size (P=.002) and early stage HCC (P=.039). Moreover, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that high expression of JDP2 was significantly associated with better survival in HCC patients (P=.006). Taken together, our results showed that JDP2 may serve as a tumor suppressor in HCC and could therefore serve as a good prognostic marker for patients with HCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The tumor suppressor, vitamin D3 up-regulated protein 1 (VDUP1), functions downstream of REPO during Drosophila gliogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandalaywala, Neil V; Chang, Solomon; Snyder, Randall G; Levendusky, Mark C; Voigt, Jeffrey M; Dearborn, Richard E

    2008-03-15

    The tumor suppressor, vitamin D(3) up-regulated protein 1 (VDUP1), regulates cell cycle progression by suppressing AP-1-dependent transcription. Loss of VDUP1 activity is associated with tumorigenesis but little is known about VDUP1 regulatory controls or developmental roles. Here we show that the Drosophila homolog of human VDUP1 (dVDUP1) is expressed throughout the nervous system at all stages of development, the first in vivo analysis of VDUP1 expression patterns in the brain. During neurogenesis dVDUP1 expression is transiently down-regulated coincident with neuroblast delamination. Subsequent to expression of the neuronal marker elav, dVDUP1 is up-regulated to varying degrees in developing neurons. In contrast, dVDUP1 expression is both robust and sustained during gliogenesis, and the cis-regulatory region of the dvdup1 gene contains consensus binding sites for the glial fate gene reversed polarity (repo). Expression of dVDUP1 in presumptive glia is lost in embryos deficient for the glial fate genes glial cells missing (gcm) and repo. Conversely, ectopic expression of gcm or repo was sufficient to induce dVDUP1 expression in the nervous system. Taken together, these data suggest a novel role for the dVDUP1 tumor suppressor during nervous system development as a regulatory target for REPO during gliogenesis.

  13. The transformation suppressor gene Reck is required for postaxial patterning in mouse forelimbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mako Yamamoto

    2012-03-01

    The membrane-anchored metalloproteinase-regulator RECK has been characterized as a tumor suppressor. Here we report that mice with reduced Reck-expression show limb abnormalities including right-dominant, forelimb-specific defects in postaxial skeletal elements. The forelimb buds of low-Reck mutants have an altered dorsal ectoderm with reduced Wnt7a and Igf2 expression, and hypotrophy in two signaling centers (i.e., ZPA and AER that are essential for limb outgrowth and patterning. Reck is abundantly expressed in the anterior mesenchyme in normal limb buds; mesenchyme-specific Reck inactivation recapitulates the low-Reck phenotype; and some teratogens downregulate Reck in mesenchymal cells. Our findings illustrate a role for Reck in the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions essential for mammalian development.

  14. Differential expression of the klf6 tumor suppressor gene upon cell damaging treatments in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrau, Ricardo C.; D'Astolfo, Diego S.; Andreoli, Veronica; Bocco, Jose L.; Koritschoner, Nicolas P.

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian Krueppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is involved in critical roles such as growth-related signal transduction, cell proliferation and differentiation, development, apoptosis and angiogenesis. Also, KLF6 appears to be an emerging key factor during cancer development and progression. Its expression is thoroughly regulated by several cell-damaging stimuli. DNA damaging agents at lethal concentrations induce a p53-independent down-regulation of the klf6 gene. To investigate the impact of external stimuli on human klf6 gene expression, its mRNA level was analyzed using a cancer cell line profiling array system, consisting in an assortment of immobilized cDNAs from multiple cell lines treated with several cell-damaging agents at growth inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 ). Cell-damaging agents affected the klf6 expression in 62% of the cDNA samples, though the expression pattern was not dependent on the cell origin type. Interestingly, significant differences (p 50 concentrations of physical and chemical stimuli in a p53-dependent manner. Most of these agents are frequently used in cancer therapy. Induction of klf6 expression in the absence of functional p53 directly correlates with cell death triggered by these compounds, whereas it is down-regulated in p53+/+ cells. Hence, klf6 expression level could represent a valuable marker for the efficiency of cell death upon cancer treatment.

  15. Re-expression of methylation-induced tumor suppressor gene silencing is associated with the state of histone modification in gastric cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Chun-Feng; Zhu, Xin-Jiang; Peng, Guo; Dai, Dong-Qiu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To identify the relationship between DNA hyper-methylation and histone modification at a hyperme-thylated, silenced tumor suppressor gene promoter in human gastric cancer cell lines and to elucidate whether alteration of DNA methylation could affect histone modification.

  16. Clinical and pathological associations with p53 tumour-suppressor gene mutations and expression of p21WAF1/Cip1 in colorectal carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slebos, R. J.; Baas, I. O.; Clement, M.; Polak, M.; Mulder, J. W.; van den Berg, F. M.; Hamilton, S. R.; Offerhaus, G. J.

    1996-01-01

    Inactivation of the p53 tumour-suppressor gene is common in a wide variety of human neoplasms. In the majority of cases, single point mutations in the protein-encoding sequence of p53 lead to positive immunohistochemistry (IHC) for the p53 protein, and are accompanied by loss of the wild-type

  17. Mimic Phosphorylation of a βC1 Protein Encoded by TYLCCNB Impairs Its Functions as a Viral Suppressor of RNA Silencing and a Symptom Determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xueting; Wang, Zhan Qi; Xiao, Ruyuan; Cao, Linge; Wang, Yaqin; Xie, Yan; Zhou, Xueping

    2017-08-15

    Phosphorylation of the βC1 protein encoded by the betasatellite of tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNB-βC1) by SNF1-related protein kinase 1 (SnRK1) plays a critical role in defense of host plants against geminivirus infection in Nicotiana benthamiana However, how phosphorylation of TYLCCNB-βC1 impacts its pathogenic functions during viral infection remains elusive. In this study, we identified two additional tyrosine residues in TYLCCNB-βC1 that are phosphorylated by SnRK1. The effects of TYLCCNB-βC1 phosphorylation on its functions as a viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR) and a symptom determinant were investigated via phosphorylation mimic mutants in N. benthamiana plants. Mutations that mimic phosphorylation of TYLCCNB-βC1 at tyrosine 5 and tyrosine 110 attenuated disease symptoms during viral infection. The phosphorylation mimics weakened the ability of TYLCCNB-βC1 to reverse transcriptional gene silencing and to suppress posttranscriptional gene silencing and abolished its interaction with N. benthamiana ASYMMETRIC LEAVES 1 in N. benthamiana leaves. The mimic phosphorylation of TYLCCNB-βC1 had no impact on its protein stability, subcellular localization, or self-association. Our data establish an inhibitory effect of phosphorylation of TYLCCNB-βC1 on its pathogenic functions as a VSR and a symptom determinant and provide a mechanistic explanation of how SnRK1 functions as a host defense factor. IMPORTANCE Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), which causes a severe yellow leaf curl disease in China, is a monopartite geminivirus associated with the betasatellite (TYLCCNB). TYLCCNB encodes a single pathogenicity protein, βC1 (TYLCCNB-βC1), which functions as both a viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR) and a symptom determinant. Here, we show that mimicking phosphorylation of TYLCCNB-βC1 weakens its ability to reverse transcriptional gene silencing, to suppress posttranscriptional gene silencing, and to interact with N

  18. No evidence for promoter region methylation of the succinate dehydrogenase and fumarate hydratase tumour suppressor genes in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrovic Alexander

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH and fumarate hydratase (FH are tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle enzymes that are also known to act as tumour suppressor genes. Increased succinate or fumarate levels as a consequence of SDH and FH deficiency inhibit hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α prolyl hydroxylases leading to sustained HIF-1α expression in tumours. Since HIF-1α is frequently expressed in breast carcinomas, DNA methylation at the promoter regions of the SDHA, SDHB, SDHC and SDHD and FH genes was evaluated as a possible mechanism in silencing of SDH and FH expression in breast carcinomas. Findings No DNA methylation was identified in the promoter regions of the SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD and FH genes in 72 breast carcinomas and 10 breast cancer cell lines using methylation-sensitive high resolution melting which detects both homogeneous and heterogeneous methylation. Conclusion These results show that inactivation via DNA methylation of the promoter CpG islands of SDH and FH is unlikely to play a major role in sporadic breast carcinomas.

  19. Polymorphisms rs12998 and rs5780218 in KiSS1 Suppressor Metastasis Gene in Mexican Patients with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edhit Guadalupe Cruz Quevedo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. KiSS1 is a metastasis suppressor gene associated with inhibition of cellular chemotaxis and invasion attenuating the metastasis in melanoma and breast cancer cell lines. Along the KiSS-1 gene at least 294 SNPs have been described; however the association of these polymorphisms as genetic markers for metastasis in breast cancer studies has not been investigated. Here we describe two simple PCR-RFLPs protocols to identify the rs5780218 (9DelT and the rs12998 (E20K KiSS1 polymorphisms and the allelic, genotypic, and haplotypic frequencies in Mexican general population (GP and patients with benign breast disease (BBD or breast cancer (BC. Results. The rs5780218 polymorphism was individually associated with breast cancer (P=0.0332 and the rs12998 polymorphism shows statistically significant differences when GP versus case (BC and BBD groups were compared (P<0.0001. The H1 Haplotype (G/- occurred more frequently in BC group (0.4256 whereas H2 haplotype (G/T was the most prevalent in BBD group (0.4674. Conclusions. Our data indicated that the rs5780218 polymorphism individually confers susceptibility for development of breast cancer in Mexican population and a possible role as a genetic marker in breast cancer metastasis for H1 haplotype (Wt/variant in KiSS1 gene must be analyzed in other populations.

  20. [Construction of Escherichia coli-Bifidobacterium longum shuttle vector and expression of tumor suppressor gene PTEN in B. longum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xin; Liu, Jun-E

    2006-06-01

    It was reported that Bifidobacterium longum accumulated specifically in hypoxic solid tumors, therefore could be used as a delivery system for cancer-specific gene therapy. Furthermore, construction of E.coli-B. longum shuttle vectors was proved by other research to be an efficient way for stable gene expression in B. longum. To obtain a shuttle vector and analyze the inhibition on mice solid tumors by genetically engineered B. longum, 48 primers with mutual overlaps were designed, assisted by software package Oligo 6.0. By PCR with the above primers, a linear plasmid was synthesized, which consists of pMB1 and HU gene promoter, both from B. longum. pMB-HU was constructed by cloning the synthesized linear plasmid into E.coli vector pMD 18-T, and was proved to be stably replicated in both E.coli DH5alpha and B. longum L17. By inserting PTEN cDNA into pMB-HU, expression vector pMB-HU-PTEN was obtained, in which PTEN gene was reported as a major tumor suppressor gene encoding a dual-specificity phosphatase. pMB-HU-PTEN was then transferred into B. longum L17 by electroporation. After transformation, an effective expression of PTEN in B. longum L17 was confirmed by Western blot, and significant inhibition on growth of mice solid tumors was also observed with the above genetically engineered B. longum. Those obtained results have laid foundation for tumor-targeting gene therapy with B. longum.

  1. Down-regulation of SFRP1 as a putative tumor suppressor gene can contribute to human hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jian; Zhang, Yun-Li; Teng, Xiao-Mei; Lin, Yun; Zheng, Da-Li; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Han, Ze-Guang

    2007-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers in the world. SFRP1 (the secreted frizzled-related protein 1), a putative tumor suppressor gene mapped onto chromosome 8p12-p11.1, the frequent loss of heterozygosity (LOH) region in human HCC, encodes a Wingless-type (Wnt) signaling antagonist and is frequently inactivated by promoter methylation in many human cancers. However, whether the down-regulation of SFRP1 can contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis still remains unclear. We investigated the expression of SFRP1 through real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry staining. The cell growth and colony formation were observed as the overexpression and knockdown of SFRP1. The DNA methylation status within SFRP1 promoter was analyzed through methylation-specific PCR or bisulphate-treated DNA sequencing assays. Loss of heterozygosity was here detected with microsatellite markers. SFRP1 was significantly down-regulated in 76.1% (35/46) HCC specimens at mRNA level and in 30% (30/100) HCCs indicated by immunohistochemistry staining, as compared to adjacent non-cancerous livers. The overexpression of SFRP1 can significantly inhibit the cell growth and colony formation of YY-8103, SMMC7721, and Hep3B cells. The RNA interference against the constitutional SFRP1 in the offspring SMMC7721 cells, which were stably transfected by ectopic SFRP1, can markedly promote cell growth of these cells. LOH of both microsatellite markers D8S532 and D8SAC016868 flanking the gene locus was found in 13% (6 of 46 HCCs) and 6.5% (3 of 46 HCCs) of the informative cases, respectively, where 5 of 8 HCC specimens with LOH showed the down-regulation of SFRP1. DNA hypermethylation within SFRP1 promoter was identified in two of three HCC specimens without SFRP1 expression. Moreover, the DNA methylation of SFRP1 promoter was significantly reduced, along with the re-expression of the gene, in those HCC cell lines, Bel7404, QGY7701, and MHCC-H, as treated by DAC. Our data suggested that the

  2. Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer identifies EPB41L3 as a functional suppressor of epithelial ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dafou, Dimitra; Grun, Barbara; Sinclair, John

    2010-01-01

    lines. Using immunohistochemistry, 66% of 794 invasive ovarian tumors showed no EPB41L3 expression compared with only 24% of benign ovarian tumors and 0% of normal ovarian epithelial tissues. EPB41L3 was extensively methylated in ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian tumors compared with normal...... (erythrocyte membrane protein band 4.1-like 3, alternative names DAL-1 and 4.1B) was a candidate ovarian cancer-suppressor gene. Immunoblot analysis showed that EPB41L3 was activated in TOV21G(+18) hybrids, expressed in normal ovarian epithelial cell lines, but was absent in 15 (78%) of 19 ovarian cancer cell...... tissues (P = .00004), suggesting this may be the mechanism of gene inactivation in ovarian cancers. Constitutive reexpression of EPB41L3 in a three-dimensional multicellular spheroid model of ovarian cancer caused significant growth suppression and induced apoptosis. Transmission and scanning electron...

  3. A Functional Dissection of PTEN N-Terminus: Implications in PTEN Subcellular Targeting and Tumor Suppressor Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Anabel; Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Stumpf, Miriam; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J.; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Spatial regulation of the tumor suppressor PTEN is exerted through alternative plasma membrane, cytoplasmic, and nuclear subcellular locations. The N-terminal region of PTEN is important for the control of PTEN subcellular localization and function. It contains both an active nuclear localization signal (NLS) and an overlapping PIP2-binding motif (PBM) involved in plasma membrane targeting. We report a comprehensive mutational and functional analysis of the PTEN N-terminus, including a panel of tumor-related mutations at this region. Nuclear/cytoplasmic partitioning in mammalian cells and PIP3 phosphatase assays in reconstituted S. cerevisiae defined categories of PTEN N-terminal mutations with distinct PIP3 phosphatase and nuclear accumulation properties. Noticeably, most tumor-related mutations that lost PIP3 phosphatase activity also displayed impaired nuclear localization. Cell proliferation and soft-agar colony formation analysis in mammalian cells of mutations with distinctive nuclear accumulation and catalytic activity patterns suggested a contribution of both properties to PTEN tumor suppressor activity. Our functional dissection of the PTEN N-terminus provides the basis for a systematic analysis of tumor-related and experimentally engineered PTEN mutations. PMID:25875300

  4. Tumor suppressors status in cancer cell line Encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonkin, Dmitriy; Hassan, Mehedi; Murphy, Denis J; Tatarinova, Tatiana V

    2013-08-01

    Tumor suppressors play a major role in the etiology of human cancer, and typically achieve a tumor-promoting effect upon complete functional inactivation. Bi-allelic inactivation of tumor suppressors may occur through genetic mechanisms (such as loss of function mutation, copy number (CN) loss, or loss of heterozygosity (LOH)), epigenetic mechanisms (such as promoter methylation or histone modification), or a combination of the two. We report systematically derived status of 69 known or putative tumor suppressors, across 799 samples of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. In order to generate such resource we constructed a novel comprehensive computational framework for the assessment of tumor suppressor functional "status". This approach utilizes several orthogonal genomic data types, including mutation data, copy number, LOH and expression. Through correlation with additional data types (compound sensitivity and gene set activity) we show that this integrative method provides a more accurate assessment of tumor suppressor status than can be inferred by expression, copy number, or mutation alone. This approach has the potential for a more realistic assessment of tumor suppressor genes for both basic and translational oncology research. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of genes highly downregulated in pancreatic cancer through a meta-analysis of microarray datasets: implications for discovery of novel tumor-suppressor genes and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonesekere, Nalin C W; Andersen, Wyatt; Smith, Alex; Wang, Xiaosheng

    2018-02-01

    The lack of specific symptoms at early tumor stages, together with a high biological aggressiveness of the tumor contribute to the high mortality rate for pancreatic cancer (PC), which has a 5-year survival rate of about 7%. Recent failures of targeted therapies inhibiting kinase activity in clinical trials have highlighted the need for new approaches towards combating this deadly disease. In this study, we have identified genes that are significantly downregulated in PC, through a meta-analysis of large number of microarray datasets. We have used qRT-PCR to confirm the downregulation of selected genes in a panel of PC cell lines. This study has yielded several novel candidate tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs) including GNMT, CEL, PLA2G1B and SERPINI2. We highlight the role of GNMT, a methyl transferase associated with the methylation potential of the cell, and CEL, a lipase, as potential therapeutic targets. We have uncovered genetic links to risk factors associated with PC such as smoking and obesity. Genes important for patient survival and prognosis are also discussed, and we confirm the dysregulation of metabolic pathways previously observed in PC. While many of the genes downregulated in our dataset are associated with protein products normally produced by the pancreas for excretion, we have uncovered some genes whose downregulation appear to play a more causal role in PC. These genes will assist in providing a better understanding of the disease etiology of PC, and in the search for new therapeutic targets and biomarkers.

  6. Epigenetic identification of ZNF545 as a functional tumor suppressor in multiple myeloma via activation of p53 signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yu [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Zhan, Qian [The Center for Clinical Molecular Medical Detection, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Xu, Hongying [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Li, Lili; Li, Chen [Cancer Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Clinical Oncology, Sir YK Pao Center for Cancer and Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong and CUHK Shenzhen Research Institute (Hong Kong); Xiao, Qian; Xiang, Shili; Hui, Tianli [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Xiang, Tingxiu, E-mail: larissaxiang@163.com [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Ren, Guosheng, E-mail: rengs726@126.com [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology and Epigenetics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2016-06-10

    The KRAB–zinc-finger protein ZNF545 was recently identified as a potential suppressor gene in several tumors. However, the regulatory mechanisms of ZNF545 in tumorigenesis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the expression and roles of ZNF545 in multiple myeloma (MM). ZNF545 was frequently downregulated in MM tissues compared with non-tumor bone marrow tissues. ZNF545 expression was silenced by promoter methylation in MM cell lines, and could be restored by demethylation treatment. ZNF545 methylation was detected in 28.3% of MM tissues, compared with 4.3% of normal bone marrow tissues. ZNF545 transcriptionally activated the p53 signaling pathway but had no effect on Akt in MM, whereas ectopic expression of ZNF545 in silenced cells suppressed their proliferation and induced apoptosis. We therefore identified ZNF545 as a novel tumor suppressor inhibiting tumor growth through activation of the p53 pathway in MM. Moreover, tumor-specific methylation of ZNF545 may represent an epigenetic biomarker for MM diagnosis, and a potential target for specific therapy. -- Highlights: •Downregulated ZNF545 in MM tissues and cell lines and ectopic expression of ZNF545 suppresses tumor growth. •Tumor-specific methylation of ZNF545 represents an epigenetic biomarker for MM diagnosis, and a potential target for specific therapy. •ZNF545 exerts its tumor suppressive effects via transcriptional activating p53 pathway.

  7. Epigenetic identification of ZNF545 as a functional tumor suppressor in multiple myeloma via activation of p53 signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Yu; Zhan, Qian; Xu, Hongying; Li, Lili; Li, Chen; Xiao, Qian; Xiang, Shili; Hui, Tianli; Xiang, Tingxiu; Ren, Guosheng

    2016-01-01

    The KRAB–zinc-finger protein ZNF545 was recently identified as a potential suppressor gene in several tumors. However, the regulatory mechanisms of ZNF545 in tumorigenesis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the expression and roles of ZNF545 in multiple myeloma (MM). ZNF545 was frequently downregulated in MM tissues compared with non-tumor bone marrow tissues. ZNF545 expression was silenced by promoter methylation in MM cell lines, and could be restored by demethylation treatment. ZNF545 methylation was detected in 28.3% of MM tissues, compared with 4.3% of normal bone marrow tissues. ZNF545 transcriptionally activated the p53 signaling pathway but had no effect on Akt in MM, whereas ectopic expression of ZNF545 in silenced cells suppressed their proliferation and induced apoptosis. We therefore identified ZNF545 as a novel tumor suppressor inhibiting tumor growth through activation of the p53 pathway in MM. Moreover, tumor-specific methylation of ZNF545 may represent an epigenetic biomarker for MM diagnosis, and a potential target for specific therapy. -- Highlights: •Downregulated ZNF545 in MM tissues and cell lines and ectopic expression of ZNF545 suppresses tumor growth. •Tumor-specific methylation of ZNF545 represents an epigenetic biomarker for MM diagnosis, and a potential target for specific therapy. •ZNF545 exerts its tumor suppressive effects via transcriptional activating p53 pathway.

  8. Linker Histone H1.2 Directs Genome-wide Chromatin Association of the Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor Protein and Facilitates Its Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shonagh Munro

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein pRb is a master regulator of cellular proliferation, principally through interaction with E2F and regulation of E2F target genes. Here, we describe the H1.2 linker histone as a major pRb interaction partner. We establish that H1.2 and pRb are found in a chromatin-bound complex on diverse E2F target genes. Interrogating the global influence of H1.2 on the genome-wide distribution of pRb indicated that the E2F target genes affected by H1.2 are functionally linked to cell-cycle control, consistent with the ability of H1.2 to hinder cell proliferation and the elevated levels of chromatin-bound H1-pRb complex, which occur in growth-arrested cells. Our results define a network of E2F target genes as susceptible to the regulatory influence of H1.2, where H1.2 augments global association of pRb with chromatin, enhances transcriptional repression by pRb, and facilitates pRb-dependent cell-cycle arrest.

  9. Heterozygous mutations in the tumor suppressor gene PATCHED provoke basal cell carcinoma-like features in human organotypic skin cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brellier, F; Bergoglio, V; Valin, A; Barnay, S; Chevallier-Lagente, O; Vielh, P; Spatz, A; Gorry, P; Avril, M-F; Magnaldo, T

    2008-11-20

    Basal cell carcinoma of the skin is the most common type of cancer in humans. The majority of these tumors displays aberrant activation of the SONIC HEDGEHOG (SHH)/PATCHED pathway, triggered by mutations in the PATCHED tumor suppressor gene, which encodes a transmembrane receptor of SHH. In this study, we took advantage of the natural genotype (PATCHED(+/-)) of healthy keratinocytes expanded from patients with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma or Gorlin syndrome to mimic heterozygous somatic mutations thought to occur in the PATCHED gene early upon basal cell carcinoma development in the general population. PATCHED(+/-) epidermis developed on a dermal equivalent containing wild-type (WT) PATCHED(+/+) fibroblasts exhibited striking invasiveness and hyperproliferation, as well as marked differentiation impairment. Deciphering the phenotype of PATCHED(+/-) keratinocytes revealed slight increases of the transcriptional activators GLI1 and GLI2-the latter known to provoke basal cell carcinoma-like tumors when overexpressed in transgenic mice. PATCHED(+/-) keratinocytes also showed a substantial increase of the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1. These data show for the first time the physiological impact of constitutive heterozygous PATCHED mutations in primary human keratinocytes and strongly argue for a yet elusive mechanism of haploinsufficiency leading to cancer proneness.

  10. Heterozygous Germline Mutations in the CBL Tumor-Suppressor Gene Cause a Noonan Syndrome-like Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Simone; De Luca, Alessandro; Stellacci, Emilia; Rossi, Cesare; Checquolo, Saula; Lepri, Francesca; Caputo, Viviana; Silvano, Marianna; Buscherini, Francesco; Consoli, Federica; Ferrara, Grazia; Digilio, Maria C.; Cavaliere, Maria L.; van Hagen, Johanna M.; Zampino, Giuseppe; van der Burgt, Ineke; Ferrero, Giovanni B.; Mazzanti, Laura; Screpanti, Isabella; Yntema, Helger G.; Nillesen, Willy M.; Savarirayan, Ravi; Zenker, Martin; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gelb, Bruce D.; Tartaglia, Marco

    2010-01-01

    RAS signaling plays a key role in controlling appropriate cell responses to extracellular stimuli and participates in early and late developmental processes. Although enhanced flow through this pathway has been established as a major contributor to oncogenesis, recent discoveries have revealed that aberrant RAS activation causes a group of clinically related developmental disorders characterized by facial dysmorphism, a wide spectrum of cardiac disease, reduced growth, variable cognitive deficits, ectodermal and musculoskeletal anomalies, and increased risk for certain malignancies. Here, we report that heterozygous germline mutations in CBL, a tumor-suppressor gene that is mutated in myeloid malignancies and encodes a multivalent adaptor protein with E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, can underlie a phenotype with clinical features fitting or partially overlapping Noonan syndrome (NS), the most common condition of this disease family. Independent CBL mutations were identified in two sporadic cases and two families from among 365 unrelated subjects who had NS or suggestive features and were negative for mutations in previously identified disease genes. Phenotypic heterogeneity and variable expressivity were documented. Mutations were missense changes altering evolutionarily conserved residues located in the RING finger domain or the linker connecting this domain to the N-terminal tyrosine kinase binding domain, a known mutational hot spot in myeloid malignancies. Mutations were shown to affect CBL-mediated receptor ubiquitylation and dysregulate signal flow through RAS. These findings document that germline mutations in CBL alter development to cause a clinically variable condition that resembles NS and that possibly predisposes to malignancies. PMID:20619386

  11. Allospecific CD8 T suppressor cells induced by multiple MLC stimulation or priming in the presence of ILT3.Fc have similar gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Xu, Zheng; Chang, Chris; Ho, Sophey; Liu, Zhuoru; Vlad, George; Cortesini, Raffaello; Clynes, Raphael A; Luo, Yun; Suciu-Foca, Nicole

    2014-02-01

    Alloantigen specific CD8 T suppressor cells can be generated in vitro either by multiple stimulations of CD3 T cells with allogeneic APC or by single stimulation in primary MLC containing recombinant ILT3.Fc protein. The aim of the present study was to determine whether multiple MLC stimulation induced in CD8(+) CD28(-) T suppressor cells molecular changes that are similar to those observed in CD8 T suppressor cells from primary MLC containing ILT3.Fc protein. Our study demonstrates that the characteristic signatures of CD8 T suppressor cells, generated by either of these methods are the same consisting of up-regulation of the BCL6 transcriptional repressor and down-regulation of inflammatory microRNAs, miR-21, miR-30b, miR-146a, and miR-155 expression. In conclusion microRNAs which are increased under inflammatory conditions in activated CD4 and CD8 T cells with helper or cytotoxic function show low levels of expression in CD8 T cells which have acquired antigen-specific suppressor activity. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Negative Regulation of the Stability and Tumor Suppressor Function of Fbw7 by the Pin1 Prolyl Isomerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sang-Hyun; Lau, Alan W.; Lee, Tae Ho; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Wei, Shuo; Huang, Pengyu; Shaik, Shavali; Lee, Daniel Yenhong; Finn, Greg; Balastik, Martin; Chen, Chun-Hau; Luo, Manli; Tron, Adriana E.; DeCaprio, James A.; Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Wei, Wenyi; Lu, Kun Ping

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Fbw7 is the substrate recognition component of the SCF (Skp1-Cullin-F-box)-type E3 ligase complex and a well-characterized tumor suppressor that targets numerous oncoproteins for destruction. Genomic deletion or mutation of FBW7 has been frequently found in various types of human cancers, however, little is known about the upstream signaling pathway(s) governing Fbw7 stability and cellular functions. Here we report that Fbw7 protein destruction and tumor suppressor function are negatively regulated by the prolyl isomerase Pin1. Pin1 interacts with Fbw7 in a phoshorylation-dependent manner and promotes Fbw7 self-ubiquitination and protein degradation by disrupting Fbw7 dimerization. Consequently, over-expressing Pin1 reduces Fbw7 abundance and suppresses Fbw7’s ability to inhibit proliferation and transformation. By contrast, depletion of Pin1 in cancer cells leads to elevated Fbw7 expression, which subsequently reduces Mcl-1 abundance, sensitizing cancer cells to Taxol. Thus, Pin1-mediated inhibition of Fbw7 contributes to oncogenesis and Pin1 may be a promising drug target for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:22608923

  13. Ontogeny of clock and KiSS-1 metastasis-suppressor (Kiss1) gene expression in the prepubertal mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Cassandra C; Mark, Peter J; Waddell, Brendan J; Smith, Jeremy T

    2017-09-01

    Kisspeptin is crucial for the generation of the circadian-gated preovulatory gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-LH surge in female rodents, with expression in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) peaking in the late afternoon of pro-oestrus. Given kisspeptin expression is established before puberty, the aim of the present study was to investigate kisspeptin and clock gene rhythms during the neonatal period. Anterior and posterior hypothalami were collected from C57BL/6J mice on Postnatal Days (P) 5, 15 and 25, at six time points across 24h, for analysis of gene expression by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like gene (Bmal1) and nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 2 (Rev-erbα) in the anterior hypothalamus (containing the suprachiasmatic nucleus) was not rhythmic at P5 or P15, but Bmal1 expression exhibited rhythmicity in P25 females, whereas Rev-erbα expression was rhythmic in P25 males. KiSS-1 metastasis-suppressor (Kiss1) expression did not exhibit time-of-day variation in the anterior (containing the AVPV) or posterior (containing the arcuate nucleus) hypothalami in female and male mice at P5, P15 or P25. The data indicate that the kisspeptin circadian peak in expression observed in the AVPV of pro-oestrous females does not manifest at P5, P15 or P25, likely due to inadequate oestrogenic stimuli, as well as incomplete development of clock gene rhythmicity before puberty.

  14. Analysis of loss of heterozygosity of the tumor suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarial carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luković Ljiljana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/aim: Among the genes involved in ovarian carcinogenesis, there has been increased interest in tumor-suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1. Both of the genes make control of cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. The p53 is a "genome guardian" inactivated in more than 50% of human cancers, while BRCA1 mutations are found mostly in breast and ovarian cancer. The aim of this investigation was to establish the frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH in the regions of the genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarian carcinomas, and to analyze the association of LOH with the disease stage and prognosis. Methods. We analyzed 20 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of epithelilal ovarian carcinoma. DNA for molecular-genetic analysis was extracted from the tumor tissue and blood as normal tissue of each person. Microsatellite markers of the regions of genes p53 and BRCA1 were amplified by PCR method. The determination of allelic status of microsatellites and detection of LOH was performed after PAA gel electroforesis. Results. Both of the analyzed microsatellite markers were informative in 13/20 (65% cases. In the region of gene p53, LOH was established in 4/13 (30.7% tumors. One of them had histological gradus G1, one had gradus G2, and two of them had gradus G3, while all were with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO IIIc stage. In the region of gene BRCA1, LOH was detected in 5/13 (38.5% tumors. Four of them had histological gradus G2, and one had gradus G3, while by the (FIGO classification one was with stage Ib, one was with stage IIIb, while the three were with stage IIIc. LOH in both of the analyzed regions was detected in one tumor (7.7%, with histological gradus G3 and the FIGO IIIc stage. Conclusion. The frequency of LOH in epthelial ovarian carcinomas was 30.7% and 38.5% for p53 and BRCA1 gene regions, respectively. Most of tumors with LOH had histological gradus G2 or G3, and the clinical FIGO stage IIIc, suggesting the

  15. [Analysis of loss of heterozygosity of the tumor suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarial carcinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Bojana; Perović, Milica; Novaković, Ivana; Atanacković, Jasmina; Popović, Branka; Luković, Ljiljana; Petković, Spasoje

    2006-09-01

    Among the genes involved in ovarian carcinogenesis, there has been increased interest in tumor-suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1. Both of the genes make control of cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. The p53 is a "genome guardian" inactivated in more than 50% of human cancers, while BRCA1 mutations are found mostly in breast and ovarian cancer. The aim of this investigation was to establish the frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the regions of the genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarian carcinomas, and to analyze the association of LOH with the disease stage and prognosis. We analyzed 20 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of epithelilal ovarian carcinoma. DNA for molecular-genetic analysis was extracted from the tumor tissue and blood as normal tissue of each person. Microsatellite markers of the regions of genes p53 and BRCA1 were amplified by PCR method. The determination of allelic status of microsatellites and detection of LOH was performed after PAA gel electroforesis. Both of the analyzed microsatellite markers were informative in 13/20 (65%) cases. In the region of gene p53, LOH was established in 4/13 (30.7%) tumors. One of them had histological gradus G1, one had gradus G2, and two of them had gradus G3, while all were with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) IIIc stage. In the region of gene BRCA1, LOH was detected in 5/13 (38.5%) tumors. Four of them had histological gradus G2, and one had gradus G3, while by the (FIGO) classification one was with stage Ib, one was with stage IIIb, while the three were with stage IlIc. LOH in both of the analyzed regions was detected in one tumor (7.70), with histological gradus G3 and the FIGO IIIc stage. The frequency of LOH in epthelial ovarian carcinomas was 30.7% and 38.5% for p53 and BRCA1 gene regions, respectively. Most of tumors with LOH had histological gradus G2 or G3, and the clinical FIGO stage IIIc, suggesting the association of this occurrence with a later phase of the disease.

  16. The Tumor Suppressor BCL7B Functions in the Wnt Signaling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Uehara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human BCL7 gene family consists of BCL7A, BCL7B, and BCL7C. A number of clinical studies have reported that BCL7 family is involved in cancer incidence, progression, and development. Among them, BCL7B, located on chromosome 7q11.23, is one of the deleted genes in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome. Although several studies have suggested that malignant diseases occurring in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome are associated with aberrations in BCL7B, little is known regarding the function of this gene at the cellular level. In this study, we focused on bcl-7, which is the only homolog of BCL7 gene family in Caenorhabditis elegans, and analyzed bcl-7 deletion mutants. As a result, we found that bcl-7 is required for the asymmetric differentiation of epithelial seam cells, which have self-renewal properties as stem cells and divide asymmetrically through the WNT pathway. Distal tip cell development, which is regulated by the WNT pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans, was also affected in bcl-7-knockout mutants. Interestingly, bcl-7 mutants exhibited nuclear enlargement, reminiscent of the anaplastic features of malignant cells. Furthermore, in KATOIII human gastric cancer cells, BCL7B knockdown induced nuclear enlargement, promoted the multinuclei phenotype and suppressed cell death. In addition, this study showed that BCL7B negatively regulates the Wnt-signaling pathway and positively regulates the apoptotic pathway. Taken together, our data indicate that BCL7B/BCL-7 has some roles in maintaining the structure of nuclei and is involved in the modulation of multiple pathways, including Wnt and apoptosis. This study may implicate a risk of malignancies with BCL7B-deficiency, such as Williams-Beuren syndrome.

  17. The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene inhibits hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor-induced invasion and branching morphogenesis in renal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koochekpour, S; Jeffers, M; Wang, P H; Gong, C; Taylor, G A; Roessler, L M; Stearman, R; Vasselli, J R; Stetler-Stevenson, W G; Kaelin, W G; Linehan, W M; Klausner, R D; Gnarra, J R; Vande Woude, G F

    1999-09-01

    Loss of function in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene occurs in familial and most sporadic renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). VHL has been linked to the regulation of cell cycle cessation (G(0)) and to control of expression of various mRNAs such as for vascular endothelial growth factor. RCC cells express the Met receptor tyrosine kinase, and Met mediates invasion and branching morphogenesis in many cell types in response to hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF). We examined the HGF/SF responsiveness of RCC cells containing endogenous mutated (mut) forms of the VHL protein (VHL-negative RCC) with that of isogenic cells expressing exogenous wild-type (wt) VHL (VHL-positive RCC). We found that VHL-negative 786-0 and UOK-101 RCC cells were highly invasive through growth factor-reduced (GFR) Matrigel-coated filters and exhibited an extensive branching morphogenesis phenotype in response to HGF/SF in the three-dimensional (3D) GFR Matrigel cultures. In contrast, the phenotypes of A498 VHL-negative RCC cells were weaker, and isogenic RCC cells ectopically expressing wt VHL did not respond at all. We found that all VHL-negative RCC cells expressed reduced levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2) relative to the wt VHL-positive cells, implicating VHL in the regulation of this molecule. However, consistent with the more invasive phenotype of the 786-0 and UOK-101 VHL-negative RCC cells, the levels of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were reduced and levels of the matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 were elevated compared to the noninvasive VHL-positive RCC cells. Moreover, recombinant TIMPs completely blocked HGF/SF-mediated branching morphogenesis, while neutralizing antibodies to the TIMPs stimulated HGF/SF-mediated invasion in vitro. Thus, the loss of the VHL tumor suppressor gene is central to changes that control tissue invasiveness, and a more invasive phenotype requires additional genetic changes seen in some but not all RCC lines. These

  18. Hypermethylation of the 16q23.1 Tumor Suppressor Gene ADAMTS18 in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify tumor suppressor genes (TSGs silenced by hypermethylation and discover new epigenetic biomarkers for early cancer detection. ADAMTS18, located at 16q23.1, has been reported to be a critical TSG in multiple primary tumors; however, this has not yet been verified in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC. We explored epigenetic alterations in this gene in ccRCC and analyzed possible clinicopathological associations. We examined ADAMTS18 gene expression and methylation by semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP in 5 ccRCC-derived cell lines before and after treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AzaC. MSP was further performed for 101 ccRCC primary tumors and 20 adjacent normal tissues. Some cell lines and specimens were examined by subsequent bisulfite genomic sequencing (BGS and real-time PCR. Further, we analyzed the relationship between the ADAMTS18 gene methylation and clinicopathological features, including short-term disease-free survival (DFS, in patients with ccRCC. ADAMTS18 down-regulation and hypermethylation were detected in the ccRCC-derived cell lines using RT-PCR and MSP. Treatment with 5-AzaC reversed the hypermethylation of the ADAMTS18 gene and restored its expression. Hypermethylation was further detected in 44 of 101 (43.6% primary tumors and 3 of 20 (15.0% adjacent normal tissues. However, a significant difference between both groups was observed (p = 0.02. BGS analysis and real-time PCR were subsequently performed to confirm the results of RT-PCR and MSP. Furthermore, the methylation status of ADAMTS18 was not significantly associated with gender, age, location, tumor diameter, pathological stage, nuclear grade or short-term DFS in patients with ccRCC (p > 0.05. The ADAMTS18 gene is often down-regulated by hypermethylation in ccRCC-derived cell lines and primary tumors, indicating its critical role as a TSG in ccRCC. We conclude that ADAMTS18

  19. Aberrations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene in human epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J W; Cho, Y H; Kwon, D J; Kim, T E; Park, T C; Lee, J M; Namkoong, S E

    1995-05-01

    Aberrations of the p53 gene in 26 surgical specimens of human epithelial ovarian carcinomas were examined by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. Seven (27%) of the tumors demonstrated a SSCP band shift in exons 4 to 9 of the gene, including 5 in the region encompassing exons 5 and 6, 1 in exon 7, and 1 in the region encompassing exons 8 and 9. Mutations were clustered in exon 5 in highly conserved regions of the p53 gene. All of the abnormal DNA fragments have been further characterized by direct DNA sequencing. These include five missense mutations (five transitions), a one-base-pair deletion introducing, by frameshift, a stop codon further downstream, and a two-base-pair insertion introducing a stop codon downstream by frameshift. Most mutations were base substitutions, and were clustered in exon 5 (71%), especially codons 175 and 179. The aberrations of the p53 gene were only found in tumors of FIGO stages III and IV. Histologic grading was also reviewed with respect to p53 aberrations. The aberrations were absent in well-differentiated carcinomas. The more undifferentiated the primary tumor, the more frequent p53 mutation (P p53 gene were common in epithelial ovarian cancers and p53 aberration may occur late during ovarian cancer evolution.

  20. PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling & its regulator tumour suppressor genes PTEN & LKB1 in human uterine leiomyomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makker, Annu; Goel, Madhu Mati; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Bhatia, Vikram; Das, Vinita; Agarwal, Anjoo; Pandey, Amita

    2016-05-01

    Despite their high occurrence and associated significant level of morbidity manifesting as spectrum of clinical symptoms, the pathogenesis of uterine leiomyomas (ULs) remains unclear. We investigated expression profile of tumour suppressor genes PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten) and LKB1 (liver kinase B1), and key signaling components of P13K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)/Akt (protein kinase B)/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway in leiomyomas and adjacent normal myometrium in women of reproductive age, to explore the possibility of targeting this pathway for future therapeutic implications. Real time PCR (qPCR) was used to quantify relative gene expression levels of PTEN, Akt1, Akt2, mTOR, LKB1 and VEGFA (vascular endothelial growth factor A) in leiomyoma as compared to adjacent normal myometrium. Immunohistochemistry was subsequently performed to analyze expression of PTEN, phospho-Akt, phospho-mTOR, phospho-S6, LKB1 and VEGFA in leiomyoma and adjacent normal myometrium. Significant upregulation of PTEN (2.52 fold; P=0.03) and LKB1 (3.93 fold; P0.01), and downregulation of VEGFA (2.95 fold; P=0.01) genes were observed in leiomyoma as compared to normal myometrium. Transcript levels of Akt1, Akt2 and mTOR did not vary significantly between leiomyoma and myometrium. An increased immunoexpression of PTEN (P=0.015) and LKB1 (PPTEN and LKB1 in concert with negative or low levels of activated Akt, mTOR and S6 indicates that PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway may not play a significant role in pathogenesis of leiomyoma.

  1. VGLL4 functions as a new tumor suppressor in lung cancer by negatively regulating the YAP-TEAD transcriptional complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Gao, Yijun; Li, Peixue; Shi, Zhubing; Guo, Tong; Li, Fei; Han, Xiangkun; Feng, Yan; Zheng, Chao; Wang, Zuoyun; Li, Fuming; Chen, Haiquan; Zhou, Zhaocai; Zhang, Lei; Ji, Hongbin

    2014-03-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most devastating diseases worldwide with high incidence and mortality. Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a conserved regulator of organ size in both Drosophila and mammals. Emerging evidence has suggested the significance of Hpo pathway in cancer development. In this study, we identify VGLL4 as a novel tumor suppressor in lung carcinogenesis through negatively regulating the formation of YAP-TEAD complex, the core component of Hpo pathway. Our data show that VGLL4 is frequently observed to be lowly expressed in both mouse and human lung cancer specimens. Ectopic expression of VGLL4 significantly suppresses the growth of lung cancer cells in vitro. More importantly, VGLL4 significantly inhibits lung cancer progression in de novo mouse model. We further find that VGLL4 inhibits the activity of the YAP-TEAD transcriptional complex. Our data show that VGLL4 directly competes with YAP in binding to TEADs and executes its growth-inhibitory function through two TDU domains. Collectively, our study demonstrates that VGLL4 is a novel tumor suppressor for lung cancer through negatively regulating the YAP-TEAD complex formation and thus the Hpo pathway.

  2. The tumor suppressor gene hypermethylated in cancer 1 is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenal, Mathias; Trinh, Emmanuelle; Britschgi, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The Hypermethylated in Cancer 1 (HIC1) gene encodes a zinc finger transcriptional repressor that cooperates with p53 to suppress cancer development. We and others recently showed that HIC1 is a transcriptional target of p53. To identify additional transcriptional regulators of HIC1, we screened...

  3. Transcriptional regulation of teleost aicda genes. Pt 1 suppressors of promiscuous promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to better understand antibody affinity maturation in fishes we sought to identify gene regulatory elements that could drive expression of activated B-cell specific fluorescent reporter transgenes in zebrafish. Specifically the promoter and several non-coding regions of the channel catfish (...

  4. Identification of Prostate Cancer Metastasis-Suppressor Genes Using Genomic shRNA Libraries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gelman, Irwin H

    2008-01-01

    .... However, little is known regarding the genetics that control disease recurrence. Our proposed research was to screen for metastasis- inducing genes in LNCaP and LAPC-4 CaP cells using libraries expressing RNAi covering the entire human genome...

  5. The induction of a tumor suppressor gene (p53) expression by low-dose radiation and its biological meaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    1997-01-01

    I report the induced accumulation of wild-type p53 protein of a tumor suppressor gene within 12 h in various organs of rats exposed to X-ray irradiation at low doses (10-50 cGy). The levels of p53 in some organs of irradiated rats were increased about 2- to 3-fold in comparison with the basal p53 levels in non-irradiated rats. Differences in the levels of p53 induction after low-dose X-ray irradiation were observed among the small intestine, bone marrow, brain, liver, adrenal gland, spleen, hypophysis and skin. In contrast, there was no obvious accumulation of p53 protein in the testis and ovary. Thus, the induction of cellular p.53 accumulation by low-dose X-ray irradiation in rats seems to be organ-specific. I consider that cell type, and interactions with other signal transduction pathways of the hormone system, immune system and nervous system may contribute to the variable induction of p53 by low-dose X-ray irradiation. I discussed the induction of p53 by radiation and its biological meaning from an aspect of the defense system for radiation-induced cancer. (author)

  6. Tumor suppressor QM-like gene from disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus): molecular characterization and transcriptional analysis upon immune challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chulhong; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Nikapitiya, Chamilani; Whang, Ilson; Kim, Yu Cheol; Kang, Do-Hyung; Heo, Soo-jin; Choi, Young-Ung; Choi, Cheol Young; Lee, Jae-Seong; Lee, Jehee

    2010-09-01

    We describe molecular characterization and transcriptional analysis of the gene encoding tumor suppressor QM-like protein, AbQM, in the disk abalone Haliotis discus discus. The full-length cDNA (765-bp) of AbQM was found to consist of a 654-bp ORF coding for a 218 amino acid protein of a 25 kDa molecular mass with a 10.2 isoelectric point. Analysis of AbQM sequence revealed the presence of characteristic motifs, including the ribosomal protein L10 signature, SH3-binding motif and two antibiotic binding sites. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that AbQM is closely related to other mollusk QM proteins, and altogether they form a mollusk QM protein sub-family which displays evolutionary conservation from yeast to human. Tissue-specific expression and transcriptional regulation of AbQM was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR in response to bacterial (Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio parahemolyticus, Listeria monocytogenes) and viral (viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, VHSV) challenge. AbQM transcripts were found to be expressed ubiquitously in all examined tissues in a constitutive manner, as similar expression levels were detected in hemocytes, mantle, digestive tract and muscle. Upon bacterial and VHSV challenge, AbQM showed significant up-regulation in gills, but not in hemocytes. Taken together, these findings suggest that AbQM in abalone-like mollusks can respond to and facilitate a defensive effect against pathogenic infection. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The P0 gene of Sugarcane yellow leaf virus encodes an RNA silencing suppressor with unique activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangwende, Tichaona; Wang Mingli; Borth, Wayne; Hu, John; Moore, Paul H.; Mirkov, T. Erik; Albert, Henrik H.

    2009-01-01

    The Sugarcane yellow leaf virus (SCYLV) P0, a member of the highly heterologous proteins of poleroviruses, is a suppressor of posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) and has additional activities not seen in other P0 proteins. The P0 protein in previously tested poleroviruses (Beet western yellows virus and Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus), suppresses local, but not systemic, PTGS induced by both sense GFP and inverted repeat GF using its F-box-like domain to mediate destabilization of the Argonaute1 protein. We now report that the SCYLV P0 protein not only suppressed local PTGS induced by sense GFP and inverted repeat GF in Nicotiana benthamiana, but also triggered a dosage dependent cell death phenotype in infiltrated leaves and suppressed systemic sense GFP-PTGS. Deletion of the first 15 N-terminal amino acid residues of SCYLV P0 abolished suppression of both local and systemic PTGS and the induction of cell death. In contrast, only systemic PTGS and cell death were lost when the 15 C-terminal amino acid residues were deleted. We conclude that the 15 C-terminal amino acid residue region of SCYLV P0 is necessary for suppressing systemic PTGS and inducing cell death, but is not required for suppression of local PTGS

  8. Alternative polyadenylation of tumor suppressor genes in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Anders Aagaard; Plass, Mireya; Døssing, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    The tumorigenesis of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) is poorly understood. Recent studies have associated alternative polyadenylation (APA) with proliferation, cell transformation, and cancer. Polyadenylation is the process in which the pre-messenger RNA is cleaved at a polyA site...... and a polyA tail is added. Genes with two or more polyA sites can undergo APA. This produces two or more distinct mRNA isoforms with different 3' untranslated regions. Additionally, APA can also produce mRNAs containing different 3'-terminal coding regions. Therefore, APA alters both the repertoire...... and the expression level of proteins. Here, we used high-throughput sequencing data to map polyA sites and characterize polyadenylation genome-wide in three SI-NETs and a reference sample. In the tumors, 16 genes showed significant changes of APA pattern, which lead to either the 3' truncation of mRNA coding regions...

  9. A targeted constitutive mutation in the APC tumor suppressor gene underlies mammary but not intestinal tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gaspar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene are responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP, an autosomal dominant hereditary predisposition to the development of multiple colorectal adenomas and of a broad spectrum of extra-intestinal tumors. Moreover, somatic APC mutations play a rate-limiting and initiating role in the majority of sporadic colorectal cancers. Notwithstanding its multifunctional nature, the main tumor suppressing activity of the APC gene resides in its ability to regulate Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Notably, genotype-phenotype correlations have been established at the APC gene between the length and stability of the truncated proteins encoded by different mutant alleles, the corresponding levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity they encode for, and the incidence and distribution of intestinal and extra-intestinal tumors. Here, we report a novel mouse model, Apc1572T, obtained by targeting a truncated mutation at codon 1572 in the endogenous Apc gene. This hypomorphic mutant allele results in intermediate levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activation when compared with other Apc mutations associated with multifocal intestinal tumors. Notwithstanding the constitutive nature of the mutation, Apc(+/1572T mice have no predisposition to intestinal cancer but develop multifocal mammary adenocarcinomas and subsequent pulmonary metastases in both genders. The histology of the Apc1572T primary mammary tumours is highly heterogeneous with luminal, myoepithelial, and squamous lineages and is reminiscent of metaplastic carcinoma of the breast in humans. The striking phenotype of Apc(+/1572T mice suggests that specific dosages of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity differentially affect tissue homeostasis and initiate tumorigenesis in an organ-specific fashion.

  10. The Role of Tumor Metastases Suppressor Gene, Drg-1, in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watabe, Kounosuke

    2008-01-01

    .... This inhibition leads to down-regulation of the ATF3 gene and thus suppressing metastases. We also found that a combination of NDRGI, PTEN and ATF3 is a good prognostic marker for breast cancer patients. These results suggest that the Wnt and ATF3 pathways are a potential therapeutic target for patients with metastatic disease. We will focus our next year's effort on further clarification of the NDRG1 pathway.

  11. Relationship of ultrasonic shear wave velocity with oncogene and tumor suppressor gene expression in primary liver cancer lesions as well as angiogenesis factor contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Yin1

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the relationship of ultrasonic shear wave velocity (SWV with oncogene and tumor suppressor gene expression in primary liver cancer lesions as well as angiogenesis factor contents. Methods: 100 patients with primary liver cancer who underwent surgical treatment in our hospital between March 2014 and September 2016 were collected as observation group, and 50 healthy subjects who received physical examination in our hospital during the same period were collected as normal control group. The ultrasonic SWV levels of two groups of subjects were measured before the operation, and the observation groups were further divided into high SWV group and low SWV group, 50 cases in each group. Intraoperative tumor tissue samples were kept and fluorescence quantitative PCR was used to determine the mRNA expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Enzymelinked immunosorbent assay was used to determine serum contents of angiogenesis factors in observation group before operation. Results: Hepatic ultrasonic SWV level in observation group was significantly higher than that in normal control group; proto-oncogene CK, Ki67, Gly-3, Survivin and Pokemon mRNA expression in tumor tissue of high SWV group were higher than those of low SWV group while tumor suppressor genes Tg737, p16, p27, PTEN and runx3 mRNA expression were lower than those of low SWV group; serum angiogenesis factors VEGF, MMP-9 and IGF-1R contents were higher than those in low SWV group. Conclusion: The hepatic ultrasonic SWV level increases in patients with primary liver cancer, and the SWV level is directly correlated with oncogene and tumor suppressor gene expression as well as angiogenesis factor contents.

  12. Alternative exon usage creates novel transcript variants of tumor suppressor SHREW-1 gene with differential tissue expression profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra A. B. Klemmt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Shrew-1, also called AJAP1, is a transmembrane protein associated with E-cadherin-mediated adherence junctions and a putative tumor suppressor. Apart from its interaction with β-catenin and involvement in E-cadherin internalization, little structure or function information exists. Here we explored shrew-1 expression during postnatal differentiation of mammary gland as a model system. Immunohistological analyses with antibodies against either the extracellular or the cytoplasmic domains of shrew-1 consistently revealed the expression of full-length shrew-1 in myoepithelial cells, but only part of it in luminal cells. While shrew-1 localization remained unaltered in myoepithelial cells, nuclear localization occurred in luminal cells during lactation. Based on these observations, we identified two unknown shrew-1 transcript variants encoding N-terminally truncated proteins. The smallest shrew-1 protein lacks the extracellular domain and is most likely the only variant present in luminal cells. RNA analyses of human tissues confirmed that the novel transcript variants of shrew-1 exist in vivo and exhibit a differential tissue expression profile. We conclude that our findings are essential for the understanding and interpretation of future functional and interactome analyses of shrew-1 variants.

  13. Thrombospondin-4 is a putative tumour-suppressor gene in colorectal cancer that exhibits age-related methylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greco, Sonia A; Leggett, Barbara A; Whitehall, Vicki LJ; Chia, June; Inglis, Kelly J; Cozzi, Sarah-Jane; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Buttenshaw, Ronald L; Spring, Kevin J; Boyle, Glen M; Worthley, Daniel L

    2010-01-01

    colon. THBS4 shows increased methylation in colorectal cancer, but this is not strongly associated with altered gene expression, either because methylation has not always reached a critical level or because other factors influence THBS4 expression. THBS4 may act as a tumour suppressor gene, demonstrated by its suppression of tumour colony formation in vitro. THBS4 methylation is detectable in normal colonic mucosa and its level may be a biomarker for the occurrence of adenomas and carcinoma

  14. Inactivation of the FLCN tumor suppressor gene induces TFE3 transcriptional activity by increasing its nuclear localization.

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    Seung-Beom Hong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in a tumor suppressor gene FLCN lead to development of fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts and renal cell carcinoma (RCC in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome. TFE3 is a member of the MiTF/TFE transcription factor family and Xp11.2 translocations found in sporadic RCC involving TFE3 result in gene fusions and overexpression of chimeric fusion proteins that retain the C-terminal DNA binding domain of TFE3. We found that GPNMB expression, which is regulated by MiTF, was greatly elevated in renal cancer cells harboring either TFE3 translocations or FLCN inactivation. Since TFE3 is implicated in RCC, we hypothesized that elevated GPNMB expression was due to increased TFE3 activity resulting from the inactivation of FLCN.TFE3 knockdown reduced GPNMB expression in renal cancer cells harboring either TFE3 translocations or FLCN inactivation. Moreover, FLCN knockdown induced GPNMB expression in FLCN-restored renal cancer cells. Conversely, wildtype FLCN suppressed GPNMB expression in FLCN-null cells. FLCN inactivation was correlated with increased TFE3 transcriptional activity accompanied by its nuclear localization as revealed by elevated GPNMB mRNA and protein expression, and predominantly nuclear immunostaining of TFE3 in renal cancer cells, mouse embryo fibroblast cells, mouse kidneys and mouse and human renal tumors. Nuclear localization of TFE3 was associated with TFE3 post-translational modifications including decreased phosphorylation.Increased TFE3 activity is a downstream event induced by FLCN inactivation and is likely to be important for renal tumor development. This study provides an important novel mechanism for induction of TFE3 activity in addition to TFE3 overexpression resulting from Xp11.2 translocations, suggesting that TFE3 may be more broadly involved in tumorigenesis.

  15. Analysis of the Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4) tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Sally J; Choong, David YH; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Ryland, Georgina L; Campbell, Ian G; Gorringe, Kylie L

    2011-01-01

    MAP2K4 is a putative tumor and metastasis suppressor gene frequently found to be deleted in various cancer types. We aimed to conduct a comprehensive analysis of this gene to assess its involvement in ovarian cancer. We screened for mutations in MAP2K4 using High Resolution Melt analysis of 149 primary ovarian tumors and methylation at the promoter using Methylation-Specific Single-Stranded Conformation Polymorphism analysis of 39 tumors. We also considered the clinical impact of changes in MAP2K4 using publicly available expression and copy number array data. Finally, we used siRNA to measure the effect of reducing MAP2K4 expression in cell lines. In addition to 4 previously detected homozygous deletions, we identified a homozygous 16 bp truncating deletion and a heterozygous 4 bp deletion, each in one ovarian tumor. No promoter methylation was detected. The frequency of MAP2K4 homozygous inactivation was 5.6% overall, and 9.8% in high-grade serous cases. Hemizygous deletion of MAP2K4 was observed in 38% of samples. There were significant correlations of copy number and expression in three microarray data sets. There was a significant correlation between MAP2K4 expression and overall survival in one expression array data set, but this was not confirmed in an independent set. Treatment of JAM and HOSE6.3 cell lines with MAP2K4 siRNA showed some reduction in proliferation. MAP2K4 is targeted by genetic inactivation in ovarian cancer and restricted to high grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas in our cohort

  16. Genetic interactions between the Drosophila tumor suppressor gene ept and the stat92E transcription factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Melissa Gilbert

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor Susceptibility Gene-101 (TSG101 promotes the endocytic degradation of transmembrane proteins and is implicated as a mutational target in cancer, yet the effect of TSG101 loss on cell proliferation in vertebrates is uncertain. By contrast, Drosophila epithelial tissues lacking the TSG101 ortholog erupted (ept develop as enlarged undifferentiated tumors, indicating that the gene can have anti-growth properties in a simple metazoan. A full understanding of pathways deregulated by loss of Drosophila ept will aid in understanding potential links between mammalian TSG101 and growth control.We have taken a genetic approach to the identification of pathways required for excess growth of Drosophila eye-antennal imaginal discs lacking ept. We find that this phenotype is very sensitive to the genetic dose of stat92E, the transcriptional effector of the Jak-Stat signaling pathway, and that this pathway undergoes strong activation in ept mutant cells. Genetic evidence indicates that stat92E contributes to cell cycle deregulation and excess cell size phenotypes that are observed among ept mutant cells. In addition, autonomous Stat92E hyper-activation is associated with altered tissue architecture in ept tumors and an effect on expression of the apical polarity determinant crumbs.These findings identify ept as a cell-autonomous inhibitor of the Jak-Stat pathway and suggest that excess Jak-Stat signaling makes a significant contribution to proliferative and tissue architectural phenotypes that occur in ept mutant tissues.

  17. Structure-function analysis of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein – is the whole a sum of its parts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dick Frederick A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Biochemical analysis of the retinoblastoma protein's function has received considerable attention since it was cloned just over 20 years ago. During this time pRB has emerged as a key regulator of the cell division cycle and its ability to block proliferation is disrupted in the vast majority of human cancers. Much has been learned about the regulation of E2F transcription factors by pRB in the cell cycle. However, many questions remain unresolved and researchers continue to explore this multifunctional protein. In particular, understanding how its biochemical functions contribute to its role as a tumor suppressor remains to be determined. Since pRB has been shown to function as an adaptor molecule that links different proteins together, or to particular promoters, analyzing pRB by disrupting individual protein interactions holds tremendous promise in unraveling the intricacies of its function. Recently, crystal structures have reported how pRB interacts with some of its molecular partners. This information has created the possibility of rationally separating pRB functions by studying mutants that disrupt individual binding sites. This review will focus on literature that investigates pRB by isolating functions based on binding sites within the pocket domain. This article will also discuss the prospects for using this approach to further explore the unknown functions of pRB.

  18. Folliculin, the product of the Birt-Hogg-Dube tumor suppressor gene, interacts with the adherens junction protein p0071 to regulate cell-cell adhesion.

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    Doug A Medvetz

    Full Text Available Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD is a tumor suppressor gene syndrome associated with fibrofolliculomas, cystic lung disease, and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. In seeking to elucidate the pathogenesis of BHD, we discovered a physical interaction between folliculin (FLCN, the protein product of the BHD gene, and p0071, an armadillo repeat containing protein that localizes to the cytoplasm and to adherens junctions. Adherens junctions are one of the three cell-cell junctions that are essential to the establishment and maintenance of the cellular architecture of all epithelial tissues. Surprisingly, we found that downregulation of FLCN leads to increased cell-cell adhesion in functional cell-based assays and disruption of cell polarity in a three-dimensional lumen-forming assay, both of which are phenocopied by downregulation of p0071. These data indicate that the FLCN-p0071 protein complex is a negative regulator of cell-cell adhesion. We also found that FLCN positively regulates RhoA activity and Rho-associated kinase activity, consistent with the only known function of p0071. Finally, to examine the role of Flcn loss on cell-cell adhesion in vivo, we utilized keratin-14 cre-recombinase (K14-cre to inactivate Flcn in the mouse epidermis. The K14-Cre-Bhd(flox/flox mice have striking delays in eyelid opening, wavy fur, hair loss, and epidermal hyperplasia with increased levels of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 activity. These data support a model in which dysregulation of the FLCN-p0071 interaction leads to alterations in cell adhesion, cell polarity, and RhoA signaling, with broad implications for the role of cell-cell adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of human disease, including emphysema and renal cell carcinoma.

  19. Immunoregulatory changes induced by total lymphoid irradiation. II. Development of thymus-leukemia antigen-positive and -negative suppressor T cells that differ in their regulatory function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, D.P.; Strober, S.

    1981-01-01

    BALB/c mice treated with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) develop non-antigen-specific suppressor cells of the adoptive secondary antibody response and of the mixed leukocyte reaction. Suppressors of the adoptive anti-DNP response were eliminated by incubation of spleen cells with anti-Thy-1.2 or anti-thymus-leukemia (TL) antiserum and complement before cell transfer. Thymectomy before TLI prevented the appearance of the latter suppressor cells. On the other hand, suppressors of the MLR were eliminated by incubation of spleen cells with anti-Thy-1.2 but not anti-TL antiserum and complement. Thymectomy before TLI did not prevent their subsequent development. Thus, two subpopulations of suppressor T cells that differ in the expression of the TL surface antigen, dependence on the presence of the thymus, and in regulatory functions develop after TLI. The TL+, thymus-dependent cell suppresses the adoptive antibody response, and the TL-, thymus-independent cell suppresses the MLR

  20. The effect of age at exposure on the inactivating mechanisms and relative contributions of key tumor suppressor genes in radiation-induced mouse T-cell lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunaoshi, Masaaki; Amasaki, Yoshiko; Hirano-Sakairi, Shinobu; Blyth, Benjamin J.; Morioka, Takamitsu; Kaminishi, Mutsumi; Shang, Yi; Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya; Tachibana, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • T-cell lymphoma incidence, latency and weight did not change with age at exposure. • Lymphomas had frequent loss of heterozygosity on chromosomes 4, 11 and 19. • These lesions targeted the Cdkn2a, Ikaros and Pten tumor suppressor genes. • Age at exposure may influence which tumor suppressor genes are lost in each tumor. • The mechanisms of tumor suppressor gene loss were different at each locus. - Abstract: Children are considered more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer than adults, yet any differences in genomic alterations associated with age-at-exposure and their underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We assessed genome-wide DNA copy number and mutation of key tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphomas arising after weekly irradiation of female B6C3F1 mice with 1.2 Gy X-rays for 4 consecutive weeks starting during infancy (1 week old), adolescence (4 weeks old) or as young adults (8 weeks old). Although T-cell lymphoma incidence was similar, loss of heterozygosity at Cdkn2a on chromosome 4 and at Ikaros on chromosome 11 was more frequent in the two older groups, while loss at the Pten locus on chromosome 19 was more frequent in the infant-irradiated group. Cdkn2a and Ikaros mutation/loss was a common feature of the young adult-irradiation group, with Ikaros frequently (50%) incurring multiple independent hits (including deletions and mutations) or suffering a single hit predicted to result in a dominant negative protein (such as those lacking exon 4, an isoform we have designated Ik12, which lacks two DNA binding zinc-finger domains). Conversely, Pten mutations were more frequent after early irradiation (60%) than after young adult-irradiation (30%). Homozygous Pten mutations occurred without DNA copy number change after irradiation starting in infancy, suggesting duplication of the mutated allele by chromosome mis-segregation or mitotic recombination. Our findings demonstrate that while deletions on chromosomes 4 and 11 affecting Cdkn2

  1. The effect of age at exposure on the inactivating mechanisms and relative contributions of key tumor suppressor genes in radiation-induced mouse T-cell lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunaoshi, Masaaki [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Amasaki, Yoshiko; Hirano-Sakairi, Shinobu; Blyth, Benjamin J. [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Morioka, Takamitsu [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kaminishi, Mutsumi [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shang, Yi [Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tachibana, Akira [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); and others

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • T-cell lymphoma incidence, latency and weight did not change with age at exposure. • Lymphomas had frequent loss of heterozygosity on chromosomes 4, 11 and 19. • These lesions targeted the Cdkn2a, Ikaros and Pten tumor suppressor genes. • Age at exposure may influence which tumor suppressor genes are lost in each tumor. • The mechanisms of tumor suppressor gene loss were different at each locus. - Abstract: Children are considered more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer than adults, yet any differences in genomic alterations associated with age-at-exposure and their underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We assessed genome-wide DNA copy number and mutation of key tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphomas arising after weekly irradiation of female B6C3F1 mice with 1.2 Gy X-rays for 4 consecutive weeks starting during infancy (1 week old), adolescence (4 weeks old) or as young adults (8 weeks old). Although T-cell lymphoma incidence was similar, loss of heterozygosity at Cdkn2a on chromosome 4 and at Ikaros on chromosome 11 was more frequent in the two older groups, while loss at the Pten locus on chromosome 19 was more frequent in the infant-irradiated group. Cdkn2a and Ikaros mutation/loss was a common feature of the young adult-irradiation group, with Ikaros frequently (50%) incurring multiple independent hits (including deletions and mutations) or suffering a single hit predicted to result in a dominant negative protein (such as those lacking exon 4, an isoform we have designated Ik12, which lacks two DNA binding zinc-finger domains). Conversely, Pten mutations were more frequent after early irradiation (60%) than after young adult-irradiation (30%). Homozygous Pten mutations occurred without DNA copy number change after irradiation starting in infancy, suggesting duplication of the mutated allele by chromosome mis-segregation or mitotic recombination. Our findings demonstrate that while deletions on chromosomes 4 and 11 affecting Cdkn2

  2. P53 tumor suppressor gene and protein expression is altered in cell lines derived from spontaneous and alpha-radiation-induced canine lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tierney, L.A.; Johnson, N.F.; Lechner, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most frequently occurring gene alterations in malignant human cancers, including lung cancer. In lung cancer, common point mutations within conserved exons of the p53 gene result in a stabilized form of mutant protein which is detectable in most cases by immunohistochemistry. In addition to point mutations, allelic loss, rearrangements, and deletions of the p53 gene have also been detected in both human and rodent tumors. It has been suggested that for at least some epithelial neoplasms, the loss of expression of wild-type p53 protein may be more important for malignant transformation than the acquisition of activating mutations. Mechanisms responsible for the loss of expression of wild-type protein include gene deletion or rearrangement, nonsense or stop mutations, mutations within introns or upstream regulatory regions of the gene, and accelerated rates of degradation of the protein by DNA viral oncoproteins

  3. Cystatin D is a candidate tumor suppressor gene induced by vitamin D in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Díaz, Silvia; Valle, Noelia; García, José Miguel; Peña, Cristina; Freije, José M P; Quesada, Víctor; Astudillo, Aurora; Bonilla, Félix; López-Otín, Carlos; Muñoz, Alberto

    2009-08-01

    The active vitamin D metabolite 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1alpha,25(OH)2D3] has wide but not fully understood antitumor activity. A previous transcriptomic analysis of 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 action on human colon cancer cells revealed cystatin D (CST5), which encodes an inhibitor of several cysteine proteases of the cathepsin family, as a candidate target gene. Here we report that 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 induced vitamin D receptor (VDR) binding to, and activation of, the CST5 promoter and increased CST5 RNA and protein levels in human colon cancer cells. In cells lacking endogenous cystatin D, ectopic cystatin D expression inhibited both proliferation in vitro and xenograft tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, cystatin D inhibited migration and anchorage-independent growth, antagonized the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway, and repressed c-MYC expression. Cystatin D repressed expression of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition inducers SNAI1, SNAI2, ZEB1, and ZEB2 and, conversely, induced E-cadherin and other adhesion proteins. CST5 knockdown using shRNA abrogated the antiproliferative effect of 1alpha,25(OH)2D3, attenuated E-cadherin expression, and increased c-MYC expression. In human colorectal tumors, expression of cystatin D correlated with expression of VDR and E-cadherin, and loss of cystatin D correlated with poor tumor differentiation. Based on these data, we propose that CST5 has tumor suppressor activity that may contribute to the antitumoral action of 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 in colon cancer.

  4. Targeting activating mutations of EZH2 leads to potent cell growth inhibition in human melanoma by derepression of tumor suppressor genes

    OpenAIRE

    Tiffen, Jessamy C.; Gunatilake, Dilini; Gallagher, Stuart J.; Gowrishankar, Kavitha; Heinemann, Anja; Cullinane, Carleen; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Pupo, Gulietta M.; Strbenac, Dario; Yang, Jean Y.; Madore, Jason; Mann, Graham J.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; McArthur, Grant A.; Filipp, Fabian V.

    2015-01-01

    The epigenetic modifier EZH2 is part of the polycomb repressive complex that suppresses gene expression via histone methylation. Activating mutations in EZH2 are found in a subset of melanoma that contributes to disease progression by inactivating tumor suppressor genes. In this study we have targeted EZH2 with a specific inhibitor (GSK126) or depleted EZH2 protein by stable shRNA knockdown. We show that inhibition of EZH2 has potent effects on the growth of both wild-type and EZH2 mutant hum...

  5. Molecular Cloning, Characterization, and Expression ofMiSOC1: A Homolog of the Flowering Gene SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 from Mango (Mangifera indicaL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Junya; Liu, Debing; Liu, Guoyin; Tang, Jie; Chen, Yeyuan

    2016-01-01

    MADS-box transcription factor plays a crucial role in plant development, especially controlling the formation and development of floral organs. Mango ( Mangifera indica L) is an economically important fruit crop, but its molecular control of flowering is largely unknown. To better understand the molecular basis of flowering regulation in mango, we isolated and characterized the MiSOC1, a putative mango orthologs for the Arabidopsis SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1/AGAMOUS-LIKE 20 (SOC1/AGL20) with homology-based cloning and RACE. The full-length cDNA (GenBank accession No.: KP404094) is 945 bp in length including a 74 bp long 5' UTR and a 189 bp long 3' UTR and the open reading frame was 733 bps, encoding 223 amino acids with molecular weight 25.6 kD. Both sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis all indicated that deduced protein contained a conservative MADS-box and semi-conservative K domain and belonged to the SOC1/TM3 subfamily of the MADS-box family. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to investigate the expression profiles of MiSOC1 gene in different tissues/organs including root, stem, leaves, flower bud, and flower. The result indicated MiSOC1 was widely expressed at different levels in both vegetative and reproductive tissues/organs with the highest expression level in the stems' leaves and inflorescences, low expression in roots and flowers. The expression of MiSOC1 in different flower developmental stages was different while same tissue -specific pattern among different varieties. In addition, MiSOC1 gene expression was affect by ethephon while high concentration ethephon inhibit the expression of MiSOC1. Overexpression of MiSOC1 resulted in early flowering in Arabidopsis . In conclusion, these results suggest that MiSOC1 may act as induce flower function in mango.

  6. Molecular Cloning, Characterization, and Expression of MiSOC1: A Homolog of the Flowering Gene SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 from Mango (Mangifera indica L)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Junya; Liu, Debing; Liu, Guoyin; Tang, Jie; Chen, Yeyuan

    2016-01-01

    MADS-box transcription factor plays a crucial role in plant development, especially controlling the formation and development of floral organs. Mango (Mangifera indica L) is an economically important fruit crop, but its molecular control of flowering is largely unknown. To better understand the molecular basis of flowering regulation in mango, we isolated and characterized the MiSOC1, a putative mango orthologs for the Arabidopsis SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1/AGAMOUS-LIKE 20 (SOC1/AGL20) with homology-based cloning and RACE. The full-length cDNA (GenBank accession No.: KP404094) is 945 bp in length including a 74 bp long 5′ UTR and a 189 bp long 3′ UTR and the open reading frame was 733 bps, encoding 223 amino acids with molecular weight 25.6 kD. Both sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis all indicated that deduced protein contained a conservative MADS-box and semi-conservative K domain and belonged to the SOC1/TM3 subfamily of the MADS-box family. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to investigate the expression profiles of MiSOC1 gene in different tissues/organs including root, stem, leaves, flower bud, and flower. The result indicated MiSOC1 was widely expressed at different levels in both vegetative and reproductive tissues/organs with the highest expression level in the stems’ leaves and inflorescences, low expression in roots and flowers. The expression of MiSOC1 in different flower developmental stages was different while same tissue –specific pattern among different varieties. In addition, MiSOC1 gene expression was affect by ethephon while high concentration ethephon inhibit the expression of MiSOC1. Overexpression of MiSOC1 resulted in early flowering in Arabidopsis. In conclusion, these results suggest that MiSOC1 may act as induce flower function in mango. PMID:27965680

  7. The interaction between endogenous 30S ribosomal subunit protein S11 and Cucumber mosaic virus LS2b protein affects viral replication, infection and gene silencing suppressor activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruilin Wang

    Full Text Available Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV is a model virus for plant-virus protein interaction and mechanism research because of its wide distribution, high-level of replication and simple genome structure. The 2b protein is a multifunctional protein encoded by CMV that suppresses RNA silencing-based antiviral defense and contributes to CMV virulence in host plants. In this report, 12 host proteins were identified as CMV LS2b binding partners using the yeast two-hybrid screen system from the Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library. Among the host proteins, 30S ribosomal subunit protein S11 (RPS11 was selected for further studies. The interaction between LS2b and full-length RPS11 was confirmed using the yeast two-hybrid system. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BIFC assays observed by confocal laser microscopy and Glutathione S-transferase (GST pull-down assays were used to verify the interaction between endogenous NbRPS11 and viral CMVLS2b both in vivo and in vitro. TRV-based gene silencing vector was used to knockdown NbRPS11 transcription, and immunoblot analysis revealed a decline in infectious viral RNA replication and a decrease in CMV infection in RPS11 down-regulated Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Thus, the knockdown of RPS11 likely inhibited CMV replication and accumulation. The gene silencing suppressor activity of CMV2b protein was reduced by the RPS11 knockdown. This study demonstrated that the function of viral LS2b protein was remarkably affected by the interaction with host RPS11 protein.

  8. Functional Studies on Primary Tubular Epithelial Cells Indicate a Tumor Suppressor Role of SETD2 in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available SET domain-containing 2 (SETD2 is responsible for the trimethylation of histone H3 lysine36 (H3K36me3 and is one of the genes most frequently mutated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC. It is located at 3p21, one copy of which is lost in the majority of ccRCC tumors, suggesting that SETD2 might function as a tumor suppressor gene. However, the manner in which loss of SETD2 contributes to ccRCC development has not been studied in renal primary tubular epithelial cells (PTECs. Therefore, we studied the consequences of SETD2 knockdown through lentiviral shRNA in human PTECs. Consistent with its known function, SETD2 knockdown (SETD-KD led to loss of H3K36me3 in PTECs. In contrast to SETD2 wild-type PTECs, which have a limited proliferation capacity; the SETD2-KD PTECs continued to proliferate. The expression profiles of SETD2-KD PTECs showed a large overlap with the expression profile of early-passage, proliferating PTECs, whereas nonproliferating PTECs showed a significantly different expression profile. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed a significant enrichment of E2F targets in SETD2-KD and proliferating PTECs as compared with nonproliferating PTECs and in proliferating PTEC compared with SETD2-KD. The SETD2-KD PTECs maintained low expression of CDKN2A and high expression of E2F1, whereas their levels changed with continuing passages in untreated PTECs. In contrast to the nonproliferating PTECs, SETD2-KD PTECs showed no β-galactosidase staining, confirming the protection against senescence. Our results indicate that SETD2 inactivation enables PTECs to bypass the senescence barrier, facilitating a malignant transformation toward ccRCC.

  9. The essential Escherichia coli msgB gene, a multicopy suppressor of a temperature-sensitive allele of the heat shock gene grpE, is identical to dapE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, B; Georgopoulos, C; Ang, D

    1992-08-01

    The grpE gene product is one of three Escherichia coli heat shock proteins (DnaK, DnaJ, and GrpE) that are essential for both bacteriophage lambda DNA replication and bacterial growth at all temperatures. In an effort to determine the role of GrpE and to identify other factors that it may interact with, we isolated multicopy suppressors of the grpE280 point mutation, as judged by their ability to reverse the temperature-sensitive phenotype of grpE280. Here we report the characterization of one of them, designated msgB. The msgB gene maps at approximately 53 min on the E. coli chromosome. The minimal gene possesses an open reading frame that encodes a protein with a predicted size of 41,269 M(r). This open reading frame was confirmed the correct one by direct amino-terminal sequence analysis of the overproduced msgB gene product. Genetic experiments demonstrated that msgB is essential for E. coli growth in the temperature range of 22 to 37 degrees C. Through a sequence homology search, MsgB was shown to be identical to N-succinyl-L-diaminopimelic acid desuccinylase (the dapE gene product), which participates in the diaminopimelic acid-lysine pathway involved in cell wall biosynthesis. Consistent with this finding, the msgB null allele mutant is viable only when the growth medium is supplemented with diaminopimelic acid. These results suggest that GrpE may have a previously unsuspected function(s) in cell wall biosynthesis in E. coli.

  10. Hsa-let-7a functions as a tumor suppressor in renal cell carcinoma cell lines by targeting c-myc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yongchao; Yin, Bingde; Zhang, Changcun; Zhou, Libin [Department of Urology, Shanghai First People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200080 (China); Fan, Jie, E-mail: jief67@sina.com [Department of Urology, Shanghai First People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200080 (China)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study is the first to test the let-7a/c-myc loop in renal cell carcinoma cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Let-7a down-regulated c-myc in three renal cell carcinoma cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-myc target genes were down-regulated because of the let-7a-mediated down-regulation of c-myc. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The let-7a/c-myc loop has a significant function in renal cell carcinoma cell lines. -- Abstract: Widespread functions of the c-myc pathway play a crucial role in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) carcinogenesis. Thus, we evaluated the connection between proto-oncogenic c-myc and anti-neoplastic hsa-let-7a (let-7a) in RCC cell lines. The levels of c-myc and let-7a in 3 RCC cell lines (769P, Caki-1 and 786O) were measured after transfecting the cells with let-7a mimics or a negative control. The change in c-myc protein level was confirmed by Western blot. The anti-neoplastic function of let-7a was evaluated using cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) for proliferation analysis and cell flow cytometry for cell cycle analysis. The changes of downstream targets of c-myc were measured using reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Our results suggest for the first time that let-7a acts as a tumor suppressor in RCC cell lines by down-regulating c-myc and c-myc target genes such as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cyclin D1 (CCND1) and the miR17-92 cluster, which is accompanied by proliferation inhibition and cell cycle arrest.

  11. Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is a tumor-suppressor gene frequently inactivated in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Helen L; Narla, Goutham; Ogunbiyi, Olagunju; Haq, Asif I; Katz, Amanda; Benzeno, Sharon; Hod, Eldad; Harpaz, Noam; Goldberg, Shlomit; Tal-Kremer, Sigal; Eng, Francis J; Arthur, Michael J P; Martignetti, John A; Friedman, Scott L

    2004-04-01

    Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is a ubiquitous zinc finger tumor suppressor that is often mutated in prostate cancer. Our aims were to establish the frequency of KLF6 inactivation in sporadic and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-associated colorectal cancers (CRC); to correlate these abnormalities with mutation and/or loss of TP53, APC, and K-RAS; and to characterize the behavior of mutant KLF6 in colon-derived cell lines. We analyzed DNA isolated from 50 microdissected CRC cases, including 35 sporadic and 15 IBD-associated tumors. Microsatellite analysis and direct sequencing were used to establish the incidence of microsatellite instability, KLF6 and TP53 allelic imbalance, and KLF6, K-RAS, TP53, and APC mutation. Loss of growth suppressive function of the CRC-derived KLF6 mutants was characterized by in vitro thymidine incorporation assays and Western blotting. KLF6 was inactivated by loss and/or mutation in most sporadic and IBD-related CRCs. The KLF6 locus was deleted in at least 55% of tumors, and mutations were identified in 44%. Rates of KLF6 loss and mutation were similar to those of TP53 and K-RAS in the same samples. KLF6 mutations were present in tumors with either microsatellite or chromosomal instability and were more common, particularly in the IBD-related cancers, in the presence of wild-type APC. Unlike wild-type KLF6, cancer-derived KLF6 mutants neither suppressed growth nor induced p21 following transfection into cultured cells. Deregulation of KLF6 by a combination of allelic imbalance and mutation may play a role in the development of CRC.

  12. Sulforaphane Alone and in Combination with Clofarabine Epigenetically Regulates the Expression of DNA Methylation-Silenced Tumour Suppressor Genes in Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubecka-Pietruszewska, Katarzyna; Kaufman-Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Stefanska, Barbara; Cebula-Obrzut, Barbara; Smolewski, Piotr; Fabianowska-Majewska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic breast cancer is frequently associated with aberrant DNA methylation patterns that are reversible and responsive to environmental factors, including diet. In the present study, we investigated the effects of sulforaphane (SFN), a phytochemical from cruciferous vegetables, on the methylation and expression of PTEN and RARbeta2 tumour suppressor genes as well as on the expression of regulators of DNA methylation reaction, DNMT1 , p53 , and p21 , in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells with different invasive potential. We also evaluate the role of SFN epigenetic effects in support of therapy with clofarabine (ClF) that was recently shown to modulate the epigenome as well. Promoter methylation and gene expression were estimated using methylation-sensitive restriction analysis and real-time PCR, respectively. In both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, SFN at IC 50 (22 and 46 μ M , respectively) and a physiologically relevant 10 μ M concentration lead to hypomethylation of PTEN and RARbeta2 promoters with concomitant gene upregulation. The combination of SFN and ClF enhances these effects, resulting in an increase in cell growth arrest and apoptosis at a non-invasive breast cancer stage. Our findings provide evidence that SFN activates DNA methylation-silenced tumour suppressor genes in breast cancer cells and may contribute to SFN-mediated support of therapy with an anti-cancer drug, ClF, increasing its applications in solid tumours.

  13. Allelic loss of the short arm of chromosome 4 in neuroblastoma suggests a novel tumour suppressor gene locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caron, H.; van Sluis, P.; Buschman, R.; Pereira do Tanque, R.; Maes, P.; Beks, L.; de Kraker, J.; Voûte, P. A.; Vergnaud, G.; Westerveld, A.; Slater, R.; Versteeg, R.

    1996-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood neural crest tumour, genetically characterized by frequent deletions of the short arm of chromosome 1 and amplification of N-myc. Here we report the first evidence for a neuroblastoma tumour suppressor locus on 4pter. Cytogenetically we demonstrated rearrangements of 4p

  14. Activated NKT cells facilitated functional switch of myeloid-derived suppressor cells at inflammation sites in fulminant hepatitis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Danxiao; Shi, Yu; Wang, Cheng; Chen, Hanwen; Liu, Qiaoyun; Liu, Jianhua; Zhang, Lihuang; Wu, Yihua; Xia, Dajing

    2017-02-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) confer immunosuppressive properties, but their roles in fulminant hepatitis have not been well defined. In this study, we systematically examined the distribution of MDSCs in bone marrow (BM), liver and spleen, and their functional and differentiation status in an acute fulminant hepatitis mouse model induced by lipopolysaccharide and D-galactosamine (LPS-GalN). Moreover, the interaction between NKT cells and MDSCs was determined. Our study revealed that BM contained the largest pool of MDSCs during pathogenesis of fulminant hepatitis compared with liver and spleen. MDSCs in liver/spleen expressed higher levels of chemokine receptors such as CCR2, CX3CR1 and CXCR2. At inflamed tissues such as liver or spleen, activated NKT cells induced differentiation of MDSCs through cell-cell interaction, which markedly dampened the immunosuppressive effects and promoted MDSCs to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines and activate inflammatory cells. Our findings thus demonstrated an unexpected pro-inflammatory state for MDSCs, which was mediated by the activated NKT cells that precipitated the differentiation and functional evolution of these MDSCs at sites of inflammation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  15. MiR-564 functions as a tumor suppressor in human lung cancer by targeting ZIC3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bin [Department of Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China); Jia, Lin [Department of Nephrology, The Central Hospital of Wuhan, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China); Guo, Qiaojuan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Provincial Clinical College of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350000 (China); Ren, Hui; Hu, Desheng; Zhou, Xiaoyi; Ren, Qingrong [Department of Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China); Hu, Yanping, E-mail: huyp1989@163.com [Department of Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China); Xie, Tao, E-mail: xietao930@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China)

    2015-11-27

    Although miR-564 was reported to be dysregulated in human malignancy, the function and mechanism of miR-564 in tumorigenesis remains unknown. In the present study, we found that miR-564 frequently downregulated in lung cancer cells and significantly inhibited cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, motility, and the tumorigenicity of lung cancer cells. Moreover, we identified zic family member 3 (ZIC3) as a direct target of miR-564. ZIC3 overexpression impaired the suppressive effects of miR-564 on the capacity of lung cancer cells for proliferation and motility. Finally, we detected the expression level of miR-564 and ZIC3 protein in tissue specimens, and found a significant negative correlation between them. Patients with low levels of miR-564 showed a poorer overall survival. Taken together, our present study revealed the tumor suppressor role of miR-564, indicating restoration of miR-564 as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of lung cancer. - Highlights: • MiR-564 inhibits cancer cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, migration, and invasion. • miR-564 suppresses the tumorigenicity of lung cancer cell in vivo. • ZIC3 is a direct and functional target of miR-564. • The expression of miR-564 was negatively correlated with ZIC3 protein in tumors. • Both low miR-564 and high ZIC3 was associated with tumor stage and prognosis.

  16. [Silencing of tumor metastasis suppressor gene 1 promotes invasion of prostate cancer cell in vitro and its molecular mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-yan; You, Jiang-feng; Pei, Fei; Zhang, Bo

    2011-12-18

    , indicating that LASS2 is a novel tumor metastasis suppressor gene.

  17. Moringa oleifera Gold Nanoparticles Modulate Oncogenes, Tumor Suppressor Genes, and Caspase-9 Splice Variants in A549 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiloke, Charlette; Phulukdaree, Alisa; Anand, Krishnan; Gengan, Robert M; Chuturgoon, Anil A

    2016-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP's) facilitate cancer cell recognition and can be manufactured by green synthesis using nutrient rich medicinal plants such as Moringa oleifera (MO). Targeting dysregulated oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes is crucial for cancer therapeutics. We investigated the antiproliferative effects of AuNP synthesized from MO aqueous leaf extracts (MLAuNP ) in A549 lung and SNO oesophageal cancer cells. A one-pot green synthesis technique was used to synthesise MLAuNP . A549, SNO cancer cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were exposed to MLAuNP and CAuNP to evaluate cytotoxicity (MTT assay); apoptosis was measured by phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization, mitochondrial depolarization (ΔΨm) (flow cytometry), caspase-3/7, -9 activity, and ATP levels (luminometry). The mRNA expression of c-myc, p53, Skp2, Fbw7α, and caspase-9 splice variants was determined using qPCR, while relative protein expression of c-myc, p53, SRp30a, Bax, Bcl-2, Smac/DIABLO, Hsp70, and PARP-1 were determined by Western blotting. MLAuNP and CAuNP were not cytotoxic to PBMCs, whilst its pro-apoptotic properties were confirmed in A549 and SNO cells. MLAuNP significantly increased caspase activity in SNO cells while MLAuNP significantly increased PS externalization, ΔΨm, caspase-9, caspase-3/7 activities, and decreased ATP levels in A549 cells. Also, p53 mRNA and protein levels, SRp30a (P = 0.428), Bax, Smac/DIABLO and PARP-1 24 kDa fragment levels were significantly increased. Conversely, MLAuNP significantly decreased Bcl-2, Hsp70, Skp2, Fbw7α, c-myc mRNA, and protein levels and activated alternate splicing with caspase-9a splice variant being significantly increased. MLAuNP possesses antiproliferative properties and induced apoptosis in A549 cells by activating alternate splicing of caspase-9. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2302-2314, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The epigenetic modifier PRDM5 functions as a tumor suppressor through modulating WNT/β-catenin signaling and is frequently silenced in multiple tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-sheng Shu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PRDM (PRDI-BF1 and RIZ domain containing proteins are zinc finger proteins involved in multiple cellular regulations by acting as epigenetic modifiers. We studied a recently identified PRDM member PRDM5 for its epigenetic abnormality and tumor suppressive functions in multiple tumorigeneses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that PRDM5 was broadly expressed in human normal tissues, but frequently silenced or downregulated in multiple carcinoma cell lines due to promoter CpG methylation, including 80% (4/5 nasopharyngeal, 44% (8/18 esophageal, 76% (13/17 gastric, 50% (2/4 cervical, and 25% (3/12 hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines, but not in any immortalized normal epithelial cell lines. PRDM5 expression could be restored by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine demethylation treatment in silenced cell lines. PRDM5 methylation was frequently detected by methylation-specific PCR (MSP in multiple primary tumors, including 93% (43/46 nasopharyngeal, 58% (25/43 esophageal, 88% (37/42 gastric and 63% (29/46 hepatocellular tumors. PRDM5 was further found a stress-responsive gene, but its response was impaired when the promoter was methylated. Ectopic PRDM5 expression significantly inhibited tumor cell clonogenicity, accompanied by the inhibition of TCF/β-catenin-dependent transcription and downregulation of CDK4, TWIST1 and MDM2 oncogenes, while knocking down of PRDM5 expression lead to increased cell proliferation. ChIP assay showed that PRDM5 bound to its target gene promoters and suppressed their transcription. An inverse correlation between the expression of PRDM5 and activated β-catenin was also observed in cell lines. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: PRDM5 functions as a tumor suppressor at least partially through antagonizing aberrant WNT/β-catenin signaling and oncogene expression. Frequent epigenetic silencing of PRDM5 is involved in multiple tumorigeneses, which could serve as a tumor biomarker.

  19. Indications for a tumor suppressor gene at 22q11 involved in the pathogenesis of ependymal tumors and distinct from hSNF5/INI1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, J A; de Millas, W; Sörensen, N; Herbold, C; Schichor, C; Tonn, J C; Wiestler, O D; von Deimling, A; Pietsch, T

    2001-07-01

    Ependymomas account for approximately 9% of all neuroepithelial tumors and represent the most frequent neuroepithelial tumors of the spinal cord. In adults, allelic loss of chromosome arm 22q occurs in up to 60% of the cases studied. Some of these tumors show an altered neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene; in others, NF2 appears to be unaffected, indicating the involvement of another tumor suppressor gene. Recently, the tumor suppressor gene hSNF5/INI1, located on 22q11.23, has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of renal and extrarenal rhabdoid tumors. In addition, this gene may be responsible for a new hereditary syndrome predisposing to a variety of tumors designated "rhabdoid predisposition syndrome." In the present study, we analyzed a series of 53 ependymal tumors of 48 patients [4 myxopapillary ependymomas (WHO grade I), 3 subependymomas (WHO grade I), 18 ependymomas (WHO grade II), 21 anaplastic ependymomas (WHO grade III) and 2 ependymoblastomas (WHO grade IV)] for mutations and homozygous deletions in the coding region of the hSNF5/INI1 gene and for allelic loss of its flanking chromosomal regions in 39 ependymal tumors of 35 patients. Allelic loss was detected in 11 of 35 informative primary ependymal tumors (31%) with a common region of overlap covered by the markers D22S257 and D22S310 on 22q11 including the marker D22S301. However, a detailed molecular analysis of 53 ependymal tumors for mutations and homozygous deletion of the hSNF5/INI1 gene revealed no alterations. We conclude that the hSNF5/INI1 gene is not involved in the pathogenesis of human ependymal tumors with allelic loss on chromosome arm 22q and an intact NF2 locus. In addition, our study localizes a putative ependymoma tumor suppressor gene(s) to a domain of chromosome arm 22q flanked by the microsatellite markers D22S257 and D22S310.

  20. The hookworm tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases (Ac-TMP-1 modifies dendritic cell function and induces generation of CD4 and CD8 suppressor T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Cuéllar

    Full Text Available Hookworm infection is a major cause of disease burden for humans. Recent studies have described hookworm-related immunosuppression in endemic populations and animal models. A Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteases (Ac-TMP-1 has been identified as one of the most abundant proteins released by the adult parasite. We investigated the effect of recombinant Ac-TMP-1 on dendritic cell (DC and T cell function. Splenic T cells from C57BL/6 mice injected with Ac-TMP-1 showed reduced proliferation to restimulation with anti CD3 or bystander antigens such as OVA. Incubation of bone marrow-derived DCs with Ac-TMP-1 decreased MHC Class I and, especially, Class II expression but increased CD86 and IL-10 expression. Co-incubation of splenic T cells with DCs pulsed with Ac-TMP-1 induced their differentiation into CD4+ and, particularly, CD8+ CD25+Foxp3+ T cells that expressed IL-10. These cells were able to suppress proliferation of naïve and activated CD4+ T cells by TGF-Beta-dependent (CD4+ suppressors or independent (CD8+ suppressors mechanisms. Priming of DCs with non-hookworm antigens, such as OVA, did not result in the generation of suppressor T cells. These data indicate that Ac-TMP-1 initiates the development of a regulatory response through modifications in DC function and generation of suppressor T cells. This is the first report to propose a role of suppressor CD8+ T cells in gastrointestinal helminthic infections.

  1. A fine balance: epigenetic control of cellular quiescence by the tumor suppressor PRDM2/RIZ at a bivalent domain in the cyclin a gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheedipudi, Sirisha; Puri, Deepika; Saleh, Amena; Gala, Hardik P; Rumman, Mohammed; Pillai, Malini S; Sreenivas, Prethish; Arora, Reety; Sellathurai, Jeeva; Schrøder, Henrik Daa; Mishra, Rakesh K; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2015-07-27

    Adult stem cell quiescence is critical to ensure regeneration while minimizing tumorigenesis. Epigenetic regulation contributes to cell cycle control and differentiation, but few regulators of the chromatin state in quiescent cells are known. Here we report that the tumor suppressor PRDM2/RIZ, an H3K9 methyltransferase, is enriched in quiescent muscle stem cells in vivo and controls reversible quiescence in cultured myoblasts. We find that PRDM2 associates with >4400 promoters in G0 myoblasts, 55% of which are also marked with H3K9me2 and enriched for myogenic, cell cycle and developmental regulators. Knockdown of PRDM2 alters histone methylation at key promoters such as Myogenin and CyclinA2 (CCNA2), and subverts the quiescence program via global de-repression of myogenesis, and hyper-repression of the cell cycle. Further, PRDM2 acts upstream of the repressive PRC2 complex in G0. We identify a novel G0-specific bivalent chromatin domain in the CCNA2 locus. PRDM2 protein interacts with the PRC2 protein EZH2 and regulates its association with the bivalent domain in the CCNA2 gene. Our results suggest that induction of PRDM2 in G0 ensures that two antagonistic programs-myogenesis and the cell cycle-while stalled, are poised for reactivation. Together, these results indicate that epigenetic regulation by PRDM2 preserves key functions of the quiescent state, with implications for stem cell self-renewal. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Genetic and Epigenetic Tumor Suppressor Gene Silencing are Distinct Molecular Phenotypes Driven by Growth Promoting Mutations in Non small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsit, C. J.; Kelsey, K. T.; Houseman, E. A.; Kelsey, K. T.; Houseman, E. A.; Nelson, H. H.

    2008-01-01

    Both genetic and epigenetic alterations characterize human non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but the biological processes that create or select these alterations remain incompletely investigated. Our hypothesis posits that a roughly reciprocal relationship between the propensity for promoter hyper methylation and a propensity for genetic deletion leads to distinct molecular phenotypes of lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we examined promoter hyper methylation of 17 tumor suppressor genes, as a marker of epigenetic alteration propensity, and deletion events at the 3p21 region, as a marker of genetic alteration. To model the complex biology between these somatic alterations, we utilized an item response theory model. We demonstrated that tumors exhibiting LOH at greater than 30% of informative alleles in the 3p21 region have a significantly reduced propensity for hyper methylation. At the same time, tumors with activating KRAS mutations showed a significantly increased propensity for hyper methylation of the loci examined, a result similar to what has been observed in colon cancer. These data suggest that NSCLCs have distinct epigenetic or genetic alteration phenotypes acting upon tumor suppressor genes and that mutation of oncogenic growth promoting genes, such as KRAS, is associated with the epigenetic phenotype.

  3. The tumor suppressors pRB and p53 as regulators of adipocyte differentiation and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallenborg, Philip; Feddersen, Søren; Madsen, Lise

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and p53 are crucial members of regulatory networks controlling the cell cycle and apoptosis, and a hallmark of virtually all cancers is dysregulation of expression or function of pRB or p53. Although they are best known for their role in cancer...... development, it is now evident that both are implicated in metabolism and cellular development. OBJECTIVE/METHODS: To review the role of pRB and p53 in adipocyte differentiation and function emphasizing that pRB and p53, via their effects on adipocyte development and function, play a role in the regulation...... of energy metabolism and homeostasis. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: pRB is required for adipose conversion and also involved in determining its mitochondrial capacity. p53 inhibits adipogenesis and results suggest that it is involved in maintaining function of adipose tissue....

  4. ATP/P2X7 axis modulates myeloid-derived suppressor cell functions in neuroblastoma microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, G; Vuerich, M; Pellegatti, P; Marimpietri, D; Emionite, L; Marigo, I; Bronte, V; Di Virgilio, F; Pistoia, V; Raffaghello, L

    2014-03-20

    Tumor microenvironment of solid tumors is characterized by a strikingly high concentration of adenosine and ATP. Physiological significance of this biochemical feature is unknown, but it has been suggested that it may affect infiltrating immune cell responses and tumor progression. There is increasing awareness that many of the effects of extracellular ATP on tumor and inflammatory cells are mediated by the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). Aim of this study was to investigate whether: (i) extracellular ATP is a component of neuroblastoma (NB) microenvironment, (ii) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) express functional P2X7R and (iii) the ATP/P2X7R axis modulates MDSC functions. Our results show that extracellular ATP was detected in NB microenvironment in amounts that increased in parallel with tumor progression. The percentage of CD11b(+)/Gr-1(+) cells was higher in NB-bearing mice compared with healthy animals. Within the CD11b/Gr-1(+) population, monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs) produced higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), arginase-1 (ARG-1), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and stimulated more potently in vivo tumor growth, as compared with granulocytic MDSCs (G-MDSCs). P2X7R of M-MDSCs was localized at the plasma membrane, coupled to increased functionality, upregulation of ARG-1, TGF-β1 and ROS. Quite surprisingly, the P2X7R in primary MDSCs as well as in the MSC-1 and MSC-2 lines was uncoupled from cytotoxicity. This study describes a novel scenario in which MDSC immunosuppressive functions are modulated by the ATP-enriched tumor microenvironment.

  5. An in vivo functional screen identifies ST6GalNAc2 sialyltransferase as a breast cancer metastasis suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugaesu, Nirupa; Iravani, Marjan; van Weverwijk, Antoinette; Ivetic, Aleksandar; Johnson, Damian A; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Fearns, Antony; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Sims, David; Fenwick, Kerry; Mitsopoulos, Costas; Gao, Qiong; Orr, Nick; Zvelebil, Marketa; Haslam, Stuart M; Dell, Anne; Yarwood, Helen; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan; Isacke, Clare M

    2014-03-01

    To interrogate the complex mechanisms involved in the later stages of cancer metastasis, we designed a functional in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) screen combined with next-generation sequencing. Using this approach, we identified the sialyltransferase ST6GalNAc2 as a novel breast cancer metastasis suppressor. Mechanistically, ST6GalNAc2 silencing alters the profile of O-glycans on the tumor cell surface, facilitating binding of the soluble lectin galectin-3. This then enhances tumor cell retention and emboli formation at metastatic sites leading to increased metastatic burden, events that can be completely blocked by galectin-3 inhibition. Critically, elevated ST6GALNAC2, but not galectin-3, expression in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers significantly correlates with reduced frequency of metastatic events and improved survival. These data demonstrate that the prometastatic role of galectin-3 is regulated by its ability to bind to the tumor cell surface and highlight the potential of monitoring ST6GalNAc2 expression to stratify patients with breast cancer for treatment with galectin-3 inhibitors.

  6. Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotypes Reveal Cell-Nonautonomous Functions of Oncogenic RAS and the p53 Tumor Suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copp& #233; , Jean-Philippe; Patil, Christopher; Rodier, Francis; Sun, Yu; Munoz, Denise; Goldstein, Joshua; Nelson, Peter; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2008-10-24

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cell proliferation, essentially permanently, in response to oncogenic stimuli, including genotoxic stress. We modified the use of antibody arrays to provide a quantitative assessment of factors secreted by senescent cells. We show that human cells induced to senesce by genotoxic stress secrete myriad factors associated with inflammation and malignancy. This senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) developed slowly over several days and only after DNA damage of sufficient magnitude to induce senescence. Remarkably similar SASPs developed in normal fibroblasts, normal epithelial cells, and epithelial tumor cells after genotoxic stress in culture, and in epithelial tumor cells in vivo after treatment of prostate cancer patients with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. In cultured premalignant epithelial cells, SASPs induced an epithelial-mesenchyme transition and invasiveness, hallmarks of malignancy, by a paracrine mechanism that depended largely on the SASP factors interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Strikingly, two manipulations markedly amplified, and accelerated development of, the SASPs: oncogenic RAS expression, which causes genotoxic stress and senescence in normal cells, and functional loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Both loss of p53 and gain of oncogenic RAS also exacerbated the promalignant paracrine activities of the SASPs. Our findings define a central feature of genotoxic stress-induced senescence. Moreover, they suggest a cell-nonautonomous mechanism by which p53 can restrain, and oncogenic RAS can promote, the development of age-related cancer by altering the tissue microenvironment.

  7. Characterization of the p53 cistrome--DNA binding cooperativity dissects p53's tumor suppressor functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Schlereth

    Full Text Available p53 protects us from cancer by transcriptionally regulating tumor suppressive programs designed to either prevent the development or clonal expansion of malignant cells. How p53 selects target genes in the genome in a context- and tissue-specific manner remains largely obscure. There is growing evidence that the ability of p53 to bind DNA in a cooperative manner prominently influences target gene selection with activation of the apoptosis program being completely dependent on DNA binding cooperativity. Here, we used ChIP-seq to comprehensively profile the cistrome of p53 mutants with reduced or increased cooperativity. The analysis highlighted a particular relevance of cooperativity for extending the p53 cistrome to non-canonical binding sequences characterized by deletions, spacer insertions and base mismatches. Furthermore, it revealed a striking functional separation of the cistrome on the basis of cooperativity; with low cooperativity genes being significantly enriched for cell cycle and high cooperativity genes for apoptotic functions. Importantly, expression of high but not low cooperativity genes was correlated with superior survival in breast cancer patients. Interestingly, in contrast to most p53-activated genes, p53-repressed genes did not commonly contain p53 binding elements. Nevertheless, both the degree of gene activation and repression were cooperativity-dependent, suggesting that p53-mediated gene repression is largely indirect and mediated by cooperativity-dependently transactivated gene products such as CDKN1A, E2F7 and non-coding RNAs. Since both activation of apoptosis genes with non-canonical response elements and repression of pro-survival genes are crucial for p53's apoptotic activity, the cistrome analysis comprehensively explains why p53-induced apoptosis, but not cell cycle arrest, strongly depends on the intermolecular cooperation of p53 molecules as a possible safeguard mechanism protecting from accidental cell

  8. Tumor suppressor function of the plasma glutathione peroxidase Gpx3 in colitis-associated carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Caitlyn W.; Ning, Wei; Chen, Xi; Smith, J. Joshua; Washington, Mary K; Hill, Kristina E.; Coburn, Lori A.; Peek, Richard M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.; Burk, Raymond F.; Williams, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    The glutathione peroxidases, a family of selenocysteine-containing redox enzymes, play pivotal roles in balancing the signaling, immunomodulatory and deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The glutathione peroxidase GPX3 is the only extracellular member of this family, suggesting it may defend cells against ROS in the extracellular environment. Notably, GPX3 hypermethylation and underexpression occurs commonly in prostate, gastric, cervical, thyroid and colon cancers. We took a reverse genetics approach to investigate whether GPX3 would augment inflammatory colonic tumorigenesis, a process characterized by oxidative stress and inflammation, comparing Gpx3−/− mice established two-stage model of inflammatory colon carcinogenesis. Gpx3-deficient mice exhibited an increased tumor number, though not size, along with a higher degree of dysplasia. Additionally, they exhibited increased inflammation with redistribution towards pro-tumorigenic M2 macrophage subsets, increased proliferation, hyperactive WNT signaling, and increased DNA damage. To determine the impact of acute gene loss in an established colon cancer line, we silenced GPX3 in human Caco2 cells, resulting in increased ROS production, DNA damage and apoptosis in response to oxidative stress, combined with decreased contact-independent growth. Taken together, our results suggested an immunomodulatory role for GPX3 that limits the development of colitis-associated carcinoma. PMID:23221387

  9. Tumor-suppressor effects of chemical functional groups in an in vitro co-culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Su-Ju; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Kong, Xiang-Dong

    2014-06-01

    Liver normal cells and cancer cells co-cultured on surfaces modified by different chemical functional groups, including mercapto (-SH), hydroxyl (-OH) and methyl (-CH3) groups. The results showed that different cells exhibited changes in response to different surfaces. Normal cells on -SH surface exhibited the smallest contact area with mostly rounded morphology, which led to the death of cancer cells, while cancer cells could not grow on -CH3 groups, which also died. In the co-culture system, the -CH3 group exhibited its unique effect that could trigger the death of cancer cells and had no effects on normal cells. Our findings provide useful information on strategies for the design of efficient and safe regenerative medicine materials.

  10. Acute Malaria Induces PD1+CTLA4+ Effector T Cells with Cell-Extrinsic Suppressor Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sophia Mackroth

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In acute Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum malaria, the pro- and anti-inflammatory immune pathways must be delicately balanced so that the parasitemia is controlled without inducing immunopathology. An important mechanism to fine-tune T cell responses in the periphery is the induction of coinhibitory receptors such as CTLA4 and PD1. However, their role in acute infections such as P. falciparum malaria remains poorly understood. To test whether coinhibitory receptors modulate CD4+ T cell functions in malaria, blood samples were obtained from patients with acute P. falciparum malaria treated in Germany. Flow cytometric analysis showed a more frequent expression of CTLA4 and PD1 on CD4+ T cells of malaria patients than of healthy control subjects. In vitro stimulation with P. falciparum-infected red blood cells revealed a distinct population of PD1+CTLA4+CD4+ T cells that simultaneously produced IFNγ and IL10. This antigen-specific cytokine production was enhanced by blocking PD1/PDL1 and CTLA4. PD1+CTLA4+CD4+ T cells were further isolated based on surface expression of PD1 and their inhibitory function investigated in-vitro. Isolated PD1+CTLA4+CD4+ T cells suppressed the proliferation of the total CD4+ population in response to anti-CD3/28 and plasmodial antigens in a cell-extrinsic manner. The response to other specific antigens was not suppressed. Thus, acute P. falciparum malaria induces P. falciparum-specific PD1+CTLA4+CD4+ Teffector cells that coproduce IFNγ and IL10, and inhibit other CD4+ T cells. Transient induction of regulatory Teffector cells may be an important mechanism that controls T cell responses and might prevent severe inflammation in patients with malaria and potentially other acute infections.

  11. Effects of atomic bomb radiation on differentiation of B lymphocytes and on the function of concanavalin A-induced suppressor T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Y.; Neriishi, S.; Ishimaru, T.; Shimba, N.; Hamilton, H.B.; Ohgushi, Y.; Koyanagi, M.; Ichimaru, M.

    1985-01-01

    The differentiation of peripheral blood B lymphocytes into immunoglobulin-producing cells (Ig-PC) by pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and the function of concanavalin A (Con A)-induced suppressor T lymphocytes were examined to elucidate the late effects of atomic bomb radiation. A total of 140 individuals, 70 with an exposure dose of 100 rad or more and an equal number with an exposure dose of 0 rad matched by sex and age, were selected from the Nagasaki Adult Health Study (AHS) sample. Both the differentiation of peripheral blood B lymphocytes into Ig-PC by PWM and the function of Con A-induced suppressor T lymphocytes tended to be more depressed in the exposed group than in the control group, but a statistically significant difference could not be observed between the two groups. The function of Con A-induced suppressor T lymphocytes tended to decrease with age, but a statistical significance was detected only for percentage suppression against IgM-PC

  12. MiR-145 functions as a tumor suppressor targeting NUAK1 in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Xinkui; Sun, Daoyi; Chai, Hao; Shan, Wengang [Liver Transplantation Center, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Key Laboratory of Living Donor Liver Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Yu, Yue [Key Laboratory of Living Donor Liver Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Pu, Liyong [Liver Transplantation Center, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Key Laboratory of Living Donor Liver Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Cheng, Feng, E-mail: docchengfeng@njmu.edu.cn [Liver Transplantation Center, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Key Laboratory of Living Donor Liver Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-09-18

    The dysregulation of micro (mi)RNAs is associated with cancer development. The miRNA miR-145 is downregulated in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC); however, its precise role in tumor progression has not yet been elucidated. Novel (nua) kinase family (NUAK)1 functions as an oncogene in various cancers and is a putative target of miR-145 regulation. In this study, we investigated the regulation of NUAK1 by miR-145 in ICC. We found that miR-145 level was significantly decreased in ICC tissue and cell lines, which corresponded with an increase in NUAK1 expression. NUAK1 was found to be a direct target of miR-145 regulation. The overexpression of miR-145 in ICC cell lines inhibited proliferation, growth, and invasion by suppressing NUAK1 expression, which was associated with a decrease in Akt signaling and matrix metalloproteinase protein expression. Similar results were observed by inhibiting NUAK1 expression. These results demonstrate that miR-145 can prevent ICC progression by targeting NUAK1 and its downstream effectors, and can therefore be useful for clinical diagnosis and targeted therapy of ICC. - Highlights: • MiR-145 suppresses ICC proliferation and invasion abilities. • We demonstrated that miR-145 directly targets NUAK1 in ICC. • MiR-145 expression in ICC was associated with Akt signaling and MMPs expression.

  13. Re-expression of methylation-induced tumor suppressor gene silencing is associated with the state of histone modification in gastric cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chun-Feng; Zhu, Xin-Jiang; Peng, Guo; Dai, Dong-Qiu

    2007-12-14

    To identify the relationship between DNA hyper-methylation and histone modification at a hyperme-thylated, silenced tumor suppressor gene promoter in human gastric cancer cell lines and to elucidate whether alteration of DNA methylation could affect histone modification. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay to assess the status of histone acetylation and methylation in promoter regions of the p16 and mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) genes in 2 gastric cancer cell lines, SGC-7901 and MGC-803. We used methylation-specific PCR (MSP) to evaluate the effect of 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC), trichostatin A (TSA) or their combination treatment on DNA methylation status. We used RT-PCR to determine whether alterations of histone modification status after 5-Aza-dC and TSA treatment are reflected in gene expression. For the p16 and MLH1 genes in two cell lines, silenced loci associated with DNA hypermethylation were characterized by histone H3-K9 hypoacetylation and hypermethylation and histone H3-K4 hypomethylation. Treatment with TSA resulted in moderately increased histone H3-K9 acetylation at the silenced loci with no effect on histone H3-K9 methylation and minimal effects on gene expression. In contrast, treatment with 5-Aza-dC rapidly reduced histone H3-K9 methylation at the silenced loci and resulted in reactivation of the two genes. Combined treatment with 5-Aza-dC and TSA was synergistic in reactivating gene expression at the loci showing DNA hypermethylation. Similarly, histone H3-K4 methylation was not affected after TSA treatment, and increased moderately at the silenced loci after 5-Aza-dC treatment. Hypermethylation of DNA in promoter CpG islands is related to transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressor genes. Histone H3-K9 methylation in different regions of the promoters studied correlates with DNA methylation status of each gene in gastric cancer cells. However, histone H3-K9 acetylation and H3-K4 methylation inversely correlate with DNA methylation

  14. MicroRNA-30e Functions as a Tumor Suppressor in Cervical Carcinoma Cells through Targeting GALNT7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan Wu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide. However, the underlying mechanism of occurrence and development of cervical cancer is obscure. In this study, we observed that miR-30e was downregulated in clinical cervical cancer tissues and cervical cancer cells. Next, overexpression of miR-30e reduced the cervical cancer cell growth through MTT, colony formation, EdU, and Transwell assay in SiHa and Caski cells. Subsequently, UDP-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine: polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 7 (GALNT7 was identified as a potential miR-30e target by bioinformatics analysis. Moreover, we showed that miR-30e was able to bind to the 3′UTR of GALNT7 by luciferase reporter assay. In addition, the mRNA and protein levels of GALNT7 in cervical cancer cells were downregulated by miR-30e. And we validated that downregulation of GALNT7 repressed the proliferation of SiHa and Caski cells by MTT, colony formation, and Transwell assay. We identified that the restoration of GALNT7 expression was able to counteract the effect of miR-30e on cell proliferation of cervical cancer cells. Furthermore, we found that the expression levels of GALNT7 were frequently upregulated and negatively correlative to those of miR-30e in cervical cancer tissues. In addition, we validated that restoration of GALNT7 rescued the miR-30e–suppressed growth of cervical cancer xenografts in vivo. In conclusion, the current results suggest that miR-30e may function as tumor suppressors in cervical cancer through downregulation of GALNT7. Both miR-30e and its novel target, GALNT7, may play an important role in the process of cervical cancer.

  15. Function analysis of unknown genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogowska-Wrzesinska, A.

    2002-01-01

      This thesis entitled "Function analysis of unknown genes" presents the use of proteome analysis for the characterisation of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) genes and their products (proteins especially those of unknown function). This study illustrates that proteome analysis can be used...... be obtained using proteome analysis. Chapter 1 and 2 provide the basic theoretical aspects of proteome analysis, its principles, the main techniques involved and their use in the studies of the molecular biology of yeast cells. Chapter 3 presents the methods and tools involved in proteome analysis and used...... presents a comparison of the proteomes of three yeast wild type strains CEN.PK2, FY1679 and W303 that are widely used in function analysis projects and proves that FY1679 and W303 strains are more similar to each other than to the CEN.PK2 strain. This study identifies 62 proteins that are differentially...

  16. Whole genome in vivo RNAi screening identifies the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor as a novel breast tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorns, Elizabeth; Ward, Toby M; Dean, Sonja; Jegg, Anna; Thomas, Dafydd; Murugaesu, Nirupa; Sims, David; Mitsopoulos, Costas; Fenwick, Kerry; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Naceur-Lombarelli, Cristina; Zvelebil, Marketa; Isacke, Clare M; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan; Hnatyszyn, H James; Pegram, Mark; Lippman, Marc

    2012-08-01

    Cancer is caused by mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, resulting in the deregulation of processes fundamental to the normal behavior of cells. The identification and characterization of oncogenes and tumor suppressors has led to new treatment strategies that have significantly improved cancer outcome. The advent of next generation sequencing has allowed the elucidation of the fine structure of cancer genomes, however, the identification of pathogenic changes is complicated by the inherent genomic instability of cancer cells. Therefore, functional approaches for the identification of novel genes involved in the initiation and development of tumors are critical. Here we report the first whole human genome in vivo RNA interference screen to identify functionally important tumor suppressor genes. Using our novel approach, we identify previously validated tumor suppressor genes including TP53 and MNT, as well as several novel candidate tumor suppressor genes including leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR). We show that LIFR is a key novel tumor suppressor, whose deregulation may drive the transformation of a significant proportion of human breast cancers. These results demonstrate the power of genome wide in vivo RNAi screens as a method for identifying novel genes regulating tumorigenesis.

  17. Sodium butyrate induces cell death by autophagy and reactivates a tumor suppressor gene DIRAS1 in renal cell carcinoma cell line UOK146.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shiv Prakash; Agarwal, Ayushi; Das, Parimal

    2018-04-01

    Sodium butyrate (SB), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, is emerging as a potent anti-cancer drug for different types of cancers. In the present study, anti-cancer activity of SB in Xp11.2 (TFE3) translocated renal cell carcinoma cell line UOK146 was studied. Anti-proliferative effect of SB in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell line UOK146 was evaluated by MTT assay and morphological characteristics were observed by phase contrast microscopy which displayed the cell death after SB treatment. SB induces DNA fragmentation and change in nuclear morphology observed by increased sub-G1 region cell population and nuclear blebbings. Cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase was found after SB treatment. UOK146 cell line shows autophagy mode of cell death as displayed by acridine orange staining and flow cytometry analysis. LC3-II, a protein marker of autophagy, was also found to be upregulated after SB treatment. A tumor suppressor gene DIRAS1 was upregulated after SB treatment, displaying its anti-cancer potential at molecular level. These findings suggest that SB could serve as a novel regulator of tumor suppressors and lead to the discovery of novel therapeutics with better and enhanced anti-cancer activity.

  18. High-level HIV-1 Nef transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana using the P19 gene silencing suppressor protein of Artichoke Mottled Crinckle Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianco Linda

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, different HIV antigens have been successfully expressed in plants by either stable transformation or transient expression systems. Among HIV proteins, Nef is considered a promising target for the formulation of a multi-component vaccine due to its implication in the first steps of viral infection. Attempts to express Nef as a single protein product (not fused to a stabilizing protein in transgenic plants resulted in disappointingly low yields (about 0.5% of total soluble protein. In this work we describe a transient expression system based on co-agroinfiltration of plant virus gene silencing suppressor proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana, followed by a two-step affinity purification protocol of plant-derived Nef. Results The effect of three gene silencing viral suppressor proteins (P25 of Potato Virus X, P19 of either Artichoke Mottled Crinckle virus and Tomato Bushy Stunt virus on Nef transient expression yield was evaluated. The P19 protein of Artichoke Mottled Crinckle virus (AMCV-P19 gave the highest expression yield in vacuum co-agroinfiltration experiments reaching 1.3% of total soluble protein, a level almost three times higher than that previously reported in stable transgenic plants. The high yield observed in the co-agroinfiltrated plants was correlated to a remarkable decrease of Nef-specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs indicating an effective modulation of RNA silencing mechanisms by AMCV-P19. Interestingly, we also showed that expression levels in top leaves of vacuum co-agroinfiltrated plants were noticeably reduced compared to bottom leaves. Moreover, purification of Nef from agroinfiltrated tissue was achieved by a two-step immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography protocol with yields of 250 ng/g of fresh tissue. Conclusion We demonstrated that expression level of HIV-1 Nef in plant can be improved using a transient expression system enhanced by the AMCV-P19 gene silencing suppressor

  19. Rotavirus gene structure and function.

    OpenAIRE

    Estes, M K; Cohen, J

    1989-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure and function of the genes and proteins of the rotaviruses has expanded rapidly. Information obtained in the last 5 years has revealed unexpected and unique molecular properties of rotavirus proteins of general interest to virologists, biochemists, and cell biologists. Rotaviruses share some features of replication with reoviruses, yet antigenic and molecular properties of the outer capsid proteins, VP4 (a protein whose cleavage is required for infectivity, possibly ...

  20. The CREB Coactivator CRTC2 Is a Lymphoma Tumor Suppressor that Preserves Genome Integrity through Transcription of DNA Mismatch Repair Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Minggang; Pak, Magnolia L; Chamberlain, Lynn; Xing, Wei; Yu, Hongbo; Green, Michael R

    2015-06-09

    The CREB-regulated transcription coactivator CRTC2 stimulates CREB target gene expression and has a well-established role in modulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Here, we find, unexpectedly, that loss of CRTC2, as well as CREB1 and its coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP), results in a deficiency in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) and a resultant increased mutation frequency. We show that CRTC2, CREB1, and CBP are transcriptional activators of well-established MMR genes, including EXO1, MSH6, PMS1, and POLD2. Mining of expression profiling databases and analysis of patient samples reveal that CRTC2 and its target MMR genes are downregulated in specific T cell lymphoma subtypes, which are microsatellite unstable. The levels of acetylated histone H3 on the CRTC2 promoter are significantly reduced in lymphoma in comparison to normal tissue, explaining the decreased CRTC2 expression. Our results establish a role for CRTC2 as a lymphoma tumor suppressor gene that preserves genome integrity by stimulating transcription of MMR genes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Physical mapping of chromosome 17p13.3 in the region of a putative tumor suppressor gene important in medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, J.D.; Daneshvar, L.; Willert, J.R. [Univ. of California, San Franciso, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Deletion mapping of a medulloblastoma tumor panel revealed loss of distal chromosome 17p13.3 sequences in tumors from 14 of 32 patients (44%). Of the 14 tumors showing loss of heterozygosity by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, 14 of 14 (100%) displayed loss of the telomeric marker p144-D6 (D17S34), while a probe for the ABR gene on 17p13.3 was lost in 7 of 8 (88%) informative cases. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we localized the polymorphic marker (VNTR-A) of the ABR gene locus to within 220 kb of the p144-D6 locus. A cosmid contig constructed in this region was used to demonstrate by fluorescence in situ hybridization that the ABR gene is oriented transcriptionally 5{prime} to 3{prime} toward the telomere. This report provides new physical mapping data for the ABR gene, which has not been previously shown to be deleted in medulloblastoma. These results provide further evidence for the existence of a second tumor suppressor gene distinct from p53 on distal chromosome 17p. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Tumoral tissue specific promoter hypermethylation of distinct tumor suppressor genes in a case with non--small cell lung carcinoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslan Sulhattin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Non-small cell lung carcinoma is an aggressive phenomenon and the epigenetical alterations of some tumor supressor genes have been reported for the different tumor types. Case Presentation: It is presented a case report concerning a 43 years old male with NSCLC on the lower segment of the right lung. The patient underwent a diag-nostic excisional thin-needle biopsy and after the histological confirmation. We examined the promoter methylation status of some distinct tumor supressor genes in tumoral and blood tissues of the case after sodium bisulfite conversion and DNA amplification with methylation specific multiplex PCR technique. Both tissues were also searched for G to A transitions in codons 12 and 13 of the K-ras proto-oncogene. Results: Tumor specimen showed fully methyl pattern profiles for the SFRP2, p16, DAPK1 and partially hyper-methylated profile for the p53 and MGMT genes in this case with non-small lung carci-noma. Blood speicemen showed normal hypomethylated profiles for all studied TS genes. The K-ras proto-oncogene was in normal structure both in blood and tumoral spiecemens that examined. Conclusion: Results indicate that genes exhibit tumor suppressor activi-ties in blood, but exhibit epigenetic inactivation in carcinoma cell. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that epigenetic mechanisms may play an important role in the non-small cell lung carcinogenesis in human.

  3. The milk protein α-casein functions as a tumor suppressor via activation of STAT1 signaling, effectively preventing breast cancer tumor growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonuccelli, Gloria; Castello-Cros, Remedios; Capozza, Franco; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lin, Zhao; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Xuanmao, Jiao; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Howell, Anthony; Lisanti, Michael P; Sotgia, Federica

    2012-11-01

    Here, we identified the milk protein α-casein as a novel suppressor of tumor growth and metastasis. Briefly, Met-1 mammary tumor cells expressing α-casein showed a ~5-fold reduction in tumor growth and a near 10-fold decrease in experimental metastasis. To identify the molecular mechanism(s), we performed genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Interestingly, our results show that α-casein upregulates gene transcripts associated with interferon/STAT1 signaling and downregulates genes associated with "stemness." These findings were validated by immunoblot and FACS analysis, which showed the upregulation and hyperactivation of STAT1 and a decrease in the number of CD44(+) "cancer stem cells." These gene signatures were also able to predict clinical outcome in human breast cancer patients. Thus, we conclude that a lactation-based therapeutic strategy using recombinant α-casein would provide a more natural and non-toxic approach to the development of novel anticancer therapies.

  4. Inhibition of human antigen-induced lymphoblastoid B-cell function by an in vivo-induced suppressor T cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieva, J A; Stevens, R H

    1983-04-01

    Lymphoblastoid (LB) B cells which spontaneously produce antitetanus toxoid IgG antibodies (Tet-IgG) in short-term cultures (3 days) appear in the circulation 5-7 days after immunization with tetanus toxoid. Addition of pokeweed mitogen (PWM), normally a stimulator of antibody production, caused instead a reduction in the in vitro synthesis of Tet-IgG by the LB cells. In order for this inhibition of antibody production to occur, T cells had to be present, and the inhibition was proportional to the number of T cells added to the culture, demonstrating the existence of PWM-inducible suppressor cells. The cells mediating the suppression had the OKT8 phenotype and also exhibited the following characteristics: (1) a PWM pretreatment period as little as 14 hr was enough to complete activation; (2) conventional inhibitors of suppressor T cells as hydrocortisone and cyclosporin A only partially reversed its effect; and (3) DNA synthesis was not required. The T-suppressor activity was detectable in the circulation before immunization, increased two- to fourfold by 5-12 days after boosting, and waned after 3 weeks. The mechanism of action of this suppression does not appear to involve conventional cytotoxic T cells as (1) the suppression was mediated across allogeneic barriers and (2) the suppression could not be reversed by inclusion of anti-Leu-2a antibodies in the culture. These results suggest that this suppressor T-cell subset may be important in the normal regulation of activated stages of human B lymphocytes.

  5. The essential Escherichia coli msgB gene, a multicopy suppressor of a temperature-sensitive allele of the heat shock gene grpE, is identical to dapE.

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, B; Georgopoulos, C; Ang, D

    1992-01-01

    The grpE gene product is one of three Escherichia coli heat shock proteins (DnaK, DnaJ, and GrpE) that are essential for both bacteriophage lambda DNA replication and bacterial growth at all temperatures. In an effort to determine the role of GrpE and to identify other factors that it may interact with, we isolated multicopy suppressors of the grpE280 point mutation, as judged by their ability to reverse the temperature-sensitive phenotype of grpE280. Here we report the characterization of on...

  6. Dissecting functions of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor and the related pocket proteins by integrating genetic, cell biology, and electrophoretic techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus; Lukas, J; Holm, K

    1999-01-01

    The members of the 'pocket protein' family, comprising the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (pRB) and its relatives, p107 and p130, negatively regulate cell proliferation and modulate fundamental biological processes including embryonic development, differentiation, homeostatic tissue renewal......, and defense against cancer. The large, multidomain pocket proteins act by binding a plethora of cell fate-determining and growth-stimulatory proteins, the most prominent of which are the E2F/DP transcription factors. These protein-protein interactions are in turn regulated by carefully orchestrated...

  7. MTHFR variants reduce the risk of G:C->A:T transition mutations within the p53 tumor suppressor gene in colon tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, C M; Curtin, K; Samowitz, W; Bigler, J; Potter, J D; Caan, B; Slattery, M L

    2005-10-01

    5,10-Methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme in folate-mediated 1-carbon metabolism. Reduced MTHFR activity has been associated with genomic DNA hypomethylation. Methylated cytosines at CpG sites are easily mutated and have been implicated in G:C-->A:T transitions in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. We investigated 2 polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene (C677T and A1298C) and their associations with colon tumor characteristics, including acquired mutations in Ki-ras and p53 genes and microsatellite instability (MSI). The study population comprised 1248 colon cancer cases and 1972 controls, who participated in a population-based case-control study and had been analyzed previously for MSI, acquired mutations in Ki-ras, p53, and germline MTHFR polymorphisms. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratios are presented. Overall, MTHFR genotypes were not associated with MSI status or the presence of any p53 or Ki-ras mutation. Individuals with homozygous variant MTHFR genotypes had a significantly reduced risk of G:C-->A:T transition mutations within the p53 gene, yet, as hypothesized, only at CpG-associated sites [677TT vs. 677CC (referent group) OR = 0.4 (95% CI: 0.1-0.8) for CpG-associated sites; OR = 1.5 (0.7-3.6) for non-CpG associated sites]. Genotypes conferring reduced MTHFR activity were associated with a decreased risk of acquired G:C-->A:T mutations within the p53 gene occurring at CpG sites. Consistent with evidence on the phenotypic effect of the MTHFR C677T variant, we hypothesize that this relation may be explained by modestly reduced genomic DNA methylation, resulting in a lower probability of spontaneous deamination of methylated cytosine to thymidine. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which MTHFR polymorphisms can affect the risk of colon cancer.

  8. The helper and suppressor functions of primate T cells elicited by a 185K streptococcal antigen, as compared with the helper function elicited by a 4K streptococcal antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, T; Mehlert, A; Avery, J; Jones, T; Caldwell, J

    1985-08-01

    Helper and suppressor functions of human T lymphocytes that act on antibody-forming B cells were elicited by a large 185K streptococcal cell wall antigen. However, a small 4K streptococcal peptide elicited helper but no suppressor function. These differences in the functional activities of the large and small m.w. streptococcal antigens (SA) were confirmed by direct immunisation of rhesus monkeys with the 185K-SA and 4K-SA. Sequential studies have shown that whereas the 185K-SA elicits dose-dependent helper and suppressor activities, the 4K-SA elicits only helper function. Cell-depletion studies with human cells suggest that removal of T8+ cells by killing with OK.T8 and complement leads to a loss of suppressor and a broadening in the concentration of 185K-SA, which elicits helper activity. Because the 4K-SA does not elicit suppression, removal of T8+ cells does not affect this function. However, similar depletion of T4+ cells results in loss of the helper activities, both with the 185K-SA and 4K-SA, and again a broadening in the concentration of the 185K-SA, which elicits suppression. Direct comparison by autoradiography between 125I-labeled 185K-SA and 4K-SA suggests that both antigens can bind directly to monocytes or T8+ VV+ cells. Furthermore, both antigens can induce helper function if T4+ cells are reconstituted with either monocytes or T8+ VV+ cells. Attempts will now be made to sequence the amino acid determinants of the 185K-SA, so as to define the epitopes responsible for the two major regulating functions elicited by this antigen.

  9. A 5'-regulatory region and two coding region polymorphisms modulate promoter activity and gene expression of the growth suppressor gene ZBED6 in cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Zhen Huang

    Full Text Available Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6 is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. Polymorphisms in its promoter and coding regions are likely to impact ZBED6 transcription and growth traits. In this study, rapid amplification of 5' cDNA ends (5'-RACE analysis revealed two transcription start sites (TSS for the bovine ZBED6 starting within exon 1 of the ZC3H11A gene (TSS-1 and upstream of the translation start codon of the ZBED6 gene (TSS-2. There was one SNP in the promoter and two missense mutations in the coding region of the bovine ZBED6 by sequencing of the pooled DNA samples (Pool-Seq, n = 100. The promoter and coding region are the key regions for gene function; polymorphisms in these regions can alter gene expression. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR analysis showed that ZBED6 has a broad tissue distribution in cattle and is highly expressed in skeletal muscle. Eleven promoter-detection vectors were constructed, which enabled the cloning of putative promoter sequences and analysis of ZBED6 transcriptional activity by luciferase reporter gene assays. The core region of the basal promoter of bovine ZBED6 is located within region -866 to -556. The activity of WT-826G-pGL3 in driving reporter gene transcription is significantly higher than that of the M-826A-pGL3 construct (P < 0.01. Analysis of gene expression patterns in homozygous full-sibling Chinese Qinchuan cattle showed that the mutant-type Hap-AGG exhibited a lower mRNA level than the wild-type Hap-GCA (P < 0.05 in longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM. Moreover, ZBED6 mRNA expression was low in C2C12 cells overexpressing the mutant-type ZBED6 (pcDNA3.1(+-Hap-GG (P < 0.01. Our results suggest that the polymorphisms in the promoter and coding regions may modulate the promoter activity and gene expression of bovine ZBED6 in the skeletal muscles of these cattle breeds.

  10. The in vitro and in vivo effects of re-expressing methylated von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene in clear cell renal carcinoma with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleman, Wade G; Tabios, Ray L; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V R; Aprelikova, Olga N; Torres-Cabala, Carlos; Mendoza, Arnulfo; Rogers, Craig; Rodgers, Craig; Sopko, Nikolai A; Linehan, W Marston; Vasselli, James R

    2004-10-15

    Clear cell renal carcinoma (ccRCC) is strongly associated with loss of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene. The VHL gene is functionally lost through hypermethylation in up to 19% of sporadic ccRCC cases. We theorized that re-expressing VHL silenced by methylation in ccRCC cells, using a hypo-methylating agent, may be an approach to treatment in patients with this type of cancer. We test the ability of two hypo-methylating agents to re-express VHL in cell culture and in mice bearing human ccRCC and evaluate the effects of re-expressed VHL in these models. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR was used to evaluate the ability of zebularine and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dCyd) to re-express VHL in four ccRCC cell lines with documented VHL gene silencing through hypermethylation. We evaluated if the VHL re-expressed after hypo-methylating agent treatment could recreate similar phenotypic changes in ccRCC cells observed when the VHL gene is re-expressed via transfection in cell culture and in a xenograft mouse model. Finally we evaluate global gene expression changes occurring in our cells, using microarray analysis. 5-Aza-dCyd was able to re-express VHL in our cell lines both in culture and in xenografted murine tumors. Well described phenotypic changes of VHL expression including decreased invasiveness into Matrigel, and decreased vascular endothelial growth factor and glucose transporter-1 expression were observed in the treated lines. VHL methylated ccRCC xenografted tumors were significantly reduced in size in mice treated with 5-aza-dCyd. Mice bearing nonmethylated but VHL-mutated tumors showed no tumor shrinkage with 5-aza-dCyd treatment. Hypo-methylating agents may be useful in the treatment of patients having ccRCC tumors consisting of cells with methylated VHL.

  11. The role of UV induced lesions in skin carcinogenesis: an overview of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene modifications in xeroderma pigmentosum skin tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daya-Grosjean, Leela; Sarasin, Alain

    2005-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a rare hereditary syndrome, is characterized by a hypersensitivity to solar irradiation due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair resulting in a predisposition to squamous and basal cell carcinomas as well as malignant melanomas appearing at a very early age. The mutator phenotype of XP cells is evident by the higher levels of UV specific modifications found in key regulatory genes in XP skin tumors compared to those in the same tumor types from the normal population. Thus, XP provides a unique model for the study of unrepaired DNA lesions, mutations and skin carcinogenesis. The high level of ras oncogene activation, Ink4a-Arf and p53 tumor suppressor gene modifications as well as alterations of the different partners of the mitogenic sonic hedgehog signaling pathway (patched, smoothened and sonic hedgehog), characterized in XP skin tumors have clearly demonstrated the major role of the UV component of sunlight in the development of skin tumors. The majority of the mutations are C to T or tandem CC to TT UV signature transitions, occurring at bipyrimidine sequences, the specific targets of UV induced lesions. These characteristics are also found in the same genes modified in sporadic skin cancers but with lower frequencies confirming the validity of studying the XP model. The knowledge gained by studying XP tumors has given us a greater perception of the contribution of genetic predisposition to cancer as well as the consequences of the many alterations which modulate the activities of different genes affecting crucial pathways vital for maintaining cell homeostasis.

  12. p16 Tumor Suppressor Gene Methylation in Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma: A Study of 88 Cases at Two Hospitals in the East Coast of Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Ridah, Lailatul Jalilah; A Talib, Norlelawati; Muhammad, Naznin; Hussain, Faezahtul Arbaeyah; Zainuddin, Norafiza

    2017-10-26

    Introduction: p16 gene plays an important role in the normal cell cycle regulation. Methylation of p16 has been reported to be one of the epigenetic events contributing to the pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) which occurring at varying frequency. DLBCL is an aggressive and high-grade malignancy which accounts for approximately 30% of all non-Hodgkin lymphoma cases. However, little is known regarding the epigenetic alterations of p16 gene in DLBCL cases in Malaysia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the status of p16 methylation in DLBCL. Methods: A total of 88 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded DLBCL tissues retrieved from two hospitals located in the east coast of Malaysia, namely Hospital Tengku Ampuan Afzan (HTAA) Pahang and Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM) Kelantan, were chosen for this study. DNA specimens were isolated and subsequently subjected to bisulfite treatment prior to methylation specific-PCR. Two pairs of primers were used to amplify methylated and unmethylated regions of p16 gene. The PCR products were then separated using agarose gel electrophoresis and visualised under UV illumination. SPSS version 12.0 was utilised to perform all statistical analysis. Result: p16 methylation was detected in 65 of 88 (74%) samples. There was a significant association between p16 methylation status and patients aged >50 years old (p=0.04). Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that methylation of p16 tumor suppressor gene in our DLBCL cases is common and significantly increased among patients aged 50 years and above. Aging is known to be an important risk factor in the development of cancers and we speculate that this might be due to the increased transformation of malignant cells in aging cell population. However, this has yet to be confirmed with further research and correlate the findings with clinicopathological parameters. Creative Commons Attribution License

  13. The role of UV induced lesions in skin carcinogenesis: an overview of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene modifications in xeroderma pigmentosum skin tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daya-Grosjean, Leela; Sarasin, Alain

    2005-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a rare hereditary syndrome, is characterized by a hypersensitivity to solar irradiation due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair resulting in a predisposition to squamous and basal cell carcinomas as well as malignant melanomas appearing at a very early age. The mutator phenotype of XP cells is evident by the higher levels of UV specific modifications found in key regulatory genes in XP skin tumors compared to those in the same tumor types from the normal population. Thus, XP provides a unique model for the study of unrepaired DNA lesions, mutations and skin carcinogenesis. The high level of ras oncogene activation, Ink4a-Arf and p53 tumor suppressor gene modifications as well as alterations of the different partners of the mitogenic sonic hedgehog signaling pathway (patched, smoothened and sonic hedgehog), characterized in XP skin tumors have clearly demonstrated the major role of the UV component of sunlight in the development of skin tumors. The majority of the mutations are C to T or tandem CC to TT UV signature transitions, occurring at bipyrimidine sequences, the specific targets of UV induced lesions. These characteristics are also found in the same genes modified in sporadic skin cancers but with lower frequencies confirming the validity of studying the XP model. The knowledge gained by studying XP tumors has given us a greater perception of the contribution of genetic predisposition to cancer as well as the consequences of the many alterations which modulate the activities of different genes affecting crucial pathways vital for maintaining cell homeostasis

  14. The role of UV induced lesions in skin carcinogenesis: an overview of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene modifications in xeroderma pigmentosum skin tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daya-Grosjean, Leela [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Cancer, UPR2169 CNRS, IFR 54, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)]. E-mail: daya@igr.fr; Sarasin, Alain [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Cancer, UPR2169 CNRS, IFR 54, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)

    2005-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a rare hereditary syndrome, is characterized by a hypersensitivity to solar irradiation due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair resulting in a predisposition to squamous and basal cell carcinomas as well as malignant melanomas appearing at a very early age. The mutator phenotype of XP cells is evident by the higher levels of UV specific modifications found in key regulatory genes in XP skin tumors compared to those in the same tumor types from the normal population. Thus, XP provides a unique model for the study of unrepaired DNA lesions, mutations and skin carcinogenesis. The high level of ras oncogene activation, Ink4a-Arf and p53 tumor suppressor gene modifications as well as alterations of the different partners of the mitogenic sonic hedgehog signaling pathway (patched, smoothened and sonic hedgehog), characterized in XP skin tumors have clearly demonstrated the major role of the UV component of sunlight in the development of skin tumors. The majority of the mutations are C to T or tandem CC to TT UV signature transitions, occurring at bipyrimidine sequences, the specific targets of UV induced lesions. These characteristics are also found in the same genes modified in sporadic skin cancers but with lower frequencies confirming the validity of studying the XP model. The knowledge gained by studying XP tumors has given us a greater perception of the contribution of genetic predisposition to cancer as well as the consequences of the many alterations which modulate the activities of different genes affecting crucial pathways vital for maintaining cell homeostasis.

  15. The PR-Set7 binding domain of Riz1 is required for the H4K20me1-H3K9me1 trans-tail ‘histone code’ and Riz1 tumor suppressor function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, Lauren M.; Sims, Jennifer K.; Tuzon, Creighton T.; Rice, Judd C.

    2014-01-01

    PR-Set7/Set8/KMT5a is the sole histone H4 lysine 20 monomethyltransferase (H4K20me1) in metazoans and is essential for proper cell division and genomic stability. We unexpectedly discovered that normal cellular levels of monomethylated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me1) were also dependent on PR-Set7, but independent of its catalytic activity. This observation suggested that PR-Set7 interacts with an H3K9 monomethyltransferase to establish the previously reported H4K20me1-H3K9me1 trans-tail ‘histone code’. Here we show that PR-Set7 specifically and directly binds the C-terminus of the Riz1/PRDM2/KMT8 tumor suppressor and demonstrate that the N-terminal PR/SET domain of Riz1 preferentially monomethylates H3K9. The PR-Set7 binding domain was required for Riz1 nuclear localization and maintenance of the H4K20me1-H3K9me1 trans-tail ‘histone code’. Although Riz1 can function as a repressor, Riz1/H3K9me1 was dispensable for the repression of genes regulated by PR-Set7/H4K20me1. Frameshift mutations resulting in a truncated Riz1 incapable of binding PR-Set7 occur frequently in various aggressive cancers. In these cancer cells, expression of wild-type Riz1 restored tumor suppression by decreasing proliferation and increasing apoptosis. These phenotypes were not observed in cells expressing either the Riz1 PR/SET domain or PR-Set7 binding domain indicating that Riz1 methyltransferase activity and PR-Set7 binding domain are both essential for Riz1 tumor suppressor function. PMID:24423864

  16. Aberrant Promoter Methylation of the Tumour Suppressor RASSF10 and Its Growth Inhibitory Function in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje M. Richter

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, with 1.7 million new cases each year. As early diagnosis and prognosis are crucial factors in cancer treatment, we investigated potential DNA methylation biomarkers of the tumour suppressor family Ras-association domain family (RASSF. Promoter hypermethylation of tumour suppressors leads to their inactivation and thereby promotes cancer development and progression. In this study we analysed the tumour suppressors RASSF1A and RASSF10. Our study shows that RASSF10 is expressed in normal breast but inactivated by methylation in breast cancer. We observed a significant inactivating promoter methylation of RASSF10 in primary breast tumours. RASSF10 is inactivated in 63% of primary breast cancer samples but only 4% of normal control breast tissue is methylated (p < 0.005. RASSF1A also shows high promoter methylation levels in breast cancer of 56% vs. 8% of normal tissue (p < 0.005. Interestingly more than 80% of breast cancer samples harboured a hypermethylation of RASSF10 and/or RASSF1A promoter. Matching samples exhibited a strong tumour specific promoter methylation of RASSF10 in comparison to the normal control breast tissue. Demethylation treatment of breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and T47D reversed RASSF10 promoter hypermethylation and re-established RASSF10 expression. In addition, we could show the growth inhibitory potential of RASSF10 in breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and T47D upon exogenous expression of RASSF10 by colony formation. We could further show, that RASSF10 induced apoptotic changes in MCF7 and T47D cells, which was verified by a significant increase in the apoptotic sub G1 fraction by 50% using flow cytometry for MCF7 cells. In summary, our study shows the breast tumour specific inactivation of RASSF10 and RASSF1A due to DNA methylation of their CpG island promoters. Furthermore RASSF10 was characterised by the ability to block growth of breast cancer cell lines by apoptosis

  17. Presymptomatic breast cancer in Egypt: role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumor suppressor genes mutations detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashishe Mervat M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is one of the most common diseases affecting women. Inherited susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are considered in breast, ovarian and other common cancers etiology. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have been identified that confer a high degree of breast cancer risk. Objective Our study was performed to identify germline mutations in some exons of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for the early detection of presymptomatic breast cancer in females. Methods This study was applied on Egyptian healthy females who first degree relatives to those, with or without a family history, infected with breast cancer. Sixty breast cancer patients, derived from 60 families, were selected for molecular genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The study also included 120 healthy first degree female relatives of the patients, either sisters and/or daughters, for early detection of presymptomatic breast cancer mutation carriers. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes of all the studied subjects. Universal primers were used to amplify four regions of the BRCA1 gene (exons 2,8,13 and 22 and one region (exon 9 of BRCA2 gene using specific PCR. The polymerase chain reaction was carried out. Single strand conformation polymorphism assay and heteroduplex analysis were used to screen for mutations in the studied exons. In addition, DNA sequencing of the normal and mutated exons were performed. Results Mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were detected in 86.7% of the families. Current study indicates that 60% of these families were attributable to BRCA1 mutations, while 26.7% of them were attributable to BRCA2 mutations. Results showed that four mutations were detected in the BRCA1 gene, while one mutation was detected in the BRCA2 gene. Asymptomatic relatives, 80(67% out of total 120, were mutation carriers. Conclusions BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes mutations are responsible for a significant proportion of breast cancer. BRCA mutations

  18. Rapid In Vivo Validation of Tumor Suppressor Gene Function in Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    identification of the best sgRNA sequences and accelerated our ability to move to the in vivo studies proposed in Aim2. Our goal was to use CRISPR / Cas ...and to initiate prostate cancer in the mouse after injection of lentiviral particles expressing CRISPR / Cas components and Cre recombinase. Our initial...in vivo Our goal was to use CRISPR / Cas lentiviral transduction of the adult prostate to inactivate p53 or Rb. We aimed to recapitulate the effects of

  19. A Genetic Screen for Genes Involved in BRCA 1 Tumor Suppressor Function

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Verma, Inder; Zhu, Quan

    2007-01-01

    Based on our initial screening, we have identified a number of candidates that are involved in DNA damage repair pathway mediated by BRCA1, which is an important aspect of tumor suppression of the molecular...

  20. Tissue distribution and functional aspects of the NF2 tumour suppressor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. den Bakker (Michael)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractNeoplastic disease in humans may occur sporadically, that is without a clear familial disposition, or less commonly as an inherited disease. Several distinct familial cancer syndromes are known and the underlying genetic cause has been identified of a number of these 46. The tumours in

  1. FoxP3 Functions as a Novel Breast Cancer Suppressor Gene Through Cooperation with NFAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    age- matched WT and condition KO (cKO) mice were measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (p value by an independent-samples t test). The images...mag- netic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor the prostate size in the live mice. As shown in Figure 5A, 12–15-week-old mice with prostate-specific...Materials Sciences, School of Dentistry , University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA *Correspondence: yangl@umich.edu (Y.L.), panz@umich.edu (P.Z

  2. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of active suppressor cells against IFN-gamma production in PHA-stimulated cord blood lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, H.; Taga, K.; Matsuda, A.; Uwadana, N.; Hasui, M.; Miyawaki, T.; Taniguchi, N.

    1986-11-15

    Cord blood mononuclear cells (MNC) were defective in their ability to produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) on stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or recombinant interleukin 2, whereas cord MNC could induce comparable amounts of IFN-gamma with adult controls on stimulation with a streptococcal preparation, OK-432. Moreover, irradiation of cord MNC with 1500 rad before PHA stimulation could restore the IFN-gamma production. Kinetic studies indicated that such augmentation of IFN-gamma production by irradiation was evident when cord MNC were irradiated before or by 12 hr of PHA-stimulated culture. But irradiation after 18 hr or more of PHA stimulation did not exert any significant augmentation on IFN-gamma production by cord MNC. It seemed most likely that the ability of IFN-gamma production is already mature at birth, but radiosensitive suppressor effectors on IFN-gamma production are activated within cord MNC at an early stage of PHA stimulation, resulting in poor IFN-gamma production by cord MNC. PHA-induced IFN-gamma production by OKT3+, OKT4+, and OKT8- cord cells were markedly enhanced by irradiation with 1,500 rad before the culture. Coculture experiments disclosed that cord OKT4+ cells, but not OKT4- cells, when prestimulated with PHA for 24 hr, exerted active suppression on PHA-induced IFN-gamma production by adult MNC in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggested that radiosensitive suppressor effectors on IFN-gamma production were induced within the OKT4+ T cell subset of cord MNC on PHA stimulation.

  3. Physical mapping of a commonly deleted region, the site of a candidate tumor suppressor gene, at 12q22 in human male germ cell tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murty, V.V.V.S.; Bosl, G.J.; Chaganti, R.S.K. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    A candidate tumor suppressor gene (TSG) site at 12q22 characterized by a high frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and a homozygous deletion has previously (LOH) and a homozygous deletion has previously been reported in human male germ cell tumors (GCTs). In a detailed deletion mapping analysis of 67 normal-tumor DNAs utilizing 20 polymorphic markers mapped to 12q22-q24, we identified the limits of the minimal region of deletion at 12q22 between D12S377 (priximal) and D12S296 (distal). We have constructed a YAC contig map of a 3-cM region of this band between the proximal marker D12S101 and the distal marker D12S346, which contained the minimal region of deletion in GCTs. The map is composed of 53 overlapping YACs and 3 cosmids onto which 25 polymorphic and nonpolymorphic sequence-tagged sites (STSs) were placed in a unique order. The size of the minimal region of deletion was approximately 2 Mb from overlapping, nonchimeric YACs that spanned the region. We also developed a radiation hybrid (RH) map of the region between D12S101 and D12S346 containing 17 loci. The consensus order developed by RH mapping is in good agreement with the YAC STS-content map order. The RH map estimated the distance between D12S101 and D12S346 to be 246 cR{sub 8000} and the minimal region of deletion to be 141 cR{sub 8000}. In addition, four genes that were previously mapped to 12q22 have been excluded as candidate genes. The leads gained from the deletion mapping and physical maps should expedite the isolation and characterization of the TSG at 12q22. 35 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Genes2FANs: connecting genes through functional association networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein-protein, cell signaling, metabolic, and transcriptional interaction networks are useful for identifying connections between lists of experimentally identified genes/proteins. However, besides physical or co-expression interactions there are many ways in which pairs of genes, or their protein products, can be associated. By systematically incorporating knowledge on shared properties of genes from diverse sources to build functional association networks (FANs), researchers may be able to identify additional functional interactions between groups of genes that are not readily apparent. Results Genes2FANs is a web based tool and a database that utilizes 14 carefully constructed FANs and a large-scale protein-protein interaction (PPI) network to build subnetworks that connect lists of human and mouse genes. The FANs are created from mammalian gene set libraries where mouse genes are converted to their human orthologs. The tool takes as input a list of human or mouse Entrez gene symbols to produce a subnetwork and a ranked list of intermediate genes that are used to connect the query input list. In addition, users can enter any PubMed search term and then the system automatically converts the returned results to gene lists using GeneRIF. This gene list is then used as input to generate a subnetwork from the user’s PubMed query. As a case study, we applied Genes2FANs to connect disease genes from 90 well-studied disorders. We find an inverse correlation between the counts of links connecting disease genes through PPI and links connecting diseases genes through FANs, separating diseases into two categories. Conclusions Genes2FANs is a useful tool for interpreting the relationships between gene/protein lists in the context of their various functions and networks. Combining functional association interactions with physical PPIs can be useful for revealing new biology and help form hypotheses for further experimentation. Our finding that disease genes in

  5. Sulforaphane Reverses the Expression of Various Tumor Suppressor Genes by Targeting DNMT3B and HDAC1 in Human Cervical Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munawwar Ali Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulforaphane (SFN may hinder carcinogenesis by altering epigenetic events in the cells; however, its molecular mechanisms are unclear. The present study investigates the role of SFN in modifying epigenetic events in human cervical cancer cells, HeLa. HeLa cells were treated with SFN (2.5 µM for a period of 0, 24, 48, and 72 hours for all experiments. After treatment, expressions of DNMT3B, HDAC1, RARβ, CDH1, DAPK1, and GSTP1 were studied using RT-PCR while promoter DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs was studied using MS-PCR. Inhibition assays of DNA methyl transferases (DNMTs and histone deacetylases (HDACs were performed at varying time points. Molecular modeling and docking studies were performed to explore the possible interaction of SFN with HDAC1 and DNMT3B. Time-dependent exposure to SFN decreases the expression of DNMT3B and HDAC1 and significantly reduces the enzymatic activity of DNMTs and HDACs. Molecular modeling data suggests that SFN may interact directly with DNMT3B and HDAC1 which may explain the inhibitory action of SFN. Interestingly, time-dependent reactivation of the studied TSGs via reversal of methylation in SFN treated cells correlates well with its impact on the epigenetic alterations accumulated during cancer development. Thus, SFN may have significant implications for epigenetic based therapy.

  6. Immunohistochemical observations on tumor suppressor gene p53 status in mouse fibrosarcoma following in-vivo photodynamic therapy: the role of xanthine oxidase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziolkowski, Piotr P.; Symonowicz, Krzysztof; Milnerowicz, Artur; Osiecka, Beata J.

    1997-12-01

    Tumor suppressor gene p53 expression in a mouse fibrosarcoma following in-vivo photodynamic therapy has been studied using the immunohistochemical method. Photodynamic treatment involved injections of the well known sensitizer -- hematoporphyrin derivative at the doses 1.25 and 2.5 mg/kg of body weight and irradiations at the doses 25 and 50 J/sq cm. Glass slide preparations from PDT-treated tumors were obtained at different time points (15, 60 minutes, 2 and 24 hours) after therapy, subsequently stained for wild type/mutant p53, and assessed for positive reaction. High PDT doses (HpD -- 2.5 mg/kg; light dose -- 50 J/sq cm) correlated with decreased expression of p53 in tumor cells. The other part of the study was directed to measure the xanthine oxidase (XO) activity in the tumor cells. PDT included injections of HpD and light exposure at the same doses as for p53 study. We observed a complete inhibition of the enzyme activity. The slight increase in XO activity was found following treatment with either light or HpD alone.

  7. Effect of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on the growth and radiotherapeutic sensitivity of human lymphoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zeyang; Fan Wo; Li Dongqing; Zhu Ran; Wang Yongqing; Wu Jinchang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the inhibitory effect and radiation sensitization of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on human lymphoma cell lines. Methods: Human lymphoma cell lines Raji and Daudi were treated with rAd-p53, radiation therapy and combined treatment, respectively. The cell growth inhibition was assessed by MTT. The p53 protein expression was detected by Western blotting, and p53 mRNA was detected by BT-PCB. Results: The MTT results showed that the inhibitory effect and radiosensitivity enhancement of rAd-p53 on human lymphoma cell lines were not obvious [Raji: (27.5±4.1)%; Daudi: (28.1±1.6)%]. The results of Western blotting and BT-PCB showed that extrinsic p53 protein and p53 mRNA were expressed to some degree, but not at high-level. In addition, the results didn't demonstrate obvious radiosensitivity enhancement. Conclusions: The role of inhibition and radiosensitivity enhancement of rAd-p53 was not significant on human lymphoma cell lines. (authors)

  8. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell-like fibrocytes are increased and associated with preserved lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, A K A; Newby, C; Hartley, R A; Mistry, V; Gupta, S; Berair, R; Roach, K M; Saunders, R; Thornton, T; Shelley, M; Edwards, K; Barker, B; Brightling, C E

    2017-04-01

    The role of fibrocytes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is unknown. We sought to enumerate blood and tissue fibrocytes in COPD and determine the association of blood fibrocytes with clinical features of disease. Utilizing flow cytometry to identify circulating, collagen type 1 + cells, we found two populations: (i) CD45 + CD34 + (fibrocytes) and (ii) CD45 + CD34 - [myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC)-like fibrocytes] cells in stable COPD (n = 41) and control (n = 29) subjects. Lung resection material from a separate group of subjects with (n = 11) or without (n = 11) COPD was collected for tissue fibrocyte detection. We examined circulating fibrocyte populations for correlations with clinical parameters including quantitative computed tomography (qCT) and determined pathways of association between correlated variables using a path analysis model. Blood and tissue fibrocytes were not increased compared to control subjects nor were blood fibrocytes associated with lung function or qCT, but were increased in eosinophilic COPD. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell-like fibrocytes were increased in COPD compared to controls [2.3 (1.1-4.9), P = 0.038]. Our path analysis model showed that collagen type 1 intensity for MDSC-like fibrocytes was positively associated with lung function through associations with air trapping, predominately in the upper lobes. We have demonstrated that two circulating populations of fibrocyte exist in COPD, with distinct clinical associations, but are not prevalent in proximal or small airway tissue. Blood MDSC-like fibrocytes, however, are increased and associated with preserved lung function through a small airway-dependent mechanism in COPD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Tumor suppressor gene mutation in a patient with a history of hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome and healed generalized osteitis fibrosa cystica: a case report and genetic pathophysiology review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, Joshua; Harris, Malcolm; Wright, John M; Kalamchi, Sabah

    2015-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT) was first observed by Jackson in 1958 in a family who exhibited hyperparathyroidism and recurrent pancreatitis. The author noticed the presence of jaw tumors in the affected family and reported them as fibrous dysplasia. However, it was not until 1990 that a familial variety of hyperparathyroidism with fibro-osseous jaw tumors was recognized as HPT-JT syndrome and reported as a clinically and genetically distinct syndrome. Hyperparathyroidism generally arises from glandular hyperplasia or parathyroid adenomas, with only about 1% of cases resulting from parathyroid carcinoma. However, parathyroid carcinoma develops in about 15% of HPT-JT patients. The true incidence of HPT-JT is unknown, although the prevalence of about 100 published cases suggests its rarity. Twenty percent of HPT-JT cases have renal hamartomas or tumors, and female patients with HPT-JT have been reported to have carcinoma of the uterus. This syndrome appears to arise from a variety of mutations that deactivate the tumor suppressor gene CDC73 (also known as HRPT2) and its production of the tumor suppressor protein parafibromin. Functional parafibromin has 531 amino acids, and mutations result in a short nonfunctional protein. CDC73 disorders exhibit dominant germline gene behavior, with varying degrees of penetration. In most cases an affected person has 1 parent with the condition, which raises the need for family investigation and genetic counseling. We report a case of HPT-JT syndrome in a male patient who presented to the local community hospital 6 years previously with a history of back pain. Investigations showed elevated serum parathyroid hormone and calcium levels, and a technetium 99m sestamibi parathyroid scan showed increased activity at the site of the lower left gland that proved to be a substernal parathyroid carcinoma. The patient's parathyroid hormone level dropped from 126 to 97 pg/mL at 5 minutes and was 65 pg/mL at 10 minutes after excision

  10. Microbial Functional Gene Diversity Predicts Groundwater Contamination and Ecosystem Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhili; Zhang, Ping; Wu, Linwei; Rocha, Andrea M; Tu, Qichao; Shi, Zhou; Wu, Bo; Qin, Yujia; Wang, Jianjun; Yan, Qingyun; Curtis, Daniel; Ning, Daliang; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Wu, Liyou; Yang, Yunfeng; Elias, Dwayne A; Watson, David B; Adams, Michael W W; Fields, Matthew W; Alm, Eric J; Hazen, Terry C; Adams, Paul D; Arkin, Adam P; Zhou, Jizhong

    2018-02-20

    Contamination from anthropogenic activities has significantly impacted Earth's biosphere. However, knowledge about how environmental contamination affects the biodiversity of groundwater microbiomes and ecosystem functioning remains very limited. Here, we used a comprehensive functional gene array to analyze groundwater microbiomes from 69 wells at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (Oak Ridge, TN), representing a wide pH range and uranium, nitrate, and other contaminants. We hypothesized that the functional diversity of groundwater microbiomes would decrease as environmental contamination (e.g., uranium or nitrate) increased or at low or high pH, while some specific populations capable of utilizing or resistant to those contaminants would increase, and thus, such key microbial functional genes and/or populations could be used to predict groundwater contamination and ecosystem functioning. Our results indicated that functional richness/diversity decreased as uranium (but not nitrate) increased in groundwater. In addition, about 5.9% of specific key functional populations targeted by a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip 5) increased significantly ( P contamination and ecosystem functioning. This study indicates great potential for using microbial functional genes to predict environmental contamination and ecosystem functioning. IMPORTANCE Disentangling the relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning is an important but poorly understood topic in ecology. Predicting ecosystem functioning on the basis of biodiversity is even more difficult, particularly with microbial biomarkers. As an exploratory effort, this study used key microbial functional genes as biomarkers to provide predictive understanding of environmental contamination and ecosystem functioning. The results indicated that the overall functional gene richness/diversity decreased as uranium increased in groundwater, while specific key microbial guilds increased significantly as

  11. Suppressor of Overexpression of CO 1 Negatively Regulates Dark-Induced Leaf Degreening and Senescence by Directly Repressing Pheophytinase and Other Senescence-Associated Genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junyi; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Ren, Jun; Qiu, Kai; Li, Zhongpeng; Xie, Zuokun; Gao, Jiong; Zhou, Xin; Kuai, Benke

    2017-03-01

    Although the biochemical pathway of chlorophyll (Chl) degradation has been largely elucidated, how Chl is rapidly yet coordinately degraded during leaf senescence remains elusive. Pheophytinase (PPH) is the enzyme for catalyzing the removal of the phytol group from pheophytin a , and PPH expression is significantly induced during leaf senescence. To elucidate the transcriptional regulation of PPH , we used a yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae ) one-hybrid system to screen for its trans-regulators. SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CO 1 (SOC1), a key flowering pathway integrator, was initially identified as one of the putative trans-regulators of PPH After dark treatment, leaves of an SOC1 knockdown mutant ( soc1-6 ) showed an accelerated yellowing phenotype, whereas those of SOC1 -overexpressing lines exhibited a partial stay-green phenotype. SOC1 and PPH expression showed a negative correlation during leaf senescence. Substantially, SOC1 protein could bind specifically to the CArG box of the PPH promoter in vitro and in vivo, and overexpression of SOC1 significantly inhibited the transcriptional activity of the PPH promoter in Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) protoplasts. Importantly, soc1-6 pph-1 (a PPH knockout mutant) double mutant displayed a stay-green phenotype similar to that of pph-1 during dark treatment. These results demonstrated that SOC1 inhibits Chl degradation via negatively regulating PPH expression. In addition, measurement of the Chl content and the maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II of soc1-6 and SOC1-OE leaves after dark treatment suggested that SOC1 also negatively regulates the general senescence process. Seven SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENES ( SAGs ) were thereafter identified as its potential target genes, and NONYELLOWING1 and SAG113 were experimentally confirmed. Together, we reveal that SOC1 represses dark-induced leaf Chl degradation and senescence in general in Arabidopsis. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All

  12. Frequent loss of heterozygosity and altered expression of the candidate tumor suppressor gene 'FAT' in human astrocytic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chosdol, Kunzang; Misra, Anjan; Puri, Sachin; Srivastava, Tapasya; Chattopadhyay, Parthaprasad; Sarkar, Chitra; Mahapatra, Ashok K; Sinha, Subrata

    2009-01-01

    We had earlier used the comparison of RAPD (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) DNA fingerprinting profiles of tumor and corresponding normal DNA to identify genetic alterations in primary human glial tumors. This has the advantage that DNA fingerprinting identifies the genetic alterations in a manner not biased for locus. In this study we used RAPD-PCR to identify novel genomic alterations in the astrocytic tumors of WHO grade II (Low Grade Diffuse Astrocytoma) and WHO Grade IV (Glioblastoma Multiforme). Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the altered region was studied by microsatellite and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers. Expression study of the gene identified at the altered locus was done by semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR). Bands consistently altered in the RAPD profile of tumor DNA in a significant proportion of tumors were identified. One such 500 bp band, that was absent in the RAPD profile of 33% (4/12) of the grade II astrocytic tumors, was selected for further study. Its sequence corresponded with a region of FAT, a putative tumor suppressor gene initially identified in Drosophila. Fifty percent of a set of 40 tumors, both grade II and IV, were shown to have Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) at this locus by microsatellite (intragenic) and by SNP markers. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed low FAT mRNA levels in a major subset of tumors. These results point to a role of the FAT in astrocytic tumorigenesis and demonstrate the use of RAPD analysis in identifying specific alterations in astrocytic tumors

  13. RPS6KA2, a putative tumour suppressor gene at 6q27 in sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bignone, P A; Lee, K Y; Liu, Y

    2007-01-01

    -activated protein kinase pathway. It is expressed in normal ovarian epithelium, whereas reduced or absent in tumours or cell lines. We show that RPS6KA2 is monoallelically expressed in the ovary suggesting that loss of a single expressed allele is sufficient to cause complete loss of expression in cancer cells....... Further, we have identified two new isoforms of RPS6KA2 with an alternative start codon. Homozygous deletions were identified within the RPS6KA2 gene in two cell lines. Re-expression of RPS6KA2 in ovarian cancer cell lines suppressed colony formation. In UCI101 cells, the expression of RPS6KA2 reduced...

  14. Decreased expression of PBLD correlates with poor prognosis and functions as a tumor suppressor in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aimin; Yan, Qun; Zhao, Xinmei; Zhong, Jietao; Yang, Haiyun; Feng, Zhiqiang; Du, Yanlei; Wang, Yadong; Wang, Zenan; Wang, Hong; Zhou, Yongjian; Liu, Side; Nie, Yuqiang

    2016-01-05

    Recent accumulating genomic and proteomic data suggested that decreased expression of phenazine biosynthesis-like domain-containing protein (PBLD) was frequently involved in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, there is lack of systematical investigation focusing on its expression pattern, clinical relevance, and biological function. Here, we found that PBLD was frequently decreased in HCC tissues relative to adjacent non-tumorigenic liver tissues. This decreased expression was significantly associated with poor tumor differentiation and advanced tumor stage. Kaplan-Meier analysis further showed that recurrence-free survival and overall survival were significantly worse among patients with low PBLD expression. Moreover, multivariate analyses revealed that PBLD was an independent predictor of OS and RFS. This prognostic value of PBLD was further validated in another independent cohort. We also found PBLD inhibited HCC cell growth and invasion in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, forced expression of PBLD influenced multiple downstream genes related to MAPK, NF-κB, EMT, and angiogenesis signaling pathways. PBLD deletion was an independent predictor of poor prognosis in patients with HCC. Elevated PBLD expression may reduce HCC cell growth and invasion via inactivation of several tumorigenesis-related signaling pathways.

  15. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) Represses Transcription of the Tumor Suppressor Rb Gene via Binding Competition with Sp1 and Recruitment of Co-repressors*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Choong-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-01-01

    FBI-1 (also called Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a BTB/POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc-finger transcription factor. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a proto-oncogenic protein, which represses tumor suppressor ARF gene transcription. The expression of FBI-1 is increased in many cancer tissues. We found that FBI-1 potently represses transcription of the Rb gene, a tumor suppressor gene important in cell cycle arrest. FBI-1 binds to four GC-rich promoter elements (FREs) located at bp –308 to –188 of the Rb promoter region. The Rb promoter also contains two Sp1 binding sites: GC-box 1 (bp –65 to –56) and GC-box 2 (bp –18 to –9), the latter of which is also bound by FBI-1. We found that FRE3 (bp –244 to –236) is also a Sp1 binding element. FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene not only by binding to the FREs, but also by competing with Sp1 at the GC-box 2 and the FRE3. By binding to the FREs and/or the GC-box, FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene through its POZ-domain, which recruits a co-repressor-histone deacetylase complex and deacetylates histones H3 and H4 at the Rb gene promoter. FBI-1 inhibits C2C12 myoblast cell differentiation by repressing Rb gene expression. PMID:18801742

  16. Genetic modelling of PIM proteins in cancer: proviral tagging, cooperation with oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and carcinogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enara eAguirre

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The PIM proteins, which were initially discovered as proviral insertion sites in Moloney murine leukemia virus infection, are a family of highly homologous serine/threonine kinases that have been reported to be overexpressed in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. The PIM proteins have also been associated with metastasis and overall treatment responses and implicated in the regulation of apoptosis, metabolism, the cell cycle, and homing and migration, which makes these proteins interesting targets for anticancer drug discovery. The use of retroviral insertional mutagenesis and refined approaches such as complementation tagging has allowed the identification of myc, pim and a third group of genes (including bmi1 and gfi1 as complementing genes in lymphomagenesis. Moreover, mouse modeling of human cancer has provided an understanding of the molecular pathways that are involved in tumor initiation and progression at the physiological level. In particular, genetically modified mice have allowed researchers to further elucidate the role of each of the Pim isoforms in various tumor types. PIM kinases have been identified as weak oncogenes because experimental overexpression in lymphoid tissue, prostate and liver induces tumors at a relatively low incidence and with a long latency. However, very strong synergistic tumorigenicity between Pim1/2 and c-Myc and other oncogenes has been observed in lymphoid tissues. Mouse models have also been used to study whether the inhibition of specific PIM isoforms is required to prevent carcinogen-induced sarcomas, indicating that the absence of Pim2 and Pim3 greatly reduces sarcoma growth and bone invasion; the extent of this effect is similar to that observed in the absence of all 3 isoforms. This review will summarize some of the animal models that have been used to understand the isoform-specific contribution of PIM kinases to tumorigenesis.

  17. Central auditory function of deafness genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willaredt, Marc A; Ebbers, Lena; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2014-06-01

    The highly variable benefit of hearing devices is a serious challenge in auditory rehabilitation. Various factors contribute to this phenomenon such as the diversity in ear defects, the different extent of auditory nerve hypoplasia, the age of intervention, and cognitive abilities. Recent analyses indicate that, in addition, central auditory functions of deafness genes have to be considered in this context. Since reduced neuronal activity acts as the common denominator in deafness, it is widely assumed that peripheral deafness influences development and function of the central auditory system in a stereotypical manner. However, functional characterization of transgenic mice with mutated deafness genes demonstrated gene-specific abnormalities in the central auditory system as well. A frequent function of deafness genes in the central auditory system is supported by a genome-wide expression study that revealed significant enrichment of these genes in the transcriptome of the auditory brainstem compared to the entire brain. Here, we will summarize current knowledge of the diverse central auditory functions of deafness genes. We furthermore propose the intimately interwoven gene regulatory networks governing development of the otic placode and the hindbrain as a mechanistic explanation for the widespread expression of these genes beyond the cochlea. We conclude that better knowledge of central auditory dysfunction caused by genetic alterations in deafness genes is required. In combination with improved genetic diagnostics becoming currently available through novel sequencing technologies, this information will likely contribute to better outcome prediction of hearing devices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic variability and evolutionary implications of RNA silencing suppressor genes in RNA1 of sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus isolates infecting sweetpotato and related wild species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur K Tugume

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The bipartite single-stranded RNA genome of Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV, genus Crinivirus; Closteroviridae encodes a Class 1 RNase III (RNase3, a putative hydrophobic protein (p7 and a 22-kDa protein (p22 from genes located in RNA1. RNase3 and p22 suppress RNA silencing, the basal antiviral defence mechanism in plants. RNase3 is sufficient to render sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas virus-susceptible and predisposes it to development of severe diseases following infection with unrelated virus. The incidence, strains and gene content of SPCSV infecting wild plant species have not been studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty SPCSV isolates were characterized from 10 wild Ipomoea species, Hewittia sublobata or Lepistemon owariensis (family Convolvulaceae in Uganda and compared with 34 local SPCSV isolates infecting sweetpotatoes. All isolates belonged to the East African (EA strain of SPCSV and contained RNase3 and p7, but p22 was not detected in six isolates. The three genes showed only limited genetic variability and the proteins were under purifying selection. SPCSV isolates lacking p22 synergized with Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV, genus potyvirus; Potyviridae and caused severe symptoms in co-infected sweetpotato plants. One SPCSV isolate enhanced accumulation of SPFMV, but no severe symptoms developed. A new whitefly-transmitted virus (KML33b encoding an RNase3 homolog (<56% identity to SPCSV RNase3 able to suppresses sense-mediated RNA silencing was detected in I. sinensis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SPCSV isolates infecting wild species and sweetpotato in Uganda were genetically undifferentiated, suggesting inter-species transmission of SPCSV. Most isolates in Uganda contained p22, unlike SPCSV isolates characterized from other countries and continents. Enhanced accumulation of SPFMV and increased disease severity were found to be uncoupled phenotypic outcomes of RNase3-mediated viral synergism in

  19. Molecular cloning, phylogenetic analysis, and expression patterns of LATERAL SUPPRESSOR-LIKE and REGULATOR OF AXILLARY MERISTEM FORMATION-LIKE genes in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fambrini, Marco; Salvini, Mariangela; Pugliesi, Claudio

    2017-03-01

    The wild sunflower (Helianthus annuus) plants develop a highly branched form with numerous small flowering heads. The origin of a no branched sunflower, producing a single large head, has been a key event in the domestication process of this species. The interaction between hormonal factors and several genes organizes the initiation and outgrowth of axillary meristems (AMs). From sunflower, we have isolated two genes putatively involved in this process, LATERAL SUPPRESSOR (LS)-LIKE (Ha-LSL) and REGULATOR OF AXILLARY MERISTEM FORMATION (ROX)-LIKE (Ha-ROXL), encoding for a GRAS and a bHLH transcription factor (TF), respectively. Typical amino acid residues and phylogenetic analyses suggest that Ha-LSL and Ha-ROXL are the orthologs of the branching regulator LS and ROX/LAX1, involved in the growth habit of both dicot and monocot species. qRT-PCR analyses revealed a high accumulation of Ha-LSL transcripts in roots, vegetative shoots, and inflorescence shoots. By contrast, in internodal stems and young leaves, a lower amount of Ha-LSL transcripts was observed. A comparison of transcription patterns between Ha-LSL and Ha-ROXL revealed some analogies but also remarkable differences; in fact, the gene Ha-ROXL displayed a low expression level in all organs analyzed. In situ hybridization (ISH) analysis showed that Ha-ROXL transcription was strongly restricted to a small domain within the boundary zone separating the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and the leaf primordia and in restricted regions of the inflorescence meristem, beforehand the separation of floral bracts from disc flower primordia. These results suggested that Ha-ROXL may be involved to establish a cell niche for the initiation of AMs as well as flower primordia. The accumulation of Ha-LSL transcripts was not restricted to the boundary zones in vegetative and inflorescence shoots, but the mRNA activity was expanded in other cellular domains of primary shoot apical meristem as well as AMs. In addition, Ha

  20. Radiation of different human melanoma cell lines increased expression of RHOB. Level of this tumor suppressor gene in different cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notcovich, C.; Molinari, B.; Duran, H.; Delgado González, D.; Sánchez Crespo, R.

    2013-01-01

    Previous results of our group show that a correlation exists between intrinsic radiosensitivity of human melanoma cells and cell death by apoptosis. RhoB is a small GTPase that regulates cytoskeletal organization. Besides, is related to the process of apoptosis in cells exposed to DNA damage as radiation. Also, RhoB levels decrease in a wide variety of tumors with the tumor stage, being considered a tumor suppressor gene due to its antiproliferative and proapoptotic effect. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of RhoB in different human melanoma cell lines in relation to melanocytes, and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on the expression of RhoB. We used the A375, SB2 and Meljcell lines, and the derived from melanocytes Pig1. It was found for all three tumor lines RhoB expression levels significantly lower than those of Pig1 (p <0.05), as assessed by semiquantitative RT-PCR . When tumor cells were irradiated to a dose of 2Gyinduction was observed at 3 hours RhoB irradiation. RhoB expression increased in all lines relative to non-irradiated control, showing a greater induction ( p< 0.05) for the more radiosensitive line SB2, consistent with apoptosis in response to radiation. The results allow for the first time in melanoma demonstrate that RhoB, as well as in other tumor types, has a lower expression in tumor cells than their normal counterparts. Moreover, induction in the expression of RhoB in irradiated cells may be associated with the process of radiation-induced apoptosis. The modulation of RhoB could be a new tool to sensitize radioresistant melanoma. (author)

  1. LRIG1, a 3p tumor suppressor, represses EGFR signaling and is a novel epigenetic silenced gene in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kou, Changhua, E-mail: chkoukou@hotmail.com [Department of Oncological Surgery, The Central Hospital of Xuzhou City, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221000 (China); Zhou, Tian [Department of Gastroenterology, The Central Hospital of Xuzhou City, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221000 (China); Han, Xilin; Zhuang, Huijie [Department of Oncological Surgery, The Central Hospital of Xuzhou City, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221000 (China); Qian, Haixin, E-mail: qianhaixin@hotmail.com [The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215000 (China)

    2015-08-21

    Downregulation of LRIG1 was found in many types of cancer. However, data concerning the possible mechanism of LRIG1 reduction in cancers were not reported yet. To analyze the regulation and function of LRIG1 in colorectal cancer (CRC), 6 cell lines, 46 paired tissues from primary CRC cases were employed in this study. In CRC cell lines, under-expression of LRIG1 was correlated with promoter region hypermethylation, and restoration of LRIG1 was induced by 5-Aza-2'-deoxyazacytidine treatment. Subsequently, we ectopically expressed LRIG1 in LRIG1 low-expressing HCT-116 cells and suppressed LRIG1 in LRIG1 high-expressing LoVo cells. We found that over-expression of LRIG1 inhibits cell proliferation and colony formation and tumor growth, while knockdown of LRIG1 promotes cell proliferation and colony formation. Decreased and increased EGFR/AKT signaling pathway may partially explain the lower and higher rates of proliferation in CRC cells transfected with LRIG1 cDNA or shRNA. In clinical samples, we compared the methylation, mRNA and protein expression of LRIG1 in samples of CRC tissues. A significant increase in LRIG1 methylation was identified in CRC specimens compared to adjacent normal tissues and that it was negatively correlated with its mRNA and protein expression. In conclusion, LRIG1 is frequently methylated in human CRC and consequent mRNA and protein downregulation may contribute to tumor growth by activating EGFR/AKT signaling. - Highlights: • Promoter methylation of LRIG1 occurred in colorectal cancer cells and tumors. • Restoration of LRIG1 inhibits tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. • Overexpression or knockdown of LRIG1 regulates EGFR/AKT and downstream apoptosis. • Methylation of LRIG1 correlates with its mRNA and protein downregulation. • LRIG1 was firstly identified as an epigenetic target in cancer.

  2. Immunometabolism and PI(3)K Signaling As a Link between IL-2, Foxp3 Expression, and Suppressor Function in Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Martin Y; Turka, Laurence A

    2018-01-01

    CD4 + Foxp3 + regulatory T cells (Tregs) are an essential component of immune homeostasis. Modulation of Treg function has been proposed as a means of treating autoimmune conditions and preventing rejection of organ transplants, although achieving this goal will require a detailed understanding of Treg signaling pathways. Signaling within Tregs is known to differ considerably from that observed in other T cell subsets. Of note, Tregs are the only cell type known to constitutively express CD25, the main ligand-binding subunit of the IL-2 receptor. The PI(3)K/Akt/mTOR cascade constitutes a major signaling pathway downstream of IL-2 and is closely tied to cellular metabolism. Due to increasing recognition of the links between cellular fuel usage and immune cell function, the interplay between IL-2 signaling and Treg metabolism represents an important space for exploration and a potential approach for immunomodulation. Here, we discuss how IL-2 may affect Treg metabolism via PI(3)K signaling, as well as the effects of altered metabolism on Treg lineage stability and suppressor function.

  3. Immunometabolism and PI(3K Signaling As a Link between IL-2, Foxp3 Expression, and Suppressor Function in Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Y. Fan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are an essential component of immune homeostasis. Modulation of Treg function has been proposed as a means of treating autoimmune conditions and preventing rejection of organ transplants, although achieving this goal will require a detailed understanding of Treg signaling pathways. Signaling within Tregs is known to differ considerably from that observed in other T cell subsets. Of note, Tregs are the only cell type known to constitutively express CD25, the main ligand-binding subunit of the IL-2 receptor. The PI(3K/Akt/mTOR cascade constitutes a major signaling pathway downstream of IL-2 and is closely tied to cellular metabolism. Due to increasing recognition of the links between cellular fuel usage and immune cell function, the interplay between IL-2 signaling and Treg metabolism represents an important space for exploration and a potential approach for immunomodulation. Here, we discuss how IL-2 may affect Treg metabolism via PI(3K signaling, as well as the effects of altered metabolism on Treg lineage stability and suppressor function.

  4. Metformin inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition in prostate cancer cells: Involvement of the tumor suppressor miR30a and its target gene SOX4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing; Shen, Chengwu [Department of Pharmacy, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Wang, Lin [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Research Center for Medicinal Biotechnology, Shandong Academy of Medicinal Sciences, Jinan 250012 (China); Ma, Quanping [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Fourth People’s Hospital of Jinan, Jinan 250031 (China); Xia, Pingtian; Qi, Mei; Yang, Muyi [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Han, Bo, E-mail: boh@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Pathology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Metformin inhibits TGF-β-induced EMT in prostate cancer (PCa) cells. • Metformin upregulates tumor suppressor miR30a and downregulates SOX4 in PCa cells. • SOX4 is a target gene of miR30a. - Abstract: Tumor metastasis is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity of prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in cancer progression and metastasis. Recent evidence suggested that diabetic patients treated with metformin have lower PCa risk and better prognosis. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of metformin on EMT in PCa cells and the possible microRNA (miRNA)-based mechanisms. MiRNAs have been shown to regulate various processes of cancer metastasis. We herein showed that metformin significantly inhibits proliferation of Vcap and PC-3 cells, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibits invasiveness and motility capacity of Vcap cells. Metformin could inhibit TGF-β-induced EMT in Vcap cells, as manifested by inhibition of the increase of N-cadherin (p = 0.013), Vimentin (p = 0.002) and the decrease of E-cadherin (p = 0.0023) and β-catenin (p = 0.034) at mRNA and protein levels. Notably, we demonstrated significant upregulation of miR30a levels by metformin (P < 0.05) and further experiments indicated that miR30a significantly inhibits proliferation and EMT process of Vcap cells. Interestingly, we identified that SOX4, a previously reported oncogenic transcriptional factor and modulator of EMT, is a direct target gene of miR30a. Finally, we screened the expression of miR30a and SOX4 in 84 PCa cases with radical prostatectomy. Of note, SOX4 overexpression is significantly associated with decreased levels of miR30a in PCa cases. In all, our study suggested that inhibition of EMT by metformin in PCa cells may involve upregulation of miR30a and downregulation of SOX4.

  5. The tumor suppressor gene TRC8/RNF139 is disrupted by a constitutional balanced translocation t(8;22(q24.13;q11.21 in a young girl with dysgerminoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorio Patrizia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNF139/TRC8 is a potential tumor suppressor gene with similarity to PTCH, a tumor suppressor implicated in basal cell carcinomas and glioblastomas. TRC8 has the potential to act in a novel regulatory relationship linking the cholesterol/lipid biosynthetic pathway with cellular growth control and has been identified in families with hereditary renal (RCC and thyroid cancers. Haploinsufficiency of TRC8 may facilitate development of clear cell-RCC in association with VHL mutations, and may increase risk for other tumor types. We report a paternally inherited balanced translocation t(8;22 in a proposita with dysgerminoma. Methods The translocation was characterized by FISH and the breakpoints cloned, sequenced, and compared. DNA isolated from normal and tumor cells was checked for abnormalities by array-CGH. Expression of genes TRC8 and TSN was tested both on dysgerminoma and in the proposita and her father. Results The breakpoints of the translocation are located within the LCR-B low copy repeat on chromosome 22q11.21, containing the palindromic AT-rich repeat (PATRR involved in recurrent and non-recurrent translocations, and in an AT-rich sequence inside intron 1 of the TRC8 tumor-suppressor gene at 8q24.13. TRC8 was strongly underexpressed in the dysgerminoma. Translin is underexpressed in the dysgerminoma compared to normal ovary. TRC8 is a target of Translin (TSN, a posttranscriptional regulator of genes transcribed by the transcription factor CREM-tau in postmeiotic male germ cells. Conclusion A role for TRC8 in dysgerminoma may relate to its interaction with Translin. We propose a model in which one copy of TRC8 is disrupted by a palindrome-mediated translocation followed by complete loss of expression through suppression, possibly mediated by miRNA.

  6. Gene, environment and cognitive function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chunsheng; Sun, Jianping; Duan, Haiping

    2015-01-01

    population living under distinct environmental condition as the Western populations. OBJECTIVE: this study aims to explore the genetic and environmental impact on normal cognitive ageing in the Chinese twins. DESIGN/SETTING: cognitive function was measured on 384 complete twin pairs with median age of 50...... factors accounting for 23-33% of the total variances. In contrast, all cognitive performances showed moderate to high influences by the unique environmental factors. CONCLUSIONS: genetic factor and common family environment have a limited contribution to cognitive function in the Chinese adults......BACKGROUND: the genetic and environmental contributions to cognitive function in the old people have been well addressed for the Western populations using twin modelling showing moderate to high heritability. No similar study has been conducted in the world largest and rapidly ageing Chinese...

  7. Suppressors of RNA silencing encoded by tomato leaf curl ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-01-06

    Jan 6, 2013 ... satellite DNA β which are predicted to function as silencing suppressors. In the present study suppressor function ... of plant viruses with circular single-stranded DNA genomes that are composed of one or two components of ..... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 M. Figure 4. Southern blot analysis of DNA ...

  8. Microbial Functional Gene Diversity Predicts Groundwater Contamination and Ecosystem Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Wu, Linwei; Rocha, Andrea M.; Shi, Zhou; Wu, Bo; Qin, Yujia; Wang, Jianjun; Yan, Qingyun; Curtis, Daniel; Ning, Daliang; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Wu, Liyou; Watson, David B.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Alm, Eric J.; Adams, Paul D.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Contamination from anthropogenic activities has significantly impacted Earth’s biosphere. However, knowledge about how environmental contamination affects the biodiversity of groundwater microbiomes and ecosystem functioning remains very limited. Here, we used a comprehensive functional gene array to analyze groundwater microbiomes from 69 wells at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (Oak Ridge, TN), representing a wide pH range and uranium, nitrate, and other contaminants. We hypothesized that the functional diversity of groundwater microbiomes would decrease as environmental contamination (e.g., uranium or nitrate) increased or at low or high pH, while some specific populations capable of utilizing or resistant to those contaminants would increase, and thus, such key microbial functional genes and/or populations could be used to predict groundwater contamination and ecosystem functioning. Our results indicated that functional richness/diversity decreased as uranium (but not nitrate) increased in groundwater. In addition, about 5.9% of specific key functional populations targeted by a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip 5) increased significantly (P contamination and ecosystem functioning. This study indicates great potential for using microbial functional genes to predict environmental contamination and ecosystem functioning. PMID:29463661

  9. The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor regulates programmed cell death 5-mediated degradation of Mdm2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essers, P B; Klasson, T D; Pereboom, T C; Mans, D A; Nicastro, M; Boldt, K; Giles, R H; MacInnes, A W

    2015-01-01

    Functional loss of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor protein (pVHL), which is part of an E3-ubiquitin ligase complex, initiates most inherited and sporadic clear-cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC). Genetic inactivation of the TP53 gene in ccRCC is rare, suggesting that an alternate

  10. Amplification of Mdmx (or Mdm4) directly contributes to tumor formation by inhibiting p53 tumor suppressor activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danovi, Davide; Meulmeester, Erik; Pasini, Diego

    2004-01-01

    Human tumors are believed to harbor a disabled p53 tumor suppressor pathway, either through direct mutation of the p53 gene or through aberrant expression of proteins acting in the p53 pathway, such as p14(ARF) or Mdm2. A role for Mdmx (or Mdm4) as a key negative regulator of p53 function in vivo...

  11. The human ARF tumor suppressor senses blastema activity and suppresses epimorphic tissue regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Robert G; Kouklis, Gayle K; Ahituv, Nadav; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    The control of proliferation and differentiation by tumor suppressor genes suggests that evolution of divergent tumor suppressor repertoires could influence species’ regenerative capacity. To directly test that premise, we humanized the zebrafish p53 pathway by introducing regulatory and coding sequences of the human tumor suppressor ARF into the zebrafish genome. ARF was dormant during development, in uninjured adult fins, and during wound healing, but was highly expressed in the blastema during epimorphic fin regeneration after amputation. Regenerative, but not developmental signals resulted in binding of zebrafish E2f to the human ARF promoter and activated conserved ARF-dependent Tp53 functions. The context-dependent activation of ARF did not affect growth and development but inhibited regeneration, an unexpected distinct tumor suppressor response to regenerative versus developmental environments. The antagonistic pleiotropic characteristics of ARF as both tumor and regeneration suppressor imply that inducing epimorphic regeneration clinically would require modulation of ARF –p53 axis activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07702.001 PMID:26575287

  12. Analysis of the tumour suppressor genes, FHIT and WT-1, and the tumour rejection genes, BAGE, GAGE-1/2, HAGE, MAGE-1, and MAGE-3, in benign and malignant neoplasms of the salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, H; Laskawi, R; Eiffert, H; Schlott, T

    2003-08-01

    Molecular genetic changes involved in tumorigenesis and malignant transformation of human tumours are novel targets of cancer diagnosis and treatment. This study aimed to analyse the expression of putative tumour suppressor genes, FHIT and WT-1, and tumour rejection genes, BAGE, GAGE-1/2, MAGE-1, MAGE-3, and HAGE (which are reported to be important in human cancers), in salivary gland neoplasms. Gene expression was analysed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in normal salivary gland tissue and 44 benign and malignant salivary gland tumours. Aberrant FHIT transcripts were found in one of 38 normal salivary glands, three of 28 adenomas, and two of 16 carcinomas. WT-1 mRNA was detectable in two adenomas and five carcinomas. Immunoblotting showed that WT-1 mRNA expression was associated with raised WT-1 protein concentrations. RT-PCR for detection of BAGE, GAGE, and MAGE gene expression was positive in two adenomas and nine carcinomas, but negative in normal salivary gland tissue. HAGE mRNA was found in two normal salivary glands, 11 benign, and eight malignant tumours. FHIT mRNA splicing does not appear to be involved in the genesis of salivary gland neoplasms. The upregulation of WT-1 mRNA in tumours of epithelial/myoepithelial phenotype may imply a potential role of WT-1 in the genesis and/or cellular differentiation of these salivary gland tumours. The tumour rejection genes were more frequently, but not exclusively, expressed in malignant salivary gland tumours than in benign neoplasms, although none was suitable as a diagnostic marker of malignancy in salivary gland neoplasms.

  13. DC-SCRIPT is a novel regulator of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ERα-positive breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ansems (Marleen); J.N. Søndergaard (Jonas Nørskov); A.M. Sieuwerts (Anieta); M.W.G. Looman (Maaike W. G.); M. Smid (Marcel); A.M.A. de Graaf (Annemarie M. A.); V. de Weerd (Vanja); M. Zuidscherwoude (Malou); J.A. Foekens (John); J.W.M. Martens (John); G.J. Adema (Gosse J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBreast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths in women. The estrogen receptor (ERα) is well known for having growth promoting effects in breast cancer. Recently, we have identified DC-SCRIPT (ZNF366) as a co-suppressor of ERα and as a strong and independent

  14. DC-SCRIPT is a novel regulator of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ERalpha-positive breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansems, M.; Sondergaard, J.N.; Sieuwerts, A.M.; Looman, M.W.G.; Smid, M.; Graaf, A.M.A. de; Weerd, V. de; Zuidscherwoude, M.; Foekens, J.A.; Martens, J.W.; Adema, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths in women. The estrogen receptor (ERalpha) is well known for having growth promoting effects in breast cancer. Recently, we have identified DC-SCRIPT (ZNF366) as a co-suppressor of ERalpha and as a strong and independent

  15. FOXA2 functions as a suppressor of tumor metastasis by inhibition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yunneng; Shu, Guangwen; Yuan, Xinwang; Jing, Naihe; Song, Jianguo

    2011-02-01

    The forkhead box transcription factor A2 (FOXA2) is an important regulator in animal development and body homeostasis. However, whether FOXA2 is involved in transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and tumor metastasis remains unknown. The present study showed that in human lung cancer cell lines, the abundance of FOXA2 positively correlates with epithelial phenotypes and negatively correlates with the mesenchymal phenotypes of cells, and TGF-β1 treatment decreased FOXA2 protein level. Consistently, knockdown of FOXA2 promoted EMT and invasion of lung cancer cells, whereas overexpression of FOXA2 reduced the invasion and suppressed TGF-β1-induced EMT. In addition, knockdown of FOXA2 induced slug expression, and ectopic expression of FOXA2 inhibited slug transcription. Furthermore, we identified that FOXA2 can bind to slug promoter through a conserved binding site, and that the DNA-binding region and transactivation region II of FOXA2 are required for repression of the slug promoter. These data demonstrate that FOXA2 functions as a suppressor of tumor metastasis by inhibition of EMT.

  16. P53 and Rb tumor suppressor gene alterations in gastric cancer Alterações dos genes supressores tumorais p53 e Rb no câncer gástrico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane Mattar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes has been frequently observed in gastric carcinogenesis. Our purpose was to study the involvement of p53, APC, DCC, and Rb genes in gastric carcinoma. METHOD: Loss of heterozygosity of the p53, APC, DCC and Rb genes was studied in 22 gastric cancer tissues using polymerase chain reaction; single-strand conformation polymorphism of the p53 gene exons 5-6 and exons 7-8 was studied using 35S-dATP, and p53 expression was detected using a histological immunoperoxidase method with an anti-p53 clone. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: No loss of heterozygosity was observed in any of these tumor suppressor genes; homozygous deletion was detected in the Rb gene in 23% (3/13 of the cases of intestinal-type gastric carcinoma. Eighteen (81.8% cases showed band mobility shifts in exons 5-6 and/or 7-8 of the p53 gene. The presence of the p53 protein was positive in gastric cancer cells in 14 cases (63.6%. Normal gastric mucosa showed negative staining for p53; thus, the immunoreactivity was likely to represent mutant forms. The correlation of band mobility shift and the immunoreactivity to anti-p53 was not significant (P = .90. There was no correlation of gene alterations with the disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: The inactivation of Rb and p53 genes is involved in gastric carcinogenesis in our environment. Loss of the Rb gene observed only in the intestinal-type gastric cancer should be further evaluated in association with Helicobacter pylori infection. The p53 gene was affected in both intestinal and diffuse histological types of gastric cancer.A inativação de genes supressores tumorais tem sido freqüentemente observada na carcinogênese gástrica. O nosso objetivo foi estudar o envolvimento dos genes p53, APC, DCC e Rb no câncer gástrico. MÉTODO: Vinte e dois casos de câncer gástrico foram estudados por PCR-LOH (reação de polimerase em cadeia- perda de alelo heterozigoto dos genes p53, APC, DCC e Rb; e por PCR-SSCP (rea

  17. Sugarcane genes related to mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca Ghislaine V.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria function as metabolic powerhouses by generating energy through oxidative phosphorylation and have become the focus of renewed interest due to progress in understanding the subtleties of their biogenesis and the discovery of the important roles which these organelles play in senescence, cell death and the assembly of iron-sulfur (Fe/S centers. Using proteins from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana we searched the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database for the presence of expressed sequence tags (ESTs with similarity to nuclear genes related to mitochondrial functions. Starting with 869 protein sequences, we searched for sugarcane EST counterparts to these proteins using the basic local alignment search tool TBLASTN similarity searching program run against 260,781 sugarcane ESTs contained in 81,223 clusters. We were able to recover 367 clusters likely to represent sugarcane orthologues of the corresponding genes from S. cerevisiae, H. sapiens and A. thaliana with E-value <= 10-10. Gene products belonging to all functional categories related to mitochondrial functions were found and this allowed us to produce an overview of the nuclear genes required for sugarcane mitochondrial biogenesis and function as well as providing a starting point for detailed analysis of sugarcane gene structure and physiology.

  18. DMPD: Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 2, a protein with multiple functions. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ns. Rico-Bautista E, Flores-Morales A, Fernandez-Perez L. Cytokine Growth Factor Rev. 2006 Dec;17(6):431-9. ...SOCS) 2, a protein with multiple functions. Authors Rico-Bautista E, Flores-Morales A, Fernandez-Perez L. Pu

  19. Functional identification of an Arabidopsis snf4 ortholog by screening for heterologous multicopy suppressors of snf4 deficiency in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinow, T.; Bhalerao, R.; Breuer, F.

    2000-01-01

    -finger factors AZF2 and ZAT10, as well as orthologs of hexose/UDP-hexose transporters, calmodulin, SMC1-cohesin and Snf4. Here we describe the characterization of AtSNF4, a functional Arabidopsis Snf4 ortholog, that interacts with yeast Snf1 and specifically binds to the C-terminal regulatory domain...

  20. Construction of a multiplex promoter reporter platform to monitor Staphylococcus aureus virulence gene expression and the identification of usnic acid as a potent suppressor of psm gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng GAO

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As antibiotic resistance becomes phenomenal, alternative therapeutic strategies for bacterial infections such as anti-virulence treatments have been advocated. We have constructed a total of 20 gfp-luxABCDE dual-reporter plasmids with selected promoters from S. aureus virulence-associated genes. The plasmids were introduced into various S. aureus strains to establish a gfp-lux based multiplex promoter reporter platform for monitoring S. aureus virulence gene expressions in real time to identify factors or compounds that may perturb virulence of S. aureus. The gene expression profiles monitored by luminescence correlated well with qRT-PCR results and extrinsic factors including carbon dioxide and some antibiotics were shown to suppress or induce the expression of virulence factors in this platform. Using this platform, sub-inhibitory ampicillin was shown to be a potent inducer for the expression of many virulence factors in S. aureus. Bacterial adherence and invasion assays using mammalian cells were employed to measure S. aureus virulence induced by ampicillin. The platform was used for screening of natural extracts that perturb the virulence of S. aureus and usnic acid was identified to be a potent repressor for the expression of psm.

  1. A mutation screening of oncogenes, tumor suppressor gene TP53 and nuclear encoded mitochondrial complex I genes in oncocytic thyroid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelisti, Cecilia; de Biase, Dario; Kurelac, Ivana; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Prokisch, Holger; Meitinger, Thomas; Caria, Paola; Vanni, Roberta; Romeo, Giovanni; Tallini, Giovanni; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Bonora, Elena

    2015-03-21

    Thyroid neoplasias with oncocytic features represent a specific phenotype in non-medullary thyroid cancer, reflecting the unique biological phenomenon of mitochondrial hyperplasia in the cytoplasm. Oncocytic thyroid cells are characterized by a prominent eosinophilia (or oxyphilia) caused by mitochondrial abundance. Although disruptive mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are the most significant hallmark of such tumors, oncocytomas may be envisioned as heterogeneous neoplasms, characterized by multiple nuclear and mitochondrial gene lesions. We investigated the nuclear mutational profile of oncocytic tumors to pinpoint the mutations that may trigger the early oncogenic hit. Total DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissues from 45 biopsies of oncocytic tumors. High-resolution melting was used for mutation screening of mitochondrial complex I subunits genes. Specific nuclear rearrangements were investigated by RT-PCR (RET/PTC) or on isolated nuclei by interphase FISH (PAX8/PPARγ). Recurrent point mutations were analyzed by direct sequencing. In our oncocytic tumor samples, we identified rare TP53 mutations. The series of analyzed cases did not include poorly- or undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas, and none of the TP53 mutated cases had significant mitotic activity or high-grade features. Thus, the presence of disruptive TP53 mutations was completely unexpected. In addition, novel mutations in nuclear-encoded complex I genes were identified. These findings suggest that nuclear genetic lesions altering the bioenergetics competence of thyroid cells may give rise to an aberrant mitochondria-centered compensatory mechanism and ultimately to the oncocytic phenotype.

  2. Defining functional distances over Gene Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Pozo Angela

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A fundamental problem when trying to define the functional relationships between proteins is the difficulty in quantifying functional similarities, even when well-structured ontologies exist regarding the activity of proteins (i.e. 'gene ontology' -GO-. However, functional metrics can overcome the problems in the comparing and evaluating functional assignments and predictions. As a reference of proximity, previous approaches to compare GO terms considered linkage in terms of ontology weighted by a probability distribution that balances the non-uniform 'richness' of different parts of the Direct Acyclic Graph. Here, we have followed a different approach to quantify functional similarities between GO terms. Results We propose a new method to derive 'functional distances' between GO terms that is based on the simultaneous occurrence of terms in the same set of Interpro entries, instead of relying on the structure of the GO. The coincidence of GO terms reveals natural biological links between the GO functions and defines a distance model Df which fulfils the properties of a Metric Space. The distances obtained in this way can be represented as a hierarchical 'Functional Tree'. Conclusion The method proposed provides a new definition of distance that enables the similarity between GO terms to be quantified. Additionally, the 'Functional Tree' defines groups with biological meaning enhancing its utility for protein function comparison and prediction. Finally, this approach could be for function-based protein searches in databases, and for analysing the gene clusters produced by DNA array experiments.

  3. A fine balance: epigenetic control of cellular quiescence by the tumor suppressor PRDM2/RIZ at a bivalent domain in the cyclin a gene

    OpenAIRE

    Cheedipudi, Sirisha; Puri, Deepika; Saleh, Amena; Gala, Hardik P.; Rumman, Mohammed; Pillai, Malini S.; Sreenivas, Prethish; Arora, Reety; Sellathurai, Jeeva; Schr?der, Henrik Daa; Mishra, Rakesh K.; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2015-01-01

    Adult stem cell quiescence is critical to ensure regeneration while minimizing tumorigenesis. Epigenetic regulation contributes to cell cycle control and differentiation, but few regulators of the chromatin state in quiescent cells are known. Here we report that the tumor suppressor PRDM2/RIZ, an H3K9 methyltransferase, is enriched in quiescent muscle stem cells in vivo and controls reversible quiescence in cultured myoblasts. We find that PRDM2 associates with >4400 promoters in G0 myobla...

  4. Differential retention of tumor- and differentiation-suppressor functions in cells derived from a human squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, D R; Montero-Puerner, Y; Beckett, M A; Cowan, J M; Weichselbaum, R R; Diamond, A M

    1992-01-01

    Three morphologically distinct cell lines--F.2a, V, and B.2--were isolated from a single human squamous cell carcinoma. Although all three cell lines can grow indefinitely in culture, they differ in a number of important transformation-related phenotypes. Only B.2 is strongly tumorigenic when injected into the flanks of nude mice, and only V can efficiently grow in semisolid media. The dominance of these traits was investigated by generating somatic cell hybrids among the three cell lines. F.2a was able to suppress the tumorigenicity of B.2 cells, whereas B.2 inhibited the capacity for anchorage-independent growth of V, the latter trait being a function of the ability of these epithelial cells to differentiate when deprived of support. The influence of exogenously added growth factors was also evaluated. This study indicates that the particular tumor we examined consisted of a heterogeneous population of cells with distinct growth and differentiation capacities.

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection and family history of gastric cancer decrease expression of FHIT tumor suppressor gene in gastric mucosa of dyspeptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stec-Michalska, Krystyna; Peczek, Lukasz; Michalski, Blazej; Wisniewska-Jarosinska, Maria; Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Nawrot, Barbara

    2009-10-01

    The expression of a fragile histidine triad (FHIT) protein is lost in stomach tumors. The study aimed at determining whether FHIT expression is affected by Helicobacter pylori infection, strain virulence (vacA and cagA genes) and histopathological changes in the gastric mucosa of patients with functional dyspepsia having first-degree relatives with gastric cancer. Eighty-eight never-smoking patients with functional dyspepsia were selected for the study, and 48 of them had first-degree relatives with gastric cancer. Bacterial DNA amplification was used to identify H. pylori colonization. The level of FHIT gene expression was determined by qRT-PCR (mRNA) and Western blot (FHIT protein) analyses. For patients having first-degree relatives with gastric cancer FHIT expression was lower (mRNA by ca. 40-45% and protein by 30%) compared with the control patients (p pylori infection decreased the FHIT mRNA level by 10-35% and the protein level by 10-20%. Bacterial strain vacA(+)cagA(+) lowered FHIT mRNA by ca. 30-35% in the antrum samples of both groups and in corpus samples of patients with first-degree relatives with gastric cancer (p pylori-negative patients with intestinal metaplasia, compared with those with non-atrophic gastritis. The decreased FHIT gene expression associated with hereditary factors and with H. pylori infection, especially with vacA(+)cagA(+)-positive strains, may be related to gastric carcinoma development.

  6. Diverse gene functions in a soil mobilome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Wenting; Xu, Zhuofei; Riber, Leise

    2016-01-01

    , the soil mobilome sampled from a well-characterized field in Hygum, Denmark. Soil bacterial cells were obtained by Nycodenz extraction, total DNA was purified by removing sheared chromosomal DNA using exonuclease digestion, and the remaining circular DNA was amplified with the phi29 polymerase and finally...... sequenced. The soil mobilome represented a wide range of known bacterial gene functions and highlighted the enrichment of plasmids, transposable elements and phages when compared to a well-characterized soil metagenome that, on the other hand, was dominated by basic biosynthesis and metabolism functions....... Approximately one eighth of the gene set was of plasmid-intrinsic traits, including replication, conjugation, mobilization and stability based on Pfam database analysis. Resistance determinants toward aminoglycosides, beta-lactams and glycopeptides as well as multi-drug functions indicated that a substantial...

  7. Ribosomal RNA gene functioning in avian oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshel, Elena; Galkina, Svetlana; Saifitdinova, Alsu; Dyomin, Alexandr; Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gaginskaya, Elena

    2016-12-01

    Despite long-term exploration into ribosomal RNA gene functioning during the oogenesis of various organisms, many intriguing problems remain unsolved. In this review, we describe nucleolus organizer region (NOR) activity in avian oocytes. Whereas oocytes from an adult avian ovary never reveal the formation of the nucleolus in the germinal vesicle (GV), an ovary from juvenile birds possesses both nucleolus-containing and non-nucleolus-containing oocytes. The evolutionary diversity of oocyte NOR functioning and the potential non-rRNA-related functions of the nucleolus in oocytes are also discussed.

  8. PHTS, a novel putative tumor suppressor, is involved in the transformation reversion of HeLaHF cells independently of the p53 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dehua; Fan, Wufang; Liu, Guohong; Nguy, Vivian; Chatterton, Jon E.; Long Shilong; Ke, Ning; Meyhack, Bernd; Bruengger, Adrian; Brachat, Arndt; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Li, Qi-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    HeLaHF is a non-transformed revertant of HeLa cells, likely resulting from the activation of a putative tumor suppressor(s). p53 protein was stabilized in this revertant and reactivated for certain transactivation functions. Although p53 stabilization has not conclusively been linked to the reversion, it is clear that the genes in p53 pathway are involved. The present study confirms the direct role of p53 in HeLaHF reversion by demonstrating that RNAi-mediated p53 silencing partially restores anchorage-independent growth potential of the revertant through the suppression of anoikis. In addition, we identified a novel gene, named PHTS, with putative tumor suppressor properties, and showed that this gene is also involved in HeLaHF reversion independently of the p53 pathway. Expression profiling revealed that PHTS is one of the genes that is up-regulated in HeLaHF but not in HeLa. It encodes a putative protein with CD59-like domains. RNAi-mediated PHTS silencing resulted in the partial restoration of transformation (anchorage-independent growth) in HeLaHF cells, similar to that of p53 gene silencing, implying its tumor suppressor effect. However, the observed increased transformation potential by PHTS silencing appears to be due to an increased anchorage-independent proliferation rate rather than suppression of anoikis, unlike the effect of p53 silencing. p53 silencing did not affect PHTS gene expression, and vice versa, suggesting PHTS may function in a new and p53-independent tumor suppressor pathway. Furthermore, over-expression of PHTS in different cancer cell lines, in addition to HeLa, reduces cell growth likely via induced apoptosis, confirming the broad PHTS tumor suppressor properties

  9. miR-7 and miR-218 epigenetically control tumor suppressor genes RASSF1A and Claudin-6 by targeting HoxB3 in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qiaoyan; Zhu, Fufan; Chen, Puxiang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Both miR-7 and miR-218 down-regulates HoxB3 expression by targeting the 3′-UTR of HoxB3 mRNA. ► A reverse correlation between the levels of endogenous miR-7, miR218 and HoxB3 expression. ► Epigenetic changes involve in the reactivation of HoxB3. ► Both miRNAs inhibits the cell cycle and clone formation of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Many microRNAs have been implicated as key regulators of cellular growth and differentiation and have been found to dysregulate proliferation in human tumors, including breast cancer. Cancer-linked microRNAs also alter the epigenetic landscape by way of DNA methylation and post-translational modifications of histones. Aberrations in Hox gene expression are important for oncogene or tumor suppressor during abnormal development and malignancy. Although recent studies suggest that HoxB3 is critical in breast cancer, the putative role(s) of microRNAs impinging on HoxB3 is not yet fully understood. In this study, we found that the expression levels of miR-7 and miR-218 were strongly and reversely associated with HoxB3 expression. Stable overexpression of miR-7 and miR-218 was accompanied by reactivation of tumor suppressor genes including RASSF1A and Claudin-6 by means of epigenetic switches in DNA methylation and histone modification, giving rise to inhibition of the cell cycle and clone formation of breast cancer cells. The current study provides a novel link between overexpression of collinear Hox genes and multiple microRNAs in human breast malignancy.

  10. Von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene loss in renal cell carcinoma promotes oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor signaling via Akt-1 and MEK-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S Justin; Lattouf, Jean-Baptiste; Xanthopoulos, Julie; Linehan, W Marston; Bottaro, Donald P; Vasselli, James R

    2008-10-01

    Clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most prevalent form of kidney cancer and is frequently associated with loss of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene function, resulting in the aberrant transcriptional activation of genes that contribute to tumor growth and metastasis, including transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), a ligand of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase. To determine the functional impact of EGFR activation on RCC, we suppressed critical components of this pathway: EGFR, Akt-1, and MEK-1. Stable transfection of RCC cells with plasmids bearing shRNA directed against each of these genes was used to individually suppress their expression. Transfectants were characterized for growth and invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. RCC cell transfectants displayed significantly reduced growth rate and matrix invasion in vitro and RCC tumor xenograft growth rate in vivo. Analysis of tumor cells that emerged after extended periods in each model showed that significant EGFR suppression was sustained, whereas Akt-1 and MEK-1 knock-down cells had escaped shRNA suppression. EGFR, Akt-1, and MEK-1 are individually critical for RCC cell invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, and even partial suppression of each can have a significant impact on tumor progression. The emergence of transfectants that had escaped Akt-1 and MEK-1 suppression during tumorigenicity experiments suggests that these effectors may each be more critical than EGFR for RCC tumorigenesis, consistent with results from clinical trials of EGFR inhibitors for RCC, where durable clinical responses have not been seen.

  11. Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Gene Loss in Renal Cell Carcinoma Promotes Oncogenic Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling via Akt-1 and MEK1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. Justin; Lattouf, Jean-Baptiste; Xanthopoulos, Julie; Linehan, W. Marston; Bottaro, Donald P.; Vasselli, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most prevalent form of kidney cancer and is frequently associated with loss of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene function, resulting in the aberrant transcriptional activation of genes that contribute to tumor growth and metastasis, including transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α), a ligand of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase. To determine the functional impact of EGFR activation on RCC, we suppressed critical components of this pathway: EGFR, Akt-1, and MEK-1. Methods Stable transfection of RCC cells with plasmids bearing shRNA directed against each of these genes was used to individually suppress their expression. Transfectants were characterized for growth and invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Results RCC cell transfectants displayed significantly reduced growth rate and matrix invasion in vitro and RCC tumor xenograft growth rate in vivo. Analysis of tumor cells that emerged after extended periods in each model showed that significant EGFR suppression was sustained, whereas Akt-1 and MEK-1 knockdown cells had escaped shRNA suppression. Conclusions EGFR, Akt-1, and MEK-1 are individually critical for RCC cell invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, and even partial suppression of each can have a significant impact on tumor progression. The emergence of transfectants that had escaped Akt-1 and MEK-1 suppression during tumorigenicity experiments suggests that these effectors may each be more critical than EGFR for RCC tumorigenesis, consistent with results from clinical trials of EGFR inhibitors for RCC, where durable clinical responses have not been seen. PMID:18243508

  12. Somatic Mutational Landscape of Splicing Factor Genes and Their Functional Consequences across 33 Cancer Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Seiler

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Hotspot mutations in splicing factor genes have been recently reported at high frequency in hematological malignancies, suggesting the importance of RNA splicing in cancer. We analyzed whole-exome sequencing data across 33 tumor types in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA, and we identified 119 splicing factor genes with significant non-silent mutation patterns, including mutation over-representation, recurrent loss of function (tumor suppressor-like, or hotspot mutation profile (oncogene-like. Furthermore, RNA sequencing analysis revealed altered splicing events associated with selected splicing factor mutations. In addition, we were able to identify common gene pathway profiles associated with the presence of these mutations. Our analysis suggests that somatic alteration of genes involved in the RNA-splicing process is common in cancer and may represent an underappreciated hallmark of tumorigenesis. : Seiler et al. report that 119 splicing factor genes carry putative driver mutations over 33 tumor types in TCGA. The most common mutations appear to be mutually exclusive and are associated with lineage-independent altered splicing. Samples with these mutations show deregulation of cell-autonomous pathways and immune infiltration. Keywords: splicing, SF3B1, U2AF1, SRSF2, RBM10, FUBP1, cancer, mutation

  13. KF-1 ubiquitin ligase: anxiety suppressor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto-Gotoh, Tamotsu; Iwabe, Naoyuki; Tsujimura, Atsushi; Nakagawa, Masanori; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2011-06-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most popular psychiatric disease in any human societies irrespective of nation, culture, religion, economics or politics. Anxiety expression mediated by the amygdala may be suppressed by signals transmitted from the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. KF-1 is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-based E3-ubiquitin (Ub) ligase with a RING-H2 finger motif at the C-terminus. The kf-1 gene expression is up-regulated in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in rats after anti-depressant treatments. The kf-1 null mice show no apparent abnormalities, but exhibit selectively pronounced anxiety-like behaviors or increased timidity-like responses. The kf-1 orthologous genes had been generated after the Poriferan emergence, and are found widely in all animals except insects, arachnids and threadworms such as Drosophila, Ixodes and Caenorhabditis, respectively. This suggests that the kf-1 gene may be relevant to some biological functions characteristic to animals. Based on these observations, the Anxiety Suppressor Model has been proposed, which assumes that KF-1 Ub ligase may suppress the amygdala-mediated anxiety by degrading some anxiety promoting protein(s), such as a neurotransmitter receptor, through the ER-associated degradation pathway in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. According to this model, the emotional sensitivity to environmental stresses may be regulated by the cellular protein level of KF-1 relative to that of the putative anxiety promoter. The kf-1 null mice should be useful in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of the anxiety regulation and for screening novel anxiolytic compounds, which may block the putative anxiety promoter.

  14. Tumor suppressor WWOX and p53 alterations and drug resistance in glioblastomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Fu eChiang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor suppressor p53 are frequently mutated in glioblastomas (GBMs and appears to contribute, in part, to resistance to temozolomide and therapeutic drugs. WW domain-containing oxidoreductase WWOX (FOR or WOX1 is a proapoptotic protein and is considered as a tumor suppressor. Loss of WWOX gene expression is frequently seen in malignant cancer cells due to promoter hypermethylation, genetic alterations, and translational blockade. Intriguingly, ectopic expression of wild type WWOX preferentially induces apoptosis in human glioblastoma cells harboring mutant p53. WWOX is known to physically bind and stabilize wild type p53. Here, we provide an overview for the updated knowledge in p53 and WWOX, and postulate a potential scenarios that wild type and mutant p53, or isoforms, modulate the apoptotic function of WWOX. We propose that triggering WWOX activation by therapeutic drugs under p53 functional deficiency is needed to overcome TMZ resistance and induce GBM cell death.

  15. Suppressors (scsl-scs7) of CSG2, a Gene Required by Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Growth in Media Containing 10 mMCa(2+), Identify Genes Required for Sphingolipid Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    grew comparably to wild type on YPD medium but failed to grow on the same medium containing 50 mM eal+ [Beeler et al., 1994]. The null allele was...8217 exchanger. The decrease of Ca" in medium can be measured spectrophotometrically. The wild type and suppressor strains were grown in YPD + 100 mM Ca" (pH...4.7), but the csg2i1 strain was grown in YPD (pH 4.7) medium . All suppressors (except scs]·]) showed vacuolar Ca"· uptake comparable to that

  16. CMTM5 exhibits tumor suppressor activity through promoter methylation in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Heyu; Nan, Xu; Li, Xuefen; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jianyun; Sun, Lisha; Han, Wenlin; Li, Tiejun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Down-regulation of CMTM5 expression in OSCC tissues was found. • The promoter methylation status of CMTM5 was measured. • CMTM5-v1 inhibited cell proliferation and migration and induced apoptosis. • CMTM5 might act as a putative tumor suppressor gene in OSCC. - Abstract: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common types of malignancies in the head and neck region. CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain-containing member 5 (CMTM5) has been recently implicated as a tumor suppressor gene in several cancer types. Herein, we examined the expression and function of CMTM5 in oral squamous cell carcinoma. CMTM5 was down-regulated in oral squamous cell lines and tumor samples from patients with promoter methylation. Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine restored CMTM5 expression. In the OSCC cell lines CAL27 and GNM, the ectopic expression of CMTM5-v1 strongly inhibited cell proliferation and migration and induced apoptosis. In addition, CMTM5-v1 inhibited tumor formation in vivo. Therefore, CMTM5 might act as a putative tumor suppressor gene through promoter methylation in oral squamous cell carcinoma

  17. CMTM5 exhibits tumor suppressor activity through promoter methylation in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Heyu [Central Laboratory, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Nan, Xu [Center for Human Disease Genomics, Department of Immunology, Key Laboratory of Medical Immunology, Ministry of Health, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China); Li, Xuefen [Central Laboratory, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jianyun [Department of Oral Pathology, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Sun, Lisha [Central Laboratory, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Han, Wenlin [Center for Human Disease Genomics, Department of Immunology, Key Laboratory of Medical Immunology, Ministry of Health, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China); Li, Tiejun, E-mail: litiejun22@vip.sina.com [Department of Oral Pathology, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Down-regulation of CMTM5 expression in OSCC tissues was found. • The promoter methylation status of CMTM5 was measured. • CMTM5-v1 inhibited cell proliferation and migration and induced apoptosis. • CMTM5 might act as a putative tumor suppressor gene in OSCC. - Abstract: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common types of malignancies in the head and neck region. CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain-containing member 5 (CMTM5) has been recently implicated as a tumor suppressor gene in several cancer types. Herein, we examined the expression and function of CMTM5 in oral squamous cell carcinoma. CMTM5 was down-regulated in oral squamous cell lines and tumor samples from patients with promoter methylation. Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine restored CMTM5 expression. In the OSCC cell lines CAL27 and GNM, the ectopic expression of CMTM5-v1 strongly inhibited cell proliferation and migration and induced apoptosis. In addition, CMTM5-v1 inhibited tumor formation in vivo. Therefore, CMTM5 might act as a putative tumor suppressor gene through promoter methylation in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  18. Signalling through FOXP3 as an X-linked Tumor Suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Hiroto; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2010-01-01

    The FOXP3 (forkhead box P3) gene is a member of forkhead winged helix family transcription factors and functions as both a transcriptional activator and a repressor. FOXP3 dysfunction is responsible for an X-linked autoimmune syndrome: immune dysregulation, polyendopathy, enterophathy, X-linked syndrome. In addition to its role as an essential transcription factor in regulatory T cells, the FOXP3 gene is an epithelial cell-intrinsic tumor suppressor for breast and prostate cancers. We will focus on the FOXP3 signalling pathway in epithelial cells and discuss how genetic and/or epigenetic inactivation of the FOXP3 contributes to the malignant transformation of cells. PMID:20678582

  19. [Agrobacterium-mediated sunflower transformation (Helianthus annuus L.) in vitro and in Planta using strain of LBA4404 harboring binary vector pBi2E with dsRNA-suppressor proline dehydrogenase gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishchenko, E N; Komisarenko, A G; Mikhal'skaia, S I; Sergeeva, L E; Adamenko, N I; Morgun, B V; Kochetov, A V

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the efficiency of proline dehydrogenase gene suppression towards increasing of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) tolerance level to water deficit and salinity, we employed strain LBA4404 harboring pBi2E with double-stranded RNA-suppressor, which were prepared on basis arabidopsis ProDH1 gene. The techniques of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in vitro and in planta during fertilization sunflower have been proposed. There was shown the genotype-depended integration of T-DNA in sunflower genome. PCR-analysis showed that ProDH1 presents in genome of inbred lines transformed in planta, as well as in T1- and T2-generations. In trans-genic regenerants the essential accumulation of free L-proline during early stages of in vitro cultivation under normal conditions was shown. There was established the essential accumulation of free proline in transgenic regenerants during cultivation under lethal stress pressure (0.4 M mannitol and 2.0% sea water salts) and its decline upon the recovery period. These data are declared about effectiveness of suppression of sunflower ProDH and gene participation in processes connected with osmotolerance.

  20. The role of MHC class II antigenic determinants in the function of human antigen binding T8+ cells, monocytes and helper and suppressor factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, T; Jones, T

    1984-06-01

    The role of MHC class II antigens was investigated in the process of antigen binding by T8+ cells and monocytes (Mo) and in the functions of helper factor (HF) and suppressor factor (SF). Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to HLA-DR, DC and SB determinants were used in immunofluorescence, inhibition of antigen binding and affinity chromatography of HF and SF. Indirect immunofluorescence studies suggest that T lymphocytes from peripheral blood of healthy subjects have a small proportion of cells expressing HLA-DR, beta chain determinants (1.4-3.8%). These belong predominantly to the T8+ subset of cells (4.6-8.8%), with only a very small proportion in the T4+ cells (0.1-1.8%). However, DC1 on DRw6+ T cells and SB2,3 on any HLA typed cells were found in significantly greater proportion than the DR antigens in both T8+ and T4+ cells, though this was again greater on T8+ (30 and 25%) than T4+ (8.3 and 14.4%) cells. Although Mo had a greatly increased proportion of cells with DR-beta chain determinants (27-45%) than the T8+ cells, the converse was found with DC1 and SB2,3 determinants (13.9 and 11.4%). Inhibition of 125I-streptococcal antigen (SA) binding to T8+ cells and to Mo by MoAbs to the class II antigens showed that DR-beta chain monomorphic or polymorphic antibodies and DC1 antibodies inhibited binding to both cell types by 66-94%. However, MoAbs to DR-alpha chains or to the SB2,3 determinant failed to yield significant inhibition. Affinity chromatography studies of HF and SF revealed that the DR-beta chain monomorphic and DC1 antibodies bound HF and SF activities and that this was not found with the DR-beta chain polymorphic or SB2,3 antibodies. The results of inhibition of 125I-SA binding to T8+ cells and Mo, and absorption of HF and SF by affinity chromatography with MoAbs suggest four categories of recognition of human MHC class II antigenic determinants. (1) Class II determinants shared by the T8+ cells, Mo, HF and SF and recognized by MoAbs to monomorphic beta

  1. Candidate Tumor-Suppressor Gene DLEC1 Is Frequently Downregulated by Promoter Hypermethylation and Histone Hypoacetylation in Human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Kwong

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Suppression of ovarian tumor growth by chromosome 3p was demonstrated in a previous study. Deleted in Lung and Esophageal Cancer 1 (DLEC1 on 3p22.3 is a candidate tumor suppressor in lung, esophageal, and renal cancers. The potential involvement of DLEC1 in epithelial ovarian cancer remains unknown. In the present study, DLEC1 downregulation was found in ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian tumors. Focus-expressed DLEC1 in two ovarian cancer cell lines resulted in 41% to 52% inhibition of colony formation. No chromosomal loss of chromosome 3p22.3 in any ovarian cancer cell line or tissue was found. Promoter hypermethylation of DLEC1 was detected in ovarian cancer cell lines with reduced DLEC1 transcripts, whereas methylation was not detected in normal ovarian epithelium and DLEC1-expressing ovarian cancer cell lines. Treatment with demethylating agent enhanced DLEC1 expression in 90% (9 of 10 of ovarian cancer cell lines. DLEC1 promoter methylation was examined in 13 high-grade ovarian tumor tissues with DLEC1 downregulation, in which 54% of the tumors showed DLEC1 methylation. In addition, 80% of ovarian cancer cell lines significantly upregulated DLEC1 transcripts after histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment. Therefore, our results suggested that DLEC1 suppressed the growth of ovarian cancer cells and that its downregulation was closely associated with promoter hypermethylation and histone hypoacetylation.

  2. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS genes are silenced by DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation and regulate response to radiotherapy in cervical cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon-Hong Kim

    Full Text Available Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS family is an important negative regulator of cytokine signaling and deregulation of SOCS has been involved in many types of cancer. All cervical cancer cell lines tested showed lower expression of SOCS1, SOCS3, and SOCS5 than normal tissue or cell lines. The immunohistochemistry result for SOCS proteins in human cervical tissue also confirmed that normal tissue expressed higher level of SOCS proteins than neighboring tumor. Similar to the regulation of SOCS in other types of cancer, DNA methylation contributed to SOCS1 downregulation in CaSki, ME-180, and HeLa cells. However, the expression of SOCS3 or SOCS5 was not recovered by the inhibition of DNA methylation. Histone deacetylation may be another regulatory mechanism involved in SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression, however, SOCS5 expression was neither affected by DNA methylation nor histone deacetylation. Ectopic expression of SOCS1 or SOCS3 conferred radioresistance to HeLa cells, which implied SOCS signaling regulates the response to radiation in cervical cancer. In this study, we have shown that SOCS expression repressed by, in part, epigenetically and altered SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression could contribute to the radiosensitive phenotype in cervical cancer.

  3. Identification of a third protein 4.1 tumor suppressor, protein 4.1R, in meningioma pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Victoria A.; Li, Wen; Gascard, Philippe; Perry, Arie; Mohandas, Narla; Gutmann, David H.

    2003-06-11

    Meningiomas are common tumors of the central nervous system, however, the mechanisms under lying their pathogenesis are largely undefined. Two members of the Protein 4.1 super family, the neuro fibromatosis 2 (NF2) gene product (merlin/schwannomin) and Protein 4.1B have been implicated as meningioma tumor suppressors. In this report, we demonstrate that another Protein 4.1 family member, Protein 4.1R, also functions as a meningioma tumor suppressor. Based on the assignment of the Protein 4.1R gene to chromosome 1p32-36, a common region of deletion observed in meningiomas, we analyzed Protein 4.1R expression in meningioma cell lines and surgical tumor specimens. We observed loss of Protein 4.1R protein expression in two meningioma cell lines (IOMM-Lee, CH157-MN) by Western blotting as well as in 6 of 15 sporadic meningioma as by immuno histo chemistry (IHC). Analysis of a subset of these sporadic meningiomas by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a Protein 4.1R specific probe demonstrated 100 percent concordance with the IHC results. In support of a meningioma tumor suppressor function, over expression of Protein 4.1R resulted in suppression of IOMM-Lee and CH157MN cell proliferation. Similar to the Protein 4.1B and merlin meningioma tumor suppressors, Protein 4.1R localization in the membrane fraction increased significantly under conditions of growth arrest in vitro. Lastly, Protein 4.1R interacted with some known merlin/Protein 4.1B interactors such as CD44 and bII-spectrin, but did not associate with the Protein 4.1B interactors 14-3-3 and PRMT3 or the merlin binding proteins SCHIP-1 and HRS. Collectively, these results suggest that Protein 4.1R functions as an important tumor suppressor important in the molecular pathogenesis of meningioma.

  4. ARS2 is a general suppressor of pervasive transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasillo, Claudia; Schmid, Manfred; Yahia, Yousra; Maqbool, Muhammad A; Descostes, Nicolas; Karadoulama, Evdoxia; Bertrand, Edouard; Andrau, Jean-Christophe; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2017-09-29

    Termination of transcription is important for establishing gene punctuation marks. It is also critical for suppressing many of the pervasive transcription events occurring throughout eukaryotic genomes and coupling their RNA products to efficient decay. In human cells, the ARS2 protein has been implicated in such function as its depletion causes transcriptional read-through of selected gene terminators and because it physically interacts with the ribonucleolytic nuclear RNA exosome. Here, we study the role of ARS2 on transcription and RNA metabolism genome wide. We show that ARS2 depletion negatively impacts levels of promoter-proximal RNA polymerase II at protein-coding (pc) genes. Moreover, our results reveal a general role of ARS2 in transcription termination-coupled RNA turnover at short transcription units like snRNA-, replication-dependent histone-, promoter upstream transcript- and enhancer RNA-loci. Depletion of the ARS2 interaction partner ZC3H18 mimics the ARS2 depletion, although to a milder extent, whereas depletion of the exosome core subunit RRP40 only impacts RNA abundance post-transcriptionally. Interestingly, ARS2 is also involved in transcription termination events within first introns of pc genes. Our work therefore establishes ARS2 as a general suppressor of pervasive transcription with the potential to regulate pc gene expression. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor-suppressor gene is down-regulated by selenium deficiency in Caco-2 cells and rat colon mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    To test the hypothesis that selenium affects DNA methylation and hence gene regulation we employed a methylation array (Panomics) in the human colonic epithelial Caco-2 cell model. The array profiles DNA methylation from promoter regions of 82 human genes. After conditioning cells to repeatedly redu...

  6. TEP1, the yeast homolog of the human tumor suppressor gene PTEN/MMAC1/TEP1, is linked to the phosphatidylinositol pathway and plays a role in the developmental process of sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymont, J; Berenfeld, L; Collins, J; Kaganovich, A; Maynes, B; Moulin, A; Ratskovskaya, I; Poon, P P; Johnston, G C; Kamenetsky, M; DeSilva, J; Sun, H; Petsko, G A; Engebrecht, J

    2000-11-07

    PTEN/MMAC1/TEP1 (PTEN, phosphatase deleted on chromosome ten; MMAC1, mutated in multiple advanced cancers; TEP1, tensin-like phosphatase) is a major human tumor suppressor gene whose suppressive activity operates on the phosphatidylinositol pathway. A single homologue of this gene, TEP1 (YNL128w), exists in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast strains deleted for TEP1 exhibit essentially no phenotype in haploids; however, diploids exhibit resistance to the phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase inhibitor wortmannin and to lithium ions. Although rates of cancer increase with age, neither tep1 haploids nor diploids have altered life spans. TEP1 RNA is present throughout the cell cycle, and levels are dramatically up-regulated during meiotic development. Although homozygous tep1 mutants initiate the meiotic program and form spores with wild-type kinetics, analysis of the spores produced in tep1 mutants indicates a specific defect in the trafficking or deposition of dityrosine, a major component of yeast spore walls, to the surface. Introduction of a common PTEN mutation found in human tumors into the analogous position in Tep1p produces a nonfunctional protein based on in vivo activity. These studies implicate Tep1p in a specific developmental trafficking or deposition event and suggest that Tep1p, like its mammalian counterpart, impinges on the phosphatidylinositol pathway.

  7. Tumor suppressor molecules and methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Peter J.; Barber, Jack R.

    2004-09-07

    The invention provides substantially pure tumor suppressor nucleic acid molecules and tumor suppressor polypeptides. The invention also provides hairpin ribozymes and antibodies selective for these tumor suppressor molecules. Also provided are methods of detecting a neoplastic cell in a sample using detectable agents specific for the tumor suppressor nucleic acids and polypeptides.

  8. Mining Association Rules among Gene Functions in Clusters of Similar Gene Expression Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Li; Obradovic, Zoran; Smith, Desmond; Bodenreider, Olivier; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios

    2009-11-01

    Association rules mining methods have been recently applied to gene expression data analysis to reveal relationships between genes and different conditions and features. However, not much effort has focused on detecting the relation between gene expression maps and related gene functions. Here we describe such an approach to mine association rules among gene functions in clusters of similar gene expression maps on mouse brain. The experimental results show that the detected association rules make sense biologically. By inspecting the obtained clusters and the genes having the gene functions of frequent itemsets, interesting clues were discovered that provide valuable insight to biological scientists. Moreover, discovered association rules can be potentially used to predict gene functions based on similarity of gene expression maps.

  9. Identification of Novel Tumor Suppressor Genes in Human Breast Cancer Using Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay Inhibition (NMDI)-Microarray Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnstone, Cameron N

    2007-01-01

    This project sought to identify genes that harbor nonsense mutations in breast cancer cell lines that are commonly used as in vitro models in the study of breast cancer biology, with the ultimate aim...

  10. Gene coexpression network analysis as a source of functional annotation for rice genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin L Childs

    Full Text Available With the existence of large publicly available plant gene expression data sets, many groups have undertaken data analyses to construct gene coexpression networks and functionally annotate genes. Often, a large compendium of unrelated or condition-independent expression data is used to construct gene networks. Condition-dependent expression experiments consisting of well-defined conditions/treatments have also been used to create coexpression networks to help examine particular biological processes. Gene networks derived from either condition-dependent or condition-independent data can be difficult to interpret if a large number of genes and connections are present. However, algorithms exist to identify modules of highly connected and biologically relevant genes within coexpression networks. In this study, we have used publicly available rice (Oryza sativa gene expression data to create gene coexpression networks using both condition-dependent and condition-independent data and have identified gene modules within these networks using the Weighted Gene Coexpression Network Analysis method. We compared the number of genes assigned to modules and the biological interpretability of gene coexpression modules to assess the utility of condition-dependent and condition-independent gene coexpression networks. For the purpose of providing functional annotation to rice genes, we found that gene modules identified by coexpression analysis of condition-dependent gene expression experiments to be more useful than gene modules identified by analysis of a condition-independent data set. We have incorporated our results into the MSU Rice Genome Annotation Project database as additional expression-based annotation for 13,537 genes, 2,980 of which lack a functional annotation description. These results provide two new types of functional annotation for our database. Genes in modules are now associated with groups of genes that constitute a collective functional

  11. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor delta acts as a neuroblastoma tumor suppressor by destabilizing the aurora kinase a oncogene

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Meehan, Maria

    2012-02-05

    Abstract Background Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor delta (PTPRD) is a member of a large family of protein tyrosine phosphatases which negatively regulate tyrosine phosphorylation. Neuroblastoma is a major childhood cancer arising from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system which is known to acquire deletions and alterations in the expression patterns of PTPRD, indicating a potential tumor suppressor function for this gene. The molecular mechanism, however, by which PTPRD renders a tumor suppressor effect in neuroblastoma is unknown. Results As a molecular mechanism, we demonstrate that PTPRD interacts with aurora kinase A (AURKA), an oncogenic protein that is over-expressed in multiple forms of cancer, including neuroblastoma. Ectopic up-regulation of PTPRD in neuroblastoma dephosphorylates tyrosine residues in AURKA resulting in a destabilization of this protein culminating in interfering with one of AURKA\\'s primary functions in neuroblastoma, the stabilization of MYCN protein, the gene of which is amplified in approximately 25 to 30% of high risk neuroblastoma. Conclusions PTPRD has a tumor suppressor function in neuroblastoma through AURKA dephosphorylation and destabilization and a downstream destabilization of MYCN protein, representing a novel mechanism for the function of PTPRD in neuroblastoma.

  12. Deletion lengthening at chromosomes 6q and 16q targets multiple tumor suppressor genes and is associated with an increasingly poor prognosis in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kluth, Martina; Jung, Simon; Habib, Omar

    2017-01-01

    317 patients for 6q and 16q deletion length heterogeneity and found that the deletion expanded within 50-60% of 6q and 16q deleted cancers. Taken together, these data suggest continuous "deletion lengthening" as a key mechanism for prostate cancer progression leading to parallel down regulation......Prostate cancer is characterized by recurrent deletions that can considerably vary in size. We hypothesized that large deletions develop from small deletions and that this "deletion lengthening" might have a "per se" carcinogenic role through a combinatorial effect of multiple down regulated genes.......In vitroknockdown of 37 genes located inside the 6q12-q22 deletion region identified 4 genes with additive tumor suppressive effects, further supporting a role of the deletion size for cancer aggressiveness. Employing fluorescencein-situhybridization analysis on prostate cancer tissue microarrays, we determined...

  13. Abnormal P-53 suppressor gene expression predicts for a poorer outcome in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated by external beam radiation therapy with or without pre-radiation androgen ablation: results based on RTOG study 86-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, Colleen A.; Grignon, David; Caplan, Richard; Sarkar, Fazlul; Forman, Jeffrey; Mesic, John; Fu, Karen K.; Abrams, Ross

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The purpose of this study is to establish the effect of the abnormal expression of the P-53 suppressor gene on the results of locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with radiation therapy with or without pre-radiation therapy androgen ablation. Materials and Methods: Patients evaluated were part of a RTOG phase III multi-institutional trial. This trial assessed the value of pre-radiation therapy androgen ablation on patients with locally advanced disease (bulky stage B and stage C). Of the 471 patients registered, pre-treatment pathological material was available for 129 patients. P-53 status was determined immunohistochemically utilizing a commercially available antibody (D07). Clinical endpoints evaluated were overall survival and development of metastases. Results: Twenty-three of the 129 patients had abnormal expression of the P-53 suppressor gene. Presence of this abnormal expression significantly correlated with lower overall survival (p=0.03) and the development of distant metastases (p=0.03). Abnormal expression of the P-53 gene was an independent prognostic indicator when evaluated against clinical stage and Gleason score. Conclusion: This data from patients entered on a phase III multi-institutional, randomized clinical trial shows that abnormal P-53 suppressor gene expression as determined immunohistochemically is an independent predictor of poorer survival and the development of distant metastases in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with radiation therapy with or without pre-radiation therapy androgen ablation

  14. DNA repair and damage pathway related cancer suppressor genes in low-dose-rate irradiated AKR/J an IR mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Hyun Soon; Bong, Jin Jong; Kang, Yumi; Choi, Moo Hyun; Lee, Hae Un; Yoo, Jae Young; Choi, Seung Jin; Kim, Hee Sun [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Mi [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    It has been reported that low-dose-rate radiation stimulates the immune response, prolongs life span and inhibits carcinogenesis. The high dose-rate radiation influences the expression of DNA repair and damage-related genes. In contrast, DNA repair and damage signaling triggered by low-dose-rate irradiation remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the differential expression of DNA repair and damage pathway related genes in the thymus of AKR/J and ICR mice after 100th day low-dose-rate irradiation. Our findings demonstrated that low-dose-rate γ -radiation suppressed tumorigenesis.

  15. Synthetic lethal interaction between the tumour suppressor STAG2 and its paralog STAG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Lorena; Cereda, Matteo; Monteverde, LeeAnn; Desai, Nikita; Ciccarelli, Francesca D

    2017-06-06

    Cohesin is a multi-protein complex that tethers sister chromatids during mitosis and mediates DNA repair, genome compartmentalisation and regulation of gene expression. Cohesin subunits frequently acquire cancer loss-of-function alterations and act as tumour suppressors in several tumour types. This has led to increased interest in cohesin as potential target in anti-cancer therapy. Here we show that the loss-of-function of STAG2, a core component of cohesin and an emerging tumour suppressor, leads to synthetic dependency of mutated cancer cells on its paralog STAG1. STAG1 and STAG2 share high sequence identity, encode mutually exclusive cohesin subunits and retain partially overlapping functions. We inhibited STAG1 and STAG2 in several cancer cell lines where the two genes have variable mutation and copy number status. In all cases, we observed that the simultaneous blocking of STAG1 and STAG2 significantly reduces cell proliferation. We further confirmed the synthetic lethal interaction developing a vector-free CRISPR system to induce STAG1/STAG2 double gene knockout. We provide strong evidence that STAG1 is a promising therapeutic target in cancers with inactivating alterations of STAG2.

  16. Tumor suppressor NDRG2 inhibits glycolysis and glutaminolysis in colorectal cancer cells by repressing c-Myc expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinyuan; Li, Jianying; Sun, Xiang; Guo, Yan; Chu, Dake; Wei, Li; Li, Xia; Yang, Guodong; Liu, Xinping; Yao, Libo; Zhang, Jian; Shen, Lan

    2015-09-22

    Cancer cells use glucose and glutamine as the major sources of energy and precursor intermediates, and enhanced glycolysis and glutamimolysis are the major hallmarks of metabolic reprogramming in cancer. Oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inactivation alter multiple intracellular signaling pathways that affect glycolysis and glutaminolysis. N-Myc downstream regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) is a tumor suppressor gene inhibiting cancer growth, metastasis and invasion. However, the role and molecular mechanism of NDRG2 in cancer metabolism remains unclear. In this study, we discovered the role of the tumor suppressor gene NDRG2 in aerobic glycolysis and glutaminolysis of cancer cells. NDRG2 inhibited glucose consumption and lactate production, glutamine consumption and glutamate production in colorectal cancer cells. Analysis of glucose transporters and the catalytic enzymes involved in glycolysis revealed that glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), hexokinase 2 (HK2), pyruvate kinase M2 isoform (PKM2) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) was significantly suppressed by NDRG2. Analysis of glutamine transporter and the catalytic enzymes involved in glutaminolysis revealed that glutamine transporter ASC amino-acid transporter 2 (ASCT2) and glutaminase 1 (GLS1) was also significantly suppressed by NDRG2. Transcription factor c-Myc mediated inhibition of glycolysis and glutaminolysis by NDRG2. More importantly, NDRG2 inhibited the expression of c-Myc by suppressing the expression of β-catenin, which can transcriptionally activate C-MYC gene in nucleus. In addition, the growth and proliferation of colorectal cancer cells were suppressed significantly by NDRG2 through inhibition of glycolysis and glutaminolysis. Taken together, these findings indicate that NDRG2 functions as an essential regulator in glycolysis and glutaminolysis via repression of c-Myc, and acts as a suppressor of carcinogenesis through coordinately targeting glucose and glutamine transporter, multiple catalytic

  17. Modulator of apoptosis 1 (MOAP-1) is a tumor suppressor protein linked to the RASSF1A protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jennifer; Salla, Mohamed; Zare, Alaa; Wong, Yoke; Luong, Le; Volodko, Natalia; Svystun, Orysya; Flood, Kayla; Lim, Jonathan; Sung, Miranda; Dyck, Jason R B; Tan, Chong Teik; Su, Yu-Chin; Yu, Victor C; Mackey, John; Baksh, Shairaz

    2015-10-02

    Modulator of apoptosis 1 (MOAP-1) is a BH3-like protein that plays key roles in cell death or apoptosis. It is an integral partner to the tumor suppressor protein, Ras association domain family 1A (RASSF1A), and functions to activate the Bcl-2 family pro-apoptotic protein Bax. Although RASSF1A is now considered a bona fide tumor suppressor protein, the role of MOAP-1 as a tumor suppressor protein has yet to be determined. In this study, we present several lines of evidence from cancer databases, immunoblotting of cancer cells, proliferation, and xenograft assays as well as DNA microarray analysis to demonstrate the role of MOAP-1 as a tumor suppressor protein. Frequent loss of MOAP-1 expression, in at least some cancers, appears to be attributed to mRNA down-regulation and the rapid proteasomal degradation of MOAP-1 that could be reversed utilizing the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Overexpression of MOAP-1 in several cancer cell lines resulted in reduced tumorigenesis and up-regulation of genes involved in cancer regulatory pathways that include apoptosis (p53, Fas, and MST1), DNA damage control (poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase and ataxia telangiectasia mutated), those within the cell metabolism (IR-α, IR-β, and AMP-activated protein kinase), and a stabilizing effect on microtubules. The loss of RASSF1A (an upstream regulator of MOAP-1) is one of the earliest detectable epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor proteins in cancer, and we speculate that the additional loss of function of MOAP-1 may be a second hit to functionally compromise the RASSF1A/MOAP-1 death receptor-dependent pathway and drive tumorigenesis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Modulator of Apoptosis 1 (MOAP-1) Is a Tumor Suppressor Protein Linked to the RASSF1A Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jennifer; Salla, Mohamed; Zare, Alaa; Wong, Yoke; Luong, Le; Volodko, Natalia; Svystun, Orysya; Flood, Kayla; Lim, Jonathan; Sung, Miranda; Dyck, Jason R. B.; Tan, Chong Teik; Su, Yu-Chin; Yu, Victor C.; Mackey, John; Baksh, Shairaz

    2015-01-01

    Modulator of apoptosis 1 (MOAP-1) is a BH3-like protein that plays key roles in cell death or apoptosis. It is an integral partner to the tumor suppressor protein, Ras association domain family 1A (RASSF1A), and functions to activate the Bcl-2 family pro-apoptotic protein Bax. Although RASSF1A is now considered a bona fide tumor suppressor protein, the role of MOAP-1 as a tumor suppressor protein has yet to be determined. In this study, we present several lines of evidence from cancer databases, immunoblotting of cancer cells, proliferation, and xenograft assays as well as DNA microarray analysis to demonstrate the role of MOAP-1 as a tumor suppressor protein. Frequent loss of MOAP-1 expression, in at least some cancers, appears to be attributed to mRNA down-regulation and the rapid proteasomal degradation of MOAP-1 that could be reversed utilizing the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Overexpression of MOAP-1 in several cancer cell lines resulted in reduced tumorigenesis and up-regulation of genes involved in cancer regulatory pathways that include apoptosis (p53, Fas, and MST1), DNA damage control (poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase and ataxia telangiectasia mutated), those within the cell metabolism (IR-α, IR-β, and AMP-activated protein kinase), and a stabilizing effect on microtubules. The loss of RASSF1A (an upstream regulator of MOAP-1) is one of the earliest detectable epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor proteins in cancer, and we speculate that the additional loss of function of MOAP-1 may be a second hit to functionally compromise the RASSF1A/MOAP-1 death receptor-dependent pathway and drive tumorigenesis. PMID:26269600

  19. Transducer of ERBB2.1 (TOB1 as a Tumor Suppressor: A Mechanistic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun Seok Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Transducer of ERBB2.1 (TOB1 is a tumor-suppressor protein, which functions as a negative regulator of the receptor tyrosine-kinase ERBB2. As most of the other tumor suppressor proteins, TOB1 is inactivated in many human cancers. Homozygous deletion of TOB1 in mice is reported to be responsible for cancer development in the lung, liver, and lymph node, whereas the ectopic overexpression of TOB1 shows anti-proliferation, and a decrease in the migration and invasion abilities on cancer cells. Biochemical studies revealed that the anti-proliferative activity of TOB1 involves mRNA deadenylation and is associated with the reduction of both cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK expressions and the induction of CDK inhibitors. Moreover, TOB1 interacts with an oncogenic signaling mediator, β-catenin, and inhibits β-catenin-regulated gene transcription. TOB1 antagonizes the v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene (AKT signaling and induces cancer cell apoptosis by activating BCL2-associated X (BAX protein and inhibiting the BCL-2 and BCL-XL expressions. The tumor-specific overexpression of TOB1 results in the activation of other tumor suppressor proteins, such as mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 4 (SMAD4 and phosphatase and tensin homolog-10 (PTEN, and blocks tumor progression. TOB1-overexpressing cancer cells have limited potential of growing as xenograft tumors in nude mice upon subcutaneous implantation. This review addresses the molecular basis of TOB1 tumor suppressor function with special emphasis on its regulation of intracellular signaling pathways.

  20. Tumor suppressor gene p16/INK4A/CDKN2A-dependent regulation into and out of the cell cycle in a spontaneous canine model of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Payal; Sandey, Maninder; DeInnocentes, Patricia; Bird, R Curtis

    2013-06-01

    p16/INK4A/CDKN2A is an important tumor suppressor gene that arrests cell cycle in G1 phase inhibiting binding of CDK4/6 with cyclin D1, leaving the Rb tumor suppressor protein unphosphorylated and E2F bound and inactive. We hypothesized that p16 has a role in exit from cell cycle that becomes defective in cancer cells. Well characterized p16-defective canine mammary cancer cell lines (CMT28, CMT27, and CMT12), derived stably p16-transfected CMT cell clones (CMT27A, CMT27H, CMT28A, and CMT28F), and normal canine fibroblasts (NCF), were used to investigate expression of p16 after serum starvation into quiescence followed by re-feeding to induce cell cycle re-entry. The parental CMT cell lines used lack p16 expression either at the mRNA or protein expression levels, while p27 and other p16-associated proteins, including CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D1, and Rb, were expressed. We have successfully demonstrated cell cycle arrest and relatively synchronous cell cycle re-entry in parental CMT12, CMT28 and NCF cells as well as p16 transfected CMT27A, CMT27H, CMT28A, and CMT28F cells and confirmed this by (3)H-thymidine incorporation and flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle phase distribution. p16-transfected CMT27A and CMT27H cells exited cell cycle post-serum-starvation in contrast to parental CMT27 cells. NCF, CMT27A, and CMT28F cells expressed upregulated levels of p27 and p16 mRNA, post-serum starvation, as cells exited cell cycle and entered quiescence. Because quiescence and differentiation are associated with increased levels of p27, our data demonstrating that p16 was upregulated along with p27 during quiescence, suggests a potential role for p16 in maintaining these non-proliferative states. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Comparative mapping reveals similar linkage of functional genes to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    logous genes and QTL of yield-related traits by silico map- ping and population mapping in O. sativa. Our results revealed that B. napus and O. sativa shared homologous se- quences of genes with similar functions, as well as consistent linkage relationships between genes and agronomic traits. Materials and methods.

  2. Suppressors of DnaAATP imposed overinitiation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Riber, Leise; Cohen, Malene

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is limited by the supply of DnaA associated with ATP. Cells deficient in RIDA (Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA) due to a deletion of the hda gene accumulate suppressor mutations (hsm) to counteract the overinitiation caused by an elevated DnaAATP level...

  3. MicroRNA-145 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting matrix metalloproteinase 11 and Rab GTPase family 27a in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, L; Wei, D; Yan, F

    2016-08-01

    Although increasing evidence has documented that microRNA-145 (miR-145) acts as a tumor suppressor in breast cancer, its exact role in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) remains poorly defined. In this study, the expression of miR-145 in human TNBC cells and samples from 30 patients was analyzed by stem-loop real-time PCR. We found that miR-145 was significantly downregulated in TNBC tissues and cells. Upregulating miR-145 in HCC1937 cells dramatically suppressed cell proliferation and induced G1-phase arrest, whereas MDA-MB-231 cells did not show growth inhibition. MiR-145 exhibited an inhibitory role in cell invasion through the post-transcriptional regulation of the novel targets MMP11 and Rab27a in TNBC cells. Additionally, miR-145 silencing could be reversed by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC). These results demonstrated that miR-145 has an inhibitory role in TNBC malignancy by targeting MMP11 and Rab27a, which might be potential therapeutic and diagnostic targets for TNBC.

  4. Differential Splicing of Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes in African- and Caucasian-American Populations: Contributing Factor in Prostate Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Sciences, Washington, District of Columbia. 3Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, NIH, Bethesda...5Department of Surgery ,Center for Prostate Disease Research, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland. 6Department of...each biopsy core was purified using the RNeasy Micro Kit (Qiagen) and interrogated with the Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST GeneChip. For miRNA

  5. Nonviral gene transfection nanoparticles: function and applications in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Indrajit; Stachowiak, Michal K; Bergey, Earl J

    2008-06-01

    In vivo transfer and expression of foreign genes allows for the elucidation of functions of genes in living organisms and generation of disease models in animals that more closely resemble the etiology of human diseases. Gene therapy holds promise for the cure of a number of diseases at the fundamental level. Synthetic "nonviral" materials are fast gaining popularity as safe and efficient vectors for delivering genes to target organs. Not only can nanoparticles function as efficient gene carriers, they also can simultaneously carry diagnostic probes for direct "real-time" visualization of gene transfer and downstream processes. This review has focused on the central nervous system (CNS) as the target for nonviral gene transfer, with special emphasis on organically modified silica (ORMOSIL) nanoparticles developed in our laboratory. These nanoparticles have shown robust gene transfer efficiency in brain cells in vivo and allowed to investigate mechanisms that control neurogenesis as well as neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. Functional analysis of the molecular interactions of TATA box-containing genes and essential genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sang-Hun; Han, Hyun Wook; Moon, Jisook

    2015-01-01

    Genes can be divided into TATA-containing genes and TATA-less genes according to the presence of TATA box elements at promoter regions. TATA-containing genes tend to be stress-responsive, whereas many TATA-less genes are known to be related to cell growth or "housekeeping" functions. In a previous study, we demonstrated that there are striking differences among four gene sets defined by the presence of TATA box (TATA-containing) and essentiality (TATA-less) with respect to number of associated transcription factors, amino acid usage, and functional annotation. Extending this research in yeast, we identified KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathways that are statistically enriched in TATA-containing or TATA-less genes and evaluated the possibility that the enriched pathways are related to stress or growth as reflected by the individual functions of the genes involved. According to their enrichment for either of these two gene sets, we sorted KEGG pathways into TATA-containing-gene-enriched pathways (TEPs) and essential-gene-enriched pathways (EEPs). As expected, genes in TEPs and EEPs exhibited opposite results in terms of functional category, transcriptional regulation, codon adaptation index, and network properties, suggesting the possibility that the bipolar patterns in these pathways also contribute to the regulation of the stress response and to cell survival. Our findings provide the novel insight that significant enrichment of TATA-binding or TATA-less genes defines pathways as stress-responsive or growth-related.

  7. Functional isotypes are not encoded by the constant region genes of the beta subunit of the T cell receptor for antigen/major histocompatibility complex

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Human T cell clones and a cDNA probe specific for constant regions of the beta subunit of the antigen/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) receptor, TiC beta 1 and TiC beta 2, were employed to determine whether these genes were differentially used by functional classes of T lymphocytes. DNA from 10 interleukin-2-dependent T cell clones including class I and class II MHC-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (n = 6), T4+ inducer T lymphocytes (n = 2), and T8+ suppressor T lymphocytes (n = 2) show...

  8. Analysis of aberrant methylation on promoter sequences of tumor suppressor genes and total DNA in sputum samples: a promising tool for early detection of COPD and lung cancer in smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzmán Leda

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a disorder associated to cigarette smoke and lung cancer (LC. Since epigenetic changes in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs are clearly important in the development of LC. In this study, we hypothesize that tobacco smokers are susceptible for methylation in the promoter region of TSGs in airway epithelial cells when compared with non-smoker subjects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of detection of genes promoter methylation in sputum specimens, as a complementary tool to identify LC biomarkers among smokers with early COPD. Methods We determined the amount of DNA in induced sputum from patients with COPD (n = 23, LC (n = 26, as well as in healthy subjects (CTR (n = 33, using a commercial kit for DNA purification, followed by absorbance measurement at 260 nm. The frequency of CDKN2A, CDH1 and MGMT promoter methylation in the same groups was determined by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP. The Fisher’s exact test was employed to compare frequency of results between different groups. Results DNA concentration was 7.4 and 5.8 times higher in LC and COPD compared to the (CTR (p  Conclusions We provide evidence that aberrant methylation of TSGs in samples of induced sputum is a useful tool for early diagnostic of lung diseases (LC and COPD in smoker subjects. Virtual slides The abstract MUST finish with the following text: Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1127865005664160

  9. Inferring gene expression dynamics via functional regression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leng Xiaoyan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporal gene expression profiles characterize the time-dynamics of expression of specific genes and are increasingly collected in current gene expression experiments. In the analysis of experiments where gene expression is obtained over the life cycle, it is of interest to relate temporal patterns of gene expression associated with different developmental stages to each other to study patterns of long-term developmental gene regulation. We use tools from functional data analysis to study dynamic changes by relating temporal gene expression profiles of different developmental stages to each other. Results We demonstrate that functional regression methodology can pinpoint relationships that exist between temporary gene expression profiles for different life cycle phases and incorporates dimension reduction as needed for these high-dimensional data. By applying these tools, gene expression profiles for pupa and adult phases are found to be strongly related to the profiles of the same genes obtained during the embryo phase. Moreover, one can distinguish between gene groups that exhibit relationships with positive and others with negative associations between later life and embryonal expression profiles. Specifically, we find a positive relationship in expression for muscle development related genes, and a negative relationship for strictly maternal genes for Drosophila, using temporal gene expression profiles. Conclusion Our findings point to specific reactivation patterns of gene expression during the Drosophila life cycle which differ in characteristic ways between various gene groups. Functional regression emerges as a useful tool for relating gene expression patterns from different developmental stages, and avoids the problems with large numbers of parameters and multiple testing that affect alternative approaches.

  10. Extravirgin olive oil up-regulates CB₁ tumor suppressor gene in human colon cancer cells and in rat colon via epigenetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, Andrea; Falconi, Anastasia; Di Germanio, Clara; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Costa, Antonio; Caramuta, Stefano; Del Carlo, Michele; Compagnone, Dario; Dainese, Enrico; Cifani, Carlo; Maccarrone, Mauro; D'Addario, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Extravirgin olive oil (EVOO) represents the typical lipid source of the Mediterranean diet, an eating habit pattern that has been associated with a significant reduction of cancer risk. Diet is the more studied environmental factor in epigenetics, and many evidences suggest dysregulation of epigenetic pathways in cancer. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of EVOO and its phenolic compounds on endocannabinoid system (ECS) gene expression via epigenetic regulation in both human colon cancer cells (Caco-2) and rats exposed to short- and long-term dietary EVOO. We observed a selective and transient up-regulation of CNR1 gene - encoding for type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB₁) - that was evoked by exposure of Caco-2 cells to EVOO (100 ppm), its phenolic extracts (OPE, 50 μM) or authentic hydroxytyrosol (HT, 50 μM) for 24 h. None of the other major elements of the ECS (i.e., CB₂; GPR55 and TRPV1 receptors; and NAPE-PLD, DAGL, FAAH and MAGL enzymes) was affected at any time point. The stimulatory effect of OPE and HT on CB₁ expression was inversely correlated to DNA methylation at CNR1 promoter and was associated with reduced proliferation of Caco-2 cells. Interestingly, CNR1 gene was less expressed in Caco-2 cells when compared to normal colon mucosa cells, and again this effect was associated with higher level of DNA methylation at CNR1. Moreover, in agreement with the in vitro studies, we also observed a remarkable (~4-fold) and selective increase in CB₁ expression in the colon of rats receiving dietary EVOO supplementation for 10 days. Consistently, CpG methylation of rat Cnr1 promoter, miR23a and miR-301a, previously shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and predicted to target CB₁ mRNA, was reduced after EVOO administration down to ~50% of controls. Taken together, our findings demonstrating CB₁ gene expression modulation by EVOO or its phenolic compounds via epigenetic mechanism, both in vitro and in vivo, may

  11. MicroRNA-429 induces tumorigenesis of human non-small cell lung cancer cells and targets multiple tumor suppressor genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Yaoguo; Xu, Shidong; Ma, Jianqun; Wu, Jun [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 150 Haping Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Jin, Shi; Cao, Shoubo [Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 150 Haping Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Yu, Yan, E-mail: yuyan@hrbmu.edu.cn [Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 150 Haping Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • MiR-429 expression is upregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). • MiR-429 inhibits PTEN, RASSF8 and TIMP2 expression. • MiR-429 promotes metastasis and proliferation. • We report important regulatory mechanisms involved in NSCLC progression. • MiR-429 is a potential therapeutic target and diagnostic marker. - Abstract: Lung cancer is the major cause of cancer death globally. MicroRNAs are evolutionally conserved small noncoding RNAs that are critical for the regulation of gene expression. Aberrant expression of microRNA (miRNA) has been implicated in cancer initiation and progression. In this study, we demonstrated that the expression of miR-429 are often upregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared with normal lung tissues, and its expression level is also increased in NSCLC cell lines compared with normal lung cells. Overexpression of miR-429 in A549 NSCLC cells significantly promoted cell proliferation, migration and invasion, whereas inhibition of miR-429 inhibits these effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-429 down-regulates PTEN, RASSF8 and TIMP2 expression by directly targeting the 3′-untranslated region of these target genes. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-429 plays an important role in promoting the proliferation and metastasis of NSCLC cells and is a potential target for NSCLC therapy.

  12. Phase I clinical trial of systemically administered TUSC2(FUS1-nanoparticles mediating functional gene transfer in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Lu

    Full Text Available Tumor suppressor gene TUSC2/FUS1 (TUSC2 is frequently inactivated early in lung cancer development. TUSC2 mediates apoptosis in cancer cells but not normal cells by upregulation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. No drug strategies currently exist targeting loss-of-function genetic abnormalities. We report the first in-human systemic gene therapy clinical trial of tumor suppressor gene TUSC2.Patients with recurrent and/or metastatic lung cancer previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy were treated with escalating doses of intravenous N-[1-(2,3-dioleoyloxypropyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride (DOTAP:cholesterol nanoparticles encapsulating a TUSC2 expression plasmid (DOTAP:chol-TUSC2 every 3 weeks.Thirty-one patients were treated at 6 dose levels (range 0.01 to 0.09 milligrams per kilogram. The MTD was determined to be 0.06 mg/kg. Five patients achieved stable disease (2.6-10.8 months, including 2 minor responses. One patient had a metabolic response on positron emission tomography (PET imaging. RT-PCR analysis detected TUSC2 plasmid expression in 7 of 8 post-treatment tumor specimens but not in pretreatment specimens and peripheral blood lymphocyte controls. Proximity ligation assay, performed on paired biopsies from 3 patients, demonstrated low background TUSC2 protein staining in pretreatment tissues compared with intense (10-25 fold increase TUSC2 protein staining in post-treatment tissues. RT-PCR gene expression profiling analysis of apoptotic pathway genes in two patients with high post-treatment levels of TUSC2 mRNA and protein showed significant post-treatment changes in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Twenty-nine genes of the 82 tested in the apoptosis array were identified by Igenuity Pathway Analysis to be significantly altered post-treatment in both patients (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.519; p<0.01.DOTAP:chol-TUSC2 can be safely administered intravenously in lung cancer patients and results in uptake of the gene

  13. Activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) functions as a tumor suppressor in colon cancer and is up-regulated upon heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackl, Christina; Stoeltzing, Oliver; Lang, Sven A; Moser, Christian; Mori, Akira; Fichtner-Feigl, Stefan; Hellerbrand, Claus; Dietmeier, Wolfgang; Schlitt, Hans J; Geissler, Edward K

    2010-01-01

    Activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) is involved in the complex process of cellular stress response. However, its exact role in cancer is discussed controversially because both tumor suppressive and oncogenic effects have been described. Here we followed-up on our previous observation that inhibition of Hsp90 may increase ATF3 expression and sought to determine the role of ATF3 in colon cancer. Regulation of ATF3 was determined in cancer cells using signaling inhibitors and a heat-shock protein-90 (Hsp90) antagonist. Human HCT116 cancer cells were stably transfected with an ATF3-shRNA or a luciferase-shRNA expression plasmid and alterations in cell motility were assessed in migration assays. The impact of ATF3 down-regulation on cancer growth and metastasis were investigated in a subcutaneous tumor model, a model of hepatic tumor growth and in a model of peritoneal carcinomatosis. Human colon cancer tissues were analyzed for ATF3 expression. The results show that therapeutic Hsp90 inhibition substantially up-regulates the expression of ATF3 in various cancer cells, including colon, gastric and pancreatic cancer. This effect was evident both in vitro and in vivo. RNAi mediated knock-down of ATF3 in HCT116 colon cancer cells significantly increased cancer cell migration in vitro. Moreover, in xenogenic mouse models, ATF3 knock-down promoted subcutaneous tumor growth and hepatic metastasis, as well as peritoneal carcinomatosis. Importantly, ATF3 expression was lower in human colon cancer specimens, as compared to corresponding normal surrounding tissues, suggesting that ATF3 may represent a down-regulated tumor suppressor in colon cancer. In conclusion, ATF3 down-regulation in colon cancer promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Considering that blocking Hsp90 induces ATF3 expression, Hsp90 inhibition may represent a valid strategy to treat metastatic colon cancer by up-regulating this anti-metastatic transcription factor

  14. A new measure for functional similarity of gene products based on Gene Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lengauer Thomas

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene Ontology (GO is a standard vocabulary of functional terms and allows for coherent annotation of gene products. These annotations provide a basis for new methods that compare gene products regarding their molecular function and biological role. Results We present a new method for comparing sets of GO terms and for assessing the functional similarity of gene products. The method relies on two semantic similarity measures; simRel and funSim. One measure (simRel is applied in the comparison of the biological processes found in different groups of organisms. The other measure (funSim is used to find functionally related gene products within the same or between different genomes. Results indicate that the method, in addition to being in good agreement with established sequence similarity approaches, also provides a means for the identification of functionally related proteins independent of evolutionary relationships. The method is also applied to estimating functional similarity between all proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to visualizing the molecular function space of yeast in a map of the functional space. A similar approach is used to visualize the functional relationships between protein families. Conclusion The approach enables the comparison of the underlying molecular biology of different taxonomic groups and provides a new comparative genomics tool identifying functionally related gene products independent of homology. The proposed map of the functional space provides a new global view on the functional relationships between gene products or protein families.

  15. The hypoxia-related microRNA miR-199a-3p displays tumor suppressor functions in ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinose, Yasuto; Sawada, Kenjiro; Nakamura, Koji; Sawada, Ikuko; Toda, Aska; Nakatsuka, Erika; Hashimoto, Kae; Mabuchi, Seiji; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Kurachi, Hirohisa; Lengyel, Ernst; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-05-10

    During the dissemination of ovarian cancer cells, the cells float in the peritoneal cavity without access to a vascular supply and so are exposed to hypoxic conditions, which may cause the ovarian cancer cells to acquire a more aggressive and malignant phenotype. In this study, we screened microRNAs (miRNAs) to identify those that displayed altered expression patterns under hypoxic conditions and then analyzed their functional roles in ovarian cancer progression. miRNA PCR arrays performed on cells from 2 ovarian cancer cell lines (CaOV3 and RMUG-S) revealed miR-199a-3p as one of the miRNAs that are downregulated under hypoxia. In silico analyses indicated that MET is one of the target genes for miR-199a-3p; subsequently, miR-199a-3p expression was found to be inversely correlated with c-Met expression in ovarian cancer. Transfection of precursor miR-199a-3p into ovarian cancer cells reduced c-Met expression and inhibited the phosphorylation of c-Met, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and AKT; in addition, proliferation, adhesion, and invasiveness were inhibited. Moreover, overexpression of miR-199a-3p in cancer cells significantly suppressed peritoneal dissemination in a xenograft model. In summary, the hypoxia-related microRNA miR-199a-3p drastically inhibits ovarian cancer progression through the downregulation of c-Met expression. Therefore, miR-199a-3p is a potential target for treating ovarian cancer dissemination.

  16. MiR-424 Promotes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Progression and Metastasis through Regulating the Tumor Suppressor Gene TNFAIP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to investigate the potential roles of miR-424 expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC metastasis and growth and its underlying mechanism. Methods: The expression of miR-424 in two NSCLC cell lines (A549 and H1975 was altered by transfection with miR-424 mimic and inhibitor. Effects of miR-424 overexpression and suppression on cells migration, invasion and colony formation were analyzed. Target genes for miR-424 were predicted using bioinformatics method and then verified using luciferase assay. Effects of miR-424 expression on cell migration, invasion and proliferation were reanalyzed on the condition of TNFAIP1 was silenced. Moreover, TNFAIP1 silencing and miR-424 modified A549 cells were subcutaneous injected into node BALB/c mice to confirm the regulation of miR-424 on TNFAIP1 in regulating tumor growth. Results: Compared with the control, miR-424 overexpression significantly increased the migrated and invaded cells, as well as the proliferated colonies. TNFAIP1 was a predicted target gene for miR-424, and was negatively regulated by miR-424. TNFAIP1 silence significantly increased the migrated and invaded cells compared to that in control, while these increases were abolished by miR-424 suppression. Animal experiment further evidenced miR-424 affected tumor growth by regulating TNFAIP1. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that miR-424 may be a contributor for NSCLC progression and metastasis through involving in cell migration, invasion and proliferation via inhibiting TNFAIP1. This study may provide theoretical basis for miR-424 in NSCLC target therapeutic treatment.

  17. When natural selection gives gene function the cold shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, Asher D; Jovelin, Richard

    2015-11-01

    It is tempting to invoke organismal selection as perpetually optimizing the function of any given gene. However, natural selection can drive genic functional change without improvement of biochemical activity, even to the extinction of gene activity. Detrimental mutations can creep in owing to linkage with other selectively favored loci. Selection can promote functional degradation, irrespective of genetic drift, when adaptation occurs by loss of gene function. Even stabilizing selection on a trait can lead to divergence of the underlying molecular constituents. Selfish genetic elements can also proliferate independent of any functional benefits to the host genome. Here we review the logic and evidence for these diverse processes acting in genome evolution. This collection of distinct evolutionary phenomena - while operating through easily understandable mechanisms - all contribute to the seemingly counterintuitive notion that maintenance or improvement of a gene's biochemical function sometimes do not determine its evolutionary fate. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The Tumor Suppressor Protein TEP1/PTEN/MMAC1 and Human Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Hong

    2002-01-01

    PTEN is an important tumor suppressor. Both inherited mutations and somatic mutations in the PTEN gene have been frequently found in a variety of human cancers, including the breast cancer, PTEN protein has been shown to possess...

  19. Structure of the Tetrameric p53 Tumor Suppressor Bound to DNA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marmorstein, Ronen

    2002-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor binds DNA as a tetramer to regulate the transcription of genes involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and alterations in the DNA-binding core domain of p53 are the most...

  20. Exploiting ontology graph for predicting sparsely annotated gene function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Cho, Hyunghoon; Zhai, ChengXiang; Berger, Bonnie; Peng, Jian

    2015-06-15

    Systematically predicting gene (or protein) function based on molecular interaction networks has become an important tool in refining and enhancing the existing annotation catalogs, such as the Gene Ontology (GO) database. However, functional labels with only a few (algorithm that independently considers each label faces a paucity of information and thus is prone to capture non-generalizable patterns in the data, resulting in poor predictive performance. There exist a variety of algorithms for function prediction, but none properly address this 'overfitting' issue of sparsely annotated functions, or do so in a manner scalable to tens of thousands of functions in the human catalog. We propose a novel function prediction algorithm, clusDCA, which transfers information between similar functional labels to alleviate the overfitting problem for sparsely annotated functions. Our method is scalable to datasets with a large number of annotations. In a cross-validation experiment in yeast, mouse and human, our method greatly outperformed previous state-of-the-art function prediction algorithms in predicting sparsely annotated functions, without sacrificing the performance on labels with sufficient information. Furthermore, we show that our method can accurately predict genes that will be assigned a functional label that has no known annotations, based only on the ontology graph structure and genes associated with other labels, which further suggests that our method effectively utilizes the similarity between gene functions. https://github.com/wangshenguiuc/clusDCA. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. Methods for transient assay of gene function in floral tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathirana Nilangani N

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is considerable interest in rapid assays or screening systems for assigning gene function. However, analysis of gene function in the flowers of some species is restricted due to the difficulty of producing stably transformed transgenic plants. As a result, experimental approaches based on transient gene expression assays are frequently used. Biolistics has long been used for transient over-expression of genes of interest, but has not been exploited for gene silencing studies. Agrobacterium-infiltration has also been used, but the focus primarily has been on the transient transformation of leaf tissue. Results Two constructs, one expressing an inverted repeat of the Antirrhinum majus (Antirrhinum chalcone synthase gene (CHS and the other an inverted repeat of the Antirrhinum transcription factor gene Rosea1, were shown to effectively induce CHS and Rosea1 gene silencing, respectively, when introduced biolistically into petal tissue of Antirrhinum flowers developing in vitro. A high-throughput vector expressing the Antirrhinum CHS gene attached to an inverted repeat of the nos terminator was also shown to be effective. Silencing spread systemically to create large zones of petal tissue lacking pigmentation, with transmission of the silenced state spreading both laterally within the affected epidermal cell layer and into lower cell layers, including the epidermis of the other petal surface. Transient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of petal tissue of tobacco and petunia flowers in situ or detached was also achieved, using expression of the reporter genes GUS and GFP to visualise transgene expression. Conclusion We demonstrate the feasibility of using biolistics-based transient RNAi, and transient transformation of petal tissue via Agrobacterium infiltration to study gene function in petals. We have also produced a vector for high throughput gene silencing studies, incorporating the option of using T-A cloning to

  2. Human Intellectual Disability Genes Form Conserved Functional Modules in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oortveld, Merel A. W.; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Oti, Martin; Nijhof, Bonnie; Fernandes, Ana Clara; Kochinke, Korinna; Castells-Nobau, Anna; van Engelen, Eva; Ellenkamp, Thijs; Eshuis, Lilian; Galy, Anne; van Bokhoven, Hans; Habermann, Bianca; Brunner, Han G.; Zweier, Christiane; Verstreken, Patrik; Huynen, Martijn A.; Schenck, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual Disability (ID) disorders, defined by an IQ below 70, are genetically and phenotypically highly heterogeneous. Identification of common molecular pathways underlying these disorders is crucial for understanding the molecular basis of cognition and for the development of therapeutic intervention strategies. To systematically establish their functional connectivity, we used transgenic RNAi to target 270 ID gene orthologs in the Drosophila eye. Assessment of neuronal function in behavioral and electrophysiological assays and multiparametric morphological analysis identified phenotypes associated with knockdown of 180 ID gene orthologs. Most of these genotype-phenotype associations were novel. For example, we uncovered 16 genes that are required for basal neurotransmission and have not previously been implicated in this process in any system or organism. ID gene orthologs with morphological eye phenotypes, in contrast to genes without phenotypes, are relatively highly expressed in the human nervous system and are enriched for neuronal functions, suggesting that eye phenotyping can distinguish different classes of ID genes. Indeed, grouping genes by Drosophila phenotype uncovered 26 connected functional modules. Novel links between ID genes successfully predicted that MYCN, PIGV and UPF3B regulate synapse development. Drosophila phenotype groups show, in addition to ID, significant phenotypic similarity also in humans, indicating that functional modules are conserved. The combined data indicate that ID disorders, despite their extreme genetic diversity, are caused by disruption of a limited number of highly connected functional modules. PMID:24204314

  3. FOXP3 as X-linked Tumor Suppressor

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lizhong; Liu, Runhua; Ribick, Mark; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2010-01-01

    The FOXP3 gene was initially identified because its mutation caused lethal autoimmune diseases in mouse and human. Mice with heterozygous mutation of Foxp3 succumb to mammary tumor spontaneously, while those with prostate-specific deletion develop prostate intraepithelial neoplasia. Somatic mutations, deletion and epigenetic inactivation of FOXP3 are widespread among human breast and prostate cancers. Unlike autosomal tumor suppressor genes that were usually inactivated by mutations in both a...

  4. Pten function in zebrafish : Anything but a fish story

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stumpf, Miriam; Choorapoikayil, Suma; den Hertog, J.

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish is an excellent model system for the analysis of gene function. We and others use zebrafish to investigate the function of the tumor suppressor, Pten, in tumorigenesis and embryonic development. Zebrafish have two pten genes, ptena and ptenb. The recently identified N-terminal extension of

  5. Pten function in zebrafish : Anything but a fish story

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stumpf, Miriam; Choorapoikayil, Suma; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish is an excellent model system for the analysis of gene function. We and others use zebrafish to investigate the function of the tumor suppressor, Pten, in tumorigenesis and embryonic development. Zebrafish have two pten genes, ptena and ptenb. The recently identified N-terminal extension of

  6. Combining many interaction networks to predict gene function and analyze gene lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Sara; Morris, Quaid

    2012-05-01

    In this article, we review how interaction networks can be used alone or in combination in an automated fashion to provide insight into gene and protein function. We describe the concept of a "gene-recommender system" that can be applied to any large collection of interaction networks to make predictions about gene or protein function based on a query list of proteins that share a function of interest. We discuss these systems in general and focus on one specific system, GeneMANIA, that has unique features and uses different algorithms from the majority of other systems. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Barley Stem Rust Resistance Genes: Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andris Kleinhofs

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Rusts are biotrophic pathogens that attack many plant species but are particularly destructive on cereal crops. The stem rusts (caused by have historically caused severe crop losses and continue to threaten production today. Barley ( L. breeders have controlled major stem rust epidemics since the 1940s with a single durable resistance gene . As new epidemics have threatened, additional resistance genes were identified to counter new rust races, such as the complex locus against races QCCJ and TTKSK. To understand how these genes work, we initiated research to clone and characterize them. The gene encodes a unique protein kinase with dual kinase domains, an active kinase, and a pseudokinase. Function of both domains is essential to confer resistance. The and genes are closely linked and function coordinately to confer resistance to several wheat ( L. stem rust races, including the race TTKSK (also called Ug99 that threatens the world's barley and wheat crops. The gene encodes typical resistance gene domains NBS, LRR, and protein kinase but is unique in that all three domains reside in a single gene, a previously unknown structure among plant disease resistance genes. The gene encodes an actin depolymerizing factor that functions in cytoskeleton rearrangement.

  8. Investigating Gene Function in Cereal Rust Fungi by Plant-Mediated Virus-Induced Gene Silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Vinay; Bakkeren, Guus

    2017-01-01

    Cereal rust fungi are destructive pathogens, threatening grain production worldwide. Targeted breeding for resistance utilizing host resistance genes has been effective. However, breakdown of resistance occurs frequently and continued efforts are needed to understand how these fungi overcome resistance and to expand the range of available resistance genes. Whole genome sequencing, transcriptomic and proteomic studies followed by genome-wide computational and comparative analyses have identified large repertoire of genes in rust fungi among which are candidates predicted to code for pathogenicity and virulence factors. Some of these genes represent defence triggering avirulence effectors. However, functions of most genes still needs to be assessed to understand the biology of these obligate biotrophic pathogens. Since genetic manipulations such as gene deletion and genetic transformation are not yet feasible in rust fungi, performing functional gene studies is challenging. Recently, Host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) has emerged as a useful tool to characterize gene function in rust fungi while infecting and growing in host plants. We utilized Barley stripe mosaic virus-mediated virus induced gene silencing (BSMV-VIGS) to induce HIGS of candidate rust fungal genes in the wheat host to determine their role in plant-fungal interactions. Here, we describe the methods for using BSMV-VIGS in wheat for functional genomics study in cereal rust fungi.

  9. PoplarGene: poplar gene network and resource for mining functional information for genes from woody plants

    OpenAIRE

    Qi Liu; Changjun Ding; Yanguang Chu; Jiafei Chen; Weixi Zhang; Bingyu Zhang; Qinjun Huang; Xiaohua Su

    2016-01-01

    Poplar is not only an important resource for the production of paper, timber and other wood-based products, but it has also emerged as an ideal model system for studying woody plants. To better understand the biological processes underlying various traits in poplar, e.g., wood development, a comprehensive functional gene interaction network is highly needed. Here, we constructed a genome-wide functional gene network for poplar (covering ~70% of the 41,335 poplar genes) and created the network...

  10. In silico prioritisation of candidate genes for prokaryotic gene function discovery: an application of phylogenetic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Frank P Y; Coiera, Enrico; Lan, Ruiting; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2009-03-17

    In silico candidate gene prioritisation (CGP) aids the discovery of gene functions by ranking genes according to an objective relevance score. While several CGP methods have been described for identifying human disease genes, corresponding methods for prokaryotic gene function discovery are lacking. Here we present two prokaryotic CGP methods, based on phylogenetic profiles, to assist with this task. Using gene occurrence patterns in sample genomes, we developed two CGP methods (statistical and inductive CGP) to assist with the discovery of bacterial gene functions. Statistical CGP exploits the differences in gene frequency against phenotypic groups, while inductive CGP applies supervised machine learning to identify gene occurrence pattern across genomes. Three rediscovery experiments were designed to evaluate the CGP frameworks. The first experiment attempted to rediscover peptidoglycan genes with 417 published genome sequences. Both CGP methods achieved best areas under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.911 in Escherichia coli K-12 (EC-K12) and 0.978 Streptococcus agalactiae 2603 (SA-2603) genomes, with an average improvement in precision of >3.2-fold and a maximum of >27-fold using statistical CGP. A median AUC of >0.95 could still be achieved with as few as 10 genome examples in each group of genome examples in the rediscovery of the peptidoglycan metabolism genes. In the second experiment, a maximum of 109-fold improvement in precision was achieved in the rediscovery of anaerobic fermentation genes in EC-K12. The last experiment attempted to rediscover genes from 31 metabolic pathways in SA-2603, where 14 pathways achieved AUC >0.9 and 28 pathways achieved AUC >0.8 with the best inductive CGP algorithms. Our results demonstrate that the two CGP methods can assist with the study of functionally uncategorised genomic regions and discovery of bacterial gene-function relationships. Our rediscovery experiments also provide a set of standard tasks

  11. In silico prioritisation of candidate genes for prokaryotic gene function discovery: an application of phylogenetic profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Ruiting

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In silico candidate gene prioritisation (CGP aids the discovery of gene functions by ranking genes according to an objective relevance score. While several CGP methods have been described for identifying human disease genes, corresponding methods for prokaryotic gene function discovery are lacking. Here we present two prokaryotic CGP methods, based on phylogenetic profiles, to assist with this task. Results Using gene occurrence patterns in sample genomes, we developed two CGP methods (statistical and inductive CGP to assist with the discovery of bacterial gene functions. Statistical CGP exploits the differences in gene frequency against phenotypic groups, while inductive CGP applies supervised machine learning to identify gene occurrence pattern across genomes. Three rediscovery experiments were designed to evaluate the CGP frameworks. The first experiment attempted to rediscover peptidoglycan genes with 417 published genome sequences. Both CGP methods achieved best areas under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of 0.911 in Escherichia coli K-12 (EC-K12 and 0.978 Streptococcus agalactiae 2603 (SA-2603 genomes, with an average improvement in precision of >3.2-fold and a maximum of >27-fold using statistical CGP. A median AUC of >0.95 could still be achieved with as few as 10 genome examples in each group of genome examples in the rediscovery of the peptidoglycan metabolism genes. In the second experiment, a maximum of 109-fold improvement in precision was achieved in the rediscovery of anaerobic fermentation genes in EC-K12. The last experiment attempted to rediscover genes from 31 metabolic pathways in SA-2603, where 14 pathways achieved AUC >0.9 and 28 pathways achieved AUC >0.8 with the best inductive CGP algorithms. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that the two CGP methods can assist with the study of functionally uncategorised genomic regions and discovery of bacterial gene-function relationships. Our

  12. Functionally enigmatic genes: a case study of the brain ignorome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh K Pandey

    Full Text Available What proportion of genes with intense and selective expression in specific tissues, cells, or systems are still almost completely uncharacterized with respect to biological function? In what ways do these functionally enigmatic genes differ from well-studied genes? To address these two questions, we devised a computational approach that defines so-called ignoromes. As proof of principle, we extracted and analyzed a large subset of genes with intense and selective expression in brain. We find that publications associated with this set are highly skewed--the top 5% of genes absorb 70% of the relevant literature. In contrast, approximately 20% of genes have essentially no neuroscience literature. Analysis of the ignorome over the past decade demonstrates that it is stubbornly persistent, and the rapid expansion of the neuroscience literature has not had the expected effect on numbers of these genes. Surprisingly, ignorome genes do not differ from well-studied genes in terms of connectivity in coexpression networks. Nor do they differ with respect to numbers of orthologs, paralogs, or protein domains. The major distinguishing characteristic between these sets of genes is date of discovery, early discovery being associated with greater research momentum--a genomic bandwagon effect. Finally we ask to what extent massive genomic, imaging, and phenotype data sets can be used to provide high-throughput functional annotation for an entire ignorome. In a majority of cases we have been able to extract and add significant information for these neglected genes. In several cases--ELMOD1, TMEM88B, and DZANK1--we have exploited sequence polymorphisms, large phenome data sets, and reverse genetic methods to evaluate the function of ignorome genes.

  13. Functionally Enigmatic Genes: A Case Study of the Brain Ignorome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Lu, Lu; Wang, Xusheng; Homayouni, Ramin; Williams, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    What proportion of genes with intense and selective expression in specific tissues, cells, or systems are still almost completely uncharacterized with respect to biological function? In what ways do these functionally enigmatic genes differ from well-studied genes? To address these two questions, we devised a computational approach that defines so-called ignoromes. As proof of principle, we extracted and analyzed a large subset of genes with intense and selective expression in brain. We find that publications associated with this set are highly skewed—the top 5% of genes absorb 70% of the relevant literature. In contrast, approximately 20% of genes have essentially no neuroscience literature. Analysis of the ignorome over the past decade demonstrates that it is stubbornly persistent, and the rapid expansion of the neuroscience literature has not had the expected effect on numbers of these genes. Surprisingly, ignorome genes do not differ from well-studied genes in terms of connectivity in coexpression networks. Nor do they differ with respect to numbers of orthologs, paralogs, or protein domains. The major distinguishing characteristic between these sets of genes is date of discovery, early discovery being associated with greater research momentum—a genomic bandwagon effect. Finally we ask to what extent massive genomic, imaging, and phenotype data sets can be used to provide high-throughput functional annotation for an entire ignorome. In a majority of cases we have been able to extract and add significant information for these neglected genes. In several cases—ELMOD1, TMEM88B, and DZANK1—we have exploited sequence polymorphisms, large phenome data sets, and reverse genetic methods to evaluate the function of ignorome genes. PMID:24523945

  14. Zebrafish neurofibromatosis type 1 genes have redundant functions in tumorigenesis and embryonic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimann Shin

    2012-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 is a common, dominantly inherited genetic disorder that results from mutations in the neurofibromin 1 (NF1 gene. Affected individuals demonstrate abnormalities in neural-crest-derived tissues that include hyperpigmented skin lesions and benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors. NF1 patients also have a predisposition to malignancies including juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML, optic glioma, glioblastoma, schwannoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs. In an effort to better define the molecular and cellular determinants of NF1 disease pathogenesis in vivo, we employed targeted mutagenesis strategies to generate zebrafish harboring stable germline mutations in nf1a and nf1b, orthologues of NF1. Animals homozygous for loss-of-function alleles of nf1a or nf1b alone are phenotypically normal and viable. Homozygous loss of both alleles in combination generates larval phenotypes that resemble aspects of the human disease and results in larval lethality between 7 and 10 days post fertilization. nf1-null larvae demonstrate significant central and peripheral nervous system defects. These include aberrant proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs, dysmorphic myelin sheaths and hyperplasia of Schwann cells. Loss of nf1 contributes to tumorigenesis as demonstrated by an accelerated onset and increased penetrance of high-grade gliomas and MPNSTs in adult nf1a+/−; nf1b−/−; p53e7/e7 animals. nf1-null larvae also demonstrate significant motor and learning defects. Importantly, we identify and quantitatively analyze a novel melanophore phenotype in nf1-null larvae, providing the first animal model of the pathognomonic pigmentation lesions of NF1. Together, these findings support a role for nf1a and nf1b as potent tumor suppressor genes that also function in the development of both central and peripheral glial cells as well as melanophores in zebrafish.

  15. Understanding doublecortin-like kinase gene function through transgenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenk, Geert J.

    2010-01-01

    Doublecortin (DCX) and DCX-domain containing Doublecortin-Like Kinase (DCLK) gene splice variants function during embryonic development, where they play a role in microtubule binding. Although a role for the DCLK gene during embryogenesis is clearly established, it encodes multiple, different

  16. Unfurling of the band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM) domain of the merlin tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yogesha, S.D.; Sharff, Andrew J.; Giovannini, Marco; Bricogne, Gerard; Izard, Tina (House Ear); (Globel Phasing); (Scripps)

    2014-10-02

    The merlin-1 tumor suppressor is encoded by the Neurofibromatosis-2 (Nf2) gene and loss-of-function Nf2 mutations lead to nervous system tumors in man and to several tumor types in mice. Merlin is an ERM (ezrin, radixin, moesin) family cytoskeletal protein that interacts with other ERM proteins and with components of cell-cell adherens junctions (AJs). Merlin stabilizes the links of AJs to the actin cytoskeleton. Thus, its loss destabilizes AJs, promoting cell migration and invasion, which in Nf2{sup +/-} mice leads to highly metastatic tumors. Paradoxically, the 'closed' conformation of merlin-1, where its N-terminal four-point-one, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM) domain binds to its C-terminal tail domain, directs its tumor suppressor functions. Here we report the crystal structure of the human merlin-1 head domain when crystallized in the presence of its tail domain. Remarkably, unlike other ERM head-tail interactions, this structure suggests that binding of the tail provokes dimerization and dynamic movement and unfurling of the F2 motif of the FERM domain. We conclude the 'closed' tumor suppressor conformer of merlin-1 is in fact an 'open' dimer whose functions are disabled by Nf2 mutations that disrupt this architecture.

  17. Correlation of transcription of MALAT-1, a novel noncoding RNA, with deregulated expression of tumor suppressor p53 in small DNA tumor virus models

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffers, Liesl K.; Duan, Kaiwen; Ellies, Lesley G.; Seaman, William T.; Burger-Calderon, Raquel A.; Diatchenko, Luda B.; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Although metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript (MALAT)-1 is known to be consistently upregulated in several epithelial malignancies, little is known about its function or regulation. We therefore examined the relationship between MALAT-1 expression and candidate modulators such as DNA tumor virus oncoproteins human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 E6 and E7, BK virus T antigen (BKVTAg), mouse polyoma virus middle T antigen (MPVmTAg) and tumor suppressor genes p53 and pRb. Using suppress...

  18. The ALMT Gene Family Performs Multiple Functions in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The aluminium activated malate transporter (ALMT gene family is named after the first member of the family identified in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. The product of this gene controls resistance to aluminium (Al toxicity. ALMT genes encode transmembrane proteins that function as anion channels and perform multiple functions involving the transport of organic anions (e.g., carboxylates and inorganic anions in cells. They share a PF11744 domain and are classified in the Fusaric acid resistance protein-like superfamily, CL0307. The proteins typically have five to seven transmembrane regions in the N-terminal half and a long hydrophillic C-terminal tail but predictions of secondary structure vary. Although widely spread in plants, relatively little information is available on the roles performed by other members of this family. In this review, we summarized functions of ALMT gene families, including Al resistance, stomatal function, mineral nutrition, microbe interactions, fruit acidity, light response and seed development.

  19. Developmentally distinct MYB genes encode functionally equivalent proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M M; Schiefelbein, J

    2001-05-01

    The duplication and divergence of developmental control genes is thought to have driven morphological diversification during the evolution of multicellular organisms. To examine the molecular basis of this process, we analyzed the functional relationship between two paralogous MYB transcription factor genes, WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABROUS1 (GL1), in Arabidopsis. The WER and GL1 genes specify distinct cell types and exhibit non-overlapping expression patterns during Arabidopsis development. Nevertheless, reciprocal complementation experiments with a series of gene fusions showed that WER and GL1 encode functionally equivalent proteins, and their unique roles in plant development are entirely due to differences in their cis-regulatory sequences. Similar experiments with a distantly related MYB gene (MYB2) showed that its product cannot functionally substitute for WER or GL1. Furthermore, an analysis of the WER and GL1 proteins shows that conserved sequences correspond to specific functional domains. These results provide new insights into the evolution of the MYB gene family in Arabidopsis, and, more generally, they demonstrate that novel developmental gene function may arise solely by the modification of cis-regulatory sequences.

  20. Relation between the changes of oncogene versus tumor suppressor gene interaction and the transition of cancer risk from female dominance through no sex discrimination to male dominance, as investigated by the reciprocal regression analysis of 5 human neoplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, M; Murakami, M; Kodama, T

    1998-01-01

    We have been investigating the mathematical nature of intercancer linkage that underlies the mutual regulation of cancer risks between any 2 tumors in their variations in time and space. Applications of both sequential regression test and topological manipulation of age-adjusted incidence rate (AAIR) data set enabled us to prepare the oncogene (Onc) activation profile and the tumor suppressor gene (TSG) inactivation profile for each tumor. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between the changes of 2 cancer gene profiles and the sex discrimination of cancer risk in 7 human neoplasias. Results obtained are as follows: i) The sex discrimination of cancer risk could better be defined by the use of log-transformed AAIR data rather than of untransformed AAIR data. ii) The sex discrimination of cancer risk, as calculated with the AAIR data of 47 population units of the world, is as follows: a) breast cancer (Br), M:F=1:120.2; b) thyroid cancer (Thy), M:F=1:2. 64; c) colon cancer (Co), M:F=1.18:1; d) liver cancer (Li), M:F=2. 63:1; e) lung cancer (Lu), M:F=3.66:1; f) esophageal cancer (Eso), M:F=3.68:1; g) laryngeal cancer (Lar), M:F=7.26:1. iii) Female-dominant cancers were associated with inversion (Br) or defectiveness (Thy) of male oncogene profile, whereas male-dominant cancers were associated with inversion (Lar) or defectiveness (Li, Lu and Eso) of female Onc profiles. Sex-indifferent cancer, Co, was distinguished from other tumors by the emergence of defectiveness in the TSG profiles of both sexes. TSG defectiveness was also detectable in female (Br, Thy) and bisexual (Lu) tumors. iv) The Onc vs TSG interaction, as assessed in terms of r value of the reciprocal regression analysis, was increasing in its positivity rate from the top of the female-dominant family (Br) through the sex-indifferent tumor (Co) to the bottom of the male-dominant family (Lar). In conclusion, the emergence of sex discrimination of cancer risk was positively correlated

  1. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of canine histiocytic sarcoma: A spontaneous model for human histiocytic cancer identifies deletion of tumor suppressor genes and highlights influence of genetic background on tumor behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abadie Jerome

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histiocytic malignancies in both humans and dogs are rare and poorly understood. While canine histiocytic sarcoma (HS is uncommon in the general domestic dog population, there is a strikingly high incidence in a subset of breeds, suggesting heritable predisposition. Molecular cytogenetic profiling of canine HS in these breeds would serve to reveal recurrent DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs that are breed and/or tumor associated, as well as defining those shared with human HS. This process would identify evolutionarily conserved cytogenetic changes to highlight regions of particular importance to HS biology. Methods Using genome wide array comparative genomic hybridization we assessed CNAs in 104 spontaneously occurring HS from two breeds of dog exhibiting a particularly elevated incidence of this tumor, the Bernese Mountain Dog and Flat-Coated Retriever. Recurrent CNAs were evaluated further by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and loss of heterozygosity analyses. Statistical analyses were performed to identify CNAs associated with tumor location and breed. Results Almost all recurrent CNAs identified in this study were shared between the two breeds, suggesting that they are associated more with the cancer phenotype than with breed. A subset of recurrent genomic imbalances suggested involvement of known cancer associated genes in HS pathogenesis, including deletions of the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/B, RB1 and PTEN. A small number of aberrations were unique to each breed, implying that they may contribute to the major differences in tumor location evident in these two breeds. The most highly recurrent canine CNAs revealed in this study are evolutionarily conserved with those reported in human histiocytic proliferations, suggesting that human and dog HS share a conserved pathogenesis. Conclusions The breed associated clinical features and DNA copy number aberrations exhibited by canine HS offer a valuable model

  2. Bioinformatics tools for predicting GPCR gene functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Makiko

    2014-01-01

    The automatic classification of GPCRs by bioinformatics methodology can provide functional information for new GPCRs in the whole 'GPCR proteome' and this information is important for the development of novel drugs. Since GPCR proteome is classified hierarchically, general ways for GPCR function prediction are based on hierarchical classification. Various computational tools have been developed to predict GPCR functions; those tools use not simple sequence searches but more powerful methods, such as alignment-free methods, statistical model methods, and machine learning methods used in protein sequence analysis, based on learning datasets. The first stage of hierarchical function prediction involves the discrimination of GPCRs from non-GPCRs and the second stage involves the classification of the predicted GPCR candidates into family, subfamily, and sub-subfamily levels. Then, further classification is performed according to their protein-protein interaction type: binding G-protein type, oligomerized partner type, etc. Those methods have achieved predictive accuracies of around 90 %. Finally, I described the future subject of research of the bioinformatics technique about functional prediction of GPCR.

  3. Suppressors of RNA silencing encoded by tomato leaf curl

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Whitefly-transmitted begomoviruses infecting tomato crop code for five different proteins, ORF AC4, ORF AC2 and ORF AV2 in DNA-A component, ORF BV1 in DNA-B ... In the present study suppressor function of ORF C1 of three betasatellites Tomato leaf curl Bangalore betasatellite ToLCBB-[IN:Hess:08], Cotton leaf curl ...

  4. Suppressors of RNA silencing encoded by tomato leaf curl ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study suppressor function of ORF C1 of three betasatellites Tomato leaf curl Bangalore betasatellite ToLCBB-[IN:Hess:08], Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite CLCuMB–[IN:Sri:02] and Luffa leaf distortion betasatellite LuLDB-[IN:Lu:04] were examined. Agroinfiltration of GFP-silenced Nicotiana tabaccum cv.

  5. Ranking, selecting, and prioritising genes with desirability functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley E. Lazic

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In functional genomics experiments, researchers often select genes to follow-up or validate from a long list of differentially expressed genes. Typically, sharp thresholds are used to bin genes into groups such as significant/non-significant or fold change above/below a cut-off value, and ad hoc criteria are also used such as favouring well-known genes. Binning, however, is inefficient and does not take the uncertainty of the measurements into account. Furthermore, p-values, fold-changes, and other outcomes are treated as equally important, and relevant genes may be overlooked with such an approach. Desirability functions are proposed as a way to integrate multiple selection criteria for ranking, selecting, and prioritising genes. These functions map any variable to a continuous 0–1 scale, where one is maximally desirable and zero is unacceptable. Multiple selection criteria are then combined to provide an overall desirability that is used to rank genes. In addition to p-values and fold-changes, further experimental results and information contained in databases can be easily included as criteria. The approach is demonstrated with a breast cancer microarray data set. The functions and an example data set can be found in the desiR package on CRAN (https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/desiR/ and the development version is available on GitHub (https://github.com/stanlazic/desiR.

  6. Biochemical mechanisms determine the functional compatibility of heterologous genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, Andreas; Schou, Thea S.; Munck, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Elucidating the factors governing the functional compatibility of horizontally transferred genes is important to understand bacterial evolution, including the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance, and to successfully engineer biological systems. In silico efforts and work using single-gene...... libraries have suggested that sequence composition is a strong barrier for the successful integration of heterologous genes. Here we sample 200 diverse genes, representing >80% of sequenced antibiotic resistance genes, to interrogate the factors governing genetic compatibility in new hosts. In contrast...... to previous work, we find that GC content, codon usage, and mRNA-folding energy are of minor importance for the compatibility of mechanistically diverse gene products at moderate expression. Instead, we identify the phylogenetic origin, and the dependence of a resistance mechanism on host physiology, as major...

  7. Intellectual disability, oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Bidart1 2 3 C. Coutton4 5 3. Plateforme Protéomique et Transcriptomique Clinique, Pole Recherche, CHU Grenoble, 38043 Grenoble, France; Equipe, Nanomédecine et Cerveau, Inserm U836, Grenoble Institut Neurosciences, 38000 Grenoble, France; Université Joseph Fourier, 38000 Grenoble, France; Département ...

  8. Gene-environment interactions involving functional variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Rudolph, Anja; Hopper, John L

    2017-01-01

    epidemiological breast cancer risk factors in relation to breast cancer. Analyses were conducted on up to 58,573 subjects (26,968 cases and 31,605 controls) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, in one of the largest studies of its kind. Analyses were carried out separately for estrogen receptor (ER.......01. The strongest interaction result in relation to overall breast cancer risk was found between CFLAR-rs7558475 and current smoking (ORint  = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.67-0.88, pint  = 1.8 × 10(-4) ). The interaction with the strongest statistical evidence was found between 5q14-rs7707921 and alcohol consumption (ORint =1.......36, 95% CI: 1.16-1.59, pint  = 1.9 × 10(-5) ) in relation to ER- disease risk. The remaining two gene-environment interactions were also identified in relation to ER- breast cancer risk and were found between 3p21-rs6796502 and age at menarche (ORint  = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.12-1.43, pint =1.8 × 10...

  9. Functional Analysis of an ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Gene in Botrytis cinerea by Gene Disruption

    OpenAIRE

    Masami, NAKAJIMA; Junko, SUZUKI; Takehiko, HOSAKA; Tadaaki, HIBI; Katsumi, AKUTSU; School of Agriculture, Ibaraki University; School of Agriculture, Ibaraki University; School of Agriculture, Ibaraki University; Department of Agriculture and Environmental Biology, The University of Tokyo; School of Agriculture, Ibaraki University

    2001-01-01

    The BMR1 gene encoding an ABC transporter was cloned from Botrytis cinerea. To examine the function of BMR1 in B.cinerea, we isolated BMR1-deficient mutants after gene disruption. Disruption vector pBcDF4 was constructed by replacing the BMR1-coding region with a hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene(hph)cassette. The BMR1 disruptants had an increased sensitivity to polyoxin and iprobenfos. Polyoxin and iprobenfos, structurally unrelated compounds, may therefore be substrates of BMR1.

  10. The effect of functional compensation among duplicate genes can ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gene duplicates have the inherent property of initially being functionally redundant. This means that they can compensate for the effect of deleterious variation occurring at one or more sister sites. Here, I present data bearing on evolutionary theory that illustrates the manner in which any functional adaptation in duplicate ...

  11. The effect of functional compensation among duplicate genes can ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Gene duplicates have the inherent property of initially being functionally redundant. This means that they can compensate for the effect of deleterious variation occurring at one or more sister sites. Here, I present data bearing on evolutionary theory that illustrates the manner in which any functional adaptation in ...

  12. Bioinformatic prediction and functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Cui

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study demonstrated that human KIAA0100 gene was a novel acute monocytic leukemia-associated antigen (MLAA gene. But the functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene has remained unknown to date. Here, firstly, bioinformatic prediction of human KIAA0100 gene was carried out using online softwares; Secondly, Human KIAA0100 gene expression was downregulated by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated (Cas 9 system in U937 cells. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were next evaluated in KIAA0100-knockdown U937 cells. The bioinformatic prediction showed that human KIAA0100 gene was located on 17q11.2, and human KIAA0100 protein was located in the secretory pathway. Besides, human KIAA0100 protein contained a signalpeptide, a transmembrane region, three types of secondary structures (alpha helix, extended strand, and random coil , and four domains from mitochondrial protein 27 (FMP27. The observation on functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene revealed that its downregulation inhibited cell proliferation, and promoted cell apoptosis in U937 cells. To summarize, these results suggest human KIAA0100 gene possibly comes within mitochondrial genome; moreover, it is a novel anti-apoptotic factor related to carcinogenesis or progression in acute monocytic leukemia, and may be a potential target for immunotherapy against acute monocytic leukemia.

  13. Molecular and Functional Characterization of Broccoli EMBRYONIC FLOWER 2 Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long-Fang O.; Lin, Chun-Hung; Lai, Ying-Mi; Huang, Jia-Yuan; Sung, Zinmay Renee

    2012-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins regulate major developmental processes in Arabidopsis. EMBRYONIC FLOWER 2 (EMF2), the VEFS domain-containing PcG gene, regulates diverse genetic pathways and is required for vegetative development and plant survival. Despite widespread EMF2-like sequences in plants, little is known about their function other than in Arabidopsis and rice. To study the role of EMF2 in broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica cv. Elegance) development, we identified two broccoli EMF2 (BoEMF2) genes with sequence homology to and a similar gene expression pattern to that in Arabidopsis (AtEMF2). Reducing their expression in broccoli resulted in aberrant phenotypes and gene expression patterns. BoEMF2 regulates genes involved in diverse developmental and stress programs similar to AtEMF2 in Arabidopsis. However, BoEMF2 differs from AtEMF2 in the regulation of flower organ identity, cell proliferation and elongation, and death-related genes, which may explain the distinct phenotypes. The expression of BoEMF2.1 in the Arabidopsis emf2 mutant (Rescued emf2) partially rescued the mutant phenotype and restored the gene expression pattern to that of the wild type. Many EMF2-mediated molecular and developmental functions are conserved in broccoli and Arabidopsis. Furthermore, the restored gene expression pattern in Rescued emf2 provides insights into the molecular basis of PcG-mediated growth and development. PMID:22537758

  14. Automated discovery of functional generality of human gene expression programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg K Gerber

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available An important research problem in computational biology is the identification of expression programs, sets of co-expressed genes orchestrating normal or pathological processes, and the characterization of the functional breadth of these programs. The use of human expression data compendia for discovery of such programs presents several challenges including cellular inhomogeneity within samples, genetic and environmental variation across samples, uncertainty in the numbers of programs and sample populations, and temporal behavior. We developed GeneProgram, a new unsupervised computational framework based on Hierarchical Dirichlet Processes that addresses each of the above challenges. GeneProgram uses expression data to simultaneously organize tissues into groups and genes into overlapping programs with consistent temporal behavior, to produce maps of expression programs, which are sorted by generality scores that exploit the automatically learned groupings. Using synthetic and real gene expression data, we showed that GeneProgram outperformed several popular expression analysis methods. We applied GeneProgram to a compendium of 62 short time-series gene expression datasets exploring the responses of human cells to infectious agents and immune-modulating molecules. GeneProgram produced a map of 104 expression programs, a substantial number of which were significantly enriched for genes involved in key signaling pathways and/or bound by NF-kappaB transcription factors in genome-wide experiments. Further, GeneProgram discovered expression programs that appear to implicate surprising signaling pathways or receptor types in the response to infection, including Wnt signaling and neurotransmitter receptors. We believe the discovered map of expression programs involved in the response to infection will be useful for guiding future biological experiments; genes from programs with low generality scores might serve as new drug targets that exhibit minimal

  15. Tumor Suppressor RARRES1 Regulates DLG2, PP2A, VCP, EB1, and Ankrd26

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad J. Sahab, Michael D. Hall, Lihua Zhang, Amrita K. Cheema, Stephen W. Byers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinoic Acid Receptor Responder (RARRES1 initially identified as a novel retinoic acid receptor regulated gene in the skin is a putative tumor suppressor of unknown function. RARRES1 was knocked down in immortalized human prostatic epithelial cell line PWR-1E cells and differential protein expression was identified using differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI mass spectrometry and western Blot analysis excluding highly abundant proteins routinely identified in almost all proteomics projects. Knock-down of RARRES1: 1- down-regulates PP2A, an enzyme involved in the negative regulation of the growth hormone-stimulated signal transduction pathways; 2- down-regulates Valosin-containing protein causing impaired autophagy; 3- up-regulates the tumor suppressor disks large 2; 4- up-regulates Ankrd26 that belongs to the POTE family of genes that are highly expressed in cancer patients with poor outcome; and 5- down-regulates EB1, a protein that is involved in spindle dynamics and chromosome alignment during mitosis.

  16. MicroRNA-31 functions as an oncogenic microRNA in mouse and human lung cancer cells by repressing specific tumor suppressors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xi; Sempere, Lorenzo F; Ouyang, Haoxu

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression. It has been suggested that obtaining miRNA expression profiles can improve classification, diagnostic, and prognostic information in oncology. Here, we sought to comprehensively identify the miRNAs that are overexpressed in lung cancer by conducting mi......RNA microarray expression profiling on normal lung versus adjacent lung cancers from transgenic mice. We found that miR-136, miR-376a, and miR-31 were each prominently overexpressed in murine lung cancers. Real-time RT-PCR and in situ hybridization (ISH) assays confirmed these miRNA expression profiles in paired...... normal-malignant lung tissues from mice and humans. Engineered knockdown of miR-31, but not other highlighted miRNAs, substantially repressed lung cancer cell growth and tumorigenicity in a dose-dependent manner. Using a bioinformatics approach, we identified miR-31 target mRNAs and independently...

  17. Polyploidization altered gene functions in cotton (Gossypium spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhanyou; Yu, John Z; Cho, Jaemin; Yu, Jing; Kohel, Russell J; Percy, Richard G

    2010-12-16

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is an important crop plant that is widely grown to produce both natural textile fibers and cottonseed oil. Cotton fibers, the economically more important product of the cotton plant, are seed trichomes derived from individual cells of the epidermal layer of the seed coat. It has been known for a long time that large numbers of genes determine the development of cotton fiber, and more recently it has been determined that these genes are distributed across At and Dt subgenomes of tetraploid AD cottons. In the present study, the organization and evolution of the fiber development genes were investigated through the construction of an integrated genetic and physical map of fiber development genes whose functions have been verified and confirmed. A total of 535 cotton fiber development genes, including 103 fiber transcription factors, 259 fiber development genes, and 173 SSR-contained fiber ESTs, were analyzed at the subgenome level. A total of 499 fiber related contigs were selected and assembled. Together these contigs covered about 151 Mb in physical length, or about 6.7% of the tetraploid cotton genome. Among the 499 contigs, 397 were anchored onto individual chromosomes. Results from our studies on the distribution patterns of the fiber development genes and transcription factors between the At and Dt subgenomes showed that more transcription factors were from Dt subgenome than At, whereas more fiber development genes were from At subgenome than Dt. Combining our mapping results with previous reports that more fiber QTLs were mapped in Dt subgenome than At subgenome, the results suggested a new functional hypothesis for tetraploid cotton. After the merging of the two diploid Gossypium genomes, the At subgenome has provided most of the genes for fiber development, because it continues to function similar to its fiber producing diploid A genome ancestor. On the other hand, the Dt subgenome, with its non-fiber producing D genome ancestor

  18. Complementation between two tospoviruses facilitates the systemic movement of a plant virus silencing suppressor in an otherwise restrictive host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeep Bag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New viruses pathogenic to plants continue to emerge due to mutation, recombination, or reassortment among genomic segments among individual viruses. Tospoviruses cause significant economic damage to a wide range of crops in many parts of the world. The genetic or molecular basis of the continued emergence of new tospoviruses and new hosts is not well understood though it is generally accepted that reassortment and/or genetic complementation among the three genomic segments of individual viruses could be contributing to this variability since plants infected with more than one tospovirus are not uncommon in nature. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two distinct and economically important tospoviruses, Iris yellow spot virus (IYSV and Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV, were investigated for inter-virus interactions at the molecular level in dually-infected plants. Datura (Datura stramonium is a permissive host for TSWV, while it restricts the movement of IYSV to inoculated leaves. In plants infected with both viruses, however, TSWV facilitated the selective movement of the viral gene silencing suppressor (NSs gene of IYSV to the younger, uninoculated leaves. The small RNA expression profiles of IYSV and TSWV in single- and dually-infected datura plants showed that systemic leaves of dually-infected plants had reduced levels of TSWV N gene-specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs. No TSWV NSs-specific siRNAs were detected either in the inoculated or systemic leaves of dually-infected datura plants indicating a more efficient suppression of host silencing machinery in the presence of NSs from both viruses as compared to the presence of only TSWV NSs. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study identifies a new role for the viral gene silencing suppressor in potentially modulating the biology and host range of viruses and underscores the importance of virally-coded suppressors of gene silencing in virus infection of plants. This is the first

  19. Complementation between Two Tospoviruses Facilitates the Systemic Movement of a Plant Virus Silencing Suppressor in an Otherwise Restrictive Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Sahar; Pappu, Hanu R.

    2012-01-01

    Background New viruses pathogenic to plants continue to emerge due to mutation, recombination, or reassortment among genomic segments among individual viruses. Tospoviruses cause significant economic damage to a wide range of crops in many parts of the world. The genetic or molecular basis of the continued emergence of new tospoviruses and new hosts is not well understood though it is generally accepted that reassortment and/or genetic complementation among the three genomic segments of individual viruses could be contributing to this variability since plants infected with more than one tospovirus are not uncommon in nature. Methodology/Principal Findings Two distinct and economically important tospoviruses, Iris yellow spot virus (IYSV) and Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), were investigated for inter-virus interactions at the molecular level in dually-infected plants. Datura (Datura stramonium) is a permissive host for TSWV, while it restricts the movement of IYSV to inoculated leaves. In plants infected with both viruses, however, TSWV facilitated the selective movement of the viral gene silencing suppressor (NSs) gene of IYSV to the younger, uninoculated leaves. The small RNA expression profiles of IYSV and TSWV in single- and dually-infected datura plants showed that systemic leaves of dually-infected plants had reduced levels of TSWV N gene-specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). No TSWV NSs-specific siRNAs were detected either in the inoculated or systemic leaves of dually-infected datura plants indicating a more efficient suppression of host silencing machinery in the presence of NSs from both viruses as compared to the presence of only TSWV NSs. Conclusion/Significance Our study identifies a new role for the viral gene silencing suppressor in potentially modulating the biology and host range of viruses and underscores the importance of virally-coded suppressors of gene silencing in virus infection of plants. This is the first experimental evidence of

  20. Small RNA binding is a common strategy to suppress RNA silencing by several viral suppressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Lóránt; Csorba, Tibor; Pantaleo, Vitantonio; Chapman, Elisabeth J; Carrington, James C; Liu, Yu-Ping; Dolja, Valerian V; Calvino, Lourdes Fernández; López-Moya, Juan José; Burgyán, József

    2006-01-01

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved system that functions as an antiviral mechanism in higher plants and insects. To counteract RNA silencing, viruses express silencing suppressors that interfere with both siRNA- and microRNA-guided silencing pathways. We used comparative in vitro and in vivo approaches to analyse the molecular mechanism of suppression by three well-studied silencing suppressors. We found that silencing suppressors p19, p21 and HC-Pro each inhibit the intermediate step of RNA silencing via binding to siRNAs, although the molecular features required for duplex siRNA binding differ among the three proteins. None of the suppressors affected the activity of preassembled RISC complexes. In contrast, each suppressor uniformly inhibited the siRNA-initiated RISC assembly pathway by preventing RNA silencing initiator complex formation. PMID:16724105

  1. Inhibitor of differentiation 4 (Id4 is a potential tumor suppressor in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey Jason PW

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibitor of differentiation 4 (Id4, a member of the Id gene family is also a dominant negative regulator of basic helix loop helix (bHLH transcription factors. Some of the functions of Id4 appear to be unique as compared to its other family members Id1, Id2 and Id3. Loss of Id4 gene expression in many cancers in association with promoter hypermethylation has led to the proposal that Id4 may act as a tumor suppressor. In this study we provide functional evidence that Id4 indeed acts as a tumor suppressor and is part of a cancer associated epigenetic re-programming. Methods Data mining was used to demonstrate Id4 expression in prostate cancer. Methylation specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP analysis was performed to understand molecular mechanisms associated with Id4 expression in prostate cancer cell lines. The effect of ectopic Id4 expression in DU145 cells was determined by cell cycle analysis (3H thymidine incorporation and FACS, expression of androgen receptor, p53 and cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 and p21 by a combination of RT-PCR, real time-PCR, western blot and immuno-cytochemical analysis. Results Id4 expression was down-regulated in prostate cancer. Id4 expression was also down-regulated in prostate cancer line DU145 due to promoter hyper-methylation. Ectopic Id4 expression in DU145 prostate cancer cell line led to increased apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation due in part by an S-phase arrest. In addition to S-phase arrest, ectopic Id4 expression in PC3 cells also resulted in prolonged G2/M phase. At the molecular level these changes were associated with increased androgen receptor (AR, p21, p27 and p53 expression in DU145 cells. Conclusion The results suggest that Id4 acts directly as a tumor suppressor by influencing a hierarchy of cellular processes at multiple levels that leads to a decreased cell proliferation and change in morphology that is possibly mediated through induction of previously

  2. A tumor suppressor role of the Bub3 spindle checkpoint protein after apoptosis inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutinho-Santos, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Most solid tumors contain aneuploid cells, indicating that the mitotic checkpoint is permissive to the proliferation of chromosomally aberrant cells. However, mutated or altered expression of mitotic checkpoint genes accounts for a minor proportion of human tumors. We describe a Drosophila melanogaster tumorigenesis model derived from knocking down spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) genes and preventing apoptosis in wing imaginal discs. Bub3-deficient tumors that were also deficient in apoptosis displayed neoplastic growth, chromosomal aneuploidy, and high proliferative potential after transplantation into adult flies. Inducing aneuploidy by knocking down CENP-E and preventing apoptosis does not induce tumorigenesis, indicating that aneuploidy is not sufficient for hyperplasia. In this system, the aneuploidy caused by a deficient SAC is not driving tumorigenesis because preventing Bub3 from binding to the kinetochore does not cause hyperproliferation. Our data suggest that Bub3 has a nonkinetochore-dependent function that is consistent with its role as a tumor suppressor. PMID:23609535

  3. Function and Diversification of MADS-Box Genes in Rice

    OpenAIRE

    Takahiro Yamaguchi; Hiro-Yuki Hirano

    2006-01-01

    MADS-box genes play critical roles in a number of developmental processes in flowering plants, such as specification of floral organ identity, control of flowering time, and regulation of fruit development. Because of their crucial functions in flower development, diversification of the MADS-box gene family has been suggested to be a major factor responsible for floral diversity during radiation of the flowering plants. Inflorescences and flowers in the grass species have unique structures th...

  4. Stably Expressed Genes Involved in Basic Cellular Functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejian Wang

    Full Text Available Stably Expressed Genes (SEGs whose expression varies within a narrow range may be involved in core cellular processes necessary for basic functions. To identify such genes, we re-analyzed existing RNA-Seq gene expression profiles across 11 organs at 4 developmental stages (from immature to old age in both sexes of F344 rats (n = 4/group; 320 samples. Expression changes (calculated as the maximum expression / minimum expression for each gene of >19000 genes across organs, ages, and sexes ranged from 2.35 to >109-fold, with a median of 165-fold. The expression of 278 SEGs was found to vary ≤4-fold and these genes were significantly involved in protein catabolism (proteasome and ubiquitination, RNA transport, protein processing, and the spliceosome. Such stability of expression was further validated in human samples where the expression variability of the homologous human SEGs was significantly lower than that of other genes in the human genome. It was also found that the homologous human SEGs were generally less subject to non-synonymous mutation than other genes, as would be expected of stably expressed genes. We also found that knockout of SEG homologs in mouse models was more likely to cause complete preweaning lethality than non-SEG homologs, corroborating the fundamental roles played by SEGs in biological development. Such stably expressed genes and pathways across life-stages suggest that tight control of these processes is important in basic cellular functions and that perturbation by endogenous (e.g., genetics or exogenous agents (e.g., drugs, environmental factors may cause serious adverse effects.

  5. Noise suppressor for turbo fan jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, D. Y. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A noise suppressor is disclosed for installation on the discharge or aft end of a turbo fan engine. Within the suppressor are fixed annular airfoils which are positioned to reduce the relative velocity between the high temperature fast moving jet exhaust and the low temperature slow moving air surrounding it. Within the suppressor nacelle is an exhaust jet nozzle which constrains the shape of the jet exhaust to a substantially uniform elongate shape irrespective of the power setting of the engine. Fixed ring airfoils within the suppressor nacelle therefore have the same salutary effects irrespective of the power setting at which the engine is operated.

  6. Suppressors made from intermetallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, James W; Muth, Thomas R; Cler, Dan L

    2014-11-04

    Disclosed are several examples of apparatuses for suppressing the blast and flash produced as a projectile is expelled by gases from a firearm. In some examples, gases are diverted away from the central chamber to an expansion chamber by baffles. The gases are absorbed by the expansion chamber and desorbed slowly, thus decreasing pressure and increasing residence time of the gases. In other examples, the gases impinge against a plurality of rods before expanding through passages between the rods to decrease the pressure and increase the residence time of the gases. These and other exemplary suppressors are made from an intermetallic material composition for enhanced strength and oxidation resistance at high operational temperatures.

  7. PHYLOGENOMICS - GUIDED VALIDATION OF FUNCTION FOR CONSERVED UNKNOWN GENES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V, DE CRECY-LAGARD; D, HANSON A

    2012-01-03

    Identifying functions for all gene products in all sequenced organisms is a central challenge of the post-genomic era. However, at least 30-50% of the proteins encoded by any given genome are of unknown function, or wrongly or vaguely annotated. Many of these 'unknown' proteins are common to prokaryotes and plants. We accordingly set out to predict and experimentally test the functions of such proteins. Our approach to functional prediction is integrative, coupling the extensive post-genomic resources available for plants with comparative genomics based on hundreds of microbial genomes, and functional genomic datasets from model microorganisms. The early phase is computer-assisted; later phases incorporate intellectual input from expert plant and microbial biochemists. The approach thus bridges the gap between automated homology-based annotations and the classical gene discovery efforts of experimentalists, and is much more powerful than purely computational approaches to identifying gene-function associations. Among Arabidopsis genes, we focused on those (2,325 in total) that (i) are unique or belong to families with no more than three members, (ii) are conserved between plants and prokaryotes, and (iii) have unknown or poorly known functions. Computer-assisted selection of promising targets for deeper analysis was based on homology .. independent characteristics associated in the SEED database with the prokaryotic members of each family, specifically gene clustering and phyletic spread, as well as availability of functional genomics data, and publications that could link candidate families to general metabolic areas, or to specific functions. In-depth comparative genomic analysis was then performed for about 500 top candidate families, which connected ~55 of them to general areas of metabolism and led to specific functional predictions for a subset of ~25 more. Twenty predicted functions were experimentally tested in at least one prokaryotic organism

  8. Avian Reovirus Protein p17 Functions as a Nucleoporin Tpr Suppressor Leading to Activation of p53, p21 and PTEN and Inactivation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR and ERK Signaling Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ru Huang

    Full Text Available Avian reovirus (ARV protein p17 has been shown to regulate cell cycle and autophagy by activation of p53/PTEN pathway; nevertheless, it is still unclear how p53 and PTEN are activated by p17. Here, we report for the first time that p17 functions as a nucleoporin Tpr suppressor that leads to p53 nuclear accumulation and consequently activates p53, p21, and PTEN. The nuclear localization signal (119IAAKRGRQLD128 of p17 has been identified for Tpr binding. This study has shown that Tpr suppression occurs by p17 interacting with Tpr and by reducing the transcription level of Tpr, which together inhibit Tpr function. In addition to upregulation of PTEN by activation of p53 pathway, this study also suggests that ARV protein p17 acts as a positive regulator of PTEN. ARV p17 stabilizes PTEN by stimulating phosphorylation of cytoplasmic PTEN and by elevating Rak-PTEN association to prevent it from E3 ligase NEDD4-1 targeting. To activate PTEN, p17 is able to promote β-arrestin-mediated PTEN translocation from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane via a Rock-1-dependent manner. The accumulation of p53 in the nucleus induces the PTEN- and p21-mediated downregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4. Furthermore, Tpr and CDK4 knockdown increased virus production in contrast to depletion of p53, PTEN, and LC3 reducing virus yield. Taken together, our data suggest that p17-mediated Tpr suppression positively regulates p53, PTEN, and p21 and negatively regulates PI3K/AKT/mTOR and ERK signaling pathways, both of which are beneficial for virus replication.

  9. Avian Reovirus Protein p17 Functions as a Nucleoporin Tpr Suppressor Leading to Activation of p53, p21 and PTEN and Inactivation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR and ERK Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Ru; Chiu, Hung-Chuan; Liao, Tsai-Ling; Chuang, Kuo-Pin; Shih, Wing-Ling; Liu, Hung-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Avian reovirus (ARV) protein p17 has been shown to regulate cell cycle and autophagy by activation of p53/PTEN pathway; nevertheless, it is still unclear how p53 and PTEN are activated by p17. Here, we report for the first time that p17 functions as a nucleoporin Tpr suppressor that leads to p53 nuclear accumulation and consequently activates p53, p21, and PTEN. The nuclear localization signal (119IAAKRGRQLD128) of p17 has been identified for Tpr binding. This study has shown that Tpr suppression occurs by p17 interacting with Tpr and by reducing the transcription level of Tpr, which together inhibit Tpr function. In addition to upregulation of PTEN by activation of p53 pathway, this study also suggests that ARV protein p17 acts as a positive regulator of PTEN. ARV p17 stabilizes PTEN by stimulating phosphorylation of cytoplasmic PTEN and by elevating Rak-PTEN association to prevent it from E3 ligase NEDD4-1 targeting. To activate PTEN, p17 is able to promote β-arrestin-mediated PTEN translocation from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane via a Rock-1-dependent manner. The accumulation of p53 in the nucleus induces the PTEN- and p21-mediated downregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4. Furthermore, Tpr and CDK4 knockdown increased virus production in contrast to depletion of p53, PTEN, and LC3 reducing virus yield. Taken together, our data suggest that p17-mediated Tpr suppression positively regulates p53, PTEN, and p21 and negatively regulates PI3K/AKT/mTOR and ERK signaling pathways, both of which are beneficial for virus replication.

  10. DAVID Knowledgebase: a gene-centered database integrating heterogeneous gene annotation resources to facilitate high-throughput gene functional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baseler Michael W

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the complex and distributed nature of biological research, our current biological knowledge is spread over many redundant annotation databases maintained by many independent groups. Analysts usually need to visit many of these bioinformatics databases in order to integrate comprehensive annotation information for their genes, which becomes one of the bottlenecks, particularly for the analytic task associated with a large gene list. Thus, a highly centralized and ready-to-use gene-annotation knowledgebase is in demand for high throughput gene functional analysis. Description The DAVID Knowledgebase is built around the DAVID Gene Concept, a single-linkage method to agglomerate tens of millions of gene/protein identifiers from a variety of public genomic resources into DAVID gene clusters. The grouping of such identifiers improves the cross-reference capability, particularly across NCBI and UniProt systems, enabling more than 40 publicly available functional annotation sources to be comprehensively integrated and centralized by the DAVID gene clusters. The simple, pair-wise, text format files which make up the DAVID Knowledgebase are freely downloadable for various data analysis uses. In addition, a well organized web interface allows users to query different types of heterogeneous annotations in a high-throughput manner. Conclusion The DAVID Knowledgebase is designed to facilitate high throughput gene functional analysis. For a given gene list, it not only provides the quick accessibility to a wide range of heterogeneous annotation data in a centralized location, but also enriches the level of biological information for an individual gene. Moreover, the entire DAVID Knowledgebase is freely downloadable or searchable at http://david.abcc.ncifcrf.gov/knowledgebase/.

  11. MicroRNA-9 functions as a tumor suppressor and enhances radio-sensitivity in radio-resistant A549 cells by targeting neuropilin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Kai; Shao, Li Hong; Zhang, Hai Qin; Jin, Linlin; Wei, Wei; Dong, Zhuo; Zhu, Yue Quan; Wu, Ning; Jin, Shun Zi; Xue, Li Xiang

    2018-03-01

    Radiotherapy is commonly used to treat lung cancer but may not kill all cancer cells, which may be attributed to the radiotherapy resistance that often occurs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). At present, the molecular mechanism of radio-resistance remains unclear. Neuropilin 1 (NRP1), a co-receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), was demonstrated to be associated with radio-resistance of NSCLC cells via the VEGF-phosphoinositide 3-kinase-nuclear factor-κB pathway in our previous study. It was hypothesized that certain microRNAs (miRs) may serve crucial functions in radio-sensitivity by regulating NRP1. Bioinformatics predicted that NRP1 was a potential target of miR-9, and this was validated by luciferase reporter assays. Functionally, miR-9-transfected A549 cells exhibited a decreased proliferation rate, increased apoptosis rate and attenuated migratory and invasive abilities. Additionally, a high expression of miR-9 also significantly enhanced the radio-sensitivity of A549 cells in vitro and in vivo . These data improve understanding of the mechanisms of cell radio-resistance, and suggest that miR-9 may be a molecular target for the prediction of radio-sensitivity in NSCLC.

  12. The Drosophila melanogaster methuselah gene: a novel gene with ancient functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Araújo

    Full Text Available The Drosophila melanogaster G protein-coupled receptor gene, methuselah (mth, has been described as a novel gene that is less than 10 million years old. Nevertheless, it shows a highly specific expression pattern in embryos, larvae, and adults, and has been implicated in larval development, stress resistance, and in the setting of adult lifespan, among others. Although mth belongs to a gene subfamily with 16 members in D. melanogaster, there is no evidence for functional redundancy in this subfamily. Therefore, it is surprising that a novel gene influences so many traits. Here, we explore the alternative hypothesis that mth is an old gene. Under this hypothesis, in species distantly related to D. melanogaster, there should be a gene with features similar to those of mth. By performing detailed phylogenetic, synteny, protein structure, and gene expression analyses we show that the D. virilis GJ12490 gene is the orthologous of mth in species distantly related to D. melanogaster. We also show that, in D. americana (a species of the virilis group of Drosophila, a common amino acid polymorphism at the GJ12490 orthologous gene is significantly associated with developmental time, size, and lifespan differences. Our results imply that GJ12490 orthologous genes are candidates for developmental time and lifespan differences in Drosophila in general.

  13. Epigenetic regulation of putative tumor suppressor TGFBI in human leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hongbo; Liu, Jing; Guo, Dan; Liu, Peixiang; Zhao, Yongliang

    2014-01-01

    Both in vitro and in vivo data have demonstrated the TGFBI gene functions as a putative tumor suppressor and is frequently downregulated in human tumors of different histological types. The hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter, as one of the main regulatory mechanisms, is associated with TGFBI silencing. In this study, we used a methylation-specific PCR (MSP) method to evaluate the methylation status of the TGFBI promoter in human leukemias. Real-time RT-PCR and methylation-specific PCR approaches were performed to define the TGFBI expression and promoter methylation in human leukemia cell lines and clinical samples. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leukemia patients, bisulfite-converted, and analyzed by the MSP method. Hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter occurred in leukemia cell lines and demethylation treatment reexpressed TGFBI at a substantially increased level in most of leukemia cell lines tested. Furthermore, a much higher level of CpG island methylation and a significantly lower TGFBI expression were also identified in clinical leukemia samples. The results suggest an important role of promoter methylation in regulating TGFBI expression in leukemia, which provides a useful diagnostic marker for clinical management of human leukemias.

  14. Deciphering the BRCA1 Tumor Suppressor Network*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qinqin; Greenberg, Roger A.

    2015-01-01

    The BRCA1 tumor suppressor protein is a central constituent of several distinct macromolecular protein complexes that execute homology-directed DNA damage repair and cell cycle checkpoints. Recent years have borne witness to an exciting phase of discovery at the basic molecular level for how this network of DNA repair proteins acts to maintain genome stability and suppress cancer. The clinical dividends of this investment are now being realized with the approval of first-in-class BRCA-targeted therapies for ovarian cancer and identification of molecular events that determine responsiveness to these agents. Further delineation of the basic science underlying BRCA network function holds promise to maximally exploit genome instability for hereditary and sporadic cancer therapy. PMID:26048987

  15. Gene Expression Architecture of Mouse Dorsal and Tail Skin Reveals Functional Differences in Inflammation and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Quigley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Inherited germline polymorphisms can cause gene expression levels in normal tissues to differ substantially between individuals. We present an analysis of the genetic architecture of normal adult skin from 470 genetically unique mice, demonstrating the effect of germline variants, skin tissue location, and perturbation by exogenous inflammation or tumorigenesis on gene signaling pathways. Gene networks related to specific cell types and signaling pathways, including sonic hedgehog (Shh, Wnt, Lgr family stem cell markers, and keratins, differed at these tissue sites, suggesting mechanisms for the differential susceptibility of dorsal and tail skin to development of skin diseases and tumorigenesis. The Pten tumor suppressor gene network is rewired in premalignant tumors compared to normal tissue, but this response to perturbation is lost during malignant progression. We present a software package for expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL network analysis and demonstrate how network analysis of whole tissues provides insights into interactions between cell compartments and signaling molecules.

  16. Restoring Sensitivity to Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells by Reconstitution of the Tumor Suppressor PTEN

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Whang, Young

    2003-01-01

    ... suppressor PTEN in regulating sensitivity to apoptosis in prostate cancer. We have previously shown that loss of HEN function leads to excessive antiapoptotic signaling through constitutive activation of the Akt protein kinase...

  17. Assessing the functional coherence of gene sets with metrics based on the Gene Ontology graph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Adam J; Muller, Brian; Shotwell, Matthew; Cowart, L Ashley; Rohrer, Bäerbel; Lu, Xinghua

    2010-06-15

    The results of initial analyses for many high-throughput technologies commonly take the form of gene or protein sets, and one of the ensuing tasks is to evaluate the functional coherence of these sets. The study of gene set function most commonly makes use of controlled vocabulary in the form of ontology annotations. For a given gene set, the statistical significance of observing these annotations or 'enrichment' may be tested using a number of methods. Instead of testing for significance of individual terms, this study is concerned with the task of assessing the global functional coherence of gene sets, for which novel metrics and statistical methods have been devised. The metrics of this study are based on the topological properties of graphs comprised of genes and their Gene Ontology annotations. A novel aspect of these methods is that both the enrichment of annotations and the relationships among annotations are considered when determining the significance of functional coherence. We applied our methods to perform analyses on an existing database and on microarray experimental results. Here, we demonstrated that our approach is highly discriminative in terms of differentiating coherent gene sets from random ones and that it provides biologically sensible evaluations in microarray analysis. We further used examples to show the utility of graph visualization as a tool for studying the functional coherence of gene sets. The implementation is provided as a freely accessible web application at: http://projects.dbbe.musc.edu/gosteiner. Additionally, the source code written in the Python programming language, is available under the General Public License of the Free Software Foundation. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  18. The function and evolution of Wnt genes in arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murat, Sophie; Hopfen, Corinna; McGregor, Alistair P

    2010-11-01

    Wnt signalling is required for a wide range of developmental processes, from cleavage to patterning and cell migration. There are 13 subfamilies of Wnt ligand genes and this diverse repertoire appeared very early in metazoan evolution. In this review, we first summarise the known Wnt gene repertoire in various arthropods. Insects appear to have lost several Wnt subfamilies, either generally, such as Wnt3, or in lineage specific patterns, for example, the loss of Wnt7 in Anopheles. In Drosophila and Acyrthosiphon, only seven and six Wnt subfamilies are represented, respectively; however, the finding of nine Wnt genes in Tribolium suggests that arthropods had a larger repertoire ancestrally. We then discuss what is currently known about the expression and developmental function of Wnt ligands in Drosophila and other insects in comparison to other arthropods, such as the spiders Achaearanea and Cupiennius. We conclude that studies of Wnt genes have given us much insight into the developmental roles of some of these ligands. However, given the frequent loss of Wnt genes in insects and the derived development of Drosophila, further studies of these important genes are required in a broader range of arthropods to fully understand their developmental function and evolution. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Human IL-22 Receptor Is Regulated through the Action of the Novel E3 Ligase Subunit FBXW12, Which Functions as an Epithelial Growth Suppressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Franz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin- (IL- 22 signaling is protective in animal models of pneumonia and bacteremia by Klebsiella pneumoniae and mediates tissue recovery from influenza and Staph aureus infection. We recently described processing of mouse lung epithelial IL-22 receptor (IL-22R by ubiquitination on the intracellular C-terminal. To identify cellular factors that regulate human IL-22R, we screened receptor abundance while overexpressing constituents of the ubiquitin system and identify that IL-22R can be shuttled for degradation by multiple previously uncharacterized F-box protein E3 ligase subunits. We observe that in human cells IL-22R is destabilized by FBXW12. FBXW12 causes depletion of endogenous and plasmid-derived IL-22R in lung epithelia, binds the E3 ligase constituent Skp-1, and facilitates ubiquitination of IL-22R in vitro. FBXW12 knockdown with shRNA increases IL-22R abundance and STAT3 phosphorylation in response to IL-22 cytokine treatment. FBXW12 shRNA increases human epithelial cell growth and cell cycle progression with enhanced constitutive activity of map kinases JNK and ERK. These findings indicate that the heretofore-undescribed protein FBXW12 functions as an E3 ligase constituent to ubiquitinate and degrade IL-22R and that therapeutic FBXW12 inhibition may enhance IL-22 signaling and bolster mucosal host defense and infection containment.

  20. Differential Retention of Gene Functions in a Secondary Metabolite Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Hannah T; Slot, Jason C; Divon, Hege H; Lysøe, Erik; Proctor, Robert H; Brown, Daren W

    2017-08-01

    In fungi, distribution of secondary metabolite (SM) gene clusters is often associated with host- or environment-specific benefits provided by SMs. In the plant pathogen Alternaria brassicicola (Dothideomycetes), the DEP cluster confers an ability to synthesize the SM depudecin, a histone deacetylase inhibitor that contributes weakly to virulence. The DEP cluster includes genes encoding enzymes, a transporter, and a transcription regulator. We investigated the distribution and evolution of the DEP cluster in 585 fungal genomes and found a wide but sporadic distribution among Dothideomycetes, Sordariomycetes, and Eurotiomycetes. We confirmed DEP gene expression and depudecin production in one fungus, Fusarium langsethiae. Phylogenetic analyses suggested 6-10 horizontal gene transfers (HGTs) of the cluster, including a transfer that led to the presence of closely related cluster homologs in Alternaria and Fusarium. The analyses also indicated that HGTs were frequently followed by loss/pseudogenization of one or more DEP genes. Independent cluster inactivation was inferred in at least four fungal classes. Analyses of transitions among functional, pseudogenized, and absent states of DEP genes among Fusarium species suggest enzyme-encoding genes are lost at higher rates than the transporter (DEP3) and regulatory (DEP6) genes. The phenotype of an experimentally-induced DEP3 mutant of Fusarium did not support the hypothesis that selective retention of DEP3 and DEP6 protects fungi from exogenous depudecin. Together, the results suggest that HGT and gene loss have contributed significantly to DEP cluster distribution, and that some DEP genes provide a greater fitness benefit possibly due to a differential tendency to form network connections. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. Using riboswitches to regulate gene expression and define gene function in mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vlack, Erik R; Seeliger, Jessica C

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria include both environmental species and many pathogenic species such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an intracellular pathogen that is the causative agent of tuberculosis in humans. Inducible gene expression is a powerful tool for examining gene function and essentiality, both in in vitro culture and in host cell infections. The theophylline-inducible artificial riboswitch has recently emerged as an alternative to protein repressor-based systems. The riboswitch is translationally regulated and is combined with a mycobacterial promoter that provides transcriptional control. We here provide methods used by our laboratory to characterize the riboswitch response to theophylline in reporter strains, recombinant organisms containing riboswitch-regulated endogenous genes, and in host cell infections. These protocols should facilitate the application of both existing and novel artificial riboswitches to the exploration of gene function in mycobacteria. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Functional consequences of integrin gene mutations in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouvard, D; Brakebusch, C; Gustafsson, E

    2001-01-01

    Integrins are cell-surface receptors responsible for cell attachment to extracellular matrices and to other cells. The application of mouse genetics has significantly increased our understanding of integrin function in vivo. In this review, we summarize the phenotypes of mice carrying mutant inte...... integrin genes and compare them with phenotypes of mice lacking the integrin ligands....

  3. Functional analysis helps importance of unclassified mismatch repair genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ou, Jianghua; Niessen, Renee C.; L tzen, Anne; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Kleibeuker, Jan. H.; De Wind, Niels; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndrome is caused by DNA variations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2. Many of the mutations identified result in premature termination of translation and thus in loss-of-function of the encoded mutated

  4. ( Euphausia superba ) transcriptome to identify function genes and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MA

    database, Superba SE, was described by Hunt et al (2017) and KrillDB was developed (Sales et al., 2017) for purpose of free accession to annotation information for users. However, the availability of molecular data concerning function genes, microsatellites, and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in E. superba is still ...

  5. Analysis of gene functions in Maize chlorotic mottle virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheets, Kay

    2016-08-15

    Gene functions of strains of Maize chlorotic mottle virus, which comprises the monotypic genus Machlomovirus, have not been previously identified. In this study mutagenesis of the seven genes encoded in maize chlorotic mottle virus (MCMV) showed that the genes with positional and sequence similarity to their homologs in viruses of related tombusvirid genera had similar functions. p50 and its readthrough protein p111 are the only proteins required for replication in maize protoplasts, and they function at a low level in trans. Two movement proteins, p7a and p7b, and coat protein, encoded on subgenomic RNA1, are required for cell-to-cell movement in maize, and p7a and p7b function in trans. A unique protein, p31, expressed as a readthrough extension of p7a, is required for efficient systemic infection. The 5' proximal MCMV gene encodes a unique 32kDa protein that is not required for replication or movement. Transcripts lacking p32 expression accumulate to about 1/3 the level of wild type transcripts in protoplasts and produce delayed, mild infections in maize plants. Additional studies on p32, p31 and the unique amino-terminal region of p50 are needed to further characterize the life cycle of this unique tombusvirid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Gene Discovery and Functional Analyses in the Model Plant Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Cai-ping; Mundy, J.

    2006-01-01

    The present mini-review describes newer methods and strategies, including transposon and T-DNA insertions, TILLING, Deleteagene, and RNA interference, to functionally analyze genes of interest in the model plant Arabidopsis. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the systems are also...

  7. Prediction of human protein function according to Gene Ontology categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Juhl; Gupta, Ramneek; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik

    2003-01-01

    developed a method for prediction of protein function for a subset of classes from the Gene Ontology classification scheme. This subset includes several pharmaceutically interesting categories-transcription factors, receptors, ion channels, stress and immune response proteins, hormones and growth factors...

  8. ( Euphausia superba ) transcriptome to identify function genes and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MA

    Further analysis produced 106,250 unigenes, of which. 31,683 were annotated based on protein homology searches against protein databases. Gene. Ontology (GO) analysis showed that Ion binding, organic substance metabolic process, and cell part were the most abundant terms in molecular function, biological process ...

  9. Gene-environment interaction and male reproductive function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Jonatan; Bonde, Jens Peter; Giwercman, Yvonne L

    2010-01-01

    that specific genotypes may confer a larger risk of male reproductive disorders following certain exposures. This paper presents a critical review of animal and human evidence on how genes may modify environmental effects on male reproductive function. Some examples have been found that support this mechanism...

  10. Bone marrow transplantations to study gene function in hematopoietic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winther, Menno P. J.; Heeringa, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Immune cells are derived from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. Experimental replacement of bone marrow offers the unique possibility to replace immune cells, to study gene function in mouse models of disease. Over the past decades, this technique has been used extensively to study, for

  11. Functional Associations by Response Overlap (FARO), a functional genomics approach matching gene expression phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Mundy, J.; Willenbrock, Hanni

    2007-01-01

    for deriving 'Functional Association(s) by Response Overlap' (FARO) between microarray gene expression studies. The transcriptional response is defined by the set of differentially expressed genes independent from the magnitude or direction of the change. This approach overcomes the limited comparability...... to confirm and further delineate the functions of Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 in disease and stress responses. Furthermore, we find that a large, well-defined set of genes responds in opposing directions to different stress conditions and predict the effects of different stress combinations. This demonstrates...

  12. Elucidating gene function and function evolution through comparison of co-expression networks in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek eMutwil

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of gene expression data has shown that transcriptionally coordinated (co-expressed genes are often functionally related, enabling scientists to use expression data in gene function prediction. This Focused Review discusses our original paper (Large-scale co-expression approach to dissect secondary cell wall formation across plant species, Frontiers in Plant Science 2:23. In this paper we applied cross-species analysis to co-expression networks of genes involved in cellulose biosynthesis. We show that the co-expression networks from different species are highly similar, indicating that whole biological pathways are conserved across species. This finding has two important implications. First, the analysis can transfer gene function annotation from well-studied plants, such as Arabidopsis, to other, uncharacterized plant species. As the analysis finds genes that have similar sequence and similar expression pattern across different organisms, functionally equivalent genes can be identified. Second, since co-expression analyses are often noisy, a comparative analysis should have higher performance, as parts of co-expression networks that are conserved are more likely to be functionally relevant. In this Focused Review, we outline the comparative analysis done in the original paper and comment on the recent advances and approaches that allow comparative analyses of co-function networks. We hypothesize that, in comparison to simple co-expression analysis, comparative analysis would yield more accurate gene function predictions. Finally, by combining comparative analysis with genomic information of green plants, we propose a possible composition of cellulose biosynthesis machinery during earlier stages of plant evolution.

  13. The FUN of identifying gene function in bacterial pathogens; insights from Salmonella functional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarlöf, Disa L; Canals, Rocío; Hinton, Jay C D

    2013-10-01

    The availability of thousands of genome sequences of bacterial pathogens poses a particular challenge because each genome contains hundreds of genes of unknown function (FUN). How can we easily discover which FUN genes encode important virulence factors? One solution is to combine two different functional genomic approaches. First, transcriptomics identifies bacterial FUN genes that show differential expression during the process of mammalian infection. Second, global mutagenesis identifies individual FUN genes that the pathogen requires to cause disease. The intersection of these datasets can reveal a small set of candidate genes most likely to encode novel virulence attributes. We demonstrate this approach with the Salmonella infection model, and propose that a similar strategy could be used for other bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Predictability of Genetic Interactions from Functional Gene Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan H. Young

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing genetic interactions is crucial to understanding cellular and organismal response to gene-level perturbations. Such knowledge can inform the selection of candidate disease therapy targets, yet experimentally determining whether genes interact is technically nontrivial and time-consuming. High-fidelity prediction of different classes of genetic interactions in multiple organisms would substantially alleviate this experimental burden. Under the hypothesis that functionally related genes tend to share common genetic interaction partners, we evaluate a computational approach to predict genetic interactions in Homo sapiens, Drosophila melanogaster, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By leveraging knowledge of functional relationships between genes, we cross-validate predictions on known genetic interactions and observe high predictive power of multiple classes of genetic interactions in all three organisms. Additionally, our method suggests high-confidence candidate interaction pairs that can be directly experimentally tested. A web application is provided for users to query genes for predicted novel genetic interaction partners. Finally, by subsampling the known yeast genetic interaction network, we found that novel genetic interactions are predictable even when knowledge of currently known interactions is minimal.

  15. Loss of genes implicated in gastric function during platypus evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordoñez, Gonzalo R; Hillier, Ladeana W; Warren, Wesley C; Grützner, Frank; López-Otín, Carlos; Puente, Xose S

    2008-01-01

    The duck-billed platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) belongs to the mammalian subclass Prototheria, which diverged from the Theria line early in mammalian evolution. The platypus genome sequence provides a unique opportunity to illuminate some aspects of the biology and evolution of these animals. We show that several genes implicated in food digestion in the stomach have been deleted or inactivated in platypus. Comparison with other vertebrate genomes revealed that the main genes implicated in the formation and activity of gastric juice have been lost in platypus. These include the aspartyl proteases pepsinogen A and pepsinogens B/C, the hydrochloric acid secretion stimulatory hormone gastrin, and the alpha subunit of the gastric H+/K+-ATPase. Other genes implicated in gastric functions, such as the beta subunit of the H+/K+-ATPase and the aspartyl protease cathepsin E, have been inactivated because of the acquisition of loss-of-function mutations. All of these genes are highly conserved in vertebrates, reflecting a unique pattern of evolution in the platypus genome not previously seen in other mammalian genomes. The observed loss of genes involved in gastric functions might be responsible for the anatomical and physiological differences in gastrointestinal tract between monotremes and other vertebrates, including small size, lack of glands, and high pH of the monotreme stomach. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the evolution of the platypus genome, might extend the less-is-more evolutionary model to monotremes, and provides novel insights into the importance of gene loss events during mammalian evolution.

  16. Drosha regulates gene expression independently of RNA cleavage function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromak, Natalia; Dienstbier, Martin; Macias, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Drosha is the main RNase III-like enzyme involved in the process of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis in the nucleus. Using whole-genome ChIP-on-chip analysis, we demonstrate that, in addition to miRNA sequences, Drosha specifically binds promoter-proximal regions of many human genes in a transcription......-terminal protein-interaction domain, which associates with the RNA-binding protein CBP80 and RNA Polymerase II. Consequently, we uncover a previously unsuspected RNA cleavage-independent function of Drosha in the regulation of human gene expression....

  17. LncRNA TUG1 acts as a tumor suppressor in human glioma by promoting cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Meng; An, Gang; Ma, Qingfang

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have revealed multiple functional roles of long non-coding RNA taurine upregulated gene 1 in different types of malignant tumors, except for human glioma. Here, it was designed to study the potential function of taurine upregulated gene 1 in glioma pathogenesis focusing on its regulation on cell apoptosis. The expression of taurine upregulated gene 1 in glioma tissues was detected by quantitative RT-PCR and compared with that in adjacent normal tissues. Further correlation analysis was conducted to show the relationship between taurine upregulated gene 1 expression and different clinicopathologic parameters. Functional studies were performed to investigate the influence of taurine upregulated gene 1 on apoptosis and cell proliferation by using Annexin V/PI staining and cell counting kit-8 assays, respectively. And, caspase activation and Bcl-2 expression were analyzed to explore taurine upregulated gene 1-induced mechanism. taurine upregulated gene 1 expression was significantly inhibited in glioma and showed significant correlation with WHO Grade, tumor size and overall survival. Further experiments revealed that the dysregulation of taurine upregulated gene 1 affected the apoptosis and cell proliferation of glioma cells. Moreover, taurine upregulated gene 1 could induce the activation of caspase-3 and-9, with inhibited expression of Bcl-2, implying the mechanism in taurine upregulated gene 1-induced apoptosis. taurine upregulated gene 1 promoted cell apoptosis of glioma cells by activating caspase-3 and -9-mediated intrinsic pathways and inhibiting Bcl-2-mediated anti-apoptotic pathways, acting as a tumor suppressor in human glioma. This study provided new insights for the function of taurine upregulated gene 1 in cancer biology, and suggested a potent application of taurine upregulated gene 1 overexpression for glioma therapy. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  18. Family expansion and gene rearrangements contributed to the functional specialization of PRDM genes in vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcalay Myriam

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progressive diversification of paralogs after gene expansion is essential to increase their functional specialization. However, mode and tempo of this divergence remain mostly unclear. Here we report the comparative analysis of PRDM genes, a family of putative transcriptional regulators involved in human tumorigenesis. Results Our analysis assessed that the PRDM genes originated in metazoans, expanded in vertebrates and further duplicated in primates. We experimentally showed that fast-evolving paralogs are poorly expressed, and that the most recent duplicates, such as primate-specific PRDM7, acquire tissue-specificity. PRDM7 underwent major structural rearrangements that decreased the number of encoded Zn-Fingers and modified gene splicing. Through internal duplication and activation of a non-canonical splice site (GC-AG, PRDM7 can acquire a novel intron. We also detected an alternative isoform that can retain the intron in the mature transcript and that is predominantly expressed in human melanocytes. Conclusion Our findings show that (a molecular evolution of paralogs correlates with their expression pattern; (b gene diversification is obtained through massive genomic rearrangements; and (c splicing modification contributes to the functional specialization of novel genes.

  19. Functional analysis of prognostic gene expression network genes in metastatic breast cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Geiger

    Full Text Available Identification of conserved co-expression networks is a useful tool for clustering groups of genes enriched for common molecular or cellular functions [1]. The relative importance of genes within networks can frequently be inferred by the degree of connectivity, with those displaying high connectivity being significantly more likely to be associated with specific molecular functions [2]. Previously we utilized cross-species network analysis to identify two network modules that were significantly associated with distant metastasis free survival in breast cancer. Here, we validate one of the highly connected genes as a metastasis associated gene. Tpx2, the most highly connected gene within a proliferation network specifically prognostic for estrogen receptor positive (ER+ breast cancers, enhances metastatic disease, but in a tumor autonomous, proliferation-independent manner. Histologic analysis suggests instead that variation of TPX2 levels within disseminated tumor cells may influence the transition between dormant to actively proliferating cells in the secondary site. These results support the co-expression network approach for identification of new metastasis-associated genes to provide new information regarding the etiology of breast cancer progression and metastatic disease.

  20. IGF-I Gene Therapy in Aging Rats Modulates Hippocampal Genes Relevant to Memory Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Joaquín; Abba, Martin C; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Ogundele, Olalekan M; Paiva, Isabel; Morel, Gustavo R; Outeiro, Tiago F; Goya, Rodolfo G

    2018-03-14

    In rats, learning and memory performance decline during normal aging, which makes this rodent species a suitable model to evaluate therapeutic strategies. In aging rats, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), is known to significantly improve spatial memory accuracy as compared to control counterparts. A constellation of gene expression changes underlie the hippocampal phenotype of aging but no studies on the effects of IGF-I on the hippocampal transcriptome of old rodents have been documented. Here, we assessed the effects of IGF-I gene therapy on spatial memory performance in old female rats and compared them with changes in the hippocampal transcriptome. In the Barnes maze test, experimental rats showed a significantly higher exploratory frequency of the goal hole than controls. Hippocampal RNA-sequencing showed that 219 genes are differentially expressed in 28-month-old rats intracerebroventricularly injected with an adenovector expressing rat IGF-I as compared with placebo adenovector-injected counterparts. From the differentially expressed genes, 81 were down and 138 upregulated. From those genes, a list of functionally relevant genes, concerning hippocampal IGF-I expression, synaptic plasticity as well as neuronal function was identified. Our results provide an initial glimpse at the molecular mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective actions of IGF-I in the aging brain.