WorldWideScience

Sample records for suppressing titanium nitride

  1. Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanostructures via Nitridation of Nanopatterned Titanium Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Kim, Jongbum

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures are obtained via nitridation of titanium dioxide. Nanoparticles acquired a cubic shape with sharper edges following the rock-salt crystalline structure of TiN. Lattice constant of the resulting TiN nanoparticles matched well with the tabulated data. Energy...

  2. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Suslov, Sergey; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average ...

  3. Local heating with titanium nitride nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible.......We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible....

  4. Surface modification of titanium by plasma nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapczinski Myriam Pereira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic investigation was undertaken on commercially pure titanium submitted to plasma nitriding. Thirteen different sets of operational parameters (nitriding time, sample temperature and plasma atmosphere were used. Surface analyses were performed using X-ray diffraction, nuclear reaction and scanning electron microscopy. Wear tests were done with stainless steel Gracey scaler, sonic apparatus and pin-on-disc machine. The obtained results indicate that the tribological performance can be improved for samples treated with the following conditions: nitriding time of 3 h; plasma atmosphere consisting of 80%N2+20%H2 or 20%N2+80%H2; sample temperature during nitriding of 600 or 800 degreesC.

  5. Corrosion stability of cermets on the base of titanium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajdash, O.N.; Marinich, M.A.; Kuzenkova, M.A.; Manzheleev, I.V.

    1991-01-01

    Corrosion resistance of titanium nitride and its cermets in 5% of HCl, 7% of HNO 3 , 10% of H 2 SO 4 is studied. It is established that alloys TiN-Ni-Mo alloyed with chromium (from 10 to 15%) possess the highest corrosion resistance. Cermet TiN-Cr has the higher stability than titanium nitride due to formation of binary nitride (Ti, Cr)N

  6. Electrochemical capacitance performance of titanium nitride nanoarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yibing, E-mail: ybxie@seu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Suzhou Research Institute of Southeast University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wang, Yong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Du, Hongxiu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Suzhou Research Institute of Southeast University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2013-12-01

    Highlights: • TiN nanoarray is formed by a nitridation process of TiO{sub 2} in ammonia atmosphere. • TiN nanoarray exhibits much higher EDLC capacitance than TiO{sub 2} nanoarray. • The specific capacitance of TiN nanoarray achieves a high level of 99.7 mF cm{sup −2}. • A flexible solid-state supercapacitor is constructed by TiN nanoarray and PVA gel. -- Abstract: In this study, titanium nitride (TiN) nanoarrays with a short nanotube and long nanopore structure have been prepared by an anodization process of ultra thin titanium foil in ethylene glycol (EG) solution containing ammonium fluoride, subsequent calcination process in an air atmosphere, and final nitridation process in an ammonia atmosphere. The morphology and microstructure characterization has been conducted using field emission scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The electrochemical properties have been investigated through cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectrum measurements. The electrochemical capacitance performance has been investigated by galvanostatic charge–discharge measurements in the acidic, neural and alkali electrolyte solution. Well-defined TiN nanoarrays contribute a much higher capacitance performance than titania (TiO{sub 2}) in the supercapacitor application due to the extraordinarily improved electrical conductivity. Such an electrochemical capacitance can be further enhanced by increasing aspect ratio of TiN nanoarray from short nanotubes to long nanopores. A flexible supercapacitor has been constructed using two symmetrical TiN nanoarray electrodes and a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) gel electrolyte with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–KCl–H{sub 2}O–EG. Such a supercapacitor has a highly improved potential window and still keeps good electrochemical energy storage. TiN nanoarray with a high aspect ratio can act well as an ultra thin film electrode material of flexible supercapacitor to contribute a superior capacitance performance.

  7. Corrosion-resistant titanium nitride coatings formed on stainless steel by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, K.; Hatada, R.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium films 70nm thick were deposited on austenitic type 316L stainless steel substrates, and these specimens were irradiated with titanium ions of energy 70kV at a fluence of 1x10 17 ioncm -2 , using a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) IV metallic ion source at room temperature. After irradiation, titanium nitride (TiN) films were deposited by titanium evaporation and simultaneous irradiation by a nitrogen ion beam, with transport ratios of Ti to N atoms from 0.5 to 10.0 and an ion acceleration voltage of 2kV. The preferred orientation of the TiN films varied from left angle 200 right angle to left angle 111 right angle normal to the surface when the transport ratio was increased. With the help of Auger electron spectroscopy, interfacial mixing was verified. Nitrogen atoms were present in the state of titanium nitride for all transport ratios from 0.5 up to 10.0. However, the chemical bonding state of titanium changed from titanium nitride to the metallic state with increasing transport ratio Ti/N. The corrosion behavior was evaluated in an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid saturated with oxygen, using multisweep cyclic voltammetry measurements. Thin film deposition of pure titanium and titanium implantation prior to TiN deposition have beneficial effects on the suppression of transpassive chromium dissolution. ((orig.))

  8. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guler Urcan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm, which was found to be the optimum size for cellular uptake with gold nanoparticles [1], exhibit plasmon resonance in the biological transparency window and demonstrate a high absorption efficiency. A self-passivating native oxide at the surface of the nanoparticles provides an additional degree of freedom for surface functionalization. The titanium oxide shell surrounding the plasmonic core can create new opportunities for photocatalytic applications.

  9. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Justin A., E-mail: jabriggs@stanford.edu [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Naik, Gururaj V.; Baum, Brian K.; Dionne, Jennifer A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Petach, Trevor A.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David [Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  10. Surface modification of 17-4PH stainless steel by DC plasma nitriding and titanium nitride film duplex treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, F.; Leng, Y.X.; Huang, N.; Bai, B.; Zhang, P.Ch.

    2007-01-01

    17-4PH stainless steel was modified by direct current (DC) plasma nitriding and titanium nitride film duplex treatment in this study. The microstructure, wear resistance and corrosion resistance were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), pin-on-disk tribological test and polarization experiment. The results revealed that the DC plasma nitriding pretreatment was in favor of improving properties of titanium nitride film. The corrosion resistance and wear resistance of duplex treatment specimen was more superior to that of only coated titanium nitride film

  11. Cellular growth and dislocation structures in laser-nitrided titanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterman, A.B.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1997-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopic observations were made of different dislocation structures in laser-nitrided titanium. Equidistant edge dislocations in the bulk and periodic surface structures exhibit a periodicity within the same order of magnitude. An analysis is presented in which both periodic

  12. The oxidation of titanium nitride- and silicon nitride-coated stainless steel in carbon dioxide environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.R.G.; Stott, F.H.

    1992-01-01

    A study has been undertaken into the effects of thin titanium nitride and silicon nitride coatings, deposited by physical vapour deposition and chemical vapour deposition processes, on the oxidation resistance of 321 stainless steel in a simulated advanced gas-cooled reactor carbon dioxide environment for long periods at 550 o C and 700 o C under thermal-cycling conditions. The uncoated steel contains sufficient chromium to develop a slow-growing chromium-rich oxide layer at these temperatures, particularly if the surfaces have been machine-abraded. Failure of this layer in service allows formation of less protective iron oxide-rich scales. The presence of a thin (3-4 μm) titanium nitride coating is not very effective in increasing the oxidation resistance since the ensuing titanium oxide scale is not a good barrier to diffusion. Even at 550 o C, iron oxide-rich nodules are able to develop following relatively rapid oxidation and breakdown of the coating. At 700 o C, the coated specimens oxidize at relatively similar rates to the uncoated steel. A thin silicon nitride coating gives improved oxidation resistance, with both the coating and its slow-growing oxide being relatively electrically insulating. The particular silicon nitride coating studied here was susceptible to spallation on thermal cycling, due to an inherently weak coating/substrate interface. (Author)

  13. Formation of titanium nitride layers on titanium metal: Results of XPS and AES investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moers, H.; Pfennig, G.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Penzhorn, R.D.; Sirch, M.; Willin, E.

    1988-09-01

    The reaction of titanium metal with gaseous nitrogen and ammonia at temperatures of 890 0 C leads to the formation of nitridic overlayers on the metallic substrate. The thicknesses of the overlayers increase with increasing reaction time. Under comparable conditions ammonia reacts much slower than nitrogen. XPS and AES depth profile analyses show continuous changes of the in-depth compositions of the overlayers. This can be interpreted in terms of a very irregular thickness of the overlayers, an assumption which is substantiated by local AES analyses and by the observation of a pronounced crystalline structure of the substrate after annealing pretreatment, which can give rise to locally different reaction rates. The depth profile is also influenced by the broad ranges of stability of the titanium nitride phases formed during the reaction. The quantitative analysis of the titanium/nitrogen overlayers by AES is difficult because of the overlap of titanium and nitrogen Auger peaks. In quantitative XPS analysis problems arise due to difficulties in defining Ti 2p peak areas. This work presents practical procedures for the quantitative evaluation by XPS and AES of nitridic overlayers with sufficient accuracy. (orig.) [de

  14. A new method for production of titanium vapor and synthesis of titanium nitride coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, Sergey N.; Melnik, Yury A.; Metel, Alexander S.; Volosova, Marina A.

    2018-03-01

    It is proposed to synthesize on machine parts and cutting tools wear-resistant titanium nitride coatings with the help of the hollow-cathode glow discharge, a molybdenum crucible for titanium evaporation being used as the anode of the discharge and a process vacuum chamber being used as the hollow cathode. The research revealed that at the anode surface area less than a critical value S* = (2m/M)1/2S, where S is the area of the chamber walls, m is the mass of electrons and M is the mass of ions, the anode fall of potential is positive and grows from ˜50 V at argon pressure p = 0.2 Pa to ˜2 kV at p = 0.02 Pa. At the discharge current I = 0.6 A electrons accelerated by the anode fall of 0.9 kV transport into the crucible with the inner diameter of 12 mm the power of ˜0.54 kW, which allows the titanium evaporation and the coating deposition rate of 5 µm·h-1 on a substrate distanced from the crucible at 100 mm. After the argon is replaced with the nitrogen, titanium nitride coating without titanium droplets is synthesized the deposition rate amounting to about the same value.

  15. Elaboration of titanium nitride coatings by activated reactive evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granier, Jean

    1978-01-01

    As titanium nitride is a very interesting and promising material for the protection against wear and corrosion of metals and alloys with a low fusion point, and notably steels, this research thesis reports the study of the elaboration of a TiN coating by activated reactive evaporation. In a first part, the author describes deposition processes based on evaporation and their characteristics. He explains the choice of the studied process. He discusses published data and results related to the titanium-nitrogen system. He describes the apparatus and reports the operation mode adjustment, and reports the study of the influence of operating conditions (substrate temperature, nitrogen pressure, evaporation rate, possible use of a discharge) on growth kinetics and on coating properties. A reaction mechanism is then proposed to describe and explain the obtained results [fr

  16. Titanium nitride room-temperature ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, Iu.G., E-mail: morozov@ism.ac.ru [Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, 8 Academician Osipyan Street, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region, 142432 (Russian Federation); Belousova, O.V. [Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, 8 Academician Osipyan Street, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region, 142432 (Russian Federation); Belyakov, O.A. [Ogarev Mordovia State University, Saransk, 68 Bol' shevistskaya Street, 430005 (Russian Federation); Parkin, I.P., E-mail: i.p.parkin@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Materials Chemistry Research Centre, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Sathasivam, S. [Department of Chemistry, Materials Chemistry Research Centre, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Kuznetcov, M.V., E-mail: maxim1968@mail.ru [All-Russian Research Institute on Problems of Civil Defense and Emergencies of Emergency Control Ministry of Russia (EMERCOM), 7 Davidkovskaya Street, Moscow, 121352 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-05

    Cubic and near-spherical TiN nanoparticles ranging in average size from 20 to 125 nm were prepared by levitation-jet aerosol synthesis through condensation of titanium vapor in an inert gas flow with gaseous nitrogen injection. The nanoparticles were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), BET measurements, UV–Vis, FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and vibrating-sample magnetometry. Room-temperature ferromagnetism with maximum magnetization up to 2.5 emu/g was recorded for the nanoparticles. The results indicate that the observed ferromagnetic ordering was related to the defect Ti–N structures on the surface of nanoparticles. This suggestion is in good correlation with the measured spectroscopical data. - Highlights: • Levitation-jet aerosol synthesis of TiN nanoparticles (NPs). • SEM, XRD, BET, UV–vis, FT-IR, Raman, XPS and magnetic characterization of the NPs. • Correlation between optical and XPS measurements data and maximum magnetization of the NPs.

  17. Titanium Nitride and Nitrogen Ion Implanted Coated Dental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Berzins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials have been investigated since the mid-1980s and considered in various applications in dentistry such as implants, abutments, orthodontic wires, endodontic files, periodontal/oral hygiene instruments, and casting alloys for fixed restorations. Multiple methodologies have been employed to create the coatings, but detailed structural analysis of the coatings is generally lacking in the dental literature. Depending on application, the purpose of the coating is to provide increased surface hardness, abrasion/wear resistance, esthetics, and corrosion resistance, lower friction, as well as greater beneficial interaction with adjacent biological and material substrates. While many studies have reported on the achievement of these properties, a consensus is not always clear. Additionally, few studies have been conducted to assess the efficacy of the coatings in a clinical setting. Overall, titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials potentially offer advantages over uncoated counterparts, but more investigation is needed to document the structure of the coatings and their clinical effectiveness.

  18. Deposition of titanium nitride layers by electric arc – Reactive plasma spraying method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Şerban, Viorel-Aurel; Roşu, Radu Alexandru; Bucur, Alexandra Ioana; Pascu, Doru Romulus

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Titanium nitride layers deposited by electric arc – reactive plasma spraying method. ► Deposition of titanium nitride layers on C45 steel at different spraying distances. ► Characterization of the coatings hardness as function of the spraying distances. ► Determination of the corrosion behavior of titanium nitride layers obtained. - Abstract: Titanium nitride (TiN) is a ceramic material which possesses high mechanical properties, being often used in order to cover cutting tools, thus increasing their lifetime, and also for covering components which are working in corrosive environments. The paper presents the experimental results on deposition of titanium nitride coatings by a new combined method (reactive plasma spraying and electric arc thermal spraying). In this way the advantages of each method in part are combined, obtaining improved quality coatings in the same time achieving high productivity. Commercially pure titanium wire and C45 steel as substrate were used for experiments. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the deposited coatings are composed of titanium nitride (TiN, Ti 2 N) and small amounts of Ti 3 O. The microstructure of the deposited layers, investigated both by optical and scanning electron microscopy, shows that the coatings are dense, compact, without cracks and with low porosity. Vickers microhardness of the coatings presents maximum values of 912 HV0.1. The corrosion tests in 3%NaCl solution show that the deposited layers have a high corrosion resistance compared to unalloyed steel substrate.

  19. Formation and characterization of titanium nitride and titanium carbide films prepared by reactive sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundgren, J.-E.

    1982-01-01

    Titanium has been reactively r.f. sputtered in mixed Ar-N 2 and Ar-CH 4 discharges on to substrates held at 775 K. The films obtained have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and by measurements of hardness and electrical resistivity. The compositions of the films have been determined using Auger electron spectroscopy. The processes occurring both on substrates and target surfaces have been studied and it is shown that the latter is of great importance for the composition and structure of deposited films. Titanium nitride films of full density and with electrical resistivity and hardness values close to those of bulk TiN were only obtained in a narrow range close to the stoichiometric composition. Titanium carbide films grown on non-biased substrates were found to have an open structure and thus a low density. A bias applied to the substrate, however, improved the quality of the films. It is also shown that the heat of formation of the compounds plays an important role in the formation of carbides and nitrides. A large value promotes the development of large grains and dense structures. (Auth.)

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF TITANIUM NITRIDE COATING FOR SNS RING VACUUM CHAMBERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HE, P.; HSEUH, H.C.; MAPES, M.; TODD, R.; WEISS, D.

    2001-01-01

    The inner surface of the ring vacuum chambers of the US Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be coated with ∼100 nm of Titanium Nitride (TiN). This is to minimize the secondary electron yield (SEY) from the chamber wall, and thus avoid the so-called e-p instability caused by electron multipacting as observed in a few high-intensity proton storage rings. Both DC sputtering and DC-magnetron sputtering were conducted in a test chamber of relevant geometry to SNS ring vacuum chambers. Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) were used to analyze the coatings for thickness, stoichiometry and impurity. Excellent results were obtained with magnetron sputtering. The development of the parameters for the coating process and the surface analysis results are presented

  1. Theoretical study of the elastic properties of titanium nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingdong CHEN; Yinglu ZHAO; Benhai YU; Chunlei WANG; Deheng SHI

    2009-01-01

    The equilibrium lattice parameter, relative volume V/Vo, elastic constants Cij, and bulk modulus of titanium nitride are successfully obtained using the ab initio plane-wave pseudopotential (PW-PP) method within the framework of density functional theory. The quasi-harmonic Debye model, using a set of total energy vs molar volume obtained with the PW-PP method, is applied to the study of the elastic properties and vibrational effects. We analyze the relationship between the bulk modulus and temperature up to 2000 K and obtain the relationship between bulk modulus B and pressure at different temperatures. It is found that the bulk modulus B increases monotonously with increasing pressure and decreases with increasing temperature. Moreover, the Debye temperature is determined from the non-equilibrium Gibbs func-tions.

  2. Anomalous response of superconducting titanium nitride resonators to terahertz radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno, J.; Baselmans, J. J. A; Coumou, P. C. J. J.; Zheng, G.; Visser, P. J. de; Klapwijk, T. M.; Driessen, E. F. C.; Doyle, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present an experimental study of kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) fabricated of atomic layer deposited TiN films and characterized at radiation frequencies of 350 GHz. The responsivity to radiation is measured and found to increase with the increase in radiation powers, opposite to what is expected from theory and observed for hybrid niobium titanium nitride/aluminium (NbTiN/Al) and all-aluminium (all-Al) KIDs. The noise is found to be independent of the level of the radiation power. The noise equivalent power improves with higher radiation powers, also opposite to what is observed and well understood for hybrid NbTiN/Al and all-Al KIDs. We suggest that an inhomogeneous state of these disordered superconductors should be used to explain these observations

  3. Anomalous response of superconducting titanium nitride resonators to terahertz radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, J., E-mail: j.bueno@sron.nl; Baselmans, J. J. A [SRON, Netherlands Institute of Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands); Coumou, P. C. J. J.; Zheng, G. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Visser, P. J. de [SRON, Netherlands Institute of Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Klapwijk, T. M. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Physics Department, Moscow State Pedagogical University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Driessen, E. F. C. [Université Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Doyle, S. [Cardiff University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queens Buildings, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-10

    We present an experimental study of kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) fabricated of atomic layer deposited TiN films and characterized at radiation frequencies of 350 GHz. The responsivity to radiation is measured and found to increase with the increase in radiation powers, opposite to what is expected from theory and observed for hybrid niobium titanium nitride/aluminium (NbTiN/Al) and all-aluminium (all-Al) KIDs. The noise is found to be independent of the level of the radiation power. The noise equivalent power improves with higher radiation powers, also opposite to what is observed and well understood for hybrid NbTiN/Al and all-Al KIDs. We suggest that an inhomogeneous state of these disordered superconductors should be used to explain these observations.

  4. Study of titanium nitride elasticity characteristics in the homogeneity range by ultrasonic resonance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khidirov, I.; Khajdarov, T.

    1995-01-01

    Elasticity characteristics of cubic and tetragonal phases of titanium nitride in the homogeneity range were studied for the first time by ultrasonic resonance method. It is established that the Young modulus, the shift and volume module of cubic titanium nitride elasticity in the homogeneity range change nonlinearly with decrease in nitrogen concentration and correlate with concentration dependences of other physical properties.15 refs., 2 figs

  5. Titanium Matrix Composite Ti/TiN Produced by Diode Laser Gas Nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Lisiecki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A high power direct diode laser, emitting in the range of near infrared radiation at wavelength 808–940 nm, was applied to produce a titanium matrix composite on a surface layer of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V by laser surface gas nitriding. The nitrided surface layers were produced as single stringer beads at different heat inputs, different scanning speeds, and different powers of laser beam. The influence of laser nitriding parameters on the quality, shape, and morphology of the surface layers was investigated. It was found that the nitrided surface layers consist of titanium nitride precipitations mainly in the form of dendrites embedded in the titanium alloy matrix. The titanium nitrides are produced as a result of the reaction between molten Ti and gaseous nitrogen. Solidification and subsequent growth of the TiN dendrites takes place to a large extent at the interface of the molten Ti and the nitrogen gas atmosphere. The direction of TiN dendrites growth is perpendicular to the surface of molten Ti. The roughness of the surface layers depends strongly on the heat input of laser nitriding and can be precisely controlled. In spite of high microhardness up to 2400 HV0.2, the surface layers are crack free.

  6. [The cytotoxicity of N48 NdFeB magnets coated with titanium-nitride].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiao-Ming; Hou, Zhi-Ming; Chu, Ming

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of N48 NdFeB magnets coated with titanium-nitride on the growth and apoptosis of L929 mouse fibroblast cells, and to determine the material biocompatibility. The NdFeB magnets coated with titanium-nitride, bare NdFeB magnets and ordinary brackets were put into RPMI-1640 to prepare fusions. L929 mouse fibroblast cells were cultivated in the negative control liquid, positive control liquid, 100%, 50% and 25% sample fusions, respectively. The cell proliferation vitality was detected by MTT assay and the relative growth rate was calculated.Cell scatter diagrams of the negative control liquid, 100% titanium-nitride coated magnets fusion and bare magnets fusion were detected by flow cytometry Annexin V/PI double staining method. The ratios of normal cells, early apoptosis, advanced apoptosis and necrosis cells were calculated. The results were analyzed for paired t test using SPSS11.5 software package. The toxic levels of N48 NdFeB coated with titanium-nitride were ranked as 0-1. The toxic levels of bare magnets were ranked as 2. The cell scatter diagrams showed that there was no significant difference in living cell, early apoptosis and necrosis between magnets coated with titanium-nitride and control group. But there was significant difference between the bare magnets group and control group. The N48 NdFeB magnets coated with titanium-nitride have good biocompatibility.

  7. Review about laser nitriding of titanium alloys; Revision sobre nitruraciones laser de aleaciones de titanio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Artieda, M.G.; Fernandez-Carrasquilla, J.

    2010-07-01

    A common technique used to improve the wear response of titanium alloys is to nitride the surface, using chemical or physical vapour deposition, ion implantation or surface remelting in a nitrogen atmosphere. In this revision nitriding systems with laser technology are studied, used in titanium alloys surface treatments.For high temperature, high strength applications, titanium based alloys are an attractive light-weight alternative to steel, due to their high strength to weight ratio and corrosion resistance. In applications that require good wear resistance, titanium alloys pose a problem due to their poor tribological characteristics.Titanium alloys used with a suitable nitriding treatment could allow the replacement of steel in different applications, obtaining weight savings in fabricated components. (Author). 68 refs.

  8. Functional nanostructured titanium nitride films obtained by sputtering magnetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, O.; Hernandez-Velez, M.; Navas, D.; Auger, M.A.; Baldonedo, J.L.; Sanz, R.; Pirota, K.R.; Vazquez, M.

    2006-01-01

    Development of new methods in the formation of hollow structures, in particular, nanotubes and nanocages are currently generating a great interest as a consequence of the growing relevance of these nanostructures on many technological fields, ranging from optoelectronics to biotechnology. In this work, we report the formation of titanium nitride (TiN) nanotubes and nanohills via reactive sputtering magnetron processes. Anodic Alumina Membranes (AAM) were used as template substrates to grow the TiN nanostructures. The AAM were obtained through electrochemical anodization processes by using oxalic acid solutions as electrolytes. The nanotubes were produced at temperatures below 100 deg. C, and using a pure titanium (99.995%) sputtering target and nitrogen as reactive gas. The obtained TiN thin films showed surface morphologies adjusted to pore diameter and interpore distance of the substrates, as well as ordered arrays of nanotubes or nanohills depending on the sputtering and template conditions. High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) was used to elucidate both the surface order and morphology of the different grown nanostructures. The crystalline structure of the samples was examined using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns and their qualitative chemical composition by using X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (XEDS) in a scanning electron microscopy

  9. Laser beam welding of titanium nitride coated titanium using pulse-shaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Sergio Fernandes de Lima

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A new welding method which allows the assembly of two titanium nitride coated titanium parts is proposed. The welding procedure utilizes the possibility for pulse-shaping in order to change the energy distribution profile during the laser pulse. The pulse-shaping is composed of three elements: a a short high power pulse for partial ablation at the surface; b a long pulse for thermal penetration; and c a quenching slope for enhanced weldability. The combination of these three elements produces crack-free welds. The weld microstructure is changed in comparison to normal welding, i.e. with a rectangular pulse, as the nitrogen and the microhardness are more homogenously distributed in the weld under pulse-shaping conditions. This laser pulse dissolves the TiN layer and allows nitrogen to diffuse into the melt pool, also contributing to an enhanced weldability by providing suitable thermal conditions.

  10. Capacitive performance of molybdenum nitride/titanium nitride nanotube array for supercapacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yibing, E-mail: ybxie@seu.edu.cn; Tian, Fang

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • MoN{sub x}/TiN NTA is fully converted from MoO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} NTA by one-step nitridation process. • MoN{sub x}/TiN NTA is used as feasible electrode material of high-performance supercapacitor. • MoN{sub x}/TiN NTA shows high capacitance, rate capability and cycling stability. - Abstract: Molybdenum nitride (MoN{sub x}) depositing on titanium nitride nanotube array (TiN NTA) was designed as MoN{sub x}/TiN NTA for supercapacitor electrode material. MoN{sub x}/TiN NTA was fabricated by electrodepositing molybdenum oxide onto titanium dioxide NTA and one-step nitridation treatment in ammonia. MoN{sub x}/TiN NTA involved top-surface layer of MoN{sub x} nanoparticles and underlying layer of TiN NTA, which contributed to electric double layer capacitance in aqueous lithium-ion electrolyte solution. The specific capacitance was increased from 69.05 mF cm{sup −2} for TiN NTA to 121.50 mF cm{sup −2} for MoN{sub x}/TiN NTA at 0.3 mA cm{sup −2}, presenting the improved capacitance performance. MoN{sub x} exhibited the capacitance of 174.83 F g{sup −1} at 1.5 A g{sup −1} and slightly declined to 109.13 F g{sup −1} at 30 A g{sup −1}, presenting high rate capability. MoN{sub x}/TiN NTA exhibited the capacitance retention ratio of 93.8% at 3.0 mA cm{sup −2} after 1000 cycles, presenting high cycling stability. MoN{sub x}/TiN NTA could act as a promising electrode material of supercapacitor.

  11. Titanium nitride plasma-chemical synthesis with titanium tetrachloride raw material in the DC plasma-arc reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpichev, D. E.; Sinaiskiy, M. A.; Samokhin, A. V.; Alexeev, N. V.

    2017-04-01

    The possibility of plasmochemical synthesis of titanium nitride is demonstrated in the paper. Results of the thermodynamic analysis of TiCl4 - H2 - N2 system are presented; key parameters of TiN synthesis process are calculated. The influence of parameters of plasma-chemical titanium nitride synthesis process in the reactor with an arc plasmatron on characteristics on the produced powders is experimentally investigated. Structure, chemical composition and morphology dependencies on plasma jet enthalpy, stoichiometric excess of hydrogen and nitrogen in a plasma jet are determined.

  12. High aspect ratio titanium nitride trench structures as plasmonic biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shkondin, Evgeniy; Repän, Taavi; Takayama, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    High aspect ratio titanium nitride (TiN) grating structures are fabricated by the combination of deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques. TiN is deposited at 500 ◦C on a silicon trench template. Silicon between vertical TiN layers is selectively etched...... to fabricate the high aspect ratio TiN trenches with the pitch of 400 nm and height of around 2.7 µm. Dielectric functions of TiN films with different thicknesses of 18 - 105 nm and post-annealing temperatures of 700 - 900 ◦C are characterized by an ellipsometer. We found that the highest annealing temperature...... of 900 ◦C gives the most pronounced plasmonic behavior with the highest plasma frequency, ωp = 2.53 eV (λp = 490 nm). Such high aspect ratio trench structures function as a plasmonic grating sensor that supports the Rayleigh-Woods anomalies (RWAs), enabling the measurement of changes in the refractive...

  13. High quality superconducting titanium nitride thin film growth using infrared pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgovkin, A.; Chaudhuri, S.; Ruhtinas, A.; Lahtinen, M.; Sajavaara, T.; Maasilta, I. J.

    2018-05-01

    Superconducting titanium nitride (TiN) thin films were deposited on magnesium oxide, sapphire and silicon nitride substrates at 700 °C, using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique, where infrared (1064 nm) pulses from a solid-state laser were used for the ablation from a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere. Structural studies performed with x-ray diffraction showed the best epitaxial crystallinity for films deposited on MgO. In the best films, superconducting transition temperatures, T C, as high as 4.8 K were observed, higher than in most previous superconducting TiN thin films deposited with reactive sputtering. A room temperature resistivity down to ∼17 μΩ cm and residual resistivity ratio up to 3 were observed in the best films, approaching reported single crystal film values, demonstrating that PLD is a good alternative to reactive sputtering for superconducting TiN film deposition. For less than ideal samples, the suppression of the film properties were correlated mostly with the unintended incorporation of oxygen (5–10 at%) in the film, and for high oxygen content films, vacuum annealing was also shown to increase the T C. On the other hand, superconducting properties were surprisingly insensitive to the nitrogen content, with high quality films achieved even in the highly nitrogen rich, Ti:N = 40/60 limit. Measures to limit oxygen exposure during deposition must be taken to guarantee the best superconducting film properties, a fact that needs to be taken into account with other deposition methods, as well.

  14. Bacterial adhesion studies on titanium, titanium nitride and modified hydroxyapatite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyachandran, Y.L.; Venkatachalam, S.; Karunagaran, B.; Narayandass, Sa.K.; Mangalaraj, D.; Bao, C.Y.; Zhang, C.L.

    2007-01-01

    A qualitative study on adhesion of the oral bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis on titanium (Ti), titanium nitride (TiN), fluorine modified hydroxyapatite (FHA) and zinc modified FHA (Zn-FHA) thin films is investigated. Ti and TiN thin films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering and hydroxyapatite-based films were prepared by solgel method. The crystalline structure, optical characteristics, chemical composition and surface topography of the films were studied by XRD, optical transmission, XPS, EDAX and AFM measurements. The predominant crystallite orientation in the Ti and TiN films was along (002) and (111) of hcp and cubic structures, respectively. The Ti : O : N composition ratio in the surface of the Ti and TiN films was found to be 7 : 21 : 1 and 3 : 8 : 2, respectively. The atomic concentration ratio (Zn + Ca) / P in Zn-FHA film was found to be 1.74 whereby the Zn replaced 3.2% of Ca. The rough surface feature in modified HA films was clearly observed in the SEM images and the surface roughness (rms) of Ti and TiN films was 2.49 and 3.5 nm, respectively, as observed using AFM. The film samples were sterilized, treated in the bacteria culture medium, processed and analyzed using SEM. Surface roughness of the films was found to have least influence on the bacterial adhesion. More bacteria were observed on the TiN film with oxide nitride surface layer and less number of adhered bacteria was noticed on the Ti film with native surface oxide layer and on Zn-FHA film

  15. Bacterial adhesion studies on titanium, titanium nitride and modified hydroxyapatite thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeyachandran, Y L [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Venkatachalam, S [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Karunagaran, B [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Narayandass, Sa K [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Mangalaraj, D [Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu (India); Bao, C Y [West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zhang, C L [West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2007-01-15

    A qualitative study on adhesion of the oral bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis on titanium (Ti), titanium nitride (TiN), fluorine modified hydroxyapatite (FHA) and zinc modified FHA (Zn-FHA) thin films is investigated. Ti and TiN thin films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering and hydroxyapatite-based films were prepared by solgel method. The crystalline structure, optical characteristics, chemical composition and surface topography of the films were studied by XRD, optical transmission, XPS, EDAX and AFM measurements. The predominant crystallite orientation in the Ti and TiN films was along (002) and (111) of hcp and cubic structures, respectively. The Ti : O : N composition ratio in the surface of the Ti and TiN films was found to be 7 : 21 : 1 and 3 : 8 : 2, respectively. The atomic concentration ratio (Zn + Ca) / P in Zn-FHA film was found to be 1.74 whereby the Zn replaced 3.2% of Ca. The rough surface feature in modified HA films was clearly observed in the SEM images and the surface roughness (rms) of Ti and TiN films was 2.49 and 3.5 nm, respectively, as observed using AFM. The film samples were sterilized, treated in the bacteria culture medium, processed and analyzed using SEM. Surface roughness of the films was found to have least influence on the bacterial adhesion. More bacteria were observed on the TiN film with oxide nitride surface layer and less number of adhered bacteria was noticed on the Ti film with native surface oxide layer and on Zn-FHA film.

  16. Anti corrosion layer for stainless steel in molten carbonate fuel cell - comprises phase vapour deposition of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride layer then oxidising layer in molten carbonate electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Forming an anticorrosion protective layer on a stainless steel surface used in a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) - comprises the phase vapour deposition (PVD) of a layer comprising at least one of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride and then forming a protective layer in situ...

  17. Titanium nitride deposition in titanium implant alloys produced by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, V.A.R.; Cairo, C.A.A.; Faria, J.; Lemos, T.G.; Galvani, E.T.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is an extremely hard material, often used as a coating on titanium alloy, steel, carbide, and aluminum components to improve wear resistance. Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EB-PVD) is a form of deposition in which a target anode is bombarded with an electron beam given off by a charged tungsten filament under high vacuum, producing a thin film in a substrate. In this work are presented results of TiN deposition in targets and substrates of Ti (C.P.) and Ti- 13 Nb- 13 Zr obtained by powder metallurgy. Samples were produced by mixing of hydride metallic powders followed by uniaxial and cold isostatic pressing with subsequent densification by sintering between 900°C up to 1400 °C, in vacuum. The deposition was carried out under nitrogen atmosphere. Sintered samples were characterized for phase composition, microstructure and microhardness by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers indentation, respectively. It was shown that the samples were sintered to high densities and presented homogeneous microstructure, with ideal characteristics for an adequate deposition and adherence. The film layer presented a continuous structure with 15μm. (author)

  18. Mesoporous coaxial titanium nitride-vanadium nitride fibers of core-shell structures for high-performance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinhong; Shang, Chaoqun; Gu, Lin; Dong, Shanmu; Chen, Xiao; Han, Pengxian; Li, Lanfeng; Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Zhihong; Xu, Hongxia; Zhu, Yuwei; Cui, Guanglei

    2011-08-01

    In this study, titanium nitride-vanadium nitride fibers of core-shell structures were prepared by the coaxial electrospinning, and subsequently annealed in the ammonia for supercapacitor applications. These core-shell (TiN-VN) fibers incorporated mesoporous structure into high electronic conducting transition nitride hybrids, which combined higher specific capacitance of VN and better rate capability of TiN. These hybrids exhibited higher specific capacitance (2 mV s(-1), 247.5 F g(-1)) and better rate capability (50 mV s(-1), 160.8 F g(-1)), which promise a good candidate for high-performance supercapacitors. It was also revealed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization that the minor capacitance fade originated from the surface oxidation of VN and TiN.

  19. Effect of zirconium nitride physical vapor deposition coating on preosteoblast cell adhesion and proliferation onto titanium screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Manuela; Gatti, Giorgio; Migliario, Mario; Marchese, Leonardo; Rocchetti, Vincenzo; Renò, Filippo

    2014-11-01

    Titanium has long been used to produce dental implants. Problems related to its manufacturing, casting, welding, and ceramic application for dental prostheses still limit its use, which highlights the need for technologic improvements. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the biologic performance of titanium dental implants coated with zirconium nitride in a murine preosteoblast cellular model. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chemical and morphologic characteristics of titanium implants coated with zirconium nitride by means of physical vapor deposition. Chemical and morphologic characterizations were performed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and the bioactivity of the implants was evaluated by cell-counting experiments. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis found that physical vapor deposition was effective in covering titanium surfaces with zirconium nitride. Murine MC-3T3 preosteoblasts were seeded onto titanium-coated and zirconium nitride-coated screws to evaluate their adhesion and proliferation. These experiments found a significantly higher number of cells adhering and spreading onto zirconium nitride-coated surfaces (Pzirconium nitride surfaces were completely covered with MC-3T3 cells. Analysis of these data indicates that the proposed zirconium nitride coating of titanium implants could make the surface of the titanium more bioactive than uncoated titanium surfaces. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tribological Characteristic of Titanium Alloy Surface Layers Produced by Diode Laser Gas Nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiecki A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the tribological properties of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V composite surface layers Ti/TiN were produced during laser surface gas nitriding by means of a novel high power direct diode laser with unique characteristics of the laser beam and a rectangular beam spot. Microstructure, surface topography and microhardness distribution across the surface layers were analyzed. Ball-on-disk tests were performed to evaluate and compare the wear and friction characteristics of surface layers nitrided at different process parameters, base metal of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V and also the commercially pure titanium. Results showed that under dry sliding condition the commercially pure titanium samples have the highest coefficient of friction about 0.45, compared to 0.36 of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V and 0.1-0.13 in a case of the laser gas nitrided surface layers. The volume loss of Ti6Al4V samples under such conditions is twice lower than in a case of pure titanium. On the other hand the composite surface layer characterized by the highest wear resistance showed almost 21 times lower volume loss during the ball-on-disk test, compared to Ti6Al4V samples.

  1. Waste conversion into high-value ceramics: Carbothermal nitridation synthesis of titanium nitride nanoparticles using automotive shredder waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayyas, Mohannad; Pahlevani, Farshid; Maroufi, Samane; Liu, Zhao; Sahajwalla, Veena

    2017-03-01

    Environmental concern about automotive shredder residue (ASR) has increased in recent years due to its harmful content of heavy metals. Although several approaches of ASR management have been suggested, these approaches remain commercially unproven. This study presents an alternative approach for ASR management where advanced materials can be generated as a by-product. In this approach, titanium nitride (TiN) has been thermally synthesized by nitriding pressed mixture of automotive shredder residue (ASR) and titanium oxide (TiO 2 ). Interactions between TiO 2 and ASR at non-isothermal conditions were primarily investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry. Results indicated that TiO 2 influences and catalyses degradation reactions of ASR, and the temperature, at which reduction starts, was determined around 980 °C. The interaction between TiO 2 and ASR at isothermal conditions in the temperature range between 1200 and 1550 °C was also studied. The pressed mixture of both materials resulted in titanium nitride (TiN) ceramic at all given temperatures. Formation kinetics were extracted using several models for product layer diffusion-controlled solid-solid and solid-fluid reactions. The effect of reactants ratio and temperature on the degree of conversion and morphology was investigated. The effect of reactants ratio was found to have considerable effect on the morphology of the resulting material, while temperature had a lesser impact. Several unique structures of TiN (porous nanostructured, polycrystalline, micro-spherical and nano-sized structures) were obtained by simply tuning the ratio of TiO 2 to ASR, and a product with appreciable TiN content of around 85% was achieved after only one hour nitridation at 1550 °C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. On the difference between optically and electrically determined resistivity of ultra-thin titanium nitride films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hao, B.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2013-01-01

    This work reports on the determination and comparison of the resistivity of ultra-thin atomic layer deposited titanium nitride films in the thickness range 0.65–20 nm using spectroscopic ellipsometry and electrical test structures. We found that for films thicker than 4 nm, the resistivity values

  3. No clinical benefit of titanium nitride coating in cementless mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hove, R.P.; Brohet, R.M.; van Royen, B.J.; Nolte, P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Titanium nitride (TiN) coating of cobalt–chromium–molybdenum (CoCrMo) implants has shown to improve the biomechanical properties of the implant surface and to reduce adhesive wear in vitro. It is yet unknown whether TiN coating of total knee prosthesis (TKP) affects the postoperative

  4. A study of nitride formation during the oxidation of titanium-tantalum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanrahan, R.J. Jr.; Lu, Y.C.; Kung, H.; Butt, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    The oxidation rates of Ti rich titanium-tantalum alloys are significantly lower in air than in oxygen. This nitrogen effect has been shown to be associated with the formation of a nitride layer at or near the scale-metal interface. In the present work the authors used transmission electron microscopy and microdiffraction to identify the nitrides formed on Ti5Ta and Ti40Ta (5 and 40 weight percent Ta alloys) during identical exposures. In both alloys the nitride develops in contact with the oxygen stabilized α-phase in the substrate. In Ti5Ta a continuous layer of TiN forms, while in Ti40Ta a discontinuous layer of Ti 2 N interspersed with Ta 2 O 5 (formed from the Ta rich β-phase) is formed. The nitride layer acts as an oxygen diffusion barrier, reducing the dissolution of oxygen in the substrate

  5. Tribological Properties of Surface-Textured and Plasma-Nitrided Pure Titanium Under Oil Lubrication Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baosen; Dong, Qiangsheng; Ba, Zhixin; Wang, Zhangzhong; Shi, Hancheng; Xue, Yanting

    2018-01-01

    Plasma nitriding was conducted as post-treatment for surface texture on pure titanium to obtain a continuous nitriding layer. Supersonic fine particles bombarding (SFPB) was carried out to prepare surface texture. The surface morphologies and chemical composition were analyzed using scanning electron microscope and energy disperse spectroscopy. The microstructures of modified layers were characterized by transmission electron microscope. The tribological properties of surface-textured and duplex-treated pure titanium under oil lubrication condition were systematically investigated in the ball-on-plate reciprocating mode. The effects of applied load and sliding velocity on the tribological behavior were analyzed. The results show that after duplex treatments, the grains size in modified layer becomes slightly larger, and hardness is obviously improved. Wear resistance of duplex-treated pure titanium is significantly improved referenced to untreated and surface-textured pure titanium, which is 3.22 times as much as untreated pure titanium and 2.15 times of that for surface-textured pure titanium, respectively.

  6. Core-shell titanium dioxide-titanium nitride nanotube arrays with near-infrared plasmon resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsinezhad, Samira; Shanavas, Thariq; Mahdi, Najia; Askar, Abdelrahman M.; Kar, Piyush; Sharma, Himani; Shankar, Karthik

    2018-04-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is a ceramic with high electrical conductivity which in nanoparticle form, exhibits localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in the visible region of the solar spectrum. The ceramic nature of TiN coupled with its dielectric loss factor being comparable to that of gold, render it attractive for CMOS polarizers, refractory plasmonics, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and a whole host of sensing applications. We report core-shell TiO2-TiN nanotube arrays exhibiting LSPR peaks in the range 775-830 nm achieved by a simple, solution-based, low cost, large area-compatible fabrication route that does not involve laser-writing or lithography. Self-organized, highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays were grown by electrochemical anodization of Ti thin films on fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass substrates and then conformally coated with a thin layer of TiN using atomic layer deposition. The effects of varying the TiN layer thickness and thermal annealing on the LSPR profiles were also investigated. Modeling the TiO2-TiN core-shell nanotube structure using two different approaches, one employing effective medium approximations coupled with Fresnel coefficients, resulted in calculated optical spectra that closely matched the experimentally measured spectra. Modeling provided the insight that the observed near-infrared resonance was not collective in nature, and was mainly attributable to the longitudinal resonance of annular nanotube-like TiN particles redshifted due to the presence of the higher permittivity TiO2 matrix. The resulting TiO2-TiN core-shell nanotube structures also function as visible light responsive photocatalysts, as evidenced by their photoelectrochemical water-splitting performance under light emitting diode illumination using 400, 430 and 500 nm photons.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of nano silicon and titanium nitride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The characterization techniques indicated ... Scalable synthesis; microwave plasma; chemical synthesis; nanoparticles. 1. Introduction ... used but very few methods are available to produce silicon and titanium ... current (A). (m3/h). 1. Si. 2.1.

  8. Titanium nitride coatings synthesized by IPD method with eliminated current oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chodun Rafał

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effects of elimination of current oscillations within the coaxial plasma accelerator during IPD deposition process on the morphology, phase structure and properties of synthesized TiN coatings. Current observations of waveforms have been made by use of an oscilloscope. As a test material for experiments, titanium nitride TiN coatings synthesized on silicon and high-speed steel substrates were used. The coatings morphology, phase composition and wear resistance properties were determined. The character of current waveforms in the plasma accelerator electric circuit plays a crucial role during the coatings synthesis process. Elimination of the current oscillations leads to obtaining an ultrafine grained structure of titanium nitride coatings and to disappearance of the tendency to structure columnarization. The coatings obtained during processes of a non-oscillating character are distinguished by better wear-resistance properties.

  9. Transient Nonlinear Optical Properties of Thin Film Titanium Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-23

    13] • Chemical composition • Crystal structure and lattice parameters • Defect structure This tuneability will be useful in future engineering ...Nitride SarahKatie Thomas Follow this and additional works at: https://scholar.afit.edu/etd Part of the Materials Science and Engineering Commons This... Thesis is brought to you for free and open access by AFIT Scholar. It has been accepted for inclusion in Theses and Dissertations by an authorized

  10. Development of new ferritic alloys reinforced by nano titanium nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathon, M.H.; Perrut, M.; Poirier, L.; Ratti, M.; Hervé, N.; Carlan, Y. de

    2015-01-01

    Nano-reinforced steels are considered for future nuclear reactors or for application at high temperature like the heat exchangers tubes or plates. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys are the most known of the nano-reinforced alloys. They exhibit high creep strength as well as high resistance to radiation damage. This article deals with the development of new nano reinforced alloys called Nitride Dispersed Strengthened (NDS). Those are also considered for nuclear applications and could exhibit higher ductility with a simplest fabrication way. Two main fabrication routes were studied: the co-milling of Fe–18Cr1W0.008N and TiH 2 powders and the plasma nitration at low temperature of a Fe–18Cr1W0.8Ti powder. The materials were studied mainly by Small Angle Neutron Scattering. The feasibility of the reinforcement by nano-nitride particles is demonstrated. The final size of the nitrides can be similar (few nanometers) to the nano-oxides observed in ODS alloys. The mechanical properties of the new NDS show an amazing ductility at high temperature for a nano-reinforced alloy

  11. Development of new ferritic alloys reinforced by nano titanium nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathon, M.H., E-mail: marie-helene.mathon@cea.fr [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Perrut, M., E-mail: mikael.perrut@onera.fr [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Poirier, L., E-mail: poirier@nitruvid.com [Bodycote France and Belgium, 9 r Jean Poulmarch, 95100 Argenteuil (France); Ratti, M., E-mail: mathieu.ratti@snecma.fr [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées, F91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hervé, N., E-mail: nicolas.herve@cea.fr [CEA, DRT, LITEN, F38054 Grenoble (France); Carlan, Y. de, E-mail: yann.decarlan@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées, F91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-01-15

    Nano-reinforced steels are considered for future nuclear reactors or for application at high temperature like the heat exchangers tubes or plates. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys are the most known of the nano-reinforced alloys. They exhibit high creep strength as well as high resistance to radiation damage. This article deals with the development of new nano reinforced alloys called Nitride Dispersed Strengthened (NDS). Those are also considered for nuclear applications and could exhibit higher ductility with a simplest fabrication way. Two main fabrication routes were studied: the co-milling of Fe–18Cr1W0.008N and TiH{sub 2} powders and the plasma nitration at low temperature of a Fe–18Cr1W0.8Ti powder. The materials were studied mainly by Small Angle Neutron Scattering. The feasibility of the reinforcement by nano-nitride particles is demonstrated. The final size of the nitrides can be similar (few nanometers) to the nano-oxides observed in ODS alloys. The mechanical properties of the new NDS show an amazing ductility at high temperature for a nano-reinforced alloy.

  12. Plasma synthesis of titanium nitride, carbide and carbonitride nanoparticles by means of reactive anodic arc evaporation from solid titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiesler, D.; Bastuck, T.; Theissmann, R.; Kruis, F. E.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma methods using the direct evaporation of a transition metal are well suited for the cost-efficient production of ceramic nanoparticles. In this paper, we report on the development of a simple setup for the production of titanium-ceramics by reactive anodic arc evaporation and the characterization of the aerosol as well as the nanopowder. It is the first report on TiC X N 1 − X synthesis in a simple anodic arc plasma. By means of extensive variations of the gas composition, it is shown that the composition of the particles can be tuned from titanium nitride over a titanium carbonitride phase (TiC X N 1 − X ) to titanium carbide as proven by XRD data. The composition of the plasma gas especially a very low concentration of hydrocarbons around 0.2 % of the total plasma gas is crucial to tune the composition and to avoid the formation of free carbon. Examination of the particles by HR-TEM shows that the material consists mostly of cubic single crystalline particles with mean sizes between 8 and 27 nm

  13. Corrosion resistance of a magnetic stainless steel ion-plated with titanium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, K; Sawase, T; Matsumura, H; Atsuta, M; Baba, K; Hatada, R

    2000-04-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the corrosion resistance of a titanium nitride (TiN) ion-plated magnetic stainless steel (447J1) for the purpose of applying a magnetic attachment system to implant-supported prostheses made of titanium. The surface hardness of the TiN ion-plated 447J1 alloy with varying TiN thickness was determined prior to the corrosion testing, and 2 micrometers thickness was confirmed to be appropriate. Ions released from the 447J1 alloy, TiN ion-plated 447J1 alloy, and titanium into a 2% lactic acid aqueous solution and 0.1 mol/L phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were determined by means of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Long-term corrosion behaviour was evaluated using a multisweep cyclic voltammetry. The ICP-AES results revealed that the 447J1 alloy released ferric ions into both media, and that the amount of released ions increased when the alloy was coupled with titanium. Although both titanium and the TiN-plated 447J1 alloy released titanium ions into lactic acid solution, ferric and chromium ions were not released from the alloy specimen for all conditions. Cyclic voltamograms indicated that the long-term corrosion resistance of the 447J1 alloy was considerably improved by ion-plating with TiN.

  14. Marangoni Convection during Free Electron Laser Nitriding of Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höche, Daniel; Müller, Sven; Rapin, Gerd; Shinn, Michelle; Remdt, Elvira; Gubisch, Maik; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Pure titanium was treated by free electron laser (FEL) radiation in a nitrogen atmosphere. As a result, nitrogen diffusion occurs and a TiN coating was synthesized. Local gradients of interfacial tension due to the local heating lead to a Marangoni convection, which determines the track properties. Because of the experimental inaccessibility of time-dependent occurrences, finite element calculations were performed, to determine the physical processes such as heat transfer, melt flow, and mass transport. In order to calculate the surface deformation of the gas-liquid interface, the level set approach was used. The equations were modified and coupled with heat-transfer and diffusion equations. The process was characterized by dimensionless numbers such as the Reynolds, Peclet, and capillary numbers, to obtain more information about the acting forces and the coating development. Moreover, the nitrogen distribution was calculated using the corresponding transport equation. The simulations were compared with cross-sectional micrographs of the treated titanium sheets and checked for their validity. Finally, the process presented is discussed and compared with similar laser treatments.

  15. Carbon dioxide ion implantation in Titanium Nitride (Ti N)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torabi, Sh.; Sari, A. H.; Hojabri, A.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen ion implantation on titanium samples performed at 3x10 18 , 8x10 17 , 3x10 18 doses. In addition CO 2 ions were also implanted at doses in the range of 1x10 17 ,4 x10 17 ,8x10 17 . Atomic Force Microscopy, used to investigate the topographical changes of implanted samples. The structure of samples and phase composition were characterized using x-ray diffraction. The results show that by increasing of nitrogen ions, the roughness, grain sizes and hardness will increase. But by further increasing of dose, hardness will be decreased. The CO 2 implantation also enhance the roughness, grain size and hardness which could be caused by phase composition.

  16. Diffusion, convection, and solidification in cw-mode free electron laser nitrided titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeche, Daniel; Mueller, Sven; Shinn, Michelle; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Titanium sheets were irradiated by free electron laser radiation in cw mode in pure nitrogen. Due to the interaction, nitrogen diffusion occurs and titanium nitride was synthesized in the tracks. Overlapping tracks have been utilized to create coatings in order to improve the tribological properties of the sheets. Caused by the local heating and the spatial dimension of the melt pool, convection effects were observed and related to the track properties. Stress, hardness, and nitrogen content were investigated with x-ray diffraction, nanoindention, and resonant nuclear reaction analysis. The measured results were correlated with the scan parameters, especially to the lateral track shift. Cross section micrographs were prepared and investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. They show the solidification behavior, phase formation, and the nitrogen distribution. The experiments give an insight into the possibilities of materials processing using such a unique heat source.

  17. Diffusion, convection, and solidification in cw-mode free electron laser nitrided titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höche, Daniel; Shinn, Michelle; Müller, Sven; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-04-01

    Titanium sheets were irradiated by free electron laser radiation in cw mode in pure nitrogen. Due to the interaction, nitrogen diffusion occurs and titanium nitride was synthesized in the tracks. Overlapping tracks have been utilized to create coatings in order to improve the tribological properties of the sheets. Caused by the local heating and the spatial dimension of the melt pool, convection effects were observed and related to the track properties. Stress, hardness, and nitrogen content were investigated with x-ray diffraction, nanoindention, and resonant nuclear reaction analysis. The measured results were correlated with the scan parameters, especially to the lateral track shift. Cross section micrographs were prepared and investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. They show the solidification behavior, phase formation, and the nitrogen distribution. The experiments give an insight into the possibilities of materials processing using such a unique heat source.

  18. Development of novel titanium nitride-based decorative coatings by calcium addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodroj, A. [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS UMR 7198, Departement CP2S, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, CS 14234, 54042 Nancy cedex (France); Pierson, J.F., E-mail: jean-francois.pierson@ijl.nancy-universite.fr [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS UMR 7198, Departement CP2S, Ecole des Mines, Parc de Saurupt, CS 14234, 54042 Nancy cedex (France)

    2011-08-01

    Calcium was added into titanium nitride coatings deposited using a hybrid magnetron sputtering-arc evaporation process. The calcium content in the films was adjusted by the variation of the pulsed DC current applied to the Ca sputtering target. X-ray diffraction analyses suggested that the increase of the calcium content induced the partial substitution of titanium atoms by calcium ones in the TiN lattice and a refinement of the grain size. Optical reflectance investigations showed that the absorption band of TiN was shifted towards higher wavelengths and that (Ti,Ca)N coatings may be suitable for decorative applications. Finally, the decrease of the film reflectivity was interpreted as a consequence of a free electron concentration decrease as confirmed from electrical resistivity measurements.

  19. Development of novel titanium nitride-based decorative coatings by calcium addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodroj, A.; Pierson, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium was added into titanium nitride coatings deposited using a hybrid magnetron sputtering-arc evaporation process. The calcium content in the films was adjusted by the variation of the pulsed DC current applied to the Ca sputtering target. X-ray diffraction analyses suggested that the increase of the calcium content induced the partial substitution of titanium atoms by calcium ones in the TiN lattice and a refinement of the grain size. Optical reflectance investigations showed that the absorption band of TiN was shifted towards higher wavelengths and that (Ti,Ca)N coatings may be suitable for decorative applications. Finally, the decrease of the film reflectivity was interpreted as a consequence of a free electron concentration decrease as confirmed from electrical resistivity measurements.

  20. Bone response to a titanium aluminium nitride coating on metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, C O; Brook, I M

    2006-05-01

    The design, surface characteristics and strength of metallic implants are dependant on their intended use and clinical application. Surface modifications of materials may enable reduction of the time taken for osseointegration and improve the biological response of bio-mechanically favourable metals and alloys. The influence of a titanium aluminium nitride (TAN) coating on the response of bone to commercially pure titanium and austenitic 18/8 stainless steel wire is reported. TAN coated and plain rods of stainless steel and commercially pure titanium were implanted into the mid-shaft of the femur of Wistar rats. The femurs were harvested at four weeks and processed for scanning electron and light microscopy. All implants exhibited a favourable response in bone with no evidence of fibrous encapsulation. There was no significant difference in the amount of new bone formed around the different rods (osseoconduction), however, there was a greater degree of shrinkage separation of bone from the coated rods than from the plain rods (p = 0.017 stainless steel and p = 0.0085 titanium). TAN coating may result in reduced osseointegration between bone and implant.

  1. Xenon thermal behavior in sintered titanium nitride, foreseen inert matrix for GFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bes, R.

    2010-11-01

    This work concerns the generation IV future nuclear reactors such as gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) for which refractory materials as titanium nitride (TiN) are needed to surround fuel and act as a fission product diffusion barrier. This study is about Xe thermal behavior in sintered titanium nitride. Microstructure effects on Xe behavior have been studied. In this purpose, several syntheses have been performed using different sintering temperatures and initial powder compositions. Xenon species have been introduced into samples by ionic implantation. Then, samples were annealed in temperature range from 1300 C to 1600 C, these temperatures being the accidental awaited temperature. A transport of xenon towards sample surface has been observed. Transport rate seems to be slow down when increasing sintering temperature. The composition of initial powder and the crystallographic orientation of each considered grain also influence xenon thermal behavior. Xenon release has been correlated with material oxidation during annealing. Xenon bubbles were observed. Their size is proportional with xenon concentration and increases with annealing temperature. Several mechanisms which could explain Xe intragranular mobility in TiN are proposed. In addition with experiments, very low Xe solubility in TiN has been confirmed by ab initio calculations. So, bi-vacancies were found to be the most favoured Xe incorporation sites in this material. (author)

  2. Preparation of Titanium nitride nanomaterials for electrode and application in energy storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Tang

    Full Text Available The Titanium nitride was made by the carbamide and titanic chloride precursors. XRD results indicate that the precursor ratio N:Ti 3:1 leads to higher crystallinity. SEM and EDX demonstrated that Ti and N elements were distributed uniformly with the ratio of 1:1. The TiN used as the electrode material for supercapacitor was also studied. The specific capacities were changed from 407 F.g−1 to 385 F.g−1, 364 F.g−1 and 312 F.g−1, when the current densities were changed from 1 A.g−1 to 2 A.g−1, 5 A.g−1 and 10 A.g−1, respectively. Chronopotentiometry tests showed high coulombic efficiency. Cycling performance of the TiN electrode was evaluated by CV at a scanning rate of 50 mV.s−1 for 20,000 cycles and there was about 9.8% loss. These results indicate that TiN is a promising electrode material for the supercapacitors. Keywords: Energy storage, Nanomaterials, Anode, Titanium nitride, Supercapacitors

  3. Increased charge storage capacity of titanium nitride electrodes by deposition of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijs, Suzan; McDonald, Matthew; Sørensen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of depositing a thin layer of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD) on titanium nitride (TiN) coated electrodes and the effect this has on charge injection properties. The charge storage capacity increased by applying the B-NCD film...

  4. Electron heating by photon-assisted tunneling in niobium terahertz mixers with integrated niobium titanium nitride striplines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leone, B; Gao, [No Value; Klapwijk, TM; Jackson, BD; Laauwen, WM; de Lange, G

    2001-01-01

    We describe the gap voltage depression and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics in pumped niobium superconductor-insulator-superconductor junction with niobium titanium nitride tuning stripline by introducing an electron heating power contribution resulting from the photon-assisted tunneling

  5. Aspects of the practical application of titanium alloys after low temperature nitriding glow discharge in hydrogen- free -gas media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashovets, N.S., E-mail: mashovets@rambler.ru [Khmelnickiy National University (Ukraine); Pastukh, I.M., E-mail: pastim@mail.ru [Khmelnickiy National University (Ukraine); Voloshko, S.M. [Khmelnickiy National University (Ukraine); National Technical University of Ukraine “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute” (Ukraine)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Surface modification of titanium alloys were carried out by low-temperature nitriding in a glow discharge in hydrogen-free environment. • Research into the phase composition was performed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). • The above material shows the promise of the technology of low-temperature hydrogen-nitriding by glow discharge. This greatly expands the range of practical applications of titanium alloys. - Abstract: X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Electron Auger-spectroscopy investigation of phase transformation on the surface of the VT8 titanium alloy after a low temperature hydrogen-free nitriding in a glow discharge. Operational characteristics of titanium alloys defined physical-mechanical characteristics of the surface and their phase composition, which depend on the process parameters of nitriding. Surface modification of titanium alloys were carried out by low-temperature nitriding in a glow discharge in hydrogen-free environment. The main advantage of this method lies in the absence of hydrogen embrittlement and complete environmental safety process. Application of the glow discharge can not only speed up the process by the order of the diffusion surface saturation with nitrogen, but also significantly alters the kinetics of the process and quality of the nitrided layer, in particular its physio-mechanical properties and phase composition. For research purposes, the standards from an α + β alloy Ti-Al6-Cr2-Mo2,5 (VT8) were used. Research into the phase composition was performed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Stratified analysis by AES was conducted by etching the surface of the samples’ argon ion beam with diameters of 1.5 mm with an energy of 3000 eV and a current density of 400 mA/cm{sup 2}. The above material shows the promise of the technology of low

  6. Aspects of the practical application of titanium alloys after low temperature nitriding glow discharge in hydrogen- free -gas media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashovets, N.S.; Pastukh, I.M.; Voloshko, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Surface modification of titanium alloys were carried out by low-temperature nitriding in a glow discharge in hydrogen-free environment. • Research into the phase composition was performed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). • The above material shows the promise of the technology of low-temperature hydrogen-nitriding by glow discharge. This greatly expands the range of practical applications of titanium alloys. - Abstract: X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Electron Auger-spectroscopy investigation of phase transformation on the surface of the VT8 titanium alloy after a low temperature hydrogen-free nitriding in a glow discharge. Operational characteristics of titanium alloys defined physical-mechanical characteristics of the surface and their phase composition, which depend on the process parameters of nitriding. Surface modification of titanium alloys were carried out by low-temperature nitriding in a glow discharge in hydrogen-free environment. The main advantage of this method lies in the absence of hydrogen embrittlement and complete environmental safety process. Application of the glow discharge can not only speed up the process by the order of the diffusion surface saturation with nitrogen, but also significantly alters the kinetics of the process and quality of the nitrided layer, in particular its physio-mechanical properties and phase composition. For research purposes, the standards from an α + β alloy Ti-Al6-Cr2-Mo2,5 (VT8) were used. Research into the phase composition was performed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Stratified analysis by AES was conducted by etching the surface of the samples’ argon ion beam with diameters of 1.5 mm with an energy of 3000 eV and a current density of 400 mA/cm 2 . The above material shows the promise of the technology of low

  7. Influence of aluminum nitride interlayers on crystal orientation and piezoelectric property of aluminum nitride thin films prepared on titanium electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamohara, Toshihiro; Akiyama, Morito; Ueno, Naohiro; Nonaka, Kazuhiro; Kuwano, Noriyuki

    2007-01-01

    Highly c-axis-oriented aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films have been prepared on titanium (Ti) bottom electrodes by using AlN interlayers. The AlN interlayers were deposited between Ti electrodes and silicon (Si) substrates, such as AlN/Ti/AlN/Si. The crystallinity and crystal orientation of the AlN films and Ti electrodes strongly depended on the thickness of the AlN interlayers. Although the sputtering conditions were the same, the X-ray diffraction intensity of AlN (0002) and Ti (0002) planes drastically increased, and the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the X-ray rocking curves decreased from 5.1 o to 2.6 o and from 3.3 o to 2.0 o , respectively. Furthermore, the piezoelectric constant d 33 of the AlN films was significantly improved from - 0.2 to - 4.5 pC/N

  8. Pulsed Laser Deposition Processing of Improved Titanium Nitride Coatings for Implant Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Talisha M.

    Recently surface coating technology has attracted considerable attention of researchers to develop novel coatings with enhanced functional properties such as hardness, biocompatibility, wear and corrosion resistance for medical devices and surgical tools. The materials currently being used for surgical implants include predominantly stainless steel (316L), cobalt chromium (Co-Cr), titanium and its alloys. Some of the limitations of these implants include improper mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, cytotoxicity and bonding with bone. One of the ways to improve the performance and biocompatibility of these implants is to coat their surfaces with biocompatible materials. Among the various coating materials, titanium nitride (TiN) shows excellent mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and low cytotoxicity. In the present work, a systematic study of pulsed laser ablation processing of TiN coatings was conducted. TiN thin film coatings were grown on commercially pure titanium (Ti) and stainless steel (316L) substrates at different substrate temperatures and different nitrogen partial pressures using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Microstructural, surface, mechanical, chemical, corrosion and biological analysis techniques were applied to characterize the TiN thin film coatings. The PLD processed TiN thin film coatings showed improvements in mechanical strength, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility when compared to the bare substrates. The enhanced performance properties of the TiN thin film coatings were a result of the changing and varying of the deposition parameters.

  9. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of the nitrides and oxynitrides of vanadium, titanium and chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elwin, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    A study has been made into the atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of nitrides and oxynitrides of vanadium, titanium and chromium. Vanadium tetrachloride, vanadium oxychloride, chromyl chloride and titanium tetrachloride have been used as precursors with ammonia, at different flow conditions and temperatures. Vanadium nitride, vanadium oxynitride, chromium oxynitride, titanium/vanadium nitride and titanium/chromium oxynitride have been deposited as thin films on glass. The APCVD reaction of VCl 4 and ammonia leads to films with general composition VN x O y . By raising the ammonia concentration so that it is in excess (0.42 dm 3 min -1 VCl 4 with 1.0 dm 3 min -1 NH 3 at 500 deg. C) a film has been deposited with the composition VN 0.8 O 0.2 . Further investigation discovered similar elemental compositions could be reached by deposition at 350 deg. C (0.42 dm 3 min -1 VCl 4 with 0.5 dm 3 min -1 NH 3 ), followed by annealing at 650 deg. C, and cooled under a flow of ammonia. Only films formed below 400 deg. C were found to contain carbon or chlorine ( 3 and ammonia also lead to films of composition VN x O y the oxygen to nitrogen ratios depending on the deposition conditions. The reaction Of VOCl 3 (0.42 dm 3 min -1 ) and ammonia (0.2 dm 3 min -1 ) at 500 deg. C lead to a film of composition VN 0. 47O 1.06 . The reaction of VOCl 3 (0.42 dm 3 min -1 ) and ammonia (0.5 dm 3 min -1 ) at 650 deg. C lead to a film of composition VN 0.63 O 0.41 . The reaction of chromyl chloride with excess ammonia led to the formation of chromium oxide (Cr 2 O 3 ) films. Mixed metal films were prepared from the reactions of vanadium tetrachloride, titanium tetrachloride and ammonia to prepare V x Ti y N z and chromyl chloride, titanium tetrachloride and ammonia to form TiCr x O y N z . Both reactions produced the intended mixed coating but it was found that the vanadium / titanium nitride contained around 10 % vanadium whatever the conditions used. Oxygen contamination

  10. Structural characterization of thin films of titanium nitride deposited by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro C, M.A.; Escobar A, L.; Camps C, E.; Mejia H, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Thin films of titanium nitride were deposited using the technique of laser ablation. It was studied the effect of the density of laser energy used for ablation the target as well as of the pressure of the work gas about the structure and the hardness of the deposited thin films. Depending on the pressure of the work gas films was obtained with preferential orientation in the directions (200) and (111). At a pressure of 1 x 10 -2 Torr only the direction (200) was observed. On the other hand to the pressure of 5 x 10 -3 Torr the deposited material this formed by a mixture of the orientation (200) and (111), being the direction (111) the predominant one. Thin films of Ti N were obtained with hardness of up to 24.0 GPa that makes to these attractive materials for mechanical applications. The hardness showed an approximately linear dependence with the energy density. (Author)

  11. Thermochemical stability of zirconia-titanium nitride as mixed ionic-electronic composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, P. S. M.; Esposito, V.; Marani, D.

    2018-01-01

    Dense zirconia (8% molar yttria-stabilized ZrO2)-titanium nitride (TiN) composites are fabricated to obtain mixed ionic-electronic conducting ceramic systems with high degree of electronic and thermal conductivity. The composites are consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS), starting from pure...... the composites, high electrical conductivity is attained. Samples exhibit metallic behavior, showing an unexpected percolation of TiN in the YSZ matrix for volume fraction ≤ 25 wt% (27 vol%). Chemical degradation and electrical properties of the compounds were monitored under oxidative (air) and inert (Ar...... transport properties of the composite can be tuned by both the relative volume fraction of phases and controlled oxidative treatments. Adjusting such parameters different electric behaviors were observed ranging from predominant electronic conductors, to temperature-independent resistivity...

  12. On the residual stress and picostructure of titanium nitride films. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, A.J.; Valvoda, V.; Rafaja, D.; Williamson, D.L.; Sartwell, B.D.

    1992-01-01

    Titanium nitride films, dual energy ion implanted with argon or krypton, have been studied with a Seemann-Bohlin fine focus goniometer at grazing angles in the range 2-10. The implantation of 1% of either gas has little effect on the lattice parameters or the residual stress. It is thought that the gas atoms are on substitutional lattice sites and are associated with vacancies created during the implantation process. At 4% of implanted gas, it precipitates out in the form of bubbles; in the case of argon these are crystalline and their lattice parameter is close to that for solid argon as recorded in the literature. The lattice parameters and the residual stresses are affected slightly by the implantation: argon reduces the former and makes the latter more tensile, whereas the krypton has the opposite effects. It is thought that the difference in behavior is due to a difference in size of the bubbles or to the greater compressibility of argon

  13. Structure and phase composition of titanium nitride coating on austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubovitskaya, N.V.; Kolenchenko, L.D.; Larikov, L.N.

    1989-01-01

    Structure and phase composition of titanium nitride coating deposited on 08Kh18N10T steel substrate using ''Bulat'' device are studied. Use of complex investigation methods permitted despite small coating thickness (1μm) to aquire information on hardness, porosity, to study phase composition in all coating thickness. The surface layer (∼0.1 μm) consists of ε-Ti 2 N, TiN 0.6 , TiC 0.35 , that is formed with carbon participation from oil vacuum. In more deeper layers beside ε-Ti 2 N TiC 0.14 N 0.77 is present. Effect of carbon diffusion from substrate to forming coating is stated. Gradient of element concentrations in the substrate-coating interface causes recrystallization of austenite

  14. Modification of the surfaces of stainless steel during titanium nitride deposition by a dynamic mixing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Katsuhiro; Tamura, Susumu; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Horiguchi, Motohiro; Nakaiwa, Hiroki; Sugimoto, Takashi; Akamatsu, Katsuya; Nakao, Kazuyoshi

    2000-05-01

    Surfaces of stainless steel SUS304 were coated with titanium nitride (TiN) at temperatures ranging from 400°C to 770°C using a dynamic mixing technique. The N+ ions were accelerated at energies of 0.5-2.0 keV, and were implanted into the stainless steel. The composition of the prepared TiN films was measured using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with He ions at an energy of 2.0 MeV. Intermediate layers containing compounds such as FesNq, Cr2N, and CrFe were formed between the TiN films and substrates at substrate temperatures higher than 700°C. The thickness of the TiN films decreased significantly when the intermediate layers were formed.

  15. Single-Atom Catalyst of Platinum Supported on Titanium Nitride for Selective Electrochemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sungeun; Kim, Jiwhan; Tak, Young Joo; Soon, Aloysius; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-02-05

    As a catalyst, single-atom platinum may provide an ideal structure for platinum minimization. Herein, a single-atom catalyst of platinum supported on titanium nitride nanoparticles were successfully prepared with the aid of chlorine ligands. Unlike platinum nanoparticles, the single-atom active sites predominantly produced hydrogen peroxide in the electrochemical oxygen reduction with the highest mass activity reported so far. The electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules, such as formic acid and methanol, also exhibited unique selectivity on the single-atom platinum catalyst. A lack of platinum ensemble sites changed the reaction pathway for the oxygen-reduction reaction toward a two-electron pathway and formic acid oxidation toward direct dehydrogenation, and also induced no activity for the methanol oxidation. This work demonstrates that single-atom platinum can be an efficient electrocatalyst with high mass activity and unique selectivity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Hardness and Elastic Modulus of Titanium Nitride Coatings Prepared by Pirac Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Siyuan; Wu, Shoujun; Zhang, Guoyun; Zhang, Weiguo

    In the present work, hardness and elastic modulus of a titanium nitride coatings prepared on Ti6Al4V by powder immersion reaction-assisted coating (PIRAC) are tested and comparatively studied with a physical vapor deposition (PVD) TiN coating. Surface hardness of the PIRAC coatings is about 11GPa, much lower than that of PVD coating of 22GPa. The hardness distribution profile from surface to substrate of the PVD coatings is steeply decreased from ˜22GPa to ˜4.5GPa of the Ti6Al4V substrate. The PIRAC coatings show a gradually decreasing hardness distribution profile. Elastic modulus of the PVD coating is about 426GPa. The PIRAC coatings show adjustable elastic modulus. Elastic modulus of the PIRAC coatings prepared at 750∘C for 24h and that at 800∘C for 8h is about 234 and 293GPa, respectively.

  17. The Importance Of Surface Topography For The Biological Properties Of Nitrided Diffusion Layers Produced On Ti6Al4V Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wierzchoń T.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion nitrided layers produced on titanium and its alloys are widely studied in terms of their application for cardiac and bone implants. The influence of the structure, the phase composition, topography and surface morphology on their biological properties is being investigated. The article presents the results of a study of the topography (nanotopography of the surface of TiN+Ti2N+αTi(N nitrided layers produced in low-temperature plasma on Ti6Al4V titanium alloy and their influence on the adhesion of blood platelets and their aggregates. The TEM microstructure of the produced layers have been examined and it was demonstrated that the interaction between platelets and the surface of the titanium implants subjected to glow-discharge nitriding can be shaped via modification of the roughness parameters of the external layer of the TiN titanium nitride nanocrystalline zone.

  18. Structure and hemocompatibility of nanocrystalline titanium nitride produced under glow-discharge conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowińska, Agnieszka; Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Tarnowski, Michał; Witkowska, Justyna; Wierzchoń, Tadeusz

    2018-04-01

    Significant efforts are being made towards developing novel antithrombotic materials. The purpose of the presented study was to characterize two variants of nitrided surface layers produced on alloy Ti-6Al-4V in different areas of low-temperature plasma - at the plasma potential (TiNp) or at the cathode potential (TiNc). The layers were characterized in terms of their microstructure, surface topography and wettability, and platelet response to the environment of different pH. The produced layers were of the TiN + Ti2N + αTiN-type, but the layer produced at the plasma potential was thinner, smoother and had lower surface free energy compared with that produced at the cathode potential. Biological evaluation demonstrated more fibrinogen buildup, less platelet adhesion and aggregation, and fewer strongly activated platelets on the TiNp surface compared with those parameters on the TiNc surface and on the titanium alloy in its initial state. Interestingly, both surface types were significantly resistant to fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion in the environment of lower pH. In conclusion, the nitrided surface layer produced at the plasma potential is a promising material and this basic information is critical for further development of hemocompatible materials.

  19. Comparative study of titanium carbide and nitride coatings grown by cathodic vacuum arc technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devia, D.M.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; Arango, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN), titanium carbide (TiC) thin films and TiC/TiN bilayers have been deposited on AISI 304 stainless steel substrates by plasma assisted physical vapor deposition technique - reactive pulsed vacuum arc method. The coatings were characterized in terms of crystalline structure, microstructure and chemical nature by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Tribological behavior was investigated using ball on disc technique. The average coefficient of friction was measured, showing lower values for the TiN/TiC bilayer. Dynamic wear curves were performed for each coating, observing a better wear resistance for TiN/TiC bilayers, compared to TiN and TiC monolayers. On the other hand, the TiCN formation in the TiN/TiC bilayer was observed, being attributed to the interdiffusion between TiN and TiC at the interface. Moreover, the substrate temperature influence was analysing observing a good behavior at T S = 115 °C.

  20. Hidroxyapatite Coating on CoCrMo Alloy Titanium Nitride Coated Using Biomimetic Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlena; Sukaryo, S.G.; Fajar, M.

    2016-01-01

    Bone implants is a way to cure broken bones which is being developed. The implants can be made of metals, ceramics and polymers. Metallic materials commonly used are titanium (Ti), stainless steel, and metal alloys. This study used Co-based alloys, i.e. CoCrMo coated with titanium nitride (TiN) which was then coated on hidroxyapatite (HAp). The HAp coating on the surface of CoCrMo alloy was done by biomimetic methods, first by soaking the metal alloys in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution for 18, 24, and 36 hours. The immersion in the SBF solution produced white coat on the surface of the metal alloy. The layers formed were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and characterized by x-ray diffractometer (XRD). Based on the SEM results of 36 hours treatment, the morphology of apatite crystal formed fine grains. According to XRD result, there were HAp peaks at angles 2θ 31.86, 32.25, dan 39.48. However, there were also CaCO 3 peaks at angles 2θ 29.46, 36.04, and 46.79. It indicated the pure HAp is not yet formed. (paper)

  1. Hidroxyapatite Coating on CoCrMo Alloy Titanium Nitride Coated Using Biomimetic Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlena; Sukaryo, S. G.; Fajar, M.

    2016-11-01

    Bone implants is a way to cure broken bones which is being developed. The implants can be made of metals, ceramics and polymers. Metallic materials commonly used are titanium (Ti), stainless steel, and metal alloys. This study used Co-based alloys, i.e. CoCrMo coated with titanium nitride (TiN) which was then coated on hidroxyapatite (HAp). The HAp coating on the surface of CoCrMo alloy was done by biomimetic methods, first by soaking the metal alloys in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution for 18, 24, and 36 hours. The immersion in the SBF solution produced white coat on the surface of the metal alloy. The layers formed were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and characterized by x-ray diffractometer (XRD). Based on the SEM results of 36 hours treatment, the morphology of apatite crystal formed fine grains. According to XRD result, there were HAp peaks at angles 2θ 31.86, 32.25, dan 39.48. However, there were also CaCO3 peaks at angles 2θ 29.46, 36.04, and 46.79. It indicated the pure HAp is not yet formed.

  2. Coating of Titanium Nitride on Stainless Steel Targets by a 4 kJ Plasma Focus Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrani, M.; Habibi, M.; Amrollahi, R.

    2012-08-01

    Titanium nitride thin films were deposited on stainless steel (SS316L) targets by using a 4 kJ plasma focus device. The corresponding energy flux delivered to SS316L surface is estimated to be 2.69 × 1013 kev cm-3 ns-1. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the formation of a nanocrystalline titanium nitride coating on the surface of targets. Thickness of the elements found on the surface of treated samples which are obtained by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analysis (RBS) were (×1015 at/cm2) .45% Ti, 50% N and 5% Fe. Scanning electron microscopy was used to indicate changes in surface morphology. Existence of grains in different size confirms the formation of TiN crystals on the surface of targets.

  3. Fabrication and Physical Properties of Titanium Nitride/Hydroxyapatite Composites on Polyether Ether Ketone by RF Magnetron Sputtering Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nupangtha, W.; Boonyawan, D.

    2017-09-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) coatings have been used very successfully in a variety of applications because of their excellent properties, such as the high hardness meaning good wear resistance and also used for covering medical implants. Hydroxyapatite is a bioactive ceramic that contributes to the restoration of bone tissue, which together with titanium nitride may contribute to obtaining a superior composite in terms of mechanical and bone tissue interaction matters. This paper aims to explain how to optimize deposition conditions for films synthesis on PEEK by varying sputtering parameters such as nitrogen flow rate and direction, deposition time, d-s (target-to-substrate distance) and 13.56 MHz RF power. The plasma conditions used to deposit films were monitored by the optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Titanium nitride/Hydroxyapatite composite films were performed by gas mixture with nitrogen and argon ratio of 1:3 and target-to-substrate distance at 8 cm. The gold colour, as-deposited film was found on PEEK with high hardness and higher surface energy than uncoated PEEK. X-ray diffraction characterization study was carried to study the crystal structural properties of these composites.

  4. High performance corrosion and wear resistant composite titanium nitride layers produced on the AZ91D magnesium alloy by a hybrid method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Tacikowski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Composite, diffusive titanium nitride layers formed on a titanium and aluminum sub-layer were produced on the AZ91D magnesium alloy. The layers were obtained using a hybrid method which combined the PVD processes with the final sealing by a hydrothermal treatment. The microstructure, resistance to corrosion, mechanical damage, and frictional wear of the layers were examined. The properties of the AZ91D alloy covered with these layers were compared with those of the untreated alloy and of some engineering materials such as 316L stainless steel, 100Cr6 bearing steel, and the AZ91D alloy subjected to commercial anodizing. It has been found that the composite diffusive nitride layer produced on the AZ91D alloy and then sealed by the hydrothermal treatment ensures the corrosion resistance comparable with that of 316L stainless steel. The layers are characterized by higher electrochemical durability which is due to the surface being overbuilt with the titanium oxides formed, as shown by the XPS examinations, from titanium nitride during the hydrothermal treatment. The composite titanium nitride layers exhibit high resistance to mechanical damage and wear, including frictional wear which is comparable with that of 100Cr6 bearing steel. The performance properties of the AZ91D magnesium alloy covered with the composite titanium nitride coating are substantially superior to those of the alloy subjected to commercial anodizing which is the dominant technique employed in industrial practice.

  5. Effect of titanium nitride coating on physical properties of three-dimensional graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabir, Fatemeh, E-mail: f.dabir@modares.ac.ir [Materials Eng. Department, Tarbiat Modares University, 1411713116, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarraf-Mamoory, Rasoul, E-mail: rsarrafm@modares.ac.ir [Materials Eng. Department, Tarbiat Modares University, 1411713116, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Loeblein, Manuela, E-mail: manuela001@e.ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore); CINTRA CNRS/NTU/THALES, UMI 3288, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, 637553 (Singapore); Tsang, Siu Hon, E-mail: shtsang@ntu.edu.sg [CINTRA CNRS/NTU/THALES, UMI 3288, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, 637553 (Singapore); Teo, Edwin Hang Tong, E-mail: htteo@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TiN was coated on 3D graphene by chemical method, followed by annealing at NH{sub 3}. • Effect of TiN coating on physical properties of 3DG was investigated. • TiN coating modified surface properties of 3DG, while retaining its skeleton. • Average number of graphene layers increased after annealing of 3DG at NH{sub 3}. • Annealing of 3DG at NH{sub 3} resulted in locally nitrogen doping. - Abstract: In this paper, titanium nitride (TiN) was applied on the surface and into the porous structure of three-dimensional graphene (3DG) by chemical method. This method consists of immersing 3DG into a solution containing Ti ions and annealing under ammonia atmosphere at 850 °C. The effects of TiN coating and high temperature annealing under NH{sub 3} on the physical properties of 3DG were investigated. For this purpose, the 3DG samples, with and without TiN coating, were characterized via XRD, SEM, XPS, and Raman spectroscopy. Then, the electrical resistivity, work function, and wettability of samples were determined by Van der Pauw method, contact angle meter, and UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), respectively. The results showed that an almost pure and very crystalline TiN phase with titanium/nitrogen atomic ratio of 1.09 was formed on the 3DG network. Annealing of 3DG under NH{sub 3} resulted in locally doping of graphene with nitrogen and generation of defects in its structure. After TiN coating, the work function value of 3DG (5 eV) was reduced to 4.68 eV, while its initial water contact angle decreased from 127° to 83°.

  6. Chiro-plasmonic refractory metamaterial with titanium nitride (TiN) core–shell nanohelices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramanababu, Sruthi; Nair, Greshma; Deshpande, Preeti; A, Jithin M.; Mohan, Sangeneni; Ghosh, Ambarish

    2018-06-01

    Chiral metamaterials are obtained by assembling plasmonic elements in geometries with broken mirror symmetry, which can have promising applications pertaining to generation, manipulation and detection of optical polarisation. The materials used to fabricate this promising nanosystem, especially in the visible–NIR regime, are limited to noble metals such as Au and Ag. However, they are not stable at elevated temperatures and in addition, incompatible with CMOS technologies. We demonstrate that it is possible to develop a chiro-plasmonic system based on a refractory material such as titanium nitride (TiN) which does not have these disadvantages. The building block of our metamaterial is a novel core–shell helix, obtained by coating TiN over silica nanohelices. These were arranged in a regular two-dimensional array over cm-scale areas, made possible by the use of scalable fabrication techniques such as laser interference lithography, glancing angle deposition and DC magnetron sputtering. The measured chiro-optical response was extremely broadband (1400 nm), and had contributions from individual, as well as collective plasmon modes of the interacting nanohelices, whose spectral characteristics could be easily controlled by varying the direction of the incident radiation.

  7. Selective ablation of a titanium nitride film on tungsten carbide substrate using ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Eduardo Spinelli

    2017-01-01

    Surface coatings are applied to many cutting tools in the metallurgical industry in order to improve cutting efficiency and extend its useful life. In this work, tests were performed to remove the coating of titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) pellets, using an ultrashort laser pulses beam. After determination of the damage thresholds of the film and the substrate, were ablated on the surface of the coating lines using two ablation conditions, it was initially operated on the low fluence regime for the film, and later on the low fluence regime of the substrate, far below the threshold of the film, applying high overlapping pulses. A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was set up to monitor the materials present in the plasma generated by the laser, but the system did not present sufficient sensitivity to read the low intensity of the plasma generated in the process and was not used. After the analysis of the traces by electron microscopy, optical profilometer and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, it was not possible to determine a safe process to carry out the selective removal of the film in question, however, due to the data obtained and observations of the results in some traces, new possibilities were raised, opening the discussion for future work. (author)

  8. Preparation of Titanium nitride nanomaterials for electrode and application in energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shun; Cheng, Qi; Zhao, Jinxing; Liang, Jiyuan; Liu, Chang; Lan, Qian; Cao, Yuan-Cheng; Liu, Jiyan

    The Titanium nitride was made by the carbamide and titanic chloride precursors. XRD results indicate that the precursor ratio N:Ti 3:1 leads to higher crystallinity. SEM and EDX demonstrated that Ti and N elements were distributed uniformly with the ratio of 1:1. The TiN used as the electrode material for supercapacitor was also studied. The specific capacities were changed from 407 F.g-1 to 385 F.g-1, 364 F.g-1 and 312 F.g-1, when the current densities were changed from 1 A.g-1 to 2 A.g-1, 5 A.g-1 and 10 A.g-1, respectively. Chronopotentiometry tests showed high coulombic efficiency. Cycling performance of the TiN electrode was evaluated by CV at a scanning rate of 50 mV.s-1 for 20,000 cycles and there was about 9.8% loss. These results indicate that TiN is a promising electrode material for the supercapacitors.

  9. Low-loss and tunable near-zero-epsilon titanium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, M.; Novaković, M.; Schmidt, E.; Schöppe, P.; Bibić, N.; Ronning, C.; Rakočević, Z.

    2017-10-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) has emerged as alternative plasmonic material in the visible and near-infrared spectral range due to its metallic properties. We studied the influence of silver ion implantation (fluence range from 0.5 × 1016-6 × 1016 ions/cm2) on the structural and optical properties of reactively sputtered 260 nm thick TiN films. The columnar structure was partially destroyed by the irradiation and up to 5 at.% of Ag was incorporated into the films within the projected ion range. The formation of cubic Ag nanoparticles with size of 1-2 nm was observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and subsequent fast Fourier transform analysis. This presence of Ag within the TiN matrix drastically changes both the real and imaginary component of the dielectric function and provides low optical losses. A Drude Lorentz dielectric analysis based on free electron and oscillator model are carried out to describe the silver influence on the optical behavior of TiN. With increasing ion fluence, the unscreened plasma frequency decreased and broadening increased. The energy, strength and broadening of the interband transitions were studied with respect to the silver ion fluence and correlated with the microstructural changes induced in TiN films.

  10. Deposition of titanium nitride on Si(1 0 0) wafers using plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Tousif; Ahmad, R.; Khan, I.A.; Siddiqui, Jamil; Khalid, Nida; Bhatti, Arshad Saleem; Naseem, Shahzad

    2009-01-01

    Titanium nitride thin films were deposited on Si(1 0 0) substrates by using a low energy (2.3 KJ) Mather-type plasma focus device. The composition of the deposited films was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The crystallite size has strong dependence on the numbers of focus shots. The crystallinity of TiN thin films is found to increase with increasing the number of focus shots. The effect of different number of focus shots on micro structural changes of thin films was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). SEM results showed net-like structure for film deposited for 15 numbers of shots, which are elongated grains of Si 3 N 4 in amorphous form embedded into TiN crystals. The average surface roughness was calculated from AFM images of the thin films. These results indicated that the average surface roughness increased for films deposited with increased number of focus shots. The least crystallite size and roughness are observed for film deposited with 25 focus shots.

  11. Impedance study on the corrosion of PVD and CVD titanium nitride coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsener, B.; Rota, A.; Boehni, H.

    1989-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) coatings, produced by physical (PVD) or chemical (CVD) vapor deposition techniques are used routinely to improve the wear and corrosion resistance of a surface. The main problem in using TiN as a protective coating in aggressive environements are pores and pinholes in the coating where the substrate is exposed to the electrolyte. In this work, the electrochemical and corrosion behaviour of TiN films on quartz glass, carbon steel, 304 and 316 stainless steel is studied by polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in hydrochloric acid. It is shown that the TiN coating can be used successfully only on substrates that passivate easily. On mild steel rapid corrosion takes place at pores in the coating due to the very noble steady state potential of the TiN coating. The interaction of the metallic substrate with the TiN coating is discussed for the two limiting cases mild steel (active) and 316SS (passive). It is shown that the determination of the coating porosity is possible for the active substrate only. On the passive substrate the occurence of an additional time constant in the high frequency region of the spectrum qualitatively indicates the presence of pores. A quality control of the coatings based on this fact might be possible. (author) 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Simulated radiation effects in the superinsulating phase of titanium nitride films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujisić Miloš Lj.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates possible effects of alpha particle and ion beam irradiation on the properties of the superinsulating phase, recently observed in titanium nitride films, by using numerical simulation of particle transport. Unique physical properties of the superinsulating state are considered by relying on a two-dimensional Josephson junction array as a model of material structure. It is suggested that radiation-induced change of the Josephson junction charging energy would not affect the current-voltage characteristics of the superinsulating film significantly. However, it is theorized that a relapse to an insulating state with thermally activated resistance is possible, due to radiation-induced disruption of the fine-tuned granular structure. The breaking of Cooper pairs caused by incident and displaced ions may also destroy the conditions for a superinsulating phase to exist. Finally, even the energy loss to phonons can influence the superinsulating state, by increasing the effective temperature of the phonon thermostat, thereby reestablishing means for an energy exchange that can support Cooper pair tunneling.

  13. Production and characterization of a novel carbon nanotube/titanium nitride nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddour, Carole Emilie; Das, Kaushik; Vengallatore, Srikar; Meunier, Jean-Luc

    2016-12-01

    A novel titanium nitride (TiN)/carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposite is produced with the purpose to mechanically, structurally and chemically stabilize a ‘felt-like’ CNT growth structure. The CNTs are grown on stainless steel (SS) 304 by chemical vapor deposition using the direct growth method previously developed, which does not require the use of an additional catalyst precursor. The TiN coating is achieved by physical vapor deposition and is shown here to generate a nanocomposite with a porous three-dimensional architecture. The contact stiffness is evaluated using nanoindentation, and wetting properties of the TiN/CNT nanocomposites are determined from contact angle measurements. An increase in contact stiffness and effective elastic modulus with TiN coating time was observed. The TiN coating on the non-wetting CNT felt results in a wetting nanocomposite surface. The wetting property is found to be a function of the TiN coating thickness on the CNT structure.

  14. Relative SHG measurements of metal thin films: Gold, silver, aluminum, cobalt, chromium, germanium, nickel, antimony, titanium, titanium nitride, tungsten, zinc, silicon and indium tin oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Che

    Full Text Available We have experimentally measured the surface second-harmonic generation (SHG of sputtered gold, silver, aluminum, zinc, tungsten, copper, titanium, cobalt, nickel, chromium, germanium, antimony, titanium nitride, silicon and indium tin oxide thin films. The second-harmonic response was measured in reflection using a 150 fs p-polarized laser pulse at 1561 nm. We present a clear comparison of the SHG intensity of these films relative to each other. Our measured relative intensities compare favorably with the relative intensities of metals with published data. We also report for the first time to our knowledge the surface SHG intensity of tungsten and antimony relative to that of well known metallic thin films such as gold and silver. Keywords: Surface second-harmonic generation, Nonlinear optics, Metal thin films

  15. Ternary nanocomposite of polyaniline/manganese dioxide/titanium nitride nanowire array for supercapacitor electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Chi; Xie, Yibing; Du, Hongxiu; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The electroactive polyaniline (PANI) and manganese oxide (MnO 2 ) were integrated with titanium nitride (TiN) nanowire array (NWA) to form PANI/MnO 2 /TiN ternary nanocomposite for supercapacitor application. TiN NWA was prepared via a seed-assisted hydrothermal synthesis and ammonia nitridization process. The electroactive MnO 2 and PANI was layer-by-layer coated on TiN NWA to form heterogeneous coaxial structure through a stepwise electrodeposition process. Scanning electron micrographs revealed that the well-separated TiN NWA was composed of well-distributed nanowires with diameters in the range of 10–30 nm and a total length of 1.5 μm. A villiform MnO 2 layer with a thickness of 10–20 nm covered on TiN NWA to form MnO 2 /TiN NWA composite. The coral-like PANI layer with thicknesses in the range of 20–50 nm covered on the above MnO 2 /TiN NWA to form PANI/MnO 2 /TiN NWA. Electrochemical measurements showed that a high specific capacitance of 674 F g −1 at a current density of 1 A g −1 (based on total mass of PANI/MnO 2 ) was obtained for PANI/MnO 2 /TiN NWA ternary nanocomposite, which was much higher than that of PANI/MnO 2 /carbon-cloth composites reported previously. This ternary nanocomposite also showed a good rate and cycling stability. Moreover, in comparison with PANI/TiN NWA or MnO 2 /TiN NWA, the specific capacitance of PANI/MnO 2 /TiN NWA was obviously enhanced due to the extra pseudocapacitance contribution and the effective surface area of coral-like PANI layer, showing the advantage of manipulating the heterogeneous coaxial configuration between PANI and MnO 2 for fundamentally improved capacitive performance. These results demonstrated that PANI/MnO 2 /TiN NWA ternary nanocomposite was a promising candidate electrode material for supercapacitor application

  16. Ternary nanocomposite of polyaniline/manganese dioxide/titanium nitride nanowire array for supercapacitor electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Chi; Xie, Yibing, E-mail: ybxie@seu.edu.cn; Du, Hongxiu; Wang, Wei [Southeast University, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2015-01-15

    The electroactive polyaniline (PANI) and manganese oxide (MnO{sub 2}) were integrated with titanium nitride (TiN) nanowire array (NWA) to form PANI/MnO{sub 2}/TiN ternary nanocomposite for supercapacitor application. TiN NWA was prepared via a seed-assisted hydrothermal synthesis and ammonia nitridization process. The electroactive MnO{sub 2} and PANI was layer-by-layer coated on TiN NWA to form heterogeneous coaxial structure through a stepwise electrodeposition process. Scanning electron micrographs revealed that the well-separated TiN NWA was composed of well-distributed nanowires with diameters in the range of 10–30 nm and a total length of 1.5 μm. A villiform MnO{sub 2} layer with a thickness of 10–20 nm covered on TiN NWA to form MnO{sub 2}/TiN NWA composite. The coral-like PANI layer with thicknesses in the range of 20–50 nm covered on the above MnO{sub 2}/TiN NWA to form PANI/MnO{sub 2}/TiN NWA. Electrochemical measurements showed that a high specific capacitance of 674 F g{sup −1} at a current density of 1 A g{sup −1} (based on total mass of PANI/MnO{sub 2}) was obtained for PANI/MnO{sub 2}/TiN NWA ternary nanocomposite, which was much higher than that of PANI/MnO{sub 2}/carbon-cloth composites reported previously. This ternary nanocomposite also showed a good rate and cycling stability. Moreover, in comparison with PANI/TiN NWA or MnO{sub 2}/TiN NWA, the specific capacitance of PANI/MnO{sub 2}/TiN NWA was obviously enhanced due to the extra pseudocapacitance contribution and the effective surface area of coral-like PANI layer, showing the advantage of manipulating the heterogeneous coaxial configuration between PANI and MnO{sub 2} for fundamentally improved capacitive performance. These results demonstrated that PANI/MnO{sub 2}/TiN NWA ternary nanocomposite was a promising candidate electrode material for supercapacitor application.

  17. Electronic and optical properties of titanium nitride bulk and surfaces from first principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Faisal; Pachter, Ruth; Murphy, Neil R.; Johnson, Walter E.

    2015-11-01

    Prediction of the frequency-dependent dielectric function of thin films poses computational challenges, and at the same time experimental characterization by spectroscopic ellipsometry remains difficult to interpret because of changes in stoichiometry and surface morphology, temperature, thickness of the film, or substrate. In this work, we report calculations for titanium nitride (TiN), a promising material for plasmonic applications because of less loss and other practical advantages compared to noble metals. We investigated structural, electronic, and optical properties of stoichiometric bulk TiN, as well as of the TiN(100), TiN(110), and TiN(111) outermost surfaces. Density functional theory (DFT) and many-body GW methods (Green's (G) function-based approximation with screened Coulomb interaction (W)) were used, ranging from G0W0, GW0 to partially self-consistent sc-GW0, as well as the GW-BSE (Bethe-Salpeter equation) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) methods for prediction of the optical properties. Structural parameters and the band structure for bulk TiN were shown to be consistent with previous work. Calculated dielectric functions, plasma frequencies, reflectivity, and the electron energy loss spectrum demonstrated consistency with experiment at the GW0-BSE level. Deviations from experimental data are expected due to varying experimental conditions. Comparison of our results to spectroscopic ellipsometry data for realistic nanostructures has shown that although TDDFT may provide a computationally feasible level of theory in evaluation of the dielectric function, application is subject to validation with GW-BSE calculations.

  18. Electronic and optical properties of titanium nitride bulk and surfaces from first principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, Faisal; Pachter, Ruth; Murphy, Neil R.; Johnson, Walter E.

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of the frequency-dependent dielectric function of thin films poses computational challenges, and at the same time experimental characterization by spectroscopic ellipsometry remains difficult to interpret because of changes in stoichiometry and surface morphology, temperature, thickness of the film, or substrate. In this work, we report calculations for titanium nitride (TiN), a promising material for plasmonic applications because of less loss and other practical advantages compared to noble metals. We investigated structural, electronic, and optical properties of stoichiometric bulk TiN, as well as of the TiN(100), TiN(110), and TiN(111) outermost surfaces. Density functional theory (DFT) and many-body GW methods (Green's (G) function-based approximation with screened Coulomb interaction (W)) were used, ranging from G 0 W 0 , GW 0 to partially self-consistent sc-GW 0 , as well as the GW-BSE (Bethe-Salpeter equation) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) methods for prediction of the optical properties. Structural parameters and the band structure for bulk TiN were shown to be consistent with previous work. Calculated dielectric functions, plasma frequencies, reflectivity, and the electron energy loss spectrum demonstrated consistency with experiment at the GW 0 -BSE level. Deviations from experimental data are expected due to varying experimental conditions. Comparison of our results to spectroscopic ellipsometry data for realistic nanostructures has shown that although TDDFT may provide a computationally feasible level of theory in evaluation of the dielectric function, application is subject to validation with GW-BSE calculations

  19. Erosion resistance of composite materials on titanium, zirconium and aluminium nitride base under the electron beam effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkhoturov, A.D.; Kuzenkova, M.A.; Slutskin, M.G.; Kravchuk, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    Erosion resistance of composites based on nitrides of titanium, zirconium and aluminium to spark and electron beam processing has been studied. The erosion resistance in spark processing is shown to depend on specific electric resistance of the alloys. TiN-AlN and ZrN-AlN alloys containing more than 70% AlN (with specific electric resistance more than 10 6 -10 7 ohm/cm) caot be processed by spark method. It is shown that erosion of the composites by an electron beam depends primarily on the rate of evaporation of the components

  20. Residual stress in ion implanted titanium nitride studied by parallel beam glancing incidence x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, D.E.; Perry, A.J.; Treglio, J.R.; Valvoda, V.; Rafaja, D.

    1995-01-01

    Ion implantation is known to increase the lifetime of cutting tools. Current theories are the increase in lifetime is caused by an increase in the residual stress, or by work hardening of the surface associated with the implantation. In this work the effect of ion implantation on the residual stress in titanium nitride coatings made by the standard industrial methods of chemical and physical vapor deposition (CVD and PVD) is studied. It is found in the as-received condition (unimplanted), the residual stress levels are near zero for CVD materials and highly compressive, of the order of 6 GPa, for PVD materials. Ion implantation has no effect on the residual stress in the coatings made by CVD. Nitrogen does increase the compressive residual stress by some 10% in the near surface regions of PVD coatings, while nickel-titanium dual metal ion implantation does not have any effect. It appears that the lifetime increase is not associated with residual stress effects

  1. A novel anti-frictional multiphase layer produced by plasma nitriding of PVD titanium coated ZL205A aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C.; Yao, J. W.; Wang, Y. X.; Zhu, Y. D.; Guo, J. H.; Wang, Y.; Fu, H. Y.; Chen, Z. B.; Yan, M. F.

    2018-02-01

    The heat treatment (consisting of solid solution and aging), is integrated with the nitriding process of titanium coated ZL205A aluminum alloy to improve the surface and matrix mechanical properties simultaneously. Two-step duplex treatment is adopted to prepare the gradient multiphase layer on a magnesium-free ZL205A aluminum-copper based alloy. Firstly, pure titanium film is deposited on the aluminum alloy substrate using magnetron sputtering. Secondly, the Ti-coated specimen is nitrided at the solid solution temperature of the substrate alloying elements in a gas mixture of N2 and H2 and aged at 175 °C. The microstructure evolution, microhardness as well as the wear resistance of obtained multiphase layers are investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), microhardness tester and pin-on-disc tribometer. The multiphase layer, dominated by TiN0.3 or Al3Ti, is prepared with significantly increased layer depth after duplex treatment. The surface hardness of multiphase layer is remarkably improved from 23.7HV to 457HV. The core matrix hardness is also increased to 65HV after aging. The wear rate of the multiphase layer decreases about 55.22% and 49.28% in comparison with the aged and Ti coated specimens, respectively. The predominant wear mechanism for the multiphase layer is abrasive and oxidation, but severe adhesive wear for the aged and Ti coated specimens.

  2. Non-carbon titanium cobalt nitride nanotubes supported platinum catalyst with high activity and durability for methanol oxidation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoxiang; Li, Wuyi; Pan, Zhanchang; Xu, Yanbin; Liu, Gen; Hu, Guanghui; Wu, Shoukun; Li, Jinghong; Chen, Chun; Lin, Yingsheng

    2018-05-01

    Titanium cobalt nitride nanotubes (Ti0.95Co0.05N NTs) hybrid support, a novel robust non-carbon support material prepared by solvothermal and post-nitriding processes, is further decorated with Pt nanoparticles for the electrooxidation of methanol. The catalyst is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption/desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical measurements. The morphology, structure and composition of the synthesized Ti0.95Co0.05N NTs suggest that the nanotube wall is porous and consists of homogeneous cohesively attached nitrides nanocube particles. Notable, Ti0.95Co0.05N NTs supported Pt catalyst exhibits significantly improved catalytic activity and durability for methanol electrooxidation compared with the conventional JM Pt/C catalyst. The experimental data indicate that enhanced catalytic activity and stability of Pt/Ti0.95Co0.05N NTs towards methanol electrooxidation might be mainly attributed to the tubular nanostructures and synergistic effect introduced by the Co doping. Both of them are playing an important role in improving the activity and durability of the Ti0.95Co0.05N NTs catalyst.

  3. [Effect of niobium nitride on the bonding strength of titanium porcelain by magnetron sputtering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-shu; Zhang, La-bao; Guang, Han-bing; Zhou, Shu; Zhang, Fei-min

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the effect of magnetron sputtered niobium nitride (NbN) on the bonding strength of commercially pure cast titanium (Ti) and low-fusing porcelain (Ti/Vita titankeramik system). Sixty Ti specimens were randomly divided into four groups, group T1, T2, T3 and T4. All specimens of group T1 and T2 were first treated with 120 microm blasted Al2O3 particles, and then only specimens of group T2 were treated with magnetron sputtered NbN film. All specimens of group T3 and T4 were first treated with magnetron sputtered NbN film and then only specimens of group T4 were treated with 120 microm blasted Al2O3 particles. The composition of the deposits were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). A universal testing machine was used to perform the three-point bending test to evaluate the bonding strength of Ti and porcelain. The microstructure of NbN, the interface of Ti-porcelain and the fractured Ti surface were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy depressive spectrum (EDS), and the results were compared. The XRD results showed that the NbN deposits were cubic crystalline phases. The bonding strength of Ti and porcelain in T1 to T4 group were (27.2+/-0.8), (43.1+/-0.6), (31.4+/-1.0) and (44.9+/-0.6) MPa. These results were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and differences between groups were compared using least significant difference test. Significant inter-group differences were found among all groups (Pporcelain, while samples treated with both Al2O3 and NbN had better bond. EDS of Ti-porcelain interface showed oxidation occurred in T1, T2 and T3, but was well controlled in T4. Magnetron sputtered NbN can prevent Ti from being oxidized, and can improve the bonding strength of Ti/Vita titankeramik system. Al2O3 blast can also improve the bonding strength of Ti/Vita titankeramik system.

  4. Differences in proliferation, differentiation, and cytokine production by bone cells seeded on titanium-nitride and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hove, R.P.; Nolte, P.A.; Semeins, C.M.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2013-01-01

    Titanium-nitride coating is used to improve cobalt-chromium-molybdenum implant survival in total knee arthroplasty, but its effect on osteoconduction is unknown. Chromium and cobalt ions negatively affect the growth and metabolism of cultured osteoblasts while enhancing osteoclastogenic cytokine

  5. Origin of the suppression in low frequency terahertz conductivity in dilute GaAs nitride and bismide alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cocker, Tylor; Lu, Xianfeng; Cooke, David

    We have performed time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy on GaAs1-xBix (x=7%) and observed a low-frequency suppression of the real conductivity previously seen only in dilute GaAs nitrides. We have developed a modified Drude model with a frequency-dependent scattering time that provides excellent...

  6. [Experimental study on the corrosion behavior of a type of oral near β-type titanium alloys modified with double glow plasma nitriding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ke; Li, Fenglan

    2015-12-01

    To study the electrochemical corrosion performance of a type of biomedical materials near beta titanium alloy(Ti-3Zr-2Sn-3Mo-25Nb, TLM) in artificial saliva before and after nitride changing, and to provide clinical basis for clinical application of titanium alloy TLM. The double glow plasma alloying technology was used to nitride the surface of titanium alloy TLM. The surface properties of the modified layer were observed and tested by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, glow discharge spectrum analyzer, X-ray diffraction and micro hardness tester. Then, electrochemical measurement system was used to test and compare titanium alloy TLM's electrochemical corrosion in artificial saliva before and after its surface change. Finally, the surface morphology of the original titanium alloy and the modified layer was compared by scanning electron microscope. By the technology of double glow plasma nitriding, the surface of the titanium alloy TLM had been successfully nitrided with a modified layer of 4-5 µm in thickness, uniform and compact. Its main compositions were Ti and Ti(2)N. The Microhardness of modified layer also had been improved from (236.8 ± 5.4) to (871.8 ± 5.2) HV. The self-corrosion potential in electrochemical corrosion tests had been increased from -0.559 V to -0.540 V, while the self- corrosion current density had been reduced from 2.091 × 10(-7) A/cm(2) to 7.188 × 10(-8) A/cm(2). Besides, alternating-current impedance(AC Impedance) had also been increased. With the scanning electron microscope, it's obvious that the diameter of corrosion holes on modified layer were approximately 10 µm. As to the diameter and number of corrosion holes on modified layer, they had been decreased comparing with the original titanium alloy. The type of near beta titanium alloy TLM can construct a nitriding modified layer on its surface. Meanwhile, the performance of its anti- corrosion in artificial saliva has been improved, comparing to the original

  7. Carbon Nanotubes on Titanium Substrates for Stray Light Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, John; Getty, Stephanie; Quijada, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    A method has been developed for growing carbon nanotubes on a titanium substrate, which makes the nano tubes ten times blacker than the current state-of-the-art paints in the visible to near infrared. This will allow for significant improvement of stray light performance in scientific instruments, or any other optical system. Because baffles, stops, and tubes used in scientific observations often undergo loads such as vibration, it is critical to develop this surface treatment on structural materials. This innovation optimizes the carbon nano - tube growth for titanium, which is a strong, lightweight structural material suitable for spaceflight use. The steps required to grow the nanotubes require the preparation of the surface by lapping, and the deposition of an iron catalyst over an alumina stiction layer by e-beam evaporation. In operation, the stray light controls are fabricated, and nanotubes (multi-walled 100 microns in length) are grown on the surface. They are then installed in the instruments or other optical devices.

  8. Titanium nitride films for micro-supercapacitors: Effect of surface chemistry and film morphology on the capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Amine; Porto, Raul Lucio; Soussou, Mohamed-Akram; Islam, Mohammad; Boujtita, Mohammed; Aissa, Kaltouma Ait; Le Brizoual, Laurent; Djouadi, Abdou; Brousse, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Electrochemical capacitors (EC) in the form of packed films can be integrated in various electronic devices as power source. A fabrication process of EC electrodes, which is compatible with micro-fabrication, should be addressed for practical applications. Here, we show that titanium nitride films with controlled porosity can be deposited on flat silicon substrates by reactive DC-sputtering for use as high performance micro-supercapacitor electrodes. A superior volumetric capacitance as high as 146.4 F cm-3, with an outstanding cycling stability over 20,000 cycles, was measured in mild neutral electrolyte of potassium sulfate. The specific capacitance of the films as well as their capacitance retentions were found to depend on thickness, porosity and surface chemistry of electrodes. The one step process used to fabricate these TiN electrodes and the wide use of this material in the field of semiconductor technology make it promising for miniaturized energy storage systems.

  9. Characterization of hard nitride and carbide titanium and zirconium coatings on high-speed steel cutting tool inserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.; Kaufherr, N.; Albertson, C.; Mapalo, G.; Nielsen, R.; Kaminsky, M.

    1986-01-01

    Hard nitride and carbide coatings of titanium and zirconium deposited by reactive evaporation and reactive sputtering techniques were characterized by electron microscopy and Auger spectroscopy to determine the effect of coating process on coating composition and microstructure. Analysis of the chemical composition by Auger spectroscopy revealed the coatings were of high purity with slight differences in stoichiometry depending on the coating technique. Both techniques produced coatings with a columnar microstructure. However, the reactive sputtering technique produced coarser (shorter and wider) columnar grains than the reactive evaporation technique. Furthermore, selected area diffraction analysis of reactively sputtered ZrN coatings showed a two-phased zone (hcp Zr and fcc ZrN) near the substrate/coating interface, while TiC coatings deposited by reactive sputtering and evaporation only showed a single-phase region of fcc TiC

  10. Effect of nitriding surface treatment on the corrosion resistance of dental nickel-titanium files in 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.-F.; Lin, M.-C.; Hsu, M.-L.; Li, U.-M.; Lin, C.-P.; Tsai, W.-F.; Ai, C.-F.; Chen, L.-K.; Huang, H.-H.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of nitriding surface treatment on the corrosion resistance of commercial dental alloy, in the form of helical nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) files, when treated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solution. The surface of dental helical Ni-Ti files was modified using nitriding treatment at 200 deg. C, 250 deg. C and 300 deg. C in an NH 3 -containing environment. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the Ni-Ti files were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The corrosion resistance of the Ni-Ti files when treated with a clinical solution of 5.25% NaOCl was evaluated using the linear polarization method and by potentiodynamic polarization curve measurement. The nitriding treatments at different temperatures created titanium nitride (TiN) on the surface of the helical Ni-Ti files. The Ni-Ti files nitrided at 200 deg. C and 250 deg. C showed higher polarization resistance and higher passive film breakdown potential together with a lower passive current than untreated files. The presence of TiN on dental Ni-Ti files significantly increased the corrosion resistance of the files in the presence of 5.25% NaOCl solution.

  11. Effect of nitriding surface treatment on the corrosion resistance of dental nickel-titanium files in 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.-F. [Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, M.-C. [Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Dental Laboratory Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Hsu, M.-L. [Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Li, U.-M. [Dental Department, Cardinal Tien Hospital, Hsintien, Taiwan (China); Lin, C.-P. [Department of Dentistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsai, W.-F.; Ai, C.-F. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, L.-K. [Department of Dentistry, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, H.-H. [Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Oral Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: hhhuang@ym.edu.tw

    2009-05-05

    This study investigated the effect of nitriding surface treatment on the corrosion resistance of commercial dental alloy, in the form of helical nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) files, when treated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solution. The surface of dental helical Ni-Ti files was modified using nitriding treatment at 200 deg. C, 250 deg. C and 300 deg. C in an NH{sub 3}-containing environment. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the Ni-Ti files were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The corrosion resistance of the Ni-Ti files when treated with a clinical solution of 5.25% NaOCl was evaluated using the linear polarization method and by potentiodynamic polarization curve measurement. The nitriding treatments at different temperatures created titanium nitride (TiN) on the surface of the helical Ni-Ti files. The Ni-Ti files nitrided at 200 deg. C and 250 deg. C showed higher polarization resistance and higher passive film breakdown potential together with a lower passive current than untreated files. The presence of TiN on dental Ni-Ti files significantly increased the corrosion resistance of the files in the presence of 5.25% NaOCl solution.

  12. Electrophysiological performance of a bipolar membrane-coated titanium nitride electrode: a randomized comparison of steroid and nonsteroid lead designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, U K; Zhdanov, A; Stammwitz, E; Crozier, I; Claessens, R J; Meier, J; Bos, R J; Bode, F; Potratz, J

    1999-06-01

    The aim of this multicenter study was to investigate the performance of a new cardiac pacemaker lead with a titanium nitride cathode coated with a copolymer membrane. In particular, the electrophysiological effect of steroid dissolved in this ion-exchange membrane was evaluated by randomized comparison. Ninety-five patients were randomized either to the 1450 T (n = 51) or the 1451 T ventricular lead (n = 45) and received telemeteral VVI(R) pacemakers with identical diagnostic features. Both leads were bipolar, were passively affixed, and had a porous titanium nitride tip with a surface area of 3.5 mm2. The only difference between the two electrodes was 13 micrograms of dexamethasone added to the 1450 Ts membrane coating. Voltage thresholds (VTH) at pulse durations of 0.25, 0.37, and 0.5 ms, lead impedance, and sensing thresholds were measured at discharge, 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after implantation. Mean amplitude and the slew rate from three telemetered intracardiac electrograms, chronaxie-rheobase product, and minimum energy consumption were calculated. After a 6-month follow-up, mean voltage thresholds of 0.65 +/- 0.20 V and 0.63 +/- 0.34 were achieved for the 1450 T lead and 1451 T lead, respectively. As a result, a VTH < 1.0 V was obtained in all patients with 1450 T electrodes and in 97.7% of patients with 1451 T leads after 6 months follow-up. In both electrodes, stable VTH was reached 2 weeks after implantation, and no transient rise in threshold was observed. No differences were observed between the steroid and the nonsteroid group in respect to VTH, chronaxie-rheobase product, minimum energy consumption, and potential amplitude and slew rate. In conclusion, safe and efficient pacing at low pulse amplitudes were achieved with both leads. The tip design, independently of the steroid additive, prevented any energy-consuming increases in the voltage threshold.

  13. Characterisation of nano-structured titanium and aluminium nitride coatings by indentation, transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girleanu, M., E-mail: maria.girleanu@uha.fr [Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes de Fabrication, LPMT (EA CNRS 4365), Universite de Haute Alsace, 61 rue Albert Camus, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Pac, M.-J.; Louis, P. [Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes de Fabrication, LPMT (EA CNRS 4365), Universite de Haute Alsace, 61 rue Albert Camus, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Ersen, O.; Werckmann, J. [Departement Structures et Interfaces, IPCMS (UMR CNRS 7504), Universite de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, F-67087 Strasbourg (France); Rousselot, C. [Departement Micro Nano Sciences et Systemes, FEMTO-ST (UMR CNRS 6174), Universite de Franche-Comte, BP 71427, F-25211 Montbeliard (France); Tuilier, M.-H. [Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes de Fabrication, LPMT (EA CNRS 4365), Universite de Haute Alsace, 61 rue Albert Camus, F-68093 Mulhouse (France)

    2011-07-01

    Titanium and aluminium nitride Ti{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}N films deposited by radiofrequency magnetron reactive sputtering onto steel substrate are examined by transmission electron microscopy over all the range of composition (x = 0, 0.5, 0.68, 0.86, 1). The deposition parameters are optimised in order to grow nitride films with low stress over all the composition range. Transmission electron microscopy cross-section images of Vickers indentation prints performed on that set of coatings show the evolution of their damage behaviour as increasing x Al content. Cubic Ti-rich nitrides consist of small grains clustered in rather large columns sliding along each other during indentation. Hexagonal Al-rich films grow in thinner columns which can be bent under the Vickers tip. Indentation tests carried out on TiN and AlN films are simulated using finite element modelling. Particular aspects of shear stresses and displacements in the coating/substrate are investigated. The growth mode and the nanostructure of two typical films, TiN and Ti{sub 0.14}Al{sub 0.86}N, are studied in detail by combining transmission electron microscopy cross-sections and plan views. Electron energy loss spectrum taken across Ti{sub 0.14}Al{sub 0.86}N film suggests that a part of nitrogen atoms is in cubic-like local environment though the lattice symmetry of Al-rich coatings is hexagonal. The poorly crystallised domains containing Ti and N atoms in cubic-like environment are obviously located in grain boundaries and afford protection of the coating against cracking.

  14. Characterisation of nano-structured titanium and aluminium nitride coatings by indentation, transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girleanu, M.; Pac, M.-J.; Louis, P.; Ersen, O.; Werckmann, J.; Rousselot, C.; Tuilier, M.-H.

    2011-01-01

    Titanium and aluminium nitride Ti 1-x Al x N films deposited by radiofrequency magnetron reactive sputtering onto steel substrate are examined by transmission electron microscopy over all the range of composition (x = 0, 0.5, 0.68, 0.86, 1). The deposition parameters are optimised in order to grow nitride films with low stress over all the composition range. Transmission electron microscopy cross-section images of Vickers indentation prints performed on that set of coatings show the evolution of their damage behaviour as increasing x Al content. Cubic Ti-rich nitrides consist of small grains clustered in rather large columns sliding along each other during indentation. Hexagonal Al-rich films grow in thinner columns which can be bent under the Vickers tip. Indentation tests carried out on TiN and AlN films are simulated using finite element modelling. Particular aspects of shear stresses and displacements in the coating/substrate are investigated. The growth mode and the nanostructure of two typical films, TiN and Ti 0.14 Al 0.86 N, are studied in detail by combining transmission electron microscopy cross-sections and plan views. Electron energy loss spectrum taken across Ti 0.14 Al 0.86 N film suggests that a part of nitrogen atoms is in cubic-like local environment though the lattice symmetry of Al-rich coatings is hexagonal. The poorly crystallised domains containing Ti and N atoms in cubic-like environment are obviously located in grain boundaries and afford protection of the coating against cracking.

  15. Robust non-carbon titanium nitride nanotubes supported Pt catalyst with enhanced catalytic activity and durability for methanol oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Yonghao; Zhan, Guohe; Fu, Zhenggao; Pan, Zhanchang; Xiao, Chumin; Wu, Shoukun; Chen, Chun; Hu, Guanghui; Wei, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    By the combination of solvothermal alcoholysis and post-nitriding method, titanium nitride nanotubes (TiN NTs), with high surface area, hollow and interior porous structure are prepared successfully and used at a support for Pt nanoparticles. The TiN NTs supported Pt (Pt/TiN NTs) catalyst displays enhanced activity and durability towards methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) compared with the commercial Pt/C (E-TEK) catalyst. X ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption/desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements are performed to investigate the physicochemical properties of the synthesized catalyst. SEM and TEM images reveal that the wall of the TiN NTs is porous and Pt nanoparticles supported on the dendritic TiN nanocrystals exhibit small size and good dispersion. Effects of inherent corrosion-resistant, tubular and porous nanostructures and electron transfer due to the strong metal–support interactions of TiN NTs contribute to the enhanced catalytic activity and stability of Pt/TiN NTs towards the MOR

  16. The effect of titanium nickel nitride decorated carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide hybrid support for methanol oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gen; Pan, Zhanchang; Li, Wuyi; Yu, Ke; Xia, Guowei; Zhao, Qixiang; Shi, Shikun; Hu, Guanghui; Xiao, Chumin; Wei, Zhigang

    2017-07-01

    Titanium nickel nitride (TiNiN) decorated three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide (CNT-rGO), a fancy 3D platinum (Pt)-based catalyst hybrid support, is prepared by a solvothermal process followed by a nitriding process, which is tested as anodic catalyst support for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The structure, morphology and composition of the synthesized TiNiN/CNT-rGO exhibits a uniform particle dispersion with high purity and interpenetrating 3D network structure. Notably, Pt/TiNiN/CNT-rGO catalyst exhibits significantly improved catalytic activity and durability for methanol oxidation in comparison with Pt/CNT-rGO and conventional Pt/C (JM). The outstanding electrochemical performance was attributed to structure and properties. That is, the 3D CNT-rGO provided a fast transport network for charge-transfer and mass-transfer as well as TiNiN NPs with good synergistic effect and the strong electronic coupling between different domains in TiNiN/CNT-rGO, thus the catalytic activity of the novel catalyst is greatly improved. These results evidences 3D TiNiN/CNT-rGO as a promising catalyst support for a wide range of applications in fuel cells.

  17. Highly catalytic and stabilized titanium nitride nanowire array-decorated graphite felt electrodes for all vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, L.; Zhao, T. S.; Zeng, L.; Zeng, Y. K.; Jiang, H. R.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we prepare a highly catalytic and stabilized titanium nitride (TiN) nanowire array-decorated graphite felt electrode for all vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). Free-standing TiN nanowires are synthesized by a two-step process, in which TiO2 nanowires are first grown onto the surface of graphite felt via a seed-assisted hydrothermal method and then converted to TiN through nitridation reaction. When applied to VRFBs, the prepared electrode enables the electrolyte utilization and energy efficiency to be 73.9% and 77.4% at a high current density of 300 mA cm-2, which are correspondingly 43.3% and 15.4% higher than that of battery assembled with a pristine electrode. More impressively, the present battery exhibits good stability and high capacity retention during the cycle test. The superior performance is ascribed to the significant improvement in the electrochemical kinetics and enlarged active sites toward V3+/V2+ redox reaction.

  18. Leachability of nitrided ilmenite in hydrochloric acid

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Swanepoel, JJ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride in upgraded nitrided ilmenite (bulk of iron removed) can selectively be chlorinated to produce titanium tetrachloride. Except for iron, most other components present during this low temperature (ca. 200 °C) chlorination reaction...

  19. The Mechanical and Tribology Properties of Sputtered Titanium Aluminum Nitride Coating on the Tungsten Carbide Insert Tool in the Dry Turning of Tool Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmar Budi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the sputtering parameters on the mechanical tribology properties of Titanium Aluminum Nitride coating on the tungsten cabide insert tool in the dry turning of tool steel has been investigated. The coating was deposited using a Direct Current magnetron sputtering system with various substrate biases (-79 to -221 V and nitrogen flow rates (30 to 72 sccm. The dry turning test was carried out on a Computer Numeric Code machine using an optimum cutting parameter setting. The results show that the lowest flank wear (~0.4 mm was achieved using a Titanium Aluminum Nitride-coated tool that was deposited at a high substrate bias (-200 V and a high nitrogen flow rate (70 sccm. The lowest flank wear was attributed to high coating hardness.

  20. Spontaneous Formation of Titanium Nitride on the Surface of a Ti Rod Induced by Electro-Discharge-Heat-Treatment in an N2 Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee W.H.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A single pulse of 2.0 to 3.5 kJ of input energy from a 450 mF capacitor was applied to a commercially pure Ti rod in a N2 atmosphere. The surface of the Ti rod transformed from TiO2 into titanium nitride in times as short as 159 msec, providing a bimodal morphology of the cross-section. A much higher value of hardness that was observed at the edge of the cross-section was attributed to nitrogen-induced solid-solution hardening that occurred during the electrical discharge process. The activation energy (Ea for the diffusion process was estimated to be approximately 86.9 kJ/mol. Results show that the electrical discharge process is a possible potential method for the nitriding of Ti; advantages include a short processing time and control of the nitrided layer without dimensional changes.

  1. The effect of titanium nickel nitride decorated carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide hybrid support for methanol oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Gen [School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006 (China); Pan, Zhanchang, E-mail: panzhanchang@163.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006 (China); Li, Wuyi; Yu, Ke [School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006 (China); Xia, Guowei; Zhao, Qixiang; Shi, Shikun [Victory Giant Technology (Hui Zhou) Co., Ltd., Huizhou 516083 (China); Hu, Guanghui; Xiao, Chumin; Wei, Zhigang [School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • TiNiN/CNT-rGO support with an interactive three-dimensional structure and high surface area was synthesized. • Pt nanoparticles with small size were well dispersed on TiNiN/CNT-rGO support. • Pt/TiNiN/CNT-rGO shows remarkably enhanced methanol oxidation activity and durability. - Abstract: Titanium nickel nitride (TiNiN) decorated three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide (CNT-rGO), a fancy 3D platinum (Pt)-based catalyst hybrid support, is prepared by a solvothermal process followed by a nitriding process, which is tested as anodic catalyst support for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The structure, morphology and composition of the synthesized TiNiN/CNT-rGO exhibits a uniform particle dispersion with high purity and interpenetrating 3D network structure. Notably, Pt/TiNiN/CNT-rGO catalyst exhibits significantly improved catalytic activity and durability for methanol oxidation in comparison with Pt/CNT-rGO and conventional Pt/C (JM). The outstanding electrochemical performance was attributed to structure and properties. That is, the 3D CNT-rGO provided a fast transport network for charge-transfer and mass-transfer as well as TiNiN NPs with good synergistic effect and the strong electronic coupling between different domains in TiNiN/CNT-rGO, thus the catalytic activity of the novel catalyst is greatly improved. These results evidences 3D TiNiN/CNT-rGO as a promising catalyst support for a wide range of applications in fuel cells.

  2. The effect of titanium nickel nitride decorated carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide hybrid support for methanol oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Gen; Pan, Zhanchang; Li, Wuyi; Yu, Ke; Xia, Guowei; Zhao, Qixiang; Shi, Shikun; Hu, Guanghui; Xiao, Chumin; Wei, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • TiNiN/CNT-rGO support with an interactive three-dimensional structure and high surface area was synthesized. • Pt nanoparticles with small size were well dispersed on TiNiN/CNT-rGO support. • Pt/TiNiN/CNT-rGO shows remarkably enhanced methanol oxidation activity and durability. - Abstract: Titanium nickel nitride (TiNiN) decorated three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide (CNT-rGO), a fancy 3D platinum (Pt)-based catalyst hybrid support, is prepared by a solvothermal process followed by a nitriding process, which is tested as anodic catalyst support for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The structure, morphology and composition of the synthesized TiNiN/CNT-rGO exhibits a uniform particle dispersion with high purity and interpenetrating 3D network structure. Notably, Pt/TiNiN/CNT-rGO catalyst exhibits significantly improved catalytic activity and durability for methanol oxidation in comparison with Pt/CNT-rGO and conventional Pt/C (JM). The outstanding electrochemical performance was attributed to structure and properties. That is, the 3D CNT-rGO provided a fast transport network for charge-transfer and mass-transfer as well as TiNiN NPs with good synergistic effect and the strong electronic coupling between different domains in TiNiN/CNT-rGO, thus the catalytic activity of the novel catalyst is greatly improved. These results evidences 3D TiNiN/CNT-rGO as a promising catalyst support for a wide range of applications in fuel cells.

  3. Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Laurel G.; Bedinger, George M.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Titanium is a mineral commodity that is essential to the smooth functioning of modern industrial economies. Most of the titanium produced is refined into titanium dioxide, which has a high refractive index and is thus able to impart a durable white color to paint, paper, plastic, rubber, and wallboard. Because of their high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance, titanium metal and titanium metal alloys are used in the aerospace industry as well as for welding rod coatings, biological implants, and consumer goods.Ilmenite and rutile are currently the principal titanium-bearing ore minerals, although other minerals, including anatase, perovskite, and titanomagnetite, could have economic importance in the future. Ilmenite is currently being mined from two large magmatic deposits hosted in rocks of Proterozoic-age anorthosite plutonic suites. Most rutile and nearly one-half of the ilmenite produced are from heavy-mineral alluvial, fluvial, and eolian deposits. Titanium-bearing minerals occur in diverse geologic settings, but many of the known deposits are currently subeconomic for titanium because of complications related to the mineralogy or because of the presence of trace contaminants that can compromise the pigment production process.Global production of titanium minerals is currently dominated by Australia, Canada, Norway, and South Africa; additional amounts are produced in Brazil, India, Madagascar, Mozambique, Sierra Leone, and Sri Lanka. The United States accounts for about 4 percent of the total world production of titanium minerals and is heavily dependent on imports of titanium mineral concentrates to meet its domestic needs.Titanium occurs only in silicate or oxide minerals and never in sulfide minerals. Environmental considerations for titanium mining are related to waste rock disposal and the impact of trace constituents on water quality. Because titanium is generally inert in the environment, human health risks from titanium and titanium

  4. Low-temperature ({<=}200 Degree-Sign C) plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of dense titanium nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samal, Nigamananda; Du Hui; Luberoff, Russell; Chetry, Krishna; Bubber, Randhir; Hayes, Alan; Devasahayam, Adrian [Veeco Instruments, 1 Terminal Drive, Plainview, New York 11803 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Titanium nitride (TiN) has been widely used in the semiconductor industry for its diffusion barrier and seed layer properties. However, it has seen limited adoption in other industries in which low temperature (<200 Degree-Sign C) deposition is a requirement. Examples of applications which require low temperature deposition are seed layers for magnetic materials in the data storage (DS) industry and seed and diffusion barrier layers for through-silicon-vias (TSV) in the MEMS industry. This paper describes a low temperature TiN process with appropriate electrical, chemical, and structural properties based on plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition method that is suitable for the DS and MEMS industries. It uses tetrakis-(dimethylamino)-titanium as an organometallic precursor and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as co-reactant. This process was developed in a Veeco NEXUS Trade-Mark-Sign chemical vapor deposition tool. The tool uses a substrate rf-biased configuration with a grounded gas shower head. In this paper, the complimentary and self-limiting character of this process is demonstrated. The effects of key processing parameters including temperature, pulse time, and plasma power are investigated in terms of growth rate, stress, crystal morphology, chemical, electrical, and optical properties. Stoichiometric thin films with growth rates of 0.4-0.5 A/cycle were achieved. Low electrical resistivity (<300 {mu}{Omega} cm), high mass density (>4 g/cm{sup 3}), low stress (<250 MPa), and >85% step coverage for aspect ratio of 10:1 were realized. Wet chemical etch data show robust chemical stability of the film. The properties of the film have been optimized to satisfy industrial viability as a Ruthenium (Ru) preseed liner in potential data storage and TSV applications.

  5. Reactive Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) of Nitride Reinforced Titanium Alloy Composites (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-15

    other industrial applications [21–25]. Titanium is widely used in the medical field to replace heart valves , joints, and bones for dental prosthetics due...their wear and fatigue resistance, hard coatings for dental implants and dental surgery tools, tribological orthopedic devices, gears, valves , pumps...their inherent brittleness and inferior fracture toughness [6,10–13]. In contrast, metal matrix composites (MMCs) reinforced with hard precipitates

  6. Effect of compacting pressure, powder degassing and thermobaric treatment on densification and properties of nanocrystalline titanium nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei V. Kapylou

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of compacting pressure, powder degassing and high pressure sintering temperature and time on the densification and properties of nanocrystalline titanium nitride have been investigated. For this reason, TiN powder with a mean particle size of 55 nm was pressed in the range of compacting pressure from 0.2 to 1.0 GPa and sintered under static pressure of 3.5 GPa in the temperature range of 900–1600°C for 45–120 s. Some of green bodies were degassed in vacuum before sintering. It was shown that samples compacted in the pressure range of 0.2–0.6 GPa have the highest density after the thermobaric treatment. The maximum density (about 97.3 %TD was obtained with degassed samples. Microhardness and microstructure investigations have shown that recrystallization of the TiN nanopowder begins at the sintering temperatures of 1100–1200°C and sintering time less than one minute. The maximum microhardness obtained was 23.2±1.0 GPa and themaximum Young modulus was 370 GPa.

  7. Non-destructive study of the ion-implantation-affected zone (the long-range effect) in titanium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, A.J.; Treglio, J.R.; Schaffer, J.P.; Brunner, J.; Valvoda, V.; Rafaja, D.

    1994-01-01

    The depth to which metal ion implantation can change the structure of titanium nitride coatings is studied using two techniques - positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) and glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (GA-XRD) -which are normally applied to the study of bulk materials. The PAS results indicate that the depth to which vacancies are found greatly exceeds the depth at which the implanted material resides. In addition, the concentration of vacancies continues to increase with the dose of implanted ions. The GA-XRD data show that the implantation does not change the residual stress - it remains slightly tensile. Furthermore, there is an increase in the diffraction peak broadening, which is attributed to an increase in the local strain distribution resulting from the generation of a dislocation network at depths of up to several tenths of a micrometer below the implanted zone. The data support the view of a long-range effect, where metal ion implantation causes lattice defect generation within an implantation-affected zone (IAZ) to depths well beyond the implanted zone. The defective nature of the IAZ depends on the implanted dose and the acceleration voltage, as well as on the nature of the ions implanted. In the present work, there is no residual stress in the samples, so this cannot induce the IAZ. ((orig.))

  8. Visible light induced electron transfer process over nitrogen doped TiO2 nanocrystals prepared by oxidation of titanium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhongbiao; Dong Fan; Zhao Weirong; Guo Sen

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen doped TiO 2 nanocrystals with anatase and rutile mixed phases were prepared by incomplete oxidation of titanium nitride at different temperatures. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), core level X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (CL XPS), valence band X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (VB XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis DRS), and visible light excited photoluminescence (PL). The photocatalytic activity was evaluated for photocatalytic degradation of toluene in gas phase under visible light irradiation. The visible light absorption and photoactivities of these nitrogen doped TiO 2 nanocrystals can be clearly attributed to the change of the additional electronic (N - ) states above the valence band of TiO 2 modified by N dopant as revealed by the VB XPS and visible light induced PL. A band gap structure model was established to explain the electron transfer process over nitrogen doped TiO 2 nanocrystals under visible light irradiation, which was consistent with the previous theoretical and experimental results. This model can also be applied to understand visible light induced photocatalysis over other nonmetal doped TiO 2

  9. Titanium nitride as an electrocatalyst for V(II)/V(III) redox couples in all-vanadium redox flow batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chunmei; Wang, Haining; Lu, Shanfu; Wu, Chunxiao; Liu, Yiyang; Tan, Qinglong; Liang, Dawei; Xiang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiN NPs) are proposed as a novel catalyst towards the V(II)/V(III) redox pair for the negative electrode in vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFB). Electrochemical properties of TiN NPs were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that TiN NPs demonstrate better electrochemical activity and reversibility for the processes of V(II)/V(III) redox couples as compared with the graphite NPs. TiN NPs facilitate the charge transfer in the V(II)/V(III) redox reaction. Performance of a VRFB using a TiN NPs coated carbon paper as a negative electrode is much higher than that of a VRFB with a raw carbon paper electrode. The columbic efficiency (CE), the voltage efficiency (VE) and the energy efficiency (EE) of the VRFB single cell at charge-discharge current density of 30 mA/cm 2 are 91.74%, 89.11% and 81.74%, respectively. During a 50 charge-discharge cycles test, the CE values of VRFB with TiN NPs consistently remain higher than 90%.

  10. Effect of substrate temperature on the microstructural properties of titanium nitride nanowires grown by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gbordzoe, S.; Kotoka, R.; Craven, Eric; Kumar, D.; Wu, F.; Narayan, J.

    2014-01-01

    The current work reports on the growth and microstructural characterization of titanium nitride (TiN) nanowires on single crystal silicon substrates using a pulsed laser deposition method. The physical and microstructural properties of the nanowires were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The corrosion properties of the TiN nanowires compared to TiN thin film were evaluated using Direct Current potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The nanowires corroded faster than the TiN thin film, because the nanowires have a larger surface area which makes them more reactive in a corrosive environment. It was observed from the FESEM image analyses that as the substrate temperature increases from 600 °C to 800 °C, there was an increase in both diameter (25 nm–50 nm) and length (150 nm–250 nm) of the nanowire growth. There was also an increase in spatial density with an increase of substrate temperature. The TEM results showed that the TiN nanowires grow epitaxially with the silicon substrate via domain matching epitaxy paradigm, despite a large misfit

  11. The role of titanium aluminide in n-gallium nitride ohmic contact technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelto, Christopher M.

    Ohmic contacts are essential to the realization of efficient and affordable nitride-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. Currently, the most successful ohmic contact schemes to n-GaN are based on the Al/Ti bilayer structure, although the mechanism responsible for the low resistance in these contacts is not sufficiently understood. In this work, the intermetallic TiAl3 has been employed both as a model ohmic contact system to help understand the essential features of the Al/Ti standard contact, as well as a thermally stable oxidation cap for the bilayer structure. A quaternary isotherm of the Al-Ti-Ga-N system was calculated at 600°C, which showed that a sufficient phase topology was present to apply the exchange mechanism to the TiAl 3/GaN couple. The exchange mechanism rationalized the selection of the TiAl3 intermetallic by predicting that an Al-rich AlGaN layer will form at the metal/semiconductor interface. As part of the investigation of these novel contact systems, a thorough characterization was undertaken on both a standard Al/Ti and Au/Ni/Al/Ti contact to n-GaN in which the essential processing parameters and metallurgical properties were identified. The TiAl 3 contact was found to exhibit inferior electrical behavior compared to the Al/Ti bilayer, requiring significantly higher annealing temperatures to achieve comparable specific contact resistance. It is conjectured that this is due to the early formation of a TiN layer at the metal/semiconductor interface of the bilayer contact, even though both contacts are suspected to form the Al-rich nitride layer at higher temperature. As an oxidation cap, the TiAl3 metallization was found to provide much improved performance characteristics compared to the four-layer Au/Al/Ni/Ti standard. The TiAl 3/Al/Ti contact proved to achieve optimal performance at a much lower temperature than the standard, and furthermore showed complete insensitivity to the oxidation content of the annealing ambient. Reaction

  12. Characterisation of titanium nitride films obtained by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD); Caracterizacao de filmes de nitreto de titanio obtidos por MOCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillis, M.F., E-mail: mfpillis@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CCTM/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Materiais; Franco, A.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Araujo, E.G. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sacilotti, M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (IF/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Fundacao de Amparo a Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (FACEPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Ceramic coatings have been widely used as protective coating to improve the life of cutting tools, for corrosion protection and in microelectronics, optical and medical areas. Transition metals nitrides are of special interest due to its high hardness and thermal stability. In this work thin films of titanium nitride were obtained by MOCVD (metalorganic chemical vapor deposition) process. The tests were carried out for 1h at 700 deg C under 80 and 100 mbar of pressure. The characterization was made by using scanning electron microscopy coupled with dispersive energy analysis, and X-ray diffraction. Preliminary results suggested that Ti{sub 2}N phase was formed and that the growth rate varied between 4 and 13 nm/min according to the process parameter considered. (author)

  13. Fibre laser nitriding of titanium and its alloy in open atmosphere for orthopaedic implant applications: Investigations on surface quality, microstructure and tribological properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Chi-Wai; Lee, Seunghwan; Smith, Graham C.

    2017-01-01

    surfaces, such as the tapered surfacein a femoral stemor the ball-shaped surface in a femoral head. To tackle this problem, a direct laser nitridingprocess in open atmosphere was performed on commercially pure titanium (grade 2, TiG2) and Ti6Al4V alloy(grade 5, TiG5) using a continuous-wave (CW) fibre...... distribution of wear debris, were carefully characterized and compared. The experimental resultsshowed that TiG2 and TiG5 reacted differently with the laser radiation at 1.06 μm wavelength in laser nitridingas evidenced by substantial differences in the microstructure, and surface colour and morphology....... Furthermore,both friction andwear properties were strongly affected by the hardness and microstructure of titaniumsamplesand direct laser nitriding led to substantial improvements in their wear resistant properties. Between the twotypes of titanium samples, bare TiG2 showed higher friction forces and wear...

  14. Different shape normal metal interlayers between niobium based SIS junctions and niobium titanium nitride leads and their influence on the electron temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selig, S; Westig, M P; Jacobs, K; Honingh, C E

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the reduction of heating in a niobium superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) junction with aluminum-oxide tunnel barrier embedded in a niobium-titanium-nitride circuit. Nonequilibrium quasiparticles which are created due to the Andreev trap at the interface between the niobium and the niobium-titanium-nitride layers are relaxed by inserting a normal-metal conductor of gold between these two layers. In an earlier work we explained the observed relaxation of nonequilibrium quasiparticles due to the geometrically assisted cooling effect. In this paper we investigate this cooling effect in dependence of the normal-metal layer shape and size. We expect that an adapted normal-metal layer is necessary for implementation in practical terahertz SIS heterodyne mixer circuits. We observe in DC-measurements of a large number of devices a clear relation between the volume of the gold layer and the effective electron temperature in the device. Our central finding is that the shape of the gold layer does not influence the cooling provided that the volume is sufficient.

  15. Mechanical properties of molybdenum-titanium alloys micro-structurally controlled by multi-step internal nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagae, M.; Yoshio, T.; Takemoto, Y.; Takada, J.; Hiraoka, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Internally nitrided dilute Mo-Ti alloys having a heavily deformed microstructure near the specimen surface were prepared by a novel two-step nitriding process at 1173 to 1773 K in N 2 gas. For the nitrided specimens three-point bend tests were performed at temperatures from 77 to 298 K in order to investigate the effect of microstructure control by internal nitriding on the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the alloy Yield strength obtained at 243 K of the specimen maintaining the deformed microstructure by the two-step nitriding was about 1.7 times as much as recrystallized specimen. The specimen subjected to the two-step nitriding was bent more than 90 degree at 243 K, whereas recrystallized specimen was fractured after showing a slight ductility at 243 K. DBTT of the specimen subjected to the two-step nitriding and recrystallized specimen was about 153 K and 203 K, respectively. These results indicate that multi-step internal nitriding is very effective to the improvement in the embrittlement by the recrystallization of molybdenum alloys. (author)

  16. Work Function Tuning in Sub-20nm Titanium Nitride (TiN) Metal Gate: Mechanism and Engineering

    KAUST Repository

    Hasan, Mehdi

    2011-07-01

    Scaling of transistors (the building blocks of modern information age) provides faster computation at the expense of excessive power dissipation. Thus to address these challenges, high-k/metal gate stack has been introduced in commercially available microprocessors from 2007. Since then titanium nitride (TiN) metal gate’s work function (Wf) tunability with its thickness (thickness increases, work function increases) is a well known phenomenon. Many hypotheses have been made over the years which include but not limited to: trap charge and metal gate nucleation, nitrogen concentration, microstructure agglomeration and global stress, metal oxide formation, and interfacial oxide thickness. However, clear contradictions exist in these assumptions. Also, nearly all these reports skipped a comprehensive approach to explain this complex paradigm. Therefore, in this work we first show a comprehensive physical investigation using transmission electron microcopy/electron energy loss spectroscopy (TEM/EELS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) to show replacement of oxygen by nitrogen in the metal/dielectric interface, formation of TiONx, reduction of Ti/N concentration and grain size increment happen with TiN thickness increment and thus may increase the work function. Then, using these finding, we experimentally show 100meV of work function modulation in 10nm TiN Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor by using low temperature oxygen annealing. A low thermal budget flow (replicating gate-last) shows similar work function boost up. Also, a work function modulation of 250meV has been possible using oxygen annealing and applying no thermal budget. On the other hand, etch-back of TiN layer can decrease the work function. Thus this study quantifies role of various factors in TiN work function tuning; it also reproduces the thickness varied TiN work function modulation in single thickness TiN thus reducing the

  17. Characteristics of the epitaxy of InGaN-based light-emitting diodes grown by nanoscale epitaxial lateral overgrowth using a nitrided titanium buffer layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, Chen-Yu; Li, Zhen-Yu; Chang, Jenq-Yang; Chi, Gou-Chung

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a buffer layer of nitrided titanium (Ti) achieved through the nitridation of a Ti metal layer on a sapphire substrate was used for the epitaxial growth of InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) achieved by low pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The effect of in-situ Ti metal nitridation on the performance of these InGaN-based LEDs was then investigated. It was very clear that the use of the nitrided Ti buffer layer (NTBL) induced the formation of a nanoscale epitaxial lateral overgrowth layer during the epitaxial growth. When evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, this epi-layer exhibited large in-plane compressive stress releasing with a Raman shift value of 567.9 cm -1 . Cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy results indicated that the InGaN-based LEDs with an NTBL have improved crystal quality, with a low threading dislocations density being yielded via the strain relaxation in the InGaN-based LEDs. Based on the results mentioned above, the electroluminescence results indicate that the light performance of InGaN-based LEDs with an NTBL can be enhanced by 45% and 42% at 20 mA and 100 mA, respectively. These results suggest that the strain relaxation and quality improvement in the GaN epilayer could be responsible for the enhancement of emission power. - Highlights: • The crystal-quality of InGaN-based LEDs with NTBL by NELOG was improved. • The InGaN-based LEDs with NTBL have strain releases by NELOG. • The optical properties of InGaN-based LEDs were shown by CL and EL measurements

  18. Leachability of nitrided ilmenite in hydrochloric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Swanepoel, J.J.; van Vuuren, D.S.; Heydenrych, M.

    2011-01-01

    Titanium nitride in upgraded nitrided ilmenite (bulk of iron removed) can selectively be chlorinated to produce titanium tetrachloride. Except for iron, most other components present during this low temperature (ca. 200°C) chlorination reaction will not react with chlorine. It is therefore necessary to remove as much iron as possible from the nitrided ilmenite. Hydrochloric acid leaching is a possible process route to remove metallic iron from nitrided ilmenite without excessive dissolution o...

  19. Impacts of dissolved organic matter on aqueous behavior of nano/micron-titanium nitride and their induced enzymatic/non-enzymatic antioxidant activities in Scenedesmus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Wang, Zhuang; Wang, Se; Fang, Hao; Zhang, Fan; Wang, De-Gao

    2017-01-02

    Freshwater dispersion stability and ecotoxicological effects of titanium nitride (TiN) with particle size of 20 nm, 50 nm, and 2-10 μm in the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) at various concentrations were studied. The TiN particles that had a more negative zeta potential and smaller hydrodynamic size showed more stable dispersion in an aqueous medium when DOM was present than when DOM was absent. Biochemical assays indicated that relative to the control, the TiN particles in the presence of DOM alleviated to some extent the antioxidative stress enzyme activity in Scenedesmus obliquus. In addition, it was found that the TiN with a primary size of 50 nm at a high concentration presented a significant impact on non-enzymatic antioxidant defense in algal cells.

  20. Structural characterization of thin films of titanium nitride deposited by laser ablation; Caracterizacion estructural de peliculas delgadas de nitruro de titanio depositadas por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro C, M.A.; Escobar A, L.; Camps C, E.; Mejia H, J.A. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Thin films of titanium nitride were deposited using the technique of laser ablation. It was studied the effect of the density of laser energy used for ablation the target as well as of the pressure of the work gas about the structure and the hardness of the deposited thin films. Depending on the pressure of the work gas films was obtained with preferential orientation in the directions (200) and (111). At a pressure of 1 x 10{sup -2} Torr only the direction (200) was observed. On the other hand to the pressure of 5 x 10{sup -3} Torr the deposited material this formed by a mixture of the orientation (200) and (111), being the direction (111) the predominant one. Thin films of Ti N were obtained with hardness of up to 24.0 GPa that makes to these attractive materials for mechanical applications. The hardness showed an approximately linear dependence with the energy density. (Author)

  1. Maternal exposure to nanosized titanium dioxide suppresses embryonic development in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong F

    2017-08-01

    both calcium and zinc in maternal serum and the fetus, and both the placenta and embryos may be major targets of developmental toxicity following maternal exposure to nano-TiO2 during the prenatal period. Therefore, the application of nano-TiO2 should be carried out with caution. Keywords: nanosized titanium dioxide, maternal exposure, embryonic toxicity, skeleton developmental suppression

  2. Effects of bias voltage on the corrosion resistance of titanium nitride thin films fabricated by dynamic plasma immersion ion implantation-deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Xiubo; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic plasma-based thin-film deposition incorporating ion mixing and plasma immersion is an effective technique to synthesize nitride-based hard films. We have fabricated TiN films using a filtered titanium vacuum arc in a nitrogen plasma environment. A pulsed high voltage is applied to the target for a short time when the metallic arc is fired to attain simultaneous plasma deposition and ion mixing. We investigate the dependence of the corrosion resistance and interfacial structure of the treated samples on the applied voltage. Our Auger results reveal an oxygen-rich surface film due to the non-ultra-high-vacuum conditions and high affinity of oxygen to titanium. The corrosion current is reduced by two orders of magnitude comparing the sample processed at 8 kV to the untreated sample, but the 23 kV sample unexpectedly shows worse results. The pitting potential diminishes substantially although the corrosion current is similar to that observed in the 8 kV sample. The polarization test data are consistent with our scanning electron microscopy observation, corroborating the difference in the pitting distribution and appearance. This anomalous behavior is believed to be due to the change in the chemical composition as a result of high-energy ion bombardment

  3. Titanium nitride (TiN) precipitation in a maraging steel during the vacuum arc remelting (VAR) process - Inclusions characterization and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descotes, V.; Bellot, J.-P.; Perrin-Guérin, V.; Witzke, S.; Jardy, A.

    2016-07-01

    Titanium Nitride (TiN) inclusions are commonly observed in a Maraging steel containing Nitrogen and Titanium and remelted in a VAR furnace. They can be easily detected by optical microscopy. A nucleus is observed next to a large number of TiN inclusions. A TEM analysis was carried out on a biphasic nucleus composed of a calcium sulfide (CaS) and a spinel (MgAl2O4), surrounded by a TiN particle. An orientation relationship between these three phases was revealed, which suggests a heterogeneous germination of the TiN particle on the nucleus by epitaxial growth. Based on this observation, on thermodynamic considerations and on previous work, a model has been developed and coupled to a numerical simulation of the VAR process to study the formation and evolution of a TiN distribution in the VAR ingot. Microsegregation is modeled using the lever rule, while the kinetics of precipitation is mainly driven by the supersaturation of the liquid bath. This model highlights the influence of the melt rate on the final size of TiN particles.

  4. Titanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage, Simon W; Muris, Joris; Jakobsen, Stig S

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to titanium (Ti) from implants and from personal care products as nanoparticles (NPs) is common. This article reviews exposure sources, ion release, skin penetration, allergenic effects, and diagnostic possibilities. We conclude that human exposure to Ti mainly derives from dental...... and medical implants, personal care products, and foods. Despite being considered to be highly biocompatible relative to other metals, Ti is released in the presence of biological fluids and tissue, especially under certain circumstances, which seem to be more likely with regard to dental implants. Although...... most of the studies reviewed have important limitations, Ti seems not to penetrate a competent skin barrier, either as pure Ti, alloy, or as Ti oxide NPs. However, there are some indications of Ti penetration through the oral mucosa. We conclude that patch testing with the available Ti preparations...

  5. Multifunctional zirconium nitride/copper multilayer coatings on medical grade 316L SS and titanium substrates for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D Dinesh; Kaliaraj, Gobi Saravanan

    2018-01-01

    Protecting from wear and corrosion of many medical devices in the biomedical field is an existing scientific challenge. Surface modification with multilayer ZrN/Cu coating was deposited on medical grade stainless steel (SS) and titanium substrates to enhance their surface properties. Structural results revealed that the ZrN/Cu coatings are highly crystalline and uniform microstructure on both the substrates. Dry and wet tribological measurements of the coated titanium substrate exhibit enhanced wear resistance and low friction coefficient due to the improved microstructure. Similarly, the corrosion resistance was exceptionally improved on titanium substrates, resulting from the high inertness of coating to the SBF electrolyte solution. Antibacterial activity and epifluorescence results signify the effective killing of pathogens by means of ion release killing as well as contact killing mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of nitriding atmosphere on the modification of surface titanium with focus on the behavior of blood platelets adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitoriano, J.O.; Alves, C.; Braz, D.C.; Camara, R.B.G.; Rocha, H.A.O.

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the influence of surface modification of titanium on the adhesion of blood platelets, through techniques of adhesion and morphological analyzes. Discs of titanium grade II received different surface treatments with plasma of Ar + N_2 + H_2 and Ar + H_2, forming two experimental groups including only polished samples used as standard. Before and after treatment the samples were characterized according to topography, crystalline structure and wettability, using atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and testing of sessile drop, respectively. Platelet rich plasma (PRP) was applied on the modified surfaces in a culture plates. Images obtained by electron microscopy of adhered platelets were analyzed to verify the behavior of platelets in the different experimental conditions. (author)

  7. Influence of aluminium nitride as a foaming agent on the preparation of foam glass-ceramics from high-titanium blast furnace slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huan; Feng, Ke-qin; Wang, Hai-bo; Chen, Chang-hong; Zhou, Hong-ling

    2016-05-01

    To effectively reuse high-titanium blast furnace slag (TS), foam glass-ceramics were successfully prepared by powder sintering at 1000°C. TS and waste glass were used as the main raw materials, aluminium nitride (AlN) as the foaming agent, and borax as the fluxing agent. The influence of the amount of AlN added (1wt%-5wt%) on the crystalline phases, microstructure, and properties of the produced foam glass-ceramics was studied. The results showed that the main crystal phases were perovskite, diopside, and augite. With increasing AlN content, a transformation from diopside to augite occurred and the crystallinity of the pyroxene phases slightly decreased. Initially, the average pore size and porosity of the foam glass-ceramics increased and subsequently decreased; similarly, their bulk density and compressive strength decreased and subsequently increased. The optimal properties were obtained when the foam glass-ceramics were prepared by adding 4wt% AlN.

  8. Laser formation of titanium nitride films as a result of Ti coating modification in a nitrogen atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskin, Sergei

    1998-12-01

    Laser treatment of the 303 and 416 stainless steels with Ti precoating was studied. CW CO2 and UV ArF excimer lasers were used. The TiN films were formed at a treatment velocity of 0.5 to 3 - 5 cm/sec and a power density of CO2 laser at (3 - 5) 104 W/cm2. X-ray diffractometry, x-ray mapping and Auger electron spectroscopy techniques indicated a TiN phase on the surface with oxygen content 12 - 25 at%. The thickness of the TiN film was 0.3 - 0.4 micrometers after treatment of the 5 micrometers Ti coating and about 900 angstroms for the 0.3 micrometers coating. Some characteristics of TiN films were examined and features of the nitriding process are discussed.

  9. The Effect of Mesoporous Carbon Nitride Modification by Titanium Oxide Nanoparticles on Photocatalytic Degradation of 1,3-Dinitrobenzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Ershad Moradi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, well ordered, mesoporous carbon nitride (MCN sorbent with uniform mesoporous wall, high surface area and pore volume has been fabricated using the simple polymerization reaction between ethylene diamine and carbon tetrachloride in mesoporous silica media, and then modified by TiO2 nanoparticles (Ti-MCN. The structural order and textural properties of the nanoporous materials were studied by XRD, elemental analysis, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption experiments. Photodegradation experiments for 1,3-dinitrobenzene were conducted in batch mode, the Ti-MCN catalysts were found to be more active compared to the free TiO2 nanoparticles for 1,3-dinitrobenzene degradation.

  10. Layer by layer assembly of catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid onto titanium nitride nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode: Study of direct voltammetry and bioelectrocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saadati, Shagayegh; Salimi, Abdollah; Hallaj, Rahman; Rostami, Amin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid were immobilized to GC/TiNnp with LBL assembly method. ► First a thin layer of NH 2 -IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation. ► With alternative assemble of IL and catalase with positive and negative charged, multilayer was formed. ► Immobilized catalase shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H 2 O 2 reduction. ► Biosensor response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. - Abstract: A novel, simple and facile layer by layer (LBL) approach is used for modification of glassy carbon (GC) electrode with multilayer of catalase and nanocomposite containing 1-(3-Aminopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bromide (amine terminated ionic liquid (NH 2 -IL)) and titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiNnp). First a thin layer of NH 2 -IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation method. Then, with alternative self assemble positively charged NH 2 -IL and negatively charged catalase a sensitive H 2 O 2 biosensor is constructed, whose response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. The surface coverage of active catalase per bilayer, heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k s ) and Michaelis–Menten constant (K M ) of immobilized catalase were 3.32 × 10 −12 mol cm −2 , 5.28 s −1 and 1.1 mM, respectively. The biosensor shows good stability, high reproducibility, long life-time, and fast amperometric response with the high sensitivity of 380 μA mM −1 cm −2 and low detection limit of 100 nM at concentration range up to 2.1 mM.

  11. Layer by layer assembly of catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid onto titanium nitride nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode: Study of direct voltammetry and bioelectrocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saadati, Shagayegh [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimi, Abdollah, E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hallaj, Rahman; Rostami, Amin [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid were immobilized to GC/TiNnp with LBL assembly method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First a thin layer of NH{sub 2}-IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With alternative assemble of IL and catalase with positive and negative charged, multilayer was formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immobilized catalase shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biosensor response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. - Abstract: A novel, simple and facile layer by layer (LBL) approach is used for modification of glassy carbon (GC) electrode with multilayer of catalase and nanocomposite containing 1-(3-Aminopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bromide (amine terminated ionic liquid (NH{sub 2}-IL)) and titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiNnp). First a thin layer of NH{sub 2}-IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation method. Then, with alternative self assemble positively charged NH{sub 2}-IL and negatively charged catalase a sensitive H{sub 2}O{sub 2} biosensor is constructed, whose response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. The surface coverage of active catalase per bilayer, heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) and Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub M}) of immobilized catalase were 3.32 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} mol cm{sup -2}, 5.28 s{sup -1} and 1.1 mM, respectively. The biosensor shows good stability, high reproducibility, long life-time, and fast amperometric response with the high sensitivity of 380 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and low detection limit of 100 nM at concentration range up to 2.1 mM.

  12. Electron Cloud in Steel Beam Pipe vs Titanium Nitride Coated and Amorphous Carbon Coated Beam Pipes in Fermilab's Main Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backfish, Michael

    2013-04-01

    This paper documents the use of four retarding field analyzers (RFAs) to measure electron cloud signals created in Fermilab’s Main Injector during 120 GeV operations. The first data set was taken from September 11, 2009 to July 4, 2010. This data set is used to compare two different types of beam pipe that were installed in the accelerator. Two RFAs were installed in a normal steel beam pipe like the rest of the Main Injector while another two were installed in a one meter section of beam pipe that was coated on the inside with titanium nitride (TiN). A second data run started on August 23, 2010 and ended on January 10, 2011 when Main Injector beam intensities were reduced thus eliminating the electron cloud. This second run uses the same RFA setup but the TiN coated beam pipe was replaced by a one meter section coated with amorphous carbon (aC). This section of beam pipe was provided by CERN in an effort to better understand how an aC coating will perform over time in an accelerator. The research consists of three basic parts: (a) continuously monitoring the conditioning of the three different types of beam pipe over both time and absorbed electrons (b) measurement of the characteristics of the surrounding magnetic fields in the Main Injector in order to better relate actual data observed in the Main Injector with that of simulations (c) measurement of the energy spectrum of the electron cloud signals using retarding field analyzers in all three types of beam pipe.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of titanium-vanadium ternary nitride (Ti{sub x}V{sub 1}-xN).; Sintesis y caracterizacion del nitruro ternario de titanio y vanadio (Ti{sub x}V{sub 1}-xN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roldan, M. A.; Alcala, M. D.; Ortega, A.; Real, C.

    2011-07-01

    Titanium-Vanadium nitride (TiVN) has been prepared from carbothermal reduction of corresponding oxides and also by direct nitridation of a mix of two metals employing the ATVC method. The characterization of the final product by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, electron energy loss (EELS), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is presented. The synthesis of the ternary nitride has been possible in all range of composition and the final product is obtained with nano metric particle size and a high microhardness after sintering. (Author) 58 refs.

  14. Ab Initio Study of the Atomic Level Structure of the Rutile TiO2(110)-Titanium Nitride (TiN) Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Moreno, José Julio; Nolan, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is widely used in industry as a protective coating due to its hardness and resistance to corrosion and can spontaneously form a thin oxide layer when it is exposed to air, which could modify the properties of the coating. With limited understanding of the TiO 2 -TiN interfacial system at present, this work aims to describe the structural and electronic properties of oxidized TiN based on a density functional theory (DFT) study of the rutile TiO 2 (110)-TiN(100) interface model system, also including Hubbard +U correction on Ti 3d states. The small lattice mismatch gives a good stability to the TiO 2 -TiN interface after depositing the oxide onto TiN through the formation of interfacial Ti-O bonds. Our DFT+U study shows the presence of Ti 3+ cations in the TiO 2 region, which are preferentially located next to the interface region as well as the rotation of the rutile TiO 2 octahedra in the interface structure. The DFT+U TiO 2 electronic density of states (EDOS) shows localized Ti 3+ defect states forming in the midgap between the top edge of the valence and the bottom of the conduction band. We increase the complexity of our models by the introduction of nonstoichiometric compositions. Although the vacancy formation energies for Ti in TiN (E vac (Ti) ≥ 4.03 eV) or O in the oxide (E vac (O) ≥ 3.40 eV) are quite high relative to perfect TiO 2 -TiN, defects are known to form during the oxide growth and can therefore be present after TiO 2 formation. Our results show that a structure with exchanged O and N can lie 0.82 eV higher in energy than the perfect system, suggesting the stability of structures with interdiffused O and N anions at ambient conditions. The presence of N in TiO 2 introduces N 2p states localized between the top edge of the O 2p valence states and the midgap Ti 3+ 3d states, thus reducing the band gap in the TiO 2 region for the exchanged O/N interface EDOS. The outcomes of these simulations give us a most comprehensive

  15. Nitride stabilized core/shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttiyiel, Kurian Abraham; Sasaki, Kotaro; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2018-01-30

    Nitride stabilized metal nanoparticles and methods for their manufacture are disclosed. In one embodiment the metal nanoparticles have a continuous and nonporous noble metal shell with a nitride-stabilized non-noble metal core. The nitride-stabilized core provides a stabilizing effect under high oxidizing conditions suppressing the noble metal dissolution during potential cycling. The nitride stabilized nanoparticles may be fabricated by a process in which a core is coated with a shell layer that encapsulates the entire core. Introduction of nitrogen into the core by annealing produces metal nitride(s) that are less susceptible to dissolution during potential cycling under high oxidizing conditions.

  16. Performance analysis of nitride alternative plasmonic materials for localized surface plasmon applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, U.; Naik, G. V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    . Titanium nitride and zirconium nitride, which were recently suggested as alternative plasmonic materials in the visible and near-infrared ranges, are compared to the performance of gold. In contrast to the results from quasistatic methods, both nitride materials are very good alternatives to the usual...

  17. Conducting metal oxide and metal nitride nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J.; Subban, Chinmayee V.

    2017-12-26

    Conducting metal oxide and nitride nanoparticles that can be used in fuel cell applications. The metal oxide nanoparticles are comprised of for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten and combinations thereof. The metal nitride nanoparticles are comprised of, for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten, zirconium, and combinations thereof. The nanoparticles can be sintered to provide conducting porous agglomerates of the nanoparticles which can be used as a catalyst support in fuel cell applications. Further, platinum nanoparticles, for example, can be deposited on the agglomerates to provide a material that can be used as both an anode and a cathode catalyst support in a fuel cell.

  18. TIDES-ACS Trial: comparison of titanium-nitride-oxide coated bio-active-stent to the drug (everolimus)-eluting stent in acute coronary syndrome. Study design and objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colkesen, E B; Eefting, F D; Rensing, B J; Suttorp, M J; Ten Berg, J M; Karjalainen, P P; Van Der Heyden, J A

    2015-02-01

    Drug-eluting stents (DES), delivering antiproliferative drugs from a durable polymer, have shown to reduce in-stent restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) compared to bare-metal stents (BMS). However, they have been associated with a hypersensitivity reaction, delayed healing, and incomplete endothelialization, which may contribute to an increased risk of late stent thrombosis. Consequently, a prolonged duration of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is needed, with an increased risk of bleeding complication. A number of stent technologies are being developed in an attempt to modify late thrombotic events and DAPT duration. The Optimax™ stent is such a novel, next generation bioactive stent (BAS), in which a thicker layer of titanium-nitride-oxide coating is inserted over the stent struts. The rationale of this is to obtain more efficient and rapid vascular healing at the site of the stent implantation. The aim of TIDES-ACS Trial is to compare clinical outcome in patients presenting with ACS, treated with PCI using Optimax-BAS versus Synergy™-EES. Second objective is to explore whether the Optimax™-BAS use is superior compared with Synergy™-EES use with respect of hard end points (cardiac death, myocardial infarction [MI] and major bleeding). A prospective, randomized, multicenter trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02049229), will be conducted in interventional centres in Finland (six centres), France (five centres) and Holland (two centres), including a total of 1800 patients.

  19. Semiconducting cubic titanium nitride in the Th3P4 structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhadram, Venkata S.; Liu, Hanyu; Xu, Enshi; Li, Tianshu; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Hrubiak, Rostislav; Lany, Stephan; Strobel, Timothy A.

    2018-01-01

    We report the discovery of a long-sought-after phase of titanium nitride with stoichiometry Ti 3 N 4 using diamond anvil cell experiments combined with in situ high-resolution x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy techniques, supported by ab initio calculations. Ti 3 N 4 crystallizes in the cubic Th 3 P 4 structure [space group I ¯ 4 3 d (220)] from a mixture of TiN and N 2 above ≈ 75 GPa and ≈ 2400 K. The density ( ≈ 5.22 g/cc) and bulk modulus ( K 0 = 290 GPa) of cubic- Ti 3 N 4 ( c - Ti 3 N 4 ) at 1 atm, estimated from the pressure-volume equation of state, are comparable to rocksalt TiN. Ab initio calculations based on the GW approximation and using hybrid functionals indicate that c - Ti 3 N 4 is a semiconductor with a direct band gap between 0.8 and 0.9 eV, which is larger than the previously predicted values. The c - Ti 3 N 4 phase is not recoverable to ambient pressure due to dynamic instabilities, but recovery of Ti 3 N 4 in the defect rocksalt (or related) structure may be feasible.

  20. Corrosion Behavior of Titanium Based Ceramic Coatings Deposited on Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Rania

    2016-01-01

    Titanium based ceramic films are increasingly used as coating materials because of their high hardness, excellent wear resistance and superior corrosion resistance. Using electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques, the electrochemical properties of different coatings deposited on different steels under different conditions were examined in this study. Thin films of titanium nitride (TiN), titanium diboride (TiB2), and titanium boronitride with different boron concentrations (TiBN-1&2) w...

  1. Zirconium nitride hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, Daiane; Amorim, Cintia Lugnani Gomes de; Soares, Gabriel Vieira; Figueroa, Carlos Alejandro; Baumvol, Israel Jacob Rabin; Basso, Rodrigo Leonardo de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) nanometric films were deposited onto different substrates, in order to study the surface crystalline microstructure and also to investigate the electrochemical behavior to obtain a better composition that minimizes corrosion reactions. The coatings were produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD). The influence of the nitrogen partial pressure, deposition time and temperature over the surface properties was studied. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and corrosion experiments were performed to characterize the ZrN hard coatings. The ZrN films properties and microstructure changes according to the deposition parameters. The corrosion resistance increases with temperature used in the films deposition. Corrosion tests show that ZrN coating deposited by PVD onto titanium substrate can improve the corrosion resistance. (author)

  2. Novel Approach for Enhanced Scandium and Titanium Leaching Efficiency from Bauxite Residue with Suppressed Silica Gel Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Gözde; Yagmurlu, Bengi; Cakmakoglu, Seckin; Hertel, Tobias; Kaya, Şerif; Gronen, Lars; Stopic, Srecko; Friedrich, Bernd

    2018-04-04

    The need of light weight alloys for future transportation industry puts Sc and Ti under a sudden demand. While these metals can bring unique and desired properties to alloys, lack of reliable sources brought forth a supply problem which can be solved by valorization of the secondary resources. Bauxite residue (red mud), with considerable Ti and Sc content, is a promising resource for secure supply of these metals. Due to drawbacks of the direct leaching route from bauxite residue, such as silica gel formation and low selectivity towards these valuable metals, a novel leaching process based on oxidative leaching conditions, aiming more efficient and selective leaching but also considering environmental aspects via lower acid consumption, was investigated in this study. Combination of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) was utilized as the leaching solution, where various acid concentrations, solid-to-liquid ratios, leaching temperatures and times were examined in a comparative manner. Leaching with 2.5 M H 2 O 2 : 2.5 M H 2 SO 4 mixture at 90 °C for 30 min was observed to be the best leaching conditions with suppressed silica gel formation and the highest reported leaching efficiency with high S/L ratio for Sc and Ti; 68% and 91%; respectively.

  3. Nano-structure and tribological properties of B+ and Ti+ co-implanted silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Noda, Katsutoshi; Yamauchi, Yukihiko

    2005-01-01

    Silicon nitride ceramics have been co-implanted with boron and titanium ions at a fluence of 2 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 and an energy of 200 keV. TEM results indicated that the boron and titanium-implanted layers were amorphized separately and titanium nitride nano-crystallites were formed in the titanium-implanted layer. XPS results indicated that the implantation profile varied a little depending on the ion implantation sequence of boron and titanium ions, with the boron implantation peak shifting to a shallower position when implanted after Ti + -implantation. Wear tests of these ion-implanted materials were carried out using a block-on-ring wear tester under non-lubricated conditions against commercially available silicon nitride materials. The specific wear rate was reduced by ion implantation and showed that the specific wear rate of Ti + -implanted sample was the lowest, followed by B + , Ti + co-implanted and B + -implanted samples

  4. Suppression of interfacial voids formation during silane (SiH4)-based silicon oxide bonding with a thin silicon nitride capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Hong; Bao, Shuyu; Wang, Yue; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.; Seng Tan, Chuan

    2018-01-01

    The material properties and bonding behavior of silane-based silicon oxide layers deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition were investigated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was employed to determine the chemical composition of the silicon oxide films. The incorporation of hydroxyl (-OH) groups and moisture absorption demonstrates a strong correlation with the storage duration for both as-deposited and annealed silicon oxide films. It is observed that moisture absorption is prevalent in the silane-based silicon oxide film due to its porous nature. The incorporation of -OH groups and moisture absorption in the silicon oxide films increase with the storage time (even in clean-room environments) for both as-deposited and annealed silicon oxide films. Due to silanol condensation and silicon oxidation reactions that take place at the bonding interface and in the bulk silicon, hydrogen (a byproduct of these reactions) is released and diffused towards the bonding interface. The trapped hydrogen forms voids over time. Additionally, the absorbed moisture could evaporate during the post-bond annealing of the bonded wafer pair. As a consequence, defects, such as voids, form at the bonding interface. To address the problem, a thin silicon nitride capping film was deposited on the silicon oxide layer before bonding to serve as a diffusion barrier to prevent moisture absorption and incorporation of -OH groups from the ambient. This process results in defect-free bonded wafers.

  5. Plasma nitriding of steels

    CERN Document Server

    Aghajani, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the effect of plasma nitriding on the properties of steels. Parameters of different grades of steels are considered, such as structural and constructional steels, stainless steels and tools steels. The reader will find within the text an introduction to nitriding treatment, the basis of plasma and its roll in nitriding. The authors also address the advantages and disadvantages of plasma nitriding in comparison with other nitriding methods. .

  6. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  7. Experimental demonstration of titanium nitride plasmonic interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinsey, N.; Ferrera, M.; Naik, G. V.

    2014-01-01

    An insulator-metal-insulator plasmonic interconnect using TiN, a CMOS-compatible material, is proposed and investigated experimentally at the telecommunication wavelength of 1.55 mu m. The TiN waveguide was shown to obtain propagation losses less than 0.8 dB/mm with a mode size of 9.8 mu m...

  8. Titanium ; dream new material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Tae; Kim Seung Eon; Heoon, Yong Taek; Jung, Hui Won

    2001-11-01

    The contents of this book are history of Titanium, present situation of Titanium industry, property of Titanium alloy, types of it, development of new alloy of Titanium smelting of Titanium, cast of Titanium and heat treatment of Titanium, Titanium alloy for plane, car parts, biological health care, and sport leisure and daily life, prospect, and Titanium industrial development of Titanium in China.

  9. Preparation of uranium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, R.A.; Tennery, V.J.

    1976-01-01

    A process is described for preparing actinide-nitrides from massive actinide metal which is suitable for sintering into low density fuel shapes by partially hydriding the massive metal and simultaneously dehydriding and nitriding the dehydrided portion. The process is repeated until all of the massive metal is converted to a nitride

  10. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity of Titanium Surface Modified by PVD/PACVD Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Min-Kyung; Lee, Min-Joo; Park, Sang-Won; Lee, Kwangmin; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Kim, Hyun-Seung; Oh, Gye-Jeong; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) via crystal violet staining assay on titanium surface modified by physical vapor deposition/plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. Specimens were divided into the following three groups: polished titanium (control group), titanium modified by DC magnetron sputtering (group TiN-Ti), and titanium modified by plasma nitriding (group N-Ti). Surface characteristics of specimens were observed by using nanosurface 3D optical profiler and field emission scanning electron microscope. Group TiN-Ti showed TiN layer of 1.2 microm in thickness. Group N-Ti was identified as plasma nitriding with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Roughness average (Ra) of all specimens had values 0.05). Within the process condition of this study, modified titanium surfaces by DC magnetron sputtering and plasma nitriding did not influence the adhesion of S. mutans.

  11. Nitridation of vanadium by ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Masato; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Kinomura, Atsushi; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    1994-01-01

    The nitridation of vanadium by ion beam irradiation is studied by the ion implantation method and the dynamic mixing method. The nitrogen ion implantation was carried out into deposited V(110) films. Using both methods, three phases are formed, i.e. α-V, β-V 2 N, and δ-VN. Which phases are formed is related to the implantation dose or the arrival ratio. The orientation of the VN films produced by the dynamic ion beam mixing method is (100) and that of the VN films produced by the ion implantation method is (111). The nitridation of vanadium is also discussed in comparison with that of titanium and chromium. ((orig.))

  12. Corrosion-electrochemical characteristics of oxide-carbide and oxide-nitride coatings formed by electrolytic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomashov, N.D.; Chukalovskaya, T.V.; Medova, I.L.; Duradzhi, V.N.; Plavnik, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The composition, structure, microhardness and corrosion-electrochemical properties of oxide-carbide and oxide-nitride coatings on titanium in 5n H 2 SO 4 , 50 deg, produced by the method of chemical-heat treatment in electrolytic plasma, containing saturation components of nitrogen and carbon, were investigated. It is shown that the coatings produced have increased hardness, possess high corrosion resistance in sulfuric acid solution at increased temperature, as to their electrochemcial behaviour they are similar to titanium carbide and nitride respectively. It is shown that high corrosion resistance is ensured by electrochemical mechanism of the oxide-carbide and oxide-nitride coating protection

  13. Corrosion surface protection by using titanium carbon nitride/titanium-niobium carbon nitride multilayered system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caicedo, J.C., E-mail: jcesarca@calima.univalle.edu.co [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Amaya, C. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Laboratorio de Recubrimientos Duros, CDT-ASTIN SENA, Cali (Colombia); Cabrera, G. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Esteve, J. [Department de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Aperador, W. [Universidad Militar Nueva Granada Bogota D.C (Colombia); Gomez, M.E. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Prieto, P. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Centro de Excelencia en Nuevos Materiales, CENM, Calle 13 100-00 Edificio 320, espacio 1026, Cali (Colombia)

    2011-07-29

    The aim of this work is the improvement of the electrochemical behavior of 4140 steel substrate using TiCN/TiNbCN multilayered system as a protective coating. We have grown [TiCN/TiNbCN]{sub n} multilayered via reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering technique in which was varied systematically the bilayer period ({Lambda}), and the bilayer number (n), maintaining constant the total thickness of the coatings ({approx} 3 {mu}m). The coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy, electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy assisted with selected area electron diffraction. The electrochemical properties were studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Tafel curves. XRD results showed a preferential growth in the face-centered cubic (111) crystal structure for [TiCN/TiNbCN]{sub n} multilayered coatings [1]. In this work was obtained the maximum corrosion resistance for the coating with ({Lambda}) equal to 15 nm, corresponding to n = 200 bilayered. The polarization resistance and corrosion rate were around 8.6 kOhm cm{sup 2} and 7.59 . 10{sup -4} mm/year, these values were 8.6 and 0.001 times better than those showed by the uncoated 4140 steel substrate (1.0 kOhm and 0.57 mm/year), respectively. The improvement of the electrochemical behavior of the 4140 coated with this TiCN/TiNbCN multilayered system can be attributed to the presence of several interfaces that act as obstacles for the inward and outward diffusions of Cl{sup -} ion species, generating an increment in the energy or potential required for translating the corrosive ions across the coating/substrate interface. Moreover, the interface systems affect the means free path on the ions toward the metallic substrate, due to the decreasing of the defects presented in the multilayered coatings.

  14. Corrosion surface protection by using titanium carbon nitride/titanium-niobium carbon nitride multilayered system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caicedo, J.C.; Amaya, C.; Cabrera, G.; Esteve, J.; Aperador, W.; Gomez, M.E.; Prieto, P.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is the improvement of the electrochemical behavior of 4140 steel substrate using TiCN/TiNbCN multilayered system as a protective coating. We have grown [TiCN/TiNbCN] n multilayered via reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering technique in which was varied systematically the bilayer period (Λ), and the bilayer number (n), maintaining constant the total thickness of the coatings (∼ 3 μm). The coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy, electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy assisted with selected area electron diffraction. The electrochemical properties were studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Tafel curves. XRD results showed a preferential growth in the face-centered cubic (111) crystal structure for [TiCN/TiNbCN] n multilayered coatings [1]. In this work was obtained the maximum corrosion resistance for the coating with (Λ) equal to 15 nm, corresponding to n = 200 bilayered. The polarization resistance and corrosion rate were around 8.6 kOhm cm 2 and 7.59 . 10 -4 mm/year, these values were 8.6 and 0.001 times better than those showed by the uncoated 4140 steel substrate (1.0 kOhm and 0.57 mm/year), respectively. The improvement of the electrochemical behavior of the 4140 coated with this TiCN/TiNbCN multilayered system can be attributed to the presence of several interfaces that act as obstacles for the inward and outward diffusions of Cl - ion species, generating an increment in the energy or potential required for translating the corrosive ions across the coating/substrate interface. Moreover, the interface systems affect the means free path on the ions toward the metallic substrate, due to the decreasing of the defects presented in the multilayered coatings.

  15. Influence of nitriding atmosphere on the modification of surface titanium with focus on the behavior of blood platelets adhesion; Influencia da atmosfera nitretante na modificacao de superficies de titanio com enfase no comportamento de adesao de plaquetas sanguineas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitoriano, J.O.; Alves, C. [Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-Arido (UFERSA), RN (Brazil); Braz, D.C.; Camara, R.B.G.; Rocha, H.A.O., E-mail: clodomiro.jr@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), RN (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the influence of surface modification of titanium on the adhesion of blood platelets, through techniques of adhesion and morphological analyzes. Discs of titanium grade II received different surface treatments with plasma of Ar + N{sub 2} + H{sub 2} and Ar + H{sub 2}, forming two experimental groups including only polished samples used as standard. Before and after treatment the samples were characterized according to topography, crystalline structure and wettability, using atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and testing of sessile drop, respectively. Platelet rich plasma (PRP) was applied on the modified surfaces in a culture plates. Images obtained by electron microscopy of adhered platelets were analyzed to verify the behavior of platelets in the different experimental conditions. (author)

  16. Selective ablation of a titanium nitride film on tungsten carbide substrate using ultrashort laser pulses; Ablação seletiva de um filme de nitreto de titânio em substrato de carboneto de tungstênio utilizando laser de pulsos ultracurtos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Eduardo Spinelli

    2017-07-01

    Surface coatings are applied to many cutting tools in the metallurgical industry in order to improve cutting efficiency and extend its useful life. In this work, tests were performed to remove the coating of titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) pellets, using an ultrashort laser pulses beam. After determination of the damage thresholds of the film and the substrate, were ablated on the surface of the coating lines using two ablation conditions, it was initially operated on the low fluence regime for the film, and later on the low fluence regime of the substrate, far below the threshold of the film, applying high overlapping pulses. A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was set up to monitor the materials present in the plasma generated by the laser, but the system did not present sufficient sensitivity to read the low intensity of the plasma generated in the process and was not used. After the analysis of the traces by electron microscopy, optical profilometer and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, it was not possible to determine a safe process to carry out the selective removal of the film in question, however, due to the data obtained and observations of the results in some traces, new possibilities were raised, opening the discussion for future work. (author)

  17. Surface characterization of nickel titanium orthodontic arch wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Manu; Seema, Saraswathy; Tiwari, Brijesh; Sharma, Himanshu S.; Londhe, Sanjay; Arora, Vimal

    2015-01-01

    Background Surface roughness of nickel titanium orthodontic arch wires poses several clinical challenges. Surface modification with aesthetic/metallic/non metallic materials is therefore a recent innovation, with clinical efficacy yet to be comprehensively evaluated. Methods One conventional and five types of surface modified nickel titanium arch wires were surface characterized with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive analysis, Raman spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy and 3D profilometry. Root mean square roughness values were analyzed by one way analysis of variance and post hoc Duncan's multiple range tests. Results Study groups demonstrated considerable reduction in roughness values from conventional in a material specific pattern: Group I; conventional (578.56 nm) > Group V; Teflon (365.33 nm) > Group III; nitride (301.51 nm) > Group VI (i); rhodium (290.64 nm) > Group VI (ii); silver (252.22 nm) > Group IV; titanium (229.51 nm) > Group II; resin (158.60 nm). It also showed the defects with aesthetic (resin/Teflon) and nitride surfaces and smooth topography achieved with metals; titanium/silver/rhodium. Conclusions Resin, Teflon, titanium, silver, rhodium and nitrides were effective in decreasing surface roughness of nickel titanium arch wires albeit; certain flaws. Findings have clinical implications, considering their potential in lessening biofilm adhesion, reducing friction, improving corrosion resistance and preventing nickel leach and allergic reactions. PMID:26843749

  18. Electrochemical properties of lanthanum nitride with calcium nitride additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesunova, R.P.; Fishman, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports on the electrochemical properties of lanthanum nitride with calcium nitride added. The lanthanum nitride was obtained by nitriding metallic lanthanum at 870 K in an ammonia stream. The product contained Cl, Pr, Nd, Sm, Fe, Ca, Cu, Mo, Mg, Al, Si, and Be. The calcium nitride was obtained by nitriding metallic calcium in a nitrogen stream. The conductivity on the LaN/C 3 N 2 system components are shown as a function of temperature. A table shows the solid solutions to be virtually electronic conductors and the lanthanum nitride a mixed conductor

  19. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs

  20. Degradation of nitride coatings in low-pressure gas discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yurii; Shugurov, Vladimir; Krysina, Olga; Petrikova, Elizaveta; Tolkachev, Oleg

    2017-12-01

    The paper provides research data on the defect structure, mechanical characteristics, and tribological properties of commercially pure VT1-0 titanium exposed to surface modification on a COMPLEX laboratory electron-ion plasma setup which allows nitriding, coating deposition, and etching in low-pressure gas discharge plasma in a single vacuum cycle. It is shown that preliminary plasma nitriding forms a columnar Ti2N phase in VT1-0 titanium and that subsequent TiN deposition results in a thin nanocrystalline TiN layer. When the coating-substrate system is etched, the coating fails and the tribological properties of the material degrade greatly.

  1. Kinetic modelling of chlorination of nitrided ilmenite using MATLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar, E-mail: srsivakumar@usm.my; Kwok, Teong Chen, E-mail: ctck@live.com; Hamid, Sheikh Abdul Rezan Sheikh Abdul, E-mail: rezanshk@gmail.com [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300, Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2016-07-19

    In the present study, chlorination of nitride ilmenite using 2{sup k} factorial design was investigated. The reduction experiments were carried out in a temperature range of 400°C to 500°C, chlorination duration from 1 hour to 3 hours and using different type of carbon reactant. Phases of raw materials and reduced samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ilmenite was reduced to TiO{sub x}C{sub y}N{sub z} through carbothermal and nitridation for further chlorination into titanium tetrachloride. The Design of Experiment analysis suggested that the types of carbon reactant contribute most influence to the extent of chlorination of nitride ilmenite. The extent of chlorination was highest at 500°C with 3 hours chlorination time and carbon nanotube as carbon reactant.

  2. Ion nitriding of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitz, T.

    2002-09-01

    The present study is devoted to the investigation of the mechanism of aluminium nitriding by a technique that employs implantation of low-energy nitrogen ions and diffusional transport of atoms. The nitriding of aluminium is investigated, because this is a method for surface modification of aluminium and has a potential for application in a broad spectrum of fields such as automobile, marine, aviation, space technologies, etc. However, at present nitriding of aluminium does not find any large scale industrial application, due to problems in the formation of stoichiometric aluminium nitride layers with a sufficient thickness and good quality. For the purposes of this study, ion nitriding is chosen, as an ion beam method with the advantage of good and independent control over the process parameters, which thus can be related uniquely to the physical properties of the resulting layers. Moreover, ion nitriding has a close similarity to plasma nitriding and plasma immersion ion implantation, which are methods with a potential for industrial application. (orig.)

  3. Characteristics of Au/PZT/TiO2/Nitride/Si structure capacitors with ICP nitride treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Hyung Seob; Kim, Tae Ho; Jeon, Chang Bae; Lee, Jae Gab; Kim, Ji Young

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the characteristics of PZT/TiO 2 ferroelectric gate stack capacitors with Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) nitridation were investigated for field effect transistor (FET)-type Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FeRAM) applications. If a high accumulation capacitance is to be had, the ICP nitridation time needs to be optimized. While a short ICP treatment time results in thermal oxide growth due to lack of nitrogen, a long nitridation time causes a nitride layer which is too thick. Au/PZT(200 nm)/TiO 2 (40 nm)/Nitride/Si (MeFINS) structure capacitors show a memory window (ΔV) of 1.6 V under ±3-V operation while Au/PZT(200 nm)/TiO 2 (40 nm)/Si (MeFIS) capacitors without nitride treatment exhibit a small memory window of 0.6 V. At the same time, the capacitance of the MeFINS device is almost twice that of the MeFIS capacitor. This result implies that the ICP nitride treatment suppresses the formation of a low dielectric constant interfacial SiO x layer and alleviates the series capacitance problem

  4. Surface improvement and biocompatibility of TiAl{sub 24}Nb{sub 10} intermetallic alloy using rf plasma nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd El-Rahman, A.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University (Egypt)], E-mail: ahmedphys96@hotmail.com; Maitz, M.F. [Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf (Germany); Kassem, M.A. [Department of Materials and Metals Engineering, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez Canal University (Egypt); El-Hossary, F.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University (Egypt); Prokert, F.; Reuther, H.; Pham, M.T.; Richter, E. [Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf (Germany)

    2007-09-30

    The present work describes the surface improvement and biocompatibility of TiAl{sub 24}Nb{sub 10} intermetallic alloy using rf plasma nitriding. The nitriding process was carried out at different plasma power from 400 W to 650 W where the other plasma conditions were fixed. Grazing incidence X-ray diffractometry (GIXRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), tribometer and a nanohardness tester were employed to characterize the nitrided layer. Further potentiodynamic polarization method was used to describe the corrosion behavior of the un-nitrided and nitrided alloy. It has been found that the Vickers hardness (HV) and corrosion resistance values of the nitrided layers increase with increasing plasma power while the wear rates of the nitrided layers reduce by two orders of magnitude as compared to those of the un-nitrided layer. This improvement in surface properties of the intermetallic alloy is due to formation of a thin modified layer which is composed of titanium nitride in the alloy surface. Moreover, all modified layers were tested for their sustainability as a biocompatible material. Concerning the application area of biocompatibility, the present treated alloy show good surface properties especially for the nitrided alloy at low plasma power of 400 W.

  5. Structure and properties of nitrided surface layer produced on NiTi shape memory alloy by low temperature plasma nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Borowski, Tomasz; Sowińska, Agnieszka; Lelątko, Józef; Oleksiak, Justyna; Kamiński, Janusz; Tarnowski, Michał; Wierzchoń, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Low temperature plasma nitriding process of NiTi shape memory alloy is presented. • The possibility of treatment details of sophisticated shape. • TiN surface layer has diffusive character. • TiN surface layer increases corrosion resistance of NiTi alloy. • Produced TiN layer modify the biological properties of NiTi alloy. - Abstract: NiTi shape memory alloys are used for bone and cardiological implants. However, on account of the metallosis effect, i.e. the release of the alloy elements into surrounding tissues, they are subjected to various surface treatment processes in order to improve their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility without influencing the required shape memory properties. In this paper, the microstructure, topography and morphology of TiN surface layer on NiTi alloy, and corrosion resistance, both before and after nitriding in low-temperature plasma at 290 °C, are presented. Examinations with the use of the potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods were carried out and show an increase of corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution after glow-discharge nitriding. This surface titanium nitride layer also improved the adhesion of platelets and the proliferation of osteoblasts, which was investigated in in vitro experiments with human cells. Experimental data revealed that nitriding NiTi shape memory alloy under low-temperature plasma improves its properties for bone implant applications

  6. Structure and properties of nitrided surface layer produced on NiTi shape memory alloy by low temperature plasma nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarnowska, Elżbieta [Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Pathology Department, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland); Borowski, Tomasz [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Sowińska, Agnieszka [Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Pathology Department, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland); Lelątko, Józef [Silesia University, Faculty of Computer Science and Materials Science, 75 Pułku Piechoty 1A, 41-500 Chorzów (Poland); Oleksiak, Justyna; Kamiński, Janusz; Tarnowski, Michał [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Wierzchoń, Tadeusz, E-mail: twierz@inmat.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Low temperature plasma nitriding process of NiTi shape memory alloy is presented. • The possibility of treatment details of sophisticated shape. • TiN surface layer has diffusive character. • TiN surface layer increases corrosion resistance of NiTi alloy. • Produced TiN layer modify the biological properties of NiTi alloy. - Abstract: NiTi shape memory alloys are used for bone and cardiological implants. However, on account of the metallosis effect, i.e. the release of the alloy elements into surrounding tissues, they are subjected to various surface treatment processes in order to improve their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility without influencing the required shape memory properties. In this paper, the microstructure, topography and morphology of TiN surface layer on NiTi alloy, and corrosion resistance, both before and after nitriding in low-temperature plasma at 290 °C, are presented. Examinations with the use of the potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods were carried out and show an increase of corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution after glow-discharge nitriding. This surface titanium nitride layer also improved the adhesion of platelets and the proliferation of osteoblasts, which was investigated in in vitro experiments with human cells. Experimental data revealed that nitriding NiTi shape memory alloy under low-temperature plasma improves its properties for bone implant applications.

  7. Oxidation of nitride films in aqueous solution: Correlation between surface analysis and electrochemical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.; Alias, M.N.

    1994-01-01

    Ac impedance and dc polarization tests of 304 stainless steels coated by cathodic arc plasma deposition (CAPD) titanium nitride and zirconium nitride were conducted in aqueous chloride solution. Cyclic polarization data suggested passive films were formed over the nitride coatings which are most likely hydrated titanium oxide and zirconium oxides. ESCA analysis of fresh samples and samples exposed during impedance tests indicated a layer rich in oxygen over the ZrN coating after exposure but not over TiN coating. Chemical shifts in the Zr 3d 5/2 core electrons indicate transformation from ZrN to its oxide; the shifts in Ti 2P 3/2 did not support the change from TiN to its oxide. The influence of these shifts on corrosion protection is documented

  8. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  9. Properties of minor actinide nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Masahide; Itoh, Akinori; Akabori, Mitsuo; Arai, Yasuo; Minato, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The present status of the research on properties of minor actinide nitrides for the development of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle based on nitride fuel and pyrochemical reprocessing is described. Some thermal stabilities of Am-based nitrides such as AmN and (Am, Zr)N were mainly investigated. Stabilization effect of ZrN was cleary confirmed for the vaporization and hydrolytic behaviors. New experimental equipments for measuring thermal properties of minor actinide nitrides were also introduced. (author)

  10. Silicon nitride nanosieve membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tong, D.H.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Gadgil, V.J.; Bostan, C.G.; Berenschot, Johan W.; van Rijn, C.J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2004-01-01

    An array of very uniform cylindrical nanopores with a pore diameter as small as 25 nm has been fabricated in an ultrathin micromachined silicon nitride membrane using focused ion beam (FIB) etching. The pore size of this nanosieve membrane was further reduced to below 10 nm by coating it with

  11. Development and Characterization of Titanium Compound N anostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhou

    The development and characterization of titanium compound nanostructures have been achieved, for potential applications in energy industry. Oil and gas, one of the traditional industry fields, observes accumulating demands on active implementations of nanotechnology, for the numerous advantages that nanomaterials can introduce to both product performances and field operations. By using chemical vapor deposition and liquid exfoliation, various titanium compound nanostructures have been synthesized through this project. Attractively, these two material fabrication methods have been recognized to be industrial friendly in terms of cost efficiency and productivity. The development of nanostructures, aiming at oil and gas field applications, presents novel solutions for existing issues, such as low durability of drilling tools, high friction in mechanical operations and ineffective heat dissipation. Titanium compound nanostructures, including titanium borides, nitrides and sulfides are therefore investigated for such applications as protective coating, lubrication and thermal management.

  12. Cavitation contributes substantially to tensile creep in silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luecke, W.E.; Wiederhorn, S.M.; Hockey, B.J.; Krause, R.F. Jr.; Long, G.G.

    1995-01-01

    During tensile creep of a hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) silicon nitride, the volume fraction of cavities increases linearly with strain; these cavities produce nearly all of the measured strain. In contrast, compressive creep in the same stress and temperature range produces very little cavitation. A stress exponent that increases with stress (var-epsilon ∝ σ n , 2 < n < 7) characterizes the tensile creep response, while the compressive creep response exhibits a stress dependence of unity. Furthermore, under the same stress and temperature, the material creeps nearly 100 times faster in tension than in compression. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicates that the cavities formed during tensile creep occur in pockets of residual crystalline silicate phase located at silicon nitride multigrain junctions. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) from crept material quantifies the size distribution of cavities observed in TEM and demonstrates that cavity addition, rather than cavity growth, dominates the cavitation process. These observations are in accord with a model for creep based on the deformation of granular materials in which the microstructure must dilate for individual grains t slide past one another. During tensile creep the silicon nitride grains remain rigid; cavitation in the multigrain junctions allows the silicate to flow from cavities to surrounding silicate pockets, allowing the dilation of the microstructure and deformation of the material. Silicon nitride grain boundary sliding accommodates this expansion and leads to extension of the specimen. In compression, where cavitation is suppressed, deformation occurs by solution-reprecipitation of silicon nitride

  13. Nitriding of high speed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, E.D.; Pagon, A.M.; Hubbard, P.; Dowey, S.J.; Pilkington, A.; McCulloch, D.G.; Latham, K.; DuPlessis, J.

    2010-01-01

    Current practice when nitriding HSS cutting tools is to avoid embrittlement of the cutting edge by limiting the depth of the diffusion zone. This is accomplished by reducing the nitriding time and temperature and eliminating any compound layer formation. However, in many applications there is an argument for generating a compound layer with beneficial tribological properties. In this investigation results are presented of a metallographic, XRD and XPS analysis of nitrided surface layers generated using active screen plasma nitriding and reactive vapour deposition using cathodic arc. These results are discussed in the context of built up edge formation observed while machining inside a scanning electron microscope. (author)

  14. Opportunities in the electrowinning of molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available used, the following forms of titanium are produced: titanium sponge, sintered electrode sponge, powder, molten titanium, electroplated titanium, hydride powder, and vapor-phase depos- ited titanium. Comparing the economics of alter- native...-up for producing titanium via the Kroll process is approximately as follows: ilmenite ($0.27/kg titanium sponge); titanium slag ($0.75/kg titanium sponge); TiCl4 ($3.09/kg titanium sponge); titanium sponge raw materials costs ($5.50/kg titanium sponge); total...

  15. Defects in dilute nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.M.; Buyanova, I.A.; Tu, C.W.; Yonezu, H.

    2005-01-01

    We provide a brief review our recent results from optically detected magnetic resonance studies of grown-in non-radiative defects in dilute nitrides, i.e. Ga(In)NAs and Ga(Al,In)NP. Defect complexes involving intrinsic defects such as As Ga antisites and Ga i self interstitials were positively identified.Effects of growth conditions, chemical compositions and post-growth treatments on formation of the defects are closely examined. These grown-in defects are shown to play an important role in non-radiative carrier recombination and thus in degrading optical quality of the alloys, harmful to performance of potential optoelectronic and photonic devices based on these dilute nitrides. (author)

  16. Optical detections from worn and unworn titanium compound surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Inge Lise; Guibert, M.; Martin, J.-M.

    2010-01-01

    of a titanium nitride (TiN) layer we obtain an increase in the reflected light as a result of wear. The relative change of reflectance of light from the tribological TiAlN coated surface to the underlying layer of TiN is similar for non-worn surfaces and for surfaces exposed to an abrasive wear process...... of a residual thickness of realistic tribological coatings prior to complete wear....

  17. Estimation of sensing characteristics for refractory nitrides based gain assisted core-shell plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishodia, Manmohan Singh; Pathania, Pankaj

    2018-04-01

    Refractory transition metal nitrides such as zirconium nitride (ZrN), hafnium nitride (HfN) and titanium nitride (TiN) have emerged as viable alternatives to coinage metals based plasmonic materials, e.g., gold (Au) and silver (Ag). The present work assesses the suitability of gain assisted ZrN-, HfN- and TiN-based conventional core-shell nanoparticles (CCSNPs) and multilayered core-shell nanoparticles (MCSNPs) for refractive index sensing. We report that the optical gain incorporation in the dielectric layer leads to multifold enhancement of the scattering efficiency (Qsca), substantial reduction of the spectral full width at half maximum, and a higher figure of merit (FOM). In comparison with CCSNPs, the MCSNP system exhibits superior sensing characteristics such as higher FOM, ˜ 45% reduction in the critical optical gain, response shift towards the biological window, and higher degree of tunability. Inherent biocompatibility, growth compatibility, chemical stability and flexible spectral tuning of refractory nitrides augmented by superior sensing properties in the present work may pave the way for refractory nitrides based low cost sensing.

  18. Optical characterization of gallium nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirilyuk, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    Group III-nitrides have been considered a promising system for semiconductor devices since a few decades, first for blue- and UV-light emitting diodes, later also for high-frequency/high-power applications. Due to the lack of native substrates, heteroepitaxially grown III-nitride layers are usually

  19. Nonlinearity in superconducting titanium nitride coplanar waveguide resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilinger, P.; Trgala, M.; Hrebikova, I.; Mikula, M.; Zahoran, M.; Truchly, M.; Grajcar, M.; Leporis, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present fabrication and characterization of superconducting CPW TiN resonator at 20 and 300 nm film thickness. Further we demonstrate strong nonlinearity in thin TiN resonators. (authors)

  20. Nanocrystalline Porous Hydrogen Storage Based on Vanadium and Titanium Nitrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Goncharov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes results of our study of the application of ion-beam assisted deposition (IBAD technology for creation of nanoporous thin-film structures that can absorb more than 6 wt.% of hydrogen. Data of mathematical modeling are presented highlighting the structure formation and component creation of the films during their deposition at the time of simultaneous bombardment by mixed beam of nitrogen and helium ions with energy of 30 keV. Results of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that VNx films consist of 150–200 nm particles, boundaries of which contain nanopores of 10–15 nm diameters. Particles themselves consist of randomly oriented 10–20 nm nanograins. Grain boundaries also contain nanopores (3–8 nm. Examination of the absorption characteristics of VNx, TiNx, and (V,TiNx films showed that the amount of absorbed hydrogen depends very little on the chemical composition of films, but it is determined by the structure pore. The amount of absorbed hydrogen at 0.3 MPa and 20°C is 6-7 wt.%, whereas the bulk of hydrogen is accumulated in the grain boundaries and pores. Films begin to release hydrogen even at 50°C, and it is desorbed completely at the temperature range of 50–250°C. It was found that the electrical resistance of films during the hydrogen desorption increases 104 times.

  1. Titanium nitride stamps replicating nanoporous anodic alumina films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navas, D; Sanchez, O; Asenjo, A; Jaafar, M; Baldonedo, J L; Vazquez, M; Hernandez-Velez, M

    2007-01-01

    Fabrication of nanostructured TiN films by magnetron sputtering using nanoporous anodic alumina films (NAAF) as substrates is reported. These hard nanostructured films could be used for pre-patterning aluminium foils and to obtain nanoporous films replicating the starting NAAF over a wide range of pore diameters and spacings. Pre-patterned Al foils are obtained by compression with pressures lower than those previously reported, then a new NAAF can be fabricated by means of only one anodization process. As an example, one of the TiN stamps was used for pre-patterning an Al foil at a pressure of 200 kg cm -2 and then it was anodized in oxalic acid solution obtaining the corresponding replica of the starting NAAF

  2. A titanium nitride based metamaterial for applications in the visible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Saha, Bivas; Liu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Epitaxially grown TiN/Al0.6Sc0.4N superlattice behaves as a hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) in the visible range. Since HMMs enhance photonic-density-of-states and reduce lifetime of an emitter, we observed nine times decrease in lifetime of a dye molecule placed close to this HMM. © 2013 The Optic...

  3. Low loss superconducting titanium nitride coplanar waveguide resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vissers, M. R.; Gao, J.; Wisbey, D. S.; Hite, D. A.; Pappas, D. P.; Tsuei, C. C.; Corcoles, A. D.; Steffen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thin films of TiN were sputter-deposited onto Si and sapphire wafers with and without SiN buffer layers. The films were fabricated into rf coplanar waveguide resonators, and internal quality factor measurements were taken at millikelvin temperatures in both the many photon and single photon limits, i.e., high and low electric field regimes, respectively. At high field, we found the highest internal quality factors (∼10 7 ) were measured for TiN with predominantly a (200)-TiN orientation. The (200)-TiN is favored for growth at high temperature on either bare Si or SiN buffer layers. However, growth on bare sapphire or Si(100) at low temperature resulted in primarily a (111)-TiN orientation. Ellipsometry and Auger measurements indicate that the (200)-TiN growth on the bare Si substrates is correlated with the formation of a thin, ≅2 nm, layer of SiN during the predeposition procedure. On these surfaces we found a significant increase of Q i for both high and low electric field regimes.

  4. {sup 14}N depth profiles in Ti and Ti6Al4V nitrided by various methods, measured by nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickridge, I; Trompetter, B [Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences Ltd., Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Brown, I [Industrial Research Ltd, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    1994-12-31

    Titanium alloys have desirable mechanical properties for applications in many areas, but their surface properties, such as friction coefficient, hardness, and wear and corrosion resistance often need to be enhanced. This may be accomplished by forming a thin layer of titanium nitride on the surface, by such methods as thermal nitriding, Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD), sol-gel technology, or ion implantation. Ion Beam Analysis is assuming an increasing importance for characterising the composition of the outer few microns since it is the only technique that can rapidly yield quantitative concentration depth profiles of {sup 14}N with minimal disruption of the analysed region. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  5. {sup 14}N depth profiles in Ti and Ti6Al4V nitrided by various methods, measured by nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickridge, I.; Trompetter, B. [Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences Ltd., Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Brown, I. [Industrial Research Ltd, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    1993-12-31

    Titanium alloys have desirable mechanical properties for applications in many areas, but their surface properties, such as friction coefficient, hardness, and wear and corrosion resistance often need to be enhanced. This may be accomplished by forming a thin layer of titanium nitride on the surface, by such methods as thermal nitriding, Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD), sol-gel technology, or ion implantation. Ion Beam Analysis is assuming an increasing importance for characterising the composition of the outer few microns since it is the only technique that can rapidly yield quantitative concentration depth profiles of {sup 14}N with minimal disruption of the analysed region. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Production of 15N for nitride type nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, Damian

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Nitride nuclear fuel is the choice for advanced nuclear reactors and ADS, considering its favorable properties as: melting point, excellent thermal conductivity, high fissile density, lower fission gas release and good radiation tolerance. The application of nitride fuels in different nuclear reactors requires use of 15 N enriched nitrogen to suppress 14 C production due to (n,p) reaction on 14 N. Nitride fuel is a promising candidate for transmutation in ADSs of radioactive minor actinides, which are converted into nitrides with 15 N for that purpose. Taking into account that at present the world wide 15 N market is about 20 - 40 Kg 15 N/y, the supply of that isotope for nitride type nuclear fuel, would demand an increase in production capacity by a factor of 1000. For an industrial plant producing 100 t/y 15 N at 99 at. % 15 N concentration, using present technology of 15 N/ 14 N isotopic exchange in Nitrox system, the first separation stage of the cascade would be fed with 10M HNO 3 solution at a 600 m 3 /h flow-rate. If conversion of HNO 3 into NO, NO 2 , at the enriching end of the columns, would be done with gaseous SO 2 , for an industrial plant of 100 t/y 15 N a consumption of 4 million t SO 2 /y and a production of 70 % H 2 SO 4 waste solution of 4.5 million m 3 /y are estimated. The reconversion of H 2 SO 4 into SO 2 in order to recycle SO 2 is a problem to be solved to compensate the cost of sulfur dioxide and to diminish the amount of sulfuric acid waste solution. It should be taken into consideration an important price reduction of 15 N in order to make possible its utilization for industrial production of nitride type nuclear fuel. (authors)

  7. Hot pressing of uranium nitride and mixed uranium plutonium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.Y.

    1975-01-01

    The hot pressing characteristics of uranium nitride and mixed uranium plutonium nitride were studied. The utilization of computer programs together with the experimental technique developed in the present study may serve as a useful purpose of prediction and fabrication of advanced reactor fuel and other high temperature ceramic materials for the future. The densification of nitrides follow closely with a plastic flow theory expressed as: d rho/ dt = A/T(t) (1-rho) [1/1-(1-rho)/sup 2/3/ + B1n (1-rho)] The coefficients, A and B, were obtained from experiment and computer curve fitting. (8 figures) (U.S.)

  8. Comprehensive perspective on the mechanism of preferred orientation in reactive-sputter-deposited nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajikawa, Yuya; Noda, Suguru; Komiyama, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Texture control of sputter-deposited nitride films has provoked a great deal of interest due to its technological importance. Despite extensive research, however, the reported results are scattered and discussions about the origin of preferred orientation (PO) are sometimes conflicting, and therefore controversial. The aim of this study is to acquire a clear perspective in order to discuss the origin of PO of sputter-deposited nitrides. Among nitrides, we focus on titanium nitride (TiN), aluminum nitride (AlN), and tantalum nitride (TaN), which are three commonly used nitrides. First, we collected reported experimental results about the relation between operating conditions and PO, because PO is considered to be determined by film formation processes, such as surface diffusion or grain growth, which is affected by operating conditions. We also collected reported results about such PO-determining processes. Then, we categorized the PO-determining processes into an initial stage and a growth stage of film deposition, and further categorized each stage into a vapor-solid interface and a solid-solid interface. Then, we related each stage and interface to film morphology and to PO-determining processes. Finally, based on existing results, previous models, and proposed schema, we discuss the origin of PO. Based on previous experimental results on film morphology, PO of nitride films occurred in the growth stage at the vapor-solid interface, where the sticking process of the precursor and the surface diffusion process determine PO, rather than in the initial stage and in the growth stage at the solid-solid interface. TiN (002) PO, however, seems to be caused in the initial stage at the solid-solid interface

  9. Formation of Ti-N graded bioceramic layer by DC hollow-cathode plasma nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Chuan-lin

    2004-01-01

    Ti-N graded ceramic layer was formed on titanium by using DC hollow-cathode plasma nitriding technique. The structure of Ti-N layer was analyzed using X-ray diffractometry(XRD) with Cu Kα radiation, and the microhardness( HV0.1) was measured from the surface to inner along the cross section of Ti-N layer. The results indicate that the Ti-N graded layer is composed of ε-Ti2 N, δ-TiN and α-Ti(N) phases. Mechanism discussion shows that hollow-cathode discharge can intensify gas ionization, increase current density and enhance the nitriding potential, which directly increases the thickness of the diffusion coatings compared with traditional nitriding methods.

  10. Wear monitoring of protective nitride coatings using image processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Inge Lise; Guibert, M.; Belin, M.

    2010-01-01

    -meter with up to 105 19 repetitive cycles, eventually leaving the embedded TiN signal layer uncovered at the bottom the wear scar. 20 The worn surface was characterized by subsequent image processing. A color detection of the wear scar with 21 the exposed TiN layer by a simple optical imaging system showed......A double-layer model system, consisting of a thin layer of tribological titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) on 17 top of titanium nitride (TiN), was deposited on polished 100Cr6 steel substrates. The TiAlN top-coatings 18 were exposed to abrasive wear by a reciprocating wear process in a linear tribo...... a significant increase up to a factor of 2 of 22 the relative color values from the TiAlN top layers to the embedded TiN signal layers. This behavior agrees 23 well with the results of reflectance detection experiment with a red laser optical system on the same system. 24 Thus we have demonstrated that image...

  11. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melendez, Anamaris; Morales, Kristle; Ramos, Idalia; Campo, Eva; Santiago, Jorge J.

    2009-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH 3 flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  12. Visible-light photocatalytic activity of nitrided TiO2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camps, Enrique; Escobar-Alarcon, L.; Camacho-Lopez, Marco Antonio; Casados, Dora A. Solis

    2010-01-01

    TiO 2 thin films have been applied in UV-light photocatalysis. Nevertheless visible-light photocatalytic activity would make this material more attractive for applications. In this work we present results on the modification of titanium oxide (anatase) sol-gel thin films, via a nitriding process using a microwave plasma source. After the treatment in the nitrogen plasma, the nitrogen content in the TiO 2 films varied in the range from 14 up to 28 at%. The titanium oxide films and the nitrided ones were characterized by XPS, micro-Raman spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. Photocatalytic activity tests were done using a Methylene Blue dye solution, and as catalyst TiO 2 and nitrided TiO 2 films. The irradiation of films was carried out with a lamp with emission in the visible (without UV). The results showed that the nitrided TiO 2 films had photocatalytic activity, while the unnitrided films did not.

  13. Titanium and titanium alloys: fundamentals and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leyens, C; Peters, M

    2003-01-01

    ... number of titanium alloys have paved the way for light metals to vastly expand into many industrial applications. Titanium and its alloys stand out primarily due to their high specific strength and excellent corrosion resistance, at just half the weight of steels and Ni-based superalloys. This explains their early success in the aerospace and the...

  14. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  15. Method for producing polycrystalline boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexeevskii, V.P.; Bochko, A.V.; Dzhamarov, S.S.; Karpinos, D.M.; Karyuk, G.G.; Kolomiets, I.P.; Kurdyumov, A.V.; Pivovarov, M.S.; Frantsevich, I.N.; Yarosh, V.V.

    1975-01-01

    A mixture containing less than 50 percent of graphite-like boron nitride treated by a shock wave and highly defective wurtzite-like boron nitride obtained by a shock-wave method is compressed and heated at pressure and temperature values corresponding to the region of the phase diagram for boron nitride defined by the graphite-like compact modifications of boron nitride equilibrium line and the cubic wurtzite-like boron nitride equilibrium line. The resulting crystals of boron nitride exhibit a structure of wurtzite-like boron nitride or of both wurtzite-like and cubic boron nitride. The resulting material exhibits higher plasticity as compared with polycrystalline cubic boron nitride. Tools made of this compact polycrystalline material have a longer service life under impact loads in machining hardened steel and chilled iron. (U.S.)

  16. Characterization of TiN, TiC and Ti(C,N) in titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels focusing on the significance of different particle morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelic, S.K., E-mail: susanne.michelic@unileoben.ac.at [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Loder, D. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Reip, T.; Ardehali Barani, A. [Outokumpu Nirosta GmbH, Essener Straße 244, 44793 Bochum (Germany); Bernhard, C. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2015-02-15

    Titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels are a competitive option to classical austenitic stainless steels owing to their similar corrosion resistance. The addition of titanium significantly influences their final steel cleanliness. The present contribution focuses on the detailed metallographic characterization of titanium nitrides, titanium carbides and titanium carbonitrides with regard to their size, morphology and composition. The methods used are manual and automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy as well as optical microscopy. Additional thermodynamic calculations are performed to explain the precipitation procedure of the analyzed titanium nitrides. The analyses showed that homogeneous nucleation is decisive at an early process stage after the addition of titanium. Heterogeneous nucleation gets crucial with ongoing process time and essentially influences the final inclusion size of titanium nitrides. A detailed investigation of the nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy proved to be difficult due to their small size. Manual Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical microscopy have to be applied. Furthermore, it was found that during solidification an additional layer around an existing titanium nitride can be formed which changes the final inclusion morphology significantly. These layers are also characterized in detail. Based on these different inclusion morphologies, in combination with thermodynamic results, tendencies regarding the formation and modification time of titanium containing inclusions in ferritic chromium steels are derived. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation and modification of TiN in the steel 1.4520 was examined. • Heterogeneous nucleation essentially influences the final steel cleanliness. • In most cases heterogeneous nuclei in TiN inclusions are magnesium based. • Particle morphology provides important information

  17. Pyrochemical reprocessing of nitride fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazono, Yoshihisa; Iwai, Takashi; Arai, Yasuo

    2004-01-01

    Electrochemical behavior of actinide nitrides in LiCl-KCl eutectic melt was investigated in order to apply pyrochemical process to nitride fuel cycle. The electrode reaction of UN and (U, Nd)N was examined by cyclic voltammetry. The observed rest potential of (U, Nd)N depended on the equilibrium of U 3+ /UN and was not affected by the addition of NdN of 8 wt.%. (author)

  18. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, P.C.; Seydel, E.R.; Raj, R.

    1988-03-22

    A process is disclosed for preparing silicon nitride ceramic parts which are relatively flaw free and which need little or no machining, said process comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a starting powder by wet or dry mixing ingredients comprising by weight from about 70% to about 99% silicon nitride, from about 1% to about 30% of liquid phase forming additive and from 1% to about 7% free silicon; (b) cold pressing to obtain a preform of green density ranging from about 30% to about 75% of theoretical density; (c) sintering at atmospheric pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 1,400 C to about 2,200 C to obtain a density which ranges from about 50% to about 100% of theoretical density and which is higher than said preform green density, and (d) press forging workpiece resulting from step (c) by isothermally uniaxially pressing said workpiece in an open die without initial contact between said workpiece and die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing and so that pressed workpiece does not contact die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing, to substantially final shape in a nitrogen atmosphere utilizing a temperature within the range of from about 1,400 C to essentially 1,750 C and strain rate within the range of about 10[sup [minus]7] to about 10[sup [minus]1] seconds[sup [minus]1], the temperature and strain rate being such that surface cracks do not occur, said pressing being carried out to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30% whereby superplastic forging is effected.

  19. Method of activating an article of passive ferrous or non-ferrous metal prior to carburising, nitriding and /or nitrocarburising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Source: US2012111456A A method of activating an article of passive ferrous or non-ferrous metal by heating at least one compound containing nitrogen and carbon, wherein the article is treated with gaseous species derived from the compound. The activated article can be subsequently carburised......, nitrided or nitrocarburised in shorter time at lower temperature and resulting superior mechanical properties compared with non-activated articles and even articles of stainless steel, nickel alloy, cobalt alloy or titanium based material can be carburised, nitrided or nitrocarburised....

  20. Effect of ion nitridation process on hardness and the corrosion resistance of biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirjoadi; Lely Susita; Bambang Siswanto; Sudjatmoko

    2012-01-01

    Ion nitriding process has been performed on metal biomaterials to improve their mechanical properties of materials, particularly to increase hardness and corrosion resistance. This metallic biomaterials used for artificial bone or a prosthetic graft and used as devices of orthopedic biomaterials are usually of 316L SS metal-type and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The purpose of this study is to research the development and utilization of ion nitridation method in order to get iron and titanium nitride thin films on the metallic biomaterials for artificial bone that has wear resistance and corrosion resistance is better. Microhardness of the samples was measured using a microhardness tester, optimum hardness of SS 316L samples are about 582 VHN, this was obtained at the nitriding temperature of 500 °C, the nitriding time of 3 hours and the nitrogen gas pressure of 1.6 mbar, while optimum hardness of Ti-6Al-4V alloy is 764 VHN, this was obtained at the nitriding temperature of 500 °C, the nitriding time of 4 hours and the nitrogen gas pressure of 1.6 mbar. The hardness value of SS 316L sample and Ti-6Al-4V alloy increase to 143% and 153%, if compared with standard samples. The optimum corrosion resistance at temperature of 350 °C for SS 316L and Ti-6Al-4V are 260,12 and 110,49 μA/cm 2 or corrosion rate are 29,866 and 15,189 mpy, respectively. (author)

  1. Morphologic and crystallographic studies on electrochemically formed chromium nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amezawa, Koji [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-01 Aramaki-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Goto, Takuya; Tsujimura, Hiroyuki; Hagiwara, Rika; Tomii, Yoichi [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Uchimoto, Yoshiharu [Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Ito, Yasuhiko [Department of Environmental Systems Science, Faculty of Engineering, Doshisya University, Kyotanabe-shi, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2007-11-20

    Chromium nitride films were prepared by anodically oxidizing nitride ions at 0.4-1.5 V versus Li{sup +}/Li on chromium substrates in molten LiCl-KCl-Li{sub 3}N systems at 723 K. A crystalline Cr{sub 2}N film was successfully prepared at 0.4-1.4 V, and was thicker at more positive electrolytic potential. At 1.5 V, a Cr-N film could be also obtained, but its growth rate was relatively low. The film prepared at 1.5 V consisted of two distinctive layers. The surface layer was amorphous Cr-N containing crystalline CrN particles, and the inner layer was crystalline CrN. It was considered the existence of the amorphous phase suppressed the film growth. (author)

  2. Aluminum nitride insulating films for MOSFET devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, G. W.; Maserjian, J.

    1972-01-01

    Application of aluminum nitrides as electrical insulator for electric capacitors is discussed. Electrical properties of aluminum nitrides are analyzed and specific use with field effect transistors is defined. Operational limits of field effect transistors are developed.

  3. Effects of surface treatment on the cavitation erosion of high-chrome steel, zirconium, titanium and their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinin, V.G.

    1994-01-01

    The erosion resistance of some structural materials used for equipment components of the first and second circuits of NPPs is studied under cavitation created by an ultrasonic vibrator. It appears that after various thermomechanical treatments (programmed loading, low-temperature rolling) and coating deposition (titanium, zirconium and titanium nitride), the erosion resistance of the materials under consideration increases and the plasticity value is not notably modified. The titanium coatings deposited onto the steel increase the corrosion-fatigue resistance in a sodium chloride environment, in several cases

  4. Fabrication of vanadium nitride by carbothermal nitridation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xitang; Wang Zhuofu; Zhang Baoguo; Deng Chengji

    2005-01-01

    Vanadium nitride is produced from V 2 O 5 by carbon-thermal reduction and nitridation. When the sintered temperature is above 1273 K, VN can be formed, and the nitrogen content of the products increased with the firing temperature raised, and then is the largest when the sintered temperature is 1573 K. The C/V 2 O 5 mass ratio of the green samples is the other key factor affecting on the nitrogen contents of the products. The nitrogen content of the products reaches the most when the C/V 2 O 5 mass ratio is 0.33, which is the theoretical ratio of the carbothermal nitridation of V 2 O 5 . (orig.)

  5. Chemical vapor deposition of refractory ternary nitrides for advanced diffusion barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Custer, Jonathan S.; Fleming, James G.; Roherty-Osmun, Elizabeth; Smith, Paul Martin

    1998-09-22

    Refractory ternary nitride films for diffusion barriers in microelectronics have been grown using chemical vapor deposition. Thin films of titanium-silicon-nitride, tungsten-boron-nitride, and tungsten-silicon-nitride of various compositions have been deposited on 150 mm Si wafers. The microstructure of the films are either fully amorphous for the tungsten based films, or nauocrystalline TiN in an amorphous matrix for titanium-silicon-nitride. All films exhibit step coverages suitable for use in future microelectronics generations. Selected films have been tested as diffusion barriers between copper and silicon, and generally perform extremely weH. These fiIms are promising candidates for advanced diffusion barriers for microelectronics applications. The manufacturing of silicon wafers into integrated circuits uses many different process and materials. The manufacturing process is usually divided into two parts: the front end of line (FEOL) and the back end of line (BEOL). In the FEOL the individual transistors that are the heart of an integrated circuit are made on the silicon wafer. The responsibility of the BEOL is to wire all the transistors together to make a complete circuit. The transistors are fabricated in the silicon itself. The wiring is made out of metal, currently aluminum and tungsten, insulated by silicon dioxide, see Figure 1. Unfortunately, silicon will diffuse into aluminum, causing aluminum spiking of junctions, killing transistors. Similarly, during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of tungsten from ~fj, the reactivity of the fluorine can cause "worn-holes" in the silicon, also destroying transistors. The solution to these problems is a so-called diffusion barrier, which will allow current to pass from the transistors to the wiring, but will prevent reactions between silicon and the metal.

  6. Simulation of the Nitriding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukovich, M. G.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation of the nitriding process makes it possible to solve many practical problems of process control, prediction of results, and development of new treatment modes and treated materials. The presented classification systematizes nitriding processes and processes based on nitriding, enables consideration of the theory and practice of an individual process in interrelation with other phenomena, outlines ways for intensification of various process variants, and gives grounds for development of recommendations for controlling the structure and properties of the obtained layers. The general rules for conducting the process and formation of phases in the layer and properties of the treated surfaces are used to create a prediction computational model based on analytical, numerical, and empirical approaches.

  7. Matrix-reinforcement reactivity in P/M titanium matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amigo, V.; Romero, F.; Salvador, M. D.; Busquets, D.

    2007-01-01

    The high reactivity of titanium and the facility of the same one to form intermetallics makes difficult obtaining composites with this material and brings the need in any case of covering the principal fibres used as reinforcement. To obtain composites of titanium reinforced with ceramic particles ins proposed in this paper, for this reason it turns out to be fundamental to evaluate the reactivity between the matrix and reinforcement. Both titanium nitride and carbide (TiN and TiC) are investigated as materials of low reactivity whereas titanium silicide (TiSi 2 ) is also studied as materials of major reactivity, already stated by the scientific community. This reactivity will be analysed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) there being obtained distribution maps of the elements that allow to establish the possible influence of the sintering temperature and time. Hereby the matrix-reinforcement interactions are optimized to obtain suitable mechanical properties. (Author) 39 refs

  8. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  9. Precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, S.A.; Miller, W.E.; Willit, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Precipitation of actinides, lanthanides, and fission products as nitrides from molten chloride melts is being investigated for use as a final cleanup step in treating radioactive salt wastes generated by electrometallurgical processing of spent nuclear fuel. The radioactive components (eg, fission products) need to be removed to reduce the volume of high-level waste that requires disposal. To extract the fission products from the salt, a nitride precipitation process is being developed. The salt waste is first contacted with a molten metal; after equilibrium is reached, a nitride is added to the metal phase. The insoluble nitrides can be recovered and converted to a borosilicate glass after air oxidation. For a bench-scale experimental setup, a crucible was designed to contact the salt and metal phases. Solubility tests were performed with candidate nitrides and metal nitrides for which there are no solubility data. Experiments were performed to assess feasibility of precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

  10. Correlation of Critical Temperatures and Electrical Properties in Titanium Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandini, C.; Lacquaniti, V.; Monticone, E.; Portesi, C.; Rajteri, M.; Rastello, M. L.; Pasca, E.; Ventura, G.

    Recently transition-edge sensors (TES) have obtained an increasing interest as light detectors due to their high energy resolution and broadband response. Titanium (Ti), with transition temperature up to 0.5 K, is among the suitable materials for TES application. In this work we investigate Ti films obtained from two materials of different purity deposited by e-gun on silicon nitride. Films with different thickness and deposition substrate temperature have been measured. Critical temperatures, electrical resistivities and structural properties obtained from x-ray are related to each other.

  11. Classification of titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias B, L.R.; Garcia C, R.M.; Maya M, M.E.; Ita T, A. De; Palacios G, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (Sem) and the X-ray Dispersive Energy Spectroscopy techniques are used with the purpose to achieve a complete identification of phases and mixture of phases of a crystalline material as titanium dioxide. The problem for solving consists of being able to distinguish a sample of titanium dioxide being different than a titanium dioxide pigment. A standard sample of titanium dioxide with NIST certificate is used, which indicates a purity of 99.74% for the TiO 2 . The following way is recommended to proceed: a)To make an analysis by means of X-ray diffraction technique to the sample of titanium dioxide pigment and on the standard of titanium dioxide waiting not find differences. b) To make a chemical analysis by the X-ray Dispersive Energy Spectroscopy via in a microscope, taking advantage of the high vacuum since it is oxygen which is analysed and if it is concluded that the aluminium oxide appears in a greater proportion to 1% it is established that is a titanium dioxide pigment, but if it is lesser then it will be only titanium dioxide. This type of analysis is an application of the nuclear techniques useful for the tariff classification of merchandise which is considered as of difficult recognition. (Author)

  12. Stoichiometric carbon nitride synthesized by ion beam sputtering and post nitrogen ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valizadeh, R.; Colligon, J.S.; Katardiev, I.V.; Faunce, C.A.; Donnelly, S.E.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Carbon nitride films have been deposited on Si (100) by ion beam sputtering a vitreous graphite target with nitrogen and argon ions with and without concurrent N2 ion bombardment at room temperature. The sputtering beam energy was 1000 eV and the assisted beam energy was 300 eV with ion / atom arrival ratio ranging from 0.5 to 5. The carbon nitride films were deposited both as single layer directly on silicon substrate and as multilayer between two layers of stoichiometric amorphous silicon nitride and polycrystalline titanium nitride. The deposited films were implanted ex-situ with 30 keV nitrogen ions with various doses ranging from 1E17 to 4E17 ions.cm -2 and 2 GeV xenon ion with a dose of 1E12 ions.cm -2 . The nitrogen concentration of the films was measured with Rutherford Backscattering (RBS), Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry (SNMS) and Parallel Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (PEELS). The nitrogen concentration for as deposited sample was 34 at% and stoichiometric carbon nitride C 3 N 4 was achieved by post nitrogen implantation of the multi-layered films. Post bombardment of single layer carbon nitride films lead to reduction in the total nitrogen concentration. Carbon K edge structure obtained from PEELS analysis suggested that the amorphous C 3 N 4 matrix was predominantly sp 2 bonded. This was confirmed by Fourier Transforrn Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the single CN layer which showed the nitrogen was mostly bonded with carbon in nitrile (C≡N) and imine (C=N) groups. The microstructure of the film was determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) which indicated that the films were amorphous

  13. Reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porz, F.

    1982-10-01

    Reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) has been characterized. The oxidation behaviour in air up to 1500 0 C and 3000 h and the effects of static and cyclic oxidation on room-temperature strength have been studied. (orig./IHOE) [de

  14. Electrowinning molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available the Manufacturing and Materials Industry in it quest for global competitiveness CSIR Manufacturing and Materials Technology 3 Rationale – Titanium Cost Build-up Material Cost Ilmenite $0.27/kg Ti sponge Titanium slag $0.75/kg Ti Sponge TiCl4 and TiO2 $3....10/kg Ti Sponge Ti Sponge raw materials costs $5.50/kg Ti Sponge Total Ti Sponge cost $9-$11/kg Ti Sponge Ti ingot $15-17/kg Ti Aluminium $1.7/kg Al Supporting the Manufacturing and Materials Industry in its quest for global competitivenessorting...

  15. Evaluation and silicon nitride internal combustion engine components. Final report, Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voldrich, W. [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Torrance, CA (United States). Garrett Ceramic Components Div.

    1992-04-01

    The feasibility of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) use in internal combustion engines was studied by testing three different components for wear resistance and lower reciprocating mass. The information obtained from these preliminary spin rig and engine tests indicates several design changes are necessary to survive high-stress engine applications. The three silicon nitride components tested were valve spring retainers, tappet rollers, and fuel pump push rod ends. Garrett Ceramic Components` gas-pressure sinterable Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (GS-44) was used to fabricate the above components. Components were final machined from densified blanks that had been green formed by isostatic pressing of GS-44 granules. Spin rig testing of the valve spring retainers indicated that these Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} components could survive at high RPM levels (9,500) when teamed with silicon nitride valves and lower spring tension than standard titanium components. Silicon nitride tappet rollers showed no wear on roller O.D. or I.D. surfaces, steel axles and lifters; however, due to the uncrowned design of these particular rollers the cam lobes indicated wear after spin rig testing. Fuel pump push rod ends were successful at reducing wear on the cam lobe and rod end when tested on spin rigs and in real-world race applications.

  16. Chitosan patterning on titanium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Gilabert Chirivella, Eduardo; Pérez Feito, Ricardo; Ribeiro, Clarisse; Ribeiro, Sylvie; Correia, Daniela; González Martin, María Luisa; Manero Planella, José María; Lanceros Méndez, Senentxu; Gallego Ferrer, Gloria; Gómez Ribelles, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are widely used in medical implants because of their excellent properties. However, bacterial infection is a frequent cause of titanium-based implant failure and also compromises its osseointegration. In this study, we report a new simple method of providing titanium surfaces with antibacterial properties by alternating antibacterial chitosan domains with titanium domains in the micrometric scale. Surface microgrooves were etched on pure titanium disks at i...

  17. III-nitride integration on ferroelectric materials of lithium niobate by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namkoong, Gon; Lee, Kyoung-Keun; Madison, Shannon M.; Henderson, Walter; Ralph, Stephen E.; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2005-01-01

    Integration of III-nitride electrical devices on the ferroelectric material lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) has been demonstrated. As a ferroelectric material, lithium niobate has a polarization which may provide excellent control of the polarity of III-nitrides. However, while high temperature, 1000 deg. C, thermal treatments produce atomically smooth surfaces, improving adhesion of GaN epitaxial layers on lithium niobate, repolarization of the substrate in local domains occurs. These effects result in multi domains of mixed polarization in LiNbO 3 , producing inversion domains in subsequent GaN epilayers. However, it is found that AlN buffer layers suppress inversion domains of III-nitrides. Therefore, two-dimensional electron gases in AlGaN/GaN heterojunction structures are obtained. Herein, the demonstration of the monolithic integration of high power devices with ferroelectric materials presents possibilities to control LiNbO 3 modulators on compact optoelectronic/electronic chips

  18. Production of titanium tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perillo, P.M.; Botbol, O.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a summary of results from theoperation of a laboratory scale for the production in batches of approximately 100 gs of titanium tetrachloride by chlorination with chloroform and carbon tetrachloride between 340 deg C and 540 deg C. Chlorination agent vapors were passed through a quartz column reacting with titanium oxide powder agglomerated in little spheres. Obtained titanium tetrachloride was condensed in a condenser, taken in a ballon and then purified by fractional distillation. Optimun temperature for chloroform was 400 deg C with 74 % yield and for carbon tetrachloride was 500 deg C with 69 % yield. (Author) [es

  19. Surface modification of the titanium implant using TEA CO2 laser pulses in controllable gas atmospheres - Comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciganovic, J.; Stasic, J.; Gakovic, B.; Momcilovic, M.; Milovanovic, D.; Bokorov, M.; Trtica, M.

    2012-01-01

    Interaction of a TEA CO 2 laser, operating at 10.6 μm wavelength and pulse duration of 100 ns (FWHM), with a titanium implant in various gas atmospheres was studied. The Ti implant surface modification was typically studied at the moderate laser beam energy density/fluence of 28 J/cm 2 in the surrounding of air, N 2 , O 2 or He. The energy absorbed from the TEA CO 2 laser beam is partially converted to thermal energy, which generates a series of effects, such as melting, vaporization of the molten material, shock waves, etc. The following titanium implant surface changes and phenomena were observed, depending on the gas used: (i) creation of cone-like surface structures in the atmospheres of air, N 2 and O 2 , and dominant micro-holes/pores in He ambient; (ii) hydrodynamic features, most prominent in air; (iii) formation of titanium nitride and titanium oxide layers, and (iv) occurrence of plasma in front of the implant. It can be concluded from this study that the reported laser fluence and gas ambiences can effectively be applied for enhancing the titanium implant roughness and creation of titanium oxides and nitrides on the strictly localized surface area. The appearance of plasma in front of the implants indicates relatively high temperatures created above the surface. This offers a sterilizing effect, facilitating contaminant-free conditions.

  20. Surface modification of the titanium implant using TEA CO{sub 2} laser pulses in controllable gas atmospheres - Comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciganovic, J.; Stasic, J.; Gakovic, B.; Momcilovic, M.; Milovanovic, D. [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. BOX 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Bokorov, M. [Faculty of Sciences, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 3, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Trtica, M., E-mail: etrtica@vinca.rs [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. BOX 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2012-01-15

    Interaction of a TEA CO{sub 2} laser, operating at 10.6 {mu}m wavelength and pulse duration of 100 ns (FWHM), with a titanium implant in various gas atmospheres was studied. The Ti implant surface modification was typically studied at the moderate laser beam energy density/fluence of 28 J/cm{sup 2} in the surrounding of air, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} or He. The energy absorbed from the TEA CO{sub 2} laser beam is partially converted to thermal energy, which generates a series of effects, such as melting, vaporization of the molten material, shock waves, etc. The following titanium implant surface changes and phenomena were observed, depending on the gas used: (i) creation of cone-like surface structures in the atmospheres of air, N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}, and dominant micro-holes/pores in He ambient; (ii) hydrodynamic features, most prominent in air; (iii) formation of titanium nitride and titanium oxide layers, and (iv) occurrence of plasma in front of the implant. It can be concluded from this study that the reported laser fluence and gas ambiences can effectively be applied for enhancing the titanium implant roughness and creation of titanium oxides and nitrides on the strictly localized surface area. The appearance of plasma in front of the implants indicates relatively high temperatures created above the surface. This offers a sterilizing effect, facilitating contaminant-free conditions.

  1. Ion nitridation - physical and technological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbern, A.W.

    1980-01-01

    Ion nitridation, is a technique which allows the formation of a controlled thickness of nitrides in the surface of the material, using this material as the cathode in a low pressure glow discharge, which presents many advantages over the conventional method. A brief review of the ion nitriding technique, the physical fenomena involved, and we discuss technological aspects of this method, are presented. (Author) [pt

  2. Silicon nitride-fabrication, forming and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yehezkel, O.

    1983-01-01

    This article, which is a literature survey of the recent years, includes description of several methods for the formation of silicone nitride, and five methods of forming: Reaction-bonded silicon nitride, sintering, hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing and chemical vapour deposition. Herein are also included data about mechanical and physical properties of silicon nitride and the relationship between the forming method and the properties. (author)

  3. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  4. Suppressed Belief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komarine Romdenh-Romluc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Moran’s revised conception of conscious belief requires us to reconceptualise suppressed belief. The work of Merleau-Ponty offers a way to do this. His account of motor-skills allows us to understand suppressed beliefs as pre-reflective ways of dealing with the world.

  5. Titanium oxide fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jonge, D.; Visser, J.

    2012-01-01

    One measure to improve air quality is to apply photo-catalytic substances that capture NOx onto the road surface or onto baffle boards alongside the roads. The effect of titanium oxide containing clinkers with coating was discussed in the report 'Demonstration project of air-purifying pavement in Hengelo, The Netherlands' that was published in May 2011. This article examines the way in which the effectiveness of this study was determined. Can titanium oxide containing clinkers and coatings indeed capture NOx?. [nl

  6. Machining of titanium alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a collection of examples illustrating the resent research advances in the machining of titanium alloys. These materials have excellent strength and fracture toughness as well as low density and good corrosion resistance; however, machinability is still poor due to their low thermal conductivity and high chemical reactivity with cutting tool materials. This book presents solutions to enhance machinability in titanium-based alloys and serves as a useful reference to professionals and researchers in aerospace, automotive and biomedical fields.

  7. Topotactic synthesis of vanadium nitride solid foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, S.T.; Kapoor, R.; Oyama, H.T.; Hofmann, D.J.; Matijevic, E.

    1993-01-01

    Vanadium nitride has been synthesized with a surface area of 120 m 2 g -1 by temperature programmed nitridation of a foam-like vanadium oxide (35 m 2 g -1 ), precipitated from vanadate solutions. The nitridation reaction was established to be topotactic and pseudomorphous by x-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The crystallographic relationship between the nitride and oxide was {200}//{001}. The effect of precursor geometry on the product size and shape was investigated by employing vanadium oxide solids of different morphologies

  8. Microhardness and microplasticity of zirconium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neshpor, V.S.; Eron'yan, M.A.; Petrov, A.N.; Kravchik, A.E.

    1978-01-01

    To experimentally check the concentration dependence of microhardness of 4 group nitrides, microhardness of zirconium nitride compact samples was measured. The samples were obtained either by bulk saturation of zirconium iodide plates or by chemical precipitation from gas. As nitrogen content decreased within the limits of homogeneity of zirconium nitride samples where the concentration of admixed oxygen was low, the microhardness grew from 1500+-100 kg/mm 2 for ZrNsub(1.0) to 27000+-100 kg/mm 2 for ZrNsub(0.78). Microplasticity of zirconium nitride (resistance to fracture) decreased, as the concentration of nitrogen vacancies was growing

  9. Surface Functionalization of Orthopedic Titanium Implants with Bone Sialoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Baranowski

    Full Text Available Orthopedic implant failure due to aseptic loosening and mechanical instability remains a major problem in total joint replacement. Improving osseointegration at the bone-implant interface may reduce micromotion and loosening. Bone sialoprotein (BSP has been shown to enhance bone formation when coated onto titanium femoral implants and in rat calvarial defect models. However, the most appropriate method of BSP coating, the necessary level of BSP coating, and the effect of BSP coating on cell behavior remain largely unknown. In this study, BSP was covalently coupled to titanium surfaces via an aminosilane linker (APTES, and its properties were compared to BSP applied to titanium via physisorption and untreated titanium. Cell functions were examined using primary human osteoblasts (hOBs and L929 mouse fibroblasts. Gene expression of specific bone turnover markers at the RNA level was detected at different intervals. Cell adhesion to titanium surfaces treated with BSP via physisorption was not significantly different from that of untreated titanium at any time point, whereas BSP application via covalent coupling caused reduced cell adhesion during the first few hours in culture. Cell migration was increased on titanium disks that were treated with higher concentrations of BSP solution, independent of the coating method. During the early phases of hOB proliferation, a suppressive effect of BSP was observed independent of its concentration, particularly when BSP was applied to the titanium surface via physisorption. Although alkaline phosphatase activity was reduced in the BSP-coated titanium groups after 4 days in culture, increased calcium deposition was observed after 21 days. In particular, the gene expression level of RUNX2 was upregulated by BSP. The increase in calcium deposition and the stimulation of cell differentiation induced by BSP highlight its potential as a surface modifier that could enhance the osseointegration of orthopedic implants

  10. Spectra of soft X-ray excitation potentials of titanium and vanadium compounds with carbon and nitrogen of a variable composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brytov, I.A.; Bleher, B. Eh.; Neshpor, V.S.

    1979-01-01

    Lsub(3,2) spectra of excitation potentials (SEP) of a soft X-ray radiation of titanium and vanadium carbides and titanium nitrides in their homogeneity range, as well as solid solutions of nitrogen in α-titanium, are studied. The binding energies of electrons of the exciting levels relatively to the Fermi level are determined, adequacy of different quantomechanical calculations is experimentally proved. The observed changes in SEP at the variation of the metalloid concentration are explained by a quantitative transformation model of valent state energetic spectra when metalloid vacancies and connected with them local levels form

  11. Plasma-spray synthesis and characterization of ti-based nitride and oxide nanogranules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antipas, Georgios S.E., E-mail: gantipas@metal.ntua.gr [School of Mining Engineering and Metallurgy, National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2014-09-15

    The synthesis of nanosized Ti-based nanogranules via plasma spraying is reported. The synthesis route involved use of both nitrogen and oxygen gases with varying results. In the case of nitrogen, a mixture of titanium nitrides were produced, yielding both the Ti2N and the sub-stoichiometric TiN0.61 compounds. In the case of oxygen, both the stoichiometric rutile and TiO ceramic phases were indexed. Based on EDS analysis, even fractional oxygen concentrations caused tungsten impurities which originated from the cathode electrode. The method yielded particle mass median sizes of the order of 15nm and the smallest particles detected were 5nm. (author)

  12. Titanium by design: TRIP titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Jamie

    Motivated by the prospect of lower cost Ti production processes, new directions in Ti alloy design were explored for naval and automotive applications. Building on the experience of the Steel Research Group at Northwestern University, an analogous design process was taken with titanium. As a new project, essential kinetic databases and models were developed for the design process and used to create a prototype design. Diffusion kinetic models were developed to predict the change in phase compositions and microstructure during heat treatment. Combining a mobility database created in this research with a licensed thermodynamic database, ThermoCalc and DICTRA software was used to model kinetic compositional changes in titanium alloys. Experimental diffusion couples were created and compared to DICTRA simulations to refine mobility parameters in the titanium mobility database. The software and database were able to predict homogenization times and the beta→alpha plate thickening kinetics during cooling in the near-alpha Ti5111 alloy. The results of these models were compared to LEAP microanalysis and found to be in reasonable agreement. Powder metallurgy was explored using SPS at GM R&D to reduce the cost of titanium alloys. Fully dense Ti5111 alloys were produced and achieved similar microstructures to wrought Ti5111. High levels of oxygen in these alloys increased the strength while reducing the ductility. Preliminary Ti5111+Y alloys were created, where yttrium additions successfully gettered excess oxygen to create oxides. However, undesirable large oxides formed, indicating more research is needed into the homogeneous distribution of the yttrium powder to create finer oxides. Principles established in steels were used to optimize the beta phase transformation stability for martensite transformation toughening in titanium alloys. The Olson-Cohen kinetic model is calibrated to shear strains in titanium. A frictional work database is established for common alloying

  13. Nitride alloy layer formation of duplex stainless steel using nitriding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleque, M. A.; Lailatul, P. H.; Fathaen, A. A.; Norinsan, K.; Haider, J.

    2018-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) shows a good corrosion resistance as well as the mechanical properties. However, DSS performance decrease as it works under aggressive environment and at high temperature. At the mentioned environment, the DSS become susceptible to wear failure. Surface modification is the favourable technique to widen the application of duplex stainless steel and improve the wear resistance and its hardness properties. Therefore, the main aim of this work is to nitride alloy layer on the surface of duplex stainless steel by the nitriding process temperature of 400°C and 450°C at different time and ammonia composition using a horizontal tube furnace. The scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analyzer are used to analyse the morphology, composition and the nitrided alloy layer for treated DSS. The micro hardnesss Vickers tester was used to measure hardness on cross-sectional area of nitrided DSS. After nitriding, it was observed that the hardness performance increased until 1100 Hv0.5kgf compared to substrate material of 250 Hv0.5kgf. The thickness layer of nitride alloy also increased from 5μm until 100μm due to diffusion of nitrogen on the surface of DSS. The x-ray diffraction results showed that the nitride layer consists of iron nitride, expanded austenite and chromium nitride. It can be concluded that nitride alloy layer can be produced via nitriding process using tube furnace with significant improvement of microstructural and hardness properties.

  14. Sustainable carbothermal reduction and nitridation of Malaysian ilmenite by polyethylene terephthalate and coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Eltefat; Hamid, Sheikh Abdul Rezan Sheikh Abdul; Hussin, Hashim; Baharun, Norlia; Ariffin, Kamar Shah; Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar; Fauzi, M. N. Ahmad; Ismail, Hanafi

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the carbothermal reduction and nitridation (CTRN) of Malaysian ilmenite has been studied as a part of crucial steps involved in reduction and subsequent chlorination processes for synthesizing titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) from nitrided Malaysian ilmenite concentrates. In CTRN, waste plastics such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) could be utilized as an alternative source of carbon reductant. In this study, titanium oxycarbonitride (TiOxCyNz) separated from iron (Fe) phase was synthesized by non-isothermal CTRN of Malaysian ilmenite under H2-N2 atmosphere by utilizing a mixture of Sarawak Mukah-Balingan coal and PET as reducing agents in a horizontal tube furnace. Experiments have been carried out in the temperature range of 1150-1250°C for 3 hours with various ratios of PET to coal (25 wt.% PET, 50 wt.% PET, and 75 wt.% PET). X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) methods of analysis were conducted to assess the microstructures and chemical compositions of the unreduced and reduced samples. The results indicated that utilizing PET had a significant effect on iron separation from titanium oxycarbonitride (TiO0.02C0.13N0.85) at 1250°C with a mixture of 75 wt.% PET. Furthermore, XRD and SEM studies demonstrated that with increasing PET weight ratio in the mixtures, the rate of conversion increased and a low-carbon TiOxCyNz with minimal intermediate titanium sub-oxides was synthesized. The method of applying PET as potential reductant for CTRN of ilmenite has beneficial side effects in sustainable recycling of waste PET.

  15. Synthesis of carbon nitride powder by selective etching of TiC0.3N0.7 in chlorine-containing atmosphere at moderate temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Jian; Lu Jinjun

    2010-01-01

    We reported the synthesis of carbon nitride powder by extracting titanium from single inorganic precursor TiC 0.3 N 0.7 in chlorine-containing atmosphere at ambient pressure and temperature not exceeding 500 deg. C. The TiC 0.3 N 0.7 crystalline structure acted as a template, supplying active carbon and nitrogen atoms for carbon nitride when it was destroyed in chlorination. X-ray diffraction data showed that the obtained carbon nitride powders were amorphous, which was in good agreement with transmission electron microscope analysis. The composition and structure of carbon nitride powders were analyzed by employing Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results indicated that disorder structure was most likely for the carbon nitride powders and the N content depended greatly on the chlorination temperature. Thermal analysis in flowing N 2 indicated that the mass loss started from 300 deg. C and the complete decomposition occurred at around 650 deg. C, confirming the low thermal stability of the carbon nitride material.

  16. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  17. Atomic Resolution Microscopy of Nitrides in Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson

    2014-01-01

    MN and CrMN type nitride precipitates in 12%Cr steels have been investigated using atomic resolution microscopy. The MN type nitrides were observed to transform into CrMN both by composition and crystallography as Cr diffuses from the matrix into the MN precipitates. Thus a change from one...

  18. Low temperature anodic bonding to silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Bouaidat, Salim

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature anodic bonding to stoichiometric silicon nitride surfaces has been performed in the temperature range from 3508C to 4008C. It is shown that the bonding is improved considerably if the nitride surfaces are either oxidized or exposed to an oxygen plasma prior to the bonding. Both bu...

  19. Fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Østergaard, Christian; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2011-01-01

    While silicon nitride surfaces are widely used in many micro electrical mechanical system devices, e.g. for chemical passivation, electrical isolation or environmental protection, studies on fusion bonding of two silicon nitride surfaces (Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding) are very few and highly application...

  20. Macrophage proinflammatory response to the titanium alloy equipment in dental implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Li, H S; Yin, Y; Feng, Y; Tan, X W

    2015-08-07

    Titanium alloy and stainless steel (SS) had been widely used as dental implant materials because of their affinity with epithelial tissue and connective tissue, and good physical, chemical, biological, mechanical properties and processability. We compared the effects of titanium alloy and SS on macrophage cytokine expression as well as their biocompatibility. Mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells were cultured on titanium alloy and SS surfaces. Cells were counted by scanning electron microscopy. A nitride oxide kit was used to detect released nitric oxide by macrophages on the different materials. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels. Scanning electron microscopy revealed fewer macrophages on the surface of titanium alloy (48.2 ± 6.4 x 10(3) cells/cm(2)) than on SS (135 ± 7.3 x 10(3) cells/cm(2)). The nitric oxide content stimulated by titanium alloy was 22.5 mM, which was lower than that stimulated by SS (26.8 mM), but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.07). The level of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 released was significantly higher in the SS group (OD value = 0.128) than in the titanium alloy group (OD value = 0.081) (P = 0.024). The transforming growth factor-b1 mRNA expression levels in macrophages after stimulation by titanium alloy for 12 and 36 h were significantly higher than that after stimulation by SS (P = 0.31 and 0.25, respectively). Macrophages participate in the inflammatory response by regulating cytokines such as nitric oxide, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and transforming growth factor-b1. There were fewer macrophages and lower inflammation on the titanium alloy surface than on the SS surface. Titanium alloy materials exhibited better biological compatibility than did SS.

  1. Alloy Effects on the Gas Nitriding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M.; Sisson, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Alloy elements, such as Al, Cr, V, and Mo, have been used to improve the nitriding performance of steels. In the present work, plain carbon steel AISI 1045 and alloy steel AISI 4140 were selected to compare the nitriding effects of the alloying elements in AISI 4140. Fundamental analysis is carried out by using the "Lehrer-like" diagrams (alloy specific Lehrer diagram and nitriding potential versus nitrogen concentration diagram) and the compound layer growth model to simulate the gas nitriding process. With this method, the fundamental understanding for the alloy effect based on the thermodynamics and kinetics becomes possible. This new method paves the way for the development of new alloy for nitriding.

  2. Selective layer disordering in III-nitrides with a capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2016-06-14

    Selective layer disordering in a doped III-nitride superlattice can be achieved by depositing a dielectric capping layer on a portion of the surface of the superlattice and annealing the superlattice to induce disorder of the layer interfaces under the uncapped portion and suppress disorder of the interfaces under the capped portion. The method can be used to create devices, such as optical waveguides, light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, solar cells, modulators, laser, and amplifiers.

  3. Titanium metal: extraction to application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambogi, Joseph (USGS, Reston, VA); Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2002-09-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

  4. Industrial experience with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, B.M.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1997-09-01

    Titanium is a reference material for the construction of waste containers in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. It has been in industrial service for over 30 a, often in severe corrosion environments, but it is still considered a relatively exotic material with limited operating history. This has arisen because of the aerospace applications of this material and the misconception that the high strength-to-weight ratio dominates the choice of this material. In fact, the advantage of titanium lies in its high reliability and excellent corrosion resistance. It has a proven record in seawater heat exchanger service and a demonstrated excellent reliability even in polluted water. For many reasons it is the technically correct choice of material for marine applications. In this report we review the industrial service history of titanium, particularly in hot saline environments, and demonstrate that it is a viable waste container material, based upon this industrial service history and operating experience. (author)

  5. Physical and Chemical Properties of TiOxNy Prepared by Low-Temperature Oxidation of Ultrathin Metal Nitride Directly Deposited on SiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yue-Ping; HAN Yan

    2009-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of titanium oxynitride (TiOxNy) formed by low-temperature oxidation of titanium nitride (TIN) layer are investigated for advanced metal-oxide--semiconductor (MOS) gate dielectric application.TiOx Ny exhibits polycrystalline properties after the standard thermal process for MOS device fabrication,showing the preferred orientation at [200].Superior electrical properties of TiOxNy can be maintained before and after the annealing,probably due to the nitrogen incorporation in the oxide bulk and at the interface.Naturally formed transition layer between TiOxNy and SiO2 is also confirmed.

  6. Solvothermal synthesis: a new route for preparing nitrides

    CERN Document Server

    Demazeau, G; Denis, A; Largeteau, A

    2002-01-01

    Solvothermal synthesis appears to be an interesting route for preparing nitrides such as gallium nitride and aluminium nitride, using ammonia as solvent. A nitriding additive is used to perform the reaction and, in the case of gallium nitride, is encapsulated by melt gallium. The syntheses are performed in the temperature range 400-800 deg. C and in the pressure range 100-200 MPa. The synthesized powders are characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Finely divided gallium nitride GaN and aluminium nitride AlN, both with wurtzite-type structure, can be obtained by this route.

  7. Surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautray, Tapash R; Narayanan, R; Kwon, Tae-Yub; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2010-05-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical devices and components, especially as hard tissue replacements as well as in cardiac and cardiovascular applications, because of their desirable properties, such as relatively low modulus, good fatigue strength, formability, machinability, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. However, titanium and its alloys cannot meet all of the clinical requirements. Therefore, to improve the biological, chemical, and mechanical properties, surface modification is often performed. In view of this, the current review casts new light on surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion beam implantation. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Surface Roughness and Tool Wear on Cryogenic Treated CBN Insert on Titanium and Inconel 718 Alloy Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thamizhmanii, S; Mohideen, R; Zaidi, A M A; Hasan, S

    2015-01-01

    Machining of materials by super hard tools like cubic boron nitride (cbn) and poly cubic boron nitride (pcbn) is to reduce tool wear to obtain dimensional accuracy, smooth surface and more number of parts per cutting edge. wear of tools is inevitable due to rubbing action between work material and tool edge. however, the tool wear can be minimized by using super hard tools by enhancing the strength of the cutting inserts. one such process is cryogenic process. this process is used in all materials and cutting inserts which requires wear resistance. the cryogenic process is executed under subzero temperature -186° celsius for longer period of time in a closed chamber which contains liquid nitrogen. in this research, cbn inserts with cryogenically treated was used to turn difficult to cut metals like titanium, inconel 718 etc. the turning parameters used is different cutting speeds, feed rates and depth of cut. in this research, titanium and inconel 718 material were used. the results obtained are surface roughness, flank wear and crater wear. the surface roughness obtained on titanium was lower at high cutting speed compared with inconel 718. the flank wear was low while turning titanium than inconel 718. crater wear is less on inconel 718 than titanium alloy. all the two materials produced saw tooth chips. (paper)

  9. Cathodoluminescence of cubic boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, V.D.; Shipilo, V.B.; Zajtsev, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    Three optically active defects are detected in mono- and polycrystal cubic boron nitride (β-BN). Analysis of intensity of temperature dependences, halfwidth and energy shift of 1.76 eV narrow phononless line (center GC-1) makes it possible to interprete the observed cathodoluminescence spectra an optical analog of the Moessbaner effect. Comparison of the obtained results with the known data for diamond monocrystals makes it possible to suggest that the detected center GC-1 is a nitrogen vacancy . The conclusion, concerning the Moessbauer optical spectra application, is made to analyze structural perfection of β-BN crystal lattice

  10. Surface analysis in steel nitrides by using Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, R.S. de.

    1991-07-01

    The formation of iron nitride layer at low temperatures, 600-700 K, by Moessbauer spectroscopy is studied. These layers were obtained basically through two different processes: ion nitriding and ammonia gas nitriding. A preliminary study about post-discharge nitriding was made using discharge in hollow cathode as well as microwave excitation. The assembly of these chambers is also described. The analysis of the nitrided samples was done by CEMS and CXMS, aided by optical microscopy, and the CEMS and CXMS detectors were constructed by ourselves. We also made a brief study about these detectors, testing as acetone as the mixture 80% He+10% C H 4 as detection gases for the use of CEMS. The surface analysis of the samples showed that in the ammonia gas process nitriding the nitrided layer starts by the superficial formation of an iron nitride rich nitrogen. By thermal evolution this nitride promotes the diffusion of nitrogen and the formation of other more stable nitrides. (author)

  11. Simple process to fabricate nitride alloy powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Keon Sik; Rhee, Young Woo; Oh, Jang-Soo; Kim, Jong Hun; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Uranium mono-nitride (UN) is considered as a fuel material [1] for accident-tolerant fuel to compensate for the loss of fissile fuel material caused by adopting a thickened cladding such as SiC composites. Uranium nitride powders can be fabricated by a carbothermic reduction of the oxide powders, or the nitriding of metal uranium. Among them, a direct nitriding process of metal is more attractive because it has advantages in the mass production of high-purity powders and the reusing of expensive 15 N 2 gas. However, since metal uranium is usually fabricated in the form of bulk ingots, it has a drawback in the fabrication of fine powders. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has a centrifugal atomisation technique to fabricate uranium and uranium alloy powders. In this study, a simple reaction method was tested to fabricate nitride fuel powders directly from uranium metal alloy powders. Spherical powder and flake of uranium metal alloys were fabricated using a centrifugal atomisation method. The nitride powders were obtained by thermal treating the metal particles under nitrogen containing gas. The phase and morphology evolutions of powders were investigated during the nitriding process. A phase analysis of nitride powders was also part of the present work. KAERI has developed the centrifugal rotating disk atomisation process to fabricate spherical uranium metal alloy powders which are used as advanced fuel materials for research reactors. The rotating disk atomisation system involves the tasks of melting, atomising, and collecting. A nozzle in the bottom of melting crucible introduces melt at the center of a spinning disk. The centrifugal force carries the melt to the edge of the disk and throws the melt off the edge. Size and shape of droplets can be controlled by changing the nozzle size, the disk diameter and disk speed independently or simultaneously. By adjusting the processing parameters of the centrifugal atomiser, a spherical and flake shape

  12. Thermogravimetric experiments with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, L.J.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1991-02-01

    In the process of preparing for pyrophoricity experiments involving uranium, we conducted hydriding and air-exposure experiments on titanium. In these experiments the hydriding reactions and response to air-exposure was generally within the range expected based on work reported by others. One aberrant behavior was a sudden weight gain followed by a significant weight loss. We speculate that loss may be due to hydrogen evolution from the TiH 2 resulting from local heating by oxidation reactions. We verified that titanium is not pyrophoric at temperatures less than 750 degree C. 18 refs. 1 fig

  13. Microstructural Characterization of Low Temperature Gas Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present work presents microstructural investigations of the surface zone of low temperature gas nitrided precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel AISI 630. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate the present phases after successive removal of very thin sections...... of the sample surface. The development of epsilon nitride, expanded austenite and expanded martensite resulted from the low temperature nitriding treatments. The microstructural features, hardness and phase composition are discussed with emphasis on the influence of nitriding duration and nitriding potential....

  14. Process for the production of metal nitride sintered bodies and resultant silicon nitride and aluminum nitride sintered bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, S.; Omori, M.; Hayashi, J.; Kayano, H.; Hamano, M.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the manufacture of metal nitride sintered bodies, in particular, a process in which a mixture of metal nitrite powders is shaped and heated together with a binding agent is described. Of the metal nitrides Si3N4 and AIN were used especially frequently because of their excellent properties at high temperatures. The goal is to produce a process for metal nitride sintered bodies with high strength, high corrosion resistance, thermal shock resistance, thermal shock resistance, and avoidance of previously known faults.

  15. Interocular suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Ana Rita; Almeida Neves Carrega, Filipa; Nunes, Amélia Fernandes

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this work is to quantify the suppressive imbalance, based on the manipulation of ocular luminance, between a group of subjects with normal binocular vision and a group of subjects with amblyopia. The result reveals that there are statistically significant differences in interocular dominance between two groups, evidencing a greater suppressive imbalance in amblyopic subjects. The technique used, proved to be a simple, easy to apply and economic method, for quantified ocular dominance. It is presented as a technique with the potential to accompany subjects with a marked dominance in one of the eyes that makes fusion difficult.

  16. New Routes to Lanthanide and Actinide Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, D.P.; Jaques, B.J.; Osterberg, D.D. [Boise State University, 1910 University Dr., Boise, Idaho 83725-2075 (United States); Marx, B.M. [Concurrent Technologies Corporation, Johnstown, PA (United States); Callahan, P.G. [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hamdy, A.S. [Central Metallurgical R and D Institute, Helwan, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-06-15

    The future of nuclear energy in the U.S. and its expansion worldwide depends greatly on our ability to reduce the levels of high level waste to minimal levels, while maintaining proliferation resistance. Implicit in the so-called advanced fuel cycle is the need for higher levels of fuel burn-up and consequential use of complex nuclear fuels comprised of fissile materials such as Pu, Am, Np, and Cm. Advanced nitride fuels comprised ternary and quaternary mixtures of uranium and these actinides have been considered for applications in advanced power plants, but there remain many processing challenges as well as necessary qualification testing. In this presentation, the advantages and disadvantages of nitride fuels are discussed. Methods of synthesizing the raw materials and sintering of fuels are described including a discussion of novel, low cost routes to nitrides that have the potential for reducing the cost and footprint of a fuel processing plant. Phase pure nitrides were synthesized via four primary methods; reactive milling metal flakes in nitrogen at room temperature, directly nitriding metal flakes in a pure nitrogen atmosphere, hydriding metal flakes prior to nitridation, and carbo-thermically reducing the metal oxide and carbon mixture prior to nitridation. In the present study, the sintering of UN, DyN, and their solid solutions (U{sub x}, Dy{sub 1-x}) (x = 1 to 0.7) were also studied. (authors)

  17. Titanium and zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard Legry, G.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium and zirconium pure and base alloys are protected by an oxide film with anionic vacancies which gives a very good resistance to corrosion in oxidizing medium, in some ph ranges. Results of pitting and crevice corrosion are given for Cl - , Br - , I - ions concentration with temperature and ph dependence, also with oxygenated ions effect. (A.B.). 32 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Low-Temperature Nitriding of Deformed Austenitic Stainless Steels with Various Nitrogen Contents Obtained by Prior High-Temperature Solution Nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, high nitrogen steels (HNS) have been regarded as substitutes for conventional austenitic stainless steels because of their superior mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the main limitation to their wider application is their expensive production process....... As an alternative, high-temperature solution nitriding has been applied to produce HNS from three commercially available stainless steel grades (AISI 304L, AISI 316, and EN 1.4369). The nitrogen content in each steel alloy is varied and its influence on the mechanical properties and the stability of the austenite...... investigated. Both hardness and yield stress increase and the alloys remain ductile. In addition, strain-induced transformation of austenite to martensite is suppressed, which is beneficial for subsequent low-temperature nitriding of the surface of deformed alloys. The combination of high- and low...

  19. Preparation of aluminum nitride-silicon carbide nanocomposite powder by the nitridation of aluminum silicon carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itatani, K.; Tsukamoto, R.; Delsing, A.C.A.; Hintzen, H.T.J.M.; Okada, I.

    2002-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN)-silicon carbide (SiC) nanocomposite powders were prepared by the nitridation of aluminum-silicon carbide (Al4SiC4) with the specific surface area of 15.5 m2·g-1. The powders nitrided at and above 1400°C for 3 h contained the 2H-phases which consisted of AlN-rich and SiC-rich

  20. Residual Stress Induced by Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The present chapter is devoted to the various mechanisms involved in the buildup and relief of residual stress in nitrided and nitrocarburized cases. The work presented is an overview of model studies on iron and iron-based alloys. Subdivision is made between the compound (or white) layer......, developing at the surfce and consisting of iron-based (carbo)nitrides, and the diffusion zone underneath, consisting of iron and alloying element nitrides dispersed in af ferritic matrix. Microstructural features are related directly to the origins of stress buildup and stres relief....

  1. Ion implantation and annealing studies in III-V nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolper, J.C.; Pearton, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    Ion implantation doping and isolation is expected to play an enabling role for the realization of advanced III-Nitride based devices. In fact, implantation has already been used to demonstrate n- and p-type doping of GaN with Si and Mg or Ca, respectively, as well as to fabricate the first GaN junction field effect transistor. Although these initial implantation studies demonstrated the feasibility of this technique for the III-Nitride materials, further work is needed to realize its full potential. After reviewing some of the initial studies in this field, the authors present new results for improved annealing sequences and defect studies in GaN. First, sputtered AlN is shown by electrical characterization of Schottky and Ohmic contacts to be an effect encapsulant of GaN during the 1,100 C implant activation anneal. The AlN suppresses N-loss from the GaN surface and the formation of a degenerate n + -surface region that would prohibit Schottky barrier formation after the implant activation anneal. Second, they examine the nature of the defect generation and annealing sequence following implantation using both Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) and Hall characterization. They show that for a Si-dose of 1 x 10 16 cm -2 50% electrical donor activation is achieved despite a significant amount of residual implantation-induced damage in the material

  2. Pulse-radiolytic investigation of the reduction of titanium(III) ions in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micic, O.I.; Nenadovic, M.T.

    1979-01-01

    The absorption spectrum and decay kinetics of intermediates formed by the reaction of titanium(III) ions with H atoms, hydrated electrons, and carboxyl radicals have been studied in aqueous solution using the pulse-radiolysis technique. The product of the reaction with H atoms in acid solution is a Ti 3+ -H hydride intermediate which decomposes by a first-order process with a half-life of ca. 3 s. Titanium(II) is formed by reaction with hydrated electrons and CO 2 H radicals. The absorption spectrum of titanium(II) and the kinetics of its reactions are reported and discussed. The formation of molecular hydrogen by reaction of Ti 2+ with water is suppressed by the other solutes in the solutions. Titanium(III) reacts with CO 2 H, CH 2 CO 2 H, and CH(CO 2 H) 2 radicals to give titanium-radical complexes. (author)

  3. Dependence of fracture toughness of molybdenum laser welds on dendritic spacing and in situ titanium additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jellison, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The fracture toughness of molybdenum welds has been improved by in situ gettering of oxygen by means of physically deposited titanium. The addition of titanium suppressed brittle intergranular fracture. Pulsed laser welds (both Nd:YAG and CO 2 ) exhibited superior toughness to that of continuous wave CO 2 laser welds. Also, welds of vacuum arc remelted grades were tougher than those of sintered molybdenum. However, weld toughness could not be correlated with either oxygen or carbon content

  4. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1999-01-01

    As a prerequisite for predictability of properties obtained by a nitriding treatment of iron-based workpieces, the relation between the process parameters and the composition and structure of the surface layer produced must be known. At present (even) the description of thermodynamic equilibrium...... of pure iron-nitrogen phases has not been achieved fully. It has been shown that taking into account ordering of nitrogen in the epsilon and gamma' iron-nitride phases, leads to an improved understanding of the Fe-N phase diagram. Although thermodynamics indicate the state the system strives for......, the nitriding result is determined largely by the kinetics of the process. The nitriding kinetics have been shown to be characterised by the occurring local near-equilibria and stationary states at surfaces and interfaces, and the diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in the various phases, for which new data have...

  5. Impurities block the alpha to omega martensitic transformation in titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Richard G; Trinkle, Dallas R; Bouchet, Johann; Srinivasan, Srivilliputhur G; Albers, Robert C; Wilkins, John W

    2005-02-01

    Impurities control phase stability and phase transformations in natural and man-made materials, from shape-memory alloys to steel to planetary cores. Experiments and empirical databases are still central to tuning the impurity effects. What is missing is a broad theoretical underpinning. Consider, for example, the titanium martensitic transformations: diffusionless structural transformations proceeding near the speed of sound. Pure titanium transforms from ductile alpha to brittle omega at 9 GPa, creating serious technological problems for beta-stabilized titanium alloys. Impurities in the titanium alloys A-70 and Ti-6Al-4V (wt%) suppress the transformation up to at least 35 GPa, increasing their technological utility as lightweight materials in aerospace applications. These and other empirical discoveries in technological materials call for broad theoretical understanding. Impurities pose two theoretical challenges: the effect on the relative phase stability, and the energy barrier of the transformation. Ab initio methods calculate both changes due to impurities. We show that interstitial oxygen, nitrogen and carbon retard the transformation whereas substitutional aluminium and vanadium influence the transformation by changing the d-electron concentration. The resulting microscopic picture explains the suppression of the transformation in commercial A-70 and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. In general, the effect of impurities on relative energies and energy barriers is central to understanding structural phase transformations.

  6. Compressive creep of silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.R.M. da; Melo, F.C.L. de; Cairo, C.A.; Piorino Neto, F.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon nitride samples were formed by pressureless sintering process, using neodymium oxide and a mixture of neodymium oxide and yttrio oxide as sintering aids. The short term compressive creep behaviour was evaluated over a stress range of 50-300 MPa and temperature range 1200 - 1350 0 C. Post-sintering heat treatments in nitrogen with a stepwise decremental variation of temperature were performed in some samples and microstructural analysis by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed that the secondary crystalline phase which form from the remnant glass are dependent upon composition and percentage of aditives. Stress exponent values near to unity were obtained for materials with low glass content suggesting grain boundary diffusion accommodation processes. Cavitation will thereby become prevalent with increase in stress, temperature and decrease in the degree of crystallization of the grain boundary phase. (author) [pt

  7. Cathodoluminescence of cubic boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, V.D.; Shipilo, V.B.; Zaitsev, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    Three types of optically active defect were observed in single-crystal and polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (β-BN). An analysis of the temperature dependences of the intensity, half-width, and energy shift of a narrow zero-phonon line at 1.76 eV (GC-1 center) made it possible to interpret the observed cathodoluminescence spectra as an optical analog of the Moessbauer effect. A comparison of the results obtained in the present study with the available data on diamond single crystals made it possible to identify the observed GC-1 center as a nitrogen vacancy. It was concluded that optical Moessbauer-type spectra can be used to analyze structure defects in the crystal lattice of β-BN

  8. Waveguide silicon nitride grating coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvik, Jan; Dolnak, Ivan; Dado, Milan

    2016-12-01

    Grating couplers are one of the most used elements for coupling of light between optical fibers and photonic integrated components. Silicon-on-insulator platform provides strong confinement of light and allows high integration. In this work, using simulations we have designed a broadband silicon nitride surface grating coupler. The Fourier-eigenmode expansion and finite difference time domain methods are utilized in design optimization of grating coupler structure. The fully, single etch step grating coupler is based on a standard silicon-on-insulator wafer with 0.55 μm waveguide Si3N4 layer. The optimized structure at 1550 nm wavelength yields a peak coupling efficiency -2.6635 dB (54.16%) with a 1-dB bandwidth up to 80 nm. It is promising way for low-cost fabrication using complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor fabrication process.

  9. Electrochemical Solution Growth of Magnetic Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monson, Todd C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pearce, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic nitrides, if manufactured in bulk form, would provide designers of transformers and inductors with a new class of better performing and affordable soft magnetic materials. According to experimental results from thin films and/or theoretical calculations, magnetic nitrides would have magnetic moments well in excess of current state of the art soft magnets. Furthermore, magnetic nitrides would have higher resistivities than current transformer core materials and therefore not require the use of laminates of inactive material to limit eddy current losses. However, almost all of the magnetic nitrides have been elusive except in difficult to reproduce thin films or as inclusions in another material. Now, through its ability to reduce atmospheric nitrogen, the electrochemical solution growth (ESG) technique can bring highly sought after (and previously inaccessible) new magnetic nitrides into existence in bulk form. This method utilizes a molten salt as a solvent to solubilize metal cations and nitrogen ions produced electrochemically and form nitrogen compounds. Unlike other growth methods, the scalable ESG process can sustain high growth rates (~mm/hr) even under reasonable operating conditions (atmospheric pressure and 500 °C). Ultimately, this translates into a high throughput, low cost, manufacturing process. The ESG process has already been used successfully to grow high quality GaN. Below, the experimental results of an exploratory express LDRD project to access the viability of the ESG technique to grow magnetic nitrides will be presented.

  10. Nitride fuels irradiation performance data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brozak, D.E.; Thomas, J.K.; Peddicord, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    An irradiation performance data base for nitride fuels has been developed from an extensive literature search and review that emphasized uranium nitride, but also included performance data for mixed nitrides [(U,Pu)N] and carbonitrides [(U,Pu)C,N] to increase the quantity and depth of pin data available. This work represents a very extensive effort to systematically collect and organize irradiation data for nitride-based fuels. The data base has many potential applications. First, it can facilitate parametric studies of nitride-based fuels to be performed using a wide range of pin designs and operating conditions. This should aid in the identification of important parameters and design requirements for multimegawatt and SP-100 fuel systems. Secondly, the data base can be used to evaluate fuel performance models. For detailed studies, it can serve as a guide to selecting a small group of pin specimens for extensive characterization. Finally, the data base will serve as an easily accessible and expandable source of irradiation performance information for nitride fuels

  11. Laser processing of in situ TiN/Ti composite coating on titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahasrabudhe, Himanshu; Soderlind, Julie; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Laser remelting of commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) surface was done in a nitrogen rich inert atmosphere to form in situ TiN/Ti composite coating. Laser surface remelting was performed at two different laser powers of 425 W and 475 W. At each power, samples were fabricated with one or two laser scans. The resultant material was a nitride rich in situ coating that was created on the surface. The cross sections revealed a graded microstructure. There was presence of nitride rich dendrites dispersed in α-Ti matrix at the uppermost region. The structure gradually changed with lesser dendrites and more heat affected α-Ti phase maintaining a smooth interface. With increasing laser power, the dendrites appeared to be larger in size. Samples with two laser scans showed discontinuous dendrites and more α-Ti phase as compared to the samples with one laser scan. The resultant composite of TiN along with Ti2N in α-Ti showed substantially higher hardness and wear resistance than the untreated CP-Ti substrate. Coefficient of friction was also found to reduce due to surface nitridation. Leaching of Ti(4+) ions during wear test in DI water medium was found to reduce due to laser surface nitriding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanochemistry of titanium oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljković Ivana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanochemistry represents an alternative route in synthesis of nanomaterials. Mechanochemical routes are attractive because of their simplicity, flexibility, and ability to prepare materials by solid state reactions at room temperature. The aim of this work is the mechanochemical synthesis of nanostructured titanium oxides of different composition starting from mixtures of Ti and TiO2, TiO and TiO2 or Ti2O3 and TiO2. Emphasis is on the Magneli phases Ti4O7 and Ti5O9 because their mixture is commercially known as EBONEX material. The materials prepared were characterized by XRPD, TG/DTA analysis, SEM and optical microscopy. Titanium monoxide and several Magneli oxides, Ti4O7, Ti5O9 and Ti6O11, are successfully prepared. The results are very interesting because the EBONEX materials were prepared at lower than usual temperature, which would decrease the effective cost of production.

  13. [Corrosion resistance of casted titanium by compound treatments in the artificial saliva with different fluoride concentrations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xian-li; Guo, Tian-wen

    2012-09-01

    To study the corrosion resistance of casted titanium by plasma nitriding and TiN-coated compound treatments in the artificial saliva with different fluoride concentrations and to investigate whether compound treatments can increase the corrosion resistance of casted titanium. Potentiodynamic polarization technique was used to depict polarization curve and to measured the current density of corrosion (Icorr) and the electric potential of corrosion (Ecorr) of casted titanium (Group A) and casted titanium by compound treatments (Group B) in the artificial saliva with different fluoride concentrations. After electrochemical experiment, the microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The Icorrs of Group A and B in the artificial saliva of different fluoride concentrations were (1530.23 ± 340.12), (2290.36 ± 320.10), (4130.52 ± 230.17) nA and (2.62 ± 0.64), (7.37 ± 3.59), (10.76 ± 6.05) nA, respectively. The Ecorrs were (-0.93 ± 0.10), (-0.89 ± 0.21), (-0.57 ± 0.09) V and (-0.21 ± 0.04), (-0.17 ± 0.03), (-0.22 ± 0.03) V, respectively.The Icorrs of Group B were significantly lower (P compound treatments can significantly increase the corrosion resistance of casted titanium.

  14. Nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding of iron; the effect of a preoxidation treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friehling, Peter B.; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2001-01-01

    grains. On prolonged nitriding, immediate nucleation at the surface of iron grains becomes possible. Calculated incubation times for the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x during nitriding are generally longer than those observed experimentally in the present work. The incubation time is reduced dramatically...

  15. Microstructural characterization of an AISI-SAE 4140 steel without nitridation and nitrided

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina F, A.; Naquid G, C.

    2000-01-01

    It was micro structurally characterized an AISI-SAE 4140 steel before and after of nitridation through the nitridation process by plasma post-unloading microwaves through Optical microscopy (OM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) by means of secondary electrons and retrodispersed, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersion spectra (EDS) and mapping of elements. (Author)

  16. Industrial experience with titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, B M; Shoesmith, D W

    1997-09-01

    Titanium is a reference material for the construction of waste containers in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. It has been in industrial service for over 30 a, often in severe corrosion environments, but it is still considered a relatively exotic material with limited operating history. This has arisen because of the aerospace applications of this material and the misconception that the high strength-to-weight ratio dominates the choice of this material. In fact, the advantage of titanium lies in its high reliability and excellent corrosion resistance. It has a proven record in seawater heat exchanger service and a demonstrated excellent reliability even in polluted water. For many reasons it is the technically correct choice of material for marine applications. In this report we review the industrial service history of titanium, particularly in hot saline environments, and demonstrate that it is a viable waste container material, based upon this industrial service history and operating experience. (author) 83 refs., 17 tabs., 3 figs.

  17. Advances in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seagle, S.R.; Wood, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    As described above, new developments in the aerospace market are focusing on higher temperature alloys for jet engine components and higher strength/toughness alloys for airframe applications. Conventional alloys for engines have reached their maximum useful temperature of about 1000 F (540 C) because of oxidation resistance requirements. IMI 834 and Ti-1100 advanced alloys show some improvement, however, the major improvement appears to be in gamma titanium aluminides which could extend the maximum usage temperature to about 1500 F (815 C). This puts titanium alloys in a competitive position to replace nickel-base superalloys. Advanced airframe alloys such as Ti-6-22-22S, Beta C TM , Ti-15-333 and Ti-10-2-3 with higher strength than conventional Ti-6-4 are being utilized in significantly greater quantities, both in military and commercial applications. These alloys offer improved strength with little or no sacrifice in toughness and improved formability, in some cases. Advanced industrial alloys are being developed for improved corrosion resistance in more reducing and higher temperature environments such as those encountered in sour gas wells. Efforts are focused on small precious metal additions to optimize corrosion performance for specific applications at a modest increase in cost. As these applications develop, the usage of titanium alloys for industrial markets should steadily increase to approach that for aerospace applications. (orig.)

  18. Experimental test of 200 W Hall thruster with titanium wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yongjie; Sun, Hezhi; Peng, Wuji; Xu, Yu; Wei, Liqiu; Li, Hong; Li, Peng; Su, Hongbo; Yu, Daren

    2017-05-01

    We designed a 200 W Hall thruster based on the technology of pushing down a magnetic field with two permanent magnetic rings. Boron nitride (BN) is an important insulating wall material for Hall thrusters. The discharge characteristics of the designed Hall thruster were studied by replacing BN with titanium (Ti). Experimental results show that the designed Hall thruster can discharge stably for a long time under a Ti channel. Experiments were performed to determine whether the channel and cathode are electrically connected. When the channel wall and cathode are insulated, the divergence angle of the plume increases, but the performance of the Hall thruster is improved in terms of thrust, specific impulse, anode efficiency, and thrust-to-power ratio. Ti exhibits a powerful antisputtering capability, a low emanation rate of gas, and a large structural strength, making it a potential candidate wall material in the design of low-power Hall thrusters.

  19. Titanium fasteners. [for aircraft industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Titanium fasteners are used in large quantities throughout the aircraft industry. Most of this usage is in aluminum structure; where titanium structure exists, titanium fasteners are logically used as well. Titanium fasteners offer potential weight savings to the designer at a cost of approximately $30 per pound of weight saved. Proper and least cost usage must take into consideration type of fastener per application, galvanic couples and installation characteristics of protective coatings, cosmetic appearance, paint adhesion, installation forces and methods available and fatigue performance required.

  20. Joining of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baeslack, William

    2002-01-01

    .... Although organized and presented by joining process, many of the observations made and relationships developed, particularly those regarding the weldability and welding metallurgy of gamma titanium...

  1. Thermogravimetry studies on ilmenite nitridation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study is based on the possibility of beneficiation of Indian-ilmenite by carbonitrothermic process. The investigations were carried out in two parts. In the first part, thermogravimetric-differential thermogravimetric (TG-DTG experiments were conducted using cold pressed pellets of blended mixtures TiO2-C and FeTiO3-C. The TG experiments were carried out up to 1500 °C at the rate of 10 °C/min under flowing nitrogen gas. The formations of TiN in case of TiO2-C mixture and TiN along with Fe in case of FeTiO3-C mixture were observed. In the second part, the experiments were conducted using similar pellets, prepared under identical conditions, in a resistance heating furnace at 1500 °C. By simple operations of crushing and sieving, the products obtained from the ilmenite-carbon mixture were separated into a fraction enriched in titanium and a fraction depleted in titanium.

  2. Chemical changes of titanium and titanium dioxide under electron bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romins Brasca

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The electron induced effect on the first stages of the titanium (Ti0 oxidation and titanium dioxide (Ti4+ chemical reduction processes has been studied by means of Auger electron spectroscopy. Using factor analysis we found that both processes are characterized by the appearance of an intermediate Ti oxidation state, Ti2O3 (Ti3+.

  3. Preparing microspheres of actinide nitrides from carbon containing oxide sols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triggiani, L.V.

    1975-01-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium nitride, uranium oxynitride, and uranium carboxynitride microspheres and the microspheres as compositions of matter. The microspheres are prepared from carbide sols by reduction and nitriding steps. (Official Gazette)

  4. Increasing Wear Resistance of Titanium Alloys by Anode Plasma Electrolytic Saturation with Interstitial Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, P. N.; Kusmanov, S. A.; Dyakov, I. G.; Silkin, S. A.; Smirnov, A. A.

    2017-05-01

    In our previous studies, we have shown that anode plasma electrolytic saturation of titanium alloys with nitrogen and carbon can improve their tribological properties. Obtained structure containing oxide layer and solid solution of diffused element in titanium promotes the enhancement of running-in ability and the decrease in the wear rate in some special cases. In this paper, further investigations are reported regarding the tribological properties of alpha- and beta-titanium alloys in wear test against hardened steel (50 HRC) disk using pin-on-disk geometry and balls of Al2O3 (6.25 mm in diameter) or bearing steel (9.6 mm in diameter) with ball-on-plate one and normal load from 5 to 209 N. Reproducible results were obtained under testing samples treated by means of the plasma electrolytic nitriding (PEN) with the mechanical removal of the oxide layer. Friction coefficient of nitrided samples is 0.5-0.9 which is somewhat higher than that for untreated one (0.48-0.75) during dry sliding against Al2O3 ball. An increase in the sliding speed results in the polishing of nitrided samples and reduction of their wear rate by 60 times. This result is obtained for 5 min at 850 °C using PEN in electrolyte containing 5 wt.% ammonia and 10 wt.% ammonium chloride followed by quenching in solution. Optical microscope was employed to assist in the evaluation of the wear behavior. Sizes of wear tracks were measured by profilometer TR200.

  5. Studies of the process of an unsteady formation of hard nitride coatings in an arc plasma flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zake, M.

    1996-01-01

    The kinetic studies of an unsteady formation of hard ZrN and TiN coatings on the surface of metallic (Zr, Ti) samples in an Ar-N plasma flow are carried out. The obtained result is that at the initial stage of an unsteady heating of titanium samples nitrogen atoms penetrate into metal lattice and form interstitial compounds of hard nitrogen solutions in α-phase of Ti. This process is followed by a growth of thin surface layers of titanium nitrides with subsequent changes of surface radiance of exposed samples. Unsteady formation of ZrN is a similar two-stage process which includes the ZrN film growth and formation of a α-hard solution with subsequent changes of total normal emissivity of the surface. (author). 1 ref., 1 fig

  6. Advancing liquid metal reactor technology with nitride fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, W.F.; Baker, R.B.; Leggett, R.D.; Matthews, R.B.

    1991-08-01

    A review of the use of nitride fuels in liquid metal fast reactors is presented. Past studies indicate that both uranium nitride and uranium/plutonium nitride possess characteristics that may offer enhanced performance, particularly in the area of passive safety. To further quantify these effects, the analysis of a mixed-nitride fuel system utilizing the geometry and power level of the US Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor as a reference is described. 18 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Physical metallurgy of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collings, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    Researches in electric, magnetic, thermophysical properties of titanium alloys in the wide range of temperatures (from helium upto elevated one), as well as stability of phases in alloys of different types are generalized. Fundamental description of physical properties of binary model alloys is given. Acoustic emission, shape memory and Bauschinger effects, pseudoelasticity, aging and other aspects of physical metallurgy of titanium alloys are considered

  8. Plasma nitridation optimization for sub-15 A gate dielectrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cubaynes, F.N; Schmitz, Jurriaan; van der Marel, C.; Snijders, J.H.M.; Veloso, A.; Rothschild, A.; Olsen, C.; Date, L.

    The work investigates the impact of plasma nitridation process parameters upon the physical properties and upon the electrical performance of sub-15 A plasma nitrided gate dielectrics. The nitrogen distribution and chemical bonding of ultra-thin plasma nitrided films have been investigated using

  9. Ion nitriding in 316=L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas-Calderon, E.L.

    1989-01-01

    Ion nitriding is a glow discharge process that is used to induce surface modification in metals. It has been applied to 316-L austenitic stainless steel looking for similar benefits already obtained in other steels. An austenitic stainless steel was selected because is not hardenable by heat treatment and is not easy to nitride by gas nitriding. The samples were plastically deformed to 10, 20, 40, 50 AND 70% of their original thickness in order to obtain bulk hardening and to observe nitrogen penetration dependence on it. The results were: an increase of one to two rockwell hardness number (except in 70% deformed sample because of its thickness); an increase of even several hundreds per cent in microhardness knoop number in nitrided surface. The later surely modifies waste resistance which would be worth to quantify in further studies. Microhardness measured in an internal transversal face to nitrided surface had a gradual diminish in its value with depth. Auger microanalysis showed a higher relative concentration rate C N /C F e near the surface giving evidence of nitrogen presence till 250 microns deep. The color metallography etchant used, produced faster corrosion in nitrited regions. Therefore, corrosion studies have to be done before using ion nitrited 316-L under these chemicals. (Author)

  10. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  11. Titanium for salt water service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadiyar, H.S.; Shibad, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium has potential as major material of construction in desalination plants, in condensers and heat exchangers, in view of its excellent corrosion resistance to salt water upto at least 120deg C. The advantages of titanium in such applications are brought out. The various specific problems such as pitting, crevice and galvanic corrosion and the preventive methods, for adopting titanium have been discussed. The hydriding problem can be overcome by suitably controlling the operating parameters such as temperature and surface preparation. A case has been made to prove the economic viability of titanium in comparison to Al-brass and Cu-Ni alloy. The future of titanium seems to be very promising in view of the negligible tube failures and outages. (auth.)

  12. Indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride quantum wells grown on polar and nonpolar gallium nitride substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kun-Yu

    Nonpolar (m-plane or a-plane) gallium nitride (GaN) is predicted to be a potential substrate material to improve luminous efficiencies of nitride-based quantum wells (QWs). Numerical calculations indicated that the spontaneous emission rate in a single In0.15Ga0.85N/GaN QW could be improved by ˜2.2 times if the polarization-induced internal field was avoided by epitaxial deposition on nonpolar substrates. A challenge for nonpolar GaN is the limited size (less than 10x10 mm2) of substrates, which was addressed by expansion during the regrowth by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy (HVPE). Subsurface damage in GaN substrates were reduced by annealing with NH3 and N2 at 950°C for 60 minutes. It was additionally found that the variation of m-plane QWs' emission properties was significantly increased when the substrate miscut toward a-axis was increased from 0° to 0.1°. InGaN/GaN QWs were grown by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on c-plane and m-plane GaN substrates. The QWs were studied by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy with different incident electron beam probe currents (0.1 nA ˜ 1000 nA). Lower emission intensities and longer peak wavelengths from c-plane QWs were attributed to the Quantum-confined Stark Effect (QCSE). The emission intensity ratios of m-plane QWs to c-plane QWs decreased from 3.04 at 1 nA to 1.53 at 1000 nA. This was identified as the stronger screening effects of QCSE at higher current densities in c-plane QWs. To further investigate these effects in a fabricated structure, biased photoluminescence measurements were performed on m-plane InGaN/GaN QWs. The purpose was to detect the possible internal fields induced by the dot-like structure in the InGaN layer through the response of these internal fields under externally applied fields. No energy shifts of the QWs were observed, which was attributed to strong surface leakage currents.

  13. Two-Dimensional Titanium Carbide (MXene) as Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarycheva, Asia [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Makaryan, Taron [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Maleski, Kathleen [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Satheeshkumar, Elumalai [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan); National Institute of Technology-Trichy, Tamil Nadu (India); Melikyan, Armen [Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) State Univ., Yerevan (Armenia); Minassian, Hayk [A. Alikhanian National Science Lab., Yerevan (Armenia); Yoshimura, Masahiro [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan); Gogotsi, Yury G. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-08-22

    Here, noble metal (gold or silver) nanoparticles or patterned films are typically used as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Two-dimensional (2D) carbides and nitrides (MXenes) exhibit unique electronic and optical properties, including metallic conductivity and plasmon resonance in the visible or near-infrared range, making them promising candidates for a wide variety of applications. Herein, we show that 2D titanium carbide, Ti3C2Tx, enhances Raman signal from organic dyes on a substrate and in solution. As a proof of concept, MXene SERS substrates were manufactured by spray-coating and used to detect several common dyes, with calculated enhancement factors reaching ~106. Titanium carbide MXene demonstrates SERS effect in aqueous colloidal solutions, suggesting the potential for biomedical or environmental applications, where MXene can selectively enhance positively charged molecules.

  14. Pulsed TEA CO2 Laser Irradiation of Titanium in Nitrogen and Carbon Dioxide Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciganovic, J.; Matavulj, P.; Trtica, M.; Stasic, J.; Savovic, J.; Zivkovic, S.; Momcilovic, M.

    2017-12-01

    Surface changes created by interaction of transversely excited atmospheric carbon dioxide (TEA CO2) laser with titanium target/implant in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas were studied. TEA CO2 laser operated at 10.6 μm, pulse length of 100 ns and fluence of ˜17 J/cm2 which was sufficient for inducing surface modifications. Induced changes depend on the gas used. In both gases the grain structure was produced (central irradiated zone) but its forms were diverse, (N2: irregular shape; CO2: hill-like forms). Hydrodynamic features at peripheral zone, like resolidified droplets, were recorded only in CO2 gas. Elemental analysis of the titanium target surface indicated that under a nitrogen atmosphere surface nitridation occurred. In addition, irradiation in both gases was followed by appearance of plasma in front of the target. The existence of plasma indicates relatively high temperatures created above the target surface offering a sterilizing effect.

  15. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1997-01-01

    As a prerequisite for the predictability of properties obtained by a nitriding treatment of iron based workpieces, the relation between the process parameters and the composition and structure of the surface layer produced must be known. At present, even the description of thermodynamic equilibrium...... of pure Fe-N phases has not been fully achieved. It is shown that taking into account the ordering of nitrogen in the epsilon and gamma' iron nitride phases leads to an improved understanding of the Fe-N phase diagram. Although consideration of thermodynamics indicates the state the system strives for...... for process control of gaseous nitriding by monitoring the partial pressure of oxygen in the furnace using a solid state electrolyte is provided. At the time the work was carried out the authors were in the Laboratory of Materials Science, Delft University of Technology, Rotterdamseweg 137, 2628 AL Delft...

  16. Molecular dynamics studies of actinide nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Ken; Uno, Masayoshi; Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Minato, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) calculation was performed for actinide nitrides (UN, NpN, and PuN) in the temperature range from 300 to 2800 K to evaluate the physical properties viz., the lattice parameter, thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility, and heat capacity. The Morse-type potential function added to the Busing-Ida type potential was employed for the ionic interactions. The interatomic potential parameters were determined by fitting to the experimental data of the lattice parameter. The usefulness and applicability of the MD method to evaluate the physical properties of actinide nitrides were studied. (author)

  17. Contribution of Titanium, Chromium and Carbon Buffer Interlayers to Bio-Tribological Properties of Multilayer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Major Ł

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Research studies on bio-tribological protective coatings of titanium, chromium and carbon based have been performed. Thin films were fabricated by hybrid PLD technique (PLD supported by magnetron sputtering. Coatings consisted of two parts; the inner part (first from the substrate in each case was formed by titanium or chromium/titanium nitride or chromium nitride (Ti/TiN or Cr/Cr2N. The outer part was formed by pure DLC or multilayer DLC/Ti or Cr. No delamination was found at the interface. Titanium or chromium metallic layer was deposited as a first layer directly on the metallic substrate to avoid delamination. All individual layers were built of columnar nano-crystallites. Mechanisms of the mechanical wear of analyzed systems were presented, focusing on the cracking propagation in ball-on-disc tests using an 1 N and 5 N applied loads for 5 000 cycles. Complex microstructure analysis of presented nano-multilayer coatings, before and after mechanical tests, were performed by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The highest stress concentration during mechanical uploading was moved through the multilayer coating by breaking only one layer at the time. The microstructure characterization revealed that cracking propagating in the outer part of the coating was stopped at the interface. In the case of the inner part of the coating Ti/TiN; Cr/Cr2N, ceramic layers showed brittle cracking, while metallic (Ti or Cr ones deformed plastically. Fabricated coatings were subjected under the analysis in the biomechanical system optimized to test for the direct contact with a human whole blood. The study considered physiological conditions mainly related to the temperature and humidity and the frequency of cyclic deformation of the artificial vessel into which the tested sample was introduced.

  18. Improvement of mechanical and tribological properties in steel surfaces by using titanium-aluminum/titanium-aluminum nitride multilayered system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipaz, L., E-mail: leoipazc@gmail.com [Thin Films Group, Physics departament, Universidad del Valle, Calle 13 100-00, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Caicedo, J.C. [Thin Films Group, Physics departament, Universidad del Valle, Calle 13 100-00, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Esteve, J. [Department de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Espinoza-Beltran, F.J. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Queretaro, Libramiento Norponiente 2000, Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, C.P. 76230 (Mexico); Zambrano, G. [Thin Films Group, Physics departament, Universidad del Valle, Calle 13 100-00, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia)

    2012-02-01

    Improvement of mechanical and tribological properties on AISI D3 steel surfaces coated with [Ti-Al/Ti-Al-N]{sub n} multilayer systems deposited in various bilayer periods ({Lambda}) via magnetron co-sputtering pulsed d.c. method, from a metallic binary target; has been studied in this work exhaustively. The multilayer coatings were characterized in terms of structural, chemical, morphological, mechanical and tribological properties by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy, nanoindentation, pin-on-disc and scratch tests, respectively. The failure mode mechanisms were studied by optical microscopy. Results from X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the crystal structure of TiAl/TiAlN multilayer coatings has a tetragonal and FCC NaCl-type lattice structures for Ti-Al and Ti-Al-N, respectively, i.e., it was found to be non-isostructural multilayers. An enhancement of both hardness and elastic modulus up to 29 GPa and 260 GPa, respectively, was observed as the bilayer periods ({Lambda}) in the coatings were decreased. The sample with a bilayer period ({Lambda}) of 25 nm and bilayer number n = 100 showed the lowest friction coefficient ({approx}0.28) and the highest critical load (45 N), corresponding to 2.7 and 1.5 times better than those values for the coating deposited with n = 1, respectively. These results indicate an enhancement of mechanical, tribological and adhesion properties, comparing to the [Ti-Al/Ti-Al-N]{sub n} multilayer systems with 1 bilayer at 26%, 63% and 33%, respectively. This enhancement in hardness and toughness for multilayer coatings could be attributed to the different mechanisms for layer formation with nanometric thickness such as the novel Ti-Al/Ti-Al-N effect and the number of interfaces that act as obstacles for the crack deflection and dissipation of crack energy.

  19. X-ray line broadening studies on aluminum nitride, titanium carbide and titanium diboride modified by high pressure shock loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morosin, B.; Graham, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Powders of AlN, TiC and TiB 2 have been subjected to controlled shock loading with peak pressures in the samples between 14 to 27 GPa and preserved for post-shock study. Broadened x-ray diffraction peak profiles are analyzed by a simplified method and show increases in residual lattice strain and small decreases in crystallite size. Strain values range from 10 -5 to 10 -4 for TiB 2 and to values larger than 10 -3 for TiC and AlN

  20. Optical properties of nitride nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantarero, A.; Cros, A.; Garro, N.; Gomez-Gomez, M.I.; Garcia, A.; Lima, M.M. de [Materials Science Institute, University of Valencia, PO Box 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Daudin, B. [Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, SPMM, CEA/Grenoble, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Rizzi, A.; Denker, C.; Malindretos, J. [IV. Physikalisches Institut, Georg August Universitaet Goettingen, 37073 Goettingen (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    In this paper we review some recent results on the optical properties of nitride nanostructures, in particular on GaN quantum dots (QDs) and InN nanocolumns (NCs). First, we will give a brief introduction on the particularities of vibrational modes of wurtzite. The GaN QDs, embedded in AlN, were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) in the Stransky-Krastanov mode on c- and a-plane 6H-SiC. We have studied the optical properties by means of photoluminescence (PL) and performed Raman scattering measurements to analyze the strain relaxation in the dots and the barrier, the effect of the internal electric fields, and the influence of specific growth parameters, like the influence of capping or the spacer on the relaxation of the QDs. A theoretical model, based on continuous elastic theory, were developed to interpret the Raman scattering results. On the other hand, InN NCs have been grown by MBE in the vapor-liquid-solid mode using Au as a catalyst. The nanocolumns have different morphology depending on the growth conditions. The optical properties can be correlated to the morphology of the samples and the best growth conditions can be selected. We observe, from the analysis of the Raman data in InN NCs, the existence of two space regions contributing to the scattering: the surface and the inner region. From the inner region, uncoupled phonon modes are clearly observed, showing the high crystal quality and the complete relaxation of the NCs (no strain). The observation of a LO-phonon-plasmon couple in the same spectra is a fingerprint of the accumulation layer predicted at the surface of the nanocolumns. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Boron nitride nanotubes for spintronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungana, Kamal B; Pati, Ranjit

    2014-09-22

    With the end of Moore's law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR) effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT), which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  2. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal B. Dhungana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available With the end of Moore’s law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT, which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  3. Two-Dimensional Modeling of Aluminum Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holmes, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    Gallium Nitride (GaN) High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMT's) are microwave power devices that have the performance characteristics to improve the capabilities of current and future Navy radar and communication systems...

  4. Microstructure and mechanical properties of silicon nitride structural ceramics of silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohaecker, T.R.; Nobrega, M.C.S.

    1989-01-01

    The utilization of direct evaluation technic of tenacity for fracturing by hardness impact in silicon nitride ceramics is described. The microstructure were analysied, by Scanning Electron Microscopy, equiped with a microanalysis acessory by X ray energy dispersion. The difference between the values of K IC measure for two silicon nitride ceramics is discussed, in function of the microstructures and the fracture surfaces of the samples studied. (C.G.C.) [pt

  5. Preparation of titanium diboride powders from titanium alkoxide and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Department of Materials and Manufacturing Process, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran. 15875-1744, Iran ... Titanium diboride is a hard refractory material with a high melting point ... (λ = 1⋅540598 Å) radiation. Morphology of the ...

  6. Pulsed 1064 nm Nd-YAG Laser Deposition of Titanium on Silicon in a Nitrogen Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Garcia

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed laser deposition (PLD technique was demonstrated for the deposition of titanium nitride (TiN thin films on Si (100 substrates. A 1064 nm pulsed Nd-YAG laser is focused on a titanium (99.5% target in a nitrogen environment to generate the atomic flux needed for the film deposition. Spectroscopic analysis of the plasma emission indicates the presence of atomic titanium and nitrogen, which are the precursors of TiN. Images of the films grown at different laser pulse energies show an increase in the number and size of deposited droplets and clusters with increasing laser pulse energy. A decrease in cluster and droplet size is also observed, with an increase in substrate temperature. EDS data show an increase in the titanium peak relative to the silicon as the ambient nitrogen pressure is decreased. An increase in deposition time was found to result in large clusters and irregularly shaped structures on the substrate. Post-deposition annealing of the samples enhanced the crystallinity of the film.

  7. Intermetallic Nickel-Titanium Alloys for Oil-Lubricated Bearing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, C.; Pepper, S. V.; Noebe, R.; Hull, D. R.; Glennon, G.

    2009-01-01

    An intermetallic nickel-titanium alloy, NITINOL 60 (60NiTi), containing 60 wt% nickel and 40 wt% titanium, is shown to be a promising candidate material for oil-lubricated rolling and sliding contact applications such as bearings and gears. NiTi alloys are well known and normally exploited for their shape memory behavior. When properly processed, however, NITINOL 60 exhibits excellent dimensional stability and useful structural properties. Processed via high temperature, high-pressure powder metallurgy techniques or other means, NITINOL 60 offers a broad combination of physical properties that make it unique among bearing materials. NITINOL 60 is hard, electrically conductive, highly corrosion resistant, less dense than steel, readily machined prior to final heat treatment, nongalling and nonmagnetic. No other bearing alloy, metallic or ceramic encompasses all of these attributes. Further, NITINOL 60 has shown remarkable tribological performance when compared to other aerospace bearing alloys under oil-lubricated conditions. Spiral orbit tribometer (SOT) tests were conducted in vacuum using NITINOL 60 balls loaded between rotating 440C stainless steel disks, lubricated with synthetic hydrocarbon oil. Under conditions considered representative of precision bearings, the performance (life and friction) equaled or exceeded that observed with silicon nitride or titanium carbide coated 440C bearing balls. Based upon this preliminary data, it appears that NITINOL 60, despite its high titanium content, is a promising candidate alloy for advanced mechanical systems requiring superior and intrinsic corrosion resistance, electrical conductivity and nonmagnetic behavior under lubricated contacting conditions.

  8. Hydrogen-Mediated Nitrogen Clustering in Dilute III-V Nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mao-Hua; Limpijumnong, Sukit; Zhang, S. B.

    2006-08-01

    First-principles calculation reveals multi-N clusters to be the ground states for hydrogenated N in dilute III-V nitrides. While hydrogenation of a single N, forming H2*(N), can relax the large strain induced by the size-mismatched N, formation of the clusters will relax the strain even more effectively. This suppresses the formation of H2*(N), the existence of which has recently been debated. More importantly, postgrowth dehydrogenation of the N-H clusters provides an explanation to the observed metastable bare N clusters in GaAsN grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy or metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

  9. Hydrogen in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wille, G.W.; Davis, J.W.

    1981-04-01

    The titanium alloys that offer properties worthy of consideration for fusion reactors are Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-Si (Ti-6242S) and Ti-5Al-6Sn-2Zr-1Mo-Si (Ti-5621S). The Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S are being considered because of their high creep resistance at elevated temperatures of 500 0 C. Also, irradiation tests on these alloys have shown irradiation creep properties comparable to 20% cold worked 316 stainless steel. These alloys would be susceptible to slow strain rate embrittlement if sufficient hydrogen concentrations are obtained. Concentrations greater than 250 to 500 wppm hydrogen and temperatures lower than 100 to 150 0 C are approximate threshold conditions for detrimental effects on tensile properties. Indications are that at the elevated temperature - low hydrogen pressure conditions of the reactors, there would be negligible hydrogen embrittlement

  10. Surface Modification of C17200 Copper-Beryllium Alloy by Plasma Nitriding of Cu-Ti Gradient Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y. D.; Yan, M. F.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, C. S.

    2018-03-01

    In the present work, a copper-titanium film of gradient composition was firstly fabricated by the dual magnetron sputtering through power control and plasma nitriding of the film was then conducted to modify C17200 Cu alloy. The results showed that the prepared gradient Cu-Ti film by magnetron sputtering was amorphous. After plasma nitriding at 650 °C, crystalline Cu-Ti intermetallics appeared in the multi-phase coating, including CuTi2, Cu3Ti, Cu3Ti2 and CuTi. Moreover, even though the plasma nitriding duration of the gradient Cu-Ti film was only 0.5 h, the mechanical properties of the modified Cu surface were obviously improved, with the surface hardness enhanced to be 417 HV0.01, the wear rate to be 0.32 × 10-14 m3/Nm and the friction coefficient to be 0.075 at the load of 10 N, which are all more excellent than the C17200 Cu alloy. In addition, the wear mechanism also changed from adhesion wear for C17200 Cu substrate to abrasive wear for the modified surface.

  11. Boron nitride nanosheets reinforced glass matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saggar, Richa; Porwal, H.; Tatarko, P.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Reece, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 114, SEP (2015), S26-S32 ISSN 1743-6753 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK155 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 264526 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Boron nitride nanosheets * Borosilicate glass * Mechanical properties Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.162, year: 2015

  12. Alkaline fuel cell with nitride membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shen-Huei; Pilaski, Moritz; Wartmann, Jens; Letzkus, Florian; Funke, Benedikt; Dura, Georg; Heinzel, Angelika

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this work is to fabricate patterned nitride membranes with Si-MEMS-technology as a platform to build up new membrane-electrode-assemblies (MEA) for alkaline fuel cell applications. Two 6-inch wafer processes based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were developed for the fabrication of separated nitride membranes with a nitride thickness up to 1 μm. The mechanical stability of the perforated nitride membrane has been adjusted in both processes either by embedding of subsequent ion implantation step or by optimizing the deposition process parameters. A nearly 100% yield of separated membranes of each deposition process was achieved with layer thickness from 150 nm to 1 μm and micro-channel pattern width of 1μm at a pitch of 3 μm. The process for membrane coating with electrolyte materials could be verified to build up MEA. Uniform membrane coating with channel filling was achieved after the optimization of speed controlled dip-coating method and the selection of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as electrolyte solvent. Finally, silver as conductive material was defined for printing a conductive layer onto the MEA by Ink-Technology. With the established IR-thermography setup, characterizations of MEAs in terms of catalytic conversion were performed successfully. The results of this work show promise for build up a platform on wafer-level for high throughput experiments.

  13. Intrinsic ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, M. S.; Gao, Daqiang, E-mail: gaodq@lzu.edu.cn, E-mail: xueds@lzu.edu.cn; Yang, Dezheng; Peng, Yong; Zhang, Z. Y.; Xue, Desheng, E-mail: gaodq@lzu.edu.cn, E-mail: xueds@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Liu, Yushen [Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials and College of Physics and Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Deng, Xiaohui [Department of Physics and Electronic Information Science, Hengyang Normal University, Hengyang 421008 (China); Zhang, G. P. [Department of Physics, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, Indiana 47809 (United States)

    2014-05-28

    Understanding the mechanism of ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which possess only s and p electrons in comparison with normal ferromagnets based on localized d or f electrons, is a current challenge. In this work, we report an experimental finding that the ferromagnetic coupling is an intrinsic property of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which has never been reported before. Moreover, we further confirm it from ab initio calculations. We show that the measured ferromagnetism should be attributed to the localized π states at edges, where the electron-electron interaction plays the role in this ferromagnetic ordering. More importantly, we demonstrate such edge-induced ferromagnetism causes a high Curie temperature well above room temperature. Our systematical work, including experimental measurements and theoretical confirmation, proves that such unusual room temperature ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets is edge-dependent, similar to widely reported graphene-based materials. It is believed that this work will open new perspectives for hexagonal boron nitride spintronic devices.

  14. Covalent biofunctionalization of silicon nitride surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arafat, A.; Giesbers, M.; Rosso, M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; White, R.G.; Li Yang,; Linford, M.R.; Zuilhof, H.

    2007-01-01

    Covalently attached organic monolayers on etched silicon nitride (SixN4; x 3) surfaces were prepared by reaction of SixN4-coated wafers with neat or solutions of 1-alkenes and 1-alkynes in refluxing mesitylene. The surface modification was monitored by measurement of the static water contact angle,

  15. Bandgap engineered graphene and hexagonal boron nitride

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article a double-barrier resonant tunnelling diode (DBRTD) has been modelled by taking advantage of single-layer hexagonal lattice of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The DBRTD performance and operation are explored by means of a self-consistent solution inside the non-equilibrium Green's ...

  16. Plasmonic spectral tunability of conductive ternary nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassavetis, S.; Patsalas, P., E-mail: ppats@physics.auth.gr [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Bellas, D. V.; Lidorikis, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Abadias, G. [Institut Pprime, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, Université de Poitiers-CNRS-ENSMA, 86962 Chasseneuil-Futuroscope (France)

    2016-06-27

    Conductive binary transition metal nitrides, such as TiN and ZrN, have emerged as a category of promising alternative plasmonic materials. In this work, we show that ternary transition metal nitrides such as Ti{sub x}Ta{sub 1−x}N, Ti{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x}N, Ti{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}N, and Zr{sub x}Ta{sub 1−x}N share the important plasmonic features with their binary counterparts, while having the additional asset of the exceptional spectral tunability in the entire visible (400–700 nm) and UVA (315–400 nm) spectral ranges depending on their net valence electrons. In particular, we demonstrate that such ternary nitrides can exhibit maximum field enhancement factors comparable with gold in the aforementioned broadband range. We also critically evaluate the structural features that affect the quality factor of the plasmon resonance and we provide rules of thumb for the selection and growth of materials for nitride plasmonics.

  17. Tribocorrosion studies of metallic biomaterials: The effect of plasma nitriding and DLC surface modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guo-Hua; Aune, Ragnhild E; Espallargas, Nuria

    2016-10-01

    The medical grade pure titanium, stainless steel and CoCrMo alloy have been utilized as biomaterials for load-bearing orthopedic prosthesis. The conventional surgery metals suffer from a combined effect of wear and corrosion once they are implanted, which may significantly accelerate the material degradation process. In this work, the tribocorrosion performance of the metallic biomaterials with different surface modifications was studied in the simulated body fluid for the purpose of investigating the effect of the surface treatments on the tribocorrosion performance and eventually finding the most suitable implantation materials. The metals were subjected to surface modifications by plasma nitriding in different treatment temperatures or physical vapor deposition (PVD) to produce diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating, respectively. The dry wear and tribocorrosion properties of the samples were evaluated by using a reciprocating ball-on-disc tribometer equipped with an electrochemical cell. Prior to the tribocorrosion tests, their electrochemical behavior was measured by the potentiodynamic polarization in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution at room temperature. Both stainless steel and CoCrMo after low temperature nitriding kept their passive nature by forming an expanded austenite phase. The DLC coated samples presented the low anodic corrosion current due to the chemical inertness of the carbon layer. During the tribocorrosion tests at open circuit potential, the untreated and low temperature nitrided samples exhibited significant potential drop towards the cathodic direction, which was a result of the worn out of the passive film. Galvanic coupling was established between the depassivated (worn) area and the still passive (unworn) area, making the materials suffered from wear-accelerated corrosion. The DLC coating performed as a solid lubricant in both dry wear and tribocorrosion tests, and the resulting wear after the tests was almost negligible. Copyright

  18. Ion beam induces nitridation of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petravic, M.; Williams, J.S.; Conway, M.

    1998-01-01

    High dose ion bombardment of silicon with reactive species, such as oxygen and nitrogen, has attracted considerable interest due to possible applications of beam-induced chemical compounds with silicon. For example, high energy oxygen bombardment of Si is now routinely used to form buried oxide layers for device purposes, the so called SIMOX structures. On the other hand, Si nitrides, formed by low energy ( 100 keV) nitrogen beam bombardment of Si, are attractive as oxidation barriers or gate insulators, primarily due to the low diffusivity of many species in Si nitrides. However, little data exists on silicon nitride formation during bombardment and its angle dependence, in particular for N 2 + bombardment in the 10 keV range, which is of interest for analytical techniques such as SIMS. In SIMS, low energy oxygen ions are more commonly used as bombarding species, as oxygen provides stable ion yields and enhances the positive secondary ion yield. Therefore, a large body of data can be found in the literature on oxide formation during low energy oxygen bombardment. Nitrogen bombardment of Si may cause similar effects to oxygen bombardment, as nitrogen and oxygen have similar masses and ranges in Si, show similar sputtering effects and both have the ability to form chemical compounds with Si. In this work we explore this possibility in some detail. We compare oxide and nitride formation during oxygen and nitrogen ion bombardment of Si under similar conditions. Despite the expected similar behaviour, some large differences in compound formation were found. These differences are explained in terms of different atomic diffusivities in oxides and nitrides, film structural differences and thermodynamic properties. (author)

  19. Thermomechanical treatment of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorev, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    The problems of the theory and practical application of thermomechanical treatment of titanium alloys are presented. On the basis of the systematic investigations developed are the methods of thermomechanical treatment of titanium alloys, established are the optimum procedures and produced are the bases of their industrial application with an account of alloy technological peculiarities and the procedure efficiency. It is found that those strengthening methods are more efficient at which the contribution of dispersion hardening prevails over the strengthening by phase hardening

  20. Technics Research on Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride Cutting Tools Dry Turning Ti-6AL-4V Alloy Based on Orthogonal Experimental Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Yunhai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ti-6Al-4V components are the most widely used titanium alloy products not only in the aerospace industry, but also for bio-medical applications. The machine-ability of titanium alloys is impaired by their high temperature chemical reactivity, low thermal conductivity and low modulus of elasticity. Polycrystalline cubic boron nitride represents a substitute tool material for turning titanium alloys due to its high hardness, wear resistance, thermal stability and hot red hardness. For determination of suitable cutting parameters in dry turning Ti-6AL-4V alloy by Polycrystalline cubic boron nitride cutting tools, the samples, 300mm in length and 100mm in diameter, were dry machined in a lathe. The turning suitable parameters, such as cutting speed, feed rate and cut depth were determined according to workpieces surface roughness and tools flank wear based on orthogonal experimental design. The experiment showed that the cutting speed in the range of 160~180 m/min, the feed rate is 0.15 mm/rev and the depth of cut is 0.20mm, ideal workpiece surface roughness and little cutting tools flank wear can be obtained.

  1. Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of supermartensitic stainless steel surfaces nitrided by plasma immersion ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schibicheski, Bruna Corina Emanuely; Souza, Gelson Biscaia de; Oliveira, Willian Rafael de; Serbena, Francisco Carlos, E-mail: bruna_schibicheski@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa (UEPG), PR (Brazil); Marino, Cláudia E.B. [Universidade Federal do Paraná (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: The supermartensitic stainless steel UNS S41426 is employed in marine oil and gas extraction ducts, where it is subjected to severe conditions of temperature, pressure and exposure to corrosive agents (as the H{sub 2}S). In such environments, pitting corrosion is a major cause of degradation of metallic alloys [1]. This work investigated the effectiveness of the nitrogen inlet, attained here by the plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technique, in improving the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the material surface. Samples were initially austenitized at 1100°C with a subsequent room temperature oil quenching in order to obtain a fully martensitic structure. The nitriding was carried out under 10 kV implantation energy and 30 ms pulse width. The temperatures ranged from 300 °C to 400°C, achieved by controlling the pulse repetition rates. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, instrumented indentation, scanning electron microscopy, potentiodynamic anodic polarization tests (in NaCl solution), and cathodic hydrogenation tests (in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution). The PIII nitriding produced stratified layers up to 30 mm thick containing nitrogen expanded martensite and iron nitride phases (γ’-Fe{sub 4}N, ε- Fe{sub 2+x}N), depending on the treatment temperature. Consequently, the surface hardness increased from ∼3GPa (reference) up to ∼13GPa (400°C). Regarding the corrosion resistance, the nitrided surfaces presented a significant improvement as compared with the pristine surface, evidenced by the increase of the corrosion potential, which was also correlated to the hydrogen embrittlement reduction and the subsequent suppression of morphological changes. References: [1] M.G. Fontana, Corrosion Engineering, Singapore: McGraw-Hill, 1987. [2] B.C.E.S. Kurelo et al., Applied Surface Science 349 (2015) 403-414. (author)

  2. Development and evaluation of two PVD-coated β-titanium orthodontic archwires for fluoride-induced corrosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Vinod; Krishnan, Anand; Remya, R; Ravikumar, K K; Nair, S Asha; Shibli, S M A; Varma, H K; Sukumaran, K; Kumar, K Jyothindra

    2011-04-01

    The present research was aimed at developing surface coatings on β titanium orthodontic archwires capable of protection against fluoride-induced corrosion. Cathodic arc physical vapor deposition PVD (CA-PVD) and magnetron sputtering were utilized to deposit thin films of titanium aluminium nitride (TiAlN) and tungsten carbide/carbon (WC/C) coatings on β titanium orthodontic archwires. Uncoated and coated specimens were immersed in a high fluoride ion concentration mouth rinse, following a specially designed cycle simulating daily use. All specimens thus obtained were subjected to critical evaluation of parameters such as electrochemical corrosion behaviour, surface analysis, mechanical testing, microstructure, element release, and toxicology. The results confirm previous research that β titanium archwires undergo a degradation process when in contact with fluoride mouth rinses. The study confirmed the superior nature of the TiAlN coating, evident as many fewer changes in properties after fluoride treatment when compared with the WC/C coating. Thus, coating with TiAlN is recommended in order to reduce the corrosive effects of fluorides on β titanium orthodontic archwires. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nitriding behavior of Ni and Ni-based binary alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonovic, Matej

    2015-01-15

    Gaseous nitriding is a prominent thermochemical surface treatment process which can improve various properties of metallic materials such as mechanical, tribological and/or corrosion properties. This process is predominantly performed by applying NH{sub 3}+H{sub 2} containing gas atmospheres serving as the nitrogen donating medium at temperatures between 673 K and 873 K (400 C and 600 C). NH{sub 3} decomposes at the surface of the metallic specimen and nitrogen diffuses into the surface adjacent region of the specimen whereas hydrogen remains in the gas atmosphere. One of the most important parameters characterizing a gaseous nitriding process is the so-called nitriding potential (r{sub N}) which determines the chemical potential of nitrogen provided by the gas phase. The nitriding potential is defined as r{sub N} = p{sub NH{sub 3}}/p{sub H{sub 2}{sup 3/2}} where p{sub NH{sub 3}} and p{sub H{sub 2}} are the partial pressures of the NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2} in the nitriding atmosphere. In contrast with nitriding of α-Fe where the nitriding potential is usually in the range between 0.01 and 1 atm{sup -1/2}, nitriding of Ni and Ni-based alloys requires employing nitriding potentials higher than 100 atm{sup -1/2} and even up to ∞ (nitriding in pure NH{sub 3} atmosphere). This behavior is compatible with decreased thermodynamic stability of the 3d-metal nitrides with increasing atomic number. Depending on the nitriding conditions (temperature, nitriding potential and treatment time), different phases are formed at the surface of the Ni-based alloys. By applying very high nitriding potential, formation of hexagonal Ni{sub 3}N at the surface of the specimen (known as external nitriding) leads to the development of a compound layer, which may improve tribological properties. Underneath the Ni{sub 3}N compound layer, two possibilities exist: (i) alloying element precipitation within the nitrided zone (known as internal nitriding) and/or (ii) development of metastable and

  4. Separation of zirconium--hafnium by nitride precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.N.; Parlee, N.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for the separation of a light reactive metal (e.g., zirconium) from a heavy reactive metal (e.g., hafnium) by forming insoluble nitrides of the metals in a molten metal solvent (e.g., copper) inert to nitrogen and having a suitable density for the light metal nitride to form a separate phase in the upper portion of the solvent and for the heavy metal nitride to form a separate phase in the lower portion of the solvent. Nitriding is performed by maintaining a nitrogen-containing atmosphere over the bath. The light and heavy metals may be an oxide mixture and carbothermically reduced to metal form in the same bath used for nitriding. The nitrides are then separately removed and decomposed to form the desired separate metals. 16 claims, 1 figure

  5. Electrophoretic deposition of hydroxyapatite-hexagonal boron nitride composite coatings on Ti substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göncü, Yapıncak; Geçgin, Merve; Bakan, Feray; Ay, Nuran

    2017-10-01

    In this study, commercial pure titanium samples were coated with nano hydroxyapatite-nano hexagonal boron nitride (nano HA-nano hBN) composite by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). The effect of process parameters (applied voltage, deposition time and solid concentration) on the coating morphology, thickness and the adhesion behavior were studied systematically and crack free nano hBN-nano HA composite coating production was achieved for developing bioactive coatings on titanium substrates for orthopedic applications. For the examination of structural and morphological characteristics of the coating surfaces, various complementary analysis methods were performed. For the structural characterization, XRD and Raman Spectroscopy were used while, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) techniques were carried out for revealing the morphological characterization. The results showed that nano HA-nano hBN were successfully deposited on Ti surface with uniform, crack-free coating by EPD. The amounts of hBN in suspension are considered to have no effect on coating thickness. By adding hBN into HA, the morphology of HA did not change and hBN has no significant effect on porous structure. These nanostructured surfaces are expected to be suitable for proliferation of cells and have high potential for bioactive materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, M; Gongadze, E; Perutkova, Š; A Iglič; Mazare, A; Schmuki, P; Kralj-Iglič, V; Milošev, I; Mozetič, M

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO 2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO 2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO 2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties. (topical review)

  7. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, M.; Mazare, A.; Gongadze, E.; Perutkova, Š.; Kralj-Iglič, V.; Milošev, I.; Schmuki, P.; Iglič, A.; Mozetič, M.

    2015-02-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties.

  8. An assessment of the thermodynamic properties of uranium nitride, plutonium nitride and uranium-plutonium mixed nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, T.; Ohse, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties such as vapour pressures, heat capacities and enthalpies of formation for UN(s), PuN(s) and (U, Pu)N(s) are critically evaluated. The equations of the vapour pressures and the heat capacities for the three nitrides are assessed. Thermal functions, and thermodynamic functions for the formation of UN(s), PuN(s) and (U, Pu)N(s), are calculated

  9. Preparation and study of the nitrides and mixed carbide-nitrides of uranium and of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselin, F.

    1966-06-01

    A detailed description is given of a simple method for preparing uranium and plutonium nitrides by the direct action of nitrogen under pressure at moderate temperatures (about 400 C) on the partially hydrogenated bulk metal. It is shown that there is complete miscibility between the UN and PuN phases. The variations in the reticular parameters of the samples as a function of temperature and in the presence of oxide have been used to detect and evaluate the solubility of oxygen in the different phases. A study has been made of the sintering of these nitrides as a function of the preparation conditions with or without sintering additives. A favorable but non-reproducible, effect has been found for traces of oxide. The best results were obtained for pure UN at 1600 C (96 per cent theoretical density) on condition that a well defined powder, was used. The criterion used is the integral width of the X-ray diffraction lines. The compounds UN and PuN are completely miscible with the corresponding carbides. This makes it possible to prepare carbide-nitrides of the general formula (U,Pu) (C,N) by solid-phase diffusion, at around 1400 C. The sintering of these carbide-nitrides is similar to that of the carbides if the nitrogen content is low; in particular, nickel is an efficient sintering agent. For high contents, the sintering is similar to that of pure nitrides. (author) [fr

  10. Intragranular Chromium Nitride Precipitates in Duplex and Superduplex Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Iversen, Torunn Hjulstad

    2012-01-01

    Intragranular chromium nitrides is a phenomenon with detrimental effects on material properties in superduplex stainless steels which have not received much attention. Precipitation of nitrides occurs when the ferritic phase becomes supersaturated with nitrogen and there is insufficient time during cooling for diffusion of nitrogen into austenite. Heat treatment was carried out at between 1060◦C and 1160◦C to study the materials susceptibility to nitride precipitation with...

  11. Prevention and suppression of metal packing fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Mark; Rogers, William J; Sam Mannan, M; Ostrowski, Scott W

    2003-11-14

    Structured packing has been widely used because of large surface area that makes possible columns with high capacity and efficiency. The large surface area also contributes to fire hazards because of hydrocarbon deposits that can easily combust and promote combustion of the thin metal packing materials. Materials of high surface area that can fuel fires include reactive metals, such as titanium, and materials that are not considered combustible, such as stainless steel. Column design and material selection for packing construction is discussed together with employee training and practices for safe column maintenance and operations. Presented also are methods and agents for suppression of metal fires. Guidance for prevention and suppression of metal fires is related to incidents involving packing fires in columns.

  12. Synthesis of Uranium nitride powders using metal uranium powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong Joo; Oh, Jang Soo; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Keon Sik

    2012-01-01

    Uranium nitride (UN) is a potential fuel material for advanced nuclear reactors because of their high fuel density, high thermal conductivity, high melting temperature, and considerable breeding capability in LWRs. Uranium nitride powders can be fabricated by a carbothermic reduction of the oxide powders, or the nitriding of metal uranium. The carbothermic reduction has an advantage in the production of fine powders. However it has many drawbacks such as an inevitable engagement of impurities, process burden, and difficulties in reusing of expensive N 15 gas. Manufacturing concerns issued in the carbothermic reduction process can be solved by changing the starting materials from oxide powder to metals. However, in nitriding process of metal, it is difficult to obtain fine nitride powders because metal uranium is usually fabricated in the form of bulk ingots. In this study, a simple reaction method was tested to fabricate uranium nitride powders directly from uranium metal powders. We fabricated uranium metal spherical powder and flake using a centrifugal atomization method. The nitride powders were obtained by thermal treating those metal particles under nitrogen containing gas. We investigated the phase and morphology evolutions of powders during the nitriding process. A phase analysis of nitride powders was also a part of the present work

  13. Review of actinide nitride properties with focus on safety aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albiol, Thierry [CEA Cadarache, St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Arai, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    This report provides a review of the potential advantages of using actinide nitrides as fuels and/or targets for nuclear waste transmutation. Then a summary of available properties of actinide nitrides is given. Results from irradiation experiments are reviewed and safety relevant aspects of nitride fuels are discussed, including design basis accidents (transients) and severe (core disruptive) accidents. Anyway, as rather few safety studies are currently available and as many basic physical data are still missing for some actinide nitrides, complementary studies are proposed. (author)

  14. Research and development of nitride fuel cycle technology in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Arai, Yasuo; Akabori, Mitsuo; Tamaki, Yoshihisa; Itoh, Kunihiro

    2004-01-01

    The research on the nitride fuel was started for an advanced fuel, (U, Pn)N, for fast reactors, and the research activities have been expanded to minor actinide bearing nitride fuels. The fuel fabrication, property measurements, irradiation tests and pyrochemical process experiments have been made. In 2002 a five-year-program named PROMINENT was started for the development of nitride fuel cycle technology within the framework of the Development of Innovative Nuclear Technologies by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. In the research program PROMINENT, property measurements, pyrochemical process and irradiation experiments needed for nitride fuel cycle technology are being made. (author)

  15. Development of pseudocapacitive molybdenum oxide–nitride for electrochemical capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, Yen-Jui Bernie [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada); Wu, Haoran [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada); Kherani, Nazir P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada); Lian, Keryn, E-mail: keryn.lian@utoronto.ca [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    A thin film Mo oxide–nitride pseudocapacitive electrode was synthesized by electrodeposition of Mo oxide on Ti and a subsequent low-temperature (400 °C) thermal nitridation. Two nitridation environments, N{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}, were used and the results were compared. Surface analyses of these nitrided films showed partial conversion of Mo oxide to nitrides, with a lower conversion percentage being the film produced in N{sub 2}. However, the electrochemical analyses showed that the surface of the N{sub 2}-treated film had better pseudocapacitive behaviors and outperformed that nitrided in NH{sub 3}. Cycle life of the resultant N{sub 2}-treated Mo oxide–nitride was also much improved over Mo oxide. A two-electrode cell using Mo oxide–nitride electrodes was demonstrated and showed high rate performance. - Highlights: • Mo(O,N){sub x} was developed by electrodeposition and nitridation in N{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}. • N{sub 2} treated Mo(O,N){sub x} showed a capacitive performance superior to that treated by NH{sub 3}. • The promising electrochemical performance was due to the formation of γ-Mo{sub 2}N.

  16. Modeling the Gas Nitriding Process of Low Alloy Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M.; Zimmerman, C.; Donahue, D.; Sisson, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    The effort to simulate the nitriding process has been ongoing for the last 20 years. Most of the work has been done to simulate the nitriding process of pure iron. In the present work a series of experiments have been done to understand the effects of the nitriding process parameters such as the nitriding potential, temperature, and time as well as surface condition on the gas nitriding process for the steels. The compound layer growth model has been developed to simulate the nitriding process of AISI 4140 steel. In this paper the fundamentals of the model are presented and discussed including the kinetics of compound layer growth and the determination of the nitrogen diffusivity in the diffusion zone. The excellent agreements have been achieved for both as-washed and pre-oxided nitrided AISI 4140 between the experimental data and simulation results. The nitrogen diffusivity in the diffusion zone is determined to be constant and only depends on the nitriding temperature, which is ~5 × 10-9 cm2/s at 548 °C. It proves the concept of utilizing the compound layer growth model in other steels. The nitriding process of various steels can thus be modeled and predicted in the future.

  17. Atomic-layer deposition of silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Ooba, K

    1999-01-01

    Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride has been investigated by means of plasma ALD in which a NH sub 3 plasma is used, catalytic ALD in which NH sub 3 is dissociated by thermal catalytic reaction on a W filament, and temperature-controlled ALD in which only a thermal reaction on the substrate is employed. The NH sub 3 and the silicon source gases (SiH sub 2 Cl sub 2 or SiCl sub 4) were alternately supplied. For all these methods, the film thickness per cycle was saturated at a certain value for a wide range of deposition conditions. In the catalytic ALD, the selective deposition of silicon nitride on hydrogen-terminated Si was achieved, but, it was limited to only a thin (2SiO (evaporative).

  18. Boron nitride encapsulated graphene infrared emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, H. R.; Zossimova, E.; Mahlmeister, N. H.; Lawton, L. M.; Luxmoore, I. J.; Nash, G. R.

    2016-01-01

    The spatial and spectral characteristics of mid-infrared thermal emission from devices containing a large area multilayer graphene layer, encapsulated using hexagonal boron nitride, have been investigated. The devices were run continuously in air for over 1000 h, with the emission spectrum covering the absorption bands of many important gases. An approximate solution to the heat equation was used to simulate the measured emission profile across the devices yielding an estimated value of the characteristic length, which defines the exponential rise/fall of the temperature profile across the device, of 40 μm. This is much larger than values obtained in smaller exfoliated graphene devices and reflects the device geometry, and the increase in lateral heat conduction within the devices due to the multilayer graphene and boron nitride layers.

  19. Boron nitride encapsulated graphene infrared emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, H. R.; Zossimova, E.; Mahlmeister, N. H.; Lawton, L. M.; Luxmoore, I. J.; Nash, G. R., E-mail: g.r.nash@exeter.ac.uk [College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QF (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-28

    The spatial and spectral characteristics of mid-infrared thermal emission from devices containing a large area multilayer graphene layer, encapsulated using hexagonal boron nitride, have been investigated. The devices were run continuously in air for over 1000 h, with the emission spectrum covering the absorption bands of many important gases. An approximate solution to the heat equation was used to simulate the measured emission profile across the devices yielding an estimated value of the characteristic length, which defines the exponential rise/fall of the temperature profile across the device, of 40 μm. This is much larger than values obtained in smaller exfoliated graphene devices and reflects the device geometry, and the increase in lateral heat conduction within the devices due to the multilayer graphene and boron nitride layers.

  20. Titanium pigmentation. An electron probe microanalysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupre, A.; Touron, P.; Daste, J.; Lassere, J.; Bonafe, J.L.; Viraben, R.

    1985-01-01

    A patient had an unusual pigmentary disease induced by titanium dioxide. The use of a topical cream containing titanium dioxide caused a xanthomalike appearance on the patient's penis. Electron probe microanalysis was valuable in establishing the cause of this balanitis

  1. An application of eddy current damping effect on single point diamond turning of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, W. S.; To, S.

    2017-11-01

    Titanium alloys Ti6Al4V (TC4) have been popularly applied in many industries. They have superior material properties including an excellent strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. However, they are regarded as difficult to cut materials; serious tool wear, a high level of cutting vibration and low surface integrity are always involved in machining processes especially in ultra-precision machining (UPM). In this paper, a novel hybrid machining technology using an eddy current damping effect is firstly introduced in UPM to suppress machining vibration and improve the machining performance of titanium alloys. A magnetic field was superimposed on samples during single point diamond turning (SPDT) by exposing the samples in between two permanent magnets. When the titanium alloys were rotated within a magnetic field in the SPDT, an eddy current was generated through a stationary magnetic field inside the titanium alloys. An eddy current generated its own magnetic field with the opposite direction of the external magnetic field leading a repulsive force, compensating for the machining vibration induced by the turning process. The experimental results showed a remarkable improvement in cutting force variation, a significant reduction in adhesive tool wear and an extreme long chip formation in comparison to normal SPDT of titanium alloys, suggesting the enhancement of the machinability of titanium alloys using an eddy current damping effect. An eddy current damping effect was firstly introduced in the area of UPM to deliver the results of outstanding machining performance.

  2. An application of eddy current damping effect on single point diamond turning of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yip, W S; To, S

    2017-01-01

    Titanium alloys Ti6Al4V (TC4) have been popularly applied in many industries. They have superior material properties including an excellent strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. However, they are regarded as difficult to cut materials; serious tool wear, a high level of cutting vibration and low surface integrity are always involved in machining processes especially in ultra-precision machining (UPM). In this paper, a novel hybrid machining technology using an eddy current damping effect is firstly introduced in UPM to suppress machining vibration and improve the machining performance of titanium alloys. A magnetic field was superimposed on samples during single point diamond turning (SPDT) by exposing the samples in between two permanent magnets. When the titanium alloys were rotated within a magnetic field in the SPDT, an eddy current was generated through a stationary magnetic field inside the titanium alloys. An eddy current generated its own magnetic field with the opposite direction of the external magnetic field leading a repulsive force, compensating for the machining vibration induced by the turning process. The experimental results showed a remarkable improvement in cutting force variation, a significant reduction in adhesive tool wear and an extreme long chip formation in comparison to normal SPDT of titanium alloys, suggesting the enhancement of the machinability of titanium alloys using an eddy current damping effect. An eddy current damping effect was firstly introduced in the area of UPM to deliver the results of outstanding machining performance. (paper)

  3. Printing of Titanium implant prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiria, Florencia Edith; Shyan, John Yong Ming; Lim, Poon Nian; Wen, Francis Goh Chung; Yeo, Jin Fei; Cao, Tong

    2010-01-01

    Dental implant plays an important role as a conduit of force and stress to flow from the tooth to the related bone. In the load sharing between an implant and its related bone, the amount of stress carried by each of them directly related to their stiffness or modulus. Hence, it is a crucial issue for the implant to have matching mechanical properties, in particular modulus, between the implant and its related bone. Titanium is a metallic material that has good biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. Whilst the modulus of the bulk material is still higher than that of bone, it is the lowest among all other commonly used metallic implant materials, such as stainless steel or cobalt alloy. Hence it is potential to further reduce the modulus of pure Titanium by engineering its processing method to obtain porous structure. In this project, porous Titanium implant prototype is fabricated using 3-dimensional printing. This technique allows the flexibility of design customization, which is beneficial for implant fabrication as tailoring of implant size and shape helps to ensure the implant would fit nicely to the patient. The fabricated Titanium prototype had a modulus of 4.8-13.2 GPa, which is in the range of natural bone modulus. The compressive strength achieved was between 167 to 455 MPa. Subsequent cell culture study indicated that the porous Titanium prototype had good biocompatibility and is suitable for bone cell attachment and proliferation.

  4. Gallium Nitride Crystals: Novel Supercapacitor Electrode Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouzhi; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Changlong; Shao, Yongliang; Wu, Yongzhong; Lv, Jiaxin; Hao, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    A type of single-crystal gallium nitride mesoporous membrane is fabricated and its supercapacitor properties are demonstrated for the first time. The supercapacitors exhibit high-rate capability, stable cycling life at high rates, and ultrahigh power density. This study may expand the range of crystals as high-performance electrode materials in the field of energy storage. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Silicon Nitride Antireflection Coatings for Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C.; Wydeven, T.; Donohoe, K.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical-vapor deposition adapted to yield graded index of refraction. Silicon nitride deposited in layers, refractive index of which decreases with distance away from cell/coating interface. Changing index of refraction allows adjustment of spectral transmittance for wavelengths which cell is most effective at converting light to electric current. Average conversion efficiency of solar cells increased from 8.84 percent to 12.63 percent.

  6. Nanopillar arrays of amorphous carbon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai Krishna, Katla; Pavan Kumar, B. V. V. S.; Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy

    2011-07-01

    Nanopillar arrays of amorphous carbon nitride have been prepared using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane as a template. The amine groups present on the surface of these nanopillars were exploited for functionalization with oleic acid in order to stabilize the nanostructure at the aqueous-organic interface and also for the immobilization of metal nanoparticles and protein. These immobilised nanoparticles were found to have good catalytic activity.

  7. Anodic growth of titanium dioxide nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of producing nanostructures of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) by anodisation of titanium (Ti) in an electrochemical cell, comprising the steps of: immersing a non-conducting substrate coated with a layer of titanium, defined as the anode, in an electrolyte solution...... an electrical contact to the layer of titanium on the anode, where the electrical contact is made in the electrolyte solution...

  8. Bonding silicon nitride using glass-ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobedoe, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon nitride has been successfully bonded to itself using magnesium-aluminosilicate glass and glass-ceramic. For some samples, bonding was achieved using a diffusion bonder, but in other instances, following an initial degassing hold, higher temperatures were used in a nitrogen atmosphere with no applied load. For diffusion bonding, a small applied pressure at a temperature below which crystallisation occurs resulted in intimate contact. At slightly higher temperatures, the extent of the reaction at the interface and the microstructure of the glass-ceramic joint was highly sensitive to the bonding temperature. Bonding in a nitrogen atmosphere resulted in a solution-reprecipitation reaction. A thin layer of glass produced a ''dry'', glass-free joint, whilst a thicker layer resulted in a continuous glassy join across the interface. The chromium silicide impurities within the silicon nitride react with the nucleating agent in the glass ceramic, which may lead to difficulty in producing a fine glass-ceramic microstructure. Slightly lower temperatures in nitrogen resulted in a polycrystalline join but the interfacial contact was poor. It is hoped that one of the bonds produced may be developed to eventually form part of a graded joint between silicon nitride and a high temperature nickel alloy. (orig.)

  9. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, O.; Hertz, D.; Lebrun, J.P.; Michel, H.

    1995-01-01

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors

  10. Thermodynamics of silicon nitridation - Effect of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, N. J.; Zeleznik, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Equilibrium compositions for the nitridization of Si were calculated to detect the effectiveness of H2 in removal of the oxide film and in increasing the concentration of SiO and reducing the proportions of O2. Gibbs free energy for the formation of SiN2O was computed above 1685 K, and at lower temperatures. The thermodynamic properties of SiN2O2 were then considered from 1000-3000 K, taking into account the known thermodynamic data for 39 molecular combinations of the Si, Ni, and O. The gases formed were assumed ideal mixtures with pure phase condensed species. The mole fractions were obtained for a system of SiO2 with each Si particle covered with a thin layer of SiO2 before nitridation, and a system in which the nitriding atmosphere had access to the Si. The presence of H2 was determined to enhance the removal of NiO2 in the first system, decrease the partial pressure of O2, increase the partial pressures of SiO, Si, H2O, NH3, and SiH4, while its effects were negligible in the Si system.

  11. Performance evaluation of Titanium nitride coated tool in turning of mild steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, B.; Pramod Kumar, G.; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Jagadeesh, N.; kumar, K. Ravi; Haribabu, S.

    2018-03-01

    The growth in demand for bio-gradable materials is opened as a venue for using vegetable oils, coconut oils etc., as alternate to the conventional coolants for machining operations. At present in manufacturing industries the demand for surface quality is increasing rapidly along with dimensional accuracy and geometric tolerances. The present study is influence of cutting parameters on the surface roughness during the turning of mild steel with TiN coated carbide tool using groundnut oil and soluble oil as coolants. The results showed vegetable gave closer surface finish compares with soluble oil. Cutting parameters has been optimized with Taguchi technique. In this paper, the main objective is to optimize the cutting parameters and reduce surface roughness analogous to increase the tool life by apply the coating on the carbide inserts. The cost of the coating is more, but economically efficient than changing the tools frequently. The plots were generated and analysed to find the relationship between them which are confirmed by performing a comparison study between the predicted results and theoretical results.

  12. Titanium Nitride Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Alkaline Solution

    KAUST Repository

    Ohnishi, R.; Katayama, M.; Cha, Dong Kyu; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Kubota, J.; Domen, K.

    2013-01-01

    Monodispersed TiN nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution (7–23 nm) were synthesized using mesoporous graphitic (mpg)-C3N4 templates with different pore sizes. The nano-materials were examined as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. The TiN nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N2 sorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and C-H-N elemental analysis. The ORR current increased as the TiN particle size decreased, and hence the surface area of TiN nanoparticles reactive to ORR increased. Rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) measurements revealed that the ORR on TiN surfaces proceeded mainly via a two-electron pathway, producing H2O2 as the main product. Mechanistic aspects of ORR on TiN surfaces are discussed.

  13. Effect of titanium implantation on the mechanical properties of silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujihana, T.; Nishimura, O.; Yabe, K.; Hayashi, H.; Iwaki, M.

    1995-01-01

    A study has been made of the chemical composition and mechanical properties of Ti + -implanted Si 3 N 4 surface layers. Implantation of 48 Ti + was performed with doses ranging from 10 15 to 10 17 ions cm -2 at an energy of 150 keV, and at nearly room temperature. XPS was used to analyze the depth dependence of atomic fraction and chemical bonding states of Ti + -implanted layers. The near-surface hardness was measured by a Vickers hardness tester. The friction and wear properties were measured under unlubricated conditions at room temperature using a pin on disk-plane and a block on wheel-periphery configurations, in which the pin and wheel used were AISI 1045 and ASTM W1-9, respectively. Implanted Ti-atoms formed a gaussian distribution predicted by the range theory. At the average projected range, most of Ti-atoms existed as a metallic state and TiN bonding was also formed. Oxygen and carbon were found near the surface layers. In addition to the surface peak, O-atoms accumulated in front of the average projected range of Ti. Such O-atoms formed bonds of Si-oxides and Ti-oxides. Carbon existed as a graphitic state. With increasing a Ti dose, the near-surface hardness decreased, and the wear rate increased at the running-in stage having the high friction coefficient. The steady wear attributed to the stable friction coefficient appeared after the running-in stage, although such a stable stage was not observed for unimplanted Si 3 N 4 . The mechanism for the change in mechanical properties of Si 3 N 4 induced by Ti + -implantation will be discussed in relation to XPS characteristics

  14. Electronic and Optical Properties of Titanium Nitride Bulk and Surfaces from First Principles Calculations (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-18

    properties of TiN bulk and surface structures were previously per- formed,24–35 analysis of the optical properties at an ab initio level for this...TDDFT dielectric functions has shown that the functional is subject to validation with GW-BSE calcula- tions. Analysis of the GW0-BSE results in...al.55) is given by the Cartesian tensor eð2Þab ðxÞ ¼ 4p 2e2 X limq!0 1 q2 P c;v;k2wkdðwkck vk wÞ huckþeaqjuvkihuckþeabqjuvki, where x is in

  15. Titanium Nitride Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Alkaline Solution

    KAUST Repository

    Ohnishi, R.

    2013-03-12

    Monodispersed TiN nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution (7–23 nm) were synthesized using mesoporous graphitic (mpg)-C3N4 templates with different pore sizes. The nano-materials were examined as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. The TiN nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N2 sorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and C-H-N elemental analysis. The ORR current increased as the TiN particle size decreased, and hence the surface area of TiN nanoparticles reactive to ORR increased. Rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) measurements revealed that the ORR on TiN surfaces proceeded mainly via a two-electron pathway, producing H2O2 as the main product. Mechanistic aspects of ORR on TiN surfaces are discussed.

  16. Picosecond ultrasonic study of surface acoustic waves on titanium nitride nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjornsson, M. M.; Connolly, A. B.; Mahat, S.; Rachmilowitz, B. E.; Daly, B. C.; Antonelli, G. A.; Myers, A.; Singh, K. J.; Yoo, H. J.; King, S. W.

    2015-01-01

    We have measured surface acoustic waves on nanostructured TiN wires overlaid on multiple thin films on a silicon substrate using the ultrafast pump-probe technique known as picosecond ultrasonics. We find a prominent oscillation in the range of 11–54 GHz for samples with varying pitch ranging from 420 nm down to 168 nm. We find that the observed oscillation increases monotonically in frequency with decrease in pitch, but that the increase is not linear. By comparing our data to two-dimensional mechanical simulations of the nanostructures, we find that the type of surface oscillation to which we are sensitive changes depending on the pitch of the sample. Surface waves on substrates that are loaded by thin films can take multiple forms, including Rayleigh-like waves, Sezawa waves, and radiative (leaky) surface waves. We describe evidence for detection of modes that display characteristics of these three surface wave types

  17. Facile Conversion of Electrospun TiO2 into Titanium Nitride/Oxynitride Fibers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zukalová, Markéta; Procházka, Jan; Bastl, Zdeněk; Duchoslav, J.; Rubáček, L.; Havlíček, D.; Kavan, Ladislav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 13 (2010), s. 4045-4055 ISSN 0897-4756 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk OC09048; GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA AV ČR KAN200100801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : visible-light photocatalysis * nitrogen doped TiO2 * thin films Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 6.400, year: 2010

  18. Epitaxial superlattices with titanium nitride as a plasmonic component for optical hyperbolic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Saha, Bivas; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    , we address these issues by realizing an epitaxial superlattice as an HMM. The superlattice consists of ultrasmooth layers as thin as 5 nm and exhibits sharp interfaces which are essential for high-quality HMM devices. Our study reveals that such a TiN-based superlattice HMM provides a higher PDOS...

  19. Photon-noise limited sensitivity in titanium nitride kinetic inductance detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubmayr, J., E-mail: hubmayr@nist.gov; Beall, J.; Becker, D.; Cho, H.-M.; Hilton, G. C.; Li, D.; Pappas, D. P.; Van Lanen, J.; Vissers, M. R.; Gao, J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Devlin, M.; Dober, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Groppi, C.; Mauskopf, P. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 781 S Terrace Rd., Tempe, Arizona 85281 (United States); Irwin, K. D. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Wang, Y. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Quantum Optoelectronics Laboratory, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu (China); Wei, L. F. [Quantum Optoelectronics Laboratory, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu (China)

    2015-02-16

    We demonstrate photon-noise limited performance at sub-millimeter wavelengths in feedhorn-coupled, microwave kinetic inductance detectors made of a TiN/Ti/TiN trilayer superconducting film, tuned to have a transition temperature of 1.4 K. Micro-machining of the silicon-on-insulator wafer backside creates a quarter-wavelength backshort optimized for efficient coupling at 250 μm. Using frequency read out and when viewing a variable temperature blackbody source, we measure device noise consistent with photon noise when the incident optical power is >0.5 pW, corresponding to noise equivalent powers >3×10{sup −17} W/√(Hz). This sensitivity makes these devices suitable for broadband photometric applications at these wavelengths.

  20. Coating of titanium implants with boron nitride by RF-magnetron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, Gazi University, Biskek caddesi 84.sokak, ... was repeated after RF power of the system was increased and voltage values were ... ination, cohesive and adhesive failures and porosity of the.

  1. Atomic platinum layer coated titanium copper nitride supported on carbon nanotubes for the methanol oxidation reaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zheng, Y

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available measurements. The results confirm the core-shell structure of the prepared TiN@Pt/CNTs catalyst. More importantly, the catalyst exhibits superb mass activity and durability for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) than that of the commercial JM Pt/C catalyst...

  2. On the leakage problem of MIM capacitors due to improper etching of titanium nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenland, A.W.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2010-01-01

    In this work, Metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitor structures are fabricated in a technology using TiN as electrode material. The electrical characterization revealed devices with small and large leakage currents. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) inspection showed a correlation between high

  3. Large-Area Ultrabroadband Absorber for Solar Thermophotovoltaics Based on 3D Titanium Nitride Nanopillars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chirumamilla, Manohar; Chirumamilla, Anisha; Yang, Yuanqing

    2017-01-01

    absorptivities of 0.94, over a wide range of oblique angles between 0° and 75°. The effect of geometrical parameters of the TiN nanopillars on broadband absorption is investigated. By combining the flexibility of nanopillar design and lossy TiN films, ultrabroadband absorption in the visible and nearinfrared...

  4. Uranium fluorides analysis. Titanium spectrophotometric determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Titanium determination in uranium hexafluoride in the range 0.7 to 100 microgrammes after transformation of uranium fluoride in sulfate. Titanium is separated by extraction with N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine, reextracted by hydrochloric-hydrofluoric acid. The complex titanium-N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine is extracted by chloroform. Spectrophotometric determination at 400 nm [fr

  5. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.1575 Section 73.1575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  6. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or on...

  7. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.2575 Section 73.2575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  8. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.575 Section 73.575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2) Color...

  9. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891, shall...

  10. Adaptive mesh refinement in titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colella, Phillip; Wen, Tong

    2005-01-21

    In this paper, we evaluate Titanium's usability as a high-level parallel programming language through a case study, where we implement a subset of Chombo's functionality in Titanium. Chombo is a software package applying the Adaptive Mesh Refinement methodology to numerical Partial Differential Equations at the production level. In Chombo, the library approach is used to parallel programming (C++ and Fortran, with MPI), whereas Titanium is a Java dialect designed for high-performance scientific computing. The performance of our implementation is studied and compared with that of Chombo in solving Poisson's equation based on two grid configurations from a real application. Also provided are the counts of lines of code from both sides.

  11. 15 N utilization in nitride nuclear fuels for advanced nuclear power reactors and accelerator - driven systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, D.

    2005-01-01

    15 N utilization for nitride nuclear fuels production for nuclear power reactors and accelerator - driven systems is presented. Nitride nuclear fuel is the obvious choice for advanced nuclear reactors and ADS because of its favorable properties: a high melting point, excellent thermal conductivity, high fissile density, lower fission gas release and good radiation tolerance. The application of nitride fuels in nuclear reactors and ADS requires use of 15 N enriched nitrogen to suppress 14 C production due to (n,p) reaction on 14 N. Accelerator - driven system is a recent development merging of accelerator and fission reactor technologies to generate electricity and transmute long - lived radioactive wastes as minor actinides: Np, Am, Cm. A high-energy proton beam hitting a heavy metal target produces neutrons by spallation. The neutrons cause fission in the fuel, but unlike in conventional reactors, the fuel is sub-critical and fission ceases when the accelerator is turned off. Nitride fuel is a promising candidate for transmutation in ADS of minor actinides, which are converted into nitrides with 15 N for that purpose. Tacking into account that the world wide market is about 20 to 40 Kg 15 N annually, the supply of that isotope for nitride fuel production for nuclear power reactors and ADS would therefore demand an increase in production capacity by a factor of 1000. For an industrial plant producing 100 t/y 15 N, using present technology of isotopic exchange in NITROX system, the first separation stage of the cascade would be fed with 10M HNO 3 solution of 600 mc/h flow - rate. If conversion of HNO 3 into NO, NO 2 , at the enriching end of the columns, would be done with gaseous SO 2 , for a production plant of 100 t/y 15 N a consumption of 4 million t SO 2 /y and a production of 70 % H 2 SO 4 waste solution of 4.5 million mc/y are estimated. The reconversion of H 2 SO 4 into SO 2 in order to recycle of SO 2 is a problem to be solved to compensate the cost of SO 2

  12. RF plasma nitriding of severely deformed iron-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferkel, H.; Glatzer, M.; Estrin, Y.; Valiev, R.Z.; Blawert, C.; Mordike, B.L.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of severe plastic deformation by cold high pressure torsion (HPT) on radio frequency (RF) plasma nitriding of pure iron, as well as St2K50 and X5CrNi1810 steels was investigated. Nitriding was carried out for 3 h in a nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of 10 -5 bar and temperatures of 350 and 400 deg. C. Nitrided specimens were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction and micro hardness measurements. It was found that HPT enhances the effect of nitriding leading almost to doubling of the thickness of the nitrided layer for pure iron and the high alloyed steel. The largest increase in hardness was observed when HPT was combined with RF plasma nitriding at 350 deg. C. In the case of pure iron, the X-ray diffraction spectra showed the formation of ε and γ' nitrides in the compound layer, with a preferential formation of γ' at the expense of the α-phase at the higher nitriding temperature. The corresponding surface hardness was up to 950 HV0.01. While the HPT-processed St2K50 exhibits both nitride phases after nitriding at 350 deg. C, only the γ'-phase was observed after nitriding at 400 deg. C. A surface hardness of up to 1050 HV0.01 was measured for this steel. The high alloyed steel X5CrNi1810 exhibited the highest increase in surface hardness when HPT was combined with nitriding at 350 deg. C. The surface hardness of this steel was greater than 1400 HV0.025. The XRD analyses indicate the formation of the expanded austenite (S-phase) in the surface layer as a result of RF plasma nitriding. Furthermore, after HPT X5CrNi1810 was transformed completely into deformation martensite which did not transform back to austenite under thermochemical treatment. However, in the case of nitriding of the HPT-processed high alloyed steel at 400 deg. C, the formation of the S-phase was less pronounced. In view of the observed XRD peak broadening, the formation of nitrides, such as e.g. CrN, cannot be ruled out

  13. Plasma nitriding - an eco friendly surface hardening process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.

    2015-01-01

    Surface hardening is a process of heating the metal such that the surface gets only hardened. This process is adopted for many components like gears, cams, and crankshafts, which desire high hardness on the outer surface with a softer core to withstand the shocks. So, to attain such properties processes like carburising, nitriding, flame hardening and induction hardening are employed. Amongst these processes nitriding is the most commonly used process by many industries. In nitriding process the steel material is heated to a temperature of around 550 C and then exposed to atomic nitrogen. This atomic nitrogen reacts with iron and other alloying elements and forms nitrides, which are very hard in nature. By this process both wear resistance and hardness of the product can be increased. The atomic nitrogen required for this process can be obtained using ammonia gas (gas nitriding), cyanide based salt bath (liquid nitriding) and plasma medium (plasma nitriding). However, plasma nitriding has recently received considerable industrial interest owing to its characteristic of faster nitrogen penetration, short treatment time, low process temperature, minimal distortion, low energy use and easier control of layer formation compared with conventional techniques such as gas and liquid nitriding. This process can be used for all ferrous materials including stainless steels. Plasma nitriding is carried out using a gas mixture of nitrogen and hydrogen gas at sub atmospheric pressures hence, making it eco-friendly in nature. Plasma nitriding allows modification of the surface layers and hardness profiles by changing the gas mixture and temperature. The wide applicable temperature range enables a multitude of applications, beyond the possibilities of gas or salt bath processes. This has led to numerous applications of this process in industries such as the manufacture of machine parts for plastics and food processing, packaging and tooling as well as pumps and hydraulic, machine

  14. The titanium oxide phi system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galehouse, D. C.; Davis, S. P.

    1980-01-01

    The phy system of titanium oxide has been studied in emission in the near-infrared, with the Fourier transform spectrometer at a resolution of 8000,000. Approximately 3000 lines from 25 bands of this system have been identified, including all five 0-0 and 0-1 bands corresponding to the five natural titanium isotopes. Eleven vibrational levels have been observed, and all bands have been rotationally analyzed. Band intensities are agreement with known isotopic abundances and calculated Franck-Condon factors.

  15. Direct comparison of the electrical properties in metal/oxide/nitride/oxide/silicon and metal/aluminum oxide/nitride/oxide/silicon capacitors with equivalent oxide thicknesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Ho-Myoung; Seo, Yu Jeong; Kim, Hee Dong; Kim, Kyoung Chan; Kim, Jong-Guk [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Won-Ju; Koh, Jung-Hyuk [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Yun Mo [Department of Materials and Science Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Geun, E-mail: tgkim1@korea.ac.k [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-31

    We examine the electrical properties of metal/oxide/nitride/oxide/silicon (MONOS) capacitors with two different blocking oxides, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, under the influence of the same electric field. The thickness of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer is set to 150 A, which is electrically equivalent to a thickness of the SiO{sub 2} layer of 65 A, in the MONOS structure for this purpose. The capacitor with the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} blocking layer shows a larger capacitance-voltage memory window of 8.6 V, lower program voltage of 7 V, faster program/erase speeds of 10 ms/1 {mu}s, lower leakage current of 100 pA and longer data retention than the one with the SiO{sub 2} blocking layer does. These improvements are attributed to the suppression of the carrier transport to the gate electrode afforded by the use of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} blocking layer physically thicker than the SiO{sub 2} one, as well as the effective charge-trapping by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the deep energy levels in the nitride layer.

  16. Nanotubular topography enhances the bioactivity of titanium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingyan; Zhang, Xinchun; Yan, Wangxiang; Chen, Zhipei; Shuai, Xintao; Wang, Anxun; Wang, Yan

    2017-08-01

    Surface modification on titanium implants plays an important role in promoting mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) response to enhance osseointegration persistently. In this study, nano-scale TiO 2 nanotube topography (TNT), micro-scale sand blasted-acid etched topography (SLA), and hybrid sand blasted-acid etched/nanotube topography (SLA/TNT) were fabricated on the surfaces of titanium implants. Although the initial cell adherence at 60 min among TNT, SLA and TNT/SLA was not different, SLA and SLA/TNT presented to be rougher and suppressed the proliferation of MSC. TNT showed hydrophilic surface and balanced promotion of cellular functions. After being implanted in rabbit femur models, TNT displayed the best osteogenesis inducing ability as well as strong bonding strength to the substrate. These results indicate that nano-scale TNT provides favorable surface topography for improving the clinical performance of endosseous implants compared with micro and hybrid micro/nano surfaces, suggesting a promising and reliable surface modification strategy of titanium implants for clinical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Irradiation response in titanium modified austenitic stainless steels prepared by rapid solidification processing. Pt. 3. A model for the effect of titanium addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imeson, D.; Tong, C.H.; Parker, C.A.; Vander Sande, J.B.; Grant, N.J.; Harling, O.K. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (USA). Nuclear Reactor Lab.)

    1984-05-01

    Titanium carbide precipitation on dislocations during irradiation and recoil-induced particle dissolution are considered. The outline analysis given indicates that complete swelling suppression may occur in favorable conditions due to a counterbalancing of the effective dislocation interstitial bias. The behavior is, however, not stable against a return to normal swelling levels for type 316 steels. A model is presented which may serve as a basis for the interpretation of some aspects of the irradiation response in this system.

  18. Coating of the orthopaedic titanium alloys with sol-gel derived hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milev, A.; Green, D.; Chai, C.S.; Ben-Nissan, B.

    1999-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is known to be both biocompatible and bioactive material, however, due to its poor mechanical properties and design limitations is not suitable for applying as a load bearing implant. This could be overcome by using appropriate metallic substrates covered with HAp, derived via different techniques. These coatings allow improved adhesion strength of the load bearing substrate to the bone, resulting in shorter healing periods as well as predictable behaviour of the implant for longer periods of time. There are different techniques of producing HAp appropriate for coating purposes. Due to the small particle size of the grains derived, sol-gel route is preferable where lower sintering temperatures are of primary importance. For better adhesion between substrate and hydroxyapatite coating, the surface of titanium substrate, in this study, was converted to titanium nitride and/or oxynitride. Sintering temperatures of 900 deg C have been used for producing crystalline HAp coatings. The control of sol-gel solutions and the analysis of the coatings were carried out using XRD, SEM and DTA techniques. Results obtained indicate high quality HAp coatings can be produced on titanium substrates especially with complex shapes that benefits over the other coating methods

  19. 77 FR 51825 - Ferrovanadium and Nitrided Vanadium From Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... Nitrided Vanadium From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject five... order on ferrovanadium and nitrided vanadium from Russia would not be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to an industry in the United States within a reasonably foreseeable time. \\1...

  20. Fabrication of functional structures on thin silicon nitride membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekkels, P.; Tjerkstra, R.W.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Brugger, J.P.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    A process to fabricate functional polysilicon structures above large (4×4 mm2) thin (200 nm), very flat LPCVD silicon rich nitride membranes was developed. Key features of this fabrication process are the use of low-stress LPCVD silicon nitride, sacrificial layer etching, and minimization of

  1. Process for producing ceramic nitrides anc carbonitrides and their precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G.M.; Maya, L.

    1987-02-25

    A process for preparing ceramic nitrides and carbon nitrides in the form of very pure, fine particulate powder. Appropriate precursors is prepared by reaching a transition metal alkylamide with ammonia to produce a mixture of metal amide and metal imide in the form of an easily pyrolyzable precipitate.

  2. Advances in cost effective processing of titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, O.E.

    1993-01-01

    Recently an industry expert pointed out that one of the greatest hindrances to the growth of titanium usage has been the low percentage of material usable in the final product. Due to the extensive processing, forming, and machining operations typically performed on titanium, yield losses are high. This is especially true in aerospace applications where most titanium is used. In engine components, the start to finish ratio, known as the buy to fly ratio, is often as high as 7 to 1. This can be illustrated by looking at the use of titanium in Pratt and Whitney engines. In the JT-8D-217 used on Boeing's 737-200, the titanium buyweight is 5,385 pounds, whereas the finished titanium, flyweight is just 758 pounds. This start to finish ratio is 7.1:1, giving titanium 17.0% of total engine weight. (orig.)

  3. Low Temperature Gaseous Nitriding of a Stainless Steel Containing Strong Nitride Formers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    Low temperature thermochemical surface hardening of the precipitation hardening austenitic stainless steel A286 in solution treated state was investigated. A286 contains, besides high amounts of Cr, also substantial amounts of strong nitride formers as Ti, Al and V. It is shown that simultaneous...

  4. Lactobacillusassisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Anal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAn eco-friendlylactobacillussp. (microbe assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at room temperature. X-ray and transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of Ti nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles as well as a number of aggregates almost spherical in shape having a size of 40–60 nm are found.

  5. On structural recrystallization in titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzaev, D.A.; Schastlivtsev, V.M.; Shtejnberg, M.M.; Ul'yanov, V.G.; AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Fiziki Metallov)

    1984-01-01

    The effect of preliminary superfast quenching on structural changes at inverse α→β transformation in titanium is studied. Cooling at rates more than 10 4 deg/s results in grain refining at succeeding annealing in β- and α- regions. The obtained effect is explained by additional phase transformation-induced hardening conditioned by decrease of the transformation point at superfast cooling

  6. Nanodispersed boriding of titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyuk, K.O.; Kostyuk, V.O.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of improving the operational reliability of machines is becoming increasingly important due to the increased mechanical, thermal and other loads on the details. There are many surface hardening methods for machines parts which breakdown begins with surface corruption. The most promising methods are chemical-thermal treatment. The aim of this work is to study the impact of boriding on the structure and properties of titanium alloy. Materials and Methods: The material of this study is VT3-1 titanium alloy. The boriding were conducted using nanodispersed powder blend based on boric substances. It is established that boriding of paste compounds allows obtaining the surface hardness within 30 - 29 GPa and with declining to 27- 26 GPa in layer to the transition zone (with total thickness up to 110 μm) owing to changes of the layer phase composition where T 2 B, TiB, TiB 2 titanium borides are formed. The increasing of chemical-thermal treatment time from 15 minutes to 2 hours leads to thickening of the borated layer (30 - 110 μm) and transition zone (30 - 190 μm). Due to usage of nanodispersed boric powder, the boriding duration is decreasing in 2 - 3 times. This allows saving time and electric energy. The developed optimal mode of boriding the VT3-1 titanium alloy allows obtaining the required operational characteristics and to combine the saturation of the surface layer with atomic boron and hardening

  7. Problems and possibilities of development of boron nitride ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusanova, L.N.; Romashin, A.G.; Kulikova, G.I.; Golubeva, O.P.

    1988-01-01

    The modern state of developments in the field of technology of ceramics produced from boron nitride is analyzed. Substantial difficulties in production of pure ceramics from hexagonal and wurtzite-like boron nitride are stated as related to the structure peculiarities and inhomogeneity of chemical bonds in elementary crystal cells of various modifications. Advantages and disadvantages of familiar technological procedures in production of boron nitride ceramics are compared. A new technology is suggested, which is based on the use of electroorganic compounds for hardening and protection of porous high-purity boron-nitride die from oxidation, and as high-efficient sintered elements for treatment of powders of various structures and further pyrolisis. The method is called thermal molecular lacing (TML). Properties of ceramics produced by the TML method are compared with characteristics of well-known brands of boron nitride ceramics

  8. Electrochemical behavior of rare earth metals and their nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yasuhiko; Goto, Takuya

    2004-01-01

    Pyrometallurgical recycle process using molten salts is considered to be a high potential in pyro-reprocess technologies for spent nitride fuels, and it is important to understand chemical and electro-chemical behavior of nitrides and metals in molten salts. In this study, cadmium nitrates deposited on the anode Cd plate in motlen salt (LiCl-KCl) with addition of Li 3 N are examined. The cadmium nitrates deposited have various compositions corresponding to polarization potentials and then, the relationship between the deposition potential of nitride Cd and their composition is cleared. Their standard chemical potential of CdN is estimated from electrochemical measurement. And then, potential-pH 3- diagram is drawn by voltametry examination of nitride resolution behavior with using thermochemical data of nitrides. (A. Hishinuma)

  9. Exploring electrolyte preference of vanadium nitride supercapacitor electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Zhaohui; Lu, Gang [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Luoyang Institute of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471023 (China); Wang, Tianhu [School of Electrical Information and Engineering, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China); Ge, Yunwang, E-mail: ywgelit@126.com [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Luoyang Institute of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471023 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Hierarchical VN nanostructures were prepared on graphite foam. • Electrolyte preference of VN supercapacitor electrodes was explored. • VN showed better capacitive property in organic and alkaline electrolytes than LiCl. - Abstract: Vanadium nitride hierarchical nanostructures were prepared through an ammonia annealing procedure utilizing vanadium pentoxide nanostructures grown on graphite foam. The electrochemical properties of hierarchical vanadium nitride was tested in aqueous and organic electrolytes. As a result, the vanadium nitride showed better capacitive energy storage property in organic and alkaline electrolytes. This work provides insight into the charge storage process of vanadium nitride and our findings can shed light on other transition metal nitride-based electrochemical energy storage systems.

  10. Additive Manufacturing of Dense Hexagonal Boron Nitride Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez Rossy, Andres E [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Elliott, Amy M [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

    2017-05-12

    The feasibility of manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via additive manufacturing techniques was investigated. It was demonstrated that it is possible to hot-extrude thermoplastic filaments containing uniformly distributed boron nitride particles with a volume concentration as high as 60% and that these thermoplastic filaments can be used as feedstock for 3D-printing objects using a fused deposition system. Objects 3D-printed by fused deposition were subsequently sintered at high temperature to obtain dense ceramic products. In a parallel study the behavior of hexagonal boron nitride in aqueous solutions was investigated. It was shown that the addition of a cationic dispersant to an azeotrope enabled the formulation of slurries with a volume concentration of boron nitride as high as 33%. Although these slurries exhibited complex rheological behavior, the results from this study are encouraging and provide a pathway for manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via robocasting.

  11. The Effect of Polymer Char on Nitridation Kinetics of Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Rickmond C.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1994-01-01

    Effects of polymer char on nitridation kinetics of attrition milled silicon powder have been investigated from 1200 to 1350 C. Results indicate that at and above 1250 C, the silicon compacts containing 3.5 wt percent polymer char were fully converted to Si3N4 after 24 hr exposure in nitrogen. In contrast, the silicon compacts without polymer char could not be fully converted to Si3N4 at 1350 C under similar exposure conditions. At 1250 and 1350 C, the silicon compacts with polymer char showed faster nitridation kinetics than those without the polymer char. As the polymer char content is increased, the amount of SiC in the nitrided material is also increased. By adding small amounts (approx. 2.5 wt percent) of NiO, the silicon compacts containing polymer char can be completely nitrided at 1200 C. The probable mechanism for the accelerated nitridation of silicon containing polymer char is discussed.

  12. Dexamethasone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medicine. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  13. Cell Attachment Following Instrumentation with Titanium and Plastic Instruments, Diode Laser, and Titanium Brush on Titanium, Titanium-Zirconium, and Zirconia Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Melissa S; Cerutis, D Roselyn; Miyamoto, Takanari; Nunn, Martha E

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface characteristics and gingival fibroblast adhesion of disks composed of implant and abutment materials following brief and repeated instrumentation with instruments commonly used in procedures for implant maintenance, stage-two implant surgery, and periimplantitis treatment. One hundred twenty disks (40 titanium, 40 titaniumzirconium, 40 zirconia) were grouped into treatment categories of instrumentation by plastic curette, titanium curette, diode microlaser, rotary titanium brush, and no treatment. Twenty strokes were applied to half of the disks in the plastic and titanium curette treatment categories, while half of the disks received 100 strokes each to simulate implant maintenance occurring on a repetitive basis. Following analysis of the disks by optical laser profilometry, disks were cultured with human gingival fibroblasts. Cell counts were conducted from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. Differences in surface roughness across all instruments tested for zirconia disks were negligible, while both titanium disks and titaniumzirconium disks showed large differences in surface roughness across the spectrum of instruments tested. The rotary titanium brush and the titanium curette yielded the greatest overall mean surface roughness, while the plastic curette yielded the lowest mean surface roughness. The greatest mean cell counts for each disk type were as follows: titanium disks with plastic curettes, titanium-zirconium disks with titanium curettes, and zirconia disks with the diode microlaser. Repeated instrumentation did not result in cumulative changes in surface roughness of implant materials made of titanium, titanium-zirconium, or zirconia. Instrumentation with plastic implant curettes on titanium and zirconia surfaces appeared to be more favorable than titanium implant curettes in terms of gingival fibroblast attachment on these surfaces.

  14. Deconstructing continuous flash suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Eunice; Blake, Randolph

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we asked to what extent the depth of interocular suppression engendered by continuous flash suppression (CFS) varies depending on spatiotemporal properties of the suppressed stimulus and CFS suppressor. An answer to this question could have implications for interpreting the results in which CFS influences the processing of different categories of stimuli to different extents. In a series of experiments, we measured the selectivity and depth of suppression (i.e., elevation in co...

  15. Radiofrequency cold plasma nitrided carbon steel: Microstructural and micromechanical characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouanis, F.Z.; Bentiss, F.; Bellayer, S.; Vogt, J.B.; Jama, C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → C38 carbon steel samples were plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge. → RF plasma treatment enables nitriding for non-heated substrates. → The morphological and chemical analyses show the formation of a uniform thickness on the surface of the nitrided C38 steel. → Nitrogen plasma active species diffuse into the samples and lead to the formation of Fe x N. → The increase in microhardness values for nitrided samples with plasma processing time is interpreted by the formation of a thicker nitrided layer on the steel surface. - Abstract: In this work, C38 carbon steel was plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge on non-heated substrates. General characterizations were performed to compare the chemical compositions, the microstructures and hardness of the untreated and plasma treated surfaces. The plasma nitriding was carried out on non-heated substrates at a pressure of 16.8 Pa, using N 2 gas. Surface characterizations before and after N 2 plasma treatment were performed by means of the electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Vickers microhardness measurements. The morphological and chemical analysis showed the formation of a uniform structure on the surface of the nitrided sample with enrichment in nitrogen when compared to untreated sample. The thickness of the nitride layer formed depends on the treatment time duration and is approximately 14 μm for 10 h of plasma treatment. XPS was employed to obtain chemical-state information of the plasma nitrided steel surfaces. The micromechanical results show that the surface microhardness increases as the plasma-processing time increases to reach, 1487 HV 0.005 at a plasma processing time of 8 h.

  16. Radiofrequency cold plasma nitrided carbon steel: Microstructural and micromechanical characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouanis, F.Z. [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ingenierie des Systemes Polymeres, CNRS UMR 8207, ENSCL, BP 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Bentiss, F. [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination et d' Analytique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Chouaib Doukkali, B.P. 20, M-24000 El Jadida (Morocco); Bellayer, S.; Vogt, J.B. [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ingenierie des Systemes Polymeres, CNRS UMR 8207, ENSCL, BP 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Jama, C., E-mail: charafeddine.jama@ensc-lille.fr [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ingenierie des Systemes Polymeres, CNRS UMR 8207, ENSCL, BP 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2011-05-16

    Highlights: {yields} C38 carbon steel samples were plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge. {yields} RF plasma treatment enables nitriding for non-heated substrates. {yields} The morphological and chemical analyses show the formation of a uniform thickness on the surface of the nitrided C38 steel. {yields} Nitrogen plasma active species diffuse into the samples and lead to the formation of Fe{sub x}N. {yields} The increase in microhardness values for nitrided samples with plasma processing time is interpreted by the formation of a thicker nitrided layer on the steel surface. - Abstract: In this work, C38 carbon steel was plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge on non-heated substrates. General characterizations were performed to compare the chemical compositions, the microstructures and hardness of the untreated and plasma treated surfaces. The plasma nitriding was carried out on non-heated substrates at a pressure of 16.8 Pa, using N{sub 2} gas. Surface characterizations before and after N{sub 2} plasma treatment were performed by means of the electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Vickers microhardness measurements. The morphological and chemical analysis showed the formation of a uniform structure on the surface of the nitrided sample with enrichment in nitrogen when compared to untreated sample. The thickness of the nitride layer formed depends on the treatment time duration and is approximately 14 {mu}m for 10 h of plasma treatment. XPS was employed to obtain chemical-state information of the plasma nitrided steel surfaces. The micromechanical results show that the surface microhardness increases as the plasma-processing time increases to reach, 1487 HV{sub 0.005} at a plasma processing time of 8 h.

  17. Nano-particulate Aluminium Nitride/Al: An Efficient and Versatile Heterogeneous Catalyst for the Synthesis of Biginelli Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekale, S. U.; Tekale, A. B.; Kanhe, N. S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Pawar, R. P.

    2011-12-01

    Nano-particulate aluminium nitride/Al (7:1) is reported as a new heterogeneous solid acid catalyst for the synthesis of 3, 4-dihydroxypyrimidi-2-(1H)-ones and their sulphur analogues using the Biginelli reaction. This method involves short reaction time, easy separation, high yields and purity of products.

  18. Ionic implantation by plasma in titanium and stainless steels used in prosthesis and medical instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz C, A. E.

    2008-01-01

    A study of a process known as plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) of nitrogen at low voltages (< 4 kV) into three kind of samples: 1) austenitic stainless AISI 316-L steel plates, 2) ferritic stainless AISI 434 steel-based dentistry drills and 3) commercially pure titanium (CPTi) disks. On the case of CPTi the study was conducted in nitrogen- oxygen calibrated mixtures: 90% N-10% O, 80% N-20% O, 70% N-30% O and in 99.5% pure oxygen and 99.9% pure nitrogen. The PIII process was carried out by using a direct current plasma source controlled both in voltage and current, a negative voltage pulse modulator, a stainless AISI 304 steel vacuum chamber and a rod of the same material, horizontally located in the upper region of the chamber, which plays the role of anode in the plasma discharge. The purpose of the nitriding is forming a relatively thick layer on the surface of the steel specimens in order to enhance their both microhardness and general corrosion performances, desirable in medical applications. This layer contains interstitial nitrogen atoms (∼24% at.) which gives place to a deformed lattice (expanded phase) of the steel. Vickers microhardness and potentiodynamic tests (the latter in agreement to the norm ASTM G-61-89) confirm an increase of microhardness up to three times and a decrease of general corrosion rate in one order of magnitude. The nitriding of de dentistry drills is aimed at inhibiting the pitting corrosion produced by the asepsis process which results in pit nucleations, their propagation and consequent fractures when being under cyclic stress (fatigue). Scanning electron microscope micrographs reveal the risks involved in surpassing the critical treatment simple temperature of 450 C as the PIII process itself induces pitting. On its part, cyclic (ASTM G-61) potentiodynamic tests indicate an excellent pitting corrosion resistance of the samples treated under 450 C. In turn, the treatment of CPTi was meant to develop oxidized and

  19. Reactive sputter deposition of boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, A.F.; Hayes, J.P.; McKernan, M.A.; Makowiecki, D.M.

    1995-10-01

    The preparation of fully dense, boron targets for use in planar magnetron sources has lead to the synthesis of Boron Nitride (BN) films by reactive rf sputtering. The deposition parameters of gas pressure, flow and composition are varied along with substrate temperature and applied bias. The films are characterized for composition using Auger electron spectroscopy, for chemical bonding using Raman spectroscopy and for crystalline structure using transmission electron microscopy. The deposition conditions are established which lead to the growth of crystalline BN phases. In particular, the growth of an adherent cubic BN coating requires 400--500 C substrate heating and an applied -300 V dc bias

  20. Packing C60 in Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, W.; Aloni, S.; Han, Wei-Qiang; Cumings, John; Zettl, A.

    2003-04-01

    We have created insulated C60 nanowire by packing C60 molecules into the interior of insulating boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). For small-diameter BNNTs, the wire consists of a linear chain of C60 molecules. With increasing BNNT inner diameter, unusual C60 stacking configurations are obtained (including helical, hollow core, and incommensurate) that are unknown for bulk or thin-film forms of C60. C60 in BNNTs thus presents a model system for studying the properties of dimensionally constrained ``silo'' crystal structures. For the linear-chain case, we have fused the C60 molecules to form a single-walled carbon nanotube inside the insulating BNNT.

  1. Doping of III-nitride materials

    OpenAIRE

    Pampili, Pietro; Parbrook, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    In this review paper we will report the current state of research regarding the doping of III-nitride materials and their alloys. GaN is a mature material with both n-type and p-type doping relatively well understood, and while n-GaN is easily achieved, p-type doping requires much more care. There are significant efforts to extend the composition range that can be controllably doped for AlGaInN alloys. This would allow application in shorter and longer wavelength optoelectronics as well as ex...

  2. Stability analysis of zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Hari Mohan, E-mail: rai.2208@gmail.com; Late, Ravikiran; Saxena, Shailendra K.; Kumar, Rajesh; Sagdeo, Pankaj R. [Indian Institute of Technology, Indore –452017 (India); Jaiswal, Neeraj K. [Discipline of Physics, PDPM- Indian Institute of Information Technology, Design and Manufacturing, Jabalpur – 482005 (India); Srivastava, Pankaj [Computational Nanoscience and Technology Lab. (CNTL), ABV- Indian Institute of Information Technology and Management, Gwalior – 474015 (India)

    2015-05-15

    We have explored the structural stability of bare and hydrogenated zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons (ZBNNRs). In order to investigate the structural stability, we calculate the cohesive energy for bare, one-edge and both edges H-terminated ZBNNRs with different widths. It is found that the ZBNNRs with width Nz=8 are energetically more favorable than the lower-width counterparts (Nz<8). Bare ZBNNRs have been found energetically most stable as compared to the edge terminated ribbons. Our analysis reveals that the structural stability is a function of ribbon-width and it is not affected significantly by the type of edge-passivation (one-edge or both-edges)

  3. Magnesium doping of boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Robert; Jordan, Kevin

    2015-06-16

    A method to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes incorporating magnesium diboride in their structure. In a first embodiment, magnesium wire is introduced into a reaction feed bundle during a BNNT fabrication process. In a second embodiment, magnesium in powder form is mixed into a nitrogen gas flow during the BNNT fabrication process. MgB.sub.2 yarn may be used for superconducting applications and, in that capacity, has considerably less susceptibility to stress and has considerably better thermal conductivity than these conventional materials when compared to both conventional low and high temperature superconducting materials.

  4. Hardness of carbides, nitrides, and borides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeter, W.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds of metals with non-metals such as C, N, and B show different hardness. Wagner's interaction parameter characterizes manner and extent of the interaction between the atoms of the substance dissolved and the additional elements in metallic mixed phases. An attempt has been made to correlate the hardness of carbides, nitrides, and borides (data taken from literature) with certain interaction parameters and associated thermodynamic quantities (ΔH, ΔG). For some metals of periods 4, 5, and 6 corresponding relations were found between microhardness, interaction parameters, heat of formation, and atomic number

  5. The failure of aluminium nitride under shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickup, I.M.; Bourne, N.K.

    2002-01-01

    The shear strength of aluminium nitride has been measured over a range of impact stresses by measuring lateral stresses in plate impact experiments. The range of impact stress spanned several key shock thresholds for the material, pre and post Hugoniot elastic limit and up to values where the hexagonal to cubic phase transition starts. The shear strength measurements indicate significant inelastic damage at stress levels in excess of the HEL, but a significant recovery of strength at the highest impact stress was observed. This stress equates to the phase transition stress. The shear strength behaviour is compared to that of silicon carbide, which does not exhibit a phase change at these impact velocities

  6. Surface enrichment with chrome and nitriding of IF steel under an abnormal glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meira, S.R.; Borges, P.C.; Bernardelli, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the influence of surface enrichment of IF steel with chrome, and nitriding, the formation of the nitrided layer. Thus, IF steel samples were subjected to surface enrichment process, using 409 stainless steel as a target for sputtering, followed by plasma nitriding, both under a dc abnormal glow discharge. The enrichment treatment was operated at 1200 ° C for 3h. The nitriding treatment was operated at 510 ° C for 2 h. The influence of the treatments on the layers formed was studied through optical microscopy (OM), scan electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Vickers microindentation. The results show that the enrichment is effective to enrich the IF surface, furthermore, improves the characteristics of nitriding, comparing nitriding samples to nitriding and enriched, was observed needles of nitrides, as well as a higher hardness, which is associated with the nitrides of chrome, on the nitriding and enriched samples. (author)

  7. Analysis of titanium content in titanium tetrachloride solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaoguo; Dong, Yingnan; Li, Shanshan; Guan, Duojiao; Wang, Jianyu; Tang, Meiling

    2018-03-01

    Strontium titanate, barium titan and lead titanate are new type of functional ceramic materials with good prospect, and titanium tetrachloride is a commonly in the production such products. Which excellent electrochemical performance of ferroelectric tempreature coefficient effect.In this article, three methods are used to calibrate the samples of titanium tetrachloride solution by back titration method, replacement titration method and gravimetric analysis method. The results show that the back titration method has many good points, for example, relatively simple operation, easy to judgment the titration end point, better accuracy and precision of analytical results, the relative standard deviation not less than 0.2%. So, it is the ideal of conventional analysis methods in the mass production.

  8. Stress and piezoelectric properties of aluminum nitride thin films deposited onto metal electrodes by pulsed direct current reactive sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, Marc-Alexandre; Muralt, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Polycrystalline aluminum nitride thin films were deposited onto platinum, aluminum, and titanium electrodes by reactive magnetron sputtering in the pulsed direct current mode. The films exhibited all a columnar microstructure and a c-axis texture. The built-in stress and the piezoelectric properties of these films were studied as a function of both the processing conditions and the electrode material. Stress was found to be very much dependent on the growth conditions, and values ranging from strong compression to high tension were observed. The piezoelectric d 33,f coefficient was shown to rely on substrate quality and ionic bombardment: The nucleation surface must be stable with regard to the nitrogen plasma and present a hexagonal symmetry and, on the other hand, enough energy must be delivered to the growing film through ionic bombardment. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  9. Liquid phase surface nitriding of Ti-6Al-4V pre-placed with chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahedi Nemani, Alireza, E-mail: alireza_vahedi@ut.ac.ir; Sohi, M. Heydarzadeh; Amadeh, A.A.; Ghaffari, Mahya

    2016-08-01

    In this study, liquid phase surface nitriding of Ti-6Al-4V was carried out by pre-placing of chromium powder on the substrate and subsequent Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) surface melting. The effect of the application of low and high heat inputs on the microstructure, microhardness and wear resistance of the treated layers were studied. Surface alloying with chromium in a nitrogen containing atmosphere resulted in the formation of hard intermetallic compounds such as TiN, Cr{sub 2}N and TiCr{sub 2}. Moreover, the presence of beta stabilizer chromium together with the application of high heat input during surface treatment resulted in the presence of beta phase at room temperature. However, applying low heat input could not prevent transformation of beta to martensite. The hardness of the layers fabricated at high and low heat inputs were respectively 1050 and 1200 HV{sub 0.3} compared to average 280 HV{sub 0.3} for the as-received material. Liquid phase surface treatment of titanium at the aforementioned conditions improved the wear resistance. The lowest weight loss belonged to the specimen with the beta phase matrix. The formation of the fairly ductile bcc-β phase hindered crack nucleation during wear. The weight loss in this condition was 7 times lower than that of the base material. - Highlights: • Liquid phase surface nitriding of Ti-6Al-4V was carried out by TIG surface melting. • Cr powder was pre-placed on the surface as the beta stabilizer alloying element. • The treated layers were characterized by OM, SEM and X-ray diffraction pattern. • Hardness of the layers increased up to 3 times higher than that of the base alloy. • Liquid phase surface alloying improved the wear resistance.

  10. Nitriding of Ti substrate using energetic ions from plasma focus device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriquez, A; Bhuyan, H; Favre, M; Bora, B; Wyndham, E; Chuaqui, H; Mändl, S; Gerlach, J W; Manova, D

    2012-01-01

    Plasma Focus (PF) discharge is a pulsed plasma producing discharge that generates high temperature and high density plasma for a short duration. PF devices are known to emit intense ion beams pulses of characteristic energy in the keV to a few MeV range, in a time scale of tens of nanoseconds. We have previously investigated the ion flux and energy spectrum of ion beams emitted from a low energy PF, operating at 20 kV, with 1.8 kJ stored energy. It was observed that the ion beams have wide range of energy and intensity spectra with a clear angular anisotropy. Due to the wide range of ion energy and intensity spectra PF has become a subject of current interest for its applications in material sciences including surface modification and thin film deposition. The purpose of this study is the formation of titanium nitride (TiN) thin film and to investigate the structural properties of the TiN thin films in terms of PF angular positions. Substrates like Ti and Ti/Si were nitrided in a 1.8 kJ PF device at different angular positions with respect to the PF axis in order to correlate their surface properties with ion beam parameters. Preliminary characterizations of the ion implanted substrates have been conducted, using SEM, EDX and XRD. Our results indicate the formation of nanocrystalline TiN thin film only in certain angular positions. Angular dependency of the surface morphology was observed, which shows that the surface features strongly depends on ion beam energy and flux. With increasing angular positions, a reduction in the deposition rate and the sputter rate is observed. A pronounced nanostructured surface is only observed at the axis of the pinched plasma column, indicating the dominant role of sputtering and perhaps melting and fast re-crystallization of the surface in creating the nanostructures.

  11. Microstructural characterization of pulsed plasma nitrided 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asgari, M.; Barnoush, A.; Johnsen, R.; Hoel, R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The low temperature pulsed plasma nitrided layer of 316 SS was studied. → The plastic deformation induced in the austenite due to nitriding is characterized by EBSD at different depths (i.e., nitrogen concentration). → Nanomechanical properties of the nitride layer was investigated by nanoindentation at different depths (i.e., nitrogen concentration). → High hardness, high nitrogen concentration and high dislocation density is detected in the nitride layer. → The hardness and nitrogen concentration decreased sharply beyond the nitride layer. - Abstract: Pulsed plasma nitriding (PPN) treatment is one of the new processes to improve the surface hardness and tribology behavior of austenitic stainless steels. Through low temperature treatment (<440 deg. C), it is possible to obtain unique combinations of wear and corrosion properties. Such a combination is achieved through the formation of a so-called 'extended austenite phase'. These surface layers are often also referred to as S-phase, m-phase or γ-phase. In this work, nitrided layers on austenitic stainless steels AISI 316L (SS316L) were examined by means of a nanoindentation method at different loads. Additionally, the mechanical properties of the S-phase at different depths were studied. Electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) examination of the layer showed a high amount of plasticity induced in the layer during its formation. XRD results confirmed the formation of the S-phase, and no deleterious CrN phase was detected.

  12. Electronic structure and mechanical properties of plasma nitrided ferrous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portolan, E. [Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, 95070-560 Caxias do Sul-RS (Brazil); Baumvol, I.J.R. [Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, 95070-560 Caxias do Sul-RS (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre 91509-970 (Brazil); Figueroa, C.A., E-mail: cafiguer@ucs.br [Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, 95070-560 Caxias do Sul-RS (Brazil)

    2009-04-15

    The electronic structures of the near-surface regions of two different nitrided steels (AISI 316 and 4140) were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Photoelectron groups from all main chemical elements involved were addressed for steel samples with implanted-N concentrations in the range 16-32 at.%. As the implanted-N concentrations were increased, rather contrasting behaviors were observed for the two kinds of steel. The N1s photoelectrons had spectral shifts toward lower (nitrided AISI 316) or higher (nitrided AISI 4140) binding energies, whereas the Fe2p{sub 3/2} photoelectron spectrum remains at a constant binding energy (nitrided AISI 316) or shifts toward higher binding energies (AISI 4140). These trends are discussed in terms of the metallic nitride formation and the overlapping of atomic orbitals. For nitrided AISI 316, a semi-classical approach of charge transfer between Cr and N is used to explain the experimental facts (formation of CrN), while for nitrided AISI 4140 we propose that the interaction between orbitals 4s from Fe and 2p from N promotes electrons to the conduction band increasing the electrical attraction of the N1s and Fe2p electrons in core shells (formation of FeN{sub x}). The increase in hardness of the steel upon N implantation is attributed to the localization of electrons in specific bonds, which diminishes the metallic bond character.

  13. Corrosion fatigue behaviour of ion nitrided AISI 4140 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genel, K. [Sakarya Univ., Adapazari (Turkey). Mech. Eng. Dept.; Demirkol, M.; Guelmez, T. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Istanbul Technical University, Guemuessuyu, 80191, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2000-08-31

    Machine components suffer from corrosion degradation of fatigue characteristics and improvement can be attained by the application of a nitriding treatment, particularly to low alloy steels. In the present study, the effect of ion nitriding on corrosion fatigue performance of AISI 4140 steel has been investigated by conducting a series of rotary bending corrosion fatigue tests at 95 Hz, in 3% NaCl aqueous solution. Hourglass shaped, 4 mm diameter fatigue specimens were ion nitrided at 748 K for 1, 3, 8 and 16 h prior to the tests. It was observed that distinct fatigue limit behaviour of ion nitrided steel in air completely disappeared in corrosive environment besides severe degradation in fatigue characteristics. An improvement reaching to 60% in corrosion fatigue strength can be attained by successive ion nitriding practice based on a fatigue life of 10{sup 7} cycles. An attempt was made to establish an empirical relationship between corrosion fatigue strength and relative case depth, which considers the size of the ion nitrided specimen. It was also determined that a power relationship holds between corrosion fatigue strength and fatigue life of ion nitrided steel. The presence of white layer has resulted in additional improvement in corrosion fatigue resistance, and it was observed that corrosion fatigue cracks were initiated dominantly under the white layer by pit formation mechanism. (orig.)

  14. Corrosion fatigue behaviour of ion nitrided AISI 4140 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genel, K.

    2000-01-01

    Machine components suffer from corrosion degradation of fatigue characteristics and improvement can be attained by the application of a nitriding treatment, particularly to low alloy steels. In the present study, the effect of ion nitriding on corrosion fatigue performance of AISI 4140 steel has been investigated by conducting a series of rotary bending corrosion fatigue tests at 95 Hz, in 3% NaCl aqueous solution. Hourglass shaped, 4 mm diameter fatigue specimens were ion nitrided at 748 K for 1, 3, 8 and 16 h prior to the tests. It was observed that distinct fatigue limit behaviour of ion nitrided steel in air completely disappeared in corrosive environment besides severe degradation in fatigue characteristics. An improvement reaching to 60% in corrosion fatigue strength can be attained by successive ion nitriding practice based on a fatigue life of 10 7 cycles. An attempt was made to establish an empirical relationship between corrosion fatigue strength and relative case depth, which considers the size of the ion nitrided specimen. It was also determined that a power relationship holds between corrosion fatigue strength and fatigue life of ion nitrided steel. The presence of white layer has resulted in additional improvement in corrosion fatigue resistance, and it was observed that corrosion fatigue cracks were initiated dominantly under the white layer by pit formation mechanism. (orig.)

  15. Electronic structure and mechanical properties of plasma nitrided ferrous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolan, E.; Baumvol, I. J. R.; Figueroa, C. A.

    2009-04-01

    The electronic structures of the near-surface regions of two different nitrided steels (AISI 316 and 4140) were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Photoelectron groups from all main chemical elements involved were addressed for steel samples with implanted-N concentrations in the range 16-32 at.%. As the implanted-N concentrations were increased, rather contrasting behaviors were observed for the two kinds of steel. The N1s photoelectrons had spectral shifts toward lower (nitrided AISI 316) or higher (nitrided AISI 4140) binding energies, whereas the Fe2p 3/2 photoelectron spectrum remains at a constant binding energy (nitrided AISI 316) or shifts toward higher binding energies (AISI 4140). These trends are discussed in terms of the metallic nitride formation and the overlapping of atomic orbitals. For nitrided AISI 316, a semi-classical approach of charge transfer between Cr and N is used to explain the experimental facts (formation of CrN), while for nitrided AISI 4140 we propose that the interaction between orbitals 4s from Fe and 2p from N promotes electrons to the conduction band increasing the electrical attraction of the N1s and Fe2p electrons in core shells (formation of FeN x). The increase in hardness of the steel upon N implantation is attributed to the localization of electrons in specific bonds, which diminishes the metallic bond character.

  16. Electronic structure and mechanical properties of plasma nitrided ferrous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portolan, E.; Baumvol, I.J.R.; Figueroa, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    The electronic structures of the near-surface regions of two different nitrided steels (AISI 316 and 4140) were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Photoelectron groups from all main chemical elements involved were addressed for steel samples with implanted-N concentrations in the range 16-32 at.%. As the implanted-N concentrations were increased, rather contrasting behaviors were observed for the two kinds of steel. The N1s photoelectrons had spectral shifts toward lower (nitrided AISI 316) or higher (nitrided AISI 4140) binding energies, whereas the Fe2p 3/2 photoelectron spectrum remains at a constant binding energy (nitrided AISI 316) or shifts toward higher binding energies (AISI 4140). These trends are discussed in terms of the metallic nitride formation and the overlapping of atomic orbitals. For nitrided AISI 316, a semi-classical approach of charge transfer between Cr and N is used to explain the experimental facts (formation of CrN), while for nitrided AISI 4140 we propose that the interaction between orbitals 4s from Fe and 2p from N promotes electrons to the conduction band increasing the electrical attraction of the N1s and Fe2p electrons in core shells (formation of FeN x ). The increase in hardness of the steel upon N implantation is attributed to the localization of electrons in specific bonds, which diminishes the metallic bond character.

  17. Characterization of plasma nitrided layers produced on sintered iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Alves Fontes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Plasma nitriding is a thermo-physical-chemical treatment process, which promotes surface hardening, caused by interstitial diffusion of atomic nitrogen into metallic alloys. In this work, this process was employed in the surface modification of a sintered ferrous alloy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD analyses, and wear and microhardness tests were performed on the samples submitted to ferrox treatment and plasma nitriding carried out under different conditions of time and temperature. The results showed that the nitride layer thickness is higher for all nitrided samples than for ferrox treated samples, and this layer thickness increases with nitriding time and temperature, and temperature is a more significant variable. The XRD analysis showed that the nitrided layer, for all samples, near the surface consists in a mixture of γ′-Fe4N and ɛ-Fe3N phases. Both wear resistance and microhardness increase with nitriding time and temperature, and temperature influences both the characteristics the most.

  18. Clean and polymer-free transfer of CVD-grown graphene films on hexagonal boron nitride substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Miho; Ogawa, Shun; Yoshimura, Shintaro; Inoue, Ryosuke; Maniwa, Yutaka; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Shinohara, Hisanori; Miyata, Yasumitsu

    2017-05-01

    This report describes the development of a solution-assisted, polymer-free transfer method and the characterization of chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene on hexagonal boron nitride. Raman analysis reveals that polymer-free samples have small variations in G- and 2D-mode Raman frequencies and are minimally affected by charge doping as observed for clean exfoliated graphene. Electrical measurements indicate that charge doping, hysteresis, and carrier scattering are suppressed in polymer-free samples. The results demonstrate that this method provides a simple and effective way to prepare clean heterostructures of CVD-grown, large-area graphene and other two-dimensional materials.

  19. Effect of sapphire substrate nitridation on the elimination of rotation domains in ZnO epitaxial films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying Minju; Du Xiaolong; Mei Zengxia; Zeng Zhaoquan; Zheng Hao; Wang Yong; Jia Jinfeng; Zhang Ze; Xue Qikun

    2004-01-01

    The rotation domain structures in ZnO films grown on sapphire substrates under different pre-treatment conditions have been investigated by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction and ex situ x-ray diffraction (XRD). It was found that by appropriate nitridation treatment, forming a thin AlN film on the substrate, the rotation domains in ZnO films could be completely suppressed, and a full width at half maximum of only 180 arcsec was observed in the (0 0 0 2) reflection of XRD rocking curves. The mechanisms for the elimination of rotation domains in the ZnO films are discussed

  20. Nanoscratch characterization of indium nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Derming [Chin-Yi Univ. of Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2014-01-15

    In this study we used RF plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy for the epitaxial growth of single-crystalline indium nitride (InN) thin films on aluminum nitride buffer layers/Si (111) substrates. We then used scratch techniques to study the influence of the c-axis orientation of the InN films and the beam interactions on the tribological performance of these samples. When grown at 440, 470, and 500 C, the coefficients of friction were 0.18, 0.22, and 0.26, respectively, under a normal force (F{sub n}) of 2000 {mu}N; 0.19, 0.23, and 0.27, respectively, under a value of Fn of 4000 {mu}N; and 0.21, 0.24, and 0.28, respectively, under a value of F{sub n} of 6000 {mu}N. These measured values increased slightly upon increasing the growth temperature because of the resulting smaller sizes of the apertures and/or pores in the inner films. The sliding resistance of the ploughed area was observed. The contact sliding line became increasingly noticeable upon increasing the value of F{sub n}; the plot of the friction with respect to the penetration depth revealed a significant relation in its adhesion properties presentation. (orig.)

  1. Graphyne–graphene (nitride) heterostructure as nanocapacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Barnali; Sarkar, Utpal

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Binding energy of heterostructures indicates the exothermic nature. • Increasing electric field enhances charge and energy stored in the system. • The external electric fields amplify the charge transfer between two flakes. • The capacitance value gets saturated above a certain electric field. - Abstract: A nanoscale capacitor composed of heterostructure derived from finite size graphyne flake and graphene (nitride) flake has been proposed and investigated using density functional theory (DFT). The exothermic nature of formation process of these heterostructures implies their stability. Significant charge transfer between two flakes generates permanent dipole in this heterostructures. The amount of charge transfer is tunable under the application of external electric field which enhances their applicability in electronics. We have specifically focused on the capacitive properties of different heterostructure composed of graphyne flake and graphene (nitride) flake, i.e., graphyne/graphene, graphyne/h-BN, graphyne/AlN, graphyne/GaN. The charge stored by each flake, energy storage, and capacitance are switchable under external electric field. Thus, our modeled heterostructures are a good candidate as nanoscale capacitor and can be used in nanocircuit. We found that the charge stored by each flake, energy storage, and capacitance value are highest for graphyne/GaN heterostructures.

  2. Stable boron nitride diamondoids as nanoscale materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fyta, Maria

    2014-01-01

    We predict the stability of diamondoids made up of boron and nitrogen instead of carbon atoms. The results are based on quantum-mechanical calculations within density functional theory (DFT) and show some very distinct features compared to the regular carbon-based diamondoids. These features are evaluated with respect to the energetics and electronic properties of the boron nitride diamondoids as compared to the respective properties of the carbon-based diamondoids. We find that BN-diamondoids are overall more stable than their respective C-diamondoid counterparts. The electronic band-gaps (E g ) of the former are overall lower than those for the latter nanostructures but do not show a very distinct trend with their size. Contrary to the lower C-diamondoids, the BN-diamondoids are semiconducting and show a depletion of charge on the nitrogen site. Their differences in the distribution of the molecular orbitals, compared to their carbon-based counterparts, offer additional bonding and functionalization possibilities. These tiny BN-based nanostructures could potentially be used as nanobuilding blocks complementing or substituting the C-diamondoids, based on the desired properties. An experimental realization of boron nitride diamondoids remains to show their feasibility. (paper)

  3. Graphyne–graphene (nitride) heterostructure as nanocapacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Barnali; Sarkar, Utpal, E-mail: utpalchemiitkgp@yahoo.com

    2016-10-20

    Highlights: • Binding energy of heterostructures indicates the exothermic nature. • Increasing electric field enhances charge and energy stored in the system. • The external electric fields amplify the charge transfer between two flakes. • The capacitance value gets saturated above a certain electric field. - Abstract: A nanoscale capacitor composed of heterostructure derived from finite size graphyne flake and graphene (nitride) flake has been proposed and investigated using density functional theory (DFT). The exothermic nature of formation process of these heterostructures implies their stability. Significant charge transfer between two flakes generates permanent dipole in this heterostructures. The amount of charge transfer is tunable under the application of external electric field which enhances their applicability in electronics. We have specifically focused on the capacitive properties of different heterostructure composed of graphyne flake and graphene (nitride) flake, i.e., graphyne/graphene, graphyne/h-BN, graphyne/AlN, graphyne/GaN. The charge stored by each flake, energy storage, and capacitance are switchable under external electric field. Thus, our modeled heterostructures are a good candidate as nanoscale capacitor and can be used in nanocircuit. We found that the charge stored by each flake, energy storage, and capacitance value are highest for graphyne/GaN heterostructures.

  4. Composite Reinforcement using Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Chemistry , Alloys, Titanium, Aluminum 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES    12    19a.  NAME OF...Journal of Physical Chemistry C [7]. DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. 6 In our initial studies on the...two projects of current interest: “Selective Sequestration of Multi-Component Compounds using Engineered Gas Vesicles” and “Design of Polymers for

  5. The release of nickel from orthodontic NiTi wires is increased by dynamic mechanical loading but not constrained by surface nitridation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitsch, T; Klocke, A; Kahl-Nieke, B; Prymak, O; Epple, M

    2007-09-01

    The influence of dynamic mechanical loading and of surface nitridation on the nickel release from superelastic nickel-titanium orthodontic wires was investigated under ultrapure conditions. Commercially available superelastic NiTi arch wires (size 0.018 x 0.025'') without surface modification (Neo Sentalloy) and with nitrogen ion implantation surface treatment (Neo Sentalloy Ionguard) were analyzed. Mechanical loading of wire segments with a force similar to the physiological situation was performed with a frequency of 5 Hz in ultrapure water and saline solution, respectively. The release of nickel was monitored by atomic absorption spectroscopy for up to 36 days. The mechanically loaded wires released significantly more nickel ( approximately 45 ng cm(-2) d(-1)) than did nonloaded wires (<1 ng cm(-2) d(-1)). There was no statistically significant effect of the testing solution (water or NaCl) or of the surface nitridation. The total amount of released nickel was small in all cases, but may nevertheless account for the occasional clinical observations of adverse reactions during application of NiTi-based orthodontic appliances. The surface nitridation did not constrain the release of nickel from NiTi under continuous mechanical stress.

  6. Irradiation response in titanium modified austenitic stainless steels prepared by rapid solidification processing. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imeson, D.; Tong, C.H.; Parker, C.A.; Vander Sande, J.B.; Grant, N.J.; Harling, O.K.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1984-01-01

    Titanium carbide precipitation on dislocations during irradiation and recoil-induced particle dissolution are considered. The outline analysis given indicates that complete swelling suppression may occur in favorable conditions due to a counterbalancing of the effective dislocation interstitial bias. The behavior is, however, not stable against a return to normal swelling levels for type 316 steels. A model is presented which may serve as a basis for the interpretation of some aspects of the irradiation response in this system. (orig.)

  7. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  8. Method of production of hollow silicon nitride articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parr, N.L.; Brown, R.L.

    1971-01-01

    The hollow articles prepared according to the invention have a high density, exhibit no internal stresses and correspond to high demands of tolerance and surface quality. One obtains these by flame spraying silicon powder on a pre-heated form designed with separating agent - e.g. NaCl. After removing the form, the silicon is nitridated to silicon nitride by heating in N 2 or in an atmosphere of ammonia. This process can be interrupted if the article is also to be mechanically processed, and then the nitridation can be completed. (Hoe/LH) [de

  9. Critical fields of niobium nitride films of various granularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonova, E.A.; Sukhov, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    The behaviour of lattice parameter, specific electrical resistivity, critical temperature, and temperature dependence of upper critical field near Tsub(cr) of sputtered niobium nitride films is investigated versus the substrate temperature and gas mixture composition in the process of reactive cathode sputtering. The relation between extrapolated value of the upper critical field and granularity of niobium nitride films, close as to composition to the stoichiometric one, has been found. Values of the kappa parameter of the Ginsburg-Landau theory and of the coherence length for niobium nitride films of various granularity are estimated in an approximation of uniform distribution of impurities in a sample

  10. Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Sambasivan [Chicago, IL; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Barnett, Scott A [Evanston, IL; Kim, Ilwon [Skokie, IL; Kroeger, Donald M [Knoxville, TN

    2009-03-31

    The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metals and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layer. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may have superconducting properties.

  11. Titanium gettering in Doublet III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Grassie, J.S.; Callis, R.; Campbell, G.

    1980-08-01

    The application of mild titanium gettering in the Doublet III tokamak has led to a significant improvement in the obtainable operating regimes and discharge parameters for all of the many plasma cross-sectional shapes studied. With gettering, low-Z impurities and radiated power are greatly reduced. The maximum line averaged electron density has increased 50% (anti n/sub e max/ approx. 1 x 10 20 /m 3 ), corresponding to a Murakami coefficient of nearly 6

  12. Analogy and differences between aluminium and titanium electrowinning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available larger market. The authors have tested this route experimentally, but could not produce pure titanium. The failure of electrowinning pure, molten titanium has been interpreted in terms of the analogy and differences between aluminium and titanium...

  13. Research and Development on Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1949-10-31

    information concerning the runs made * * In order to check the general operation of the train and furnace, a number of qualitative runs were made. These runs... General Technique. * . . * * . 109 The Analysis of Titanium . . . . ... ... 112 Notes and Comments, . . . .. . .. . . . 113 The Results from Vacuum...described in this report are as follows: 1. Arc ielting Titanium-Base Alloys. 2. Evaluation of Experimental Titanium-Base Alloys. 3. Investigation of

  14. Titanium metal obtention by fused salts electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perillo, P.M.; Ares, Osvaldo; Botbol, Jose.

    1989-01-01

    Potassium fluorotitanate dissolved in fused sodium chloride or potassium chloride may be electrolyzed under an inert gas atmosphere. Solid electrolysis products are formed on the cathode which contains titanium metal, sodium chloride, lower fluorotitanates and small quantities of alkali metal fluorotitanate. The extraction of titanium from the electrolysis products may be carried out by aqueous leaching (removal of chloride salts of alkali metals and a certain amount of fluorotitanates). Titanium metal obtained is relatively pure. (Author)

  15. Production of titanium from ilmenite: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohli, R.

    1981-12-01

    The general principles for beneficiation of titanium ores are reviewed and the specific processes used in individual units in various countries are discussed. This is followed by a critical evaluation of various current and potential reduction methods for the production of titanium metal from the processed concentrates. Finally, the report outlines a research program for the development of a commercially viable alternative method for the production of titanium metal.

  16. Strength and structure of nanocrystalline titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noskova, N.I.; Pereturina, I.A.; Elkina, O.A.; Stolyarov, V.V.

    2004-01-01

    Investigation results on strength and plasticity of nanocrystalline titanium VT-1 are presented. Specific features of plastic deformation on tension of this material specimens in an electron microscope column are studied in situ. It is shown that nanocrystalline titanium strength and plasticity at room temperature are dependent on the structure and nanograin size. It is revealed that deformation processes in nanocrystalline titanium are characterized by activation of deformation rotational modes and microtwinning [ru

  17. Cranioplasty with individual titanium implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishinov, S.; Stupak, V.; Sadovoy, M.; Mamonova, E.; Koporushko, N.; Larkin, V.; Novokshonov, A.; Dolzhenko, D.; Panchenko, A.; Desyatykh, I.; Krasovsky, I.

    2017-09-01

    Cranioplasty is the second procedure in the history of neurosurgery after trepanation, and it is still relevant despite the development of civilization and progress in medicine. Each cranioplasty operation is unique because there are no two patients with identical defects of the skull bones. The development of Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) technique opened up the possibility of direct implant printing of titanium, a biocompatible metal used in medicine. This eliminates the need for producing any intermediate products to create the desired implant. We have produced 8 patient-specific titanium implants using this technique for patients who underwent different decompressive cranioectomies associated with bone tumors. Follow-up duration ranged from 6 to 12 months. We observed no implant-related reactions or complications. In all cases of reconstructive neurosurgery we achieved good clinical and aesthetic results. The analysis of the literature and our own experience in three-dimensional modeling, prototyping, and printing suggests that direct laser sintering of titanium is the optimal method to produce biocompatible surgical implants.

  18. Machinability evaluation of titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Okuno, Osamu

    2004-03-01

    In the present study, the machinability of titanium, Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6A1-7Nb, and free-cutting brass was evaluated using a milling machine. The metals were slotted with square end mills under four cutting conditions. The cutting force and the rotational speed of the spindle were measured. The cutting forces for Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb were higher and that for brass was lower than that for titanium. The rotational speed of the spindle was barely affected by cutting. The cross sections of the Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb chips were more clearly serrated than those of titanium, which is an indication of difficult-to-cut metals. There was no marked difference in the surface roughness of the cut surfaces among the metals. Cutting force and the appearance of the metal chips were found to be useful as indices of machinability and will aid in the development of new alloys for dental CAD/CAM and the selection of suitable machining conditions.

  19. Stir zone microstructure of commercial purity titanium friction stir welded using pcBN tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yu; Sato, Yutaka S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Park, Seung Hwan C.; Hirano, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, friction stir welding was applied to commercial purity titanium using a polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tool, and microstructure and hardness in the weld were examined. Additionally, the microstructural evolution during friction stir welding was also discussed. The stir zone consisted of fine equiaxed α grains surrounded by serrate grain boundaries, which were produced through the β → α allotropic transformation during the cooling cycle of friction stir welding. The fine α grains caused higher hardness than that in the base material. A lath-shaped α grain structure containing Ti borides and tool debris was observed in the surface region of the stir zone, whose hardness was the highest in the weld

  20. IMPACT OF VIBRATORY AND ROTATIONAL SHOT PEENING ONTO SELECTED PROPERTIES OF TITANIUM ALLOY SURFACE LAYER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz Zaleski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results of tests on impact of vibratory and rotational shot peening of the Ti6A12Mo2Cr titanium alloy onto the processed object surface roughness and surface layer microhardness. The external surfaces of ring-shaped samples were shot peened. The preceding process consisted of turning with a cubic boron nitride blade knife. Steel beads, having a diameter of 6 mm, were used as a processing medium. The variable parameters of shot peening were vibrator amplitude and shot peening time. The range of recommended technological parameters for vibratory and rotational shot peening was determined. As a result of shot peening, the surface roughness could be reduced by approximately 4 times and the surface layer could be hardened to the depth of approximately 0.4 mm.

  1. Titanium Matrix Composite Pressure Vessel, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For over 15 years, FMW Composite Systems has developed Metal Matrix Composite manufacturing methodologies for fabricating silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced titanium...

  2. Appcelerator Titanium patterns and best practices

    CERN Document Server

    Pollentine, Boydlee

    2013-01-01

    The book takes a step-by-step approach to help you understand CommonJS and Titanium architecture patterns, with easy to follow samples and plenty of in-depth explanations If you're an existing Titanium developer or perhaps a new developer looking to start off your Titanium applications "the right way", then this book is for you. With easy to follow examples and a full step-by-step account of architecting a sample application using CommonJS and MVC, along with chapters on new features such as ACS, you'll be implementing enterprise grade Titanium solutions in no time. You should have some JavaSc

  3. Criterion of titanium aviation alloy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasyunas, O.P.

    1976-01-01

    The most significant statistic mechanical characteristics are presented of titanium as compared with those of aluminium and steel. Based on these data one can draw conclusions as to the advantages and disadvantages of titanium. High chemical activity and diffusivity of titanium place limitations on the use of its alloys. Despite the promising features of a needle-like structure, specifications still keep relying on a globular structure, which is explained by the easeiness of the production. Titanium is expensive, sometimes its cost may by a factor of 20 exceed that of other aviation materials

  4. Fabrication of Aluminum Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride MESFET And It's Applications in Biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alur, Siddharth

    Gallium Nitride has been researched extensively for the past three decades for its application in Light Emitting Diodes (LED's), power devices and UV photodetectors. With the recent developments in crystal growth technology and the ability to control the doping there has been an increased interest in heterostructures formed between Gallium nitride and it's alloy Aluminium Gallium Nitride. These heterostructures due to the combined effect of spontaneous and piezoelectric effect can form a high density and a high mobility electron gas channel without any intentional doping. This high density electron gas makes these heterostructures ideal to be used as sensors. Gallium Nitride is also chemically very stable. Detection of biomolecules in a fast and reliable manner is very important in the areas of food safety and medical research. For biomolecular detection it is paramount to have a robust binding of the probes on the sensor surface. Therefore, in this dissertation, the fabrication and application of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as biological sensors for the detection of DNA and Organophosphate hydrolase enzyme is discussed. In order to use these AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as biological sensors capable of working in a liquid environment photodefinable polydimethyl-siloxane is used as an encapsulant. The immobilization conditions for a robust binding of thiolated DNA and the catalytic receptor enzyme organophosphate hydrolase on gold surfaces is developed with the help of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. DNA and OPH are detected by measuring the change in the drain current of the device as a function of time.

  5. Diagnostic of corrosion–erosion evolution for [Hf-Nitrides/V-Nitrides]n structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, C.; Villarreal, M. [Thin Film Group, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Caicedo, J.C., E-mail: jcaicedoangulo1@gmail.com [Powder Metallurgy and Processing of Solid Recycled Research Group, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Aperador, W. [Ingeniería Mecatrónica, Universidad Militar Nueva Granada, Bogotá (Colombia); Caicedo, H.H. [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Illinois at Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Prieto, P. [Thin Film Group, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Center of Excellence for Novel Materials, CENM, Cali (Colombia)

    2013-10-31

    HfN/VN multilayered systems were grown on 4140 steel substrates with the aim to improve their electrochemical behavior. The multilayered coatings were grown via reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering technique by systematically varying the bilayer period (Λ) and the bilayer number (n) while maintaining constant the total coating thickness (∼ 1.2 μm). The coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electron microscopy. The electrochemical properties were studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Tafel curves. XRD results showed preferential growth in the face-centered cubic (111) crystal structure for [HfN/VN]{sub n} multilayered coatings. The maximum corrosion resistance was obtained for coatings with (Λ) equal to 15 nm, corresponding to bilayer n = 80. Polarization resistance and corrosion rate was around 112.19 kΩ cm{sup 2} and 0.094*10{sup −3} mmy respectively; moreover, these multilayered system showed a decrease of 80% on mass loss due to the corrosive–erosive process, in relation to multilayered systems with n = 1 and Λ = 1200. HfN/VN multilayers have been designed and deposited on Si (100) and AISI 4140 steel substrates with bilayer periods (Λ) in a broad range, from nanometers to hundreds of nanometers to study the microstructural evolution and electrochemical progress with decreasing bilayer thickness. - Highlights: • Enhancements on surface electrochemical properties and response to surface corrosion attack. • Superficial phenomenon that occurs in corrosion surface of [Hf-Nitrides/V-Nitrides]n • Corrosion–erosion evolution for [Hf-Nitrides/V-Nitrides]n structures.

  6. Diagnostic of corrosion–erosion evolution for [Hf-Nitrides/V-Nitrides]n structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, C.; Villarreal, M.; Caicedo, J.C.; Aperador, W.; Caicedo, H.H.; Prieto, P.

    2013-01-01

    HfN/VN multilayered systems were grown on 4140 steel substrates with the aim to improve their electrochemical behavior. The multilayered coatings were grown via reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering technique by systematically varying the bilayer period (Λ) and the bilayer number (n) while maintaining constant the total coating thickness (∼ 1.2 μm). The coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electron microscopy. The electrochemical properties were studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Tafel curves. XRD results showed preferential growth in the face-centered cubic (111) crystal structure for [HfN/VN] n multilayered coatings. The maximum corrosion resistance was obtained for coatings with (Λ) equal to 15 nm, corresponding to bilayer n = 80. Polarization resistance and corrosion rate was around 112.19 kΩ cm 2 and 0.094*10 −3 mmy respectively; moreover, these multilayered system showed a decrease of 80% on mass loss due to the corrosive–erosive process, in relation to multilayered systems with n = 1 and Λ = 1200. HfN/VN multilayers have been designed and deposited on Si (100) and AISI 4140 steel substrates with bilayer periods (Λ) in a broad range, from nanometers to hundreds of nanometers to study the microstructural evolution and electrochemical progress with decreasing bilayer thickness. - Highlights: • Enhancements on surface electrochemical properties and response to surface corrosion attack. • Superficial phenomenon that occurs in corrosion surface of [Hf-Nitrides/V-Nitrides]n • Corrosion–erosion evolution for [Hf-Nitrides/V-Nitrides]n structures

  7. Titanium. Properties, raw datum surface, physicochemical basis and fabrication technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garmata, V.A.; Petrun'ko, A.N.; Galitskij, N.V.; Olesov, Yu.G.; Sandler, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    On the nowadays science and technology achievements the complex of titanium metallurgy problems comprising raw material base, physico-chemical basis and fabrication technique, properties and titanium usage fields is considered for the first time. A particular attention is given to raw material base, manufacturing titanium concentrates and titanium tetrachloride, metallothermal reduction, improvement of metal quality. Data on titanium properties are given, processes of titanium powder metallurgy, scrap and waste processing, problems of economics and complex raw material use are considered

  8. Interlayer shear of nanomaterials: Graphene-graphene, boron nitride-boron nitride and graphene-boron nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinfeng Li; Weiwei Zhang; Bill Guo; Dibakar Datta

    2017-01-01

    In this paper,the interlayer sliding between graphene and boron nitride (h-BN) is studied by molecular dynamics simulations.The interlayer shear force between h-BN/h-BN is found to be six times higher than that of graphene/graphene,while the interlayer shear between graphene/h-BN is approximate to that of graphene/graphene.The graphene/h-BN heterostructure shows several anomalous interlayer shear characteristics compared to its bilayer counterparts.For graphene/graphene and h-BN/h-BN,interlayer shears only exit along the sliding direction while interlayer shear for graphene/h-BN is observed along both the translocation and perpendicular directions.Our results provide significant insight into the interlayer shear characteristics of 2D nanomaterials.

  9. Fabrication of carbide and nitride pellets and the nitride irradiations Niloc 1 and Niloc 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blank, H.

    1991-01-01

    Besides the relatively well-known advanced LMFBR mixed carbide fuel an advanced mixed nitride is also an attractive candidate for the optimised fuel cycle of the European Fast Reactor, but the present knowledge about the nitride is still insufficient and should be raised to the level of the carbide. For such an optimised fuel cycle the following general conditions have been set up for the fuel: (i) the burnup of the optimised MN and MC should be at least 15 a/o or even beyond, at moderate linear ratings of less than 75 kW/m (ii) the fuel will be used in a He-bonding pin concept and (iii) as far as available an advanced economic pellet fabrication method should be employed. (iv) The fuel structure must contain 15 - 20% porosity in order to accomodate the fission product swelling at high burnup. This report gives a comprehensive description of fuel and pellet fabrication and characterization, irradiation, and post-irradiation examination. From the results important conclusions can be drawn about future work on nitrides

  10. Humidity-dependent stability of amorphous germanium nitrides fabricated by plasma nitridation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutsuki, Katsuhiro; Okamoto, Gaku; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the stability of amorphous germanium nitride (Ge 3 N 4 ) layers formed by plasma nitridation of Ge(100) surfaces using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. We have found that humidity in the air accelerates the degradation of Ge 3 N 4 layers and that under 80% humidity condition, most of the Ge-N bonds convert to Ge-O bonds, producing a uniform GeO 2 layer, within 12 h even at room temperature. After this conversion of nitrides to oxides, the surface roughness drastically increased by forming GeO 2 islands on the surfaces. These findings indicate that although Ge 3 N 4 layers have superior thermal stability compared to the GeO 2 layers, Ge 3 N 4 reacts readily with hydroxyl groups and it is therefore essential to take the best care of the moisture in the fabrication of Ge-based devices with Ge 3 N 4 insulator or passivation layers

  11. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, S.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  12. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamann, S.; Röpcke, J.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH 4 , C 2 H 2 , HCN, and NH 3 ). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined

  13. EDITORIAL: Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung; Kneissl, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Throughout the history of group-III-nitride materials and devices, scientific breakthroughs and technological advances have gone hand-in-hand. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the discovery of the nucleation of smooth (0001) GaN films on c-plane sapphire and the activation of p-dopants in GaN led very quickly to the realization of high-brightness blue and green LEDs, followed by the first demonstration of GaN-based violet laser diodes in the mid 1990s. Today, blue InGaN LEDs boast record external quantum efficiencies exceeding 80% and the emission wavelength of the InGaN-based laser diode has been pushed into the green spectral range. Although these tremenduous advances have already spurred multi-billion dollar industries, there are still a number of scientific questions and technological issues that are unanswered. One key challenge is related to the polar nature of the III-nitride wurtzite crystal. Until a decade ago all research activities had almost exclusively concentrated on (0001)-oriented polar GaN layers and heterostructures. Although the device characteristics seem excellent, the strong polarization fields at GaN heterointerfaces can lead to a significant deterioration of the device performance. Triggered by the first demonstration non-polar GaN quantum wells grown on LiAlO2 by Waltereit and colleagues in 2000, impressive advances in the area of non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors and devices have been achieved. Today, a large variety of heterostructures free of polarization fields and exhibiting exceptional electronic and optical properties have been demonstrated, and the fundamental understanding of polar, semipolar and non-polar nitrides has made significant leaps forward. The contributions in this Semiconductor Science and Technology special issue on non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors provide an impressive and up-to-date cross-section of all areas of research and device physics in this field. The articles cover a wide range of

  14. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, S., E-mail: hamann@inp-greifswald.de; Röpcke, J. [INP-Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Materials Engineering, Gustav-Zeuner-Str. 5, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Strämke, M.; Strämke, S. [ELTRO GmbH, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Ring 3, 52499 Baesweiler (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, HCN, and NH{sub 3}). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  15. Comparative study involving the uranium determination through catalytic reduction of nitrates and nitrides by using decoupled plasma nitridation (DPN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Marco Antonio Souza; Gutz, Ivano G. Rolf

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports a comparative study on the determination of uranium through the catalytic reduction of nitrate and nitride using the decoupled plasma nitridation. The uranyl ions are a good catalyst for the reduction of NO - 3 and NO - 2 ions on the surface of a hanging drop mercury electrode (HDME). The presence of NO - in a solution with p H = 3 presented a catalytic signal more intense than the signal obtained with NO - 3 (concentration ten times higher). A detection limit of 1x10 9 M was obtained using the technique of decoupled plasma nitridation (DPN), suggesting the development of a sensitive way for the determination of uranium in different matrixes

  16. Deconstructing continuous flash suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eunice; Blake, Randolph

    2012-03-08

    In this paper, we asked to what extent the depth of interocular suppression engendered by continuous flash suppression (CFS) varies depending on spatiotemporal properties of the suppressed stimulus and CFS suppressor. An answer to this question could have implications for interpreting the results in which CFS influences the processing of different categories of stimuli to different extents. In a series of experiments, we measured the selectivity and depth of suppression (i.e., elevation in contrast detection thresholds) as a function of the visual features of the stimulus being suppressed and the stimulus evoking suppression, namely, the popular "Mondrian" CFS stimulus (N. Tsuchiya & C. Koch, 2005). First, we found that CFS differentially suppresses the spatial components of the suppressed stimulus: Observers' sensitivity for stimuli of relatively low spatial frequency or cardinally oriented features was more strongly impaired in comparison to high spatial frequency or obliquely oriented stimuli. Second, we discovered that this feature-selective bias primarily arises from the spatiotemporal structure of the CFS stimulus, particularly within information residing in the low spatial frequency range and within the smooth rather than abrupt luminance changes over time. These results imply that this CFS stimulus operates by selectively attenuating certain classes of low-level signals while leaving others to be potentially encoded during suppression. These findings underscore the importance of considering the contribution of low-level features in stimulus-driven effects that are reported under CFS.

  17. Microstructure and Hardness of High Temperature Gas Nitrided AISI 420 Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Nor Nurulhuda Md.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the microstructure and hardness of as-received and nitrided AISI 420 martensitic stainless steels. High temperature gas nitriding was employed to treat the steels at 1200°C for one hour and four hours using nitrogen gas, followed by furnace cooled. Chromium nitride and iron nitride were formed and concentrated at the outmost surface area of the steels since this region contained the highest concentration of nitrogen. The grain size enlarged at the interior region of the nitrided steels due to nitriding at temperature above the recrystallization temperature of the steel and followed by slow cooling. The nitrided steels produced higher surface hardness compared to as-received steel due to the presence of nitrogen and the precipitation of nitrides. Harder steel was produced when nitriding at four hours compared to one hour since more nitrogen permeated into the steel.

  18. Hydrogen diffusion between plasma-deposited silicon nitride-polyimide polymer interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, S.V.; Kerbaugh, M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports a nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) for hydrogen technique used to analyze the hydrogen concentration near plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride-polyimide interfaces at various nitride-deposition and polyimide-polymer-curing temperatures. The CF 4 + O 2 (8% O 2 ) plasma-etch-rate variation of PECVD silicon nitride films deposited on polyimide appeared to correlate well with the variation of hydrogen-depth profiles in the nitride films. The NRA data indicate that hydrogen-depth-profile fluctuation in the nitride films is due to hydrogen diffusion between the nitride-polyimide interfaces during deposition. Annealing treatment of polyimide films in a hydrogen atmosphere prior to the nitride film deposition tends to enhance the hydrogen-depth-profile uniformity in the nitride films, and thus substantially reduces or eliminates variation in the nitride plasma-etch rate

  19. Investigation of hexagonal boron nitride as an atomically thin corrosion passivation coating in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yang, Yingchao; Lou, Jun

    2016-09-09

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) atomic layers were utilized as a passivation coating in this study. A large-area continuous h-BN thin film was grown on nickel foil using a chemical vapor deposition method and then transferred onto sputtered copper as a corrosion passivation coating. The corrosion passivation performance in a Na2SO4 solution of bare and coated copper was investigated by electrochemical methods including cyclic voltammetry (CV), Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). CV and Tafel analysis indicate that the h-BN coating could effectively suppress the anodic dissolution of copper. The EIS fitting result suggests that defects are the dominant leakage source on h-BN films, and improved anti-corrosion performances could be achieved by further passivating these defects.

  20. Hydrogen-mediated Nitrogen Clustering in Dilute III-V Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, M.-H.; Limpijumnong, S.; Zhang, S. B

    2006-01-01

    First-principles calculation reveals multi-N clusters to be the ground states for hydrogenated N in dilute III-V nitrides. While hydrogenation of a single N, forming H*{sub 2}(N), can relax the large strain induced by the size-mismatched N, formation of the clusters will relax the strain even more effectively. This suppresses the formation of H*{sub 2}(N), the existence of which has recently been debated. More importantly, postgrowth dehydrogenation of the N-H clusters provides an explanation to the observed metastable bare N clusters in GaAsN grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy or metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

  1. The vapour phase deposition of boron on titanium by the reaction between gaseous boron trichloride and titanium metal. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, D.J.; Shelton, R.A.J.

    1965-03-01

    The reaction, between boron trichloride vapour and titanium has been investigated in the temperature range 200 - 1350 deg. C. It has been found that an initial reaction leads to the formation of titanium tetrachloride and the deposition of boron on titanium, but that except for reactions between 900 and 1000 deg. C, the system is complicated by the formation of lower titanium chlorides due to secondary reactions between the titanium and titanium tetrachloride

  2. Anomalous piezoelectricity in two-dimensional graphene nitride nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelisko, Matthew; Hanlumyuang, Yuranan; Yang, Shubin; Liu, Yuanming; Lei, Chihou; Li, Jiangyu; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Sharma, Pradeep

    2014-06-27

    Piezoelectricity is a unique property of materials that permits the conversion of mechanical stimuli into electrical and vice versa. On the basis of crystal symmetry considerations, pristine carbon nitride (C3N4) in its various forms is non-piezoelectric. Here we find clear evidence via piezoresponse force microscopy and quantum mechanical calculations that both atomically thin and layered graphitic carbon nitride, or graphene nitride, nanosheets exhibit anomalous piezoelectricity. Insights from ab inito calculations indicate that the emergence of piezoelectricity in this material is due to the fact that a stable phase of graphene nitride nanosheet is riddled with regularly spaced triangular holes. These non-centrosymmetric pores, and the universal presence of flexoelectricity in all dielectrics, lead to the manifestation of the apparent and experimentally verified piezoelectric response. Quantitatively, an e11 piezoelectric coefficient of 0.758 C m(-2) is predicted for C3N4 superlattice, significantly larger than that of the commonly compared α-quartz.

  3. Continuum modelling for carbon and boron nitride nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thamwattana, Ngamta; Hill, James M

    2007-01-01

    Continuum based models are presented here for certain boron nitride and carbon nanostructures. In particular, certain fullerene interactions, C 60 -C 60 , B 36 N 36 -B 36 N 36 and C 60 -B 36 N 36 , and fullerene-nanotube oscillator interactions, C 60 -boron nitride nanotube, C 60 -carbon nanotube, B 36 N 36 -boron nitride nanotube and B 36 N 36 -carbon nanotube, are studied using the Lennard-Jones potential and the continuum approach, which assumes a uniform distribution of atoms on the surface of each molecule. Issues regarding the encapsulation of a fullerene into a nanotube are also addressed, including acceptance and suction energies of the fullerenes, preferred position of the fullerenes inside the nanotube and the gigahertz frequency oscillation of the inner molecule inside the outer nanotube. Our primary purpose here is to extend a number of established results for carbon to the boron nitride nanostructures

  4. Iron Carbides and Nitrides: Ancient Materials with Novel Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhantong; Zhang, Peng; Lei, Xiang; Wang, Xiaobai; Zhao, Nan; Yang, Hua

    2018-02-07

    Iron carbides and nitrides have aroused great interest in researchers, due to their excellent magnetic properties, good machinability and the particular catalytic activity. Based on these advantages, iron carbides and nitrides can be applied in various areas such as magnetic materials, biomedical, photo- and electrocatalysis. In contrast to their simple elemental composition, the synthesis of iron carbides and nitrides still has great challenges, particularly at the nanoscale, but it is usually beneficial to improve performance in corresponding applications. In this review, we introduce the investigations about iron carbides and nitrides, concerning their structure, synthesis strategy and various applications from magnetism to the catalysis. Furthermore, the future prospects are also discussed briefly. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Defect complexes in carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of defect complexes on the stability, structural and electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes is investigated using the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method implemented...

  6. Effect of gas pressure on active screen plasma nitriding response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Akio; Nagatsuka, Kimiaki; Narita, Ryota; Nii, Hiroaki; Akamatsu, Katsuya

    2010-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 was active screen plasma nitrided using a 304 steel screen to investigate the effect of the gas pressure on the ASPN response. The sample was treated for 18 ks at 723 K in 25% N2 + 75% H2 gases. The gas pressure was changed to 100, 600 and 1200 Pa. The distance between screen and sample was also changed to 10, 30 and 50 mm. The nitrided samples were characterized by appearance observation, surface roughness, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and microhardness testing. After nitriding, polygonal particles with a normal distribution were observed at the center and edges of all the ASPN-treated sample surfaces. Particles on the sample surfaces were finer with an increase in the gas pressure. The nitrided layer with a greater and homogeneous thickness was obtained at a low gas pressure of 100 Pa. (author)

  7. Optical properties of indium nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagaj, V.A.; Evstigneev, A.M.; Krasiko, A.N.; Andreeva, A.F.; Malakhov, V.Ya.

    1977-01-01

    Reflection and transmission spectra of heavily doped indium nitride are studied at lambda=0.5-5 μm. Dispersion of the refractive index near the plasma resonance frequency, h.f. dielectric constant (epsilonsub(infinity)=9.3), and extinction coefficient near the transmission maximum of films have been determined from the analysis of interference pattern. The reflection spectrum exhibits maximum in the infrared range and optical effective mass is found through its position (msub(opt)*=0.11msub(0)). Free carrier absorption coefficient is shown to vary according to the law K approximately lambdasup(2.9+-0.1) which is characteristic of electron scattering by charged impurities. The analysis of absorption spectra near the threshold of interband transitions has lead to the conclusion that free carriers are localized in the lateral extremum of conduction band (or out of the center of the Brillouin zone), therefore the Burstein-Moss effect is absent

  8. Boron Nitride Nanotube: Synthesis and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Amanda L.; Park, Cheol; Lee, Joseph W.; Luong, Hoa H.; Gibbons, Luke J.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Applin, Samantha I.; Gnoffo, Peter; Lowther, Sharon; Kim, Hyun Jung; hide

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have predicted that carbon's immediate neighbors on the periodic chart, boron and nitrogen, may also form perfect nanotubes, since the advent of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in 1991. First proposed then synthesized by researchers at UC Berkeley in the mid 1990's, the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) has proven very difficult to make until now. Herein we provide an update on a catalyst-free method for synthesizing highly crystalline, small diameter BNNTs with a high aspect ratio using a high power laser under a high pressure and high temperature environment first discovered jointly by NASA/NIA JSA. Progress in purification methods, dispersion studies, BNNT mat and composite formation, and modeling and diagnostics will also be presented. The white BNNTs offer extraordinary properties including neutron radiation shielding, piezoelectricity, thermal oxidative stability (> 800 C in air), mechanical strength, and toughness. The characteristics of the novel BNNTs and BNNT polymer composites and their potential applications are discussed.

  9. Boron nitride: A new photonic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chubarov, M.; Pedersen, H.; Högberg, H.; Filippov, S.; Engelbrecht, J.A.A.; O'Connel, J.; Henry, A.

    2014-01-01

    Rhombohedral boron nitride (r-BN) layers were grown on sapphire substrate in a hot-wall chemical vapor deposition reactor. Characterization of these layers is reported in details. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is used as a routine characterization tool to investigate the crystalline quality of the films and the identification of the phases is revealed using detailed pole figure measurements. Transmission electron microscopy reveals stacking of more than 40 atomic layers. Results from Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements are compared with XRD data showing that FTIR is not phase sensitive when various phases of sp 2 -BN are investigated. XRD measurements show a significant improvement of the crystalline quality when adding silicon to the gas mixture during the growth; this is further confirmed by cathodoluminescence which shows a decrease of the defects related luminescence intensity.

  10. Boron nitride: A new photonic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubarov, M., E-mail: mihcu@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Pedersen, H., E-mail: henke@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Högberg, H., E-mail: hanho@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Filippov, S., E-mail: stafi@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Engelbrecht, J.A.A., E-mail: Japie.Engelbrecht@nmmu.ac.za [Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); O' Connel, J., E-mail: jacques.oconnell@gmail.com [Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Henry, A., E-mail: anne.henry@liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2014-04-15

    Rhombohedral boron nitride (r-BN) layers were grown on sapphire substrate in a hot-wall chemical vapor deposition reactor. Characterization of these layers is reported in details. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is used as a routine characterization tool to investigate the crystalline quality of the films and the identification of the phases is revealed using detailed pole figure measurements. Transmission electron microscopy reveals stacking of more than 40 atomic layers. Results from Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements are compared with XRD data showing that FTIR is not phase sensitive when various phases of sp{sup 2}-BN are investigated. XRD measurements show a significant improvement of the crystalline quality when adding silicon to the gas mixture during the growth; this is further confirmed by cathodoluminescence which shows a decrease of the defects related luminescence intensity.

  11. Laser ablation of molecular carbon nitride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D., E-mail: d.fischer@fkf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Schwinghammer, K. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany); Sondermann, C. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Lau, V.W.; Mannhart, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Lotsch, B.V. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We present a method for the preparation of thin films on sapphire substrates of the carbon nitride precursors dicyandiamide (C{sub 2}N{sub 4}H{sub 4}), melamine (C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6}), and melem (C{sub 6}N{sub 10}H{sub 6}), using the femtosecond-pulsed laser deposition technique (femto-PLD) at different temperatures. The depositions were carried out under high vacuum with a femtosecond-pulsed laser. The focused laser beam is scanned on the surface of a rotating target consisting of the pelletized compounds. The resulting polycrystalline, opaque films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence, SEM, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry measurements. The crystal structures and optical/spectroscopic results of the obtained rough films largely match those of the bulk materials.

  12. Hexagonal boron nitride and water interaction parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yanbin; Aluru, Narayana R., E-mail: aluru@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Wagner, Lucas K. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801-3080 (United States)

    2016-04-28

    The study of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in microfluidic and nanofluidic applications at the atomic level requires accurate force field parameters to describe the water-hBN interaction. In this work, we begin with benchmark quality first principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations on the interaction energy between water and hBN, which are used to validate random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. We then proceed with RPA to derive force field parameters, which are used to simulate water contact angle on bulk hBN, attaining a value within the experimental uncertainties. This paper demonstrates that end-to-end multiscale modeling, starting at detailed many-body quantum mechanics and ending with macroscopic properties, with the approximations controlled along the way, is feasible for these systems.

  13. Apatite formability of boron nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahiri, Debrupa; Keshri, Anup K; Agarwal, Arvind; Singh, Virendra; Seal, Sudipta

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the ability of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) to induce apatite formation in a simulated body fluid environment for a period of 7, 14 and 28 days. BNNTs, when soaked in the simulated body fluid, are found to induce hydroxyapatite (HA) precipitation on their surface. The precipitation process has an initial incubation period of ∼ 4.6 days. The amount of HA precipitate increases gradually with the soaking time. High resolution TEM results indicated a hexagonal crystal structure of HA needles. No specific crystallographic orientation relationship is observed between BNNT and HA, which is due to the presence of a thin amorphous HA layer on the BNNT surface that disturbs a definite orientation relationship.

  14. CVD mechanism of pyrolytic boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanji, H.; Monden, K.; Ide, M.

    1987-01-01

    Pyrolytic boron nitride (P-BN) has become a essential material for III-V compound semiconductor manufacturing process. As the demand from electronics industry for larger single crystals increases, the demand for larger and more economical P-BN components is growing rapidly. P-BN is manufactured by low pressure CVD using boron-trihalides and ammonia as the reactants. In spite that P-BN has been in the market for quite a long time, limited number of fundamental studies regarding the kinetics and the formation mechanism of P-BN have been reported. As it has been demonstrated in CVD of Si, knowledge and both theoretical and empirical modeling of CVD process can be applied to improve the deposition technology and to give more uniform deposition with higher efficiency, and it should also apply to the deposition of P-BN

  15. Thermal expansion of quaternary nitride coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasnádi, Ferenc; Wang, Fei; Odén, Magnus; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2018-04-01

    The thermal expansion coefficient of technologically relevant multicomponent cubic nitride alloys are predicted using the Debye model with ab initio elastic constants calculated at 0 K and an isotropic approximation for the Grüneisen parameter. Our method is benchmarked against measured thermal expansion of TiN and Ti(1-x)Al x N as well as against results of molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the thermal expansion coefficients of Ti(1-x-y)X y Al x N (X  =  Zr, Hf, Nb, V, Ta) solid solutions monotonously increase with the amount of alloying element X at all temperatures except for Zr and Hf, for which they instead decrease for y≳ 0.5 .

  16. A boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loh, G. C.; Baillargeat, D.

    2014-01-01

    The precise guidance of heat from one specific location to another is paramount in many industrial and commercial applications, including thermal management and thermoelectric generation. One of the cardinal requirements is a preferential conduction of thermal energy, also known as thermal rectification, in the materials. This study introduces a novel nanomaterial for rectifying heat—the boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier. Classical non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are performed on this nanomaterial, and interestingly, the strength of the rectification phenomenon is dissimilar at different operating temperatures. This is due to the contingence of the thermal flux on the conductance at the localized region around the scatterer, which varies with temperature. The rectification performance of the peapod rectifier is inherently dependent on its asymmetry. Last but not least, the favourable rectifying direction in the nanomaterial is established.

  17. A boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loh, G. C., E-mail: jgloh@mtu.edu [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, #16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Baillargeat, D. [CNRS-International-NTU-Thales Research Alliance (CINTRA), 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

    2014-06-28

    The precise guidance of heat from one specific location to another is paramount in many industrial and commercial applications, including thermal management and thermoelectric generation. One of the cardinal requirements is a preferential conduction of thermal energy, also known as thermal rectification, in the materials. This study introduces a novel nanomaterial for rectifying heat—the boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier. Classical non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are performed on this nanomaterial, and interestingly, the strength of the rectification phenomenon is dissimilar at different operating temperatures. This is due to the contingence of the thermal flux on the conductance at the localized region around the scatterer, which varies with temperature. The rectification performance of the peapod rectifier is inherently dependent on its asymmetry. Last but not least, the favourable rectifying direction in the nanomaterial is established.

  18. Rebar graphene from functionalized boron nitride nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yilun; Peng, Zhiwei; Larios, Eduardo; Wang, Gunuk; Lin, Jian; Yan, Zheng; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Tour, James M

    2015-01-27

    The synthesis of rebar graphene on Cu substrates is described using functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) that were annealed or subjected to chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of graphene. Characterization shows that the BNNTs partially unzip and form a reinforcing bar (rebar) network within the graphene layer that enhances the mechanical strength through covalent bonds. The rebar graphene is transferrable to other substrates without polymer assistance. The optical transmittance and conductivity of the hybrid rebar graphene film was tested, and a field effect transistor was fabricated to explore its electrical properties. This method of synthesizing 2D hybrid graphene/BN structures should enable the hybridization of various 1D nanotube and 2D layered structures with enhanced mechanical properties.

  19. CEMS of nitride coatings in agressive environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanžel, D.; Agudelo, A. C.; Gancedo, J. R.; Lakatos-Varsanyi, M.; Marco, J. F.

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion properties of single layered TiN and CrN films have been compared to bi-layered and multi-layered Ti/TiN films. XPS has showed that in humid SO2 atmosphere the best corrosion properties have been achieved by a multi-layered Ti/TiN coating. Cyclic voltammetry in acetate buffer has been applied to measure the porousity and corrosion resistance of coatings. The best results have been achieved by multi-layered Ti/TiN and CrN films. Conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy has been used to study the changes in the interface Fe/TiN during thermal treatment in UHV. It has been shown that the amount of iron nitrides in the interface increases with increasing temperature.

  20. CEMS of nitride coatings in agressive environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanzel, D.; Agudelo, A.C.; Gancedo, J.R.; Lakatos-Varsanyi, M.; Marco, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion properties of single layered TiN and CrN films have been compared to bi-layered and multi-layered Ti/TiN films. XPS has showed that in humid SO 2 atmosphere the best corrosion properties have been achieved by a multi-layered Ti/TiN coating. Cyclic voltammetry in acetate buffer has been applied to measure the porousity and corrosion resistance of coatings. The best results have been achieved by multi-layered Ti/TiN and CrN films. Conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy has been used to study the changes in the interface Fe/TiN during thermal treatment in UHV. It has been shown that the amount of iron nitrides in the interface increases with increasing temperature