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Sample records for suppressing gene expression

  1. miR-370 suppresses HBV gene expression and replication by targeting nuclear factor IA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongxia; Lv, Ping; Lv, Jing; Zhao, Xiaopei; Liu, Min; Zhang, Guangling; Tang, Hua

    2017-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major health problem worldwide. The roles of microRNAs in the regulation of HBV expression are being increasingly recognized. In this study, we found that overexpression of miR-370 suppressed HBV gene expression and replication in Huh7 cells, whereas antisense knockdown of endogenous miR-370 enhanced HBV gene expression and replication in Huh7 cells and HepG2.2.15 cells. Further, we identified the transcription factor nuclear factor IA (NFIA) as a new host target of miR-370. Overexpression and knockdown studies showed that NFIA stimulated HBV gene expression and replication. Importantly, overexpression of NFIA counteracted the effect of miR-370 on HBV gene expression and replication. Further mechanistic studies showed that miR-370 suppressed HBV replication and gene expression by repressing HBV Enhancer I activity, and one of the NFIA binding site in the Enhancer I element was responsible for the repressive effect of miR-370 on HBV Enhancer I activity. Altogether, our results demonstrated that miR-370 suppressed HBV gene expression and replication through repressing NFIA expression, which stimulates HBV replication via direct regulation on HBV Enhancer I activities. Our findings may provide a new antiviral strategy for HBV infection. J. Med. Virol. 89:834-844, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Altered Gene Expressions and Cytogenetic Repair Efficiency in Cells with Suppressed Expression of XPA after Proton Exposure

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    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Gridley, Daila S.; Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    Cellular responses to damages from ionizing radiation (IR) exposure are influenced not only by the genes involved in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, but also by non- DSB repair genes. We demonstrated previously that suppressed expression of several non-DSB repair genes, such as XPA, elevated IR-induced cytogenetic damages. In the present study, we exposed human fibroblasts that were treated with control or XPA targeting siRNA to 250 MeV protons (0 to 4 Gy), and analyzed chromosome aberrations and expressions of genes involved in DNA repair. As expected, after proton irradiation, cells with suppressed expression of XPA showed a significantly elevated frequency of chromosome aberrations compared with control siRNA treated (CS) cells. Protons caused more severe DNA damages in XPA knock-down cells, as 36% cells contained multiple aberrations compared to 25% in CS cells after 4Gy proton irradiation. Comparison of gene expressions using the real-time PCR array technique revealed that expressions of p53 and its regulated genes in irradiated XPA suppressed cells were altered similarly as in CS cells, suggesting that the impairment of IR induced DNA repair in XPA suppressed cells is p53-independent. Except for XPA, which was more than 2 fold down regulated in XPA suppressed cells, several other DNA damage sensing and repair genes (GTSE1, RBBP8, RAD51, UNG and XRCC2) were shown a more than 1.5 fold difference between XPA knock-down cells and CS cells after proton exposure. The possible involvement of these genes in the impairment of DNA repair in XPA suppressed cells will be further investigated.

  3. [Screening of differentially expressed genes in human renal cell carcinoma using suppression subtractive hybridization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Wei; Li, Xu

    2008-01-01

    To suppress COL1A1 and COL3A1 gene expressions in human skin fibroblasts (HSFs) by means of RNA interference (RNAi). SSH was performed in two directions to isolate the differentially expressed genes between human a RCC cell line RLC-310 and a normal renal cell line HK-2 (ATCC). The cDNAs obtained from the final nested PCR were directly inserted into T/A cloning vector to establish a subtractive cDNA library of specifically or highly expressed genes in RCC. Reverse Northern dot blotting was performed to screen the truly differentially expressed genes, and 200 positive genes were randomly selected for sequencing. The two-directional subtractive libraries contained more than 1200 clones, and 213 positive clones were obtained using reverse Northern blotting. Sequence analysis of these clones identified 144 differentially expressed genes, including 67 up-regulated and 77 down-regulated genes, in which 14 novel ESTs and 21 functionally unknown genes were found. Cluster analysis indicated the involvement of the sequenced genes in cell growth, cell adhesion and apoptosis. Reliable subtractive cDNA libraries of human RCC have been constructed successfully with SSH. The identification of the gene expression profile in RCC may help clarify the mechanism of tumorigenesis and development of RCC, and also sheds light on new targets for prevention, diagnosis and therapy of this malignancy.

  4. Inverse agonistic activity of antihistamines and suppression of histamine H1 receptor gene expression.

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    Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Ono, Shohei; Hattori, Masashi; Fukui, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Histamine H(1) receptor (H1R) expression influences the severity of allergy symptoms. We examined the effect of inverse agonists on H1R gene expression. Two inverse agonists (carebastine and mepyramine), but not the neutral antagonist oxatomide, decreased inositol phosphate accumulation. The inverse agonists also decreased H1R gene expression and down-regulated H1R mRNA below basal expression, while basal H1R mRNA expression was maintained after oxatomide treatment. These results suggest that inverse agonists more potently alleviate allergy symptoms by not only inhibiting stimulus-induced up-regulation of H1R gene expression but also by suppressing basal histamine signaling through their inverse agonistic activity.

  5. A DNA vector-based RNAi technology to suppress gene expression in mammalian cells.

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    Sui, Guangchao; Soohoo, Christina; Affar, El Bachir; Gay, Frédérique; Shi, Yujiang; Forrester, William C; Shi, Yang

    2002-04-16

    Double-stranded RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) has recently emerged as a powerful reverse genetic tool to silence gene expression in multiple organisms including plants, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila. The discovery that synthetic double-stranded, 21-nt small interfering RNA triggers gene-specific silencing in mammalian cells has further expanded the utility of RNAi into mammalian systems. Here we report a technology that allows synthesis of small interfering RNAs from DNA templates in vivo to efficiently inhibit endogenous gene expression. Significantly, we were able to use this approach to demonstrate, in multiple cell lines, robust inhibition of several endogenous genes of diverse functions. These findings highlight the general utility of this DNA vector-based RNAi technology in suppressing gene expression in mammalian cells.

  6. [Analysis of Phenotypic Manifestation of peanut Gene Expression Suppression by RNAi in Drosophila Oogenesis].

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    Akhmetova, K A; Dorogova, C N; Chesnokov, I N; Fedorova, S A

    2015-09-01

    The peanut gene functions in Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis were studied. It was demonstrated that the suppression of peanut expression by RNA interference in the ovary follicular cells results in the violation of oocyte polarization, anomalous cytokinesis in the chorion cells, and violation of the chromatin condensation in follicular cells. No oogenesis violations were observed in females with decreased peanut gene expression or an absence of the Pnut protein in the ovary generative cells. However, embryos produced by such females had a decreased survival rate caused by two death peaks.

  7. Histamine suppresses gene expression and synthesis of tumor necrosis factor alpha via histamine H2 receptors

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Histamine and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) can each contribute to the pathogenesis of allergic reactions and chronic inflammatory diseases. We now report the effect of histamine on gene expression and total cellular synthesis of TNF-alpha. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced synthesis of TNF-alpha in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 18 healthy donors was suppressed by histamine concentrations from 10(-6) to 10(-4) M, levels comparable with those measured in tissues after...

  8. Suppression of polygalacturonase gene expression in the phytopathogenic fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi by RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Joyce S; de la Bastide, Paul Y; Chabot, Meghan; Lerch, Lindsey; Hintz, William E

    2010-05-01

    The fungal pathogen, Ophiostomo novo-ulmi, has been responsible for the rapid decline of American elm (Ulmus americana) across North America and remains a serious threat to surviving elm populations. The production of pectinolytic polygalacturonase enzymes has been implicated as a virulence factor for many fungal pathogens, including O. novo-ulmi. Previous work has shown that the targeted disruption of the endopolygalacturonase gene locus epg1 of O. novo-ulmi reduced, but did not eliminate pectinase activity. In the present study, we evaluated the use of RNA interference (RNAi) as a method of suppressing expression of the epg1 locus in O. novo-ulmi and compared its efficiency to the gene disruption method. While there was a reduction in epg1-specific mRNA transcripts and in the amount of polygalacturonase enzyme secreted for both methods of gene regulation, neither method completely suppressed the expression of pectinase activity. There was, however, a significantly greater reduction in both transcript levels and secreted enzyme observed for some of the RNAi transformants. As the first demonstration of RNAi in O. novo-ulmi, this method of gene regulation shows promise in future studies of gene expression and pathogenicity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Profiling of differentially expressed genes using suppression subtractive hybridization in an equine model of chronic asthma.

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    Jean-Pierre Lavoie

    Full Text Available Gene expression analyses are used to investigate signaling pathways involved in diseases. In asthma, they have been primarily derived from the analysis of bronchial biopsies harvested from mild to moderate asthmatic subjects and controls. Due to ethical considerations, there is currently limited information on the transcriptome profile of the peripheral lung tissues in asthma.To identify genes contributing to chronic inflammation and remodeling in the peripheral lung tissue of horses with heaves, a naturally occurring asthma-like condition.Eleven adult horses (6 heaves-affected and 5 controls were studied while horses with heaves were in clinical remission (Pasture, and during disease exacerbation induced by a 30-day natural antigen challenge during stabling (Challenge. Large peripheral lung biopsies were obtained by thoracoscopy at both time points. Using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH, lung cDNAs of controls (Pasture and Challenge and asymptomatic heaves-affected horses (Pasture were subtracted from cDNAs of horses with heaves in clinical exacerbation (Challenge. The differential expression of selected genes of interest was confirmed using quantitative PCR assay.Horses with heaves, but not controls, developed airway obstruction when challenged. Nine hundred and fifty cDNA clones isolated from the subtracted library were screened by dot blot array and 224 of those showing the most marked expression differences were sequenced. The gene expression pattern was confirmed by quantitative PCR in 15 of 22 selected genes. Novel genes and genes with an already defined function in asthma were identified in the subtracted cDNA library. Genes of particular interest associated with asthmatic airway inflammation and remodeling included those related to PPP3CB/NFAT, RhoA, and LTB4/GPR44 signaling pathways.Pathways representing new possible targets for anti-inflammatory and anti-remodeling therapies for asthma were identified. The findings of genes

  10. Isolation of differentially expressed sex genes in garden asparagus using suppression subtractive hybridization.

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    Deng, Chuan-liang; Wang, Ning-na; Li, Shu-fen; Dong, Tian-yu; Zhao, Xin-peng; Wang, Shao-jing; Gao, Wu-jun; Lu, Long-dou

    2015-09-01

    Garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) is a dioecious species whose male and female flowers are found in separate unisexual individuals. A region called the M-locus, located on a pair of homomorphic sex chromosomes, controls sexual dimorphism in asparagus. To date, no sex determining gene has been isolated from asparagus. To identify more genes involved in flower development in asparagus, subtractive hybridization library of male flowers in asparagus was constructed by suppression subtraction hybridization. A total of 107 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified. BLASTX analysis showed that the library contained several genes that could be related to flower development. The expression patterns of seven selected genes believed to be involved in the development of asparagus male flower were further analyzed by semi-quantitative or real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results showed that AOEST4-5, AOEST12-40, and AOEST13-38 were strongly expressed in the male flower stage, whereas no transcript level of AOEST13-38 was detected in the female flower stage. The expression levels of AOEST13-87, AOEST13-92, AOEST13-40, and AOEST18-87 in the male flower stage were also higher than those in the female flower stage, although these transcripts were also expressed in other tissues. The identified genes can provide a strong starting point for further studies on the underlying molecular differences between the male and female flowers of asparagus.

  11. Suppression subtractive hybridization identified differentially expressed genes in lung adenocarcinoma: ERGIC3 as a novel lung cancer-related gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Mingsong; Tu, Tao; Huang, Yunchao; Cao, Yi

    2013-01-01

    To understand the carcinogenesis caused by accumulated genetic and epigenetic alterations and seek novel biomarkers for various cancers, studying differentially expressed genes between cancerous and normal tissues is crucial. In the study, two cDNA libraries of lung cancer were constructed and screened for identification of differentially expressed genes. Two cDNA libraries of differentially expressed genes were constructed using lung adenocarcinoma tissue and adjacent nonmalignant lung tissue by suppression subtractive hybridization. The data of the cDNA libraries were then analyzed and compared using bioinformatics analysis. Levels of mRNA and protein were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-RT-PCR) and western blot respectively, as well as expression and localization of proteins were determined by immunostaining. Gene functions were investigated using proliferation and migration assays after gene silencing and gene over-expression. Two libraries of differentially expressed genes were obtained. The forward-subtracted library (FSL) and the reverse-subtracted library (RSL) contained 177 and 59 genes, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that these genes were involved in a wide range of cellular functions. The vast majority of these genes were newly identified to be abnormally expressed in lung cancer. In the first stage of the screening for 16 genes, we compared lung cancer tissues with their adjacent non-malignant tissues at the mRNA level, and found six genes (ERGIC3, DDR1, HSP90B1, SDC1, RPSA, and LPCAT1) from the FSL were significantly up-regulated while two genes (GPX3 and TIMP3) from the RSL were significantly down-regulated (P < 0.05). The ERGIC3 protein was also over-expressed in lung cancer tissues and cultured cells, and expression of ERGIC3 was correlated with the differentiated degree and histological type of lung cancer. The up-regulation of ERGIC3 could promote cellular migration and proliferation in vitro. The

  12. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes Associated with Apple Fruit Ripening and Softening by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization.

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    Zhang, Zongying; Jiang, Shenghui; Wang, Nan; Li, Min; Ji, Xiaohao; Sun, Shasha; Liu, Jingxuan; Wang, Deyun; Xu, Haifeng; Qi, Sumin; Wu, Shujing; Fei, Zhangjun; Feng, Shouqian; Chen, Xuesen

    2015-01-01

    Apple is one of the most economically important horticultural fruit crops worldwide. It is critical to gain insights into fruit ripening and softening to improve apple fruit quality and extend shelf life. In this study, forward and reverse suppression subtractive hybridization libraries were generated from 'Taishanzaoxia' apple fruits sampled around the ethylene climacteric to isolate ripening- and softening-related genes. A set of 648 unigenes were derived from sequence alignment and cluster assembly of 918 expressed sequence tags. According to gene ontology functional classification, 390 out of 443 unigenes (88%) were assigned to the biological process category, 356 unigenes (80%) were classified in the molecular function category, and 381 unigenes (86%) were allocated to the cellular component category. A total of 26 unigenes differentially expressed during fruit development period were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. These genes were involved in cell wall modification, anthocyanin biosynthesis, aroma production, stress response, metabolism, transcription, or were non-annotated. Some genes associated with cell wall modification, anthocyanin biosynthesis and aroma production were up-regulated and significantly correlated with ethylene production, suggesting that fruit texture, coloration and aroma may be regulated by ethylene in 'Taishanzaoxia'. Some of the identified unigenes associated with fruit ripening and softening have not been characterized in public databases. The results contribute to an improved characterization of changes in gene expression during apple fruit ripening and softening.

  13. Citrus nobiletin suppresses inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression in interleukin-1β-treated hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshigai, Emi [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Ritsumeikan Global Innovation Research Organization (R-GIRO), Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Machida, Toru [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Okuyama, Tetsuya [Ritsumeikan Global Innovation Research Organization (R-GIRO), Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Mori, Masatoshi; Murase, Hiromitsu; Yamanishi, Ryota [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Okumura, Tadayoshi [Research Organization of Science and Technology, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Department of Surgery, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka (Japan); Ikeya, Yukinobu [Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Nishino, Hoyoku [Ritsumeikan Global Innovation Research Organization (R-GIRO), Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Nishizawa, Mikio, E-mail: nishizaw@sk.ritsumei.ac.jp [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan)

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •Nobiletin is a polymethoxylated flavone that is abundant in citrus peels. •Nobiletin is a major constituent of the Citrus unshiu peel extract. •Nobiletin suppresses induction of NO and reduces iNOS expression in hepatocytes. •Nobiletin reduces the iNOS promoter activity and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. -- Abstract: Background: Nobiletin is a polymethoxylated flavone that is abundant in the peels of citrus fruits, such as Citrus unshiu (Satsuma mandarin) and Citrus sinensis. The dried peels of C. unshiu (chinpi) have been included in several formulae of Japanese Kampo medicines. Nobiletin may suppress the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which synthesizes the inflammatory mediator nitric oxide (NO) in hepatocytes. Methods: A C. unshiu peel (CUP) extract was prepared. Primary cultured rat hepatocytes were treated with the CUP extract or nobiletin in the presence of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), which induces iNOS expression. NO production and iNOS gene expression were analyzed. Results: High-performance liquid chromatography analyses revealed that the nobiletin content in the CUP extract was 0.14%. Nobiletin dose-dependently reduced the NO levels and decreased iNOS expression at the protein, mRNA and antisense transcript levels. Flavone, which does not contain any methoxy groups, also suppressed iNOS induction. Nobiletin reduced the transcriptional activity of iNOS promoter-luciferase constructs and the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) in the nuclei. Conclusions: The suppression of iNOS induction by nobiletin suggests that nobiletin may be responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of citrus peels and have a therapeutic potential for liver diseases.

  14. WSSV-responsive gene expression under the influence of PmVRP15 suppression.

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    Tummamunkong, Phawida; Jaree, Phattarunda; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya

    2018-01-01

    The viral responsive protein 15 from black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (PmVRP15), is highly up-regulated and produced in the hemocytes of shrimp with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. To investigate the differential expression of genes from P. monodon hemocytes that are involved in WSSV infection under the influence of PmVRP15 expression, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) of PmVRP15-silenced shrimp infected with WSSV was performed. The 189 cDNA clones of the forward library were generated by subtracting the cDNAs from WSSV-infected and PmVRP15 knockdown shrimp with cDNAs from WSSV-infected and GFP knockdown shrimp. For the opposite subtraction, the 176 cDNA clones in the reverse library was an alternative set of genes in WSSV-infected shrimp hemocytes in the presence of PmVRP15 expression. The abundant genes in forward SSH library had a defense/homeostasis of 26%, energy/metabolism of 23% and in the reverse SSH library a hypothetical protein with unknown function was found (30%). The differential expressed immune-related genes from each library were selected for expression analysis using qRT-PCR. All selected genes from the forward library showed high up-regulation in the WSSV-challenged PmVRP15 knockdown group as expected. Interestingly, PmHHAP, a hemocyte homeostasis associated protein, and granulin-like protein, a conserved growth factor, are extremely up-regulated in the absence of PmVRP15 expression in WSSV-infected shrimp. Only transcript level of transglutaminase II, that functions in regulating hematopoietic tissue differentiation and inhibits mature hemocyte production in shrimp, was obviously down-regulated as observed from SSH results. Taken together, our results suggest that PmVRP15 might have a function relevant to hemocyte homeostasis during WSSV infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Adenovirus-encoding virus-associated RNAs suppress HDGF gene expression to support efficient viral replication.

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    Saki Kondo

    Full Text Available Non-coding small RNAs are involved in many physiological responses including viral life cycles. Adenovirus-encoding small RNAs, known as virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs, are transcribed throughout the replication process in the host cells, and their transcript levels depend on the copy numbers of the viral genome. Therefore, VA RNAs are abundant in infected cells after genome replication, i.e. during the late phase of viral infection. Their function during the late phase is the inhibition of interferon-inducible protein kinase R (PKR activity to prevent antiviral responses; recently, mivaRNAs, the microRNAs processed from VA RNAs, have been reported to inhibit cellular gene expression. Although VA RNA transcription starts during the early phase, little is known about its function. The reason may be because much smaller amount of VA RNAs are transcribed during the early phase than the late phase. In this study, we applied replication-deficient adenovirus vectors (AdVs and novel AdVs lacking VA RNA genes to analyze the expression changes in cellular genes mediated by VA RNAs using microarray analysis. AdVs are suitable to examine the function of VA RNAs during the early phase, since they constitutively express VA RNAs but do not replicate except in 293 cells. We found that the expression level of hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF significantly decreased in response to the VA RNAs under replication-deficient condition, and this suppression was also observed during the early phase under replication-competent conditions. The suppression was independent of mivaRNA-induced downregulation, suggesting that the function of VA RNAs during the early phase differs from that during the late phase. Notably, overexpression of HDGF inhibited AdV growth. This is the first report to show the function, in part, of VA RNAs during the early phase that may be contribute to efficient viral growth.

  16. Celecoxib inhibits osteoblast maturation by suppressing the expression of Wnt target genes

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    Akihiro Nagano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs have been shown to impair bone healing. We previously reported that in colon cancer cells, celecoxib, a COX-2-selective NSAID, inhibited the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Since this pathway also plays an important role in osteoblast growth and differentiation, we examined the effect of celecoxib on maturation of osteoblast-like cell line MC3T3-E1. Celecoxib induced degradation of transcription factor 7-like 2, a key transcription factor of the canonical Wnt pathway. Subsequently, we analyzed the effect of celecoxib on two osteoblast differentiation markers; runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2 and alkaline phosphatase (ALP, both of which are the products of the canonical Wnt pathway target genes. Celecoxib inhibited the expression of both RUNX2 and ALP by suppressing their promoter activity. Consistent with these observations, celecoxib also strongly inhibited osteoblast-mediated mineralization. These results suggest that celecoxib inhibits osteoblast maturation by suppressing Wnt target genes, and this could be the mechanism that NSAIDs inhibit bone formation and fracture healing.

  17. Cannabidivarin (CBDV suppresses pentylenetetrazole (PTZ-induced increases in epilepsy-related gene expression

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    Naoki Amada

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To date, anticonvulsant effects of the plant cannabinoid, cannabidivarin (CBDV, have been reported in several animal models of seizure. However, these behaviourally observed anticonvulsant effects have not been confirmed at the molecular level. To examine changes to epilepsy-related gene expression following chemical convulsant treatment and their subsequent control by phytocannabinoid administration, we behaviourally evaluated effects of CBDV (400 mg/kg, p.o. on acute, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ: 95 mg/kg, i.p.-induced seizures, quantified expression levels of several epilepsy-related genes (Fos, Casp 3, Ccl3, Ccl4, Npy, Arc, Penk, Camk2a, Bdnf and Egr1 by qPCR using hippocampal, neocortical and prefrontal cortical tissue samples before examining correlations between expression changes and seizure severity. PTZ treatment alone produced generalised seizures (median: 5.00 and significantly increased expression of Fos, Egr1, Arc, Ccl4 and Bdnf. Consistent with previous findings, CBDV significantly decreased PTZ-induced seizure severity (median: 3.25 and increased latency to the first sign of seizure. Furthermore, there were correlations between reductions of seizure severity and mRNA expression of Fos, Egr1, Arc, Ccl4 and Bdnf in the majority of brain regions in the CBDV+PTZ treated group. When CBDV treated animals were grouped into CBDV responders (criterion: seizure severity ≤3.25 and non-responders (criterion: seizure severity >3.25, PTZ-induced increases of Fos, Egr1, Arc, Ccl4 and Bdnf expression were suppressed in CBDV responders. These results provide the first molecular confirmation of behaviourally observed effects of the non-psychoactive, anticonvulsant cannabinoid, CBDV, upon chemically-induced seizures and serve to underscore its suitability for clinical development.

  18. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 suppresses gene expression of cyclin D1 in tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasmin, Tania; Takahashi-Yanaga, Fumi; Mori, Jun; Miwa, Yoshikazu; Hirata, Masato; Watanabe, Yutaka; Morimoto, Sachio; Sasaguri, Toshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    To determine the mechanism by which differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), a morphogen of Dictyostelium discoideum, inhibits tumor cell proliferation, we examined the effect of DIF-1 on the gene expression of cyclin D1. DIF-1 strongly reduced the expression of cyclin D1 mRNA and correspondingly decreased the amount of β-catenin in HeLa cells and squamous cell carcinoma cells. DIF-1 activated glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and inhibition of GSK-3β attenuated the DIF-1-induced β-catenin degradation, indicating the involvement of GSK-3β in this effect. Moreover, DIF-1 reduced the activities of T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF) reporter plasmid and a reporter gene driven by the human cyclin D1 promoter. Eliminating the TCF/LEF consensus site from the cyclin D1 promoter diminished the effect of DIF-1. These results suggest that DIF-1 inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling, resulting in the suppression of cyclin D1 promoter activity

  19. Sex Chromosome-wide Transcriptional Suppression and Compensatory Cis-Regulatory Evolution Mediate Gene Expression in the Drosophila Male Germline.

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    Emily L Landeen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes has repeatedly resulted in the evolution of sex chromosome-specific forms of regulation, including sex chromosome dosage compensation in the soma and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the germline. In the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a novel but poorly understood form of sex chromosome-specific transcriptional regulation occurs that is distinct from canonical sex chromosome dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation. Previous work shows that expression of reporter genes driven by testis-specific promoters is considerably lower-approximately 3-fold or more-for transgenes inserted into X chromosome versus autosome locations. Here we characterize this transcriptional suppression of X-linked genes in the male germline and its evolutionary consequences. Using transgenes and transpositions, we show that most endogenous X-linked genes, not just testis-specific ones, are transcriptionally suppressed several-fold specifically in the Drosophila male germline. In wild-type testes, this sex chromosome-wide transcriptional suppression is generally undetectable, being effectively compensated by the gene-by-gene evolutionary recruitment of strong promoters on the X chromosome. We identify and experimentally validate a promoter element sequence motif that is enriched upstream of the transcription start sites of hundreds of testis-expressed genes; evolutionarily conserved across species; associated with strong gene expression levels in testes; and overrepresented on the X chromosome. These findings show that the expression of X-linked genes in the Drosophila testes reflects a balance between chromosome-wide epigenetic transcriptional suppression and long-term compensatory adaptation by sex-linked genes. Our results have broad implications for the evolution of gene expression in the Drosophila male germline and for genome evolution.

  20. Antisense suppression of LOX3 gene expression in rice endosperm enhances seed longevity.

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    Xu, Huibin; Wei, Yidong; Zhu, Yongsheng; Lian, Ling; Xie, Hongguang; Cai, Qiuhua; Chen, Qiushi; Lin, Zhongping; Wang, Zonghua; Xie, Huaan; Zhang, Jianfu

    2015-05-01

    Lipid peroxidation plays a major role in seed longevity and viability. In rice grains, lipid peroxidation is catalyzed by the enzyme lipoxygenase 3 (LOX3). Previous reports showed that grain from the rice variety DawDam in which the LOX3 gene was deleted had less stale flavour after grain storage than normal rice. The molecular mechanism by which LOX3 expression is regulated during endosperm development remains unclear. In this study, we expressed a LOX3 antisense construct in transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants to down-regulate LOX3 expression in rice endosperm. The transgenic plants exhibited a marked decrease in LOX mRNA levels, normal phenotypes and a normal life cycle. We showed that LOX3 activity and its ability to produce 9-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) from linoleic acid were significantly lower in transgenic seeds than in wild-type seeds by measuring the ultraviolet absorption of 9-HPOD at 234 nm and by high-performance liquid chromatography. The suppression of LOX3 expression in rice endosperm increased grain storability. The germination rate of TS-91 (antisense LOX3 transgenic line) was much higher than the WT (29% higher after artificial ageing for 21 days, and 40% higher after natural ageing for 12 months). To our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that decreased LOX3 expression can preserve rice grain quality during storage with no impact on grain yield, suggesting potential applications in agricultural production. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Conserved RXLR Effector Genes of Phytophthora infestans Expressed at the Early Stage of Potato Infection Are Suppressive to Host Defense

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    Junliang Yin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Late blight has been the most devastating potato disease worldwide. The causal agent, Phytophthora infestans, is notorious for its capability to rapidly overcome host resistance. Changes in the expression pattern and the encoded protein sequences of effector genes in the pathogen are responsible for the loss of host resistance. Among numerous effector genes, the class of RXLR effector genes is well-known in mediating host genotype-specific resistance. We therefore performed deep sequencing of five genetically diverse P. infestans strains using in planta materials infected with zoospores (12 h post inoculation and focused on the identification of RXLR effector genes that are conserved in coding sequences, are highly expressed in early stages of plant infection, and have defense suppression activities. In all, 245 RXLR effector genes were expressed in five transcriptomes, with 108 being co-expressed in all five strains, 47 of them comparatively highly expressed. Taking sequence polymorphism into consideration, 18 candidate core RXLR effectors that were conserved in sequence and with higher in planta expression levels were selected for further study. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient expression of the selected effector genes in Nicotiana benthamiana and potato demonstrated their potential virulence function, as shown by suppression of PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI or/and effector-triggered immunity (ETI. The identified collection of core RXLR effectors will be useful in the search for potential durable late blight resistance genes. Analysis of 10 known Avr RXLR genes revealed that the resistance genes R2, Rpi-blb2, Rpi-vnt1, Rpi-Smira1, and Rpi-Smira2 may be effective in potato cultivars. Analysis of 8 SFI (Suppressor of early Flg22-induced Immune response RXLR effector genes showed that SFI2, SFI3, and SFI4 were highly expressed in all examined strains, suggesting their potentially important function in early stages of pathogen infection.

  2. Interleukin-1β Suppresses the Transporter Genes Ank and Ent1 Expression in Stromal Progenitor Cells Retaining Mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezura, Yoichi; Lin, Xin; Hatta, Arina; Izu, Yayoi; Noda, Masaki

    2016-08-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) in various tissues evokes clinical problems. Inflammatory responses of the stromal progenitor cells may be involved in its etiology. Previous report indicated that pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β enhanced the in vitro calcification of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), by suppressing the expression of ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase-1 gene (ENPP1). However, possible contribution of other related factors had not been investigated. Here, we investigated the expression of regulators of extracellular pyrophosphate and nucleosides including Enpp1, Nt5e, Ank, Enptds, and Ent1, examining various connective tissue stromal progenitor cells, including bone marrow stromal cells and synovium derived cells from mouse, or bone marrow MSCs from human. Consistent with previous studies, we observed characteristic suppression of the osteoblastic marker genes by IL-1β during the osteogenic culture for 20 days. In addition, we observed a reduced expression of the important transporter genes, Ank and Ent1, whereas the alteration in Enpp1 and Nt5e levels was not always consistent among the cell types. Our results suggest that IL-1β suppresses not only the osteoblastic but also the negative regulators of soft-tissue calcification, including Ank and Ent1 in stromal progenitor cells, which may contribute to the mechanisms of HO in various disorders.

  3. Analysis and characterization of differential gene expression during rapid trophoblastic elongation in the pig using suppression subtractive hybridization

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    Malayer Jerry R

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During late peri-implantation development, porcine conceptuses undergo a rapid (2–3 hrs morphological transformation from a 10 mm sphere to a thin filamentous form greater than 150 mm in length. Elongation of the conceptus is important for establishing adequate placental surface area needed for embryo and fetal survival throughout gestation. Genes involved with triggering this unique transition in conceptus development are not well defined. Objective of the present study was to utilize suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH to characterize the change in gene expression during conceptus transformation from spherical (8–9 mm to tubular (15–40 mm to early filamentous (>150 mm morphology. Spherical, tubular, and filamentous conceptuses were collected from pregnant gilts and subjected to SSH. Forward and reverse subtractions were performed to identify candidate genes differentially expressed during spherical to tubular and tubular to filamentous transition. A total of 384 transcripts were differentially screened to ensure unique expression. Of the transcripts screened, sequences were obtained for 142 that were confirmed to be differentially expressed among the various morphologies. Gene expression profiles during rapid trophoblastic elongation were generated for selected mRNAs using quantitative real-time PCR. During the transition from tubular to early filamentous conceptuses, s-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase and heat shock cognate 70 kDa expression were significantly enhanced. A novel unknown gene was isolated and shown to be significantly up-regulated at the onset of rapid trophoblastic elongation and further enhanced in filamentous conceptuses.

  4. Suppression of gluconeogenic gene expression by LSD1-mediated histone demethylation.

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    Dongning Pan

    Full Text Available Aberrant gluconeogenic gene expression is associated with diabetes, glycogen storage disease, and liver cancer. However, little is known how these genes are regulated at the chromatin level. In this study, we investigated in HepG2 cells whether histone demethylation is a potential mechanism. We found that knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of histone demethylase LSD1 causes remarkable transcription activation of two gluconeogenic genes, FBP1 and G6Pase, and consequently leads to increased de novo glucose synthesis and decreased intracellular glycogen content. Mechanistically, LSD1 occupies the promoters of FBP1 and G6Pase, and modulates their H3K4 dimethylation levels. Thus, our work identifies an epigenetic pathway directly governing gluconeogenic gene expression, which might have important implications in metabolic physiology and diseases.

  5. Identification of differentially expressed genes in SHSY5Y cells exposed to okadaic acid by suppression subtractive hybridization

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    Valdiglesias Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Okadaic acid (OA, a toxin produced by several dinoflagellate species is responsible for frequent food poisonings associated to shellfish consumption. Although several studies have documented the OA effects on different processes such as cell transformation, apoptosis, DNA repair or embryogenesis, the molecular mechanistic basis for these and other effects is not completely understood and the number of controversial data on OA is increasing in the literature. Results In this study, we used suppression subtractive hybridization in SHSY5Y cells to identify genes that are differentially expressed after OA exposure for different times (3, 24 and 48 h. A total of 247 subtracted clones which shared high homology with known genes were isolated. Among these, 5 specific genes associated with cytoskeleton and neurotransmission processes (NEFM, TUBB, SEPT7, SYT4 and NPY were selected to confirm their expression levels by real-time PCR. Significant down-regulation of these genes was obtained at the short term (3 and 24 h OA exposure, excepting for NEFM, but their expression was similar to the controls at 48 h. Conclusions From all the obtained genes, 114 genes were up-regulated and 133 were down-regulated. Based on the NCBI GenBank and Gene Ontology databases, most of these genes are involved in relevant cell functions such as metabolism, transport, translation, signal transduction and cell cycle. After quantitative PCR analysis, the observed underexpression of the selected genes could underlie the previously reported OA-induced cytoskeleton disruption, neurotransmission alterations and in vivo neurotoxic effects. The basal expression levels obtained at 48 h suggested that surviving cells were able to recover from OA-caused gene expression alterations.

  6. Profiling of differentially expressed genes in roots of Robinia pseudoacacia during nodule development using suppressive subtractive hybridization.

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    Hongyan Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Legume-rhizobium symbiosis is a complex process that is regulated in the host plant cell through gene expression network. Many nodulin genes that are upregulated during different stages of nodulation have been identified in leguminous herbs. However, no nodulin genes in woody legume trees, such as black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia, have yet been reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To identify the nodulin genes involved in R. pseudoacacia-Mesorhizobium amorphae CCNWGS0123 symbiosis, a suppressive subtractive hybridization approach was applied to reveal profiling of differentially expressed genes and two subtracted cDNA libraries each containing 600 clones were constructed. Then, 114 unigenes were identified from forward SSH library by differential screening and the putative functions of these translational products were classified into 13 categories. With a particular interest in regulatory genes, twenty-one upregulated genes encoding potential regulatory proteins were selected based on the result of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis. They included nine putative transcription genes, eight putative post-translational regulator genes and four membrane protein genes. The expression patterns of these genes were further analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR at different stages of nodule development. CONCLUSIONS: The data presented here offer the first insights into the molecular foundation underlying R. pseudoacacia-M. amorphae symbiosis. A number of regulatory genes screened in the present study revealed a high level of regulatory complexity (transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational and post-translational that is likely essential to develop symbiosis. In addition, the possible roles of these genes in black locust nodulation are discussed.

  7. Profiling of Differentially Expressed Genes in Roots of Robinia pseudoacacia during Nodule Development Using Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization

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    Wang, Xinye; Liu, Sisi; Zhang, Feilong; Wei, Gehong

    2013-01-01

    Background Legume-rhizobium symbiosis is a complex process that is regulated in the host plant cell through gene expression network. Many nodulin genes that are upregulated during different stages of nodulation have been identified in leguminous herbs. However, no nodulin genes in woody legume trees, such as black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia), have yet been reported. Methodology/Principal findings To identify the nodulin genes involved in R. pseudoacacia-Mesorhizobium amorphae CCNWGS0123 symbiosis, a suppressive subtractive hybridization approach was applied to reveal profiling of differentially expressed genes and two subtracted cDNA libraries each containing 600 clones were constructed. Then, 114 unigenes were identified from forward SSH library by differential screening and the putative functions of these translational products were classified into 13 categories. With a particular interest in regulatory genes, twenty-one upregulated genes encoding potential regulatory proteins were selected based on the result of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. They included nine putative transcription genes, eight putative post-translational regulator genes and four membrane protein genes. The expression patterns of these genes were further analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR at different stages of nodule development. Conclusions The data presented here offer the first insights into the molecular foundation underlying R. pseudoacacia–M. amorphae symbiosis. A number of regulatory genes screened in the present study revealed a high level of regulatory complexity (transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational and post-translational) that is likely essential to develop symbiosis. In addition, the possible roles of these genes in black locust nodulation are discussed. PMID:23776436

  8. Inflammation and Gli2 suppress gastrin gene expression in a murine model of antral hyperplasia.

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    Milena Saqui-Salces

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation in the stomach can lead to gastric cancer. We previously reported that gastrin-deficient (Gast⁻/⁻ mice develop bacterial overgrowth, inflammatory infiltrate, increased Il-1β expression, antral hyperplasia and eventually antral tumors. Since Hedgehog (Hh signaling is active in gastric cancers but its role in precursor lesions is poorly understood, we examined the role of inflammation and Hh signaling in antral hyperplasia. LacZ reporter mice for Sonic hedgehog (Shh, Gli1, and Gli2 expression bred onto the Gast⁻/⁻ background revealed reduced Shh and Gli1 expression in the antra compared to wild type controls (WT. Gli2 expression in the Gast⁻/⁻ corpus was unchanged. However in the hyperplastic Gast⁻/⁻ antra, Gli2 expression increased in both the mesenchyme and epithelium, whereas expression in WT mice remained exclusively mesenchymal. These observations suggested that Gli2 is differentially regulated in the hyperplastic Gast⁻/⁻ antrum versus the corpus and by a Shh ligand-independent mechanism. Moreover, the proinflammatory cytokines Il-1β and Il-11, which promote gastric epithelial proliferation, were increased in the Gast⁻/⁻ stomach along with Infγ. To test if inflammation could account for elevated epithelial Gli2 expression in the Gast⁻/⁻ antra, the human gastric cell line AGS was treated with IL-1β and was found to increase GLI2 but decrease GLI1 levels. IL-1β also repressed human GAST gene expression. Indeed, GLI2 but not GLI1 or GLI3 expression repressed gastrin luciferase reporter activity by ∼50 percent. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation of GLI2 in AGS cells confirmed that GLI2 directly binds to the GAST promoter. Using a mouse model of constitutively active epithelial GLI2 expression, we found that activated GLI2 repressed Gast expression but induced Il-1β gene expression and proliferation in the gastric antrum, along with a reduction of the number of G-cells. In summary

  9. Suppression subtractive hybridization coupled with microarray analysis to examine differential expression of genes in virus infected cells

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    Munir Shirin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available High throughput detection of differential expression of genes is an efficient means of identifying genes and pathways that may play a role in biological systems under certain experimental conditions. There exist a variety of approaches that could be used to identify groups of genes that change in expression in response to a particular stimulus or environment. We here describe the application of suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH coupled with cDNA microarray analysis for isolation and identification of chicken transcripts that change in expression on infection of host cells with a paramyxovirus. SSH was used for initial isolation of differentially expressed transcripts, a large-scale validation of which was accomplished by microarray analysis. The data reveals a large group of regulated genes constituting many biochemical pathways that could serve as targets for future investigations to explore their role in paramyxovirus pathogenesis. The detailed methods described herein could be useful and adaptable to any biological system for studying changes in gene expression.

  10. Expression of immune-response genes in lepidopteran host is suppressed by venom from an endoparasitoid, Pteromalus puparum

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    Fang Qi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationships between parasitoids and their insect hosts have attracted attention at two levels. First, the basic biology of host-parasitoid interactions is of fundamental interest. Second, parasitoids are widely used as biological control agents in sustainable agricultural programs. Females of the gregarious endoparasitoid Pteromalus puparum (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae inject venom along with eggs into their hosts. P. puparum does not inject polydnaviruses during oviposition. For this reason, P. puparum and its pupal host, the small white butterfly Pieris rapae (Lepidoptera: Pieridae, comprise an excellent model system for studying the influence of an endoparasitoid venom on the biology of the pupal host. P. puparum venom suppresses the immunity of its host, although the suppressive mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we tested our hypothesis that P. puparum venom influences host gene expression in the two main immunity-conferring tissues, hemocytes and fat body. Results At 1 h post-venom injection, we recorded significant decreases in transcript levels of 217 EST clones (revealing 113 genes identified in silico, including 62 unknown contigs derived from forward subtractive libraries of host hemocytes and in transcript levels of 288 EST clones (221 genes identified in silico, including 123 unknown contigs from libraries of host fat body. These genes are related to insect immune response, cytoskeleton, cell cycle and apoptosis, metabolism, transport, stress response and transcriptional and translational regulation. We verified the reliability of the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH data with semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of a set of randomly selected genes. This analysis showed that most of the selected genes were down-regulated after venom injection. Conclusions Our findings support our hypothesis that P. puparum venom influences gene expression in host hemocytes and fat body. Specifically

  11. Human umbilical cord matrix mesenchymal stem cells suppress the growth of breast cancer by expression of tumor suppressor genes.

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    Naomi Ohta

    Full Text Available Human and rat umbilical cord matrix mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSC possess the ability to control the growth of breast carcinoma cells. Comparative analyses of two types of UCMSC suggest that rat UCMSC-dependent growth regulation is significantly stronger than that of human UCMSC. Their different tumoricidal abilities were clarified by analyzing gene expression profiles in the two types of UCMSC. Microarray analysis revealed differential gene expression between untreated naïve UCMSC and those co-cultured with species-matched breast carcinoma cells. The analyses screened 17 differentially expressed genes that are commonly detected in both human and rat UCMSC. The comparison between the two sets of gene expression profiles identified two tumor suppressor genes, adipose-differentiation related protein (ADRP and follistatin (FST, that were specifically up-regulated in rat UCMSC, but down-regulated in human UCMSC when they were co-cultured with the corresponding species' breast carcinoma cells. Over-expression of FST, but not ADRP, in human UCMSC enhanced their ability to suppress the growth of MDA-231 cells. The growth of MDA-231 cells was also significantly lower when they were cultured in medium conditioned with FST, but not ADRP over-expressing human UCMSC. In the breast carcinoma lung metastasis model generated with MDA-231 cells, systemic treatment with FST-over-expressing human UCMSC significantly attenuated the tumor burden. These results suggest that FST may play an important role in exhibiting stronger tumoricidal ability in rat UCMSC than human UCMSC and also implies that human UCMSC can be transformed into stronger tumoricidal cells by enhancing tumor suppressor gene expression.

  12. 3-Deazaneplanocin A suppresses aggressive phenotype-related gene expression in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

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    Hatta, Mitsutoki; Naganuma, Kaori; Kato, Kenichi; Yamazaki, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In tumor tissues, alterations of gene expression caused by aberrant epigenetic modifications confer phenotypic diversity on malignant cells. Although 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep) has been shown to reactivate tumor suppressor genes in several cancer cells, it remains unclear whether DZNep attenuates the malignant phenotypes of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of DZNep on the expression of genes related to aggressive phenotypes, such as epithelial–mesenchymal transition, in OSCC cells. We found that DZNep reduced the cellular levels of polycomb group proteins (EZH2, SUZ12, BMI1, and RING1A) and the associated trimethylation of Lys27 on histone H3 and monoubiquitination of Lys119 on histone H2A in the poorly differentiated OSCC cell line SAS. Immunocytochemical staining demonstrated that DZNep induced the reorganization of filamentous actin and the membrane localization of E-cadherin associated with cell–cell adhesions. We also found an inhibitory effect of DZNep on cell proliferation using a WST assay. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that genes involved in the aggressive phenotypes (TWIST2, EGFR, ACTA2, TGFB1, WNT5B, and APLIN) were down-regulated, whereas epithelial phenotype genes (CDH1, CLDN4, IVL, and TGM1) were up-regulated in SAS cells treated with DZNep. Collectively, our findings suggest that DZNep reverses the aggressive characteristics of OSCC cells through the dynamic regulation of epithelial plasticity via the reprogramming of gene expression patterns. - Highlights: • DZNep reduced PcG proteins and associated histone modifications in OSCC cells. • DZNep enhanced cell–cell adhesion indicative of epithelial phenotype in OSCC cells. • DZNep suppressed the aggressive phenotype-related gene expression in OSCC cells. • DZNep activated the gene expression of epithelial markers in OSCC cells.

  13. 3-Deazaneplanocin A suppresses aggressive phenotype-related gene expression in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

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    Hatta, Mitsutoki, E-mail: hatta@college.fdcnet.ac.jp [Department of Physiological Science and Molecular Biology, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka (Japan); Naganuma, Kaori [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka (Japan); Kato, Kenichi; Yamazaki, Jun [Department of Physiological Science and Molecular Biology, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2015-12-04

    In tumor tissues, alterations of gene expression caused by aberrant epigenetic modifications confer phenotypic diversity on malignant cells. Although 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep) has been shown to reactivate tumor suppressor genes in several cancer cells, it remains unclear whether DZNep attenuates the malignant phenotypes of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of DZNep on the expression of genes related to aggressive phenotypes, such as epithelial–mesenchymal transition, in OSCC cells. We found that DZNep reduced the cellular levels of polycomb group proteins (EZH2, SUZ12, BMI1, and RING1A) and the associated trimethylation of Lys27 on histone H3 and monoubiquitination of Lys119 on histone H2A in the poorly differentiated OSCC cell line SAS. Immunocytochemical staining demonstrated that DZNep induced the reorganization of filamentous actin and the membrane localization of E-cadherin associated with cell–cell adhesions. We also found an inhibitory effect of DZNep on cell proliferation using a WST assay. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that genes involved in the aggressive phenotypes (TWIST2, EGFR, ACTA2, TGFB1, WNT5B, and APLIN) were down-regulated, whereas epithelial phenotype genes (CDH1, CLDN4, IVL, and TGM1) were up-regulated in SAS cells treated with DZNep. Collectively, our findings suggest that DZNep reverses the aggressive characteristics of OSCC cells through the dynamic regulation of epithelial plasticity via the reprogramming of gene expression patterns. - Highlights: • DZNep reduced PcG proteins and associated histone modifications in OSCC cells. • DZNep enhanced cell–cell adhesion indicative of epithelial phenotype in OSCC cells. • DZNep suppressed the aggressive phenotype-related gene expression in OSCC cells. • DZNep activated the gene expression of epithelial markers in OSCC cells.

  14. Differential expression of genes identified by suppression subtractive hybridization in liver and adipose tissue of gerbils with diabetes

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    Li, Zhenkun; Li, Xiaohong; Guo, Meng; Lu, Jing; Wang, Ying; Chen, Zhenwen

    2018-01-01

    Objectives We aimed at identifying genes related to hereditary type 2 diabetes expressed in the liver and the adipose tissue of spontaneous diabetic gerbils using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) screening. Methods Two gerbil littermates, one with high and the other with normal blood glucose level, from our previously bred spontaneous diabetic gerbil strain were used in this study. To identify differentially expressed genes in the liver and the adipose tissue, mRNA from these tissues was extracted and SSH libraries were constructed for screening. After sequencing and BLAST analyzing, up or down-regulated genes possibly involved in metabolism and diabetes were selected, and their expression levels in diabetic gerbils and normal controls were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Results A total of 4 SSH libraries were prepared from the liver and the adipose tissue of gerbils. There are 95 up or down-regulated genes were identified to be involved in metabolism, oxidoreduction, RNA binding, cell proliferation, and differentiation or other function. Expression of 17 genes most possibly associated with diabetes was analyzed and seven genes (Sardh, Slc39a7, Pfn1, Arg1, Cth, Sod1 and P4hb) in the liver and one gene (Fabp4) in the adipose tissue were identified that were significantly differentially expressed between diabetic gerbils and control animals. Conclusions We identified eight genes associated with type 2 diabetes from the liver and the adipose tissue of gerbils via SSH screening. These findings provide further insights into the molecular mechanisms of diabetes and imply the value of our spontaneous diabetic gerbil strain as a diabetes model. PMID:29394254

  15. Suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) and macroarray techniques reveal differential gene expression profiles in brain of sea bream infected with nodavirus.

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    Dios, S; Poisa-Beiro, L; Figueras, A; Novoa, B

    2007-03-01

    Despite of the impact that viruses have on aquatic organisms, relatively little is known on how fish fight against these infections. In this work, the brain gene expression pattern of sea bream (Sparus aurata) in response to nodavirus infection was investigated. We used the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method to generate a subtracted cDNA library enriched with gene transcripts differentially expressed after 1 day post-infection. Some of the ESTs from the infected tissues fell in gene categories related to stress and immune responses. For the reverse library (ESTs expressed in controls compared with infected tissues) the most abundant transcripts were of ribosomal and mitochondrial nature. Several ESTs potentially induced by virus exposure were selected for in vivo expression studies. We observed a clear difference in expression between infected and control samples for two candidate genes, ubiquitin conjugating enzyme 7 interacting protein, which seems to play an important role in apoptosis and the interferon induced protein with helicase C domain 1 (mda-5) that contributes to apoptosis and regulates the type I IFN production, a key molecule of the antiviral innate response in most organisms.

  16. Resveratrol Suppresses PAI-1 Gene Expression in a Human In Vitro Model of Inflamed Adipose Tissue

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    Ivana Zagotta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 levels are associated with a number of pathophysiological complications; among them is obesity. Resveratrol was proposed to improve obesity-related health problems, but the effect of resveratrol on PAI-1 gene expression in obesity is not completely understood. In this study, we used SGBS adipocytes and a model of human adipose tissue inflammation to examine the effects of resveratrol on the production of PAI-1. Treatment of SGBS adipocytes with resveratrol reduced PAI-1 mRNA and protein in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Further experiments showed that obesity-associated inflammatory conditions lead to the upregulation of PAI-1 gene expression which was antagonized by resveratrol. Although signaling via PI3K, Sirt1, AMPK, ROS, and Nrf2 appeared to play a significant role in the modulation of PAI-1 gene expression under noninflammatory conditions, those signaling components were not involved in mediating the resveratrol effects on PAI-1 production under inflammatory conditions. Instead, we demonstrate that the resveratrol effects on PAI-1 induction under inflammatory conditions were mediated via inhibition of the NFκB pathway. Together, resveratrol can act as NFκB inhibitor in adipocytes and thus the subsequently reduced PAI-1 expression in inflamed adipose tissue might provide a new insight towards novel treatment options of obesity.

  17. Gene expression of the concentration-sensitive sodium channel is suppressed in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

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    Hagiwara, Teruki; Yoshida, Shigeru; Hidaka, Yuji

    2017-04-01

    The concentration-sensitive sodium channel (Na C ) is expressed in alveolar type II epithelial cells and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells in mouse lungs. We recently reported that Na C contributes to amiloride-insensitive sodium transport in mouse lungs (Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology, 2016). However, details regarding its physiological role in the lung remain unknown. To examine whether Na C is involved in alveolar fluid clearance during an acute lung injury (ALI), we analyzed the relationship between Na C gene expression in the lung and the development of pulmonary edema in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI mice. LPS-induced ALI mice were prepared by the intratracheal administration of LPS. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) neutrophils and lung water content (LWCs) were used as a marker of ALI and pulmonary edema, respectively. Na C protein production in the lung was detected by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. The gene expressions of Na C and the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) of LPS-induced ALI mice were examined by quantitative RT-PCR over a time course of 14 days. The BAL neutrophil count increased until day 2 after LPS administration and had nearly recovered by day 6. LWCs in LPS-induced mice gradually increased until day 8 and had recovered by day 14. The expression of the Na C protein in the lungs of LPS-induced mice dramatically decreased from day 2 to day 6, but recovered by day 8. The mRNA expression of Na C decreased in the lung, as well as those for α-, β-, and γ-ENaC during ALI. Thus, Na C expression is suppressed during the development stage of pulmonary edema and then recovers in the convalescent phase. Our results suggest that suppression of the gene expression of Na C is involved in the development of pulmonary edema in ALI.

  18. Suppression of different classes of somatic mutations in Arabidopsis by vir gene-expressing Agrobacterium strains.

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    Shah, Jasmine M; Ramakrishnan, Anantha Maharasi; Singh, Amit Kumar; Ramachandran, Subalakshmi; Unniyampurath, Unnikrishnan; Jayshankar, Ajitha; Balasundaram, Nithya; Dhanapal, Shanmuhapreya; Hyde, Geoff; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2015-08-26

    Agrobacterium infection, which is widely used to generate transgenic plants, is often accompanied by T-DNA-linked mutations and transpositions in flowering plants. It is not known if Agrobacterium infection also affects the rates of point mutations, somatic homologous recombinations (SHR) and frame-shift mutations (FSM). We examined the effects of Agrobacterium infection on five types of somatic mutations using a set of mutation detector lines of Arabidopsis thaliana. To verify the effect of secreted factors, we exposed the plants to different Agrobacterium strains, including wild type (Ach5), its derivatives lacking vir genes, oncogenes or T-DNA, and the heat-killed form for 48 h post-infection; also, for a smaller set of strains, we examined the rates of three types of mutations at multiple time-points. The mutation detector lines carried a non-functional β-glucuronidase gene (GUS) and a reversion of mutated GUS to its functional form resulted in blue spots. Based on the number of blue spots visible in plants grown for a further two weeks, we estimated the mutation frequencies. For plants co-cultivated for 48 h with Agrobacterium, if the strain contained vir genes, then the rates of transversions, SHRs and FSMs (measured 2 weeks later) were lower than those of uninfected controls. In contrast, co-cultivation for 48 h with any of the Agrobacterium strains raised the transposition rates above control levels. The multiple time-point study showed that in seedlings co-cultivated with wild type Ach5, the reduced rates of transversions and SHRs after 48 h co-cultivation represent an apparent suppression of an earlier short-lived increase in mutation rates (peaking for plants co-cultivated for 3 h). An increase after 3 h co-cultivation was also seen for rates of transversions (but not SHR) in seedlings exposed to the strain lacking vir genes, oncogenes and T-DNA. However, the mutation rates in plants co-cultivated for longer times with this strain subsequently

  19. Cytogenetic Response to Ionizing Radiation Exposure in Human Fibroblasts with Suppressed Expression of Non-DSB Repair Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Mehta, Satish K.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Pierson, Duane L.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in double-strand break (DSB) repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of IR inducible genes in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations and micronuclei formation. In the study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN) formation and chromosome aberrations were measured to determine the efficiency of cytogenetic repair, and the fraction of bi-nucleated cells in the MN analysis was used as a marker for cell cycle progression. In response to gamma radiation, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of five genes: Ku70 (DSB repair pathway), XPA (nucleotide excision repair pathway), RPA1 (mismatch repair pathway), RAD17 and RBBP8 (cell cycle control). Knocked-down expression of four genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Moreover, decreased XPA, p21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Nine of these eleven genes, whose knock-down expression affected cytogenetic repair, were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate IR

  20. Suppression of extracellular invertase inhibitor gene expression improves seed weight in soybean (Glycine max).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaofei; Su, Tao; Han, Mei; Wei, Lai; Wang, Weiwei; Yu, Zhiyuan; Xue, Yongguo; Wei, Hongbin; Du, Yejie; Greiner, Steffen; Rausch, Thomas; Liu, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    Cell wall invertase (CWI) and vacuolar invertase (VI) play multiple functions in plant growth. As well as depending on transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation, there is growing evidence that CWI and VI are also subject to post-translational control by small inhibitory proteins. Despite the significance of this, genes encoding inhibitors, their molecular and biochemical properties, and their potential roles in regulating seed production have not been well documented in soybean (Glycine max). In this study, two invertase inhibitor isoforms, GmCIF1 and GmC/VIF2, were characterized to possess inhibitory activities in vitro via heterologous expression. Transcript analyses showed that they were predominantly expressed in developing seeds and in response to ABA. In accordance with this, surveys of primary targets showed subcellular localizations to the apoplast in tobacco epidermis after expressing YFP-fusion constructs. Investigations using RNAi transgenic plants demonstrated marked elevations of CWI activities and improvements in seed weight in conjunction with higher accumulations of hexoses, starch, and protein in mature seeds. Further co-expression analyses of GmCIF1 with several putative CWI genes corroborated the notion that GmCIF1 modulation of CWI that affects seed weight is mainly contingent on post-translational mechanisms. Overall, the results suggest that post-translational elevation of CWI by silencing of GmCIF1 expression orchestrates the process of seed maturation through fine-tuning sucrose metabolism and sink strength.

  1. Ethylene and 1-methylcyclopropene differentially regulate gene expression during onion sprout suppression.

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    Cools, Katherine; Chope, Gemma A; Hammond, John P; Thompson, Andrew J; Terry, Leon A

    2011-07-01

    Onion (Allium cepa) is regarded as a nonclimacteric vegetable. In onions, however, ethylene can suppress sprouting while the ethylene-binding inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) can also suppress sprout growth; yet, it is unknown how ethylene and 1-MCP elicit the same response. In this study, onions were treated with 10 μL L(-1) ethylene or 1 μL L(-1) 1-MCP individually or in combination for 24 h at 20°C before or after curing (6 weeks) at 20°C or 28°C and then stored at 1°C. Following curing, a subset of these same onions was stored separately under continuous air or ethylene (10 μL L(-1)) at 1°C. Onions treated with ethylene and 1-MCP in combination after curing for 24 h had reduced sprout growth as compared with the control 25 weeks after harvest. Sprout growth following storage beyond 25 weeks was only reduced through continuous ethylene treatment. This observation was supported by a higher proportion of down-regulated genes characterized as being involved in photosynthesis, measured using a newly developed onion microarray. Physiological and biochemical data suggested that ethylene was being perceived in the presence of 1-MCP, since sprout growth was reduced in onions treated with 1-MCP and ethylene applied in combination but not when applied individually. A cluster of probes representing transcripts up-regulated by 1-MCP alone but down-regulated by ethylene alone or in the presence of 1-MCP support this suggestion. Ethylene and 1-MCP both down-regulated a probe tentatively annotated as an ethylene receptor as well as ethylene-insensitive 3, suggesting that both treatments down-regulate the perception and signaling events of ethylene.

  2. Ethylene and 1-Methylcyclopropene Differentially Regulate Gene Expression during Onion Sprout Suppression1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cools, Katherine; Chope, Gemma A.; Hammond, John P.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Terry, Leon A.

    2011-01-01

    Onion (Allium cepa) is regarded as a nonclimacteric vegetable. In onions, however, ethylene can suppress sprouting while the ethylene-binding inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) can also suppress sprout growth; yet, it is unknown how ethylene and 1-MCP elicit the same response. In this study, onions were treated with 10 μL L−1 ethylene or 1 μL L−1 1-MCP individually or in combination for 24 h at 20°C before or after curing (6 weeks) at 20°C or 28°C and then stored at 1°C. Following curing, a subset of these same onions was stored separately under continuous air or ethylene (10 μL L−1) at 1°C. Onions treated with ethylene and 1-MCP in combination after curing for 24 h had reduced sprout growth as compared with the control 25 weeks after harvest. Sprout growth following storage beyond 25 weeks was only reduced through continuous ethylene treatment. This observation was supported by a higher proportion of down-regulated genes characterized as being involved in photosynthesis, measured using a newly developed onion microarray. Physiological and biochemical data suggested that ethylene was being perceived in the presence of 1-MCP, since sprout growth was reduced in onions treated with 1-MCP and ethylene applied in combination but not when applied individually. A cluster of probes representing transcripts up-regulated by 1-MCP alone but down-regulated by ethylene alone or in the presence of 1-MCP support this suggestion. Ethylene and 1-MCP both down-regulated a probe tentatively annotated as an ethylene receptor as well as ethylene-insensitive 3, suggesting that both treatments down-regulate the perception and signaling events of ethylene. PMID:21593215

  3. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors suppress UV-induced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gene expression at the posttranscriptional level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagoe, S.; Kohda, T.; Oishi, M.

    1991-01-01

    Gene expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is induced not only by trans activation mediated through a gene product (tat) encoded by the virus but also by treatment of virus-carrying cells with DNA-damaging agents such as UV light. Employing an artificially constructed DNA in which the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene was placed under the control of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, we analyzed the induction process in HeLa cells and found that inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase suppressed UV-induced HIV-1 gene expression but not tat-mediated expression. We also found that suppression occurs at the posttranscriptional level. These results indicate that HIV-1 gene expression is activated by at least two different mechanisms, one of which involves poly-ADP ribosylation. A possible new role of poly-ADP ribosylation in the regulation of specific gene expression is also discussed

  4. Pur-Alpha Induces JCV Gene Expression and Viral Replication by Suppressing SRSF1 in Glial Cells.

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    Ilker Kudret Sariyer

    Full Text Available PML is a rare and fatal demyelinating disease of the CNS caused by the human polyomavirus, JC virus (JCV, which occurs in AIDS patients and those on immunosuppressive monoclonal antibody therapies (mAbs. We sought to identify mechanisms that could stimulate reactivation of JCV in a cell culture model system and targeted pathways which could affect early gene transcription and JCV T-antigen production, which are key steps of the viral life cycle for blocking reactivation of JCV. Two important regulatory partners we have previously identified for T-antigen include Pur-alpha and SRSF1 (SF2/ASF. SRSF1, an alternative splicing factor, is a potential regulator of JCV whose overexpression in glial cells strongly suppresses viral gene expression and replication. Pur-alpha has been most extensively characterized as a sequence-specific DNA- and RNA-binding protein which directs both viral gene transcription and mRNA translation, and is a potent inducer of the JCV early promoter through binding to T-antigen.Pur-alpha and SRSF1 both act directly as transcriptional regulators of the JCV promoter and here we have observed that Pur-alpha is capable of ameliorating SRSF1-mediated suppression of JCV gene expression and viral replication. Interestingly, Pur-alpha exerted its effect by suppressing SRSF1 at both the protein and mRNA levels in glial cells suggesting this effect can occur independent of T-antigen. Pur-alpha and SRSF1 were both localized to oligodendrocyte inclusion bodies by immunohistochemistry in brain sections from patients with HIV-1 associated PML. Interestingly, inclusion bodies were typically positive for either Pur-alpha or SRSF1, though some cells appeared to be positive for both proteins.Taken together, these results indicate the presence of an antagonistic interaction between these two proteins in regulating of JCV gene expression and viral replication and suggests that they play an important role during viral reactivation leading to

  5. Identification and computational annotation of genes differentially expressed in pulp development of Cocos nucifera L. by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuanxue; Yuan, Yijun; Liu, Tao; Mao, Wei; Zheng, Yusheng; Li, Dongdong

    2014-08-02

    Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) is one of the world's most versatile, economically important tropical crops. Little is known about the physiological and molecular basis of coconut pulp (endosperm) development and only a few coconut genes and gene product sequences are available in public databases. This study identified genes that were differentially expressed during development of coconut pulp and functionally annotated these identified genes using bioinformatics analysis. Pulp from three different coconut developmental stages was collected. Four suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries were constructed (forward and reverse libraries A and B between stages 1 and 2, and C and D between stages 2 and 3), and identified sequences were computationally annotated using Blast2GO software. A total of 1272 clones were obtained for analysis from four SSH libraries with 63% showing similarity to known proteins. Pairwise comparing of stage-specific gene ontology ids from libraries B-D, A-C, B-C and A-D showed that 32 genes were continuously upregulated and seven downregulated; 28 were transiently upregulated and 23 downregulated. KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) analysis showed that 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (LPAAT), phospholipase D, acetyl-CoA carboxylase carboxyltransferase beta subunit, 3-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA hydrolase-like and pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 β subunit were associated with fatty acid biosynthesis or metabolism. Triose phosphate isomerase, cellulose synthase and glucan 1,3-β-glucosidase were related to carbohydrate metabolism, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was related to both fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism. Of 737 unigenes, 103 encoded enzymes were involved in fatty acid and carbohydrate biosynthesis and metabolism, and a number of transcription factors and other interesting genes with stage-specific expression were confirmed by real-time PCR, with validation of the SSH results as high as 66.6%. Based on

  6. Identification of differential expression of genes in hepatocellular carcinoma by suppression subtractive hybridization combined cDNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuefang; Zhu, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jin; Liao, Shibing; Tang, Qi; Liu, Kaikun; Guan, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jianping; Feng, Zhenqing

    2007-10-01

    The genetic background of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has yet to be completely understood. Here, we describe the application of suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) coupled with cDNA microarray analysis for the isolation and identification of differential expression of genes in HCC. Twenty-six known genes were validated as up-regulated and 19 known genes as down-regulated in HCC. The known genes identified were found to have diverse functions. In addition to the overexpression of AFP, these genes (increased in the presence of HCC) are involved in many processes, such as transcription and protein biosynthesis (HNRPDL, PABPC1, POLR2K, SRP9, SNRPA, and six ribosomal protein genes including RPL8, RPL14, RPL41, RPS5, RPS17, RPS24), the metabolism of lipids and proteins (FADS1, ApoA-II, ApoM, FTL), cell proliferation (Syndecan-2, and Annexin A2), and signal transduction (LRRC28 and FMR1). Additionally, a glutathione-binding protein involved in the detoxification of methylglyoxal known as GLO1 and an enzyme which increases the formation of prostaglandin E(2) known as PLA2G10 were up-regulated in HCC. Among the underexpressed genes discovered in HCC, most were responsible for liver-synthesized proteins (fibrinogen, complement species, amyloid, albumin, haptoglobin, hemopexin and orosomucoid). The enzyme implicated in the biotransformation of CYP family members (LOC644587) was decreased. The genes coding enzymes ADH1C, ALDH6A1, ALDOB, Arginase and CES1 were also found. Additionally, we isolated a zinc transporter (Zip14) and a function-unknown gene named ZBTB11 (Zinc finger and BTB domain containing 11) which were underexpressed, and seven expression sequence tags deregulated in HCC without significant homology reported in the public database. Essentially, by using SSH combined with a cDNA microarray we have identified a number of genes associated with HCC, most of which have not been previously reported. Further characterization of these differentially expressed

  7. Identification and computational annotation of genes differentially expressed in pulp development of Cocos nucifera L. by suppression subtractive hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) is one of the world’s most versatile, economically important tropical crops. Little is known about the physiological and molecular basis of coconut pulp (endosperm) development and only a few coconut genes and gene product sequences are available in public databases. This study identified genes that were differentially expressed during development of coconut pulp and functionally annotated these identified genes using bioinformatics analysis. Results Pulp from three different coconut developmental stages was collected. Four suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries were constructed (forward and reverse libraries A and B between stages 1 and 2, and C and D between stages 2 and 3), and identified sequences were computationally annotated using Blast2GO software. A total of 1272 clones were obtained for analysis from four SSH libraries with 63% showing similarity to known proteins. Pairwise comparing of stage-specific gene ontology ids from libraries B-D, A-C, B-C and A-D showed that 32 genes were continuously upregulated and seven downregulated; 28 were transiently upregulated and 23 downregulated. KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) analysis showed that 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (LPAAT), phospholipase D, acetyl-CoA carboxylase carboxyltransferase beta subunit, 3-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA hydrolase-like and pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 β subunit were associated with fatty acid biosynthesis or metabolism. Triose phosphate isomerase, cellulose synthase and glucan 1,3-β-glucosidase were related to carbohydrate metabolism, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was related to both fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism. Of 737 unigenes, 103 encoded enzymes were involved in fatty acid and carbohydrate biosynthesis and metabolism, and a number of transcription factors and other interesting genes with stage-specific expression were confirmed by real-time PCR, with validation of the SSH results as

  8. Genome expression analysis by suppression subtractive hybridization identified overexpression of Humanin, a target gene in gastric cancer chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottaghi-Dastjerdi, Negar; Soltany-Rezaee-Rad, Mohammad; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Roshandel, Gholamreza; Ebrahimifard, Farzaneh; Setayesh, Neda

    2014-01-08

    In cancer cells, apoptosis is an important mechanism that influences the outcome of chemotherapy and the development of chemoresistance. To find the genes involved in chemoresistance and the development of gastric cancer, we used the suppression subtractive hybridization method to identify the genes that are overexpressed in gastric cancer tissues compared to normal gastric tissues. In the suppression subtractive hybridization library we constructed, the most highly overexpressed genes were humanin isoforms. Humanin is a recently identified endogenous peptide that has anti-apoptotic activity and has been selected for further study due to its potential role in the chemoresistance of gastric cancer. Upregulation of humanin isoforms was also observed in clinical samples by using quantitative real-time PCR. Among the studied isoforms, humanin isoform 3, with an expression level of 4.166 ± 1.44 fold, was the most overexpressed isoform in GC. The overexpression of humanin in gastric cancer suggests a role for chemoresistance and provides new insight into the biology of gastric cancer. We propose that humanin isoforms are novel targets for combating chemoresistance in gastric cancer.

  9. Isolation and Expression Analysis of Novel Silicon Absorption Gene from Roots of Mangrove (Rhizophora apiculata via Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

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    Mahbod Sahebi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon (Si is the second most abundant element in soil after oxygen. It is not an essential element for plant growth and formation but plays an important role in increasing plant tolerance towards different kinds of abiotic and biotic stresses. The molecular mechanism of Si absorption and accumulation may differ between plants, such as monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Silicon absorption and accumulation in mangrove plants are affected indirectly by some proteins rich in serine and proline amino acids. The expression level of the genes responsible for Si absorption varies in different parts of plants. In this study, Si is mainly observed in the epidermal roots’ cell walls of mangrove plants compared to other parts. The present work was carried out to discover further information on Si stress responsive genes in Rhizophora apiculata, using the suppression subtractive hybridization technique. To construct the cDNA library, two-month-old seedlings were exposed to 0.5, 1, and 1.5 mM SiO2 for 15 hrs and for 1 to 6 days resulting in a total of 360 high quality ESTs gained. Further examination by RT-PCR and real-time qRT-PCR showed the expression of a candidate gene of serine-rich protein.

  10. [Gene expression profiling by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH): a example for its application to the study of lymphomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalva, C; Trempat, P; Zenou, R C; Delsol, G; Brousset, P

    2001-03-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to isolate genes that were differentially expressed in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive and ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma. In addition, this approach was applied to Hodgkin's disease cases with different clinical outcomes. SSH combines a normalization step that equalizes the abundance of cDNAs within the sequences to be tested and a subtraction step that excludes the common sequences between the target and the control. In a model system, the SSH technique enriches for rare sequences up to 5,000-fold in one round. We have isolated several genes whose expression varied significantly with regard to the tumour subtypes. There were different genes with known or unknown functions. We aim to compare the results of the SSH approach with those obtained with high density filters. In a near future, we would like to design DNA chips specific of each pathology that could be used for clinical purposes (evaluation of prognosis and therapeutic response).

  11. Analysis of gene expression by ESTs from suppression subtractive hybridization library in Chenopodium album L. under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lili; Xu, Dongsheng; You, Tianyu; Li, Xiuming; Yao, Shixiang; Chen, Shasha; Zhao, Juan; Lan, Haiyan; Zhang, Fuchun

    2011-11-01

    To identify genes expression in Chenopodium album exposed to NaCl stress and screen ESTs related to salt stress, a subtractive suppression hybridization (SSH) library of C. album under salt stress was constructed in the present study. Random EST sequencing produced 825 high-quality ESTs with GenBank ID GE746311-GE747007, which had 301 bp of average size and were clustered into 88 contigs and 550 singletons. They were classified into 12 categories according to their function annotations. 635 ESTs (76.97%) showed similarities to gene sequences in the non-redundancy database, while 190 ESTs (23.03%) showed low or no similarities. The transcriptional profiles of 56 ESTs randomly selected from 347 unknown or novel ESTs of SSH library under varying NaCl concentration and at different time points were analyzed. The results indicated that a high proportion of tested ESTs were activated by salt stress. Four in 56 ESTs responded to NaCl were also enhanced in expression level when exposed to ABA and PEG stresses. The above four ESTs were validated by northern blotting which was consistent with the results of RT-PCR. The results suggested that genes corresponded to these ESTs might be involved in stress response or regulation. The complete sequences and detailed function of these ESTs need to be further studied.

  12. Suppression of leaky expression of adenovirus genes by insertion of microRNA-targeted sequences in the replication-incompetent adenovirus vector genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahori Shimizu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaky expression of adenovirus (Ad genes occurs following transduction with a conventional replication-incompetent Ad vector, leading to an induction of cellular immunity against Ad proteins and Ad protein-induced toxicity, especially in the late phase following administration. To suppress the leaky expression of Ad genes, we developed novel Ad vectors by incorporating four tandem copies of sequences with perfect complementarity to miR-122a or miR-142-3p into the 3′-untranslated region (UTR of the E2A, E4, or pIX gene, which were mainly expressed from the Ad vector genome after transduction. These Ad vectors easily grew to high titers comparable to those of a conventional Ad vector in conventional 293 cells. The leaky expression of these Ad genes in mouse organs was significantly suppressed by 2- to 100-fold, compared with a conventional Ad vector, by insertion of the miRNA-targeted sequences. Notably, the Ad vector carrying the miR-122a–targeted sequences into the 3′-UTR of the E4 gene expressed higher and longer-term transgene expression and more than 20-fold lower levels of all the Ad early and late genes examined in the liver than a conventional Ad vector. miR-122a–mediated suppression of the E4 gene expression in the liver significantly reduced the hepatotoxicity which an Ad vector causes via both adaptive and non-adaptive immune responses.

  13. Suppressing Sorbitol Synthesis Substantially Alters the Global Expression Profile of Stress Response Genes in Apple (Malus domestica) Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting; Wang, Yi; Zheng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Xu, Kenong; Han, Zhenhai; Cheng, Lailiang

    2015-09-01

    Sorbitol is a major product of photosynthesis in apple (Malus domestica) that is involved in carbohydrate metabolism and stress tolerance. However, little is known about how the global transcript levels in apple leaves respond to decreased sorbitol synthesis. In this study we used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) profiling to characterize the transcriptome of leaves from transgenic lines of the apple cultivar 'Greensleeves' exhibiting suppressed expression of aldose-6-phosphate reductase (A6PR) to gain insights into sorbitol function and the consequences of decreased sorbitol synthesis on gene expression. We observed that, although the leaves of the low sorbitol transgenic lines accumulate higher levels of various primary metabolites, only very limited changes were found in the levels of transcripts associated with primary metabolism. We suggest that this is indicative of post-transcriptional and/or post-translational regulation of primary metabolite accumulation and central carbon metabolism. However, we identified significantly enriched gene ontology terms belonging to the 'stress related process' category in the antisense lines (P-value apple trees to abiotic and biotic stresses. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes in Metastatic and Non-Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

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    Xu-Yu Yang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is an epithelial neoplasm with high occurrence rates in southern China. The disease often metastasizes to regional lymphnodes at a very early stage. Local recurrences and metastasis occur frequently in patients with NPC and are a leading cause of death, despite improvements on treatment modalities. The molecular mechanism underlying the metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma remains poorly understood, however, and requires additional elucidation. The aim of this study was to explore possible NPC gene candidates that may play key roles in NPC metastasis. Methods: Subtractive suppression hybridization (SSH was performed to isolate differentially expressed clones between the metastatic 5-8F and non-metastatic 6-10B nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines. Differentially expressed clones were screened and confirmed by reverse Northern blotting. The sequences of cDNA fragments were subsequently analyzed and compared to known sequences in Genbank. Results & Discussion: The SSH library contained thousands of positive clones. Random analysis of 300 clones by PCR demonstrated that 269 clones contained inserted fragments. Reverse Northern blot confirmed that 20 out of 192 clones examined were significantly up-regulated in the 5-8F cell line. Among these 20 clones, 16 were previously identified genes (flotilin-2, ezrin, pim-3, fli-1, mel, neugrin, znf216, ASB1, raly, UBE2A, keratin6A, TMED7, EIF3S9, FTL, two ribosomal proteins RPL21 and RPL16, two were predicted genes (c9orf74 and MDS006, and two sequences shared no homology with known genes listed in GenBank and may represent novel genes. The proposed functions of the genes identified in this study include cell signal transduction, cell survival, transcription regulation, cell mobility, protein synthesis, and DNA damage repair. Flotillin-2, fli-1, pim-3 and ezrin have previously been reported to be associated with tumor metastasis and progression. The

  15. Gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, C.E.; Crawford, B.D.; Walters, R.A.; Enger, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    We prepared probes for isolating functional pieces of the metallothionein locus. The probes enabled a variety of experiments, eventually revealing two mechanisms for metallothionein gene expression, the order of the DNA coding units at the locus, and the location of the gene site in its chromosome. Once the switch regulating metallothionein synthesis was located, it could be joined by recombinant DNA methods to other, unrelated genes, then reintroduced into cells by gene-transfer techniques. The expression of these recombinant genes could then be induced by exposing the cells to Zn 2+ or Cd 2+ . We would thus take advantage of the clearly defined switching properties of the metallothionein gene to manipulate the expression of other, perhaps normally constitutive, genes. Already, despite an incomplete understanding of how the regulatory switch of the metallothionein locus operates, such experiments have been performed successfully

  16. Ebi/AP-1 suppresses pro-apoptotic genes expression and permits long-term survival of Drosophila sensory neurons.

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    Young-Mi Lim

    Full Text Available Sensory organs are constantly exposed to physical and chemical stresses that collectively threaten the survival of sensory neurons. Failure to protect stressed neurons leads to age-related loss of neurons and sensory dysfunction in organs in which the supply of new sensory neurons is limited, such as the human auditory system. Transducin β-like protein 1 (TBL1 is a candidate gene for ocular albinism with late-onset sensorineural deafness, a form of X-linked age-related hearing loss. TBL1 encodes an evolutionarily conserved F-box-like and WD40 repeats-containing subunit of the nuclear receptor co-repressor/silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptor and other transcriptional co-repressor complexes. Here we report that a Drosophila homologue of TBL1, Ebi, is required for maintenance of photoreceptor neurons. Loss of ebi function caused late-onset neuronal apoptosis in the retina and increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Ebi formed a complex with activator protein 1 (AP-1 and was required for repression of Drosophila pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes expression. These results suggest that Ebi/AP-1 suppresses basal transcription levels of apoptotic genes and thereby protects sensory neurons from degeneration.

  17. The stealth episome: suppression of gene expression on the excised genomic island PPHGI-1 from Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola.

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    Scott A C Godfrey

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola is the causative agent of halo blight in the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris. P. syringae pv. phaseolicola race 4 strain 1302A contains the avirulence gene avrPphB (syn. hopAR1, which resides on PPHGI-1, a 106 kb genomic island. Loss of PPHGI-1 from P. syringae pv. phaseolicola 1302A following exposure to the hypersensitive resistance response (HR leads to the evolution of strains with altered virulence. Here we have used fluorescent protein reporter systems to gain insight into the mobility of PPHGI-1. Confocal imaging of dual-labelled P. syringae pv. phaseolicola 1302A strain, F532 (dsRFP in chromosome and eGFP in PPHGI-1, revealed loss of PPHGI-1::eGFP encoded fluorescence during plant infection and when grown in vitro on extracted leaf apoplastic fluids. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS of fluorescent and non-fluorescent PPHGI-1::eGFP F532 populations showed that cells lost fluorescence not only when the GI was deleted, but also when it had excised and was present as a circular episome. In addition to reduced expression of eGFP, quantitative PCR on sub-populations separated by FACS showed that transcription of other genes on PPHGI-1 (avrPphB and xerC was also greatly reduced in F532 cells harbouring the excised PPHGI-1::eGFP episome. Our results show how virulence determinants located on mobile pathogenicity islands may be hidden from detection by host surveillance systems through the suppression of gene expression in the episomal state.

  18. Regulation of gene expression by low levels of ultraviolet-B radiation in Pisum sativum: Isolation of novel genes by suppression subtractive hybridisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sävenstrand, H.; Brosché, M.; Strid, A.

    2002-01-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridisation was used to isolate genes differentially regulated by low levels (UV-B BE,300 0.13 W m -2 ) of ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B; 290–320 nm) in Pisum sativum. Six genes were regulated, two of which were novel. The mRNA levels for these two (PsTSDC and PsUOS1) were increased and depressed by UV-B treatment, respectively. Domains in the PsTSDC translation product was similar to TIR (Toll-Interleukin-1 receptor-similar) domains and a NB-ARC domain (nucleotide-binding domain in APAF-1, R gene products and CED-4). The PsUOS1 translation product was similar to an open reading frame in Arabidopsis. Genes encoding embryo-abundant protein (PsEMB) and S-adenosyl-l-methionine synthase (PsSAMS) were induced by UV-B, whereas the transcript levels for genes encoding sucrose transport protein (PsSUT) or ribulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase (PsR5P3E) were decreased. These regulation patterns are novel, and the PsEMB and PsR5P3E sequences are reported for the first time. The stress-specificity of regulation of these genes were tested by ozone fumigation (100 ppb O 3 ). Qualitatively, the similarity of expression after both UV-B and ozone exposure suggests that, for these genes, similar stress-response pathways are in action. (author)

  19. Expression of the rat protamine 2 gene is suppressed at the level of transcription and translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunick, D.; Hecht, N.B. (Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)); Balhorn, R.; Stanker, L.H. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1990-05-01

    The authors have compared the rat protamine 2 gene sequence (rP2) to that of the mouse protamine 2 (mP2) gene. The sequence encompasses 435 nucleotides of the coding region which includes an intron of 120 nucleotides, 461 nucleotides 5{prime} to the coding sequence and 181 bases 3{prime} to it. In the mouse the protamine 2 gene is abundantly transcribed and translated. The mP2 protein is initially synthesized as a precursor and then proteolytically processed to yield the mature protein. In contrast, in the rat, protamine 2 transcripts are present at 2-5% that found in the mouse and the mature protein has never been detected in spermatozoa. Analyses of total sperm basic nuclear proteins extracted from epididymal sperm using a monoclonal antibody specific for protamine 2 suggest that the rat P2 mRNA is translated in vivo but is not properly processed. These results suggest that the lowered transcription rate and altered processing sites of the rat protamine 2 gene are likely to contribute to the lack of protamine 2 in rat spermatozoa.

  20. Identification of hemostatic genes expressed in human and rat leg muscles and a novel gene (LPP1/PAP2A suppressed during prolonged physical inactivity (sitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zderic Theodore W

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Partly because of functional genomics, there has been a major paradigm shift from solely thinking of skeletal muscle as contractile machinery to an understanding that it can have roles in paracrine and endocrine functions. Physical inactivity is an established risk factor for some blood clotting disorders. The effects of inactivity during sitting are most alarming when a person develops the enigmatic condition in the legs called deep venous thrombosis (DVT or “coach syndrome,” caused in part by muscular inactivity. The goal of this study was to determine if skeletal muscle expresses genes with roles in hemostasis and if their expression level was responsive to muscular inactivity such as occurs in prolonged sitting. Methods Microarray analyses were performed on skeletal muscle samples from rats and humans to identify genes associated with hemostatic function that were significantly expressed above background based on multiple probe sets with perfect and mismatch sequences. Furthermore, we determined if any of these genes were responsive to models of physical inactivity. Multiple criteria were used to determine differential expression including significant expression above background, fold change, and non-parametric statistical tests. Results These studies demonstrate skeletal muscle tissue expresses at least 17 genes involved in hemostasis. These include the fibrinolytic factors tetranectin, annexin A2, and tPA; the anti-coagulant factors TFPI, protein C receptor, PAF acetylhydrolase; coagulation factors, and genes necessary for the posttranslational modification of these coagulation factors such as vitamin K epoxide reductase. Of special interest, lipid phosphate phosphatase-1 (LPP1/PAP2A, a key gene for degrading prothrombotic and proinflammatory lysophospholipids, was suppressed locally in muscle tissue within hours after sitting in humans; this was also observed after acute and chronic physical inactivity conditions

  1. N-Nicotinoyl tyramine, a novel niacinamide derivative, inhibits melanogenesis by suppressing MITF gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bora; Lee, Soung-Hoon; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2015-10-05

    We synthesized and investigated the inhibitory effects of a novel niacinamide derivative, N-nicotinoyltyramine (NNT) on melanogenesis. NNT inhibited melanin production in B16F10 murine melanoma cells stimulated with α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), in human melanocyte and in three-dimensional cultured human skin model. NNT did not affect the catalytic activity of tyrosinase, but acted as an inhibitor of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and tyrosinase expressions in B16F10 cells. These findings suggest that the hypopigmentary effect of NNT results from the down-regulation of MITF and subsequently of tyrosinase, although NNT did not directly inhibit tyrosinase activity. In addition, safety of NNT was verified through performing neural stem cell morphology assay and Human repeated insult patch test as whitening agent. Our findings indicate that NNT may be a potential and non-skin irritant whitening agent for use in cosmetics and in the medical treatment of pigmentary disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Profiling of oxygen-modulated gene expression in early human placenta by systematic sequencing of suppressive subtractive hybridization products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondon, Françoise; Mignot, Thérèse-Marie; Rebourcet, Régis; Jammes, Hélène; Danan, Jean-Louis; Ferré, Françoise; Vaiman, Daniel

    2005-06-16

    Villi from first-trimester human placenta were exposed to oxygen concentrations of either 2 or 20% during 3 h to construct two reciprocally subtracted libraries using the suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) methodology. After cloning, sequencing, and gene identification, the genes (1,071 clones corresponding to 822 different sequences) were classified according to 1) the subtracted library from which they originated and 2) within 58 groups of gene functions. We then developed a logarithm of the odds (LOD) test to identify a possible excess of genes in each group. We show that genes involved in angiogenesis are significantly overrepresented in the "hypoxic" condition (2% O2), whereas apoptotic genes are overrepresented in the "normoxic" condition (20% O2). Furthermore, we observed an excess of kinases relative to phosphatases and an excess of genes involved in proliferation over genes involved in cell growth in the hypoxic condition. To validate our results, we used quantitative RT-PCR to analyze the set of eight genes involved in angiogenesis on six independent placentas. Finally, we studied the distribution of gene clusters on human chromosomes to check whether their chromosomal distribution was random or not. We observed on human chromosome 11 a clear clustering of genes regulated similarly by O2 tension, and we also discovered indications that such clustering exists on chromosomes 6 and 12.

  3. Pregnancy Suppresses the Daily Rhythmicity of Core Body Temperature and Adipose Metabolic Gene Expression in the Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharfe, Michaela D; Wyrwoll, Caitlin S; Waddell, Brendan J; Mark, Peter J

    2016-09-01

    Maternal adaptations in lipid metabolism are crucial for pregnancy success due to the role of white adipose tissue as an energy store and the dynamic nature of energy needs across gestation. Because lipid metabolism is regulated by the rhythmic expression of clock genes, it was hypothesized that maternal metabolic adaptations involve changes in both adipose clock gene expression and the rhythmic expression of downstream metabolic genes. Maternal core body temperature (Tc) was investigated as a possible mechanism driving pregnancy-induced changes in clock gene expression. Gonadal adipose tissue and plasma were collected from C57BL/6J mice before and on days 6, 10, 14, and 18 of pregnancy (term 19 d) at 4-hour intervals across a 24-hour period. Adipose expression of clock genes and downstream metabolic genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR, and Tc was measured by intraperitoneal temperature loggers. Adipose clock gene expression showed robust rhythmicity throughout pregnancy, but absolute levels varied substantially across gestation. Rhythmic expression of the metabolic genes Lipe, Pnpla2, and Lpl was clearly evident before pregnancy; however, this rhythmicity was lost with the onset of pregnancy. Tc rhythm was significantly altered by pregnancy, with a 65% decrease in amplitude by term and a 0.61°C decrease in mesor between days 6 and 18. These changes in Tc, however, did not appear to be linked to adipose clock gene expression across pregnancy. Overall, our data show marked adaptations in the adipose clock in pregnancy, with an apparent decoupling of adipose clock and lipolytic/lipogenic gene rhythms from early in gestation.

  4. Production of human growth hormone in transgenic rice seeds: co-introduction of RNA interference cassette for suppressing the gene expression of endogenous storage proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemitsu, Takanari; Ozaki, Shinji; Saito, Yuhi; Kuroda, Masaharu; Morita, Shigeto; Satoh, Shigeru; Masumura, Takehiro

    2012-03-01

    Rice seeds are potentially useful hosts for the production of pharmaceutical proteins. However, low yields of recombinant proteins have been observed in many cases because recombinant proteins compete with endogenous storage proteins. Therefore, we attempt to suppress endogenous seed storage proteins by RNA interference (RNAi) to develop rice seeds as a more efficient protein expression system. In this study, human growth hormone (hGH) was expressed in transgenic rice seeds using an endosperm-specific promoter from a 10 kDa rice prolamin gene. In addition, an RNAi cassette for reduction of endogenous storage protein expressions was inserted into the hGH expression construct. Using this system, the expression levels of 13 kDa prolamin and glutelin were effectively suppressed and hGH polypeptides accumulated to 470 μg/g dry weight at the maximum level in transgenic rice seeds. These results suggest that the suppression of endogenous protein gene expression by RNAi could be of great utility for increasing transgene products.

  5. Suppression of Tla1 gene expression for improved solar conversion efficiency and photosynthetic productivity in plants and algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Anastasios; Mitra, Mautusi

    2010-06-29

    The invention provides method and compositions to minimize the chlorophyll antenna size of photosynthesis by decreasing TLA1 gene expression, thereby improving solar conversion efficiencies and photosynthetic productivity in plants, e.g., green microalgae, under bright sunlight conditions.

  6. Deferoxamine Suppresses Collagen Cleavage and Protease, Cytokine, and COL10A1 Expression and Upregulates AMPK and Krebs Cycle Genes in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchetina, Elena V; Markova, Galina A; Poole, A Robin; Zukor, David J; Antoniou, John; Makarov, Sergey A; Kuzin, Aleksandr N

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the effects of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) on collagen cleavage, inflammation, and chondrocyte hypertrophy in relation to energy metabolism-related gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilage. Full-depth explants of human OA knee articular cartilage from arthroplasty were cultured with exogenous DFO (1-50  μ M). Type II collagen cleavage and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) concentrations were measured using ELISAs. Gene expression studies employed real-time PCR and included AMPK analyses in PBMCs. In OA explants collagen cleavage was frequently downregulated by 10-50  μ M DFO. PCR analysis of 7 OA patient cartilages revealed that 10  μ M DFO suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-13, IL-1 β , and TNF α and a marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy, COL10A1. No changes were observed in the expression of glycolysis-related genes. In contrast, expressions of genes associated with the mitochondrial Krebs cycle (TCA), AMPK, HIF1 α , and COL2A1 were upregulated. AMPK gene expression was reduced in OA cartilage and increased in PBMCs from the same patients compared to healthy controls. Our studies demonstrate that DFO is capable of suppressing excessive collagenase-mediated type II collagen cleavage in OA cartilage and reversing phenotypic changes. The concomitant upregulation of proanabolic TCA-related gene expressions points to a potential for availability of energy generating substrates required for matrix repair by end-stage OA chondrocytes. This might normally be prevented by high whole-body energy requirements indicated by elevated AMPK expression in PBMCs of OA patients.

  7. Deferoxamine Suppresses Collagen Cleavage and Protease, Cytokine, and COL10A1 Expression and Upregulates AMPK and Krebs Cycle Genes in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Tchetina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the effects of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO on collagen cleavage, inflammation, and chondrocyte hypertrophy in relation to energy metabolism-related gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA articular cartilage. Full-depth explants of human OA knee articular cartilage from arthroplasty were cultured with exogenous DFO (1–50 μM. Type II collagen cleavage and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (pAMPK concentrations were measured using ELISAs. Gene expression studies employed real-time PCR and included AMPK analyses in PBMCs. In OA explants collagen cleavage was frequently downregulated by 10–50 μM DFO. PCR analysis of 7 OA patient cartilages revealed that 10 μM DFO suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-13, IL-1β, and TNFα and a marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy, COL10A1. No changes were observed in the expression of glycolysis-related genes. In contrast, expressions of genes associated with the mitochondrial Krebs cycle (TCA, AMPK, HIF1α, and COL2A1 were upregulated. AMPK gene expression was reduced in OA cartilage and increased in PBMCs from the same patients compared to healthy controls. Our studies demonstrate that DFO is capable of suppressing excessive collagenase-mediated type II collagen cleavage in OA cartilage and reversing phenotypic changes. The concomitant upregulation of proanabolic TCA-related gene expressions points to a potential for availability of energy generating substrates required for matrix repair by end-stage OA chondrocytes. This might normally be prevented by high whole-body energy requirements indicated by elevated AMPK expression in PBMCs of OA patients.

  8. Three genes for mitochondrial proteins suppress null-mutations in both Afg3 and Rca1 when over-expressed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rep, M; Nooy, J; Guélin, E; Grivell, L A

    1996-08-01

    The AFG3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a mitochondrial inner membrane protein with ATP-dependent protease activity. To gain more insight into the function of this protein, multi-copy suppressors of an afg3-null mutation were isolated. Three genes were found that restored partial growth on non-fermentable carbon sources, all of which affect the biogenesis of respiratory competent mitochondria: PIM1(LON) encodes a matrix-localized ATP-dependent protease involved in the turnover of matrix proteins; OXA1(PET1402) encodes a putative mitochondrial inner membrane protein involved in the biogenesis of the respiratory chain; and MBA1 encodes a mitochondrial protein required for optimal respiratory growth. All three genes also suppressed a null mutation in a related gene, RCA1, as well as in the combination of afg3- and rca1-null.

  9. Exploring suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) for discriminating Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris SK11 and ATCC 19257 in mixed culture based on the expression of strain-specific genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndoye, B; Lessard, M-H; LaPointe, G; Roy, D

    2011-02-01

    An approach based on quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-qPCR) was developed for monitoring two strains of lactococci in co-culture in milk by measuring the expression of specific genes identified by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). SSH was used to identify strain-specific genes of Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris SK11 and ATCC 19257. RT-qPCR was then employed to validate gene specificity and compare the expression of selected specific genes (glycosyltransferase and amidase genes for L. lactis ssp. cremoris ATCC 19257 and a hypothetical protein for SK11) identified by SSH. The time profile of changes in gene expression relative to ldh transcription differed between pure and mixed cultures as well as between media. At the stationary phase, gene expression of mixed cultures in GM17 attained the highest proportion of ldh transcription while mixed cultures in milk peaked at the postexponential phase. Strain ratios expressed as RNA proportion appear to favour SK11 in GM17 medium, while ATCC 19257 dominated in milk co-cultures. This approach was useful to determine the contribution of strain SK11 in relation to strain ATCC 19257 during co-culture in milk compared to rich medium. The ability to track the metabolic contribution of each lactococcal strain during fermentation of milk or cheese ripening will extend our understanding of the impact of process parameters on the production performance of strains. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Biotin augments acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 gene expression in the hypothalamus, leading to the suppression of food intake in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Hideyuki; Kamiyama, Shin; Higuchi, Mutsumi; Fujino, Kaho; Kubo, Shizuka; Miyazawa, Masami; Shirato, Saya; Hiroi, Yuka; Shiozawa, Kota

    2016-07-29

    It is known that biotin prevents the development of diabetes by increasing the functions of pancreatic beta-cells and improving insulin sensitivity in the periphery. However, its anti-obesity effects such as anorectic effects remain to be clarified. Acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), a biotin-dependent enzyme, has two isoforms (ACC1 and ACC2) and serves to catalyze the reaction of acetyl CoA to malonyl CoA. In the hypothalamus, ACC2 increases the production of malonyl CoA, which acts as a satiety signal. In this study, we investigated whether biotin increases the gene expression of ACC2 in the hypothalamus and suppresses food intake in mice administered excessive biotin. Food intake was significantly decreased by biotin, but plasma regulators of appetite, including glucose, ghrelin, and leptin, were not affected. On the other hand, biotin notably accumulated in the hypothalamus and enhanced ACC2 gene expression there, but it did not change the gene expression of ACC1, malonyl CoA decarboxylase (a malonyl CoA-degrading enzyme), and AMP-activated protein kinase α-2 (an ACC-inhibitory enzyme). These findings strongly suggest that biotin potentiates the suppression of appetite by upregulating ACC2 gene expression in the hypothalamus. This effect of biotin may contribute to the prevention of diabetes by biotin treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Cavβ1a subunit regulates gene expression and suppresses myogenin in muscle progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jackson; Pereyra, Andrea; Zhang, Tan; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Kuan, Pei-Fen; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2014-06-23

    Voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) β subunits are auxiliary subunits to Cavs. Recent reports show Cavβ subunits may enter the nucleus and suggest a role in transcriptional regulation, but the physiological relevance of this localization remains unclear. We sought to define the nuclear function of Cavβ in muscle progenitor cells (MPCs). We found that Cavβ1a is expressed in proliferating MPCs, before expression of the calcium conducting subunit Cav1.1, and enters the nucleus. Loss of Cavβ1a expression impaired MPC expansion in vitro and in vivo and caused widespread changes in global gene expression, including up-regulation of myogenin. Additionally, we found that Cavβ1a localizes to the promoter region of a number of genes, preferentially at noncanonical (NC) E-box sites. Cavβ1a binds to a region of the Myog promoter containing an NC E-box, suggesting a mechanism for inhibition of myogenin gene expression. This work indicates that Cavβ1a acts as a Cav-independent regulator of gene expression in MPCs, and is required for their normal expansion during myogenic development. © 2014 Taylor et al.

  12. Suppression substractive hybridisation (SSH) and real time PCR reveal differential gene expression in the Pacific cupped oyster, Crassostrea gigas, challenged with Ostreid herpesvirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, T; Faury, N; Barbosa-Solomieu, V; Moreau, K

    2011-07-01

    Virus-induced genes were identified using suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH) from Pacific cupped oyster, Crassostrea gigas, haemocytes challenged by OsHV-1. A total of 304 clones from SSH forward library were sequenced. Among these sequences, some homologues corresponded to (i) immune related genes (macrophage express protein, IK cytokine, interferon-induced protein 44 or multicopper oxidase), (ii) apoptosis related genes (Bcl-2) and (iii) cell signalling and virus receptor genes (glypican). Molecular characterization and phylogenic analysis of 3 immune-related genes (macrophage expressed protein, multicopper oxidase and immunoglobulin domain cell adhesion molecule) were performed. Finally, quantitative PCR revealed significant changes in the expression of immune related genes (multicopper oxidase, macrophage expressed protein, myeloid differentiation factor 88 and interferon-induced protein 44) in oysters experimentally challenged with OsHV-1. These findings provide a first basis for studying the role of innate immunity in response to viruses in bivalves and identified genes may serve as markers of interest in breeding programs in order to obtain selected oysters presenting OsHV-1 resistance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dienogest, a synthetic progestin, inhibits the proliferation of immortalized human endometrial epithelial cells with suppression of cyclin D1 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yutaka; Takeuchi, Takashi; Mita, Shizuka; Mizuguchi, Kiyoshi; Kiyono, Tohru; Inoue, Masaki; Kyo, Satoru

    2009-10-01

    Dienogest is a specific progesterone receptor agonist with potent oral endometrial activity and is used in the treatment of endometriosis. In this study, we examined the direct effects of dienogest on the proliferation of human endometrial epithelial cells using an immortalized cell line. 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into the cells was inhibited by dienogest and by progesterone (P(4)) in dose-dependent fashion at concentrations of 10(-8) mol/l or higher. To identify the target genes of dienogest and P(4), we screened the expression of 84 genes related to cell cycle regulation by real-time polymerase chain reaction after 6 h of treatment at a concentration of 10(-7) mol/l. Results showed that only cyclin D1 expression was significantly down-regulated, although expression of the other genes did not significantly change after dienogest or P(4) treatment compared with the control. In a time-course study during the first 24 h after drug treatment, dienogest and P(4) each produced a lasting decrease in the expression of cyclin D1 mRNA, followed by a decrease in cyclin E1 mRNA but not an increase in the expression of cell cycle inhibitor genes (p21, p27 and p53). These findings suggest that dienogest directly inhibits the proliferation of human endometrial epithelial cells with suppression of cyclin D1 gene expression.

  14. Robust Thyroid Gene Expression and Radioiodine Uptake Induced by Simultaneous Suppression of BRAF V600E and Histone Deacetylase in Thyroid Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Weiwei; Liu, Rengyun; Zhu, Guangwu; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Context: Use of BRAF V600E inhibitors to restore thyroid iodide-handling gene expression and radioactive iodine (RAI) avidity is an attractive therapeutic strategy for RAI-refractory thyroid cancer, but recent initial clinical responses were modest. Given histone deacetylation at the sodium/iodide symporter promoter by histone deacetylase (HDAC) as a mechanism, simultaneously targeting BRAF V600E and HDAC could be a more effective strategy. Objectives: The objective of the study was to test whether suppressing both BRAF V600E and HDAC could more effectively induce thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake in thyroid cancer cells. Research Design: We tested the BRAF V600E inhibitor PLX4032 (vemurafenib) and the HDAC inhibitor SAHA (vorinostat), two major anticancer drugs currently approved for clinical use, in inducing thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake in thyroid cancer cells. Results: PLX4032 alone induced a modest expression of thyroid genes and RAI uptake preferentially in thyroid cancer cells harboring BRAF V600E. SAHA showed an effect in a genetic-independent manner in all the cells. A robust synergistic effect on thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake was observed in BRAF V600E-positive thyroid cancer cells when the two inhibitors were simultaneously used. This was dramatically enhanced further by TSH; triple combination of PLX4032, SAHA, and TSH showed the most robust effect on thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake in cells harboring BRAF V600E. Abundant sodium/iodide symporter protein expression in thyroid cancer cells under these conditions was confirmed by immunofluorescent microscopy. Conclusions: Simultaneously suppressing BRAF V600E and HDAC, particularly when cotreated with TSH, induced a far more robust expression of thyroid genes and RAI uptake in thyroid cancer cells than suppressing BRAF V600E alone. Triple combination of PLX4032, SAHA, and TSH is a specific robust regimen to restore RAI avidity in RAI-refractory BRAF V600E-positive thyroid

  15. Identification of genes expressed in response to yellow head virus infection in the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prapavorarat, Adisak; Pongsomboon, Siriporn; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2010-06-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was employed to identify yellow head virus (YHV)-responsive genes from the hemocytes of the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon. Two SSH cDNA libraries were constructed to identify viral responsive genes in the early (24I) and late (48/72I) phases of YHV infection. From 240 randomly selected clones from each library, 155 and 30 non-redundant transcripts were obtained for the early and late libraries, respectively. From these clones, 72 and 16, respectively, corresponded to known genes (E-values SSH library, but not in 48/72I SSH library implying that these immune molecules participate in viral defense immunity in the early phase of YHV infection whereas their expressions were suppressed in the late phase of infection. Novel YHV-responsive genes were uncovered from these SSH libraries including caspases, histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 2, Rab11, beta-integrin, tetraspanin, prostaglandin E synthase, transglutaminase, Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor and antimicrobial peptides. Among these YHV-responsive genes, several have been previously reported to participate in defense against white-spot syndrome virus (WSSV) implying that YHV infection in shrimp induces similar host immune responses as observed during WSSV infection. The expression of four apparently upregulated immune-related genes identified from the two SSH libraries, anti-lipopolysaccharide factor isoform 6 (ALFPm6), crustin isoform 1 (crustinPm1), transglutaminase and Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor isoform 2 (SPIPm2), was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR to reveal differential expression in response to YHV infection at 6, 24, 48 and 72 h post-infection. The results confirmed their differential expression and upregulation, and thus verified the success of the SSHs and the likely involvement of these genes in shrimp antiviral mechanisms. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Genomic structure, chromosomal localization and expression profile of a novel melanoma differentiation associated (mda-7) gene with cancer specific growth suppressing and apoptosis inducing properties.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, E. Y.; Madireddi, M. T.; Gopalkrishnan, R. V.; Leszczyniecka, M.; Su, Z. Z.; Lebedeva, I. V.; Kang, D. C.; Jian, H.; Lin, J. J.; Alexandre, D.; Chen, Y.; Vozhilla, N.; Mei, M. X.; Christiansen, K. A.; Sivo, F.; Goldstein, N. I.; Chada, S.; Huberman, E.; Pestka, S.; Fisher, P. B.; Biochip Technology Center; Columbia Univ.; Introgen Therapeutics Inc.; UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

    2001-10-25

    Abnormalities in cellular differentiation are frequent occurrences in human cancers. Treatment of human melanoma cells with recombinant fibroblast interferon (IFN-beta) and the protein kinase C activator mezerein (MEZ) results in an irreversible loss in growth potential, suppression of tumorigenic properties and induction of terminal cell differentiation. Subtraction hybridization identified melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (mda-7), as a gene induced during these physiological changes in human melanoma cells. Ectopic expression of mda-7 by means of a replication defective adenovirus results in growth suppression and induction of apoptosis in a broad spectrum of additional cancers, including melanoma, glioblastoma multiforme, osteosarcoma and carcinomas of the breast, cervix, colon, lung, nasopharynx and prostate. In contrast, no apparent harmful effects occur when mda-7 is expressed in normal epithelial or fibroblast cells. Human clones of mda-7 were isolated and its organization resolved in terms of intron/exon structure and chromosomal localization. Hu-mda-7 encompasses seven exons and six introns and encodes a protein with a predicted size of 23.8 kDa, consisting of 206 amino acids. Hu-mda-7 mRNA is stably expressed in the thymus, spleen and peripheral blood leukocytes. De novo mda-7 mRNA expression is also detected in human melanocytes and expression is inducible in cells of melanocyte/melanoma lineage and in certain normal and cancer cell types following treatment with a combination of IFN-beta plus MEZ. Mda-7 expression is also induced during megakaryocyte differentiation induced in human hematopoietic cells by treatment with TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate). In contrast, de novo expression of mda-7 is not detected nor is it inducible by IFN-beta+MEZ in a spectrum of additional normal and cancer cells. No correlation was observed between induction of mda-7 mRNA expression and growth suppression following treatment with IFN-beta+MEZ and

  17. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) combined with bioinformatics method: an integrated functional annotation approach for analysis of differentially expressed immune-genes in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badapanda, Chandan

    2013-01-01

    The suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) approach, a PCR based approach which amplifies differentially expressed cDNAs (complementary DNAs), while simultaneously suppressing amplification of common cDNAs, was employed to identify immuneinducible genes in insects. This technique has been used as a suitable tool for experimental identification of novel genes in eukaryotes as well as prokaryotes; whose genomes have been sequenced, or the species whose genomes have yet to be sequenced. In this article, I have proposed a method for in silico functional characterization of immune-inducible genes from insects. Apart from immune-inducible genes from insects, this method can be applied for the analysis of genes from other species, starting from bacteria to plants and animals. This article is provided with a background of SSH-based method taking specific examples from innate immune-inducible genes in insects, and subsequently a bioinformatics pipeline is proposed for functional characterization of newly sequenced genes. The proposed workflow presented here, can also be applied for any newly sequenced species generated from Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) platforms.

  18. gene structure, gene expression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and seedling leaves were sampled at 6 h after the treatment. For cold stress, the seedlings were transferred to 4◦C growth chamber for 30 min. Control seedlings were exposed to none of these treatments. To examine the expression patterns of these predicted genes in Poplar and to further confirm their stress responsive-.

  19. Suppression of cell expansion by ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis SUPERMAN gene in transgenic petunia and tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kater, M M; Franken, J; van Aelst, A; Angenent, G C

    2000-08-01

    Molecular and genetic analyses have shown that the Arabidopsis thaliana gene SUPERMAN (SUP) has at least two functions in Arabidopsis flower development. SUP is necessary to control the correct distribution of cells with either a stamen or carpel fate, and is essential for proper outgrowth of the ovule outer integument. Both these functions indicate a role for SUP in cell proliferation. To study the function of the Arabidopsis SUP gene in more detail, we over-expressed the SUP gene in petunia and tobacco in a tissue-specific manner. The petunia FLORAL BINDING PROTEIN 1 (FBP1) gene promoter was used to restrict the expression of SUP to petals and stamens. The development of petals and stamens was severely affected in both petunia and tobacco plants over-expressing SUP. Petals remained small and did not unfold, resulting in closed flowers. Stamen filaments were thin and very short. Detailed analysis of these floral organs from the petunia transformants showed that cell expansion was dramatically reduced without affecting cell division. These results reveal a novel activity for SUP as a regulator of cell expansion.

  20. Differentially expressed genes of Tetrahymena thermophila in response to tributyltin (TBT) identified by suppression subtractive hybridization and real time quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lifang; Miao, Wei; Wu, Yuxuan

    2007-02-15

    Tributyltin (TBT) is widely used as antifouling paints, agriculture biocides, and plastic stabilizers around the world, resulting in great pollution problem in aquatic environments. However, it has been short of the biomonitor to detect TBT in freshwater. We constructed the suppression subtractive hybridization library of Tetrahymena thermophila exposed to TBT, and screened out 101 Expressed Sequence Tags whose expressions were significantly up- or down-regulated with TBT treatment. From this, a series of genes related to the TBT toxicity were discovered, such as glutathione-S-transferase gene (down-regulated), plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase isoforms 3 gene (up-regulated) and NgoA (up-regulated). Furthermore, their expressions under different concentrations of TBT treatment (0.5-40 ppb) were detected by real time fluorescent quantitative PCR. The differentially expressed genes of T. thermophila in response to TBT were identified, which provide the basic to make Tetrahymena as a sensitive, rapid and convenient TBT biomonitor in freshwater based on rDNA inducible expression system.

  1. Exposure of Tg.AC transgenic mice to benzene suppresses hematopoietic progenitor cells and alters gene expression in critical signaling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nwosu, Veronica C.; Kissling, Grace E.; Trempus, Carol S.; Honeycutt, Hayden; French, John E.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of acute benzene (BZ) exposure on hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) derived from bone marrow cells were studied using homozygous male v-Ha-ras Tg.AC mice at 8-10 weeks of age. The mice were given 0.02% BZ in their drinking water for 28 days with the dose rate estimated to be 34 mg benzene/kg BW/day. Analysis of cultured HPCs indicated that BZ suppressed the proliferation of the multilineage colony forming unit-granulocyte, erythrocyte, macrophage, megakaryocyte (CFU-GEMM); colony forming unit-granulocyte, macrophage (CFU-GM); and blast forming unit erythrocyte/colony forming unit erythrocyte (BFUE/CFUE). A gene expression profile was generated using nylon arrays spotted with 23 cDNAs involved in selected signal pathways involved in cell distress, inflammation, DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Of the 23 marker genes, 6 (bax, c-fos, E124, hsf1, ikBa, and p57) were significantly (Mann-Whitney U tests, P < 0.05) overexpressed in BZ-exposed mice. Two genes (c-myc and IL-2) approached significance (at P = 0.053). The pattern of gene expression was consistent with BZ toxicity and the suppression of HPCs

  2. Complete suppression of viral gene expression is associated with the onset and progression of lymphoid malignancy: observations in Bovine Leukemia Virus-infected sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burny Arsène

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During malignant progression, tumor cells need to acquire novel characteristics that lead to uncontrolled growth and reduced immunogenicity. In the Bovine Leukemia Virus-induced ovine leukemia model, silencing of viral gene expression has been proposed as a mechanism leading to immune evasion. However, whether proviral expression in tumors is completely suppressed in vivo was not conclusively demonstrated. Therefore, we studied viral expression in two selected experimentally-infected sheep, the virus or the disease of which had features that made it possible to distinguish tumor cells from their nontransformed counterparts. Results In the first animal, we observed the emergence of a genetically modified provirus simultaneously with leukemia onset. We found a Tax-mutated (TaxK303 replication-deficient provirus in the malignant B-cell clone while functional provirus (TaxE303 had been consistently monitored over the 17-month aleukemic period. In the second case, both non-transformed and transformed BLV-infected cells were present at the same time, but at distinct sites. While there was potentially-active provirus in the non-leukemic blood B-cell population, as demonstrated by ex-vivo culture and injection into naïve sheep, virus expression was completely suppressed in the malignant B-cells isolated from the lymphoid tumors despite the absence of genetic alterations in the proviral genome. These observations suggest that silencing of viral genes, including the oncoprotein Tax, is associated with tumor onset. Conclusion Our findings suggest that silencing is critical for tumor progression and identify two distinct mechanisms-genetic and epigenetic-involved in the complete suppression of virus and Tax expression. We demonstrate that, in contrast to systems that require sustained oncogene expression, the major viral transforming protein Tax can be turned-off without reversing the transformed phenotype. We propose that suppression

  3. Nitric oxide suppresses tumor cell migration through N-Myc downstream-regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) expression: role of chelatable iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickok, Jason R; Sahni, Sumit; Mikhed, Yuliya; Bonini, Marcelo G; Thomas, Douglas D

    2011-12-02

    N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a ubiquitous cellular protein that is up-regulated under a multitude of stress and growth-regulatory conditions. Although the exact cellular functions of this protein have not been elucidated, mutations in this gene or aberrant expression of this protein have been linked to both tumor suppressive and oncogenic phenotypes. Previous reports have demonstrated that NDRG1 is strongly up-regulated by chemical iron chelators and hypoxia, yet its regulation by the free radical nitric oxide ((•)NO) has never been demonstrated. Herein, we examine the chemical biology that confers NDRG1 responsiveness at the mRNA and protein levels to (•)NO. We demonstrate that the interaction of (•)NO with the chelatable iron pool (CIP) and the appearance of dinitrosyliron complexes (DNIC) are key determinants. Using HCC 1806 triple negative breast cancer cells, we find that NDRG1 is up-regulated by physiological (•)NO concentrations in a dose- and time-dependant manner. Tumor cell migration was suppressed by NDRG1 expression and we excluded the involvement of HIF-1α, sGC, N-Myc, and c-Myc as upstream regulatory targets of (•)NO. Augmenting the chelatable iron pool abolished (•)NO-mediated NDRG1 expression and the associated phenotypic effects. These data, in summary, reveal a link between (•)NO, chelatable iron, and regulation of NDRG1 expression and signaling in tumor cells.

  4. [Differentially expressed genes identified in the main olfactory epithelium of mice with deficiency of adenylate cyclase 3 by using suppression subtractive hybridization approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhenlong, Cao; Jiangye, Hao; Yanfen, Zhou; Zhe, Zhang; Zhihua, Ni; Yuanxiang, Hu; Weili, Liu; Yongchao, Li; Daniel, R Storm; Runlin, Z Ma; Zhenshan, Wang

    2014-06-01

    Adenylate cyclase 3 (AC3) is one of the major players in the olfactory signaling within the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) of mice. However, we are not ascertained whether deficiency of AC3 will lead to the differential expression of related genes in the MOE. Forward and reverse subtractive libraries were constructed by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) approach, with MOEs from AC3(-/-) and AC3(+/+) mice. These two libraries were primarily screened by Dot blot, differential expressed clones were sequenced and analyzed by bioinformatics, and differential expressed genes were verified by qRT-PCR. A total of 386 differentially expressed clones were picked out after Dot blot. The DNA sequences of 80 clones randomly selected were determined, and 62 clones were identified by blasting in GenBank. We found that 24 up-regulated clones were corresponded to genes of kcnk3, mapk7, megf11, and 38 down-regulated clones were corresponded to tmem88b, c-mip, skp1a, mlycd, etc. Their functions were annotated with Gene Ontology (GO) and found to be mainly focused on molecular binding, cell cycle, processes of biology and cells. Five genes (kcnk3, c-mip, mlycd, tmem88b and trappc5) were verified by qRT-PCR with individuals of AC3(+/+) and AC3(-/-) mice. The data indicate that kcnk3 gene is up-regulated significantly, increasing 1.27 folds compared to control mice, whereas c-mip, mlycd, tmem88b and trappc5 are down-regulated significantly, decreasing 20%, 7%, 32% and 29% compared to the AC3(+/+)mice. The functions of these genes are closely related with K(+) channels, cell differentiation, metabolism of fats, membrane transportation, and so on. It is tempting to speculate that these genes might work together with AC3 to orchestrate the olfactory transduction signaling in the MOE.

  5. The Natural Product Osthole Attenuates Yeast Growth by Extensively Suppressing the Gene Expressions of Mitochondrial Respiration Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Shen, Yan

    2017-03-01

    The fast growing evidences have indicated that the natural product osthole is a promising drug candidate for fighting several serious human diseases, for example, cancer and inflammation. However, the mode-of-action (MoA) of osthole remains largely incomplete. In this study, we investigated the growth inhibition activity of osthole using fission yeast as a model, with the goal of understanding the osthole's mechanism of action, especially from the molecular level. Microarray analysis indicated that osthole has significant impacts on gene transcription levels (In total, 214 genes are up-regulated, and 97 genes are down-regulated). Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) indicated that 11 genes belong to the "Respiration module" category, especially including the components of complex III and V of mitochondrial respiration chain. Based on GSEA and network analysis, we also found that 54 up-regulated genes belong to the "Core Environmental Stress Responses" category, particularly including many transporter genes, which suggests that the rapidly activated nutrient exchange between cell and environment is part of the MoA of osthole. In summary, osthole can greatly impact on fission yeast transcriptome, and it primarily represses the expression levels of the genes in respiration chain, which next causes the inefficiency of ATP production and thus largely explains osthole's growth inhibition activity in Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S. pombe). The complexity of the osthole's MoA shown in previous studies and our current research demonstrates that the omics approach and bioinformatics tools should be applied together to acquire the complete landscape of osthole's growth inhibition activity.

  6. Identification of differentially expressed genes in the oviduct of two rabbit lines divergently selected for uterine capacity using suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, M; Castelló, A; Peiró, R; Argente, M J; Santacreu, M A; Folch, J M

    2013-06-01

    Suppressive subtractive hybridization libraries from oviduct at 62 h post-mating of two lines of rabbits divergently selected for uterine capacity were generated to identify differentially expressed genes. A total of 438 singletons and 126 contigs were obtained by cluster assembly and sequence alignment of 704 expressed sequence tags (ESTs), of which 54% showed homology to known proteins of the non-redundant NCBI databases. Differential screening by dot blot validated 71 ESTs, of which 47 showed similarity to known genes. Transcripts of genes were functionally annotated in the molecular function and the biological process gene ontology categories using the BLAST2GO software and were assigned to reproductive developmental process, immune response, amino acid metabolism and degradation, response to stress and apoptosis terms. Finally, three interesting genes, PGR, HSD17B4 and ERO1L, were identified as overexpressed in the low line using RT-qPCR. Our study provides a list of candidate genes that can be useful to understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenotypic differences observed in early embryo survival and development traits. © 2012 The Authors, Animal Genetics © 2012 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  7. PPAR{alpha} does not suppress muscle-associated gene expression in brown adipocytes but does influence expression of factors that fingerprint the brown adipocyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walden, Tomas B.; Petrovic, Natasa [The Wenner-Gren Institute, The Arrhenius Laboratories F3, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Nedergaard, Jan, E-mail: jan@metabol.su.se [The Wenner-Gren Institute, The Arrhenius Laboratories F3, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-06-25

    Brown adipocytes and myocytes develop from a common adipomyocyte precursor. PPAR{alpha} is a nuclear receptor important for lipid and glucose metabolism. It has been suggested that in brown adipose tissue, PPAR{alpha} represses the expression of muscle-associated genes, in this way potentially acting to determine cell fate in brown adipocytes. To further understand the possible role of PPAR{alpha} in these processes, we measured expression of muscle-associated genes in brown adipose tissue and brown adipocytes from PPAR{alpha}-ablated mice, including structural genes (Mylpf, Tpm2, Myl3 and MyHC), regulatory genes (myogenin, Myf5 and MyoD) and a myomir (miR-206). However, in our hands, the expression of these genes was not influenced by the presence or absence of PPAR{alpha}, nor by the PPAR{alpha} activator Wy-14,643. Similarly, the expression of genes common for mature brown adipocyte and myocytes (Tbx15, Meox2) were not affected. However, the brown adipocyte-specific regulatory genes Zic1, Lhx8 and Prdm16 were affected by PPAR{alpha}. Thus, it would not seem that PPAR{alpha} represses muscle-associated genes, but PPAR{alpha} may still play a role in the regulation of the bifurcation of the adipomyocyte precursor into a brown adipocyte or myocyte phenotype.

  8. Identification of differentially expressed genes in American cockroach ovaries and testes by suppression subtractive hybridization and the prediction of its miRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wan; Jiang, Guo-Fang; Sun, Shu-Hong; Lu, Yong; Ma, Fei; Li, Bin

    2013-11-01

    Studies on the cockroach have contributed to our understanding of several important developmental processes, especially those that can be easily studied in the embryo. However, our knowledge on late events such as gonad differentiation in the cockroach is still limited. The major aim of the present study was to identify sex-specific genes between adult female and male Periplaneta americana. Two cDNA libraries were constructed using the suppression subtractive hybridization method; a total of 433 and 599 unique sequences were obtained from the forward library and the reverse library, respectively, by cluster assembly, and sequence alignment of 1,032 expressed sequence tags. The analysis of the differentially expressed gene functions allowed these genes to be categorized into three groups: biological process, molecular function, and cellular component. The differentially expressed genes were suggested to be related to the development of the gonads of P. americana. Twelve differentially expressed genes were randomly selected and verified using relative quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Meanwhile, by adopting a range of filtering criteria, we predicted two potential microRNA sequences for P. americana, pam-miR100-3p and pam-miR7. To confirm the expression of potential microRNAs (miRNAs) in American cockroach, a qRT-PCR approach was also employed. The data presented here offer the insights into the molecular foundation of sex differences in American cockroach, and the first report for the miRNAs in this species. In addition, the results can be used as a reference for unraveling candidate genes associated with the sex and reproduction of cockroaches.

  9. Recombinant adenovirus expressing ICP47 gene suppresses the ability of dendritic cells by restricting specific T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Kan, Quancheng; Yu, Zujiang; Li, Ling; Zhang, Zhenxiang; Pan, Xue; Feng, Ting

    2013-04-01

    Adenoviral vectors have been demonstrated to be one of the most effective vehicles to deliver foreign DNA into dendritic cells (DCs). However, the response of host immune systems against foreign gene products is a major obstacle to successful gene therapy. Infected cell protein 47 (ICP47) inhibits MHC Ⅰ antigen presentation pathway by binding to host transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP), and thereby attenuates of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) responses and evades the host immune clearance. This subject was designed to construct a recombinant adenovirus expressing His-tag-ICP47 fusion protein to investigate further the role of ICP47 in the elimination of transgene expression. Consequently, a recombinant adenovirus expressing the His-tag-ICP47 fusion protein was successfully constructed and it had the abilities of attenuating the stimulatory capacity of DCs by reducing the proliferation of lymphocytes and cytokine production of perforin compared with those of the r-track group and the control group. Our observations provide the first evidence of the regulation mechanism of ICP47 on DC-based immunotherapy for long-term persistence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Differential gene expression in gall midge susceptible rice genotypes revealed by suppressive subtraction hybridization (SSH) cDNA libraries and microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Nidhi; Neeraja, Chiruvuri Naga; Nair, Suresh; Bentur, Jagadish S

    2012-12-01

    A major pest of rice, the Asian rice gall midge (Orseolia oryzae Wood-Mason), causes significant yield losses in the rice growing regions throughout Asia. Feeding by the larvae induces susceptible plants to produce nutritive tissue to support growth and development. In order to identify molecular signatures during compatible interactions, genome wide transcriptional profiling was performed using SSH library and microarray technology. Results revealed up-regulation of genes related to primary metabolism, nutrient relocation, cell organization and DNA synthesis. Concomitantly, defense, secondary metabolism and signaling genes were suppressed. Further, real-time PCR validation of a selected set of 20 genes, in three susceptible rice varieties (TN1, Kavya and Suraksha) during the interaction with the respective virulent gall midge biotypes, also revealed variation in gene expression in Kavya as compared to TN1 and Suraksha. These studies showed that virulent insects induced the plants to step up metabolism and transport nutrients to their feeding site and suppressed defense responses. But Kavya rice mounted an elevated defense response during early hours of virulent gall midge infestation, which was over-powered later, resulting in host plant susceptibility.

  11. Identification of differentially-expressed genes potentially implicated in drought response in pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) by suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qing-Jie; Yan, Feng-Xia; Qiao, Guang; Zhang, Bing-Xue; Wen, Xiao-Peng

    2014-01-01

    Drought is one of the most severe threats to the growth, development and yield of plant. In order to unravel the molecular basis underlying the high tolerance of pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) to drought stress, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and cDNA microarray approaches were firstly combined to identify the potential important or novel genes involved in the plant responses to drought stress. The forward (drought over drought-free) and reverse (drought-free over drought) suppression subtractive cDNA libraries were constructed using in vitro shoots of cultivar 'Zihonglong' exposed to drought stress and drought-free (control). A total of 2112 clones, among which half were from either forward or reverse SSH library, were randomly picked up to construct a pitaya cDNA microarray. Microarray analysis was carried out to verify the expression fluctuations of this set of clones upon drought treatment compared with the controls. A total of 309 expressed sequence tags (ESTs), 153 from forward library and 156 from reverse library, were obtained, and 138 unique ESTs were identified after sequencing by clustering and blast analyses, which included genes that had been previously reported as responsive to water stress as well as some functionally unknown genes. Thirty six genes were mapped to 47 KEGG pathways, including carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, energy metabolism, nucleotide metabolism, and amino acid metabolism of pitaya. Expression analysis of the selected ESTs by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) corroborated the results of differential screening. Moreover, time-course expression patterns of these selected ESTs further confirmed that they were closely responsive to drought treatment. Among the differentially expressed genes (DEGs), many are related to stress tolerances including drought tolerance. Thereby, the mechanism of drought tolerance of this pitaya genotype is a very complex physiological and biochemical process, in

  12. Palmitic acid suppresses apolipoprotein M gene expression via the pathway of PPAR{sub β/δ} in HepG2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Guanghua; Shi, Yuanping; Zhang, Jun; Mu, Qinfeng; Qin, Li; Zheng, Lu; Feng, Yuehua [Comprehensive Laboratory, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Changzhou 213003 (China); Berggren-Söderlund, Maria; Nilsson-Ehle, Peter [Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, S-221 85 Lund (Sweden); Zhang, Xiaoying, E-mail: zhangxy6689996@163.com [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Changzhou 213003 (China); Xu, Ning, E-mail: ning.xu@med.lu.se [Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, S-221 85 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • Palmitic acid significantly inhibited APOM gene expression in HepG2 cells. • Palmitic acid could obviously increase PPARB/D mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. • PPAR{sub β/δ} antagonist, GSK3787, had no effect on APOM expression. • GSK3787 could reverse the palmitic acid-induced down-regulation of APOM expression. • Palmitic acid induced suppression of APOM expression is mediated via the PPAR{sub β/δ} pathway. - Abstract: It has been demonstrated that apolipoprotein M (APOM) is a vasculoprotective constituent of high density lipoprotein (HDL), which could be related to the anti-atherosclerotic property of HDL. Investigation of regulation of APOM expression is of important for further exploring its pathophysiological function in vivo. Our previous studies indicated that expression of APOM could be regulated by platelet activating factor (PAF), transforming growth factors (TGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), leptin, hyperglycemia and etc., in vivo and/or in vitro. In the present study, we demonstrated that palmitic acid could significantly inhibit APOM gene expression in HepG2 cells. Further study indicated neither PI-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 nor protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GFX could abolish palmitic acid induced down-regulation of APOM expression. In contrast, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta (PPAR{sub β/δ}) antagonist GSK3787 could totally reverse the palmitic acid-induced down-regulation of APOM expression, which clearly demonstrates that down-regulation of APOM expression induced by palmitic acid is mediated via the PPAR{sub β/δ} pathway.

  13. Global gene expression profiling reveals a suppressed immune response pathway associated with 3q amplification in squamous carcinoma of the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Qian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome 3q26–28 is a critical region of genomic amplification in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, particularly lung squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs. No molecular therapeutic target has shown clinical utility for SCC, in contrast with adenocarcinomas of the lung. To identify novel candidate drivers in this region, we performed both Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array CGH, Agilent Human Genome CGH 244A oligo-microarrays and Gene Expression Microarray (Agilent Human Gene Expression 4 × 44 K microarray on 24 untreated lung SCC specimens. Using our previously published integrative genomics approach, we identified 12 top amplified driver genes within this region that are highly correlated and overexpressed in lung SCC. We further demonstrated one of the 12 top amplified driver Fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 (FXR1 as a novel cancer gene in NSCLC and FXR1 executes its regulatory function by forming a novel complex with two other oncogenes, protein kinase C, iota ( PRKCI and epithelial cell transforming 2 (ECT2 within the same amplicon in lung cancer cell. Here we report that immune response pathways are significantly suppressed in lung SCC and negatively associated with 3q driver gene expression, implying a potential role of 3q drivers in cancer immune-surveillance. In light of the attractive immunotherapy strategy using blockade of negative regulators of T cell function for multiple human cancer including lung SCC, our findings may provide a rationale for targeting 3q drivers in combination of immunotherapies for human tumors harboring the 3q amplicon. The data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GSE40089.

  14. Green tea extract suppresses adiposity and affects the expression of lipid metabolism genes in diet-induced obese zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasumura Takahiro

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visceral fat accumulation is one of the most important predictors of mortality in obese populations. Administration of green tea extract (GTE can reduce body fat and reduce the risk of obesity-related diseases in mammals. In this study, we investigated the effects and mechanisms of GTE on adiposity in diet-induced obese (DIO zebrafish. Methods Zebrafish at 3.5 to 4.5 months post-fertilization were allocated to four groups: non-DIO, DIO, DIO + 0.0025%GTE, and DIO + 0.0050%GTE. The non-DIO group was fed freshly hatched Artemia once daily (5 mg cysts/fish daily for 40 days. Zebrafish in the three DIO groups were fed freshly hatched Artemia three times daily (60 mg cysts/fish daily. Zebrafish in the DIO + 0.0025%GTE and DIO + 0.0050%GTE groups were exposed to GTE after the start of feeding three times daily for 40 days. Results Three-dimensional microcomputed tomography analysis showed that GTE exposure significantly decreased the volume of visceral but not subcutaneous fat tissue in DIO zebrafish. GTE exposure increased hepatic expression of the lipid catabolism genes ACOX1 (acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1, palmitoyl, ACADM (acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, c-4 to c-12 straight chain, and PPARA (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha. GTE exposure also significantly decreased the visceral fat expression of SOCS3 (suppressor of cytokine signaling 3b which inhibits leptin signaling. Conclusions The present results are consistent with those seen in mammals treated with GTE, supporting the validity of studying the effects of GTE in DIO zebrafish. Our results suggest that GTE exerts beneficial effects on adiposity, possibly by altering the expression of lipid catabolism genes and SOCS3.

  15. MiR-27a suppresses triglyceride accumulation and affects gene mRNA expression associated with fat metabolism in dairy goat mammary gland epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xian-Zi; Luo, Jun; Zhang, Li-Ping; Wang, Wei; Shi, Heng-Bo; Zhu, Jiang-Jiang

    2013-05-25

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a well-defined group of small RNAs containing about 22 nucleotides, participate in various biological metabolic processes. miR-27a is a miRNA that is known to regulate fat synthesis and differentiation in preadipocyte cells. However, little is known regarding the role that miR-27a plays in regulating goat milk fat synthesis. In this study, we determined the miR-27a expression profile in goat mammary gland and found that miR-27a expression was correlated with the lactation cycle. Additionally, prolactin promoted miR-27a expression in goat mammary gland epithelial cells. Further functional analysis showed that over-expression of miR-27a down-regulated triglyceride accumulation and decreased the ratio of unsaturated/saturated fatty acid in mammary gland epithelial cells. miR-27a also significantly affected mRNA expression related to milk fat metabolism. Specifically, over-expression of miR-27a reduced gene mRNA expression associated with triglyceride synthesis by suppressing PPARγ protein levels. This study provides the first experimental evidence that miR-27a regulates triglyceride synthesis in goat mammary gland epithelial cells and improves our understanding about the importance of miRNAs in milk fat synthesis. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes Associated with Coronatine-Induced Laticifer Differentiation in the Rubber Tree by Subtractive Hybridization Suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Xin Zhang

    Full Text Available The secondary laticifer in the secondary phloem is differentiated from the vascular cambia of the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.. The number of secondary laticifers is closely related to the rubber yield potential of Hevea. Pharmacological data show that jasmonic acid and its precursor linolenic acid are effective in inducing secondary laticifer differentiation in epicormic shoots of the rubber tree. In the present study, an experimental system of coronatine-induced laticifer differentiation was developed to perform SSH identification of genes with differential expression. A total of 528 positive clones were obtained by blue-white screening, of which 248 clones came from the forward SSH library while 280 clones came from the reverse SSH library. Approximately 215 of the 248 clones and 171 of the 280 clones contained cDNA inserts by colony PCR screening. A total of 286 of the 386 ESTs were detected to be differentially expressed by reverse northern blot and sequenced. Approximately 147 unigenes with an average length of 497 bp from the forward and 109 unigenes with an average length of 514 bp from the reverse SSH libraries were assembled and annotated. The unigenes were associated with the stress/defense response, plant hormone signal transduction and structure development. It is suggested that Ca2+ signal transduction and redox seem to be involved in differentiation, while PGA and EIF are associated with the division of cambium initials for COR-induced secondary laticifer differentiation in the rubber tree.

  17. Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes Associated with Coronatine-Induced Laticifer Differentiation in the Rubber Tree by Subtractive Hybridization Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Xin; Wu, Shao-Hua; Chen, Yue-Yi; Tian, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    The secondary laticifer in the secondary phloem is differentiated from the vascular cambia of the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.). The number of secondary laticifers is closely related to the rubber yield potential of Hevea. Pharmacological data show that jasmonic acid and its precursor linolenic acid are effective in inducing secondary laticifer differentiation in epicormic shoots of the rubber tree. In the present study, an experimental system of coronatine-induced laticifer differentiation was developed to perform SSH identification of genes with differential expression. A total of 528 positive clones were obtained by blue-white screening, of which 248 clones came from the forward SSH library while 280 clones came from the reverse SSH library. Approximately 215 of the 248 clones and 171 of the 280 clones contained cDNA inserts by colony PCR screening. A total of 286 of the 386 ESTs were detected to be differentially expressed by reverse northern blot and sequenced. Approximately 147 unigenes with an average length of 497 bp from the forward and 109 unigenes with an average length of 514 bp from the reverse SSH libraries were assembled and annotated. The unigenes were associated with the stress/defense response, plant hormone signal transduction and structure development. It is suggested that Ca2+ signal transduction and redox seem to be involved in differentiation, while PGA and EIF are associated with the division of cambium initials for COR-induced secondary laticifer differentiation in the rubber tree.

  18. Point mutation in the NF2 gene of HEI-193 human schwannoma cells results in the expression of a merlin isoform with attenuated growth suppressive activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepont, Pierig; Stickney, John T.; Foster, Lauren A.; Meng, Jin-Jun; Hennigan, Robert F. [Department of Cell and Cancer Biology, Vontz Center for Molecular Studies, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3125 Eden Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0521 (United States); Ip, Wallace [Department of Cell and Cancer Biology, Vontz Center for Molecular Studies, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3125 Eden Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0521 (United States)], E-mail: wallace.ip@uc.edu

    2008-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a genetic disorder characterized by the formation of bilateral schwannomas of the eighth cranial nerve. Although the protein product of the NF2 gene (merlin) is a classical tumor suppressor, the mechanism by which merlin suppresses cell proliferation is not fully understood. The availability of isolated tumor cells would facilitate a better understanding of the molecular function of merlin, but primary schwannoma cells obtained from patients grow slowly and do not yield adequate numbers for biochemical analysis. In this study, we have examined the NF2 mutation in HEI-193 cells, an immortalized cell line derived from the schwannoma of an NF2 patient. Previous work showed that the NF2 mutation in HEI-193 cells causes a splicing defect in the NF2 transcript. We have confirmed this result and further identified the resultant protein product as an isoform of merlin previously designated as isoform 3. The level of isoform 3 proteins in HEI-193 cells is comparable to the levels of merlin isoforms 1 and 2 in normal human Schwann cells and several other immortalized cell lines. In contrast to many mutant forms of merlin, isoform 3 is as resistant to proteasomal degradation as isoforms 1 and 2 and can interact with each of these isoforms in vivo. Cell proliferation assays showed that, in NF2{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts, exogenously expressed merlin isoform 3 does exhibit growth suppressive activity although it is significantly lower than that of identically expressed merlin isoform 1. These results indicate that, although HEI-193 cells have undetectable levels of merlin isoforms 1 and 2, they are, in fact, not a merlin-null model because they express the moderately active growth suppressive merlin isoform 3.

  19. Suppression of human papillomavirus gene expression in vitro and in vivo by herpes simplex virus type 2 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, L.; Ward, M.G.; Welsh, P.A.; Budgeon, L.R.; Neely, E.B.; Howett, M.K.

    2003-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have found that women infected with both herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 or HPV-18 are at greater risk of developing cervical carcinoma compared to women infected with only one virus. However, it remains unclear if HSV-2 is a cofactor for cervical cancer or if HPV and HSV-2 interact in any way. We have studied the effect of HSV-2 infection on HPV-11 gene expression in an in vitro double-infection assay. HPV transcripts were down-regulated in response to HSV-2 infection. Two HSV-2 vhs mutants failed to reduce HPV-16 E1-circumflexE4 transcripts. We also studied the effect of HSV-2 infection on preexisting experimental papillomas in a vaginal epithelial xenograft model. Doubly infected grafts demonstrated papillomatous transformation and the classical cytopathic effect from HSV-2 infection. HPV and HSV DNA signals were mutually exclusive. These studies may have therapeutic applications for HPV infections and related neoplasms

  20. Suppression of HLA expression by lentivirus-mediated gene transfer of siRNA cassettes and in vivo chemoselection to enhance hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacke, Katrin; Falahati, Rustom; Flebbe-Rehwaldt, Linda; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Gaensler, Karin M L

    2009-01-01

    Current approaches for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and organ transplantation are limited by donor and host-mediated immune responses to allo-antigens. Application of these therapies is limited by the toxicity of preparative and post-transplant immunosuppressive regimens and a shortage of appropriate HLA-matched donors. We have been exploring two complementary approaches for genetically modifying donor cells that achieve long-term suppression of cellular proteins that elicit host immune responses to mismatched donor antigens, and provide a selective advantage to genetically engineered donor cells after transplantation. The first approach is based on recent advances that make feasible targeted down-regulation of HLA expression. Suppression of HLA expression could help to overcome limitations imposed by extensive HLA polymorphisms that restrict the availability of suitable donors. Accordingly, we have recently investigated whether knockdown of HLA by RNA interference (RNAi) enables allogeneic cells to evade immune recognition. For efficient and stable delivery of short hairpin-type RNAi constructs (shRNA), we employed lentivirus-based gene transfer vectors that integrate into genomic DNA, thereby permanently modifying transduced donor cells. Lentivirus-mediated delivery of shRNA targeting pan-Class I and allele-specific HLA achieved efficient and dose-dependent reduction in surface expression of HLA in human cells, and enhanced resistance to allo-reactive T lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity, while avoiding non-MHC restricted killing. Complementary strategies for genetic engineering of HSC that would provide a selective advantage for transplanted donor cells and enable successful engraftment with less toxic preparative and immunosuppressive regimens would increase the numbers of individuals to whom HLA suppression therapy could be offered. Our second strategy is to provide a mechanism for in vivo selection of genetically modified HSC and other donor cells. We have

  1. [Construction of suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA library of half-blood males of Dermacentor silvarum and analysis of differentially expressed genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Wang, Wei-lin; Meng, Qing-feng; Xu, Zhan; Cui, Jie; Liu, Xin-xin; Wang, Wei-li

    2014-08-01

    To construct a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library of half-blood males of Dermacentor silvarum, and analyze the differentially expressed genes. Total RNA was extracted from the half-blood males and unfed males of D. silvarum. cDNA was synthesized following the protocol of SMARTER cDNA synthesis kit. After Rsa I digestion, cDNA was ligated to adaptors. The cDNA from the half-blood males was used as the tester, and unfed males as the driver. The SSH library was constructed using TaKaRa PCR-select cDNA subtraction kit. Differentially expressed cDNAs were amplified by nested PCR, cloned into PMD-18T vector, transformed into E. coli DH5alpha, and the white-blue plaque selection was used to get the positive clones. The titer of SSH library and the recombination efficiency were calculated. Individual colonies were randomly selected from library. Subtractive efficiency of the subtracted cDNA library was examined by reverse Northern blotting and RT-PCR. Positive clones with differentially expressed genes were sequenced. Homology comparison and function prediction were performed by Blastn and Blastx. The bands of double-stranded cDNAs from half-blood males and unfed males of D. silvarum were dispersed and longer than 500 bp. After Rsa I digestion, the ds cDNA-fragments were 100-1000 bp. The ligation reaction efficiency of adaptor was more than 25%. Nested PCR showed that the bands of subtracted ds cDNA were gathered, ranging from 250 to 500 bp. The titer of SSH library was 700,000 pfu/ml, and the recombination efficiency was 88.5% (239/270). Reverse Northern hybridization revealed that the clones showed stronger signals in half-blood males cDNA probes than in unfed males cDNA probes. RT-PCR showed that among the eight random selected positive clones, 5 clones were up-expressed under half-blood condition. A total of 87 differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs, 200-800 bp) were obtained from 115 positive clones. Among the 87 ESTs, 53 ESTs showed

  2. TGFβ-induced deptor suppression recruits mTORC1 and not mTORC2 to enhance collagen I (α2 gene expression.

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    Falguni Das

    Full Text Available Enhanced TGFβ activity contributes to the accumulation of matrix proteins including collagen I (α2 by proximal tubular epithelial cells in progressive kidney disease. Although TGFβ rapidly activates its canonical Smad signaling pathway, it also recruits noncanonical pathway involving mTOR kinase to regulate renal matrix expansion. The mechanism by which chronic TGFβ treatment maintains increased mTOR activity to induce the matrix protein collagen I (α2 expression is not known. Deptor is an mTOR interacting protein that suppresses mTOR activity in both mTORC1 and mTORC2. In proximal tubular epithelial cells, TGFβ reduced deptor levels in a time-dependent manner with concomitant increase in both mTORC1 and mTORC2 activities. Expression of deptor abrogated activity of mTORC1 and mTORC2, resulting in inhibition of collagen I (α2 mRNA and protein expression via transcriptional mechanism. In contrast, neutralization of endogenous deptor by shRNAs increased activity of both mTOR complexes and expression of collagen I (α2 similar to TGFβ treatment. Importantly, downregulation of deptor by TGFβ increased the expression of Hif1α by increasing translation of its mRNA. TGFβ-induced deptor downregulation promotes Hif1α binding to its cognate hypoxia responsive element in the collagen I (α2 gene to control its protein expression via direct transcriptional mechanism. Interestingly, knockdown of raptor to specifically block mTORC1 activity significantly inhibited expression of collagen I (α2 and Hif1α while inhibition of rictor to prevent selectively mTORC2 activation did not have any effect. Critically, our data provide evidence for the requirement of TGFβ-activated mTORC1 only by deptor downregulation, which dominates upon the bystander mTORC2 activity for enhanced expression of collagen I (α2. Our results also suggest the presence of a safeguard mechanism involving deptor-mediated suppression of mTORC1 activity against developing TGF

  3. Antihistamines suppress upregulation of histidine decarboxylase gene expression with potencies different from their binding affinities for histamine H1 receptor in toluene 2,4-diisocyanate-sensitized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Mizuguchi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antihistamines inhibit histamine signaling by blocking histamine H1 receptor (H1R or suppressing H1R signaling as inverse agonists. The H1R gene is upregulated in patients with pollinosis, and its expression level is correlated with the severity of nasal symptoms. Here, we show that antihistamine suppressed upregulation of histidine decarboxylase (HDC mRNA expression in patients with pollinosis, and its expression level was correlated with that of H1R mRNA. Certain antihistamines, including mepyramine and diphenhydramine, suppress toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI-induced upregulation of HDC gene expression and increase HDC activity in TDI-sensitized rats. However, d-chlorpheniramine did not demonstrate any effect. The potencies of antihistamine suppressive effects on HDC mRNA elevation were different from their H1R receptor binding affinities. In TDI-sensitized rats, the potencies of antihistamine inhibitory effects on sneezing in the early phase were related to H1R binding. In contrast, the potencies of their inhibitory effects on sneezing in the late phase were correlated with those of suppressive effects on HDC mRNA elevation. Data suggest that in addition to the antihistaminic and inverse agonistic activities, certain antihistamines possess additional properties unrelated to receptor binding and alleviate nasal symptoms in the late phase by inhibiting synthesis and release of histamine by suppressing HDC gene transcription.

  4. Antihistamines suppress upregulation of histidine decarboxylase gene expression with potencies different from their binding affinities for histamine H1 receptor in toluene 2,4-diisocyanate-sensitized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Das, Asish K; Maeyama, Kazutaka; Dev, Shrabanti; Shahriar, Masum; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Takeda, Noriaki; Fukui, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    Antihistamines inhibit histamine signaling by blocking histamine H1 receptor (H1R) or suppressing H1R signaling as inverse agonists. The H1R gene is upregulated in patients with pollinosis, and its expression level is correlated with the severity of nasal symptoms. Here, we show that antihistamine suppressed upregulation of histidine decarboxylase (HDC) mRNA expression in patients with pollinosis, and its expression level was correlated with that of H1R mRNA. Certain antihistamines, including mepyramine and diphenhydramine, suppress toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI)-induced upregulation of HDC gene expression and increase HDC activity in TDI-sensitized rats. However, d-chlorpheniramine did not demonstrate any effect. The potencies of antihistamine suppressive effects on HDC mRNA elevation were different from their H1R receptor binding affinities. In TDI-sensitized rats, the potencies of antihistamine inhibitory effects on sneezing in the early phase were related to H1R binding. In contrast, the potencies of their inhibitory effects on sneezing in the late phase were correlated with those of suppressive effects on HDC mRNA elevation. Data suggest that in addition to the antihistaminic and inverse agonistic activities, certain antihistamines possess additional properties unrelated to receptor binding and alleviate nasal symptoms in the late phase by inhibiting synthesis and release of histamine by suppressing HDC gene transcription. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative transcript profiling of gene expression between seedless Ponkan mandarin and its seedy wild type during floral organ development by suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Wen-Ming

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seedlessness is an important agronomic trait for citrus, and male sterility (MS is one main cause of seedless citrus fruit. However, the molecular mechanism of citrus seedlessness remained not well explored. Results An integrative strategy combining suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH library with cDNA microarray was employed to study the underlying mechanism of seedlessness of a Ponkan mandarin seedless mutant (Citrus reticulata Blanco. Screening with custom microarray, a total of 279 differentially expressed clones were identified, and 133 unigenes (43 contigs and 90 singletons were obtained after sequencing. Gene Ontology (GO distribution based on biological process suggested that the majority of differential genes are involved in metabolic process and respond to stimulus and regulation of biology process; based on molecular function they function as DNA/RNA binding or have catalytic activity and oxidoreductase activity. A gene encoding male sterility-like protein was highly up-regulated in the seedless mutant compared with the wild type, while several transcription factors (TFs such as AP2/EREBP, MYB, WRKY, NAC and C2C2-GATA zinc-finger domain TFs were down-regulated. Conclusion Our research highlighted some candidate pathways that participated in the citrus male gametophyte development and could be beneficial for seedless citrus breeding in the future.

  6. Sorafenib overcomes the chemoresistance in HBx-expressing hepatocellular carcinoma cells through down-regulation of HBx protein stability and suppresses HBV gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Young; Jung, Hye Uk; Yoo, Seung Hee; Yoo, Ki Soo; Cheong, JaeHun; Park, Bong Soo; Yun, Il; Yoo, Young Hyun

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have revealed that HBx expression has anti-apoptotic effects, resulting in increased drug resistance in HCC cells. Thus, we examined if sorafenib efficiently induces apoptosis in HBx-overexpressing HCC cells. Noticeably, sorafenib efficiently induced apoptosis, even in HBx-expressing HepG2 cells, indicating that the HBx protein does not attenuate sorafenib-induced apoptosis. We next investigated if sorafenib modulates autophagy, allowing HCC cells to overcome the chemoresistance conferred by the HBx protein. Although autophagy plays a cytoprotective role against sorafenib-induced lethality, sorafenib was effective irrespective of HBx protein overexpression. We next examined if sorafenib exerts its cytotoxic effect via direct effects on the HBx protein. Importantly, sorafenib decreased HBx protein stability through a proteasome-dependent degradation pathway. Moreover, sorafenib decreased HBV gene expression and viral promoter activity. Taken together, sorafenib efficiently induces apoptotic cell death in HBx-expressing HCC cells via the downregulation of the HBx protein, a key factor in the anti-cancer drug resistance observed in HBV-induced HCC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH)-based method for estimating Cd-induced differences in gene expression at cultivar level and identification of genes induced by Cd in two water spinach cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Baifei; Xin, Junliang; Yang, Zhongyi; Zhou, Yihui; Yuan, Jiangang; Gong, Yulian

    2009-10-14

    The abilities to accumulate cadmium (Cd) are different among cultivars (cv.) in many species. The characteristic of Cd concentration among cultivars is heritable and is probably controlled by genes, but rather limited information about the relevant genes in vegetable crops has been published. In the present study, a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) approach was used to identify genes induced by Cd in two water spinach (an important vegetable in southern China) cultivars that differ in Cd accumulation in their edible parts. The two cultivars were cv. Qiangkunqinggu (QK), a low Cd accumulative cultivar and cv. Taiwan 308 (TW), a high Cd accumulative cultivar. In the construction of QK and TW libraries, the plants without Cd treatment were taken as drivers and the plants exposed to 6 mg L(-1) Cd for 24 h as testers. Four hundred clones were sequenced, and 164 nonrepeated sequences (112 from the QK library and 52 from the TW library) were assigned to being functional genes or proteins. A tremendous difference in Cd-induced gene expressions between the two libraries was observed. In the QK library, genes implicated in disease/defense comprised one of the largest sets (20.6%), whereas the proportion was only 8.8% in the TW library. An MT3 gene (Q5), a wound inductive gene (Q22), an antioxidation relevant gene (Q34), a lectin gene (Q45), an f-box family protein gene (Q319), a 20S proteasome subunit gene (T17), a multidrug resistance associated protein gene (T156), and a cationic amino acid transporter gene (T218) were selected to compare semiquantitatively their expression between cv. QK and cv. TW using the RT-PCR method, and obvious differences were detected. The relationships between the identified differences in the expressions of the genes and the Cd accumulation of the two cultivars were discussed, and it was concluded that the SSH approach is useful for finding the difference in expression of Cd-induced gene even at the cultivar level and is applicable

  8. Isolation, identification and expression analysis of salt-induced genes in Suaeda maritima, a natural halophyte, using PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahu Binod B

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite wealth of information generated on salt tolerance mechanism, its basics still remain elusive. Thus, there is a need of continued effort to understand the salt tolerance mechanism using suitable biotechnological techniques and test plants (species to enable development of salt tolerant cultivars of interest. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to generate information on salt stress responsive genes in a natural halophyte, Suaeda maritima, using PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization (PCR-SSH technique. Results Forward and reverse SSH cDNA libraries were constructed after exposing the young plants to 425 mM NaCl for 24 h. From the forward SSH cDNA library, 429 high quality ESTs were obtained. BLASTX search and TIGR assembler programme revealed overexpression of 167 unigenes comprising 89 singletons and 78 contigs with ESTs redundancy of 81.8%. Among the unigenes, 32.5% were found to be of special interest, indicating novel function of these genes with regard to salt tolerance. Literature search for the known unigenes revealed that only 17 of them were salt-inducible. A comparative analysis of the existing SSH cDNA libraries for NaCl stress in plants showed that only a few overexpressing unigenes were common in them. Moreover, the present study also showed increased expression of phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase gene, indicating the possible accumulation of a much studied osmoticum, glycinebetaine, in halophyte under salt stress. Functional categorization of the proteins as per the Munich database in general revealed that salt tolerance could be largely determined by the proteins involved in transcription, signal transduction, protein activity regulation and cell differentiation and organogenesis. Conclusion The study provided a clear indication of possible vital role of glycinebetaine in the salt tolerance process in S. maritima. However, the salt-induced expression of a large number of genes

  9. Isolation, identification and expression analysis of salt-induced genes in Suaeda maritima, a natural halophyte, using PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Binod B; Shaw, Birendra P

    2009-06-05

    Despite wealth of information generated on salt tolerance mechanism, its basics still remain elusive. Thus, there is a need of continued effort to understand the salt tolerance mechanism using suitable biotechnological techniques and test plants (species) to enable development of salt tolerant cultivars of interest. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to generate information on salt stress responsive genes in a natural halophyte, Suaeda maritima, using PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization (PCR-SSH) technique. Forward and reverse SSH cDNA libraries were constructed after exposing the young plants to 425 mM NaCl for 24 h. From the forward SSH cDNA library, 429 high quality ESTs were obtained. BLASTX search and TIGR assembler programme revealed overexpression of 167 unigenes comprising 89 singletons and 78 contigs with ESTs redundancy of 81.8%. Among the unigenes, 32.5% were found to be of special interest, indicating novel function of these genes with regard to salt tolerance. Literature search for the known unigenes revealed that only 17 of them were salt-inducible. A comparative analysis of the existing SSH cDNA libraries for NaCl stress in plants showed that only a few overexpressing unigenes were common in them. Moreover, the present study also showed increased expression of phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase gene, indicating the possible accumulation of a much studied osmoticum, glycinebetaine, in halophyte under salt stress. Functional categorization of the proteins as per the Munich database in general revealed that salt tolerance could be largely determined by the proteins involved in transcription, signal transduction, protein activity regulation and cell differentiation and organogenesis. The study provided a clear indication of possible vital role of glycinebetaine in the salt tolerance process in S. maritima. However, the salt-induced expression of a large number of genes involved in a wide range of cellular functions was

  10. Suppression of cell expansion by ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis SUPERMAN gene in transgenic petunia an tobacco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kater, M.M.; Franken, J.; Aelst, van A.; Angenent, G.C.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular and genetic analyses have shown that the Arabidopsis thaliana gene SUPERMAN (SUP) has at least two functions in Arabidopsis flower development. SUP is necessary to control the correct distribution of cells with either a stamen or carpel fate, and is essential for proper outgrowth of the

  11. Xanthohumol Suppresses Mylip/Idol Gene Expression and Modulates LDLR Abundance and Activity in HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Fen; Chen, Pei-Yi; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Wu, Ming-Jiuan; Yen, Jui-Hung

    2017-09-13

    Xanthohumol, a prenylated flavonoid found in hops (Humulus lupulus L.), exhibits multiple biological activities such as antiatherosclerosis and hypolipidemic activities. In this study, we aim to investigate the hypocholesterolemic effects and molecular mechanisms of xanthohumol in hepatic cells. We found that xanthohumol (10 and 20 μM) increased the amount of cell-surface low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) from 100.0 ± 2.1% to 115.0 ± 1.3% and 135.2 ± 2.7%, and enhanced the LDL uptake activity from 100.0 ± 0.9% to 139.1 ± 13.2% in HepG2 cells (p Idol) mRNA and protein by approximately 45% (p Idol expression via counteracting liver X receptor (LXR) activation. The molecular docking results predicted that xanthohumol has a high binding affinity to interact with the LXRα ligand-binding domain, which may result in attenuation of LXRα-induced Mylip/Idol expression. Finally, we demonstrated that the Mylip/Idol expression and LDLR activity were synergistically changed by a combination of xanthohumol and simvastatin treatment. Our findings indicated that xanthohumol may regulate the LXR-Mylip/Idol axis to modulate hepatic LDLR abundance and activity.

  12. Dioscin and methylprotodioscin isolated from the root of Asparagus cochinchinensis suppressed the gene expression and production of airway MUC5AC mucin induced by phorbol ester and growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jae; Park, Jin Sung; Yoon, Yong Pill; Shin, Ye Jin; Lee, Sang Kook; Kim, Yeong Shik; Hong, Jang-Hee; Son, Kun Ho; Lee, Choong Jae

    2015-05-15

    The root of Asparagus cochinchinensis (Lour.) Merr. has been utilized as mucoregulators and expectorants for controlling the airway inflammatory diseases in folk medicine. We investigated whether dioscin and methylprotodioscin isolated from the root of Asparagus cochinchinensis (Lour.) Merr. suppress the gene expression and production of airway MUC5AC mucin induced by phorbol ester and growth factor. Confluent NCI-H292 cells were pretreated with dioscin or methylprotodioscin for 30 min and then stimulated with EGF or PMA for 24 h. The MUC5AC mucin gene expression was measured by RT-PCR. Production of MUC5AC mucin protein was measured by ELISA. (1) Dioscin and methylprotodioscin suppressed the expression of MUC5AC mucin gene induced by EGF or PMA; (2) dioscin suppressed the production of MUC5AC mucin induced by either EGF at 10(-5) M (p Asparagus cochinchinensis suppress the gene expression and production of MUC5AC mucin, by directly acting on airway epithelial cells, and the results are consistent with the traditional use of Asparagus cochinchinensis as remedy for diverse inflammatory pulmonary diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. PDGF-Rα gene expression predicts proliferation, but PDGF-A suppresses transdifferentiation of neonatal mouse lung myofibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossmann Ruth E

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet-derived growth factor A (PDGF-A signals solely through PDGF-Rα, and is required for fibroblast proliferation and transdifferentiation (fibroblast to myofibroblast conversion during alveolar development, because pdgfa-null mice lack both myofibroblasts and alveoli. However, these PDGF-A-mediated mechanisms remain incompletely defined. At postnatal days 4 and 12 (P4 and P12, using mouse lung fibroblasts, we examined (a how PDGF-Rα correlates with ki67 (proliferation marker or alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA, myofibroblast marker expression, and (b whether PDGF-A directly affects αSMA or modifies stimulation by transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ. Methods Using flow cytometry we examined PDGF-Rα, αSMA and Ki67 in mice which express green fluorescent protein (GFP as a marker for PDGF-Rα expression. Using real-time RT-PCR we quantified αSMA mRNA in cultured Mlg neonatal mouse lung fibroblasts after treatment with PDGF-A, and/or TGFβ. Results The intensity of GFP-fluorescence enabled us to distinguish three groups of fibroblasts which exhibited absent, lower, or higher levels of PDGF-Rα. At P4, more of the higher than lower PDGF-Rα + fibroblasts contained Ki67 (Ki67+, and Ki67+ fibroblasts predominated in the αSMA + but not the αSMA- population. By P12, Ki67+ fibroblasts comprised a minority in both the PDGF-Rα + and αSMA+ populations. At P4, most Ki67+ fibroblasts were PDGF-Rα + and αSMA- whereas at P12, most Ki67+ fibroblasts were PDGF-Rα- and αSMA-. More of the PDGF-Rα + than - fibroblasts contained αSMA at both P4 and P12. In the lung, proximate αSMA was more abundant around nuclei in cells expressing high than low levels of PDGF-Rα at both P4 and P12. Nuclear SMAD 2/3 declined from P4 to P12 in PDGF-Rα-, but not in PDGF-Rα + cells. In Mlg fibroblasts, αSMA mRNA increased after exposure to TGFβ, but declined after treatment with PDGF-A. Conclusion During both septal eruption (P4 and

  14. Reoxygenation of human coronary smooth muscle cells suppresses HIF-1{alpha} gene expression and augments radiation-induced growth delay and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grumann, T.; Arab, A.; Bode, C.; Hehrlein, C. [Dept. of Cardiology, Univ. Clinic of Freiburg (Germany); Guttenberger, R. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Clinic of Freiburg (Germany)

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Catheter-based coronary brachytherapy with {beta}- and {gamma}-radiation is an evidence-based method to prevent restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and stent implantation, but the outcome may be PTCA are hypoxic. A lack of oxygen decreases the effect of low LET (linear energy transfer) irradiation. The authors assumed that reoxygenation of hypoxic human coronary smooth muscle cells (HCSMCs) improves the results of coronary brachytherapy. The expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) gene, and the rates of growth and apoptosis of hypoxic and reoxygenated HCSMCs after {gamma}-iradiation were therefore analyzed. Material and Methods: An in vitro model of megacolonies of HCSMCs was developed. After exposure to chronic hypoxia the HCSMCs were irradiated with graded doses of 2, 4, 8, and 16 Gy using a {sup 60}Co source either under hypoxia (pO{sub 2}<3 mmHg) or after reoxygenation (pO{sub 2}{approx}150 mmHg). RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) analysis was used to quantify HIF-1{alpha} gene expression and the growth of HCSMC megacolonies was measured serially. The oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) was calculate from the specific growth delay. Apoptosis of HCSMCs was quantified by counting cells with specific DNA strand breaks using the TUNEL assy. Results: HIF-1{alpha} gene expression was markedly suppressed in reoxygenated cells versus hypoxic cells 30 min after {gamma}-irradiation at all radiation doses (158{+-}46% vs. 1,675{+-}1,211%; p<0.01). Apoptosis was markedly increased in reoxygenated HCSMCs. The OER was 1.8(95% CI[confidence interval]1.3-2.4). Therefore, reoxygenated HCSMCs require 44% less radiation dose to achieve the equivalent biological radiation effect compared to hypoxic HCSMCs. Conclusion: Reoxygenation of coronary smooth muscle cells should be considered an option to increase efficacy of coronary brachytherapy. This could be used to reduce radiation dose

  15. Recombinant gene expression protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tuan, Rocky S

    1997-01-01

    .... A fundamental requirement for successful recombinant gene expression is the design of the cloning vector and the choice of the host organism for expression. Recombinant Gene Expression Protocols grows out of the need for a laboratory manual that provides the reader the background and rationale, as well as the practical protocols for the preparation of...

  16. The effect of intense intermittent training with and without taking vitamin E on mRNA expression of p53/PTEN tumor suppressing genes in prostate glands of male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Esmaeil Afzalpour

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity and diet are the most important modifiable determinants of cancer risk. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of intense intermittent training with and without taking vitamin E on expression of p53 and PTEN tumor suppressing genes in the prostate gland of male rats. For this purpose, 50 Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly assigned into 5 groups: [1] control (CON, n = 10, [2] sham (S, n = 10, [3] intense intermittent training (IIT, n = 10, [4] intense intermittent training + vitamin E (IIT + VE, n = 10, [5] vitamin E (VE, n = 10. Protocol of this study was implemented for 6 days per week for 6 weeks, with observing the overload principle on the motorized treadmill. After implementing training protocol, expression rate of p53 and PTEN genes reduced significantly (p<0.000, p<0.031, respectively. Taking vitamin E with intermittent training caused significant reduction in p53 expression (p<0.013, while it caused significant increase in expression of PTEN (p<0.035. These results showed that intense intermittent training reduces expression of p53 and PTEN tumor suppressing genes and taking supplementation vitamin E along with this type of training could cause different effects in expression of these tumor suppressor genes.

  17. Antisense-induced suppression of taxoid 14β- hydroxylase gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-15

    Aug 15, 2011 ... the 11(12)-diene might be directed to the production of useful C-13 oxygenated taxoids such as Taxol. Here, we reported a general method for adjusting regulation of the taxoid pathway and provide evidence for the suppression of taxoid 14β-hydroxylase gene expression in transgenic Taxus × media cell ...

  18. Oxygen at nanomolar levels reversibly suppresses process rates and gene expression of anammox and denitrification in the oxygen minimum zone off northern Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Tage; Stewart, Frank J.; Thamdrup, Bo

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: A major percentage (20 to 40%) of global marine fixed-nitrogen loss occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Concentrations of O2 and the sensitivity of the anaerobic N2-producing processes of anammox and denitrification determine where this loss occurs. We studied experimentally how O2...... at nanomolar levels affects anammox and denitrification rates and the transcription of nitrogen cycle genes in the anoxic OMZ off Chile. Rates of anammox and denitrification were reversibly suppressed, most likely at the enzyme level. Fiftypercent inhibition of N2 and N2O production by denitrification....... This O2 concentration did not suppress the transcription of other dissimilatory nitrogen cycle genes, including nitrate reductase (narG), hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo), and nitrite reductase (nirK). However, taxonomic characterization of transcripts suggested inhibition of narG transcription...

  19. Increase of IRF-1 gene expression and impairment of T regulatory cells suppression activity on patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: A longitudinal one-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perazzio, Aline S B; Oliveira, José Salvador R; Figueiredo, Vera L P; Chauffaille, Maria de Lourdes L F

    2017-04-01

    Studies have demonstrated that abnormalities in interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) expression might develop myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). IRF-1 was described as modulator of T regulatory (Treg) cells by suppressing Foxp3 on mice. We aimed to determine the role of Treg and IRF-1 in MDS. Thirty-eight MDS patients fulfilling WHO criteria and classified according to risk scores were evaluated at time 0 (T0) and after 12 months (T12) for: Treg suppression activity in coculture with T effector (Teff) cells; IRF-1 and Foxp3 genetic expression by qRT-PCR; IL-2, -4, -6, -10, -17, TNFα and IFNγ production by Cytometric Bead Array. No differences in Foxp3 expression (T0=0.06±0.06 vs T12=0.06±0.12, p=0.5), Treg number (T0=5.62±2.84×10 5 vs T12=4.87±2.62×10 5 ; p=0.3) and Teff percentage (T0=16.8±9.56% vs T12=13.1±6.3%; p=0.06) were observed on T12. Low risk MDS patients showed a higher number of Treg (5.2±2.6×10 5 ) versus high risk group (2.6±1.2×10 5 , p=0.03). Treg suppression activity was impaired on T0 and T12.Cytokine production and IRF-1 expression were increased on T12. The correlation between IRF-1 and FoxP3 was negative (r 2 =0.317, p=0.045) on T0. These results suggest a hyper activity of the immune system, probably secondary to Treg suppression activity impairment. This state may induce the loss of tolerance culminating in the proliferation of MDS clones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Androgen-androgen receptor system improves chronic inflammatory conditions by suppressing monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in adipocytes via transcriptional regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morooka, Nobukatsu, E-mail: amorooka@gunma-u.ac.jp [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan); Ueguri, Kei [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan); Yee, Karen Kar Lye [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan); Human Resources Cultivation Center, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryushi, Gunma, 376-8515 (Japan); Yanase, Toshihiko [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes Mellitus, School of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka, 814-0180 (Japan); Sato, Takashi [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan)

    2016-09-02

    Age-related decreases in sex hormones are closely related to chronic inflammation in obesity and metabolic diseases. Particularly, the molecular basis of androgen activity in regulating inflammation and controlling metabolism remains largely unknown. Obese adipocytes secrete monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a key chemokine that promotes the infiltration of monocytes/macrophages into adipose tissue, thereby leading to metabolic disorders. Here, we studied the role of androgen-androgen receptor (AR) action in regulating MCP-1 expression in adipose tissue. We observed the induction of Mcp-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes co-cultured with RAW264.7 macrophages. Additionally, Mcp-1 expression was upregulated by culturing in conditioned medium derived from inflammatory macrophages (M1-Mφ) containing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). We found that sex hormones downregulated TNF-α-induced Mcp-1 and interleukin (Il)-6 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Furthermore, luciferase-reporter analysis indicated that MCP-1 promoter activity was predominantly suppressed by dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-AR interactions through functional canonical nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) sites, whereas non-canonical NF-κB site containing important flanking sequences exhibited minor contributions to DHT-AR transcriptional repression. These findings suggested that androgen-AR suppressed obesity-induced chronic inflammation in adipose tissue. - Highlights: • DHT, non-aromatizable androgen suppresses Mcp-1 expression in adipocytes. • Mcp-1 transcription was negatively regulated by DHT-AR action. • DHT-AR selectively regulates Mcp-1 transcription through distinct NF-κB sites.

  1. Weakener of white (Wow), a gene that modifies the expression of the white eye color locus and that suppresses position effect variegation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchler, J A; Bhadra, U; Rabinow, L; Linsk, R; Nguyen-Huynh, A T

    1994-08-01

    A locus is described in Drosophila melanogaster that modifies the expression of the white eye color gene. This trans-acting modifier reduces the expression of the white gene in the eye, but elevates the expression in other adult tissues. Because of the eye phenotype in which the expression of white is lessened but not eliminated, the newly described locus is called the Weakener of white (Wow). Northern analysis reveals that Wow can exert an inverse or direct modifying effect depending upon the developmental stage. Two related genes, brown and scarlet, that are coordinately expressed with white, are also affected by Wow. In addition, Wow modulates the steady state RNA level of the retrotransposon, copia. When tested with a white promoter-Alcohol dehydrogenase reporter. Wow confers the modifying effect to the reporter, suggesting a requirement of the white regulatory sequences for mediating the response. In addition to being a dosage sensitive regulator of white, brown, scarlet and copia, Wow acts as a suppressor of position effect variegation. There are many dosage sensitive suppressors of position effect variegation and many dosage-sensitive modifiers of gene expression. The Wow mutations provide evidence for an overlap between the two types of modifiers.

  2. Identification of Differentially-Expressed Genes in Response to Mycosphaerella fijiensis in the Resistant Musa Accession 'Calcutta-4' Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Timm, Eduardo; Hidalgo Pardo, Lisette; Pacheco Coello, Ricardo; Chávez Navarrete, Tatiana; Navarrete Villegas, Oscar; Santos Ordóñez, Efrén

    2016-01-01

    Bananas and plantains are considered an important crop around the world. Banana production is affected by several constraints, of which Black Sigatoka Disease, caused by the fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis, is considered one of the most important diseases in banana plantations. The banana accession 'Calcutta-4' has a natural resistance to Black Sigatoka; however, the fruit is not valuable for commercialization. Gene identification and expression studies in 'Calcutta-4' might reveal possible gene candidates for resistant to the disease and elucidate mechanisms for resistance. A subtracted cDNA library was generated from leaves after 6, 9 and 12 days inoculated with M. fijiensis conidia on greenhouse banana plants of the accession 'Calcutta-4'. Bioinformatic analysis revealed 99 good quality sequences. Blast2go analysis revealed that 31% of the sequences could not be categorized and, according to the Biological Process Category, 32 and 28 ESTs are related to general metabolic and cellular processes, respectively; while 10 ESTs response to stimulus. Seven sequences were redundant and one was similar to genes that may be involved in pathogen resistance including the putative disease resistance protein RGA1. Genes encoding zinc finger domains were identified and may play an important role in pathogen resistance by inducing the expression of downstream genes. Expression analysis of four selected genes was performed using RT-qPCR during the early stage of the disease development at 6, 9, 12 and 15 days post inoculation showing a peak of up regulation at 9 or 12 days post inoculation. Three of the four genes showed an up-regulation of expression in 'Calcutta-4' when compared to 'Williams' after inoculation with M. fijiensis, suggesting a fine regulation of specific gene candidates that may lead to a resistance response. The genes identified in early responses in a plant-pathogen interaction may be relevant for the resistance response of 'Calcutta-4' to Black Sigatoka

  3. Identification of Differentially-Expressed Genes in Response to Mycosphaerella fijiensis in the Resistant Musa Accession 'Calcutta-4' Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Sánchez Timm

    Full Text Available Bananas and plantains are considered an important crop around the world. Banana production is affected by several constraints, of which Black Sigatoka Disease, caused by the fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis, is considered one of the most important diseases in banana plantations. The banana accession 'Calcutta-4' has a natural resistance to Black Sigatoka; however, the fruit is not valuable for commercialization. Gene identification and expression studies in 'Calcutta-4' might reveal possible gene candidates for resistant to the disease and elucidate mechanisms for resistance. A subtracted cDNA library was generated from leaves after 6, 9 and 12 days inoculated with M. fijiensis conidia on greenhouse banana plants of the accession 'Calcutta-4'. Bioinformatic analysis revealed 99 good quality sequences. Blast2go analysis revealed that 31% of the sequences could not be categorized and, according to the Biological Process Category, 32 and 28 ESTs are related to general metabolic and cellular processes, respectively; while 10 ESTs response to stimulus. Seven sequences were redundant and one was similar to genes that may be involved in pathogen resistance including the putative disease resistance protein RGA1. Genes encoding zinc finger domains were identified and may play an important role in pathogen resistance by inducing the expression of downstream genes. Expression analysis of four selected genes was performed using RT-qPCR during the early stage of the disease development at 6, 9, 12 and 15 days post inoculation showing a peak of up regulation at 9 or 12 days post inoculation. Three of the four genes showed an up-regulation of expression in 'Calcutta-4' when compared to 'Williams' after inoculation with M. fijiensis, suggesting a fine regulation of specific gene candidates that may lead to a resistance response. The genes identified in early responses in a plant-pathogen interaction may be relevant for the resistance response of 'Calcutta-4' to

  4. Identification of Differentially-Expressed Genes in Response to Mycosphaerella fijiensis in the Resistant Musa Accession ‘Calcutta-4’ Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco Coello, Ricardo; Chávez Navarrete, Tatiana; Navarrete Villegas, Oscar; Santos Ordóñez, Efrén

    2016-01-01

    Bananas and plantains are considered an important crop around the world. Banana production is affected by several constraints, of which Black Sigatoka Disease, caused by the fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis, is considered one of the most important diseases in banana plantations. The banana accession ‘Calcutta-4’ has a natural resistance to Black Sigatoka; however, the fruit is not valuable for commercialization. Gene identification and expression studies in ‘Calcutta-4’ might reveal possible gene candidates for resistant to the disease and elucidate mechanisms for resistance. A subtracted cDNA library was generated from leaves after 6, 9 and 12 days inoculated with M. fijiensis conidia on greenhouse banana plants of the accession ‘Calcutta-4’. Bioinformatic analysis revealed 99 good quality sequences. Blast2go analysis revealed that 31% of the sequences could not be categorized and, according to the Biological Process Category, 32 and 28 ESTs are related to general metabolic and cellular processes, respectively; while 10 ESTs response to stimulus. Seven sequences were redundant and one was similar to genes that may be involved in pathogen resistance including the putative disease resistance protein RGA1. Genes encoding zinc finger domains were identified and may play an important role in pathogen resistance by inducing the expression of downstream genes. Expression analysis of four selected genes was performed using RT-qPCR during the early stage of the disease development at 6, 9, 12 and 15 days post inoculation showing a peak of up regulation at 9 or 12 days post inoculation. Three of the four genes showed an up-regulation of expression in ‘Calcutta-4’ when compared to ‘Williams’ after inoculation with M. fijiensis, suggesting a fine regulation of specific gene candidates that may lead to a resistance response. The genes identified in early responses in a plant-pathogen interaction may be relevant for the resistance response of ‘Calcutta-4

  5. The milk-derived fusion peptide, ACFP, suppresses the growth of primary human ovarian cancer cells by regulating apoptotic gene expression and signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Juan; Zhao, Mengjing; Tang, Yigui; Wang, Jing; Wei, Cai; Gu, Fang; Lei, Ting; Chen, Zhiwu; Qin, Yide

    2016-03-24

    ACFP is an anti-cancer fusion peptide derived from bovine milk protein. This study was to investigate the anti-cancer function and underlying mechanisms of ACFP in ovarian cancer. Fresh ovarian tumor tissues were collected from 53 patients who underwent initial debulking surgery, and primary cancer cells were cultured. Normal ovarian surface epithelium cells (NOSECs), isolated from 7 patients who underwent surgery for uterine fibromas, were used as normal control tissue. Anti-viabilities of ACFP were assessed by WST-1 (water-soluble tetrazolium 1), and apoptosis was measured using a flow cytometry-based assay. Gene expression profiles of ovarian cancer cells treated with ACFP were generated by cDNA microarray, and the expression of apoptotic-specific genes, such as bcl-xl, bax, akt, caspase-3, CDC25C and cyclinB1, was assessed by real time PCR and western blot analysis. Treatment with ACFP inhibited the viability and promoted apoptosis of primary ovarian cancer cells but exhibited little or no cytotoxicity toward normal primary ovarian cells. Mechanistically, the anti-cancer effects of ACFP in ovarian cells were shown to occur partially via changes in gene expression and related signal pathways. Gene expression profiling highlighted that ACFP treatment in ovarian cancer cells repressed the expression of bcl-xl, akt, CDC25C and cyclinB1 and promoted the expression of bax and caspase-3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Our results suggest that ACFP may represent a potential therapeutic agent for ovarian cancer that functions by altering the expression and signaling of cancer-related pathways in ovarian cancer cells.

  6. Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene Expression Omnibus is a public functional genomics data repository supporting MIAME-compliant submissions of array- and sequence-based data. Tools are provided...

  7. Suppression of serotonin hyperinnervation does not alter the dysregulatory influences of dopamine depletion on striatal neuropeptide gene expression in rodent neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, G J; Walker, P D

    1999-10-15

    Sixty days following neonatal dopamine depletion (>98%) with 6-hydroxydopamine, preprotachykinin and preprodynorphin mRNA levels were significantly reduced (67 and 78% of vehicle controls, respectively) in the anterior striatum as determined by in situ hybridization while preproenkephalin mRNA expression was elevated (133% of vehicle controls). Suppression of the serotonin hyperinnervation phenomenon in the dopamine-depleted rat with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine yielded no significant alterations in reduced striatal preprotachykinin (66%) or preprodynorphin (64%) mRNA levels, while preproenkephalin mRNA expression remained significantly elevated (140%). These data suggest that striatal serotonin hyperinnervation does not contribute to the development of dysregulated striatal neuropeptide transmission in either direct or indirect striatal output pathways following neonatal dopamine depletion.

  8. Dietary soy protein induces hepatic lipogenic enzyme gene expression while suppressing hepatosteatosis in obese female Zucker rats bearing DMBA-initiated mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkak, Reza; Al-Dwairi, Ahmed; Fuchs, George J; Korourian, Soheila; Simmen, Frank A

    2012-10-01

    Fatty liver is associated with obesity and breast cancer. We used an obese rat model of mammary cancer to examine whether hepatosteatosis is modifiable by diet and associated with altered expression of hepatic lipogenic enzyme genes, thyroid hormone system genes and cholesterol metabolism-related genes. Beginning at the age of 5 weeks, lean and obese female Zucker rats were fed high-isoflavone soy protein- or casein (control protein)-containing diets. Rats were euthanized at 200 days of age [corresponding to 147 days after administration of carcinogen to induce mammary tumors; (Hakkak et al. in, Oncol Lett 2:29-36, 2011)]. Obese rats had a greater degree of liver steatosis than lean rats. Obese casein-fed rats had marked steatosis with small foci of mononuclear infiltration, whereas obese soy protein-fed rats had a significantly lower steatosis index. Comparisons between lean and obese casein-fed rats showed that obesity was associated with significant reductions in hepatic mRNA abundance for Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD), 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase (6PGD), Thyroid Receptor Alpha 1 (TRα1), Thyroid Receptor Beta 1 (TRβ1) and Iodothyronine Deiodinase 1 (DIO1). The soy protein diet was associated with increased expression of Fatty Acid Synthase (FASN), Malic Enzyme 1 (ME1), 6PGD, Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein-1c (SREBP-1c) and SREBP-2 genes in the livers of obese but not lean rats. Western blot analysis showed a significant induction of ME1 protein expression in the livers of obese, soy protein-fed rats, which paralleled the increased serum insulin level in this group. Long-term soy protein consumption can counter hepatic steatosis while coincidently promoting hepatic lipogenic gene expression, the latter likely a consequence of elevated serum insulin. We suggest that elevations in serum insulin, hepatic lipogenesis and cholesterol synthesis all contributed to the increased tumorigenesis previously observed for the obese, soy protein

  9. Quinclorac resistance induced by the suppression of the expression of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase and ACC oxidase genes in Echinochloa crus-galli var. zelayensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Li, Jun; Pan, Xukun; Liu, Dingrong; Napier, Richard; Dong, Liyao

    2018-04-01

    We previously reported that the mechanism of quinclorac resistance in Echinochloa crus-galli var. zelayensis may be closely related to ethylene biosynthesis and the detoxification of cyanide. Differences in EcCAS gene sequences and expression levels may result in higher capacity to detoxify cyanide in resistant biotypes, which may avoid cyanide accumulation and avoid more ethylene and cyanide production and then avoid damage. In the present study, we focused on the mechanism of resistance related to ethylene biosynthesis in E. crus-galli var. zelayensis. The fresh weight of susceptible and moderately resistant biotypes were significantly reduced after treatment with quinclorac. However, AOA, an ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor, reduced the impact of quinclorac. On pretreatment with AOA, ethylene production was significantly reduced in the three biotypes. The highly resistant biotype produced less ethylene compared to the other two biotypes. Three ACS and seven ACO genes, which are the key genes in ethylene biosynthesis, were obtained. The expression levels of EcACS-like, EcACS7, and EcACO1 varied in the three biotypes upon treatment with quinclorac, which could be manipulated by AOA. In summary, it is inferred that the expression of EcACS-like, EcACS7, and EcACO1 can be stimulated to varying extent after quinclorac treatment in three E. crus-galli var. zelayensis biotypes, which consequently results in varying levels of ethylene production. Lower expression of these three genes results in more resistance to quinclorac, which may also be related to quinclorac resistance in E. crus-galli var. zelayensis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pectobacterium carotovorum elicits plant cell death with DspE/F but the P. carotovorum DspE does not suppress callose or induce expression of plant genes early in plant-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Sook; Thammarat, Phanit; Lommel, Steven A; Hogan, Clifford S; Charkowski, Amy O

    2011-07-01

    The broad-host-range bacterial soft rot pathogen Pectobacterium carotovorum causes a DspE/F-dependent plant cell death on Nicotiana benthamiana within 24 h postinoculation (hpi) followed by leaf maceration within 48 hpi. P. carotovorum strains with mutations in type III secretion system (T3SS) regulatory and structural genes, including the dspE/F operon, did not cause hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death and or leaf maceration. A strain with a mutation in the type II secretion system caused HR-like plant cell death but no maceration. P. carotovorum was unable to impede callose deposition in N. benthamiana leaves, suggesting that P. carotovorum does not suppress this basal immunity function. Within 24 hpi, there was callose deposition along leaf veins and examination showed that the pathogen cells were localized along the veins. To further examine HR-like plant cell death induced by P. carotovorum, gene expression profiles in N. benthamiana leaves inoculated with wild-type and mutant P. carotovorum and Pseudomonas syringae strains were compared. The N. benthamiana gene expression profile of leaves infiltrated with Pectobacterium carotovorum was similar to leaves infiltrated with a Pseudomonas syringae T3SS mutant. These data support a model where Pectobacterium carotovorum uses the T3SS to induce plant cell death in order to promote leaf maceration rather than to suppress plant immunity.

  11. Ectopic expression of SUPERMAN suppresses development of petals and stamens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jae-Young; Weigel, Detlef; Lee, Ilha

    2002-01-01

    The floral regulatory gene SUPERMAN (SUP) encodes a C2H2 type zinc finger protein that is required for maintaining boundaries between floral organs in Arabidopsis. It has been proposed that the main function of SUP is to balance cell proliferation in the third and fourth whorl of developing flowers, thereby maintaining the boundaries between the two whorls. To gain further insight into the function of SUP, we have ectopically expressed SUP using the promoter of APETALA1 (AP1), a gene that is initially expressed throughout floral meristems and later becomes restricted to the first and second whorls. Flowers of AP1::SUP plants have fewer floral organs, consistent with an effect of SUP on cell proliferation. In addition, the AP1::SUP transgene caused the conversion of petals to sepals and suppressed the development of stamens. The expression of the B function homeotic gene APETALA3 (AP3) and its regulator UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) were delayed and reduced in AP1::SUP flowers. However, SUP does not act merely through UFO, as constitutive expression of UFO did not rescue the defects in petal and stamen development in AP1::SUP flowers. Together, these results suggest that SUP has both indirect and direct effects on the expression of B function homeotic genes.

  12. miR-200c targets nuclear factor IA to suppress HBV replication and gene expression via repressing HBV Enhancer I activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hui; He, Zhenkun

    2018-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronic infection is a health problem in the worldwide, with a underlying higher risk of liver cirrhosis and hepaticocellular carcinoma. A number of studies indicate that microRNAs (miRNAs) play vital roles in HBV replication. This study was designed to explore the potential molecular mechanism of miR-200c in HBV replication. The expression of miR-200c, nuclear factor IA (NFIA) mRNA, HBV DNA, and HBV RNA (pregenomic RNA (pgRNA), and total RNA) were measured by qRCR. The levels of HBsAg and HBeAg were detected by ELISA. NFIA expression at protein level was measured by western blot. The direct interaction between miR-200c and NFIA were identified by Targetscan software and Dual-Luciferase reporter analysis. Enhance I activity were detected by Dual-Luciferase reporter assay. miR-200c expression was prominently reduced in pHBV1.3-tranfected Huh7 and in stable HBV-producing cell line (HepG2.2.15). The enforced expression of miR-200c significantly suppressed HBV replication, as demonstrated by the reduced levels of HBV protein (HBsAg and HBeAg) and, DNA and RNA (pgRNA and total RNA) levels. NFIA was proved to be a target of miR-200c and NFIA overexpression notably stimulated HBV replication. In addition, the inhibitory effect of miR-200c on HBV Enhance I activity was abolished following restoration of NFIA. miR-200c repressed HBV replication by directly targeting NFIA, which might provide a novel therapeutic target for HBV infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Differential expression of cell adhesion genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Wilfred D; Litman, Thomas; Fojo, Tito

    2005-01-01

    that compare cells grown in suspension to similar cells grown attached to one another as aggregates have suggested that it is adhesion to the extracellular matrix of the basal membrane that confers resistance to apoptosis and, hence, resistance to cytotoxins. The genes whose expression correlates with poor...... survival might, therefore, act through such a matrix-to-cell suppression of apoptosis. Indeed, correlative mining of gene expression and patient survival databases suggests that poor survival in patients with metastatic cancer correlates highly with tumor expression of a common theme: the genes involved...

  14. Soy milk suppresses cholesterol-induced inflammatory gene expression and improves the fatty acid profile in the skin of SD rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Min; Kim, Yunhye; Choi, Hye jung; Choi, Jina; Yi, Yue; Yoon, Sun

    2013-01-04

    Recently, an elevation in skin cholesterol level has been implicated in skin inflammation. Given the potential therapeutic effects of soy on low grade inflammatory diseases, we hypothesized that a CHOL diet could promote an inflammatory response in skin and that soy milk (SM) or fermented soy milk (F.SM) could prevent this cholesterol-induced skin inflammation. To test this hypothesis, freeze-dried SM or F.SM was provided as a protein replacement for 20% of the casein in the diets of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The animals were divided into the following groups: (1) control group (CTRL), AIN76A diet without cholesterol, (2) high cholesterol (CHOL) group, AIN76A with 1% (w/w) cholesterol, (3) SM group, CHOL diet with freeze-dried SM, and (4) F.SM group, CHOL diet with F.SM. In the CHOL group, the expression levels of pro-inflammatory genes, including IL-1β, IL-1α, iNOS, and COX-2, were elevated. In comparison, the SM and F.SM groups displayed the lowered expression of IL-1β, COX-2, F4/80, and Cd68, an increase of a n-3/n-6 ratio, and a reduction in the estimated desaturase activities of delta 5 desaturase (D5D) and steaoryl CoA desaturase (SCD-1). In particular, F.SM significantly increased the proportion of dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA) in skin fatty acid (FA) composition compared with the CHOL group. Here we present evidence that SM or F.SM could alleviate the inflammatory response in the skin that is triggered by excess dietary cholesterol by reducing the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. This response could be partly associated with a decreased in macrophages in skin and/or by modulation of the skin's FA composition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of genes showing differential expression profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suppression subtractive hybridization was used to identify genes showing differential expression profile associated withgrowth rate in skeletal muscle tissue of Landrace weanling pig. Two subtracted cDNA populations were generated from mus-culus longissimus muscle tissues of selected pigs with extreme expected ...

  16. Identification of genes showing differential expression profile ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Suppression subtractive hybridization was used to identify genes showing differential expression profile associated with growth rate in skeletal muscle tissue of Landrace weanling pig. Two subtracted cDNA populations were generated from mus- culus longissimus muscle tissues of selected pigs with extreme ...

  17. Identification of genes showing differential expression profile ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suppression subtractive hybridization was used to identify genes showing differential expression profile associated withgrowth rate in skeletal muscle tissue of Landrace weanling pig. Two subtracted cDNA populations were generated from mus-culus longissimus muscle tissues of selected pigs with extreme expected ...

  18. Gene expression and gene therapy imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, Claire; Couillaud, Franck; Moonen, Chrit T.W.

    2007-01-01

    The fast growing field of molecular imaging has achieved major advances in imaging gene expression, an important element of gene therapy. Gene expression imaging is based on specific probes or contrast agents that allow either direct or indirect spatio-temporal evaluation of gene expression. Direct evaluation is possible with, for example, contrast agents that bind directly to a specific target (e.g., receptor). Indirect evaluation may be achieved by using specific substrate probes for a target enzyme. The use of marker genes, also called reporter genes, is an essential element of MI approaches for gene expression in gene therapy. The marker gene may not have a therapeutic role itself, but by coupling the marker gene to a therapeutic gene, expression of the marker gene reports on the expression of the therapeutic gene. Nuclear medicine and optical approaches are highly sensitive (detection of probes in the picomolar range), whereas MRI and ultrasound imaging are less sensitive and require amplification techniques and/or accumulation of contrast agents in enlarged contrast particles. Recently developed MI techniques are particularly relevant for gene therapy. Amongst these are the possibility to track gene therapy vectors such as stem cells, and the techniques that allow spatiotemporal control of gene expression by non-invasive heating (with MRI guided focused ultrasound) and the use of temperature sensitive promoters. (orig.)

  19. [Screening of high taxol producing fungi by mutagenesis and construction of subtracted cDNA library by suppression subtracted hybridization for differentially expressed genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Sun, Lixin; Wang, Xuan; Li, Xiuliang; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Dongpo

    2011-07-01

    To screen mutants with high yield of taxol, and construct cDNA subtractive library of obtained mutant and primary strain HD(1-3). The spores of taxol-producing fungus HD(1-3) were treated by diethyl sulphate (DES), ultraviolet radiation and diethyl sulphate (UV + DES). cDNA subtractive library of taxol producing fungi from the mRNA of obtained mutant with high yield of taxol tester and HD(1-3) driver was constructed by using suppression subtracted hybridization (SSH). The optimal conditions for mutagenesis of strain HD(1-3) were as follows: the spore suspension was treated with 8% DES for 15 min, followed by UV irradiation (30 w, 30 cm distance) for 45 sec under magnetic stirring, a mutant UD(14-1) which was able to produce taxol with high yield and could be stably passed on genetics was found. Its ability to produce taxol was improved from 232.73 +/- 4.61 microg/L (strain HD(1-3)) to 312.81 +/- 7.51 microg/L (strain UD(14-1)). The tilter of the constructed cDNA library was 1.2 x 10(7) cfu/mL, the recombinant rate reached to 75.3% and the length of the inserted fragments was mostly 300 bp-1.0 kb. A mutant UD(14-11) with high yield was obtained, and cDNA subtractive library of the mutant UD(14-11) and strain HD(1-3) was constructed. The study laid solid foundation for isolation of taxol biosynthesis related genes and construction of engineering strains with high yield of taxol by genetic techniques.

  20. Complementary Information Derived from CRISPR Cas9 Mediated Gene Deletion and Suppression. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    CRISPR-Cas9 provides the means to perform genome editing and facilitates loss-of-function screens. However, we and others demonstrated that expression of the Cas9 endonuclease induces a gene-independent response that correlates with the number of target sequences in the genome. An alternative approach to suppressing gene expression is to block transcription using a catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9). Here we directly compare genome editing by CRISPR-Cas9 (cutting, CRISPRc) and gene suppression using KRAB-dCas9 (CRISPRi) in loss-of-function screens to identify cell essential genes.

  1. Gene Expression in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrogio, A.

    Skeletal system has two main functions, to provide mechanical integrity for both locomotion and protection and to play an important role in mineral homeostasis. There is extensive evidence showing loss of bone mass during long-term Space-Flights. The loss is due to a break in the equilibrium between the activity of osteoblasts (the cells that forms bone) and the activity of osteoclasts (the cells that resorbs bone). Surprisingly, there is scanty information about the possible altered gene expression occurring in cells that form bone in microgravity.(Just 69 articles result from a "gene expression in microgravity" MedLine query.) Gene-chip or microarray technology allows to screen thousands of genes at the same time: the use of this technology on samples coming from cells exposed to microgravity could provide us with many important informations. For example, the identification of the molecules or structures which are the first sensors of the mechanical stress derived from lack of gravity, could help in understanding which is the first event leading to bone loss due to long-term exposure to microgravity. Consequently, this structure could become a target for a custom-designed drug. It is evident that bone mass loss, observed during long-time stay in Space, represents an accelerated model of what happens in aging osteoporosis. Therefore, the discovery and design of drugs able to interfere with the bone-loss process, could help also in preventing negative physiological processes normally observed on Earth. Considering the aims stated above, my research is designed to:

  2. Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: incomplete suppression of a retrotransposed gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Snider

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Each unit of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat contains a retrotransposed gene encoding the DUX4 double-homeobox transcription factor. Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD is caused by deletion of a subset of the D4Z4 units in the subtelomeric region of chromosome 4. Although it has been reported that the deletion of D4Z4 units induces the pathological expression of DUX4 mRNA, the association of DUX4 mRNA expression with FSHD has not been rigorously investigated, nor has any human tissue been identified that normally expresses DUX4 mRNA or protein. We show that FSHD muscle expresses a different splice form of DUX4 mRNA compared to control muscle. Control muscle produces low amounts of a splice form of DUX4 encoding only the amino-terminal portion of DUX4. FSHD muscle produces low amounts of a DUX4 mRNA that encodes the full-length DUX4 protein. The low abundance of full-length DUX4 mRNA in FSHD muscle cells represents a small subset of nuclei producing a relatively high abundance of DUX4 mRNA and protein. In contrast to control skeletal muscle and most other somatic tissues, full-length DUX4 transcript and protein is expressed at relatively abundant levels in human testis, most likely in the germ-line cells. Induced pluripotent (iPS cells also express full-length DUX4 and differentiation of control iPS cells to embryoid bodies suppresses expression of full-length DUX4, whereas expression of full-length DUX4 persists in differentiated FSHD iPS cells. Together, these findings indicate that full-length DUX4 is normally expressed at specific developmental stages and is suppressed in most somatic tissues. The contraction of the D4Z4 repeat in FSHD results in a less efficient suppression of the full-length DUX4 mRNA in skeletal muscle cells. Therefore, FSHD represents the first human disease to be associated with the incomplete developmental silencing of a retrogene array normally expressed early in development.

  3. alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone is contained in nerve terminals innervating thyrotropin-releasing hormone-synthesizing neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and prevents fasting-induced suppression of prothyrotropin-releasing hormone gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, C; Légrádi, G; Mihály, E; Huang, Q H; Tatro, J B; Rand, W M; Emerson, C H; Lechan, R M

    2000-02-15

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus has an essential role in mediating the homeostatic responses of the thyroid axis to fasting by altering the sensitivity of prothyrotropin-releasing hormone (pro-TRH) gene expression in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) to feedback regulation by thyroid hormone. Because agouti-related protein (AGRP), a leptin-regulated, arcuate nucleus-derived peptide with alpha-MSH antagonist activity, is contained in axon terminals that terminate on TRH neurons in the PVN, we raised the possibility that alpha-MSH may also participate in the mechanism by which leptin influences pro-TRH gene expression. By double-labeling immunocytochemistry, alpha-MSH-IR axon varicosities were juxtaposed to approximately 70% of pro-TRH neurons in the anterior and periventricular parvocellular subdivisions of the PVN and to 34% of pro-TRH neurons in the medial parvocellular subdivision, establishing synaptic contacts both on the cell soma and dendrites. All pro-TRH neurons receiving contacts by alpha-MSH-containing fibers also were innervated by axons containing AGRP. The intracerebroventricular infusion of 300 ng of alpha-MSH every 6 hr for 3 d prevented fasting-induced suppression of pro-TRH in the PVN but had no effect on AGRP mRNA in the arcuate nucleus. alpha-MSH also increased circulating levels of free thyroxine (T4) 2.5-fold over the levels in fasted controls, but free T4 did not reach the levels in fed controls. These data suggest that alpha-MSH has an important role in the activation of pro-TRH gene expression in hypophysiotropic neurons via either a mono- and/or multisynaptic pathway to the PVN, but factors in addition to alpha-MSH also contribute to the mechanism by which leptin administration restores thyroid hormone levels to normal in fasted animals.

  4. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, Leonard I.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on 'suicide gene therapy' of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k + ) has been use for 'suicide' in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k + gene expression where the H S V-1 t k + gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([ 18 F]F H P G; [ 18 F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([ 123 / 131 I]I V R F U; [ 124 / 131I ]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [ 123 / 131I ]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k + reporter gene will be presented

  5. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  6. A gene encoding a protein with a proline-rich domain (MtPPRD1), revealed by suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH), is specifically expressed in the Medicago truncatula embryo axis during germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouton, Sophie; Viau, Laure; Lelièvre, Eric; Limami, Anis M

    2005-03-01

    A gene MtPPRD1, encoding a protein of 132 amino acids containing a proline-rich domain (PRD), has been revealed by suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) with two mRNA populations of embryo axes harvested immediately before and after radicle emergence. Although at the protein level MtPPRD1 showed low homology with plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs), it did exhibit the eight cysteine residues conserved in all plant LTPs, a characteristic signature that allows the formation of a hydrophobic cavity adapted for loading hydrophobic molecules. Expression studies of MtPPRD1 have been carried out by quantitative real time RT-PCR throughout germination and post-germination processes in control seeds and seeds in which germination was delayed by abscisic acid (ABA) or the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulphoximine (MSX) treatments. The results showed that MtPPRD1 expression is developmentally regulated, induced in the embryo axis immediately before radicle emergence, reaches its maximum expression and declines during the early post-germination phase. Organ specificity studies showed that, except for a low and probably constitutive expression in roots, MtPPRD1 is specifically expressed in the embryo axis. Based on both experimental and in silico studies several putative roles are proposed for MtPPRD1 in Medicago truncatula, this protein can intervene (i) as an LTP in membrane biogenesis and regulation of the intracellular fatty acid pool by binding and transferring fatty acids and phospholipids between membranes, (ii) in the control of a developmental process specific to late germination and to early phases of post-germination, and (iii) and/or pathogen defence.

  7. Gene expression: RNA interference in adult mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Anton P.; Meuse, Leonard; Pham, Thu-Thao T.; Conklin, Douglas S.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Kay, Mark A.

    2002-07-01

    RNA interference is an evolutionarily conserved surveillance mechanism that responds to double-stranded RNA by sequence-specific silencing of homologous genes. Here we show that transgene expression can be suppressed in adult mice by synthetic small interfering RNAs and by small-hairpin RNAs transcribed in vivo from DNA templates. We also show the therapeutic potential of this technique by demonstrating effective targeting of a sequence from hepatitis C virus by RNA interference in vivo.

  8. Evolution of gene expression after gene amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-04-24

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat-maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  9. Regulation of eucaryotic gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent, R.; Ptashne, M.S

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a method of regulating the expression of a gene in a eucaryotic cell. The method consists of: providing in the eucaryotic cell, a peptide, derived from or substantially similar to a peptide of a procaryotic cell able to bind to DNA upstream from or within the gene, the amount of the peptide being sufficient to bind to the gene and thereby control expression of the gene.

  10. Differentially expressed genes in the midgut of Silkworm infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this report, we employed suppression subtractive hybridization to compare differentially expressed genes in the midguts of CPV-infected and normal silkworm larvae. 36 genes and 20 novel ESTs were obtained from 2 reciprocal subtractive libraries. Three up-regulated genes (ferritin, rpL11 and alkaline nuclease) and 3 ...

  11. Context shapes social judgments of positive emotion suppression and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalokerinos, Elise K; Greenaway, Katharine H; Casey, James P

    2017-02-01

    It is generally considered socially undesirable to suppress the expression of positive emotion. However, previous research has not considered the role that social context plays in governing appropriate emotion regulation. We investigated a context in which it may be more appropriate to suppress than express positive emotion, hypothesizing that positive emotion expressions would be considered inappropriate when the valence of the expressed emotion (i.e., positive) did not match the valence of the context (i.e., negative). Six experiments (N = 1,621) supported this hypothesis: when there was a positive emotion-context mismatch, participants rated targets who suppressed positive emotion as more appropriate, and evaluated them more positively than targets who expressed positive emotion. This effect occurred even when participants were explicitly made aware that suppressing targets were experiencing mismatched emotion for the context (e.g., feeling positive in a negative context), suggesting that appropriate emotional expression is key to these effects. These studies are among the first to provide empirical evidence that social costs to suppression are not inevitable, but instead are dependent on context. Expressive suppression can be a socially useful emotion regulation strategy in situations that call for it. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Ketamine inhibits tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 gene expressions in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages through suppression of toll-like receptor 4-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation and activator protein-1 activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, G.-J.; Chen, T.-L.; Ueng, Y.-F.; Chen, R.-M.

    2008-01-01

    Our previous study showed that ketamine, an intravenous anesthetic agent, has anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we further evaluated the effects of ketamine on the regulation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interlukin-6 (IL-6) gene expressions and its possible signal-transducing mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. Exposure of macrophages to 1, 10, and 100 μM ketamine, 100 ng/ml LPS, or a combination of ketamine and LPS for 1, 6, and 24 h was not cytotoxic to macrophages. A concentration of 1000 μM of ketamine alone or in combined treatment with LPS caused significant cell death. Administration of LPS increased cellular TNF-α and IL-6 protein levels in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Meanwhile, treatment with ketamine concentration- and time-dependently alleviated the enhanced effects. LPS induced TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA syntheses. Administration of ketamine at a therapeutic concentration (100 μM) significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA expressions. Application of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) small interfering (si)RNA into macrophages decreased cellular TLR4 levels. Co-treatment of macrophages with ketamine and TLR4 siRNA decreased the LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 productions more than alone administration of TLR4 siRNA. LPS stimulated phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and translocation of c-Jun and c-Fos from the cytoplasm to nuclei. However, administration of ketamine significantly decreased LPS-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and translocation of c-Jun and c-Fos. LPS increased the binding of nuclear extracts to activator protein-1 consensus DNA oligonucleotides. Administration of ketamine significantly ameliorated LPS-induced DNA binding activity of activator protein-1. Therefore, a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine can inhibit TNF-α and IL-6 gene expressions in LPS-activated macrophages. The suppressive mechanisms occur through suppression of TLR4-mediated

  13. Differential Gene Expression and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Seroude

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been established that an intricate program of gene expression controls progression through the different stages in development. The equally complex biological phenomenon known as aging is genetically determined and environmentally modulated. This review focuses on the genetic component of aging, with a special emphasis on differential gene expression. At least two genetic pathways regulating organism longevity act by modifying gene expression. Many genes are also subjected to age-dependent transcriptional regulation. Some age-related gene expression changes are prevented by caloric restriction, the most robust intervention that slows down the aging process. Manipulating the expression of some age-regulated genes can extend an organism's life span. Remarkably, the activity of many transcription regulatory elements is linked to physiological age as opposed to chronological age, indicating that orderly and tightly controlled regulatory pathways are active during aging.

  14. Abberent expression of oncogenic and tumor-suppressive microRNAs and their target genes in human adenocarcinoma alveolar basal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Tafsiri

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The significant differential expression level of these miRNAs made them as candidate biomarkers in NSCLC tumor tissues of patients. Perhaps Bcl-2 down-regulation and Akt-3 up-regulation can be linked with survival signals in A549 cell line. We can conclude that Bcl-2 and Akt-3 might be therapeutic targets to inhibit cell proliferation in NSCLC.

  15. Identification of formaldehyde-responsive genes by suppression subtractive hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min-Ho; Kim, Young-Ae; Na, Tae-Young; Kim, Sung-Hye; Shin, Young Kee; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Shin, Ho-Sang; Lee, Mi-Ock

    2008-01-01

    Formaldehyde is frequently used in indoor household and occupational environments. Inhalation of formaldehyde invokes an inflammatory response, including a variety of allergic signs and symptoms. Therefore, formaldehyde has been considered as the most prevalent cause of sick building syndrome, which has become a major social problem, especially in developing urban areas. Further formaldehyde is classified as a genotoxicant in the respiratory tract of rats and humans. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in formaldehyde intoxication, we sought differentially regulated genes by formaldehyde exposure to Hs 680.Tr human trachea cells, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based suppression subtractive hybridization. We identified 27 different formaldehyde-inducible genes, including those coding for the major histocompatibility complex, class IA, calcyclin, glutathione S-transferase pi, mouse double minute 2 (MDM2), platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha, and which are known to be associated with cell proliferation and differentiation, immunity and inflammation, and detoxification. Induction of these genes by formaldehyde treatment was confirmed by reverse transcription PCR and western blot analysis. Further, the expression of calcyclin, glutathione S-transferase pi, PDGFRA and MDM2 were significantly induced in the tracheal epithelium of Sprague Dawley rats after formaldehyde inhalation. Our results suggest that the elevated levels of these genes may be associated with the formaldehyde-induced toxicity, and that they deserve evaluation as potential biomarkers for formaldehyde intoxication

  16. A snapshot of the hepatic transcriptome: ad libitum alcohol intake suppresses expression of cholesterol synthesis genes in alcohol-preferring (P rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathon D Klein

    Full Text Available Research is uncovering the genetic and biochemical effects of consuming large quantities of alcohol. One prime example is the J- or U-shaped relationship between the levels of alcohol consumption and the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Moderate alcohol consumption in humans (about 30 g ethanol/d is associated with reduced risk of coronary heart disease, while abstinence and heavier alcohol intake is linked to increased risk. However, the hepatic consequences of moderate alcohol drinking are largely unknown. Previous data from alcohol-preferring (P rats showed that chronic consumption does not produce significant hepatic steatosis in this well-established model. Therefore, free-choice alcohol drinking in P rats may mimic low risk or nonhazardous drinking in humans, and chronic exposure in P animals can illuminate the molecular underpinnings of free-choice drinking in the liver. To address this gap, we captured the global, steady-state liver transcriptome following a 23 week free-choice, moderate alcohol consumption regimen (∼ 7.43 g ethanol/kg/day in inbred alcohol-preferring (iP10a rats. Chronic consumption led to down-regulation of nine genes in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, including HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting step for cholesterol synthesis. These findings corroborate our phenotypic analyses, which indicate that this paradigm produced animals whose hepatic triglyceride levels, cholesterol levels and liver histology were indistinguishable from controls. These findings explain, at least in part, the J- or U-shaped relationship between cardiovascular risk and alcohol intake, and provide outstanding candidates for future studies aimed at understanding the mechanisms that underlie the salutary cardiovascular benefits of chronic low risk and nonhazardous alcohol intake.

  17. A snapshot of the hepatic transcriptome: ad libitum alcohol intake suppresses expression of cholesterol synthesis genes in alcohol-preferring (P) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jonathon D; Sherrill, Jeremy B; Morello, Gabriella M; San Miguel, Phillip J; Ding, Zhenming; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Liang, Tiebing; Muir, William M; Lumeng, Lawrence; Lossie, Amy C

    2014-01-01

    Research is uncovering the genetic and biochemical effects of consuming large quantities of alcohol. One prime example is the J- or U-shaped relationship between the levels of alcohol consumption and the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Moderate alcohol consumption in humans (about 30 g ethanol/d) is associated with reduced risk of coronary heart disease, while abstinence and heavier alcohol intake is linked to increased risk. However, the hepatic consequences of moderate alcohol drinking are largely unknown. Previous data from alcohol-preferring (P) rats showed that chronic consumption does not produce significant hepatic steatosis in this well-established model. Therefore, free-choice alcohol drinking in P rats may mimic low risk or nonhazardous drinking in humans, and chronic exposure in P animals can illuminate the molecular underpinnings of free-choice drinking in the liver. To address this gap, we captured the global, steady-state liver transcriptome following a 23 week free-choice, moderate alcohol consumption regimen (∼ 7.43 g ethanol/kg/day) in inbred alcohol-preferring (iP10a) rats. Chronic consumption led to down-regulation of nine genes in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, including HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting step for cholesterol synthesis. These findings corroborate our phenotypic analyses, which indicate that this paradigm produced animals whose hepatic triglyceride levels, cholesterol levels and liver histology were indistinguishable from controls. These findings explain, at least in part, the J- or U-shaped relationship between cardiovascular risk and alcohol intake, and provide outstanding candidates for future studies aimed at understanding the mechanisms that underlie the salutary cardiovascular benefits of chronic low risk and nonhazardous alcohol intake.

  18. Electroacupuncture at the Wangu acupoint suppresses expression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: The 54 healthy, male, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, 9 months old, and of clean grade (300-450) g, were randomly divided into three groups: sham surgery group, VD group and electro-acupuncture group. The ethology scores of VD rats were evaluated and the mRNA expressions of inflammatory ...

  19. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each......' C, and clustered Dukes' D separately. Real-time PCR of 10 known genes and 5 ESTs demonstrated excellent reproducibility of the array-based findings. The most frequently altered genes belonged to functional categories of metabolism (22%), transcription and translation (11%), and cellular processes (9...

  20. Human Lacrimal Gland Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Kumar Aakalu

    Full Text Available The study of human lacrimal gland biology and development is limited. Lacrimal gland tissue is damaged or poorly functional in a number of disease states including dry eye disease. Development of cell based therapies for lacrimal gland diseases requires a better understanding of the gene expression and signaling pathways in lacrimal gland. Differential gene expression analysis between lacrimal gland and other embryologically similar tissues may be helpful in furthering our understanding of lacrimal gland development.We performed global gene expression analysis of human lacrimal gland tissue using Affymetrix ® gene expression arrays. Primary data from our laboratory was compared with datasets available in the NLM GEO database for other surface ectodermal tissues including salivary gland, skin, conjunctiva and corneal epithelium.The analysis revealed statistically significant difference in the gene expression of lacrimal gland tissue compared to other ectodermal tissues. The lacrimal gland specific, cell surface secretory protein encoding genes and critical signaling pathways which distinguish lacrimal gland from other ectodermal tissues are described.Differential gene expression in human lacrimal gland compared with other ectodermal tissue types revealed interesting patterns which may serve as the basis for future studies in directed differentiation among other areas.

  1. Behavioral experience induces zif268 expression in mature granule cells but suppresses its expression in immature granule cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckleberry, Kylie A.; Kane, Gary A.; Mathis, Rita J.; Cook, Sarah G.; Clutton, Jonathan E.; Drew, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of neurons are born each day in the dentate gyrus (DG), but many of these cells die before reaching maturity. Both death and survival of adult-born neurons are regulated by neuronal activity in the DG. The immediate-early gene (IEG) zif268 appears to be an important mediator of these effects, as its expression can be induced by neural activity and knockout of zif268 impairs survival of adult-born neurons (Richardson et al., 1992; Veyrac et al., 2013). Despite the apparent importance of zif268 for adult neurogenesis, its behavior-induced expression has not been fully characterized in adult-born neurons. Here we characterize behavior-evoked expression of zif268 in mature and newborn dentate granule cells (DGCs). We first quantified zif268 expression in doublecortin-positive (DCX+) immature neurons and in the general granule cell population after brief exposure to a novel environment (NE). In the general granule cell population, zif268 expression peaked 1 h after NE exposure and returned to baseline by 8 h post-exposure. However, in the DCX+ cells, zif268 expression was suppressed relative to home cage for at least 8 h post-exposure. We next asked whether suppression of zif268 in DCX+ immature cells occurs in other behavioral paradigms that recruit the hippocampus. Exposure to Morris water maze (MWM) training, an enriched environment, or a NE caused approximately equal suppression of zif268 expression in DCX+ cells and approximately equal activation of zif268 expression among the general granule cell population. The same behavioral procedures activated zif268 expression in 6-week-old BrdU-labeled adult-born neurons, indicating that zif268 suppression is specific to immature neurons. Finally, we asked whether zif268 suppression varied as a function of age within the DCX+ population, which ranges in age from 0 to approximately 4 weeks. NE exposure had no significant effect on zif268 expression in 2- or 4-week-old BrdU-labeled neurons, but it significantly

  2. Why expressive suppression does not pay? Cognitive costs of negative emotion suppression: The mediating role of subjective tense-arousal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczygieł Dorota

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to contribute to a broader understanding of the cognitive consequences of expressive suppression. Specifically, we examined whether the deteriorating effect of expressive suppression on cognitive functioning is caused by tense arousal enhanced by suppression. Two experiments were performed in order to test this prediction. In both studies we tested the effect of expressive suppression on working memory, as measured with a backwards digit-span task (Study 1, N = 43 and anagram problem-solving task (Study 2, N = 60. In addition, in Study 2 we tested whether expressive suppression degrades memory of the events that emerged during the period of expressive suppression. Both studies were conducted in a similar design: Participants watched a film clip which evoked negative emotions (i.e. disgust in Study 1 and a combination of sadness and anxiety in Study 2 under the instruction to suppress those negative emotions or (in the control condition to simply watch the film. The results of these experiments lead to three conclusions. First, the results reveal that expressive suppression degrades memory of the events that emerged during the period of expressive suppression and leads to poorer performance on working memory tasks, as measured with a backwards digit-span task and anagram problem-solving task. Second, the results indicate that expressive suppression leads to a significant increase in subjective tense arousal. Third, the results support our prediction that expressive suppression decreases cognitive performance through its effects on subjective tense arousal. The results of the Study 1 show that tense arousal activated during expressive suppression of disgust fully mediates the negative effect of suppression on working memory as measured with a backwards digit-span task. The results of Study 2 reveal that subjective tense arousal elicited while suppressing sadness and anxiety mediates both the effect of suppression on

  3. Brain structural basis of cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Andrea; Bieber, Alexandra; Keck, Tanja; Vaitl, Dieter; Stark, Rudolf

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression, two major emotion regulation strategies, are differentially related to emotional well-being. The aim of this study was to test the association of individual differences in these two emotion regulation strategies with gray matter volume of brain regions that have been shown to be involved in the regulation of emotions. Based on high-resolution magnetic resonance images of 96 young adults voxel-based morphometry was used to analyze the gray matter volumes of the a priori regions of interest, including amygdala, insula, dorsal anterior cingulate and paracingulate cortex, medial and lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) and their association with cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression usage as well as neuroticism. A positive association of cognitive reappraisal with right and tendentially left amygdala volume and of neuroticism with left amygdala volume (marginally significant) was found. Expressive suppression was related to dorsal anterior cingulate/paracingulate cortex and medial PFC gray matter volume. The results of this study emphasize the important role of the amygdala in individual differences in cognitive reappraisal usage as well as neuroticism. Additionally, the association of expressive suppression usage with larger volumes of the medial PFC and dorsal anterior/paracingulate cortex underpins the role of these regions in regulating emotion-expressive behavior. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Ascorbate induces apoptosis in melanoma cells by suppressing Clusterin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafi, Sushmita; Sant, David W; Liu, Zhao-Jun; Wang, Gaofeng

    2017-06-16

    Pharmacological levels of ascorbate have long been suggested as a potential treatment of cancer. However, we observed that EC50 of ascorbate was at a similar level for cultured healthy melanocytes and melanoma cells, suggesting a limit of pharmacological ascorbate in treating cancer. Loss of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5 hmC) is an epigenetic hallmark of cancer and ascorbate promotes 5 hmC generation by serving as a cofactor for TET methylcytosine dioxygenases. Our previous work demonstrated that ascorbate treatment at physiological level (100 μM) increased 5 hmC content in melanoma cells toward the level of healthy melanocytes. Here we show that 100 µM of ascorbate induced apoptosis in A2058 melanoma cells. RNA-seq analysis revealed that expression of the Clusterin (CLU) gene, which is related to apoptosis, was downregulated by ascorbate. The suppression of CLU was verified at transcript level in different melanoma cell lines, and at protein level in A2058 cells. The anti-apoptotic cytoplasmic CLU was decreased, while the pro-apoptotic nuclear CLU was largely maintained, after ascorbate treatment. These changes in CLU subcellular localization were also associated with Bax and caspases activation, Bcl-xL sequestration, and cytochrome c release. Taken together, this study establishes an impending therapeutic role of physiological ascorbate to potentiate apoptosis in melanoma.

  5. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each...... pool) of total RNA from left-sided sporadic colorectal carcinomas. We compared normal tissue to carcinoma tissue from Dukes' stages A-D (noninvasive to distant metastasis) and identified 908 known genes and 4,155 ESTs that changed remarkably from normal to tumor tissue. Based on intensive filtering 226...

  6. Remote control of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xiaochun; Miano, Joseph M

    2007-06-01

    The elucidation of a growing number of species' genomes heralds an unprecedented opportunity to ascertain functional attributes of non-coding sequences. In particular, cis regulatory modules (CRMs) controlling gene expression constitute a rich treasure trove of data to be defined and experimentally validated. Such information will provide insight into cell lineage determination and differentiation and the genetic basis of heritable diseases as well as the development of novel tools for restricting the inactivation of genes to specific cell types or conditions. Historically, the study of CRMs and their individual transcription factor binding sites has been limited to proximal regions around gene loci. Two important by-products of the genomics revolution, artificial chromosome vectors and comparative genomics, have fueled efforts to define an increasing number of CRMs acting remotely to control gene expression. Such regulation from a distance has challenged our perspectives of gene expression control and perhaps the very definition of a gene. This review summarizes current approaches to characterize remote control of gene expression in transgenic mice and inherent limitations for accurately interpreting the essential nature of CRM activity.

  7. Potent anti-inflammatory effect of a novel furan-2,5-dione derivative, BPD, mediated by dual suppression of COX-2 activity and LPS-induced inflammatory gene expression via NF-κB inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ji-Sun; Park, Seung-Jae; Ryu, Suran; Kang, Han Byul; Kim, Tae Woo; Choi, Jung-Hye; Lee, Jae-Yeol; Cho, Young-Wuk; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2012-03-01

    We previously reported that 3-(benzo[d]-1,3-dioxol-5-yl)-4-phenylfuran-2,5-dione (BPD) showed strong inhibitory effects on PGE(2) production. However, the exact mechanism for the anti-inflammatory effect of BPD is not completely understood. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism involved in the effects of BPD on inflammatory mediators in LPS-stimulated macrophages and animal models of inflammation. The expressions of COX-2, inducible NOS (iNOS), TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β, in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells and murine peritoneal macrophages, were determined by Western blot and/or qRT-PCR, respectively. NF-κB activation was investigated by EMSA, reporter gene assay and Western blotting. Anti-inflammatory effects of BPD were evaluated in vivo in carrageenan-induced paw oedema in rats and LPS-induced septic shock in mice. BPD not only inhibited COX-2 activity but also reduced the expression of COX-2. In addition, BPD inhibited the expression of iNOS, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β at the transcriptional level. BPD attenuated LPS-induced DNA-binding activity and the transcription activity of NF-κB; this was associated with a decrease in the phosphorylation level of inhibitory κB-α (IκB-α) and reduced nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Furthermore, BPD suppressed the formation of TGF-β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1)/TAK-binding protein1 (TAB1), which was accompanied by a parallel reduction of phosphorylation of TAK1 and IκB kinase (IKK). Pretreatment with BPD inhibited carrageenan-induced paw oedema and LPS-induced septic death. Taken together, our data indicate that BPD is involved in the dual inhibition of COX-2 activity and TAK1-NF-κB pathway, providing a molecular basis for the anti-inflammatory properties of BPD. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Methylation-related chromatin structure is associated with exclusion of transcription factors from and suppressed expression of the O-6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase gene in human glioma cell lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Costello, J F; Futscher, B W; Kroes, R A; Pieper, R O

    1994-01-01

    There is considerable interest in identifying factors responsible for expression of the O-6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene, as MGMT is a major determinant in the response of glioma cells to the chemotherapeutic agent 1,3 bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea. Recently we have shown that MGMT expression is correlated in a direct, graded fashion with methylation in the body of the MGMT gene and in an inverse, graded fashion with promoter methylation in human glioma cell lines. To de...

  9. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  10. Human papillomavirus gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, L.T.; Hirochika, H.; Nasseri, M.; Stoler, M.H.; Wolinsky, S.M.; Chin, M.T.; Hirochika, R.; Arvan, D.S.; Broker, T.R.

    1987-01-01

    To determine the role of tissue differentiation on expression of each of the papillomavirus mRNA species identified by electron microscopy, the authors prepared exon-specific RNA probes that could distinguish the alternatively spliced mRNA species. Radioactively labeled single-stranded RNA probes were generated from a dual promoter vector system and individually hybridized to adjacent serial sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsies of condylomata. Autoradiography showed that each of the message species had a characteristic tissue distribution and relative abundance. The authors have characterized a portion of the regulatory network of the HPVs by showing that the E2 ORF encodes a trans-acting enhancer-stimulating protein, as it does in BPV-1 (Spalholz et al. 1985). The HPV-11 enhancer was mapped to a 150-bp tract near the 3' end of the URR. Portions of this region are duplicated in some aggressive strains of HPV-6 (Boshart and zur Hausen 1986; Rando et al. 1986). To test the possible biological relevance of these duplications, they cloned tandem arrays of the enhancer and demonstrated, using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assay, that they led to dramatically increased transcription proportional to copy number. Using the CAT assays, the authors found that the E2 proteins of several papillomavirus types can cross-stimulate the enhancers of most other types. This suggests that prior infection of a tissue with one papillomavirus type may provide a helper effect for superinfection and might account fo the HPV-6/HPV-16 coinfections in condylomata that they have observed

  11. Novel redox nanomedicine improves gene expression of polyion complex vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Toh, Toru Yoshitomi, Yutaka Ikeda and Yukio Nagasaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy has generated worldwide attention as a new medical technology. While non-viral gene vectors are promising candidates as gene carriers, they have several issues such as toxicity and low transfection efficiency. We have hypothesized that the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS affects gene expression in polyplex supported gene delivery systems. The effect of ROS on the gene expression of polyplex was evaluated using a nitroxide radical-containing nanoparticle (RNP as an ROS scavenger. When polyethyleneimine (PEI/pGL3 or PEI alone was added to the HeLa cells, ROS levels increased significantly. In contrast, when (PEI/pGL3 or PEI was added with RNP, the ROS levels were suppressed. The luciferase expression was increased by the treatment with RNP in a dose-dependent manner and the cellular uptake of pDNA was also increased. Inflammatory cytokines play an important role in ROS generation in vivo. In particular, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α caused intracellular ROS generation in HeLa cells and decreased gene expression. RNP treatment suppressed ROS production even in the presence of TNF-α and increased gene expression. This anti-inflammatory property of RNP suggests that it may be used as an effective adjuvant for non-viral gene delivery systems.

  12. Moving Toward Integrating Gene Expression Profiling into ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microarray profiling of chemical-induced effects is being increasingly used in medium and high-throughput formats. In this study, we describe computational methods to identify molecular targets from whole-genome microarray data using as an example the estrogen receptor α (ERα), often modulated by potential endocrine disrupting chemicals. ERα biomarker genes were identified by their consistent expression after exposure to 7 structurally-diverse ERα agonists and 3 ERα antagonists in ERα-positive MCF-7 cells. Most of the biomarker genes were shown to be directly regulated by ERα as determined by ESR1 gene knockdown using siRNA as well as through ChIP-Seq analysis of ERα-DNA interactions. The biomarker was evaluated as a predictive tool using the fold-change rank-based Running Fisher algorithm by comparison to annotated gene expression data sets from experiments using MCF-7 cells, including those evaluating the transcriptional effects of hormones and chemicals. Using 141 comparisons from chemical- and hormone-treated cells, the biomarker gave a balanced accuracy for prediction of ERα activation or suppression of 94% and 93%, respectively. The biomarker was able to correctly classify 18 out of 21 (86%) ER reference chemicals including “very weak” agonists. Importantly, the biomarker predictions accurately replicated predictions based on 18 in vitro high-throughput screening assays that queried different steps in ERα signaling. For 114 chemicals,

  13. Homeobox gene expression in Brachiopoda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altenburger, Andreas; Martinez, Pedro; Wanninger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The molecular control that underlies brachiopod ontogeny is largely unknown. In order to contribute to this issue we analyzed the expression pattern of two homeobox containing genes, Not and Cdx, during development of the rhynchonelliform (i.e., articulate) brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. Not...

  14. Correction of gene expression data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darbani Shirvanehdeh, Behrooz; Stewart, C. Neal, Jr.; Noeparvar, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    an analytical approach to examine the suitability of correction methods by considering the inter-treatment bias as well as the inter-replicate variance, which allows use of the best correction method with minimum residual bias. Analyses of RNA sequencing and microarray data showed that the efficiencies......This report investigates for the first time the potential inter-treatment bias source of cell number for gene expression studies. Cell-number bias can affect gene expression analysis when comparing samples with unequal total cellular RNA content or with different RNA extraction efficiencies....... For maximal reliability of analysis, therefore, comparisons should be performed at the cellular level. This could be accomplished using an appropriate correction method that can detect and remove the inter-treatment bias for cell-number. Based on inter-treatment variations of reference genes, we introduce...

  15. Vascular Gene Expression: A Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Concepción eMartínez-Navarro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The phloem is the conduit through which photoassimilates are distributed from autotrophic to heterotrophic tissues and is involved in the distribution of signaling molecules that coordinate plant growth and responses to the environment. Phloem function depends on the coordinate expression of a large array of genes. We have previously identified conserved motifs in upstream regions of the Arabidopsis genes, encoding the homologs of pumpkin phloem sap mRNAs, displaying expression in vascular tissues. This tissue-specific expression in Arabidopsis is predicted by the overrepresentation of GA/CT-rich motifs in gene promoters. In this work we have searched for common motifs in upstream regions of the homologous genes from plants considered to possess a primitive vascular tissue (a lycophyte, as well as from others that lack a true vascular tissue (a bryophyte, and finally from chlorophytes. Both lycophyte and bryophyte display motifs similar to those found in Arabidopsis with a significantly low E-value, while the chlorophytes showed either a different conserved motif or no conserved motif at all. These results suggest that these same genes are expressed coordinately in non- vascular plants; this coordinate expression may have been one of the prerequisites for the development of conducting tissues in plants. We have also analyzed the phylogeny of conserved proteins that may be involved in phloem function and development. The presence of CmPP16, APL, FT and YDA in chlorophytes suggests the recruitment of ancient regulatory networks for the development of the vascular tissue during evolution while OPS is a novel protein specific to vascular plants.

  16. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  17. Long-day suppressed expression of type 2 deiodinase gene in the mediobasal hypothalamus of the Saanen goat, a short-day breeder: implication for seasonal window of thyroid hormone action on reproductive neuroendocrine axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuo, Shinobu; Nakao, Nobuhiro; Ohkura, Satoshi; Iigo, Masayuki; Hagiwara, Satoko; Goto, Akemitsu; Ando, Hiroshi; Yamamura, Takashi; Watanabe, Miwa; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Oda, Sen-ichi; Maeda, Kei-ichiro; Lincoln, Gerald A; Okamura, Hiroaki; Ebihara, Shizufumi; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    In most animals that live in temperate regions, reproduction is under photoperiodic control. In long-day breeders such as Japanese quail and Djungarian hamsters, type 2 deiodinase (Dio2) plays an important role in the mediobasal hypothalamus, catalyzing the conversion of prohormone T4 to bioactive T3 to regulate the photoperiodic response of the gonads. However, the molecular basis for seasonal reproduction in short-day breeders remains unclear. Because thyroid hormones are also known to be involved in short-day breeders, we examined the effect of an artificial long-day stimulus on Dio2 expression in the male Saanen goat (Capra hircus), a short-day breeder. Dio2 expression was observed in the caudal continuation of the arcuate nucleus, known as the target site for both melatonin and T4 action. In addition, expression of Dio2 and T3 content in the mediobasal hypothalamus was suppressed by artificial long-day conditions, which is the opposite of the results of long-day breeders. Thyroid hormone action on the development of neuroendocrine anestrus is known to be limited to a specific seasonal window. This long-day suppression of Dio2 may provide a mechanism that accounts for the lack of responsiveness to thyroxine during the mid to late anestrus.

  18. Gene expression profile of pulpitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicia, Johnah C.; Henson, Brett R.; Parker, Joel S.; Khan, Asma A.

    2016-01-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the Significance Analysis of Microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (≥30mm on VAS) compared to those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  19. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology.

  20. Gene Expression in Trypanosomatid Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Martínez-Calvillo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The parasites Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi are the trypanosomatid protozoa that cause the deadly human diseases leishmaniasis, African sleeping sickness, and Chagas disease, respectively. These organisms possess unique mechanisms for gene expression such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-coding genes and trans-splicing. Little is known about either the DNA sequences or the proteins that are involved in the initiation and termination of transcription in trypanosomatids. In silico analyses of the genome databases of these parasites led to the identification of a small number of proteins involved in gene expression. However, functional studies have revealed that trypanosomatids have more general transcription factors than originally estimated. Many posttranslational histone modifications, histone variants, and chromatin modifying enzymes have been identified in trypanosomatids, and recent genome-wide studies showed that epigenetic regulation might play a very important role in gene expression in this group of parasites. Here, we review and comment on the most recent findings related to transcription initiation and termination in trypanosomatid protozoa.

  1. Adipose genes down-regulated during experimental endotoxemia are also suppressed in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rachana; Hinkle, Christine C; Haris, Lalarukh; Shah, Rhia; Mehta, Nehal N; Putt, Mary E; Reilly, Muredach P

    2012-11-01

    Adipose inflammation is a crucial link between obesity and its metabolic complications. Human experimental endotoxemia is a controlled model for the study of inflammatory cardiometabolic responses in vivo. We hypothesized that adipose genes down-regulated during endotoxemia would approximate changes observed with obesity-related inflammation and reveal novel candidates in cardiometabolic disease. Healthy volunteers (n = 14) underwent a 3 ng/kg endotoxin challenge; adipose biopsies were taken at 0, 4, 12, and 24 h for mRNA microarray. A priority list of highly down-regulated and biologically relevant genes was validated by RT-PCR in an independent sample of adipose from healthy subjects (n = 7) undergoing a subclinical 0.6 ng/kg endotoxemia protocol. Expression of validated genes was screened in adipose of lean and severely obese individuals (n = 11 per group), and cellular source was probed in cultured adipocytes and macrophages. Endotoxemia (3 ng/kg) suppressed expression of 353 genes (to endotoxemia revealed suppression of genes involved in cell development and differentiation. A majority of candidates were also suppressed in endogenous human obesity, suggesting a potential pathophysiological role in human obesity-related adipose inflammation.

  2. Transgenic Suppression of AGAMOUS Genes in Apple Reduces Fertility and Increases Floral Attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocko, Amy L; Borejsza-Wysocka, Ewa; Brunner, Amy M; Shevchenko, Olga; Aldwinckle, Herb; Strauss, Steven H

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ability of RNA interference (RNAi) directed against two co-orthologs of AGAMOUS (AG) from Malus domestica (domestic apple, MdAG) to reduce the risks of invasiveness and provide genetic containment of transgenes, while also promoting the attractiveness of flowers for ornamental usage. Suppression of two MdAG-like genes, MdMADS15 and MdMADS22, led to the production of trees with highly showy, polypetalous flowers. These "double-flowers" had strongly reduced expression of both MdAG-like genes. Members of the two other clades within in the MdAG subfamily showed mild to moderate differences in gene expression, or were unchanged, with the level of suppression approximately proportional to the level of sequence identity between the gene analyzed and the RNAi fragment. The double-flowers also exhibited reduced male and female fertility, had few viable pollen grains, a decreased number of stigmas, and produced few viable seeds after cross-pollination. Despite these floral alterations, RNAi-AG trees with double-flowers set full-sized fruit. Suppression or mutation of apple AG-like genes appears to be a promising method for combining genetic containment with improved floral attractiveness.

  3. Transgenic Suppression of AGAMOUS Genes in Apple Reduces Fertility and Increases Floral Attractiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Klocko

    Full Text Available We investigated the ability of RNA interference (RNAi directed against two co-orthologs of AGAMOUS (AG from Malus domestica (domestic apple, MdAG to reduce the risks of invasiveness and provide genetic containment of transgenes, while also promoting the attractiveness of flowers for ornamental usage. Suppression of two MdAG-like genes, MdMADS15 and MdMADS22, led to the production of trees with highly showy, polypetalous flowers. These "double-flowers" had strongly reduced expression of both MdAG-like genes. Members of the two other clades within in the MdAG subfamily showed mild to moderate differences in gene expression, or were unchanged, with the level of suppression approximately proportional to the level of sequence identity between the gene analyzed and the RNAi fragment. The double-flowers also exhibited reduced male and female fertility, had few viable pollen grains, a decreased number of stigmas, and produced few viable seeds after cross-pollination. Despite these floral alterations, RNAi-AG trees with double-flowers set full-sized fruit. Suppression or mutation of apple AG-like genes appears to be a promising method for combining genetic containment with improved floral attractiveness.

  4. Behavioral experience induces zif268 expression in mature granule cells but suppresses its expression in immature granule cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie A. Huckleberry

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of neurons are born each day in the dentate gyrus (DG, but many of these cells die before reaching maturity. Both death and survival of adult-born neurons are regulated by neuronal activity in DG. The immediate-early gene (IEG zif268 is an important mediator of these effects, as its expression is induced by neural activity and knockout of zif268 impairs survival of adult-born neurons (Veyrac et al., 2013. Despite the apparent importance of zif268 for adult neurogenesis, its behavior-induced expression has not been fully characterized in adult-born neurons. Here we characterize behavior-evoked expression of zif268 in mature and newborn dentate granule cells (DGCs. In the general granule cell population, zif268 expression peaked 1 hour after novel environment exposure and returned to baseline by 8 hours post-exposure. However, in the doublecortin-positive (DCX+ immature neurons, zif268 expression was suppressed relative to home cage for at least 8 hours post-exposure. We next determined that exposure to water maze training, an enriched environment, or a novel environment caused approximately equal suppression of zif268 expression in DCX+ cells and approximately equal activation of zif268 in the general DGC population and in 6-week-old adult-born neurons. Finally, we asked whether zif268 suppression varied as a function of age within the DCX+ population, which ranges in age from 0 to approximately 4 weeks. Novel environment exposure had no significant effect on zif268 expression in 2- or 4-week-old BrdU-labeled neurons, but it significantly suppressed zif268 expression in 3-week-old neurons. In summary, behavioral experience transiently activated expression of zif268 in mature DGCs but caused a more long-lasting suppression of zif268 expression in immature, adult-born DGCs. We hypothesize that zif268 suppression inhibits memory-related synaptic plasticity in immature DGCs or mediates learning-induced apoptosis of immature adult

  5. Suppression of expression of muscle-associated proteins by PPARα in brown adipose tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Yuhong; Hara, Atsushi; Komatsu, Makiko; Tanaka, Naoki; Kamijo, Yuji; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2005-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) belongs to the steroid/nuclear receptor superfamily. Two-dimensional (2D) SDS-PAGE analysis of brown adipose tissue (BAT) unexpectedly revealed six spots that were present only in PPARα-null mice. Proteomic analysis indicated that these proteins were tropomyosin-1 α chain, tropomyosin β chain, myosin regulatory light chain 2, myosin light chain 3, and parvalbumin α. Analyses of mRNA have revealed that PPARα suppressed the genes encoding these proteins in a synchronous manner in adult wild-type mice. Histological and physiological analyses of BAT showed in adult wild-type mice, a marked suppression of BAT growth concurrent with a prominent decrease in lipolytic and thermogenesis activities. These results suggest that in adult mice, PPARα functions to suppress the expression of the proteins that may be involved in the architecture of BAT, and thus may function in keeping BAT in a quiescent state

  6. Identification of Genes Associated with Morphology in Aspergillus Niger by Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Ziyu; Mao, Xingxue; Magnuson, Jon K.; Lasure, Linda L.

    2004-04-01

    The morphology of citric acid production strains of Aspergillus niger is sensitive to a variety of factors including the concentration of manganese (Mn2+). Upon increasing the Mn2+ concentration in A. niger (ATCC 11414) cultures to 14 ppb or higher, the morphology switches from pelleted to filamentous, accompanied by a rapid decline in citric acid production. Molecular mechanisms through which Mn2+ exerts effects on morphology and citric acid production in A. niger have not been well defined, but our use of suppression subtractive hybridization has identified 22 genes responsive to Mn2+. Fifteen genes were differentially expressed when A. niger was grown in media containing 1000 ppb Mn2+ (filamentous form) and seven genes in 10 ppb Mn2+ (pelleted form). Of the fifteen filamentous-associated genes, seven are novel and eight share 47-100% identity to genes from other organisms. Five of the pellet-associated genes are novel, and the other two genes encode a pepsin-type protease and polyubiquitin. All ten genes with deduced functions are either involved in amino acid metabolism/protein catabolism or cell regulatory processes. Northern-blot analysis showed that the transcripts of all 22 genes were rapidly enhanced or suppressed by Mn2+. Steady-state mRNA levels of six selected filamentous associated genes remained high during five days of culture in a filamentous state and low under pelleted growth conditions. The opposite behavior was observed for four selected pellet-associated genes. The full-length cDNA of the filamentous-associated clone, Brsa-25 was isolated. Antisense expression of Brsa-25 permitted pelleted growth and increased citrate production at higher concentrations of Mn2+ than could be tolerated by the parent strain. The results suggest the involvement of the newly isolated genes in regulation of A. niger morphology.

  7. miR-24 inhibits cell proliferation by suppressing expression of E2F2, MYC and other cell cycle regulatory genes by binding to “seedless” 3′UTR microRNA recognition elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Ashish; Navarro, Francisco; Maher, Christopher; Maliszewski, Laura E.; Yan, Nan; O'Day, Elizabeth; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Dykxhoorn, Derek M.; Tsai, Perry; Hofman, Oliver; Becker, Kevin G.; Gorospe, Myriam; Hide, Winston; Lieberman, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Summary miR-24, up-regulated during terminal differentiation of multiple lineages, inhibits cell cycle progression. Antagonizing miR-24 restores post-mitotic cell proliferation and enhances fibroblast proliferation, while over-expressing miR-24 increases the G1 compartment. The 248 mRNAs down-regulated upon miR-24 over-expression are highly enriched for DNA repair and cell cycle regulatory genes that form a direct interaction network with prominent nodes at genes that enhance (MYC, E2F2, CCNB1, CDC2) or inhibit (p27Kip1, VHL) cell cycle progression. miR-24 directly regulates MYC and E2F2 and some genes they transactivate. Enhanced proliferation from antagonizing miR-24 is abrogated by knocking down E2F2, but not MYC, and cell proliferation, inhibited by miR-24 over-expression, is rescued by miR-24-insensitive E2F2. Therefore, E2F2 is a critical miR-24 target. The E2F2 3′UTR lacks a predicted miR-24 recognition element. In fact, miR-24 regulates expression of E2F2, MYC, AURKB, CCNA2, CDC2, CDK4 and FEN1 by recognizing seedless, but highly complementary, sequences. PMID:19748357

  8. Pharmacologic suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Vallina, L; Yañez, R; Blanco, B; Gil, M; Russell, S J

    2000-04-01

    Adoptive therapy with autologous T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors (chTCRs) is of potential interest for the treatment of malignancy. To limit possible T-cell-mediated damage to normal tissues that weakly express the targeted tumor antigen (Ag), we have tested a strategy for the suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells. Jurkat T cells were transduced with an anti-hapten chTCR tinder the control of a tetracycline-suppressible promoter and were shown to respond to Ag-positive (hapten-coated) but not to Ag-negative target cells. The engineered T cells were then reacted with hapten-coated target cells at different effector to target cell ratios before and after exposure to tetracycline. When the engineered T cells were treated with tetracycline, expression of the chTCR was greatly decreased and recognition of the hapten-coated target cells was completely suppressed. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells may be a useful strategy to limit the toxicity of the approach to cancer gene therapy.

  9. Medusa: a novel gene drive system for confined suppression of insect populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Marshall

    Full Text Available Gene drive systems provide novel opportunities for insect population suppression by driving genes that confer a fitness cost into pest or disease vector populations; however regulatory issues arise when genes are capable of spreading across international borders. Gene drive systems displaying threshold properties provide a solution since they can be confined to local populations and eliminated through dilution with wild-types. We propose a novel, threshold-dependent gene drive system, Medusa, capable of inducing a local and reversible population crash. Medusa consists of four components--two on the X chromosome, and two on the Y chromosome. A maternally-expressed, X-linked toxin and a zygotically-expressed, Y-linked antidote results in suppression of the female population and selection for the presence of the transgene-bearing Y because only male offspring of Medusa-bearing females are protected from the effects of the toxin. At the same time, the combination of a zygotically-expressed, Y-linked toxin and a zygotically-expressed, X-linked antidote selects for the transgene-bearing X in the presence of the transgene-bearing Y. Together these chromosomes create a balanced lethal system that spreads while selecting against females when present above a certain threshold frequency. Simple population dynamic models show that an all-male release of Medusa males, carried out over six generations, is expected to induce a population crash within 12 generations for modest release sizes on the order of the wild population size. Re-invasion of non-transgenic insects into a suppressed population can result in a population rebound; however this can be prevented through regular releases of modest numbers of Medusa males. Finally, we outline how Medusa could be engineered with currently available molecular tools.

  10. Harnessing gene expression networks to prioritize candidate epileptic encephalopathy genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Karen L; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets.

  11. Zfp423 Maintains White Adipocyte Identity through Suppression of the Beige Cell Thermogenic Gene Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Mengle; Ishibashi, Jeff; Kusminski, Christine M; Wang, Qiong A; Hepler, Chelsea; Vishvanath, Lavanya; MacPherson, Karen A; Spurgin, Stephen B; Sun, Kai; Holland, William L; Seale, Patrick; Gupta, Rana K

    2016-06-14

    The transcriptional regulators Ebf2 and Prdm16 establish and maintain the brown and/or beige fat cell identity. However, the mechanisms operating in white adipocytes to suppress the thermogenic gene program and maintain an energy-storing phenotype are less understood. Here, we report that the transcriptional regulator Zfp423 is critical for maintaining white adipocyte identity through suppression of the thermogenic gene program. Zfp423 expression is enriched in white versus brown adipocytes and suppressed upon cold exposure. Doxycycline-inducible inactivation of Zfp423 in mature adipocytes, combined with β-adrenergic stimulation, triggers a conversion of differentiated adiponectin-expressing inguinal and gonadal adipocytes into beige-like adipocytes; this reprogramming event is sufficient to prevent and reverse diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Mechanistically, Zfp423 acts in adipocytes to inhibit the activity of Ebf2 and suppress Prdm16 activation. These data identify Zfp423 as a molecular brake on adipocyte thermogenesis and suggest a therapeutic strategy to unlock the thermogenic potential of white adipocytes in obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Suppression of gluconeogenic gene transcription by SIK1-induced ubiquitination and degradation of CRTC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei-Wei; Tang, Hei-Man Vincent; Cheng, Yun; Chan, Ching-Ping; Chan, Chi-Ping; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2018-01-31

    CRTCs are a group of three transcriptional coactivators required for CREB-dependent transcription. CREB and CRTCs are critically involved in the regulation of various biological processes such as cell proliferation, metabolism, learning and memory. However, whether CRTC1 efficiently induces gluconeogenic gene expression and how CRTC1 is regulated by upstream kinase SIK1 remain to be understood. In this work, we demonstrated SIK1-induced phosphorylation, ubiquitination and degradation of CRTC1 in the context of the regulation of gluconeogenesis. CRTC1 protein was destabilized by SIK1 but not SIK2 or SIK3. This effect was likely mediated by phosphorylation at S155, S167, S188 and S346 residues of CRTC1 followed by K48-linked polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Expression of gluconeogenic genes such as that coding for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was stimulated by CRTC1, but suppressed by SIK1. Depletion of CRTC1 protein also blocked forskolin-induced gluconeogenic gene expression, knockdown or pharmaceutical inhibition of SIK1 had the opposite effect. Finally, SIK1-induced ubiquitination of CRTC1 was mediated by RFWD2 ubiquitin ligase at a site not equivalent to K628 in CRTC2. Taken together, our work reveals a regulatory circuit in which SIK1 suppresses gluconeogenic gene transcription by inducing ubiquitination and degradation of CRTC1. Our findings have implications in the development of new antihyperglycemic agents. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Modulation of gene expression made easy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2002-01-01

    A new approach for modulating gene expression, based on randomization of promoter (spacer) sequences, was developed. The method was applied to chromosomal genes in Lactococcus lactis and shown to generate libraries of clones with broad ranges of expression levels of target genes. In one example...... that the method can be applied to modulating the expression of native genes on the chromosome. We constructed a series of strains in which the expression of the las operon, containing the genes pfk, pyk, and ldh, was modulated by integrating a truncated copy of the pfk gene. Importantly, the modulation affected...

  14. Cerebrovascular gene expression in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grell, Anne-Sofie; Frederiksen, Simona Denise; Edvinsson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    in the middle cerebral arteries from hypertensive compared to normotensive rats. The gene expression of 72 genes was decreased and the gene expression of 97 genes was increased. The following genes with a fold difference ≥1.40 were verified by quantitative PCR; Postn, Olr1, Fas, Vldlr, Mmp2, Timp1, Serpine1......, Mmp11, Cd34, Ptgs1 and Ptgs2. The gene expression of Postn, Olr1, Fas, Vldlr, Mmp2, Timp1 and Serpine1 and the protein expression of LOX1 (also known as OLR1) were significantly increased in the middle cerebral arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats compared to Wistar-Kyoto rats. In conclusion...

  15. Aspirin augments the expression of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli protein by suppression of IKKβ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashida, Noboru, E-mail: nashida@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Innovative Medicine, Institute for Advancement of Clinical and Translational Science, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Kishihata, Masako [Department of Clinical Innovative Medicine, Institute for Advancement of Clinical and Translational Science, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Tien, Dat Nguyen [Department of Clinical Innovative Medicine, Institute for Advancement of Clinical and Translational Science, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Kamei, Kaeko [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Kimura, Takeshi [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Yokode, Masayuki [Department of Clinical Innovative Medicine, Institute for Advancement of Clinical and Translational Science, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Clinical studies revealed aspirin inhibits cancer, but the mechanism is not known. • Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) is a well-known tumor-suppressing gene. • We found aspirin up-regulates the protein of APC. • Aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, an essential kinase in NFκB activation. • The deletion of IKKβ significantly increases the expression of APC protein. - Abstract: Aspirin has been widely used as analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory medicine for long. In addition to these traditional effects, clinical studies suggest that aspirin can protect against cancer, but its mechanism has not been explored. To unveil it, we identified the proteins up- or down-regulated after incubation with aspirin by using proteomics analysis with Nano-flow LC/MALDI-TOF system. Interestingly, the analysis identified the protein of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) as one of the most up-regulated protein. APC regulates cell proliferation or angiogenesis, and is widely known as a tumor-suppressing gene which can cause colorectal cancer when it is mutated. Western blots confirmed this result, and real-time PCR indicated it is transcriptionally regulated. We further tried to elucidate the molecular mechanism with focusing on IKKβ. IKKβ is the essential kinase in activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), major transcriptional factors that regulate genes responsible for inflammation or immune response. Previous reports indicated that aspirin specifically inhibits IKKβ activity, and constitutively active form of IKKβ accelerates APC loss. We found that aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, and the deletion of IKKβ by siRNA increases the expression of APC in HEK294 cells. Finally, we observed similar effects of aspirin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these results reveal that aspirin up-regulates the expression of APC via the suppression of IKKβ. This can be a mechanism how aspirin prevents cancer at

  16. Aspirin augments the expression of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli protein by suppression of IKKβ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashida, Noboru; Kishihata, Masako; Tien, Dat Nguyen; Kamei, Kaeko; Kimura, Takeshi; Yokode, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Clinical studies revealed aspirin inhibits cancer, but the mechanism is not known. • Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) is a well-known tumor-suppressing gene. • We found aspirin up-regulates the protein of APC. • Aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, an essential kinase in NFκB activation. • The deletion of IKKβ significantly increases the expression of APC protein. - Abstract: Aspirin has been widely used as analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory medicine for long. In addition to these traditional effects, clinical studies suggest that aspirin can protect against cancer, but its mechanism has not been explored. To unveil it, we identified the proteins up- or down-regulated after incubation with aspirin by using proteomics analysis with Nano-flow LC/MALDI-TOF system. Interestingly, the analysis identified the protein of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) as one of the most up-regulated protein. APC regulates cell proliferation or angiogenesis, and is widely known as a tumor-suppressing gene which can cause colorectal cancer when it is mutated. Western blots confirmed this result, and real-time PCR indicated it is transcriptionally regulated. We further tried to elucidate the molecular mechanism with focusing on IKKβ. IKKβ is the essential kinase in activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), major transcriptional factors that regulate genes responsible for inflammation or immune response. Previous reports indicated that aspirin specifically inhibits IKKβ activity, and constitutively active form of IKKβ accelerates APC loss. We found that aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, and the deletion of IKKβ by siRNA increases the expression of APC in HEK294 cells. Finally, we observed similar effects of aspirin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these results reveal that aspirin up-regulates the expression of APC via the suppression of IKKβ. This can be a mechanism how aspirin prevents cancer at

  17. Z-360, a novel therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer, prevents up-regulation of ephrin B1 gene expression and phosphorylation of NR2B via suppression of interleukin-1 β production in a cancer-induced pain model in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hori Yuko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Z-360 is an orally active cholecystokinin-2 (CCK2/gastrin receptor antagonist currently under development as a therapeutic drug for pancreatic cancer. It was previously reported that Z-360 treatment in combination with gemcitabine prolonged the survival period in a lethal pancreatic cancer xenograft model in mice. In a phase Ib/IIa clinical study, Z-360 treatment displayed a trend of reduced pain in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer in combination with gemcitabine including analgesics such as opioids. Here, we investigated the mechanism of analgesic action of Z-360 in a severe cancer-induced pain model in mice, which is considered to be opioid-resistant, by examining ephrin B1 gene expression, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NR2B subunit phosphorylation, and interleukin-1β (IL-1β production. Results In a mouse model of cancer-induced pain, ephrin B1 gene expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs and the phosphorylation of NR2B in the spinal cord were induced. Z-360 treatment inhibited both ephrin B1 gene expression and the phosphorylation of NR2B. In addition, IL-1β production increased in the cancer-inoculated hind paw of mice, but could be suppressed by treatment with Z-360. Moreover, we observed that the CCK1 receptor antagonist devazepide similarly suppressed up-regulation of ephrin B1 gene expression and IL-1β production, and that the intraperitoneal injection of sulfated CCK-8 induced the production of IL-1β in the cancer-inoculated region. Conclusions We have identified a novel pain cascade, in which IL-1β production in cancer-inoculated regions induces ephrin B1 gene expression in DRGs and then ephrin B1 enhances the tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B via Eph B receptor in the spinal cord. Notably, Z-360 relieves cancer-induced pain by preventing this pain cascade through the suppression of IL-1β production, likely via the blockade of CCK1 receptor. The pre-clinical results presented here support the analgesic

  18. Adaptive Evolution of Gene Expression in Drosophila

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    Armita Nourmohammad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression levels are important quantitative traits that link genotypes to molecular functions and fitness. In Drosophila, population-genetic studies have revealed substantial adaptive evolution at the genomic level, but the evolutionary modes of gene expression remain controversial. Here, we present evidence that adaptation dominates the evolution of gene expression levels in flies. We show that 64% of the observed expression divergence across seven Drosophila species are adaptive changes driven by directional selection. Our results are derived from time-resolved data of gene expression divergence across a family of related species, using a probabilistic inference method for gene-specific selection. Adaptive gene expression is stronger in specific functional classes, including regulation, sensory perception, sexual behavior, and morphology. Moreover, we identify a large group of genes with sex-specific adaptation of expression, which predominantly occurs in males. Our analysis opens an avenue to map system-wide selection on molecular quantitative traits independently of their genetic basis.

  19. XENOBIOTIC INDUCED ORGAN-SPECIFIC GENE EXPRESSION AND MACRO/MICROARRAY DEVELOPMENT IN MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of an ongoing effort to understand and address the short and long-term consequences of increasing levels of environmental contaminants, we used suppressive subtractive hydridization (SSH) to develop gene expression profiles from Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) exposed ...

  20. Peripheral Androgen Receptor Gene Suppression Rescues Disease in Mouse Models of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

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    Andrew P. Lieberman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is caused by the polyglutamine androgen receptor (polyQ-AR, a protein expressed by both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle. Although viewed as a motor neuronopathy, data from patients and mouse models suggest that muscle contributes to disease pathogenesis. Here, we tested this hypothesis using AR113Q knockin and human bacterial artificial chromosome/clone (BAC transgenic mice that express the full-length polyQ-AR and display androgen-dependent weakness, muscle atrophy, and early death. We developed antisense oligonucleotides that suppressed AR gene expression in the periphery but not the CNS after subcutaneous administration. Suppression of polyQ-AR in the periphery rescued deficits in muscle weight, fiber size, and grip strength, reversed changes in muscle gene expression, and extended the lifespan of mutant males. We conclude that polyQ-AR expression in the periphery is an important contributor to pathology in SBMA mice and that peripheral administration of therapeutics should be explored for SBMA patients.

  1. Nonlinear dimensionality reduction of gene expression data

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Using microarray measurements techniques, it is possible to measure the activity of genes simultaneously across the whole genome. Since genes influence each others activity levels through complex regulatory networks, such gene expression measurements are state samples of a dynamical system. Gene expression data has proven useful for diagnosis and definition of disease subgroups, for inference of the functional role of a given gene or for the deciphering of complex disease mechanisms. However,...

  2. Fear Expression Suppresses Medial Prefrontal Cortical Firing in Rats.

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    Thomas F Giustino

    Full Text Available The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC plays a crucial role in emotional learning and memory in rodents and humans. While many studies suggest a differential role for the prelimbic (PL and infralimbic (IL subdivisions of mPFC, few have considered the relationship between neural activity in these two brain regions recorded simultaneously in behaving animals. Importantly, how concurrent PL and IL activity relate to conditioned freezing behavior is largely unknown. Here we used single-unit recordings targeting PL and IL in awake, behaving rats during the acquisition and expression of conditioned fear. On Day 1, rats received either signaled or unsignaled footshocks in the recording chamber; an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS preceded signaled footshocks. Twenty-four hours later, animals were returned to the recording chamber (modified to create a novel context where they received 5 CS-alone trials. After fear conditioning, both signaled and unsignaled rats exhibited high levels of post-shock freezing that was associated with an enduring suppression of mPFC spontaneous firing, particularly in the IL of signaled rats. Twenty-four hours later, CS presentation produced differential conditioned freezing in signaled and unsignaled rats: freezing increased in rats that had received signaled shocks, but decreased in animals in the unsignaled condition (i.e., external inhibition. This group difference in CS-evoked freezing was mirrored in the spontaneous firing rate of neurons in both PL and IL. Interestingly, differences in PL and IL firing rate highly correlated with freezing levels. In other words, in the signaled group IL spontaneous rates were suppressed relative to PL, perhaps limiting IL-mediated suppression of fear and allowing PL activity to dominate performance, resulting in high levels of freezing. This was not observed in the unsignaled group, which exhibited low freezing. These data reveal that the activity of mPFC neurons is modulated by both

  3. Antisense-induced suppression of taxoid 14β- hydroxylase gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Following the construction of an antisense RNA expression vector of 14OH from Taxus chinensis, the antisense 14OH cDNA (as14OH) was introduced into TM3 cells by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Southern blot analysis of hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (HYG) revealed that this selection ...

  4. Bovine Mammary Gene Expression Profiling during the Onset of Lactation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuanyuan; Lin, Xueyan; Shi, Kerong; Yan, Zhengui; Wang, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Background Lactogenesis includes two stages. Stage I begins a few weeks before parturition. Stage II is initiated around the time of parturition and extends for several days afterwards. Methodology/Principal Findings To better understand the molecular events underlying these changes, genome-wide gene expression profiling was conducted using digital gene expression (DGE) on bovine mammary tissue at three time points (on approximately day 35 before parturition (−35 d), day 7 before parturition (−7 d) and day 3 after parturition (+3 d)). Approximately 6.2 million (M), 5.8 million (M) and 6.1 million (M) 21-nt cDNA tags were sequenced in the three cDNA libraries (−35 d, −7 d and +3 d), respectively. After aligning to the reference sequences, the three cDNA libraries included 8,662, 8,363 and 8,359 genes, respectively. With a fold change cutoff criteria of ≥2 or ≤−2 and a false discovery rate (FDR) of ≤0.001, a total of 812 genes were significantly differentially expressed at −7 d compared with −35 d (stage I). Gene ontology analysis showed that those significantly differentially expressed genes were mainly associated with cell cycle, lipid metabolism, immune response and biological adhesion. A total of 1,189 genes were significantly differentially expressed at +3 d compared with −7 d (stage II), and these genes were mainly associated with the immune response and cell cycle. Moreover, there were 1,672 genes significantly differentially expressed at +3 d compared with −35 d. Gene ontology analysis showed that the main differentially expressed genes were those associated with metabolic processes. Conclusions The results suggest that the mammary gland begins to lactate not only by a gain of function but also by a broad suppression of function to effectively push most of the cell's resources towards lactation. PMID:23990904

  5. Bovine mammary gene expression profiling during the onset of lactation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lactogenesis includes two stages. Stage I begins a few weeks before parturition. Stage II is initiated around the time of parturition and extends for several days afterwards. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To better understand the molecular events underlying these changes, genome-wide gene expression profiling was conducted using digital gene expression (DGE on bovine mammary tissue at three time points (on approximately day 35 before parturition (-35 d, day 7 before parturition (-7 d and day 3 after parturition (+3 d. Approximately 6.2 million (M, 5.8 million (M and 6.1 million (M 21-nt cDNA tags were sequenced in the three cDNA libraries (-35 d, -7 d and +3 d, respectively. After aligning to the reference sequences, the three cDNA libraries included 8,662, 8,363 and 8,359 genes, respectively. With a fold change cutoff criteria of ≥ 2 or ≤-2 and a false discovery rate (FDR of ≤ 0.001, a total of 812 genes were significantly differentially expressed at -7 d compared with -35 d (stage I. Gene ontology analysis showed that those significantly differentially expressed genes were mainly associated with cell cycle, lipid metabolism, immune response and biological adhesion. A total of 1,189 genes were significantly differentially expressed at +3 d compared with -7 d (stage II, and these genes were mainly associated with the immune response and cell cycle. Moreover, there were 1,672 genes significantly differentially expressed at +3 d compared with -35 d. Gene ontology analysis showed that the main differentially expressed genes were those associated with metabolic processes. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the mammary gland begins to lactate not only by a gain of function but also by a broad suppression of function to effectively push most of the cell's resources towards lactation.

  6. Cadmium-mediated disruption of cortisol biosynthesis involves suppression of corticosteroidogenic genes in rainbow trout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandhu, Navdeep; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2011-01-01

    Cadmium is widely distributed in the aquatic environment and is toxic to fish even at sublethal concentrations. This metal is an endocrine disruptor, and one well established role in teleosts is the suppression of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-stimulated cortisol biosynthesis by the interrenal tissue. However the mechanism(s) leading to this steroid suppression is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that cadmium targets genes encoding proteins critical for corticosteroid biosynthesis, including melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To test this, head kidney slices (containing the interrenal tissues) were incubated in vitro with cadmium chloride (0, 10, 100 and 1000 nM) for 4 h either in the presence or absence of ACTH (0.5 IU/mL). In the unstimulated head kidney slices, cadmium exposure did not affect basal cortisol secretion and the mRNA levels of MC2R and P450scc, while StAR gene expression was significantly reduced. Cadmium exposure significantly suppressed ACTH-stimulated cortisol production in a dose-related fashion. This cadmium-mediated suppression in corticosteroidogenesis corresponded with a significant reduction in MC2R, StAR and P450scc mRNA levels in trout head kidney slices. The inhibition of ACTH-stimulated cortisol production and suppression of genes involved in corticosteroidogenesis by cadmium were completely abolished in the presence of 8-Bromo-cAMP (a cAMP analog). Overall, cadmium disrupts the expression of genes critical for corticosteroid biosynthesis in rainbow trout head kidney slices. However, the rescue of cortisol production as well as StAR and P450scc gene expressions by cAMP analog suggests that cadmium impact occurs upstream of cAMP production. We propose that MC2R signaling, the primary step in ACTH-induced cortocosteroidogenesis, is a key target for cadmium-mediated disruption of

  7. Cadmium-mediated disruption of cortisol biosynthesis involves suppression of corticosteroidogenic genes in rainbow trout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, Navdeep [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Vijayan, Mathilakath M., E-mail: mvijayan@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2011-05-15

    Cadmium is widely distributed in the aquatic environment and is toxic to fish even at sublethal concentrations. This metal is an endocrine disruptor, and one well established role in teleosts is the suppression of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-stimulated cortisol biosynthesis by the interrenal tissue. However the mechanism(s) leading to this steroid suppression is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that cadmium targets genes encoding proteins critical for corticosteroid biosynthesis, including melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To test this, head kidney slices (containing the interrenal tissues) were incubated in vitro with cadmium chloride (0, 10, 100 and 1000 nM) for 4 h either in the presence or absence of ACTH (0.5 IU/mL). In the unstimulated head kidney slices, cadmium exposure did not affect basal cortisol secretion and the mRNA levels of MC2R and P450scc, while StAR gene expression was significantly reduced. Cadmium exposure significantly suppressed ACTH-stimulated cortisol production in a dose-related fashion. This cadmium-mediated suppression in corticosteroidogenesis corresponded with a significant reduction in MC2R, StAR and P450scc mRNA levels in trout head kidney slices. The inhibition of ACTH-stimulated cortisol production and suppression of genes involved in corticosteroidogenesis by cadmium were completely abolished in the presence of 8-Bromo-cAMP (a cAMP analog). Overall, cadmium disrupts the expression of genes critical for corticosteroid biosynthesis in rainbow trout head kidney slices. However, the rescue of cortisol production as well as StAR and P450scc gene expressions by cAMP analog suggests that cadmium impact occurs upstream of cAMP production. We propose that MC2R signaling, the primary step in ACTH-induced cortocosteroidogenesis, is a key target for cadmium-mediated disruption of

  8. Effects of Assisted Reproduction Technology on Placental Imprinted Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Yukiko; Aoki, Chizu; Tamaki-Ishihara, Yuko; Fukuda, Yusuke; Kitamura, Mamoru; Matsue, Yoichi; So, Akiko; Morita, Mineto

    2010-01-01

    We used placental tissue to compare the imprinted gene expression of IGF2, H19, KCNQ1OT1, and CDKN1C of singletons conceived via assisted reproduction technology (ART) with that of spontaneously conceived (SC) singletons. Of 989 singletons examined (ART n = 65; SC n = 924), neonatal weight was significantly lower (P < .001) in the ART group than in the SC group, but placental weight showed no significant difference. Gene expression analyzed by real-time PCR was similar for both groups with appropriate-for-date (AFD) birth weight. H19 expression was suppressed in fetal growth retardation (FGR) cases in the ART and SC groups compared with AFD cases (P < .02 and P < .05, resp.). In contrast, CDKN1C expression was suppressed in FGR cases in the ART group (P < .01), while KCNQ1OT1 expression was hyperexpressed in FGR cases in the SC group (P < .05). As imprinted gene expression patterns differed between the ART and SC groups, we speculate that ART modifies epigenetic status even though the possibilities always exist. PMID:20706653

  9. Knockdown of Pokemon protein expression inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation by suppression of AKT activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaosan; Dai, Yichen; Chen, Zhangxin; Xie, Junpei; Zeng, Wei; Lin, Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of Pokemon, which is an erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor protein, occurs in different cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Pokemon is also reported to have an oncogenic activity in various human cancers. This study investigated the effect of Pokemon knockdown on the regulation of HCC growth. POK shRNA suppressed the expression of Pokemon protein in HepG2 cells compared to the negative control vector-transfected HCC cells. Pokemon knockdown also reduced HCC cell viability and enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in HCC cells. AKT activation and the expression of various cell cycle-related genes were inhibited following Pokemon knockdown. These data demonstrate that Pokemon may play a role in HCC progression, suggesting that inhibition of Pokemon expression using Pokemon shRNA should be further evaluated as a novel target for the control of HCC.

  10. Differential gene-expression profiles associated with gastric adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenawa, H; Kurosaki, M; Enomoto, N; Miyasaka, Y; Kanazawa, N; Sakamoto, N; Ikeda, T; Izumi, N; Sato, C; Watanabe, M

    2004-01-12

    Gastric adenomas may eventually progress to adenocarcinomas at varying rates. The purpose of the present study was to identify gene-expression profiles linked to the heterogeneous nature of gastric adenoma as compared to adenocarcinoma. Suppression subtractive hybridisation analysis was performed to extract relevant genes from two cases of low- and high-grade gastric adenomas. The identified genes were quantified by RT-PCR in 14 low-grade adenoma, nine high-grade adenoma and nine adenocarcinoma samples, followed by hierarchical clustering analysis to separate tumours into groups according to their gene-expression profiles. Nine genes previously implicated in carcinogenesis in a variety of organs, including three genes related to gastric adenocarcinoma, were identified. The overexpression of these genes in gastric adenoma has not been reported previously. The clustering analysis of these nine genes across 32 cases identified three groups, one of which consisted primarily of adenocarcinomas, whereas the other two groups consisted of adenomas. One group of adenomas, characterised by larger tumour size, exhibited gene-expression profiles of an intestinal cell lineage implicated in the pathogenesis of an intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. Another adenoma group consisting of low-grade adenomas with smaller tumour size exhibited a unique expression profile. In conclusion, clustering analysis of expression profiles using a limited number of genes may serve as molecular markers for gastric adenoma with different biological properties. Although the prognostic values of these gene-expression profiles need to be evaluated in further follow-up study of adenoma cases, these findings add new insights to (a) our understanding of the pathogenesis of gastric tumours, (b) the development of specific tumour markers for clinical practice, and (c) the design of novel therapeutic targets.

  11. Hypoxia-induced suppression of c-Myc by HIF-2α in human pulmonary endothelial cells attenuates TFAM expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Ali J; Kao, Derrick; Nguyen, Dustin T; Loscalzo, Joseph; Handy, Diane E

    2017-10-01

    The adaptive response to hypoxia is mediated in large part by stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible factors, HIF-1α and HIF-2α. A hallmark of this response is the metabolic shift to decreased oxidative phosphorylation and increased glycolysis. We hypothesized that hypoxic responses would include a suppression of mitochondrial gene expression. We determined the effects of hypoxia on TFAM, a key mitochondrial transcription factor, in normal pulmonary artery endothelial cells. Hypoxia decreased gene expression of TFAM and that of its upstream regulator, the transcriptional co-activator PGC1β. Although HIF-1α and HIF-2α pathways both contributed to hypoxia-mediated PGC1β suppression, TFAM suppression was regulated solely by HIF-2α-dependent mechanisms. We found that HIF-2α suppresses TFAM by decreasing c-Myc expression. In addition, we show a role for c-Jun in this pathway, linking HIF-2α with attenuation of c-Jun activation. Taken together, these findings establish a new link between HIF-2α and MAPK-signaling that mediates the adaptive regulation of mitochondrial gene expression under low oxygen tension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Transgenic expression of nonclassically secreted FGF suppresses kidney repair.

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    Aleksandr Kirov

    Full Text Available FGF1 is a signal peptide-less nonclassically released growth factor that is involved in angiogenesis, tissue repair, inflammation, and carcinogenesis. The effects of nonclassical FGF export in vivo are not sufficiently studied. We produced transgenic mice expressing FGF1 in endothelial cells (EC, which allowed the detection of FGF1 export to the vasculature, and studied the efficiency of postischemic kidney repair in these animals. Although FGF1 transgenic mice had a normal phenotype with unperturbed kidney structure, they showed a severely inhibited kidney repair after unilateral ischemia/reperfusion. This was manifested by a strong decrease of postischemic kidney size and weight, whereas the undamaged contralateral kidney exhibited an enhanced compensatory size increase. In addition, the postischemic kidneys of transgenic mice were characterized by hyperplasia of interstitial cells, paucity of epithelial tubular structures, increase of the areas occupied by connective tissue, and neutrophil and macrophage infiltration. The continuous treatment of transgenic mice with the cell membrane stabilizer, taurine, inhibited nonclassical FGF1 export and significantly rescued postischemic kidney repair. It was also found that similar to EC, the transgenic expression of FGF1 in monocytes and macrophages suppresses kidney repair. We suggest that nonclassical export may be used as a target for the treatment of pathologies involving signal peptide-less FGFs.

  13. Prediction of the gene expression in normal lung tissue by the gene expression in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, Justin W; Zhu, Dakai; Qian, David C; Byun, Jinyoung; Gorlova, Olga Y; Amos, Christopher I; Gorlov, Ivan P

    2015-11-17

    Comparative analysis of gene expression in human tissues is important for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying tissue-specific control of gene expression. It can also open an avenue for using gene expression in blood (which is the most easily accessible human tissue) to predict gene expression in other (less accessible) tissues, which would facilitate the development of novel gene expression based models for assessing disease risk and progression. Until recently, direct comparative analysis across different tissues was not possible due to the scarcity of paired tissue samples from the same individuals. In this study we used paired whole blood/lung gene expression data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We built a generalized linear regression model for each gene using gene expression in lung as the outcome and gene expression in blood, age and gender as predictors. For ~18 % of the genes, gene expression in blood was a significant predictor of gene expression in lung. We found that the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) influencing expression of a given gene in either blood or lung, also known as the number of quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), was positively associated with efficacy of blood-based prediction of that gene's expression in lung. This association was strongest for shared eQTLs: those influencing gene expression in both blood and lung. In conclusion, for a considerable number of human genes, their expression levels in lung can be predicted using observable gene expression in blood. An abundance of shared eQTLs may explain the strong blood/lung correlations in the gene expression.

  14. Synthetic promoter libraries- tuning of gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Karin; Mijakovic, Ivan; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2006-01-01

    The study of gene function often requires changing the expression of a gene and evaluating the consequences. In principle, the expression of any given gene can be modulated in a quasi-continuum of discrete expression levels but the traditional approaches are usually limited to two extremes: gene...... be met by using promoter libraries. This approach generally consists of inserting a library of promoters in front of the gene to be studied, whereby the individual promoters might deviate either in their spacer sequences or bear slight deviations from the consensus sequence of a vegetative promoter. Here......, we describe the two different methods for obtaining promoter libraries and compare their applicability....

  15. Ethanolic extracts of herbal supplement Equiguard suppress growth and control gene expression in CWR22Rv1 cells representing the transition of prostate cancer from androgen dependence to hormone refractory status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tze-Chen; Wu, Joseph M

    2008-01-01

    Dietary supplements and botanical products are widely used by patients diagnosed with prostate cancer (CaP) as a primary or adjuvant form of treatment for their medical conditions in the United States. Many of the available products are complex mixtures composed of extracts from foreign plants, whose mechanism of action typically is not systematically and rigorously investigated. Laboratory studies employing precisely defined conditions and referenced methodologies are essential not only for standardization and characterization of the products, but are also important requisites for providing scientific evidence and molecular insights in regard to the clinical efficacies some of these products purportedly demonstrate. In previous studies from this laboratory, we serendipitously observed that Equiguard, a dietary supplement formulated with extracts from nine Chinese herbs for preventing decline in renal functions associated with the aging process, contain 70% ethanol-extractable ingredients that displayed potent growth inhibitory activities in androgen-dependent (AD) LNCaP and androgen-independent (AI) DU-145 and PC-3 cells. Moreover, significant reduction in expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) also occurred in Equiguard-treated LNCaP cells. Although these results offer the possibility that Equiguard confers chemoprevention for CaP, it remains undetermined whether Equiguard functions in CaP cell types that represent the transition of AD to the AI status. Further, details of its mechanism of action have not been fully elucidated. The studies described in this report focusing on CWR22Rv1 cells are intended to fill these gaps. These cells express AR and PSA, yet show weak responsiveness to androgens and largely proliferate in an AI-independent manner - features that mimic AD --> AI in clinically advanced disease. Using the CWR22Rv1 cells, we showed that 70% ethanolic extracts of Equiguard effectively suppressed colony formation

  16. Implication of p53-dependent cellular senescence related gene, TARSH in tumor suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakoh, Takeshi; Uekawa, Natsuko; Terauchi, Kunihiko; Sugimoto, Masataka; Ishigami, Akihito; Shimada, Jun-ichi; Maruyama, Mitsuo

    2009-01-01

    A novel target of NESH-SH3 (TARSH) was identified as a cellular senescence related gene in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) replicative senescence, the expression of which has been suppressed in primary clinical lung cancer specimens. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of TARSH involved in pulmonary tumorigenesis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the reduction of TARSH gene expression by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) system robustly inhibited the MEFs proliferation with increase in senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity. Using p53 -/- MEFs, we further suggest that this growth arrest by loss of TARSH is evoked by p53-dependent p21 Cip1 accumulation. Moreover, we also reveal that TARSH reduction induces multicentrosome in MEFs, which is linked in chromosome instability and tumor development. These results suggest that TARSH plays an important role in proliferation of replicative senescence and may serve as a trigger of tumor development.

  17. P53 suppresses expression of the 14-3-3gamma oncogene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wenqing

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 14-3-3 proteins are a family of highly conserved proteins that are involved in a wide range of cellular processes. Recent evidence indicates that some of these proteins have oncogenic activity and that they may promote tumorigenesis. We previously showed that one of the 14-3-3 family members, 14-3-3gamma, is over expressed in human lung cancers and that it can induce transformation of rodent cells in vitro. Methods qRTPCR and Western blot analysis were performed to examine 14-3-3gamma expression in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC. Gene copy number was analyzed by qPCR. P53 mutations were detected by direct sequencing and also by western blot. CHIP and yeast one hybrid assays were used to detect p53 binding to 14-3-3gamma promoter. Results Quantitative rtPCR results showed that the expression level of 14-3-3gamma was elevated in the majority of NSCLC that we examined which was also consistent with protein expression. Further analysis of the expression pattern of 14-3-3gamma in lung tumors showed a correlation with p53 mutations suggesting that p53 might suppress 14-3-3 gamma expression. Analysis of the gamma promoter sequence revealed the presence of a p53 consensus binding motif and in vitro assays demonstrated that wild-type p53 bound to this motif when activated by ionizing radiation. Deletion of the p53 binding motif eliminated p53's ability to suppress 14-3-3gamma expression. Conclusion Increased expression of 14-3-3gamma in lung cancer coincides with loss of functional p53. Hence, we propose that 14-3-3gamma's oncogenic activities cooperate with loss of p53 to promote lung tumorigenesis.

  18. Lgr4 Expression in Osteoblastic Cells Is Suppressed by Hydrogen Peroxide Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawaputanon Na Mahasarakham, Chantida; Izu, Yayoi; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Izumi, Yuichi; Noda, Masaki; Ezura, Yoichi

    2017-07-01

    LGR4 is expressed in bone and has been shown to be involved in bone metabolism. Oxidative stress is one of the key issues in pathophysiology of osteoporosis. However, the link between Lgr4 and oxidative stress has not been known. Therefore, effects of hydrogen peroxide on Lgr4 expression in osteoblasts were examined. Hydrogen peroxide treatment suppressed the levels of Lgr4 mRNA expression in an osteoblastic cell line, MC3T3-E1. The suppressive effects were not obvious at 0.1 mM, while 1 mM hydrogen peroxide suppressed Lgr4 expression by more than 50%. Hydrogen peroxide treatment suppressed Lgr4 expression within 12 h and this suppression lasted at least up to 48 h. Hydrogen peroxide suppression of Lgr4 expression was still observed in the presence of a transcription inhibitor but was no longer observed in the presence of a protein synthesis inhibitor. Although Lgr4 expression in osteoblasts is enhanced by BMP2 treatment as reported before, hydrogen peroxide treatment suppressed Lgr4 even in the presence of BMP2. Finally, hydrogen peroxide suppressed Lgr4 expression in primary cultures of osteoblasts similarly to MC3T3-E1 cells. These date indicate that hydrogen peroxide suppresses Lgr4 expression in osteoblastic cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1761-1766, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Ozone responsive genes in Medicago truncatula: analysis by suppression subtraction hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckette, Michael; Peal, Lila; Steele, Jarrod; Tang, Yuhong; Mahalingam, Ramamurthy

    2009-08-15

    Acute ozone is a model abiotic elicitor of oxidative stress in plants. In order to identify genes that are important for conferring ozone resistance or sensitivity we used two accessions of Medicago truncatula with contrasting responses to this oxidant. We used suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) to identify genes differentially expressed in ozone-sensitive Jemalong and ozone-resistant JE154 following exposure to 300 nLL(-1) of ozone for 6h. Following differential screening of more than 2500 clones from four subtraction libraries, more than 800 clones were selected for sequencing. Sequence analysis of these clones identified 239 unique contigs. Fifteen novel genes of unknown functions were identified. A majority of the ozone responsive genes identified in this study were present in the Medicago truncatula EST collections. Genes induced in JE154 were associated with adaptive responses to stress, while in Jemalong, the gene ontologies for oxidative stress, cell growth, and translation were enriched. A meta-analysis of ozone responsive genes using the Genvestigator program indicated enrichment of ABA and auxin responsive genes in JE154, while cytokinin response genes were induced in Jemalong. In resistant JE154, down regulation of photosynthesis-related genes and up regulation of genes responding to low nitrate leads us to speculate that lowering carbon-nitrogen balance may be an important resource allocation strategy for overcoming oxidative stress. Temporal profiles of select genes using real-time PCR analysis showed that most of the genes in Jemalong were induced at the later time points and is consistent with our earlier microarray studies. Inability to mount an early active transcriptional reprogramming in Jemalong may be the cause for an inefficient defense response that in turn leads to severe oxidative stress and culminates in cell death.

  20. Transgenic Suppression of AGAMOUS Genes in Apple Reduces Fertility and Increases Floral Attractiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Klocko, Amy L.; Borejsza-Wysocka, Ewa; Brunner, Amy M.; Shevchenko, Olga; Aldwinckle, Herb; Strauss, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ability of RNA interference (RNAi) directed against two co-orthologs of AGAMOUS (AG) from Malus domestica (domestic apple, MdAG) to reduce the risks of invasiveness and provide genetic containment of transgenes, while also promoting the attractiveness of flowers for ornamental usage. Suppression of two MdAG-like genes, MdMADS15 and MdMADS22, led to the production of trees with highly showy, polypetalous flowers. These "double-flowers" had strongly reduced expression of bot...

  1. Profiling Gene Expression in Germinating Brassica Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myoung Ryoul; Wang, Yi-Hong; Hasenstein, Karl H

    2014-01-01

    Based on previously developed solid-phase gene extraction (SPGE) we examined the mRNA profile in primary roots of Brassica rapa seedlings for highly expressed genes like ACT7 (actin7), TUB (tubulin1), UBQ (ubiquitin), and low expressed GLK (glucokinase) during the first day post-germination. The assessment was based on the mRNA load of the SPGE probe of about 2.1 ng. The number of copies of the investigated genes changed spatially along the length of primary roots. The expression level of all genes differed significantly at each sample position. Among the examined genes ACT7 expression was most even along the root. UBQ was highest at the tip and root-shoot junction (RS). TUB and GLK showed a basipetal gradient. The temporal expression of UBQ was highest in the MZ 9 h after primary root emergence and higher than at any other sample position. Expressions of GLK in EZ and RS increased gradually over time. SPGE extraction is the result of oligo-dT and oligo-dA hybridization and the results illustrate that SPGE can be used for gene expression profiling at high spatial and temporal resolution. SPGE needles can be used within two weeks when stored at 4 °C. Our data indicate that gene expression studies that are based on the entire root miss important differences in gene expression that SPGE is able to resolve for example growth adjustments during gravitropism.

  2. Polycistronic gene expression in Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetze, Tabea; Meyer, Vera

    2017-09-25

    Genome mining approaches predict dozens of biosynthetic gene clusters in each of the filamentous fungal genomes sequenced so far. However, the majority of these gene clusters still remain cryptic because they are not expressed in their natural host. Simultaneous expression of all genes belonging to a biosynthetic pathway in a heterologous host is one approach to activate biosynthetic gene clusters and to screen the metabolites produced for bioactivities. Polycistronic expression of all pathway genes under control of a single and tunable promoter would be the method of choice, as this does not only simplify cloning procedures, but also offers control on timing and strength of expression. However, polycistronic gene expression is a feature not commonly found in eukaryotic host systems, such as Aspergillus niger. In this study, we tested the suitability of the viral P2A peptide for co-expression of three genes in A. niger. Two genes descend from Fusarium oxysporum and are essential to produce the secondary metabolite enniatin (esyn1, ekivR). The third gene (luc) encodes the reporter luciferase which was included to study position effects. Expression of the polycistronic gene cassette was put under control of the Tet-On system to ensure tunable gene expression in A. niger. In total, three polycistronic expression cassettes which differed in the position of luc were constructed and targeted to the pyrG locus in A. niger. This allowed direct comparison of the luciferase activity based on the position of the luciferase gene. Doxycycline-mediated induction of the Tet-On expression cassettes resulted in the production of one long polycistronic mRNA as proven by Northern analyses, and ensured comparable production of enniatin in all three strains. Notably, gene position within the polycistronic expression cassette matters, as, luciferase activity was lowest at position one and had a comparable activity at positions two and three. The P2A peptide can be used to express at

  3. Fetuin-A induces cytokine expression and suppresses adiponectin production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita M Hennige

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The secreted liver protein fetuin-A (AHSG is up-regulated in hepatic steatosis and the metabolic syndrome. These states are strongly associated with low-grade inflammation and hypoadiponectinemia. We, therefore, hypothesized that fetuin-A may play a role in the regulation of cytokine expression, the modulation of adipose tissue expression and plasma concentration of the insulin-sensitizing and atheroprotective adipokine adiponectin. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human monocytic THP1 cells and human in vitro differenttiated adipocytes as well as C57BL/6 mice were treated with fetuin-A. mRNA expression of the genes encoding inflammatory cytokines and the adipokine adiponectin (ADIPOQ was assessed by real-time RT-PCR. In 122 subjects, plasma levels of fetuin-A, adiponectin and, in a subgroup, the multimeric forms of adiponectin were determined. Fetuin-A treatment induced TNF and IL1B mRNA expression in THP1 cells (p<0.05. Treatment of mice with fetuin-A, analogously, resulted in a marked increase in adipose tissue Tnf mRNA as well as Il6 expression (27- and 174-fold, respectively. These effects were accompanied by a decrease in adipose tissue Adipoq mRNA expression and lower circulating adiponectin levels (p<0.05, both. Furthermore, fetuin-A repressed ADIPOQ mRNA expression of human in vitro differentiated adipocytes (p<0.02 and induced inflammatory cytokine expression. In humans in plasma, fetuin-A correlated positively with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, a marker of subclinical inflammation (r = 0.26, p = 0.01, and negatively with total- (r = -0.28, p = 0.02 and, particularly, high molecular weight adiponectin (r = -0.36, p = 0.01. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We provide novel evidence that the secreted liver protein fetuin-A induces low-grade inflammation and represses adiponectin production in animals and in humans. These data suggest an important role of fatty liver in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and

  4. Heterologous expression of gentian MYB1R transcription factors suppresses anthocyanin pigmentation in tobacco flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, Takashi; Yamada, Eri; Saito, Misa; Fujita, Kohei; Nishihara, Masahiro

    2013-12-01

    Single-repeat MYB transcription factors, GtMYB1R1 and GtMYB1R9 , were isolated from gentian. Overexpression of these genes reduced anthocyanin accumulation in tobacco flowers, demonstrating their applicability to modification of flower color. RNA interference (RNAi) has recently been used to successfully modify flower color intensity in several plant species. In most floricultural plants, this technique requires prior isolation of target flavonoid biosynthetic genes from the same or closely related species. To overcome this limitation, we developed a simple and efficient method for reducing floral anthocyanin accumulation based on genetic engineering using novel transcription factor genes isolated from Japanese gentians. We identified two single-repeat MYB genes--GtMYB1R and GtMYB1R9--predominantly expressed in gentian petals. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing these genes were produced, and their flowers were analyzed for flavonoid components and expression of flavonoid biosynthetic genes. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing GtMYB1R1 or GtMYB1R9 exhibited significant reductions in floral anthocyanin accumulation, resulting in white-flowered phenotypes. Expression levels of chalcone isomerase (CHI), dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR), and anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) genes were preferentially suppressed in these transgenic tobacco flowers. A yeast two-hybrid assay demonstrated that both GtMYB1R1 and GtMYB1R9 proteins interacted with the GtbHLH1 protein, previously identified as an anthocyanin biosynthesis regulator in gentian flowers. In addition, a transient expression assay indicated that activation of the gentian GtDFR promoter by the GtMYB3-GtbHLH1 complex was partly canceled by addition of GtMYB1R1 or GtMYB1R9. These results suggest that GtMYB1R1 and GtMYB1R9 act as antagonistic transcription factors of anthocyanin biosynthesis in gentian flowers. These genes should consequently be useful for manipulating anthocyanin accumulation via genetic engineering in

  5. Gene Expression and Microarray Investigation of Dendrobium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Result: Between the diabetic rat group and the wild-type group, 1339 functional genes showed differences in expression levels (p < 0.05). ... Genes whose expression normalized were mainly those affected by the disease state and associated with glucose and lipid metabolism, cell growth, apoptosis, biosynthesis, olfactory ...

  6. Expression of conserved signalling pathway genes during

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hence, we analysed the expression of Notch, Wnt and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathway genes during differentiation of R1 cells into early vascular lineages. Notch-, Wnt-and Shh-mediated signalling is important during embryonic development. Regulation of gene expression through these signalling molecules is a frequently ...

  7. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ruissen, Fred; Baas, Frank

    2007-01-01

    In 1995, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) was developed as a versatile tool for gene expression studies. SAGE technology does not require pre-existing knowledge of the genome that is being examined and therefore SAGE can be applied to many different model systems. In this chapter, the SAGE

  8. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer suppresses experimental arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Quattrocchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Collagen Induced Arthritis (CIA is a widely studied animal model to develop and test novel therapeutic approaches for treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA in humans. Soluble Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4-Ig, which binds B7 molecule on antigen presenting cells and blocks CD28 mediated T-lymphocyte activation, has been shown to ameliorate experimental autoimmune diseases such as lupus, diabetes and CIA. Objective of our research was to investigate in vivo the effectiveness of blocking the B7/CD28 T-lymphocyte co-stimulatory pathway, utilizing a gene transfer technology, as a therapeutic strategy against CIA. Replication-deficient adenoviruses encoding a chimeric CTLA4-Ig fusion protein, or β-galactosidase as control, have been injected intravenously once at arthritis onset. Disease activity has been monitored by the assessment of clinical score, paw thickness and type II collagen (CII specific cellular and humoral immune responses for 21 days. The adenovirally delivered CTLA4-Ig fusion protein at a dose of 2×108 pfu suppressed established CIA, whereas the control β-galactosidase did not significantly affect the disease course. CII-specific lymphocyte proliferation, IFNg production and anti-CII antibodies were significantly reduced by CTLA4-Ig treatment. Our results demonstrate that blockade of the B7/CD28 co-stimulatory pathway by adenovirus-mediated CTLA4-Ig gene transfer is effective in treating established CIA suggesting its potential in treating RA.

  9. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  10. Low-dose radiation suppresses Pokemon expression under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Whan; Yu, Kweon; Shin, Kee-Sun; Kwon, Kisang; Hwang, Tae-Sik; Kwon, O-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Our previous data demonstrated that CoCl2-induced hypoxia controls endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated and other intracellular factors. One of them, the transcription factor Pokemon, was differentially regulated by low-dose radiation (LDR). There are limited data regarding how this transcription factor is involved in expression of the unfolded protein response (UPR) under hypoxic conditions. The purpose of this study was to obtain clues on how Pokemon is involved in the UPR. Pokemon was selected as a differentially expressed gene under hypoxic conditions; however, its regulation was clearly repressed by LDR. It was also demonstrated that both expression of ER chaperones and ER stress sensors were affected by hypoxic conditions, and the same results were obtained when cells in which Pokemon was up- or down-regulated were used. The current state of UPR and LDR research associated with the Pokemon pathway offers an important opportunity to understand the oncogenesis, senescence, and differentiation of cells, as well as to facilitate introduction of new therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals.

  11. Expression of Sox genes in tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Watanabe, Momoko; Idrus, Erik; Nagai, Takahiro; Oommen, Shelly; Maeda, Takeyasu; Hagiwara, Nobuko; Que, Jianwen; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Sox gene family play roles in many biological processes including organogenesis. We carried out comparative in situ hybridization analysis of seventeen sox genes (Sox1-14, 17, 18, 21) during murine odontogenesis from the epithelial thickening to the cytodifferentiation stages. Localized expression of five Sox genes (Sox6, 9, 13, 14 and 21) was observed in tooth bud epithelium. Sox13 showed restricted expression in the primary enamel knots. At the early bell stage, three Sox genes (Sox8, 11, 17 and 21) were expressed in pre-ameloblasts, whereas two others (Sox5 and 18) showed expression in odontoblasts. Sox genes thus showed a dynamic spatio-temporal expression during tooth development.

  12. Determinants of human adipose tissue gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viguerie, Nathalie; Montastier, Emilie; Maoret, Jean-José

    2012-01-01

    of environmental and individual factors controlling AT adaptation is therefore essential. Here, expression of 271 transcripts, selected for regulation according to obesity and weight changes, was determined in 515 individuals before, after 8-week low-calorie diet-induced weight loss, and after 26-week ad libitum...... interconnection between expression of genes involved in de novo lipogenesis and components of the metabolic syndrome. Sex had a marked influence on AT expression of 88 transcripts, which persisted during the entire dietary intervention and after control for fat mass. In women, the influence of body mass index...... on expression of a subset of genes persisted during the dietary intervention. Twenty-two genes revealed a metabolic syndrome signature common to men and women. Genetic control of AT gene expression by cis signals was observed for 46 genes. Dietary intervention, sex, and cis genetic variants independently...

  13. Gene set analysis for longitudinal gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piepho Hans-Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene set analysis (GSA has become a successful tool to interpret gene expression profiles in terms of biological functions, molecular pathways, or genomic locations. GSA performs statistical tests for independent microarray samples at the level of gene sets rather than individual genes. Nowadays, an increasing number of microarray studies are conducted to explore the dynamic changes of gene expression in a variety of species and biological scenarios. In these longitudinal studies, gene expression is repeatedly measured over time such that a GSA needs to take into account the within-gene correlations in addition to possible between-gene correlations. Results We provide a robust nonparametric approach to compare the expressions of longitudinally measured sets of genes under multiple treatments or experimental conditions. The limiting distributions of our statistics are derived when the number of genes goes to infinity while the number of replications can be small. When the number of genes in a gene set is small, we recommend permutation tests based on our nonparametric test statistics to achieve reliable type I error and better power while incorporating unknown correlations between and within-genes. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method has a greater power than other methods for various data distributions and heteroscedastic correlation structures. This method was used for an IL-2 stimulation study and significantly altered gene sets were identified. Conclusions The simulation study and the real data application showed that the proposed gene set analysis provides a promising tool for longitudinal microarray analysis. R scripts for simulating longitudinal data and calculating the nonparametric statistics are posted on the North Dakota INBRE website http://ndinbre.org/programs/bioinformatics.php. Raw microarray data is available in Gene Expression Omnibus (National Center for Biotechnology Information with

  14. Positron emission tomography imaging of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ganghua

    2001-01-01

    The merging of molecular biology and nuclear medicine is developed into molecular nuclear medicine. Positron emission tomography (PET) of gene expression in molecular nuclear medicine has become an attractive area. Positron emission tomography imaging gene expression includes the antisense PET imaging and the reporter gene PET imaging. It is likely that the antisense PET imaging will lag behind the reporter gene PET imaging because of the numerous issues that have not yet to be resolved with this approach. The reporter gene PET imaging has wide application into animal experimental research and human applications of this approach will likely be reported soon

  15. Photosynthetic gene expression in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, James O; Yerramsetty, Pradeep; Zielinski, Amy M; Mure, Christopher M

    2013-11-01

    Within the chloroplasts of higher plants and algae, photosynthesis converts light into biological energy, fueling the assimilation of atmospheric carbon dioxide into biologically useful molecules. Two major steps, photosynthetic electron transport and the Calvin-Benson cycle, require many gene products encoded from chloroplast as well as nuclear genomes. The expression of genes in both cellular compartments is highly dynamic and influenced by a diverse range of factors. Light is the primary environmental determinant of photosynthetic gene expression. Working through photoreceptors such as phytochrome, light regulates photosynthetic genes at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Other processes that affect photosynthetic gene expression include photosynthetic activity, development, and biotic and abiotic stress. Anterograde (from nucleus to chloroplast) and retrograde (from chloroplast to nucleus) signaling insures the highly coordinated expression of the many photosynthetic genes between these different compartments. Anterograde signaling incorporates nuclear-encoded transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulators, such as sigma factors and RNA-binding proteins, respectively. Retrograde signaling utilizes photosynthetic processes such as photosynthetic electron transport and redox signaling to influence the expression of photosynthetic genes in the nucleus. The basic C3 photosynthetic pathway serves as the default form used by most of the plant species on earth. High temperature and water stress associated with arid environments have led to the development of specialized C4 and CAM photosynthesis, which evolved as modifications of the basic default expression program. The goal of this article is to explain and summarize the many gene expression and regulatory processes that work together to support photosynthetic function in plants.

  16. A genetic screen identifies interferon-α effector genes required to suppress hepatitis C virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Dahlene N; Brisac, Cynthia; John, Sinu P; Huang, Yi-Wen; Chin, Christopher R; Xie, Tiao; Zhao, Hong; Jilg, Nikolaus; Zhang, Leiliang; Chevaliez, Stephane; Wambua, Daniel; Lin, Wenyu; Peng, Lee; Chung, Raymond T; Brass, Abraham L

    2013-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of end-stage liver disease. Interferon-α (IFNα) is an important component of anti-HCV therapy; it up-regulates transcription of IFN-stimulated genes, many of which have been investigated for their antiviral effects. However, all of the genes required for the antiviral function of IFNα (IFN effector genes [IEGs]) are not known. IEGs include not only IFN-stimulated genes, but other nontranscriptionally induced genes that are required for the antiviral effect of IFNα. In contrast to candidate approaches based on analyses of messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, identification of IEGs requires a broad functional approach. We performed an unbiased genome-wide small interfering RNA screen to identify IEGs that inhibit HCV. Huh7.5.1 hepatoma cells were transfected with small interfering RNAs incubated with IFNα and then infected with JFH1 HCV. Cells were stained using HCV core antibody, imaged, and analyzed to determine the percent infection. Candidate IEGs detected in the screen were validated and analyzed further. The screen identified 120 previously unreported IEGs. From these, we more fully evaluated the following: asparagine-linked glycosylation 10 homolog (yeast, α-1,2-glucosyltransferase); butyrylcholinesterase; dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (CD26, adenosine deaminase complexing protein 2); glucokinase (hexokinase 4) regulator; guanylate cyclase 1, soluble, β 3; MYST histone acetyltransferase 1; protein phosphatase 3 (formerly 2B), catalytic subunit, β isoform; peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ-DBD-interacting protein 1; and solute carrier family 27 (fatty acid transporter), member 2; and demonstrated that they enabled IFNα-mediated suppression of HCV at multiple steps of its life cycle. Expression of these genes had more potent effects against flaviviridae because a subset was required for IFNα to suppress dengue virus but not influenza A virus. In addition, many of the host genes detected in this

  17. Development of gene expression assays measuring immune ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using qPCR, the relative expression stability of the reference genes ACTB, GAPDH, YWHAZ and TBP in these samples was determined as well as the mean fold change in the expression of IFNG, CXCL8, CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 in M. bovis-antigen stimulated blood. The expression of YWHAZ and TBP showed ...

  18. Suppression of Idol expression is an additional mechanism underlying statin-induced up-regulation of hepatic LDL receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bin; Wu, Minhao; Cao, Aiqin; Li, Hai; Liu, Jingwen

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have identified proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) and Idol as negative regulators of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) protein stability. While the induction of PCSK9 transcription has been recognized as a limitation to the statin cholesterol-lowering efficacy at higher doses, it is unknown whether Idol is involved in the statin-mediated up-regulation of the hepatic LDLR. Here we report that statins exert opposite effects on PCSK9 and Idol gene expression in human hepatoma-derived cell lines and primary hepatocytes isolated from hamsters and rats. While PCSK9 expression was induced, the level of Idol mRNA rapidly declined in statin-treated cells in a dose-dependent manner. This differs from the effect of the liver X receptor ligand, GW3965, which increased the expression of both PCSK9 and Idol. We further show that cellular depletion of Idol by siRNA transfection did not change PCSK9 expression levels in control and statin-treated cells; however, the basal level of LDLR protein increased by 60% in Idol siRNA transfected HepG2 cells. More importantly, the increase in LDLR protein abundance by rosuvastatin and atorvastatin treatment was compromised by Idol siRNA transfection. Collectively, our present findings suggest that the suppression of Idol gene expression in liver cells is an additional mechanism underlying the statin-induced up-regulation of hepatic LDLR expression. This may contribute to the hypocholesterolemic effects of statins observed in clinical settings.

  19. SRC-2-mediated coactivation of anti-tumorigenic target genes suppresses MYC-induced liver cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaorong; Comerford, Sarah A.; York, Brian; O’Donnell, Kathryn A.

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common solid tumor in the world and the third leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. A Sleeping Beauty-mediated transposon mutagenesis screen previously identified mutations that cooperate with MYC to accelerate liver tumorigenesis. This revealed a tumor suppressor role for Steroid Receptor Coactivator 2/Nuclear Receptor Coactivator 2 (Src-2/Ncoa2) in liver cancer. In contrast, SRC-2 promotes survival and metastasis in prostate cancer cells, suggesting a tissue-specific and context-dependent role for SRC-2 in tumorigenesis. To determine if genetic loss of SRC-2 is sufficient to accelerate MYC-mediated liver tumorigenesis, we bred Src-2-/- mice with a MYC-induced liver tumor model and observed a significant increase in liver tumor burden. RNA sequencing of liver tumors and in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed a set of direct target genes that are bound by SRC-2 and exhibit downregulated expression in Src-2-/- liver tumors. We demonstrate that activation of SHP (Small Heterodimer Partner), DKK4 (Dickkopf-4), and CADM4 (Cell Adhesion Molecule 4) by SRC-2 suppresses tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. These studies suggest that SRC-2 may exhibit oncogenic or tumor suppressor activity depending on the target genes and nuclear receptors that are expressed in distinct tissues and illuminate the mechanisms of tumor suppression by SRC-2 in liver. PMID:28273073

  20. Let-7b-mediated suppression of basigin expression and metastasis in mouse melanoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Tzu-Yen [Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chia-Che [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, 91 Hsueh Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chun-Ting [Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Lai, Cong-Hao [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Department of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Peng, Shao-Yu; Ko, Yi-Ju [Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Tang, Pin-Chi, E-mail: pctang@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China)

    2011-02-15

    Basigin (Bsg), also called extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), is highly expressed on the surface of tumor cells and stimulates adjacent fibroblasts or tumor cells to produce matrix metalloproteinases (mmps). It has been shown that Bsg plays an important role in growth, development, cell differentiation, and tumor progression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short endogenous non-protein coding RNAs of 20-25 nucleotides (nt) that function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression by base-pairing to their target mRNAs and thereby mediate cleavage of target mRNAs or translational repression. In this study, let-7b, one of the let-7 family members, was investigated for its effect on the growth and invasiveness of the mouse melanoma cell line B16-F10. We have shown that let-7b can suppress the expression of Bsg in B16-F10 cells and also provided evidence that this suppression could result in the indirect suppression of mmp-9. The ability of B16-F10 cells transfected with let-7b to invade or migrate was significantly reduced. In addition, let-7b transfected B16-F10 cells displayed an inhibition of both cellular proliferation and colony formation. Furthermore, it was shown that the overexpression of let-7b in B16-F10 cells could reduce lung metastasis. Taken together, the present study identifies let-7b as a tumor suppressor that represses cancer cell proliferation and migration as well as tumor metastasis in mouse melanoma cells.

  1. TR4 nuclear receptor suppresses HCC cell invasion via downregulating the EphA2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ren'an; Lin, Hui; Li, Gonghui; Xu, Junjie; Shi, Liang; Chang, Chawnshang; Cai, Xiujun

    2018-02-15

    Early studies indicated that testicular nuclear receptor 4 (TR 4 ) could function as a suppressor in the transcriptional regulation of the HBV core gene expression, which might then influence the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The direct linkage between TR 4 and HCC progression, however, remained unclear. Here, via a human clinical sample survey, we found that 13 of the 18 HCC patients studied had lower TR 4 expression in metastatic lesions than in matched primary HCC lesions, suggesting that TR 4 may play a negative role in HCC metastasis. Results from in vitro cell migration/invasion studied confirmed that TR 4 could suppress HCC cell migration/invasion. Mechanism dissection revealed that TR 4 might function through downregulating ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2) expression at the transcriptional level via direct binding to the TR 4 REs located on the 5' promoter of EphA2 to suppress HCC cell migration/invasion. Targeting the EphA2 via EphA2-siRNA partially reversed the enhanced HCC cell migration/invasion with confirmed TR 4 knockdown. Notably, results from preclinical studies using in vivo mouse model with orthotopic xenograft of HCC LM3 cells also confirmed the in vitro findings. Taking these findings together, preclinical studies using multiple in vitro HCC cell lines and an in vivo mouse model all led to the conclusion that TR 4 may function as a suppressor of HCC metastasis and that targeting this newly identified TR 4 -EphA2 signaling may improve our ability to suppress HCC metastasis.

  2. Caleydo: connecting pathways and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Marc; Lex, Alexander; Kalkusch, Michael; Zatloukal, Kurt; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2009-10-15

    Understanding the relationships between pathways and the altered expression of their components in disease conditions can be addressed in a visual data analysis process. Caleydo uses novel visualization techniques to support life science experts in their analysis of gene expression data in the context of pathways and functions of individual genes. Pathways and gene expression visualizations are placed in a 3D scene where selected entities (i.e. genes) are visually connected. This allows Caleydo to seamlessly integrate interactive gene expression visualization with cross-database pathway exploration. The Caleydo visualization framework is freely available on www.caleydo.org for non-commercial use. It runs on Windows and Linux and requires a 3D capable graphics card.

  3. Adaptive Evolution of Gene Expression in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourmohammad, Armita; Rambeau, Joachim; Held, Torsten; Kovacova, Viera; Berg, Johannes; Lässig, Michael

    2017-08-08

    Gene expression levels are important quantitative traits that link genotypes to molecular functions and fitness. In Drosophila, population-genetic studies have revealed substantial adaptive evolution at the genomic level, but the evolutionary modes of gene expression remain controversial. Here, we present evidence that adaptation dominates the evolution of gene expression levels in flies. We show that 64% of the observed expression divergence across seven Drosophila species are adaptive changes driven by directional selection. Our results are derived from time-resolved data of gene expression divergence across a family of related species, using a probabilistic inference method for gene-specific selection. Adaptive gene expression is stronger in specific functional classes, including regulation, sensory perception, sexual behavior, and morphology. Moreover, we identify a large group of genes with sex-specific adaptation of expression, which predominantly occurs in males. Our analysis opens an avenue to map system-wide selection on molecular quantitative traits independently of their genetic basis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Obesity Suppresses Estrogen Receptor Beta Expression in Breast Cancer Cells via a HER2-Mediated Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Laura W; Wiese, Megan; Brenner, Andrew J; Rossi, Emily L; Tekmal, Rajeshwar R; Hursting, Stephen D; deGraffenried, Linda A

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a worse breast cancer prognosis, while greater breast tumor estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) expression is correlated with improved therapy response and survival. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of obesity on breast cancer cell ERβ expression, which is currently unknown. We utilized an in vitro model of obesity in which breast cancer cells were exposed to patient serum pooled by body mass index category (obese (OB): ≥30 kg/m2; normal weight (N): 18.5-24.9 kg/m2). Four human mammary tumor cell lines representing the major breast cancer subtypes (SKBR3, MCF-7, ZR75, MDA-MB-231) and mammary tumor cells from MMTV-neu mice were used. ERβ expression, assessed by qPCR and western blotting, was suppressed in the two HER2-overexpressing cell lines (SKBR3, MMTV-neu) following OB versus N sera exposure, but did not vary in the other cell lines. Expression of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1, two genes negatively regulated by ERβ, was elevated in SKBR3 cells following exposure to OB versus N sera, but this difference was eliminated when the ERβ gene was silenced with siRNA. Herceptin, a HER2 antagonist, and siRNA to HER2 were used to evaluate the role of HER2 in sera-induced ERβ modulation. SKBR3 cell treatment with OB sera plus Herceptin increased ERβ expression three-fold. Similar results were obtained when HER2 expression was silenced with siRNA. OB sera also promoted greater SKBR3 cell viability and growth, but this variance was not present when ERβ was silenced or the cells were modified to overexpress ERβ. Based on this data, we conclude that obesity-associated systemic factors suppress ERβ expression in breast cancer cells via a HER2-mediated pathway, leading to greater cell viability and growth. Elucidation of the mechanism(s) mediating this effect could provide important insights into how ERβ expression is regulated as well as how obesity promotes a more aggressive disease.

  5. Obesity Suppresses Estrogen Receptor Beta Expression in Breast Cancer Cells via a HER2-Mediated Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura W Bowers

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with a worse breast cancer prognosis, while greater breast tumor estrogen receptor beta (ERβ expression is correlated with improved therapy response and survival. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of obesity on breast cancer cell ERβ expression, which is currently unknown. We utilized an in vitro model of obesity in which breast cancer cells were exposed to patient serum pooled by body mass index category (obese (OB: ≥30 kg/m2; normal weight (N: 18.5-24.9 kg/m2. Four human mammary tumor cell lines representing the major breast cancer subtypes (SKBR3, MCF-7, ZR75, MDA-MB-231 and mammary tumor cells from MMTV-neu mice were used. ERβ expression, assessed by qPCR and western blotting, was suppressed in the two HER2-overexpressing cell lines (SKBR3, MMTV-neu following OB versus N sera exposure, but did not vary in the other cell lines. Expression of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1, two genes negatively regulated by ERβ, was elevated in SKBR3 cells following exposure to OB versus N sera, but this difference was eliminated when the ERβ gene was silenced with siRNA. Herceptin, a HER2 antagonist, and siRNA to HER2 were used to evaluate the role of HER2 in sera-induced ERβ modulation. SKBR3 cell treatment with OB sera plus Herceptin increased ERβ expression three-fold. Similar results were obtained when HER2 expression was silenced with siRNA. OB sera also promoted greater SKBR3 cell viability and growth, but this variance was not present when ERβ was silenced or the cells were modified to overexpress ERβ. Based on this data, we conclude that obesity-associated systemic factors suppress ERβ expression in breast cancer cells via a HER2-mediated pathway, leading to greater cell viability and growth. Elucidation of the mechanism(s mediating this effect could provide important insights into how ERβ expression is regulated as well as how obesity promotes a more aggressive disease.

  6. Differential gene expression during Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

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    Marco Aurelio Krieger

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of epimastigotes into metacyclic trypomastigotes involves changes in the pattern of expressed genes, resulting in important morphological and functional differences between these developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. In order to identify and characterize genes involved in triggering the metacyclogenesis process and in conferring to metacyclic trypomastigotes their stage specific biological properties, we have developed a method allowing the isolation of genes specifically expressed when comparing two close related cell populations (representation of differential expression or RDE. The method is based on the PCR amplification of gene sequences selected by hybridizing and subtracting the populations in such a way that after some cycles of hybridization-amplification genes specific to a given population are highly enriched. The use of this method in the analysis of differential gene expression during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis (6 hr and 24 hr of differentiation and metacyclic trypomastigotes resulted in the isolation of several clones from each time point. Northern blot analysis showed that some genes are transiently expressed (6 hr and 24 hr differentiating cells, while others are present in differentiating cells and in metacyclic trypomastigotes. Nucleotide sequencing of six clones characterized so far showed that they do not display any homology to gene sequences available in the GeneBank.

  7. Gene expression in the aging human brain: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Adith; Mather, Karen A; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Baune, Bernhard T; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2016-03-01

    The review aims to provide a summary of recent developments in the study of gene expression in the aging human brain. Profiling differentially expressed genes or 'transcripts' in the human brain over the course of normal aging has provided valuable insights into the biological pathways that appear activated or suppressed in late life. Genes mediating neuroinflammation and immune system activation in particular, show significant age-related upregulation creating a state of vulnerability to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disease in the aging brain. Cellular ionic dyshomeostasis and age-related decline in a host of molecular influences on synaptic efficacy may underlie neurocognitive decline in later life. Critically, these investigations have also shed light on the mobilization of protective genetic responses within the aging human brain that help determine health and disease trajectories in older age. There is growing interest in the study of pre and posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression, and the role of noncoding RNAs in particular, as mediators of the phenotypic diversity that characterizes human brain aging. Gene expression studies in healthy brain aging offer an opportunity to unravel the intricately regulated cellular underpinnings of neurocognitive aging as well as disease risk and resiliency in late life. In doing so, new avenues for early intervention in age-related neurodegenerative disease could be investigated with potentially significant implications for the development of disease-modifying therapies.

  8. Identifying genes related to choriogenesis in insect panoistic ovaries by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

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    Bellés Xavier

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insect ovarioles are classified into two categories: panoistic and meroistic, the later having apparently evolved from an ancestral panoistic type. Molecular data on oogenesis is practically restricted to meroistic ovaries. If we aim at studying the evolutionary transition from panoistic to meroistic, data on panoistic ovaries should be gathered. To this end, we planned the construction of a Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH library to identify genes involved in panoistic choriogenesis, using the cockroach Blattella germanica as model. Results We constructed a post-vitellogenic ovary library by SSH to isolate genes involved in choriogenesis in B. germanica. The tester library was prepared with an ovary pool from 6- to 7-day-old females, whereas the driver library was prepared with an ovary pool from 3- to 4-day-old females. From the SSH library, we obtained 258 high quality sequences which clustered into 34 unique sequences grouped in 19 contigs and 15 singlets. The sequences were compared against non-redundant NCBI databases using BLAST. We found that 44% of the unique sequences had homologous sequences in known genes of other organisms, whereas 56% had no significant similarity to any of the databases entries. A Gene Ontology analysis was carried out, classifying the 34 sequences into different functional categories. Seven of these gene sequences, representative of different categories and processes, were chosen to perform expression studies during the first gonadotrophic cycle by real-time PCR. Results showed that they were mainly expressed during post-vitellogenesis, which validates the SSH technique. In two of them corresponding to novel genes, we demonstrated that they are specifically expressed in the cytoplasm of follicular cells in basal oocytes at the time of choriogenesis. Conclusion The SSH approach has proven to be useful in identifying ovarian genes expressed after vitellogenesis in B. germanica. For

  9. EXPRESSION OF BACTERIOOPSIN GENES IN ESCHERICHIA COLI

    OpenAIRE

    TSUJIUCHI, Yutaka; IWASA, Tatsuo; TOKUNAGA, Fumio

    1994-01-01

    An inducible expression vector pUBO was constructed with native codons in order to express the gene of Bacteriorhodopsin (BOP) in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Vector pUBO contains lac-promoter followed by the partial structural gene of lacZ and the structural gene of BOP. The expression of this fusion protein was detected by ELISA with anti-BOP antiserum. The fusion protein obtained from E. coli trnsformed with pUBO formed approximately 0.1% of the total protein of the E. coli membrane fraction.

  10. Myofibroblast Expression in Skin Wounds Is Enhanced by Collagen III Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed M. Al-Qattan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally speaking, the excessive expression of myofibroblasts is associated with excessive collagen production. One exception is seen in patients and animal models of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV in which the COL3A1 gene mutation results in reduced collagen III but with concurrent increased myofibroblast expression. This paradox has not been examined with the use of external drugs/modalities to prevent hypertrophic scars. In this paper, we injected the rabbit ear wound model of hypertrophic scarring with two doses of a protein called nAG, which is known to reduce collagen expression and to suppress hypertrophic scarring in that animal model. The higher nAG dose was associated with significantly less collagen III expression and concurrent higher degree of myofibroblast expression. We concluded that collagen III content of the extracellular matrix may have a direct or an indirect effect on myofibroblast differentiation. However, further research is required to investigate the pathogenesis of this paradoxical phenomenon.

  11. Tolerance associated gene expression following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Pidala

    Full Text Available Biologic markers of immune tolerance may facilitate tailoring of immune suppression duration after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT. In a cross-sectional study, peripheral blood samples were obtained from tolerant (n = 15, median 38.5 months post-HCT and non-tolerant (n = 17, median 39.5 post-HCT HCT recipients and healthy control subjects (n = 10 for analysis of immune cell subsets and differential gene expression. There were no significant differences in immune subsets across groups. We identified 281 probe sets unique to the tolerant (TOL group and 122 for non-tolerant (non-TOL. These were enriched for process networks including NK cell cytotoxicity, antigen presentation, lymphocyte proliferation, and cell cycle and apoptosis. Differential gene expression was enriched for CD56, CD66, and CD14 human lineage-specific gene expression. Differential expression of 20 probe sets between groups was sufficient to develop a classifier with > 90% accuracy, correctly classifying 14/15 TOL cases and 15/17 non-TOL cases. These data suggest that differential gene expression can be utilized to accurately classify tolerant patients following HCT. Prospective investigation of immune tolerance biologic markers is warranted.

  12. Efficacy of SSH PCR in isolating differentially expressed genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Li

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suppression Subtractive Hybridization PCR (SSH PCR is a sophisticated cDNA subtraction method to enrich and isolate differentially expressed genes. Despite its popularity, the method has not been thoroughly studied for its practical efficacy and potential limitations. Results To determine the factors that influence the efficacy of SSH PCR, a theoretical model, under the assumption that cDNA hybridization follows the ideal second kinetic order, is proposed. The theoretical model suggests that the critical factor influencing the efficacy of SSH PCR is the concentration ratio (R of a target gene between two cDNA preparations. It preferentially enriches "all or nothing" differentially expressed genes, of which R is infinite, and strongly favors the genes with large R. The theoretical predictions were validated by our experiments. In addition, the experiments revealed some practical limitations that are not obvious from the theoretical model. For effective enrichment of differentially expressed genes, it requires fractional concentration of a target gene to be more than 0.01% and concentration ratio to be more than 5 folds between two cDNA preparations. Conclusion Our research demonstrated theoretical and practical limitations of SSH PCR, which could be useful for its experimental design and interpretation.

  13. Efficacy of SSH PCR in isolating differentially expressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wan; Wright, Matthew B; Cai, Li; Flament, Angel; Lindpaintner, Klaus

    2002-05-20

    Suppression Subtractive Hybridization PCR (SSH PCR) is a sophisticated cDNA subtraction method to enrich and isolate differentially expressed genes. Despite its popularity, the method has not been thoroughly studied for its practical efficacy and potential limitations. To determine the factors that influence the efficacy of SSH PCR, a theoretical model, under the assumption that cDNA hybridization follows the ideal second kinetic order, is proposed. The theoretical model suggests that the critical factor influencing the efficacy of SSH PCR is the concentration ratio (R) of a target gene between two cDNA preparations. It preferentially enriches "all or nothing" differentially expressed genes, of which R is infinite, and strongly favors the genes with large R. The theoretical predictions were validated by our experiments. In addition, the experiments revealed some practical limitations that are not obvious from the theoretical model. For effective enrichment of differentially expressed genes, it requires fractional concentration of a target gene to be more than 0.01% and concentration ratio to be more than 5 folds between two cDNA preparations. Our research demonstrated theoretical and practical limitations of SSH PCR, which could be useful for its experimental design and interpretation.

  14. Glucose Regulates the Expression of the Apolipoprotein A5 Gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruchart, Jamila; Nowak, Maxime; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Jakel, Heidelinde; Moitrot, Emmanuelle; Rommens, Corinne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2008-04-07

    The apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) is a key player in determining triglyceride concentrations in humans and mice. Since diabetes is often associated with hypertriglyceridemia, this study explores whether APOA5 gene expression is regulated by alteration in glucose homeostasis and the related pathways. D-glucose activates APOA5 gene expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner in hepatocytes, and the glycolytic pathway involved was determined using D-glucose analogs and metabolites. Together, transient transfections, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level through an increase of USF1/2 binding to an E-box in the APOA5 promoter. We show that this phenomenon is not due to an increase of mRNA or protein expression levels of USF. Using protein phosphatases 1 and 2A inhibitor, we demonstrate that D-glucose regulates APOA5 gene via a dephosphorylation mechanism, thereby resulting in an enhanced USF1/2-promoter binding. Last, subsequent suppressions of USF1/2 and phosphatases mRNA through siRNA gene silencing abolished the regulation. We demonstrate that APOA5 gene is up regulated by D-glucose and USF through phosphatase activation. These findings may provide a new cross talk between glucose and lipid metabolism.

  15. [Effects of dietary monosodium-glutamate on gene expression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurasek, Júlia Vanda; Raposa, László Bence; Gubicskóné Kisbenedek, Andrea; Varga, Veronika; Szabó, Zoltán; Varjas, Tímea

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, the food industry more often uses different type of additives during the food production. Our aim was to examine the monosodium-glutamate's effect (in animal experiment) on DNA-methyltransferases in gene expression patterns of mRNA levels. In the investigation we used 24 (n=24) CD1 type female mice. The animals were fed with different equivalent human doses of the tested substance. After autopsy, mRNA was isolated from different tissues (lung, liver, kidney, spleen). DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B levels were determined by Quantitative Real-Time PCR. DNMT1 significantly suppressed the gene expression in all the three treated groups (pmonosodium glutamate, suppressed the DNMT1 and DNMT3A gene expression - on mRNA levels of several organs - in mice. It can be a similar chemopreventive effect to epigallo-catechin-gallate's, curcumin's, genistein's, likopine's and rezveratrol's effects. In this case it can be possible that the MSG has anticarcinogenic effects. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(10), 380-385.

  16. MiR-433 inhibits retinoblastoma malignancy by suppressing Notch1 and PAX6 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohua; Yang, Lan; Shuai, Tianjiao; Piao, Tianhua; Wang, Rui

    2016-08-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most frequent primary intraocular cancer. It has been demonstrated by previous studies that retinoblastoma is initiated primarily by the inactivation of the retinoblastoma Rb1 gene in retinal cells. However, additional genetic alterations than Rb1 mutation could play important roles in the process of transforming benign retinal cells into retinoblastoma tumor cells. In this study, we identified that microRNA miR-433 is one of such genetic factors. We found that the expression levels of miR-433 were downregulated in RB tissues. We also determined that miR-433 negatively regulated RB cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of RB cells. We used bioinformatics method to predict and confirmed that Notch1 and PAX6 were miR-433 target genes in RB cells. Importantly, we demonstrated that restoration of Notch1 and PAX6 expression partially rescued the inhibition of cell proliferation and metastasis induced by miR-433 overexpression, suggesting that miR-433 regulates RB cell proliferation and metastasis through suppressing the expression of Notch1 and PAX6. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamic telomerase gene suppression via network effects of GSK3 inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan E Bilsland

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase controls telomere homeostasis and cell immortality and is a promising anti-cancer target, but few small molecule telomerase inhibitors have been developed. Reactivated transcription of the catalytic subunit hTERT in cancer cells controls telomerase expression. Better understanding of upstream pathways is critical for effective anti-telomerase therapeutics and may reveal new targets to inhibit hTERT expression.In a focused promoter screen, several GSK3 inhibitors suppressed hTERT reporter activity. GSK3 inhibition using 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime suppressed hTERT expression, telomerase activity and telomere length in several cancer cell lines and growth and hTERT expression in ovarian cancer xenografts. Microarray analysis, network modelling and oligonucleotide binding assays suggested that multiple transcription factors were affected. Extensive remodelling involving Sp1, STAT3, c-Myc, NFkappaB, and p53 occurred at the endogenous hTERT promoter. RNAi screening of the hTERT promoter revealed multiple kinase genes which affect the hTERT promoter, potentially acting through these factors. Prolonged inhibitor treatments caused dynamic expression both of hTERT and of c-Jun, p53, STAT3, AR and c-Myc.Our results indicate that GSK3 activates hTERT expression in cancer cells and contributes to telomere length homeostasis. GSK3 inhibition is a clinical strategy for several chronic diseases. These results imply that it may also be useful in cancer therapy. However, the complex network effects we show here have implications for either setting.

  18. Downregulation of immediate-early genes linking to suppression of neuronal plasticity in rats after 28-day exposure to glycidol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akane, Hirotoshi [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Saito, Fumiyo [Chemicals Evaluation and Research Institute, Japan, 1-4-25 Koraku, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-0004 (Japan); Shiraki, Ayako [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Pathogenetic Veterinary Science, United Graduate School of Veterinary Sciences, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Takeyoshi, Masahiro; Imatanaka, Nobuya [Chemicals Evaluation and Research Institute, Japan, 1-4-25 Koraku, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-0004 (Japan); Itahashi, Megu [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Pathogenetic Veterinary Science, United Graduate School of Veterinary Sciences, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Murakami, Tomoaki [Laboratory of Veterinary Toxicology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Shibutani, Makoto, E-mail: mshibuta@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan)

    2014-09-01

    We previously found that the 28-day oral toxicity study of glycidol at 200 mg/kg/day in rats resulted in axonopathy in both the central and peripheral nervous systems and aberrations in the late-stage of hippocampal neurogenesis targeting the process of neurite extension. To capture the neuronal parameters in response to glycidol toxicity, these animals were subjected to region-specific global gene expression profiling in four regions of cerebral and cerebellar architectures, followed by immunohistochemical analysis of selected gene products. Expression changes of genes related to axonogenesis and synaptic transmission were observed in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, cingulate cortex and cerebellar vermis at 200 mg/kg showing downregulation in most genes. In the corpus callosum, genes related to growth, survival and functions of glial cells fluctuated their expression. Immunohistochemically, neurons expressing gene products of immediate-early genes, i.e., Arc, Fos and Jun, decreased in their number in the dentate granule cell layer, cingulate cortex and cerebellar vermis. We also applied immunohistochemical analysis in rat offspring after developmental exposure to glycidol through maternal drinking water. The results revealed increases of Arc{sup +} neurons at 1000 ppm and Fos{sup +} neurons at ≥ 300 ppm in the dentate granule cell layer of offspring only at the adult stage. These results suggest that glycidol suppressed neuronal plasticity in the brain after 28-day exposure to young adult animals, in contrast to the operation of restoration mechanism to increase neuronal plasticity at the adult stage in response to aberrations in neurogenesis after developmental exposure. - Highlights: • Neuronal toxicity parameters after 28-day glycidol treatment were examined in rats. • Region-specific global gene expression profiling was conducted in brain regions. • Cortical tissues downregulated genes on axonogenesis and synaptic transmission. • Cortical tissues

  19. Downregulation of immediate-early genes linking to suppression of neuronal plasticity in rats after 28-day exposure to glycidol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akane, Hirotoshi; Saito, Fumiyo; Shiraki, Ayako; Takeyoshi, Masahiro; Imatanaka, Nobuya; Itahashi, Megu; Murakami, Tomoaki; Shibutani, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    We previously found that the 28-day oral toxicity study of glycidol at 200 mg/kg/day in rats resulted in axonopathy in both the central and peripheral nervous systems and aberrations in the late-stage of hippocampal neurogenesis targeting the process of neurite extension. To capture the neuronal parameters in response to glycidol toxicity, these animals were subjected to region-specific global gene expression profiling in four regions of cerebral and cerebellar architectures, followed by immunohistochemical analysis of selected gene products. Expression changes of genes related to axonogenesis and synaptic transmission were observed in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, cingulate cortex and cerebellar vermis at 200 mg/kg showing downregulation in most genes. In the corpus callosum, genes related to growth, survival and functions of glial cells fluctuated their expression. Immunohistochemically, neurons expressing gene products of immediate-early genes, i.e., Arc, Fos and Jun, decreased in their number in the dentate granule cell layer, cingulate cortex and cerebellar vermis. We also applied immunohistochemical analysis in rat offspring after developmental exposure to glycidol through maternal drinking water. The results revealed increases of Arc + neurons at 1000 ppm and Fos + neurons at ≥ 300 ppm in the dentate granule cell layer of offspring only at the adult stage. These results suggest that glycidol suppressed neuronal plasticity in the brain after 28-day exposure to young adult animals, in contrast to the operation of restoration mechanism to increase neuronal plasticity at the adult stage in response to aberrations in neurogenesis after developmental exposure. - Highlights: • Neuronal toxicity parameters after 28-day glycidol treatment were examined in rats. • Region-specific global gene expression profiling was conducted in brain regions. • Cortical tissues downregulated genes on axonogenesis and synaptic transmission. • Cortical tissues decreased

  20. Drosophila melanogaster gene expression changes after spaceflight.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gene expression levels were determined in 3rd instar and adult Drosophila melanogaster reared during spaceflight to elucidate the genetic and molecular mechanisms...

  1. PRAME gene expression profile in medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Maria Vulcani-Freitas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant tumors of central nervous system in the childhood. The treatment is severe, harmful and, thus, has a dismal prognosis. As PRAME is present in various cancers, including meduloblastoma, and has limited expression in normal tissues, this antigen can be an ideal vaccine target for tumor immunotherapy. In order to find a potential molecular target, we investigated PRAME expression in medulloblastoma fragments and we compare the results with the clinical features of each patient. Analysis of gene expression was performed by real-time quantitative PCR from 37 tumor samples. The Mann-Whitney test was used to analysis the relationship between gene expression and clinical characteristics. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to evaluate survival. PRAME was overexpressed in 84% samples. But no statistical association was found between clinical features and PRAME overexpression. Despite that PRAME gene could be a strong candidate for immunotherapy since it is highly expressed in medulloblastomas.

  2. Homeobox genes expressed during echinoderm arm regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khadra, Yousra; Said, Khaled; Thorndyke, Michael; Martinez, Pedro

    2014-04-01

    Regeneration in echinoderms has proved to be more amenable to study in the laboratory than the more classical vertebrate models, since the smaller genome size and the absence of multiple orthologs for different genes in echinoderms simplify the analysis of gene function during regeneration. In order to understand the role of homeobox-containing genes during arm regeneration in echinoderms, we isolated the complement of genes belonging to the Hox class that are expressed during this process in two major echinoderm groups: asteroids (Echinaster sepositus and Asterias rubens) and ophiuroids (Amphiura filiformis), both of which show an extraordinary capacity for regeneration. By exploiting the sequence conservation of the homeobox, putative orthologs of several Hox genes belonging to the anterior, medial, and posterior groups were isolated. We also report the isolation of a few Hox-like genes expressed in the same systems.

  3. Evaluation of suitable reference genes for gene expression studies ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-12-14

    Dec 14, 2011 ... MADS family of TFs control floral organ identity within each whorl of the flower by activating downstream genes. Measuring gene expression in different tissue types and developmental stages is of fundamental importance in TFs functional research. In last few years, quantitative real-time. PCR (qRT-PCR) ...

  4. Histamine exerts multiple effects on expression of genes associated with epidermal barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowska-Owsiak, D; Salimi, M; Selvakumar, T A; Wang, X; Taylor, S; Ogg, G S

    2014-01-01

    The role of epidermal barrier genes in the pathogenesis of atopic skin inflammation has recently been highlighted. Cytokines that are abundant in the skin during inflammation have been shown to exert various effects on the expression of barrier genes, although the role of histamine in this area of skin biology is not yet fully understood. To assess the effect of stimulation with histamine on keratinocytes by analysis of the pathways involved in epidermal barrier integrity. We performed a gene expression analysis of histamine-stimulated keratinocytes. Functional changes were tested using the dye penetration assay. Differential changes in filaggrin and the filaggrin-processing enzyme bleomycin hydrolase (BLMH) were validated at the protein level, and expression was also assessed in filaggrin knock-down keratinocytes. Histamine altered expression of multiple barrier genes. Expression of filaggrin was downregulated, as was that of other markers, thus suggesting the presence of delayed/aberrant keratinocyte differentiation. Expression of genes involved in cellular adhesiveness and genes of protease expression was dysregulated, but expression of protease inhibitors was increased. BLMH was upregulated in keratinocytes subjected to histamine and filaggrin knockdown. Histamine exerts a dual effect on epidermal barrier genes; it suppresses keratinocyte differentiation and dysregulates genes of cellular adhesiveness, although it induces genes contributing to stratum corneum function. Upregulation of BLMH and protease inhibitors could support maintenance of the permeability barrier by enhanced generation of moisturizing compounds and suppressed desquamation. In contrast, in the case of stratum corneum damage, histamine could enhance transcutaneous sensitization.

  5. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis.

  6. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odelta dos Santos

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis.

  7. Inferring gene networks from discrete expression data

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, L.

    2013-07-18

    The modeling of gene networks from transcriptional expression data is an important tool in biomedical research to reveal signaling pathways and to identify treatment targets. Current gene network modeling is primarily based on the use of Gaussian graphical models applied to continuous data, which give a closedformmarginal likelihood. In this paper,we extend network modeling to discrete data, specifically data from serial analysis of gene expression, and RNA-sequencing experiments, both of which generate counts of mRNAtranscripts in cell samples.We propose a generalized linear model to fit the discrete gene expression data and assume that the log ratios of the mean expression levels follow a Gaussian distribution.We restrict the gene network structures to decomposable graphs and derive the graphs by selecting the covariance matrix of the Gaussian distribution with the hyper-inverse Wishart priors. Furthermore, we incorporate prior network models based on gene ontology information, which avails existing biological information on the genes of interest. We conduct simulation studies to examine the performance of our discrete graphical model and apply the method to two real datasets for gene network inference. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  8. Perspectives: Gene Expression in Fisheries Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Pavey, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Functional genes and gene expression have been connected to physiological traits linked to effective production and broodstock selection in aquaculture, selective implications of commercial fish harvest, and adaptive changes reflected in non-commercial fish populations subject to human disturbance and climate change. Gene mapping using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify functional genes, gene expression (analogue microarrays and real-time PCR), and digital sequencing technologies looking at RNA transcripts present new concepts and opportunities in support of effective and sustainable fisheries. Genomic tools have been rapidly growing in aquaculture research addressing aspects of fish health, toxicology, and early development. Genomic technologies linking effects in functional genes involved in growth, maturation and life history development have been tied to selection resulting from harvest practices. Incorporating new and ever-increasing knowledge of fish genomes is opening a different perspective on local adaptation that will prove invaluable in wild fish conservation and management. Conservation of fish stocks is rapidly incorporating research on critical adaptive responses directed at the effects of human disturbance and climate change through gene expression studies. Genomic studies of fish populations can be generally grouped into three broad categories: 1) evolutionary genomics and biodiversity; 2) adaptive physiological responses to a changing environment; and 3) adaptive behavioral genomics and life history diversity. We review current genomic research in fisheries focusing on those that use microarrays to explore differences in gene expression among phenotypes and within or across populations, information that is critically important to the conservation of fish and their relationship to humans.

  9. Expression of Deinococcus geothermalis trehalose synthase gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A novel trehalose synthase gene from Deinococcus geothermalis (DSMZ 11300) containing 1692 bp reading-frame encoding 564 amino acids was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The gene was ligated into pET30Ek/LIC vector and expressed after isopropyl β-D-thiogalactopyranoside induction in ...

  10. TFF1 expression suppresses H. pylori-induced inflammation in gastric carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soutto, Mohammed; Chen, Zheng; Katsha, Ahmed; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Krishna, Uma; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Washington, M. Kay; Peek, Richard M.; Belkhiri, Abbes; El-Rifai, Wael

    2015-01-01

    Background Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a high-risk factor for gastric cancer, is frequently associated with chronic inflammation through activation of NFκB. TFF1 is a constitutively expressed protein in the stomach that has tumor suppressor functions and plays a critical role in maintaining mucosal integrity. In this study, we investigated the role of TFF1 in regulating the proinflammatory response to H. pylori infection. Methods For in vitro studies, we performed immunofluorescence, luciferase reporter assay, Western blot, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to investigate activation of NFκB and its target genes in response to infection with H. pylori strains J166 and 7.13. In addition, we utilized the Tff1 knockout (KO) and Tff1 wild-type (WT) mice for infection with PMSS1 H. pylori strain. Results The reconstitution of TFF1 expression in gastric cancer cells significantly suppressed an H. pylori-mediated increase of NFκB-p65 nuclear staining, transcriptional activity and expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes (TNFα, IL1β, CXCL5, and IL4R) that were associated with reduction in expression and phosphorylation of NFκB-p65 and IKKα/β proteins. The in vivo studies using the Tff1-KO mouse model of gastric neoplasia confirmed the in vitro findings. Furthermore, they demonstrated an increase in chronic inflammation scores and frequency of invasive gastric adenocarcinoma in the Tff1-KO mice infected with H. pylori, as compared to uninfected Tff1-KO mice. Conclusion These findings underscore an important protective role of TFF1 in abrogating H. pylori-mediated inflammation, a crucial hallmark of gastric tumorigenesis. Therefore, loss of TFF1 expression could be an important step in the H. pylori-mediated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26372254

  11. Bayesian assignment of gene ontology terms to gene expression experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykacek, P

    2012-09-15

    Gene expression assays allow for genome scale analyses of molecular biological mechanisms. State-of-the-art data analysis provides lists of involved genes, either by calculating significance levels of mRNA abundance or by Bayesian assessments of gene activity. A common problem of such approaches is the difficulty of interpreting the biological implication of the resulting gene lists. This lead to an increased interest in methods for inferring high-level biological information. A common approach for representing high level information is by inferring gene ontology (GO) terms which may be attributed to the expression data experiment. This article proposes a probabilistic model for GO term inference. Modelling assumes that gene annotations to GO terms are available and gene involvement in an experiment is represented by a posterior probabilities over gene-specific indicator variables. Such probability measures result from many Bayesian approaches for expression data analysis. The proposed model combines these indicator probabilities in a probabilistic fashion and provides a probabilistic GO term assignment as a result. Experiments on synthetic and microarray data suggest that advantages of the proposed probabilistic GO term inference over statistical test-based approaches are in particular evident for sparsely annotated GO terms and in situations of large uncertainty about gene activity. Provided that appropriate annotations exist, the proposed approach is easily applied to inferring other high level assignments like pathways. Source code under GPL license is available from the author. peter.sykacek@boku.ac.at.

  12. Bayesian assignment of gene ontology terms to gene expression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykacek, P.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Gene expression assays allow for genome scale analyses of molecular biological mechanisms. State-of-the-art data analysis provides lists of involved genes, either by calculating significance levels of mRNA abundance or by Bayesian assessments of gene activity. A common problem of such approaches is the difficulty of interpreting the biological implication of the resulting gene lists. This lead to an increased interest in methods for inferring high-level biological information. A common approach for representing high level information is by inferring gene ontology (GO) terms which may be attributed to the expression data experiment. Results: This article proposes a probabilistic model for GO term inference. Modelling assumes that gene annotations to GO terms are available and gene involvement in an experiment is represented by a posterior probabilities over gene-specific indicator variables. Such probability measures result from many Bayesian approaches for expression data analysis. The proposed model combines these indicator probabilities in a probabilistic fashion and provides a probabilistic GO term assignment as a result. Experiments on synthetic and microarray data suggest that advantages of the proposed probabilistic GO term inference over statistical test-based approaches are in particular evident for sparsely annotated GO terms and in situations of large uncertainty about gene activity. Provided that appropriate annotations exist, the proposed approach is easily applied to inferring other high level assignments like pathways. Availability: Source code under GPL license is available from the author. Contact: peter.sykacek@boku.ac.at PMID:22962488

  13. Bacterium-Expressed dsRNA Downregulates Microsporidia Nosema bombycis Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qiuling; Wang, Ling; Dang, Xiaoqun; Ma, Zhengang; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Shiliang; Zhou, Zeyang; Xu, Jinshan

    2017-03-01

    The microsporidia Nosema bombycis is the insect pathogen of pebrine disease severely destructive to sericulture production. Here, we describe the use of Escherichia coli HT115 strain (DE3) to express double-strand RNAs targeting the gene encoding ADP/ATP protein in N. bombycis. The results showed that dsRNAs deferentially suppressed the gene expression during N. bombycis infection in the silkworm, and the effect waned gradually. Our results, for the first time, provide a tool to utilize the dsRNA expressed by recombinant E. coli to control the pebrine disease of the domestic silkworm. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  14. Mismatch repair gene expression in gastroesophageal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracea, Amelia; Angelescu, Cristina; Danciulescu, Mihaela; Ciurea, Marius; Ioana, Mihai; Burada, Florin

    2015-09-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) genes play a critical role in maintaining genomic stability, and the impairment of MMR machinery is associated with different human cancers, mainly colorectal cancer. The purpose of our study was to analyze gene expression patterns of three MMR genes (MSH2, MHS6, and EXO1) in gastroesophageal cancers, a pathology in which the contribution of DNA repair genes remains essentially unclear. A total of 45 Romanian patients diagnosed with sporadic gastroesophageal cancers were included in this study. For each patient, MMR mRNA levels were measured in biopsied tumoral (T) and peritumoral (PT) tissues obtained by upper endoscopy. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with specific TaqMan probes was used to measure gene expression levels for MSH2, MSH6, and EXO1 genes. A significant association was observed for the investigated MMR genes, all of which were detected to be upregulated in gastroesophageal tumor samples when compared with paired normal samples. In the stratified analysis, the association was limited to gastric adenocarcinoma samples. We found no statistically significant associations between MMR gene expression and tumor site or histological grade. In our study, MSH2, MSH6, and EXO1 genes were overexpressed in gastroesophageal cancers. Further investigations based on more samples are necessary to validate our findings.

  15. Identification of genes showing differential expression profile ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in pig with genetic propensity for higher growth rate were identified by sequence analysis of 12 differentially expressed clones selected by differential screening following the generation of the subtracted cDNA population. Real-time PCR analysis con- firmed difference in expression profiles of the identified genes in ...

  16. Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 4 regulates gene expression via transcription factor release in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Plant and animal perception of microbes through pathogen surveillance proteins leads to MAP kinase signalling and the expression of defence genes. However, little is known about how plant MAP kinases regulate specific gene expression. We report that, in the absence of pathogens, Arabidopsis MAP...... supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4-wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation....

  17. Phenobarbital reduces blood glucose and gluconeogenesis through down-regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) gene expression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Hiroaki; Okuda, Yuji; Yoshida, Yukiko; Kimura, Noriko; Kakinuma, Atsushi

    2015-10-23

    The regulatory mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate carboykinase (GTP) (EC 4.1.1.32) (PEPCK) gene expression and gluconeogenesis by phenobarbital (PB), which is known to induce drug-metabolizing enzymes, was investigated. Higher level of PEPCK mRNA was observed in spherical rat primary hepatocytes on EHS-gel than monolayer hepatocytes on TIC (type I collagen). We found that PB directly suppressed PEPCK gene expression in spherical hepatocytes on EHS-gel, but not in those on TIC. PB strongly suppressed cAMP-dependent induction of PEPCK gene expression. Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT), another gluconeogenic enzyme, was induced by cAMP, but not suppressed by PB. Chronic administration of PB reduced hepatic PEPCK mRNA in streptozotocin-induced diabetic and nondiabetic rats, and PB reduced blood glucose level in diabetic rats. Increased TAT mRNA in diabetic rats was not suppressed by PB. These results indicated that PB-dependent reduction is specific to PEPCK. From pyrvate challenge test, PB suppressed the increased gluconeogenesis in diabetic rats. PEPCK gene promoter activity was suppressed by PB in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, we found that spherical hepatocytes cultured on EHS-gel are capable to respond to PB to suppress PEPCK gene expression. Moreover, our results indicate that hypoglycemic action of PB result from transcriptional repression of PEPCK gene and subsequent suppression of gluconeogenesis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. E-cigarette use results in suppression of immune and inflammatory-response genes in nasal epithelial cells similar to cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth M; Clapp, Phillip W; Rebuli, Meghan E; Pawlak, Erica A; Glista-Baker, Ellen; Benowitz, Neal L; Fry, Rebecca C; Jaspers, Ilona

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke is known to result in impaired host defense responses and immune suppressive effects. However, the effects of new and emerging tobacco products, such as e-cigarettes, on the immune status of the respiratory epithelium are largely unknown. We conducted a clinical study collecting superficial nasal scrape biopsies, nasal lavage, urine, and serum from nonsmokers, cigarette smokers, and e-cigarette users and assessed them for changes in immune gene expression profiles. Smoking status was determined based on a smoking history and a 3- to 4-wk smoking diary and confirmed using serum cotinine and urine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) levels. Total RNA from nasal scrape biopsies was analyzed using the nCounter Human Immunology v2 Expression panel. Smoking cigarettes or vaping e-cigarettes resulted in decreased expression of immune-related genes. All genes with decreased expression in cigarette smokers (n = 53) were also decreased in e-cigarette smokers. Additionally, vaping e-cigarettes was associated with suppression of a large number of unique genes (n = 305). Furthermore, the e-cigarette users showed a greater suppression of genes common with those changed in cigarette smokers. This was particularly apparent for suppressed expression of transcription factors, such as EGR1, which was functionally associated with decreased expression of 5 target genes in cigarette smokers and 18 target genes in e-cigarette users. Taken together, these data indicate that vaping e-cigarettes is associated with decreased expression of a large number of immune-related genes, which are consistent with immune suppression at the level of the nasal mucosa. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Regulation of gene expression in human tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archambault Joanne M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic tendon injuries, also known as tendinopathies, are common among professional and recreational athletes. These injuries result in a significant amount of morbidity and health care expenditure, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms leading to tendinopathy. Methods We have used histological evaluation and molecular profiling to determine gene expression changes in 23 human patients undergoing surgical procedures for the treatment of chronic tendinopathy. Results Diseased tendons exhibit altered extracellular matrix, fiber disorientation, increased cellular content and vasculature, and the absence of inflammatory cells. Global gene expression profiling identified 983 transcripts with significantly different expression patterns in the diseased tendons. Global pathway analysis further suggested altered expression of extracellular matrix proteins and the lack of an appreciable inflammatory response. Conclusions Identification of the pathways and genes that are differentially regulated in tendinopathy samples will contribute to our understanding of the disease and the development of novel therapeutics.

  20. Noise minimization in eukaryotic gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Giaever, Guri; Kumm, Jochen; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-01-15

    All organisms have elaborate mechanisms to control rates of protein production. However, protein production is also subject to stochastic fluctuations, or noise. Several recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli have investigated the relationship between transcription and translation rates and stochastic fluctuations in protein levels, or more generally, how such randomness is a function of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, the fundamental question of whether stochasticity in protein expression is generally biologically relevant has not been addressed, and it remains unknown whether random noise in the protein production rate of most genes significantly affects the fitness of any organism. We propose that organisms should be particularly sensitive to variation in the protein levels of two classes of genes: genes whose deletion is lethal to the organism and genes that encode subunits of multiprotein complexes. Using an experimentally verified model of stochastic gene expression in S. cerevisiae, we estimate the noise in protein production for nearly every yeast gene, and confirm our prediction that the production of essential and complex-forming proteins involves lower levels of noise than does the production of most other genes. Our results support the hypothesis that noise in gene expression is a biologically important variable, is generally detrimental to organismal fitness, and is subject to natural selection.

  1. Global gene expression in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Kjærgaard, K.; Klemm, Per

    2003-01-01

    It is now apparent that microorganisms undergo significant changes during the transition from planktonic to biofilm growth. These changes result in phenotypic adaptations that allow the formation of highly organized and structured sessile communities, which possess enhanced resistance...... to antimicrobial treatments and host immune defence responses. Escherichia coli has been used as a model organism to study the mechanisms of growth within adhered communities. In this study, we use DNA microarray technology to examine the global gene expression profile of E. coli during sessile growth compared...... the transition to biofilm growth, and these included genes expressed under oxygen-limiting conditions, genes encoding (putative) transport proteins, putative oxidoreductases and genes associated with enhanced heavy metal resistance. Of particular interest was the observation that many of the genes altered...

  2. Pharmacological and Genetic Modulation of REV-ERB Activity and Expression Affects Orexigenic Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Amador

    Full Text Available The nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of the circadian rhythm and various metabolic processes. The circadian rhythm is an endogenous mechanism, which generates entrainable biological changes that follow a 24-hour period. It regulates a number of physiological processes, including sleep/wakeful cycles and feeding behaviors. We recently demonstrated that REV-ERB-specific small molecules affect sleep and anxiety. The orexinergic system also plays a significant role in mammalian physiology and behavior, including the regulation of sleep and food intake. Importantly, orexin genes are expressed in a circadian manner. Given these overlaps in function and circadian expression, we wanted to determine whether the REV-ERBs might regulate orexin. We found that acute in vivo modulation of REV-ERB activity, with the REV-ERB-specific synthetic ligand SR9009, affects the circadian expression of orexinergic genes in mice. Long term dosing with SR9009 also suppresses orexinergic gene expression in mice. Finally, REV-ERBβ-deficient mice present with increased orexinergic transcripts. These data suggest that the REV-ERBs may be involved in the repression of orexinergic gene expression.

  3. [Construction of the suppression subtractive cDNA libraries of human large cell lung cancer line L9981 before and after transfection with nm23-H1 gene.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Sujuan; Feng, Zhihua; Zhu, Wen; Cai, Chunji; Li, Lu; Sun, Liya; Wan, Haisu; Ma, Li; Zhou, Qinghua

    2008-08-20

    It has been proven that nm23-H1 gene is an important metastaticsuppressed gene of lung cancer. In order to screen the differential expression genes related to nm23-H1 , we constructed the suppression subtractive cDNA libraries of human large cell lung cancer line L9981 transfected and untransfected with nm23-H1 gene by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) in this study, which lay a solid foundation for further screening and cloning metastatic-related genes of nm23-H1. The forward and reverse suppression subtractive cDNA libraries were constructed in the human large cell lung cancer line L9981 before and after transfection with nm23-H1 gene (L9981 and L9981-nm23-H1) by SSH method. The positive clones were preliminarily screened by bluewhite colony, and precisely identified by PCR. The suppression subtractive cDNA libraries were successfully constructed in the human large cell lung cancer line L9981 transfected and untransfected with nm23-H1 gene (L9981-nm23-H1 and L9981). After the blue-white screening, about three hundred positive clones in the forward subtracted library and four hundred positive clones in the reverse subtracted library were obtained. Ramdom analysis of 96 clones in each library with colony PCR methods showed that 84 clones in the forward subtracted library and 83 clones in the reverse subtracted library contained (300-750) bp inserts. SSH is proved to be an efficient tool for differential expression gene cloning. The forward and reverse suppression subtractive cDNA libraries of human large cell lung cancer line L9981 transfected and untransfected with nm23-H1 gene (L9981-nm23-H1 and L9981) are successfully constructed by SSH and T/A cloning technology. The expression of nm23-H1 gene in the human large cell lung cancer cell lines may affect the differential expression of some metastatic-related genes.

  4. Down-Regulation of Gene Expression by RNA-Induced Gene Silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travella, Silvia; Keller, Beat

    Down-regulation of endogenous genes via post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is a key to the characterization of gene function in plants. Many RNA-based silencing mechanisms such as post-transcriptional gene silencing, co-suppression, quelling, and RNA interference (RNAi) have been discovered among species of different kingdoms (plants, fungi, and animals). One of the most interesting discoveries was RNAi, a sequence-specific gene-silencing mechanism initiated by the introduction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), homologous in sequence to the silenced gene, which triggers degradation of mRNA. Infection of plants with modified viruses can also induce RNA silencing and is referred to as virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). In contrast to insertional mutagenesis, these emerging new reverse genetic approaches represent a powerful tool for exploring gene function and for manipulating gene expression experimentally in cereal species such as barley and wheat. We examined how RNAi and VIGS have been used to assess gene function in barley and wheat, including molecular mechanisms involved in the process and available methodological elements, such as vectors, inoculation procedures, and analysis of silenced phenotypes.

  5. MYC through miR-17-92 Suppresses Specific Target Genes to Maintain Survival, Autonomous Proliferation, and a Neoplastic State

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yulin

    2014-08-01

    The MYC oncogene regulates gene expression through multiple mechanisms, and its overexpression culminates in tumorigenesis. MYC inactivation reverses turmorigenesis through the loss of distinguishing features of cancer, including autonomous proliferation and survival. Here we report that MYC via miR-17-92 maintains a neoplastic state through the suppression of chromatin regulatory genes Sin3b, Hbp1, Suv420h1, and Btg1, as well as the apoptosis regulator Bim. The enforced expression of miR-17-92 prevents MYC suppression from inducing proliferative arrest, senescence, and apoptosis and abrogates sustained tumor regression. Knockdown of the five miR-17-92 target genes blocks senescence and apoptosis while it modestly delays proliferative arrest, thus partially recapitulating miR-17-92 function. We conclude that MYC, via miR-17-92, maintains a neoplastic state by suppressing specific target genes.

  6. Vanillin Suppresses Cell Motility by Inhibiting STAT3-Mediated HIF-1α mRNA Expression in Malignant Melanoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Ji; Lee, Yoon-Mi; Oh, Taek-In; Kim, Byeong Mo; Lim, Beong-Ou; Lim, Ji-Hong

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that vanillin has anti-cancer, anti-mutagenic, and anti-metastatic activity; however, the precise molecular mechanism whereby vanillin inhibits metastasis and cancer progression is not fully elucidated. In this study, we examined whether vanillin has anti-cancer and anti-metastatic activities via inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in A2058 and A375 human malignant melanoma cells. Immunoblotting and quantitative real time (RT)-PCR analysis revealed that vanillin down-regulates HIF-1α protein accumulation and the transcripts of HIF-1α target genes related to cancer metastasis including fibronectin 1 ( FN1 ), lysyl oxidase-like 2 ( LOXL2 ), and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor ( uPAR ). It was also found that vanillin significantly suppresses HIF-1α mRNA expression and de novo HIF-1α protein synthesis. To understand the suppressive mechanism of vanillin on HIF-1α expression, chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed. Consequently, it was found that vanillin causes inhibition of promoter occupancy by signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), but not nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), on HIF1A . Furthermore, an in vitro migration assay revealed that the motility of melanoma cells stimulated by hypoxia was attenuated by vanillin treatment. In conclusion, we demonstrate that vanillin might be a potential anti-metastatic agent that suppresses metastatic gene expression and migration activity under hypoxia via the STAT3-HIF-1α signaling pathway.

  7. Stage dependent expression and tumor suppressive function of FAM134B (JK1) in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Farhadul; Gopalan, Vinod; Wahab, Riajul; Smith, Robert A; Qiao, Bin; Lam, Alfred King-Yin

    2017-01-01

    The aims of the present study are to investigate sub-cellular location, differential expression in different cancer stages and functional role of FAM134B in colon cancer development. FAM134B expression was studied and quantified at protein and mRNA levels in cell lines using immunocytochemistry, Western blot and real-time PCR. In vitro functional assays and an in vivo xenotransplantation mouse models were used to investigate the molecular role of FAM134B in cancer cell biology in response to FAM134B silencing with shRNA lentiviral particles. FAM134B protein was noted in both cytoplasm and nuclei of cancer cells. In cancer cells derived from stage IV colon cancer, FAM134B expression was remarkably reduced when compared to non-cancer colon cells and cancer cells derived from stage II colon cancer. FAM134B knockdown significantly (P colon cancer cells following lentiviral transfection. Furthermore, FAM134B suppression significantly increased (34-52%; P cancer suppressor gene in colon cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The efficiency of reappraisal and expressive suppression in regulating everyday affective experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Thomas; Smeets, Tom; Giesbrecht, Timo; Merckelbach, Harald

    2012-12-30

    A widespread assumption in research and clinical practice is that cognitive reappraisal is a healthy and successful emotion regulation strategy, while expressive suppression is ineffective and has non-favourable consequences (e.g., decreased positive affect, higher physiological arousal). However, little is known about the consequences of reappraisal and expressive suppression for everyday affect. We investigated affective consequences of habitual reappraisal and expressive suppression in undergraduates (n=87), and sampled affect characteristics for 24h. Moreover, we quantified affective recovery from viewing an aversive video fragment. Habitual reappraisal was associated with lowered emotional arousal (but not valence), both in terms of diurnal affect levels and positive and negative responses to the emotional provocation task. This pattern contravenes the popular assumption that reappraisal has generally favourable consequences. Additionally, in contrast to the alleged non-favourable consequences of habitual expressive suppression, the current study failed to find a relation between expressive suppression, diurnal affect levels and affective recovery. This suggests that the detrimental effects of expressive suppression are limited in duration. Collectively, our results emphasise that the everyday consequences of emotion regulation for affect merits systematic research, for instance by using more naturalistic and prolonged interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of genes involved in interactions between Biomphalaria glabrata and Schistosoma mansoni by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockyer, Anne E; Spinks, Jennifer; Noble, Leslie R; Rollinson, David; Jones, Catherine S

    2007-01-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata is an intermediate snail host for Schistosoma mansoni, a medically important schistosome. In order to identify transcripts involved in snail-schistosome interactions, subtractive cDNA libraries were prepared, using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) between a parasite-exposed schistosome-resistant and a susceptible strain of B. glabrata, and also between schistosome-exposed and unexposed snails from the resistant snail line. Separate libraries were made from both haemocytes and the haemopoietic organ. Subtraction was performed in both directions enriching for cDNAs differentially expressed between parasite-exposed resistant and susceptible samples and up or down-regulated in the resistant line after challenge. The resulting eight libraries were screened and eight genes, differentially expressed between the haemocytes of resistant and susceptible snail strains, were identified and confirmed with reverse transcriptase PCR, including two transcripts expected to be involved in the stress response mechanism for regulating the damaging oxidative burst pathways involved in cytotoxic killing of the parasite: the iron-storage and immunoregulatory molecule, ferritin, and HtrA2, a serine protease involved in the cellular stress response. Transcripts with elevated levels in the resistant strain, had the same expression patterns in the subtracted libraries and unsubtracted controls; higher levels in exposed resistant snails compared to susceptible ones and down-regulated in exposed compared with unexposed resistant snails. Differential expression of two of the transcripts with no known function from the susceptible strain, was independently confirmed in a repeat exposure experiment.

  10. Expression Study of Banana Pathogenic Resistance Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenny M. Dwivany

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Banana is one of the world's most important trade commodities. However, infection of banana pathogenic fungi (Fusarium oxysporum race 4 is one of the major causes of decreasing production in Indonesia. Genetic engineering has become an alternative way to control this problem by isolating genes that involved in plant defense mechanism against pathogens. Two of the important genes are API5 and ChiI1, each gene encodes apoptosis inhibitory protein and chitinase enzymes. The purpose of this study was to study the expression of API5 and ChiI1 genes as candidate pathogenic resistance genes. The amplified fragments were then cloned, sequenced, and confirmed with in silico studies. Based on sequence analysis, it is showed that partial API5 gene has putative transactivation domain and ChiI1 has 9 chitinase family GH19 protein motifs. Data obtained from this study will contribute in banana genetic improvement.

  11. Control of immune ligands by members of a cytomegalovirus gene expansion suppresses natural killer cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Ceri A; Weekes, Michael P; Nobre, Luis V; Ruckova, Eva; Wilkie, Gavin S; Paulo, Joao A; Chang, Chiwen; Suárez, Nicolás M; Davies, James A; Antrobus, Robin; Stanton, Richard J; Aicheler, Rebecca J; Nichols, Hester; Vojtesek, Borek; Trowsdale, John; Davison, Andrew J; Gygi, Steven P; Tomasec, Peter; Lehner, Paul J; Wilkinson, Gavin W G

    2017-02-10

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US12 family consists of ten sequentially arranged genes (US12-21) with poorly characterized function. We now identify novel natural killer (NK) cell evasion functions for four members: US12, US14, US18 and US20. Using a systematic multiplexed proteomics approach to quantify ~1300 cell surface and ~7200 whole cell proteins, we demonstrate that the US12 family selectively targets plasma membrane proteins and plays key roles in regulating NK ligands, adhesion molecules and cytokine receptors. US18 and US20 work in concert to suppress cell surface expression of the critical NKp30 ligand B7-H6 thus inhibiting NK cell activation. The US12 family is therefore identified as a major new hub of immune regulation.

  12. Identification and characterization of genes associated with tapping panel dryness from Hevea brasiliensis latex using suppression subtractive hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chunliu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tapping panel dryness (TPD is one of the most serious threats to natural rubber production. Although a great deal of effort has been made to study TPD in rubber tree, the molecular mechanisms underlying TPD remain poorly understood. Identification and systematical analyses of the genes associated with TPD are the prerequisites for elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in TPD. The present study is undertaken to generate information about the genes related to TPD in rubber tree. Results To identify the genes related to TPD in rubber tree, forward and reverse cDNA libraries from the latex of healthy and TPD trees were constructed using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH method. Among the 1106 clones obtained from the two cDNA libraries, 822 clones showed differential expression in two libraries by reverse Northern blot analyses. Sequence analyses indicated that the 822 clones represented 237 unique genes; and most of them have not been reported to be associated with TPD in rubber tree. The expression patterns of 20 differentially expressed genes were further investigated to validate the SSH data by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR and real-time PCR analysis. According to the Gene Ontology convention, 237 unique genes were classified into 10 functional groups, such as stress/defense response, protein metabolism, transcription and post-transcription, rubber biosynthesis, etc. Among the genes with known function, the genes preferentially expressed were associated with stress/defense response in the reverse library, whereas metabolism and energy in the forward one. Conclusions The genes associated with TPD were identified by SSH method in this research. Systematic analyses of the genes related to TPD suggest that the production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS, ubiquitin proteasome pathway, programmed cell death and rubber biosynthesis might play important roles in TPD. Therefore, our results not only

  13. Stress, and pathogen response gene expression in modeled microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Pellis, Neal R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Immune suppression in microgravity has been well documented. With the advent of human exploration and long-term space travel, the immune system of the astronaut must be optimally maintained. It is important to investigate the expression patterns of cytokine genes, because they are directly related to immune response. Heat shock proteins (HSPs), also called stress proteins, are a group of proteins that are present in the cells of every life form. These proteins are induced when a cell responds to stressors such as heat, cold and oxygen deprivation. Microgravity is another stressor that may regulate HSPs. Heat shock proteins trigger immune response through activities that occur both inside the cell (intracellular) and outside the cell (extracellular). Knowledge about these two gene groups could lead to establishment of a blueprint of the immune response and adaptation-related genes in the microgravity environment. Methods: Human peripheral blood cells were cultured in 1g (T flask) and modeled microgravity (MMG, rotating-wall vessel) for 24 and 72 hours. Cell samples were collected and subjected to gene array analysis using the Affymetrix HG_U95 array. Data was collected and subjected to a two-way analysis of variance. The genes related to immune and stress responses were analyzed. Results and Conclusions: HSP70 was up-regulated by more than two fold in microgravity culture, while HSP90 was significantly down-regulated. HSP70 is not typically expressed in all kinds of cells, but it is expressed at high levels in stress conditions. HSP70 participates in translation, protein translocation, proteolysis and protein folding, suppressing aggregation and reactivating denatured proteins. Increased serum HSP70 levels correlate with a better outcome for heat-stroke or severe trauma patients. At the same time, elevated serum levels of HSP70 have been detected in patients with peripheral or renal vascular disease. HSP90 has been identified in the cytosol, nucleus and

  14. Gene expression analysis of flax seed development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharpe Andrew

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flax, Linum usitatissimum L., is an important crop whose seed oil and stem fiber have multiple industrial applications. Flax seeds are also well-known for their nutritional attributes, viz., omega-3 fatty acids in the oil and lignans and mucilage from the seed coat. In spite of the importance of this crop, there are few molecular resources that can be utilized toward improving seed traits. Here, we describe flax embryo and seed development and generation of comprehensive genomic resources for the flax seed. Results We describe a large-scale generation and analysis of expressed sequences in various tissues. Collectively, the 13 libraries we have used provide a broad representation of genes active in developing embryos (globular, heart, torpedo, cotyledon and mature stages seed coats (globular and torpedo stages and endosperm (pooled globular to torpedo stages and genes expressed in flowers, etiolated seedlings, leaves, and stem tissue. A total of 261,272 expressed sequence tags (EST (GenBank accessions LIBEST_026995 to LIBEST_027011 were generated. These EST libraries included transcription factor genes that are typically expressed at low levels, indicating that the depth is adequate for in silico expression analysis. Assembly of the ESTs resulted in 30,640 unigenes and 82% of these could be identified on the basis of homology to known and hypothetical genes from other plants. When compared with fully sequenced plant genomes, the flax unigenes resembled poplar and castor bean more than grape, sorghum, rice or Arabidopsis. Nearly one-fifth of these (5,152 had no homologs in sequences reported for any organism, suggesting that this category represents genes that are likely unique to flax. Digital analyses revealed gene expression dynamics for the biosynthesis of a number of important seed constituents during seed development. Conclusions We have developed a foundational database of expressed sequences and collection of plasmid

  15. Gene expression analysis of flax seed development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venglat, Prakash; Xiang, Daoquan; Qiu, Shuqing; Stone, Sandra L; Tibiche, Chabane; Cram, Dustin; Alting-Mees, Michelle; Nowak, Jacek; Cloutier, Sylvie; Deyholos, Michael; Bekkaoui, Faouzi; Sharpe, Andrew; Wang, Edwin; Rowland, Gordon; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Datla, Raju

    2011-04-29

    Flax, Linum usitatissimum L., is an important crop whose seed oil and stem fiber have multiple industrial applications. Flax seeds are also well-known for their nutritional attributes, viz., omega-3 fatty acids in the oil and lignans and mucilage from the seed coat. In spite of the importance of this crop, there are few molecular resources that can be utilized toward improving seed traits. Here, we describe flax embryo and seed development and generation of comprehensive genomic resources for the flax seed. We describe a large-scale generation and analysis of expressed sequences in various tissues. Collectively, the 13 libraries we have used provide a broad representation of genes active in developing embryos (globular, heart, torpedo, cotyledon and mature stages) seed coats (globular and torpedo stages) and endosperm (pooled globular to torpedo stages) and genes expressed in flowers, etiolated seedlings, leaves, and stem tissue. A total of 261,272 expressed sequence tags (EST) (GenBank accessions LIBEST_026995 to LIBEST_027011) were generated. These EST libraries included transcription factor genes that are typically expressed at low levels, indicating that the depth is adequate for in silico expression analysis. Assembly of the ESTs resulted in 30,640 unigenes and 82% of these could be identified on the basis of homology to known and hypothetical genes from other plants. When compared with fully sequenced plant genomes, the flax unigenes resembled poplar and castor bean more than grape, sorghum, rice or Arabidopsis. Nearly one-fifth of these (5,152) had no homologs in sequences reported for any organism, suggesting that this category represents genes that are likely unique to flax. Digital analyses revealed gene expression dynamics for the biosynthesis of a number of important seed constituents during seed development. We have developed a foundational database of expressed sequences and collection of plasmid clones that comprise even low-expressed genes such as

  16. Gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle after gene electrotransfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Zibert, John R; Gissel, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    ) followed by a long low voltage pulse (LV, 100 V/cm, 400 ms); a pulse combination optimised for efficient and safe gene transfer. Muscles were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and excised at 4 hours, 48 hours or 3 weeks after treatment. RESULTS: Differentially expressed genes were...... with the control muscles. Most interestingly, no changes in the expression of proteins involved in inflammatory responses or muscle regeneration was detected, indicating limited muscle damage and regeneration. Histological analysis revealed structural changes with loss of cell integrity and striation pattern......BACKGROUND: Gene transfer by electroporation (DNA electrotransfer) to muscle results in high level long term transgenic expression, showing great promise for treatment of e.g. protein deficiency syndromes. However little is known about the effects of DNA electrotransfer on muscle fibres. We have...

  17. Visualizing Gene Expression In Situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlage, R.S.

    1998-11-02

    Visualizing bacterial cells and describing their responses to the environment are difficult tasks. Their small size is the chief reason for the difficulty, which means that we must often use many millions of cells in a sample in order to determine what the average response of the bacteria is. However, an average response can sometimes mask important events in bacterial physiology, which means that our understanding of these organisms will suffer. We have used a variety of instruments to visualize bacterial cells, all of which tell us something different about the sample. We use a fluorescence activated cell sorter to sort cells based on the fluorescence provided by bioreporter genes, and these can be used to select for particular genetic mutations. Cells can be visualized by epifluorescent microscopy, and sensitive photodetectors can be added that allow us to find a single bacterial cell that is fluorescent or bioluminescent. We have also used standard photomultipliers to examine cell aggregates as field bioreporter microorganisms. Examples of each of these instruments show how our understanding of bacterial physiology has changed with the technology.

  18. Histamine H1Receptor Gene Expression and Drug Action of Antihistamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Hiroyuki; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Hisao; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Takeda, Noriaki

    2017-01-01

    The upregulation mechanism of histamine H 1 receptor through the activation of protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) and the receptor gene expression was discovered. Levels of histamine H 1 receptor mRNA and IL-4 mRNA in nasal mucosa were elevated by the provocation of nasal hypersensitivity model rats. Pretreatment with antihistamines suppressed the elevation of mRNA levels. Scores of nasal symptoms were correlatively alleviated to the suppression level of mRNAs above. A correlation between scores of nasal symptoms and levels of histamine H 1 receptor mRNA in the nasal mucosa was observed in patients with pollinosis. Both scores of nasal symptoms and the level of histamine H 1 receptor mRNA were improved by prophylactic treatment of antihistamines. Similar to the antihistamines, pretreatment with antiallergic natural medicines showed alleviation of nasal symptoms with correlative suppression of gene expression in nasal hypersensitivity model rats through the suppression of PKCδ. Similar effects of antihistamines and antiallergic natural medicines support that histamine H 1 receptor-mediated activation of histamine H 1 receptor gene expression is an important signaling pathway for the symptoms of allergic diseases. Antihistamines with inverse agonist activity showed the suppression of constitutive histamine H 1 receptor gene expression, suggesting the advantage of therapeutic effect.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide triggers nuclear import of Lpcat1 to regulate inducible gene expression in lung epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Bryon; Kaercher, Leah; Snavely, Courtney; Zhao, Yutong; Zou, Chunbin

    2012-07-26

    To report that Lpcat1 plays an important role in regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inducible gene transcription. Gene expression in Murine Lung Epithelial MLE-12 cells with LPS treatment or Haemophilus influenza and Escherichia coli infection was analyzed by employing quantitative Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction techniques. Nucleofection was used to deliver Lenti-viral system to express or knock down Lpcat1 in MLE cells. Subcellular protein fractionation and Western blotting were utilized to study Lpcat1 nuclear relocation. Lpcat1 translocates into the nucleus from the cytoplasm in murine lung epithelia (MLE) after LPS treatment. Haemophilus influenza and Escherichia coli, two LPS-containing pathogens that cause pneumonia, triggered Lpcat1 nuclear translocation from the cytoplasm. The LPS inducible gene expression profile was determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction after silencing Lpcat1 or overexpression of the enzyme in MLE cells. We detected that 17 out of a total 38 screened genes were upregulated, 14 genes were suppressed, and 7 genes remained unchanged in LPS treated cells in comparison to controls. Knockdown of Lpcat1 by shRNA dramatically changed the spectrum of the LPS inducible gene transcription, as 18 genes out of 38 genes were upregulated, of which 20 genes were suppressed or unchanged. Notably, in Lpcat1 overexpressed cells, 25 genes out of 38 genes were reduced in the setting of LPS treatment. These observations suggest that Lpcat1 relocates into the nucleus in response to bacterial infection to differentially regulate gene transcriptional repression.

  20. Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED): a relational database of gene expression profiles in kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingzhou; Yang, Bo; Chen, Xujiao; Xu, Jing; Mei, Changlin; Mao, Zhiguo

    2014-01-01

    We present a bioinformatics database named Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED), which contains comprehensive gene expression data sets from renal disease research. The web-based interface of RGED allows users to query the gene expression profiles in various kidney-related samples, including renal cell lines, human kidney tissues and murine model kidneys. Researchers can explore certain gene profiles, the relationships between genes of interests and identify biomarkers or even drug targets in kidney diseases. The aim of this work is to provide a user-friendly utility for the renal disease research community to query expression profiles of genes of their own interest without the requirement of advanced computational skills. Availability and implementation: Website is implemented in PHP, R, MySQL and Nginx and freely available from http://rged.wall-eva.net. Database URL: http://rged.wall-eva.net PMID:25252782

  1. Sequencing and Gene Expression Analysis of Leishmania tropica LACK Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoudeh, Nour; Kweider, Mahmoud; Abbady, Abdul-Qader; Soukkarieh, Chadi

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania Homologue of receptors for Activated C Kinase (LACK) antigen is a 36-kDa protein, which provokes a very early immune response against Leishmania infection. There are several reports on the expression of LACK through different life-cycle stages of genus Leishmania, but only a few of them have focused on L.tropica. The present study provides details of the cloning, DNA sequencing and gene expression of LACK in this parasite species. First, several local isolates of Leishmania parasites were typed in our laboratory using PCR technique to verify of Leishmania parasite species. After that, LACK gene was amplified and cloned into a vector for sequencing. Finally, the expression of this molecule in logarithmic and stationary growth phase promastigotes, as well as in amastigotes, was evaluated by Reverse Transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) technique. The typing result confirmed that all our local isolates belong to L.tropica. LACK gene sequence was determined and high similarity was observed with the sequences of other Leishmania species. Furthermore, the expression of LACK gene in both promastigotes and amastigotes forms was confirmed. Overall, the data set the stage for future studies of the properties and immune role of LACK gene products.

  2. Hotair mediates hepatocarcinogenesis through suppressing miRNA-218 expression and activating P14 and P16 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei-Ming; Zhu, Xiao; Wang, Wei-Mao; Lu, Ying-Fei; Hu, Bao-Guang; Wang, Hua; Liang, Wei-Cheng; Wang, Shan-Shan; Ko, Chun-Hay; Waye, Mary Miu-Yee; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Li, Gang; Zhang, Jin-Fang

    2015-10-01

    Long non-coding RNA Hotair has been considered as a pro-oncogene in multiple cancers. Although there is emerging evidence that reveals its biological function and the association with clinical prognosis, the precise mechanism remains largely elusive. We investigated the function and mechanism of Hotair in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell models and a xenograft mouse model. The regulatory network between miR-218 and Hotair was elucidated by RNA immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assays. Finally, the correlation between Hotair, miR-218 and the target gene Bmi-1 were evaluated in 52 paired HCC specimens. In this study, we reported that Hotair negatively regulated miR-218 expression in HCC, which might be mediated through an EZH2-targeting-miR-218-2 promoter regulatory axis. Further investigation revealed that Hotair knockdown dramatically inhibited cell viability and induced G1-phase arrest in vitro and suppressed tumorigenicity in vivo by promoting miR-218 expression. Oncogene Bmi-1 was shown to be a functional target of miR-218, and the main downstream targets signaling, P16(Ink4a) and P14(ARF), were activated in Hotair-suppressed tumorigenesis. In primary human HCC specimens, Hotair and Bmi-1 were concordantly upregulated whereas miR-218 was downregulated in these tissues. Furthermore, Hotair was inversely associated with miR-218 expression and positively correlated with Bmi-1 expression in these clinical tissues. Hotair silence activates P16(Ink4a) and P14(ARF) signaling by enhancing miR-218 expression and suppressing Bmi-1 expression, resulting in the suppression of tumorigenesis in HCC. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Suppression of the cell proliferation in stomach cancer cells by the ZNRD1 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Liu; Zhang Yumei; Liu Na; Liu Changjiang; Zhi Min; Pan Yanglin; Lan Mei; Sun Li; Fan Daiming

    2004-01-01

    Zinc ribbon domain-containing 1 (ZNRD1), a transcription-associated gene, was recently found to be downregulated in human gastric cancer tissues as compared to the matched adjacent nonneoplastic tissues. In this study, we constructed the siRNA eukaryotic expression vectors of ZNRD1 and transfected them into normal gastric epithelial cells (GES-1). We also introduced the ZNRD1 gene into gastric cancer cells that do (SGC7901) and do not (AGS) express ZNRD1 endogenously. GES-1 cells stably transfected with the ZNRD1-RNAi were found to exhibit significantly quicker proliferation than empty vector transfectants. AGS cells stably transfected with the ZNRD1 cDNA exhibited significantly decreased growth rate as compared to control vector transfectants, whereas SGC7901 cells did not. Furthermore, ZNRD1 suppresses growth of AGS cells in soft agar and tumor formation in athymic nude mice. This study clearly demonstrates that ZNRD1 may play an important role in the control of human gastric cancer development by regulating cell proliferation. These results provide new insights into the function of ZNRD1 and further validate ZNRD1 as a potential therapeutic target in gastric cancer

  4. RKIP Suppresses Breast Cancer Metastasis to the Bone by Regulating Stroma-Associated Genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, E.; Frankenberger, C.A.; Rosner, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade cancer research has recognized the importance of tumor stroma interactions for the progression of primary tumors to an aggressive and invasive phenotype and for colonization of new organs in the context of metastasis. The dialogue between tumor cells and the surrounding stroma is a complex and dynamic phenomenon, as many cell types and soluble factors are involved. While the function of many of the players involved in this cross talk have been studied, the regulatory mechanisms and signaling pathways that control their expression have not been investigated in depth. By using a novel, interdisciplinary approach applied to the mechanism of action of the metastasis suppressor, Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP), we identified a signaling pathway that suppresses invasion and metastasis through regulation of stroma-associated genes. Conceptually, the approach we developed uses a master regulator and expression arrays from breast cancer patients to formulate hypotheses based on clinical data. Experimental validation is followed by further bioinformatics analysis to establish the clinical significance of discoveries. Using RKIP as an example we show here that this multi-step approach can be used to identify gene regulatory mechanisms that affect tumor-stroma interactions that in turn influence metastasis to the bone or other organs

  5. [Imprinting genes and it's expression in Arabidopsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xu, Pei-Zhou; Yang, Hua; Wu, Xian-Jun

    2010-07-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to the phenomenon that the expression of a gene copy depends on its parent of origin. The Arabidopsis imprinted FIS (Fertilisation-independent seed) genes, mea, fis2, and fie, play essential roles in the repression of central cell and the regulation of early endosperm development. fis mutants display two phenotypes: autonomous diploid endosperm development when fertilization is absent and un-cellularised endosperm formation when fertilization occurs. The FIS Polycomb protein complex including the above three FIS proteins catalyzes histone H3 K27 tri-methylation on target loci. DME (DEMETER), a DNA glycosylase, and AtMET1 (Methyltransferase1), a DNA methyltransferase, are involved in the regulation of imprinted expression of both mea and fis2. This review summarizes the studies on the Arabidopsis imprinted FIS genes and other related genes. Recent works have shown that the insertion of transposons may affect nearby gene expression, which may be the main driving force behind the evolution of genomic imprinting. This summary covers the achievements on Arabidopsis imprinted genes will provide important information for studies on genomic imprinting in the important crops such as rice and maize.

  6. Gene expression profiling for pharmaceutical toxicology screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugelski, Peter J

    2002-01-01

    Advances in medicinal chemistry and high-throughput pharmacological screening are creating a multitude of potential lead compounds. There is also heightened concern about drug-induced toxicity, which is all too often uncovered late in development or at the post marketing stage. Together, these factors have created a need for novel approaches to screen for toxicity. There have been technological advances that enable study of changes in the gene expression profile caused by toxic insults and important steps made toward unraveling target organ toxicity at the molecular level. Thus, gene expression profile-based screens hold the promise to revolutionize the way in which compounds are selected for development. For screens focused on specific mechanisms of toxicity, reporter gene systems have proven utility, albeit modest because of our limited knowledge of which genes are true surrogate markers for toxicity. For broader forecasts of toxicity, DNA microarrays hold great promise for delivering practical gene expression profile screens (GEPS). For this promise to be realized, however, a number of technological hurdles must be cleared: (i) cost; (ii) reproducibility; (iii) throughput; and (iv) data analysis. Of equal if not greater importance, issues relating to the test systems used, the requisite number of genes to be studied and the size and scope of the database upon which forecasts will be based must be addressed. At present, the proof-of-concept for GEPS for toxicity is in hand, and we are poised to realize the goal of creating practical GEPS for application in compound prioritization.

  7. Regulation of gene expression by tobacco product preparations in cultured human dermal fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malpass, Gloria E., E-mail: gloria.malpass@gmail.com [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Arimilli, Subhashini, E-mail: sarimill@wakehealth.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Prasad, G.L., E-mail: prasadg@rjrt.com [R and D Department, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Winston-Salem, NC 27102 (United States); Howlett, Allyn C., E-mail: ahowlett@wakehealth.edu [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Skin fibroblasts comprise the first barrier of defense against wounds, and tobacco products directly contact the oral cavity. Cultured human dermal fibroblasts were exposed to smokeless tobacco extract (STE), total particulate matter (TPM) from tobacco smoke, or nicotine at concentrations comparable to those found in these extracts for 1 h or 5 h. Differences were identified in pathway-specific genes between treatments and vehicle using qRT-PCR. At 1 h, IL1α was suppressed significantly by TPM and less significantly by STE. Neither FOS nor JUN was suppressed at 1 h by tobacco products. IL8, TNFα, VCAM1, and NFκB1 were suppressed after 5 h with STE, whereas only TNFα and NFκB1 were suppressed by TPM. At 1 h with TPM, secreted levels of IL10 and TNFα were increased. Potentially confounding effects of nicotine were exemplified by genes such as ATF3 (5 h), which was increased by nicotine but suppressed by other components of STE. Within 2 h, TPM stimulated nitric oxide production, and both STE and TPM increased reactive oxygen species. The biological significance of these findings and utilization of the gene expression changes reported herein regarding effects of the tobacco product preparations on dermal fibroblasts will require additional research. - Highlights: • Tobacco product preparations (TPPs) alter gene expression in dermal fibroblasts. • Some immediate early genes critical to the inflammatory process are affected. • Different TPPs produce differential responses in certain pro-inflammatory genes.

  8. [Regulation of heat shock gene expression in response to stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuz, D G

    2017-01-01

    Heat shock (HS) genes, or stress genes, code for a number of proteins that collectively form the most ancient and universal stress defense system. The system determines the cell capability of adaptation to various adverse factors and performs a variety of auxiliary functions in normal physiological conditions. Common stress factors, such as higher temperatures, hypoxia, heavy metals, and others, suppress transcription and translation for the majority of genes, while HS genes are upregulated. Transcription of HS genes is controlled by transcription factors of the HS factor (HSF) family. Certain HSFs are activated on exposure to higher temperatures or other adverse factors to ensure stress-induced HS gene expression, while other HSFs are specifically activated at particular developmental stages. The regulation of the main mammalian stress-inducible factor HSF1 and Drosophila melanogaster HSF includes many components, such as a variety of early warning signals indicative of abnormal cell activity (e.g., increases in intracellular ceramide, cytosolic calcium ions, or partly denatured proteins); protein kinases, which phosphorylate HSFs at various Ser residues; acetyltransferases; and regulatory proteins, such as SUMO and HSBP1. Transcription factors other than HSFs are also involved in activating HS gene transcription; the set includes D. melanogaster GAF, mammalian Sp1 and NF-Y, and other factors. Transcription of several stress genes coding for molecular chaperones of the glucose-regulated protein (GRP) family is predominantly regulated by another stress-detecting system, which is known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) system and is activated in response to massive protein misfolding in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial matrix. A translational fine tuning of HS protein expression occurs via changing the phosphorylation status of several proteins involved in translation initiation. In addition, specific signal sequences in the 5'-UTRs of some HS

  9. Identification of cold responsive genes in Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinxia; Wei, Pinyuan; Chen, Xiuli; Zeng, Digang; Chen, Xiaohan

    2016-01-10

    The Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) is one of the most widely cultured shrimp species in the world. Despite L. vannamei having tropical origins, it is being reared subtropically, with low temperature stress being one of the most severe threats to its growth, survival and distribution. To unravel the molecular basis of cold tolerance in L. vannamei, the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) platform was employed to identify cold responsive genes in the hepatopancreas of L. vannamei. Both forward and reverse cDNA libraries were constructed, followed by dot blot hybridization, cloning, sequence analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. These approaches identified 92 cold induced and 48 cold inhibited ESTs to give a total of 37 cold induced and 17 cold inhibited contigs. Some of the identified genes related to stress response or cell defense, such as tetraspanins (TSPANs), DEAD-box helicase, heat shock proteins (HSPs) and metallothionein (MT), which were more abundant in the forward SSH library than in the reverse SSH library. The most abundant Est was a tetraspanin-8 (TSPAN8) homolog dubbed LvTSPAN8. A multiple sequence alignment and transmembrane domain prediction was also performed for LvTSPAN8. LvTSPAN8 expression was also examined in the gills, muscle, heart and hepatopancreas following cold exposure and showed the highest expression levels in the hepatopancreas. Overall, this study was able to identify several known genes and novel genes via SSH that appear to be associated with cold stress and will help to provide further insights into the molecular mechanisms regulating cold tolerance in L. vannamei. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of sleep deprivation on rhythms of clock gene expression and melatonin in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Ackermann, K; Plomp, R; Lao, O; Middleton, B; Revell, VL; Skene, DJ; Kayser, M

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of sleep deprivation on the human circadian system. Plasma melatonin and cortisol levels and leukocyte expression levels of 12 genes were examined over 48 h (sleep vs. no-sleep nights) in 12 young males (mean ± SD: 23 ± 5 yrs). During one night of total sleep deprivation, BMAL1 expression was suppressed, the heat shock gene HSPA1B expression was induced, and the amplitude of the melatonin rhythm increased, whereas other high-amplitude clock gene rhythms (e.g...

  11. Differential testicular gene expression in seasonal fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maywood, Elizabeth S.; Chahad-Ehlers, Samira; Garabette, Martine L.; Pritchard, Claire; Underhill, Phillip; Greenfield, Andrew; Ebling, Francis J. P.; Kyriacou, Charalambos P.; Hastings, Michael H.; Reddy, Akhilesh B.

    2012-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is an essential precursor for successful sexual reproduction. Recently, there has been an expansion in our knowledge of the genes associated with particular stages of normal, physiological testicular development and pubertal activation. What has been lacking, however, is an understanding of those genes that are involved in specifically regulating sperm production, rather than in maturation and elaboration of the testis as an organ. By utilising the reversible (seasonal) fertility of the Syrian hamster as a model system, we sought to discover genes which are specifically involved in turning off sperm production and not in tissue specification and/or maturation. Using gene expression microarrays and in situ hybridisation in hamsters and genetically infertile mice, we have identified a variety of known and novel factors involved in reversible, transcriptional, translational and post-translational control of testicular function, as well those involved in cell division and macromolecular metabolism. The novel genes uncovered could be potential targets for therapies against fertility disorders. PMID:19346449

  12. Gene expression during normal and FSHD myogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowden Janet

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is a dominant disease linked to contraction of an array of tandem 3.3-kb repeats (D4Z4 at 4q35. Within each repeat unit is a gene, DUX4, that can encode a protein containing two homeodomains. A DUX4 transcript derived from the last repeat unit in a contracted array is associated with pathogenesis but it is unclear how. Methods Using exon-based microarrays, the expression profiles of myogenic precursor cells were determined. Both undifferentiated myoblasts and myoblasts differentiated to myotubes derived from FSHD patients and controls were studied after immunocytochemical verification of the quality of the cultures. To further our understanding of FSHD and normal myogenesis, the expression profiles obtained were compared to those of 19 non-muscle cell types analyzed by identical methods. Results Many of the ~17,000 examined genes were differentially expressed (> 2-fold, p DUX4 RNA isoform was detected by RT-PCR in FSHD myoblast and myotube preparations only at extremely low levels. Unique insights into myogenesis-specific gene expression were also obtained. For example, all four Argonaute genes involved in RNA-silencing were significantly upregulated during normal (but not FSHD myogenesis relative to non-muscle cell types. Conclusions DUX4's pathogenic effect in FSHD may occur transiently at or before the stage of myoblast formation to establish a cascade of gene dysregulation. This contrasts with the current emphasis on toxic effects of experimentally upregulated DUX4 expression at the myoblast or myotube stages. Our model could explain why DUX4's inappropriate expression was barely detectable in myoblasts and myotubes but nonetheless linked to FSHD.

  13. Identification of expressed genes during infection of chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis) by Plasmodiophora brassicae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundelin, Thomas; Jensen, Dan Funck; Lübeck, Mette

    2011-01-01

    and that the introns are small. These results show that it is possible to discover new P. brassicae genes from a mixed pool of both plant and pathogen cDNA. The results also revealed that some of the P. brassicae genes expressed in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis) were identical to the genes expressed......Plasmodiophora brassicae is an obligate, biotrophic pathogen causing the club-root disease of crucifers. Despite its importance as a plant pathogen, little is known about P. brassicae at the molecular level as most of its life cycle takes place inside the plant host, and axenic culturing...... is impossible. Discovery of genes expressed during infection and gene organization are the first steps toward a better understanding of the pathogen–host interaction. Here, suppression subtractive hybridization was used to search for the P. brassicae genes expressed during plant infection. One-hundred and forty...

  14. Light-dependent expression of flg22-induced defense genes in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi eSano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplasts have been reported to generate retrograde immune signals that activate defense gene expression in the nucleus. However, the roles of light and photosynthesis in plant immunity remain largely elusive. In this study, we evaluated the effects of light on the expression of defense genes induced by flg22, a peptide derived from bacterial flagellins which acts as a potent elicitor in plants. Whole-transcriptome analysis of flg22-treated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under light and dark conditions for 30 min revealed that a number of (30% genes strongly induced by flg22 (>4.0 require light for their rapid expression, whereas flg22-repressed genes include a significant number of genes that are down-regulated by light. Furthermore, light is responsible for the flg22-induced accumulation of salicylic acid, indicating that light is indispensable for basal defense responses in plants. To elucidate the role of photosynthesis in defense, we further examined flg22-induced defense gene expression in the presence of specific inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport: 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU and 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-benzoquinone (DBMIB. Light-dependent expression of defense genes was largely suppressed by DBMIB, but only partially suppressed by DCMU. These findings suggest that photosynthetic electron flow plays a role in controling the light-dependent expression of flg22-inducible defense genes.

  15. Growth hormone regulation of rat liver gene expression assessed by SSH and microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardmo, Cissi; Swerdlow, Harold; Mode, Agneta

    2002-04-25

    The sexually dimorphic secretion of growth hormone (GH) that prevails in the rat leads to a sex-differentiated expression of GH target genes, particularly in the liver. We have used subtractive suppressive hybridization (SSH) to search for new target genes induced by the female-characteristic, near continuous, pattern of GH secretion. Microarrays and dot-blot hybridizations were used in an attempt to confirm differential ratios of expression of obtained SSH clones. Out of 173 unique SSH clones, 41 could be verified as differentially expressed. Among these, we identified 17 known genes not previously recognized as differentially regulated by the sex-specific GH pattern. Additional SSH clones may also represent genes subjected to sex-specific GH regulation since only transcripts abundantly expressed could be verified. Optimized analyses, specific for each gene, are required to fully characterize the degree of differential expression.

  16. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer-associated somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) are known. Currently, one of the challenges is to identify the molecular downstream effects of these variants. Although several SCNAs are known to change gene expression levels, it is not clear whether each individual SCNA affects gen...

  17. Gene expression analysis of zebrafish heart regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ling Lien

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian hearts cannot regenerate. In contrast, zebrafish hearts regenerate even when up to 20% of the ventricle is amputated. The mechanism of zebrafish heart regeneration is not understood. To systematically characterize this process at the molecular level, we generated transcriptional profiles of zebrafish cardiac regeneration by microarray analyses. Distinct gene clusters were identified based on temporal expression patterns. Genes coding for wound response/inflammatory factors, secreted molecules, and matrix metalloproteinases are expressed in regenerating heart in sequential patterns. Comparisons of gene expression profiles between heart and fin regeneration revealed a set of regeneration core molecules as well as tissue-specific factors. The expression patterns of several secreted molecules around the wound suggest that they play important roles in heart regeneration. We found that both platelet-derived growth factor-a and -b (pdgf-a and pdgf-b are upregulated in regenerating zebrafish hearts. PDGF-B homodimers induce DNA synthesis in adult zebrafish cardiomyocytes. In addition, we demonstrate that a chemical inhibitor of PDGF receptor decreases DNA synthesis of cardiomyocytes both in vitro and in vivo during regeneration. Our data indicate that zebrafish heart regeneration is associated with sequentially upregulated wound healing genes and growth factors and suggest that PDGF signaling is required.

  18. Gene expression in early stage cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biewenga, Petra; Buist, Marrije R.; Moerland, Perry D.; van Thernaat, Emiel Ver Loren; van Kampen, Antoine H. C.; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.; Baas, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Pelvic lymph node metastases are the main prognostic factor for survival in early stage cervical cancer, yet accurate detection methods before surgery are lacking. In this study, we examined whether gene expression profiling can predict the presence of lymph node metastasis in early stage

  19. Gene Expression and Microarray Investigation of Dendrobium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diet. The rats were continuously fed for 16 months, and blood glucose monitored by a glucose meter. One wild-type rat and 4 high- fat/high-glucose rats died during ..... therapy not only changed gene expression patterns in type 2 diabetes but also improved immune activity and reduced the likelihood of cancer development.

  20. Genomics analysis of genes expressed reveals differential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genomics analysis of genes expressed reveals differential responses to low chronic nitrogen stress in maize. ... Most induced clones were largely involved in various metabolism processes including physiological process, organelle regulation of biological process, nutrient reservoir activity, transcription regulator activity and ...

  1. Global gene expression in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Kjærgaard, K.; Klemm, Per

    2003-01-01

    to antimicrobial treatments and host immune defence responses. Escherichia coli has been used as a model organism to study the mechanisms of growth within adhered communities. In this study, we use DNA microarray technology to examine the global gene expression profile of E. coli during sessile growth compared...

  2. Differentially expressed genes in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified through serial analysis of gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hustinx, Steven R; Cao, Dengfeng; Maitra, Anirban

    2004-01-01

    genome and better biocomputational techniques have substantially improved the assignment of differentially expressed SAGE "tags" to human genes. These improvements have provided us with an opportunity to re-evaluate global gene expression in pancreatic cancer using existing SAGE libraries. SAGE libraries...... generated from six pancreatic cancers were compared to SAGE libraries generated from 11 non-neoplastic tissues. Compared to normal tissue libraries, we identified 453 SAGE tags as differentially expressed in pancreatic cancer, including 395 that mapped to known genes and 58 "uncharacterized" tags....... Of the 395 SAGE tags assigned to known genes, 223 were overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, and 172 were underexpressed. In order to map the 58 uncharacterized differentially expressed SAGE tags to genes, we used a newly developed resource called TAGmapper (http://tagmapper.ibioinformatics.org), to identify...

  3. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  4. Screening and identification of lung cancer metastasis-related genes by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiewei; Zhong, Xiaorong; Li, Juan; Liu, Baoxing; Guo, Shanxian; Chen, Jun; Tan, Qingwei; Wang, Qin; Ma, Wei; Wu, Zhihao; Wang, Haisu; Hou, Mei; Zhang, Hong-Tao; Zhou, Qinghua

    2012-08-01

      Lung cancer metastasis is a complicated process in which multiple stages and multiple genes are involved. There is an urgent need to use new molecular biology techniques to get more systematic information and have a general idea of the molecular events that take place in lung cancer metastasis. The object of this study was to construct the subtracted cDNA libraries of different metastatic potential lung cancer cell lines, NL9980 and L9981, which were established and screened from human lung large cell carcinoma cell line, WCQH-9801.   The forward and reverse subtracted cDNA libraries were constructed in the large cell lung cancer cell lines NL9980 and L9981 with the same heredity background but different metastatic potential, by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). The positive clones were preliminarily screened by blue-white colony and precisely identified by PCR. The forward and reverse subtracted libraries were screened and identified by dot blot so as to obtain the clones corresponding to gene segments with differential expression. DNA sequencing was performed to analyze the sequences of differential expression segments, which were then searched and compared using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool from The National Center for Biotechnology Information NCBI BLAST tools. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting were performed to confirm the differential expressed genes both on RNA and protein levels.   The forward and reverse subtracted cDNA libraries of the different large cell lung cancer cell lines with metastatic potential were successfully constructed. With blue-white colony and dot blot, 307 positive clones in the forward subtracted library and 78 positive clones in the reverse subtracted library were obtained. Fifty-five clones were successfully sequenced in the forward subtracted library while 31 clones were successfully sequenced in the reverse subtracted library. One new

  5. Aberrant Gene Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    genes and genetic signatures and for reducing dimensionally of gene expression data. Next, we have used machine-learning methods to predict survival and to assess important predictors based on these results. General application of a number of these methods has been implemented into two public query......Summary Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer of the bone marrow, affecting formation of blood cells during haematopoiesis. This thesis presents investigation of AML using mRNA gene expression profiles (GEP) of samples extracted from the bone marrow of healthy and diseased subjects....... Here GEPs from purified healthy haematopoietic populations, with different levels of differentiation, form the basis for comparison with diseased samples. We present a mathematical transformation of mRNA microarray data to make it possible to compare AML samples, carrying expanded aberrant...

  6. Gene Expression Commons: an open platform for absolute gene expression profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Seita

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling using microarrays has been limited to comparisons of gene expression between small numbers of samples within individual experiments. However, the unknown and variable sensitivities of each probeset have rendered the absolute expression of any given gene nearly impossible to estimate. We have overcome this limitation by using a very large number (>10,000 of varied microarray data as a common reference, so that statistical attributes of each probeset, such as the dynamic range and threshold between low and high expression, can be reliably discovered through meta-analysis. This strategy is implemented in a web-based platform named "Gene Expression Commons" (https://gexc.stanford.edu/ which contains data of 39 distinct highly purified mouse hematopoietic stem/progenitor/differentiated cell populations covering almost the entire hematopoietic system. Since the Gene Expression Commons is designed as an open platform, investigators can explore the expression level of any gene, search by expression patterns of interest, submit their own microarray data, and design their own working models representing biological relationship among samples.

  7. Comparative gene expression of intestinal metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ho-Chul; Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Cho, Hee-Jung; Yi, Hee; Cho, Soo-Min; Lee, Dong-Goo; Abd El-Aty, A M; Kim, Jin-Suk; Sun, Duxin; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the expression profiles of drug-metabolizing enzymes in the intestine of mouse, rat and human. Total RNA was isolated from the duodenum and the mRNA expression was measured using Affymetrix GeneChip oligonucleotide arrays. Detected genes from the intestine of mouse, rat and human were ca. 60% of 22690 sequences, 40% of 8739 and 47% of 12559, respectively. Total genes of metabolizing enzymes subjected in this study were 95, 33 and 68 genes in mouse, rat and human, respectively. Of phase I enzymes, the mouse exhibited abundant gene expressions for Cyp3a25, Cyp4v3, Cyp2d26, followed by Cyp2b20, Cyp2c65 and Cyp4f14, whereas, the rat showed higher expression profiles of Cyp3a9, Cyp2b19, Cyp4f1, Cyp17a1, Cyp2d18, Cyp27a1 and Cyp4f6. However, the highly expressed P450 enzymes were CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP4F3, CYP2C18, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP3A7, CYP11B1 and CYP2B6 in the human. For phase II enzymes, glucuronosyltransferase Ugt1a6, glutathione S-transferases Gstp1, Gstm3 and Gsta2, sulfotransferase Sult1b1 and acyltransferase Dgat1 were highly expressed in the mouse. The rat revealed predominant expression of glucuronosyltransferases Ugt1a1 and Ugt1a7, sulfotransferase Sult1b1, acetyltransferase Dlat and acyltransferase Dgat1. On the other hand, in human, glucuronosyltransferases UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, glutathione S-transferases MGST3, GSTP1, GSTA2 and GSTM4, sulfotransferases ST1A3 and SULT1A2, acetyltransferases SAT1 and CRAT, and acyltransferase AGPAT2 were dominantly detected. Therefore, current data indicated substantial interspecies differences in the pattern of intestinal gene expression both for P450 enzymes and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. This genomic database is expected to improve our understanding of interspecies variations in estimating intestinal prehepatic clearance of oral drugs.

  8. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesha Rana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (ARΔZF2 versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57 Kip2, Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle, and the expression of all but p57 Kip2 was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  9. Comparison of RNA expression profiles on generations of Porphyra yezoensis (Rhodophyta), based on suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Porphyra yezoensis Ueda is one of the most important edible seaweed, with a dimorphic life cycle which consists of gametophyte as macroscopical blade and sporophyte as microscopic filamentous. Conspicuous differences exist in the two generations, such as morphology, cell structure, biochemistry, physiology, and so on. The developmental process of Porphyra yezoensis has been studied thoroughly, but the mechanism is still ambiguous and few studies on genetic expression have been carried out. In this study, the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method conducted to generate large-scale expressed sequence tags (EST) is designed to identify gene candidates related to the morphological and physiological differences between the gametophytic and sporophytic generations of Porphyra yezoensis Ueda. Findings Each 300 clones of sporophyte and gametophyte cells were dipped onto the membrane for hybridization. The result of dot-blot suggested there were 222 positive clones in gametophyte library and 236 positive clones in sporophyte library. 383 positive clones of strongest signals had been sequenced, and 191 EST sequences of gametophyte and 192 of sporophyte were obtained. A total of 196 genes were obtained, within which 104 genes were identified from the gametophyte and 92 from the sporophyte. Thirty-nine genes of the gametophyte and 62 genes of the sporophyte showed sequence similarity to those genes with known or putative functions which were classified according to their putative biological roles and molecular functions. The GO annotation showed about 58% of the cellular component of sporophyte and gametophyte cells were mainly located in cytoplasm and nucleus. The special genes were located in Golgi apparatus, and high expression in plastid, ribosome and endoplasmic reticulum. The main biological functions of gametophyte cells contributed to DNA repair/replication, carbohydrate metabolism, transport and transcription, especially in response to heat and

  10. Comparison of RNA expression profiles on generations of Porphyra yezoensis (Rhodophyta, based on suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Songdong

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porphyra yezoensis Ueda is one of the most important edible seaweed, with a dimorphic life cycle which consists of gametophyte as macroscopical blade and sporophyte as microscopic filamentous. Conspicuous differences exist in the two generations, such as morphology, cell structure, biochemistry, physiology, and so on. The developmental process of Porphyra yezoensis has been studied thoroughly, but the mechanism is still ambiguous and few studies on genetic expression have been carried out. In this study, the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH method conducted to generate large-scale expressed sequence tags (EST is designed to identify gene candidates related to the morphological and physiological differences between the gametophytic and sporophytic generations of Porphyra yezoensis Ueda. Findings Each 300 clones of sporophyte and gametophyte cells were dipped onto the membrane for hybridization. The result of dot-blot suggested there were 222 positive clones in gametophyte library and 236 positive clones in sporophyte library. 383 positive clones of strongest signals had been sequenced, and 191 EST sequences of gametophyte and 192 of sporophyte were obtained. A total of 196 genes were obtained, within which 104 genes were identified from the gametophyte and 92 from the sporophyte. Thirty-nine genes of the gametophyte and 62 genes of the sporophyte showed sequence similarity to those genes with known or putative functions which were classified according to their putative biological roles and molecular functions. The GO annotation showed about 58% of the cellular component of sporophyte and gametophyte cells were mainly located in cytoplasm and nucleus. The special genes were located in Golgi apparatus, and high expression in plastid, ribosome and endoplasmic reticulum. The main biological functions of gametophyte cells contributed to DNA repair/replication, carbohydrate metabolism, transport and transcription

  11. Comparison of RNA expression profiles on generations of Porphyra yezoensis (Rhodophyta), based on suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Songdong; Zhang, Gaochuan; Li, Yanyan; Wang, Li; Xu, Pu; Yi, Lefei

    2011-10-20

    Porphyra yezoensis Ueda is one of the most important edible seaweed, with a dimorphic life cycle which consists of gametophyte as macroscopical blade and sporophyte as microscopic filamentous. Conspicuous differences exist in the two generations, such as morphology, cell structure, biochemistry, physiology, and so on. The developmental process of Porphyra yezoensis has been studied thoroughly, but the mechanism is still ambiguous and few studies on genetic expression have been carried out.In this study, the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method conducted to generate large-scale expressed sequence tags (EST) is designed to identify gene candidates related to the morphological and physiological differences between the gametophytic and sporophytic generations of Porphyra yezoensis Ueda. Each 300 clones of sporophyte and gametophyte cells were dipped onto the membrane for hybridization. The result of dot-blot suggested there were 222 positive clones in gametophyte library and 236 positive clones in sporophyte library. 383 positive clones of strongest signals had been sequenced, and 191 EST sequences of gametophyte and 192 of sporophyte were obtained.A total of 196 genes were obtained, within which 104 genes were identified from the gametophyte and 92 from the sporophyte. Thirty-nine genes of the gametophyte and 62 genes of the sporophyte showed sequence similarity to those genes with known or putative functions which were classified according to their putative biological roles and molecular functions. The GO annotation showed about 58% of the cellular component of sporophyte and gametophyte cells were mainly located in cytoplasm and nucleus. The special genes were located in Golgi apparatus, and high expression in plastid, ribosome and endoplasmic reticulum. The main biological functions of gametophyte cells contributed to DNA repair/replication, carbohydrate metabolism, transport and transcription, especially in response to heat and oxidative stress. The

  12. Suppression of Arabidopsis genes by terminator-less transgene constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgene-mediated gene silencing is an important biotechnological and research tool. There are several RNAi-mediated techniques available for silencing genes in plants. The basis of all these techniques is to generate double stranded RNA precursors in the cell, which are recognized by the cellula...

  13. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 mediates Tazarotene-induced gene 1-induced growth suppression of human colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chang-Chieh; Tsai, Fu-Ming; Shyu, Rong-Yaun; Tsai, Ya-Ming; Wang, Chun-Hua; Jiang, Shun-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Tazarotene-induced gene 1 (TIG1) is a retinoid-inducible type II tumour suppressor gene. The B isoform of TIG1 (TIG1B) inhibits growth and invasion of cancer cells. Expression of TIG1B is frequently downregulated in various cancer tissues; however, the expression and activities of the TIG1A isoform are yet to be reported. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of the TIG1A and TIG1B isoforms on cell growth and gene expression profiles using colon cancer cells. TIG1A and TIG1B stable clones derived from HCT116 and SW620 colon cancer cells were established using the GeneSwitch system; TIG1 isoform expression was induced by mifepristone treatment. Cell growth was assessed using the WST-1 cell proliferation and colony formation assays. RNA interference was used to examine the TIG1 mediating changes in cell growth. Gene expression profiles were determined using microarray and validated using real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot analyses. Both TIG1 isoforms were expressed at high levels in normal prostate and colon tissues and were downregulated in colon cancer cell lines. Both TIG1 isoforms significantly inhibited the growth of transiently transfected HCT116 cells and stably expressing TIG1A and TIG1B HCT116 and SW620 cells. Expression of 129 and 55 genes was altered upon induction of TIG1A and TIG1B expression, respectively, in stably expressing HCT116 cells. Of the genes analysed, 23 and 6 genes were upregulated and downregulated, respectively, in both TIG1A and TIG1B expressing cells. Upregulation of the G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) was confirmed using real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses in both TIG1 stable cell lines. Silencing of TIG1A or GRK5 expression significantly decreased TIG1A-mediated cell growth suppression. Expression of both TIG1 isoforms was observed in normal prostate and colon tissues and was downregulated in colon cancer cell lines. Both TIG1 isoforms suppressed cell growth and

  14. Human biallelic MFN2 mutations induce mitochondrial dysfunction, upper body adipose hyperplasia, and suppression of leptin expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Nuno; Bulger, David A; Frontini, Andrea; Titheradge, Hannah; Gribsholt, Sigrid Bjerge; Knox, Rachel; Page, Matthew; Harris, Julie; Payne, Felicity; Adams, Claire; Sleigh, Alison; Crawford, John; Gjesing, Anette Prior; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Pedersen, Oluf; Barroso, Inês; Hansen, Torben; Cox, Helen; Reilly, Mary; Rossor, Alex; Brown, Rebecca J; Taylor, Simeon I; McHale, Duncan; Armstrong, Martin; Oral, Elif A; Saudek, Vladimir; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Maher, Eamonn R; Richelsen, Bjørn; Savage, David B; Semple, Robert K

    2017-01-01

    MFN2 encodes mitofusin 2, a membrane-bound mediator of mitochondrial membrane fusion and inter-organelle communication. MFN2 mutations cause axonal neuropathy, with associated lipodystrophy only occasionally noted, however homozygosity for the p.Arg707Trp mutation was recently associated with upper body adipose overgrowth. We describe similar massive adipose overgrowth with suppressed leptin expression in four further patients with biallelic MFN2 mutations and at least one p.Arg707Trp allele. Overgrown tissue was composed of normal-sized, UCP1-negative unilocular adipocytes, with mitochondrial network fragmentation, disorganised cristae, and increased autophagosomes. There was strong transcriptional evidence of mitochondrial stress signalling, increased protein synthesis, and suppression of signatures of cell death in affected tissue, whereas mitochondrial morphology and gene expression were normal in skin fibroblasts. These findings suggest that specific MFN2 mutations cause tissue-selective mitochondrial dysfunction with increased adipocyte proliferation and survival, confirm a novel form of excess adiposity with paradoxical suppression of leptin expression, and suggest potential targeted therapies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23813.001 PMID:28414270

  15. Gene expression profiling of laterally spreading tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minemura, Shoko; Tanaka, Takeshi; Arai, Makoto; Okimoto, Kenichiro; Oyamada, Arata; Saito, Keiko; Maruoka, Daisuke; Matsumura, Tomoaki; Nakagawa, Tomoo; Katsuno, Tatsuro; Kishimoto, Takashi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-06-06

    Laterally spreading tumors (LSTs) are generally defined as lesions >10 mm in diameter, are characterized by lateral expansion along the luminal wall with a low vertical axis. In contrast to other forms of tumor, LSTs are generally considered to have a superficial growth pattern and the potential for malignancy. We focused on this morphological character of LSTs, and analyzed the gene expression profile of LSTs. The expression of 168 genes in 41 colorectal tumor samples (17 LST-adenoma, 12 LST-carcinoma, 12 Ip [pedunculated type of the Paris classification)-adenoma, all of which were 10 mm or more in diameter] was analyzed by PCR array. Based on the results, we investigated the expression levels of genes up-regulated in LST-adenoma, compared to Ip-adenoma, by hierarchical and K-means clustering. To confirm the results of the array analysis, using an additional 60 samples (38 LST-adenoma, 22 Ip-adenoma), we determined the localization of the gene product by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of 129 genes differed in colorectal tumors from normal mucosa by PCR array analysis. As a result of K-means clustering, the expression levels of five genes, AKT1, BCL2L1, ERBB2, MTA2 and TNFRSF25, were found to be significantly up-regulated (p < 0.05) in LST-adenoma, compared to Ip-adenoma. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the BCL2L1 protein was significantly and meaningfully up-regulated in LST-adenoma compared to Ip-adenoma (p = 0.010). With respect to apoptosis status in LST-Adenoma, it assumes that BCL2L1 is anti-apoptotic protein, the samples such as BCL2L1 positive and TUNEL negative, or BCL2L1 negative and TUNEL positive are consistent with the assumption. 63.2 % LST-adenoma samples were consistent with the assumption. LSTs have an unusual profile of gene expression compared to other tumors and BCL2L1 might be concerned in the organization of LSTs.

  16. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2007-01-01

    ) patients and healthy individuals were specific for the arthritic process or likewise altered in other chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, HT) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using qPCR for 18 RA-discriminative genes, there were no significant......A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...... immunoinflammatory diseases, but only if accompanied by pronounced systemic manifestations. This suggests that at least some of the genes activated in RA are predominantly or solely related to general and disease-nonspecific autoimmune processes...

  17. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Wall, Dennis P.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-03-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically interacting proteins coevolve. We estimate average expression levels of genes from four closely related fungi of the genus Saccharomyces using the codon adaptation index and show that expression levels of interacting proteins exhibit coordinated changes in these different species. We find that this coevolution of expression is a more powerful predictor of physical interaction than is coevolution of amino acid sequence. These results demonstrate previously uncharacterized coevolution of gene expression, adding a different dimension to the study of the coevolution of interacting proteins and underscoring the importance of maintaining coexpression of interacting proteins over evolutionary time. Our results also suggest that expression coevolution can be used for computational prediction of protein protein interactions.

  18. Digital gene expression analysis of gene expression differences within Brassica diploids and allopolyploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinjin; Wang, Yue; Zhu, Bao; Fang, Tingting; Fang, Yujie; Wang, Youping

    2015-01-27

    Brassica includes many successfully cultivated crop species of polyploid origin, either by ancestral genome triplication or by hybridization between two diploid progenitors, displaying complex repetitive sequences and transposons. The U's triangle, which consists of three diploids and three amphidiploids, is optimal for the analysis of complicated genomes after polyploidization. Next-generation sequencing enables the transcriptome profiling of polyploids on a global scale. We examined the gene expression patterns of three diploids (Brassica rapa, B. nigra, and B. oleracea) and three amphidiploids (B. napus, B. juncea, and B. carinata) via digital gene expression analysis. In total, the libraries generated between 5.7 and 6.1 million raw reads, and the clean tags of each library were mapped to 18547-21995 genes of B. rapa genome. The unambiguous tag-mapped genes in the libraries were compared. Moreover, the majority of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were explored among diploids as well as between diploids and amphidiploids. Gene ontological analysis was performed to functionally categorize these DEGs into different classes. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis was performed to assign these DEGs into approximately 120 pathways, among which the metabolic pathway, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, and peroxisomal pathway were enriched. The non-additive genes in Brassica amphidiploids were analyzed, and the results indicated that orthologous genes in polyploids are frequently expressed in a non-additive pattern. Methyltransferase genes showed differential expression pattern in Brassica species. Our results provided an understanding of the transcriptome complexity of natural Brassica species. The gene expression changes in diploids and allopolyploids may help elucidate the morphological and physiological differences among Brassica species.

  19. Predicting gene expression from sequence: a reexamination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yuan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Although much of the information regarding genes' expressions is encoded in the genome, deciphering such information has been very challenging. We reexamined Beer and Tavazoie's (BT approach to predict mRNA expression patterns of 2,587 genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae from the information in their respective promoter sequences. Instead of fitting complex Bayesian network models, we trained naïve Bayes classifiers using only the sequence-motif matching scores provided by BT. Our simple models correctly predict expression patterns for 79% of the genes, based on the same criterion and the same cross-validation (CV procedure as BT, which compares favorably to the 73% accuracy of BT. The fact that our approach did not use position and orientation information of the predicted binding sites but achieved a higher prediction accuracy, motivated us to investigate a few biological predictions made by BT. We found that some of their predictions, especially those related to motif orientations and positions, are at best circumstantial. For example, the combinatorial rules suggested by BT for the PAC and RRPE motifs are not unique to the cluster of genes from which the predictive model was inferred, and there are simpler rules that are statistically more significant than BT's ones. We also show that CV procedure used by BT to estimate their method's prediction accuracy is inappropriate and may have overestimated the prediction accuracy by about 10%.

  20. Gene expression regulation in roots under drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiak, Agnieszka; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Stress signalling and regulatory networks controlling expression of target genes are the basis of plant response to drought. Roots are the first organs exposed to water deficiency in the soil and are the place of drought sensing. Signalling cascades transfer chemical signals toward the shoot and initiate molecular responses that lead to the biochemical and morphological changes that allow plants to be protected against water loss and to tolerate stress conditions. Here, we present an overview of signalling network and gene expression regulation pathways that are actively induced in roots under drought stress. In particular, the role of several transcription factor (TF) families, including DREB, AP2/ERF, NAC, bZIP, MYC, CAMTA, Alfin-like and Q-type ZFP, in the regulation of root response to drought are highlighted. The information provided includes available data on mutual interactions between these TFs together with their regulation by plant hormones and other signalling molecules. The most significant downstream target genes and molecular processes that are controlled by the regulatory factors are given. These data are also coupled with information about the influence of the described regulatory networks on root traits and root development which may translate to enhanced drought tolerance. This is the first literature survey demonstrating the gene expression regulatory machinery that is induced by drought stress, presented from the perspective of roots. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle after gene electrotransfer

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    Eriksen Jens

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transfer by electroporation (DNA electrotransfer to muscle results in high level long term transgenic expression, showing great promise for treatment of e.g. protein deficiency syndromes. However little is known about the effects of DNA electrotransfer on muscle fibres. We have therefore investigated transcriptional changes through gene expression profile analyses, morphological changes by histological analysis, and physiological changes by force generation measurements. DNA electrotransfer was obtained using a combination of a short high voltage pulse (HV, 1000 V/cm, 100 μs followed by a long low voltage pulse (LV, 100 V/cm, 400 ms; a pulse combination optimised for efficient and safe gene transfer. Muscles were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP and excised at 4 hours, 48 hours or 3 weeks after treatment. Results Differentially expressed genes were investigated by microarray analysis, and descriptive statistics were performed to evaluate the effects of 1 electroporation, 2 DNA injection, and 3 time after treatment. The biological significance of the results was assessed by gene annotation and supervised cluster analysis. Generally, electroporation caused down-regulation of structural proteins e.g. sarcospan and catalytic enzymes. Injection of DNA induced down-regulation of intracellular transport proteins e.g. sentrin. The effects on muscle fibres were transient as the expression profiles 3 weeks after treatment were closely related with the control muscles. Most interestingly, no changes in the expression of proteins involved in inflammatory responses or muscle regeneration was detected, indicating limited muscle damage and regeneration. Histological analysis revealed structural changes with loss of cell integrity and striation pattern in some fibres after DNA+HV+LV treatment, while HV+LV pulses alone showed preservation of cell integrity. No difference in the force generation capacity was observed in

  2. Inflammation stimulates thrombopoietin (Tpo) expression in rat brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells, but suppresses Tpo in astrocytes and microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Freyer, Dorette; Rung, Olga; Im, Ae-Rie; Hoffmann, Olaf; Dame, Christof

    2010-07-01

    Thrombopoietin (Tpo) and its receptor (c-Mpl; TpoR), which primary regulate megakaryopoiesis and platelet production, are also expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). Increased Tpo concentrations are present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of some patients with bacterial or viral meningitis. Since previous data implicated a proapoptotic role of Tpo on newly generated neuronal cells, we herein elucidated the regulation of Tpo in primary rat neurons (e17), astrocytes, and microglia (p0-p3), as well as in brain-derived vascular endothelial cells of 3-week-old rats after exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS inhibited Tpo gene expression in astrocytes and microglia, but not in neurons, most likely due to absence of Toll-like receptor 4 in neurons. While Tpo mRNA expression recovered in astrocytes after 24 h, it remained suppressed in microglia. Furthermore, we detected Tpo mRNA expression in primary brain-derived vascular endothelial cells, which also express the TpoR. In these cells, LPS significantly up-regulated Tpo mRNA expression. TpoR mRNA and protein expression remained constitutive in all cell types. Thus, our data provide evidence for a cell-type-specific modulation of Tpo mRNA expression by inflammation in brain-derived cells. Transient down-regulation of Tpo expression in astrocytes and microglia may limit Tpo-induced neuronal cell death in inflammatory brain disorders.

  3. Monitoring the Efficacy of Oncolytic Viruses via Gene Expression

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    Ashley Ansel

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available With the recent success of oncolytic viruses in clinical trials, efforts toward improved monitoring of the viruses and their mechanism have intensified. Four main gene expression strategies have been employed to date including: analyzing overall gene expression in tumor cells, looking at gene expression of a few specific genes in the tumor cells, focusing on gene expression of specific transgenes introduced into the virus, and following gene expression of certain viral genes. Each strategy presents certain advantages and disadvantages over the others. Various methods to organize the dysregulated genes into clusters have provided a window into the mechanism of action for these viruses. Methodologically, the combined approach of looking at both overall gene expression, the tumor cells and gene expression of viral genes, enables researchers to assess correlation between the introduction of the virus and the changes in the tumor. This would seem to be the most productive approach for future studies, providing much information on mechanism and timing.

  4. Suppressed expression of T-box transcription factors is involved in senescence in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

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    George K Acquaah-Mensah

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major global health problem. The etiology of COPD has been associated with apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. However, understanding of the molecular interactions that modulate COPD pathogenesis remains only partly resolved. We conducted an exploratory study on COPD etiology to identify the key molecular participants. We used information-theoretic algorithms including Context Likelihood of Relatedness (CLR, Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNE, and Inferelator. We captured direct functional associations among genes, given a compendium of gene expression profiles of human lung epithelial cells. A set of genes differentially expressed in COPD, as reported in a previous study were superposed with the resulting transcriptional regulatory networks. After factoring in the properties of the networks, an established COPD susceptibility locus and domain-domain interactions involving protein products of genes in the generated networks, several molecular candidates were predicted to be involved in the etiology of COPD. These include COL4A3, CFLAR, GULP1, PDCD1, CASP10, PAX3, BOK, HSPD1, PITX2, and PML. Furthermore, T-box (TBX genes and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A, which are in a direct transcriptional regulatory relationship, emerged as preeminent participants in the etiology of COPD by means of senescence. Contrary to observations in neoplasms, our study reveals that the expression of genes and proteins in the lung samples from patients with COPD indicate an increased tendency towards cellular senescence. The expression of the anti-senescence mediators TBX transcription factors, chromatin modifiers histone deacetylases, and sirtuins was suppressed; while the expression of TBX-regulated cellular senescence markers such as CDKN2A, CDKN1A, and CAV1 was elevated in the peripheral lung tissue samples from patients with COPD. The critical balance

  5. Suppressed Expression of T-Box Transcription Factors is Involved in Senescence in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acquaah-Mensah, George; Malhotra, Deepti; Vulimiri, Madhulika; McDermott, Jason E.; Biswal, Shyam

    2012-06-19

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global health problem. The etiology of COPD has been associated with apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. However, understanding of the molecular interactions that modulate COPD pathogenesis remains only partly resolved. We conducted an exploratory study on COPD etiology to identify the key molecular participants. We used information-theoretic algorithms including Context Likelihood of Relatedness (CLR), Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNE), and Inferelator. We captured direct functional associations among genes, given a compendium of gene expression profiles of human lung epithelial cells. A set of genes differentially expressed in COPD, as reported in a previous study were superposed with the resulting transcriptional regulatory networks. After factoring in the properties of the networks, an established COPD susceptibility locus and domain-domain interactions involving protein products of genes in the generated networks, several molecular candidates were predicted to be involved in the etiology of COPD. These include COL4A3, CFLAR, GULP1, PDCD1, CASP10, PAX3, BOK, HSPD1, PITX2, and PML. Furthermore, T-box (TBX) genes and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A), which are in a direct transcriptional regulatory relationship, emerged as preeminent participants in the etiology of COPD by means of senescence. Contrary to observations in neoplasms, our study reveals that the expression of genes and proteins in the lung samples from patients with COPD indicate an increased tendency towards cellular senescence. The expression of the anti-senescence mediators TBX transcription factors, chromatin modifiers histone deacetylases, and sirtuins was suppressed; while the expression of TBX-regulated cellular senescence markers such as CDKN2A, CDKN1A, and CAV1 was elevated in the peripheral lung tissue samples from patients with COPD. The critical balance between senescence

  6. IL-1β directly suppress ghrelin mRNA expression in ghrelin-producing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bando, Mika; Iwakura, Hiroshi; Ueda, Yoko; Ariyasu, Hiroyuki; Inaba, Hidefumi; Furukawa, Yasushi; Furuta, Hiroto; Nishi, Masahiro; Akamizu, Takashi

    2017-05-15

    In animal models, ghrelin production is suppressed by LPS administration. To elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms involved in the phenomenon, we investigated the effects of LPS and LPS-inducible cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, on the expression of ghrelin in the ghrelin-producing cell line MGN3-1. These cells expressed IL-1R, and IL-1β significantly suppressed ghrelin mRNA levels. The suppressive effects of IL-1β were attenuated by knockdown of IKKβ, suggesting the involvement of the NF-κB pathway. These results suggested that IL-1β is a major regulator of ghrelin expression during inflammatory processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Investigation of fusion gene expression in HCT116 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanmei; Ren, Juan; Fang, Mengdie; Wang, Xiaoju

    2017-12-01

    Colon cancer is the most common type of gastrointestinal cancer. A number of specific and sensitive biomarkers facilitate the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with colon cancer. Fusion genes are typically identified in cancer and a majority of the newly identified fusion genes are oncogenic in nature. Therefore, fusion genes are potential biomarkers and/or therapy targets in cancer. In the present study, the regulation of specific candidate fusion genes were investigated using Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites (BORIS) in the HCT116 colon cancer cell line, which is a paralog of the fusion gene regulator CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF). The copy number of BORIS increased correspondingly to the progression of colorectal carcinoma from the M0 to the M1a stage. It was identified that EIF3E(e1)-RSPO2(e2) , EIF3E(e1)-RSPO2(e3) , PTPRK(e1)-RSPO3(e2) , PTPRK(e7)-RSPO3(e2), TADA2A-MEF2B and MED13L-CD4 are fusion transcripts present in the transcriptome of the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. CDC42SE2-KIAAO146 is a genomic fusion transcript, which originates from DNA arrangement in HCT116 cells. BORIS suppresses the expression of EIF3E , RSPO2 , PTPRK , RSPO3 , TADA2A and CD4 to inhibit the expression of fusion transcripts in HCT116 cells. It was hypothesized that the fusion transcripts investigated in the present study may not be oncogenic in HCT116 cells. As BORIS is not colorectal carcinoma-specific, the fusion genes investigated may be a biomarker assemblage for monitoring the progression of colorectal carcinoma.

  8. Gene expression profiles of fin regeneration in loach (Paramisgurnus dabryanu).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; He, Jingya; Wang, Linlin; Chen, Weihua; Chang, Zhongjie

    2017-11-01

    Teleost fins can regenerate accurate position-matched structure and function after amputation. However, we still lack systematic transcriptional profiling and methodologies to understand the molecular basis of fin regeneration. After histological analysis, we established a suppression subtraction hybridization library containing 418 distinct sequences expressed differentially during the process of blastema formation and differentiation in caudal fin regeneration. Genome ontology and comparative analysis of differential distribution of our data and the reference zebrafish genome showed notable subcategories, including multi-organism processes, response to stimuli, extracellular matrix, antioxidant activity, and cell junction function. KEGG pathway analysis allowed the effective identification of relevant genes in those pathways involved in tissue morphogenesis and regeneration, including tight junction, cell adhesion molecules, mTOR and Jak-STAT signaling pathway. From relevant function subcategories and signaling pathways, 78 clones were examined for further Southern-blot hybridization. Then, 17 genes were chosen and characterized using semi-quantitative PCR. Then 4 candidate genes were identified, including F11r, Mmp9, Agr2 and one without a match to any database. After real-time quantitative PCR, the results showed obvious expression changes in different periods of caudal fin regeneration. We can assume that the 4 candidates, likely valuable genes associated with fin regeneration, deserve additional attention. Thus, our study demonstrated how to investigate the transcript profiles with an emphasis on bioinformatics intervention and how to identify potential genes related to fin regeneration processes. The results also provide a foundation or knowledge for further research into genes and molecular mechanisms of fin regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Highly Efficient Gene Suppression by Chemically Modified 27 Nucleotide Double-Stranded RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takanori; Zhelev, Zhivko; Bakalova, Rumiana; Ohba, Hideki

    2008-02-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology, described by Fire and Mello in 1998, is a powerful tool for the suppression of gene expression in mammalian cells. RNAi technology has several advantages over other chemical and genetic drugs. However, several problems in RNAi technology, such as cellular delivery, nuclease stability, and side effects, should be solved before applying it in the clinic. In this study, we focused on the development of novel chemically modified 27 nucleotide (nt) double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) with improved biological properties. Our chemically modified 27 nt dsRNAs exhibited an enhanced RNAi activity and a markedly increased stability in cell culture medium (containing 10% serum) in comparison with widely used 21 nt siRNAs and recently reported nonmodified 27 nt dsRNAs. The chemically modified 27 nt dsRNAs also exhibited a strong high long-term gene silencing effect after the 7 d treatment of viable cells. The chemically modified 27 nt dsRNAs in specific positions could be processed to 21 nt siRNAs by a recombinant Dicer enzyme. We suggested that the chemically modified 27 nt dsRNAs could be used for therapeutic applications (as genetic drugs) and bioanalyses.

  10. "Keep calm and carry on": structural correlates of expressive suppression of emotions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Kühn

    Full Text Available There is a growing appreciation that individuals differ systematically in their use of particular emotion regulation strategies. Our aim was to examine the structural correlates of the habitual use of expressive suppression of emotions. Based on our previous research on the voluntary suppression of actions we expected this response-focused emotion regulation strategy to be associated with increased grey matter volume in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC. On high-resolution MRI scans of 42 college-aged healthy adults we computed optimized voxel-based-morphometry (VBM to explore the correlation between grey matter volume and inter-individual differences in the tendency to suppress the expression of emotions assessed by means of the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (Gross & John, 2003. We found a positive correlation between the habitual use of expressive suppression as an emotion regulation strategy and grey matter volume in the dmPFC. No other brain area showed a significant positive or negative correlation with the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire scores. The association between the suppression of expression of emotions and volume in the dmPFC supports the behavioural stability and biological foundation of the concept of this particular emotion regulation strategy within an age-homogenous sample of adults.

  11. "Keep calm and carry on": structural correlates of expressive suppression of emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Simone; Gallinat, Jürgen; Brass, Marcel

    2011-01-26

    There is a growing appreciation that individuals differ systematically in their use of particular emotion regulation strategies. Our aim was to examine the structural correlates of the habitual use of expressive suppression of emotions. Based on our previous research on the voluntary suppression of actions we expected this response-focused emotion regulation strategy to be associated with increased grey matter volume in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). On high-resolution MRI scans of 42 college-aged healthy adults we computed optimized voxel-based-morphometry (VBM) to explore the correlation between grey matter volume and inter-individual differences in the tendency to suppress the expression of emotions assessed by means of the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (Gross & John, 2003). We found a positive correlation between the habitual use of expressive suppression as an emotion regulation strategy and grey matter volume in the dmPFC. No other brain area showed a significant positive or negative correlation with the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire scores. The association between the suppression of expression of emotions and volume in the dmPFC supports the behavioural stability and biological foundation of the concept of this particular emotion regulation strategy within an age-homogenous sample of adults.

  12. Enhanced gene expression from retroviral vectors

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    Micklem David R

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retroviruses are widely used to transfer genes to mammalian cells efficiently and stably. However, genetic elements required for high-level gene expression are incompatible with standard systems. The retroviral RNA genome is produced by cellular transcription and post-transcriptional processing within packaging cells: Introns present in the retroviral genomic transcript are removed by splicing, while polyadenylation signals lead to the production of ineffective truncated genomes. Furthermore strong enhancer/promoters within the retroviral payload lead to detrimental competition with the retroviral enhancer/promoter. Results By exploiting a new method of producing the retroviral genome in vitro it is possible to produce infectious retroviral particles carrying a high-level expression cassette that completely prohibits production of infectious retroviral particles by conventional methods. We produced an expression cassette comprising a strong enhancer/promoter, an optimised intron, the GFP open reading frame and a strong polyadenylation signal. This cassette was cloned into both a conventional MMLV retroviral vector and a vector designed to allow in vitro transcription of the retroviral genome by T7 RNA polymerase. When the conventional retroviral vector was transfected into packaging cells, the expression cassette drove strong GFP expression, but no infectious retrovirus was produced. Introduction of the in vitro produced uncapped retroviral genomic transcript into the packaging cells did not lead to any detectable GFP expression. However, infectious retrovirus was easily recovered, and when used to infect target primary human cells led to very high GFP expression – up to 3.5 times greater than conventional retroviral LTR-driven expression. Conclusion Retroviral vectors carrying an optimized high-level expression cassette do not produce infectious virions when introduced into packaging cells by transfection of DNA

  13. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

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    Déziel Eric

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14. Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center. Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to

  14. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) for isolation and characterization of genes related to testicular development in the giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelatanawit, Rungnapa; Klinbunga, Sirawut; Aoki, Takashi; Hirono, Ikuo; Valyasevi, Rudd; Menasveta, Piamsak

    2008-11-30

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA libraries of the giant tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, were constructed. In total, 178 and 187 clones from the forward and reverse SSH libraries, respectively, of P. monodon were unidirectionally sequenced. From these, 37.1% and 53.5% Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) significantly matched known genes (E-value 0.05).

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress suppresses lipin-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Nobuhiko, E-mail: ntkhs@hoku-iryo-u.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine, School of Dentistry, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, 1757, Kanazawa, Ishikari-Toubetsu, Hokkaido 061-0023 (Japan); Division of Gastroenterology and Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, 2-1-1-1, Midorigaoka-Higashi, Asahikawa, Hokkaido 078-8510 (Japan); Yoshizaki, Takayuki [Innovation Center, Kagoshima University, 1-21-40, Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Hiranaka, Natsumi; Suzuki, Takeshi [Department of Internal Medicine, School of Dentistry, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, 1757, Kanazawa, Ishikari-Toubetsu, Hokkaido 061-0023 (Japan); Yui, Tomoo; Akanuma, Masayoshi [Department of Fixed Prosthodontics and Oral Implantology, School of Dentistry, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, 1757, Kanazawa, Ishikari-Toubetsu, Hokkaido 061-0023 (Japan); Kanazawa, Kaoru [Department of Dental Anesthesiology, School of Dentistry, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, 1757, Kanazawa, Ishikari-Toubetsu, Hokkaido 061-0023 (Japan); Yoshida, Mika; Naito, Sumiyoshi [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, 1757, Kanazawa, Ishikari-Toubetsu, Hokkaido 061-0023 (Japan); Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka [Division of Gastroenterology and Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, 2-1-1-1, Midorigaoka-Higashi, Asahikawa, Hokkaido 078-8510 (Japan); Ieko, Masahiro [Department of Internal Medicine, School of Dentistry, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, 1757, Kanazawa, Ishikari-Toubetsu, Hokkaido 061-0023 (Japan)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Lipin-1 involves lipid metabolism, adipocyte differentiation, and inflammation. ► Adipose lipin-1 expression is reduced in obesity. ► ER stress suppresses lipin-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. ► Activation of PPAR-γ recovers ER stress-induced lipin-1 reduction. -- Abstract: Lipin-1 plays crucial roles in the regulation of lipid metabolism and cell differentiation in adipocytes. In obesity, adipose lipin-1 mRNA expression is decreased and positively correlated with systemic insulin sensitivity. Amelioration of the lipin-1 depletion might be improved dysmetabolism. Although some cytokines such as TNF-α and interleukin-1β reduces adipose lipin-1 expression, the mechanism of decreased adipose lipin-1 expression in obesity remains unclear. Recently, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity. Here we investigated the role of ER stress on the lipin-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We demonstrated that lipin-1 expression was suppressed by the treatment with ER stress inducers (tunicamycin and thapsigargin) at transcriptional level. We also showed that constitutive lipin-1 expression could be maintained by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ recovered the ER stress-induced lipin-1 suppression. These results suggested that ER stress might be involved in the pathogenesis of obesity through lipin-1 depletion.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum stress suppresses lipin-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Nobuhiko; Yoshizaki, Takayuki; Hiranaka, Natsumi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Yui, Tomoo; Akanuma, Masayoshi; Kanazawa, Kaoru; Yoshida, Mika; Naito, Sumiyoshi; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka; Ieko, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Lipin-1 involves lipid metabolism, adipocyte differentiation, and inflammation. ► Adipose lipin-1 expression is reduced in obesity. ► ER stress suppresses lipin-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. ► Activation of PPAR-γ recovers ER stress-induced lipin-1 reduction. -- Abstract: Lipin-1 plays crucial roles in the regulation of lipid metabolism and cell differentiation in adipocytes. In obesity, adipose lipin-1 mRNA expression is decreased and positively correlated with systemic insulin sensitivity. Amelioration of the lipin-1 depletion might be improved dysmetabolism. Although some cytokines such as TNF-α and interleukin-1β reduces adipose lipin-1 expression, the mechanism of decreased adipose lipin-1 expression in obesity remains unclear. Recently, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity. Here we investigated the role of ER stress on the lipin-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We demonstrated that lipin-1 expression was suppressed by the treatment with ER stress inducers (tunicamycin and thapsigargin) at transcriptional level. We also showed that constitutive lipin-1 expression could be maintained by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ recovered the ER stress-induced lipin-1 suppression. These results suggested that ER stress might be involved in the pathogenesis of obesity through lipin-1 depletion

  17. Suppression of HPV E6 and E7 expression by BAF53 depletion in cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kiwon; Lee, Ah-Young; Kwon, Yunhee Kim; Kwon, Hyockman

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Integration of HPV into host genome critical for activation of E6 and E7 oncogenes. → BAF53 is essential for higher-order chromatin structure. → BAF53 knockdown suppresses E6 and E7 from HPV integrants, but not from episomal HPVs. → BAF53 knockdown decreases H3K9Ac and H4K12Ac on P105 promoter of integrated HPV 18. → BAF53 knockdown restores the p53-dependent signaling pathway in HeLa and SiHa cells. -- Abstract: Deregulation of the expression of human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes E6 and E7 plays a pivotal role in cervical carcinogenesis because the E6 and E7 proteins neutralize p53 and Rb tumor suppressor pathways, respectively. In approximately 90% of all cervical carcinomas, HPVs are found to be integrated into the host genome. Following integration, the core-enhancer element and P105 promoter that control expression of E6 and E7 adopt a chromatin structure that is different from that of episomal HPV, and this has been proposed to contribute to activation of E6 and E7 expression. However, the molecular basis underlying this chromatin structural change remains unknown. Previously, BAF53 has been shown to be essential for the integrity of higher-order chromatin structure and interchromosomal interactions. Here, we examined whether BAF53 is required for activated expression of E6 and E7 genes. We found that BAF53 knockdown led to suppression of expression of E6 and E7 genes from HPV integrants in cervical carcinoma cell lines HeLa and SiHa. Conversely, expression of transiently transfected HPV18-LCR-Luciferase was not suppressed by BAF53 knockdown. The level of the active histone marks H3K9Ac and H4K12Ac on the P105 promoter of integrated HPV 18 was decreased in BAF53 knockdown cells. BAF53 knockdown restored the p53-dependent signaling pathway in HeLa and SiHa cells. These results suggest that activated expression of the E6 and E7 genes of integrated HPV is dependent on BAF53-dependent higher-order chromatin structure or nuclear motor

  18. Gene expression in Streptococcus mutans biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Banu, L D

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is considered the major aetiological agent of human dental caries. It is an obligate biofilm-forming bacterium, which resides on teeth and forms, together with other species, an oral biofilm that is often designated as supragingival plaque. This thesis consists of three distinct parts. The first part describes, using microarray analysis, how S. mutans modulates gene expression when grown under different conditions in biofilms. The goal of this analysis was to identify gen...

  19. Blood Gene Expression Predicts Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome

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    Richard Danger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS, the main manifestation of chronic lung allograft dysfunction, leads to poor long-term survival after lung transplantation. Identifying predictors of BOS is essential to prevent the progression of dysfunction before irreversible damage occurs. By using a large set of 107 samples from lung recipients, we performed microarray gene expression profiling of whole blood to identify early biomarkers of BOS, including samples from 49 patients with stable function for at least 3 years, 32 samples collected at least 6 months before BOS diagnosis (prediction group, and 26 samples at or after BOS diagnosis (diagnosis group. An independent set from 25 lung recipients was used for validation by quantitative PCR (13 stables, 11 in the prediction group, and 8 in the diagnosis group. We identified 50 transcripts differentially expressed between stable and BOS recipients. Three genes, namely POU class 2 associating factor 1 (POU2AF1, T-cell leukemia/lymphoma protein 1A (TCL1A, and B cell lymphocyte kinase, were validated as predictive biomarkers of BOS more than 6 months before diagnosis, with areas under the curve of 0.83, 0.77, and 0.78 respectively. These genes allow stratification based on BOS risk (log-rank test p < 0.01 and are not associated with time posttransplantation. This is the first published large-scale gene expression analysis of blood after lung transplantation. The three-gene blood signature could provide clinicians with new tools to improve follow-up and adapt treatment of patients likely to develop BOS.

  20. Proteomic and gene expression patterns of keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkasubhra Ghosh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus is a progressive corneal thinning disease associated with significant tissue remodeling activities and activation of a variety of signaling networks. However, it is not understood how differential gene and protein expression direct function in keratoconus corneas to drive the underlying pathology, ectasia. Research in the field has focused on discovering differentially expressed genes and proteins and quantifying their levels and activities in keratoconus patient samples. In this study, both microarray analysis of total ribonucleic acid (RNA and whole proteome analyses are carried out using corneal epithelium and tears from keratoconus patients and compared to healthy controls. A number of structural proteins, signaling molecules, cytokines, proteases, and enzymes have been found to be deregulated in keratoconus corneas. Together, the data provide clues to the complex process of corneal degradation which suggest novel ways to clinically diagnose and manage the disease. This review will focus on discussing these recent advances in the knowledge of keratoconus biology from a gene expression and function point-of-view.

  1. Identification of heavy metal pollutant tolerance-associated genes in Avicennia marina (Forsk.) by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jicheng; Yu, Jinfeng; Hong, Hualong; Liu, Jingchun; Lu, Haoliang; Yan, Chongling

    2017-06-15

    The halophytic Avicennia marina (Forsk.) is one of the pioneer mangroves along the south coast of China. It is an appropriate material for understanding molecular mechanisms of heavy metal tolerance in mangrove plants. A forward and a reverse cDNA library was constructed by PCR-based suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) to isolate these tolerance-associated genes from A. marina leaves. A total of 99 ESTs obtained from the forward and reverse libraries showed significant differential expressions. Twenty-nine genes selected by SSH were studied by real-time PCR in order to analyze their expression level. Most of these genes' expression increased in leaves under Cd stress, which suggests that these genes contribute to the heavy metal tolerance in A. marina. The diversity of these genes indicated that heavy metal stress resulted in a complex response in mangrove plants. This could prove a useful approach for further exploring the molecular mechanisms behind such heavy metal tolerance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Improved production of heterologous lipase in Trichoderma reesei by RNAi mediated gene silencing of an endogenic highly expressed gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li-Na; Cai, Fu-Rong; Dong, Xin-Rui; Huang, Zhen-Bang; Tao, Yong; Huang, Jian-Zhong; Dong, Zhi-Yang

    2012-04-01

    A lipase gene (Lip) of the Aspergillus niger was de novo synthesized and expressed in the Trichoderma reesei under the promoter of the cellobiohydrolase I gene (cbh1). RNAi-mediated gene silencing was successfully used to further improve the recombinant lipase production via down-regulation of CBHI which comprised more than 60% of the total extracellular proteins in T. reesei. The gene and protein expression of CBHI and recombinant lipase were analyzed by real-time PCR, SDS-PAGE and activity assay. The results demonstrated that RNAi-mediated gene silencing could effectively suppress cbh1 gene expression and the reduction of CBHI could result in obvious improvement of heterologous lipase production. The reconstructed strains with decreased CBHI production exhibited 1.8- to 3.2-fold increase in lipase activity than that of parental strain. The study herein provided a feasible and advantageous method of increasing heterologous target gene expression in T. reesei through preventing the high expression of a specific endogenenous gene by RNA interference. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of gene expression in rabbit muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Gálová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing consumer knowledge of the link between diet and health has raised the demand for high quality food. Meat and meat products may be considered as irreplaceable in human nutrition. Breeding livestock to higher content of lean meat and the use of modern hybrids entails problems with the quality of meat. Analysing of livestock genomes could get us a great deal of important information, which may significantly affect the improvement process. Domestic animals are invaluable resources for study of the molecular architecture of complex traits. Although the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL responsible for economically important traits in domestic animals has achieved remarkable results in recent decades, not all of the genetic variation in the complex traits has been captured because of the low density of markers used in QTL mapping studies. The genome wide association study (GWAS, which utilizes high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, provides a new way to tackle this issue. New technologies now allow producing microarrays containing thousands of hybridization probes on a single membrane or other solid support. We used microarray analysis to study gene expression in rabbit muscle during different developmental age stages. The outputs from GeneSpring GX sotware are presented in this work. After the evaluation of gene expression in rabbits, will be selected genes of interest in relation to meat quality parameters and will be further analyzed by the available methods of molecular biology and genetics.

  4. Copper-dependent and -independent hypoxia-inducible factor-1 regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Qiu, Liying; Lin, Chen; Yang, Hong; Fu, Haiying; Li, Rui; Kang, Y James

    2014-10-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) regulates the expression of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a process requiring copper (Cu) participation. HIF-1 is also involved in the expression of more than a hundred of genes, but it is unknown how HIF-1 differentially controls the expression of these genes timely and spatially. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that Cu is not required for the expression of all HIF-1-regulated genes, thus exploring mechanistic insights into the differential control of multiple gene expression by one transcription factor. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with siRNA targeting HIF-1α to define the essential role of HIF-1 in the regulation of BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3) and insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2) expression. A Cu chelator, tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA), was used to reduce intracellular availability of Cu. In comparison, a zinc chelator, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN), was used to reduce intracellular zinc concentration. The expression of both BNIP3 and IGF-2 was completely suppressed in the HIF-1α deficient cells. The removal of Cu suppressed the expression of BNIP3, but did not affect that of IGF-2. The reduction of intracellular zinc did not cause the same effect. Further screening identified a group of genes whose expression required Cu and the others did not need Cu. The present study thus demonstrates Cu-dependent and -independent HIF-1 regulation of gene expression, indicating a mechanism for differential control of multiple gene expression by one transcription factor.

  5. Differentially expressed genes in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified through serial analysis of gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hustinx, Steven R; Cao, Dengfeng; Maitra, Anirban

    2004-01-01

    generated from six pancreatic cancers were compared to SAGE libraries generated from 11 non-neoplastic tissues. Compared to normal tissue libraries, we identified 453 SAGE tags as differentially expressed in pancreatic cancer, including 395 that mapped to known genes and 58 "uncharacterized" tags....... Of the 395 SAGE tags assigned to known genes, 223 were overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, and 172 were underexpressed. In order to map the 58 uncharacterized differentially expressed SAGE tags to genes, we used a newly developed resource called TAGmapper (http://tagmapper.ibioinformatics.org), to identify...

  6. Expression of highly toxic genes in E. coli: special strategies and genetic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saïda, F; Uzan, M; Odaert, B; Bontems, F

    2006-02-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) remains the most efficient widely-used host for recombinant protein production. Well-known genetics, high transformation efficiency, cultivation simplicity, rapidity and inexpensiveness are the main factors that contribute to the selection of this host. With the advent of the post-genomic era has come the need to express in this bacterium a growing number of genes originating from different organisms. Unfortunately, many of these genes severely interfere with the survival of E. coli cells. They lead to bacteria death or cause significant defects in bacteria growth that dramatically decrease expression capabilities. In this paper, we review special strategies and genetics tools successfully used to express, in E. coli, highly toxic genes. Suppression of basal expression from leaky inducible promoters, suppression of read-through transcription from cryptic promoters, tight control of plasmids copy numbers and proteins production as inactive (but reversible) forms are among the solutions presented and discussed. Special expression vectors and modified E. coli strains are listed and their effectiveness illustrated with key examples, some of which are related to our study of the highly toxic phage T4 restriction endoribonuclease RegB. We mainly selected those strategies and tools that permit E. coli normal growth until the very moment of highly toxic gene induction. Expression then occurs efficiently before cells die. Because they do not target a particular toxic effect, these strategies and tools can be used to express a wide variety of highly toxic genes.

  7. Knock-down of NDRG2 sensitizes cervical cancer Hela cells to cisplatin through suppressing Bcl-2 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Junye; Guo, Guozhen; Yang, Le; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Yongbin; Li, Kangchu; Li, Yurong; Li, Yan; Yao, Libo

    2012-01-01

    NDRG2, a member of N-Myc downstream regulated gene family, plays some roles in cellular stress, cell differentiation and tumor suppression. We have found that NDRG2 expression in cervical cancer Hela cells increases significantly upon stimulation with cisplatin, the most popular chemotherapeutic agent currently used for the treatment of advanced cervical cancer. This interesting phenomenon drove us to evaluate the role of NDRG2 in chemosensitivity of Hela cells. In the present study, RNA interference was employed to down-regulate NDRG2 expression in Hela cells. RT-PCR and Western blot were used to detect expression of NDRG2, Bcl-2 and Bax in cancer cells. Real-time PCR was applied to detect miR-15b and miR-16 expression levels. Drug sensitivity was determined with MTT assay. Cell cloning efficiency was evaluated by Colony-forming assay. Apoptotic cells were detected with annexin V staining and flow cytometry. In vitro drug sensitivity assay revealed that suppression of NDRG2 could sensitize Hela cells to cisplatin. Down-regulation of NDRG2 didn’t influence the colony-forming ability but promoted cisplatin-induced apoptosis of Hela cells. Inhibition of NDRG2 in Hela cells was accompanied by decreased Bcl-2 protein level. However, Bcl-2 mRNA level was not changed in Hela cells with down-regulation of NDRG2. Further study indicated that miR-15b and miR-16, two microRNAs targetting Bcl-2, were significantly up-regulated in NDRG2-suppressed Hela cells. These data suggested that down-regulation of NDRG2 could enhance sensitivity of Hela cells to cisplatin through inhibiting Bcl-2 protein expression, which might be mediated by up-regulating miR-15b and miR-16

  8. Reduced Dnmt3a increases Gdf5 expression with suppressed satellite cell differentiation and impaired skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatazawa, Yukino; Ono, Yusuke; Hirose, Yuma; Kanai, Sayaka; Fujii, Nobuharu L; Machida, Shuichi; Nishino, Ichizo; Shimizu, Takahiko; Okano, Masaki; Kamei, Yasutomi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2018-03-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism regulating gene expression. In this study, we observed that DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) expression is decreased after muscle atrophy. We made skeletal muscle-specific Dnmt3a-knockout (Dnmt3a-KO) mice. The regeneration capacity after muscle injury was markedly decreased in Dnmt3a-KO mice. Diminished mRNA and protein expression of Dnmt3a were observed in skeletal muscles as well as in satellite cells, which are important for muscle regeneration, in Dnmt3a-KO mice. Dnmt3a-KO satellite cell showed smaller in size (length/area), suggesting suppressed myotube differentiation. Microarray analysis of satellite cells showed that expression of growth differentiation factor 5 (Gdf5) mRNA was markedly increased in Dnmt3a-KO mice. The DNA methylation level of the Gdf5 promoter was markedly decreased in Dnmt3a-KO satellite cells. In addition, DNA methylation inhibitor azacytidine treatment increased Gdf5 expression in wild-type satellite cells, suggesting Gdf5 expression is regulated by DNA methylation. Also, we observed increased inhibitor of differentiation (a target of Gdf5) mRNA expression in Dnmt3a-KO satellite cells. Thus, Dnmt3a appears to regulate satellite cell differentiation via DNA methylation. This mechanism may play a role in the decreased regeneration capacity during atrophy such as in aged sarcopenia.-Hatazawa, Y., Ono, Y., Hirose, Y., Kanai, S., Fujii, N. L., Machida, S., Nishino, I., Shimizu, T., Okano, M., Kamei, Y., Ogawa, Y. Reduced Dnmt3a increases Gdf5 expression with suppressed satellite cell differentiation and impaired skeletal muscle regeneration.

  9. Reduced expression of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34, an essential gene, enhances heterologous gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salem, Tamer Z. [Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Microbial Molecular Biology, AGERI, Agricultural Research Center, Giza 12619 (Egypt); Division of Biomedical Sciences, Zewail University, Zewail City of Science and Technology, Giza 12588 (Egypt); Zhang, Fengrui [Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Thiem, Suzanne M., E-mail: smthiem@msu.edu [Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2013-01-20

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34 is part of a transcriptional unit that includes ORF32, encoding a viral fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and ORF33. We identified ORF34 as a candidate for deletion to improve protein expression in the baculovirus expression system based on enhanced reporter gene expression in an RNAi screen of virus genes. However, ORF34 was shown to be an essential gene. To explore ORF34 function, deletion (KO34) and rescue bacmids were constructed and characterized. Infection did not spread from primary KO34 transfected cells and supernatants from KO34 transfected cells could not infect fresh Sf21 cells whereas the supernatant from the rescue bacmids transfection could recover the infection. In addition, budded viruses were not observed in KO34 transfected cells by electron microscopy, nor were viral proteins detected from the transfection supernatants by western blots. These demonstrate that ORF34 is an essential gene with a possible role in infectious virus production.

  10. Improvement of cytotoxicity of autologous CIKs from patients with breast cancer to MCF-7 cells by suppressed PD-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Wei; Yang, Ming-Ya; Zhou, Min; Li, Jia-Jia; Liu, Bo; Pan, Yue-Yin

    2017-12-06

    To investigate the improvement of cytotoxicity of autologous CIKs from patients with breast cancer to MCF-7 cells by suppressed PD-1 expression. The Lentiviral Vector/PD-1 carrying the gene that can suppressed PD-1 was transferred to CIK cells from patients with breast cancer to inhibit PD-1 expression. The PD-1 protein were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. The positive PD-1 of CIKs and PD-L1 of MCF-7 cells were detected by FCM, and cytotoxicity of CIKs to MCF-7 was assayed by CCK-8. The PD-1 positive CIKs with Lentiviral Vector/PD-1 transferred from patients with breast cancer were 16.02%, 14.36% and 14.64% at 14th, 21st and 28th day, obviously inhibited as compared to 50.54%, 74.50% and 73.36% in CIKs without transinfection (PMCF-7 cells were 58.78% and 68.14%, respectively. MCF-7 cells have a strong PD-L1 expression at its surface, and inhibition of PD-1 expression can improve the cytotoxicity of CIK cells.

  11. Three gene expression vector sets for concurrently expressing multiple genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Takashi; Makino, Harumi; Ogura, Akira; Matsuda, Fumio; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-05-01

    Yeast has the potential to be used in bulk-scale fermentative production of fuels and chemicals due to its tolerance for low pH and robustness for autolysis. However, expression of multiple external genes in one host yeast strain is considerably labor-intensive due to the lack of polycistronic transcription. To promote the metabolic engineering of yeast, we generated systematic and convenient genetic engineering tools to express multiple genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We constructed a series of multi-copy and integration vector sets for concurrently expressing two or three genes in S. cerevisiae by embedding three classical promoters. The comparative expression capabilities of the constructed vectors were monitored with green fluorescent protein, and the concurrent expression of genes was monitored with three different fluorescent proteins. Our multiple gene expression tool will be helpful to the advanced construction of genetically engineered yeast strains in a variety of research fields other than metabolic engineering. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Gene expression profiling in the inductive human hematopoietic microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongjun; Chen, Edwin; Li Liheng; Gong Baiwei; Xie Wei; Nanji, Shaherose; Dube, Ian D.; Hough, Margaret R.

    2004-01-01

    Human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and their progenitors can be maintained in vitro in long-term bone marrow cultures (LTBMCs) in which constituent HSCs can persist within the adherent layers for up to 2 months. Media replenishment of LTBMCs has been shown to induce transition of HSCs from a quiescent state to an active cycling state. We hypothesize that the media replenishment of the LTBMCs leads to the activation of important regulatory genes uniquely involved in HSC proliferation and differentiation. To profile the gene expression changes associated with HSC activation, we performed suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) on day 14 human LTBMCs following 1-h media replenishment and on unmanipulated controls. The generated SSH library contained 191 differentially up-regulated expressed sequence tags (ESTs), the majority corresponding to known genes related to various intracellular processes, including signal transduction pathways, protein synthesis, and cell cycle regulation. Nineteen ESTs represented previously undescribed sequences encoding proteins of unknown function. Differential up-regulation of representative genes, including IL-8, IL-1, putative cytokine 21/HC21, MAD3, and a novel EST was confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Levels of fibronectin, G-CSF, and stem cell factor also increased in the conditioned media of LTBMCs as assessed by ELISA, indicating increased synthesis and secretion of these factors. Analysis of our library provides insights into some of the immediate early gene changes underlying the mechanisms by which the stromal elements within the LTBMCs contribute to the induction of HSC activation and provides the opportunity to identify as yet unrecognized factors regulating HSC activation in the LTBMC milieu

  13. Suppression of PCD-related genes affects salt tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahieldin, Ahmed; Alqarni, Dhafer A M; Atef, Ahmed; Gadalla, Nour O; Al-matary, Mohammed; Edris, Sherif; Al-Kordy, Magdy A; Makki, Rania M; Al-Doss, Abdullah A; Sabir, Jamal S M; Mutwakil, Mohammed H Z; El-Domyati, Fotouh M

    2016-01-01

    This work aims at examining a natural exciting phenomenon suggesting that suppression of genes inducing programmed cell death (PCD) might confer tolerance against abiotic stresses in plants. PCD-related genes were induced in tobacco under oxalic acid (OA) treatment (20 mM), and plant cells were characterized to confirm the incidence of PCD. The results indicated that PCD was triggered 24 h after the exposure to OA. Then, RNAs were extracted from tobacco cells 0, 2, 6, 12 and 24 h after treatment for deep sequencing. RNA-Seq analyses were done with a special emphasis to clusters whose PCD-related genes were upregulated after 2 h of OA exposure. Accordingly, 23 tobacco PCD-related genes were knocked down via virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), whereas our results indicated the influence of five of them on inducing or suppressing PCD. Knockout T-DNA insertion mutants of these five genes in Arabidopsis were tested under salt stress (0, 100, 150, and 200 mM NaCl), and the results indicated that a mutant of an antiapoptotic gene, namely Bax Inhibitor-1 (BI-1), whose VIGS induced PCD in tobacco, was salt sensitive, while a mutant of an apoptotic gene, namely mildew resistance locus O (Mlo), whose VIGS suppressed PCD, was salt tolerant as compared to the WT (Col) control. These data support our hypothesis that retarding PCD-inducing genes can result in higher levels of salt tolerance, while retarding PCD-suppressing genes can result in lower levels of salt tolerance in plants. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Suppression of calpain expression by NSAIDs is associated with inhibition of cell migration in rat duodenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Kristopher; Littlejohn, A; Thomas, Laurel; Bawa, Bhupinder; Lillich, James D

    2017-05-15

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for the alleviation of pain and inflammation, but these drugs are also associated with a suite of negative side effects. Gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity is particularly concerning since it affects an estimated 70% of individuals taking NSAIDs routinely, and evidence suggests the majority of toxicity is occurring in the small intestine. Traditionally, NSAID-induced GI toxicity has been associated with indiscriminate inhibition of cyclooxygenase isoforms, but other mechanisms, including inhibition of cell migration, intestinal restitution, and wound healing, are likely to contribute to toxicity. Previous efforts demonstrated that treatment of cultured intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) with NSAIDs inhibits expression and activity of calpain proteases, but the effects of specific inhibition of calpain expression in vitro or the effects of NSAIDs on intestinal cell migration in vivo remain to be determined. Accordingly, we examined the effect of suppression of calpain protease expression with siRNA on cell migration in cultured IECs and evaluated the effects of NSAID treatment on epithelial cell migration and calpain protease expression in rat duodenum. Our results show that calpain siRNA inhibits protease expression and slows migration in cultured IECs. Additionally, NSAID treatment of rats slowed migration up the villus axis and suppressed calpain expression in duodenal epithelial cells. Our results are supportive of the hypothesis that suppression of calpain expression leading to slowing of cell migration is a potential mechanism through which NSAIDs cause GI toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Gene expression profiles predictive of cold-induced sweetening in potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Jonathan; Lagüe, M; Thomson, S; Aurousseau, F; Murphy, A M; Bizimungu, B; Deveaux, V; Bègue, Y; Jacobs, J M E; Tai, H H

    2017-07-01

    Cold storage (2-4 °C) used in potato production to suppress diseases and sprouting during storage can result in cold-induced sweetening (CIS), where reducing sugars accumulate in tuber tissue leading to undesirable browning, production of bitter flavors, and increased levels of acrylamide with frying. Potato exhibits genetic and environmental variation in resistance to CIS. The current study profiles gene expression in post-harvest tubers before cold storage using transcriptome sequencing and identifies genes whose expression is predictive for CIS. A distance matrix for potato clones based on glucose levels after cold storage was constructed and compared to distance matrices constructed using RNA-seq gene expression data. Congruence between glucose and gene expression distance matrices was tested for each gene. Correlation between glucose and gene expression was also tested. Seventy-three genes were found that had significant p values in the congruence and correlation tests. Twelve genes from the list of 73 genes also had a high correlation between glucose and gene expression as measured by Nanostring nCounter. The gene annotations indicated functions in protein degradation, nematode resistance, auxin transport, and gibberellin response. These 12 genes were used to build models for prediction of CIS using multiple linear regression. Nine linear models were constructed that used different combinations of the 12 genes. An F-box protein, cellulose synthase, and a putative Lax auxin transporter gene were most frequently used. The findings of this study demonstrate the utility of gene expression profiles in predictive diagnostics for severity of CIS.

  16. The Regulation of Induced Depression during a Frustrating Situation: Benefits of Expressive Suppression in Chinese Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Nanxiang; Yang, Jiemin

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies from European-American cultures consistently reported that expressive suppression was associated with worse emotional consequence (e.g. depression) in comparison with acceptance. However, this conclusion may not apply to Chinese, as suppressing emotional displays to maintain relational harmony is culturally valued in East Asian countries. Thus, the present study examined the effects of suppression and acceptance on the depressive mood induced by a frustrating task in a Chinese sample. Method Sixty-four subjects were randomly assigned to one of three instructions: suppression, acceptance or no-regulation during a frustrating arithmetic task. The experience of depressive emotion and skin conductance response (SCR) were recorded during pre-frustration baseline, frustration induction and post-frustration recovery phases, respectively. Results Compared with the control and acceptance instructions, suppression instruction was associated with decreased depressive experiences and smaller SCR activity during frustration. There were no significant differences between acceptance and control groups in both subjective depression and SCR activity during frustration. Moreover, the suppression group showed a better emotional recovery after the frustrating task, in comparison with the acceptance and control groups. Correlation analyses verified that SCR reactivity was a reliable index of experienced depression during the frustration. Conclusions Expressive suppression is effective in reducing depressive experiences and depression-related physiological activity (SCR) when Chinese people are involved. By contrast, the acceptance of depressive emotion in Chinese people does not produce a similar regulation effect. These findings suggest that cultural context should be considered in understanding the emotional consequences of suppression and acceptance strategies. PMID:24827934

  17. Transcriptome analysis of Carica papaya embryogenic callus upon De-etiolated 1 (DET1 gene suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diyana Jamaluddin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Papaya is considered to be one of the most nutritional fruits. It is rich in vitamins, carotenoids, flavonoids and other phytonutrient which function as antioxidant in our body [1]. Previous studies revealed that the suppression of a negative regulator gene in photomorphogenesis, De-etiolated 1 (DET1 can improve the phytonutrient in tomato and canola without affecting the fruit quality [2,3]. This report contains the experimental data on high-throughput 3′ mRNA sequencing of transformed papaya callus upon DET1 gene suppression.

  18. Differential Gene Expression from Midguts of Refractory and Susceptible Lines of the Mosquito, Aedes aegypti, Infected with Dengue-2 Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Bar?n, Olga L.; Ursic-Bedoya, Raul J.; Lowenberger, Carl A.; Ocampo, Clara B.

    2010-01-01

    Suppressive subtractive hybridization was used to evaluate the differential expression of midgut genes of feral populations of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) from Colombia that are naturally refractory or susceptible to Dengue-2 virus infection. A total of 165 differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified in the subtracted libraries. The analysis showed a higher number of differentially expressed genes in the susceptible Ae. aegypti individuals than the refractory mosquito...

  19. Epigenetic suppression of potassium-chloride co-transporter 2 expression in inflammatory pain induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C-R; Cheng, J-K; Wu, C-H; Chen, K-H; Liu, C-K

    2017-02-01

    Multiple mechanisms contribute to the stimulus-evoked pain hypersensitivity that may be experienced after peripheral inflammation. Persistent pathological stimuli in many pain conditions affect the expression of certain genes through epigenetic alternations. The main purpose of our study was to investigate the role of epigenetic modification on potassium-chloride co-transporter 2 (KCC2) gene expression in the persistence of inflammatory pain. Persistent inflammatory pain was induced through the injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the left hind paw of rats. Acetyl-histone H3 and H4 level was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation in the spinal dorsal horn. Pain behaviour and inhibitory synaptic function of spinal cord were determined before and after CFA injection. KCC2 expression was determined by real time RT-PCR and Western blot. Intrathecal KCC2 siRNA (2 μg per 10 μL per rat) or HDAC inhibitor (10 μg per 10 μL per rat) was injected once daily for 3 days before CFA injection. Persistent inflammatory pain epigenetically suppressed KCC2 expression through histone deacetylase (HDAC)-mediated histone hypoacetylation, resulting in decreased inhibitory signalling efficacy. KCC2 knock-down caused by intrathecal administration of KCC2 siRNA in naïve rats reduced KCC2 expression in the spinal cord, leading to sensitized pain behaviours and impaired inhibitory synaptic transmission in their spinal cords. Moreover, intrathecal HDAC inhibitor injection in CFA rats increased KCC2 expression, partially restoring the spinal inhibitory synaptic transmission and relieving the sensitized pain behaviour. These findings suggest that the transcription of spinal KCC2 is regulated by histone acetylation epigenetically following CFA. Persistent pain suppresses KCC2 expression through HDAC-mediated histone hypoacetylation and consequently impairs the inhibitory function of inhibitory interneurons. Drugs such as HDAC inhibitors that suppress the influences of

  20. YY1 suppresses FEN1 over-expression and drug resistance in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhou, Lina; Li, Zhi; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Wenpeng; Liu, Zheng; Yuan, Yate-Ching; Su, Fan; Xu, Lu; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Xiaotong; Xu, Hong; Hua, Yuejin; Wang, Ying-Jie; Zheng, Li; Teng, Yue-E; Shen, Binghui

    2015-02-13

    Drug resistance is a major challenge in cancer therapeutics. Abundant evidence indicates that DNA repair systems are enhanced after repetitive chemotherapeutic treatments, rendering cancers cells drug-resistant. Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) plays critical roles in DNA replication and repair and in counteracting replication stress, which is a key mechanism for many chemotherapeutic drugs to kill cancer cells. FEN1 was previously shown to be upregulated in response to DNA damaging agents. However, it is unclear about the transcription factors that regulate FEN1 expression in human cancer. More importantly, it is unknown whether up-regulation of FEN1 has an adverse impact on the prognosis of chemotherapeutic treatments of human cancers. To reveal regulation mechanism of FEN1 expression, we search and identify FEN1 transcription factors or repressors and investigate their function on FEN1 expression by using a combination of biochemical, molecular, and cellular approaches. Furthermore, to gain insights into the impact of FEN1 levels on the response of human cancer to therapeutic treatments, we determine FEN1 levels in human breast cancer specimens and correlate them to the response to treatments and the survivorship of corresponding breast cancer patients. We observe that FEN1 is significantly up-regulated upon treatment of chemotherapeutic drugs such as mitomycin C (MMC) and Taxol in breast cancer cells. We identify that the transcription factor/repressor YY1 binds to the FEN1 promoter and suppresses the expression of FEN1 gene. In response to the drug treatments, YY1 is dissociated from the FEN1 promoter region leading over-expression of FEN1. Overexpression of YY1 in the cells results in down-regulation of FEN1 and sensitization of the cancer cells to MMC or taxol. Furthermore, we observe that the level of FEN1 is inversely correlated with cancer drug and radiation resistance and with survivorship in breast cancer patients. Altogether, our current data indicate that

  1. Drosophila clueless is highly expressed in larval neuroblasts, affects mitochondrial localization and suppresses mitochondrial oxidative damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Sen

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are critical for neuronal function due to the high demand of ATP in these cell types. During Drosophila development, neuroblasts in the larval brain divide asymmetrically to populate the adult central nervous system. While many of the proteins responsible for maintaining neuroblast cell fate and asymmetric cell divisions are known, little is know about the role of metabolism and mitochondria in neuroblast division and maintenance. The gene clueless (clu has been previously shown to be important for mitochondrial function. clu mutant adults have severely shortened lifespans and are highly uncoordinated. Part of their lack of coordination is due to defects in muscle, however, in this study we have identified high levels of Clu expression in larval neuroblasts and other regions of the dividing larval brain. We show while mitochondria in clu mutant neuroblasts are mislocalized during the cell cycle, surprisingly, overall brain morphology appears to be normal. This is explained by our observation that clu mutant larvae have normal levels of ATP and do not suffer oxidative damage, in sharp contrast to clu mutant adults. Mutations in two other genes encoding mitochondrial proteins, technical knockout and stress sensitive B, do not cause neuroblast mitochondrial mislocalization, even though technical knockout mutant larvae suffer oxidative damage. These results suggest Clu functions upstream of electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, has a role in suppressing oxidative damage in the cell, and that lack of Clu's specific function causes mitochondria to mislocalize. These results also support the previous observation that larval development relies on aerobic glycolysis, rather than oxidative phosphorylation. Thus Clu's role in mitochondrial function is not critical during larval development, but is important for pupae and adults.

  2. Gene Expression Profiling of Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowden Nikola A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a rare recessive disorder that is characterized by extreme sensitivity to UV light. UV light exposure results in the formation of DNA damage such as cyclobutane dimers and (6-4 photoproducts. Nucleotide excision repair (NER orchestrates the removal of cyclobutane dimers and (6-4 photoproducts as well as some forms of bulky chemical DNA adducts. The disease XP is comprised of 7 complementation groups (XP-A to XP-G, which represent functional deficiencies in seven different genes, all of which are believed to be involved in NER. The main clinical feature of XP is various forms of skin cancers; however, neurological degeneration is present in XPA, XPB, XPD and XPG complementation groups. The relationship between NER and other types of DNA repair processes is now becoming evident but the exact relationships between the different complementation groups remains to be precisely determined. Using gene expression analysis we have identified similarities and differences after UV light exposure between the complementation groups XP-A, XP-C, XP-D, XP-E, XP-F, XP-G and an unaffected control. The results reveal that there is a graded change in gene expression patterns between the mildest, most similar to the control response (XP-E and the severest form (XP-A of the disease, with the exception of XP-D. Distinct differences between the complementation groups with neurological symptoms (XP-A, XP-D and XP-G and without (XP-C, XP-E and XP-F were also identified. Therefore, this analysis has revealed distinct gene expression profiles for the XP complementation groups and the first step towards understanding the neurological symptoms of XP.

  3. A Positive Role for PERIOD in Mammalian Circadian Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Akashi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the current model of the mammalian circadian clock, PERIOD (PER represses the activity of the circadian transcription factors BMAL1 and CLOCK, either independently or together with CRYPTOCHROME (CRY. Here, we provide evidence that PER has an entirely different function from that reported previously, namely, that PER inhibits CRY-mediated transcriptional repression through interference with CRY recruitment into the BMAL1-CLOCK complex. This indirect positive function of PER is consistent with previous data from genetic analyses using Per-deficient or mutant mice. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that PER plays different roles in different circadian phases: an early phase in which it suppresses CRY activity, and a later phase in which it acts as a transcriptional repressor with CRY. This buffering effect of PER on CRY might help to prolong the period of rhythmic gene expression. Additional studies are required to carefully examine the promoter- and phase-specific roles of PER.

  4. Cholinergic regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bo; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing......Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing...

  5. Stage-specific gene expression during sexual development in Phytophthora infestans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabritius, Anna-Liisa; Cvitanich, Cristina; Judelson, Howard S.

    2002-01-01

    Eight genes that are upregulated during sexual development in the heterothallic oomycete, Phytophthora infestans, were identified by suppression subtractive hybridization. Two genes showed very low but detectable expression in vegetative hyphae and became induced about 40- to >100-fold early...... revealed that the predicted products of three of the genes had similarity to proteins that influence RNA stability, namely a ribonuclease activator, the pumilio family of RNA-binding proteins and RNase H. The products of two other mating-induced genes resembled two types of Phytophthora proteins previously...

  6. Construction of the suppression subtractive cDNA libraries of human large cell lung cancer line L9981 before and after transfection with nm23-H1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujuan YE

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that nm23-H1 gene is an important metastatic-suppressed gene of lung cancer. In order to screen the differential expression genes related to nm23-H1, we constructed the suppression subtractive cDNA libraries of human large cell lung cancer line L9981 transfected and untransfected with nm23-H1 gene by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH in this study, which lay a solid foundation for further screening and cloning metastatic-related genes of nm23-H1. Methods The forward and reverse suppression subtractive cDNA libraries were constructed in the human large cell lung cancer line L9981 before and after transfection with nm23-H1 gene (L9981 and L9981-nm23-H1 by SSH method. The positive clones were preliminarily screened by blue-white colony, and precisely identified by PCR. Results The suppression subtractive cDNA libraries were successfully constructed in the human large cell lung cancer line L9981 transfected and untransfected with nm23-H1 gene (L9981-nm23-H1 and L9981. After the blue-white screening, about three hundred positive clones in the forward subtracted library and four hundred positive clones in the reverse subtracted library were obtained. Ramdom analysis of 96 clones in each library with colony PCR methods showed that 84 clones in the forward subtracted library and 83 clones in the reverse subtracted library contained (300-750 bp inserts. Conclusion SSH is proved to be an efficient tool for differential expression gene cloning. The forward and reverse suppression subtractive cDNA libraries of human large cell lung cancer line L9981 transfected and untransfected with nm23-H1 gene (L9981-nm23-H1 and L9981 are successfully constructed by SSH and T/A cloning technology. The expression of nm23-H1 gene in the human large cell lung cancer cell lines may affect the differential expression of some metastatic-related genes.

  7. Emotion Regulation in Adolescence: A Prospective Study of Expressive Suppression and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Junilla K.; Vermulst, Ad A.; Geenen, Rinie; van Middendorp, Henriet; English, Tammy; Gross, James J.; Ha, Thao; Evers, Catharine; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Cross-sectional studies have shown a positive association between expressive suppression and depressive symptoms. These results have been interpreted as reflecting the impact of emotion regulation efforts on depression. However, it is also possible that depression may alter emotion regulation tendencies. The goal of the present study was to…

  8. Adeno-associated virus-mediated doxycycline-regulatable TRAIL expression suppresses growth of human breast carcinoma in nude mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Liu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL functions as a cytokine to selectively kill various cancer cells without toxicity to most normal cells. Numerous studies have demonstrated the potential use of recombinant soluble TRAIL as a cancer therapeutic agent. We have showed previous administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV vector expressing soluble TRAIL results in an efficient suppression of human tumor growth in nude mice. In the present study, we introduced Tet-On gene expression system into the rAAV vector to control the soluble TRAIL expression and evaluate the efficiency of the system in cancer gene therapy. Methods Controllability of the Tet-On system was determined by luciferase activity assay, and Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. Cell viability was determined by MTT assay. The breast cancer xenograft animal model was established and recombinant virus was administrated through tail vein injection to evaluate the tumoricidal activity. Results The expression of soluble TRAIL could be strictly controlled by the Tet-On system in both normal and cancer cells. Transduction of human cancer cell lines with rAAV-TRE-TRAIL&rAAV-Tet-On under the presence of inducer doxycycline resulted in a considerable cell death by apoptosis. Intravenous injection of the recombinant virus efficiently suppressed the growth of human breast carcinoma in nude mice when activated by doxycycline. Conclusion These data suggest that rAAV-mediated soluble TRAIL expression under the control of the Tet-On system is a promising strategy for breast cancer therapy.

  9. Gene expression in developing watermelon fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernandez Alvaro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultivated watermelon form large fruits that are highly variable in size, shape, color, and content, yet have extremely narrow genetic diversity. Whereas a plethora of genes involved in cell wall metabolism, ethylene biosynthesis, fruit softening, and secondary metabolism during fruit development and ripening have been identified in other plant species, little is known of the genes involved in these processes in watermelon. A microarray and quantitative Real-Time PCR-based study was conducted in watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb. Matsum. & Nakai var. lanatus] in order to elucidate the flow of events associated with fruit development and ripening in this species. RNA from three different maturation stages of watermelon fruits, as well as leaf, were collected from field grown plants during three consecutive years, and analyzed for gene expression using high-density photolithography microarrays and quantitative PCR. Results High-density photolithography arrays, composed of probes of 832 EST-unigenes from a subtracted, fruit development, cDNA library of watermelon were utilized to examine gene expression at three distinct time-points in watermelon fruit development. Analysis was performed with field-grown fruits over three consecutive growing seasons. Microarray analysis identified three hundred and thirty-five unique ESTs that are differentially regulated by at least two-fold in watermelon fruits during the early, ripening, or mature stage when compared to leaf. Of the 335 ESTs identified, 211 share significant homology with known gene products and 96 had no significant matches with any database accession. Of the modulated watermelon ESTs related to annotated genes, a significant number were found to be associated with or involved in the vascular system, carotenoid biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation, pathogen and stress response, and ethylene biosynthesis. Ethylene bioassays, performed with a closely related watermelon

  10. Gene expression in first trimester preeclampsia placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Founds, Sandra A; Terhorst, Lauren A; Conrad, Kirk P; Hogge, W Allen; Jeyabalan, Arun; Conley, Yvette P

    2011-04-01

    The goal of this study was to further validate eight candidate genes identified in a microarray analysis of first trimester placentas in preeclampsia. Surplus chorionic villus sampling (CVS) specimens of 4 women subsequently diagnosed with preeclampsia (PE) and 8 control women (C) without preeclampsia analyzed previously by microarray and 24 independent additional control samples (AS) were submitted for confirmatory studies by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Downregulation was significant in FSTL3 in PE as compared to C and AS (p = .04). PAEP was downregulated, but the difference was only significant between C and AS (p = .002) rather than between PE and either of the control groups. Expression levels for CFH, EPAS1, IGFBP1, MMP12, and SEMA3C were not statistically different among groups, but trends were consistent with microarray results; there was no anti-correlation. S100A8 was not measurable in all samples, probably because different probes and primers were needed. This study corroborates reduced FSTL3 expression in the first trimester of preeclampsia. Nonsignificant trends in the other genes may require follow-up in studies powered for medium or medium/large effect sizes. qRT-PCR verification of the prior microarray of CVS may support the placental origins of preeclampsia hypothesis. Replication is needed for the candidate genes as potential biomarkers of susceptibility, early detection, and/or individualized care of maternal-infant preeclampsia.

  11. Knockdown of p53 suppresses Nanog expression in embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelalim, Essam Mohamed, E-mail: emohamed@qf.org.qa [Qatar Biomedical Research Institute, Qatar Foundation, Doha 5825 (Qatar); Molecular Neuroscience Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan); Department of Cytology and Histology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Tooyama, Ikuo [Molecular Neuroscience Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •We investigate the role of p53 in ESCs in the absence of DNA damage. •p53 knockdown suppresses ESC proliferation. •p53 knockdown downregulates Nanog expression. •p53 is essential for mouse ESC self-renewal. -- Abstract: Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) express high levels of cytoplasmic p53. Exposure of mouse ESCs to DNA damage leads to activation of p53, inducing Nanog suppression. In contrast to earlier studies, we recently reported that chemical inhibition of p53 suppresses ESC proliferation. Here, we confirm that p53 signaling is involved in the maintenance of mouse ESC self-renewal. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of p53 induced downregulation of p21 and defects in ESC proliferation. Furthermore, p53 knockdown resulted in a significant downregulation in Nanog expression at 24 and 48 h post-transfection. p53 knockdown also caused a reduction in Oct4 expression at 48 h post-transfection. Conversely, exposure of ESCs to DNA damage caused a higher reduction of Nanog expression in control siRNA-treated cells than in p53 siRNA-treated cells. These data show that in the absence of DNA damage, p53 is required for the maintenance of mouse ESC self-renewal by regulating Nanog expression.

  12. Nuclear AXIN2 represses MYC gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Konsavage, Wesley M.; Yochum, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •AXIN2 localizes to cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments in colorectal cancer cells. •Nuclear AXIN2 represses the activity of Wnt-responsive luciferase reporters. •β-Catenin bridges AXIN2 to TCF transcription factors. •AXIN2 binds the MYC promoter and represses MYC gene expression. -- Abstract: The β-catenin transcriptional coactivator is the key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In the absence of Wnt, β-catenin associates with a cytosolic and multi-protein destruction complex where it is phosphorylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. In the presence of Wnt, the destruction complex is inactivated and β-catenin translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors to activate expression of c-MYC (MYC) and Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2). AXIN2 is a member of the destruction complex and, thus, serves in a negative feedback loop to control Wnt/β-catenin signaling. AXIN2 is also present in the nucleus, but its function within this compartment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AXIN2 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells within normal and colonic tumor tissues as well as colorectal cancer cell lines. In the nucleus, AXIN2 represses expression of Wnt/β-catenin-responsive luciferase reporters and forms a complex with β-catenin and TCF. We demonstrate that AXIN2 co-occupies β-catenin/TCF complexes at the MYC promoter region. When constitutively localized to the nucleus, AXIN2 alters the chromatin structure at the MYC promoter and directly represses MYC gene expression. These findings suggest that nuclear AXIN2 functions as a rheostat to control MYC expression in response to Wnt/β-catenin signaling

  13. Nuclear AXIN2 represses MYC gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Konsavage, Wesley M.; Yochum, Gregory S., E-mail: gsy3@psu.edu

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •AXIN2 localizes to cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments in colorectal cancer cells. •Nuclear AXIN2 represses the activity of Wnt-responsive luciferase reporters. •β-Catenin bridges AXIN2 to TCF transcription factors. •AXIN2 binds the MYC promoter and represses MYC gene expression. -- Abstract: The β-catenin transcriptional coactivator is the key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In the absence of Wnt, β-catenin associates with a cytosolic and multi-protein destruction complex where it is phosphorylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. In the presence of Wnt, the destruction complex is inactivated and β-catenin translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors to activate expression of c-MYC (MYC) and Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2). AXIN2 is a member of the destruction complex and, thus, serves in a negative feedback loop to control Wnt/β-catenin signaling. AXIN2 is also present in the nucleus, but its function within this compartment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AXIN2 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells within normal and colonic tumor tissues as well as colorectal cancer cell lines. In the nucleus, AXIN2 represses expression of Wnt/β-catenin-responsive luciferase reporters and forms a complex with β-catenin and TCF. We demonstrate that AXIN2 co-occupies β-catenin/TCF complexes at the MYC promoter region. When constitutively localized to the nucleus, AXIN2 alters the chromatin structure at the MYC promoter and directly represses MYC gene expression. These findings suggest that nuclear AXIN2 functions as a rheostat to control MYC expression in response to Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  14. Characteristics and Expression Profile of KRT71 Screened by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization cDNA Library in Curly Fleece Chinese Tan Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiaolong; Liu, Yufang; Zhang, Jibin; Xu, Qinqin; Liu, Chengkun; Fang, Meiying

    2017-07-01

    As an important commercial trait for sheep, curly fleece has a great economic impact on production costs and efficiency in sheep industry. To identify genes that are important for curly fleece formation in mammals, a suppression subtractive hybridization analysis was performed on the shoulder skin tissues exposed to two different growth stages of Chinese Tan sheep with different phenotypes (curly fleece and noncurling fleece). BLAST analysis identified 67 differentially expressed genes, of which 31 were expressed lower and 36 were expressed higher in lambs than in adult sheep. Differential expressions of seven randomly selected genes were verified using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). KRT71 gene was selected for further study due to its high correlation with the curly hair phenotype in various mammal species. Semi-qPCR showed distinctively high expression of KRT71 in skin tissues. Moreover, qPCR result showed a significantly higher expression of KRT71 in curly fleece than noncurling Tan sheep. The luciferase assay and electrophoresis mobility shift assay showed that there were transcription factor binding sites in the promoter region of KRT71 related to the differential expression of KRT71 at the two growth stages of Tan sheep. Online bioinformation tools predicted MFZ1 as a transcriptional factor that regulates the expression of KRT71. These studies on KRT71 gene revealed some mechanisms underlying the relationship between the KRT71 gene and the curly fleece phenotype of Tan sheep.

  15. Satellite DNA Modulates Gene Expression in the Beetle Tribolium castaneum after Heat Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidoro Feliciello

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding repetitive DNAs have been proposed to perform a gene regulatory role, however for tandemly repeated satellite DNA no such role was defined until now. Here we provide the first evidence for a role of satellite DNA in the modulation of gene expression under specific environmental conditions. The major satellite DNA TCAST1 in the beetle Tribolium castaneum is preferentially located within pericentromeric heterochromatin but is also dispersed as single repeats or short arrays in the vicinity of protein-coding genes within euchromatin. Our results show enhanced suppression of activity of TCAST1-associated genes and slower recovery of their activity after long-term heat stress relative to the same genes without associated TCAST1 satellite DNA elements. The level of gene suppression is not influenced by the distance of TCAST1 elements from the associated genes up to 40 kb from the genes' transcription start sites, but it does depend on the copy number of TCAST1 repeats within an element, being stronger for the higher number of copies. The enhanced gene suppression correlates with the enrichment of the repressive histone marks H3K9me2/3 at dispersed TCAST1 elements and their flanking regions as well as with increased expression of TCAST1 satellite DNA. The results reveal transient, RNAi based heterochromatin formation at dispersed TCAST1 repeats and their proximal regions as a mechanism responsible for enhanced silencing of TCAST1-associated genes. Differences in the pattern of distribution of TCAST1 elements contribute to gene expression diversity among T. castaneum strains after long-term heat stress and might have an impact on adaptation to different environmental conditions.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of curcumin action: gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishodia, Shishir

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin derived from the tropical plant Curcuma longa has a long history of use as a dietary agent, food preservative, and in traditional Asian medicine. It has been used for centuries to treat biliary disorders, anorexia, cough, diabetic wounds, hepatic disorders, rheumatism, and sinusitis. The preventive and therapeutic properties of curcumin are associated with its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Extensive research over several decades has attempted to identify the molecular mechanisms of curcumin action. Curcumin modulates numerous molecular targets by altering their gene expression, signaling pathways, or through direct interaction. Curcumin regulates the expression of inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF, IL-1), growth factors (e.g., VEGF, EGF, FGF), growth factor receptors (e.g., EGFR, HER-2, AR), enzymes (e.g., COX-2, LOX, MMP9, MAPK, mTOR, Akt), adhesion molecules (e.g., ELAM-1, ICAM-1, VCAM-1), apoptosis related proteins (e.g., Bcl-2, caspases, DR, Fas), and cell cycle proteins (e.g., cyclin D1). Curcumin modulates the activity of several transcription factors (e.g., NF-κB, AP-1, STAT) and their signaling pathways. Based on its ability to affect multiple targets, curcumin has the potential for the prevention and treatment of various diseases including cancers, arthritis, allergies, atherosclerosis, aging, neurodegenerative disease, hepatic disorders, obesity, diabetes, psoriasis, and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms of modulation of gene expression by curcumin. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. MiR-200a Suppresses the Proliferation and Metastasis in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma through Downregulation of DEK Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available MiR-200a has been reported to be able to suppress the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process in pancreatic cancer stem cells, suggesting that miR-200a could suppress the metastasis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC. However, its role in proliferation and metastasis of PDAC and the underlying mechanism by which miR-200a works in PDAC have not been elucidated. In our study, we for the first time identified that DEK gene is a direct downstream target of miR-200a. It was found that overexpression of miR-200a decreased DEK expression, suppressing the proliferation, migration, and invasion of PDAC cells. Meanwhile, knockdown of miR-200a can increase DEK level, promoting the proliferation, migration, and invasion of PDAC cells. Our study demonstrated that miR-200a suppresses the metastasis in pancreatic PDAC through downregulation of DEK, suggesting that miR-200a may be used as a novel potential marker in prediction of metastasis of PDAC.

  18. Expression responses of five cold tolerant related genes to two temperature dropping treatments in sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengze; Chang, Yaqing; Pang, Zhenguo; Ding, Jun; Ji, Nanjing

    2015-03-01

    Environmental conditions, including ambient temperature, play important roles in survival, growth development, and reproduction of the Japanese sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus. Low temperatures result in slowed growth and skin ulceration disease. In a previous study, we investigated the effect of low temperature on gene expression profiles in A. japonicus by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). Genes encoding Ferritin, Lysozyme, Hsp70, gp96, and AjToll were selected from a subtracted cDNA library of A. japonicus under acute cold stress. The transcriptional expression profiles of these genes were investigated in different tissues (coelomocyte, respiratory tree, intestine, longitudinal muscle) after exposure to acute and mild temperature dropping treatments. The results show that (1) the five cold-tolerance-related genes were found in all four tissues and the highest mRNA levels were observed in coelomocyte and respiratory tree; (2) under the temperature dropping treatments, three types of transcriptional regulation patterns were observed: primary suppression followed by up-regulation at -2°C, suppressed expression throughout the two treatments, and more rarely an initial stimulation followed by suppression; and (3) gene expression suppression was more severe under acute temperature dropping than under mild temperature dropping treatment. The five cold-tolerance-related genes that were distributed mainly in coelomocyte and respiratory tissues were generally down-regulated by low temperature stress but an inverse up-regulation event was found at the extreme temperature (-2°C).

  19. Studying the Complex Expression Dependences between Sets of Coexpressed Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Huerta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organisms simplify the orchestration of gene expression by coregulating genes whose products function together in the cell. The use of clustering methods to obtain sets of coexpressed genes from expression arrays is very common; nevertheless there are no appropriate tools to study the expression networks among these sets of coexpressed genes. The aim of the developed tools is to allow studying the complex expression dependences that exist between sets of coexpressed genes. For this purpose, we start detecting the nonlinear expression relationships between pairs of genes, plus the coexpressed genes. Next, we form networks among sets of coexpressed genes that maintain nonlinear expression dependences between all of them. The expression relationship between the sets of coexpressed genes is defined by the expression relationship between the skeletons of these sets, where this skeleton represents the coexpressed genes with a well-defined nonlinear expression relationship with the skeleton of the other sets. As a result, we can study the nonlinear expression relationships between a target gene and other sets of coexpressed genes, or start the study from the skeleton of the sets, to study the complex relationships of activation and deactivation between the sets of coexpressed genes that carry out the different cellular processes present in the expression experiments.

  20. Changes in gene expression following androgen receptor blockade ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu urs

    Involution of the rat ventral prostate and concomitant modulation of gene expression post-castration is a well- documented phenomenon. While the rat castration model has been extensively used to study androgen regulation of gene expression in the ventral prostate, it is not clear whether all the gene expression changes ...

  1. Modulation of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes by ToxCast Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  2. Osmotic Stress Induces the Expression of VvMAP Kinase Gene in Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Daldoul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stress adversely affects the growth of grapevine plants. In order to study the early expression changes of genes particularly involved in signal transduction upon salt and drought stresses in grapevines, ESTs derived from a suppressive subtractive hybridization approach (SSH were selected for expression studies. We were particularly interested in the expression behaviour of the MAP kinase cDNA clone identified by differential screening of the salt-stressed SSH libraries. Interestingly, VvMAP kinase transcript showed a differential expression towards salt and drought treatment in the salt tolerant cultivar Razegui. The upregulation of this transcript was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Our results revealed that the VvMAP kinase gene could be classified as an osmotic stress responsive gene as its expression was induced by salinity and drought. Furthermore, our study provides the basis for future research on the diverse signaling pathways mediated by MAPKs in grapevine.

  3. Agrobacterium tumefaciens exoR controls acid response genes and impacts exopolysaccharide synthesis, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckel, Brynn C; Tomlinson, Amelia D; Morton, Elise R; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Fuqua, Clay

    2014-09-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a facultative plant pathogen and the causative agent of crown gall disease. The initial stage of infection involves attachment to plant tissues, and subsequently, biofilms may form at these sites. This study focuses on the periplasmic ExoR regulator, which was identified based on the severe biofilm deficiency of A. tumefaciens exoR mutants. Genome-wide expression analysis was performed to elucidate the complete ExoR regulon. Overproduction of the exopolysaccharide succinoglycan is a dramatic phenotype of exoR mutants. Comparative expression analyses revealed that the core ExoR regulon is unaffected by succinoglycan synthesis. Several findings are consistent with previous observations: genes involved in succinoglycan biosynthesis, motility, and type VI secretion are differentially expressed in the ΔexoR mutant. In addition, these studies revealed new functional categories regulated by ExoR, including genes related to virulence, conjugation of the pAtC58 megaplasmid, ABC transporters, and cell envelope architecture. To address how ExoR exerts a broad impact on gene expression from its periplasmic location, a genetic screen was performed to isolate suppressor mutants that mitigate the exoR motility phenotype and identify downstream components of the ExoR regulatory pathway. This suppression analysis identified the acid-sensing two-component system ChvG-ChvI, and the suppressor mutant phenotypes suggest that all or most of the characteristic exoR properties are mediated through ChvG-ChvI. Subsequent analysis indicates that exoR mutants are simulating a response to acidic conditions, even in neutral media. This work expands the model for ExoR regulation in A. tumefaciens and underscores the global role that this regulator plays on gene expression. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Asthenoteratozoospermia in mice lacking testis expressed gene 18 (Tex18)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaroszynski, L.; dev, A.; Li, M.; Meinhardt, A.; de rooij, D. G.; Mueller, Christian; Böhm, Detlef; Wolf, S.; Adham, I. M.; Wulf, G.; Engel, W.; Nayernia, K.

    2007-01-01

    Testis expressed gene 18 (Tex18) is a small gene with one exon of 240 bp, which is specifically expressed in male germ cells. The gene encodes for a protein of 80 amino acids with unknown domain. To investigate the function of (Tex18) gene, we generated mice with targeted disruption of the (Tex18)

  5. Selection of genes associated with variations in the Circle of Willis in gerbils using suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenkun Li

    Full Text Available Deformities in the Circle of Willis (CoW can significantly increase the risk of cerebrovascular disease in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these deformities have not been understood. Based on our previous studies, variations in the CoW of gerbils are hereditary. A normal CoW is observed in approximately 60% of gerbils, a percentage that also applies to humans. Thus, gerbil is an ideal experimental model for studying variations in the CoW. To study the mechanisms underlying these variations, we selected genes associated with different types of the CoW using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH. After evaluating the efficiency of SSH using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR on subtracted and unsubtracted cDNA and Southern blotting on SSH PCR products, 12 SSH libraries were established. We identified 4 genes (CST3, GNAS, GPx4 and PFN2 associated with variations in the CoW. These genes were identified with qPCR and Western blotting using 70 expressed sequence tags from the SSH libraries. Cloning and sequencing allowed us to demonstrate that the 4 genes were closely related to mouse genes. We may assume that these 4 genes play an important role in the development of variations in the CoW. This study provides a foundation for further research of genes related to development of variations in the CoW and the mechanisms of dysmorphosis of cerebral vessels.

  6. Selection of Genes Associated with Variations in the Circle of Willis in Gerbils Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenkun; Huo, Xueyun; Zhang, Shuangyue; Lu, Jing; Li, Changlong; Guo, Meng; Fu, Rui; He, Zhengming; Du, Xiaoyan; Chen, Zhenwen

    2015-01-01

    Deformities in the Circle of Willis (CoW) can significantly increase the risk of cerebrovascular disease in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these deformities have not been understood. Based on our previous studies, variations in the CoW of gerbils are hereditary. A normal CoW is observed in approximately 60% of gerbils, a percentage that also applies to humans. Thus, gerbil is an ideal experimental model for studying variations in the CoW. To study the mechanisms underlying these variations, we selected genes associated with different types of the CoW using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). After evaluating the efficiency of SSH using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) on subtracted and unsubtracted cDNA and Southern blotting on SSH PCR products, 12 SSH libraries were established. We identified 4 genes (CST3, GNAS, GPx4 and PFN2) associated with variations in the CoW. These genes were identified with qPCR and Western blotting using 70 expressed sequence tags from the SSH libraries. Cloning and sequencing allowed us to demonstrate that the 4 genes were closely related to mouse genes. We may assume that these 4 genes play an important role in the development of variations in the CoW. This study provides a foundation for further research of genes related to development of variations in the CoW and the mechanisms of dysmorphosis of cerebral vessels. PMID:25973917

  7. Effects of Emdogain on osteoblast gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinci, F; Piattelli, A; Guida, L; Perrotti, V; Laino, G; Oliva, A; Annunziata, M; Palmieri, A; Pezzetti, F

    2006-05-01

    Emdogain (EMD) is a protein extract purified from porcine enamel and has been introduced in clinical practice to obtain periodontal regeneration. EMD is composed mainly of amelogenins (90%), while the remaining 10% is composed of non-amelogenin enamel matrix proteins such as enamelins, tuftelin, amelin and ameloblastin. Enamel matrix proteins seem to be involved in root formation. EMD has been reported to promote proliferation, migration, adhesion and differentiation of cells associated with healing periodontal tissues in vivo. How this protein acts on osteoblasts is poorly understood. We therefore attempted to address this question by using a microarray technique to identify genes that are differently regulated in osteoblasts exposed to enamel matrix proteins. By using DNA microarrays containing 20,000 genes, we identified several upregulated and downregulated genes in the osteoblast-like cell line (MG-63) cultured with enamel matrix proteins (Emd). The differentially expressed genes cover a broad range of functional activities: (i) signaling transduction, (ii) transcription, (iii) translation, (iv) cell cycle regulation, proliferation and apoptosis, (v) immune system, (vi) vesicular transport and lysosome activity, and (vii) cytoskeleton, cell adhesion and extracellular matrix production. The data reported are the first genome-wide scan of the effect of enamel matrix proteins on osteoblast-like cells. These results can contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of bone regeneration and as a model for comparing other materials with similar clinical effects.

  8. The relationship among gene expression, the evolution of gene dosage, and the rate of protein evolution.

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    Jean-François Gout

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of selective constraints affecting genes is a major issue in biology. It is well established that gene expression level is a major determinant of the rate of protein evolution, but the reasons for this relationship remain highly debated. Here we demonstrate that gene expression is also a major determinant of the evolution of gene dosage: the rate of gene losses after whole genome duplications in the Paramecium lineage is negatively correlated to the level of gene expression, and this relationship is not a byproduct of other factors known to affect the fate of gene duplicates. This indicates that changes in gene dosage are generally more deleterious for highly expressed genes. This rule also holds for other taxa: in yeast, we find a clear relationship between gene expression level and the fitness impact of reduction in gene dosage. To explain these observations, we propose a model based on the fact that the optimal expression level of a gene corresponds to a trade-off between the benefit and cost of its expression. This COSTEX model predicts that selective pressure against mutations changing gene expression level or affecting the encoded protein should on average be stronger in highly expressed genes and hence that both the frequency of gene loss and the rate of protein evolution should correlate negatively with gene expression. Thus, the COSTEX model provides a simple and common explanation for the general relationship observed between the level of gene expression and the different facets of gene evolution.

  9. Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, activates PPARα and γ and suppresses COX-2 expression[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Mariko; Nakata, Rieko; Katsukawa, Michiko; Hori, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Saori; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the rate-limiting enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis, plays a key role in inflammation and circulatory homeostasis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily and are involved in the control of COX-2 expression, and vice versa. Here, we show that COX-2 promoter activity was suppressed by essential oils derived from thyme, clove, rose, eucalyptus, fennel, and bergamot in cell-based transfection assays using bovine arterial endothelial cells. Moreover, from thyme oil, we identified carvacrol as a major component of the suppressor of COX-2 expression and an activator of PPARα and γ. PPARγ-dependent suppression of COX-2 promoter activity was observed in response to carvacrol treatment. In human macrophage-like U937 cells, carvacrol suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, suggesting that carvacrol regulates COX-2 expression through its agonistic effect on PPARγ. These results may be important in understanding the antiinflammatory and antilifestyle-related disease properties of carvacrol. PMID:19578162

  10. Gene expression profiling of cutaneous wound healing

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    Wang Ena

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the sequence of events leading to wound repair has been described at the cellular and, to a limited extent, at the protein level this process has yet to be fully elucidated. Genome wide transcriptional analysis tools promise to further define the global picture of this complex progression of events. Study Design This study was part of a placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial in which basal cell carcinomas were treated topically with an immunomodifier – toll-like receptor 7 agonist: imiquimod. The fourteen patients with basal cell carcinoma in the placebo arm of the trial received placebo treatment consisting solely of vehicle cream. A skin punch biopsy was obtained immediately before treatment and at the end of the placebo treatment (after 2, 4 or 8 days. 17.5K cDNA microarrays were utilized to profile the biopsy material. Results Four gene signatures whose expression changed relative to baseline (before wound induction by the pre-treatment biopsy were identified. The largest group was comprised predominantly of inflammatory genes whose expression was increased throughout the study. Two additional signatures were observed which included preferentially pro-inflammatory genes in the early post-treatment biopsies (2 days after pre-treatment biopsies and repair and angiogenesis genes in the later (4 to 8 days biopsies. The fourth and smallest set of genes was down-regulated throughout the study. Early in wound healing the expression of markers of both M1 and M2 macrophages were increased, but later M2 markers predominated. Conclusion The initial response to a cutaneous wound induces powerful transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory stimuli which may alert the host defense. Subsequently and in the absence of infection, inflammation subsides and it is replaced by angiogenesis and remodeling. Understanding this transition which may be driven by a change from a mixed macrophage population to predominately M2

  11. Recent Progress on Liver Kinase B1 (LKB1: Expression, Regulation, Downstream Signaling and Cancer Suppressive Function

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    Ren-You Gan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Liver kinase B1 (LKB1, known as a serine/threonine kinase, has been identified as a critical cancer suppressor in many cancer cells. It is a master upstream kinase of 13 AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK-related protein kinases, and possesses versatile biological functions. LKB1 gene is mutated in many cancers, and its protein can form different protein complexes with different cellular localizations in various cell types. The expression of LKB1 can be regulated through epigenetic modification, transcriptional regulation and post-translational modification. LKB1 dowcnstream pathways mainly include AMPK, microtubule affinity regulating kinase (MARK, salt-inducible kinase (SIK, sucrose non-fermenting protein-related kinase (SNRK and brain selective kinase (BRSK signalings, etc. This review, therefore, mainly discusses recent studies about the expression, regulation, downstream signaling and cancer suppressive function of LKB1, which can be helpful for better understanding of this molecular and its significance in cancers.

  12. Network Completion for Static Gene Expression Data

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    Natsu Nakajima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We tackle the problem of completing and inferring genetic networks under stationary conditions from static data, where network completion is to make the minimum amount of modifications to an initial network so that the completed network is most consistent with the expression data in which addition of edges and deletion of edges are basic modification operations. For this problem, we present a new method for network completion using dynamic programming and least-squares fitting. This method can find an optimal solution in polynomial time if the maximum indegree of the network is bounded by a constant. We evaluate the effectiveness of our method through computational experiments using synthetic data. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our proposed method can distinguish the differences between two types of genetic networks under stationary conditions from lung cancer and normal gene expression data.

  13. Suppression of plant resistance gene-based immunity by a fungal effector.

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    Petra M Houterman

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system of plants consists of two layers. The first layer, called basal resistance, governs recognition of conserved microbial molecules and fends off most attempted invasions. The second layer is based on Resistance (R genes that mediate recognition of effectors, proteins secreted by pathogens to suppress or evade basal resistance. Here, we show that a plant-pathogenic fungus secretes an effector that can both trigger and suppress R gene-based immunity. This effector, Avr1, is secreted by the xylem-invading fungus Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici (Fol and triggers disease resistance when the host plant, tomato, carries a matching R gene (I or I-1. At the same time, Avr1 suppresses the protective effect of two other R genes, I-2 and I-3. Based on these observations, we tentatively reconstruct the evolutionary arms race that has taken place between tomato R genes and effectors of Fol. This molecular analysis has revealed a hitherto unpredicted strategy for durable disease control based on resistance gene combinations.

  14. Inhibiting AP-1 activity alters cocaine induced gene expression and potentiates sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paletzki, Ronald F.; Myakishev, Max V.; Polesskaya, Oksana; Orosz, Andras; Hyman, Steven E.; Vinson, Charles

    2008-01-01

    We have expressed A-FOS, an inhibitor of AP-1 DNA binding, in adult mouse striatal neurons. We observe normal behavior including locomotion and exploratory activities. Following a single injection of cocaine, locomotion increased similarly in both the A-FOS expressing and littermate controls. However, following repeated injections of cocaine, the A-FOS expressing mice showed increased locomotion relative to littermate controls, an increase that persisted following a week of withdrawal and subsequent cocaine administration. These results indicate that AP-1 suppresses this behavioral responses to cocaine. We analyzed mRNA from the striatum before and 4 and 24 hours after a single cocaine injection in both A-FOS and control striata using Affymetrix microarrays (430 2.0 Array) to identify genes mis-regulated by A-FOS that may mediate the increased locomotor sensitization to cocaine. A-FOS expression did not change gene expression in the basal state or 4 hours following cocaine treatment relative to controls. However, 24 hours after an acute cocaine treatment, 84 genes were identified that were differentially expressed between the A-FOS and control mice. 56 gene are down regulated while 28 genes are up regulated including previously identified candidates for addiction including BDNF and Per1. Using a random sample of identified genes, quantitative PCR was used to verify the microarray studies. The chromosomal location of these 84 genes was compared to human genome scans of addiction to identify potential genes in humans that are involved in addiction. PMID:18355967

  15. Inferring gene expression dynamics via functional regression analysis

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    Leng Xiaoyan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporal gene expression profiles characterize the time-dynamics of expression of specific genes and are increasingly collected in current gene expression experiments. In the analysis of experiments where gene expression is obtained over the life cycle, it is of interest to relate temporal patterns of gene expression associated with different developmental stages to each other to study patterns of long-term developmental gene regulation. We use tools from functional data analysis to study dynamic changes by relating temporal gene expression profiles of different developmental stages to each other. Results We demonstrate that functional regression methodology can pinpoint relationships that exist between temporary gene expression profiles for different life cycle phases and incorporates dimension reduction as needed for these high-dimensional data. By applying these tools, gene expression profiles for pupa and adult phases are found to be strongly related to the profiles of the same genes obtained during the embryo phase. Moreover, one can distinguish between gene groups that exhibit relationships with positive and others with negative associations between later life and embryonal expression profiles. Specifically, we find a positive relationship in expression for muscle development related genes, and a negative relationship for strictly maternal genes for Drosophila, using temporal gene expression profiles. Conclusion Our findings point to specific reactivation patterns of gene expression during the Drosophila life cycle which differ in characteristic ways between various gene groups. Functional regression emerges as a useful tool for relating gene expression patterns from different developmental stages, and avoids the problems with large numbers of parameters and multiple testing that affect alternative approaches.

  16. Stochastic fluctuations and distributed control of gene expression impact cellular memory.

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    Guillaume Corre

    Full Text Available Despite the stochastic noise that characterizes all cellular processes the cells are able to maintain and transmit to their daughter cells the stable level of gene expression. In order to better understand this phenomenon, we investigated the temporal dynamics of gene expression variation using a double reporter gene model. We compared cell clones with transgenes coding for highly stable mRNA and fluorescent proteins with clones expressing destabilized mRNA-s and proteins. Both types of clones displayed strong heterogeneity of reporter gene expression levels. However, cells expressing stable gene products produced daughter cells with similar level of reporter proteins, while in cell clones with short mRNA and protein half-lives the epigenetic memory of the gene expression level was completely suppressed. Computer simulations also confirmed the role of mRNA and protein stability in the conservation of constant gene expression levels over several cell generations. These data indicate that the conservation of a stable phenotype in a cellular lineage may largely depend on the slow turnover of mRNA-s and proteins.

  17. Stress-induced gene expression profiling in the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Vega, Enrique; Hall, Michael R; Wilson, Kate J; Reverter, Antonio; Woods, Rick G; Degnan, Bernard M

    2007-09-19

    Cultured shrimp are continuously exposed to variable environmental conditions that have been associated with stress and subsequent outbreaks of disease. To investigate the effect of environmental stress on Penaeus monodon gene expression, a 3,853 random cDNA microarray chip was generated with clones originating from six stress-enriched hemocyte libraries generated by suppression subtractive hybridization and a normal hemocyte cDNA library. Changes in temporal gene expression were analyzed from shrimp exposed to hypoxic, hyperthermic, and hypoosmotic conditions; 3.1% of the cDNAs were differentially expressed in response to at least one of the environmental stressors, and 72% of the differentially expressed clones had no significant sequence similarity to previously known genes. Among those genes with high identity to known sequences, the most common functional groups were immune-related genes and non-long terminal repeat retrotransposons. Hierarchical clustering revealed a set of cDNAs with temporal and stress-specific gene expression profiles as well as a set of cDNAs indicating a common stress response between stressors. Hypoxic and hyperthermic stressors induced the most severe short-term response in terms of gene regulation, and the osmotic stress had the least variation in expression profiles relative to the control. These expression data agree with observed differences in shrimp physical appearance and behavior following exposure to stress conditions.

  18. Expression regulation of design process gene in product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bo; Fang, Lusheng; Li, Bo

    2011-01-01

    is proposed and analyzed, as well as its three categories i.e., the operator gene, the structural gene and the regulator gene. Second, the trigger mechanism that design objectives and constraints trigger the operator gene is constructed. Third, the expression principle of structural gene is analyzed...... with the example of design management gene. Last, the regulation mode that the regulator gene regulates the expression of the structural gene is established and it is illustrated by taking the design process management gene as an example. © (2011) Trans Tech Publications....

  19. Global expression differences and tissue specific expression differences in rice evolution result in two contrasting types of differentially expressed genes

    KAUST Repository

    Horiuchi, Youko

    2015-12-23

    Background Since the development of transcriptome analysis systems, many expression evolution studies characterized evolutionary forces acting on gene expression, without explicit discrimination between global expression differences and tissue specific expression differences. However, different types of gene expression alteration should have different effects on an organism, the evolutionary forces that act on them might be different, and different types of genes might show different types of differential expression between species. To confirm this, we studied differentially expressed (DE) genes among closely related groups that have extensive gene expression atlases, and clarified characteristics of different types of DE genes including the identification of regulating loci for differential expression using expression quantitative loci (eQTL) analysis data. Results We detected differentially expressed (DE) genes between rice subspecies in five homologous tissues that were verified using japonica and indica transcriptome atlases in public databases. Using the transcriptome atlases, we classified DE genes into two types, global DE genes and changed-tissues DE genes. Global type DE genes were not expressed in any tissues in the atlas of one subspecies, however changed-tissues type DE genes were expressed in both subspecies with different tissue specificity. For the five tissues in the two japonica-indica combinations, 4.6 ± 0.8 and 5.9 ± 1.5 % of highly expressed genes were global and changed-tissues DE genes, respectively. Changed-tissues DE genes varied in number between tissues, increasing linearly with the abundance of tissue specifically expressed genes in the tissue. Molecular evolution of global DE genes was rapid, unlike that of changed-tissues DE genes. Based on gene ontology, global and changed-tissues DE genes were different, having no common GO terms. Expression differences of most global DE genes were regulated by cis-eQTLs. Expression

  20. Suppression of LFA-1 expression by spermine is associated with enhanced methylation of ITGAL, the LFA-1 promoter area.

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    Yoshihiko Kano

    Full Text Available Spermine and spermidine, natural polyamines, suppress lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1 expression and its associated cellular functions through mechanisms that remain unknown. Inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase, which is required for polyamine synthesis, in Jurkat cells by 3 mM D,L-alpha-difluoromethylornithine hydrochloride (DFMO significantly decreased spermine and spermidine concentrations and was associated with decreased DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt activity, enhanced demethylation of the LFA-1 gene (ITGAL promoter area, and increased CD11a expression. Supplementation with extracellular spermine (500 µM of cells pretreated with DFMO significantly increased polyamine concentrations, increased Dnmt activity, enhanced methylation of the ITGAL promoter, and decreased CD11a expression. It has been shown that changes in intracellular polyamine concentrations affect activities of -adenosyl-L-methionine-decaroboxylase, and, as a result, affect concentrations of the methyl group donor, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM, and of the competitive Dnmt inhibitor, decarboxylated SAM. Additional treatments designed to increase the amount of SAM and decrease the amount of decarboxylated SAM-such as treatment with methylglyoxal bis-guanylhydrazone (an inhibitor of S-adenosyl-L-methionine-decaroboxylase and SAM supplementation-successfully decreased CD11a expression. Western blot analyses revealed that neither DFMO nor spermine supplementation affected the amount of active Ras-proximate-1, a member of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases and a key protein for regulation of CD11a expression. The results of this study suggest that polyamine-induced suppression of LFA-1 expression occurs via enhanced methylation of ITGAL.

  1. Identification of Botrytis cinerea genes up-regulated during infection and controlled by the Galpha subunit BCG1 using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze Gronover, Christian; Schorn, Corinna; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2004-05-01

    The Galpha subunit BCG1 plays an important role during the infection of host plants by Botrytis cinerea. Delta bcg1 mutants are able to conidiate, penetrate host leaves, and produce small primary lesions. However, in contrast to the wild type, the mutants completely stop invasion of plant tissue at this stage; secondary lesions have never been observed. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to identify fungal genes whose expression on the host plant is specifically affected in bcg1 mutants. Among the 22 differentially expressed genes, we found those which were predicted to encode proteases, enzymes involved in secondary metabolism, and others encoding cell wall-degrading enzymes. All these genes are highly expressed during infection in the wild type but not in the mutant. However, the genes are expressed in both the wild type and the mutant under certain conditions in vitro. Most of the BCG1-controlled genes are still expressed in adenylate cyclase (bac) mutants in planta, suggesting that BCG1 is involved in at least one additional signaling cascade in addition to the cAMP-depending pathway. In a second SSH approach, 1,500 clones were screened for those that are specifically induced by the wild type during the infection of bean leaves. Of the 22 BCG1-controlled genes, 11 also were found in the in planta SSH library. Therefore, SSH technology can be successfully applied to identify target genes of signaling pathways and differentially expressed genes in planta.

  2. Prognostic Gene Expression Profiles in Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristina Pilekær

    Each year approximately 4,800 Danish women are diagnosed with breast cancer. Several clinical and pathological factors are used as prognostic and predictive markers to categorize the patients into groups of high or low risk. Around 90% of all patients are allocated to the high risk group and offe......Each year approximately 4,800 Danish women are diagnosed with breast cancer. Several clinical and pathological factors are used as prognostic and predictive markers to categorize the patients into groups of high or low risk. Around 90% of all patients are allocated to the high risk group...... clinical courses, and they may be useful as novel prognostic biomarkers in breast cancer. The aim of the present project was to predict the development of metastasis in lymph node negative breast cancer patients by RNA profiling. We collected and analyzed 82 primary breast tumors from patients who...... developed metastasis and 82 primary breast tumors from patients who remained metastasis-free, by microarray gene expression profiling. We employed a nested case-control design, where samples were matched, in this study one-to-one, to exclude differences in gene expression based on tumor type, tumor size...

  3. The Effects of Hallucinogens on Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David A; Nichols, Charles D

    2018-01-01

    The classic serotonergic hallucinogens, or psychedelics, have the ability to profoundly alter perception and behavior. These can include visual distortions, hallucinations, detachment from reality, and mystical experiences. Some psychedelics, like LSD, are able to produce these effects with remarkably low doses of drug. Others, like psilocybin, have recently been demonstrated to have significant clinical efficacy in the treatment of depression, anxiety, and addiction that persist for at least several months after only a single therapeutic session. How does this occur? Much work has recently been published from imaging studies showing that psychedelics alter brain network connectivity. They facilitate a disintegration of the default mode network, producing a hyperconnectivity between brain regions that allow centers that do not normally c