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Sample records for suppresses mast cell-mediated

  1. Lipopolysaccharide suppresses IgE-mast cell-mediated reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N; McKell, M; Dang, A; Yamani, A; Waggoner, L; Vanoni, S; Noah, T; Wu, D; Kordowski, A; Köhl, J; Hoebe, K; Divanovic, S; Hogan, S P

    2017-12-01

    Clinical and experimental analyses have identified a central role for IgE/FcεRI/mast cells in promoting IgE-mediated anaphylaxis. Recent data from human studies suggest that bacterial infections can alter susceptibility to anaphylaxis. We examined the effect of LPS exposure on the induction of IgE-mast cell (MC) mediated reactions in mice. C57BL/6 WT, tlr4 -/- and IL10 -/- mice were exposed to LPS, and serum cytokines (TNF and IL-10) were measured. Mice were subsequently treated with anti-IgE, and the symptoms of passive IgE-mediated anaphylaxis, MC activation, Ca 2+ -mobilization and the expression of FcεRI on peritoneal MCs were quantitated. We show that LPS exposure of C57BL/6 WT mice constraints IgE-MC-mediated reactions. LPS-induced suppression of IgE-MC-mediated responses was TLR-4-dependent and associated with increased systemic IL-10 levels, decreased surface expression of FcεRI on MCs and loss of sensitivity to IgE activation. Notably, LPS-induced desensitization of MCs was short term with MC sensitivity to IgE reconstituted within 48 hours, which was associated with recapitulation of FcεRI expression on the MCs. Mechanistic analyses revealed a requirement for IL-10 in LPS-mediated decrease in MC FcεRI surface expression. Collectively, these studies suggest that LPS-induced IL-10 promotes the down-regulation of MC surface FcεRI expression and leads to desensitization of mice to IgE-mediated reactions. These studies indicate that targeting of the LPS-TLR-4-IL-10 pathway may be used as a therapeutic approach to prevent adverse IgE-mediated reactions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. 4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibits activation of Syk kinase to suppress mast cells in vitro and mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kui Lea [Center for Drug Development Assistance, National Institute of Food Drug Safety Evaluation (NIFDS), KFDA, Cheongwon-gun (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Na Young; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Kim, A-Ram; Her, Erk; Kim, Bokyung [Department of Immunology and physiology, College of Medicine, Konkuk University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Sik [College of Pharmacy, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Eun-Yi [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, College of Biological Science, Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Mi [College of Pharmacy, Duksung Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hang-Rae, E-mail: hangrae2@snu.ac.kr [Department of Anatomy, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Wahn Soo, E-mail: wahnchoi@kku.ac.kr [Department of Immunology and physiology, College of Medicine, Konkuk University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline is a quinoxaline derivative. We aimed to study the effects of 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline on activation of mast cells in vitro and in mice. 4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline reversibly inhibited degranulation of mast cells in a dose-dependent manner, and also suppressed the expression and secretion of TNF-{alpha} and IL-4 in mast cells. Mechanistically, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibited activating phosphorylation of Syk and LAT, which are crucial for early Fc{epsilon}RI-mediated signaling events, as well as Akt and MAP kinases, which play essential roles in the production of various pro-inflammatory cytokines in mast cells. Notably, although 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibited the activation of Fyn and Syk, minimal inhibition was observed in mast cells in the case of Lyn. Furthermore, consistent with its in vitro activity, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline significantly suppressed mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice. In summary, the results from this study demonstrate that 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline shows an inhibitory effect on mast cells in vitro and in vivo, and that this is mediated by inhibiting the activation of Syk in mast cells. Therefore, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline could be useful in the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline is a quinoxaline derivative. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline on mast cells was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline reversibly inhibited Syk activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline could be useful for IgE-mediated allergy.

  3. 4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibits activation of Syk kinase to suppress mast cells in vitro and mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kui Lea; Ko, Na Young; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Kim, A-Ram; Her, Erk; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Hyung Sik; Moon, Eun-Yi; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Hang-Rae; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2011-01-01

    4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline is a quinoxaline derivative. We aimed to study the effects of 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline on activation of mast cells in vitro and in mice. 4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline reversibly inhibited degranulation of mast cells in a dose-dependent manner, and also suppressed the expression and secretion of TNF-α and IL-4 in mast cells. Mechanistically, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibited activating phosphorylation of Syk and LAT, which are crucial for early FcεRI-mediated signaling events, as well as Akt and MAP kinases, which play essential roles in the production of various pro-inflammatory cytokines in mast cells. Notably, although 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibited the activation of Fyn and Syk, minimal inhibition was observed in mast cells in the case of Lyn. Furthermore, consistent with its in vitro activity, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline significantly suppressed mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice. In summary, the results from this study demonstrate that 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline shows an inhibitory effect on mast cells in vitro and in vivo, and that this is mediated by inhibiting the activation of Syk in mast cells. Therefore, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline could be useful in the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. -- Highlights: ► 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline is a quinoxaline derivative. ► The effect of 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline on mast cells was investigated. ► 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline reversibly inhibited Syk activation. ► 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline could be useful for IgE-mediated allergy.

  4. Assay of mast cell mediators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Swindle, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Mediator release from activated mast cells is a major initiator of the symptomology associated with allergic disorders such as anaphylaxis and asthma. Thus, methods to monitor the generation and release of such mediators have widespread applicability in studies designed to understand the processes...... regulating mast cell activation and for the identification of therapeutic approaches to block mast cell-driven disease. In this chapter, we discuss approaches used for the determination of mast cell degranulation, lipid-derived inflammatory mediator production, and cytokine/chemokine gene expression as well...

  5. Inhibitory effect of 1,2,4,5-tetramethoxybenzene on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation through suppression of IκB kinase complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Je, In-Gyu [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyun Gyu [College of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hui-Hun; Lee, Soyoung; Choi, Jin Kyeong [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Wan; Kim, Duk-Sil [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, CHA Gumi Medical Center, CHA University, Gumi 730-040 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Taeg Kyu [Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu 704-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Tae-Yong [College of Pharmacy, Woosuk University, Jeonju 565-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Pil-Hoon [College of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Khang, Dongwoo, E-mail: dkhang@gachon.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Gachon University, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang-Hyun, E-mail: shkim72@knu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-01

    As the importance of allergic disorders such as atopic dermatitis and allergic asthma, research on potential drug candidates becomes more necessary. Mast cells play an important role as initiators of allergic responses through the release of histamine; therefore, they should be the target of pharmaceutical development for the management of allergic inflammation. In our previous study, anti-allergic effect of extracts of Amomum xanthioides was demonstrated. To further investigate improved candidates, 1,2,4,5-tetramethoxybenzene (TMB) was isolated from methanol extracts of A. xanthioides. TMB dose-dependently attenuated the degranulation of mast cells without cytotoxicity by inhibiting calcium influx. TMB decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-4 at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Increased expression of these cytokines was caused by translocation of nuclear factor-κB into the nucleus, and it was hindered by suppressing activation of IκB kinase complex. To confirm the effect of TMB in vivo, the ovalbumin (OVA)-induced active systemic anaphylaxis (ASA) and IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) models were used. In the ASA model, hypothermia was decreased by oral administration of TMB, which attenuated serum histamine, OVA-specific IgE, and IL-4 levels. Increased pigmentation of Evans blue was reduced by TMB in a dose-dependent manner in the PCA model. Our results suggest that TMB is a possible therapeutic candidate for allergic inflammatory diseases that acts through the inhibition of mast cell degranulation and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. - Highlights: • TMB reduced the degranulation of mast cells. • TMB inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. • TMB suppressed both active and passive anaphylaxis. • Anti-allergic inflammatory effects of TMB might be due to the blocking IKK complex. • TMB might be a candidate for the treatment of

  6. Mast cell mediator tryptase levels after inhalation or intravenous administration of high doses pharmaceutically prepared heroin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rook, E. J.; van Zanten, A. P.; van den Brink, W.; van Ree, J. M.; Beijnen, J. H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids like morphine and heroin induce mast cell degranulation in vitro. The release of mast cell mediators like histamine and tryptase may lead to allergic symptoms. In this study it was investigated whether mast cell mediator release also occurs in vivo in addicted patients who

  7. Inhibition of Mast Cell-Mediated Allergic Responses by Arctii Fructus Extracts and Its Main Compound Arctigenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Ji-Ye; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2017-11-01

    The Arctium lappa seeds (Arctii Fructus) and its major active compound, arctigenin (ARC), are known to have anticancer, antiobesity, antiosteoporosis, and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the effect of Arctii Fructus and ARC on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation and its associated mechanism have not been elucidated. Therefore, we attempted to investigate the antiallergic activity of Arctii Fructus and ARC on mast cells and experimental mouse models. Arctii Fructus water extract (AFW) or ethanol extract (AFE) and ARC reduced the production of histamine and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α in mast cells. AFW, AFE, and ARC inhibited phosphorylation of MAPKs and NF-κB in activated mast cells. Moreover, IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and compound 48/80-induced anaphylactic shock were suppressed by AFW, AFE, and ARC administration. These results suggest that Arctii Fructus and ARC are potential therapeutic agents against allergic inflammatory diseases.

  8. Effect of Schizonepeta tenuifolia extract on mast cell-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, T Y; Jeong, H J; Jun, S M; Chae, H J; Kim, H R; Baek, S H; Kim, H M

    1999-11-01

    We investigated the effect of an aqueous extract of Schizonepeta tenuifolia (STAE) on mast cell-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity. STAE inhibited systemic allergic reaction induced by compound 48/80 in rats dose-dependently. STAE also inhibited plasma histamine levels induced by compound 48/80. STAE inhibited local allergic reaction activated by anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE. In addition, STAE does-dependently inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC) activated by compound 48/80 or anti-DNP IgE. However, STAE had a significant enhancing effect on anti-DNP IgE-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production from RPMC. These results indicate that STAE inhibits immediate-type hypersensitivity and suggest that STAE can selectively activate the TNF-alpha production from RPMC.

  9. A 17 year experience in perioperative anaphylaxis 1998-2015: harmonising optimal detection of mast cell mediator release.

    OpenAIRE

    Egner, W.; Sargur, R.; Shrimpton, A.; York, M.; Green, K.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sheffield NARCOS (National Adverse Reactions Advisory Service) investigates suspected perioperative anaesthetic reactions using serial tryptase, urinary methylhistamine and clinical information. Further recommendations for additional allergy clinic assessment are provided. OBJECTIVE: To establish a robustly measurable protocol for identifying mast cell mediator (MMR) release in this cohort. To compare these thresholds with previous suggested thresholds and algorithms. METHOD: A re...

  10. pH-evoked dural afferent signaling is mediated by ASIC3 and is sensitized by mast cell mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jin; Wei, Xiaomei; Bischoff, Christina; Edelmayer, Rebecca M; Dussor, Gregory

    2013-09-01

    Prior studies have shown that decreased meningeal pH activates dural afferents via opening of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), suggesting one pathophysiological mechanism for the generation of headaches. The studies described here further examined the ASIC subtype mediating pH-induced dural-afferent activation and examined whether sensitization influences pH responses. Given the potential importance of meningeal mast cells to headache, the goal of this study was to evaluate dural afferent responses to pH following sensitization with mast cell mediators. Cutaneous allodynia was measured in rats following stimulation of the dura with decreased pH alone or in combination with mast cell mediators. Trigeminal ganglion neurons retrogradely labeled from the dura were stained with an ASIC3 antibody using immunohistochemistry. Current and action potentials evoked by changes in pH alone or in combination with mast cell mediators were measured in retrogradely labeled dural afferents using patch-clamp electrophysiology. pH-sensitive dural afferents generated currents in response to the ASIC3 activator 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline (GMQ), approximately 80% of these neurons express ASIC3 protein, and pH-evoked behavioral responses were inhibited by the ASIC3 blocker APETx2. Following exposure to mast cell mediators, dural afferents exhibited increased pH-evoked excitability, and cutaneous allodynia was observed at higher pH than with pH stimuli alone. These data indicate that the predominant ASIC subtype responding to decreased meningeal pH is ASIC3. Additionally, they demonstrate that in the presence of inflammation, dural afferents respond to even smaller decreases in pH providing further support for the ability of small pH changes within the meninges to initiate afferent input leading to headache. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  11. Anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin on mast cell-mediated allergic responses in ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Hong; Jia, Jihui; He, Mingqiang

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin has commonly been used for the treatment of various allergic diseases. However, its precise anti-allergic rhinitis effect and mechanism remain unknown. In the present study, the effect of curcumin on allergic responses in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic rhinitis mouse was investigated. We explored the effect of curcumin on the release of allergic inflammatory mediators, such as histamine, OVA-specific IgE, and inflammatory cytokines. Also, we found that curcumin improved rhinitis symptoms, inhibited the histopathological changes of nasal mucosa, and decreased the serum levels of histamine, OVA-specific IgE and TNF-α in OVA-induced allergic rhinitis mice. In addition, curcumin suppressed the production of inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. Moreover, curcumin significantly inhibited PMA-induced p-ERK, p-p38, p-JNK, p-Iκ-Bα and NF-κB. These findings suggest that curcumin has an anti-allergic effect through modulating mast cell-mediated allergic responses in allergic rhinitis, at least partly by inhibiting MAPK/NF-κB pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cornuside inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic response by down-regulating MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Liangchang [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Yanbian University, Yanji, 133002 (China); Jin, Guangyu [Yanbian University Hospital, Medicine College, Yanbian University, Yanji, 133000 (China); Jiang, Jingzhi [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Yanbian University, Yanji, 133002 (China); Zheng, Mingyu; Jin, Yan [College of Pharmacy, Yanbian University, Yanji, 133002 (China); Lin, Zhenhua [Department of Pathology & Cancer Research Center, Yanbian University Medical College, Yanji, 133002 (China); Li, Guangzhao [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Yanbian University, Yanji, 133002 (China); Choi, Yunho, E-mail: why76@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Anatomy, Medical School, Institute for Medical Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Yan, Guanghai, E-mail: ghyan2015@sina.com [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Yanbian University, Yanji, 133002 (China)

    2016-04-29

    Aims: The present study is to investigate the effect of cornuside on mast cell-mediated allergic response, as well as its possible mechanisms of action. Methods: To test the anti-allergic effects of cornuside in vivo, local extravasation was induced by local injection of anti-dinitrophenyl immunoglobulin E (IgE) followed by intravenous antigenic challenge in passive cutaneous anaphylaxis model rats. Mast cell viability was determined using MTT assay. Histamine content from rat peritoneal mast cells was measured by the radioenzymatic method. To investigate the mechanisms by which cornuside affects the reduction of histamine release, the levels of calcium uptake were measured. To examine whether cornuside affects the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, Western blotting and ELISA were carried out. Results: Oral administration of cornuside inhibited passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in rats. Presence of cornuside attenuated IgE-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. The inhibitory effect of cornuside on histamine release was mediated by the modulation of intracellular calcium. In addition, cornuside decreased phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated production and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6 in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of cornuside on pro-inflammatory cytokines was dependent on nuclear factor-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Conclusions: The present study provides evidence that cornuside inhibits mast cell-derived inflammatory allergic reactions by blocking histamine release and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro anti-allergic effects of cornuside suggest a possible therapeutic application of this agent in inflammatory allergic diseases.

  13. Hydrogen inhalation ameliorated mast cell mediated brain injury after ICH in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaenko, Anatol; Lekic, Tim; Ma, Qingyi; Zhang, John H.; Tang, Jiping

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hydrogen inhalation was neuroprotective in several brain injury models. Its mechanisms are believed to be related to anti-oxidative stress. We investigated the potential neurovascular protective effect of hydrogen inhalation especially effect on mast cell activation in a mouse model of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). DESIGN Controlled in vivo laboratory study. SETTING Animal research laboratory SUBJECTS 171, 8 weeks old male CD-1 mice were used. INTERVENTIONS Collagenase-induced ICH model in 8 weeks old, male, CD-1 mice was used. Hydrogen was administrated via spontaneous inhalation. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and neurological deficits were investigated at 24 and 72 hours after ICH. Mast cell activation was evaluated by Western blot and immuno-staining. The effects of hydrogen inhalation on mast cell activation were confirmed in an autologous blood injection model ICH. MEASURMENT AND MAIN RESULTS At 24 and 72 hours post-ICH, animals showed BBB disruption, brain edema, neurological deficits, accompanied with phosphorylation of Lyn kinase and release of tryptase, indicating mast cell activation. Hydrogen treatment diminished phosphorylation of Lyn kinase and release of tryptase, decreased accumulation and degranulation of mast cells, attenuated BBB disruption and improved neurobehavioral function. CONCLUSION Activation of mast cells following ICH contributed to increase of BBB permeability and brain edema. Hydrogen inhalation preserved BBB disruption by prevention of mast cell activation after ICH. PMID:23388512

  14. Strongyloides ratti: implication of mast cell-mediated expulsion through FcεRI-independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe K.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine whether FcεRI-dependent degranulation of intestinal mast cells is required for expulsion of intestinal nematode Strongyloides ratti, CD45 exon6-deficient (CD45-/- mice were inoculated with S. ratti. In CD45-/- mice, egg excretion in feces persisted for more than 30 days following S. ratti larvae inoculation, whereas in wild-type (CD45+/+ mice, the eggs completely disappeared by day 20 post-infection. The number of intestinal mucosal mast cells, which are known effector cells for the expulsion of S. ratti, was 75% lower in CD45-/- mice compared with that in CD45+/+ mice. Adoptive transfer of wild-type T cells from CD45+/+ mice into CD45-/- mice reduced the duration of S. ratti infection to comparable levels observed in CD45+/+ mice, with concomitant increases in intestinal mucosal mast cells. These results showed that CD45 is not involved in the effector function of intestinal mucosal mast cells against S. ratti infection. Since FcεRI-dependent degranulation of mast cells is completely impaired in these CD45 knockout mice, we conclude that FcεRIdependent degranulation is not required in the protective function of intestinal mucosal mast cells against primary infection of S. ratti.

  15. The Ameliorative Effect of Sophoricoside on Mast Cell-Mediated Allergic Inflammation in Vivo and in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Young Um

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sophoricoside exhibits numerous pharmacological effects, including anti- inflammatory and anti-cancer actions, yet the exact mechanism that accounts for the anti-allergic effects of sophoricoside is not completely understood. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether and how sophoricoside modulates the mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the pharmacological effects of sophoricoside on both compound 48/80 or histamine-induced scratching behaviors and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB-induced atopic dermatitis in mice. Additionally, to find a possible explanation for the anti-inflammatory effects of sophoricoside, we evaluated the effects of sophoricoside on the production of histamine and inflammatory cytokines and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and caspase-1 in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI-stimulated human mast cells (HMC-1. The finding of this study demonstrated that sophoricoside reduced compound 48/80 or histamine-induced scratching behaviors and DNCB-induced atopic dermatitis in mice. Additionally, sophoricoside inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines as well as the activation of NF-κB and caspase-1 in stimulated HMC-1. Collectively, the findings of this study provide us with novel insights into the pharmacological actions of sophoricoside as a potential molecule for use in the treatment of allergic inflammation diseases.

  16. Rosae Multiflorae Fructus Hot Water Extract Inhibits a Murine Allergic Asthma Via the Suppression of Th2 Cytokine Production and Histamine Release from Mast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chang Ho; Bui, Thi Tho; Piao, Chun Hua; Shin, Hee Soon; Shon, Dong-Hwa; Han, Eui-Hyeog; Kim, Hyoung Tae; Chai, Ok Hee

    2016-09-01

    Mast cell-mediated anaphylactic reactions are involved in many allergic diseases, including asthma and allergic rhinitis. In Korea, where it has been used as a traditional medicine, Rosae Multiflorae fructus (RMF) is known to have potent antioxidative, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities and to have no obvious acute toxicity. However, its specific effect on asthma is still unknown. In this study, we evaluated whether or not RMF hot water extracts (RMFW) could inhibit ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma and evaluated compound 48/80-induced mast cell activation to elucidate the mechanisms of asthma inhibition by RMFW. Oral administration of RMFW decreased the number of eosinophils and lymphocytes in the lungs of mice challenged by OVA and downregulated histological changes such as eosinophil infiltration, mucus accumulation, goblet cell hyperplasia, and collagen fiber deposits. In addition, RMFW significantly reduced T helper 2 cytokines, TNF-α, IL-4, and IL-6 levels in the BAL fluid of mice challenged by OVA. Moreover, RMFW suppressed compound 48/80-induced rat peritoneal mast cell degranulation and inhibited histamine release from mast cells induced by compound 48/80 in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that RMFW may act as an antiallergic agent by inhibitingTh2 cytokine production from Th2 cells and histamine release from mast cells, and could be used as a therapy for patients with Th2-mediated or mast cell-mediated allergic diseases.

  17. A 17-year experience in perioperative anaphylaxis 1998-2015: harmonizing optimal detection of mast cell mediator release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egner, W; Sargur, R; Shrimpton, A; York, M; Green, K

    2016-11-01

    Sheffield NARCOS (National Adverse Reactions Advisory Service) investigates suspected perioperative anaesthetic reactions using serial tryptase, urinary methylhistamine (UMH) and clinical information. Further recommendations for additional allergy clinic assessment are provided. To establish a robustly measurable protocol for identifying mast cell mediator (MMR) release in this cohort. To compare these thresholds with previously suggested thresholds and algorithms. A review of 3455 NARCOS cases referred with a suspected perioperative allergic reaction. Tryptase, UMH and clinical details were analysed. A total of 1746 cases were graded using the Ring and Messmer scale. Reaction grade, tryptase and UMH changes were compared with statistical and graphical presentations appropriate to non-normally distributed measurements using Analyse-IT software. Sensitive strategies such as 3 μg/L or 20% are measurable and translatable and would substantially increase detection of potentially relevant changes in tryptases. Adequate quality assurance for low-level measurement is needed. An incremental threshold of 20% would identify potential MMR in an additional 14% of cases with peak tryptase (Tp) between 5 and 14 μg/L and a further 15% with Tp below 5 μg/L. Further work is required to establish the diagnostic performance characteristics of this more sensitive approach. UMH also identified up to 120 further cases of potential MMR in the absence of tryptase increments. Future studies should establish and compare the predictive performance characteristics of each strategy against clinical phenotypes. A single agreed definition of positive serial tryptases is needed to enable robust evaluation of diagnostic strategies. This could serve as a harmonized standard for comparative studies of case series from different centres. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. An indoxyl compound 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl 1,3-diacetate, CAC-0982, suppresses activation of Fyn kinase in mast cells and IgE-mediated allergic responses in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun Ho [Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Chungju 380-701 (Korea, Republic of); College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyung [College of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyuk Soon; Kim, A-Ram [Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Chungju 380-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do-Kyun [Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Chungju 380-701 (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Allergic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Nam, Seung Taek; Kim, Hyun Woo; Park, Young Hwan; Her, Erk; Park, Yeong Min [Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Chungju 380-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Sik [College of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Mi [College of Pharmacy, Duksung Women' s University, Seoul 132-714 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Wahn Soo, E-mail: wahnchoi@kku.ac.kr [Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Chungju 380-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Mast cells, constituents of virtually all organs and tissues, are critical cells in IgE-mediated allergic responses. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of an indoxyl chromogenic compound, 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl 1,3-diacetate, CAC-0982, on IgE-mediated mast cell activation and allergic responses in mice. CAC-0982 reversibly suppressed antigen-stimulated degranulation in murine mast cells (IC{sub 50}, ~ 3.8 μM) and human mast cells (IC{sub 50}, ~ 3.0 μM). CAC-0982 also inhibited the expression and secretion of IL-4 and TNF-α in mast cells. Furthermore, CAC-0982 suppressed the mast cell-mediated allergic responses in mice in a dose-dependent manner (ED{sub 50} 27.9 mg/kg). As for the mechanism, CAC-0982 largely suppressed the phosphorylation of Syk and its downstream signaling molecules, including LAT, Akt, Erk1/2, p38, and JNK. Notably, the tyrosine kinase assay of antigen-stimulated mast cells showed that CAC-0982 inhibited Fyn kinase, one of the upstream tyrosine kinases for Syk activation in mast cells. Taken together, these results suggest that CAC-0982 may be used as a new treatment for regulating IgE-mediated allergic diseases through the inhibition of the Fyn/Syk pathway in mast cells. - Highlights: • The anti-allergic effect of 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl 1,3-diacetate, CAC-0982, was measured. • CAC-0982 reversibly suppressed the activation of mast cells by IgE and antigen. • CAC-0982 inhibited passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice. • CAC-0982 suppresses mast cells through inhibition of Fyn activation in mast cells.

  19. Immunotherapy: Shifting the Balance of Cell-Mediated Immunity and Suppression in Human Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Jo A.; Jochems, Caroline [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Gulley, James L. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Medical Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Schlom, Jeffrey, E-mail: js141c@nih.gov; Tsang, Kwong Y. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2012-12-11

    Active immunotherapy is dependent on the ability of the immune system to recognize and respond to tumors. Despite overwhelming evidence to support a cell-mediated immune response to prostate cancer, it is insufficient to eradicate the disease. This is likely due to a high level of suppression at the tumor site from a variety of sources, including immunosuppressive cells. Immune cells entering the tumor microenvironment may be inhibited directly by the tumor, stromal cells or other immune cells that have been induced to adopt a suppressive phenotype. The resurgence of interest in immunotherapy following the approval of sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab by the Food and Drug Administration has brought about new strategies for overcoming tumor-mediated suppression and bolstering anti-tumor responses. Improved understanding of the immune response to prostate cancer can lead to new combination therapies, such as the use of vaccine with small molecule and checkpoint inhibitors or other immunotherapies.

  20. Immunotherapy: Shifting the Balance of Cell-Mediated Immunity and Suppression in Human Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, Jo A.; Jochems, Caroline; Gulley, James L.; Schlom, Jeffrey; Tsang, Kwong Y.

    2012-01-01

    Active immunotherapy is dependent on the ability of the immune system to recognize and respond to tumors. Despite overwhelming evidence to support a cell-mediated immune response to prostate cancer, it is insufficient to eradicate the disease. This is likely due to a high level of suppression at the tumor site from a variety of sources, including immunosuppressive cells. Immune cells entering the tumor microenvironment may be inhibited directly by the tumor, stromal cells or other immune cells that have been induced to adopt a suppressive phenotype. The resurgence of interest in immunotherapy following the approval of sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab by the Food and Drug Administration has brought about new strategies for overcoming tumor-mediated suppression and bolstering anti-tumor responses. Improved understanding of the immune response to prostate cancer can lead to new combination therapies, such as the use of vaccine with small molecule and checkpoint inhibitors or other immunotherapies

  1. Antibacterial agent triclosan suppresses RBL-2H3 mast cell function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, Rachel K.; Hutchinson, Lee M.; Burpee, Benjamin T.; Tupper, Emily J.; Pelletier, Jonathan H.; Kormendy, Zsolt; Hopke, Alex R.; Malay, Ethan T.; Evans, Brieana L.; Velez, Alejandro; Gosse, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent, which has been shown previously to alleviate human allergic skin disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that the mechanism of this action of triclosan is, in part, due to effects on mast cell function. Mast cells play important roles in allergy, asthma, parasite defense, and carcinogenesis. In response to various stimuli, mast cells degranulate, releasing allergic mediators such as histamine. In order to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory effect of triclosan on mast cells, we monitored the level of degranulation in a mast cell model, rat basophilic leukemia cells, clone 2H3. Having functional homology to human mast cells, as well as a very well defined signaling pathway leading to degranulation, this cell line has been widely used to gain insight into mast-cell driven allergic disorders in humans. Using a fluorescent microplate assay, we determined that triclosan strongly dampened the release of granules from activated rat mast cells starting at 2 μM treatment, with dose-responsive suppression through 30 μM. These concentrations were found to be non-cytotoxic. The inhibition was found to persist when early signaling events (such as IgE receptor aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation) were bypassed by using calcium ionophore stimulation, indicating that the target for triclosan in this pathway is likely downstream of the calcium signaling event. Triclosan also strongly suppressed F-actin remodeling and cell membrane ruffling, a physiological process that accompanies degranulation. Our finding that triclosan inhibits mast cell function may explain the clinical data mentioned above and supports the use of triclosan or a mechanistically similar compound as a topical treatment for allergic skin disease, such as eczema. -- Highlights: ►The effects of triclosan on mast cell function using a murine mast cell model. ►Triclosan strongly inhibits degranulation of mast cells.

  2. Antibacterial agent triclosan suppresses RBL-2H3 mast cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, Rachel K., E-mail: rachel.palmer@maine.edu [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States); Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States); Hutchinson, Lee M.; Burpee, Benjamin T.; Tupper, Emily J.; Pelletier, Jonathan H.; Kormendy, Zsolt; Hopke, Alex R.; Malay, Ethan T.; Evans, Brieana L.; Velez, Alejandro [Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States); Gosse, Julie A., E-mail: julie.gosse@umit.maine.edu [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States); Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent, which has been shown previously to alleviate human allergic skin disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that the mechanism of this action of triclosan is, in part, due to effects on mast cell function. Mast cells play important roles in allergy, asthma, parasite defense, and carcinogenesis. In response to various stimuli, mast cells degranulate, releasing allergic mediators such as histamine. In order to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory effect of triclosan on mast cells, we monitored the level of degranulation in a mast cell model, rat basophilic leukemia cells, clone 2H3. Having functional homology to human mast cells, as well as a very well defined signaling pathway leading to degranulation, this cell line has been widely used to gain insight into mast-cell driven allergic disorders in humans. Using a fluorescent microplate assay, we determined that triclosan strongly dampened the release of granules from activated rat mast cells starting at 2 μM treatment, with dose-responsive suppression through 30 μM. These concentrations were found to be non-cytotoxic. The inhibition was found to persist when early signaling events (such as IgE receptor aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation) were bypassed by using calcium ionophore stimulation, indicating that the target for triclosan in this pathway is likely downstream of the calcium signaling event. Triclosan also strongly suppressed F-actin remodeling and cell membrane ruffling, a physiological process that accompanies degranulation. Our finding that triclosan inhibits mast cell function may explain the clinical data mentioned above and supports the use of triclosan or a mechanistically similar compound as a topical treatment for allergic skin disease, such as eczema. -- Highlights: ►The effects of triclosan on mast cell function using a murine mast cell model. ►Triclosan strongly inhibits degranulation of mast cells.

  3. Cell-mediated immune suppression effect of rocket kerosene through dermal exposure in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-xin XU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the effect of cell-mediated immune suppression effect of rocket kerosene (RK through dermal application in mice. Methods Skin delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH was used to observe the relation of the RK amount the skin exposed and the cellular immune inhibitory function. Different amount of the undiluted fuel was smeared directly onto the dorsal skin of mice. Mice in negative and positive control groups were treated with acetone. After the last exposure, all the mice except those in negative control group were allergized by evenly smearing with 1% dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB solution on their dorsum. Five days after allergy, 1% DNFB solution was smeared onto right ear of all mice to stimulate the allergic reaction. Twenty-four hours after attack, the auricle swelling, spleen index and thymus index in corresponding mice were determined. In the first series of experiments, different dosages of RK were applied once, and the ICR mice were randomly divided into negative control group, positive control group and experimental group (0.5ml/kg.BW×1, 1ml/kg.BW×1 and 2ml/kg.BW×1 group. In the second series of experiments, the certain and same dosage of RK was applied for different times, and the ICR mice were randomly divided into negative control group, positive control group and experimental group (0.5ml/kg.BW×1, 0.5mL/kg.BW×2, 0.5ml/kg.BW×3, 0.5ml/kg.BW×4 and 0.5mL/kg.BW×5 group. In the third series of experiments, the different dosages of RK were applied more than once, and the ICR mice were randomly divided into negative control group, positive control group and experimental group (0.5ml/kg.BW×5, 1ml/kg.BW×5 and 2ml/kg.BW×5 group. Lymphocyte proliferation experiment in vitrowas conducted to observe the persistent time of the cell-mediated immune suppression in mice by RK dermal exposure. The lymphocyte proliferation induced by concanavalin A (Con A was analyzed by MTT assay, and T lymphocyte subsets (CD3+, CD4+ and CD

  4. Growth suppression of Leydig TM3 cells mediated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iseki, Minoru; Ikuta, Togo; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Kawajiri, Kaname

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin induces developmental toxicity in reproductive organs. To elucidate the function of AhR, we generated stable transformants of TM3 cells overexpressing wild-type aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) or its mutants which carried mutations in nuclear localization signal or nuclear export signal. In the presence of 3-methylcholanthrene (MC), proliferation of the cells transfected with wild-type AhR was completely suppressed, whereas cells expressing AhR mutants proliferated in a manner equivalent to control TM3 cells, suggesting AhR-dependent growth inhibition. The suppression was associated with up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 Cip1 , which was abolished by pretreatment with actinomycin D. A p38 MAPK specific inhibitor, SB203580, blocked the increase of p21 Cip1 mRNA in response to MC. Treatment with indigo, another AhR ligand, failed to increase of p21 Cip1 mRNA, although up-regulation of mRNA for CYP1A1 was observed. These data suggest AhR in Leydig cells mediates growth inhibition by inducing p21 Cip1

  5. Changes in numbers and types of mast cell colony-forming cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice after injection of distilled water: evidence that mast cells suppress differentiation of bone marrow-derived precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanakura, Y.; Kuriu, A.; Waki, N.; Nakano, T.; Asai, H.; Yonezawa, T.; Kitamura, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Two different types of cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice produce mast cell colonies in methylcellulose. Large mast cell colonies are produced by bone marrow-derived precursors resembling lymphoid cells by light microscopy (L-CFU-Mast), whereas medium and small mast cell colonies are produced by morphologically identifiable mast cells (M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast, respectively). In the present study we eradicated peritoneal mast cells by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of distilled water. The regeneration process was investigated to clarify the relationship between L-CFU-Mast, M-CFU-Mast, and S-CFU-Mast. After injection of distilled water, M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast disappeared, but L-CFU-Mast increased, and then M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast appeared, suggesting the presence of a hierarchic relationship. When purified peritoneal mast cells were injected two days after the water injection, the L-CFU-Mast did not increase. In the peritoneal cavity of WBB6F1-+/+ mice that had been lethally irradiated and rescued by bone marrow cells of C57BL/6-bgJ/bgJ (beige, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice, L-CFU-Mast were of bgJ/bgJ type, but M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast were of +/+ type. The injection of distilled water to the radiation chimeras resulted in the development of bgJ/bgJ-type M-CFU-Mast and then S-CFU-Mast. The presence of mast cells appeared to suppress the recruitment of L-CFU-Mast from the bloodstream and to inhibit the differentiation of L-CFU-Mast to M-CFU-Mast

  6. Changes in numbers and types of mast cell colony-forming cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice after injection of distilled water: evidence that mast cells suppress differentiation of bone marrow-derived precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanakura, Y.; Kuriu, A.; Waki, N.; Nakano, T.; Asai, H.; Yonezawa, T.; Kitamura, Y.

    1988-03-01

    Two different types of cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice produce mast cell colonies in methylcellulose. Large mast cell colonies are produced by bone marrow-derived precursors resembling lymphoid cells by light microscopy (L-CFU-Mast), whereas medium and small mast cell colonies are produced by morphologically identifiable mast cells (M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast, respectively). In the present study we eradicated peritoneal mast cells by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of distilled water. The regeneration process was investigated to clarify the relationship between L-CFU-Mast, M-CFU-Mast, and S-CFU-Mast. After injection of distilled water, M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast disappeared, but L-CFU-Mast increased, and then M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast appeared, suggesting the presence of a hierarchic relationship. When purified peritoneal mast cells were injected two days after the water injection, the L-CFU-Mast did not increase. In the peritoneal cavity of WBB6F1-+/+ mice that had been lethally irradiated and rescued by bone marrow cells of C57BL/6-bgJ/bgJ (beige, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice, L-CFU-Mast were of bgJ/bgJ type, but M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast were of +/+ type. The injection of distilled water to the radiation chimeras resulted in the development of bgJ/bgJ-type M-CFU-Mast and then S-CFU-Mast. The presence of mast cells appeared to suppress the recruitment of L-CFU-Mast from the bloodstream and to inhibit the differentiation of L-CFU-Mast to M-CFU-Mast.

  7. Endogenous suppression of mast cell development and survival by IL-4 and IL-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speiran, Kelly; Bailey, Daniel P; Fernando, Josephine; Macey, Matthew; Barnstein, Brian; Kolawole, Motunrayo; Curley, Dana; Watowich, Stephanie S; Murray, Peter J; Oskeritzian, Carole; Ryan, John J

    2009-05-01

    Mast cell development is an important component of atopic and chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. In this study, we found that IL-4 and IL-10 were produced constitutively in cultures of developing mast cells, correlating with mast cell purity. Deletion of either gene increased mast cell numbers and Fc epsilon RI expression during culture in IL-3 + stem cell factor (SCF). By adding exogenous IL-4 and IL-10 to bone marrow (BM) cultures containing IL-3 + SCF, we found that IL-4 + IL-10 suppressed mast cell development through mechanisms not used by either cytokine alone. IL-4 + IL-10 elicited a rapid cell death coincidental with reduced Kit receptor expression and signaling and enhanced mitochondrial damage and caspase activation. IL-4 or IL-10 costimulation, unlike either cytokine alone, altered mast cell ontogeny to yield predominantly macrophages in cultures that typically produce mast cells. This effect was observed consistently with unseparated BM cells, purified mouse BM stem cells, and erythrocyte-depleted human umbilical cord blood cells. These experiments demonstrated a major role for Stat6 and Stat3, but not the Stat3-induced transcriptional repressor Ets variant gene 3. Genetic background was also a critical factor, as BALB/c-derived BM cells were completely resistant to IL-10-mediated killing and expressed lower levels of IL-10R. Collectively, these results support the theory that IL-4 and IL-10 function as endogenous regulators of mast cell progenitor development, consistent with a role in immune homeostasis. Loss of this homeostasis, perhaps via genetic polymorphism, could contribute to the etiology of mast cell-associated disease.

  8. B1 Cell IgE Impedes Mast Cell-Mediated Enhancement of Parasite Expulsion through B2 IgE Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rebecca K; Damle, Sheela R; Valentine, Yolander A; Zellner, Matthew P; James, Briana N; Lownik, Joseph C; Luker, Andrea J; Davis, Elijah H; DeMeules, Martha M; Khandjian, Laura M; Finkelman, Fred D; Urban, Joseph F; Conrad, Daniel H

    2018-02-13

    Helminth infection is known for generating large amounts of poly-specific IgE. Here we demonstrate that innate-like B1 cells are responsible for this IgE production during infection with the nematode parasites Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri. In vitro analysis of B1 cell immunoglobulin class switch recombination to IgE demonstrated a requirement for anti-CD40 and IL-4 that was further enhanced when IL-5 was added or when the B1 source was helminth infected mice. An IL-25-induced upregulation of IgE in B1 cells was also demonstrated. In T cell-reconstituted RAG1 -/- mice, N. brasiliensis clearance was enhanced with the addition of B2 cells in an IgE-dependent manner. This enhanced clearance was impeded by reconstitution with IgE sufficient B1 cells. Mucosal mast cells mediated the B2 cell enhancement of clearance in the absence of B1 cells. The data support B1 cell IgE secretion as a regulatory response exploited by the helminth. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Inhibitory effect of putranjivain A on allergic inflammation through suppression of mast cell activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hui-Hun; Park, Seung-Bin; Lee, Soyoung [CMRI, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Taeg Kyu [Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu 704-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Tae-Yong [College of Pharmacy, Woosuk University, Jeonju 565-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Pil-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Ho [College of Pharmacy, Youngnam University, Kyungsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang-Hyun, E-mail: shkim72@knu.ac.kr [CMRI, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    A great number of people are suffering from allergic inflammatory disease such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and sinusitis. Therefore discovery of drugs for the treatment of these diseases is an important subject in human health. Putranjivain A (PJA), member of ellagitannin, is known to possess beneficial effects including anti-cancer and anti-viral activities. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether PJA modulates the allergic inflammatory reaction and to study its possible mechanisms of action using mast cell-based in vitro and in vivo models. The study was performed in anaphylaxis mouse model and cultured mast cells. PJA inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in immunoglobulin E-stimulated mast cells. PJA reduced this expression by inhibiting nuclear factor (NF)-κB and nuclear factor of activated T cell. The oral administration of PJA reduced systemic and cutaneous anaphylaxis, the release of serum histamine, and the expression of the histamine H{sub 1} receptor. In addition, PJA attenuated the activation of mast cells. PJA inhibited the release of histamine from various types of mast cells by the suppression of intracellular calcium. The inhibitory activity of PJA on the allergic reaction was similar to that of disodium cromoglycate, a known anti-allergic drug. These results suggest that PJA can facilitate the prevention or treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases mediated by mast cells. - Highlights: • PJA reduced the degranulation of mast cells. • PJA inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines. • The effect of PJA on allergic reaction was comparable to the DSCG. • PJA might be a candidate for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases.

  10. ANTI-ALLERGIC EFFECTS OF 1,5-BIS(4’-HYDROXY-3’-METHOXYPHENYL-1,4-PENTADIENE-3-ONE ON MAST CELL-MEDIATED ALLERGY MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGUNG ENDRO NUGROHO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available 1,5-bis(4’-hydroxy-3’-methoxyphenyl-1,4-pentadiene-3-one is a 1,5-diphenyl-1,4-pentadiene-3-one analogue of curcumin that is produced by modifying the middle site of curcumin leading to 1,4-pentadiene-3-ones to maintain the hydroxy moiety at the aromatic rings that are responsible for its biological activities. Curcumin has been reported to have anti-allergic effects and can inhibit the release of histamine from mast cells. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-allergic effects of 1,5-bis(4’-hydroxy-3’-methoxyphenyl-1,4-pentadiene-3-one in a mast cell-mediated allergy mode in order to provide information about a newly synthesised-compound for an alternative allergy drug. The study was performed using (1 a rat basophilic leukaemia (RBL-2H3 cell line, which is a tumour analogue of mast cells, with DNP24-BSA, thapsigargin and ionomycin as inducers for secretory markers from mast cells, and (2 an active cutaneous anaphylaxis (ACA reaction, with ovalbumin as an inductor of mast cell degranulation. Treatment with 1,5-bis(4’-hydroxy-3’-methoxyphenyl-1,4-pentadiene-3-one strongly inhibited the DNP24-BSA, thapsigargin and ionomycin-mediated release of histamine and β-hexosaminidase from the RBL-2H3 cell line. The results indicated that this compound influenced the activation processes of FcεRI by antigen and intracellular Ca2+ signalling events in mast cells. In type 1 allergy model, this compound also inhibited the active cutaneous anaphylactic reaction on rat dorsal skins generated by ovalbumin. We conclude that the compound 1,5-bis(4’-hydroxy-3’-methoxyphenyl-1,4-pentadiene-3-one showed anti-allergic activities mediated by mechanisms related to intracellular signalling events in mast cells.

  11. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells mediate immune suppression in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yu, Wei-bo; Tao, Lian-yuan; Xu, Qing

    2016-01-15

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is characterized by the loss of motor and sensory functions in areas below the level of the lesion and numerous accompanying deficits. Previous studies have suggested that myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC)-induced immune depression may play a pivotal role in the course of SCI. However, the concrete mechanism of these changes regarding immune suppression remains unknown. Here, we created an SCI mouse model to gain further evidence regarding the relationship between MDSCs following SCI and T lymphocyte suppression. We showed that in the SCI mouse model, the expanding MDSCs have the capacity to suppress T cell proliferation, and this suppression could be reversed by blocking the arginase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Histamine suppresses regulatory T cells mediated by TGF-β in murine chronic allergic contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaka, Kyoko; Seike, Masahiro; Hagiwara, Tamio; Sato, Atsushi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress effector T cells and ameliorate contact hypersensitivity (CH); however, the role of Tregs in chronic allergic contact dermatitis (CACD) has not been assessed. Repeated elicitation of CH has been used to produce CACD models in mice. We previously showed that the presence of histamine facilitates the creation of eczematous lesions in this model using histidine decarboxylase (HDC) (-/-) mice. Therefore, the effects of histamine on Tregs in the CACD model were investigated in this study. CACD was developed by repeated epicutaneous application of 2, 4, 6-trinitro-1-chlorobenzene (TNCB) on HDC (+/+) and HDC (-/-) murine skin to assess the effects of histamine in CACD. Histamine aggravated CACD in the murine model and suppressed the number of Tregs in the skin. Histamine also suppressed the level of TGF-β1 in this model. Recombinant TGF-β1 or anti-TGF-β1 antibody was injected into the dorsal dermis of HDC (+/+) mice daily just before TNCB challenge to determine the effects of histamine-regulated TGF-β on the Treg population in CACD. Recombinant TGF-β1 injection promoted the infiltration of Tregs in the skin and the production of IL-10; however, anti-TGF-β1 antibody injection suppressed the number of Tregs in the skin and the production of IL-10. Histamine suppresses the number of Tregs in CACD, and this effect is mediated by TGF-β. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Mechanisms of CD8+ T cell-mediated suppression of HIV/SIV replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBrien, Julia Bergild; Kumar, Nitasha A; Silvestri, Guido

    2018-02-10

    In this article, we summarize the role of CD8 + T cells during natural and antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated HIV and SIV infections, discuss the mechanisms responsible for their suppressive activity, and review the rationale for CD8 + T cell-based HIV cure strategies. Evidence suggests that CD8 + T cells are involved in the control of virus replication during HIV and SIV infections. During early HIV infection, the cytolytic activity of CD8 + T cells is responsible for control of viremia. However, it has been proposed that CD8 + T cells also use non-cytolytic mechanisms to control SIV infection. More recently, CD8 + T cells were shown to be required to fully suppress virus production in ART-treated SIV-infected macaques, suggesting that CD8 + T cells are involved in the control of virus transcription in latently infected cells that persist under ART. A better understanding of the complex antiviral activities of CD8 + T cells during HIV/SIV infection will pave the way for immune interventions aimed at harnessing these functions to target the HIV reservoir. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Butyrate suppresses murine mast cell proliferation and cytokine production through inhibiting histone deacetylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanying; Du, Min; Yang, Qiyuan; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Beyond their nutritional impact to colonic epithelial cells, the intestinal microbiota metabolite butyrate has pleotropic effects to host cells and is known for its beneficial effects on intestinal homeostasis and metabolism. However, it remains unclear how it modulates mast cell function. Here, we demonstrate that butyrate profoundly inhibited proliferation of mouse mastocytoma P815 cells through inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, as well as decreasing c-Kit activation. In addition, butyrate increased early- and late-stage apoptotic P815 cells. In murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC), butyrate-suppressed FcεRI-dependent tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) release without affecting β-Hexosaminidase, but that was associated with decreased mitogen-activated protein kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases activation. Butyrate treatment substantially enhanced histone 3 acetylation in both P815 and BMMC and decreased FcεRI-dependent mRNA expression of tnf-α and il-6 in BMMC, mimicking the effect of Trichostatin A, a known histone deacetylase inhibitor. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that butyrate enhanced acetylation of the tnf-α and il-6 promoter regions but blocked RNA polymerase II binding to the promoters of tnf-α and il-6 genes, indicating suppressed transcription initiation. These phenotypes mimicked those of Trichostatin A treatment. In conclusion, butyrate inhibits cell proliferation and increases cell apoptosis in mastocytoma P815 cells and suppresses FcεRI-dependent cytokine production in murine primary BMMC, which are likely mediated by HDAC inhibition. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Integrin αvβ8-Mediated TGF-β Activation by Effector Regulatory T Cells Is Essential for Suppression of T-Cell-Mediated Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, John J.; Kelly, Aoife; Smedley, Catherine; Bauché, David; Campbell, Simon; Marie, Julien C.; Travis, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Regulatory T (Treg) cells play a pivotal role in suppressing self-harmful T cell responses, but how Treg cells mediate suppression to maintain immune homeostasis and limit responses during inflammation is unclear. Here we show that effector Treg cells express high amounts of the integrin αvβ8, which enables them to activate latent transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Treg-cell-specific deletion of integrin αvβ8 did not result in a spontaneous inflammatory phenotype, suggesting that this pathway is not important in Treg-cell-mediated maintenance of immune homeostasis. However, Treg cells lacking expression of integrin αvβ8 were unable to suppress pathogenic T cell responses during active inflammation. Thus, our results identify a mechanism by which Treg cells suppress exuberant immune responses, highlighting a key role for effector Treg-cell-mediated activation of latent TGF-β in suppression of self-harmful T cell responses during active inflammation. PMID:25979421

  16. Drosera rotundifolia and Drosera tokaiensis suppress the activation of HMC-1 human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kenji; Nagai, Kanji; Hoshi, Yoshikazu; Masumoto, Saeko; Mikami, Ichiho; Takahashi, Yumiko; Oike, Hideaki; Kobori, Masuko

    2009-08-17

    Several Northern Hemisphere Drosera species have been used in the therapy of respiratory tract infections as the traditional medicine Droserae Herba. To determine the anti-inflammatory effects of Drosera species and to investigate a substitute material for Droserae Herba, we examined the effect of extracts of Drosera rotundifolia, Drosera tokaiensis and Drosera spatulata on activated T cell membrane (aTc-m)-induced inflammatory gene expression in HMC-1 human mast cells. Drosera rotundifolia, Drosera spatulata and Drosera tokaiensis were collected in Japan. Herbs were extracted with 80% EtOH, and subsequently applied to OASIS HLB column. HMC-1 cells were treated with each Drosera column-adsorbed fraction for 15min, and subsequently added to aTc-m and incubated for 16h. Inflammatory gene and protein expressions were determined by DNA microarray, RT-PCR and Western blotting. Drosera rotundifolia and Drosera tokaiensis fractions, but not the Drosera spatulata fraction, suppressed inflammatory gene expression induced by aTc-m in HMC-1 cells. Drosera rotundifolia and Drosera tokaiensis suppressed activation of HMC-1 cells induced by aTc-m. Since the Drosera tokaiensis fraction was more effective than the traditionally used Drosera rotundifolia, Drosera tokaiensis is a likely substitute as a source of Droserae Herba.

  17. The suppression of IgE-mediated histamine release from mast cells following exocytic exclusion of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Kohei; Tadokoro, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Hiromitsu; Kawashima, Yoshiaki; Hirashima, Naohide

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) on the allergic response of mast cells that release inflammatory mediators such as histamine through exocytosis. Submicron-sized biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) NPs were prepared by the emulsion solvent diffusion method. Here, we examined the interactions of the mast cells with two types of PLGA NPs, unmodified NPs and NPs modified with chitosan (CS), a biodegradable cationic polymer. The cellular uptake of NPs increased by CS modification due to electrostatic interactions with the plasma membrane. NPs were taken up by mast cells through an endocytic pathway (endocytic phase) and then the cellular uptake was saturated and maintained plateau level by the exclusion of NPs through exocytosis (exocytic phase). Antigen-induced histamine release from mast cells was inhibited during the exocytic phase. The extent of histamine release inhibition was related to the amount of excluded NPs. Exocytic exclusion of NPs competitively antagonize the antigen-induced exocytotic release of histamine by highjacking exocytosis machinery such as SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins, since histamine release was recovered in mast cells that overexpress SNAP-23. The inhibitory effect of the allergic response by PLGA NPs was also evaluated in vivo using the mouse model for systemic anaphylaxis. The administration of NPs suppressed the antigen-induced systemic allergic response in vivo. In conclusion, PLGA NP itself has actions to inhibit the allergic responses mediated by mast cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis of Gallic Acid Analogs as Histamine and Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Inhibitors for Treatment of Mast Cell-Mediated Allergic Inflammation

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    Xiang Fei

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, is a natural product found in various foods and herbs that are well known as powerful antioxidants. Our previous report demonstrated that it inhibits mast cell-derived inflammatory allergic reactions by blocking histamine release and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. In this report, various amide analogs of gallic acid have been synthesized by introducing different amines through carbodiimide-mediated amide coupling and Pd/C-catalyzed hydrogenation. These compounds showed a modest to high inhibitory effect on histamine release and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Among them, the amide bearing (S-phenylglycine methyl ester 3d was found to be more active than natural gallic acid. Further optimization yielded several (S- and (R-phenylglycine analogs that inhibited histamine release in vitro. Our findings suggest that some gallamides could be used as a treatment for allergic inflammatory diseases.

  19. Membrane-bound Dickkopf-1 in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells suppresses T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis.

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    Chae, Wook-Jin; Park, Jong-Hyun; Henegariu, Octavian; Yilmaz, Saliha; Hao, Liming; Bothwell, Alfred L M

    2017-10-01

    Induction of tolerance is a key mechanism to maintain or to restore immunological homeostasis. Here we show that Foxp3 + regulatory T (Treg) cells use Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) to regulate T-cell-mediated tolerance in the T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis model. Treg cells from DKK-1 hypomorphic doubleridge mice failed to control CD4 + T-cell proliferation, resulting in CD4 T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. Thymus-derived Treg cells showed a robust expression of DKK-1 but not in naive or effector CD4 T cells. DKK-1 expression in Foxp3 + Treg cells was further increased upon T-cell receptor stimulation in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, Foxp3 + Treg cells expressed DKK-1 in the cell membrane and the functional inhibition of DKK-1 using DKK-1 monoclonal antibody abrogated the suppressor function of Foxp3 + Treg cells. DKK-1 expression was dependent on de novo protein synthesis and regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway but not by the canonical Wnt pathway. Taken together, our results highlight membrane-bound DKK-1 as a novel Treg-derived mediator to maintain immunological tolerance in T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. © 2017 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Tyrosol Suppresses Allergic Inflammation by Inhibiting the Activation of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase in Mast Cells.

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    In-Gyu Je

    Full Text Available Allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis, rhinitis, asthma, and anaphylaxis are attractive research areas. Tyrosol (2-(4-hydroxyphenylethanol is a polyphenolic compound with diverse biological activities. In this study, we investigated whether tyrosol has anti-allergic inflammatory effects. Ovalbumin-induced active systemic anaphylaxis and immunoglobulin E-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis models were used for the immediate-type allergic responses. Oral administration of tyrosol reduced the allergic symptoms of hypothermia and pigmentation in both animal models. Mast cells that secrete allergic mediators are key regulators on allergic inflammation. Tyrosol dose-dependently decreased mast cell degranulation and expression of inflammatory cytokines. Intracellular calcium levels and activation of inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK regulate cytokine expression and degranulation. Tyrosol blocked calcium influx and phosphorylation of the IKK complex. To define the molecular target for tyrosol, various signaling proteins involved in mast cell activation such as Lyn, Syk, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K, and Akt were examined. Our results showed that PI3K could be a molecular target for tyrosol in mast cells. Taken together, these findings indicated that tyrosol has anti-allergic inflammatory effects by inhibiting the degranulation of mast cells and expression of inflammatory cytokines; these effects are mediated via PI3K. Therefore, we expect tyrosol become a potential therapeutic candidate for allergic inflammatory disorders.

  1. Cigarette Smoke Suppresses the Surface Expression of c-kit and FcεRI on Mast Cells

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    M. E. Givi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a multicomponent disease characterized by emphysema and/or chronic bronchitis. COPD is mostly associated with cigarette smoking. Cigarette smoke contains over 4,700 chemical compounds, including free radicals and LPS (a Toll-Like Receptor 4 agonist at concentrations which may contribute to the pathogenesis of diseases like COPD. We have previously shown that short-term exposure to cigarette smoke medium (CSM can stimulate several inflammatory cells via TLR4 and that CSM reduces the degranulation of bone-marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs. In the current study, the effect of CSM on mast cells maturation and function was investigated. Coculturing of BMMC with CSM during the development of bone marrow progenitor cells suppressed the granularity and the surface expression of c-kit and FcεRI receptors. Stimulation with IgE/antigen resulted in decreased degranulation and release of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. The effects of CSM exposure could not be mimicked by the addition of LPS to the culture medium. In conclusion, this study shows that CSM may affect mast cell development and subsequent response to allergic activation in a TLR4-independent manner.

  2. Galectin-9 enhances cytokine secretion, but suppresses survival and degranulation, in human mast cell line.

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    Reiji Kojima

    Full Text Available Galectin-9 (Gal-9, a lectin having a β-galactoside-binding domain, can induce apoptosis of Th1 cells by binding to TIM-3. In addition, Gal-9 inhibits IgE/Ag-mediated degranulation of mast cell/basophilic cell lines by binding to IgE, thus blocking IgE/Ag complex formation. However, the role of Gal-9 in mast cell function in the absence of IgE is not fully understood. Here, we found that recombinant Gal-9 directly induced phosphorylation of Erk1/2 but not p38 MAPK in a human mast cell line, HMC-1, which does not express FcεRI. Gal-9 induced apoptosis and inhibited PMA/ionomycin-mediated degranulation of HMC-1 cells. On the other hand, Gal-9 induced cytokine and/or chemokine production by HMC-1 cells, dependent on activation of ERK1/2 but not p38 MAPK. In addition, the lectin activity of Gal-9 was required for Gal-9-mediated cytokine secretion by HMC-1 cells. These observations suggest that Gal-9 has dual properties as both a regulator and an activator of mast cells.

  3. Gamma-irradiated black ginseng extract inhibits mast cell degranulation and suppresses atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

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    Kang, Jung Ae; Song, Ha-Yeon; Byun, Eui-Hong; Ahn, Nam-Geun; Kim, Hye-Min; Nam, You Ree; Lee, Gyeong Hee; Jang, Beom-Su; Choi, Dae Seong; Lee, Dong-Eun; Byun, Eui-Baek

    2018-01-01

    Gamma irradiation is able to affect various structural modification and an increase of the biological properties of biomaterials. This study was conducted to investigate the anti-allergenic effect of γ-irradiated black ginseng extract (BGE) using in vitro and in vivo experiments. IgEantigen complex-induced degranulation was measured in RBL-2H3 mast cells. In addition, an anti-atopic dermatitis (AD) test was carried out by spreading γ-irradiated BGE on the dorsal skin of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-induced BALB/c mice. The content of arginylfructose (AF) of gamma-irradiated BGE was higher than that of BGE. In RBL-2H3 mast cells, γ-irradiated BGE treatments significantly reduced the IgE-antigen complex-induced release of β-hexosaminidase, histamine, intracellular ROS, and Ca2+ influx. A western blot analysis showed that γ-irradiated BGE had an inhibitory activity on the FcεRI-mediated signaling in mast cells. In the DNCB-induced AD model, γ-irradiated BGE significantly alleviated the ADlike skin symptoms and clinical signs. The suppression of AD by γ-irradiated BGE was accompanied by a decrease in the serum level of IgE and IL-4, as well as the number of leukocyte. Gamma-irradiated BGE also suppressed IL-4 and increased IFN-γ in splenocytes. Our data suggests that γ-irradiated BGE may be effective therapeutic agents for the treatment of AD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Suppressive Activity of Fucofuroeckol-A Derived from Brown Algal Ecklonia stolonifera Okamura on UVB-Induced Mast Cell Degranulation

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    Thanh Sang Vo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available UV light, especially UVB, is known as a trigger of allergic reaction, leading to mast cell degranulation and histamine release. In this study, phlorotannin Fucofuroeckol-A (F-A derived from brown algal Ecklonia stolonifera Okamura was evaluated for its protective capability against UVB-induced allergic reaction in RBL-2H3 mast cells. It was revealed that F-A significantly suppress mast cell degranulation via decreasing histamine release as well as intracellular Ca2+ elevation at the concentration of 50 μM. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of F-A on IL-1β and TNF-α productions was also evidenced. Notably, the protective activity of F-A against mast cell degranulation was found due to scavenging ROS production. Accordingly, F-A from brown algal E. stolonifera was suggested to be promising candidate for its protective capability against UVB-induced allergic reaction.

  5. HIV-Specific CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Viral Suppression Correlates With the Expression of CD57

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sanne S; Tingstedt, Jeanette Linnea; Larsen, Tine Kochendorf

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Virus-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses are believed to play an important role in the control of HIV-1 infection; however, what constitutes an effective HIV-1 CD8(+) T-cell response remains a topic of debate. The ex vivo viral suppressive capacity was measured of CD8(+) T cells from 44...... HIV-1-positive individuals. The phenotypic and cytokine profiles, and also the specificity of the CD8(+) T cells, were correlated with the suppression of HIV-1 replication. We also aimed to determine whether antiretroviral therapy (ART) had any positive effect on the HIV-1 suppressive CD8(+) T cells....... METHOD: Ex vivo suppression assay was used to evaluate the ability of CD8(+) T cells to suppress HIV-1 replication in autologous CD4(+) T cells. The CD107a, interferon-γ, interleukin-2, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β) responses to HIV-1 were evaluated...

  6. Mast cells and their activations

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    Dilek Bayramgürler

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells which are traditionally known as the major cells of IgE-dependent immediate hypersensitivity reactions are currently recognized to have a role as effector cells in many settings of the both innate and adaptive immunity. Mast cells secrete a wide spectrum of preformed or newly synthesized biologically active mediators with proinflammatory, anti-inflammatory and/or immunosupressive functions, in response to several stimuli. Current knowledge about mast cells and their activation, mast cell mediators, their roel s in inflammation and immune system will be discussed in thisr eview.

  7. Possible Therapeutic Application of Targeting Type II Natural Killer T Cell-Mediated Suppression of Tumor Immunity

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    Kato, Shingo; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Terabe, Masaki

    2018-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique T cell subset that exhibits characteristics from both the innate immune cells and T cells. There are at least two subsets of NKT cells, type I and type II. These two subsets of NKT cells have opposite functions in antitumor immunity. Type I NKT cells usually enhance and type II NKT cells suppress antitumor immunity. In addition, these two subsets of NKT cells cross-regulate each other. In this review, we mainly focus on immunosuppressive NKT cells, type II NKT cells. After summarizing their definition, experimental tools to study them, and subsets of them, we will discuss possible therapeutic applications of type II NKT cell pathway targeted therapies. PMID:29520281

  8. Ethanol Extract of Sanguisorbae Radix Inhibits Mast Cell Degranulation and Suppresses 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ju-Hye; Yoo, Jae-Myung; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2016-01-01

    Sanguisorbae Radix (SR) is well known as herbal medicine named "Zi-Yu" in Korea, which is the dried roots of Sanguisorba officinalis L. (Rosacease). We investigated the underlying mechanism on the inhibition of atopic dermatitis (AD) of an ethanol extract of SR (ESR) using 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene- (DNCB-) induced AD mice model. Oral administration of ESR significantly suppressed DNCB-induced AD-like symptoms such as scratching behavior, ear thickness, epidermal thickness, and IgE levels. To investigate the effects of ESR treatment on degranulation of IgE/Ag-activated mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs), we measured the release of β-hexosaminidase (β-HEX, degranulation marker). ESR decreased the infiltration of eosinophils and mast cells into the AD skin lesions. Furthermore, ESR significantly inhibited degranulation of IgE/Ag-activated BMMCs. We have demonstrated that ESR decreased AD symptoms in mice and inhibits degranulation of IgE/Ag-activated mast cells. Our study suggests that ESR may serve as a potential therapeutic candidate for the treatment of AD symptoms.

  9. Ethanol Extract of Sanguisorbae Radix Inhibits Mast Cell Degranulation and Suppresses 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Hye Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sanguisorbae Radix (SR is well known as herbal medicine named “Zi-Yu” in Korea, which is the dried roots of Sanguisorba officinalis L. (Rosacease. We investigated the underlying mechanism on the inhibition of atopic dermatitis (AD of an ethanol extract of SR (ESR using 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene- (DNCB- induced AD mice model. Oral administration of ESR significantly suppressed DNCB-induced AD-like symptoms such as scratching behavior, ear thickness, epidermal thickness, and IgE levels. To investigate the effects of ESR treatment on degranulation of IgE/Ag-activated mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs, we measured the release of β-hexosaminidase (β-HEX, degranulation marker. ESR decreased the infiltration of eosinophils and mast cells into the AD skin lesions. Furthermore, ESR significantly inhibited degranulation of IgE/Ag-activated BMMCs. We have demonstrated that ESR decreased AD symptoms in mice and inhibits degranulation of IgE/Ag-activated mast cells. Our study suggests that ESR may serve as a potential therapeutic candidate for the treatment of AD symptoms.

  10. Ethanol Inhibits High-Affinity Immunoglobulin E Receptor (FcεRI) Signaling in Mast Cells by Suppressing the Function of FcεRI-Cholesterol Signalosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draberova, Lubica; Paulenda, Tomas; Halova, Ivana; Potuckova, Lucie; Bugajev, Viktor; Bambouskova, Monika; Tumova, Magda; Draber, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol has multiple effects on biochemical events in a variety of cell types, including the high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (FcεRI) signaling in antigen-activated mast cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown. To get better understanding of the effect of ethanol on FcεRI-mediated signaling we examined the effect of short-term treatment with non-toxic concentrations of ethanol on FcεRI signaling events in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells. We found that 15 min exposure to ethanol inhibited antigen-induced degranulation, calcium mobilization, expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-13), and formation of reactive oxygen species in a dose-dependent manner. Removal of cellular cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin had a similar effect and potentiated some of the inhibitory effects of ethanol. In contrast, exposure of the cells to cholesterol-saturated methyl-β-cyclodextrin abolished in part the inhibitory effect of ethanol on calcium response and production of reactive oxygen species, supporting lipid-centric theories of ethanol action on the earliest stages of mast cell signaling. Further studies showed that exposure to ethanol and/or removal of cholesterol inhibited early FcεRI activation events, including tyrosine phosphorylation of the FcεRI β and γ subunits, SYK kinases, LAT adaptor protein, phospholipase Cγ, STAT5, and AKT and internalization of aggregated FcεRI. Interestingly, ethanol alone, and particularly in combination with methyl-β-cyclodextrin, enhanced phosphorylation of negative regulatory tyrosine 507 of LYN kinase. Finally, we found that ethanol reduced passive cutaneous anaphylactic reaction in mice, suggesting that ethanol also inhibits FcεRI signaling under in vivo conditions. The combined data indicate that ethanol interferes with early antigen-induced signaling events in mast cells by suppressing the function of Fc

  11. The interleukin-15 system suppresses T cell-mediated autoimmunity by regulating negative selection and nT(H)17 cell homeostasis in the thymus.

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    Hou, Mau-Sheng; Huang, Shih-Ting; Tsai, Ming-Han; Yen, Ching-Cheng; Lai, Yein-Gei; Liou, Yae-Huei; Lin, Chih-Kung; Liao, Nan-Shih

    2015-01-01

    The interleukin-15 (IL-15) system is important for regulating both innate and adaptive immune responses, however, its role in autoimmune disease remained unclear. Here we found that Il15(-/-) and Il15ra(-/-) mice spontaneously developed late-onset autoimmune phenotypes. CD4(+) T cells of the knockout mice showed elevated autoreactivity as demonstrated by the induction of lymphocyte infiltration in the lacrimal and salivary glands when transferred into nude mice. The antigen-presenting cells in the thymic medullary regions expressed IL-15 and IL-15Rα, whose deficiency resulted in insufficient negative selection and elevated number of natural IL-17A-producing CD4(+) thymocytes. These findings reveal previously unknown functions of the IL-15 system in thymocyte development, and thus a new layer of regulation in T cell-mediated autoimmunity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cyclophosphamide chemotherapy sensitizes tumor cells to TRAIL-dependent CD8 T cell-mediated immune attack resulting in suppression of tumor growth.

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    Robbert G van der Most

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anti-cancer chemotherapy can be simultaneously lymphodepleting and immunostimulatory. Pre-clinical models clearly demonstrate that chemotherapy can synergize with immunotherapy, raising the question how the immune system can be mobilized to generate anti-tumor immune responses in the context of chemotherapy. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used a mouse model of malignant mesothelioma, AB1-HA, to investigate T cell-dependent tumor resolution after chemotherapy. Established AB1-HA tumors were cured by a single dose of cyclophosphamide in a CD8 T cell- and NK cell-dependent manner. This treatment was associated with an IFN-alpha/beta response and a profound negative impact on the anti-tumor and total CD8 T cell responses. Despite this negative effect, CD8 T cells were essential for curative responses. The important effector molecules used by the anti-tumor immune response included IFN-gamma and TRAIL. The importance of TRAIL was supported by experiments in nude mice where the lack of functional T cells could be compensated by agonistic anti-TRAIL-receptor (DR5 antibodies. CONCLUSION: The data support a model in which chemotherapy sensitizes tumor cells for T cell-, and possibly NK cell-, mediated apoptosis. A key role of tumor cell sensitization to immune attack is supported by the role of TRAIL in tumor resolution and explains the paradox of successful CD8 T cell-dependent anti-tumor responses in the absence of CD8 T cell expansion.

  13. Ability of Interleukin-33- and Immune Complex-Triggered Activation of Human Mast Cells to Down-Regulate Monocyte-Mediated Immune Responses.

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    Rivellese, Felice; Suurmond, Jolien; Habets, Kim; Dorjée, Annemarie L; Ramamoorthi, Nandhini; Townsend, Michael J; de Paulis, Amato; Marone, Gianni; Huizinga, Tom W J; Pitzalis, Costantino; Toes, René E M

    2015-09-01

    Mast cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In particular, their activation by interleukin-33 (IL-33) has been linked to the development of arthritis in animal models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional responses of human mast cells to IL-33 in the context of RA. Human mast cells were stimulated with IL-33 combined with plate-bound IgG or IgG anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs), and their effects on monocyte activation were evaluated. Cellular interactions of mast cells in RA synovium were assessed by immunofluorescence analysis, and the expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) for mast cell-specific genes was evaluated in synovial biopsy tissue from patients with early RA who were naive to treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. IL-33 induced the up-regulation of Fcγ receptor type IIa and enhanced the activation of mast cells by IgG, including IgG ACPAs, as indicated by the production of CXCL8/IL-8. Intriguingly, mast cell activation triggered with IL-33 and IgG led to the release of mediators such as histamine and IL-10, which inhibited monocyte activation. Synovial mast cells were found in contact with CD14+ monocyte/macrophages. Finally, mRNA levels of mast cell-specific genes were inversely associated with disease severity, and IL-33 mRNA levels showed an inverse correlation with the levels of proinflammatory markers. When human mast cells are activated by IL-33, an immunomodulatory phenotype develops, with human mast cells gaining the ability to suppress monocyte activation via the release of IL-10 and histamine. These findings, together with the presence of synovial mast cell-monocyte interactions and the inverse association between the expression of mast cell genes at the synovial level and disease activity, suggest that these newly described mast cell-mediated inhibitory pathways might have a functional relevance in the pathogenesis of RA. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  14. An Interleukin-33-Mast Cell-Interleukin-2 Axis Suppresses Papain-Induced Allergic Inflammation by Promoting Regulatory T Cell Numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Hideaki; Arae, Ken; Unno, Hirotoshi; Miyauchi, Kousuke; Toyama, Sumika; Nambu, Aya; Oboki, Keisuke; Ohno, Tatsukuni; Motomura, Kenichiro; Matsuda, Akira; Yamaguchi, Sachiko; Narushima, Seiko; Kajiwara, Naoki; Iikura, Motoyasu; Suto, Hajime; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Takahashi, Takao; Karasuyama, Hajime; Okumura, Ko; Azuma, Miyuki; Moro, Kazuyo; Akdis, Cezmi A; Galli, Stephen J; Koyasu, Shigeo; Kubo, Masato; Sudo, Katsuko; Saito, Hirohisa; Matsumoto, Kenji; Nakae, Susumu

    2015-07-21

    House dust mite-derived proteases contribute to allergic disorders in part by disrupting epithelial barrier function. Interleukin-33 (IL-33), produced by lung cells after exposure to protease allergens, can induce innate-type airway eosinophilia by activating natural helper (NH) cells, a member of group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2), to secrete Th2 type-cytokines. Because IL-33 also can induce mast cells (MCs) to secrete Th2 type-cytokines, MCs are thought to cooperate with NH cells in enhancing protease or IL-33-mediated innate-type airway eosinophilia. However, we found that MC-deficient Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice exhibited exacerbated protease-induced lung inflammation associated with reduced numbers of regulatory T (Treg) cells. Moreover, IL-2 produced by IL-33-stimulated MCs promoted expansion of numbers of Treg cells, thereby suppressing development of papain- or IL-33-induced airway eosinophilia. We have thus identified a unique anti-inflammatory pathway that can limit induction of innate-type allergic airway inflammation mediated by NH cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Houttuynia cordata Thunb inhibits the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines through inhibition of the NFκB signaling pathway in HMC-1 human mast cells.

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    Lee, Hee Joe; Seo, Hye-Sook; Kim, Gyung-Jun; Jeon, Chan Yong; Park, Jong Hyeong; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Park, Sun-Ju; Shin, Yong-Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2013-09-01

    Houttuynia cordata Thunb (HCT) is widely used in oriental medicine as a remedy for inflammation. However, at present there is no explanation for the mechanism by which HCT affects the production of inflammatory cytokines. The current study aimed to determine the effect of an essence extracted from HCT on mast cell-mediated inflammatory responses. Inflammatory cytokine production induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) plus a calcium ionophore, A23187, was measured in the human mast cell line, HMC-1, incubated with various concentrations of HCT. TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 secreted protein levels were measured using an ELISA assay. TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA levels were measured using RT-PCR analysis. Nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins were examined by western blot analysis. The NF-κB promoter activity was examined by luciferase assay. It was observed that HCT inhibited PMA plus A23187-induced TNF-α and IL-6 secretion and reduced the mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8. It was also noted that HCT suppressed the induction of NF-κB activity, inhibited nuclear translocation of NF-κB and blocked the phosphorylation of IκBα in stimulated HMC-1 cells. It was concluded that HCT is an inhibitor of NF-κB and cytokines blocking mast cell-mediated inflammatory responses. These results indicate that HCT may be used for the treatment of mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory diseases.

  16. Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells delay expulsion of intestinal nematodes by suppression of IL-9-driven mast cell activation in BALB/c but not in C57BL/6 mice.

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    Birte Blankenhaus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that IL-9-mediated immunity plays a fundamental role in control of intestinal nematode infection. Here we report a different impact of Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells (Treg in nematode-induced evasion of IL-9-mediated immunity in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Infection with Strongyloides ratti induced Treg expansion with similar kinetics and phenotype in both strains. Strikingly, Treg depletion reduced parasite burden selectively in BALB/c but not in C57BL/6 mice. Treg function was apparent in both strains as Treg depletion increased nematode-specific humoral and cellular Th2 response in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice to the same extent. Improved resistance in Treg-depleted BALB/c mice was accompanied by increased production of IL-9 and accelerated degranulation of mast cells. In contrast, IL-9 production was not significantly elevated and kinetics of mast cell degranulation were unaffected by Treg depletion in C57BL/6 mice. By in vivo neutralization, we demonstrate that increased IL-9 production during the first days of infection caused accelerated mast cell degranulation and rapid expulsion of S. ratti adults from the small intestine of Treg-depleted BALB/c mice. In genetically mast cell-deficient (Cpa3-Cre BALB/c mice, Treg depletion still resulted in increased IL-9 production but resistance to S. ratti infection was lost, suggesting that IL-9-driven mast cell activation mediated accelerated expulsion of S. ratti in Treg-depleted BALB/c mice. This IL-9-driven mast cell degranulation is a central mechanism of S. ratti expulsion in both, BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, because IL-9 injection reduced and IL-9 neutralization increased parasite burden in the presence of Treg in both strains. Therefore our results suggest that Foxp3⁺ Treg suppress sufficient IL-9 production for subsequent mast cell degranulation during S. ratti infection in a non-redundant manner in BALB/c mice, whereas additional regulatory pathways are functional in

  17. Andrographolide suppresses thymic stromal lymphopoietin in phorbol myristate acetate/calcium ionophore A23187-activated mast cells and 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like mice model

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    Li CX

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chun-xiao Li,* Hua-guo Li,* Hui Zhang,* Ru-hong Cheng, Ming Li, Jian-ying Liang, Yan Gu, Bo Ling, Zhi-rong Yao, Hong Yu Department of Dermatology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD is one of the most common inflammatory cutaneous diseases. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP has been demonstrated to be an important immunologic factor in the pathogenesis of AD. The production of TSLP can be induced by a high level of intracellular calcium concentration and activation of the receptor-interacting protein 2/caspase-1/NF-κB pathway. Andrographolide (ANDRO, a natural bicyclic diterpenoid lactone, has been found to exert anti-inflammatory effects in gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders through suppressing the NF-κB pathway. Objective: To explore the effect of ANDRO on the production of TSLP in human mast cells and AD mice model. Methods: We utilized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence staining assay to investigate the effects of ANDRO on AD. Results: ANDRO ameliorated the increase in the intracellular calcium, protein, and messenger RNA levels of TSLP induced by phorbol myristate acetate/calcium ionophore A23187, through the blocking of the receptor-interacting protein 2/caspase-1/NF-κB pathway in human mast cell line 1 cells. ANDRO, via oral or local administration, also attenuated clinical symptoms in 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced AD mice model and suppressed the levels of TSLP in lesional skin. Conclusion: Taken together, ANDRO may be a potential therapeutic agent for AD through suppressing the expression of TSLP. Keywords: atopic dermatitis, thymic stromal lymphopoietin, andrographolide, human mast cell

  18. Possible neuroimmunomodulation therapy in T-cell-mediated oral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Sato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and oral lichen planus are local chronic inflammatory diseases which are implicated in T cell-mediated immunity. According to the systematic review, there is insufficient evidence to support any specific treatment for T-cell mediated oral diseases. The hypothesis: In this paper, we propose a hypothesis that recurrent aphthous stomatitis and oral lichen planus can be treated with selective α7 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 -nAChR agonists. Our hypothesis is supported by the following two facts. First, the pathophysiological conditions, T h 1/T h 17 cell activation and autonomic nervous system dysfunction, are observed in T-cell mediated oral diseases as well as in T-cell mediated systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Second, the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is inhibited in systemic T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory diseases. On the other hand, treatment with α7 -nAChR agonists which activate the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway suppresses neuroinflammation via inhibition of T h 1/T h 17 responses in animal model of systemic T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory diseases. We thus expect that selective α7 -nAChR agonists will be effective for the treatment of T-cell mediated oral diseases. Evaluation of the hypothesis: To test our hypothesis, we need to develop in vivo mouse model of T-cell mediated oral diseases. To evaluate the therapeutic effect of a selective α7 -nAChR agonist, we choose ABT-107 because of its safety and tolerability. We believe that the selective α7 -nAChR agonist, especially ABT-107, may be a therapeutic drug to treat T-cell mediated oral diseases.

  19. Diospyros lotus leaf and grapefruit stem extract synergistically ameliorate atopic dermatitis-like skin lesion in mice by suppressing infiltration of mast cells in skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byoung Ok; Che, Denis Nchang; Yin, Hong Hua; Shin, Jae Young; Jang, Seon Il

    2017-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis, a chronic relapsing and pruritic inflammation of the skin also thought to be involved in, or caused by immune system destruction is an upsetting health problem due to its continuously increasing incidence especially in developed countries. Mast cell infiltration in atopic dermatitis skin lesions and its IgE-mediated activation releases various cytokines and chemokines that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. This study was aimed at investigating synergistic anti-inflammatory, anti-pruritic and anti-atopic dermatitis effects of Diospyros lotus leaf extract (DLE) and Muscat bailey A grapefruit stem extract (GFSE) in atopic dermatitis-like induced skin lesions in mice. Combinations of DLE and GFSE inhibited TNF-α and IL-6 production more than DLE or GFSE in PMA plus calcium ionophore A23187-activated HMC-1 cells. DLE and GFSE synergistically inhibited compound 48/80-induced dermal infiltration of mast cells and reduced scratching behavior than DLE or GFSE. Furthermore, DLE and GFSE synergistically showed a stronger ameliorative effect in skin lesions by reducing clinical scores; dermal infiltration of mast cells; ear and dorsal skin thickness; serum IgE and IL-4 production in atopic dermatitis-like mice. Collectively, these results suggest that DLE and GFSE synergistically exhibit anti-atopic dermatitis effects in atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. Cell-mediated non-allergic rhinitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli Del Giudice, Alessandro; Barbara, Michele; Russo, Giuseppe Maria; Fiocca Matthews, Emily; Cassano, Michele

    2012-12-01

    Non-allergic rhinitis is a heterogeneous disease whose etiology is largely unknown. Nasal cytology only allows us to recognize different non-allergic rhinitis forms on the basis of the prevalent inflammatory cell infiltrate: non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophils, with neutrophils, with mast-cells and with both eosinophils and mast-cells. The aim of this study is to define the incidence, clinical features and comorbidity of the different types of cell-mediated non-allergic rhinitis in a pediatric age group. One hundred and fourteen non-allergic children with chronic nasal obstruction and associated symptoms (rhinorrhea, sneezing and nasal itchiness) were retrospectively selected. All patients had been submitted to a clinical history, pediatric evaluation, anterior rhinoscopy and fiberendoscopy, rhinomanometry and nasal cytology. Non-allergic rhinitis with neutrophils was present in 46 (40.4%) children, non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophils in 53 (46.5%), non-allergic rhinitis with mast-cells in 12 (10.5%) and non-allergic rhinitis with both eosinophils and mast-cells in 3 (2.6%). Nasal obstruction was prevalent in non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophils and in non-allergic rhinitis with mast-cells patients (Pallergic rhinitis with eosinophils group showed a higher probability of asthma (Ppediatric age group the most frequent forms of non-allergic rhinitis are those with eosinophils or with neutrophils. A diagnosis of non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophils in children presumes more severe symptoms and a higher incidence of pulmonary disease and roncopathy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mast Cells: A Pivotal Role in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerappan, Arul; O'Connor, Nathan J.; Brazin, Jacqueline; Reid, Alicia C.; Jung, Albert; McGee, David; Summers, Barbara; Branch-Elliman, Dascher; Stiles, Brendon; Worgall, Stefan; Kaner, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by an inflammatory response that includes macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and mast cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether mast cells play a role in initiating pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced with bleomycin in mast-cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv (MCD) mice and their congenic controls (WBB6F1-+/+). Mast cell deficiency protected against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, but protection was reversed with the re-introduction of mast cells to the lungs of MCD mice. Two mast cell mediators were identified as fibrogenic: histamine and renin, via angiotensin (ANG II). Both human and rat lung fibroblasts express the histamine H1 and ANG II AT1 receptor subtypes and when activated, they promote proliferation, transforming growth factor β1 secretion, and collagen synthesis. Mast cells appear to be critical to pulmonary fibrosis. Therapeutic blockade of mast cell degranulation and/or histamine and ANG II receptors should attenuate pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:23570576

  2. 2. Cell-mediatedImmunity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    Cell-mediated Immunity sma hmed', Banishree Saha', nand Patwardhan°,. Shwetha Shivaprasad and Dipankar Nandis. Our immune system, by and large, does a fine job in protect- ing us from opportunistic and infectious microbes, potential carcinogens and allergens. It is therefore crucial to under- stand the organization ...

  3. Study of mast cell count in skin tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaher Hesham

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Skin tags or acrochordons are common tumors of middle-aged and elderly subjects. They consist of loose fibrous tissue and occur mainly on the neck and major flexures as small, soft, pedunculated protrusions. Objectives: The aim was to compare the mast cells count in skin tags to adjacent normal skin in diabetic and nondiabetic participants in an attempt to elucidate the possible role of mast cells in the pathogenesis of skin tags. Participants and Methods: Thirty participants with skin tags were divided into group I (15 nondiabetic participants and group II (15 diabetic participants. Three biopsies were obtained from each participant: a large skin tag, a small skin tag and adjacent normal skin. Mast cell count from all the obtained sections was carried out, and the mast cell density was expressed as the average mast cell count/high power field (HPF. Results: A statistically significant increase in mast cells count in skin tags in comparison to normal skin was detected in group I and group II. There was no statistically significant difference between mast cell counts in skin tags of both the groups. Conclusion: Both the mast cell mediators and hyperinsulinemia are capable of inducing fibroblast proliferation and epidermal hyperplasia that are the main pathologic abnormalities seen in all types of skin tags. However, the presence of mast cells in all examined skin tags regardless of diabetes and obesity may point to the possible crucial role of mast cells in the etiogenesis of skin tags through its interaction with fibroblasts and keratinocytes.

  4. Mast Wake Reduction by Shaping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beauchamp, Charles H

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to various mast shapes, in which the mast shapes minimize the production of visible, electro-optic, infrared and radar cross section wake signatures produced by water surface piercing masts...

  5. Sophora flavescens Aiton inhibits the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines through inhibition of the NF kappaB/IkappaB signal pathway in human mast cell line (HMC-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Myung Hee; Lee, Ji Young; Jung, Hee; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Go, Ho Yeon; Kim, Ji Hye; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Shin, Yong-Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2009-03-01

    The dried roots of Sophora flavescens Aiton (SFA) has been used in traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, diarrhea, and asthma. In the present study, we investigated the effect of SFA on the inflammatory allergic reaction using human mast cell-1 (HMC-1). SFA (200mg/kg) inhibited the mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction in vivo and the release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells by compound 48/80. In addition, the expression levels of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-8 were also decreased by SFA treatment. In molecular mechanism level, this study showed that SFA inhibited the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF) kappaB through inhibition of the phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaB-alpha, which is an inhibitor of NF kappaB. Moreover, SFA suppressed PMA plus A23187-induced phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 and c-jun N-terminal kinase. The inhibited induction of NF kappaB promoter by SFA was determined using luciferase activity. These results suggest that SFA could be used as a treatment for mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory diseases.

  6. Mast cell-derived histamine mediates cystitis pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles N Rudick

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells trigger inflammation that is associated with local pain, but the mechanisms mediating pain are unclear. Interstitial cystitis (IC is a bladder disease that causes debilitating pelvic pain of unknown origin and without consistent inflammation, but IC symptoms correlate with elevated bladder lamina propria mast cell counts. We hypothesized that mast cells mediate pelvic pain directly and examined pain behavior using a murine model that recapitulates key aspects of IC.Infection of mice with pseudorabies virus (PRV induces a neurogenic cystitis associated with lamina propria mast cell accumulation dependent upon tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF, TNF-mediated bladder barrier dysfunction, and pelvic pain behavior, but the molecular basis for pelvic pain is unknown. In this study, both PRV-induced pelvic pain and bladder pathophysiology were abrogated in mast cell-deficient mice but were restored by reconstitution with wild type bone marrow. Pelvic pain developed normally in TNF- and TNF receptor-deficient mice, while bladder pathophysiology was abrogated. Conversely, genetic or pharmacologic disruption of histamine receptor H1R or H2R attenuated pelvic pain without altering pathophysiology.These data demonstrate that mast cells promote cystitis pain and bladder pathophysiology through the separable actions of histamine and TNF, respectively. Therefore, pain is independent of pathology and inflammation, and histamine receptors represent direct therapeutic targets for pain in IC and other chronic pain conditions.

  7. The Mast Cell, Contact, and Coagulation System Connection in Anaphylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Guilarte

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaphylaxis is the most severe form of allergic reaction, resulting from the effect of mediators and chemotactic substances released by activated cells. Mast cells and basophils are considered key players in IgE-mediated human anaphylaxis. Beyond IgE-mediated activation of mast cells/basophils, further mechanisms are involved in the occurrence of anaphylaxis. New insights into the potential relevance of pathways other than mast cell and basophil degranulation have been unraveled, such as the activation of the contact and the coagulation systems. Mast cell heparin released upon activation provides negatively charged surfaces for factor XII (FXII binding and auto-activation. Activated FXII, the initiating serine protease in both the contact and the intrinsic coagulation system, activates factor XI and prekallikrein, respectively. FXII-mediated bradykinin (BK formation has been proven in the human plasma of anaphylactic patients as well as in experimental models of anaphylaxis. Moreover, the severity of anaphylaxis is correlated with the increase in plasma heparin, BK formation and the intensity of contact system activation. FXII also activates plasminogen in the fibrinolysis system. Mast cell tryptase has been shown to participate in fibrinolysis through plasmin activation and by facilitating the degradation of fibrinogen. Some usual clinical manifestations in anaphylaxis, such as angioedema or hypotension, or other less common, such as metrorrhagia, may be explained by the direct effect of the activation of the coagulation and contact system driven by mast cell mediators.

  8. First results from MAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sykes, A.; Akers, R.J.; Appel, L.C.

    2001-01-01

    MAST is one of the new generation of large, purpose-built spherical tokamaks (STs) now becoming operational, designed to investigate the properties of the ST in large, collisionless plasmas. The first six months of MAST operations have been remarkably successful. Operationally, both merging-compr...

  9. Mast Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2014-01-01

    Since first described by Paul Ehrlich in 1878, mast cells have been mostly viewed as effectors of allergy. It has been only in the past two decades that mast cells have gained recognition for their involvement in other physiological and pathological processes. Mast cells have a widespread distribution and are found predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment. Mast cell maturation, phenotype and function are a direct consequence of the local microenvironment and have a marked influence on their ability to specifically recognize and respond to various stimuli through the release of an array of biologically active mediators. These features enable mast cells to act as both first responders in harmful situations as well as to respond to changes in their environment by communicating with a variety of other cells implicated in physiological and immunological responses. Therefore, the critical role of mast cells in both innate and adaptive immunity, including immune tolerance, has gained increased prominence. Conversely, mast cell dysfunction has pointed to these cells as the main offenders in several chronic allergic/inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the current knowledge of mast cell function in both normal and pathological conditions with regards to their regulation, phenotype and role. PMID:25062998

  10. Mast cell activation disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    Blood basophils also participate in allergic and other inflammatory reactions in the same way as mast cells.4. The capacity of mast cells and basophil to release mediators of anaphylaxis in response to cell activation, also termed releasability, depends on a number of different factors, including the primary underlying disease ...

  11. Mast cell and histamine content of human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, R M; Godfrey, R C; Holgate, S T

    1985-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in 97 patients including control patients with bronchial carcinoma (24) and patients with sarcoidosis (20), cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis (9), and asthma (4), and others. Cytocentrifuged slides were stained by two methods: May-Grünwald Giemsa and toluidine blue. In the last 32 subjects the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was separated into supernatant and cell pellet for the subsequent assay of the performed mast cell mediator, histamine. Comparison of the two methods of staining showed a bias towards toluidine blue. Controls had a differential mean (SE) mast cell count of 0.07% (0.01%). Higher counts were noted in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis--0.61% (0.15%) (p less than 0.001)--and in sarcoidosis--0.14% (0.02%) (p less than 0.05). There was a strong correlation between absolute mast cell counts and cell lysate histamine concentration (r = 0.78, p less than 0.001). Less strong, significant, correlations between supernatant histamine concentration and absolute mast cell counts (r = 0.48, p less than 0.01) or cell lysate histamine concentration (r = 0.72, p less than 0.01) were also found. Derived mean values of histamine per mast cell ranged from 3.7 to 10.9 picograms. The mean histamine content of lavage fluid supernatant as a percentage of the total lavage fluid histamine was 24.9% (3.3%). The possible clinical significance of these findings is discussed. Images PMID:4060097

  12. Mouse mannose-binding lectin-A and ficolin-A inhibit lipopolysaccharide-mediated pro-inflammatory responses on mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Kang, Hee Jung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2013-01-01

    It is unknown how soluble pattern-recognition receptors in blood, such as mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins, modulate mast cell-mediated inflammatory responses. We investigate how mouse MBL-A or ficolin-A regulate mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (mBMMCs)-derived inflammatory response...... cytokine production by LPS-mediated TLR4 in mBMMCs appears to be down-regulated, indicating that mouse MBL and ficolin may have an inhibitory function toward mouse TLR4-mediated excessive inflammation on the mast cells.......It is unknown how soluble pattern-recognition receptors in blood, such as mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins, modulate mast cell-mediated inflammatory responses. We investigate how mouse MBL-A or ficolin-A regulate mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (mBMMCs)-derived inflammatory response...

  13. Mast cells & Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike eJönsson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Classically, allergy depends on IgE antibodies and on high-affinity IgE receptors expressed by mast cells and basophils. This long accepted IgE/FcεRI/mast cell paradigm, on which the definition of immediate hypersensitivity was based in the Gell and Coomb’s classification, appears too reductionist. Recently accumulated evidence indeed requires that not only IgE but also IgG antibodies, that not only FcεRI but also FcγR of the different types, that not only mast cells and basophils but also neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, eosinophils, and other myeloid cells by considered as important players in allergy. This view markedly changes our understanding of allergic diseases and, possibly, their treatment.

  14. Mast cells, glia and neuroinflammation: partners in crime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaper, Stephen D; Facci, Laura; Giusti, Pietro

    2014-03-01

    Glia and microglia in particular elaborate pro-inflammatory molecules that play key roles in central nervous system (CNS) disorders from neuropathic pain and epilepsy to neurodegenerative diseases. Microglia respond also to pro-inflammatory signals released from other non-neuronal cells, mainly those of immune origin such as mast cells. The latter are found in most tissues, are CNS resident, and traverse the blood-spinal cord and blood-brain barriers when barrier compromise results from CNS pathology. Growing evidence of mast cell-glia communication opens new perspectives for the development of therapies targeting neuroinflammation by differentially modulating activation of non-neuronal cells that normally control neuronal sensitization - both peripherally and centrally. Mast cells and glia possess endogenous homeostatic mechanisms/molecules that can be up-regulated as a result of tissue damage or stimulation of inflammatory responses. Such molecules include the N-acylethanolamine family. One such member, N-palmitoylethanolamine is proposed to have a key role in maintenance of cellular homeostasis in the face of external stressors provoking, for example, inflammation. N-Palmitoylethanolamine has proven efficacious in mast-cell-mediated experimental models of acute and neurogenic inflammation. This review will provide an overview of recent progress relating to the pathobiology of neuroinflammation, the role of microglia, neuroimmune interactions involving mast cells and the possibility that mast cell-microglia cross-talk contributes to the exacerbation of acute symptoms of chronic neurodegenerative disease and accelerates disease progression, as well as promoting pain transmission pathways. We will conclude by considering the therapeutic potential of treating systemic inflammation or blockade of signalling pathways from the periphery to the brain in such settings. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The MAST improved divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darke, A.C.; Hayward, R.J.; Counsell, G.F.; Hawkins, K.

    2005-01-01

    The Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) at Culham is one of the leading world machines studying the spherical tokamak (ST) concept. At the time of the initial construction in 1998 little was known about the sort of divertor structures that would be required in an ST. The machine was therefore provided with relatively rudimentary structures that were designed mostly to protect important components from the hot plasma. While these have served the machine well it was accepted that they might not be suitable when operating MAST to its full potential. The years of experience of operating MAST have led to the design, manufacture and now installation of a new divertor, the MAST improved divertor (MID), that should be able to cope with the full performance of the machine. The design is based on imbricated (fan-shaped) disks of tiles at the top and bottom of the machine for the outer strike points, giving an excellent compromise between power handling and diagnostic access, with substantial new centre column strike point armour and a shaped plate in between. High purity graphite is chosen as the plasma facing material in preference to CFC since in this case it has a better balance of performance and cost. The lower imbricated disk is insulated in alternate sectors for studies of divertor biasing and extensive diagnostics and additional inboard gas injection are included

  16. Overview of MAST results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chapman, I.T.; Adámek, Jiří; Akers, R.J.; Allan, S.; Appel, L.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Ben Ayed, N.; Bigelow, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradley, J.; Brünner, J.; Cahyna, Pavel; Carr, M.; Caughman, J.; Cecconelo, M.; Challis, C.; Chapman, S.; Chorley, J.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N.; Cooper, W.A.; Cox, M.; Crocker, N.; Crowley, B.J.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darrow, D.; Dendy, R.; Diallo, A.; Dickinson, D.; Diem, S.; Dorland, W.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Field, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fox, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y.C.; Gibson, K.; Graves, J.; Gurl, C.; Guttenfelder, W.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Havlickova, E.; Hawke, J.; Hawkes, N.; Hender, T.; Henderson, S.; Highcock, E.; Hillesheim, J.; Hnat, B.; Holgate, J.; Horáček, Jan; Howard, J.; Huang, B.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaye, S.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Klimek, I.; Kocan, M.; Leggate, H.; Lilley, M.; Lipschutz, B.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y.Q.; Lloyd, B.; Lomanowski, B.; Lupelli, I.; Maddison, G.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G.; McClements, K.; McMillan, B.; Meakins, A.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Milnes, J.; Morris, A.W.; Motojima, G.; Muir, D.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A.; O’Brien, M.; O’Gorman, T.; Ono, Y.; Oliver, H.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Parra, F.; Patel, A.; Peebles, W.; Peng, M.; Perez, R.; Pinches, S.; Piron, L.; Podesta, M.; Price, M.; Reinke, M.; Ren, Y.; Roach, C.; Robinson, J.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Schekochihin, A.; Sharapov, S.; Sharples, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Silburn, S.; Simpson, J.; Storrs, J.; Takase, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Tanaka, H.; Taylor, D.; Taylor, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R.; Walkden, N.; Wilson, H.; Wyk, L.V.; Yamada, T.; Zoletnik, S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 10 (2015), s. 104008-104008 ISSN 0029-5515. [Fusion Energy Conference 2014 (FEC) /25./. St Petersburg, 13.10.2014-18.10.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : numerical model * MAST * high confinement operation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.040, year: 2015

  17. [Inhibitory effect of kaempferol on inflammatory response of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human mast cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yun-jiang; Wang, Hu; Li, Li; Sui, He-huan; Huang, Jia-jun

    2015-06-01

    This study is to investigate the inhibitory effect of kaempferol on inflammatory response of lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-stimulated HMC-1 mast cells. The cytotoxicity of kaempferol to HMC-1 mast cells were analyzed by using MTT assay and then the administration concentrations of kaempferol were established. Histamine, IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β and TNF-α were measured using ELISA assay in activated HMC-1 mast cells after incubation with various concentrations of kaempferol (10, 20 and 40 µmol.L-1). Western blot was used to test the protein expression of p-IKKβ, IκBα, p-IκBα and nucleus NF-κB of LPS-induced HMC-1 mast cells after incubation with different concentrations of kaempferol. The optimal concentrations of kaempferol were defined as the range from 5 µmol.L-1 to 40 µmol.L-1. Kaempferol significantly decreased the release of histamine, IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β and TNF-α of activated HMC-1 mast cells (Pkaempferol, the protein expression of p-IKKβ, p-IKBa and nucleus NF-κB (p65) markedly reduced in LPS-stimulated HMC-1 mast cells (Pkaempferol markedly inhibit mast cell-mediated inflammatory response. At the same time, kaempferol can inhibit the activation of IKKβ, block the phosphorylation of IκBα, prevent NF-KB entering into the nucleus, and then decrease the release of inflammatory mediators.

  18. The Anti-Allergic Rhinitis Effect of Traditional Chinese Medicine of Shenqi by Regulating Mast Cell Degranulation and Th1/Th2 Cytokine Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yang-Yang; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Hu, Min; Li, Jin-Ze; Chen, Cheng-Juan; Wang, Yong-Jiang; Shi, Xiao-Yun; Wang, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Tian-Tai

    2017-03-22

    Shenqi is a traditional Chinese polyherbal medicine has been widely used for the treatment of allergic rhinitis (AR). The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-allergic rhinitis activity of Shenqi and explore its underlying molecular mechanism. Ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic rhinitis rat model was used to evaluate the anti-allergic rhinitis effect of Shenqi. The effect of Shenqi on IgE-mediated degranulation was measured using rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells. Primary spleen lymphocytes were isolated to investigate the anti-allergic mechanism of Shenqi by detecting the expression of transcription factors via Western blot and the level of cytokines (IL-4 and IFN-γ) via ELISA. In OVA-induced AR rat models, Shenqi relieved the allergic rhinitis symptoms, inhibited the histopathological changes of nasal mucosa, and reduced the levels of IL-4 and IgE. The results from the in vitro study certified that Shenqi inhibited mast cell degranulation. Furthermore, the results of GATA3, T-bet, p-STAT6, and SOCS1 expression and production of IFN-γ and IL-4 demonstrated that Shenqi balanced the ratio of Th1/Th2 (IFN-γ/IL-4) in OVA-stimulated spleen lymphocytes. In conclusion, these results suggest that Shenqi exhibits an obvious anti-allergic effect by suppressing the mast cell-mediated allergic response and by improving the imbalance of Th1/Th2 ratio in allergic rhinitis.

  19. Anti-allergic effects of a nonameric peptide isolated from the intestine gastrointestinal digests of abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) in activated HMC-1 human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seok-Chun; Lee, Dae-Sung; Park, Won Sun; Yoo, Jong Su; Yim, Mi-Jin; Qian, Zhong-Ji; Lee, Chang-Min; Oh, Junghwan; Jung, Won-Kyo; Choi, Il-Whan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether the intestine gastrointestinal (GI) digests of abalone [Haliotis discus hannai (H. discus hannai)] modulate inflammatory responses and to elucidate the mechanisms involved. The GI digests of the abalone intestines were fractionated into fractions I (>10 kDa), II (5-10 kDa) and Ⅲ (<5 kDa). Of the abalone intestine GI digests (AIGIDs), fraction Ⅲ inhibited the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reaction in mice. Subsequently, a bioactive peptide [abalone intestine GI digest peptide (AIGIDP)] isolated from fraction Ⅲ was determined to be 1175.2 Da, and the amino acid sequence was found to be PFNQGTFAS. We noted that the purified nonameric peptide (AIGIDP) attenuated the phorbol‑12‑myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-induced histamine release and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in human mast cells (HMC-1 cells). In addition, we also noted that AIGIDP inhibited the PMACI‑induced activation of nuclear factor‑κB (NF-κB) by suppressing IκBα phosphorylation and that it suppressed the production of cytokines by decreasing the phosphorylation of JNK. The findings of our study indicate that AIGIDP exerts a modulatory, anti-allergic effect on mast cell-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  20. Histamine from brain resident MAST cells promotes wakefulness and modulates behavioral states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Chikahisa

    Full Text Available Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of various chemical mediators, such as histamine and cytokines, which significantly affect sleep. Mast cells also exist in the central nervous system (CNS. Since up to 50% of histamine contents in the brain are from brain mast cells, mediators from brain mast cells may significantly influence sleep and other behaviors. In this study, we examined potential involvement of brain mast cells in sleep/wake regulations, focusing especially on the histaminergic system, using mast cell deficient (W/W(v mice. No significant difference was found in the basal amount of sleep/wake between W/W(v mice and their wild-type littermates (WT, although W/W(v mice showed increased EEG delta power and attenuated rebound response after sleep deprivation. Intracerebroventricular injection of compound 48/80, a histamine releaser from mast cells, significantly increased histamine levels in the ventricular region and enhanced wakefulness in WT mice, while it had no effect in W/W(v mice. Injection of H1 antagonists (triprolidine and mepyramine significantly increased the amounts of slow-wave sleep in WT mice, but not in W/W(v mice. Most strikingly, the food-seeking behavior observed in WT mice during food deprivation was completely abolished in W/W(v mice. W/W(v mice also exhibited higher anxiety and depression levels compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that histamine released from brain mast cells is wake-promoting, and emphasizes the physiological and pharmacological importance of brain mast cells in the regulation of sleep and fundamental neurobehavior.

  1. Histamine from brain resident MAST cells promotes wakefulness and modulates behavioral states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikahisa, Sachiko; Kodama, Tohru; Soya, Atsushi; Sagawa, Yohei; Ishimaru, Yuji; Séi, Hiroyoshi; Nishino, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of various chemical mediators, such as histamine and cytokines, which significantly affect sleep. Mast cells also exist in the central nervous system (CNS). Since up to 50% of histamine contents in the brain are from brain mast cells, mediators from brain mast cells may significantly influence sleep and other behaviors. In this study, we examined potential involvement of brain mast cells in sleep/wake regulations, focusing especially on the histaminergic system, using mast cell deficient (W/W(v)) mice. No significant difference was found in the basal amount of sleep/wake between W/W(v) mice and their wild-type littermates (WT), although W/W(v) mice showed increased EEG delta power and attenuated rebound response after sleep deprivation. Intracerebroventricular injection of compound 48/80, a histamine releaser from mast cells, significantly increased histamine levels in the ventricular region and enhanced wakefulness in WT mice, while it had no effect in W/W(v) mice. Injection of H1 antagonists (triprolidine and mepyramine) significantly increased the amounts of slow-wave sleep in WT mice, but not in W/W(v) mice. Most strikingly, the food-seeking behavior observed in WT mice during food deprivation was completely abolished in W/W(v) mice. W/W(v) mice also exhibited higher anxiety and depression levels compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that histamine released from brain mast cells is wake-promoting, and emphasizes the physiological and pharmacological importance of brain mast cells in the regulation of sleep and fundamental neurobehavior.

  2. Functional cell mediated lympholysis I. Description of the assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeken, N.E.; Thompson, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    The anamnestic response by human bi-directional (BD) mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC) to restimulation by cells of the original stimulating type is generally strikingly reduced as compared to that of standard one-way cultures. This difference was shown not to be related to a change in kinetics nor was it due to exhaustion of the media or soluble factors since fresh media did not ameliorate the effect nor were supernatants from BD cultures found to be suppressive. The relative inhibition was also not reversed by removal of the allogeneic cells by phenotype specific antiserum. Cytotoxic tests with donor and responder specific antisera revealed that the cells bearing that phenotype were dramatically reduced in BD as compared to one-way cultures. Thus, the diminished secondary response appears to be due to cytotoxic elimination of the responder cells. This allogeneic cytotoxicity is dependent on non-T, phagocytic, adherent cells. The phenomenon is called Functional Cell Mediated Lympholysis (F-CML). (author)

  3. Mast cells in renal inflammation and fibrosis: lessons learnt from animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjene, Lydia Celia; Pons, Maguelonne; Danelli, Luca; Claver, Julien; Ali, Liza; Madera-Salcedo, Iris K; Kassas, Asma; Pellefigues, Christophe; Marquet, Florian; Dadah, Albert; Attout, Tarik; El-Ghoneimi, Alaa; Gautier, Gregory; Benhamou, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Daugas, Eric; Launay, Pierre; Blank, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are hematopoietic cells involved in inflammation and immunity and have been recognized also as important effector cells in kidney inflammation. In humans, only a few mast cells reside in kidneys constitutively but in progressive renal diseases their numbers increase substantially representing an essential part of the interstitial infiltrate of inflammatory cells. Recent data obtained in experimental animal models have emphasized a complex role of these cells and the mediators they release as they have been shown both to promote, but also to protect from disease and fibrosis development. Sometimes conflicting results have been reported in similar models suggesting a very narrow window between these activities depending on the pathophysiological context. Interestingly in mice, mast cell or mast cell mediator specific actions became also apparent in the absence of significant mast cell kidney infiltration supporting systemic or regional actions via draining lymph nodes or kidney capsules. Many of their activities rely on the capacity of mast cells to release, in a timely controlled manner, a wide range of inflammatory mediators, which can promote anti-inflammatory actions and repair activities that contribute to healing, but in some circumstances or in case of inappropriate regulation may also promote kidney disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of Mast Cells in Oral Lichen Planus and Oral Lichenoid Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Suganya; Malathi, Narasimhan; Thamizhchelvan, Harikrishnan; Sangeetha, Narasimhan; Rajan, Sharada T

    2018-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic T cell mediated disease of oral mucosa, skin, and its appendages with a prevalence of 0.5 to 2.6% worldwide. Oral lichenoid reactions (OLR) are a group of lesions with diverse aetiologies but have clinical and histological features similar to OLP, thereby posing a great challenge in differentiating both lesions. Mast cells are multifunctional immune cells that play a major role in the pathogenesis of lichen planus by release of certain chemical mediators. Increased mast cell densities with significant percentage of degranulation have been observed as a consistent finding in pathogenesis of oral lichen planus. The current study was aimed at quantifying the mast cells in histopathological sections of OLP and OLR thereby aiding a means of distinguishing these lesions. The study group involved 21 cases of oral lichen planus, 21 cases of oral lichenoid reactions, and 10 control specimens of normal buccal mucosa. All the cases were stained with Toluidine Blue and routine haematoxylin and eosin and the mast cells were quantified. The results were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test and an intergroup analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U test. The number of mast cells showed an increased value in oral lichen planus when compared to oral lichenoid reaction and thus an estimation of mast cells count could aid in distinguishing OLP from OLR histopathologically.

  5. Anti-apoptotic BFL-1 is the major effector in activation-induced human mast cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ekoff

    Full Text Available Mast cells are best known for their role in allergic reactions, where aggregation of FcεRI leads to the release of mast cell mediators causing allergic symptoms. The activation also induces a survival program in the cells, i.e., activation-induced mast cell survival. The aim of the present study was to investigate how the activation-induced survival is mediated. Cord blood-derived mast cells and the mast cell line LAD-2 were activated through FcεRI crosslinking, with or without addition of chemicals that inhibit the activity or expression of selected Bcl-2 family members (ABT-737; roscovitine. Cell viability was assessed using staining and flow cytometry. The expression and function of Bcl-2 family members BFL-1 and MCL-1 were investigated using real-time quantitative PCR and siRNA treatment. The mast cell expression of Bfl-1 was investigated in skin biopsies. FcεRI crosslinking promotes activation-induced survival of human mast cells and this is associated with an upregulation of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bfl-1. ABT-737 alone or in combination with roscovitine decreases viability of human mast cells although activation-induced survival is sustained, indicating a minor role for Bcl-X(L, Bcl-2, Bcl-w and Mcl-1. Reducing BFL-1 but not MCL-1 levels by siRNA inhibited activation-induced mast cell survival. We also demonstrate that mast cell expression of Bfl-1 is elevated in birch-pollen-provocated skin and in lesions of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis patients. Taken together, our results highlight Bfl-1 as a major effector in activation-induced human mast cell survival.

  6. MAST magnetic diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlington, T.; Martin, R.; Pinfold, T.

    2001-01-01

    The mega-ampere spherical tokamak (MAST) experiment is a new, large, low aspect ratio device (R=0.7-0.8 m, a=0.5-0.65 m, maximum BT˜0.63 T at R=0.7 m) operating its first experimental physics campaign. Designed to study a wide variety of plasma shapes with up to 2 MA of plasma current with an aspect ratio down to 1.3, the poloidal field (PF) coils used for plasma formation, equilibrium and shaping are inside the main vacuum vessel. For plasma control and to investigate a wide range of plasma phenomena, an extensive set of magnetic diagnostics have been installed inside the vacuum vessel. More than 600 vacuum compatible, bakeable diagnostic coils are configured in a number of discrete arrays close to the plasma edge with about half the coils installed behind the graphite armour tiles covering the center column. The coil arrays measure the toroidal and poloidal variation in the equilibrium field and its high frequency fluctuating components. Internal coils also measure currents in the PF coils, plasma current, stored energy and induced currents in the mechanical support structures of the coils and graphite armour tiles. The latter measurements are particularly important when halo currents are induced following a plasma termination, for example, when the plasma becomes vertically unstable. The article describes the MAST magnetic diagnostic coil set and their calibration. The way in which coil signals are used to control the plasma equilibrium is described and data from the first MAST experimental campaign presented. These coil data are used as input to the code EFIT [L. Lao et al., Nucl. Fusion 25, 1611 (1985)], for measurement of halo currents in the vacuum vessel structure and for measurements of the structure of magnetic field fluctuations near the plasma edge.

  7. Immune regulation by mast cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suurmond, Jolien

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this PhD thesis is to understand mast cell (and basophil) functions and their role in autoimmune disease by focusing on three main aims: 1. To characterize the interaction between innate and Fc receptor triggers on mast cell and basophil function 2. To analyze the interaction

  8. Effect of methylmercury on the rat mast cell degranulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graevskaya, E. E.; Yasutake, A.; Aramai, R.; Rubin, A. B.

    2003-05-01

    Methylmercury is the well-known neurotoxicant as weil as a modulator of the immune system. We investigated the effects of MeHg on the rat mast cell degranulation induced by nonimmunological stimuli (the selective liberator of histamine, compound 48/80, and calcium ionophore A23187) both in vivo and in vitro. In 8, 12 and 15 days afterthe final administration of MeHg we observed the suppression of calcium ionophore A23187-and 48/80-induced histamine release, which enhanced with time. In experiments in vitro incubation of peritoneal mast cells with MeHg alone in the dose range 10^{-8} to 10^{-6} did not induce mast cell degranulation, however modified the activation of mast cells by compound 48/80, and calcium ionophore A23187. We observed activation of stimulated secretion by preliminary incubation with low dose of MeHg 10^{-8} M and inhibition by dose of MeHg 10^{-6} M. These results show that MeHg treatment can modify mast cell function in vivo and in vitro and provide insight into the understanding what role this cell has in the pathogenesis of Minamata disease-comlected disorders.

  9. Mast cells in viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Witczak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available  There are some premises suggesting that mast cells are involved in the mechanisms of anti-virus defense and in viral disease pathomechanisms. Mast cells are particularly numerous at the portals of infections and thus may have immediate and easy contact with the external environment and invading pathogens. These cells express receptors responsible for recognition of virus-derived PAMP molecules, mainly Toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9, but also RIG-I-like and NOD-like molecules. Furthermore, mast cells generate various mediators, cytokines and chemokines which modulate the intensity of inflammation and regulate the course of innate and adaptive anti-viral immunity. Indirect evidence for the role of mast cells in viral infections is also provided by clinical observations and results of animal studies. Currently, more and more data indicate that mast cells can be infected by some viruses (dengue virus, adenoviruses, hantaviruses, cytomegaloviruses, reoviruses, HIV-1 virus. It is also demonstrated that mast cells can release pre formed mediators as well as synthesize de novo eicosanoids in response to stimulation by viruses. Several data indicate that virus-stimulated mast cells secrete cytokines and chemokines, including interferons as well as chemokines with a key role in NK and Tc lymphocyte influx. Moreover, some information indicates that mast cell stimulation via TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9 can affect their adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins and chemotaxis, and influence expression of some membrane molecules. Critical analysis of current data leads to the conclusion that it is not yet possible to make definitive statements about the role of mast cells in innate and acquired defense mechanisms developing in the course of viral infection and/or pathomechanisms of viral diseases.

  10. Mast Cells: Key Contributors to Cardiac Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Levick

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Historically, increased numbers of mast cells have been associated with fibrosis in numerous cardiac pathologies, implicating mast cells in the development of cardiac fibrosis. Subsequently, several approaches have been utilised to demonstrate a causal role for mast cells in animal models of cardiac fibrosis including mast cell stabilising compounds, rodents deficient in mast cells, and inhibition of the actions of mast cell-specific proteases such as chymase and tryptase. Whilst most evidence supports a pro-fibrotic role for mast cells, there is evidence that in some settings these cells can oppose fibrosis. A major gap in our current understanding of cardiac mast cell function is identification of the stimuli that activate these cells causing them to promote a pro-fibrotic environment. This review will present the evidence linking mast cells to cardiac fibrosis, as well as discuss the major questions that remain in understanding how mast cells contribute to cardiac fibrosis.

  11. Degranulating mast cells in fibrotic regions of human tumors and evidence that mast cell heparin interferes with the growth of tumor cells through a mechanism involving fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanakubo Emi

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mast cells that are present in fibrotic regions of cancer can suppress the growth of tumor cells through an indirect mechanism involving peri-tumoral fibroblasts. Methods We first immunostained a wide variety of human cancers for the presence of degranulated mast cells. In a subsequent series of controlled in vitro experiments, we then co-cultured UACC-812 human breast cancer cells with normal fibroblasts in the presence or absence of different combinations and doses of mast cell tryptase, mast cell heparin, a lysate of the human mast cell line HMC-1, and fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7, a powerful, heparin-binding growth factor for breast epithelial cells. Results Degranulating mast cells were localized predominantly in the fibrous tissue of every case of breast cancer, head and neck cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and Hodgkin's disease that we examined. Mast cell tryptase and HMC-1 lysate had no significant effect on the clonogenic growth of cancer cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. By contrast, mast cell heparin at multiple doses significantly reduced the size and number of colonies of tumor cells co-cultured with fibroblasts, especially in the presence of FGF-7. Neither heparin nor FGF-7, individually or in combination, produced any significant effect on the clonogenic growth of breast cancer cells cultured without fibroblasts. Conclusion Degranulating mast cells are restricted to peri-tumoral fibrous tissue, and mast cell heparin is a powerful inhibitor of clonogenic growth of tumor cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. These results may help to explain the well-known ability of heparin to inhibit the growth of primary and metastatic tumors.

  12. Chrysin attenuates atopic dermatitis by suppressing inflammation of keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Kyeong; Jang, Yong Hyun; Lee, Soyoung; Lee, Sang-Rae; Choi, Young-Ae; Jin, Meiling; Choi, Jung Ho; Park, Jee Hun; Park, Pil-Hoon; Choi, Hyukjae; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Khang, Dongwoo; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2017-12-01

    We previously reported the inhibitory effect of chrysin, a natural flavonoid plentifully contained in propolis, vegetables and fruits, on the mast cell-mediated allergic reaction. In this study, we evaluated the effect of chrysin on atopic dermatitis (AD) and defined underlying mechanisms of action. We used an AD model in BALB/c mice by the repeated local exposure of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and house dust mite (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) to the ears. Repeated alternative treatment of DNCB/DFE caused AD-like skin lesions. Oral administration of chrysin diminished AD symptoms such as ear thickness and histopathological analysis, in addition to serum IgE and IgG2a levels. Chrysin decreased infiltration of mast cells, and reduced serum histamine level. Chrysin also suppressed AD by inhibiting the inflammatory responses of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells in mouse lymph node and ear. Interestingly, chrysin significantly inhibited the production of cytokines, Th2 chemokines, CCL17 and CCL22 by the down-regulation of p38 MAPK, NF-κB, and STAT1 in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α/interferon (IFN)-γ-stimulated human keratinocytes (HaCaT). Chrysin also inhibited TNF-α/IFN-γ-stimulated IL-33 expression in HaCaT cells and mouse primary keratinocytes. Taken together, the results indicate that chrysin suppressed AD symptoms, suggesting that chrysin might be a candidate for the treatment of AD and skin allergic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cytoskeleton in Mast Cell Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dráber, Pavel; Sulimenko, Vadym; Dráberová, Eduarda

    2012-01-01

    Mast cell activation mediated by the high affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI) is a key event in allergic response and inflammation. Other receptors on mast cells, as c-Kit for stem cell factor and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) synergistically enhance the FcεRI-mediated release of inflammatory mediators. Activation of various signaling pathways in mast cells results in changes in cell morphology, adhesion to substrate, exocytosis, and migration. Reorganization of cytoskeleton is pivotal in all these processes. Cytoskeletal proteins also play an important role in initial stages of FcεRI and other surface receptors induced triggering. Highly dynamic microtubules formed by αβ-tubulin dimers as well as microfilaments build up from polymerized actin are affected in activated cells by kinases/phosphatases, Rho GTPases and changes in concentration of cytosolic Ca2+. Also important are nucleation proteins; the γ-tubulin complexes in case of microtubules or Arp 2/3 complex with its nucleation promoting factors and formins in case of microfilaments. The dynamic nature of microtubules and microfilaments in activated cells depends on many associated/regulatory proteins. Changes in rigidity of activated mast cells reflect changes in intermediate filaments build up from vimentin. This review offers a critical appraisal of current knowledge on the role of cytoskeleton in mast cells signaling. PMID:22654883

  14. Lipid mediator metabolic profiling demonstrates differences in eicosanoid patterns in two phenotypically distinct mast cell populations[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundström, Susanna L.; Saluja, Rohit; Adner, Mikael; Haeggström, Jesper Z.; Nilsson, Gunnar; Wheelock, Craig E.

    2013-01-01

    Mast cells are inflammatory cells that play key roles in health and disease. They are distributed in all tissues and appear in two main phenotypes, connective tissue and mucosal mast cells, with differing capacities to release inflammatory mediators. A metabolic profiling approach was used to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of the ability of mast cell phenotypes to produce eicosanoids and other lipid mediators. A total of 90 lipid mediators (oxylipins) were characterized using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), representing the cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LO), and cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolic pathways. In vitro-derived murine mucosal-like mast cells (MLMC) and connective tissue-like mast cells (CTLMC) exhibited distinct mRNA expression patterns of enzymes involved in oxylipin biosynthesis. Oxylipins produced by 5-LO and COX pathways were the predominant species in both phenotypes, with 5-LO products constituting 90 ± 2% of the CTLMCs compared with 58 ± 8% in the MLMCs. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that CTLMCs and MLMCs secrete differing oxylipin profiles at baseline and following calcium ionophore stimulation, evidencing specificity in both a time- and biosynthetic pathway-dependent manner. In addition to the COX-regulated prostaglandin PGD2 and 5-LO-regulated cysteinyl-leukotrienes (e.g., LTC4), several other mediators evidenced phenotype-specificity, which may have biological implications in mast cell-mediated regulation of inflammatory responses. PMID:23034214

  15. Quercetin inhibits expression of inflammatory cytokines through attenuation of NF-kappaB and p38 MAPK in HMC-1 human mast cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Y-D; Choi, C-H; Bark, H; Son, H-Y; Park, H-H; Lee, S; Park, J-W; Park, E-K; Shin, H-I; Kim, S-H

    2007-05-01

    Mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation is involved in many diseases such as asthma, sinusitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Mast cells induce production of pro-inflammatory cytokines with immune regulatory properties. We investigated the effect of quercetin on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human mast cell line, HMC-1. HMC-1 cells were stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI). Quercetin decreased the gene expression and production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and IL-8 in PMACI-stimulated HMC-1 cells. Quercetin attenuated PMACI-induced activation of NF-kappaB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Our study provides evidence that quercetin may suitable for the treatment of mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory diseases.

  16. Mast Cell, the Neglected Member of the Tumor Microenvironment: Role in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Aponte-López

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are unique tissue-resident immune cells that secrete a diverse array of biologically active compounds that can stimulate, modulate, or suppress the immune response. Although mounting evidence supports that mast cells are consistently infiltrating tumors, their role as either a driving or an opposite force for cancer progression is still controversial. Particularly, in breast cancer, their function is still under discussion. While some studies have shown a protective role, recent evidence indicates that mast cells enhance blood and lymphatic vessel formation. Interestingly, one of the most important components of the mast cell cargo, the serine protease tryptase, is a potent angiogenic factor, and elevated serum tryptase levels correlate with bad prognosis in breast cancer patients. Likewise, histamine is known to induce tumor cell proliferation and tumor growth. In agreement, mast cell depletion reduces the size of mammary tumors and metastasis in murine models that spontaneously develop breast cancer. In this review, we will discuss the evidence supporting protumoral and antitumoral roles of mast cells, emphasizing recent findings placing mast cells as important drivers of tumor progression, as well as the potential use of these cells or their mediators as therapeutic targets.

  17. Olopatadine Inhibits Exocytosis in Rat Peritoneal Mast Cells by Counteracting Membrane Surface Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuka Baba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgroud/Aims: Besides its anti-allergic properties as a histamine receptor antagonist, olopatadine stabilizes mast cells by inhibiting the release of chemokines. Since olopatadine bears amphiphilic features and is preferentially partitioned into the lipid bilayers of the plasma membrane, it would induce some morphological changes in mast cells and thus affect the process of exocytosis. Methods: Employing the standard patch-clamp whole-cell recording technique, we examined the effects of olopatadine and other anti-allergic drugs on the membrane capacitance (Cm in rat peritoneal mast cells during exocytosis. Using confocal imaging of a water-soluble fluorescent dye, lucifer yellow, we also examined their effects on the deformation of the plasma membrane. Results: Low concentrations of olopatadine (1 or 10 µM did not significantly affect the GTP-γ-S-induced increase in the Cm. However, 100 µM and 1 mM olopatadine almost totally suppressed the increase in the Cm. Additionally, these doses completely washed out the trapping of the dye on the cell surface, indicating that olopatadine counteracted the membrane surface deformation induced by exocytosis. As shown by electron microscopy, olopatadine generated inward membrane bending in mast cells. Conclusion: This study provides electrophysiological evidence for the first time that olopatadine dose-dependently inhibits the process of exocytosis in rat peritoneal mast cells. Such mast cell stabilizing properties of olopatadine may be attributed to its counteracting effects on the plasma membrane deformation in degranulating mast cells.

  18. 46 CFR 154.805 - Vent masts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....805 Vent masts. Relief valves or common vent headers from relief valves must discharge to a vent mast... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vent masts. 154.805 Section 154.805 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF...

  19. Luteolin isolated from the flowers of Lonicera japonica suppresses inflammatory mediator release by blocking NF-kappaB and MAPKs activation pathways in HMC-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ok-Hwa; Choi, Jang-Gi; Lee, John-Hwa; Kwon, Dong-Yeul

    2010-01-18

    Luteolin (3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxylflavone) is a plant flavonoid and pharmacologically active agent that has been isolated from several plant species. In the present study, the effect of luteolin from the flowers of Lonicera japonica on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus A23187-induced mast cell activation was examined. Luteolin significantly inhibited the induction of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by PMA plus A23187. Moreover, luteolin attenuated cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression and intracellular Ca2+ levels. In activated HMC-1 cells, the phosphorylation of extra-signal response kinase (ERK 1/2) and c-jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK 1/2), but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) were decreased by treatment of the cells with luteolin. Luteolin inhibited PMA plus A23187-induced nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation, IkappaB degradation, and luciferase activity. Furthermore, luteolin suppressed the expression of TNF-alpha, IL-8, IL-6, GM-CSF, and COX-2 through a decrease in the intracellular Ca2+ levels, and also showed a suppression of the ERK 1/2, JNK 1/2, and NF-kappaB activation. These results indicated that luteolin from the flowers of Lonicera japonica exerted a regulatory effect on mast cell-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as RA, allergy disease and IBD.

  20. Polydatin (PD) inhibits IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice by stabilizing mast cells through modulating Ca{sup 2+} mobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Meichun [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Department of Physiology, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan (China); Li, Jianjie [State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease for Allergy at Shengzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Lv, Jingzhang [Shenzhen Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, Shenzhen 518045 (China); Mo, Xucheng; Yang, Chengbin [State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease for Allergy at Shengzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Chen, Xiangdong [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Liu, Zhigang [State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease for Allergy at Shengzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Liu, Jie, E-mail: ljljz@yahoo.com [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2012-11-01

    Mast cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of asthma and are a promising target for therapeutic intervention in asthma. This study investigated the effects of polydatin (PD), a resveratrol glucoside, on mast cell degranulation upon cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptors (FcεRI), as well as the anti-allergic activity of PD in vivo. Herein, we demonstrated that PD treatment for 30 min suppressed FcεRI-mediated mast cell degranulation in a dose-dependent manner. Concomitantly, PD significantly decreased FcεRI-mediated Ca{sup 2+} increase in mast cells. The suppressive effects of PD on FcεRI-mediated Ca{sup 2+} increase were largely inhibited by using LaCl{sub 3} to block the Ca{sup 2+} release-activated Ca{sup 2+} channels (CRACs). Furthermore, PD significantly inhibited Ca{sup 2+} entry through CRACs evoked by thapsigargin (TG). Knocking down protein expression of Orai1, the pore-forming subunit of CRACs, significantly decreased PD suppression of FcεRI-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx and mast cell degranulation. In a mouse model of mast cell-dependent passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA), in vivo PD administration suppressed mast cell degranulation and inhibited anaphylaxis. Taken together, our data indicate that PD stabilizes mast cells by suppressing FcεRI-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization mainly through inhibiting Ca{sup 2+} entry via CRACs, thus exerting a protective effect against PCA. -- Highlights: ► Polydatin can prevent the pathogenesis of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice. ► Polydatin stabilizes mast cells by decreasing FcεRI-mediated degranulation. ► Polydatin suppresses Ca{sup 2+} entry through CRAC channels in mast cells.

  1. The mast cell degranulator compound 48/80 directly activates neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schemann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Compound 48/80 is widely used in animal and tissue models as a "selective" mast cell activator. With this study we demonstrate that compound 48/80 also directly activates enteric neurons and visceral afferents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used in vivo recordings from extrinsic intestinal afferents together with Ca(++ imaging from primary cultures of DRG and nodose neurons. Enteric neuronal activation was examined by Ca(++ and voltage sensitive dye imaging in isolated gut preparations and primary cultures of enteric neurons. Intraluminal application of compound 48/80 evoked marked afferent firing which desensitized on subsequent administration. In egg albumen-sensitized animals, intraluminal antigen evoked a similar pattern of afferent activation which also desensitized on subsequent exposure to antigen. In cross-desensitization experiments prior administration of compound 48/80 failed to influence the mast cell mediated response. Application of 1 and 10 µg/ml compound 48/80 evoked spike discharge and Ca(++ transients in enteric neurons. The same nerve activating effect was observed in primary cultures of DRG and nodose ganglion cells. Enteric neuron cultures were devoid of mast cells confirmed by negative staining for c-kit or toluidine blue. In addition, in cultured enteric neurons the excitatory action of compound 48/80 was preserved in the presence of histamine H(1 and H(2 antagonists. The mast cell stabilizer cromolyn attenuated compound 48/80 and nicotine evoked Ca(++ transients in mast cell-free enteric neuron cultures. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results showed direct excitatory action of compound 48/80 on enteric neurons and visceral afferents. Therefore, functional changes measured in tissue or animal models may involve a mast cell independent effect of compound 48/80 and cromolyn.

  2. The role of mast cells and fibre type in ischaemia reperfusion injury of murine skeletal muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bortolotto Susan K

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ischaemia reperfusion (IR injury of skeletal muscle, is a significant cause of morbidity following trauma and surgical procedures, in which muscle fibre types exhibit different susceptibilities. The relative degree of mast cell mediated injury, within different muscle types, is not known. Methods In this study we compared susceptibility of the fast-twitch, extensor digitorum longus (EDL, mixed fast/slow-twitch gastrocnemius and the predominately slow-twitch soleus, muscles to ischemia reperfusion (IR injury in four groups of mice that harbour different mast cell densities; C57/DBA mast cell depleted (Wf/Wf, their heterozygous (Wf/+ and normal littermates (+/+ and control C57BL/6 mice. We determined whether susceptibility to IR injury is associated with mast cell content and/or fibre type and/or mouse strain. In experimental groups, the hind limbs of mice were subjected to 70 minutes warm tourniquet ischemia, followed by 24 h reperfusion, and the muscle viability was assessed on fresh whole-mount slices by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT histochemical assay. Results Viability was remarkably higher in the Wf/Wf strain irrespective of muscle type. With respect to muscle type, the predominately slow-twitch soleus muscle was significantly more resistant to IR injury than gastrocnemius and the EDL muscles in all groups. Mast cell density was inversely correlated to muscle viability in all types of muscle. Conclusion These results show that in skeletal muscle, IR injury is dependent upon both the presence of mast cells and on fibre type and suggest that a combination of preventative therapies may need to be implemented to optimally protect muscles from IR injury.

  3. MAST Upgrade – Construction Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milnes, Joe, E-mail: Joe.Milnes@ccfe.ac.uk; Ayed, Nizar Ben; Dhalla, Fahim; Fishpool, Geoff; Hill, John; Katramados, Ioannis; Martin, Richard; Naylor, Graham; O’Gorman, Tom; Scannell, Rory

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Outlines unique capability of MAST-U, including divertor and diagnostic capability. • Describes progress made in the manufacture and assembly of key MAST-U components. • Highlights the design challenges that have been overcome. • Lists the key lessons learned thus far in the project. - Abstract: The Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) is the centre piece of the UK fusion research programme. In 2010, a MAST Upgrade programme was initiated with three primary objectives, to contribute to: (1) testing reactor concepts (in particular exhaust solutions via a flexible divertor allowing Super-X and other extended leg configurations); (2) adding to the knowledge base for ITER (by addressing important plasma physics questions and developing predictive models to help optimise ITER performance of ITER) and (3) exploring the feasibility of using a spherical tokamak as the basis for a fusion Component Test Facility. With the project mid-way through its construction phase, progress will be reported on a number of the critical subsystems. This will include manufacture and assembly of the coils, armour and support structures that make up the new divertors, construction of the new set coils that make up the centre column, installation of the new power supplies for powering the divertor coils and enhanced TF coil set, progress in delivering the upgraded diagnostic capability, the modification and upgrading of the NBI heating systems and the complete overhaul of the machine control infrastructure, including a new control room with full remote participation facilities.

  4. Zipper mast for enhanced communications and surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, George; Muench, Paul; Witus, Gary

    2011-05-01

    In this project, we further developed and tested a "ZipperMast" for small robots and legacy manned vehicles. The ZipperMast knits three coiled bands of spring steel together to form a rigid mast. As the mast is extended, it draws up a cable connecting the host platform to the payload, typically antennas and sensors. Elevating the payload improves line of sight, and thus improves radio communication and surveillance situation awareness. When the mast is retracted, the interior cable slides into a horizontal tray. The ZipperMast is a scaleable design. We have made systems that elevate to 8 and 20 feet. The 8 foot ZipperMast collapses to less that 8 inches high and 8 inches wide. The 20 foot ZipperMast collapses to less that 12 inches high and 18 inches wide. In this paper we report on tests of the mechanical properties of the mast, specifically the strength and stiffness under quasi-static and impulsive loading. These properties are important for specifying constraints on height as a function of speed and payload and on speed as a function of height and payload in order to ensure that the mast will not fail in the event of sudden stop, as in the event of a collision.

  5. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester promotes anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting MAPK and NF-κB signaling in activated HMC-1 human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Mi Suk; Park, Won Sun; Jung, Won-Kyo; Qian, Zhong-Ji; Lee, Dae-Sung; Choi, Jung-Sik; Lee, Da-Young; Park, Sae-Gwang; Seo, Su-Kil; Kim, Hak-Ju; Won, Jun Yeon; Yu, Byeng Chul; Choi, Il-Whan

    2014-07-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an active component of honeybee propolis, is known to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and other beneficial medicinal properties. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its anti-allergic effects in mast cells are unknown. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether CAPE modulates the immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated local allergic reaction in animals, as well as to elucidate the effects of CAPE on mast cells in vitro. To investigate the bioactive potential of CAPE (10 or 20 µM), HMC-1 cells were stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI) for 24 h in the presence or absence of CAPE. To study the pharmacological effects of CAPE, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), and fluorescence assays were used. CAPE (10 mg/kg) inhibited local IgE-mediated allergic reactions (0.164 versus 0.065 O.D.) in a mouse model. Additionally, CAPE (20 µM) attenuated PMACI-stimulated histamine release (3146.42 versus 2564.83 pg/ml) and the production of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β (4.775 versus 0.713 pg/ml, IC50 = 6.67 µM), IL-6 (4771.5 versus 449.1 pg/ml, IC50 = 5.25 µM), and IL-8 (5991.7 versus 2213.1 pg/ml, IC50 = 9.95 µM) in HMC-1 cells. In activated HMC-1 cells, pretreatment with CAPE decreased the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase. In addition, CAPE inhibited PMACI-induced nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation by suppressing IκBα phosphorylation and its degradation. Our results indicated that CAPE can modulate mast cell-mediated allergic disease.

  6. The mast on the house

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landberg, L.

    1997-01-01

    . The knowledge gained will be used to give guide-lines as to the use of the WASP program to correct the observations. Should the house/hut simply be treated as an extension of the mast, should the house/hut be treated as a hill with speed-up effects, or should the house/hill be ignored completely? The paper...... will show that the house/hut should indeed be treated as a hill with speed-up effects. Placing meteorological masts on houses or huts is common practice in quite a few countries in the world. The problem is therefore one which most people involved in detailed wind resource assessment will face sooner...

  7. Cytoskeleton in mast cell signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráber, Pavel; Sulimenko, Vadym; Dráberová, Eduarda

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 3, May (2012), s. 130 ISSN 1664-3224 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP302/10/1701; GA ČR GPP302/11/P709; GA ČR GAP302/12/1673 Grant - others:ECST(XE) Action BM1007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : cytoskeleton * mast cell activation * signal transduction Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  8. Vibrational Based Inspection Of A Steel Mast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Rytter, A.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results from a research project concerning vibrational based inspection of a 20 meter high steel mast containing well defined damages. Introductory analyses dealing with among other things evaluation of potential damage indicators and determination of accep...... of acceptable damage levels are described. The modal parameters of the mast are determined by using ARMA-models on signals from wind induced response of the mast. Two different damage detection methods are tested, evaluated and compared....

  9. Resveratrol inhibits IgE-mediated basophilic mast cell degranulation and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seon-Young; Bae, Ji-Young; Park, Sin-Hye; Kim, Yun-Ho; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Kang, Young-Hee

    2013-05-01

    Resveratrol is a phytoalexin abundantly found in red grape skin and is effective in antitumor and antiinflammation associated with immune responses. This study investigated whether resveratrol suppressed immunoglobulin (Ig)E-mediated allergic responses and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in rat RBL-2H3 mast cells and in BALB/c mice. The release of β-hexosaminidase and histamine was enhanced in mast cells sensitized with anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP)-IgE and subsequently stimulated by DNP-human serum albumin (HSA), indicative of mast cell degranulation. When mast cells were pretreated with nontoxic resveratrol at 1-25 μmol/L, such induction was dose dependently diminished. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) of sensitized mast cells were activated by stimulation with DNP-HSA antigen, which was dampened by ≥5 μmol/L resveratrol. The phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKC)μ and PKCθ was attenuated by administering resveratrol to DNP-HSA-exposed mast cells, whereas quiescent PKCζ/λ in sensitized cells was dose-dependently activated by resveratrol. Male BALB/c mice were sensitized for 24 h with DNP-IgE and orally administered with resveratrol 1 h before the DNP-HSA challenge. The histamine concentration was enhanced in sensitized mice challenged to DNP-HSA, which was reversed by administration of 10 mg/kg resveratrol. Additionally, it encumbered the tissue activation of Syk, PLCγ, and PKCμ in antigen-exposed mice. Resveratrol decreased IgE-mediated PCA and alleviated allergic edema of mouse ear and dorsal skin. Mast cell degranulation and allergic inflammation, accompanying the induction of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-2, were inhibited by supplementing resveratrol to antigen-challenged mice. Resveratrol inhibited mast cell-derived, immediate-type allergic reactions, and these responses of resveratrol suggest possible therapeutic strategies in preventing allergic inflammatory diseases.

  10. Any Defining Role of Mast Cell or Mast Cell Density in Oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Any Defining Role of Mast Cell or. Mast Cell Density in. Oral Squamous Cell. Carcinoma? Dear Sir,. I read an article by Zaidi et al. titled to “A study on assessment of mast cell (MCs) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC)” with great interest.[1] We are concerned about their meandering conclusion presuming close ...

  11. Multi-Axial Simulation Table (MAST)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The MAST delivers an extensive array of testing applications providing rapid, flexible and reliable analysis for ground vehicle components and subassemblies. Using...

  12. Glia and mast cells as targets for palmitoylethanolamide, an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective lipid mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaper, Stephen D; Facci, Laura; Giusti, Pietro

    2013-10-01

    Glia are key players in a number of nervous system disorders. Besides releasing glial and neuronal signaling molecules directed to cellular homeostasis, glia respond also to pro-inflammatory signals released from immune-related cells, with the mast cell being of particular interest. A proposed mast cell-glia communication may open new perspectives for designing therapies to target neuroinflammation by differentially modulating activation of non-neuronal cells normally controlling neuronal sensitization-both peripherally and centrally. Mast cells and glia possess endogenous homeostatic mechanisms/molecules that can be upregulated as a result of tissue damage or stimulation of inflammatory responses. Such molecules include the N-acylethanolamines, whose principal family members are the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide), and its congeners N-stearoylethanolamine, N-oleoylethanolamine, and N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA). A key role of PEA may be to maintain cellular homeostasis when faced with external stressors provoking, for example, inflammation: PEA is produced and hydrolyzed by microglia, it downmodulates mast cell activation, it increases in glutamate-treated neocortical neurons ex vivo and in injured cortex, and PEA levels increase in the spinal cord of mice with chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. Applied exogenously, PEA has proven efficacious in mast cell-mediated experimental models of acute and neurogenic inflammation. This fatty acid amide possesses also neuroprotective effects, for example, in a model of spinal cord trauma, in a delayed post-glutamate paradigm of excitotoxic death, and against amyloid β-peptide-induced learning and memory impairment in mice. These actions may be mediated by PEA acting through "receptor pleiotropism," i.e., both direct and indirect interactions of PEA with different receptor targets, e.g., cannabinoid CB2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha.

  13. The 3 major types of innate and adaptive cell-mediated effector immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziato, Francesco; Romagnani, Chiara; Romagnani, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    The immune system has tailored its effector functions to optimally respond to distinct species of microbes. Based on emerging knowledge on the different effector T-cell and innate lymphoid cell (ILC) lineages, it is clear that the innate and adaptive immune systems converge into 3 major kinds of cell-mediated effector immunity, which we propose to categorize as type 1, type 2, and type 3. Type 1 immunity consists of T-bet(+) IFN-γ-producing group 1 ILCs (ILC1 and natural killer cells), CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (TC1), and CD4(+) TH1 cells, which protect against intracellular microbes through activation of mononuclear phagocytes. Type 2 immunity consists of GATA-3(+) ILC2s, TC2 cells, and TH2 cells producing IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, which induce mast cell, basophil, and eosinophil activation, as well as IgE antibody production, thus protecting against helminthes and venoms. Type 3 immunity is mediated by retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt(+) ILC3s, TC17 cells, and TH17 cells producing IL-17, IL-22, or both, which activate mononuclear phagocytes but also recruit neutrophils and induce epithelial antimicrobial responses, thus protecting against extracellular bacteria and fungi. On the other hand, type 1 and 3 immunity mediate autoimmune diseases, whereas type 2 responses can cause allergic diseases. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Sonoyama

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla. Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  15. Mast cell distribution in normal adult skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. Janssens (Artiena Soe); R. Heide (Rogier); J.C. den Hollander (Jan); P.G.M. Mulder (P. G M); B. Tank (Bhupendra); A.P. Oranje (Arnold)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__AIMS:__ To investigate mast cell distribution in normal adult skin to provide a reference range for comparison with mastocytosis. __METHODS:__ Mast cells (MCs) were counted in uninvolved skin adjacent to basal cell carcinomas and other dermatological disorders in adults.

  16. Vibration Measurements on the Frejlev Mast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Hansen, Lars Pilegaard

    The present report presents full-scale measurements on the Frejlev-mast which is a 200 meter hight guyed steel mast located 10 km. from Aalborg. The goal of the research was to investigate various techniques which could be used to estimate cable forces from vibration measurements. The cables...

  17. Mast Cell Quantification in Orofacial Granulomatosis | Nwizu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study points to a possible association between mast cells and orofacial granulomatosis, as oedematous area usually associated with OFG showed less numbers of mast cells. This is probably due to degranulation, releasing mediators of inflammation, which is responsible for oedema formation. Further light needs to be ...

  18. Mast cells in neuroinflammation and brain disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, Erik; van Bergeijk, Doris; Oosting, Ronald S; Redegeld, Frank A

    2017-01-01

    It is well recognized that neuroinflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases. Microglia and astrocytes are major pathogenic components within this process and known to respond to proinflammatory mediators released from immune cells such as mast cells. Mast cells

  19. Mast cells in lung of rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ivanova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a short review of scientific literature on lung mast cells in norm and pathology that shows the current state of this problem. Particular attention is paid to the quantity, location and arrangement of the mast cells. The mast cells are a part of immune system whom origin are myeloid stem cells. They are a kind of white blood cells. Many authors from the 19th century to the present day have traced and described the role of mast cells in the human body, their structure and changes depending on the functional state of the organism. Paul Ehrlich is the first author that described in his doctoral thesis the mast cells as effectors of allergy particularly in the beginning of reaction and in acute phase of the process. Research has continued through out the 20th century and researchers' efforts are primarily focused on clarifying the structure and function of mast cells and identifying their role in pathological responses in the human body. Mast cells are found in all organs, but they predominate in peripheral blood, spleen and bone marrow. There are cells in the rat skin that live for about 12 weeks, and more recent studies have found that proliferation of mature mast cells is caused by various factors.

  20. An aqueous Chlorella extract inhibits IL-5 production by mast cells in vitro and reduces ovalbumin-induced eosinophil infiltration in the airway in mice in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralovec, J A; Power, M R; Liu, F; Maydanski, E; Ewart, H S; Watson, L V; Barrow, C J; Lin, T J

    2005-04-01

    An aqueous extract of the edible microalga (CP) (1), has recently been tested for its immunomodulatory effects in a human clinical trial. Here, the CP extract was dialyzed and fractionated using Sephadex G 100 chromatography. The effects of a dialyzed aqueous CP extract, fraction 2 , on mast cell mediator release in vitro and ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation in vivo were examined. In vitro, treatment of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells with 2 for 18 h significantly inhibited antigen (trinitrophenyl-BSA)-induced IL-5 production. In vivo, treatment of mice with 2 during ovalbumin sensitization and stimulation process significantly reduced eosinophil and neutrophil infiltration in the airways. Moreover, fractions obtained by size exclusion chromatography of 2 inhibited IgE-dependent cytokine GM-CSF production from human cord blood-derived mast cells. Taken together, these results suggest that 2 is composed of biopolymers with anti-allergic potential.

  1. The mast on the house

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landberg, L.

    2000-01-01

    will show that the house/hut should indeed be treated as a hill with speed-up effects. Placing meteorological masts on houses or huts is common practice in quite a few countries in the world. The problem is therefore one which most people involved in detailed wind resource assessment will face sooner......An often encountered problem when preparing the basic input data for a wind atlas study is the correction for the influence of the house or hut on which the mast—whose data form the basis of this wind atlas—is placed. The article will describe an experiment where this problem has been addressed....... The knowledge gained will be used to give guidelines as to the use of the WAsP program to correct the observations. Should the house/hut simply be treated as an extension of the mast, should the house/hut be treated as a hill with speed-up effects, or should the house/hill be ignored completely? The paper...

  2. Au@Pt nanoparticles as catalase mimics to attenuate tumor hypoxia and enhance immune cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hong; Wu, Ying; Ou, Xiang-Yu; Li, Jing-Ying; Li, Juan

    2017-11-01

    Hypoxic tumor microenvironment (TME) is closely linked to tumor progression, heterogeneity and immune suppression. Therefore, the development of effective methods to overcome hypoxia and substantially enhance the immunotherapy efficacy remains a desirable goal. Herein, we engineered a biocompatible Au core/Pt shell nanoparticles (Au@Pt NPs) to reoxygenate the TME by reacting with endogenous H2O2. Treatment with Au@Pt NPs appeared to improve oxygen in intracellular environments and decrease hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression. Furthermore, the integration of high catalytic efficiency of Au@Pt NPs with cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cell immunotherapy, could lead to significantly improve the effect of CIK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. These results suggest great potential of Au@Pt NPs for regulation of the hypoxic TME and enhance immune cell mediated anti-tumor immunity.

  3. Athymic nude rat. III natural cell mediated cytotoxicity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H. de Jong; P.A. Steerenberg; P.S. Ursem; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); J.G. Vos (Joseph); E.J. Ruitenberg (Joost)

    1980-01-01

    textabstractHomozygous rnu/rnu and heterozygous +/rnu rats were investigated and compared with each other for the existence of natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Investigated were total, adherent, and nonadherent cell populations from spleen, peritoneal cavity, and mesenteric lymph node. The

  4. The Major Players in Adaptive Immunity-Cell-mediated Immunity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 6. The Major Players in Adaptive Immunity - Cell-mediated Immunity. Asma Ahmed Banishree Saha Anand Patwardhan Shwetha Shivaprasad Dipankar Nandi. General Article Volume 14 Issue 6 June 2009 pp 610-621 ...

  5. Inhibitory effect of retinoic acid on proliferation, maturation and tryptase level in human leukemic mast cells (HMC-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrakis, M G; Kyriakou, D S; Seretakis, D; Boucher, W; Letourneau, R; Kempuraj, D; Theoharides, T C

    2003-01-01

    Mast cells play important role in allergic inflammation by releasing histamine, tryptase and several inflammatory cytokines. Human leukemic mast cells (HMC-1) have been used to study mast cell mediator and their role in inflammatory mechanisms. HMC-1 contain and release several inflammatory mediators, of which the proteolytic enzyme tryptase is most characteristic. Retinoids, including retinoic acid, are naturally occurring and synthetic derivatives of vitamin A. All-trans-retinoic (ATRA) acid had been previously reported to inhibit cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ATRA on the proliferation and secretion of tryptase in HMC-1. HMC-1 were treated with ATRA at 10(-4M), 10(-5M) or 10(-6M) for 3, 4 or 5 days in culture. Control HMC-1 were treated with equal amount of culture medium only. ATRA decreased the number of HMC-1 as compared to the control group. The same treatment for 3, 4 or 5 days also decreased intracellular tryptase levels. These results indicate that ATRA significantly inhibits both proliferation and growth as shown by the decreased intracellular tryptase levels in HMC-1. ATRA may be a useful agent in the treatment of mast cell proliferative disorders.

  6. Less contribution of mast cells to the progression of renal fibrosis in Rat kidneys with chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Asuka; Tachi, Masahiro; Ejima, Yutaka; Endo, Yasuhiro; Toyama, Hiroaki; Saito, Kazutomo; Abe, Nozomu; Yamauchi, Masanori; Miura, Chieko; Kazama, Itsuro

    2017-02-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is histopathologically characterized by tubulointerstitial fibrosis in addition to glomerulosclerosis. Although mast cells are known to infiltrate into the kidneys with chronic inflammation, we know little about their contribution to the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis associated with CRF. The aim of this study was to reveal the involvement of mast cells in the progression of renal fibrosis in CRF. Using a rat model with CRF resulting from 5/6 nephrectomy, we examined the histopathological features of the kidneys and the infiltration of mast cells into the renal interstitium. By treating the rats with a potent mast cell stabilizer, tranilast, we also examined the involvement of mast cells in the progression of renal fibrosis associated with CRF. The CRF rat kidneys were characterized by the wide staining of collagen III and increased number of myofibroblasts, indicating the progression of renal fibrosis. Compared to T-lymphocytes or macrophages, the number of tryptase-positive mast cells was much smaller within the fibrotic kidneys and they did not proliferate in situ. The mRNA expression of mast cell-derived fibroblast-activating factors was not increased in the renal cortex isolated from CRF rat kidneys. Treatment with tranilast did not suppress the progression of renal fibrosis, nor did it ameliorate the progression of glomerulosclerosis and the interstitial proliferation of inflammatory leukocytes. This study demonstrated for the first time that mast cells are neither increased nor activated in the fibrotic kidneys of CRF rats. Compared to T-lymphocytes or macrophages that proliferate in situ within the fibrotic kidneys, mast cells were less likely to contribute to the progression of renal fibrosis associated with CRF. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  7. Cell-mediated fibre recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices, we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibres, and bulk contraction of the material. Increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation; however, increasing fibre stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation for certain network architectures. Lower fibre stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibres, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signalling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fibre recruitment as a previously undescribed mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices.

  8. Effects of Reactive Nitrogen Scavengers on NK-Cell-Mediated Killing of K562 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yili Zeng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the effects of reactive nitrogen metabolites (RNMS on natural-killer- (NK- cell-mediated killing of K562 cells and the influence of RNM scavengers, such as tiopronin (TIP, glutamylcysteinylglycine (GSH, and histamine dihydrochloride (DHT, on reversing the suppressing effect of RNM. We administered exogenous and endogenous RNM in the NK + K562 culture system and then added RNM scavengers. The concentrations of RNM, TNF-β and IFN-γ, and NK-cell cytotoxicity (NCC and the percentage of living NK cells were then examined. We found that both exogenous and endogenous RNM caused the KIR to decrease (<0.01; however, RNM scavengers such as TIP and GSH rescued this phenomenon dose dependently. In conclusion, our data suggests that RNM scavengers such as TIP and GSH enhance the antineoplasmic activity of NK cells.

  9. Inhibitory effects of the transgenic Panax ginsengs on phorbol ester plus A23187-induced IL-6 production and cyclooxygenase-2 via suppression of NF-κB and MAPKs in HMC-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, In-Young; Kim, Su-Jin; Kim, Min-Cheol; Kim, Hye-Lin; Shin, Hyun-Ji; Kang, Tae-Hee; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Shim, Ju-Sun; Kim, Ju-Hwan; Yang, Deok-Chun; Hong, Seung-Heon; Kim, Hyung-Min; Um, Jae-Young

    2011-03-01

    Our previous studies have that demonstrated the overexpression of the squalene synthase gene enhances the biosynthesis of triterpene and phytosterol in Panax ginseng. The total ginsenoside contents in adventitious roots of transgenic P. ginseng were about 1.6-3-fold higher than those in the wild-type. In the present work, we have evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of two types of transgenic P. ginseng (BS and SS) and the wild-type P. ginseng (GS) in a stimulated human mast cell line 1 (HMC-1). GS, BS, and SS inhibited not only the production of interleukin 6 (IL-6), but also the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-stimulated HMC-1. Additionally, GS, BS, and SS suppressed the expression of the nuclear transcription factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases induced by PMACI. The anti-inflammatory effects of BS and SS were higher than that of GS. These results provide new insights into the pharmacological actions of transgenic P. ginseng as a potential molecule for use in therapy in mast cell-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  10. Fine-tuning of mast cell activation by FceRIbeta chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chisei eRa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells play the key role in allergic reaction and disorders, being activated by the high affinity receptor for IgE, FceRI. There are two types of FceRI expressed on the cell surface of human mast cells, abg2 type and ag2 type (without b chain, while in mouse mast cells only the tetrameric abg2 type is expressed. In the lesion of allergic inflammation such as atopic conjunctivitis and atopic dermatitis, mast cells increase in number and exclusively express the abg2 type FceRI, in contrast in healthy conjunctiva and skin most mast cells express the ag2 type. The human and mouse FceRI genes contain seven exons and in the human gene we found a repressor element locates in the forth intron. Through the repressor element HDACs are recruited to the FceRIb gene by MZF-1/FHL3/NFY complex and repress b transcription by deacetylation of histones in the presence of GM-CSF. It has been long recognized that the function of the b chain ITAM is a signal amplifier, but we have recently revealed bidirectional (positive and negative functions of the b chain ITAM in the regulation of the mast cell activation and effector functions. Namely, the b chain enhances the mast cell activation signal triggered with low intensity stimulation such as lower dose antigen than threshold while it suppresses the signal of high intensity stimulation. Employing mouse model of CHS induced by oxazolone, we have revealed that IgE-mediated mast cell activation is required for CHS and that the b chain is crucially involved in this model. On the other hand diverse immune receptors including TLRs, SCF receptor and GPCRs are known to mediate signals which modulate FceRI・adenosine receptors, one of GPCRs, trigger synergistic degranulation response in mast cells even when the FceRI stimulation is of ‘lower intensity’ than the threshold. We have recently elucidated, in this synergistic degranulation response, b chain ITAM plays positive role, possibly reflecting in vivo allergic

  11. Histamine Release from Mast Cells and Basophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, Francesco; Iannone, Raffaella; Marone, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells and basophils represent the most relevant source of histamine in the immune system. Histamine is stored in cytoplasmic granules along with other amines (e.g., serotonin), proteases, proteoglycans, cytokines/chemokines, and angiogenic factors and rapidly released upon triggering with a variety of stimuli. Moreover, mast cell and basophil histamine release is regulated by several activating and inhibitory receptors. The engagement of different receptors can trigger different modalities of histamine release and degranulation. Histamine released from mast cells and basophils exerts its biological activities by activating four G protein-coupled receptors, namely H1R, H2R, H3R (expressed mainly in the brain), and the recently identified H4R. While H1R and H2R activation accounts mainly for some mast cell- and basophil-mediated allergic disorders, the selective expression of H4R on immune cells is uncovering new roles for histamine (possibly derived from mast cells and basophils) in allergic, inflammatory, and autoimmune disorders. Thus, the in-depth knowledge of mast cell and basophil histamine release and its biologic effects is poised to uncover new therapeutic avenues for a wide spectrum of disorders.

  12. Overview of physics results from MAST towards ITER/DEMO and the MAST Upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, H.; Abel, I.G.; Akers, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    New diagnostic, modelling and plant capability on the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) have delivered important results in key areas for ITER/DEMO and the upcoming MAST Upgrade, a step towards future ST devices on the path to fusion currently under procurement. Micro-stability analysis of the...

  13. Overview of physics results from MAST towards ITER/DEMO and the MAST Upgrade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, H.; Abel, I. G.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, A.; Allan, S. Y.; Appel, L. C.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Barratt, N. C.; N. Ben Ayed,; Bradley, J. W.; Canik, J.; Cahyna, P.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C. D.; Chapman, I.T.; Ciric, D.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N. J.; Cox, M.; Crowley, B. J.; Cowley, S. C.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darke, A.; de Bock, M. F. M.; De Temmerman, G.; Dendy, R. O.; Denner, P.; Dickinson, D.; Dnestrovskij, A. Y.; Dnestrovsky, Y.; Driscoll, M. D.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Dunstan, M.; Dura, P.; Elmore, S.; Field, A. R.; Fishpool, G.; Freethy, S.; Fundamenski, W.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gibson, K. J.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Harrison, J.; E. Havlíčková,; Hawkes, N. C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Hender, T. C.; Highcock, E.; Higgins, D.; Hill, P.; Hnat, B.; Hole, M. J.; J. Horáček,; Howell, D. F.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaveeva, E.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; M. Kočan,; Lake, R. J.; Lehnen, M.; Leggate, H. J.; Liang, Y.; Lilley, M. K.; Lisgo, S. W.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Maddison, G. P.; J. Mailloux,; Martin, R.; McArdle, G. J.; McClements, K. G.; McMillan, B.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Molchanov, P.; Mordijck, S.; Morgan, T.; Morris, A. W.; Muir, D. G.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A. H.; O' Brien, M. R.; O' Gorman, T.; Pamela, S.; Parra, F. I.; Patel, A.; Pinches, S. D.; Price, M. N.; Roach, C. M.; Robinson, J. R.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Seidl, J.; Sharapov, S. E.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Shevchenko, V.; Shibaev, S.; Stork, D.; Storrs, J.; Sykes, A.; Tallents, G. J.; Tamain, P.; Taylor, D.; Temple, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.; M. Valovič,; Vann, R. G. L.; Verwichte, E.; Voskoboynikov, P.; Voss, G.; Warder, S. E. V.; Wilson, H. R.; Wodniak, I.; Zoletnik, S.; Zagorski, R.; MAST Team,; NBI Team,

    2013-01-01

    New diagnostic, modelling and plant capability on the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) have delivered important results in key areas for ITER/DEMO and the upcoming MAST Upgrade, a step towards future ST devices on the path to fusion currently under procurement. Micro-stability analysis of the

  14. Mast cells dysregulate apoptotic and cell cycle genes in mucosal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Paul

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucosal squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is a disease of high mortality and morbidity. Interactions between the squamous cell carcinoma and the host's local immunity, and how the latter contributes to the biological behavior of the tumor are unclear. In vivo studies have demonstrated sequential mast cell infiltration and degranulation during squamous cell carcinogenesis. The degree of mast cell activation correlates closely with distinct phases of hyperkeratosis, dysplasia, carcinoma in-situ and invasive carcinoma. However, the role of mast cells in carcinogenesis is unclear. Aim This study explores the effects of mast cells on the proliferation and gene expression profile of mucosal squamous cell carcinoma using human mast cell line (HMC-1 and human glossal squamous cell carcinoma cell line (SCC25. Methods HMC-1 and SCC25 were co-cultured in a two-compartment chamber, separated by a polycarbonate membrane. HMC-1 was stimulated to degranulate with calcium ionophore A23187. The experiments were done in quadruplicate. Negative controls were established where SCC25 were cultured alone without HMC-1. At 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours, proliferation and viability of SCC25 were assessed with MTT colorimetric assay. cDNA microarray was employed to study differential gene expression between co-cultured and control SCC25. Results HMC-1/SCC25 co-culture resulted in suppression of growth rate for SCC-25 (34% compared with 110% for the control by 72 hours, p Conclusion We show that mast cells have a direct inhibitory effect on the proliferation of mucosal squamous cell carcinoma in vitro by dysregulating key genes in apoptosis and cell cycle control.

  15. Mast Cell Activation Disease and Microbiotic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Lawrence B; Khoruts, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews the diagnostically challenging presentation of mast cell activation disease (MCAD) and current thoughts regarding interactions between microbiota and MCs. A search for all studies on interactions between mast cells, mast cell activation disease, and microbiota published on pubmed.gov and scholar.google.com between 1960 and 2015 was conducted using the search terms mast cell, mastocyte, mastocytosis, mast cell activation, mast cell activation disease, mast cell activation syndrome, microbiome, microbiota. A manual review of the references from identified studies was also conducted. Studies were excluded if they were not accessible electronically or by interlibrary loan. Research increasingly is revealing essential involvement of MCs in normal human biology and in human disease. Via many methods, normal MCs-present sparsely in every tissue-sense their environment and reactively exert influences that, directly and indirectly, locally and remotely, improve health. The dysfunctional MCs of the "iceberg" of MCAD, on the other hand, sense abnormally, react abnormally, activate constitutively, and sometimes (in mastocytosis, the "tip" of the MCAD iceberg) even proliferate neoplastically. MCAD causes chronic multisystem illness generally, but not necessarily, of an inflammatory ± allergic theme and with great variability in behavior among patients and within any patient over time. Furthermore, the range of signals to which MCs respond and react include signals from the body's microbiota, and regardless of whether an MCAD patient has clonal mastocytosis or the bulk of the iceberg now known as MC activation syndrome (also suspected to be clonal but without significant MC proliferation), dysfunctional MCs interact as dysfunctionally with those microbiota as they interact with other human tissues, potentially leading to many adverse consequences. Interactions between microbiota and MCs are complex at baseline. The potential for both pathology and benefit

  16. Inhibition of the BET family of epigenetic reader proteins: A novel principle for modulating gene expression in IgE-activated mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Faroldi, Gianni; Rönnberg, Elin; Grujic, Mirjana; Pejler, Gunnar

    2017-06-01

    The BET family of bromodomain-containing proteins constitute epigenetic readers that bind to acetylated lysine residues of core histones, thereby translating epigenetic histone marks to effects on gene expression. BET inhibitors are currently emerging as promising therapeutic agents for treatment of various pathological conditions. Here, we explored the potential of using BET inhibition to modulate IgE-mediated responses in mast cells. We assessed the effects of BET inhibitors PFI-1, I-BET151, and I-BET762 on responses downstream of mast cell activation through IgE receptor cross-linking. BET inhibitors were neither toxic for mast cells (at doses up to 20 μM), nor did they prevent IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation. However, we found that BET inhibition, in particular by I-BET151, suppressed IL-6 gene expression and IL-6 protein release in response to IgE-mediated mast cell activation. This was observed in both bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) and in mature peritoneal-cell derived mast cells. Further analysis showed that BET inhibition also suppressed the expression of a number of additional genes of those that were upregulated by IgE receptor cross-linking, including IL-3, IL-7R, CCR1, and ADAMTS9. However, BET inhibition was selective, i.e., several genes that were upregulated by IgE receptor cross-linking were not affected by BET inhibitors. These findings suggest that BET inhibition can interfere with the upregulated expression of selected genes in mast cells activated by IgE receptor cross-linking. Further, our findings introduce the concept of utilizing epigenetic mechanisms for modulating mast cell function in the context of IgE-driven disease. © 2017 The Authors. Immunity, Inflammation and Disease Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Innate defense regulator IDR-1018 activates human mast cells through G protein-, phospholipase C-, MAPK- and NF-ĸB-sensitive pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanashima, Kensuke; Chieosilapatham, Panjit; Yoshimoto, Eri; Okumura, Ko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Niyonsaba, François

    2017-08-01

    Host defense (antimicrobial) peptides not only display antimicrobial activities against numerous pathogens but also exert a broader spectrum of immune-modulating functions. Innate defense regulators (IDRs) are a class of host defense peptides synthetically developed from natural or endogenous cationic host defense peptides. Of the IDRs developed to date, IDR-1018 is more efficient not only in killing bacteria but also in regulating the various functions of macrophages and neutrophils and accelerating the wound healing process. Because mast cells intimately participate in wound healing and a number of host defense peptides involved in wound healing are also known to activate mast cells, this study aimed to investigate the effects of IDR-1018 on mast cell activation. Here, we showed that IDR-1018 induced the degranulation of LAD2 human mast cells and caused their production of leukotrienes, prostaglandins and various cytokines and chemokines, including granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and -3, macrophage-inflammatory protein-1α and -1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α. Furthermore, IDR-1018 increased intracellular calcium mobilization and induced mast cell chemotaxis. The mast cell activation was markedly suppressed by pertussis toxin, U-73122, U0126, SB203580, JNK inhibitor II, and NF-κB activation inhibitor II, suggesting the involvement of G-protein, phospholipase C, ERK, p38, JNK and NF-κB pathways, respectively, in IDR-1018-induced mast cell activation. Notably, we confirmed that IDR-1018 caused the phosphorylation of MAPKs and IκB. Altogether, the current study suggests a novel immunomodulatory role of IDR-1018 through its ability to recruit and activate human mast cells at the sites of inflammation and wounds. We report that IDR-1018 stimulates various functions of human mast cells. IDR-1018-induced mast cell activation is mediated through G protein, PLC, MAPK and NF-κB pathways. IDR-1018

  18. Nerve growth factor interactions with mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritas, S K; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Saggini, A; Pantalone, A; Rosati, M; Tei, M; Speziali, A; Saggini, R; Pandolfi, F; Cerulli, G; Conti, P

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptides are involved in neurogenic inflammation where there is vasodilation and plasma protein extravasion in response to this stimulus. Nerve growth factor (NGF), identified by Rita Levi Montalcini, is a neurotrophin family compound which is important for survival of nociceptive neurons during their development. Therefore, NGF is an important neuropeptide which mediates the development and functions of the central and peripheral nervous system. It also exerts its proinflammatory action, not only on mast cells but also in B and T cells, neutrophils and eosinophils. Human mast cells can be activated by neuropeptides to release potent mediators of inflammation, and they are found throughout the body, especially near blood vessels, epithelial tissue and nerves. Mast cells generate and release NGF after degranulation and they are involved in iperalgesia, neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. NGF is also a potent degranulation factor for mast cells in vitro and in vivo, promoting differentiation and maturation of these cells and their precursor, acting as a co-factor with interleukin-3. In conclusion, these studies are focused on cross-talk between neuropeptide NGF and inflammatory mast cells.

  19. Television alignment of mast assembly in refueling of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, J.W.; Swidwa, K.J.; Hornak, L.P.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes the refueling of a nuclear reactor having component assemblies of at least one type and being disposed in a pit in a containment under water, the refueling being carried out with a mast movable axially and circumferentially for raising and lowering the component assemblies, a mechanism, connected to an end of the mast, cooperative with the mast, for engaging a component assembly to be raised by the mast, a television camera, and a television monitor having an image-reference indication, the mechanism being connected to the mast movable with the mast; the method of positioning the mechanism to engage the component assembly appropriately for raising and lowering. It comprises: mounting the camera on the mechanism movable therewith, suspending the mast in the water of the pit with the mechanism extending from the end of the mast in the pit in position to engage the component assembly

  20. The emerging role of mast cells in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarido, Veronica; Kennedy, Lindsey; Hargrove, Laura; Demieville, Jennifer; Thomson, Joanne; Stephenson, Kristen; Francis, Heather

    2017-08-01

    The depth of our knowledge regarding mast cells has widened exponentially in the last 20 years. Once thought to be only important for allergy-mediated events, mast cells are now recognized to be important regulators of a number of pathological processes. The revelation that mast cells can influence organs, tissues, and cells has increased interest in mast cell research during liver disease. The purpose of this review is to refresh the reader's knowledge of the development, type, and location of mast cells and to review recent work that demonstrates the role of hepatic mast cells during diseased states. This review focuses primarily on liver diseases and mast cells during autoimmune disease, hepatitis, fatty liver disease, liver cancer, and aging in the liver. Overall, these studies demonstrate the potential role of mast cells in disease progression.

  1. Extendable mast used in one shot soil penetrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotz, G. M.; Howard, G. A.

    1966-01-01

    Penetrometer to test soil characteristics has a piercing head with soil instrumentation equipment attached to an expandable mast actuated by compressed air. The penetrometer gives continuous measurements as the mast pushes the piercing head through the soil.

  2. Delta Hemolysin and Phenol-Soluble Modulins, but Not Alpha Hemolysin or Panton-Valentine Leukocidin, Induce Mast Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodille, Elisabeth; Cuerq, Charlotte; Badiou, Cédric; Bienvenu, Françoise; Steghens, Jean-Paul; Cartier, Régine; Bes, Michèle; Tristan, Anne; Plesa, Adriana; Le, Vien T M; Diep, Binh A; Lina, Gérard; Dumitrescu, Oana

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are located at host interfaces, such as the skin, and contribute to the first-line defense against pathogens by releasing soluble mediators, including those that induce itching and scratching behavior. Here, we show that delta-hemolysin (Hld) and phenol soluble modulins (PSMs) PSMα1 and PSMα3, but not alpha-hemolysin (Hla) or Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), induce dose-dependent tryptase, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release by the HMC-1 human mast cell line. Using supernatants from isogenic strains, we verified that tryptase and LDH release was Hld- and PSMα-dependent. PSMα1 and Hld production was detected in 65 and 17% of human Staphylococcus aureus -infected skin abscess specimens, respectively, but they were produced in vitro by all clinical isolates. The results suggest that Hld and PSM-α1 produced in vivo during S. aureus skin infections induce the release of mast cell mediators responsible for itching and scratching behavior, which may enhance skin to skin transmission of S. aureus via the hands. As Hld and PSMs are upregulated by accessory gene regulator (agr), their association may contribute to the elective transmission of S. aureus strains with a functional agr system.

  3. Delta Hemolysin and Phenol-soluble Modulins, but not Alpha Hemolysin or Panton-Valentine Leukocidin, Induce Mast Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Hodille

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are located at host interfaces, such as the skin, and contribute to the first-line defense against pathogens by releasing soluble mediators, including those that induce itching and scratching behavior. Here, we show that delta-hemolysin (Hld and phenol soluble modulins (PSMs PSMα1 and PSMα3, but not alpha-hemolysin (Hla or Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, induce dose-dependent tryptase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release by the HMC-1 human mast cell line. Using supernatants from isogenic strains, we verified that tryptase and LDH release was Hld- and PSMα-dependent. PSMα1 and Hld production was detected in 65% and 17% of human Staphylococcus aureus-infected skin abscess specimens, respectively, but they were produced in vitro by all clinical isolates. The results suggest that Hld and PSM-α1 produced in vivo during S. aureus skin infections induce the release of mast cell mediators responsible for itching and scratching behavior, which may enhance skin to skin transmission of S. aureus via the hands. As Hld and PSMs are upregulated by accessory gene regulator (agr, their association may contribute to the elective transmission of S. aureus strains with a functional agr system.

  4. Engineering PTEN-L for Cell-Mediated Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavictoire, Sylvie J; Gont, Alexander; Julian, Lisa M; Stanford, William L; Vlasschaert, Caitlyn; Gray, Douglas A; Jomaa, Danny; Lorimer, Ian A J

    2018-06-15

    The tumor suppressor PTEN is frequently inactivated in glioblastoma. PTEN-L is a long form of PTEN produced by translation from an alternate upstream start codon. Unlike PTEN, PTEN-L has a signal sequence and a tract of six arginine residues that allow PTEN-L to be secreted from cells and be taken up by neighboring cells. This suggests that PTEN-L could be used as a therapeutic to restore PTEN activity. However, effective delivery of therapeutic proteins to treat CNS cancers such as glioblastoma is challenging. One method under evaluation is cell-mediated therapy, where cells with tumor-homing abilities such as neural stem cells are genetically modified to express a therapeutic protein. Here, we have developed a version of PTEN-L that is engineered for enhanced cell-mediated delivery. This was accomplished by replacement of the native leader sequence of PTEN-L with a leader sequence from human light-chain immunoglobulin G (IgG). This version of PTEN-L showed increased secretion and an increased ability to transfer to neighboring cells. Neural stem cells derived from human fibroblasts could be modified to express this version of PTEN-L and were able to deliver catalytically active light-chain leader PTEN-L (lclPTEN-L) to neighboring glioblastoma cells.

  5. Gene expression profiles in adenosine-treated human mast cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of mast cells in allergic diseases and innate immunity has been widely researched and much is known about the expression profiles of immune-related genes in mast cells after bacterial challenges. However, little is known about the gene expression profiles of mast cells in response to adenosine. Herein, we ...

  6. Quantification and Localization of Mast Cells in Periapical Lesions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Mast cells were more in number in radicular cyst. Based on the concept that mast cells play a critical role in the induction of inflammation, it is logical to use therapeutic agents to alter mast cell function and secretion, to thwart inflammation at its earliest phases. These findings may suggest the possible role of ...

  7. Skin tags: A link between lesional mast cell count/tryptase expression and obesity and dyslipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Abdallah M Salem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:The etiology of skin tags (STs is not fully understood. A relation to diabetes mellitus and obesity was suggested. Few studies of possible mast cells (MCs involvement were reported. Tyrptase is a mast cell mediator and a potent fibroblast growth factor. It may provide a molecular link between mast cell activation and fibrosis. Aims: The aim was to assess clinical and laboratory findings in patients with STs, and the possible link between obesity, dyslipidemia, and lesional MC count/tryptase expression. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 patients with STs were subjected to clinical examination, estimation of body mass index (BMI, fasting blood glucose (FBG, postprandial blood glucose (PPBG, serum cholesterol and triglycerides, abdominal ultrasound for fatty liver assessment, in addition to study of MCs through staining for MC tryptase in two skin biopsies; lesional and nonlesional (control. Results:All patients showed abnormally high BMI and hypertriglyceridemia, with abnormal sonographic pattern in 15 patients (75%. STs number positively correlated with the age of patients. STs showed significantly higher MC counts and tryptase expression, compared with control skin ( P < 0.001, with no correlation of the STs number or MC count with BMI, FBG, PPBG or serum cholesterol. Obese patients showed a significantly higher MC count than overweight and there was a positive correlation between MC count and serum triglycerides. Axilla and under breast STs showed a higher MC count compared with other sites. Conclusions:STs seem to be related to obesity and hypertriglyceridemia. MCs with their tryptase are possibly involved in pathogenesis of STs. MC count is related to the associated factors; obesity and serum triglycerides. MC tryptase expression is a reliable method for accurate tissue MC counting.

  8. Thyroid hormone suppression and cell-mediated immunomodulation in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) exposed to PCBs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, J E; Fernie, K J; Bortolotti, G R; Marchant, T A

    2002-10-01

    Exposure to environmental contaminants can induce physiological changes in animals through various mechanisms. One manifestation of subclinical toxicity from polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure is the disruption of normal immune function described in numerous species, including American kestrels (Falco sparverius). In 1998, 152 mature male and female kestrels were fed either a mixture of Aroclor 1248:1254:1260 (approximately 7 mg/kg kestrel/day) through their food items, or control diets. Offspring produced by 50 breeding pairs (thus, half received in ovo PCB exposure only) were also studied. Total and differential white blood cell counts, the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin response, as well as thyroid hormone levels were tested in vivo in nonbreeding adults (1998 only) and nestlings (1998 and 1999). In 1999, nestlings came from three parental groups; adults exposed in 1998, birds produced by PCB-exposed parents, and unexposed birds. In 1998, directly exposed males but not females had increased total white blood cell counts driven by lymphocytosis, plus a decreased heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio relative to controls. PCB-exposed birds had a significantly greater response to PHA than did controls, with sex as a significant factor and plasma triiodothyonine (T(3)) as a significant covariate. Levels of T(3) were significantly depressed in PCB-exposed birds of both sexes. The 1999 nestlings (F1 generation with respect to PCB exposure) did not show any effect of parental treatment group on the PHA skin response, yet T(3) remained as a significant covariate. Immunological effects are discussed in light of the antibody-mediated immunotoxicity found in the same birds and reported previously.

  9. Expression of E-cadherin in human mast cell line HMC-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Minoru; Kawai, Kenzo; Tanaka, Makoto; Tegoshi, Tatsuya; Arizono, Naoki

    2003-11-01

    E-cadherin is one of the cell adhesion molecules normally expressed on epithelial cells. We previously reported that murine bone marrow-derived mast cells express E-cadherin that could be involved in homophilic binding with epithelial cell E-cadherin. In the present study we examined whether E-cadherin is also expressed in human mast cell HMC-1. Gene expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin was observed in HMC-1 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), while N-cadherin expression was undetectable. cDNA sequencing of HMC-1 E-cadherin revealed no deletions or mutations. E-cadherin expression in HMC-1 was confirmed by immunoblotting as well as by flow cytometric analyses. In the presence of E-cadherin blocking antibody or a synthetic E-cadherin decapeptide with HAV sequence in culture medium, adhesion of HMC-1 cells to the A431 epithelial cell monolayer was slightly but significantly suppressed. In contrast, N- or P-cadherin decapeptides did not suppress the binding. These results indicated that human mast cell HMC-1 expresses E-cadherin, and is possibly involved in cellular interactions with epithelial cells, while other functions still remain to be elucidated.

  10. Overview of recent physics results from MAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, A.; Adamek, J.; Akers, R.J.

    2017-01-01

    New results from MAST are presented that focus on validating models in order to extrapolate to future devices. Measurements during start-up experiments have shown how the bulk ion temperature rise scales with the square of the reconnecting field. During the current ramp-up, models are not able to...

  11. NESREA and NCC Regulations on Telecommunication Masts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There have been conflicting findings in studies conducted to determine whether or not electromagnetic radiations (EMR) emitted by telecommunication masts are injurious to human health and the environment. The recent imbroglio between the National Environmental Standards and Regulations Enforcement Agency ...

  12. Role of mast cells in cow metritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Guo-Qing

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bovine postpartum metritis causes great losses. Mast cell (MC-released mediators participate in uterine inflammation and immune response, but their role in postpartum metritis in cows has not been reported. This study investigated the effect of endometrial MC on the disorder.

  13. Drug hypersensitivity in clonal mast cell disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonadonna, P; Pagani, M; Aberer, W

    2015-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a clonal disorder characterized by the proliferation and accumulation of mast cells (MC) in different tissues, with a preferential localization in skin and bone marrow (BM). The excess of MC in mastocytosis as well as the increased releasability of MC may lead to a higher frequenc...

  14. Di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT), an anticancer agent, exerts an anti-inflammatory effect in activated human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sun-Young; Han, Na-Ra; Yoon, Kyoung Wan; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2017-10-01

    Inflammation has been closely associated with the development and progression of cancer. Previously, we reported that mast cells play a critical role in tumor growth. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of an anticancer agent, di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT), on an activated human mast cell line, in this case HMC-1 cells. We evaluated the effect and specific molecular mechanism of Dp44mT on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI) using HMC-1 cells. Here, we demonstrated that Dp44mT significantly decreased the protein levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor without exposing activated HMC-1 cells to any cytotoxicity. In activated mast cells, Dp44mT mitigated the strong production and mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines, in this case, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin, through a blockade of caspase-1 and nuclear factor-κB activities. Furthermore, phosphorylations of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family included in inflammatory signaling cascades were significantly inhibited by a Dp44mT treatment. Overall, our results indicate that the anticancer agent Dp44mT has an anti-inflammatory effect and may be of therapeutic importance for the treatment of mast cell-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  15. Seedling establishment in a masting desert shrub parallels the pattern for forest trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Susan E.; Pendleton, Burton K.

    2015-05-01

    The masting phenomenon along with its accompanying suite of seedling adaptive traits has been well studied in forest trees but has rarely been examined in desert shrubs. Blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima) is a regionally dominant North American desert shrub whose seeds are produced in mast events and scatter-hoarded by rodents. We followed the fate of seedlings in intact stands vs. small-scale disturbances at four contrasting sites for nine growing seasons following emergence after a mast year. The primary cause of first-year mortality was post-emergence cache excavation and seedling predation, with contrasting impacts at sites with different heteromyid rodent seed predators. Long-term establishment patterns were strongly affected by rodent activity in the weeks following emergence. Survivorship curves generally showed decreased mortality risk with age but differed among sites even after the first year. There were no detectable effects of inter-annual precipitation variability or site climatic differences on survival. Intraspecific competition from conspecific adults had strong impacts on survival and growth, both of which were higher on small-scale disturbances, but similar in openings and under shrub crowns in intact stands. This suggests that adult plants preempted soil resources in the interspaces. Aside from effects on seedling predation, there was little evidence for facilitation or interference beneath adult plant crowns. Plants in intact stands were still small and clearly juvenile after nine years, showing that blackbrush forms cohorts of suppressed plants similar to the seedling banks of closed forests. Seedling banks function in the absence of a persistent seed bank in replacement after adult plant death (gap formation), which is temporally uncoupled from masting and associated recruitment events. This study demonstrates that the seedling establishment syndrome associated with masting has evolved in desert shrublands as well as in forests.

  16. Mechanisms of glyceryl trinitrate provoked mast cell degranulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sara Hougaard; Ramachandran, Roshni; Amrutkar, Dipak Vasantrao

    2015-01-01

    inflammation and dural mast cell degranulation is supported by the effectiveness of prednisolone on glyceryl trinitrate-induced delayed headache. METHODS: Using a newly developed rat model mimicking the human glyceryl trinitrate headache model, we have investigated the occurrence of dural mast cell...... glyceryl trinitrate-induced mast cell degranulation whereas the calcitonin gene-related peptide-receptor antagonist olcegepant and the substance P receptor antagonist L-733,060 did not affect mast cell degranulation. However, topical application of two different nitric oxide donors did not cause mast cell...... degranulation ex vivo. CONCLUSIONS: Direct application of an exogenous nitric oxide donor on dural mast cells does not cause mast cell degranulation ex vivo. In vivo application of the nitric oxide donor glyceryl trinitrate leads to a prominent level of degranulation via a yet unknown mechanism. This effect can...

  17. Local cell-mediated immune reactions in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilynskij, B.T.; Vasil'ev, N.V.; Volod'ko, N.A.; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Tomsk. Onkologicheskij Nauchnyj Tsentr)

    1988-01-01

    The analysis of 178 cases of stage I-II breast cancer showed morphological features of local cell-mediated immune reactions to be of limited prognostic value. A comparative evaluation of some characteristics of cell surface receptors, such as ability to spontaneous rosette formation with sheep erythrocytes and sensitivty to theophylline, was carried out in lymphocyte samples obtained from tumor tissue and peripheral blood of 76 cancer patients subjected to preoperative radiotherapy. The said parameters were studied in breast cancer patients of rosette-forming cell reaction to theophylline were identified, the incidence of some of them being determined by the presence or absence of regional metastases. The level and functional activity of surface receptors of tumor mononuclear cells proved to influence prognosis

  18. Disturbances of cell-mediated immunity in ornithosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, L; Koba, S; Partyka, M; Maślanka, K; Kryczka, W; Szerszén, B; Bartosz, B

    1984-01-01

    27 cases of ornithosis were observed during an epidemia in 1980 in Kielce and subsequently followed with respect to immunological characteristics of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Blastic transformation of these cells was tested after stimulation in vitro with three different mitogens. Identification of peripheral blood T and B lymphocytes was done using rosette tests (E,EA,EAC) and the occurrence of surface immunoglobulins was determined by the immunofluorescent method with polyvalent anti-immunoglobulin serum. The counts of T and B lymphocytes in the peripheral blood were normal throughout the whole period of the observation, but from the 3rd week on a significant impairment of 3H-thymidine incorporation into the cells stimulated with Con A was observed, and from the 10th week on, this impairment appeared also in cells stimulated with PHA and PWM. These observations revealed considerable disturbances in cell-mediated reactivity in patients with ornithosis and seem to be connected with chronic infection with Chlamydia psittaci.

  19. Cell mediated immune response in human antirabies revaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Regina Veiga

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of secondary cell mediated immune response (CMI in human antirabies immunization was studied. The Puenzalida & Palácios vaccine was used because it is routinely used in Brazil. CMI was evaluated by lymphoblastic transformation indices obtained in whole blood culture in the presence of rabies and control (nervous tissue antigens. Eleven volunteers submitted to revaccination constituted the group under study, while three other volunteers submitted primo vaccination were utilized as control group. A clear secondary CMI to rabies antigen was detected in all the revaccinated volunteers who showed earlier and more intense response than the control group. Response to the control antigen, however, present in all the components of the first group was not detectable in two out of the three primovaccinated and very low in the third one.

  20. Are mast cells instrumental for fibrotic diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eOvered-Sayer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a fatal lung disorder of unknown etiology characterised by accumulation of lung fibroblasts and extracellular matrix deposition, ultimately leading to compromised tissue architecture and lung function capacity. IPF has a heterogeneous clinical course; however the median survival after diagnosis is only 3-5 years. The pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry has made many attempts to find effective treatments for IPF, but the disease has so far defied all attempts at therapeutic intervention. Clinical trial failures may arise for many reasons, including disease heterogeneity, lack of readily measurable clinical end points other than overall survival, and, perhaps most of all, a lack of understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of the progression of IPF.The precise link between inflammation and fibrosis remains unclear, but it appears that immune cells can promote fibrosis by releasing fibrogenic factors. So far, however, therapeutic approaches targeting macrophages, neutrophils, or lymphocytes have failed to alter disease pathogenesis. A new cell to garner research interest in fibrosis is the mast cell. Increased numbers of mast cells have long been known to be present in pulmonary fibrosis and clinically correlations between mast cells and fibrosis have been reported. More recent data suggests that mast cells may contribute to the fibrotic process by stimulating fibroblasts resident in the lung, thus driving the pathogenesis of the disease. In this review, we will discuss the mast cell and its physiological role in tissue repair and remodelling, as well as its pathological role in fibrotic diseases such as IPF, where the process of tissue repair and remodelling is thought to be dysregulated.

  1. Inflammation induced by mast cell deficiency rather than the loss of interstitial cells of Cajal causes smooth muscle dysfunction in W/Wv mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, John H.; Chen, Jinghong; Shi, Xuan-Zheng; Sarna, Sushil K.

    2014-01-01

    The initial hypothesis suggested that the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) played an essential role in mediating enteric neuronal input to smooth muscle cells. Much information for this hypothesis came from studies in W/Wv mice lacking ICC. However, mast cells, which play critical roles in regulating inflammation in their microenvironment, are also absent in W/Wv mice. We tested the hypothesis that the depletion of mast cells in W/Wv mice generates inflammation in fundus muscularis externa (ME) that impairs smooth muscle reactivity to Ach, independent of the depletion of ICC. We performed experiments on the fundus ME from wild type (WT) and W/Wv mice before and after reconstitution of mast cells by bone marrow transplant. We found that mast cell deficiency in W/Wv mice significantly increased COX-2 and iNOS expression and decreased smooth muscle reactivity to Ach. Mast cell reconstitution or concurrent blockade of COX-2 and iNOS restored smooth muscle contractility without affecting the suppression of c-kit in W/Wv mice. The expression of nNOS and ChAT were suppressed in W/Wv mice; mast cell reconstitution did not restore them. We conclude that innate inflammation induced by mast cell deficiency in W/Wv mice impairs smooth muscle contractility independent of ICC deficiency. The impairment of smooth muscle contractility and the suppression of the enzymes regulating the synthesis of Ach and NO in W/Wv mice need to be considered in evaluating the role of ICC in regulating smooth muscle and enteric neuronal function in W/Wv mice. PMID:24550836

  2. Inflammation induced by mast cell deficiency rather than the loss of interstitial cells of Cajal causes smooth muscle dysfunction in W/W(v) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, John H; Chen, Jinghong; Shi, Xuan-Zheng; Sarna, Sushil K

    2014-01-01

    The initial hypothesis suggested that the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) played an essential role in mediating enteric neuronal input to smooth muscle cells. Much information for this hypothesis came from studies in W/W(v) mice lacking ICC. However, mast cells, which play critical roles in regulating inflammation in their microenvironment, are also absent in W/W(v) mice. We tested the hypothesis that the depletion of mast cells in W/W(v) mice generates inflammation in fundus muscularis externa (ME) that impairs smooth muscle reactivity to Ach, independent of the depletion of ICC. We performed experiments on the fundus ME from wild type (WT) and W/W(v) mice before and after reconstitution of mast cells by bone marrow transplant. We found that mast cell deficiency in W/W(v) mice significantly increased COX-2 and iNOS expression and decreased smooth muscle reactivity to Ach. Mast cell reconstitution or concurrent blockade of COX-2 and iNOS restored smooth muscle contractility without affecting the suppression of c-kit in W/W(v) mice. The expression of nNOS and ChAT were suppressed in W/W(v) mice; mast cell reconstitution did not restore them. We conclude that innate inflammation induced by mast cell deficiency in W/W(v) mice impairs smooth muscle contractility independent of ICC deficiency. The impairment of smooth muscle contractility and the suppression of the enzymes regulating the synthesis of Ach and NO in W/W(v) mice need to be considered in evaluating the role of ICC in regulating smooth muscle and enteric neuronal function in W/W(v) mice.

  3. Core heat transport in the MAST Spherical Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, A.R.; Akers, R.J.; Brickley, C.; Carolan, P.G.; Challis, C.; Conway, N.J.; Cunningham, G.; Meyer, H.; Patel, A.; Roach, C.; Valovie, M.; Applegate, D.J.; Cowley, S.C.; Joiner, N.; Walsh, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    High-β spherical tokamak (ST) plasmas have intrinsic properties which favour the suppression of anomalous transport. Transport has been studied in NBI heated plasmas in the MAST ST device, where it is found that ion thermal transport is typically close to the neo-classical level. Calculations of the ITG microstability with the GS2 gyro-kinetic code suggest that this form of turbulence may be suppressed by the high ExB shearing rates in these plasmas. Electron transport is somewhat higher and cannot be explained from mixing length estimates of ETG turbulence. This is perhaps due instead either to micro-tearing modes in the core plasma or extended radial structures in the saturated turbulence. Micro-stability is also favoured by low magnetic shear and this has been used to produce high-performance L- and H-mode plasmas with improved core confinement as well as plasmas exhibiting ITBs in both the ion and electron channels. Broad electron ITBs have been produced with counter-NBI heating in which anomalous electron transport apparently has been reduced by the very high ExB shearing rates prevailing in these plasmas. Such studies also contribute towards testing the transport and ITB physics basis for the ITER device. (author)

  4. EBW simulation for MAST and NSTX experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preinhaelter, J.; Urban, J.; Pavlo, P.; Taylor, G.; Shevchenko, V.; Valovic, M.; Vahala, L.; Vahala, G.

    2005-01-01

    The interpretation of EBW emission from spherical tokamaks is nontrivial. We report on a 3D simulation model of this process that incorporates Gaussian beams for the antenna, a full wave solution of EBW-X and EBW-X-O conversions using adaptive finite elements, and EBW ray tracing to determine the radiative temperature. This model is then used to interpret the experimental results from MAST and NSTX. EBW for ELM free H-modes in MAST suggests that the magnetic equilibrium determined by the EFIT code does not adequately represent the B-field within the transport barrier. Using the EBW signal for the reconstruction of the radial profile of the magnetic field, we determine a new equilibrium and see that the EBW simulation now yields better agreement with experimental results. EBW simulations yield excellent results for the time development of the plasma temperature as measured by the EBW radiometer on NSTX

  5. The Model for Assessment of Telemedicine (MAST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidholm, Kristian; Clemensen, Jane; Caffery, Liam J

    2017-01-01

    The evaluation of telemedicine can be achieved using different evaluation models or theoretical frameworks. This paper presents a scoping review of published studies which have applied the Model for Assessment of Telemedicine (MAST). MAST includes pre-implementation assessment (e.g. by use of par...... the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. In this article, research design and methods used in the multidisciplinary assessment are described, strengths and weaknesses are analysed, and recommendations for future research are presented....... of participatory design), followed by multidisciplinary assessment, including description of the patients and the application and assessment of safety, clinical effectiveness, patient perspectives, economic aspects organisational aspects and socio-cultural, legal and ethical aspects. Twenty-two studies met...

  6. Mast cell chemotaxis - chemoattractants and signaling pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hálová, Ivana; Dráberová, Lubica; Dráber, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 3, May (2012), s. 119 ISSN 1664-3224 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12073; GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759 Grant - others:ECST(XE) BM1007; AV ČR(CZ) MC200520901 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : mast cell * IgE receptor * plasma membrane Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  7. Signal transduction and chemotaxis in mast cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráber, Petr; Hálová, Ivana; Polakovičová, Iva; Kawakami, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 778, jaro (2016), s. 11-23 ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-09807S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-00703S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Mast cell * IgE receptor * KIT receptor * Signal transduction * Chemotaxis * Plasma membrane Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.896, year: 2016

  8. The validity of the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, H; Nielsen, S D; Gluud, C

    1994-01-01

    This review examines the validity of the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST) as a screening instrument for alcohol problems. Studies that compare the MAST-questionnaire with other defined diagnostic criteria of alcohol problems were retrieved through MEDLINE and a cross-bibliographic check....... A total of 20 validity studies were included. The studies varied considerably regarding the prevalence of alcohol problems, the diagnostic criteria, and the examined patient categories. The MAST compared with other diagnostic criteria of alcohol problems gave validity measures with the following span...... and the specificities show substantial variations. The variables that seem to have the largest influence on the PVpos seem to be the prevalence of alcohol problems, the diagnostic method against which the MAST-questionnaire is validated, and the populations on which the MAST is applied. The MAST should in the future...

  9. Cytotoxic T cells mediate pathology and metastasis in cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda O Novais

    Full Text Available Disease progression in response to infection can be strongly influenced by both pathogen burden and infection-induced immunopathology. While current therapeutics focus on augmenting protective immune responses, identifying therapeutics that reduce infection-induced immunopathology are clearly warranted. Despite the apparent protective role for murine CD8⁺ T cells following infection with the intracellular parasite Leishmania, CD8⁺ T cells have been paradoxically linked to immunopathological responses in human cutaneous leishmaniasis. Transcriptome analysis of lesions from Leishmania braziliensis patients revealed that genes associated with the cytolytic pathway are highly expressed and CD8⁺ T cells from lesions exhibited a cytolytic phenotype. To determine if CD8⁺ T cells play a causal role in disease, we turned to a murine model. These studies revealed that disease progression and metastasis in L. braziliensis infected mice was independent of parasite burden and was instead directly associated with the presence of CD8⁺ T cells. In mice with severe pathology, we visualized CD8⁺ T cell degranulation and lysis of L. braziliensis infected cells. Finally, in contrast to wild-type CD8⁺ T cells, perforin-deficient cells failed to induce disease. Thus, we show for the first time that cytolytic CD8⁺ T cells mediate immunopathology and drive the development of metastatic lesions in cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  10. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Khondoker M; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2016-01-19

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  11. Environmental immunogens and T-cell-mediated responses in fibromyalgia: evidence for immune dysregulation and determinants of granuloma formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanklin, D R; Stevens, M V; Hall, M F; Smalley, D L

    2000-10-01

    Thirty-nine patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) according to American College of Rheumatology criteria were studied for cell-mediated sensitivity to environmental chemicals. Lymphocytes were tested by standard [(3)H]thymidine incorporation in vitro for T cell memory to 11 chemical substances. Concanavalin A (Con A) was used to demonstrate T cell proliferation. Controls were 25 contemporaneous healthy adults and 252 other concurrent standard controls without any aspect of FMS. Significantly higher (P P > 0.02) SI were found for cadmium and silicon. FMS patients showed sporadic responses to the specific substances tested, with no high-frequency result (>50%) and no obvious pattern. Mitogenic responses to Con A indicated some suppression of T cell functionality in FMS. Possible links between mitogenicity and immunogenic T cell proliferation, certain electrochemical specifics of granuloma formation, maintenance of connective tissue, and the fundamental nature of FMS are considered. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  12. Distribution of mast cells in benign odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis Caldas Pereira, Francisco; Gurgel, Clarissa Araújo Silva; Ramos, Eduardo Antônio Gonçalves; Vidal, Manuela Torres Andion; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz Barbosa; Jurisic, Vladimir; Sales, Caroline Brandi Schlaepfer; Cury, Patrícia Ramos; dos Santos, Jean Nunes

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of mast cells in a series of odontogenic tumors. Forty-five cases of odontogenic tumors were investigated using immunohistochemistry for mast cell triptase, and differences between groups were statistically evaluated. Mast cells were present in 96% of odontogenic tumors. Mast cells present in solid ameloblastoma were observed in the tumor stroma surrounding more solid and follicular epithelial islands, with or without squamous metaplasia. The odontogenic mixoma showed few mast cells. In odontogenic tumors with a cystic structure, the mast cells were distributed throughout all areas of the lesions, mainly in keratocystic odontogenic tumor. In addition, the total density of mast cells between all odontogenic tumors showed no significant difference (p > 0.05). A greater mast cells distribution was found in keratocystic odontogenic tumor in relation to adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (p < 0.01), and when the unicystic ameloblastoma and keratocistic odontogenic tumor were compared to the odontogenic myxoma (p < 0.05). Syndrome keratocystic odontogenic tumor showed a higher mean of mast cells when compared with the other tumors of the sample. Mast cells values presented by syndrome keratocystic odontogenic tumor were significantly greater than those of the sporadic keratocystic odontogenic tumor that were not associated with the syndrome (p = 0.03). Mast cells are probably one of the major components of the stromal scaffold in odontogenic tumors. We found significant differences of mast cells between syndrome nonsyndrome keratocystic odontogenic tumors, although their distribution did not seem to have any influence on the biologic behavior of benign odontogenic tumors.

  13. Central nervous system mast cells in peripheral inflammatory nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellmeier Wilfried

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional aspects of mast cell-neuronal interactions remain poorly understood. Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of powerful pro-inflammatory mediators such as histamine and cytokines. Cerebral dural mast cells have been proposed to modulate meningeal nociceptor activity and be involved in migraine pathophysiology. Little is known about the functional role of spinal cord dural mast cells. In this study, we examine their potential involvement in nociception and synaptic plasticity in superficial spinal dorsal horn. Changes of lower spinal cord dura mast cells and their contribution to hyperalgesia are examined in animal models of peripheral neurogenic and non-neurogenic inflammation. Results Spinal application of supernatant from activated cultured mast cells induces significant mechanical hyperalgesia and long-term potentiation (LTP at spinal synapses of C-fibers. Lumbar, thoracic and thalamic preparations are then examined for mast cell number and degranulation status after intraplantar capsaicin and carrageenan. Intradermal capsaicin induces a significant percent increase of lumbar dural mast cells at 3 hours post-administration. Peripheral carrageenan in female rats significantly increases mast cell density in the lumbar dura, but not in thoracic dura or thalamus. Intrathecal administration of the mast cell stabilizer sodium cromoglycate or the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk inhibitor BAY-613606 reduce the increased percent degranulation and degranulated cell density of lumbar dural mast cells after capsaicin and carrageenan respectively, without affecting hyperalgesia. Conclusion The results suggest that lumbar dural mast cells may be sufficient but are not necessary for capsaicin or carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia.

  14. Mast cells promote lung vascular remodelling in pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, J; Yin, J; Kukucka, M; Yin, N; Saarikko, I; Sterner-Kock, A; Fujii, H; Leong-Poi, H; Kuppe, H; Schermuly, R T; Kuebler, W M

    2011-06-01

    Left heart disease (LHD) frequently causes lung vascular remodelling and pulmonary hypertension (PH). Yet pharmacological treatment for PH in LHD is lacking and its pathophysiological basis remains obscure. We aimed to identify candidate mechanisms of PH in LHD and to test their relevance and therapeutic potential. In rats, LHD was induced by supracoronary aortic banding. Whole genome microarray analyses were performed, candidate genes were confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blots and functional relevance was tested in vivo by genetic and pharmacological strategies. In lungs of LHD rats, mast cell activation was the most prominently upregulated gene ontology cluster. Mast cell gene upregulation was confirmed at RNA and protein levels and remodelled vessels showed perivascular mast cell accumulations. In LHD rats treated with the mast cell stabiliser ketotifen, or in mast cell deficient Ws/Ws rats, PH and vascular remodelling were largely attenuated. Both strategies also reduced PH and vascular remodelling in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension, suggesting that the role of mast cells extends to non-cardiogenic PH. In PH of different aetiologies, mast cells accumulate around pulmonary blood vessels and contribute to vascular remodelling and PH. Mast cells and mast cell-derived mediators may present promising targets for the treatment of PH.

  15. Effect of 3-D magnetic fields on neutral particle fueling and exhaust in MAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, Kurt; Kremeyer, Thierry; Waters, Ian; Schmitz, Oliver; Kirk, Andrew; Harrison, James

    2017-10-01

    The application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) is used to suppress edge localized modes but causes in many cases a density pump-out. At MAST, this particle pump out was found to be connected to an amplifying MHD plasma response. An analysis is presented on past MAST discharges to understand the effect of these RMPs on the neutral household and on changes in neutral fueling and exhaust during the pump out. A global, 0-D particle balance model was used to study the neutral dynamics and plasma confinement during shots with and without RMP application. Using the D α emission measured by filterscopes and a calibrated 1-D CCD camera, as well as S/XB coefficients determined by the edge plasma parameters, globally averaged ion confinement times were calculated. In L-mode, discharges with RMPs that caused an MHD response had a 15-20% decrease in confinement time but an increase in total recycling flux. The application of RMPs in H-mode caused either a decrease or no change in confinement, like those in L-mode, depending on the configuration of the RMPs and plasma response. A spectroscopically assisted Penning gauge is being prepared for the next campaign at MAST-U to extend this particle balance to study impurity exhaust with RMPs. This work was funded in part by the U.S. DoE under Grant DE-SC0012315.

  16. Decentralized control of the COFS-I Mast using linear dc motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Celano, Tom; Ide, Eric

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to a decentralized control design for vibration suppression in the COFS-I Mast using linear dc motors for actuators. The decentralized control design is based results from power systems using root locus techniques that are not well known. The approach is effective because the loop gain is low due to low actuator authority. The frequency-dependent nonlinearities of the actuator are taken into account. Because of the tendency of the transients to saturate the the stroke length of the actuator, its effectiveness is limited.

  17. Cell-mediated immunity during syphilis. A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavia, Charles S.; Folds, James D.; Baseman, Joel B.

    1978-01-01

    Evidence is presented which reinforces the complexity of the host-parasite interaction during the course of syphilis. Infection with Treponema pallidum evokes a complicated antibody response and an assortment of cell-mediated immune reactions in the host. It appears that humoral immunity plays a minor role towards the complete elimination of syphilitic infection while the cellular limb of the immune response may be an important host defence mechanism. Information now available indicates that a state of anergy, or immunosuppression, exists in the early stages of human and experimental rabbit syphilis based upon negative skin reactions to T. pallidum antigen(s), the abnormal histological appearance of lymphoid organs, and impaired in vitro lymphocyte reactivity. It is also evident that in the later stages of the disease cellular immunity becomes activated as delayed type skin reactions can normally be elicited in tertiary syphilitics and lymphocyte behaviour in cell culture appears normal. Several mechanisms have been invoked to explain the delay in an effective immune response against syphilitic infection and the duration of the disease: (1) a capsule-like substance on the outer surface of virulant T. pallidum may act as a barrier against treponemicidal antibody; (2) this material and other biological properties of virulent treponemes could enable spirochaetes to escape being engulfed by macrophages and other phagocytic cells; (3) antigenic competition among different treponemal antigens causing partial tolerance; (4) T. pallidum infection may bring about the elaboration of immunosuppressive substances of host or treponemal origin which inhibit the proper function of lymphocytes, macrophages, and other cell types. PMID:350348

  18. B-cell-mediated strategies to fight chronic allograft rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali H Dalloul

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after one year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of tolerant vs effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic

  19. e Ciências Afins (MAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Granato

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available MAST is a science and technology museum located in the grounds and architectural complex belonging to the former Observatório Nacional in Rio de Janeiro. This complex, concluded in 1921, comprises of 16 buildings, and was listed by the Artistic and Historic National (1986 and State (1987 Heritage. This complex features three pavilions sheltering the equatorial telescopes, typical examples of Architecture and Engineering buildings for Astronomic purposes. Two of these pavilions, all of which are under the care of MAST, shelter the 21 cm and 32 cm telescopes, plus a third, part of the National Observatory, which houses the 46 cm equatorial telescope. The present study is the result of the work undertaken by MAST to preserve and restore the historical buildings under its responsibility. Thanks to a partnership set up with the Vitae Foundation, it has been possible to develop restoration work covering all aspects of the pavilions (moving metal dome, building, scientific instrument, as well as the area’s museography, with a view to informing visitors about the restoration work undertaken. The project, based on the historical research on the complex, was carried out by a multidisciplinary team over two years. Each stage of the work was comprehensively photographed, including the intervention project design, which was based on architectural surveys and the diagnosis of the complex’s state of repair, plus the restoration per se. This is a groundbreaking initiative in Latin America and will serve as an example for future actions to be taken on historical buildings, especially those built for scientific and technological purposes.

  20. [Tonsillar mast cell infiltration and allergic tonsillitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Callejo, F J; Orts Alborch, M H; Roselló, P; Marco Algarra, J

    2003-04-01

    We report the case of a seven year-old boy bearing of exudative acute tonsillitis after strawberry ingestion with no previous infectious history. After having diagnosed it as hypersensitivity type I, this patient began to suffer repetitive episodes of exudative and purulent tonsillitis, related to cool drinks and direct manipulation of tonsils. These were hyperplastic and Staphylococcus sp. and Streptococcus sp. were isolated in them. The episodes were shortened by the use of corticosteroids. Tonsillectomy was the definitive therapy. Biopsy informed of mast cells infiltration in germinal centers of both palatine tonsils.

  1. Mast-sipping in EPR trademark plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenberger, Jan; Schienbein, Marcel; Geier, Roland

    2010-01-01

    For more than 20 years, AREVA applies and develops different sipping techniques to identify fuel assemblies with leaking fuel rods. For the EPR trademark reactors a Mast Sipping System with newest developments will be implemented considering radiation protection and latest standards requirements. The innovative EPR trademark Sipping System differs from previous systems in many ways. One of the main innovations is that all the necessary processes of the Sipping system have been fully digitized. Second, several ALARA design modifications have been implemented to meet the current radiation protection requirements. An additional implementable multilingual assistance program facilitates the handling of the system and helps to prevent incorrect operation. (orig.)

  2. Overview of recent physics results from MAST.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kirk, A.; Adámek, Jiří; Akers, R.J.; Allan, S.; Appel, L.; Arese Lucini, F.; Barnes, M.; Barrett, T.; Ben Ayed, N.; Boeglin, W.; Bradley, J.; Browning, P.K.; Brünner, J.; Cahyna, Pavel; Cardnell, S.; Carr, M.; Casson, F.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C.; Chapman, I.T.; Chapman, S.; Chorley, J.; Conroy, S.; Conway, N.; Cooper, W.A.; Cox, M.; Crocker, N.; Crowley, B.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darrow, D.; Dendy, R.; Dickinson, D.; Dorland, W.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Evans, M.; Farley, T.; Fedorczak, N.; Field, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fitzgerald, I.; Fox, M.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y.C.; Gi, K.; Gibson, K.; Gorelenkova, M.; Gracias, W.; Gurl, C.; Guttenfelder, W.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Havlickova, E.; Hawkes, N.; Hender, T.; Henderson, S.; Highcock, E.; Hillesheim, J.; Hnat, B.; Horáček, Jan; Howard, J.; Howell, D.; Huang, B.; Imada, K.; Inomoto, M.; Imazawa, R.; Jones, O.; Kadowaki, K.; Kaye, S.; Keeling, D.; Klimek, I.; Kocan, M.; Kogan, L.; Komm, Michael; Lai, W.; Leddy, J.; Leggate, H.; Hollocombe, J.; Lipschultz, B.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y.Q.; Lloyd, B.; Lomanowski, B.; Lukin, V.; Lupelli, I.; Maddison, G.; Madsen, J.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G.; McClements, K.; McMillan, B.; Meakins, A.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Milnes, J.; Morris, A.W.; Motojima, G.; Muir, D.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A.; O’Brien, M.; O’Gorman, T.; O’Mullane, M.; Olsen, J.; Omotani, J.; Ono, Y.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Parra, F.; Patel, A.; Peebles, W.; Perez, R.; Pinches, S.; Piron, L.; Price, M.; Reinke, M.; Ricci, P.; Riva, F.; Roach, C.; Romanelli, M.; Ryan, D.; Saarelma, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Schekochihin, A.; Sharapov, S.; Sharples, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Shinohara, K.; Silburn, S.; Simpson, J.; Stanier, A.; Storrs, J.; Summers, H.; Takase, Y.; Tamain, P.; Tanabe, H.; Tanaka, H.; Tani, K.; Taylor, D.; Thomas, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R.; Van Wyk, F.; Walkden, N.; Watanabe, T.; Wilson, H.; Wischmeier, M.; Yamada, T.; Young, J.; Zoletnik, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 102007. ISSN 0029-5515. [IAEA Fusion Energy Conference/26./. Kyoto, 17.10.2016-22.10.2016] EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : MAST upgrade * DBS system * edge and core turbulence Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1741-4326/aa65e0/meta

  3. Overview of physics results from MAST

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Meyer, H.; Akers, R.J.; Alladio, F.; Appel, L.C.; Axon, K.B.; Ben Ayed, N.; Boerner, P.; Buttery, R.J.; Carolan, P.G.; Ciric, D.; Challis, C.D.; Chapman, I.; Coyler, G.; Conner, J.W.; Conway, N.J.; Cowley, S.; Cox, M.; Counsell, G.F.; Cunningham, G.; Darke, A.; deBock, M.; deTemmerman, G.; Dendy, R.O.; Dowling, J.; Dnestrovskij, A.Yu.; Dnestrovskij, Yu.N.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Dunstan, M.; Field, A.R.; Foster, A.; Garzotti, L.; Gibbon, K.; Gryaznevich, M.P.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hawkes, N.C.; Harrison, J.; Helander, P.; Hnat, B.; Hole, M.J.; Howell, D.F.; Duc Hua, M.; Hubbard, A.; Istenic, M.; Joiner, N.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Koslowski, H.R.; Liang, Y.; Lilley, M.; Lisgo, S.; Lloyd, B.; Maddison, G.P.; Maingi, R.; Mancuso, A.; Manhood, S.J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G.J.; McCone, J.; Michael, C.; Micozzi, P.; Morgan, T.; Morris, A.W.; Muir, D.G.; Nardon, E.; Naylor, G.; O’Brien, M.R.; O’Gorman, T.; Patel, A.; Pinches, S.; Preinhaelter, Josef; Price, M.N.; Rachlew, E.; Reiter, D.; Roach, C.M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Sharapov, S.E.; Shevchenko, V.; Shibaev, S.; Smith, H.; Staebler, G.E.; Stork, D.; Storrs, J.; Sykes, A.; Tallents, S.; Tamain, P.; Taylor, D.; Temple, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Thyagaraja, A.; Turnyanskiy, M.R.; Urban, Jakub; Valovic, M.; Vann, R.G.L.; Volpe, F.; Voss, F.; Walsh, M.J.; Warder, S.E.V.; Watkins, R.; Wilson, H.R.; Windridge, M.; Wisse, M.; Zabolotski, A.; Zoletnik, S.; Zolotukhin, O.; MAST, Mast.Teams.; NBI, NBI.Teams.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 10 (2009), s. 104017-104017 ISSN 0029-5515. [IAEA Fusion Energy Conference/22nd./. Geneva, 13.10.2008-18.10.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/0419; GA MŠk 7G09042 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Overdense plasma * MAST * Tokamaks * Diagnostics * Elektron Bernstein waves Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.270, year: 2009 http://www.iop.org/EJ/abstract/0029-5515/49/10/104017

  4. Preliminary validation of the Multi-Attitude Suicide Tendency (MAST ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective:The factor structure of the Multi-Attitude Suicide Tendency (MAST) scale was examined using a sample of non-white South African adolescents. Method: The MAST scale was administered to 205 secondary school students between 13 and 20 years of age. Results: The scale demonstrated satisfactory internal ...

  5. Measuring histamine and cytokine release from basophils and mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina M; Falkencrone, Sidsel; Skov, Per S

    2014-01-01

    Basophils and mast cells are known for their capability to release both preformed and newly synthesized inflammatory mediators. In this chapter we describe how to stimulate and detect histamine released from basophils in whole blood, purified basophils, in vitro cultured mast cells, and in situ s...

  6. Histophysiology of mast cells in skin and other organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, H; Förster, F J

    1975-10-29

    Our observations demonstrate an intimate relationship between peripheral nerve fibers and mast cells. In addition, mast cells in various organs influence both the small blood vessels and the organ parenchyma cells. These relations are interpreted in the sence of a neuro-hormonale feedback-system.

  7. Micronutrient supplementation and T-cell mediated immune responses in patients with tuberculosis in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limited studies exist regarding whether incorporating micronutrient supplements during tuberculosis (TB) treatment may improve cell-mediated immune response. We examine the effect of micronutrient supplementation on lymphocyte proliferation response to mycobacteria or T cell mitogens in a randomize...

  8. Stereological quantification of mast cells in human synovium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, T E; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Herlin, T

    1999-01-01

    Mast cells participate in both the acute allergic reaction as well as in chronic inflammatory diseases. Earlier studies have revealed divergent results regarding the quantification of mast cells in the human synovium. The aim of the present study was therefore to quantify these cells in the human...... synovium, using stereological techniques. Different methods of staining and quantification have previously been used for mast cell quantification in human synovium. Stereological techniques provide precise and unbiased information on the number of cell profiles in two-dimensional tissue sections of......, in this case, human synovium. In 10 patients suffering from osteoarthritis a median of 3.6 mast cells/mm2 synovial membrane was found. The total number of cells (synoviocytes, fibroblasts, lymphocytes, leukocytes) present was 395.9 cells/mm2 (median). The mast cells constituted 0.8% of all the cell profiles...

  9. Mast cell function modulating IgE-mediated allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby Pawankar

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic diseases, such as atopic rhinitis, bronchial asthma and urticaria, are prevalent and increasing in frequency. Mast cells are known to play a central role in the immediate phase reaction of allergic diseases through the IgE-mediated release of a variety of chemical mediators, such as histamine, leukotrienes and prostaglandins. In contrast, T lymphocytes, basophils and eosinophils are thought to be responsible for inducing the late phase response. However, whether the mast cell can be simplistically assigned a role in the immediate phase allergic response and whether mast cells are necessary for the ongoing allergic response, including the development of hyperresponsiveness, remains to be completely studied. In the present article, the author will discuss the integrated roles of mast cells in IgE-mediated allergic inflammation, with specific emphasis on the roles of mast cell-derived cytokines in the late phase allergic response and chronic allergic inflammation.

  10. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha in T-cell-mediated immunity to viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas N; Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    The immune response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) was evaluated. Generation of virus-specific effector T cells is unimpaired in MIP-1alpha-deficient mice. Furthermore, MIP-1alpha is not required for T-cell-mediated virus...... control or virus-induced T-cell-dependent inflammation. Thus, MIP-1alpha is not mandatory for T-cell-mediated antiviral immunity....

  11. Induction of dexamethasone (DM) of histidine decarboxylase (HDC) in mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, A.; Imanishi, N.; Nakayama, T.; Asano, M.; Tomita, K.

    1986-05-01

    Effects of glucocorticoids on HDC in cultured mouse mastocytoma P-815 cells and rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC) were investigated to explore the role of steroids in inflammatory tissues. DM (1 nM to 10 ..mu..M) significantly elevated the histamine content and HDC activity of P-815 cells (37/sup 0/C, 24 hrs), accompanying with a growth retardation of the cells by about 40%. In contrast to histamine, serotonin levels of P-815 cells were decreased by treatment with DM. However, DM had no significant effects on the activities of various enzymes other than HDC present in granules or membrane of P-815 cells. DM-induced increases of histamine and HDC activity were completely suppressed by the addition of cycloheximide and actinomycin D. P-815 cells were found to have the binding sites for /sup 3/H-DM in the cytosol (Kd=2.2 nM, 450 sites/cell) and in the nuclei (Kd=0.1 nM, 39 sites/nucleus). Purified HDC from P-815 cells was identified to be an isozyme of mast cell type enzyme (MW=110K, pI=5.4). In contrast, the basal histamine level of cultured RPMC was not affected by treatment of DM, which suppressed histamine release activity induced by DNP-ascaris antiserum by 40%-50%. Histamine-depleted RPMC after degranulation partially recovered histamine level by 50%-60% in the presence of DM. These results showed that glucocorticoids specifically stimulated histamine formation with the increased de novo synthesis of HDC in mast cells.

  12. Digital quantitative analysis of mast cell infiltration in interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Yoshiyuki; Maeda, Daichi; Morikawa, Teppei; Niimi, Aya; Nomiya, Akira; Yamada, Yukio; Igawa, Yasuhiko; Goto, Akiteru; Fukayama, Masashi; Homma, Yukio

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the significance of mast cell infiltration in interstitial cystitis (IC) by comparison with equally inflamed controls using a digital quantification technique. Bladder biopsy specimens from 31 patients with Hunner type IC and 38 patients with non-Hunner type IC were analyzed. Bladder biopsy specimens from 37 patients without IC, including 19 non-specific chronic cystitis ("non-IC cystitis") specimens and 18 non-inflamed bladder ("normal bladder") specimens, were used as controls. Mast cell tryptase-, CD3-, CD20-, and CD138-immunoreactive cells were quantified using digital image analysis software to evaluate both mast cell and lymphoplasmacytic cell densities. Mast cell and lymphoplasmacytic cell densities were counted independently in the entire lamina propria and detrusor areas and compared among the four groups. In the lamina propria, there were no significant differences in mast cell and lymphoplasmacytic cell densities between Hunner type IC and non-IC cystitis or between non-Hunner type IC and normal bladder specimens. In the detrusor, the mast cell densities were not significantly different among the four groups. Mast cell density was correlated with lymphoplasmacytic cell density, but not with clinical parameters. Mast cell density is not significantly different between IC specimens and non-IC control specimens with a similar degree of background inflammation. The intensity of mast cell infiltration generally correlated with that of lymphoplasmacytic cells. We conclude that mast cell count is of no value in the differential diagnosis between IC and other etiologies. © 2017 The Authors. Neurourology and Urodynamics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Non-immunological activation of peritoneal mast cells of rats by means of mast cell degranulating peptide from bee toxic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.

    1982-01-01

    The subject of this dissertation is the interaction of MCD-peptide with the mast cell with regard to binding properties and histamine-liberating activity. The peptide is labelled with Na 125 I, its binding characteristics on degranulating and deactivating mast cells recorded and compared to binding on periteneal macrophages and neutrophilic granulocytes. Further, the non-lytic mode of action of MCD-peptide is pointed out, whereby the surface-active toxic peptide of the bee, melittin, finds application in parallel studies. In order to establish to what extent the binding property of the peptide to the mast cell is inhibited by IgE-antibodies charged on the later, rats are immunized with dead Bordetella pertussis microorganisms as adjuvant and ovalbumin as antigen. The induced IgE specific immune response provides active sensitized mast cells and enriches reagin antibodies in the sera of immunized animals. The binding of peptides is studied on active and passive sensitized mast cells and compared to the situation found with normal mast cells. A further section of work deals with the question whether an altered binding pattern is caused by enzymatic treatment of the cell surface. A possible interference of the MCD-peptide with the IgE-receptor could thus be indicated or other types of binding position demonstrated. The influence of granular secretion on mast cell binding is illustrated by means of studies on isolated mast cell granula. (orig./MG) [de

  14. MAST's Integrated Data Access Management system: IDAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, D.G.; Appel, L.; Conway, N.J.; Kirk, A.; Martin, R.; Meyer, H.; Storrs, J.; Taylor, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Waterhouse, J.

    2008-01-01

    A new Integrated Data Access Management system, IDAM, has been created to address specific data management issues of the MAST spherical Tokamak. For example, this system enables access to numerous file formats, both legacy and modern (IDA, Ufile, netCDF, HDF5, MDSPlus, PPF, JPF). It adds data quality values at the signal level, and automatically corrects for problems in data: in timings, calibrations, and labelling. It also builds new signals from signal components. The IDAM data server uses a hybrid XML-relational database to record how data are accessed, whether locally or remotely, and how alias and generic signal names are mapped to true names. Also, XML documents are used to encode the details of data corrections, as well as definitions of composite signals and error models. The simple, user friendly, API and accessor function library, written in C on Linux, is available for applications in C, C++, IDL and Fortran-90/95/2003 with good performance: a MAST plasma current trace (28 kbytes of data), requested using a generic name and with data corrections applied, is delivered over a 100 Mbit/s network in ∼13 ms

  15. Mast cell distribution in normal adult skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, A S; Heide, R; den Hollander, J C; Mulder, P G M; Tank, B; Oranje, A P

    2005-03-01

    To investigate mast cell distribution in normal adult skin to provide a reference range for comparison with mastocytosis. Mast cells (MCs) were counted in uninvolved skin adjacent to basal cell carcinomas and other dermatological disorders in adults. There was an uneven distribution of MCs in different body sites using the anti-tryptase monoclonal antibody technique. Numbers of MCs on the trunk, upper arm, and upper leg were similar, but were significantly different from those found on the lower leg and forearm. Two distinct groups were formed--proximal and distal. There were 77.0 MCs/mm2 at proximal body sites and 108.2 MCs/mm2 at distal sites. Adjusted for the adjacent diagnosis and age, this difference was consistent. The numbers of MCs in uninvolved skin adjacent to basal cell carcinomas and other dermatological disorders were not different from those in the control group. Differences in the numbers of MCs between the distal and the proximal body sites must be considered when MCs are counted for a reliable diagnosis of mastocytosis. A pilot study in patients with mastocytosis underlined the variation in the numbers of MCs in mastocytosis and normal skin, but showed a considerable overlap. The observed numbers of MCs in adults cannot be extrapolated to children. MC numbers varied significantly between proximal and distal body sites and these differences must be considered when MCs are counted for a reliable diagnosis of mastocytosis. There was a considerable overlap between the numbers of MCs in mastocytosis and normal skin.

  16. Circumvention of regulatory CD4(+) T cell activity during cross-priming strongly enhances T cell-mediated immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, Antje; Gebhardt, Friedemann; Lahl, Katharina; Neuenhahn, Michael; Schmitz, Frank; Anderl, Florian; Wagner, Hermann; Sparwasser, Tim; Busch, Dirk H; Kastenmüller, Kathrin

    2008-06-01

    Immunization with purified antigens is a safe and practical vaccination strategy but is generally unable to induce sustained CD8(+) T cell-mediated protection against intracellular pathogens. Most efforts to improve the CD8(+) T cell immunogenicity of these vaccines have focused on co-administration of adjuvant to support cross-presentation and dendritic cell maturation. In addition, it has been shown that CD4(+) T cell help during the priming phase contributes to the generation of protective CD8(+) memory T cells. In this report we demonstrate that the depletion of CD4(+) T cells paradoxically enhances long-lasting CD8-mediated protective immunity upon protein vaccination. Functional and genetic in vivo inactivation experiments attribute this enhancement primarily to MHC class II-restricted CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which appear to physiologically suppress the differentiation process towards long-living effector memory T cells. Since, in functional terms, this suppression by Treg largely exceeds the positive effects of conventional CD4(+) T cell help, even the absence of all CD4(+) T cells or lack of MHC class II-mediated interactions on priming dendritic cells result in enhanced CD8(+) T cell immunogenicity. These findings have important implications for the improvement of vaccines against intracellular pathogens or tumors, especially in patients with highly active Treg.

  17. Chronic Insulin Exposure Induces ER Stress and Lipid Body Accumulation in Mast Cells at the Expense of Their Secretory Degranulation Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E Greineisen

    Full Text Available Lipid bodies (LB are reservoirs of precursors to inflammatory lipid mediators in immunocytes, including mast cells. LB numbers are dynamic, increasing dramatically under conditions of immunological challenge. We have previously shown in vitro that insulin-influenced lipogenic pathways induce LB biogenesis in mast cells, with their numbers attaining steatosis-like levels. Here, we demonstrate that in vivo hyperinsulinemia resulting from high fat diet is associated with LB accumulation in murine mast cells and basophils. We characterize the lipidome of purified insulin-induced LB, and the shifts in the whole cell lipid landscape in LB that are associated with their accumulation, in both model (RBL2H3 and primary mast cells. Lipidomic analysis suggests a gain of function associated with LB accumulation, in terms of elevated levels of eicosanoid precursors that translate to enhanced antigen-induced LTC4 release. Loss-of-function in terms of a suppressed degranulation response was also associated with LB accumulation, as were ER reprogramming and ER stress, analogous to observations in the obese hepatocyte and adipocyte. Taken together, these data suggest that chronic insulin elevation drives mast cell LB enrichment in vitro and in vivo, with associated effects on the cellular lipidome, ER status and pro-inflammatory responses.

  18. Reciprocal regulation of ARPP-16 by PKA and MAST3 kinases provides a cAMP-regulated switch in protein phosphatase 2A inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musante, Veronica; Li, Lu; Kanyo, Jean; Lam, Tukiet T; Colangelo, Christopher M; Cheng, Shuk Kei; Brody, A Harrison; Greengard, Paul; Le Novère, Nicolas; Nairn, Angus C

    2017-01-01

    ARPP-16, ARPP-19, and ENSA are inhibitors of protein phosphatase PP2A. ARPP-19 and ENSA phosphorylated by Greatwall kinase inhibit PP2A during mitosis. ARPP-16 is expressed in striatal neurons where basal phosphorylation by MAST3 kinase inhibits PP2A and regulates key components of striatal signaling. The ARPP-16/19 proteins were discovered as substrates for PKA, but the function of PKA phosphorylation is unknown. We find that phosphorylation by PKA or MAST3 mutually suppresses the ability of the other kinase to act on ARPP-16. Phosphorylation by PKA also acts to prevent inhibition of PP2A by ARPP-16 phosphorylated by MAST3. Moreover, PKA phosphorylates MAST3 at multiple sites resulting in its inhibition. Mathematical modeling highlights the role of these three regulatory interactions to create a switch-like response to cAMP. Together, the results suggest a complex antagonistic interplay between the control of ARPP-16 by MAST3 and PKA that creates a mechanism whereby cAMP mediates PP2A disinhibition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24998.001 PMID:28613156

  19. The Role of Mast Cells in Parathyroid Bone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Russell T; Iwaniec, Urszula T; Marley, Kevin; Sibonga, Jean D

    2010-01-01

    Chronic hyperparathyroidism (HPT) is a common cause of metabolic bone disease. These studies investigated the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the detrimental actions of elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) on the skeleton. Bone biopsies from hyperparathyroid patients revealed an association between parathyroid bone disease and increased numbers of bone marrow mast cells. We therefore evaluated the role of mast cells in the etiology of parathyroid bone disease in a rat model for chronic HPT. In rats, mature mast cells were preferentially located at sites undergoing bone turnover, and the number of mast cells at the bone–bone marrow interface was greatly increased following treatment with PTH. Time-course studies and studies employing parathyroid hormone–related peptide (PTHrP), as well as inhibitors of platelet-derived growth factor-A (PDGF-A, trapidil), kit (gleevec), and PI3K (wortmannin) signaling revealed that mature mast cell redistribution from bone marrow to bone surfaces precedes and is associated with osteitis fibrosa, a hallmark of parathyroid bone disease. Importantly, mature mast cells were not observed in the bone marrow of mice. Mice, in turn, were resistant to the development of PTH-induced bone marrow fibrosis. These findings suggest that the mast cell may be a novel target for treatment of metabolic bone disease. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20200965

  20. Overview of physics results from MAST towards ITER/DEMO and the MAST Upgrade

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Meyer, H.; Abel, I.G.; Akers, R.J.; Allan, A.; Allan, S.Y.; Appel, L.C.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Barratt, N.C.; Ben Ayed, N.; Bradley, J.W.; Canik, J.; Cahyna, Pavel; Cecconelo, M.; Challis, C.D.; Chapman, I.T.; Ciric, D.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N.J.; Cox, M.; Crowley, B.J.; Cowley, S.C.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darke, A.; De Bock, M.F.M.; De Temmerman, G.; Dendy, R.O.; Denner, P.; Dickinson, D.; Dnestrovsky, A.Y.; Dnestrovsky, Y.; Driscoll, M.D.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Dunstan, M.; Dura, P.; Elmore, S.; Field, A.R.; Fishpool, G.; Freethy, S.; Fundameski, W.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y.C.; Gibson, K.J.; Gryaznevich, M.P.; Harrison, J.; Havlíčková, E.; Hawkes, N.C.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hender, T.C.; Highcock, E.; Higgins, D.; Hill, P.; Hnat, B.; Hole, M.J.; Horáček, Jan; Howell, D.F.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaveeva, E.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Kočan, M.; Lake, R.J.; Lehnen, M.; Leggate, H.J.; Liang, Y.; Lilley, M.K.; Lisgo, S.W.; Liu, Y.Q.; Lloyd, B.; Maddison, G.P.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G.J.; McClements, K.G.; McMillan, B.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Molchanov, P.; Mordijck, S.; Morgan, T.; Morris, A.W.; Muir, D.G.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A.H.; O’Brien, M.R.; O’Gorman, T.; Pamela, S.; Parra, F.I.; Patel, A.; Pinches, S.D.; Price, M.N.; Roach, C.M.; Robinson, J.R.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Seidl, J.; Sharapov, S.E.; Schekochihin, A.A.; Shevchenko, V.; Shibaev, S.; Stork, D.; Storrs, J.; Sykes, A.; Tallents, G. J.; Tamain, P.; Taylor, D.; Temple, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M.R.; Valovič, M.; Vann, R.G.L.; Verwichte, E.; Voskoboynikov, P.; Voss, G.; Warder, S.E.V.; Wilson, H. R.; Wodniak, I.; Zoletnik, S.; Zagórski, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 10 (2013), s. 104008-104008 ISSN 0029-5515. [IAEA Fusion Energy Conference/24./. San Diego, 08.10.2012-13.10.2012] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : ITER * DEMO * MAST * spherical tokamak * JET Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.243, year: 2013 http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/53/10/104008/pdf/0029-5515_53_10_104008.pdf

  1. Mast Cells in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Guo-Ping; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2013-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are proinflammatory cells that play important roles in allergic responses, tumor growth, obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Although the presence and function of MCs in atherosclerotic lesions have been thoroughly studied in human specimens......, in primary cultured vascular cells, and in atherosclerosis in animals, their role in AAA was recognized only recently. Via multiple activation pathways, MCs release a spectrum of mediators � including histamine, inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, proteoglycans, and proteases � to activate...... neighboring cells, degrade extracellular matrix proteins, process latent bioactive molecules, promote angiogenesis, recruit additional inflammatory cells, and stimulate vascular cell apoptosis. These activities associate closely with medial elastica breakdown, medial smooth-muscle cell loss and thinning...

  2. Mast Cells in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Guo-Ping; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2013-01-01

    neighboring cells, degrade extracellular matrix proteins, process latent bioactive molecules, promote angiogenesis, recruit additional inflammatory cells, and stimulate vascular cell apoptosis. These activities associate closely with medial elastica breakdown, medial smooth-muscle cell loss and thinning......Mast cells (MCs) are proinflammatory cells that play important roles in allergic responses, tumor growth, obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Although the presence and function of MCs in atherosclerotic lesions have been thoroughly studied in human specimens......, in primary cultured vascular cells, and in atherosclerosis in animals, their role in AAA was recognized only recently. Via multiple activation pathways, MCs release a spectrum of mediators � including histamine, inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, proteoglycans, and proteases � to activate...

  3. Critical role of mast cells and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in the induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells by marijuana cannabidiol in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Venkatesh L.; Singh, Udai P.; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2015-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a natural non-psychotropic cannabinoid from marijuana (Cannabis sativa) with anti-epileptic and anti-inflammatory properties. Effect of CBD on naïve immune system is not precisely understood. In this study, we observed that administering CBD into naïve mice triggers robust induction of CD11b+Gr-1+ MDSC in the peritoneum, which expressed functional Arg1, and potently suppressed T cell proliferation ex vivo. Further, CBD-MDSC suppressed LPS-induced acute inflammatory response upon adoptive transfer in vivo. CBD-induced suppressor cells were comprised of CD11b+Ly6-G+Ly6-C+ granulocytic and CD11b+Ly6-G−Ly6-C+ monocytic subtypes, with monocytic MDSC exhibiting higher T cell suppressive function. Induction of MDSC by CBD was markedly attenuated in Kit-mutant (KitW/W-v) mast cell-deficient mice. MDSC response was reconstituted upon transfer of WT bone marrow-derived mast cells in KitW/W-v mice suggesting the key role of cKit (CD117) as well as mast cells. Moreover, mast cell activator compound 48/80 induced significant levels of MDSC in vivo. CBD administration in mice induced G-CSF, CXCL1 and M-CSF, but not GM-CSF. G-CSF was found to play a key role in MDSC mobilization inasmuch as neutralizing G-CSF caused a significant decrease in MDSC. Lastly, CBD enhanced the transcriptional activity of PPARγ in luciferase reporter assay, and PPARγ selective antagonist completely inhibited MDSC induction in vivo suggesting its critical role. Together, the results suggest that CBD may induce activation of PPARγ in mast cells leading to secretion of G-CSF and consequent MDSC mobilization. CBD being a major component of Cannabis, our study indicates that marijuana may modulate or dysregulate the immune system by mobilizing MDSC. PMID:25917103

  4. Fatigue failure and cracking in high mast poles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    This report presents the findings of a comprehensive research project to investigate the fatigue : cracking and failure of galvanized high mast illumination poles (HMIP). Ultrasonic inspection of : poles throughout the state has revealed the presence...

  5. Regulation of mast cell activation by complement-derived peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Anna; Andrásfalvy, Márton; Péterfy, Hajna; Tóth, Gábor; Pecht, Israel

    2004-03-29

    It is known for more than 25 years that the complement-derived anaphylatoxic peptides, C3a, C4a and C5a are potent activators of basophils and certain types of mast cells. Although tissue distribution of receptors for C3a and C5a well exceeds myeloid cells, apparently they are not expressed on mucosal type mast cells, consequently these cells are not activated by C3a and C5a. Our results do however demonstrate that C3a and peptides related to this complement activation product are able to inhibit FcRI-clustering induced activation of mucosal type mast cells-such as RBL-2H3 cells and bone-marrow derived mast cells. Based on the current results we propose the presence of separate "activator" and "inhibitor" sequence motifs in C3a which are in balance under physiologic conditions.

  6. On the functioning of folded dipole antennas on conducting masts

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mcnamara, DA

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available The radiation properties of individual folded dipole antennas mounted at various radial distances from the centre of conducting masts of different diameters are described in compact fashion....

  7. Mast Cell Inhibition Improves Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartelds, Beatrijs; van Loon, Rosa Laura E.; Mohaupt, Saffloer; Wijnberg, Hans; Dickinson, Michael G.; Takens, Janny; van Albada, Mirjam; Berger, Rolf M. F.; Boersma, B.

    Background: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive angioproliferative disease with high morbidity and mortality. Although the histopathology is well described, its pathogenesis is largely unknown. We previously identified the increased presence of mast cells and their markers in a

  8. Precision Deployable Mast for the SWOT KaRIn Instrument

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Design and prototype a lightweight, precision-deployable mast for the Ka-band Radar Interferometer (KaRIn) antennas in the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT)...

  9. Physiological and pathophysiological functions of intestinal mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Stephan C

    2009-07-01

    The normal gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa is equipped with mast cells that account for 2-3% of lamina propria cells under normal conditions. Mast cells are generally associated with allergic disease, and indeed, food allergy that manifests in the GI tract is usually mast cell dependent. On the other hand, mast cells have a number of physiological functions in the GI tract, namely regulatory functions such as control of blood flow and coagulation, smooth muscle contraction and peristalsis, and secretion of acid, electrolytes, and mucus by epithelial cells. One of the most intriguing functions of intestinal mast cells is their role in host defense against microbes like bacteria, viruses, or parasites. Mast cells recognize microbes by antibody-dependent mechanisms and through pattern-recognition receptors. They direct the subsequent immune response by attracting both granulocytes and lymphocytes to the site of challenge via paracrine cytokine release. Moreover, mast cells initiate, by releasing proinflammatory mediators, innate defense mechanisms such as enhanced epithelial secretion, peristalsis, and alarm programs of the enteric nervous This initiation can occur in response to a primary contact to the microbe or other danger signals, but becomes much more effective if the triggering antigen reappears and antibodies of the IgE or IgG type have been generated in the meantime by the specific immune system. Thus, mast cells operate at the interface between innate and adaptive immune responses to enhance the defense against pathogens and, most likely, the commensal flora. In this respect, it is important to note that mast cells are directly involved in controlling the function of the intestinal barrier that turned out to be a crucial site for the development of infectious and immune-mediated diseases. Hence, intestinal mast cells perform regulatory functions to maintain tissue homeostasis, they are involved in host defense mechanisms against pathogens, and they can induce

  10. IL-10 polymorphism and cell-mediated immune response to Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, H.; Tiitinen, A; Halttunen, M.

    2006-01-01

    background. To study a relationship between interleukin-10 (IL-10) promoter -1082 polymorphism and cell-mediated immune response during C trachomatis infection in vitro, lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine (IL-10, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5) secretion were analysed in subjects with different...... IL-10 genotypes. Enhanced IL-10 secretion and reduced antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferative and IFN-gamma responses were found in subjects with IL-10 -1082 GG genotype when compared to those with -1082 AA genotype. CD14+ monocytes were main source of IL-10 indicating that these cells...... are important regulators of the antigen-specific cell-mediated responses during active C trachomatis infection. We conclude that impaired cell-mediated response to C trachomatis is associated with IL-10 genotype in subjects with high IL-10 producing capacity. A comparison of immune markers between subjects...

  11. Optimal Electrostatic Space Tower (Mast, New Space Elevator)

    OpenAIRE

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Author offers and researched the new and revolutionary inflatable electrostatic AB space towers (mast, new space elevator) up to one hundred twenty thousands kilometers (or more) in height. The main innovation is filling the tower by electron gas, which can create pressure up one atmosphere, has negligible small weight and surprising properties. The suggested mast has following advantages in comparison with conventional space elevator: 1. Electrostatic AB tower may be built from Earth surface...

  12. IL-9-Producing Mast Cell Precursors and Food Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0517 TITLE: IL-9-Producing Mast Cell Precursors and Food Allergy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Simon P. Hogan PhD...IL-9-Producing Mast Cell Precursors and Food Allergy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Yui Hsi Wang, Sunil...for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT: Food allergy is a harmful immune reaction driven by uncontrolled type-2

  13. Apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine response of mast cells induced by influenza A viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of the influenza A virus has been investigated heavily, and both the inflammatory response and apoptosis have been found to have a definitive role in this process. The results of studies performed by the present and other groups have indicated that mast cells may play a role in the severity of the disease. To further investigate cellular responses to influenza A virus infection, apoptosis and inflammatory response were studied in mouse mastocytoma cell line P815. This is the first study to demonstrate that H1N1 (A/WSN/33, H5N1 (A/Chicken/Henan/1/04, and H7N2 (A/Chicken/Hebei/2/02 influenza viruses can induce mast cell apoptosis. They were found to do this mainly through the mitochondria/cytochrome c-mediated intrinsic pathway, and the activation of caspase 8-mediated extrinsic pathway was here found to be weak. Two pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3 -only molecules Bim and Puma appeared to be involved in the apoptotic pathways. When virus-induced apoptosis was inhibited in P815 cells using pan-caspase (Z-VAD-fmk and caspase-9 (Z-LEHD-fmk inhibitors, the replication of these three subtypes of viruses was suppressed and the secretions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-6, IL-18, TNF-α, and MCP-1, decreased. The results of this study may further understanding of the role of mast cells in host defense and pathogenesis of influenza virus. They may also facilitate the development of novel therapeutic aids against influenza virus infection.

  14. Mast cells, peptides and cardioprotection - an unlikely marriage?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, S K

    2012-01-31

    1 Mast cells have classically been regarded as the \\'bad guys\\' in the setting of acute myocardial ischaemia, where their released contents are believed to contribute both to tissue injury and electrical disturbances resulting from ischaemia. Recent evidence suggests, however, that if mast cell degranulation occurs in advance of ischaemia onset, this may be cardioprotective by virtue of the depletion of mast cell contents that can no longer act as instruments of injury when the tissue becomes ischaemic. 2 Many peptides, such as ET-1, adrenomedullin, relaxin and atrial natriuretic peptide, have been demonstrated to be cardioprotective when given prior to the onset of myocardial ischaemia, although their physiological functions are varied and the mechanisms of their cardioprotective actions appear to be diverse and often ill defined. However, one common denominator that is emerging is the ability of these peptides to modulate mast cell degranulation, raising the possibility that peptide-induced mast cell degranulation or stabilization may hold the key to a common mechanism of their cardioprotection. 3 The aim of this review was to consolidate the evidence implying that mast cell degranulation could play both a detrimental and protective role in myocardial ischaemia, depending upon when it occurs, and that this may underlie the cardioprotective effects of a range of diverse peptides that exerts physiological effects within the cardiovascular system.

  15. Mast cells in rheumatoid arthritis: friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivellese, Felice; Nerviani, Alessandra; Rossi, Francesca Wanda; Marone, Gianni; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; de Paulis, Amato; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2017-06-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident cells of the innate immunity, implicated in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). They are present in synovia and their activation has been linked to the potentiation of inflammation in the course of RA. However, recent investigations questioned the role of mast cells in arthritis. In particular, animal models generated conflicting results, so that many of their pro-inflammatory, i.e. pro-arthritogenic functions, even though supported by robust experimental evidence, have been labelled as redundant. At the same time, a growing body of evidence suggests that mast cells can act as tunable immunomodulatory cells. These characteristics, not yet fully understood in the context of RA, could partially explain the inconsistent results obtained with experimental models, which do not account for the pro- and anti-inflammatory functions exerted in more chronic heterogeneous conditions such as RA. Here we present an overview of the current knowledge on mast cell involvement in RA, including the intriguing hypothesis of mast cells acting as subtle immunomodulatory cells and the emerging concept of synovial mast cells as potential biomarkers for patient stratification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. B cells exposed to enterobacterial components suppress development of experimental colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye; Larsen, Hjalte List; Kristensen, Nanna Ny

    2012-01-01

    ). RESULTS: We demonstrate that splenic B cells exposed to ebx produce large amounts of IL-10 in vitro and express CD1d and CD5 previously known to be associated with regulatory B cells. In SCID mice transplanted with colitogenic CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells, co-transfer of ebx-B cells significantly suppressed...... development of colitis. Suppression was dependent on B cell-derived IL-10, as co-transfer of IL-10 knockout ebx-B cells failed to suppress colitis. Ebx-B cell-mediated suppression of colitis was associated with a decrease in interferon gamma (IFN-¿)-producing T(H) 1 cells and increased frequencies of Foxp3......-expressing T cells. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that splenic B cells exposed to enterobacterial components acquire immunosuppressive functions by which they can suppress development of experimental T cell-mediated colitis in an IL-10-dependent way. (Inflamm Bowel Dis 2011;)....

  17. Analysis of cell-mediated immune responses in support of dengue vaccine development efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Alan L; Currier, Jeffrey R; Friberg, Heather L; Mathew, Anuja

    2015-12-10

    Dengue vaccine development has made significant strides, but a better understanding of how vaccine-induced immune responses correlate with vaccine efficacy can greatly accelerate development, testing, and deployment as well as ameliorate potential risks and safety concerns. Advances in basic immunology knowledge and techniques have already improved our understanding of cell-mediated immunity of natural dengue virus infection and vaccination. We conclude that the evidence base is adequate to argue for inclusion of assessments of cell-mediated immunity as part of clinical trials of dengue vaccines, although further research to identify useful correlates of protective immunity is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mast cells and atopic dermatitis. Stereological quantification of mast cells in atopic dermatitis and normal human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, T E; Olesen, A B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1997-01-01

    Stereological quantification of mast cell numbers was applied to sections of punch biopsies from lesional and nonlesional skin of atopic dermatitis patients and skin of healthy volunteers. We also investigated whether the method of staining and/or the fixative influenced the results...... of the determination of the mast cell profile numbers. The punch biopsies were taken from the same four locations in both atopic dermatitis patients and normal individuals. The locations were the scalp, neck and flexure of the elbow (lesional skin), and nates (nonlesional skin). Clinical scoring was carried out...... yielded the following results: (1) in atopic dermatitis lesional skin an increased number of mast cell profiles was found as compared with nonlesional skin, (2) comparing atopic dermatitis skin with normal skin, a significantly increased number of mast cell profiles per millimetre squared was found...

  19. Mast cells and atopic dermatitis. Stereological quantification of mast cells in atopic dermatitis and normal human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, T E; Olesen, A B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1997-01-01

    at the site of each biopsy. After fixation and plastic embedding, the biopsies were cut into 2 microns serial sections. Ten sections, 30 microns apart, from each biopsy were examined and stained alternately with either toluidine blue or Giemsa stain and mast cell profile numbers were determined. The study...... of the determination of the mast cell profile numbers. The punch biopsies were taken from the same four locations in both atopic dermatitis patients and normal individuals. The locations were the scalp, neck and flexure of the elbow (lesional skin), and nates (nonlesional skin). Clinical scoring was carried out...... the clinical score and the number of mast cell profiles per millimetre squared. Using stereological techniques, this study indicated that mast cells might participate in the inflammatory process in skin leading to atopic dermatitis....

  20. Suppressed Belief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komarine Romdenh-Romluc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Moran’s revised conception of conscious belief requires us to reconceptualise suppressed belief. The work of Merleau-Ponty offers a way to do this. His account of motor-skills allows us to understand suppressed beliefs as pre-reflective ways of dealing with the world.

  1. An antimicrobial peptide with angiogenic properties, AG-30/5C, activates human mast cells through the MAPK and NF-κB pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Kazo; Okumura, Ko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Niyonsaba, François

    2016-04-01

    Apart from their direct antimicrobial activities against invading pathogens, antimicrobial peptides exhibit additional protective functions that have led to their being named host defense peptides (HDPs). These functions include the stimulation of the production of cytokines/chemokines, the promotion of chemotaxis and cell proliferation and the induction of angiogenesis and wound healing. AG-30/5C is a novel angiogenic HDP that in addition to its antimicrobial activity also activates fibroblasts and endothelial cells and promotes angiogenesis and wound healing. Given that mast cells are found primarily in the vicinity of vessels, where they are intimately involved in wound healing, we hypothesized that AG-30/5C may activate mast cells. We demonstrated that AG-30/5C activated LAD2 human mast cells to degranulate and produce lipid mediators including leukotriene C4, prostaglandin D2 and E2. Moreover, AG-30/5C increased mast cell chemotaxis and induced the production of the cytokines GM-CSF and TNF-α and various chemokines, such as IL-8, MCP-1, MCP-3, MIP-1α and MIP-1β. The chemotaxis and cytokine/chemokine production induced by AG-30/5C were suppressed by both pertussis toxin and U-73122, suggesting the involvement of the G protein and phospholipase C pathways in AG-30/5C-induced mast cell activation. Furthermore, these pathways were activated downstream of the MAPK and NF-κB signaling molecules, as demonstrated by the inhibitory effects of ERK-, JNK-, p38- and NF-κB-specific inhibitors on cytokine/chemokine production. Interestingly, AG-30/5C caused the phosphorylation of MAPKs and IκB. We suggest that the angiogenic and antimicrobial peptide AG-30/5C plays a key role in the recruitment and activation of human mast cells at inflammation and wound sites.

  2. MicroRNA-143 Downregulates Interleukin-13 Receptor Alpha1 in Human Mast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqiu Cheng

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNA-143 (miR-143 was found to be downregulated in allergic rhinitis, and bioinformatics analysis predicted that IL-13Rα1 was a target gene of miR-143. To understand the molecular mechanisms of miR-143 involved in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, recombinant miR-143 plasmid vectors were constructed, and human mast cell-1(HMC-1 cells which play a central role in the allergic response were used for study. The plasmids were transfected into HMC-1 cells using a lentiviral vector. Expression of IL-13Rα1 mRNA was then detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western Blotting. The miR-143 lentiviral vector was successfully stably transfected in HMC-1 cells for target gene expression. Compared to the control, the target gene IL-13Rα1 was less expressed in HMC-1 transfected with miR-143 as determined by RT-PCR and Western Blotting (p < 0.05; this difference in expression was statistically significant and the inhibition efficiency was 71%. It indicates that miR-143 directly targets IL-13Rα1 and suppresses IL-13Rα1 expression in HMC-1 cells. Therefore, miR-143 may be associated with allergic reaction in human mast cells.

  3. Acupuncture causes serotonin release by mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay; Atanasova, Dimitrinka; Tomov, Nikola; Sivrev, Dimitar; Lazarov, Nikolai

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are important object in experimental acupuncture due to their putative involvement in local reactions to needling. In the rat, they are shown to contain in their granules, among other tissue mediators, serotonin, also called 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). The aim of this study is to examine the normal distribution of 5-HT-containing MCs in soft tissues of Zusanli (ST36) acupuncture point (acupoint) and their morphological changes caused by experimental acupuncture. We observed 5-HT-immunopositive MCs in the tissues and in the vicinity of the needle tract formed after acupuncture. As a result of acupuncture needling, the tissue integrity is disrupted and certain folds are formed in the direction of the needle tract. Connective tissue in the vicinity of the needle tract gets compressed and displaced, together with the 5-HT-immunoreactive MCs seen there. Some of those 5-HT-immunopositive MCs showed signs of degranulation with numerous discharged granules, some of them found at a considerable distance form the cell. Furthermore, 5-HT-immunopositive MCs are unevenly distributed in soft tissues of ST36 acupoint. Larger numbers of 5-HT-containing MCs were visualized in subcutis and dermis, compared to the observed in striated muscles. Placing the acupuncture needle into the rat skin caused a formation of an apparent needle tract, tissue displacement and degranulation of 5-HT-immunopositive MCs. The demonstrated serotonin release by means of MC degranulation might be involved in the local tissue response to acupuncture.

  4. Mast cells express tyrosine hydroxylase and store dopamine in a serglycin-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnberg, Elin; Calounova, Gabriela; Pejler, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Here we show that mast cells contain dopamine and that mast cell activation causes dopamine depletion, indicating its presence within secretory granules. Dopamine storage increased during mast cell maturation from bone marrow precursors, and was dependent on the presence of serglycin. Moreover, the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, the key enzyme in dopamine biosynthesis, was induced during mast cell maturation; histidine decarboxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase 1 were also induced. Mast cell activation caused a robust induction of histidine decarboxylase, but no stimulation of tyrosine hydroxylase or tryptophan hydroxylase 1 expression. The present study points toward a possible role of dopamine in mast cell function.

  5. Inhibition of Angiogenic Factor Production from Murine Mast Cells by an Antiallergic Agent (Epinastine Hydrochloride In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Asano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is an important event both in the development of allergic inflammatory responses and in the pathophysiology of tissue remodeling in allergic diseases. In the present study, therefore, we examined the influence of antihistamines on angiogenesis through the choice of epinastine hydrochloride (EP and murine mast cells in vitro. Mast cells (5×105 cells/mL presensitized with murine IgE specific for ovalbumin (OVA were stimulated with 10 ng/mL OVA in the presence of various concentrations of EP for 4 hours. The levels of angiogenesis factors, keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in culture supernatants, were examined by ELISA. We also examined mRNA expression for the angiogenesis factors by RT-PCR. EP significantly inhibited the production of KC, TNF, and VEGF induced by IgE-dependent mechanism at more than 25 ng/mL. Semiquantitative analysis using RT-PCR showed that EP also significantly reduced mRNA expressions for KC, TNF, and VEGF. These results strongly suggest that EP suppresses angiogenesis factor production through the inhibition of mRNA expression in mast cells and results in favorable modification of clinical conditions of allergic diseases.

  6. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chen

    Full Text Available Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG, on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound.

  7. Mast cell chemotaxis – Chemoattractants and signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana eHalova

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Migration of mast cells is essential for their recruitment within target tissues where they play an important role in innate and adaptive immune responses. These processes rely on the ability of mast cells to recognize appropriate chemotactic stimuli and react to them by a chemotactic response. Another level of intercellular communication is attained by production of chemoattractants by activated mast cells, which results in accumulation of mast cells and other hematopoietic cells at the sites of inflammation. Mast cells express numerous surface receptors for various ligands with properties of potent chemoattractants. They include the stem cell factor recognized by c-Kit, antigen, which binds to immunoglobulin E (IgE anchored to the high affinity IgE receptor (FcRI, highly cytokinergic IgE recognized by FcRI, lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, which binds to G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Other large groups of chemoattractants are eicosanoids [prostaglandin E2 and D2, leukotriene (LT B4, LTD4 and LTC4, and others] and chemokines (CC, CXC, C and CX3X, which also bind to various GPCRs. Further noteworthy chemoattractants are isoforms of transforming growth factor (TGF , which are sensitively recognized by TGF- serine/threonine type I and II  receptors, adenosine, C1q, C3a, and C5a components of the complement, 5-hydroxytryptamine, neuroendocrine peptide catestatin, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor- and others. Here we discuss the major types of chemoattractants recognized by mast cells, their target receptors, as well as signaling pathways they utilize. We also briefly deal with methods used for studies of mast cell chemotaxis and with ways of how these studies profited from the results obtained in other cellular systems.

  8. Cell-mediated immunity in Aujeszky disease virus infected pigs. I. Lymphocyte stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, G; Bartenbach, G; Jakubik, J

    1976-01-01

    The appearance of cell-mediated immunity was studied in Aujeszky diseased pigs with the aid of the in vitro stimulation of sensitized lymphocytes. The first cell-mediated immunity reaction of lymphocytes occurred 4 days after infection. From day 7 to 35, the latest day tested, the reactions were most marked with lymphocytes from lymph nodes and spleen, whereas blood and thymus lymphocytes reacted less frequently; bone marrow lymphocytes showed no response. Reinfection did not considerably enhance lymphocyte reactivity. Humoral immunity was demonstrated a few days later than cell-mediated immunity. Neutralizing antibodies were first detected at day 7, reaching optimal titers at day 14. Complement fixing antibodies were detected from day 14 onward. Reinfection caused a very weak booster effect only on neutralizing antibody production. The sensitivity of the neutralization test could be enhanced up to sixfold by the addition of fresh guinea pig complement. It is concluded that cell-mediated immunity influences the early stage of infection with Aujeszky disease virus when humoral immunity is not yet demonstrable or yet rather low. Lymph nodes and spleen are apparently of special importance for the appearance of ADV-reactive lymphocytes.

  9. Inhibition of natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity by lipids extracted from Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozemond, R. C.; Halperin, M.; Das, P. K.

    1985-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated an augmentation of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity by various adjuvants including BCG. Inhibitory effects of BCG have also been reported, particularly for relatively high doses. Because the cell wall of Mycobacterium bovis BCG contains a high

  10. Contribution of T cell-mediated immunity to the resistance to staphlococcal infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, S.; Sasai, Y.; Minami, K.; Nomoto, K.

    1978-01-01

    Abscess formation in nude mice after subcutaneous inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) was more extensive and prolonged as compared with that in phenotypically normal littermates. Abscess formation in nude mice was augmented markedly by whole-body irradiation. Not only T cell-mediated immunity but also radiosensitive, nonimmune phagocytosis appear to contribute to the resistance against staphylococcal infection

  11. Natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity is increased by a type II arabinogalactan from Anoectochilus formosanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Chan; Lai, Ching-Yi; Lin, Wen-Chuan

    2017-01-02

    This study investigated the effects of a type II arabinogalactan from Anoectochilus formosanus (AGAF) on natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity and the possible underlying mechanisms. This study reported that sustained exposure to AGAF increased NK-92MI cell-mediated cytotoxicity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, as characterized according to the cellular lactic dehydrogenase leakage from K562 leukemia cells. Additionally, antibody neutralization studies have reported that interferon (IFN)-γ, but not perforin or tumor necrosis factor-α, released by NK-92MI NK cells is crucial in enhancing cytotoxicity through an autocrine loop. In this study, AGAF was further demonstrated to induce IFN-γ expression, increasing the susceptibility to NK-92MI cell-mediated cytotoxicity through the toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, TLR4, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear factor-κB pathways. A pharmacological study revealed that Janus kinase 2/signal transducers and activators of the signal transducers and of transcription 3 signaling are involved in IFN-γ-induced NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Effects of ionizing radiation on differentiation of murine bone marrow cells into mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Sho; Yoshino, Hironori; Ishikawa, Junya; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Tsujiguchi, Takakiyo; Nishiyama, Ayaka; Yokoyama, Kouki; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells, immune effector cells produced from bone marrow cells, play a major role in immunoglobulin E–mediated allergic responses. Ionizing radiation affects the functions of mast cells, which are involved in radiation-induced tissue damage. However, whether ionizing radiation affects the differential induction of mast cells is unknown. Here we investigated whether bone marrow cells of X-irradiated mice differentiated into mast cells. To induce mast cells, bone marrow cells from X-irradiated and unirradiated mice were cultured in the presence of cytokines required for mast cell induction. Although irradiation at 0.5 Gy and 2 Gy decreased the number of bone marrow cells 1 day post-irradiation, the cultured bone marrow cells of X-irradiated and unirradiated mice both expressed mast cell–related cell-surface antigens. However, the percentage of mast cells in the irradiated group was lower than in the unirradiated group. Similar decreases in the percentage of mast cells induced in the presence of X-irradiation were observed 10 days post irradiation, although the number of bone marrow cells in irradiated mice had recovered by this time. Analysis of mast cell function showed that degranulation of mast cells after immunoglobulin E–mediated allergen recognition was significantly higher in the X-irradiated group compared with in the unirradiated group. In conclusion, bone marrow cells of X-irradiated mice differentiated into mast cells, but ionizing radiation affected the differentiation efficiency and function of mast cells. (author)

  13. Mercury induces inflammatory mediator release from human mast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Erika

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mercury is known to be neurotoxic, but its effects on the immune system are less well known. Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, but also in innate and acquired immunity, as well as in inflammation. Many patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD have "allergic" symptoms; moreover, the prevalence of ASD in patients with mastocytosis, characterized by numerous hyperactive mast cells in most tissues, is 10-fold higher than the general population suggesting mast cell involvement. We, therefore, investigated the effect of mercuric chloride (HgCl2 on human mast cell activation. Methods Human leukemic cultured LAD2 mast cells and normal human umbilical cord blood-derived cultured mast cells (hCBMCs were stimulated by HgCl2 (0.1-10 μM for either 10 min for beta-hexosaminidase release or 24 hr for measuring vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and IL-6 release by ELISA. Results HgCl2 induced a 2-fold increase in β-hexosaminidase release, and also significant VEGF release at 0.1 and 1 μM (311 ± 32 pg/106 cells and 443 ± 143 pg/106 cells, respectively from LAD2 mast cells compared to control cells (227 ± 17 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to the proinflammatory neuropeptide substance P (SP, 0.1 μM had synergestic action in inducing VEGF from LAD2 mast cells. HgCl2 also stimulated significant VEGF release (360 ± 100 pg/106 cells at 1 μM, n = 5, p 6 cells, and IL-6 release (466 ± 57 pg/106 cells at 0.1 μM compared to untreated cells (13 ± 25 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to SP (5 μM further increased IL-6 release. Conclusions HgCl2 stimulates VEGF and IL-6 release from human mast cells. This phenomenon could disrupt the blood-brain-barrier and permit brain inflammation. As a result, the findings of the present study provide a biological mechanism for how low levels of mercury may contribute to ASD pathogenesis.

  14. Mast cells down-regulate CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cell suppressor function via histamine H1 receptor interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forward, Nicholas A; Furlong, Suzanne J; Yang, Yongjun; Lin, Tong-Jun; Hoskin, David W

    2009-09-01

    Mast cells promote both innate and acquired immune responses, but little is known about the effect of mast cells on T regulatory (T(reg)) cell function. In this study, we show for the first time that the capacity of murine CD4(+)CD25(+) T(reg) cells to suppress in vitro proliferation by CD4(+)CD25(-) T responder (T(resp)) cells in response to anti-CD3/anti-CD28 mAb-coated beads was reduced in the presence of syngeneic bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) activated by FcepsilonR cross-linking. Activated BMMC culture supernatants or exogenous histamine also inhibited T(reg) cell suppressor function while the histamine H1 receptor-specific antagonist loratadine, but not the H2 receptor-specific antagonist famotidine, restored T(reg) cell suppressor function in the presence of activated BMMC or activated BMMC culture supernatants. Moreover, treatment of T(reg) cells with loratadine, but not famotidine, rescued T(reg) cell suppressor function in the presence of exogenous histamine. In addition, the H1 receptor-specific agonist 2-pyridylethylamine dihydrochloride inhibited T(reg) cell suppressor function to an extent that was comparable to histamine, whereas the H2 receptor-specific agonist amthamine dihydrobromide was without effect. Both T(reg) cells and T(resp) cells expressed H1 receptors. Exposure to histamine caused T(reg) cells to express lower levels of CD25 and the T(reg) cell-specific transcription factor Foxp3. Taken together, these data indicate that BMMC-elaborated histamine inhibited T(reg) cell suppressor function by signaling through the H1 receptor. We suggest that histamine released as a result of mast cell activation by microbial products might cause a transient decrease in T(reg) cell suppressor function, thereby enhancing the development of protective immunity.

  15. Cigarette smoke extract-treated mast cells promote alveolar macrophage infiltration and polarization in experimental chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Yang, Tian; Ning, Qian; Li, Feiyan; Chen, Tianjun; Yao, Yan; Sun, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the main cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and may modulate the immune response of exposed individuals. Mast cell function can be altered by cigarette smoking, but the role of smoking in COPD remains poorly understood. The current study aimed to explore the role of cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-treated mast cells in COPD pathogenesis. Cytokine and chemokine expression as well as degranulation of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) were detected in cells exposed to immunoglobulin E (IgE) and various doses of CSE. Adoptive transfer of CSE-treated BMMCs into C57BL/6J mice was performed, and macrophage infiltration and polarization were evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Furthermore, a coculture system of BMMCs and macrophages was established to examine macrophage phenotype transition. The role of protease serine member S31 (Prss31) was also investigated in the co-culture system and in COPD mice. CSE exposure suppressed cytokine expression and degranulation in BMMCs, but promoted the expressions of chemokines and Prss31. Adoptive transfer of CSE-treated BMMCs induced macrophage infiltration and M2 polarization in the mouse lung. Moreover, CSE-treated BMMCs triggered macrophage M2 polarization via Prss31 secretion. Recombinant Prss31 was shown to activate interleukin (IL)-13/IL-13Rα/Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat) 6 signaling in macrophages. Additionally, a positive correlation was found between Prss31 expression and the number of M2 macrophages in COPD mice. In conclusion, CSE-treated mast cells may induce macrophage infiltration and M2 polarization via Prss31 expression, and potentially contribute to COPD progression.

  16. Mast cell subsets and neuropeptides in leprosy reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes Sérgio Luiz Gomes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The immunohistochemical identification of neuropeptides (calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, substance P, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone and gamma-melanocyte stimulating hormone quantification of mast cells and their subsets (tryptase/chymase-immunoreactive mast cells = TCMC and tryptase-immunoreactive mast cells = TMC were determined in biopsies of six patients with leprosy reactions (three patients with type I reaction and three with type II. Biopsies were compared with those taken from the same body site in the remission stage of the same patient. We found a relative increase of TMC in the inflammatory infiltrate of the reactional biopsies compared to the post-reactional biopsy. Also, the total number of mast cells and the TMC/TCMC ratio in the inflammatory infiltrate was significantly higher than in the intervening dermis of the biopsies of both periods. No significant difference was found regarding neuroptide expression in the reactional and post-reactional biopsies. The relative increase of TMC in the reactional infiltrates could implicate this mast cell subset in the reported increase of the immune response in leprosy reactions.

  17. The Role of Mast Cells in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Nyeong Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders, but its treatment is unsatisfactory as its pathophysiology is multifactorial. The putative factors of IBS pathophysiology are visceral hypersensitivity and intestinal dysmotility, also including psychological factors, dysregulated gut-brain axis, intestinal microbiota alterations, impaired intestinal permeability, and mucosal immune alterations. Recently, mucosal immune alterations have received much attention with the role of mast cells in IBS. Mast cells are abundant in the intestines and function as intestinal gatekeepers at the interface between the luminal environment in the intestine and the internal milieu under the intestinal epithelium. As a gatekeeper at the interface, mast cells communicate with the adjacent cells such as epithelial, neuronal, and other immune cells throughout the mediators released when they themselves are activated. Many studies have suggested that mast cells play a role in the pathophysiology of IBS. This review will focus on studies of the role of mast cell in IBS and the limitations of studies and will also consider future directions.

  18. Inhibitory effect of baicalin on allergic response in ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis guinea pigs and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yun-Jiang; Wang, Hu; Sui, He-Huan; Li, Li; Zhou, Chun-Ling; Huang, Jia-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Baicalin, a flavonoid compound purified from the dry roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has generally been used for the treatment of various allergic diseases. However, there is little information about the anti-inflammatory effects of baicalin for allergic rhinitis. This study aims to investigate the anti-allergic effect of baicalin on allergic response in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic rhinitis guinea pigs and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human mast cells. Using in vivo models, we evaluated the effect of baicalin on allergic rhinitis symptoms via recording the number of nasal rubs and sneezes. The levels of histamine, OVA-specific immunoglobulin E(IgE), eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and inflammatory cytokines were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The histological changes of nasal mucosa were observed by light microscope after HE staining. In vitro, the release of histamine and β-hexosaminidase of compound 48/80-induced human mast cells were measured by ELISA and PNP-NAG colorimetry, respectively. The productions of inflammatory cytokines of LPS-stimulated human mast cells were determined using ELISA. Western blot was used to test the protein expression of JAK2, p-JAK2, STAT5, p-STAT5, IKKβ, p-IKKβ, IκBα, p-IκBα and NF-κB (p65) of LPS-stimulated human mast cells. The oral administration of baicalin at doses of 50 and 200 mg/kg improved allergic rhinitis symptoms and the histological changes of nasal mucosa and decreased the serum levels of histamine, ECP, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and OVA-specific IgE in OVA-induced allergic rhinitis guinea pigs. In vitro, baicalin suppressed the release of histamine and β-hexosaminidase in compound 48/80-induced human mast cells. In addition, baicalin also inhibited the productions of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α and suppressed the phosphorylation of JAK2, STAT5, IKKβ, IκBα and the nuclear translocation

  19. X-Ray Contrast Media Mechanisms in the Release of Mast Cell Contents: Understanding These Leads to a Treatment for Allergies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott C. Lasser

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A long history of searching for the etiology of X-ray contrast material (CM reactions has led to the understanding that the CM do not produce anti-CM antigens. Since CM reactions are anaphylactoid in nature, however, a source for mast cell activation was sought. This resulted in the finding that concentrated CM could suppress mast cell activation by attachment to the Fc portion of IgE and IgG. This is presumed to be a steric hindrance effect. In a study of the effects of CM on BP and a study of the effects of CM in sensitized rats, it was concluded that less concentrated CM activated mast cells and that this mechanism was best explained by bridging of adjacent IgE molecules via attachment to their Fc segments. The mast cell release of heparin activating the contact system, as well as the release of histamine, is believed to be responsible for CM reactions and allergic diatheses.

  20. Effect of propolis extract on guines pig lung mast cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. O. Orsi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The direct effect of ethanolic extract of propolis on guinea pig lung cell suspension containing mast cells, as well as its influence on the histamine release induced by antigen (ovoalbumin 10 mug/ml and ionophore A 23187 (3 muM were investigated. Propolis ethanolic extract (300 mug/ml increased the histamine release in guinea pig lung suspension containing mast cells by a cytotoxic effect. Lower concentrations of propolis had no effect on histamine release. Our results demonstrated that propolis (3, 10, 30, and 100 mug/ml shows no significant effect on the histamine release induced by ionophore and antigen. Based on these results, we suggest that propolis could directly activate mast cells, promoting inflammatory mediators release by cytotoxic mechanisms, what could be related to allergic processes in propolis sensitive people.

  1. Degranulated mast cells and TNF-α in oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reactions diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parichehr Ghalayani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study was to assess mast cells and TNF-α in oral lichen planus (OLP and oral lichenoid reactions (OLR patients as diagnostic marker to the differential diagnosis of OLP and OLR diseases. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, samples were obtained from 30 OLP and 30 OLR patients, between June 2010 and March 2011 in Dental clinic of the University of Isfahan, Iran. Mast cells in the reticular layer of the lamina propria for samples were evaluated using toluidine blue method and immunohistochemical technique. The clinical relevant data taken into account were: demographical data, total number and degranulated mast cells, ratio of degranulated mast cells and TNF-α positive degranulated mast cells. Results: In OLP and OLR, the total mast cells were 21.2 ± 7.9 and 20.3 ± 6.8, degranulated mast cells were 15.5 ± 6.9 and 19.2 ± 6.9, ratio of degranulated mast cells to total mast cells were 0.716 ± 0.067 and 0.946 ± 0.081, and TNF-α positive degranulated mast cells were 13.6 ± 6.3 and 17.1 ± 6.04, respectively. There was no significant difference for the total mast cells. But degranulated mast cells, ratio of degranulated mast cells and TNF-α positive degranulated mast cells in OLR were significantly higher than OLP patients. Conclusions: Our results showed that the degranulated mast cells, ratio of degranulated mast cells and TNF-α in OLR was significantly more than OLP patients and these may be able to be used as diagnostic markers to the differential diagnosis of OLP and OLR.

  2. An XML-based configuration system for MAST PCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storrs, J.; McArdle, G.

    2008-01-01

    MAST PCS, a port of General Atomics' generic Plasma Control System, is a large software system comprising many source files in C and IDL. Application parameters can affect multiple source files in complex ways, making code development and maintenance difficult. The MAST PCS configuration system aims to make the task of the application developer easier, through the use of XML-based configuration files and a configuration tool which processes them. It is presented here as an example of a useful technique with wide application

  3. Initial Effects of Reproduction Cutting Treatments on Residual Hard Mast Production in the Ouachita Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger W. Perry; Ronald E. Thill

    2003-01-01

    We compared indices of total hard mast production (oak and hickory combined) in 20, second-growth, pine-hardwood stands under five treatments to determine the effects of different reproduction treatments on mast production in the Ouachita Mountains. We evaluated mast production in mature unharvested controls and stands under four reproduction cutting methods (single-...

  4. Anti-allergic activity of R-phycocyanin from Porphyra haitanensis in antigen-sensitized mice and mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingmei; Wang, Youzhao; Cao, Minjie; Pan, Tzuming; Yang, Yang; Mao, Haiyan; Sun, Lechang; Liu, Guangming

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of food allergy has increased in Asian countries. Marine algae have been proposed as the potential resource for anti-allergic therapeutics. The present study was aimed at isolating R-phycocyanin (RPC) from Porphyra haitanensis and determining the anti-allergy potential of RPC in antigen-sensitized mice and mast cells. In animal experiments, RPC could effectively reduce tropomyosin (TM)-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) and histamine levels, alleviate allergy symptoms and jejunum tissue inflammation in mice, and inhibit the expression and release of cytokines (interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-13) in peritoneal lavage fluid. In spleen lymphocyte experiments, high purity of RPC skewed the immunological function of CD4(+) T cells towards Th1 activity. A higher expression of interferon (IFN)-γ was induced by a synergistic effect of TM and RPC. Through the Jun N-terminal kinase and Janus kinase 2 signaling pathways, IFN-γ synthesis was induced by RPC in combination with TM. Anti-allergic effect of RPC was evaluated in IgE-mediated rat mast RBL-2H3 cells. The results demonstrated that RPC inhibited allergy markers, including the release of β-hexosaminidase, histamine and ROS in antigen-sensitized RBL-2H3 cells. RPC also suppressed the production of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-4 and tumor necrosis factor-α). In conclusion, RPC decreased allergic sensitization against TM by blocking Th2 cell polarization as well as suppressed the release of allergic-mediators in antigen-stimulated mast cells. It may be used as a functional food component or active pharmaceutical ingredient for allergic patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Recent Advances in Type-2-Cell-Mediated Immunity: Insights from Helminth Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Nicola L; Loke, P'ng

    2017-12-19

    Type-2-cell-mediated immune responses play a critical role in mediating both host-resistance and disease-tolerance mechanisms during helminth infections. Recently, type 2 cell responses have emerged as major regulators of tissue repair and metabolic homeostasis even under steady-state conditions. In this review, we consider how studies of helminth infection have contributed toward our expanding cellular and molecular understanding of type-2-cell-mediated immunity, as well as new areas such as the microbiome. By studying how these successful parasites form chronic infections without overt pathology, we are gaining additional insights into allergic and inflammatory diseases, as well as normal physiology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Receptor binding and cell-mediated metabolism of [125I]monoiodoglucagon by isolated canine hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagopian, W.A.; Tager, H.S.

    1984-01-01

    A reverse-phase HPLC method has been developed to purify 125 I-labeled products resulting from the chloramine-T-based iodination of glucagon. In addition the products [( 125 I)iodoTyr 10 13 ]glucagon, [( 125 I)iodoTyr 13 ]glucagon, and [( 125 I)iodoTyr 10 ]glucagon) have been used to study the receptor binding of glucagon and the cell-mediated metabolism of the hormone by isolated canine hepatocytes. It was concluded that (a) not withstanding apparent differences in affinities exhibited by the three peptides, the interactions with the glucagon receptor are functionally equivalent, and (b) the cell-mediated metabolism of receptor-bound glucagon involves the formation of hormone-derived peptides in which the biologically important NH 2 -terminal region of the hormone has been modified by limited proteolytic cleavage

  7. Effect of microencapsulated ampicillin on cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsoum, I S; Kopydlowski, K M; Burge, J R; Setterstrom, J A

    1997-11-01

    The effects of free ampicillin, microencapsulated ampicillin anhydrate (MEAA) and antibiotic-free microspheres on the cell-mediated immune response in Balb/c mice were measured by lymphoproliferation assay, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and cytokine production. Injection into mice for seven consecutive days with equivalent subcutaneous doses of ampicillin, MEAA or placebo microspheres did not produce any consistent change in lymphocyte proliferation nor did it affect DTH responses or interleukin-2 production. Although the production of interleukin-4 in mice treated with ampicillin or MEAA increased compared with the control mice, this increase was not statistically significant. These results indicate that ampicillin and MEAA have similar effects on cell-mediated immunity in mice.

  8. Challenges and opportunities for T cell-mediated strategies to eliminate HIV reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Alan Brockman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available HIV’s ability to establish latent reservoirs of reactivation-competent virus is the major barrier to cure. Shock and kill methods consisting of latency reversing agents (LRAs followed by elimination of reactivating cells through cytopathic effects are under active development. However, the clinical efficacy of LRAs remains to be established. Moreover, recent studies indicate that reservoirs may not be reduced efficiently by either viral cytopathic or CD8+ T-cell-mediated mechanisms. In this perspective, we highlight challenges to T-cell-mediated elimination of HIV reservoirs, including characteristics of responding T-cells, aspects of the cellular reservoirs and properties of the latent virus itself. We also discuss potential strategies to overcome these challenges by targeting the antiviral activity of T-cells towards appropriate viral antigens following latency.

  9. Cell-mediated allergy to cerebral aneurysm clip causing extensive cerebral edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Terence; Tee, Jin W; Han, Tiew F

    2014-10-01

    The authors report the first case of vasogenic cerebral edema due to a cell-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to a nickel-containing aneurysm clip. The patient initially presented for elective clipping of a right middle cerebral artery aneurysm, and on long-term follow-up she demonstrated relapsing-remitting cerebral edema. Four years post-aneurysm clipping, she underwent an exploratory craniotomy given unsuccessful conservative management of her headaches and imaging evidence of cerebral edema with mass effect. During surgery, gross parenchymal edema and inflammatory nodules were observed. Histopathology was consistent with a cell-mediated (Type IV) hypersensitivity reaction. Concerns regarding nickel allergy are often reported in the cardiac literature. This case highlights the possibility of nickel hypersensitivity when using nickel-containing aneurysm clips, especially in patients with known nickel allergies.

  10. Role of very late antigen-1 in T-cell-mediated immunity to systemic viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Kauffmann, Susanne; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2006-01-01

    The T-cell response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mice lacking very late antigen-1 (VLA-1). The generation of virus-specific effector T cells was unimpaired in VLA-1(-/-) mice. In the memory phase, VLA-1 deficiency did not influence the number of memory CD8(+) T cells or th......, the current findings indicate that the expression of VLA-1 is not pivotal for T-cell-mediated antiviral immunity to a systemic infection....... or their distribution between lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs. Regarding a functional role of VLA-1, we found that intracerebral infection of both VLA-1(-/-) and wild-type (wt) mice resulted in lethal T-cell-mediated meningitis, and quantitative and qualitative analyses of the cellular exudate did not reveal any...

  11. Saos-2 cell-mediated mineralization on collagen gels: Effect of densification and bioglass incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gengbo; Pastakia, Meet; Fenn, Michael B; Kishore, Vipuil

    2016-05-01

    Plastic compression is a collagen densification process that has been widely used for the development of mechanically robust collagen-based materials. Incorporation of bioglass within plastically compressed collagen gels has been shown to mimic the microstructural properties of native bone and enhance in vitro cell-mediated mineralization. The current study seeks to decouple the effects of collagen densification and bioglass incorporation to understand the interplay between collagen packing density and presence of bioglass on cell-mediated mineralization. Saos-2 cell-mediated mineralization was assessed as a measure of the osteoconductivity of four different collagen gels: (1) uncompressed collagen gel (UC), (2) bioglass incorporated uncompressed collagen gel (UC + BG), (3) plastically compressed collagen gel (PC), and (4) bioglass incorporated plastically compressed collagen gel (PC + BG). The results indicated that collagen densification enhanced mineralization as shown by SEM, increased alkaline phosphatase activity and produced significantly higher amounts of mineralized nodules on PC gels compared to UC gels. Further, the amount of nodule formation on PC gels was significantly higher compared to UC + BG gels indicating that increase in matrix stiffness due to collagen densification had a greater effect on cell-mediated mineralization compared to bioglass incorporation into loosely packed UC gels. Incorporation of bioglass into PC gels further enhanced mineralization as evidenced by significantly larger nodule size and higher amount of mineralization on PC + BG gels compared to PC gels. In conclusion, collagen densification via plastic compression improves the osteoconductivity of collagen gels. Further, incorporation of bioglass within PC gels has an additive effect and further enhances the osteoconductivity of collagen gels. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Cell-mediated immune response in rotavirus-infected calves: leucocyte migration inhibition assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, R S; Singh, N P

    1992-07-01

    The cell-mediated immune (CMI) response was determined in rotavirus-infected calves by leucocyte migration inhibition assay with blood, spleen, mesenteric lymph node and intestinal lymphocytes. The inhibition of migration was more prominent in intestinal and mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes than in spleen and blood. In rotavirus-infected calves, the assay indicated the presence of CMI response which was more prominent at the local site of infection.

  13. Humoral and cell-mediated immune response to crude antigens of Dermatophilus congolensis during experimental infection of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinde, A A; Wilkie, B N

    1979-01-01

    Rabbits were infected with Dermatophilus congolensis and tested for humoral immune response by indirect haemagglutination and for cell-mediated immune response to crude antigens of D. congolensis. Lymphocyte transformation and macrophage migration inhibition assays were used as in vitro correlates of cell-mediated immune response while cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity was used in vivo. Endo-antigen and whole cell antigen were found to significantly induce cell-mediated immune response. In contrast, humoral responses were found to be more significantly induced by exo-antigen. A biphasic immune response was revealed by the lymphocyte transformation test.

  14. Silibinin inhibits the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines through inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathway in HMC-1 human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom-Rak; Seo, Hye-Sook; Ku, Jin-Mo; Kim, Gyung-Jun; Jeon, Chan Yong; Park, Jong Hyeong; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Park, Sun-Ju; Shin, Yong-Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2013-11-01

    Silibinin is the major active molecule of silymarin, the mixture of flavonolignans extracted from Cirsium japonicum. It has been used for the treatment of hepatitis and inflammation-related diseases. In the present study, the effects of silibinin on allergic inflammation and its signaling were investigated in the induced human mast cells. Cell growth inhibition induced by silibinin was measured by MTS assay. Histamine release was measured by enzyme immunoassay. The tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-8 (IL-8) secreted protein levels and mRNA levels were measured by the ELISA assay and RT-PCR, respectively. The NF-κB promoter activity was examined by a luciferase assay. Silibinin suppressed the growth of HMC-1 cells and also reduced the production and mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8. Moreover, silibinin inhibited the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB through inhibition of the phosphorylation of IκBα and suppressed NF-κB transcriptional activity in stimulated HMC-1 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that silibinin inhibits the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines through inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathway in HMC-1 human mast cells, suggesting that silibinin could be used for the treatment of mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory diseases.

  15. Influence of the Meteorology Mast on a Cup Anemometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin O. L.; Pedersen, B.M.

    1999-01-01

    The actuator disc model is applied on lattice-type meteorological masts to estimate the influence of the tower on the accuracy of the measured wind speed. Combining the results with corrections for the boom, on which the anemometer is mounted, good agreement is found for measurements made...

  16. The development of human mast cells. An historical reappraisal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribatti, Domenico, E-mail: domenico.ribatti@uniba.it

    2016-03-15

    The understanding of mast cell (MC) differentiation is derived mainly from in vitro studies of different stages of stem and progenitor cells. The hematopoietic lineage development of human MCs is unique compared to other myeloid-derived cells. Human MCs originate from CD34{sup +}/CD117{sup +}/CD13{sup +}multipotent hematopoietic progenitors, which undergo transendothelial recruitment into peripheral tissues, where they complete differentiation. Stem cell factor (SCF) is a major chemotactic factor for MCs and their progenitors. SCF also elicits cell-cell and cell-substratum adhesion, facilitates the proliferation, and sustains the survival, differentiation, and maturation, of MCs. Because MC maturation is influenced by local microenvironmental factors, different MC phenotypes can develop in different tissues and organs. - Highlights: • Human mast cells originate from CD34/CD117/CD13 positive multipotent hematopoietic progenitors. • Stem cell factor is a major chemotactic factor for mast cells and their progenitors. • Different mast cell phenotypes can develop in different tissues and organs.

  17. The Hazards of Non-Ionizing Radiation of Telecommunication Mast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The health hazards of non-ionizing radiation from telecommunication mast on the exposed community were assessed using a descriptive cross-sectional survey. The socio-demographic pattern and hazard profile of the respondent were documented. The results of the data showed that majority of respondents (60.8%) were ...

  18. Quantifying mast cells in bladder pain syndrome by immunohistochemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M.S.; Mortensen, S.; Nordling, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate a simple method for counting mast cells, thought to have a role in the pathophysiology of bladder pain syndrome (BPS, formerly interstitial cystitis, a syndrome of pelvic pain perceived to be related to the urinary bladder and accompanied by other urinary symptoms, e. g...

  19. Intestinal mast cells in gut inflammation and motility disturbances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, Benedicte Y.; van den Wijngaard, Rene M.; de Jonge, Wouter J.

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells may be regarded as prototypes of innate immune cells that can be controlled by neuronal mediators. Their activation has been implicated in many types of neuro-inflammatory responses, and related disturbances of gut motility, via direct or indirect mechanisms that involve several

  20. Relevance of mast cell-nerve interactions in intestinal nociception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diest, Sophie A.; Stanisor, Oana I.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; de Jonge, Wouter J.; van den Wijngaard, René M.

    2012-01-01

    Cross-talk between the immune- and nervous-system is considered an important biological process in health and disease. Because mast cells are often strategically placed between nerves and surrounding (immune)cells they may function as important intermediate cells. This review summarizes the current

  1. Design, construction and evaluation of a meteorological mobile mast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 30 metre meteorological mobile mast has been designed and constructed for upper air profile measurements. The parameters to be measured are wind speed, wind direction, temperature and relative humidity. The sensors for each parameter to be measured are constructed with locally available materials.

  2. Defense in Depth Added to Malicious Activities Simulation Tools (MAST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    RMF .......................................................70 2. MAST Rebuild Using OOP ...Activity Simulation Tool OOP Object Orientated Programming RMF Risk Management Framework RSA Rivest, Shamir, Adleman SE Scenario Execution Server SG...occurring letters in a language and use that information to decipher the encrypted message. An example of this would be to examine the English language and

  3. Purinergic Signaling in Mast Cell Degranulation and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan-Guo Gao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are responsible for the majority of allergic conditions. It was originally thought that almost all allergic events were mediated directly only via the high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptors. However, recent evidence showed that many other receptors, such as G protein-coupled receptors and ligand-gated ion channels, are also directly involved in mast cell degranulation, the release of inflammatory mediators such as histamine, serine proteases, leukotrienes, heparin, and serotonin. These mediators are responsible for the symptoms in allergic conditions such as allergic asthma. In recent years, it has been realized that purinergic signaling, induced via the activation of G protein-coupled adenosine receptors and P2Y nucleotide receptors, as well as by ATP-gated P2X receptors, plays a significant role in mast cell degranulation. Both adenosine and ATP can induce degranulation and bronchoconstriction on their own and synergistically with allergens. All three classes of receptors, adenosine, P2X and P2Y are involved in tracheal mucus secretion. This review will summarize the currently available knowledge on the role of purinergic signaling in mast cell degranulation and its most relevant disease, asthma.

  4. The protein tyrosine kinase Tec regulates mast cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Uwe; Abramova, Anastasia; Boucheron, Nicole; Eckelhart, Eva; Schebesta, Alexandra; Bilic, Ivan; Kneidinger, Michael; Unger, Bernd; Hammer, Martina; Sibilia, Maria; Valent, Peter; Ellmeier, Wilfried

    2009-11-01

    Mast cells play crucial roles in a variety of normal and pathophysiological processes and their activation has to be tightly controlled. Here, we demonstrate that the protein tyrosine kinase Tec is a crucial regulator of murine mast cell function. Tec was activated upon Fc epsilon RI stimulation of BM-derived mast cells (BMMC). The release of histamine in the absence of Tec was normal in vitro and in vivo; however, leukotriene C(4) levels were reduced in Tec(-) (/) (-) BMMC. Furthermore, the production of IL-4 was severely impaired, and GM-CSF, TNF-alpha and IL-13 levels were also diminished. Finally, a comparison of WT, Tec(-) (/) (-), Btk(-) (/) (-) and Tec(-) (/) (-)Btk(-) (/) (-) BMMC revealed a negative role for Btk in the regulation of IL-4 production, while for the efficient production of TNF-alpha, IL-13 and GM-CSF, both Tec and Btk were required. Our results demonstrate a crucial role for Tec in mast cells, which is partially different to the function of the well-characterized family member Btk.

  5. Quantification and Localization of Mast Cells in Periapical Lesions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Manjunatha BS,. Department of Dental Anatomy and Oral Biology, Basic Dental. Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry,. Taif University, Al‑Taif‑21944,. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. E‑mail: drmanju26@hotmail.com. Introduction. Mast cell is resident of connective tissue and contains many granules rich in histamine and heparin.

  6. Increased mast cell numbers in a calcaneal tendon overuse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Wienecke, Jacob; Kongsgaard Madsen, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Tendinopathy is often discovered late because the initial development of tendon pathology is asymptomatic. The aim of this study was to examine the potential role of mast cell involvement in early tendinopathy using a high-intensity uphill running (HIUR) exercise model. Twenty-four male Wistar ra...

  7. Association of mast cell infiltration with gastric cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bei; Li, Yu; Liu, Xiaodong; Wang, Dongsheng

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the expression of mast cells, C-C motif chemokine ligand 2 (CCL-2) and C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) in gastric cancer tumor tissue; and the association of mast cells with the proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis of gastric cancer cells. In addition, whether the stem cell factor (SCF)/c-Kit pathway was associated with the secretion of CCL-2 by gastric cancer cells was explored. Flow cytometry analysis and immunohistochemistry were used to observe the relative number of mast cells, and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were utilized to determine the expression of CCL-2 and CCR2 mRNA and protein. Following the co-culture of the mast cell line HMC-1 and the gastric cancer cell line BGC-823, a Transwell assay was used to validate the effect of mast cells on the migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, Cell Counting kit-8 and dual acridine orange/ethidium bromide fluorescent staining assays were performed to determine the proliferation and apoptosis of gastric cancer cells, following co-culture with mast cells. The expression of SCF and c-Kit were also determined with a western blot analysis. A specific phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, wortmannin, was used to test the effect of PI3K inhibition on the secretion of CCL-2 in gastric cancer. The results demonstrated that the proportion of infiltrating mast cells, and the mRNA/protein expression of CCL-2 and CCR2, were significantly increased in tumor tissue relative to adjacent tissues. In addition, the migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells were significantly increased when mast cells were used as an attractant. When co-cultured with mast cells, the viability of gastric cancer cells was significantly increased and H 2 O 2 -induced apoptosis was inhibited. In gastric cancer tissue samples, the expression of SCF, c-Kit and phosphorylated (p)-Akt protein were significantly

  8. Spatial patterns and broad-scale weather cues of beech mast seeding in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchiano, Giorgio; Hacket-Pain, Andrew; Turco, Marco; Motta, Renzo; Maringer, Janet; Conedera, Marco; Drobyshev, Igor; Ascoli, Davide

    2017-07-01

    Mast seeding is a crucial population process in many tree species, but its spatio-temporal patterns and drivers at the continental scale remain unknown . Using a large dataset (8000 masting observations across Europe for years 1950-2014) we analysed the spatial pattern of masting across the entire geographical range of European beech, how it is influenced by precipitation, temperature and drought, and the temporal and spatial stability of masting-weather correlations. Beech masting exhibited a general distance-dependent synchronicity and a pattern structured in three broad geographical groups consistent with continental climate regimes. Spearman's correlations and logistic regression revealed a general pattern of beech masting correlating negatively with temperature in the summer 2 yr before masting, and positively with summer temperature 1 yr before masting (i.e. 2T model). The temperature difference between the two previous summers (DeltaT model) was also a good predictor. Moving correlation analysis applied to the longest eight chronologies (74-114 yr) revealed stable correlations between temperature and masting, confirming consistency in weather cues across space and time. These results confirm widespread dependency of masting on temperature and lend robustness to the attempts to reconstruct and predict mast years using temperature data. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. Estimation of the total number of mast cells in the human umbilical cord. A methodological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg Damsgaard, T M; Windelborg Nielsen, B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the total number of mast cells in the human umbilical cord. Using 50 microns-thick paraffin sections, made from a systematic random sample of umbilical cord, the total number of mast cells per cord was estimated using a combination of the optical...... disector and fractionated sampling. The mast cell of the human umbilical cord was found in Wharton's jelly, most frequently in close proximity to the three blood vessels. No consistent pattern of variation in mast cell numbers from the fetal end of the umbilical cord towards the placenta was seen....... The total number of mast cells found in the umbilical cord was 5,200,000 (median), range 2,800,000-16,800,000 (n = 7), that is 156,000 mast cells per gram umbilical cord (median), range 48,000-267,000. Thus, the umbilical cord constitutes an adequate source of mast cells for further investigation...

  10. Linearized models for a new magnetic control in MAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artaserse, G.; Maviglia, F.; Albanese, R.; McArdle, G.J.; Pangione, L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We applied linearized models for a new magnetic control on MAST tokamak. ► A suite of procedures, conceived to be machine independent, have been used. ► We carried out model-based simulations, taking into account eddy currents effects. ► Comparison with the EFIT flux maps and the experimental magnetic signals are shown. ► A current driven model for the dynamic simulations of the experimental data have been performed. -- Abstract: The aim of this work is to provide reliable linearized models for the design and assessment of a new magnetic control system for MAST (Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak) using rtEFIT, which can easily be exported to MAST Upgrade. Linearized models for magnetic control have been obtained using the 2D axisymmetric finite element code CREATE L. MAST linearized models include equivalent 2D axisymmetric schematization of poloidal field (PF) coils, vacuum vessel, and other conducting structures. A plasmaless and a double null configuration have been chosen as benchmark cases for the comparison with experimental data and EFIT reconstructions. Good agreement has been found with the EFIT flux map and the experimental signals coming from magnetic probes with only few mismatches probably due to broken sensors. A suite of procedures (equipped with a user friendly interface to be run even remotely) to provide linearized models for magnetic control is now available on the MAST linux machines. A new current driven model has been used to obtain a state space model having the PF coil currents as inputs. Dynamic simulations of experimental data have been carried out using linearized models, including modelling of the effects of the passive structures, showing a fair agreement. The modelling activity has been useful also to reproduce accurately the interaction between plasma current and radial position control loops

  11. Linearized models for a new magnetic control in MAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artaserse, G., E-mail: giovanni.artaserse@enea.it [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Maviglia, F.; Albanese, R. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA-CREATE sulla Fusione, Via Claudio 21, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); McArdle, G.J.; Pangione, L. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► We applied linearized models for a new magnetic control on MAST tokamak. ► A suite of procedures, conceived to be machine independent, have been used. ► We carried out model-based simulations, taking into account eddy currents effects. ► Comparison with the EFIT flux maps and the experimental magnetic signals are shown. ► A current driven model for the dynamic simulations of the experimental data have been performed. -- Abstract: The aim of this work is to provide reliable linearized models for the design and assessment of a new magnetic control system for MAST (Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak) using rtEFIT, which can easily be exported to MAST Upgrade. Linearized models for magnetic control have been obtained using the 2D axisymmetric finite element code CREATE L. MAST linearized models include equivalent 2D axisymmetric schematization of poloidal field (PF) coils, vacuum vessel, and other conducting structures. A plasmaless and a double null configuration have been chosen as benchmark cases for the comparison with experimental data and EFIT reconstructions. Good agreement has been found with the EFIT flux map and the experimental signals coming from magnetic probes with only few mismatches probably due to broken sensors. A suite of procedures (equipped with a user friendly interface to be run even remotely) to provide linearized models for magnetic control is now available on the MAST linux machines. A new current driven model has been used to obtain a state space model having the PF coil currents as inputs. Dynamic simulations of experimental data have been carried out using linearized models, including modelling of the effects of the passive structures, showing a fair agreement. The modelling activity has been useful also to reproduce accurately the interaction between plasma current and radial position control loops.

  12. Induction of Microglial Activation by Mediators Released from Mast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Microglia are the resident immune cells in the brain and play a pivotal role in immune surveillance in the central nervous system (CNS. Brain mast cells are activated in CNS disorders and induce the release of several mediators. Thus, brain mast cells, rather than microglia, are the “first responders” due to injury. However, the functional aspects of mast cell-microglia interactions remain uninvestigated. Methods: Conditioned medium from activated HMC-1 cells induces microglial activation similar to co-culture of microglia with HMC-1 cells. Primary cultured microglia were examined by flow cytometry analysis and confocal microscopy. TNF- alpha and IL-6 were measured with commercial ELISA kits. Cell signalling was analysed by Western blotting. Results: In the present study, we found that the conditioned medium from activated HMC-1 cells stimulated microglial activation and the subsequent production of the pro-inflammatory factors TNF-α and IL-6. Co-culture of microglia and HMC-1 cells with corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH for 24, 48 and 72 hours increased TNF-α and IL-6 production. Antagonists of histamine receptor 1 (H1R, H4R, proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2 or Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 reduced HMC-1-induced pro-inflammatory factor production and MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathway activation. Conclusions: These results imply that activated mast cells trigger microglial activation. Interactions between mast cells and microglia could constitute a new and unique therapeutic target for CNS inflammation-related diseases.

  13. Cell-mediated immunity against human retinal extract, S-antigen, and interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein in onchocercal chorioretinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lelij, A.; Rothova, A.; Stilma, J. S.; Hoekzema, R.; Kijlstra, A.

    1990-01-01

    Autoimmune mechanisms are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of onchocercal chorioretinopathy. Cell-mediated immune responses to human retinal S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP), and crude retinal extract were investigated in patients with onchocerciasis from

  14. Generation, isolation, and maintenance of human mast cells and mast cell lines derived from peripheral blood or cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Kuehn, Hye Sun

    2010-01-01

    Antigen-mediated mast cell activation is a pivotal step in the initiation of allergic disorders including anaphylaxis and atopy. To date, studies aimed at investigating the mechanisms regulating these responses, and studies designed to identify potential ways to prevent them, have primarily been...

  15. Suppression chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Akio.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To miniaturize the storage tank of condensated water in BWR reactor. Constitution: A diaphragm is provided in a suppression chamber thereby to partition the same into an inner compartment and an outer compartment. In one of said compartments there is stored clean water to be used for feeding at the time of separating the reactor and for the core spray system, and in another compartment there is stored water necessary for accomplishing the depressurization effect at the time of coolant loss accident. To the compartment in which clean water is stored there is connected a water cleaning device for constantly maintaining water in clean state. As this cleaning device an already used fuel pool cleaning device can be utilized. Further, downcomers for accomplishing the depressurization function are provided in both inner compartment and outer compartment. The capacity of the storage tank can be reduced by the capacity of clean water within the suppression chamber. (Ikeda, J.)

  16. A Novel Mechanism of Estrogen Action in Breast Cancer Cells Mediated Through ER-FE65 Complex Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    breast cancer cells mediated through ER-FE65 complex formation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Wenlong Bai, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...breast cancer cells mediated through ER-FE65 complex formation 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0574 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...above information, we proposed a novel function for Fe65 in breast cancer cells . We hypothesize that Fe65 functions as a dual adaptor for ERα and

  17. The role of Lin28b in myeloid and mast cell differentiation and mast cell malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L D; Rao, T N; Rowe, R G; Nguyen, P T; Sullivan, J L; Pearson, D S; Doulatov, S; Wu, L; Lindsley, R C; Zhu, H; DeAngelo, D J; Daley, G Q; Wagers, A J

    2015-06-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are critical components of the innate immune system and important for host defense, allergy, autoimmunity, tissue regeneration and tumor progression. Dysregulated MC development leads to systemic mastocytosis (SM), a clinically variable but often devastating family of hematologic disorders. Here we report that induced expression of Lin28, a heterochronic gene and pluripotency factor implicated in driving a fetal hematopoietic program, caused MC accumulation in adult mice in target organs such as the skin and peritoneal cavity. In vitro assays revealed a skewing of myeloid commitment in LIN28B-expressing hematopoietic progenitors, with increased levels of LIN28B in common myeloid and basophil-MC progenitors altering gene expression patterns to favor cell fate choices that enhanced MC specification. In addition, LIN28B-induced MCs appeared phenotypically and functionally immature, and in vitro assays suggested a slowing of MC terminal differentiation in the context of LIN28B upregulation. Finally, interrogation of human MC leukemia samples revealed upregulation of LIN28B in abnormal MCs from patients with SM. This work identifies Lin28 as a novel regulator of innate immune function and a new protein of interest in MC disease.

  18. Different radiosensitivities of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and skin of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Sonoda, T.; Mori, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although tissue mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, some descendants of bone marrow-derived precursors retain the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mast cells even after localization in the skin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the D0 values for mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and those localized in the skin. Bone marrow cells were removed from (WB X C57BL/6)F1-+/+ mice after various doses of irradiation and injected into the skin of the congenic W/Wv mice which were genetically without mast cells. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow was evaluated by determining the proportion of the injection sites at which mast cells did not appear. For the assay of the radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors localized in the skin, pieces of skin were removed from beige C57BL/6 (bgJ/bgJ. Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice after various doses of irradiation and grafted onto the back of the normal C57BL/6 mice. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the skin was evaluated by determining the decrease of beige-type mast cells which possessed giant granules. Mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow were much more radiosensitive than those localized in the skin. D0 value was about 100 rad for the former and about 800 rad for the latter.

  19. Different radiosensitivities of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and skin of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Sonoda, T.; Mori, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although tissue mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, some descendants of bone marrow-derived precursors retain the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mast cells even after localization in the skin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the D/sub 0/ values for mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and those localized in the skin. Bone marrow cells were removed from (WB X C57BL/6)F/sub 1/+/+ mice after various doses of irradiation and injected into the skin of the congenic W/W/sup v/ mice which were genetically without mast cells. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow was evaluated by determining the proportion of the injection sites at which mast cells did not appear. For the assay of the radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors localized in the skin, pieces of skin were removed from beige C57BL/6 (bg/sup J//bg/sup J/, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice after various doses of irradiation and grafted onto the backs of the normal C57BL/6 mice. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the skin was evaluated by determining the decrease of beige-type mast cells which possessed giant granules. Mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow were much more radiosenitive than those localized in the skin. D/sup 0/ value was about 100 rad for the former and about 800 rad for the latter.

  20. Different radiosensitivities of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and skin of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Sonoda, T.; Mori, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although tissue mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, some descendants of bone marrow-derived precursors retain the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mast cells even after localization in the skin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the D0 values for mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and those localized in the skin. Bone marrow cells were removed from (WB X C57BL/6)F1-+/+ mice after various doses of irradiation and injected into the skin of the congenic W/Wv mice which were genetically without mast cells. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow was evaluated by determining the proportion of the injection sites at which mast cells did not appear. For the assay of the radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors localized in the skin, pieces of skin were removed from beige C57BL/6 (bgJ/bgJ. Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice after various doses of irradiation and grafted onto the back of the normal C57BL/6 mice. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the skin was evaluated by determining the decrease of beige-type mast cells which possessed giant granules. Mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow were much more radiosensitive than those localized in the skin. D0 value was about 100 rad for the former and about 800 rad for the latter

  1. Different radiosensitivities of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and skin of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Sonoda, T.; Mori, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although tissue mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, some descendants of bone marrow-derived precursors retain the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mast cells even after localization in the skin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the D 0 values for mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and those localized in the skin. Bone marrow cells were removed from (WB X C57BL/6)F 1 +/+ mice after various doses of irradiation and injected into the skin of the congenic W/W/sup v/ mice which were genetically without mast cells. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow was evaluated by determining the proportion of the injection sites at which mast cells did not appear. For the assay of the radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors localized in the skin, pieces of skin were removed from beige C57BL/6 (bg/sup J//bg/sup J/, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice after various doses of irradiation and grafted onto the backs of the normal C57BL/6 mice. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the skin was evaluated by determining the decrease of beige-type mast cells which possessed giant granules. Mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow were much more radiosenitive than those localized in the skin. D 0 value was about 100 rad for the former and about 800 rad for the latter

  2. Concurrent inhibition of kit- and FcepsilonRI-mediated signaling: coordinated suppression of mast cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina M; Beaven, Michael A; Iwaki, Shoko

    2008-01-01

    characterized Kit inhibitor imatinib mesylate (imatinib). In contrast to imatinib, however, hypothemycin also effectively inhibited FcepsilonRI-mediated degranulation and cytokine production in addition to the potentiation of these responses via Kit. The effect of hypothemycin on Kit-mediated responses could...

  3. [T cell-mediated immune responses and the recognition of tuberculosis antigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Kunio; Koide, Yukio

    2010-06-01

    T cell-mediated immune responses profoundly contribute to the protection against the re-activation of latently infected Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Th1 cells produce IFN-gamma to activate infected macrophages and promote the formation of granulomas around infected macrophages. CD8+, gamma delta and CD1-restricted T cells also produce IFN-gamma and participate the protective responses against bacterial growth. Th17 cells produce IL-17 to promote the mobilization of immunocompetent cells and contribute to the granuloma formation. On the contrary, Th2 cells and Tregs interfere these protective immune responses.

  4. Piper nigrum extract ameliorated allergic inflammation through inhibiting Th2/Th17 responses and mast cells activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thi Tho; Piao, Chun Hua; Song, Chang Ho; Shin, Hee Soon; Shon, Dong-Hwa; Chai, Ok Hee

    2017-12-01

    Piper nigrum (Piperaceae) is commonly used as a spice and traditional medicine in many countries. P. nigrum has been reported to have anti-oxidant, anti-bacterial, anti-tumor, anti-mutagenic, anti-diabetic, and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of P. nigrum on allergic asthma has not been known. This study investigated the effect of P. nigrum ethanol extracts (PNE) on airway inflammation in asthmatic mice model. In the ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma model, we analysed the number of inflammatory cells and cytokines production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue; histological structure; as well as the total immunoglobulin (Ig)E, anti-OVA IgE, anti-OVA IgG 1 and histamine levels in serum. The oral administration (200 mg/kg) of PNE reduced the accumulation of inflammatory cells (eosinophils, neutrophils in BALF and mast cells in lung tissue); regulated the balance of the cytokines production of Th1, Th2, Th17 and Treg cells, specifically, inhibited the expressions of GATA3, IL-4, IL-6, IL-1β, RORγt, IL-17A, TNF-α and increased the secretions of IL-10, INF-γ in BALF and lung homogenate. Moreover, PNE suppressed the levels of total IgE, anti-OVA IgE, anti-OVA IgG 1 and histamine release in serum. The histological analysis showed that the fibrosis and infiltration of inflammatory cells were also ameliorated in PNE treated mice. On the other hand, PNE inhibited the allergic responses via inactivation of rat peritoneal mast cells degranulation. These results suggest that PNE has therapeutic potential for treating allergic asthma through inhibiting Th2/Th17 responses and mast cells activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Role And Relevance Of Mast Cells In Fungal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit eSaluja

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their detrimental role in allergic diseases, mast cells (MCs are well known to be important cells of the innate immune system. In the last decade, they have been shown to contribute significantly to optimal host defense against numerous pathogens including parasites, bacteria, and viruses. The contribution of MCs to the immune responses in fungal infections, however, is largely unknown. In this review, we first discuss key features of mast cell responses to pathogens in general and then summarize the current knowledge on the function of MCs in the defense against fungal pathogens. We especially focus on the potential and proven mechanisms by which MC can detect fungal infections and on possible MC effector mechanisms in protecting from fungal infections.

  6. FAST Mast Structural Response to Axial Loading: Modeling and Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Templeton, Justin D.; Song, Kyongchan; Rayburn, Jeffery T.

    2012-01-01

    The International Space Station s solar array wing mast shadowing problem is the focus of this paper. A building-block approach to modeling and analysis is pursued for the primary structural components of the solar array wing mast structure. Starting with an ANSYS (Registered Trademark) finite element model, a verified MSC.Nastran (Trademark) model is established for a single longeron. This finite element model translation requires the conversion of several modeling and analysis features for the two structural analysis tools to produce comparable results for the single-longeron configuration. The model is then reconciled using test data. The resulting MSC.Nastran (Trademark) model is then extended to a single-bay configuration and verified using single-bay test data. Conversion of the MSC. Nastran (Trademark) single-bay model to Abaqus (Trademark) is also performed to simulate the elastic-plastic longeron buckling response of the single bay prior to folding.

  7. Vacuolin-1-modulated exocytosis and cell resealing in mast cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shaik, Gouse Mohiddin; Dráberová, Lubica; Heneberg, Petr; Dráber, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 8 (2009), s. 1337-1345 ISSN 0898-6568 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506; GA MŠk LC545; GA ČR GA301/09/1826 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : vacuolin-1 * exocytosis * mast cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.094, year: 2009

  8. Asthma: Eosinophil Disease, Mast Cell Disease, or Both?

    OpenAIRE

    Bradding, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Although there is much circumstantial evidence implicating eosinophils as major orchestrators in the pathophysiology of asthma, recent studies have cast doubt on their importance. Not only does anti-interleukin-5 treatment not alter the course of the disease, but some patients with asthma do not have eosinophils in their airways, whereas patients with eosinophilic bronchitis exhibit a florid tissue eosinophilia but do not have asthma. In contrast, mast cells are found in all airways and loca...

  9. Control and acquisition for MAST Thomson scattering diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibaev, S.; Naylor, G.; Scannell, R.; McArdle, G.; O'Gorman, T.; Walsh, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    The MAST (mega-amp spherical tokamak) Thomson scattering (TS) diagnostics have been radically upgraded and expanded. Eight 30 Hz 1.6 J Nd:YAG lasers have been combined to produce a sampling rate of 240 Hz. The scattered signals are acquired by two spectrometer systems: core and edge. The core system has been built anew: collection optics, polychromators, digitizers, and control computers. It allows measurement of electron temperature and density at 130 spatial points with ∼10 mm resolution across the plasma. The Nd:YAG scattered light signals are registered in 650 channels as polychromator outputs; each channel is registered on two ADCs: at 1 GHz rate in a short interval around each laser pulse and at 100 kHz for background data. The fast ADCs are combined in 26 data acquisition units. Each unit is assembled in a 6 U PXI chassis with embedded controller and six 4-channel 1 GHz ADC cards. Some chassis contain a 96-channel slow ADC card with Ethernet control. The Ruby TS has been rebuilt with a new spectrometer and CCD camera to provide higher spatial resolution - 512 points; the laser has been modified to add double pulse capability. A new control and acquisition system has been developed; it has modular design allowing flexibility and seamless expansion. The system supports event-triggered and real-time operation (will be added in a later stage). A smart trigger device has been developed for TS timing and synchronisation. It provides complex pulse sequences for laser firing with resynchronisation on a number of digital and analogue inputs including plasma events. This device also triggers TS acquisition. The system is integrated by a TS master process running on the dedicated computer; it is represented as a standard MAST data acquisition unit. The Ruby TS is also implemented as a standard MAST unit linked with the Nd:YAG TS by MAST system services.

  10. IL-9-Producing Mast Cell Precursors and Food Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    signaling enhances or attenuates allergic responses to food allergens. Methods: Mice of an IL-25 transgenic mouse line (iIL-25Tg mice), which...developing experimental food allergy, we generated IL-25 transgenic mouse lines (iIL-25Tg mice) that constitutively overexpress murine IL-25 driven by the...AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0517 TITLE: IL-9-Producing Mast Cell Precursors and Food Allergy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Yui

  11. Closed loop lab tests of NASA's Mini-Mast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, C.; Kim, J. H.; Skelton, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    A design strategy which integrates model reduction by modal cost analysis and a multiobjective controller synthesis algorithm is used to design controllers for NASA's Mini-Mast system. The necessary modeling and control algorithms are easily programmed in Matlab standard software. Hence, this method is very practical for controller design for large space structures. The design algorithm also presents a solution for the important problem of tuning multiple-loop controllers.

  12. Asthma: Eosinophil Disease, Mast Cell Disease, or Both?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradding Peter

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Although there is much circumstantial evidence implicating eosinophils as major orchestrators in the pathophysiology of asthma, recent studies have cast doubt on their importance. Not only does anti-interleukin-5 treatment not alter the course of the disease, but some patients with asthma do not have eosinophils in their airways, whereas patients with eosinophilic bronchitis exhibit a florid tissue eosinophilia but do not have asthma. In contrast, mast cells are found in all airways and localize specifically to key tissue structures such as the submucosal glands and airway smooth muscle within asthmatic bronchi, irrespective of disease severity or phenotype. Here they are activated and interact exclusively with these structural cells via adhesive pathways and through the release of soluble mediators acting across the distance of only a few microns. The location of mast cells within the airway smooth muscle bundles seems particularly important for the development and propagation of asthma, perhaps occurring in response to, and then serving to aggravate, an underlying abnormality in asthmatic airway smooth muscle function. Targeting this mast cell-airway smooth muscle interaction in asthma offers exciting prospects for the treatment of this common disease.

  13. Amarogentin Displays Immunomodulatory Effects in Human Mast Cells and Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Wölfle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratinocytes express the bitter taste receptors TAS2R1 and TAS2R38. Amarogentin as an agonist for TAS2R1 and other TAS2Rs promotes keratinocyte differentiation. Similarly, mast cells are known to express bitter taste receptors. The aim of this study was to assess whether bitter compounds display immunomodulatory effects on these immunocompetent cells in the skin, so that they might be a target in chronic inflammatory diseases such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Here, we investigated the impact of amarogentin on substance P-induced release of histamine and TNF-α from the human mast cell line LAD-2. Furthermore, the effect of amarogentin on HaCaT keratinocytes costimulated with TNF-α and histamine was investigated. Amarogentin inhibited in LAD-2 cells substance P-induced production of newly synthesized TNF-α, but the degranulation and release of stored histamine were not affected. In HaCaT keratinocytes histamine and TNF-α induced IL-8 and MMP-1 expression was reduced by amarogentin to a similar extent as with azelastine. In conclusion amarogentin displays immunomodulatory effects in the skin by interacting with mast cells and keratinocytes.

  14. Mediators of Mast Cells in Bullous Pemphigoid and Dermatitis Herpetiformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Zebrowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bullous pemphigoid (BP and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH are skin diseases associated with inflammation. However, few findings exist concerning the role of mast cells in autoimmune blistering disease. Skin biopsies were taken from 27 BP and 14 DH patients, as well as 20 healthy individuals. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify the localization and mast cell expression of TNFα and MMP9 in skin lesions and perilesional skin. The serum concentrations of TNFα, MMP9, chymase, tryptase, PAF, and IL-4 were measured by immunoassay. TNFα and MMP9 expression in the epidermis and in inflammatory influxed cells in the dermis was detected in skin biopsies from patients. Although these mediators were found to be expressed in the perilesional skin of all patients, the level was much lower than that in lesional skin. Increased serum PAF levels were observed in BP patients. Mast cells may play an essential role in activating inflammation, which ultimately contributes to the tissue damage observed in BP and DH. Our findings suggest that differences in the pattern of cytokine expression directly contribute to variations in cellular infiltration in DH and BP.

  15. Acrolein induction of oxidative stress and degranulation in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochman, Daniel J; Collaco, Christopher R; Brooks, Edward G

    2014-08-01

    Increases in asthma worldwide have been associated epidemiologically with expanding urban air pollution. The mechanistic relationship between airway hyper-responsiveness, inflammation, and ambient airborne triggers remains ambiguous. Acrolein, a ubiquitous aldehyde pollutant, is a product of incomplete combustion reactions. Acrolein is abundant in cigarette smoke, effluent from industrial smokestacks, diesel exhaust, and even hot oil cooking vapors. Acrolein is a potent airway irritant and can induce airway hyper-responsiveness and inflammation in the lungs of animal models. In the present study, we utilized the mast cell analog, RBL-2H3, to interrogate the responses of cells relevant to airway inflammation and allergic responses as a model for the induction of asthma-like conditions upon exposure to acrolein. We hypothesized that acrolein would induce oxidative stress and degranulation in airway mast cells. Our results indicate that acrolein at 1 ppm initiated degranulation and promoted the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Introduction of antioxidants to the system significantly reduced both ROS generation and degranulation. At higher levels of exposure (above 100 ppm), RBL-2H3 cells displayed signs of severe toxicity. This experimental data indicates acrolein can induce an allergic inflammation in mast cell lines, and the initiation of degranulation was moderated by the application of antioxidants. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  16. Analysis of fuel retention on MAST by global gas balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Lisgo, S.; Maddison, G.; MAST Team

    2010-07-01

    The retention of deuterium fuel during MAST discharges has been studied using the method of global gas balance. The results show that with inter-shot 4He-GDC, the total number of particles retained for a discharge increases with the total number of injected particles, and the total retention fraction stays very high, and can be almost 100%. However, it is observed that disruptions can reduce the wall inventory. With inter-shot 4He-GDC to recondition surfaces on MAST, the retention for all shots analysed has not been observed to saturate, while if there is no 4He-GDC before a shot, the following plasma density can become uncontrollable owing to lower wall pumping capacity. This indicates that a majority of injected particles is retained in the walls/divertor targets during each discharge and that most of them can be recovered with 4He-GDC, suggesting that on the short time-scale of MAST pulses, the particle balance is dominated by direct implantation of ions and neutral particles in shallow surface layers.

  17. NK cell-mediated killing of AML blasts. Role of histamine, monocytes and reactive oxygen metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, M.; Mellqvist, U.H. [Sahlgren`s Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Medicine, Haematology Section, Goeteborg (Sweden); Hansson, M.; Hermodsson, S.; Hellstrand, K. [Sahlgren`s Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Virology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Blasts recovered from patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) were lysed by heterologeous natural killer (NK) cells treated with NK cell-activating cytokine-induced killing of AML blasts was inhibited by monocytes, recovered from peripheral blood by counterflow centrifugal elutriation. Histamine, at concentrations exceeding 0.1 {mu}M, abrogated the monocyte-induced inhibition of NK cells; thereby, histamine and IL-2 or histamine and IFN-{alpha} synergistically induced NK cell-mediated destruction of AML blasts. The effect of histamine was completely blocked by the histamine H2-receptor (H2R) antagonist ranitidine but not by its chemical control AH20399AA. Catalase, a scavenger of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM), reversed the monocyte-induced inhibition of NK cell-mediated killing of blast cells, indicating that the inhibitory signal was mediated by products of the respiratory burst of monocytes. It is concluded that (i) monocytes inhibit anti-leukemic properties of NK cells, (ii) the inhibition is conveyed by monocyte-derived ROM, and (iii) histamine reverses the inhibitory signal and, thereby, synergizes with NK cell-activating cytokines to induce killing of AML blasts. (au) 19 refs.

  18. Role of T-cell-mediated inflammation in psoriasis: pathogenesis and targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flatz L

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lukas Flatz, Curdin ConradDepartment of Dermatology, University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV, Lausanne, SwitzerlandAbstract: Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic, inflammatory, T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Over the past decade, increased knowledge of disease pathogenesis has fundamentally changed psoriasis treatment, with the introduction of biologics, and this has led to a multitude of improved selective targets providing potential therapeutic options. Indeed, numerous pathogenesis-based treatments are currently in development, as psoriasis has also become increasingly relevant for proof-of-concept studies. The purpose of this review was to summarize current knowledge of psoriasis immunopathogenesis, focusing on the T-cell-mediated immune response and its initiation. The authors describe recent advances in psoriasis treatment and discuss pathogenesis-based therapies that are currently in development or which could be envisioned for the future. Although current biologics are well tolerated, several issues such as long-term efficacy, long-term safety, and high costs keep driving the search for new and better therapies. With further advances in understanding disease pathogenesis, more genomic data from psoriasis patients becoming available, and potentially the identification of autoantigens in psoriasis, current research should lead to the development of a growing arsenal of improved targeted treatments and to further breakthrough immunotherapies.Keywords: autoimmunity, autoimmune disease, immune response, immunopathogenesis

  19. The measurement of cell mediated immunity by radioimmunoassay in desensitizing treatment with acupoints for allergic asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Ronglin; Luan Meiling; Wang Mingsuo; Liu Keliang

    1994-05-01

    Three mitogens consisted of PHA, PWM, LPS were used to activate lymphocytes. Lymphocyte transformation with radioisotope incorporation of 3 H-TdR was done in 20 patients with allergic asthma and 14 healthy persons as control groups. Cell mediated immune in these cases of desensitizing treatment with acupoints were studied. The experiments showed that the incorporation rates of 3 H-TdR, acupoints were studied. The experiments showed that the incorporation rates of 3 H-TdR, activated by PHA, PWM, LPS, of the allergic asthma patients were P>0.05, P 3 H-TdR in lymphocytes after desensitizing treatment with acupoints compared with that before the treatment tended to be normal. Lymphocyte transformation difference of 3 H-TdR incorporation rates between this group and A or B control groups was significant (P<0.01). This study provides scientific clinical experimental evidences for researching cell mediated immune in attack and curative effects of allergic asthma

  20. Vulnerability of cultured canine lung tumor cells to NK cell-mediated cytolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haley, P.J.; Kohr, J.M.; Kelly, G.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Guilmette, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Five cell lines, designated as canine lung epithelial cell (CLEP), derived from radiation induced canine lung tumors and canine thyroid adeno-carcinoma (CTAC) cells were compared for their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytolysis using peripheral blood lymphocytes from normal, healthy Beagle dogs as effector cells. Effector cells and chromium 51 radiolabeled target cells were incubated for 16 h at ratios of 12.5:1, 25:1, 50:1, and 100:1. Increasing cytolysis was observed for all cell lines as the effector-to-target-cell ratios increased from 12.5:1 to 100:1. The percent cytotoxicity was significantly less for all lung tumor cell lines as compared to CTAC at the 100:1 ratio. One lung tumor cell line, CLEP-9, had 85% of the lytic vulnerability of the CTAC cell line and significantly greater susceptibility to NK cell-mediated lysis than all of the other lung tumor cell lines. Susceptibility to NK cell cytolysis did not correlate with in vivo malignant behavior of the original tumor. These data suggest that cultured canine lung tumor cells are susceptible to NK cell cytolytic activity in vitro and that at least one of these cell lines (CLEP-9) is a candidate for substitution of the standard canine NK cell target, CTAC, in NK cell assays. The use of lung tumor cells in NK cell assays may provide greater insight into the control of lung tumors by immune mechanisms. (author)

  1. An Interventional Study Using Cell-Mediated Immunity to Personalize Therapy for Cytomegalovirus Infection After Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D; Mian, M; Singer, L; Humar, A

    2017-09-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses predict clinical cytomegalovirus (CMV) events but have not been adopted into routine practice due to lack of interventional studies. Our objective was to demonstrate the safety and feasibility of early discontinuation of antivirals based on the real-time measurement of CMV-specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in patients with CMV viremia. Transplant patients were enrolled at the onset of CMV viremia requiring antiviral therapy. CD8 T cell responses were determined using the Quantiferon-CMV assay, and results were used to guide subsequent management. A total of 27 patients (median viral load at onset 10 900 International Units/mL) were treated until viral load negative. At end of treatment, 14/27 (51.9%) had a positive CMV-CMI response and had antivirals discontinued. The remaining 13/27 (48.1%) patients had a negative CMV-CMI response and received 2 months of secondary antiviral prophylaxis. In those with a positive CMI and early discontinuation of antivirals, only a single patient experienced a low-level asymptomatic recurrence. In contrast, recurrence was observed in 69.2% of CMI-negative patients despite more prolonged antivirals (p = 0.001). In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate the feasibility and safety of real-time CMV-specific CMI assessment to guide changes to the management of CMV infection. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  2. The Role of Antioxidation and Immunomodulation in Postnatal Multipotent Stem Cell-Mediated Cardiac Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Huard

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and inflammation play major roles in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease including myocardial infarction (MI. The pathological progression following MI is very complex and involves a number of cell populations including cells localized within the heart, as well as cells recruited from the circulation and other tissues that participate in inflammatory and reparative processes. These cells, with their secretory factors, have pleiotropic effects that depend on the stage of inflammation and regeneration. Excessive inflammation leads to enlargement of the infarction site, pathological remodeling and eventually, heart dysfunction. Stem cell therapy represents a unique and innovative approach to ameliorate oxidative stress and inflammation caused by ischemic heart disease. Consequently, it is crucial to understand the crosstalk between stem cells and other cells involved in post-MI cardiac tissue repair, especially immune cells, in order to harness the beneficial effects of the immune response following MI and further improve stem cell-mediated cardiac regeneration. This paper reviews the recent findings on the role of antioxidation and immunomodulation in postnatal multipotent stem cell-mediated cardiac repair following ischemic heart disease, particularly acute MI and focuses specifically on mesenchymal, muscle and blood-vessel-derived stem cells due to their antioxidant and immunomodulatory properties.

  3. Histamine release from gut mast cells from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolte, Hendrik; Spjeldnæs, Nikolaj; Kruse, Aksel

    1990-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators from intestinal mast cells may serve as initiators of acute and delayed inflammation. Mast cell histamine release was measured in 19 patients with inflammatory bowel diseases using gut mast cells from enzymatically dispersed endoscopic forceps biopsy specimens...... of macroscopically inflamed and normal tissue. Mast cells and corresponding basophils were challenged with anti-IgE, anti-IgG, subclass anti-IgG4, and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and results were compared with those from nine patient control subjects. The mast cell count in patients with ulcerative...... colitis was increased compared with that in control subjects and patients with Crohn's disease, and the mast cell count obtained from inflamed tissue was greater than that of normal tissue. The study also shows the heterogeneity of the responsiveness of the histamine releasing cells to various...

  4. Relationship between Mast Cells and the Colitis with Relapse Induced by Trinitrobenzesulphonic Acid in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Luchini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to clarify the role of mast cells in colitis with relapse induced in Wistar rats by trinitrobenzenosulphonic acid. Colitis induction increased the histamine concentration in the colon, which peaked on day 26. The number of mast cells, probably immature, was ten times higher on day 8. Different from animals infected with intestinal parasites, after colitis remission, mast cells do not migrate to the spleen, showing that mast cell proliferation presents different characteristics depending on the inflammation stimuli. Treatment with sulfasalazine, doxantrazole, quercetin, or nedocromil did not increase the histamine concentration or the mast cell number in the colon on day 26, thereby showing absence of degranulation of these cells. In conclusion, although mast cell proliferation is associated with colitis, these cells and their mediators appear to play no clear role in the colitis with relapses.

  5. Mast cells, macrophages, and crown-like structures distinguish subcutaneous from visceral fat in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Altintas, Mehmet M.; Azad, Adiba; Nayer, Behzad; Contreras, Gabriel; Zaias, Julia; Faul, Christian; Reiser, Jochen; Nayer, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is accompanied by adipocyte death and accumulation of macrophages and mast cells in expanding adipose tissues. Considering the differences in biological behavior of fat found in different anatomical locations, we explored the distribution of mast cells, solitary macrophages, and crown-like structures (CLS), the surrogates for dead adipocytes, in subcutaneous and abdominal visceral fat of lean and diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice. In fat depots of lean mice, mast cells were far less pre...

  6. Climate-influenced ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) seed masting trends in western Montana, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Keyes, Christopher R.; Gonzalez, Ruben Manso

    2015-01-01

    Aim of study: The aim of this study was to analyze 10-year records of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) seed production, in order to confirm synchronic seed production and to evaluate cyclical masting trends, masting depletion effect, and climate-masting relationships. Area of study: The study area was located in a P. ponderosa stand in the northern Rocky Mountains (western Montana, USA). Material and methods: The study was conducted in one stand that had been subjected to a silvicul...

  7. Microarray analysis of the gene expression profile of HMC-1 mast cells following Schizonepeta tenuifolia Briquet treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sung-Hwa; Cho, Sunim; Ji, Eun Seok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Shin, Minkyu; Hong, Moochang; Bae, Hyunsu

    2012-01-01

    It has long been believed that mast cells play a crucial role in the development of many physiological changes during immediate allergic responses. This study was conducted to evaluate the anti-inflammation mechanism of Schizonepeta tenuifolia (ST) extract and ST purified chemicals on the PMA plus A23187-induced stimulation of HMC-1 human mast cells. ST, rosmarinic acid, pulegone, and 2α,3α,24-thrihydrooxylen-12en-28oic acid treatment of HMC-1 cells led to significant suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α) in a dose dependent manner. In addition, the results of the microarray and real-time RT-PCR analyses revealed that ST regulates several pathways, including the cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction (CCRI), MAPK, and the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways. ST may be useful for the treatment of inflammation disease via anti-inflammation activity that occurs through inhibition of the CCRI, MAPK, and TLR signaling pathways. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Macrophages and mast cells in dystrophic masseter muscle: a light and electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Mikkelsen, H

    1988-01-01

    Macrophages and mast cells in masseter muscle from normal and dystrophic mice were studied by light and electron microscopy. Acid phosphatase activity and FITC-dextran were used to identify and describe macrophages. Toluidine blue was used as a marker for mast cells. In dystrophic muscle, the num......Macrophages and mast cells in masseter muscle from normal and dystrophic mice were studied by light and electron microscopy. Acid phosphatase activity and FITC-dextran were used to identify and describe macrophages. Toluidine blue was used as a marker for mast cells. In dystrophic muscle...

  9. Are mast cells still good biomarkers for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamper, Marianne; Regauer, Sigrid; Welter, JoEllen; Eberhard, Jakob; Viereck, Volker

    2015-06-01

    ESSIC identifies mast cell infiltrates of detrusor muscle as a diagnostic criterion for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. However, an increased mast cell count is also characteristic of overactive bladder syndrome. The lack of uniformity in mast cell detection methods hampers data comparison. Using state-of-the-art techniques we investigated whether mast cells differ among bladder conditions. We analyzed bladder biopsies from 56 patients, including 31 with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis with (12) or without (19) Hunner lesions, 13 with overactive bladder syndrome and 12 without bladder symptoms to determine the quantity, location, distribution and activation of mast cells using immunohistochemistry with anti-mast cell tryptase. Patients were allocated to study groups by key bladder symptoms commonly used to define conditions (pain and major urgency). Subepithelial mast cell localization (p interstitial cystitis with Hunner lesions. The optimal cutoff of 32 detrusor mast cells per mm(2) achieved only 68% accuracy with 38% positive predictive value. No difference was observed between bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis without Hunner lesions and overactive bladder syndrome. Patient groups differed in lymphocyte infiltration (p = 0.001), nodular lymphocyte aggregates (p interstitial cystitis with Hunner lesions. Detrusor mastocytosis had poor predictive value for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Mast cell assessment did not distinguish bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis without Hunner lesions from overactive bladder syndrome. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The relationship of mast cells and angiogenesis with prognosis in renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guldur, M.E.; Kocarslan, S.; Dincoglu, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of mast cell count and angiogenesis on the prognosis of renal cell carcinoma. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at the Harran University, Sanliurfa, Turkey, and included 64 cases with diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma between 2002 and 2012. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on paraffin sections using the standard streptavidin-biotin immunoperoxidase method. CD31 antibodies were used to identify microvessels in tumoural tissues. The microvessel density was calculated using a serological method. The mean vascular density was equivalent to the vascular surface area (in mm) per unit tissue volume (in mm) (MVD=mm). Mast cells tryptase antibody was used to evaluate the mast cell count in tumoural and non-tumoural tissues. The relationship between mast cell count and microvessel density was evaluated and compared with stage, grade, tumour diameter, and age. Results: The mast cell count in the tumoral tissue of renal cell carcinoma was significantly higher compared with non-neoplastic renal tissue (p 0.05). The intratumoural mast cell count in clear cell renal carcinoma was significantly higher compared with non-clear variety (p=0.001). No significant relationship was found between microvessel density, age, stage, diameter, or grade of the tumour and tumoral mast cell count (p>0.05). Conclusion: No significant association was found between the number of mast cells in tumoral tissue and microvessel density. Further studies are needed to demonstrate the effect of mast cells on angiogenesis in renal cell carcinoma. (author)

  11. Protective Role of Mast Cells in Primary Systemic Vasculitis: A Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Springer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are important cells of the immune system. Although traditionally considered as key players in allergic and hypersensitivity reactions, emerging evidence suggests that mast cells have many complex roles in vascular disease. These include regulation of vasodilation, angiogenesis, activation of matrix metalloproteinases, apoptosis of smooth muscle cells, and activation of the renin angiotensin system. Mast cells are also known to play an immunomodulatory role via modulation of regulatory T-cell (Treg, macrophage and endothelial cell functions. This dual role of the mast cells is evident in myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-mouse model of glomerulonephritis in which mast cell deficiency worsens glomerulonephritis, whereas inhibition of mast cell degranulation is effective in abrogating the development of glomerulonephritis. Our previous work demonstrated that mast cell degranulation inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin 6 (IL-6 production in mice. This effect was not seen in histamine-1-receptor knockout (H1R−/− mice suggesting a role for histamine in IL-6 homeostasis. In addition, mast cell degranulation-mediated decrease in IL-6 production was associated with an upregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 protein in the aorta. We propose that mast cells regulate large artery inflammation through T-cells, shifting a primarily Th1 and Th17 toward a Th2 response and leading to enhanced IL-10 production, activation Treg cells, and the inhibition of macrophage functions.

  12. Endocytosis of erythrocytes in vivo and particulate substances in vitro by feline neoplastic mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madewell, B R; Munn, R J; Phillips, L P

    1987-01-01

    Clinical evidence for the phagocytic capability of neoplastic feline mast cells was provided by recognition of endocytosed erythrocytes in seven of 12 cytological smears of mast cell neoplasms, particularly in those cells collected from splenic tumors. The capability of these neoplastic mast cells to endocytose particulate substances was also studied in vitro. Evidence is presented that under cultural conditions, feline neoplastic mast cells are capable of endocytosing a variety of substances including polystyrene latex microspheres, zymosan particles, horse spleen ferritin, salmon sperm nuclei, horseradish peroxidase, and carbon particles. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3134117

  13. Cassia tora Seed Extract and Its Active Compound Aurantio-obtusin Inhibit Allergic Responses in IgE-Mediated Mast Cells and Anaphylactic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myungsuk; Lim, Sue Ji; Lee, Hee-Ju; Nho, Chu Won

    2015-10-21

    Cassia tora seed is widely used due to its various biological properties including anticancer, antidiabetic, and anti-inflammatory effects. However, there has been no report of the effects of C. tora seed extract (CTE) on immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergic responses. In this research, we demonstrated the effects of CTE and its active compound aurantio-obtusin on IgE-sensitized allergic reactions in mast cells and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA). CTE and aurantio-obtusin suppressed degranulation, histamine production, and reactive oxygen species generation and inhibited the production and mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-4. CTE and aurantio-obtusin also suppressed the prostaglandin E2 production and expression of cyclooxygenase 2. Furthermore, CTE and aurantio-obtusin suppressed IgE-mediated FcεRI signaling such as phosphorylation of Syk, protein kinase Cμ, phospholipase Cγ, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. CTE and aurantio-obtusin blocked mast cell-dependent PCA in IgE-mediated mice. These results suggest that CTE and aurantio-obtusin are a beneficial treatment for allergy-related diseases.

  14. Anti-allergic cromones inhibit histamine and eicosanoid release from activated human and murine mast cells by releasing Annexin A1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Yazid

    Full Text Available Although the 'cromones' (di-sodium cromoglycate and sodium nedocromil are used to treat allergy and asthma, their 'mast cell stabilising' mechanism of pharmacological action has never been convincingly explained. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that these drugs act by stimulating the release of the anti-inflammatory protein Annexin-A1 (Anx-A1 from mast cells.We used biochemical and immuno-neutralisation techniques to investigate the mechanism by which cromones suppress histamine and eicosanoid release from cord-derived human mast cells (CDMCs or murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMDMCs from wild type and Anx-A1 null mice.CDMCs activated by IgE-FcRε1 crosslinking, released histamine and prostaglandin (PG D2, which were inhibited (30-65% by 5 min pre-treatment with cromoglycate (10 nM or nedocromil (10 nM, as well as dexamethasone (2 nM and human recombinant Anx-A1 (1-10 nM. In CDMCs cromones potentiated (2-5 fold protein kinase C (PKC phosphorylation and Anx-A1 phosphorylation and secretion (3-5 fold. Incubation of CDMCs with a neutralising anti-Anx-A1 monoclonal antibody reversed the cromone inhibitory effect. Nedocromil (10 nM also inhibited (40-60% the release of mediators from murine bone marrow derived-mast cells from wild type mice activated by compound 48/80 and IgE-FcRε1 cross-linking, but were inactive in such cells when these were prepared from Anx-A1 null mice or when the neutralising anti-Anx-A1 antibody was present.We conclude that stimulation of phosphorylation and secretion of Anx-A1 is an important component of inhibitory cromone actions on mast cells, which could explain their acute pharmacological actions in allergy. These findings also highlight a new pathway for reducing mediator release from these cells.

  15. Special regulatory T cell review: The suppression problem!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Herman

    2008-01-01

    The concept of T-cell mediated suppression evolved more than 30 years ago. At that time it spawned many claims that have not stood the test of time. The rediscovery of suppression phenomena and regulatory T cells over the past 15 years created schizophrenic responses amongst immunologists. Some claimed that the new proponents of suppression were, once again, bringing immunology into disrepute, whilst others have embraced the field with great enthusiasm and novel approaches to clarification. Without faithful repetition of the "old" experiments, it is difficult to establish what was right and what was wrong. Nevertheless, immunologists must now accept that a good number of the old claims were overstated, and reflected poor scientific discipline. "I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke, But here I am to speak what I do know" Shakespeare. Julius Caesar Act 3, Scene 2.

  16. Desensitization of delayed-type hypersensitivity in mice: suppressive environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Katsura

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The systemic injection of high doses of antigen into a preimmunized animal results in transient unresponsiveness of cell-mediated immune responses. This phenomenon is known as desensitization. Serum interleukin 2 (IL-2 activity was found transiently in desensitized mice at 3 h after the antigen challenge. These mice could not reveal antigen nonspecific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH 1 d after the challenge. Specific suppression of DTH was observed at later stages. Sera from 3 h desensitized mice showed suppressive effects on DTH in preo immunized mice. Administration of recombinant IL-2 into preimmunized mice led to the failure of development of DTH to antigens. These observations suggest that IL-2 plays an important role in the suppressive environment.

  17. Study on cytokine modulation in mast cell-induced allergic reactions by using gamma-irradiated natural herbal extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwon, Hui Jeong; Lim, Youn Mook; Kim, Yong Soo; Nho, Young Chang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Kim Hae Kyoung [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    We previously described that some natural herbal extracts such as Houttuynia cordata (H), Centella asiatica (C), Plantago asiatica (P), Morus alba L. (M), and Ulmus davidiana (U), differentially suppress an atopic dermatitis like skin lesions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pro-inflammatory cytokine modulation of the water extract of the H, C, P, M, U, and those mixtures (M) and their mechanism in a phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) plus calcium inopore A23187 treated human mast cell line (HMC-1). The H, C, P, M, U, and M inhibited the inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-{alpha}, IL-6 and IL-8 stimulated by PMA plus A23187 from HMC-1 cells. In addition, the M did not significantly affect the cell viability and had no toxicity on the HMC-1 cells. Based on these results, M can be used for the treatment of an allergic inflammation response.

  18. C3a-derived peptide binds to the type I FcepsilonR and inhibits proximal-coupling signal processes and cytokine secretion by mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péterfy, Hajna; Tóth, Gábor; Pecht, Israel; Erdei, Anna

    2008-10-01

    A peptide with the natural sequence derived from the complement component C3a, designated C3a7, and C3a9, having a modified sequence of that, was previously shown to inhibit the high-affinity IgER (FcepsilonRI)-induced secretory response of both mucosal and serosal-type mast cells. In addition, several processes that couple the FcepsilonRI stimulus to the cellular response were all suppressed in the presence of these peptides. Here, we show that peptide C3a9 binds to the FcepsilonRI on the surface of unperturbed mast cells (rat mucosal-type RBL-2H3 cell line) and remains bound even after FcepsilonRI-IgE aggregation by antigen as assessed by confocal microscopy. Moreover, that peptide interferes the initial steps of FcepsilonRI-coupling network. Namely, peptide binding to the FcepsilonRI beta-chain interrupts this chain's association with both src family protein tyrosine kinases Lyn and Fyn and enhances the internalization of the receptor. C3a9 was further found to inhibit the phosphorylation of two members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38. Although ERK is usually activated via the ras-raf-mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase (MEK) pathway, our results show that C3a9 has no effect on the c-raf phosphorylation, suggesting that this complement-derived peptide inhibits ERK activation via an alternative route. C3a9 also inhibits the late-phase response to FcepsilonRI stimulus of bone marrow-derived mast cells, reducing secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Taken together, the consequence of its interference with the earliest steps of FcepsilonRI stimulus-response coupling and the C3a-derived peptide inhibits both the immediate and the late-phase responses of mast cells.

  19. Mast cells and histamine enhance the proliferation of non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanov, Evgeniy; Uddin, Mohib; Mankuta, David; Dubinett, Steven M; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common form of lung cancer with an extremely low survival rate. It is characterized by a chronic inflammatory process with intense mast cell infiltrate that is associated with reduced survival. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that mast cells have an enhancing effect on NSCLC proliferation. To assess the tumor-promoting potential of mast cells, we used the human alveolar basal adenocarcinoma (A549) and the mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cell lines, umbilical cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMC) and the mast cell-deficient mouse Sash model. The proliferation rate of A549/LLC cells was markedly increased by mast cells and histamine. Histamine proliferating activity was mediated via H(1), H(2) and H(4) receptors and caused ERK phosphorylation. LLC induced in Sash mice or in wild-type mice treated with the mast cell stabilizer nedocromil sodium displayed an accelerated growth (number of metastic colonies in the lungs, total lung area and lung/total mice weight ratio). In summary, we have shown a significant effect of mast cells and histamine in enhancing NSCLC/LLCX growth in vitro, while in a mouse LLC model in vivo we have found that mast cells are important negative regulators of cancer development. Therefore our results would indicate a pro-tumorogenic effect of the mast cells in vitro on established lung tumor cell lines, and anti-tumorogenic effect in mice at lung cancer induction. In conclusion, mast cell/anti-histamine targeted therapies should carefully consider this dual effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A non-surgical approach for male germ cell mediated gene transmission through transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmani, Abul; Ganguli, Nirmalya; Sarkar, Hironmoy; Dhup, Suveera; Batta, Suryaprakash R; Vimal, Manoj; Ganguli, Nilanjana; Basu, Sayon; Nagarajan, P; Majumdar, Subeer S

    2013-12-05

    Microinjection of foreign DNA in male pronucleus by in-vitro embryo manipulation is difficult but remains the method of choice for generating transgenic animals. Other procedures, including retroviral and embryonic stem cell mediated transgenesis are equally complicated and have limitations. Although our previously reported technique of testicular transgenesis circumvented several limitations, it involved many steps, including surgery and hemicastration, which carried risk of infection and impotency. We improved this technique further, into a two step non-surgical electroporation procedure, for making transgenic mice. In this approach, transgene was delivered inside both testes by injection and modified parameters of electroporation were used for in-vivo gene integration in germ cells. Using variety of constructs, germ cell integration of the gene and its transmission in progeny was confirmed by PCR, slot blot and immunohistochemical analysis. This improved technique is efficient, requires substantially less time and can be easily adopted by various biomedical researchers.

  1. Biomimetic and cell-mediated mineralization of hydroxyapatite by carrageenan functionalized graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongyan; Cheng, Ju; Chen, Fengjuan; Hou, Fengping; Bai, Decheng; Xi, Pinxian; Zeng, Zhengzhi

    2014-03-12

    In bone tissue engineering, it is imperative to design multifunctional biomaterials that can induce and assemble bonelike apatite that is close to natural bone. In this study, graphene oxide (GO) was functionalized by carrageenan. The resulting GO-carrageenan (GO-Car) composite was further used as a substrate for biomimetic and cell-mediated mineralization of hydroxyapatite (HA). It was confirmed that carrageenan on the GO surface facilitated the nucleation of HA. The observation of the effect of the GO-Car on the adhesion, morphology, and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells was investigated. In vitro studies clearly show the effectiveness of GO-Car in promoting HA mineralization and cell differentiation. The results of this study suggested that the GO-Car hybrid will be a promising material for bone regeneration and implantation.

  2. Effect of radiation on cell-mediated cytotoxicity and lymphocyte subpopulations in patients with ovarian carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohorn, E.I.; Mitchell, M.S.; Dwyer, J.M.; Knowlton, A.H.; Klein-Angerer, S.

    1978-01-01

    Lymphocyte subpopulations and cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMI) were studied during radiation therapy in 16 patients with ovarian carcinoma. The total lymphocyte count became depressed in all patients. The depression was more marked among T cells, while the proportion of B cells remained unaffected. In patients with Stage I and II ovarian cancer, CMI was depressed significantly by radiotherapy after 7 days of treatment, remained low at 14 days but recovered despite continuation of radiation. This depression of CMI occurred at a delivered dose of 1,000 rads with subsequent recovery. Patients with Stage III ovarian cancer given pelvic and abdominal radiation were found to have no consistent depression of CMI, a finding similar to that in Stage III ovarian carcinoma patients given chemotherapy

  3. Combined effect of x irradiation and cell-mediated immune reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, C.W.; Guertin, D.P.

    1978-01-01

    The combined effect of radiation and cell-mediated immune reaction on tumor cells was investigated in vitro. Mastocytoma P815-X2 cells of DBA mice either were irradiated first and subjected to immune lysis by immune splenic lymphocytes of C57Bl mice, or the tumor cells were subjected to immune reaction first and then irradiated. Cell survival was quantitated by colony formation in soft agar medium. It was observed that cellular immune damage to tumor cells did not influence the response of tumor cells to subsequent radiation. Irradiation of tumor cells first, followed by subjection of the cells to cellular immune reaction, slightly enhanced the death of the tumor cells. It appears that this enhanced death might have resulted from a relative increase in the ratio of the number of cytotoxic immune cells to the number of target tumor cells in the incubation mixture as a consequence of the decrease in the number of viable tumor cells by radiation

  4. T Cell-Mediated Immunity towards Yellow Fever Virus and Useful Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Alan M; Klimstra, William B

    2017-04-11

    The 17D line of yellow fever virus vaccines is among the most effective vaccines ever created. The humoral and cellular immunity elicited by 17D has been well characterized in humans. Neutralizing antibodies have long been known to provide protection against challenge with a wild-type virus. However, a well characterized T cell immune response that is robust, long-lived and polyfunctional is also elicited by 17D. It remains unclear whether this arm of immunity is protective following challenge with a wild-type virus. Here we introduce the 17D line of yellow fever virus vaccines, describe the current state of knowledge regarding the immunity directed towards the vaccines in humans and conclude with a discussion of animal models that are useful for evaluating T cell-mediated immune protection to yellow fever virus.

  5. Modulations in cell-mediated immunity of Mytilus edulis following the 'Sea Empress' oil spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyrynda, E.A.; Dyrynda, P.E.J.; Ratcliffe, N.A.; Pipe, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    The 'Sea Empress' oil tanker grounded outside Milford Haven (Wales, UK) in February 1996, spilling ∼ 70,000 tonnes of crude oil and contaminating over 100 km of coastline, causing mass mortalities and strandings of at least 11 mollusc species. Intensive field monitoring commenced after the spill, examining immunity and hydrocarbon levels in the mussel, Mytilus edulis (Mollusca: Bivalvia), a commercially-harvested species which can accumulate contaminants. Comparisons of mussels from oiled and reference sites revealed significant modulations in cell-mediated immunity. Elevations in blood cell (haemocyte) numbers and decreases in superoxide generation and phagocytosis were identified in contaminated animals. The immune response of contaminated mussels gradually improved and generally showed no significant differences compared with clean mussels after 11 weeks. By then, total hydrocarbon content in contaminated mussels had declined by 70-90%, while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content had decreased by over 90%. (author)

  6. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation of mammalian cells by chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    We have developed a cell-mediated mutagenesis assay in which cells with the appropriate markers for mutagenesis are co-cultivated with either lethally irradiated rodent embryonic cells that can metabolize carcinogenic hydrocarbons or with primary rat liver cells that can metabolize chemicals carcinogenic to the liver. During co-cultivation, the reactive metabolites of the procarcinogen appear to be transmitted to the mutable cells and induce mutations in them. Assays of this type make it possible to demonstrate a relationship between carcinogenic potency of the chemicals and their ability to induce mutations in mammalian cells. In addition, by simultaneously comparing the frequencies of transformation and mutation induced in normal diploid hamster cells by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and one of its metabolites, it is possible to estimate the genetic target size for cell transformation in vitro

  7. A longitudinal study of cell-mediated immunity in pigs infected with porcine parvovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladekjaer-Mikkelsen, A.S.; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) is an ubiquitous pathogen causing reproductive failure in swine. Protection against reproductive failure caused by acute PPV infection has commonly been related to the presence of specific antibodies in the dam. However, the role of cell-mediated immunity during chronic PPV......-mediated immune response, a longitudinal infection experiment was performed, using swine leukocyte antigens (SLA) class I characterized growing pigs (haplotype H7/H7). Pigs were intranasally inoculated with PPV at 0, 80, and 136 days. At predetermined time points, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were......-cell subset of PBMC proliferated in response to virus antigen, in keeping with the assumed role for these cells in immunological memory. This is, to our knowledge, the first indication of a cellular immune response following PPV infection. A weak CTL activity, which peaked on days 80 and 87, was observed...

  8. A convergent and essential interneuron pathway for Mauthner-cell-mediated escapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Alix M B; Schoppik, David; Robson, Drew N; Haesemeyer, Martin; Portugues, Ruben; Li, Jennifer M; Randlett, Owen; Wee, Caroline L; Engert, Florian; Schier, Alexander F

    2015-06-01

    The Mauthner cell (M-cell) is a command-like neuron in teleost fish whose firing in response to aversive stimuli is correlated with short-latency escapes [1-3]. M-cells have been proposed as evolutionary ancestors of startle response neurons of the mammalian reticular formation [4], and studies of this circuit have uncovered important principles in neurobiology that generalize to more complex vertebrate models [3]. The main excitatory input was thought to originate from multisensory afferents synapsing directly onto the M-cell dendrites [3]. Here, we describe an additional, convergent pathway that is essential for the M-cell-mediated startle behavior in larval zebrafish. It is composed of excitatory interneurons called spiral fiber neurons, which project to the M-cell axon hillock. By in vivo calcium imaging, we found that spiral fiber neurons are active in response to aversive stimuli capable of eliciting escapes. Like M-cell ablations, bilateral ablations of spiral fiber neurons largely eliminate short-latency escapes. Unilateral spiral fiber neuron ablations shift the directionality of escapes and indicate that spiral fiber neurons excite the M-cell in a lateralized manner. Their optogenetic activation increases the probability of short-latency escapes, supporting the notion that spiral fiber neurons help activate M-cell-mediated startle behavior. These results reveal that spiral fiber neurons are essential for the function of the M-cell in response to sensory cues and suggest that convergent excitatory inputs that differ in their input location and timing ensure reliable activation of the M-cell, a feedforward excitatory motif that may extend to other neural circuits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hypoxia simultaneously alters satellite cell-mediated angiogenesis and hepatocyte growth factor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flann, K L; Rathbone, C R; Cole, L C; Liu, X; Allen, R E; Rhoads, R P

    2014-05-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration is a multifaceted process requiring the spatial and temporal coordination of myogenesis as well as angiogenesis. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) plays a pivotal role in myogenesis by activating satellite cells (SC) in regenerating muscle and likely plays a role as a contributor to revascularization. Moreover, repair of a functional blood supply is critical to ameliorate tissue ischemia and restore skeletal muscle function, however effects of hypoxia on satellite cell-mediated angiogenesis remain unclear. The objective of this study was to examine the role of HGF and effect of hypoxia on the capacity of satellite cells to promote angiogenesis. To characterize the role of HGF, a microvascular fragment (MVF) culture model coupled with satellite cell conditioned media (CM) was employed. The activity of HGF was specifically blocked in SC CM reducing sprout length compared to control CM. In contrast, MVF sprout number did not differ between control or HGF-deficient SC CM media. Next, we cultured MVF in the presence of CM from satellite cells exposed to normoxic (20% O2 ) or hypoxic (1% O2 ) conditions. Hypoxic CM recapitulated a MVF angiogenic response identical to HGF deficient satellite cell CM. Hypoxic conditions increased satellite cell HIF-1α protein abundance and VEGF mRNA abundance but decreased HGF mRNA abundance compared to normoxic satellite cells. Consistent with reduced HGF gene expression, HGF promoter activity decreased during hypoxia. Taken together, this data indicates that hypoxic modulation of satellite cell-mediated angiogenesis involves a reduction in satellite cell HGF expression. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Effect of vitamin E levels on the cell-mediated immunity of broilers vaccinated against coccidiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ICM da Silva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the relationships between animal nutrition and immunity have sought reliable methodologies to measure responses. Cell-mediated immune response is similarly studied in humans. The cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity test (CBH is one of the methods to measure that response and consists in the infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly of lymphocytes and basophils, as result of the application of substances capable of inducing cell proliferation in determined sites, such as wings, wattle, and interdigital space in birds. CBH is considered a simple and fast method and can be applied in birds of different ages. In immunocompetence studies with poultry, phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P is a commonly used substance, despite the variability of the response related to the method of application (intradermal injection and the antigens used. In the present experiment, PHA-P was used to observe the cell-mediated immune response of 216 chicks fed three dietary levels of vitamin E from 1 to 36 days of age. All birds were immunologically challenged by vaccination against coccidiosis at three days of age and against Newcastle Disease (NCD at 14 and 30 days of age. At 36 days of age, birds were submitted to the CBH test according to the methodology of Corrier & DeLoach (1990. Birds fed 65mg/kg of vitamin E presented lasting cell reaction (p<0.08, which indicates that this vitamin E level improved cell immune response of birds due to its antioxidant and immunomodulating properties. The use of this vitamin E level can be considered by nutritionists under practical conditions, aiming to improve broiler immunity.

  11. Role of the endothelin axis in astrocyte- and endothelial cell-mediated chemoprotection of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Wook; Choi, Hyun Jin; Lee, Ho-Jeong; He, Junqin; Wu, Qiuyu; Langley, Robert R.; Fidler, Isaiah J.; Kim, Sun-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that astrocytes protect cancer cells from chemotherapy by stimulating upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes in those cells. We investigated the possibility that activation of the endothelin axis orchestrates survival gene expression and chemoprotection in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and H226 lung cancer cells. Methods Cancer cells, murine astrocytes, and murine fibroblasts were grown in isolation, and expression of endothelin (ET) peptides and ET receptors (ETAR and ETBR) compared with expression on cancer cells and astrocytes (or cancer cells and fibroblasts) that were co-incubated for 48 hours. Type-specific endothelin receptor antagonists were used to evaluate the contribution of ETAR and ETBR to astrocyte-induced activation of the protein kinase B (AKT)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathways, anti-apoptotic gene expression, and chemoprotection of cancer cells. We also investigated the chemoprotective potential of brain endothelial cells and microglial cells. Results Gap junction signaling between MDA-MB-231 cancer cells and astrocytes stimulates upregulation of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8 expression in cancer cells, which increases ET-1 production from astrocytes and ET receptor expression on cancer cells. ET-1 signals for activation of AKT/MAPK and upregulation of survival proteins that protect cancer cells from taxol. Brain endothelial cell-mediated chemoprotection of cancer cells also involves endothelin signaling. Dual antagonism of ETAR and ETBR is required to abolish astrocyte- and endothelial cell-mediated chemoprotection. Conclusions Bidirectional signaling between astrocytes and cancer cells involves upregulation and activation of the endothelin axis, which protects cancer cells from cytotoxicity induced by chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:25008093

  12. The spleen is the site where mast cells are induced in the development of food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Shota; Wakamatsu, Ei; Ishida, Yasuo; Obata, Yuuki; Kurashima, Yosuke; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Abe, Ryo

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that splenic immune responses play pivotal roles in the development of allergic diseases; however, the precise role of the spleen remains unclear. Herein, we demonstrated a novel role of the spleen in the pathogenesis of food allergy (FA). We found that mast cells (MCs) developed from progenitor cells present in spleen during an antigen-specific T-cell response in vitro. In a Th2 response-mediated FA model, significant expansion of MCs was also observed in spleen. The incidence of allergic diarrhea was profoundly reduced in splenectomized mice, whereas adoptive transfer of in vitro-induced splenic MCs into these mice restored allergic symptoms, suggesting that the splenic MCs functioned as the pathogenic cells in the development of FA. The in vitro-generated MCs required not only IL-3 but also IFN-γ, and treatment of FA-induced mice with anti-IFN-γ antibody suppressed expansion of MCs in spleen as well as diarrhea development, highlighting that IFN-γ in the spleen orchestrated the development of FA, which was followed by a Th2 response in the local lesion. Overall, we propose that the role of the spleen in the development of FA is to provide a unique site where antigen-specific T cells induce development of pathogenic MCs. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Airway responsiveness to mannitol in asthma is associated with chymase-positive mast cells and eosinophilic airway inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrild, Asger; Bergqvist, A; Baines, K J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to inhaled mannitol is associated with indirect markers of mast cell activation and eosinophilic airway inflammation. It is unknown how AHR to mannitol relates to mast cell phenotype, mast cell function and measures of eosinophilic inflammation in airway...... tissue. We compared the number and phenotype of mast cells, mRNA expression of mast cell-associated genes and number of eosinophils in airway tissue of subjects with asthma and healthy controls in relation to AHR to mannitol. METHODS: Airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled mannitol was measured in 23 non......-smoking, corticosteroid-free asthmatic individuals and 10 healthy controls. Mast cells and eosinophils were identified in mucosal biopsies from all participants. Mast cells were divided into phenotypes based on the presence of chymase. mRNA expression of mast cell-associated genes was measured by real-time PCR. RESULTS...

  14. ELM mitigation via rotating resonant magnetic perturbations on MAST

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thornton, A.J.; Kirk, A.; Cahyna, Pavel; Chapman, I.T.; Fishpool, G.; Harrison, J.R.; Liu, Y.Q.; Kripner, Lukáš; Peterka, Matěj

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 463, August (2015), s. 723-726 ISSN 0022-3115. [PLASMA-SURFACE INTERACTIONS 21: International Conference on Plasma-Surface Interactions in Controlled Fusion Devices. Kanazawa, 26.05.2014-30.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/2341 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : edge localised mode * resonant magnetic perturbation * MAST Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 2.199, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022311514006795

  15. Molecular targets on mast cells and basophils for novel therapies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harvima, I.T.; Levi-Schaffer, F.; Dráber, Petr; Friedman, S.; Polakovičová, Iva; Gibbs, B.F.; Blank, U.; Nilsson, G.; Maurer, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 134, č. 3 (2014), s. 530-544 ISSN 0091-6749 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12073; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-09807S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-00703S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : cell activation * mast cells and basophils * treatment of allergic diseases Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.476, year: 2014

  16. A Comparative Study of virtual and operational met mast data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orhan, Dr Ö Emre; Ahmet, Gökhan

    2014-01-01

    Performance of wind assessment studies depend on the adequacy and duration of the wind data. For a reasonable wind assessment, at least one full year wind data is needed so that, all the variations throughout the year are represented. On the other hand, it is always a question of time and cost how to get the wind data. On-site measurements are the most common way of obtaining wind data but it is the most expensive and time consuming as well. Apart from onsite data, there are also reanalysis long term data sources like MERRA, NCAR, etc. Time and spatial resolution of these long term data are lower compared to on-site measurements but in cases where on-site measurements are not available, they are also utilized. On top of on-site and reanalysis wind data, weather forecasting models like WRF, MM5 are available. Although, these models mainly are used for forecasting services, flexibility of the models makes them suitable for preliminary resource assessment purposes. In this study, comparisons of annual energy production estimations are computed using virtual and on-site met mast data separately for a specific time range. The widely used weather research and forecasting model (WRF) is used to provide virtual met mast data. Once WRF simulations are completed, interpolation routines are employed in order to extract data for a specific location. The on-site met mast is located inside a wind farm project area which is under development. Project site is located in the south of Turkey. There are four different met masts, three of them recording wind data presently. On-site measurements together with WRF results are used to obtain energy yields for the project area. The performance of both methodologies is compared. It has been observed that WRF can as well serve as a preliminary model in cases where no other data source is available but the model has to be implemented with great care depending on the project site conditions

  17. Anti-inflammatory activity of 6-hydroxy-2,7-dimethoxy-1,4-henanthraquinone from tuberous roots of yam (Dioscorea batatas) through inhibition of prostaglandin D₂ and leukotriene C₄ production in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Meihua; Lu, Yue; Yang, Ju Hye; Jo, Tae Hyung; Park, Young In; Lee, Chong-Kil; Park, Sang-Jo; Son, Kun Ho; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2011-09-01

    6-Hydroxy-2,7-dimethoxy-1,4-phenanthraquinone (PAQ) isolated from the tuberous roots of Yam (Dioscorea batatas) inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) dependent prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) generation in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells in a concentration-dependent manner with IC(50) values of 0.08 μM and 0.27 μM, respectively. In the Western blotting with specific anti-COX-2 antibodies, the decrease of the quantity of PGD(2) was accompanied by a decrease in the COX-2 protein level. But PAQ did not affect COX-1 protein level. In addition, this compound inhibited 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) dependent production of leukotriene C(4) in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC(50) of 0.032 μM. These results demonstrate that PAQ has a dual COX-2/5-LOX inhibitory activity. This compound also inhibited the degranulation reaction in a dose-dependent manner with an IC(50) of 2.7 μM. Thus, these results suggest that PAQ may be useful in regulating mast cell-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  18. Mast cell numbers in airway smooth muscle and PC(20)AMP in asthma and COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liesker, J. J. W.; ten Hacken, N. H. T.; Rutgers, S. R.; Zeinstra-Smith, M.; Postma, D. S.; Timens, W.

    Introduction: Most patients with asthma and many patients with COPD show bronchial hyperresponsiveness to adenosine (BHRAMP). BHRAMP may be caused by release of mast cell histamine, which induces smooth muscle contraction. Aim of the study: To evaluate whether mast cell numbers in airway smooth

  19. A Study on Assessment of Mast Cells in Oral Squamous Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Apart from the role of mast cells in maintenance of homeostasis and inflammation, their association with tumors has been described recently. In several malignancies, mast cell density has been found to correlate with angiogenesis, increased risk of metastasis and poor prognosis. Aim: The aim of the following ...

  20. Comparison of four staining methods for detection of mast cells in equine bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclere, Mathilde; Desnoyers, Michel; Beauchamp, Guy; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells normally are present in equine bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), but usually represent Romanowsky method to stain mast cell granules with that of 3 metachromatic stains: automated Romanowsky, May-Grünwald Giemsa, and toluidine blue stains. The BALF cells from 24 horses were studied. A differential cell count was performed blindly on 400 cells. The percentages of mast cells obtained were analyzed by means of repeated-measures analysis of variance and Fischer's PLSD test. The Bland and Altman method was used to assess agreement among stains. The mean percentage of mast cells in BALF was significantly lower with the fast Romanowsky than with the automated Romanowsky, May-Grünwald Giemsa, and toluidine blue stains. With the fast Romanowsky stain, the metachromatic granules of mast cells were not stained, and their identification was based on morphologic criteria. Toluidine blue staining allowed detection of the highest mean percentage of mast cells, but was inadequate for performing a differential cell count on other cell types. In conclusion, fast Romanosky stain may be inadequate for detection of mast cells in equine BALF, whereas automated Romanowsky, May-Grünwald Giemsa, and toluidine blue stains provide metachromatic staining of mast cell granules.

  1. Macrophages and mast cells in dystrophic masseter muscle: a light and electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Mikkelsen, H

    1988-01-01

    Macrophages and mast cells in masseter muscle from normal and dystrophic mice were studied by light and electron microscopy. Acid phosphatase activity and FITC-dextran were used to identify and describe macrophages. Toluidine blue was used as a marker for mast cells. In dystrophic muscle...

  2. Variable Acorn Crops: Responses of White-Tailed Deer and Other Mast Consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. McShea; Georg Schwede

    1993-01-01

    We examined movements and behavior of female white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) relative to the acorn mast-fall from 1986 through 1989 in a mature deciduous forest in Front Royal, Virginia. Ten white-tailed deer with radiotransmitters increased their home range to incorporate acorn-producing areas during mast-fall. Consumption of acorns by...

  3. A study on assessment of mast cells in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Apart from the role of mast cells in maintenance of homeostasis and inflammation, their association with tumors has been described recently. In several malignancies, mast cell density has been found to correlate with angiogenesis, increased risk of metastasis and poor prognosis. Aim: The aim of the following ...

  4. Changing the threshold-Signals and mechanisms of mast cell priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halova, Ivana; Rönnberg, Elin; Draberova, Lubica; Vliagoftis, Harissios; Nilsson, Gunnar P; Draber, Petr

    2018-03-01

    Mast cells play a key role in allergy and other inflammatory diseases involving engagement of multivalent antigen with IgE bound to high-affinity IgE receptors (FcεRIs). Aggregation of FcεRIs on mast cells initiates a cascade of signaling events that eventually lead to degranulation, secretion of leukotrienes and prostaglandins, and cytokine and chemokine production contributing to the inflammatory response. Exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, bacterial and viral products, as well as some other biological products and drugs, induces mast cell transition from the basal state into a primed one, which leads to enhanced response to IgE-antigen complexes. Mast cell priming changes the threshold for antigen-mediated activation by various mechanisms, depending on the priming agent used, which alone usually do not induce mast cell degranulation. In this review, we describe the priming processes induced in mast cells by various cytokines (stem cell factor, interleukins-4, -6 and -33), chemokines, other agents acting through G protein-coupled receptors (adenosine, prostaglandin E 2 , sphingosine-1-phosphate, and β-2-adrenergic receptor agonists), toll-like receptors, and various drugs affecting the cytoskeleton. We will review the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms behind priming of mast cells leading to degranulation and cytokine production and discuss the biological effects of mast cell priming induced by several cytokines. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Modeling Pharmacological Inhibition of Mast Cell Degranulation as a Therapy for Insulinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Soucek

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Myc, a pleiotropic transcription factor that is deregulated and/or overexpressed in most human cancers, instructs multiple extracellular programs that are required to sustain the complex microenvironment needed for tumor maintenance, including remodeling of tumor stroma, angiogenesis, and inflammation. We previously showed in a model of pancreatic β-cell tumorigenesis that acute Myc activation in vivo triggers rapid recruitment of mast cells to the tumor site and that this is absolutely required for angiogenesis and macroscopic tumor expansion. More-over, systemic inhibition of mast cell degranulation with sodium cromoglycate induced death of tumor and endothelial cells in established tumors. Hence, mast cells are required both to establish and to maintain the tumors. Whereas this intimates that selective inhibition of mast cell function could be therapeutically efficacious, cromoglycate is not a practical drug for systemic delivery in humans, and no other systemic inhibitor of mast cell degranulation has hitherto been available. PCI-32765 is a novel inhibitor of Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk that blocks mast cell degranulation and is currently in clinical trial as a therapy for B-cell non–Hodgkin lymphoma. Here, we show that systemic treatment of insulinoma-bearing mice with PCI-32765 efficiently inhibits Btk, blocks mast cell degranulation, and triggers collapse of tumor vasculature and tumor regression. These data reinforce the notion that mast cell function is required for maintenance of certain tumor types and indicate that the Btk inhibitor PCI-32765 may be useful in treating such diseases.

  6. Pharmacological targeting of the KIT growth factor receptor: a therapeutic consideration for mast cell disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina Margrethe; Akin, C; Gilfillan, A M

    2008-01-01

    KIT is a member of the tyrosine kinase family of growth factor receptors which is expressed on a variety of haematopoietic cells including mast cells. Stem cell factor (SCF)-dependent activation of KIT is critical for mast cell homeostasis and function. However, when KIT is inappropriately activa...

  7. Comparative immunohistochemical study of the presence of mast cells in apical granulomas and periapical cysts: possible role of mast cells in the course of human periapical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Rodini, Camila; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Lara, Vanessa Soares

    2004-01-01

    Cells other than macrophages and lymphocytes have recently been shown capable of producing cytokines and mediators. Among these are mast cells, a cell population now recognized for its immunoregulatory properties. Little is known about the complex interactions between cells, cytokines, and other inflammatory elements in periapical lesions. The objective of this investigation was to determine the immunohistochemical pattern of expression of mast cells tryptase in periapical lesions based on study of 20 apical granulomas and 20 periapical cysts. Microscopic analysis revealed mast cells to be present in greater numbers in periapical cysts than in apical granulomas, and in cysts were more numerous in regions of active inflammation. Mast cells tended to be more common in the peripheral regions of both periapical lesions, and were often found in close proximity to lymphocytes. These findings lead us to propose a functional relationship between these two cell populations that may facilitate elicitation of an immune response contributory to the pathogenesis of periapical lesions.

  8. Ultraviolet B radiation increases hairless mouse mast cells in a dose-dependent manner and alters distribution of UV-induced mast cell growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kligman, L.H.; Murphy, G.F. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). School of Medicine

    1996-01-01

    In studies of the effects of chronic UVB irradiation on dermal connective tissue in the hairless mouse, we observed that the number and size of mast cells was increased. Because mast cells are known to be associated with connective tissue remodeling, we examined and quantified the effect of increasing UVB (290-320 nm)doses on this cell. Groups of mice were exposed to filtered FS-40 Westinghouse lamps (290-400 nm: peak irradiance 313 nm) for 1-5 minimal erythema doses (MED) thrice weekly for 10 weeks. Appropriate controls were included. Biopsies, processed for light microscopy, were stained with toluidine blue. Mast cells were counted in 15 high-magnification fields per specimen with upper and lower dermis scored separately. Significant increases in large densely granular mast cells occurred at 2 MED in the lower dermic in association with the UVB-exacerbated granulomatous reaction. In the upper dermis, mast cells were significantly increased with 3 MED. These findings suggest that mast cells may play a dual role in UV-irradiated skin with those in the lower dermis related to inflammation processes and those in the upper dermis involved in connective tissue modeling. To gain understanding of the mechanism of mast cell recruitment and maturation, we examined the effect of UVB on mast cell growth factor expression. This was enhanced in the epidermis by UVB, with a shift from cytoplasmic staining to membrane-associated or intercellular staining at 2 MED and higher. Dermal dendritic and mononuclear cells also showed increased reactivity. (Author).

  9. Increased dermal mast cell prevalence and susceptibility to development of basal cell carcinoma in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimbaldeston, Michele A; Skov, Lone; Finlay-Jones, John J

    2002-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation (280-320 nm) is the primary etiologic factor associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The outgrowth of these keratinocyte-derived skin lesions is enhanced by the ability of UVB to impair an immune response that would otherwise...... eliminate them. Studies in a range of inbred mouse strains as well as mast cell-depleted mice reconstituted with mast cell precursors support a functional link between histamine-staining dermal mast cells and the extent of susceptibility to UVB-induced systemic immunomodulation. Humans, like mouse strains......, display variations in dermal mast cell prevalence. In a study of Danish and South Australian BCC patients and control subjects, one 4-mm punch biopsy of non-sun-exposed buttock skin was sampled from each participant. This skin site was investigated to avoid any changes in mast cell prevalence caused...

  10. Human mast cells decrease SLPI levels in type II – like alveolar cell model, in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyström Max

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mast cells are known to accumulate at sites of inflammation and upon activation to release their granule content, e.g. histamine, cytokines and proteases. The secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI is produced in the respiratory mucous and plays a role in regulating the activity of the proteases. Result We have used the HMC-1 cell line as a model for human mast cells to investigate their effect on SLPI expression and its levels in cell co-culture experiments, in vitro. In comparison with controls, we found a significant reduction in SLPI levels (by 2.35-fold, p Conclusion These results indicate that SLPI-producing cells may assist mast cell migration and that the regulation of SLPI release and/or consumption by mast cells requires interaction between these cell types. Therefore, a "local relationship" between mast cells and airway epithelial cells might be an important step in the inflammatory response.

  11. Isolation of Mature (Peritoneum-Derived Mast Cells and Immature (Bone Marrow-Derived Mast Cell Precursors from Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen K Meurer

    Full Text Available Mast cells (MCs are a versatile cell type playing key roles in tissue morphogenesis and host defence against bacteria and parasites. Furthermore, they can enhance immunological danger signals and are implicated in inflammatory disorders like fibrosis. This granulated cell type originates from the myeloid lineage and has similarities to basophilic granulocytes, both containing large quantities of histamine and heparin. Immature murine mast cells mature in their destination tissue and adopt either the connective tissue (CTMC or mucosal (MMC type. Some effector functions are executed by activation/degranulation of MCs which lead to secretion of a typical set of MC proteases (MCPT and of the preformed or newly synthesized mediators from its granules into the local microenvironment. Due to the potential accumulation of mutations in key signalling pathway components of corresponding MC cell-lines, primary cultured MCs are an attractive mean to study general features of MC biology and aspects of MC functions relevant to human disease. Here, we describe a simple protocol for the simultaneous isolation of mature CTMC-like murine MCs from the peritoneum (PMCs and immature MC precursors from the bone marrow (BM. The latter are differentiated in vitro to yield BM-derived MCs (BMMC. These cells display the typical morphological and phenotypic features of MCs, express the typical MC surface markers, and can be propagated and kept in culture for several weeks. The provided protocol allows simple amplification of large quantities of homogenous, non-transformed MCs from the peritoneum and bone marrow-derived mast cells for cell- and tissue-based biomedical research.

  12. Aspects of mast building and the fine structure of “amphipod silk” glands in Dyopedos bispinis (Amphipoda, Dulichiidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neretin, N.Y.; Zhadan, A.E.; Tzetlin, A.B.

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the biology of Dyopedos bispinis, a mast-building amphipod that is abundant near the N. Pertsov White Sea Biological Station. To examine the peculiarities of mast building in Dyopedos bispinis, we studied the social structure of individuals inhabiting the masts

  13. Strict mast fruiting for a tropical dipterocarp tree: a demographic cost–benefit analysis of delayed reproduction and seed predation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.D.; Jongejans, E.; Breugel, van M.; Zuidema, P.A.; Chen, Y.Y.; Kassim, A.R.; Kroon, de H.

    2011-01-01

    1. Masting, the production of large seed crops at intervals of several years, is a reproductive adaptation displayed by many tree species. The predator satiation hypothesis predicts that starvation of seed predators between mast years and satiation during mast years decreases seed predation and thus

  14. Remarkable heterogeneity displayed by oval cells in rat and mouse models of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Peter; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Rasmussen, Morten

    2007-01-01

    the molecular phenotypes of oval cells in several of the most commonly used protocols of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration-namely, treatment with 2-acetylaminofluorene and partial (70%) hepatectomy (AAF/PHx); a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet; a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydro...

  15. CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNE RESPONSES IN THE SEA-STAR ASTERIAS RUBENS (ECHINODERM)

    OpenAIRE

    Michel Leclerc

    2012-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses occur in sea star system. In Asterias rubens it is said that B sea star lymphocytes and T sea star lymphocytes exist in the axial organ which can be considered as an ancestral lymphoid organ. In the same manner the origin of lymphocytes can be found in Invertebrates such as Echinodermal.

  16. Effect of renal and non-renal ischemia/reperfusion on cell-mediated immunity in organs and plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøchner, Anne C; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederik; Toft, Palle

    2010-01-01

    , the mortality rate still remains above 50%. The causes of death are primarily extra-renal and include infection, shock, septicemia, and respiratory failure. We wanted to evaluate the cell-mediated inflammatory response of renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) and non-renal I/R, in blood and in distant organs. In our...

  17. Effect of response to backtest and housing condition on cell-mediated and humoral immunity in adult pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geverink, N.A.; Parmentier, H.K.; Vries Reilingh, de G.; Schouten, W.G.P.; Gort, G.; Wiegant, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    Several recent studies in juvenile pigs demonstrated a relationship between the degree of resistance displayed early in life in a so-called "backtest" and parameters of cell-mediated and humoral immunity. Some of the immune characteristics were reported to depend on the interaction between backtest

  18. Evidence of functional cell-mediated immune responses to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in otitis-prone children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppanen, Elke; Tan, Dino; Corscadden, Karli J.; Currie, Andrew J.; Richmond, Peter C.; Thornton, Ruth B.

    2018-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) remains a common paediatric disease, despite advances in vaccinology. Susceptibility to recurrent acute OM (rAOM) has been postulated to involve defective cell-mediated immune responses to common otopathogenic bacteria. We compared the composition of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 20 children with a history of rAOM (otitis-prone) and 20 healthy non-otitis-prone controls, and assessed innate and cell-mediated immune responses to the major otopathogen nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). NTHi was a potent stimulator of inflammatory cytokine secretion from PBMC within 4 hours, with no difference in cytokine levels produced between PBMC from cases or controls. In the absence of antigen stimulation, otitis-prone children had more circulating Natural Killer (NK) cells (potitis-prone and non-otitis-prone children (potitis-prone children are functional and respond to NTHi. CD8+ T cells and NK cells from both cases and controls produced IFNγ in response to polyclonal stimulus (Staphylococcal enterotoxin B; SEB), with more IFNγ+ CD8+ T cells present in cases than controls (pOtitis-prone children had more circulating IFNγ-producing NK cells (potitis-prone children mounted innate and T cell-mediated responses to NTHi challenge that were comparable to healthy children. These data provide evidence that otitis-prone children do not have impaired functional cell mediated immunity. PMID:29621281

  19. Transcriptional Profiling Confirms the Therapeutic Effects of Mast Cell Stabilization in a Dengue Disease Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Juliet; Rathore, Abhay P S; Mantri, Chinmay K; Aman, Siti A B; Nishida, Andrew; St John, Ashley L

    2017-09-15

    There are no approved therapeutics for the treatment of dengue disease despite the global prevalence of dengue virus (DENV) and its mosquito vectors. DENV infections can lead to vascular complications, hemorrhage, and shock due to the ability of DENV to infect a variety of immune and nonimmune cell populations. Increasingly, studies have implicated the host response as a major contributor to severe disease. Inflammatory products of various cell types, including responding T cells, mast cells (MCs), and infected monocytes, can contribute to immune pathology. In this study, we show that the host response to DENV infection in immunocompetent mice recapitulates transcriptional changes that have been described in human studies. We found that DENV infection strongly induced metabolic dysregulation, complement signaling, and inflammation. DENV also affected the immune cell content of the spleen and liver, enhancing NK, NKT, and CD8 + T cell activation. The MC-stabilizing drug ketotifen reversed many of these responses without suppressing memory T cell formation and induced additional changes in the transcriptome and immune cell composition of the spleen, consistent with reduced inflammation. This study provides a global transcriptional map of immune activation in DENV target organs of an immunocompetent host and supports the further development of targeted immunomodulatory strategies to treat DENV disease. IMPORTANCE Dengue virus (DENV), which causes febrile illness, is transmitted by mosquito vectors throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Symptoms of DENV infection involve damage to blood vessels and, in rare cases, hemorrhage and shock. Currently, there are no targeted therapies to treat DENV infection, but it is thought that drugs that target the host immune response may be effective in limiting symptoms that result from excessive inflammation. In this study, we measured the host transcriptional response to infection in multiple DENV target organs

  20. 3T3 fibroblasts induce cloned interleukin 3-dependent mouse mast cells to resemble connective tissue mast cells in granular constituency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayton, E.T.; Pharr, P.; Ogawa, M.; Serafin, W.E.; Austen, K.F.; Levi-Schaffer, F.; Stevens, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    As assessed by ultrastructure, histochemical staining, and T-cell dependency, in vitro-differentiated interleukin 3-dependent mouse mast cells are comparable to the mast cells that reside in the gastrointestinal mucosa but not in the skin or the serosal cavity of the mouse. The authors now demonstrate that when cloned interleukin 3-dependent mast cells are cocultured with mouse skin-derived 3T3 fibroblasts in the presence of WEHI-3 conditioned medium for 28 days, the mast cells acquire the ability to stain with safranin, increase their histamine content ∼ 50-fold and their carboxypeptidase. A content ∼ 100-fold, and augment ∼ their biosynthesis of proteoglycans bearing 35 S-labeled haparin relative to 35 S-labeled chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. Thus, fibroblasts induce interleukin 3-dependent mouse mast cells to change phenotype from mucosal-like to connective tissue-like, indicating that the biochemical and functional characteristics of this mast cell type are strongly influenced by the connective tissue microenvironment

  1. Differential usage of COX-1 and COX-2 in prostaglandin production by mast cells and basophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bando, Tomoyuki; Fujita, Setsuko; Nagano, Naoko; Yoshikawa, Soichiro; Yamanishi, Yoshinori; Minami, Masashi; Karasuyama, Hajime

    2017-07-01

    Basophils have been erroneously considered as minor relatives of mast cells, due to some phenotypic similarity between them. While recent studies have revealed non-redundant roles for basophils in various immune responses, basophil-derived effector molecules, including lipid mediators, remain poorly characterized, compared to mast cell-derived ones. Here we analyzed and compared eicosanoids produced by mouse basophils and mast cells when stimulated with IgE plus allergens. The production of 5-LOX metabolites such as LTB4 and 5-HETE was detected as early as 0.5 h post-stimulation in both cell types, even though their amounts were much smaller in basophils than in mast cells. In contrast, basophils and mast cells showed distinct time course in the production of COX metabolites, including PGD2, PGE2 and 11-HETE. Their production by mast cells was detected at both 0.5 and 6 h post-stimulation while that by basophils was detectable only at 6 h. Of note, mast cells showed 8-9 times higher levels of COX-1 than did basophils at the resting status. In contrast to unaltered COX-1 expression with or without stimulation, COX-2 expression was up-regulated in both cell types upon activation. Importantly, when activated, basophils expressed 4-5 times higher levels of COX-2 than did mast cells. In accordance with these findings, the late-phase production of the COX metabolites by basophils was completely ablated by COX-2 inhibitor whereas the early-phase production by mast cells was blocked by COX-1 but not COX-2 inhibitor. Thus, the production of COX metabolites is differentially regulated by COX-1 and COX-2 in basophils and mast cells.

  2. Electrogene therapy with interleukin-12 in canine mast cell tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlin, Darja; Cemazar, Maja; Cör, Andrej; Sersa, Gregor; Pogacnik, Azra; Tozon, Natasa

    2010-01-01

    Mast cell tumors (MCT) are the most common malignant cutaneous tumors in dogs with extremely variable biological behaviour. Different treatment approaches can be used in canine cutaneous MCT, with surgical excision being the treatment of choice. In this study, electrogene therapy (EGT) as a new therapeutic approach to canine MCTs, was established. Eight dogs with a total of eleven cutaneous MCTs were treated with intratumoral EGT using DNA plasmid encoding human interleukin-12 (IL-12). The local response to the therapy was evaluated by repeated measurements of tumor size and histological examination of treated tumors. A possible systemic response was assessed by determination of IL-12 and interferon- γ (IFN-γ) in patients’ sera. The occurence of side effects was monitored with weekly clinical examinations of treated animals and by performing basic bloodwork, consisting of the complete bloodcount and determination of selected biochemistry parameters. Intratumoral EGT with IL-12 elicits significant reduction of treated tumors’ size, ranging from 13% to 83% (median 50%) of the initial tumor volume. Additionally, a change in the histological structure of treated nodules was seen. There was a reduction in number of malignant mast cells and inflammatory cell infiltration of treated tumors. Systemic release of IL-12 in four patients was detected, without any noticeable local or systemic side effects. These data suggest that intratumoral EGT with plasmid encoding IL-12 may be useful in the treatment of canine MCTs, exerting a local antitumor effect

  3. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid action in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppong, Emmanuel; Flink, Nesrin; Cato, Andrew C B

    2013-11-05

    Glucocorticoids are compounds that have successfully been used over the years in the treatment of inflammatory disorders. They are known to exhibit their effects through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) that acts to downregulate the action of proinflammatory transcription factors such as AP-1 and NF-κB. The GR also exerts anti-inflammatory effects through activation of distinct genes. In addition to their anti-inflammatory actions, glucocorticoids are also potent antiallergic compounds that are widely used in conditions such as asthma and anaphylaxis. Nevertheless the mechanism of action of this hormone in these disorders is not known. In this article, we have reviewed reports on the effects of glucocorticoids in mast cells, one of the important immune cells in allergy. Building on the knowledge of the molecular action of glucocorticoids and the GR in the treatment of inflammation in other cell types, we have made suggestions as to the likely mechanisms of action of glucocorticoids in mast cells. We have further identified some important questions and research directions that need to be addressed in future studies to improve the treatment of allergic disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Exhaust properties of centre-column-limited plasmas on MAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddison, G.P.; Akers, R.J.; Brickley, C.; Gryaznevich, M.P.; Lott, F.C.; Patel, A.; Sykes, A.; Turner, A.; Valovic, M.

    2007-01-01

    The lowest aspect ratio possible in a spherical tokamak is defined by limiting the plasma on its centre column, which might therefore maximize many physics benefits of this fusion approach. A key issue for such discharges is whether loads exhausted onto the small surface area of the column remain acceptable. A first series of centre-column-limited pulses has been examined on MAST using fast infra-red thermography to infer incident power densities as neutral-beam heating was scanned from 0 to 2.5 MW. Simple mapping shows that efflux distributions on the column armour are governed mostly by magnetic geometry, which moreover spreads them advantageously over almost the whole vertical length. Hence steady peak power densities between sawteeth remained low, -2 , comparable with the target strike-point value in a reference diverted plasma at lower power. Plasma purity and normalized thermal energy confinement through the centre-column-limited (CCL) series were also similar to properties of MAST diverted cases. A major bonus of CCL geometry is a propensity for exhaust to penetrate through its inner scrape-off layer connecting to the column into an expanding outer plume, which forms a 'natural divertor'. Effectiveness of this process may even increase with plasma heating, owing to rising Shafranov shift and/or toroidal rotation. A larger CCL device could potentially offer a simpler, more economic next-step design

  5. DNA Vaccine Encoding HPV16 Oncogenes E6 and E7 Induces Potent Cell-mediated and Humoral Immunity Which Protects in Tumor Challenge and Drives E7-expressing Skin Graft Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Janin; Dutton, Julie L; Li, Bo; Woo, Wai-Ping; Xu, Yan; Tolley, Lynn K; Yong, Michelle; Wells, James W; R Leggatt, Graham; Finlayson, Neil; Frazer, Ian H

    We have previously shown that a novel DNA vaccine technology of codon optimization and the addition of ubiquitin sequences enhanced immunogenicity of a herpes simplex virus 2 polynucleotide vaccine in mice, and induced cell-mediated immunity when administered in humans at relatively low doses of naked DNA. We here show that a new polynucleotide vaccine using the same technology and encoding a fusion protein of the E6 and E7 oncogenes of high-risk human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is immunogenic in mice. This vaccine induces long-lasting humoral and cell-mediated immunity and protects mice from establishment of HPV16-E7-expressing tumors. In addition, it suppresses growth of readily established tumors and shows enhanced efficacy when combined with immune checkpoint blockade targeted at PD-L1. This vaccine also facilitates rejection of HPV16-E7-expressing skin grafts that demonstrate epidermal hyperplasia with characteristics of cervical and vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia. Clinical studies evaluating the efficacy of this vaccine in patients with HPV16 premalignancies are planned.

  6. A marked reduction in priming of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells mediated by stress-induced glucocorticoids involves multiple deficiencies in cross-presentation by dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunzeker, John T; Elftman, Michael D; Mellinger, Jennifer C; Princiotta, Michael F; Bonneau, Robert H; Truckenmiller, Mary E; Norbury, Christopher C

    2011-01-01

    Protracted psychological stress elevates circulating glucocorticoids, which can suppress CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity, but the mechanisms are incompletely understood. Dendritic cells (DCs), required for initiating CTL responses, are vulnerable to stress/corticosterone, which can contribute to diminished CTL responses. Cross-priming of CD8(+) T cells by DCs is required for initiating CTL responses against many intracellular pathogens that do not infect DCs. We examined the effects of stress/corticosterone on MHC class I (MHC I) cross-presentation and priming and show that stress/corticosterone-exposed DCs have a reduced ability to cross-present OVA and activate MHC I-OVA(257-264)-specific T cells. Using a murine model of psychological stress and OVA-loaded β(2)-microglobulin knockout "donor" cells that cannot present Ag, DCs from stressed mice induced markedly less Ag-specific CTL proliferation in a glucocorticoid receptor-dependent manner, and endogenous in vivo T cell cytolytic activity generated by cross-presented Ag was greatly diminished. These deficits in cross-presentation/priming were not due to altered Ag donation, Ag uptake (phagocytosis, receptor-mediated endocytosis, or fluid-phase uptake), or costimulatory molecule expression by DCs. However, proteasome activity in corticosterone-treated DCs or splenic DCs from stressed mice was partially suppressed, which limits formation of antigenic peptide-MHC I complexes. In addition, the lymphoid tissue-resident CD11b(-)CD24(+)CD8α(+) DC subset, which carries out cross-presentation/priming, was preferentially depleted in stressed mice. At the same time, CD11b(-)CD24(+)CD8α(-) DC precursors were increased, suggesting a block in development of CD8α(+) DCs. Therefore, glucocorticoid-induced changes in both the cellular composition of the immune system and intracellular protein degradation contribute to impaired CTL priming in stressed mice.

  7. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafti, Mehdi; Lammers, Gert J.; Dauvilliers, Yves; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Mayer, Geert; Nowak, Jacek; Pfister, Corinne; Dubois, Valérie; Eliaou, Jean-François; Eberhard, Hans-Peter; Liblau, Roland; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Geisler, Peter; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Mathis, Johannes; Lecendreux, Michel; Khatami, Ramin; Heinzer, Raphaël; Haba-Rubio, José; Feketeova, Eva; Baumann, Christian R.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Tiercy, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoimmune attack against hypocretin-producing neurons. Despite the strong association with HLA class II, there is no evidence for CD4+ T-cell-mediated mechanism in narcolepsy. Since neurons express class I and not class II molecules, the final effector immune cells involved might include class I-restricted CD8+ T-cells. Methods: HLA class I (A, B, and C) and II (DQB1) genotypes were analyzed in 944 European narcolepsy with cataplexy patients and in 4,043 control subjects matched by country of origin. All patients and controls were DQB1*06:02 positive and class I associations were conditioned on DQB1 alleles. Results: HLA-A*11:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.18–1.87] P = 7.0*10−4), C*04:01 (OR = 1.34 [1.10–1.63] P = 3.23*10−3), and B*35:01 (OR = 1.46 [1.13–1.89] P = 3.64*10−3) were associated with susceptibility to narcolepsy. Analysis of polymorphic class I amino-acids revealed even stronger associations with key antigen-binding residues HLA-A-Tyr9 (OR = 1.32 [1.15–1.52] P = 6.95*10−5) and HLA-C-Ser11 (OR = 1.34 [1.15–1.57] P = 2.43*10−4). Conclusions: Our findings provide a genetic basis for increased susceptibility to infectious factors or an immune cytotoxic mechanism in narcolepsy, potentially targeting hypocretin neurons. Citation: Tafti M, Lammers GJ, Dauvilliers Y, Overeem S, Mayer G, Nowak J, Pfister C, Dubois V, Eliaou JF, Eberhard HP, Liblau R, Wierzbicka A, Geisler P, Bassetti CL, Mathis J, Lecendreux M, Khatami R, Heinzer R, Haba-Rubio J, Feketeova E, Baumann CR, Kutalik Z, Tiercy JM. Narcolepsy-associated HLA class I alleles implicate cell-mediated cytotoxicity. SLEEP 2016;39(3):581–587. PMID:26518595

  8. Mast cell gastritis: Children complaining of chronic abdominal pain with histologically normal gastric mucosal biopsies except for increase in mast cells, proposing a new entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourpak Zahra

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mast cells reside within the connective tissue of a variety of tissues and all vascularized organs. Since 1996, few studies have been performed on mast cell density in gastrointestinal biopsies, mainly in adult age group. We recently studied mast cell density in pediatric age group on rather larger number of cases in a referral children hospital. Mast cell density was 12.6 ± 0.87 in 0.25 mm2 (range: 0-81 in our study. Since we frequently encounter cases with rather normal gastric biopsies with no H.pylori, which mainly complain of chronic abdominal pain, we gathered those cases with mast cell density more than 30/0.25 mm2. from 895 gastric biopsies and wanted to study their clinical and endoscopic findings and propose a new entity. Methods Between April 2005 and May 2008, 895 children (2, were chosen and a questionnaire was filled for each patient including clinical, endoscopic and pathologic findings. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS, version 13 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. Results Over a 3 year period of study, of 895 selected children, 86 patients fulfilled the entrance criteria. The major complaint of patients was recurrent abdominal pain. The mean mast cell density was 45.59 ± 13.81 in 0.25 mm2 (range: 30-93. Among our cases, about 67.4% (n = 58 had 30 to 49, 23.3% (n = 20 had 50 to 69, 8.1% (n = 7 had 70 to 89 and 1.2% (n = 1 had 93 mast cells/0.25 mm2 in their specimens Discussion In 29% of our cases, neither endoscopic nor pathologic change was detected and only increase in mast cell number was reported and in others endoscopic and histopathological findings were negligible except increase in mast cells. In updated Sydney system (classification and grading of gastritis, no term is introduced which is in concordance with this group but we think that increased density of mast cells in these cases should not be overlooked and it may contribute to clinical manifestations in some way. We hope that

  9. Effect of Scour on the Natural Frequency Responses of the Meteorological Mast in the Taiwan Strait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chen Tseng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The meteorological mast (met mast for the Taiwan Power Company’s offshore wind farm is located in Taiwan Strait near Changhua County. The p–y curve method recommended in the current offshore foundation design codes does not account for the local scour around the pile foundation; it overestimates the lateral pile deformation and underestimates the foundation stiffness. This paper presents a method to correct the initial modulus of subgrade reaction and modify the ultimate lateral resistance caused by the local scour. The natural frequency of the met mast structure is also determined by a numerical model and verified with the measured data in situ. A comprehensive parameter study is performed to analyze the effect of scour on the dynamic responses of the met mast. Two types of foundation model, a coupled-springs foundation model and a distributed-springs foundation model, are considered in the dynamic analysis of the met mast. The results demonstrate that using a distributed-springs foundation model provides a relatively accurate estimate of the natural frequencies of the met mast structure. Furthermore, the scour exerted significant effects on certain modes of the vibration responses. The natural frequencies of the met mast structure can be reduced by approximately 14% due to scour, particularly in the horizontal bending modes. This paper also provides a preliminary strategy for structural monitoring and analysis to detect scour damage on offshore wind turbines with monopile foundations.

  10. Mast Cell Subsets and Their Functional Modulation by the Acanthocheilonema viteae Product ES-62

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimity H. Ball

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ES-62, an immunomodulator secreted by filarial nematodes, exhibits therapeutic potential in mouse models of allergic inflammation, at least in part by inducing the desensitisation of FcεRI-mediated mast cell responses. However, in addition to their pathogenic roles in allergic and autoimmune diseases, mast cells are important in fighting infection, wound healing, and resolving inflammation, reflecting that mast cells exhibit a phenotypic and functional plasticity. We have therefore characterised the differential functional responses to antigen (via FcεRI and LPS and their modulation by ES-62 of the mature peritoneal-derived mast cells (PDMC; serosal and those of the connective tissue-like mast cells (CTMC and the mucosal-like mast cells derived from bone marrow progenitors (BMMC as a first step to produce disease tissue-targeted therapeutics based on ES-62 action. All three mast cell populations were rendered hyporesponsive by ES-62 and whilst the mechanisms underlying such desensitisation have not been fully delineated, they reflect a downregulation of calcium and PKCα signalling. ES-62 also downregulated MyD88 and PKCδ in mucosal-type BMMC but not PDMC, the additional signals targeted in mucosal-type BMMC likely reflecting that these cells respond to antigen and LPS by degranulation and cytokine secretion whereas PDMC predominantly respond in a degranulation-based manner.

  11. Our perception of the mast cell from Paul Ehrlich to now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaven, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Just over a century ago Paul Ehrlich received the Nobel Prize for his studies of immunity. This review describes one of his legacies, the histochemical description of the mast cell, and the research that has ensued since then. After a long period of largely descriptive studies, which revealed little about the biological role of the mast cell, the field was galvanized in the 1950s by the recognition that the mast cell was the main repository of histamine and a key participant in anaphylactic reactions. Although the mast cell was long-viewed in these terms, recent research has now shown that the mast cell also plays a key role in innate and adaptive immune responses, autoimmune disease, and possibly tissue homeostasis by virtue of its expression of a diverse array of receptors and biologically active products. In addition, the responsiveness of mast cells to immunological and pathological stimulants is highly modulated by the tissue cytokine environment and by synergistic, or inhibitory, interactions among the various mast cell receptor systems. This once enigmatic cell of Paul Ehrlich has proved to be both adaptable and multifunctional.

  12. Mast cells in chronic inflammation, pelvic pain and depression in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziottin, Alessandra; Skaper, Stephen D; Fusco, Mariella

    2014-07-01

    Inflammatory and neuroinflammatory processes are increasingly recognized as critical pathophysiologic steps in the development of multiple chronic diseases and in the etiology of persistent pain and depression. Mast cells are immune cells now viewed as cellular sensors in inflammation and immunity. When stimulated, mast cells release an array of mediators to orchestrate an inflammatory response. These mediators can directly initiate tissue responses on resident cells, and may also regulate the activity of other immune cells, including central microglia. New evidence supports the involvement of peripheral and central mast cells in the development of pain processes as well as in the transition from acute, to chronic and neuropathic pain. That behavioral and endocrine states can increase the number and activation of peripheral and brain mast cells suggests that mast cells represent the immune cells that peripherally and centrally coordinate inflammatory processes in neuropsychiatric diseases such as depression and anxiety which are associated with chronic pelvic pain. Given that increasing evidence supports the activated mast cell as a director of common inflammatory pathways/mechanisms contributing to chronic and neuropathic pelvic pain and comorbid neuropsychiatric diseases, mast cells may be considered a viable target for the multifactorial management of both pain and depression.

  13. Myocardial remodeling in diabetic cardiomyopathy associated with cardiac mast cell activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Gang Huang

    Full Text Available Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a specific disease process distinct from coronary artery disease and hypertension. The disease features cardiac remodeling stimulated by hyperglycemia of the left ventricle wall and disrupts contractile functions. Cardiac mast cells may be activated by metabolic byproducts resulted from hyperglycermia and then participate in the remodeling process by releasing a multitude of cytokines and bioactive enzymes. Nedocromil, a pharmacologic stabilizer of mast cells, has been shown to normalize cytokine levels and attenuate cardiac remodeling. In this study, we describe the activation of cardiac mast cells by inducing diabetes in normal mice using streptozotocin (STZ. Next, we treated the diabetic mice with nedocromil for 12 weeks and then examined their hearts for signs of cardiac remodeling and quantified contractile function. We observed significantly impaired heart function in diabetic mice, as well as increased cardiac mast cell density and elevated mast cell secretions that correlated with gene expression and aberrant cytokine levels associated with cardiac remodeling. Nedocromil treatment halted contractile dysfunction in diabetic mice and reduced cardiac mast cell density, which correlated with reduced bioactive enzyme secretions, reduced expression of extracellular matrix remodeling factors and collagen synthesis, and normalized cytokine levels. However, the results showed nedocromil treatments did not return diabetic mice to a normal state. We concluded that manipulation of cardiac mast cell function is sufficient to attenuate cardiomyopathy stimulated by diabetes, but other cellular pathways also contribute to the disease process.

  14. [Optimization of triple plasmids transfection into HEK293 cells mediated by polyethylenimine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Li, Yan; Zheng, Zhaofen; Liu, Aizhong; Yuan, Zhenhua; Peng, Jianqiang; He, Jin

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, packaging system composed of pAAV-CMV-GFP, pAAV-RC and pHelper were transfected into human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293 cells) mediated by polyethyleneimine (PEI) to explore an optimal transfection condition. Different total plasmid DNA dosages (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 μg) and different PEI/Plasmid ratios (1:1, 3:1, 5:1, 7:1) were tested with detection of green fluorescence protein (GFP) with ImagePro Plus6. 0 Software. Then transfection efficiency of the optimized transfection system was further observed for different time periods(12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72 h). The results showed that total plasmid dosage of 4 μg/well with PEI/plasmid ratio of 3 : 1-5 : 1 was an efficient transfection condition. Transfection efficiency-time curve was an S-shaped curve. Transfection efficiency reached a plateau at 60 h after transfection. The optimized conditions for PEI-mediated transfection at the optimal time result in enhanced transfection efficiency of triple plasmid into HEK293 cells.

  15. TRESK channel as a potential target to treat T-cell mediated immune dysfunction

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    Han, Jaehee [Medical Research Center for Neural Dysfunction, Department of Physiology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dawon, E-mail: dawon@gnu.ac.kr [Medical Research Center for Neural Dysfunction, Department of Physiology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-25

    In this review, we propose that TRESK background K{sup +} channel could serve as a potential therapeutic target for T-cell mediated immune dysfunction. TRESK has many immune function-related properties. TRESK is abundantly expressed in the thymus, the spleen, and human leukemic T-lymphocytes. TRESK is highly activated by Ca{sup 2+}, calcineurin, acetylcholine, and histamine which induce hypertrophy, whereas TRESK is inhibited by immunosuppressants, such as cyclosporin A and FK506. Cyclosporine A and FK506 target the binding site of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) to inhibit calcineurin. Interestingly, TRESK possesses an NFAT-like docking site that is present at its intracellular loop. Calcineurin has been found to interact with TRESK via specific NFAT-like docking site. When the T-cell is activated, calcineurin can bind to the NFAT-docking site of TRESK. The activation of both TRESK and NFAT via Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT/TRESK pathway could modulate the transcription of new genes in addition to regulating several aspects of T-cell function.

  16. First line of defense: Innate cell-mediated control of pulmonary Aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa eEspinosa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mycotic infections and their effect on the human condition have been widely overlooked and poorly surveilled by many health organizations even though mortality rates have increased in recent years. The increased usage of immunosuppressive and myeloablative therapies for the treatment of malignant as well as non-malignant diseases has contributed significantly to the increased incidence of fungal infections. Invasive fungal infections have been found to be responsible for at least 1.5 million deaths worldwide. About 90% of these deaths can be attributed to Cryptococcus, Candida, Aspergillus, and Pneumocystis. A better understanding of how the host immune system contains fungal infection is likely to facilitate the development of much needed novel antifungal therapies. Innate cells are responsible for the rapid recognition and containment of fungal infections and have been found to play essential roles in defense against multiple fungal pathogens. In this review we summarize our current understanding of host-fungi interactions with a focus on mechanisms of innate cell-mediated recognition and control of pulmonary aspergillosis.

  17. Atrophying pityriasis versicolor as an idiosyncratic T cell-mediated response to Malassezia: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Jonathan Michael Stephen; Magro, Cynthia

    2017-04-01

    Atrophying pityriasis versicolor (PV), first described in 1971, is a rare variant in which lesions appear atrophic. We sought to determine the pathophysiology of atrophying PV. A retrospective chart review identified 6 cases of atrophying PV. In all cases, routine light microscopy, an elastic tissue stain, and immunohistochemical assessment for the expression of CD3, CD4, CD8, GATA3 and CXCR3 was performed. All cases demonstrated hyperkeratosis with intracorneal infiltration by pathogenic hyphal forms as well as epidermal attenuation and papillary dermal elastolysis. A supervening, mild-to-moderate, superficial lymphocytic infiltrate was noted and characterized by a focal CD8 + T cell-mediated interface dermatitis along with a mixed T-cell infiltrate composed of GATA3 + and CXCR3 + T cells. Small sample size and the loss of some patients to follow-up. Atrophying PV represents the sequelae of a mixed helper T-cell (T H 1 and T H 2) idiosyncratic immune response to Malassezia and can present as a protracted dermatosis that may clinically mimic an atypical lymphocytic infiltrate. T H 1 cytokines can recruit histiocytes, a source of elastases, and upregulate matrix metalloproteinase activity, which may contribute to epidermal atrophy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Neonatal Fc Receptor Expression in Dendritic Cells Mediates Protective Immunity Against Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kristi; Rath, Timo; Flak, Magdalena B.; Arthur, Janelle C.; Chen, Zhangguo; Glickman, Jonathan N.; Zlobec, Inti; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Stachler, Matthew D.; Odze, Robert D.; Lencer, Wayne I.; Jobin, Christian; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancers arising in mucosal tissues account for a disproportionately large fraction of malignancies. IgG and the neonatal Fc receptor for IgG (FcRn) have an important function in the mucosal immune system which we have now shown extends to the induction of CD8+ T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity. We demonstrate that FcRn within dendritic cells (DC) was critical for homeostatic activation of mucosal CD8+ T cells which drove protection against the development of colorectal cancers and lung metastases. FcRn-mediated tumor protection was driven by DC activation of endogenous tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells via the cross-presentation of IgG complexed antigens (IgG IC) as well as the induction of cytotoxicity-promoting cytokine secretion, particularly interleukin-12 (IL-12), both of which were independently triggered by the FcRn–IgG IC interaction in murine and human DC. FcRn thus has a primary role within mucosal tissues in activating local immune responses that are critical for priming efficient anti-tumor immunosurveillance. PMID:24290911

  19. Epistasis between MicroRNAs 155 and 146a during T Cell-Mediated Antitumor Immunity

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    Thomas B. Huffaker

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An increased understanding of antitumor immunity is necessary for improving cell-based immunotherapies against human cancers. Here, we investigated the roles of two immune system-expressed microRNAs (miRNAs, miR-155 and miR-146a, in the regulation of antitumor immune responses. Our results indicate that miR-155 promotes and miR-146a inhibits interferon γ (IFNγ responses by T cells and reduces solid tumor growth in vivo. Using a double-knockout (DKO mouse strain deficient in both miR-155 and miR-146a, we have also identified an epistatic relationship between these two miRNAs. DKO mice had defective T cell responses and tumor growth phenotypes similar to miR-155−/− mice. Further analysis of the T cell compartment revealed that miR-155 modulates IFNγ expression through a mechanism involving repression of Ship1. Our work reveals critical roles for miRNAs in the reciprocal regulation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor immunity and demonstrates the dominant nature of miR-155 during its promotion of immune responses.

  20. Dynamics of an HIV-1 infection model with cell mediated immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pei; Huang, Jianing; Jiang, Jiao

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of an improved mathematical model on HIV-1 virus with cell mediated immunity. This new 5-dimensional model is based on the combination of a basic 3-dimensional HIV-1 model and a 4-dimensional immunity response model, which more realistically describes dynamics between the uninfected cells, infected cells, virus, the CTL response cells and CTL effector cells. Our 5-dimensional model may be reduced to the 4-dimensional model by applying a quasi-steady state assumption on the variable of virus. However, it is shown in this paper that virus is necessary to be involved in the modeling, and that a quasi-steady state assumption should be applied carefully, which may miss some important dynamical behavior of the system. Detailed bifurcation analysis is given to show that the system has three equilibrium solutions, namely the infection-free equilibrium, the infectious equilibrium without CTL, and the infectious equilibrium with CTL, and a series of bifurcations including two transcritical bifurcations and one or two possible Hopf bifurcations occur from these three equilibria as the basic reproduction number is varied. The mathematical methods applied in this paper include characteristic equations, Routh-Hurwitz condition, fluctuation lemma, Lyapunov function and computation of normal forms. Numerical simulation is also presented to demonstrate the applicability of the theoretical predictions.

  1. Loss of STAT3 in Lymphoma Relaxes NK Cell-Mediated Tumor Surveillance

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    Putz, Eva Maria [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria); Hoelzl, Maria Agnes [Institute of Pharmacology, Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna (MUV), Waehringer Strasse 13A, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Baeck, Julia [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria); Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria); Clinical Institute of Pathology, Medical University of Vienna (MUV), Waehringer Gürtel 18-20, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Schuster, Christian [Institute of Pharmacology, Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna (MUV), Waehringer Strasse 13A, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Reichholf, Brian [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria); Kern, Daniela; Aberger, Fritz [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, Salzburg 5020 (Austria); Sexl, Veronika; Hoelbl-Kovacic, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.hoelbl@vetmeduni.ac.at [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria)

    2014-01-27

    The transcription factors and proto-oncogenes STAT3 and STAT5 are highly activated in hematological malignancies and represent promising therapeutic targets. Whereas the importance of STAT5 as tumor promoter is beyond doubt, the role of STAT3 in hematological cancers is less well understood. Both, enforced as well as attenuated expression of STAT3 were reported in hematopoietic malignancies. Recent evidence implicates STAT3 as key player for tumor immune surveillance as it both mediates the production of and response to inflammatory cytokines. Here we investigated the effects of STAT3 deletion in a BCR/ABL-induced lymphoma model, which is tightly controlled by natural killer (NK) cells in vivo. Upon STAT3 deletion tumor growth is significantly enhanced when compared to STAT3-expressing controls. The increased tumor size upon loss of STAT3 was accompanied by reduced NK cell infiltration and decreased levels of the cytokine IFN-γ and the chemokine RANTES. Upon transplantation into NK cell-deficient mice differences in lymphoma size were abolished indicating that STAT3 expression in the tumor cells controls NK cell-dependent tumor surveillance. Our findings indicate that STAT3 inhibition in lymphoma patients will impair NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance, which needs to be taken into account when testing STAT3 inhibitors in preclinical or clinical trials.

  2. Fibrocyte-like cells mediate acquired resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy with bevacizumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Atsushi; Goto, Hisatsugu; Saijo, Atsuro; Trung, Van The; Aono, Yoshinori; Ogino, Hirokazu; Kuramoto, Takuya; Tabata, Sho; Uehara, Hisanori; Izumi, Keisuke; Yoshida, Mitsuteru; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Hidefusa; Gotoh, Masashi; Kakiuchi, Soji; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Yano, Seiji; Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Sakiyama, Shoji; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Bevacizumab exerts anti-angiogenic effects in cancer patients by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). However, its use is still limited due to the development of resistance to the treatment. Such resistance can be regulated by various factors, although the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we show that bone marrow-derived fibrocyte-like cells, defined as alpha-1 type I collagen-positive and CXCR4-positive cells, contribute to the acquired resistance to bevacizumab. In mouse models of malignant pleural mesothelioma and lung cancer, fibrocyte-like cells mediate the resistance to bevacizumab as the main producer of fibroblast growth factor 2. In clinical specimens of lung cancer, the number of fibrocyte-like cells is significantly increased in bevacizumab-treated tumours, and correlates with the number of treatment cycles, as well as CD31-positive vessels. Our results identify fibrocyte-like cells as a promising cell biomarker and a potential therapeutic target to overcome resistance to anti-VEGF therapy. PMID:26635184

  3. Bowman Capsulitis Predicts Poor Kidney Allograft Outcome in T Cell-Mediated Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallan, Alexander J; Chon, W James; Josephson, Michelle A; Cunningham, Patrick N; Henriksen, Kammi J; Chang, Anthony

    2018-02-28

    Acute T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) is an important cause of renal allograft loss. The Banff classification for tubulointerstitial (type I) rejection is based on the extent of both interstitial inflammation and tubulitis. Lymphocytes may also be present between parietal epithelial cells and Bowman capsules in this setting, which we have termed "capsulitis." We conducted this study to determine the clinical significance of capsulitis. We identified 42 patients from the pathology archives at the University of Chicago with isolated Banff type I TCMR from 2010-2015. Patient demographic data, Banff classification, and graft outcome measurements were compared between capsulitis and non-capsulitis groups using Mann-Whitney U test. Capsulitis was present in 26 (62%), and was more frequently seen in Banff IB than IA TCMR (88% vs 44%, P=.01). Patients with capsulitis had a higher serum creatinine at biopsy (4.6 vs 2.9mg/dL, P=.04) and were more likely to progress to dialysis (42% vs 13%, P=.06) with fewer recovering their baseline serum creatinine (12% vs 38%, P=.08). Patients with both Banff IA TCMR and capsulitis have clinical outcomes similar or possibly worse than Banff IB TCMR compared to those with Banff IA and an absence of capsulitis. Capsulitis is an important pathologic parameter in the evaluation of kidney transplant biopsies with potential diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications in the setting of TCMR. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Epstein-Barr virus reactivation associated with diminished cell-mediated immunity in antarctic expeditioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.; Cooley, H.; Dubow, R.; Lugg, D.

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at 2 Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, that was evaluated 2 times before winter isolation and 3 times during isolation. At all 5 evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished CMI response. Diminished DTH was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal DTH responses for all 5 tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, during, and after the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least 1 occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (P = 0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (P viruses.

  5. Maternal immunity enhances Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccination induced cell-mediated immune responses in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrick, Meggan; Theis, Kara; Molitor, Thomas W

    2014-06-05

    Passively acquired maternal derived immunity (MDI) is a double-edged sword. Maternal derived antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) are critical immediate defenses for the neonate; however, MDI may interfere with the induction of active immunity in the neonate, i.e. passive interference. The effect of antigen-specific MDI on vaccine-induced AMI and CMI responses to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) was assessed in neonatal piglets. To determine whether CMI and AMI responses could be induced in piglets with MDI, piglets with high and low levels of maternal M. hyopneumoniae-specific immunity were vaccinated against M. hyopneumoniae at 7 d of age. Piglet M. hyopneumoniae-specific antibody, lymphoproliferation, and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were measured 7 d and 14 d post vaccination. Piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI failed to show vaccine-induced AMI responses; there was no rise in M. hyopneumoniae antibody levels following vaccination of piglets in the presence of M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI. However, piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI had primary (antigen-specific lymphoproliferation) and secondary (DTH) M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses following vaccination. In this study neonatal M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI was not subject to passive interference by MDI. Further, it appears that both maternal derived and endogenous CMI contribute to M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses in piglets vaccinated in the face of MDI.

  6. Cell-mediated retraction versus hemodynamic loading - A delicate balance in tissue-engineered heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loosdregt, Inge A E W; Argento, Giulia; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Oomens, Cees W J; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2014-06-27

    Preclinical studies of tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHVs) showed retraction of the heart valve leaflets as major failure of function mechanism. This retraction is caused by both passive and active cell stress and passive matrix stress. Cell-mediated retraction induces leaflet shortening that may be counteracted by the hemodynamic loading of the leaflets during diastole. To get insight into this stress balance, the amount and duration of stress generation in engineered heart valve tissue and the stress imposed by physiological hemodynamic loading are quantified via an experimental and a computational approach, respectively. Stress generation by cells was measured using an earlier described in vitro model system, mimicking the culture process of TEHVs. The stress imposed by the blood pressure during diastole on a valve leaflet was determined using finite element modeling. Results show that for both pulmonary and systemic pressure, the stress imposed on the TEHV leaflets is comparable to the stress generated in the leaflets. As the stresses are of similar magnitude, it is likely that the imposed stress cannot counteract the generated stress, in particular when taking into account that hemodynamic loading is only imposed during diastole. This study provides a rational explanation for the retraction found in preclinical studies of TEHVs and represents an important step towards understanding the retraction process seen in TEHVs by a combined experimental and computational approach. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Mathematical modeling on T-cell mediated adaptive immunity in primary dengue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasmal, Sourav Kumar; Dong, Yueping; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2017-09-21

    At present, dengue is the most common mosquito-borne viral disease in the world, and the global dengue incidence is increasing day by day due to climate changing. Here, we present a mathematical model of dengue viruses (DENVs) dynamics in micro-environment (cellular level) consisting of healthy cells, infected cells, virus particles and T-cell mediated adaptive immunity. We have considered the explicit role of cytokines and antibody in our model. We find that the virus load goes down to zero within 6 days as it is common for DENV infection. From our analysis, we have identified the important model parameters and done the numerical simulation with respect to such important parameters. We have shown that the cytokine mediated virus clearance plays a very important role in dengue dynamics. It can change the dynamical behavior of the system and causes essential extinction of the virus. Finally, we have incorporated the antiviral treatment for dengue in our model and shown that the basic reproduction number is directly proportional to the antiviral treatment effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Induction of cell-mediated immunity during early stages of infection with intracellular protozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazzinelli R.T.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii and Trypanosoma cruzi are intracellular parasites which, as part of their life cycle, induce a potent cell-mediated immunity (CMI maintained by Th1 lymphocytes and IFN-g. In both cases, induction of a strong CMI is thought to protect the host against rapid parasite multiplication and consequent pathology and lethality during the acute phase of infection. However, the parasitic infection is not eliminated by the immune system and the vertebrate host serves as a parasite reservoir. In contrast, Leishmania sp, which is a slow growing parasite, appears to evade induction of CMI during early stages of infection as a strategy for surviving in a hostile environment (i.e., inside the macrophages which are their obligatory niche in the vertebrate host. Recent reports show that the initiation of IL-12 synthesis by macrophages during these parasitic infections is a key event in regulating CMI and disease outcome. The studies reviewed here indicate that activation/inhibition of distinct signaling pathways and certain macrophage functions by intracellular protozoa are important events in inducing/modulating the immune response of their vertebrate hosts, allowing parasite and host survival and therefore maintaining parasite life cycles.

  9. Bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells and peritoneal mast cells as targets of a growth activity secreted by BALB/3T3 fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jozaki, K.; Kuriu, A.; Hirota, S.; Onoue, H.; Ebi, Y.; Adachi, S.; Ma, J.Y.; Tarui, S.; Kitamura, Y.

    1991-01-01

    When fibroblast cell lines were cultured in contact with bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (CMC), both NIH/3T3 and BALB/3T3 cell lines supported the proliferation of CMC. In contrast, when contact between fibroblasts and CMC was prohibited by Biopore membranes or soft agar, only BALB/3T3 fibroblasts supported CMC proliferation, suggesting that BALB/3T3 but not NIH/3T3 cells secreted a significant amount of a mast cell growth activity. Moreover, the BALB/3T3-derived growth activity induced the incorporation of [3H]thymidine by CMC and the clonal growth of peritoneal mast cells in methylcellulose. The mast cell growth activity appeared to be different from interleukin 3 (IL-3) and interleukin 4 (IL-4), because mRNAs for these interleukins were not detectable in BALB/3T3 fibroblasts. Although mast cells are genetically deficient in tissues of W/Wv mice, CMC did develop when bone marrow cells of W/Wv mice were cultured with pokeweed mitogen-stimulated spleen cell-conditioned medium. Because BALB/3T3 fibroblast-conditioned medium (BALB-FCM) did not induce the incorporation of [3H]thymidine by W/Wv CMC, the growth activity in BALB-FCM appeared to be a ligand for the receptor encoded by the W (c-kit) locus. Because CMC and peritoneal mast cells are obtained as homogeneous suspensions rather easily, these cells may be potentially useful as targets for the fibroblast-derived mast cell growth activity

  10. MAST CELLS AND ANGIOGENESIS IN ORAL EPITHELIAL DYSPLASTIC LESIONS AND ORAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veda, Marla Vinay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The progression of oral epithelial dysplastic lesions into oral squamous cell carcinoma is characterized by an ‘angiogenic switch’ which is characterized by an increase in neo-vascularization in the sub-epithelial lamina propria which can be considered an indicator of malignant transformation. Mast cells are a rich source of various angiogenic factors. Moreover mast cells secrete various proteolytic enzymes which degrade the extracellular matrix and create space for the developing blood vessels. Aims: This study was undertaken to determine the relationship between mast cell density and microvessel density in normal oral mucosa, oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma and to find out whether any correlation exists between these two parameters. Material and Methods: This retrospective study was performed using formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissues of previously diagnosed cases of oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Mast cells were stained using toluidine blue, whereas in the capillaries, immunohistochemical staining technique was performed using mouse monoclonal antibody against CD34. Results: Mast cell density and microvessel density were higher in oral epithelial dysplasia and in oral squamous cell carcinoma compared to the normal mucosa. However, statistically significant positive correlation was noted only in oral epithelial dysplasia Conclusion: The above results probably indicate a role of mast cells in ‘angiogenic switch’. These angiogenic factors secreted by mast cells promote angiogenesis either directly by stimulating the migration and/or proliferation of mast cells or indirectly through degradation of extracellular matrix. Targeting the mast cells may contribute in preventing the progression of the lesion.

  11. The mast cell-B cell axis in lung vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitling, Siegfried; Hui, Zhang; Zabini, Diana; Hu, Yijie; Hoffmann, Julia; Goldenberg, Neil M; Tabuchi, Arata; Buelow, Roland; Dos Santos, Claudia; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2017-05-01

    Over past years, a critical role for the immune system and, in particular, for mast cells in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) has emerged. However, the way in which mast cells promote PH is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which mast cells may contribute to PH, specifically focusing on the interaction between the innate and adaptive immune response and the role of B cells and autoimmunity. Experiments were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats and B cell-deficient JH-KO rats in the monocrotaline, Sugen/hypoxia, and the aortic banding model of PH. Hemodynamics, cell infiltration, IL-6 expression, and vascular remodeling were analyzed. Gene array analyses revealed constituents of immunoglobulins as most prominently regulated mast cell-dependent genes in the lung in experimental PH. IL-6 was shown to link mast cells to B cells, as 1 ) IL-6 was upregulated and colocalized with mast cells and was reduced by mast-cell stabilizers and 2 ) IL-6 or mast cell blockade reduced B cells in lungs of monocrotaline-treated rats. A functional role for B cells in PH was demonstrated in that either blocking B cells by an anti-CD20 antibody or B-cell deficiency in JH-KO rats attenuated right ventricular systolic pressure and vascular remodeling in experimental PH. We here identify a mast cell-B cell axis driven by IL-6 as a critical immune pathway in the pathophysiology of PH. Our results provide novel insights into the role of the immune system in PH, which may be therapeutically exploited by targeted immunotherapy. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Mast cell lines HMC-1 and LAD2 in comparison with mature human skin mast cells--drastically reduced levels of tryptase and chymase in mast cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhl, Sven; Babina, Magda; Neou, Angelos; Zuberbier, Torsten; Artuc, Metin

    2010-09-01

    To circumvent the costly isolation procedure associated with tissue mast cells (MC), two human MC lines, i.e. HMC-1 and LAD2, are frequently employed, but their relation to mature MC is unknown. Here, we quantitatively assessed their expression of MC markers in direct comparison to skin MC (sMC). sMC expressed all lineage markers at highest and HMC-1 cells at lowest levels. LAD2 cells expressed comparable high-affinity IgE receptor alpha (FcepsilonRIalpha) and FcepsilonRIgamma but less FcepsilonRIbeta than sMC and displayed slightly reduced, but robust FcepsilonRI-mediated histamine release. Only minor differences were found for total histamine content and c-Kit expression. Huge, and to this level unexpected, differences were found for MC tryptase and chymase, with sMC > LAD2 > HMC-1. Taken together, HMC-1 cells represent very immature malignantly transformed MC, whereas LAD2 cells can be considered intermediately differentiated. Because of the minute levels of MC proteases, MC lines can serve as surrogates of tissue MC to a limited degree only.

  13. Use of Neural Networks for Damage Assessment in a Steel Mast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Rytter, A.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the possibility of using a Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) network trained with the Backpropagation Algorithm for detecting location and size of a damage in a civil engineering structure is investigated. The structure considered is a 20 m high steel lattice mast subjected to wind excita...... as well as full-scale tests where the mast is identified by an ARMA-model. The results show that a neural network trained with simulated data is capable for detecting location of a damage in a steel lattice mast when the network is subjected to experimental data.·...

  14. Detection of Damage in a Lattice Mast Excited by Wind by Dynamic Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars; Brincker, Rune

    2007-01-01

    under ambient loading conditions. The paper presents the instrumentation and considerations regarding layout of instrumentation and strategies for acquisition and processing of data. Damage in the mast is provoked using a hacksaw and the cross sectional area of one the diagonals of the mast (one located...... are identified. By studying the recorded variations it seems reasonable to conclude that by implementing a vibration monitoring system on the mast it would be possible to reliably detect a damage corresponding to less than a 50% loss of cross sectional area of the diagonal. This would allow for issue...

  15. Adaptive and innate immune reactions regulating mast cell activation: from receptor-mediated signaling to responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tkaczyk, Christine; Jensen, Bettina M; Iwaki, Shoko

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we have described studies that have demonstrated that mast cells can be activated as a consequence of adaptive and innate immune reactions and that these responses can be modified by ligands for other receptors expressed on the surface of mast cells. These various stimuli...... differentially activate multiple signaling pathways within the mast cells required for the generation and/or release of inflammatory mediators. Thus, the composition of the suite of mediators released and the physiologic ramifications of these responses are dependent on the stimuli and the microenvironment...

  16. Adrenergic nerve fibres and mast cells: correlation in rat thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Marco; Cavallotti, Carlo; Cavallotti, Daniela

    2002-10-21

    The interactions between adrenergic nerve fibres and mast cells (MCs) were studied in the thymus of adult and old rats by morphological methods and by quantitative analysis of images (QAIs). The whole thymus was drawn in adult (12 months old) rats: normal, sympathectomized or electrostimulated. Thymuses from the above-mentioned animals were weighed, measured and dissected. Thymic slices were stained with eosin orange for detection of microanatomical details and with Bodian's method for identification of the whole nerve fibres. Thymic MCs were stained with Astrablau. Histofluorescence microscopy was used for staining of adrenergic nerve fibres. Finally, all morphological results were submitted to the QAIs and statistical analysis of data. Our results suggest that after surgical sympathectomy, the greater part of adrenergic nerve fibres disappear while related MCs appear to show less evident fluorescence and few granules. On the contrary, electrostimulation of the cervical superior ganglion induced an increase in the fluorescence of adrenergic nerve fibres and of related MCs.

  17. Localization of calcium changes in stimulated rat mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horoyan, M; Soler, M; Benoliel, A M; Fraterno, M; Passerel, M; Subra, H; Martin, J M; Bongrand, P; Foa, C

    1992-01-01

    We studied intracellular free, bound, and sequestered calcium in rat mast cells after various stimulations. The use of a fluorescent probe combined with digitized imaging on individual living cells demonstrated transient increases of free Ca2+ in the micromolar range. The use of histochemical techniques (K pyroantimonate and anhydrous fixation), together with X-ray microanalysis, energy electron-loss spectroscopy, and electron spectroscopic imaging, revealed large amounts of stored calcium within the cells (in the millimolar range). Chelation experiments and stimulations enabled us to identify at least two pools of bound calcium which exhibited different dynamic behaviors. Stimulation in the presence of EGTA did not modify calcium from granules, granule membranes, and heterochromatin, whereas it decreased calcium from other cell compartments. Stimulation triggered variations in the amount of bound calcium but they did not parallel free calcium movements. Hence, whereas free calcium is implicated in exocytosis, bound calcium may be involved in altogether different cell functions.

  18. STIM1-Directed Reorganization of Microtubules in Activated Mast Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájková, Zuzana; Bugajev, Viktor; Dráberová, Eduarda; Vinopal, Stanislav; Dráberová, Lubica; Janáček, Jiří; Dráber, Petr; Dráber, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 186, č. 2 (2011), s. 913-923 ISSN 0022-1767 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084; GA ČR GA204/09/1777; GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759; GA MŠk LC545; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA AV ČR KAN200520701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : STIM1 * bonemarrow-derived mast cells * microtubules Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.788, year: 2011

  19. Mast cell sarcoma with megakaryocytic differentiation in a calf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Ayako; Wada, Yoshihiro; Kanada, Toshiaki; Ishikawa, Yoshiharu; Kadota, Koichi

    2012-12-01

    A case of mast cell sarcoma in a 5-month-old Holstein female calf is described. Macroscopically, enlargement of the spleen, lymph nodes, tonsils and kidneys was noted, and there were tumor masses in the neck region and on the pleura and peritoneum. The pericardium and uterine and ureter walls were also involved by tumor. Most neoplastic cells had eosinophilic granules, which were metachromatic and positive for naphthol AS-D chloroacetate esterase and tryptase, whereas smaller numbers of cells were positive for factor VIII-related antigen, a marker of megakaryocytes. Some of the predominant type of these tumor cells were found within the epithelia of the lungs, tonsils, gastrointestinal tract, liver, ureters, urinary bladder and uterus. Their normal counterparts were considered to be globule leukocytes.

  20. STIM1-Directed Reorganization of Microtubules in Activated Mast Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájková, Zuzana; Bugajev, Viktor; Dráberová, Eduarda; Vinopal, Stanislav; Dráberová, Lubica; Janáček, Jiří; Dráber, Petr; Dráber, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 186, č. 2 (2011), s. 913-923 ISSN 0022-1767 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084; GA ČR GA204/09/1777; GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759; GA MŠk LC545; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA AV ČR KAN200520701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : STIM1 * bone marrow-derived mast cells * microtubules Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.788, year: 2011

  1. Martian Arctic Dust Devil and Phoenix Meteorology Mast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander caught this dust devil in action west-southwest of the lander at 11:16 a.m. local Mars time on Sol 104, or the 104th Martian day of the mission, Sept. 9, 2008. Dust devils have not been detected in any Phoenix images from earlier in the mission, but at least six were observed in a dozen images taken on Sol 104. Dust devils are whirlwinds that often occur when the Sun heats the surface of Mars, or some areas on Earth. The warmed surface heats the layer of atmosphere closest to it, and the warm air rises in a whirling motion, stirring dust up from the surface like a miniature tornado. The vertical post near the left edge of this image is the mast of the Meteorological Station on Phoenix. The dust devil visible at the horizon just to the right of the mast is estimated to be 600 to 700 meters (about 2,000 to 2,300 feet) from Phoenix, and 4 to 5 meters (10 to 13 feet) in diameter. It is much smaller than dust devils that have been observed by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit much closer to the equator. It is closer in size to dust devils seen from orbit in the Phoenix landing region, though still smaller than those. The image has been enhanced to make the dust devil easier to see. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  2. Stimulated mast cells promote maturation of myocardial microvascular endothelial cell neovessels by modulating the angiopoietin-Tie-2 signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z.H. [Division of Cardiology, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China, Division of Cardiology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China); Yancheng People' s First Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Yancheng, Jiangsu, China, Division of Cardiology, Yancheng People’s First Hospital, Yancheng, Jiangsu (China); Zhu, W.; Tao, J.P.; Zhang, Q.Y.; Wei, M. [Division of Cardiology, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China, Division of Cardiology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China)

    2013-10-22

    Angiopoietin (Ang)-1 and Ang-2 interact in angiogenesis to activate the Tie-2 receptor, which may be involved in new vessel maturation and regression. Mast cells (MCs) are also involved in formation of new blood vessels and angiogenesis. The present study was designed to test whether MCs can mediate angiogenesis in myocardial microvascular endothelial cells (MMVECs). Using a rat MMVEC and MC co-culture system, we observed that Ang-1 protein levels were very low even though its mRNA levels were increased by MCs. Interestingly, MCs were able to enhance migration, proliferation, and capillary-like tube formation, which were associated with suppressed Ang-2 protein expression, but not Tie-2 expression levels. These MCs induced effects that could be reversed by either tryptase inhibitor [N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK)] or chymase inhibitor (N-tosyl-L-phenylalanyl chloromethyl ketone), with TLCK showing greater effects. In conclusion, our data indicated that MCs can interrupt neovessel maturation via suppression of the Ang-2/Tie-2 signaling pathway.

  3. Stimulation of mast cells leads to cholesterol accumulation in macrophages in vitro by a mast cell granule-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokkonen, J.O.; Kovanen, P.T.

    1987-01-01

    The uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) by cultured mouse macrophages was markedly promoted by isolated rat mast cell granules present in the culture medium. The granule-mediated uptake of 125 I-LDL enhanced the rate of cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages, the result being accumulation of cholesteryl esters in these cells. Binding of LDL to the granules was essential for the granule-mediated uptake of LDL by macrophages, for the uptake process was prevented by treating the granules with avidin or protamine chloride or by treating LDL with 1,2-cyclohexanedione, all of which inhibit the binding of LDL to the granules. Inhibition of granule phagocytosis by the macrophages with cytochalasin B also abolished the granule-mediated uptake of LDL. Finally, mouse macrophage monolayers and LDL were incubated in the presence of isolated rat serosal mast cells. Stimulation of the mast cells with compound 48/80, a degranulating agent, resulted in dose-dependent release of secretory granules from the mast cells and a parallel increase in 14 C cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages. The results show that, in this in vitro model, the sequence of events leading to accumulation of cholesteryl esters in macrophages involves initial stimulation of mast cells, subsequent release of their secretory granules, binding of LDL to the exocytosed granules, and, finally, phagocytosis of the LDL-containing granules by macrophages

  4. Cell-mediated immunity to herpes simplex in humans: lymphocyte cytotoxicity measured by 51Cr release from infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, A.S.; Percy, J.S.; Kovithavongs, T.

    1975-01-01

    We assessed cell-mediated immunity to herpes simplex virus type 1 antigen in patients suffering from recurrent cold sores and in a series of healthy controls. Paradoxically, all those subject to recurrent herpetic infections had, without exception, evidence of cell-mediated immunity to herpes antigens. This was demonstrated by lymphocyte transformation and specific 51 Cr release from infected human amnion cells after incubation with peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Where performed, skin tests with herpes antigen were also positive. In addition, serum from these patients specifically sensitized herpes virus-infected cells to killing by nonimmune, control mononuclear cells. These tests were negative in the control patients except in a few cases, and it is suggested that these latter may be the asymptomatic herpes virus carriers previously recognized or that they may have experienced a genital infection. (U.S.)

  5. Cell-mediated immune responses differentiate infections with Brucella suis from Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O : 9 in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Ulla; Jungersen, Gregers

    2007-01-01

    with YeO:9 were all negative, except for solitary false positives in 3.7% of the samples from both the experimentally YeO:9 infected pigs and control pigs. Skin tests using the same commercial Brucella antigen confirmed the ability of cell-mediated immune responses to differentiate between the two...... of antibody responses it was hypothesized that cell-mediated immune responses to non-LPS antigens of the two bacteria can be used to separate immune responses to these two biologically very different infections. Following subclinical experimental infections with Brucella suis biovar 2, high interferon......-gamma (IFN-gamma) assay responses with a commercial Brucella melitensis antigen preparation (Brucellergene OCB) preceded the development of antibodies. High IFN-gamma responses in the seven B. suis inoculated pigs with serological evidence of infection were consistent throughout a 20-week postinoculation...

  6. Slp-76 is a critical determinant of NK cell-mediated recognition of missing-self targets

    OpenAIRE

    Lampe, Kristin; Endale, Mehari; Cashman, Siobhan; Fang, Hao; Mattner, Jochen; Hildeman, David; Hoebe, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    Absence of MHC class I expression is an important mechanism by which NK cells recognize a variety of target cells, yet the pathways underlying “missing-self” recognition, including the involvement of activating receptors, remain poorly understood. Using ENU mutagenesis in mice, we identified a germline mutant, designated Ace, with a marked defect in NK cell-mediated recognition and elimination of “missing-self” targets. The causative mutation was linked to chromosome 11 and identified as a mi...

  7. Antigenic specificity of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity directed against human immunodeficiency virus in antibody-positive sera.

    OpenAIRE

    Koup, R A; Sullivan, J L; Levine, P H; Brewster, F; Mahr, A; Mazzara, G; McKenzie, S; Panicali, D

    1989-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been described for HIV-infected individuals. To determine the antigenic specificity of this immune response and to define its relationship to the disease state, an ADCC assay was developed using Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line targets infected with vaccinia virus vectors expressing HIV proteins. The vaccinia virus vectors induced appropriate HIV proteins (envelope g...

  8. UTX demethylase activity is required for satellite cell-mediated muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faralli, Hervé; Wang, Chaochen; Nakka, Kiran; Benyoucef, Aissa; Sebastian, Soji; Zhuang, Lenan; Chu, Alphonse; Palii, Carmen G; Liu, Chengyu; Camellato, Brendan; Brand, Marjorie; Ge, Kai; Dilworth, F Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    The X chromosome-encoded histone demethylase UTX (also known as KDM6A) mediates removal of repressive trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) to establish transcriptionally permissive chromatin. Loss of UTX in female mice is embryonic lethal. Unexpectedly, male UTX-null mice escape embryonic lethality due to expression of UTY, a paralog that lacks H3K27 demethylase activity, suggesting an enzyme-independent role for UTX in development and thereby challenging the need for active H3K27 demethylation in vivo. However, the requirement for active H3K27 demethylation in stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration remains untested. Here, we employed an inducible mouse KO that specifically ablates Utx in satellite cells (SCs) and demonstrated that active H3K27 demethylation is necessary for muscle regeneration. Loss of UTX in SCs blocked myofiber regeneration in both male and female mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that UTX mediates muscle regeneration through its H3K27 demethylase activity, as loss of demethylase activity either by chemical inhibition or knock-in of demethylase-dead UTX resulted in defective muscle repair. Mechanistically, dissection of the muscle regenerative process revealed that the demethylase activity of UTX is required for expression of the transcription factor myogenin, which in turn drives differentiation of muscle progenitors. Thus, we have identified a critical role for the enzymatic activity of UTX in activating muscle-specific gene expression during myofiber regeneration and have revealed a physiological role for active H3K27 demethylation in vivo.

  9. Effect of Zinc on Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immunity of Broilers Vaccinated Against Coccidiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad Moazeni

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present study was the comparison of humoral and cell-mediated immunity in ‎broilers fed with different levels of zinc during a coccidiosis challenge.‎Methods: One hundred and forty-‎four one-day-old broiler chicks were used with three ‎dietary zinc ‎(40, 120 and 200 mg/kg. At 14 d of age, all birds were inoculated orally with 5×103 sporulated oocysts of E. Tenella. ‎At ‎2, 22, 32, 42 ‎days of age, the blood serums were tested for ‎antibody titer against‎ Newcas­tle disease vaccine, using ‎the standard HI test. On day 42 the sum of nitrite ‎and nitrate based on the reduction of nitrate ‎to nitrite by cadmium ‎and white blood cell count (WBC using a hemocytometer were measured.Results: At 42 d, levels of ‎120 and 200 mg significantly (P< 0.05 increased the antibody titer in compare with the control. The peak response of CBH was observed at the level of 200 mg Zn/kg diet. Also both level of 120 and 200 mg Zn/kg diet increased WBC count and sum of nitrite and nitrate‎ in serum compared with the control.Conclusion: The levels of 120 and 200 mg Zn/kg diet could be considered as a non-pharmacologic booster of immunity in broilers chicks infected with E. Tenella.

  10. Endogenous n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids attenuate T cell-mediated hepatitis via autophagy activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs exert anti-inflammatory effects in several liver disorders, including cirrhosis, acute liver failure, and fatty liver disease. To date, little is known about their role in immune-mediated liver diseases. In this study, we used fat-1 transgenic mice rich in endogenous n-3 PUFAs to examine the role of n-3 PUFAs in immune-mediated liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A was administered intravenously to wild-type (WT and fat-1 transgenic mice to induce T cell-mediated hepatitis. Reduced liver damage was shown in Con A-administrated fat-1 transgenic mice, as evidenced by decreased mortality, attenuated hepatic necrosis, lessened serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT activity, and inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17A and IFN-γ. In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited the activation of hepatic T cells and the differentiation of Th1 cells after Con A challenge. Further studies showed that n-3 PUFAs markedly increased autophagy level in Con A-treated fat-1 T cells compared with the WT counterparts. Blocking hepatic autophagy activity with chloroquine diminished the differences in T cell activation and liver injury between Con A-injected WT and fat-1 transgenic mice. We conclude that n-3 PUFAs limit Con A-induced hepatitis via an autophagy-dependent mechanism, and could be exploited as a new therapeutic approach for autoimmune hepatitis.

  11. Emerging Targets for Developing T Cell-Mediated Vaccines for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danushka K. Wijesundara

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 has infected >75 million individuals globally, and, according to the UN, is responsible for ~2.1 million new infections and 1.1 million deaths each year. Currently, there are ~37 million individuals with HIV infection and the epidemic has already resulted in 35 million deaths. Despite the advances of anti-retroviral therapy (ART, a cost-effective vaccine remains the best long-term solution to end the HIV-1 epidemic especially given that the vast majority of infected individuals live in poor socio-economic regions of the world such as Sub-Saharan Africa which limits their accessibility to ART. The modest efficacy of the RV144 Thai trial provides hope that a vaccine for HIV-1 is possible, but as markers for sterilizing immunity are unknown, the design of an effective vaccine is empirical, although broadly cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies (bNAb that can neutralize various quasispecies of HIV-1 are considered crucial. Since HIV-1 transmission often occurs at the genito-rectal mucosa and is cell-associated, there is a need to develop vaccines that can elicit CD8+ T cell immunity with the capacity to kill virus infected cells at the genito-rectal mucosa and the gut. Here we discuss the recent progress made in developing T cell-mediated vaccines for HIV-1 and emphasize the need to elicit mucosal tissue-resident memory CD8+ T (CD8+ Trm cells. CD8+ Trm cells will likely form a robust front-line defense against HIV-1 and eliminate transmitter/founder virus-infected cells which are responsible for propagating HIV-1 infections following transmission in vast majority of cases.

  12. Mixed Signals: Co-Stimulation in Invariant Natural Killer T Cell-Mediated Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah C. Shissler

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are an integral component of the immune system and play an important role in antitumor immunity. Upon activation, iNKT cells can directly kill malignant cells as well as rapidly produce cytokines that stimulate other immune cells, making them a front line defense against tumorigenesis. Unfortunately, iNKT cell number and activity are reduced in multiple cancer types. This anergy is often associated with upregulation of co-inhibitory markers such as programmed death-1. Similar to conventional T cells, iNKT cells are influenced by the conditions of their activation. Conventional T cells receive signals through the following three types of receptors: (1 T cell receptor (TCR, (2 co-stimulation molecules, and (3 cytokine receptors. Unlike conventional T cells, which recognize peptide antigen presented by MHC class I or II, the TCRs of iNKT cells recognize lipid antigen in the context of the antigen presentation molecule CD1d (Signal 1. Co-stimulatory molecules can positively and negatively influence iNKT cell activation and function and skew the immune response (Signal 2. This study will review the background of iNKT cells and their co-stimulatory requirements for general function and in antitumor immunity. We will explore the impact of monoclonal antibody administration for both blocking inhibitory pathways and engaging stimulatory pathways on iNKT cell-mediated antitumor immunity. This review will highlight the incorporation of co-stimulatory molecules in antitumor dendritic cell vaccine strategies. The use of co-stimulatory intracellular signaling domains in chimeric antigen receptor-iNKT therapy will be assessed. Finally, we will explore the influence of innate-like receptors and modification of immunosuppressive cytokines (Signal 3 on cancer immunotherapy.

  13. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity: a new era in cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekaran N

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Narendiran Rajasekaran,1,* Cariad Chester,1,* Atsushi Yonezawa,1,2 Xing Zhao,1,3 Holbrook E Kohrt1 1Division of Oncology, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan; 3Tissue Engineering and Stem Cells Research Center, Department of Immunology, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou Province, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The therapeutic efficacy of some anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs depends on the capacity of the mAb to recognize the tumor-associated antigen and induce cytotoxicity via a network of immune effector cells. This process of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC against tumor cells is triggered by the interaction of the fragment crystallizable (Fc portion of the mAb with the Fc receptors on effector cells like natural killer cells, macrophages, γδ T cells, and dendritic cells. By augmenting ADCC, the antitumor activity of mAbs can be significantly increased. Currently, identifying and developing therapeutic agents that enhance ADCC is a growing area of research. Combining existing tumor-targeting mAbs and ADCC-promoting agents that stimulate effector cells will translate to greater clinical responses. In this review, we discuss strategies for enhancing ADCC and emphasize the potential of combination treatments that include US Food and Drug Administration-approved mAbs and immunostimulatory therapeutics. Keywords: ADCC, NK cell, reovirus, TLR, CD137

  14. Divergent Roles of Interferon-γ and Innate Lymphoid Cells in Innate and Adaptive Immune Cell-Mediated Intestinal Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseit, Jennifer; Kwong Chung, Cheong K. C.; Noti, Mario; Zysset, Daniel; Hoheisel-Dickgreber, Nina; Genitsch, Vera; Corazza, Nadia; Mueller, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    Aberrant interferon gamma (IFNγ) expression is associated with the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune- and inflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, the requirement of IFNγ for the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation remains controversial. The aim of this study was thus to investigate the role of IFNγ in experimental mouse models of innate and adaptive immune cell-mediated intestinal inflammation using genetically and microbiota-stabilized hosts. While we find that IFNγ drives acute intestinal inflammation in the anti-CD40 colitis model in an innate lymphoid cell (ILC)-dependent manner, IFNγ secreted by both transferred CD4 T cells and/or cells of the lymphopenic Rag1−/− recipient mice was dispensable for CD4 T cell-mediated colitis. In the absence of IFNγ, intestinal inflammation in CD4 T cell recipient mice was associated with enhanced IL17 responses; consequently, targeting IL17 signaling in IFNγ-deficient mice reduced T cell-mediated colitis. Intriguingly, in contrast to the anti-CD40 model of colitis, depletion of ILC in the Rag1−/− recipients of colitogenic CD4 T cells did not prevent induction of colonic inflammation. Together, our findings demonstrate that IFNγ represents an essential, or a redundant, pro-inflammatory cytokine for the induction of intestinal inflammation, depending on the experimental mouse model used and on the nature of the critical disease inducing immune cell populations involved. PMID:29416538

  15. Slp-76 is a critical determinant of NK cell-mediated recognition of missing-self targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Kristin; Endale, Mehari; Cashman, Siobhan; Fang, Hao; Mattner, Jochen; Hildeman, David; Hoebe, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    Absence of MHC class I expression is an important mechanism by which NK cells recognize a variety of target cells, yet the pathways underlying “missing-self” recognition, including the involvement of activating receptors, remain poorly understood. Using ENU mutagenesis in mice, we identified a germline mutant, designated Ace, with a marked defect in NK cell-mediated recognition and elimination of “missing-self” targets. The causative mutation was linked to chromosome 11 and identified as a missense mutation [Thr428Ile] in the SH2 domain of Slp-76—a critical adapter molecule downstream of ITAM-containing surface receptors. The Slp-76 Ace mutation behaved as a hypomorphic allele—while no major defects were observed in conventional T cell development/function, a marked defect in NK cell-mediated elimination of β2-Microglobulin (β2M)-deficient target cells was observed. Further studies revealed Slp-76 to control NK cell receptor expression and maturation, however, activation of Slp-76ace/ace NK cells through ITAM-containing NK cell receptors or allogeneic/tumor target cells appeared largely unaffected. Imagestream analysis of the NK-β2M−/− target cell synapse, revealed a specific defect in actin recruitment to the conjugate synapse in Slp-76ace/ace NK cells. Overall these studies establish Slp-76 as a critical determinant of NK cell development and NK cell-mediated elimination of missing-self target cells. PMID:25929249

  16. Concordance of CCR5 Genotypes that Influence Cell-Mediated Immunity and HIV-1 Disease Progression Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catano, Gabriel; Chykarenko, Zoya A.; Mangano, Andrea; Anaya, J-M; Smith, Alison; Bologna, Rosa; Sen, Luisa; Clark, Robert A.; Lloyd, Andrew; Shostakovich-Koretskaya, Ludmila

    2011-01-01

    We used cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, a powerful in vivo measure of cell-mediated immunity, to evaluate the relationships among cell-mediated immunity, AIDS, and polymorphisms in CCR5, the HIV-1 coreceptor. There was high concordance between CCR5 polymorphisms and haplotype pairs that influenced delayed-type hypersensitivity responses in healthy persons and HIV disease progression. In the cohorts examined, CCR5 genotypes containing -2459G/G (HHA/HHA, HHA/HHC, HHC/HHC) or -2459A/A (HHE/HHE) associated with salutary or detrimental delayed-type hypersensitivity and AIDS phenotypes, respectively. Accordingly, the CCR5-Δ32 allele, when paired with non-Δ32-bearing haplotypes that correlate with low (HHA, HHC) versus high (HHE) CCR5 transcriptional activity, associates with disease retardation or acceleration, respectively. Thus, the associations of CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity partly reflect the effect of the non-▵32 haplotype in a background of CCR5 haploinsufficiency. The correlations of increased delayed-type hypersensitivity with -2459G/G-containing CCR5 genotypes, reduced CCR5 expression, decreased viral replication, and disease retardation suggest that CCR5 may influence HIV infection and AIDS, at least in part, through effects on cell-mediated immunity. PMID:21288827

  17. Stress, the neuroendocrine system and mast cells: current understanding of their role in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvima, Ilkka T; Nilsson, Gunnar

    2012-03-01

    Psychological stress can activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and sensory nerves in the brain and skin, resulting in the release of neuroendocrine and neural mediators such as, corticotropin-releasing hormone, neuropeptides, neurotrophins and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. These factors can activate mast cells to release proinflammatory mediators and some of them, for example, histamine, tryptase and nerve growth factor, can stimulate sensory C-fibers. Since corticotropin-releasing hormone, sensory nerves and mast cell numbers are increased in the psoriatic lesion, a feedforward loop can exist potentiating the inflammation. Studies in rats and mice have shown that mast cells are activated during standardized stress through corticotropin-releasing hormone and sensory nerves. Therefore, the role of stress, the neuroendocrine system and mast cells in psoriasis is discussed in this article.

  18. Scaling Issues in the Determination of Wind loads on Lattice Masts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koss, Holger; Srouji, Robin G.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a study conducted to investigate the influence of geometric scale and flow condition on the wind load coefficients for lattice masts structures. An initial study in 2008 on a full size mast section indicated a possible contingency, which could be used to add equipment...... reflecting model scale behavior than full scale aerodynamics. This reveals the main challenge if for reasons of economic production and operation of telecommunication towers and masts a more accurate wind load description is required: full size testing....... on telecommunication towers without further structural strengthening. This study focuses on the role of scaling. A 1:6 scaled mast model was tested in two different flow conditions and in three layout variations. It was found that scaling does play a large role and that some of the codified loads are in fact more...

  19. Radiation survey of mobile and wireless technology masts in public places in Kaduna metropolis Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoh, N. I.; Ogbanje, G. O.; Jonah, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Work was done to measure radiation exposure of the populace in Kaduna metropolis from radiation emitted from global satellite communication masts. Base stations were surveyed in residential, school and office areas. Parameters sampled include the electric field strength, magnetic field strength, power density and ionizing radiation dose rate of the 20 surveyed masts belonging to four service providers. The instruments deployed include the Rf- EMF strength meter Model 480836 used to measure the first three parameters and Radiation Monitor Radex RD 1503 used to determine the forth parameter. The result obtained in this work was compared with the limits set by international regulatory bodies. Our result shows that electromagnetic and ionizing radiation exposures from the surveyed masts are far below the standard limits. Based on this, the population in Kaduna metropolis is not subjected to any adverse health effects from the Global System of Mobile Communication/Universal Mobile Telecommunication System masts at the moment.

  20. Fatigue Resistant Design Criteria for MD SHA Cantilevered Mast Arm Signal Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The fatigue design of the mast arm structures and connections vary significantly based on the Category of Importance factor adopted and the load cases for fatigue design loads. Consideration should include the cost and size of the structures for both...

  1. Mast cells infiltration and decreased E-cadherin expression in ketamine-induced cystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengqiang Li

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Increased mast cells in bladder wall and downregulated expression of E-cadherin junction protein in epithelial cells were probably associated with interstitial inflammation and fissures in mucosa. It implied that ketamine induced an interstitial cystitis.

  2. Lysophosphatidic acid triggers mast cell-driven atherosclerotic plaque destabilization by increasing vascular inflammation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, M.; , van, Berkel T.J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lysophospholipid, accumulates in the atherosclerotic plaque. It has the capacity to activate mast cells, which potentially exacerbates plaque progression. In this study, we thus aimed to investigate whether LPA contributes to plaque destabilization by

  3. Proof of concept for using unmanned aerial vehicles for high mast pole and bridge inspections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Bridges and high mast luminaires (HMLs) are key components of transportation infrastructures. Effective inspection : processes are crucial to maintain the structural integrity of these components. The most common approach for : inspections is visual ...

  4. Full-scale investigation of wind-induced vibrations of mast-arm traffic signal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Because of their inherent : fl : exibility and low damping ratios, cantilevered mast : - : arm : tra : ffi : c signal structures are suscepti : b : le to : wind : - : induced vibrations. : These vibrations : cause stru : ctural stresses and strains t...

  5. Differential effect of plant lectins on mast cells of different origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.C. Lopes

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Histamine release induced by plant lectins was studied with emphasis on the carbohydrate specificity, external calcium requirement, metal binding sites, and mast cell heterogeneity and on the importance of antibodies bound to the mast cell membrane to the lectin effect. Peritoneal mast cells were obtained by direct lavage of the rat peritoneal cavity and guinea pig intestine and hamster cheek pouch mast cells were obtained by dispersion with collagenase type IA. Histamine release was induced with concanavalin A (Con A, lectins from Canavalia brasiliensis, mannose-specific Cymbosema roseum, Maackia amurensis, Parkia platycephala, Triticum vulgaris (WGA, and demetallized Con A and C. brasiliensis, using 1-300 µg/ml lectin concentrations applied to Wistar rat peritoneal mast cells, peaking on 26.9, 21.0, 29.1, 24.9, 17.2, 10.7, 19.9, and 41.5%, respectively. This effect was inhibited in the absence of extracellular calcium. The lectins were also active on hamster cheek pouch mast cells (except demetallized Con A and on Rowett nude rat (animal free of immunoglobulins peritoneal mast cells (except for mannose-specific C. roseum, P. platycephala and WGA. No effect was observed in guinea pig intestine mast cells. Glucose-saturated Con A and C. brasiliensis also released histamine from Wistar rat peritoneal mast cells. These results suggest that histamine release induced by lectins is influenced by the heterogeneity of mast cells and depends on extracellular calcium. The results also suggest that this histamine release might occur by alternative mechanisms, because the usual mechanism of lectins is related to their binding properties to metals from which depend the binding to sugars, which would be their sites to bind to immunoglobulins. In the present study, we show that the histamine release by lectins was also induced by demetallized lectins and by sugar-saturated lectins (which would avoid their binding to other sugars. Additionally, the lectins

  6. Mast Cell Activation in Brain Injury, Stress, and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Alzheimer's Disease Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duraisamy Kempuraj

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are localized throughout the body and mediate allergic, immune, and inflammatory reactions. They are heterogeneous, tissue-resident, long-lived, and granulated cells. Mast cells increase their numbers in specific site in the body by proliferation, increased recruitment, increased survival, and increased rate of maturation from its progenitors. Mast cells are implicated in brain injuries, neuropsychiatric disorders, stress, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration. Brain mast cells are the first responders before microglia in the brain injuries since mast cells can release prestored mediators. Mast cells also can detect amyloid plaque formation during Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis. Stress conditions activate mast cells to release prestored and newly synthesized inflammatory mediators and induce increased blood-brain barrier permeability, recruitment of immune and inflammatory cells into the brain and neuroinflammation. Stress induces the release of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH from paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus and mast cells. CRH activates glial cells and mast cells through CRH receptors and releases neuroinflammatory mediators. Stress also increases proinflammatory mediator release in the peripheral systems that can induce and augment neuroinflammation. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a traumatic-chronic stress related mental dysfunction. Currently there is no specific therapy to treat PTSD since its disease mechanisms are not yet clearly understood. Moreover, recent reports indicate that PTSD could induce and augment neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Mast cells play a crucial role in the peripheral inflammation as well as in neuroinflammation due to brain injuries, stress, depression, and PTSD. Therefore, mast cells activation in brain injury, stress, and PTSD may accelerate the pathogenesis of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases

  7. Mast Cell Activation in Brain Injury, Stress, and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Alzheimer's Disease Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Selvakumar, Govindhasamy P; Thangavel, Ramasamy; Ahmed, Mohammad E; Zaheer, Smita; Raikwar, Sudhanshu P; Iyer, Shankar S; Bhagavan, Sachin M; Beladakere-Ramaswamy, Swathi; Zaheer, Asgar

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells are localized throughout the body and mediate allergic, immune, and inflammatory reactions. They are heterogeneous, tissue-resident, long-lived, and granulated cells. Mast cells increase their numbers in specific site in the body by proliferation, increased recruitment, increased survival, and increased rate of maturation from its progenitors. Mast cells are implicated in brain injuries, neuropsychiatric disorders, stress, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration. Brain mast cells are the first responders before microglia in the brain injuries since mast cells can release prestored mediators. Mast cells also can detect amyloid plaque formation during Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Stress conditions activate mast cells to release prestored and newly synthesized inflammatory mediators and induce increased blood-brain barrier permeability, recruitment of immune and inflammatory cells into the brain and neuroinflammation. Stress induces the release of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) from paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus and mast cells. CRH activates glial cells and mast cells through CRH receptors and releases neuroinflammatory mediators. Stress also increases proinflammatory mediator release in the peripheral systems that can induce and augment neuroinflammation. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a traumatic-chronic stress related mental dysfunction. Currently there is no specific therapy to treat PTSD since its disease mechanisms are not yet clearly understood. Moreover, recent reports indicate that PTSD could induce and augment neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Mast cells play a crucial role in the peripheral inflammation as well as in neuroinflammation due to brain injuries, stress, depression, and PTSD. Therefore, mast cells activation in brain injury, stress, and PTSD may accelerate the pathogenesis of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases including AD. This

  8. Human lung mast cells modulate the functions of airway smooth muscle cells in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhouri, H; Hollins, F; Moir, L M; Brightling, C E; Armour, C L; Hughes, J M

    2011-09-01

    Activated mast cell densities are increased on the airway smooth muscle in asthma where they may modulate muscle functions and thus contribute to airway inflammation, remodelling and airflow obstruction. To determine the effects of human lung mast cells on the secretory and proliferative functions of airway smooth muscle cells from donors with and without asthma. Freshly isolated human lung mast cells were stimulated with IgE/anti-IgE. Culture supernatants were collected after 2 and 24 h and the mast cells lysed. The supernatants/lysates were added to serum-deprived, subconfluent airway smooth muscle cells for up to 48 h. Released chemokines and extracellular matrix were measured by ELISA, proliferation was quantified by [(3) H]-thymidine incorporation and cell counting, and intracellular signalling by phospho-arrays. Mast cell 2-h supernatants reduced CCL11 and increased CXCL8 and fibronectin production from both asthmatic and nonasthmatic muscle cells. Leupeptin reversed these effects. Mast cell 24-h supernatants and lysates reduced CCL11 release from both muscle cell types but increased CXCL8 release by nonasthmatic cells. The 24-h supernatants also reduced asthmatic, but not nonasthmatic, muscle cell DNA synthesis and asthmatic cell numbers over 5 days through inhibiting extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphatidylinositol (PI3)-kinase pathways. However, prostaglandins, thromboxanes, IL-4 and IL-13 were not involved in reducing the proliferation. Mast cell proteases and newly synthesized products differentially modulated the secretory and proliferative functions of airway smooth muscle cells from donors with and without asthma. Thus, mast cells may modulate their own recruitment and airway smooth muscle functions locally in asthma. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Defective bone repair in mast cell-deficient Cpa3Cre/+ mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Ramirez-GarciaLuna

    Full Text Available In the adult skeleton, cells of the immune system interact with those of the skeleton during all phases of bone repair to influence the outcome. Mast cells are immune cells best known for their pathologic role in allergy, and may be involved in chronic inflammatory and fibrotic disorders. Potential roles for mast cells in tissue homeostasis, vascularization and repair remain enigmatic. Previous studies in combined mast cell- and Kit-deficient KitW-sh/W-sh mice (KitW-sh implicated mast cells in bone repair but KitW-sh mice suffer from additional Kit-dependent hematopoietic and non- hematopoietic deficiencies that could have confounded the outcome. The goal of the current study was to compare bone repair in normal wild type (WT and Cpa3Cre/+ mice, which lack mast cells in the absence of any other hematopoietic or non- hematopoietic deficiencies. Repair of a femoral window defect was characterized using micro CT imaging and histological analyses from the early inflammatory phase, through soft and hard callus formation, and finally the remodeling phase. The data indicate 1 mast cells appear in healing bone of WT mice but not Cpa3Cre/+ mice, beginning 14 days after surgery; 2 re-vascularization of repair tissue and deposition of mineralized bone was delayed and dis-organised in Cpa3Cre/+ mice compared with WT mice; 3 the defects in Cpa3Cre/+ mice were associated with little change in anabolic activity and biphasic alterations in osteoclast and macrophage activity. The outcome at 56 days postoperative was complete bridging of the defect in most WT mice and fibrous mal-union in most Cpa3Cre/+ mice. The results indicate that mast cells promote bone healing, possibly by recruiting vascular endothelial cells during the inflammatory phase and coordinating anabolic and catabolic activity during tissue remodeling. Taken together the data indicate that mast cells have a positive impact on bone repair.

  10. Mast cells modulate acute ozone-induced inflammation of the murine lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleeberger, S.R.; Seiden, J.E.; Levitt, R.C.; Zhang, L.Y. (Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1993-11-01

    We hypothesized that mast cells modulate lung inflammation that develops after acute ozone (O3) exposure. Two tests were done: (1) genetically mast-cell-deficient (WBB6F1-W/Wv, WCB6F1-SI/SId) and bone-marrow-transplanted W/Wv mice were exposed to O3 or filtered air, and the inflammatory responses were compared with those of mast-cell-sufficient congenic mice (WBB6F1-(+)/+, WCB6F1-(+)/+); (2) genetically O3-susceptible C57BL/6J mice were treated pharmacologically with putative mast-cell modulators or vehicle, and the O3-induced inflammatory responses were compared. Mice were exposed to 1.75 ppm O3 or air for 3 h, and lung inflammation was assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) 6 and 24 h after exposure. Relative to O3-exposed W/Wv and SI/SId mice, the mean numbers of lavageable polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and total BAL protein concentration (a marker of permeability) were significantly greater in the respective O3-exposed normal congenic +/+ mice (p < 0.05). Mast cells were reconstituted in W/Wv mice by transplantation of bone marrow cells from congenic +/+ mice, and O3-induced lung inflammation was assessed in the mast-cell-replete W/Wv mice. After O3 exposure, the changes in lavageable PMNs and total protein of mast-cell-replete W/Wv mice were not different from age-matched normal +/+ control mice, and they were significantly greater than those of sham-transplanted W/Wv mice (p < 0.05). Genetically susceptible C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with a mast-cell stabilizer (nedocromil sodium), secretagogue (compound 48/80), or vehicle, and the mice were exposed to O3.

  11. MAST CELLS AND ANGIOGENESIS IN ORAL EPITHELIAL DYSPLASTIC LESIONS AND ORAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

    OpenAIRE

    Veda, Marla Vinay

    2015-01-01

    Background: The progression of oral epithelial dysplastic lesions into oral squamous cell carcinoma is characterized by an ‘angiogenic switch’ which is characterized by an increase in neo-vascularization in the sub-epithelial lamina propria which can be considered an indicator of malignant transformation. Mast cells are a rich source of various angiogenic factors. Moreover mast cells secrete various proteolytic enzymes which degrade the extracellular matrix and create space for the developing...

  12. Association of mast cell-derived VEGF and proteases in Dengue shock syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahisa Furuta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent in-vitro studies have suggested that mast cells are involved in Dengue virus infection. To clarify the role of mast cells in the development of clinical Dengue fever, we compared the plasma levels of several mast cell-derived mediators (vascular endothelial cell growth factor [VEGF], soluble VEGF receptors [sVEGFRs], tryptase, and chymase and -related cytokines (IL-4, -9, and -17 between patients with differing severity of Dengue fever and healthy controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study was performed at Children's Hospital No. 2, Ho Chi Minh City, and Vinh Long Province Hospital, Vietnam from 2002 to 2005. Study patients included 103 with Dengue fever (DF, Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF, and Dengue shock syndrome (DSS, as diagnosed by the World Health Organization criteria. There were 189 healthy subjects, and 19 febrile illness patients of the same Kinh ethnicity. The levels of mast cell-derived mediators and -related cytokines in plasma were measured by ELISA. VEGF and sVEGFR-1 levels were significantly increased in DHF and DSS compared with those of DF and controls, whereas sVEGFR-2 levels were significantly decreased in DHF and DSS. Significant increases in tryptase and chymase levels, which were accompanied by high IL-9 and -17 concentrations, were detected in DHF and DSS patients. By day 4 of admission, VEGF, sVEGFRs, and proteases levels had returned to similar levels as DF and controls. In-vitro VEGF production by mast cells was examined in KU812 and HMC-1 cells, and was found to be highest when the cells were inoculated with Dengue virus and human Dengue virus-immune serum in the presence of IL-9. CONCLUSIONS: As mast cells are an important source of VEGF, tryptase, and chymase, our findings suggest that mast cell activation and mast cell-derived mediators participate in the development of DHF. The two proteases, particularly chymase, might serve as good predictive markers of Dengue disease severity.

  13. Association of Mast Cell-Derived VEGF and Proteases in Dengue Shock Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Takahisa; Murao, Lyre Anni; Lan, Nguyen Thi Phuong; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Huong, Vu Thi Que; Thuy, Tran Thi; Tham, Vo Dinh; Nga, Cao Thi Phi; Ha, Tran Thi Ngoc; Ohmoto, Yasukazu; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Morita, Kouichi; Yasunami, Michio; Hirayama, Kenji; Watanabe, Naohiro

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent in-vitro studies have suggested that mast cells are involved in Dengue virus infection. To clarify the role of mast cells in the development of clinical Dengue fever, we compared the plasma levels of several mast cell-derived mediators (vascular endothelial cell growth factor [VEGF], soluble VEGF receptors [sVEGFRs], tryptase, and chymase) and -related cytokines (IL-4, -9, and -17) between patients with differing severity of Dengue fever and healthy controls. Methodology/Principal Findings The study was performed at Children's Hospital No. 2, Ho Chi Minh City, and Vinh Long Province Hospital, Vietnam from 2002 to 2005. Study patients included 103 with Dengue fever (DF), Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and Dengue shock syndrome (DSS), as diagnosed by the World Health Organization criteria. There were 189 healthy subjects, and 19 febrile illness patients of the same Kinh ethnicity. The levels of mast cell-derived mediators and -related cytokines in plasma were measured by ELISA. VEGF and sVEGFR-1 levels were significantly increased in DHF and DSS compared with those of DF and controls, whereas sVEGFR-2 levels were significantly decreased in DHF and DSS. Significant increases in tryptase and chymase levels, which were accompanied by high IL-9 and -17 concentrations, were detected in DHF and DSS patients. By day 4 of admission, VEGF, sVEGFRs, and proteases levels had returned to similar levels as DF and controls. In-vitro VEGF production by mast cells was examined in KU812 and HMC-1 cells, and was found to be highest when the cells were inoculated with Dengue virus and human Dengue virus-immune serum in the presence of IL-9. Conclusions As mast cells are an important source of VEGF, tryptase, and chymase, our findings suggest that mast cell activation and mast cell-derived mediators participate in the development of DHF. The two proteases, particularly chymase, might serve as good predictive markers of Dengue disease severity. PMID:22363824

  14. Growth hormone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  15. Tumor-infiltrating tryptase+mast cells predict unfavorable clinical outcome in solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guoming; Wang, Shimin; Cheng, Pu

    2018-02-15

    The prognostic role of tumor-infiltrating tryptase + mast cells in human solid tumors remains controversial. Herein, we conducted a meta-analysis including 28 published studies with 4224 patients identified from PubMed and EBSCO to assess the prognostic impact of tumor-infiltrating tryptase + mast cells in human solid tumors. We found that tryptase + mast cell infiltration significantly decreased overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in all types of solid tumors. In stratified analyses, tryptase + mast cell infiltration was significantly associated with worse OS in non-small cell lung cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma and 5-year survival in colorectal cancer. And these cells were inversely associated with DFS in hepatocellular and colorectal cancer. In addition, high density of intratumoral tryptase + mast cells significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis of solid tumor. In conclusion, Tryptase + mast cell infiltration leads to an unfavorable clinical outcome in solid tumors, implicating that it is a valuable biomarker for prognostic prediction for human solid malignances and targeting it may have a potential for effective treatment. © 2017 UICC.

  16. IgE and mast cells in host defense against parasites and venoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Kaori; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    IgE-dependent mast cell activation is a major effector mechanism underlying the pathology associated with allergic disorders. The most dramatic of these IgE-associated disorders is the fatal anaphylaxis which can occur in some people who have developed IgE antibodies to otherwise innocuous antigens, such as those contained in certain foods and medicines. Why would such a highly “maladaptive” immune response develop in evolution, and be retained to the present day? Host defense against parasites has long been considered the only beneficial function that might be conferred by IgE and mast cells. However, recent studies have provided evidence that, in addition to participating in host resistance to certain parasites, mast cells and IgE are critical components of innate (mast cells) and adaptive (mast cells and IgE) immune responses that can enhance host defense against the toxicity of certain arthropod and animal venoms, including enhancing the survival of mice injected with such venoms. Yet, in some people, developing IgE antibodies to insect or snake venoms puts them at risk for having a potentially fatal anaphylactic reaction upon subsequent exposure to such venoms. Delineating the mechanisms underlying beneficial versus detrimental innate and adaptive immune responses associated with mast cell activation and IgE is likely to enhance our ability to identify potential therapeutic targets in such settings, not only for reducing the pathology associated with allergic disorders but perhaps also for enhancing immune protection against pathogens and animal venoms. PMID:27225312

  17. Liver tryptase-positive mast cells and fibrosis in children with hepatic echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulubova Maya

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The hepatic echinococcosis in children is a serious surgical problem. The aim of this study is to investigate the participation of mast cells in liver inflammatory reactions triggered by echinococcal cysts. Liver biopsy samples were collected from the tissue surrounding the cysts from 16 sick children (11 boys and 5 girls in the course of abdominal surgery and from 5 controls. Light and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry was performed using monoclonal antibody against tryptase. Light microscopical immunocytochemistry revealed abundance of tryptase-positive (MCT mast cells in the capsules of the cysts (43.58 cells/mm2. There were also observed greatly increased numbers of mast cells in portal tracts surrounding the cyst, compared to those of control biopsies (26.49 vs. 1.78 cells/mm2, p=0.0009, Mann-Whitney U test. Based on the ultrastructural appearance of tryptase-positive mast cell granules, morphological sings of activation of most of the mast cells were distinguished. In conclusion, we suggest that the accumulated and activated tryptase-positive mast cells in liver tissues surrounding the echinococcal cysts play a crucial role in modulation of the inflammatory liver response and could induce chronic inflammation and fibrogenesis, resulting in serious liver injury such as nonspecific reactive hepatitis.

  18. Mast fruiting is a frequent strategy in woody species of eastern South America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Norden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is thought that mast seeding is a rare reproductive strategy in the tropics, since tropical climates are less variable, and fruit consumers tend to be more generalist in these regions. However, previous tests of this hypothesis were based on only few tropical datasets, and none from tropical South America. Moreover, reproductive strategies have been quantified based on the coefficient of variation of interannual seed production, an index that potentially confounds masting and high interannual variability in seed production. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a new approach to model the monthly variability in seed production for 28 tree species, and 20 liana species monitored during 5 years in a tropical forest of Central French Guiana. We found that 23% of the species showed a masting pattern, 54% an annual fruiting pattern, and 23% an irregular fruiting pattern. The majority of masting species were trees (8 out of 11, most of them animal-dispersed. The classification into reproductive strategies based on the coefficient of variation was inconsistent with our results in nearly half of the cases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study is the first to clearly evidence the frequency of the masting strategy in a tropical forest community of Eastern South America. The commonness of the masting strategy in tropical plants may promote species coexistence through storage dynamics.

  19. Association of mast cells with helicobacter pylori infection in the antral mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SR KC

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate consisting of neutrophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes and plasma cells. Helicobacter pylori lead to mast cell degranulation and release of active chemical compounds in in-vitro conditions. The objective of this study was to find out the association of mast cell density and Helicobacter pylori in the antral mucosa of the stomach. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 endoscopic biopsies were included in the study. In addition to routine Hematoxylin and Eosin stained slides, Giemsa stain was done in each case for the evaluation of Helicobacter pylori and mast cell density in the gastric mucosa. Results: Out of 150 gastric biopsies with histopathological diagnosis of chronic gastritis, 36 cases (24% were positive for Helicobacter pylori. In the antral mucosa, mast cell density was significantly higher in the Helicobacter pylori-positive group than in the Helicobacter pylori-negative group (P<0.01. Conclusion: Mast cells may play a role in the development of Helicobacter pylori gastritis. Keywords: Gastritis; Mast Cell; Helicobacter pylori DOI: 10.3126/jpn.v1i1.4448 Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2011 Vol.1, 34-36

  20. The Role of Adenoid Mast Cells in the Pathogenesis of Secretory Otitis Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Faruk Oktay

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the possible role of adenoid mast cells in the etiology of secretory otitis media. Between 2001-2002, 25 patients with chronic adenoitis and chronic secretory otitis media and 25 patients with isolated adenoid hypertrophy were included to the study. Adenoidectomy performed to the all patients under general anesthesia. Adenoidectomy specimens were evaluated under the light microscopy and the number of mast cells were calculated for each patient. The number of mast cells were compared between two groups. The number of mast cells were between 4-84 in the otitis media with effusion and adenoid hypertrophy group (median:52, however it was between 2-63 (median: 23 in the isolated adenoid hypertrophy group. When comparing the two groups using Mann-Withney U test, the number of mast cells found to be significantly higher in the chronic secretory otitis media group (p<0.001.Based on our findings there is a relationship between increased adenoid mast cells and otitis media with effusion and these cells may have a possible role in the etiology of chronic secretory otitis media.

  1. Effect of oestradiol on mast cell number and histamine level in the mammary glands of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, H; Wang, Z; Chen, Y

    2012-06-01

    Variations of mast cell number, histamine concentration and oestrogen receptor (ER) expression in mammary glands with the fluctuation of plasma oestradiol level were identified either in the intact rats at different oestrous stages or in the ovary-ectomized rats administrated with different doses of oestradiol benzoate. The results showed that the number of mast cells and histamine concentration fluctuated concomitantly with plasma oestradiol level during the oestrous cycle. More mast cell number and higher histamine concentrations were observed in the oestrous stage than that in the prooestrous and dioestrous stages. Ovariectomy decreased the mast cell number and histamine concentration, which were reconstituted by exogenous oestradiol. ER was mainly found in the nuclear of epithelial cells and interstitial cells of mammary glands. In addition, ER was also expressed in the cytoplasm of some stromal cells. These stromal cells were verified to be mast cells. In conclusion, our results suggested that oestradiol modulated mast cell number and its degranulation in the mammary gland through the ERs pathway. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Different Patterns of Mast Cells Distinguish Diffuse from Encapsulated Neurofibromas in Patients with Neurofibromatosis 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Tracy; Riccardi, Vincent M.; Sutcliffe, Margaret; Vielkind, Juergen; Wechsler, Janine; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Friedman, Jan M.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple neurofibromas are cardinal features of neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1). Several different types of NF1-associated neurofibromas occur, each distinct in terms of pathological details, clinical presentation, and natural history. Mast cells are present in most neurofibromas and have been shown to be critical to the origin and progression of neurofibromas in both human NF1 and relevant mouse models. In this investigation, the authors determined whether mast cell involvement is the same for all types of NF1-associated neurofibromas. They examined the density and distribution of mast cells within 49 NF1-associated neurofibromas classified histopathologically as diffuse or encapsulated on the basis of the presence or absence of the perineurium or its constituent cells. They made two observations: (1) Diffuse neurofibromas had significantly higher densities of mast cells than did encapsulated neurofibromas, and (2) mast cells were evenly distributed throughout diffuse neurofibromas but were primarily restricted to the periphery of encapsulated neurofibromas. The differences in mast cell density and distribution differentiate the two basic types of NF1-associated neurofibromas, suggesting that the pathogenesis of diffuse and encapsulated neurofibromas may be significantly different. PMID:21525187

  3. Brain mast cells link the immune system to anxiety-like behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Katherine M.; Ribeiro, Ana C.; Pfaff, Donald W.; Silver, Rae

    2008-01-01

    Mast cells are resident in the brain and contain numerous mediators, including neurotransmitters, cytokines, and chemokines, that are released in response to a variety of natural and pharmacological triggers. The number of mast cells in the brain fluctuates with stress and various behavioral and endocrine states. These properties suggest that mast cells are poised to influence neural systems underlying behavior. Using genetic and pharmacological loss-of-function models we performed a behavioral screen for arousal responses including emotionality, locomotor, and sensory components. We found that mast cell deficient KitW−sh/W−sh (sash−/−) mice had a greater anxiety-like phenotype than WT and heterozygote littermate control animals in the open field arena and elevated plus maze. Second, we show that blockade of brain, but not peripheral, mast cell activation increased anxiety-like behavior. Taken together, the data implicate brain mast cells in the modulation of anxiety-like behavior and provide evidence for the behavioral importance of neuroimmune links. PMID:19004805

  4. Application of cultured human mast cells (CHMC) for the design and structure-activity relationship of IgE-mediated mast cell activation inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argade, Ankush; Bhamidipati, Somasekhar; Li, Hui; Carroll, David; Clough, Jeffrey; Keim, Holger; Sylvain, Catherine; Rossi, Alexander B; Coquilla, Christina; Issakani, Sarkiz D; Masuda, Esteban S; Payan, Donald G; Singh, Rajinder

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the optimization of small molecule inhibitors of human mast cell degranulation via anti-IgE-mediated tryptase release following cross-linking and activation of IgE-loaded FcεR1 receptors. The compounds are selective upstream inhibitors of FcεR1-dependent human mast cell degranulation and proved to be devoid of activity in downstream ionomycin mediated degranulation. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) leading to compound 26 is outlined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of in ovo exposure to PCBs (coplanar congener, kanechlor mixture, hydroxylated metabolite) on the developing cell-mediated immunity in chickens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, J.; Matsuda, M.; Kawano, M.; Wakimoto, T. [Faculty of Agriculture, Ehime Univ., Matsuyama, Ehime (Japan); Kashima, Y. [Dept. of Hygiene, Yokohama City Univ. School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are wide spread environmental contaminants and known to cause various adverse effects on health of human and wildlife. Immune system is one of the several targets for toxic effects of PCBs and its normal balance is often disrupted by the exposure of the compounds. For example, PCBs may induce immune suppression and result in increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections, or conversely, excessive immune enhancement may cause adverse outcomes including as autoimmune disease and anergy. Therefore immune function is regarded as one of an important endpoint in toxicological risk assessment. There are a number of studies shown that neonatal organisms perinatally exposed to polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) such as PCBs have severer effects on their immune system than adult. Dioxins and coplanar PCB congeners, structurally planar PHAHs are known to have high affinity for aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) have the strongest affinity among such compounds and these are considered to act on immune system through AhR. On the other hand, such as non-planar PCB congeners with low affinity for AhR, which are abundantly contained in commercial PCB preparations have non-additive (antagonistic) effects on immune function. Prenatal exposure of TCDD to rodent induced abnormal lymphoid development in the thymus and thymus-dependent immune functions were remarkably disturbed. Although several experimental studies in mammals have been carried out on the developmental immunotoxicity of PCBs, there are still limited information available on avian species. Thus in this study, prenatal exposure to low level of PCBs and the effects on the developing immune system were investigated with chicken as a model animal of avian species, especially it is focused on the cell-mediated immune function.

  6. Transcriptomic Analysis of Persistent Infection with Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Cattle Suggests Impairment of Apoptosis and Cell-Mediated Immunity in the Nasopharynx.

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    Michael Eschbaumer

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the mechanisms of persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV infection in cattle, transcriptome alterations associated with the FMDV carrier state were characterized using a bovine whole-transcriptome microarray. Eighteen cattle (8 vaccinated with a recombinant FMDV A vaccine, 10 non-vaccinated were challenged with FMDV A24 Cruzeiro, and the gene expression profiles of nasopharyngeal tissues collected between 21 and 35 days after challenge were compared between 11 persistently infected carriers and 7 non-carriers. Carriers and non-carriers were further compared to 2 naïve animals that had been neither vaccinated nor challenged. At a controlled false-discovery rate of 10% and a minimum difference in expression of 50%, 648 genes were differentially expressed between FMDV carriers and non-carriers, and most (467 had higher expression in carriers. Among these, genes associated with cellular proliferation and the immune response-such as chemokines, cytokines and genes regulating T and B cells-were significantly overrepresented. Differential gene expression was significantly correlated between non-vaccinated and vaccinated animals (biological correlation +0.97, indicating a similar transcriptome profile across these groups. Genes related to prostaglandin E2 production and the induction of regulatory T cells were overexpressed in carriers. In contrast, tissues from non-carrier animals expressed higher levels of complement regulators and pro-apoptotic genes that could promote virus clearance. Based on these findings, we propose a working hypothesis for FMDV persistence in nasopharyngeal tissues of cattle, in which the virus may be maintained by an impairment of apoptosis and the local suppression of cell-mediated antiviral immunity by inducible regulatory T cells.

  7. Anandamide attenuates Th-17 cell-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity response by triggering IL-10 production and consequent microRNA induction.

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    Austin R Jackson

    Full Text Available Endogenous cannabinoids [endocannabinoids] are lipid signaling molecules that have been shown to modulate immune functions. However, their role in the regulation of Th17 cells has not been studied previously. In the current study, we used methylated Bovine Serum Albumin [mBSA]-induced delayed type hypersensitivity [DTH] response in C57BL/6 mice, mediated by Th17 cells, as a model to test the anti-inflammatory effects of endocannabinoids. Administration of anandamide [AEA], a member of the endocannabinoid family, into mice resulted in significant mitigation of mBSA-induced inflammation, including foot pad swelling, cell infiltration, and cell proliferation in the draining lymph nodes [LN]. AEA treatment significantly reduced IL-17 and IFN-γ production, as well as decreased RORγt expression while causing significant induction of IL-10 in the draining LNs. IL-10 was critical for the AEA-induced mitigation of DTH response inasmuch as neutralization of IL-10 reversed the effects of AEA. We next analyzed miRNA from the LN cells and found that 100 out of 609 miRNA species were differentially regulated in AEA-treated mice when compared to controls. Several of these miRNAs targeted proinflammatory mediators. Interestingly, many of these miRNA were also upregulated upon in vitro treatment of LN cells with IL-10. Together, the current study demonstrates that AEA may suppress Th-17 cell-mediated DTH response by inducing IL-10 which in turn triggers miRNA that target proinflammatory pathways.

  8. T-cell mediated anti-tumor immunity after photodynamic therapy: Why does it not always work and how can we improve it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Lucas Freitas; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses the combination of non-toxic photosensitizers and harmless light to generate reactive oxygen species that destroy tumors by a combination of direct tumor cell killing, vascular shutdown, and activation of the immune system. It has been shown in some animal models that mice that have been cured of cancer by PDT, may exhibit resistance to rechallenge. The cured mice can also possess tumor specific T-cells that recognize defined tumor antigens, destroy tumor cells in vitro, and can be adoptively transferred to protect naïve mice from cancer. However, these beneficial outcomes are the exception rather than the rule. The reasons for this lack of consistency lie in the ability of many tumors to suppress the host immune system and to actively evade immune attack. The presence of an appropriate tumor rejection antigen in the particular tumor cell line is a requisite for T-cell mediated immunity. Regulatory T-cells (CD25+, Foxp3+) are potent inhibitors of anti-tumor immunity, and their removal by low dose cyclophosphamide can potentiate the PDT-induced immune response. Treatments that stimulate dendritic cells (DC) such as CpG oligonucleotide can overcome tumor-induced DC dysfunction and improve PDT outcome. Epigenetic reversal agents can increase tumor expression of MHC class I and also simultaneously increase expression of tumor antigens. A few clinical reports have shown that anti-tumor immunity can be generated by PDT in patients, and it is hoped that these combination approaches may increase tumor cures in patients. PMID:26062987

  9. Specificity of two tests for the early diagnosis of bovine paratuberculosis based on cell-mediated immunity : the Johnin skin test and the gamma interferon assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalis, CHJ; Collins, MT; Hesselink, JW; Barkema, H.W.

    2003-01-01

    Paratuberculosis in cattle is a chronic debilitating infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium paratuberculosis. Control of paratuberculosis is based on tests that principally detect advanced stages of infections: faecal culture and serology. Tests measuring cell-mediated immunity (CMI) could

  10. Cell mediated immune responses in the placenta following challenge of vaccinated pregnant heifers with Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Y P; Cantón, G; Regidor-Cerrillo, J; Chianini, F; Morrell, E; Lischinsky, L; Ortega-Mora, L M; Innes, E A; Odeón, A; Campero, C M; Moore, D P

    2015-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate and correlate the cell-mediated immune response and pathological changes at the maternal-fetal interface of Neospora-challenged pregnant cattle previously immunized with live and inactivated experimental vaccines. Pregnant heifers naïve to Neospora caninum were divided in 5 groups of 4 animals, each one immunized before mating: Group A heifers were intravenously (iv) immunized with 6.25 × 10(7) live tachyzoites of the NC-6 strain; group B heifers were immunized twice subcutaneously (sc) 3 weeks apart with native antigen extract of the NC-6 strain formulated with ISCOMs; group C heifers were sc immunized twice 3 weeks apart with three recombinant proteins (rNcSAG1, rNcHSP20, rNcGRA7) of the NC-1 strain formulated with ISCOMs; group D heifers were sc injected with sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and group E heifers received sc ISCOM-matrix (ISCOMs without antigen). All groups were iv-challenged with 4.7 × 10(7) NC-1 tachyzoites at 70 days of gestation. Heifers were culled at day 104 of gestation and placentomes were examined to evaluate lesions and local cellular immune responses using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and real time-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed using bovine leucocyte specific antibodies. Cytokine expression and levels (IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α) were measured using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and ELISA, respectively. Minimal inflammation was observed in group A placentomes; while placentomes from group B, C, D and E had moderate to severe infiltration with CD3(+), CD4(+), γδ-T cells, CD8(+) cells and macrophages being more numerous in groups B and E placentomes, when compared with groups C and D (P<0.001). Cytokine levels were significantly increased in the caruncles of animals of groups B and C in comparison with the other animal groups (P < 0.001). The results from this study showed that the strongest cellular immune responses were observed in the

  11. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  12. Nuclear receptor 4a3 (nr4a3 regulates murine mast cell responses and granule content.

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    Gianni Garcia-Faroldi

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptor 4a3 (Nr4a3 is a transcription factor implicated in various settings such as vascular biology and inflammation. We have recently shown that mast cells dramatically upregulate Nuclear receptor 4a3 upon activation, and here we investigated the functional impact of Nuclear receptor 4a3 on mast cell responses. We show that Nuclear receptor 4a3 is involved in the regulation of cytokine/chemokine secretion in mast cells following activation via the high affinity IgE receptor. Moreover, Nuclear receptor 4a3 negatively affects the transcript and protein levels of mast cell tryptase as well as the mast cell's responsiveness to allergen. Together, these findings identify Nuclear receptor 4a3 as a novel regulator of mast cell function.

  13. Climate-influenced ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa seed masting trends in western Montana, USA

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    Christopher R. Keyes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The aim of this study was to analyze 10-year records of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa seed production, in order to confirm synchronic seed production and to evaluate cyclical masting trends, masting depletion effect, and climate-masting relationships. Area of study: The study area was located in a P. ponderosa stand in the northern Rocky Mountains (western Montana, USA. Material and methods: The study was conducted in one stand that had been subjected to a silvicultural study of uneven-aged management techniques that was carried out in 1984, and which resulted in three separate units consisting of one control, one cut/no-burn treatment, and one cut/burn treatment. Seeds were collected during the 10 years following treatment in 15 traps systematically deployed within each of the stand’s three units. The total numbers of seeds collected in each unit were plotted over time to analyze crop synchrony, with Spearman rank correlation coefficient used to test for masting cycles and crop depletion after a mast year. Meteorological records over the period 1983-1994 were related to the occurrence of a mast event (defined as crops exceeding 50,000 viable seeds/ha. Main results: The seed production pattern was non-cyclical, synchronous, and independent of silvicultural treatment history. A mast-depletion effect was evident but was not statistically significant. Mast events seem to be promoted by the occurrence of optimum mean temperatures at the beginning of spring during both the first (11 °C and second (9 °C years of cone maturation. The probability of a mast year was also affected by summer temperature (number of late frost days; negative effect and precipitation amount (positive effect. All these factors would seemingly explain the observed synchronous pattern in cone production. Research highlights: The non-cyclical trend of ponderosa pine seed mast years is influenced by specific climate determinants. Fluctuations in mean early

  14. Mast cells as effector cells of innate immunity and regulators of adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardamone, Chiara; Parente, Roberta; Feo, Giulia De; Triggiani, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    Mast cells are widely distributed in human organs and tissues and they are particularly abundant at major body interfaces with the external environment such as the skin, the lung and the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, mast cells are located around blood vessels and are highly represented within central and peripheral lymphoid organs. The strategic distribution of mast cells closely reflects the primary role of these cells in providing first-line defense against environmental dangers, in regulating local and systemic inflammatory reactions and in shaping innate and adaptive immune responses. Human mast cells have pleiotropic and multivalent functions that make them highly versatile cells able to rapidly adapt responses to microenvironmental changes. They express a wide variety of surface receptors including immunoglobulin receptors, pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptors and danger signal receptors. The abundance of these receptors makes mast cells unique and effective surveillance cells able to detect promptly aggression by viral, bacterial and parasitic agents. In addition, mast cells express multiple receptors for cytokines and chemokines that confer them the capacity of being recruited and activated at sites of inflammation. Once activated by immunological or nonimmunological stimuli mast cells secrete a wide spectrum of preformed (early) and de novo synthesized (late) mediators. Preformed mediators are stored within granules and are rapidly released in the extracellular environment to provide a fast vascular response that promotes inflammation and local recruitment of other innate immunity cells such as neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils and monocyte/macrophages. Later on, delayed release of multiple cytokines and chemokines from mast cells further induce modulation of cells of adaptive immunity and regulates tissue injury and, eventually, resolution of inflammation. Finally, mast cells express several costimulatory and inhibitory surface molecules

  15. Improved H-mode access in connected DND in MAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H; Carolan, P G; Conway, N J; Counsell, G F; Cunningham, G; Field, A R; Kirk, A; McClements, K G; Price, M; Taylor, D

    2005-01-01

    In the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak, MAST, the formation of the edge transport barrier leading to the high-confinement (H-mode) regime is greatly facilitated by operating in a double null diverted (DND) configuration where both X-points are practically on the same flux surface. Ohmic H-modes are presently only obtained in these connected double null diverted (CDND) configurations. The ease of H-mode access is lost if the two flux surfaces passing through the X-points are radially separated by more than one ion Larmor radius (ρ i ∼ 6 mm) at the low-field-side mid-plane. The change of the magnetic configuration from disconnected to CDND is accompanied by a change in the radial electric field of about ΔE ψ ∼ -1 kV m -1 and a reduction of the electron temperature decay length in the high-field-side scrape-off-layer. Other parameters at the plasma edge, in particular those affecting the H-mode access criteria of common L/H transition theories, are not affected by the slight changes to the magnetic configuration. It is believed that the observed change in E ψ , which may result from differences in ion orbit losses, leads to a higher initial E x B flow shear in CDND configurations which could lead to the easier H-mode access

  16. Long Pulse EBW Start-up Experiments in MAST

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    Shevchenko V.F.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Start-up technique reported here relies on a double mode conversion (MC for electron Bernstein wave (EBW excitation. It consists of MC of the ordinary (O mode, entering the plasma from the low field side of the tokamak, into the extraordinary (X mode at a mirror-polarizer located at the high field side. The X mode propagates back to the plasma, passes through electron cyclotron resonance (ECR and experiences a subsequent X to EBW MC near the upper hybrid resonance (UHR. Finally the excited EBW mode is totally absorbed at the Doppler shifted ECR. The absorption of EBW remains high even in cold rarefied plasmas. Furthermore, EBW can generate significant plasma current giving the prospect of a fully solenoid-free plasma start-up. First experiments using this scheme were carried out on MAST [1]. Plasma currents up to 33 kA have been achieved using 28 GHz 100kW 90ms RF pulses. Recently experimental results were extended to longer RF pulses showing further increase of plasma currents generated by RF power alone. A record current of 73kA has been achieved with 450ms RF pulse of similar power. The current drive enhancement was mainly achieved due to RF pulse extension and further optimisation of the start-up scenario.

  17. Physical urticarias: mast cell disfunction. Preventive, diagnostic and therapeutical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Geller

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present and discuss the current classification of physicalurticarias based on immunologic and pathophysiological mechanisms.To describe clinical symptoms, triggering and worsening factors,different diagnostic tools, and to list the available pharmacologicaltherapeutic approaches as well as the methods of physicaldesensitization. Methods: The literature search was carried out usingMedline. Forty studies were evaluated including case-control series,meta-analyses, case reports and reviews in the English language. Thekeywords used were physical urticarias, classification, and physicaldesensitization. A didactic diagnostic classification of differentgroups of physical urticarias was made, as well as a description ofthe several modalities of these dermatatologic conditions causedby physical stimuli, as localized or diffuse, classical or atypical,acquired or familial, with or without IgE involvement. The geneticpredisposing factors were determined. Results: Physical urticaria isdue to mast cell dysfunction with lowered threshold for the releaseof cytoplasmic anaphylactic mediators triggered by physical factors.These precipitating environmental physical factors include cold, heat,mechanical stimuli, exercises, exposure to sunlight and skin contactwith water. Conclusions: Physical urticarias occur in approximately17% of chronic urticaria patients and different forms may coexist inthe same individual. Treatments include prevention, antihistamines(classical and non-sedating presentations and, occasionally,corticosteroids, dapsone and other anti-inflammatory drugs, and thepotential use of specific physical desensitization.

  18. Mast Cell Function and Death in Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuser-Batista, Marcelo; Corrêa, José Raimundo; Carvalho, Vinícius Frias; de Carvalho Britto, Constança Felícia De Paoli; da Cruz Moreira, Otacilio; Batista, Marcos Meuser; Soares, Maurílio José; Filho, Francisco Alves Farias; e Silva, Patrícia Machado R.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Silva, Robson Coutinho; Henriques-Pons, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Although the roles of mast cells (MCs) are essential in many inflammatory and fibrotic diseases, their role in Trypanosoma cruzi–induced cardiomyopathy is unexplored. In this study, we treated infected CBA mice with cromolyn, an MC stabilizer, and observed much greater parasitemia and interferon-γ levels, higher mortality, myocarditis, and cardiac damage. Although these data show that MCs are important in controlling acute infection, we observed MC apoptosis in the cardiac tissue and peritoneal cavity of untreated mice. In the heart, pericardial mucosal MC die, perhaps because of reduced amounts of local stem cell factor. Using RT-PCR in purified cardiac MCs, we observed that infection induced transcription of P2X7 receptor and Fas, two molecules reportedly involved in cell death and inflammatory regulation. In gld/gld mice (FasL−/−), apoptosis of cardiac, but not peritoneal, MCs was decreased. Conversely, infection of P2X7−/− mice led to reduced peritoneal, but not cardiac, MC death. These data illustrate the immunomodulatory role played by MCs in T. cruzi infection and the complexity of molecular interactions that control inflammatory pathways in different tissues and compartments. PMID:21819958

  19. Canine mast cell tumors: diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett LD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Laura D Garrett Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine, Urbana, IL, USA Abstract: Mast cell tumors (MCTs are the most common malignant skin cancer in dogs, and significant variability exists in their biological behavior. Most MCTs are cured with appropriate local therapy, but a subset shows malignant behavior with the potential to spread to lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and other areas and to thus become a systemic cancer. Because of this variable behavior, it is difficult to predict how any individual tumor is going to behave. The variability thus creates uncertainty in deciding what a particular dog's prognosis is, whether staging tests to assess for metastasis are needed, and even what treatments will be necessary for best outcome. In addition to controversies over the potential for development of systemic disease, or diffuse metastasis, controversies also exist over what treatment is needed to best attain local control of these tumors. This article will briefly discuss the diagnosis of MCTs in dogs and will summarize the literature in regards to the controversial topics surrounding the more aggressive form of this disease, with recommendations made based on published studies. Keywords: mitotic index, mastocytosis, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, histologic grade

  20. Mast cell: an emerging partner in immune interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia eGri

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells (MCs are currently recognized as effector cells in many settings of the immune response, including host defense, immune regulation, allergy, chronic inflammation and autoimmune diseases. MC pleiotropic functions reflect their ability to secrete a wide spectrum of preformed or newly synthesized biologically active products with pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive properties, in response to multiple signals. Moreover, the modulation of MC effector phenotypes relies on the interaction of a wide variety of membrane molecules involved in cell-cell or cell-extracellular-matrix interaction. The delivery of co-stimulatory signals allow MC to specifically communicate with immune cells belonging to both innate and acquired immunity, as well as with non-immune tissue-specific cell types. This article reviews and discuss the evidence that MC membrane-expressed molecules play a central role in regulating MC priming and activation and in modulation of innate and adaptive immune response not only against host injury, but also in peripheral tolerance and tumor-surveillance or -escape. The complex expression of MC surface molecules may be regarded as a measure of connectivity, with altered patterns of cell-cell interaction representing functionally distinct MC state. We will focalize our attention on role and functions of recently discovered molecules involved in the cross-talk of MCs with other immune partners.

  1. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity affects the density of mast cells in abdominal fat depots and lymph nodes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Mehmet M; Nayer, Behzad; Walford, Eric C; Johnson, Kevin B; Gaidosh, Gabriel; Reiser, Jochen; De La Cruz-Munoz, Nestor; Ortega, Luis M; Nayer, Ali

    2012-02-07

    Mast cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin resistance. Here, we explored the effects of leptin deficiency-induced obesity on the density of mast cells in metabolic (abdominal fat depots, skeletal muscle, and liver) and lymphatic (abdominal lymph nodes, spleen, and thymus) organs. Fourteen-week-old male leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and their controls fed a standard chow were studied. Tissue sections were stained with toluidine blue to determine the density of mast cells. CD117/c-kit protein expression analysis was also carried out. Furthermore, mast cells containing immunoreactive tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine involved in obesity-linked insulin resistance, were identified by immunostaining. ob/ob mice demonstrated adiposity and insulin resistance. In abdominal fat depots, mast cells were distributed differentially. While most prevalent in subcutaneous fat in controls, mast cells were most abundant in epididymal fat in ob/ob mice. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity was accompanied by a 20-fold increase in the density of mast cells in epididymal fat, but a 13-fold decrease in subcutaneous fat. This finding was confirmed by CD117/c-kit protein expression analysis. Furthermore, we found that a subset of mast cells in epididymal and subcutaneous fat were immunoreactive for TNF-α. The proportion of mast cells immunoreactive for TNF-α was higher in epididymal than in subcutaneous fat in both ob/ob and control mice. Mast cells were also distributed differentially in retroperitoneal, mesenteric, and inguinal lymph nodes. In both ob/ob mice and lean controls, mast cells were more prevalent in retroperitoneal than in mesenteric and inguinal lymph nodes. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity was accompanied by increased mast cell density in all lymph node stations examined. No significant difference in the density of mast cells in skeletal muscle, liver, spleen, and thymus was noted between ob/ob and control mice. This study

  2. A new role for mast cells as scavengers for clearance of erythrocytes damaged due to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyanka; Puri, Niti

    2018-04-07

    Anemia, inflammation, and oxidative stress are interconnected. Erythrocytes are continuously exposed to oxidative stress, normally and during inflammatory diseases. Systemic mastocytosis and genetic depletion of mast cells affect anemia. In the present study, a direct role for mast cells in clearance of erythrocytes was explored. We show, for the first time, direct phagocytosis of opsonized as well as oxidatively damaged erythrocytes in vitro by mast cell lines, bone marrow derived mast cells (BMMCs) and in vivo by murine peritoneal mast cells. Also, activated mast cells, as may be present in inflammatory conditions, showed a significantly higher uptake of oxidatively damaged erythrocytes than resting mast cells. This suggests the involvement of mast cells in erythrocyte clearance during oxidative stress or inflammatory disorders. Partial inhibition of phagocytosis by various inhibitors indicated that this process may be controlled by several pathways. Our study provides important evidence for a scavenging role for mast cells in anemia due to inflammation and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity affects the density of mast cells in abdominal fat depots and lymph nodes in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altintas Mehmet M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mast cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin resistance. Here, we explored the effects of leptin deficiency-induced obesity on the density of mast cells in metabolic (abdominal fat depots, skeletal muscle, and liver and lymphatic (abdominal lymph nodes, spleen, and thymus organs. Fourteen-week-old male leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and their controls fed a standard chow were studied. Tissue sections were stained with toluidine blue to determine the density of mast cells. CD117/c-kit protein expression analysis was also carried out. Furthermore, mast cells containing immunoreactive tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine involved in obesity-linked insulin resistance, were identified by immunostaining. Results ob/ob mice demonstrated adiposity and insulin resistance. In abdominal fat depots, mast cells were distributed differentially. While most prevalent in subcutaneous fat in controls, mast cells were most abundant in epididymal fat in ob/ob mice. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity was accompanied by a 20-fold increase in the density of mast cells in epididymal fat, but a 13-fold decrease in subcutaneous fat. This finding was confirmed by CD117/c-kit protein expression analysis. Furthermore, we found that a subset of mast cells in epididymal and subcutaneous fat were immunoreactive for TNF-α. The proportion of mast cells immunoreactive for TNF-α was higher in epididymal than in subcutaneous fat in both ob/ob and control mice. Mast cells were also distributed differentially in retroperitoneal, mesenteric, and inguinal lymph nodes. In both ob/ob mice and lean controls, mast cells were more prevalent in retroperitoneal than in mesenteric and inguinal lymph nodes. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity was accompanied by increased mast cell density in all lymph node stations examined. No significant difference in the density of mast cells in skeletal muscle, liver, spleen, and thymus was

  4. Increased mast cell tryptase in sudden infant death - anaphylaxis, hypoxia or artefact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edston, E; Gidlund, E; Wickman, M; Ribbing, H; Van Hage-Hamsten, M

    1999-12-01

    Increased concentrations of mast cell tryptase in post mortem blood have frequently been observed in sudden infant deaths but the cause of this has not yet been clarified. The aim was to evaluate factors (immunological, morphological and anamnestic data) behind the observed increase in mast cell tryptase in sudden infant deaths with elevated tryptase. Mast cell tryptase and total immunoglobulin (Ig) E were measured in post mortem sera from 44 infants younger than 1.5 years. Radioallergosorbent tests were performed for possible allergens (mixture for relevant food allergens, Phadiatop and latex). IgG subclasses, IgM, and complement factors (C3, C4 and factor B) were measured with radial immunodiffusion. Mast cells, labelled with antibodies against mast cell tryptase, were counted in the lungs and heart. The circumstances of death and medical history of the deceased infant and family were obtained through police and hospital records. In 40% of the SIDS cases tryptase was elevated (>10 microg/L). Total IgE in serum was increased in 33% compared with clinical reference values but showed no association with mast cell tryptase. RAST tests were positive in three cases. In one of these cases both tryptase and total IgE were elevated. The only variable that was associated with high tryptase values was prone position at death (P Children with elevated total IgE also displayed high concentrations of IgG1 and IgG2. Infants who died in the spring had significantly higher IgE than the others (P < or = 0.05). The results do not support the hypothesis that the elevated tryptase concentrations in sudden infant death are caused by allergy. The association between prone position at death and elevated tryptase could hypothetically be explained by mast cell degranulation due to, for example, a hypoxic stimulus in these infants.

  5. Omalizumab may not inhibit mast cell and basophil activation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, J; Ohanyan, T; Church, M K; Maurer, M; Metz, M

    2015-09-01

    In March 2014, omalizumab, a monoclonal anti-IgE antibody, was approved for the treatment of chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU). The primary mode of action of omalizumab is considered to be the reduction in free IgE serum levels and the subsequent down-regulation of FcεRI, the high affinity receptor for IgE, on mast cells and basophils. Recently, it has been suggested that most CSU patients have an autoimmune aetiology which may lead to chronic activation of mast cells and basophils. To understand more of the mechanisms by which omalizumab may exert its effects in CSU, its efficacy was tested on human mast cells and basophils. Omalizumab, which was or was not preincubated with serum from healthy donors or CSU patients, was coincubated with isolated healthy donor skin mast cells or peripheral blood-derived monocytes containing 1-2% basophils. Degranulation was induced using anti-human IgE, C5a, or substance P and histamine release determined. Anti-human IgE-induced histamine release from mast cells or basophils was not altered in the presence or absence of omalizumab. In contrast, preincubation of mast cells with DARPin Fc fusion protein, a positive control for negative signalling via FcεRI-FcγRIIb cross activation, significantly diminished histamine release. Moreover, omalizumab, that was preincubated with healthy donor serum, CSU patient serum or auto-reactive CSU serum to allow for the formation of potential immune complexes, did not alter induced histamine release in a coincubation setup with mast cells or basophils as compared to the absence of omalizumab. In vivo, blood basophil numbers and basophil histamine content increase under omalizumab therapy. Our results suggest that the rapid response to omalizumab therapy is more likely to result from the elimination of an activating signal rather than the generation of a negative, inhibitory signal. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  6. Human mast cells are major IL-22 producers in patients with psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashiko, Shunya; Bouguermouh, Salim; Rubio, Manuel; Baba, Nobuyasu; Bissonnette, Robert; Sarfati, Marika

    2015-08-01

    Psoriasis is a systemic inflammatory disease in which IL-17 and IL-22 levels are markedly increased in the skin and blood. The prevalent concept, using skin cells that are isolated from psoriatic plaques and examined after cell expansion and in vitro stimulation, is that IL-17 and IL-22 production essentially results from T cells and the rare type 3 innate lymphoid cells. We sought to examine the cellular source of IL-17A and IL-22 at the protein and transcriptional single-cell level immediately after ex vivo skin cell isolation from psoriatic plaques. Skin biopsy specimens were collected from patients with psoriasis, as well as from patients with atopic dermatitis. Cell suspensions were prepared by combining mild enzymatic digestion and mechanical dissociation and analyzed for cytokine expression without prior in vitro culture and stimulation. Expression of IL-17 and IL-22 was quantified at the protein and mRNA single-cell level by using flow cytometry. IL-22 is predominantly expressed by CD3(-)c-Kit(+) cells relative to CD3(+) T cells in lesional skin of patients with psoriasis and patients with atopic dermatitis. Strikingly, we identified c-Kit(+)FcεRI(+) mast cells as major IL-22 producers. The proportion of mast cells that produce IL-22 ranges from 20% to 80% in patients with psoriasis or those with atopic dermatitis. Skin mast cells express IL-22 and IL-17 mRNA. Conversely, IL-17-producing T cells outnumber IL-17-producing mast cells, which also express IL-17 receptor. Human skin mast cells are previously unrecognized IL-22 producers. We further established that skin mast cells express IL-17. Thus mast cells might play an important role in the physiopathology of chronic inflammatory skin disorders. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mast Cell Stabilizers as Host Modulatory Drugs to Prevent and Control Periodontal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhoom Singh Mehta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mast cells are among the first cells to get in-volved in periodontal inflammation. Their numbers have been shown to be in-creased in cases of gingivitis and periodontal disease. The hypothesis: Since mast cell stabilizers like sodium cromogly-cate (SCG and nedocromil sodium (NS have been used in the prophylaxis of bronchial asthma without any significant adverse effects and also the fact that drugs like SCG show significant anti-inflammatory activities, it would be logical to use mast cell stabilizers as host modulating drugs for the treatment and prevention of peri-odontal disease. Evaluation of the hypothesis: Safety and efficacy of both SCG and NS are well documented. So, it will be systemically safe to use in humans. However, oral administration SCG or delivery of the drug by means local irrigation will not be very useful because SCG may not be secreted in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF(as in the case of oral administraion or the drug may get washed out from periodontal pocket due to the constant flow of GCF(as in the case of irrigation. A local or targeted drug delivery of mast cell stabilizers can be used in patients with periodontal disease. Role of mast cells in periodontal disease has been dealt in-depth in many studies and articles. However, limited amount of research has been done on using mast cell stabilizers in the prevention and control of periodontal diseases. More studies are needed to study the efficacy and effective-ness of mast cell stabilizers as an adjunct to phase I therapy in the control of periodontal disease.

  8. Bait stations, hard mast, and black bear population growth in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Joseph D.; van Manen, Frank T.; Pelton, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Bait-station surveys are used by wildlife managers as an index to American black bear (Ursus americanus) population abundance, but the relationship is not well established. Hard mast surveys are similarly used to assess annual black bear food availability which may affect mortality and natality rates. We used data collected in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) from 1989 to 2003 to determine whether changes in the bait-station index (ΔBSI) were associated with estimated rates of bear population growth (λ) and whether hard mast production was related to bear visitation to baits. We also evaluated whether hard mast production from previous years was related to λ. Estimates of λ were based on analysis of capture-recapture data with the Pradel temporal symmetry estimator. Using the Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), our analysis revealed no direct relationship between ΔBSI and λ. A simulation analysis indicated that our data were adequate to detect a relationship had one existed. Model fit was marginally improved when we added total oak mast production of the previous year as an interaction term suggesting that the BSI was confounded with environmental variables. Consequently the utility of the bait-station survey as a population monitoring technique is questionable at the spatial and temporal scales we studied. Mast survey data, however, were valuable covariates of λ. Population growth for a given year was negatively related to oak mast production 4 and 5 years prior. That finding supported our hypothesis that mast failures can trigger reproductive synchrony, which may not be evident from the trapped sample until years later.

  9. Nonclinical evaluation of the potential for mast cell activation by an erythropoietin analog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, James L., E-mail: James.Weaver@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Applied Regulatory Science, OCP/OTS/CDER/FDA, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Boyne, Michael, E-mail: mboyne@biotechlogic.com [Division of Pharmaceutical Analysis, OTR/OPQ/CDER/FDA, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Pang, Eric, E-mail: Eric.Pang@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Applied Regulatory Science, OCP/OTS/CDER/FDA, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Chimalakonda, Krishna, E-mail: Krishna.Chimalakonda@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Applied Regulatory Science, OCP/OTS/CDER/FDA, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Howard, Kristina E., E-mail: Kristina.Howard@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Applied Regulatory Science, OCP/OTS/CDER/FDA, Silver Spring, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The erythropoietin analog peginesatide was withdrawn from marketing due to unexpected severe anaphylactic reactions associated with administration of the multi-use formulation. The adverse events occurred rapidly following the first ever administration of the drug with most affected patients becoming symptomatic in less than 30 min. This is most consistent with an anaphylactoid reaction due to direct activation of mast cells. Laboratory evaluation was undertaken using rat peritoneal mast cells as the model system. Initial studies showed that high concentrations of the formulated drug as well as formulated vehicle alone could cause mast cell degranulation as measured by histamine release. The purified active drug was not able to cause histamine release whereas the vehicle filtrate and lab created drug vehicle were equally potent at causing histamine release. Individual formulations of vehicle leaving one component out showed that histamine release was due to phenol. Dose response studies with phenol showed a very sharp dose response curve that was similar in three buffer systems. Cellular analysis by flow cytometry showed that the histamine release was not due to cell death, and that changes in light scatter parameters consistent with degranulation were rapidly observed. Limited testing with primary human mast cells showed a similar dose response of histamine release with exposure to phenol. To provide in vivo confirmation, rats were injected with vehicle formulated with various concentrations of phenol via a jugular vein cannula. Significant release of histamine was detected in blood samples taken 2 min after dosing at the highest concentrations tested. - Highlights: • Peginesatide caused severe anaphylactoid reactions in 0.2% of patients. • Both formulated drug and vehicle cause degranulation of rat mast cells. • Phenol was identified as the vehicle component causing degranulation. • Human mast cells show similar dose response to phenol as rat mast cells

  10. Roles of PU.1 in monocyte- and mast cell-specific gene regulation: PU.1 transactivates CIITA pIV in cooperation with IFN-gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tomonobu; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Nishiyama, Makoto; Usui, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Kanada, Shunsuke; Fukuyama, Kanako; Akiba, Hisaya; Tokura, Tomoko; Hara, Mutsuko; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko

    2009-07-01

    Over-expression of PU.1, a myeloid- and lymphoid-specific transcription factor belonging to the Ets family, induces monocyte-specific gene expression in mast cells. However, the effects of PU.1 on each target gene and the involvement of cytokine signaling in PU.1-mediated gene expression are largely unknown. In the present study, PU.1 was over-expressed in two different types of bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (BMMCs): BMMCs cultured with IL-3 plus stem cell factor (SCF) and BMMCs cultured with pokeweed mitogen-stimulated spleen-conditioned medium (PWM-SCM). PU.1 over-expression induced expression of MHC class II, CD11b, CD11c and F4/80 on PWM-SCM-cultured BMMCs, whereas IL-3/SCF-cultured BMMCs expressed CD11b and F4/80, but not MHC class II or CD11c. When IFN-gamma was added to the IL-3/SCF-based medium, PU.1 transfectant acquired MHC class II expression, which was abolished by antibody neutralization or in Ifngr(-/-) BMMCs, through the induction of expression of the MHC class II transactivator, CIITA. Real-time PCR detected CIITA mRNA driven by the fourth promoter, pIV, and chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated direct binding of PU.1 to pIV in PU.1-over-expressing BMMCs. PU.1-over-expressing cells showed a marked increase in IL-6 production in response to LPS stimulation in both IL-3/SCF and PWM-SCM cultures. These results suggest that PU.1 overproduction alone is sufficient for both expression of CD11b and F4/80 and for amplification of LPS-induced IL-6 production. However, IFN-gamma stimulation is essential for PU.1-mediated transactivation of CIITA pIV. Reduced expression of mast cell-related molecules and transcription factors GATA-1/2 and up-regulation of C/EBPalpha in PU.1 transfectants indicate that enforced PU.1 suppresses mast cell-specific gene expression through these transcription factors.

  11. Regulatory NK cells mediated between immunosuppressive monocytes and dysfunctional T cells in chronic HBV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haijun; Zhai, Naicui; Wang, Zhongfeng; Song, Hongxiao; Yang, Yang; Cui, An; Li, Tianyang; Wang, Guangyi; Niu, Junqi; Crispe, Ian Nicholas; Su, Lishan; Tu, Zhengkun

    2017-09-12

    HBV infection represents a major health problem worldwide, but the immunological mechanisms by which HBV causes chronic persistent infection remain only partly understood. Recently, cell subsets with suppressive features have been recognised among monocytes and natural killer (NK) cells. Here we examine the effects of HBV on monocytes and NK cells. Monocytes and NK cells derived from chronic HBV-infected patients and healthy controls were purified and characterised for phenotype, gene expression and cytokines secretion by flow cytometry, quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR, ELISA and western blotting. Culture and coculture of monocytes and NK cells were used to determine NK cell activation, using intracellular cytokines staining. In chronic HBV infection, monocytes express higher levels of PD-L1, HLA-E, interleukin (IL)-10 and TGF-β, and NK cells express higher levels of PD-1, CD94 and IL-10, compared with healthy individuals. HBV employs hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) to induce suppressive monocytes with HLA-E, PD-L1, IL-10 and TGF-β expression via the MyD88/NFκB signalling pathway. HBV-treated monocytes induce NK cells to produce IL-10, via PD-L1 and HLA-E signals. Such NK cells inhibit autologous T cell activation. Our findings reveal an immunosuppressive cascade, in which HBV generates suppressive monocytes, which initiate regulatory NK cells differentiation resulting in T cell inhibition. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Slp-76 is a critical determinant of NK-cell mediated recognition of missing-self targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Kristin; Endale, Mehari; Cashman, Siobhan; Fang, Hao; Mattner, Jochen; Hildeman, David; Hoebe, Kasper

    2015-07-01

    Absence of MHC class I expression is an important mechanism by which NK cells recognize a variety of target cells, yet the pathways underlying "missing-self" recognition, including the involvement of activating receptors, remain poorly understood. Using ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis in mice, we identified a germline mutant, designated Ace, with a marked defect in NK cell mediated recognition and elimination of "missing-self" targets. The causative mutation was linked to chromosome 11 and identified as a missense mutation (Thr428Ile) in the SH2 domain of Slp-76-a critical adapter molecule downstream of ITAM-containing surface receptors. The Slp-76 Ace mutation behaved as a hypomorphic allele-while no major defects were observed in conventional T-cell development/function, a marked defect in NK cell mediated elimination of β2-microglobulin (β2M) deficient target cells was observed. Further studies revealed Slp-76 to control NK-cell receptor expression and maturation; however, activation of Slp-76(ace/ace) NK cells through ITAM-containing NK-cell receptors or allogeneic/tumor target cells appeared largely unaffected. Imagestream analysis of the NK-β2M(-/-) target cell synapse revealed a specific defect in actin recruitment to the conjugate synapse in Slp-76(ace/ace) NK cells. Overall these studies establish Slp-76 as a critical determinant of NK-cell development and NK cell mediated elimination of missing-self target cells in mice. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in DNA immunized mink challenged with wild-type canine distemper virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line; Søgaard, Mette; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the different phases of the immune response after DNA immunization with the hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein genes from canine distemper virus (CDV). Although attenuated live CDV vaccines have effectively reduced the incidence of disease, canine distemper...... is still a problem worldwide. The broad host range of CDV creates a constant viral reservoir among wildlife animals. Our results demonstrated early humoral and cell-mediated immune responses (IFN-gamma) in DNA vaccinated mink compared to mock-vaccinated mink after challenge with a Danish wild-type CDV....... The DNA vaccine-induced immunity protected the natural host against disease development....

  14. CHARACTERISATION OF CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNE RESPONSE IN PIGS IN A CLINICAL CHALLENGE EXPERIMENT OF A VACCINE AGAINST MYCOPLASMA HYOSYNOVIAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Josephine Skovgaard; Riber, Ulla; Lauritsen, Klara Tølbøll

    be due to increased systemic infection in the placebo group. Cell-mediated immune response was further characterised by four colour flow cytometry analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) before Mhs challenge (day -1) and at days 6 and 9 after challenge. IFN-γ producing cells were found...... to be CD4 and especially CD4CD8 double positive T-cells simultaneously expressing CD25. Interestingly, the proportion of CD4CD8 double positive T-cells within the total population of CD4 positive cells increased in the vaccine group after challenge, indicating that generation of specific T-cell memory had...

  15. THE STATE OF CELL MEDIATED IMMUNITY AMONG HEPATITIS B SURFACE ,ANTGENI CARRIERS IN IRAN,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. MASSOUD

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated immune (CMI s t a t us and sub- popul at i ons o f pe r ipheral b l ood lymphocytes were investigated in one hundre d volunt a ry blood donors who were car r ier s of Ag • HE S A signi f i c ant decr e ase of t otal T-cells observed in HB Ag carri e rs as compared t o normal controls. The percenS t age o f active T-cells a nd B-lymphocytes did not d i f f e r signi f icant ly between the t wo groups ."nAddi t ion of aut ologous serum from HE Ag c a r r iers t o s t heir l ymphocyt e s reduced the numbe r of detectabl e cells in HE Ag carriers . This reduction coul d be due to the s presence of a r osette i nhi bitory f actor in their serum. Our studies demonstrated a failur e o f CMI among HB Ags car r i ers detected by the l e ukocyte migr ation i nhibition (LMI test. This failure cannot be attributed to the presence of HE Ag-AB complexes in their serum. It is s possible that specific failure of CMI allows the hepatitis B virus to remain harmless in carriers a Hepatitis B surface-antigen (HE Ag; Hepatitis Bs coreantigen (HE Ag and Hepatitis Be-antigen (HE Ag, c e have been established as indicating ineffectivity in viral hepatitis B ({I, 6 , 20, 28."nA number of infected individuals also developed clini cal evidence of disease and HE Ag may s the serum of some subjects for a long rema•ln present I•n time (18. It has been suggested that to a defect in CMI, the persistence of HB Ag s whether liver disease is is related present or not, and impairment of the lymphocyte response to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA in this group is presented in evide•"nnee (8, •9 , 13, 24, 25 .In contrast, other workers report a normal respons e t o PHA in healthy carriers of HE Ag and s they concludE that the defective T-cell response is relat ed to the live!' disease rather than the immune system (31. Dudley et al (8 have suggested that liver damage occurring after hepatitis B infection, may be an effect of thymus-dependent lymphocytes (12."n

  16. Differential effects of IL-2 and IL-21 on expansion of the CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ T regulatory cells with redundant roles in natural killer cell mediated antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Aruna; Ramanunni, Asha; Cheney, Carolyn; Rozewski, Darlene; Kindsvogel, Wayne; Lehman, Amy; Jarjoura, David; Caligiuri, Michael; Byrd, John C; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2010-01-01

    CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells are expanded in solid and hematological malignancies including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Several cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules are required for generation, survival and maintenance of their suppressive effect. We and others have shown direct cytotoxic effect of the novel common gamma chain cytokine interleukin (IL)-21 on primary B cells from CLL patients. Since members of this family of cytokines are known to exhibit their effects on diverse immune cells, we have examined the effects of IL-21 on CLL patient derived regulatory T cell (Treg) induction, expansion and the inhibitory effect on natural killer cells in vitro. We demonstrate here the expression of IL-21 receptor in CD4(+)CD25(High) regulatory cells from CLL patients. In contrast to IL-2, the IL-21 cytokine failed to mediate expansion of regulatory T cells or induced expression of Foxp3 in CD4(+)CD25(Intermediate) or CD4(+)CD25(Dim/-) T cells in whole blood derived from CLL patients. Interestingly, in contrast to their differential effects on expansion of the CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)T cells, IL-2 and IL-21 exhibited a redundant role in Treg mediated suppression of NK cell mediated antibody dependent cytotoxicity function. Given the infusion related toxicities and pro-survival effect of IL-2 in CLL, these studies provide a rationale to explore IL-21 as an alternate gamma chain cytokine in CLL therapy.

  17. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells mediate tolerance induction in autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Anja; Verhagen, Johan; Wraith, David C

    2017-05-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) T cells aberrantly recognize self-peptides of the myelin sheath and attack the central nervous system (CNS). Antigen-specific peptide immunotherapy, which aims to restore tolerance while avoiding the use of non-specific immunosuppressive drugs, is a promising approach to combat autoimmune disease, but the cellular mechanisms behind successful therapy remain poorly understood. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been studied intensively in the field of cancer and to a lesser extent in autoimmunity. Because of their suppressive effect on the immune system in cancer, we hypothesized that the development of MDSCs and their interaction with CD4 + T cells could be beneficial for antigen-specific immunotherapy. Hence, changes in the quantity, phenotype and function of MDSCs during tolerance induction in our model of MS were evaluated. We reveal, for the first time, an involvement of a subset of MDSCs, known as polymorphonuclear (PMN)-MDSCs, in the process of tolerance induction. PMN-MDSCs were shown to adopt a more suppressive phenotype during peptide immunotherapy and inhibit CD4 + T-cell proliferation in a cell-contact-dependent manner, mediated by arginase-1. Moreover, increased numbers of tolerogenic PMN-MDSCs, such as observed over the course of peptide immunotherapy, were demonstrated to provide protection from disease in a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Enhancement of T-cell-mediated antitumor response: angiostatic adjuvant to immunotherapy against cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dings, Ruud P M; Vang, Kieng B; Castermans, Karolien; Popescu, Flavia; Zhang, Yan; Oude Egbrink, Mirjam G A; Mescher, Matthew F; Farrar, Michael A; Griffioen, Arjan W; Mayo, Kevin H

    2011-05-15

    Tumor-released proangiogenic factors suppress endothelial adhesion molecule (EAM) expression and prevent leukocyte extravasation into the tumor. This is one reason why immunotherapy has met with limited success in the clinic. We hypothesized that overcoming EAM suppression with angiogenesis inhibitors would increase leukocyte extravasation and subsequently enhance the effectiveness of cellular immunotherapy. Intravital microscopy, multiple color flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and various tumor mouse (normal and T-cell deficient) models were used to investigate the temporal dynamics of cellular and molecular events that occur in the tumor microenvironment during tumor progression and angiostatic intervention. We report that while EAM levels and T-cell infiltration are highly attenuated early on in tumor growth, angiostatic therapy modulates these effects. In tumor models with normal and T-cell-deficient mice, we show the active involvement of the adaptive immune system in cancer and differentiate antiangiogenic effects from antiangiogenic mediated enhancement of immunoextravasation. Our results indicate that a compromised immune response in tumors can be obviated by the use of antiangiogenic agents. Finally, with adoptive transfer studies in mice, we show that a phased combination of angiostatic therapy and T-cell transfer significantly (P response within the tumor microenvironment, in particular as a consequence of the temporal dynamics of EAM levels. Moreover, our results suggest that adjuvant therapy with angiogenesis inhibitors holds promise for cellular immunotherapy in the clinic. ©2011 AACR.

  19. Poxvirus-encoded serpins do not prevent cytolytic T cell-mediated recovery from primary infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllbacher, A; Wallich, R; Moyer, R W; Simon, M M

    1999-06-15

    Previous observations that the highly conserved poxvirus-encoded serpins inhibit cytotoxic activities of alloreactive CTL via granule and/or Fas-mediated pathways was taken to indicate their involvement in immune evasion by poxviruses. We now show that interference with 51Cr release from target cells by ectromelia and cowpoxvirus is limited to alloreactive but not MHC-restricted CTL. The data are in support of the paramount importance of CTL and its effector molecule perforin in the recovery from primary ectromelia virus infection and question the role of serpins in the evasion of poxviruses from killing by CTL. Further analysis of poxvirus interference with target cell lysis by alloreactive CTL revealed that suppression primarily affects the Fas-mediated, and to a lesser extent, the granule exocytosis pathway. Serpin-2 is the main contributor to suppression for both killing pathways. In addition, inhibition of lysis was shown to be both target cell type- and MHC allotype-dependent. We hypothesize that differences in TCR affinities and/or state of activation between alloreactive and MHC-restricted CTL as well as the quality (origin) of target cells are responsible for the observed phenomenon.

  20. Marijuana-derived Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol suppresses Th1/Th17 cell-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity through microRNA regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sido, Jessica M; Jackson, Austin R; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2016-09-01

    ∆(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is one of the major bioactive cannabinoids derived from the Cannabis sativa plant and is known for its anti-inflammatory properties. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) is driven by proinflammatory T helper cells including the classic inflammatory Th1 lineage as well as the more recently discovered Th17 lineage. In the current study, we investigated whether THC can alter the induction of Th1/Th17 cells involved in mBSA-induced DTH response. THC treatment (20 mg/kg) of C57BL/6 mice with DTH caused decreased swelling and infiltration of immune cells at the site of antigen rechallenge. Additionally, THC treatment decreased lymphocyte activation as well as Th1/Th17 lineage commitment, including reduced lineage-specific transcription factors and cytokines. Interestingly, while DTH caused an overexpression of miR-21, which increases Th17 differentiation via SMAD7 inhibition, and downregulation of miR-29b, an IFN-γ inhibitor, THC treatment reversed this microRNA (miR) dysregulation. Furthermore, when we transfected primary cells from DTH mice with miR-21 inhibitor or miR-29b mimic, as seen with THC treatment, the expression of target gene message was directly impacted increasing SMAD7 and decreasing IFN-γ expression, respectively. In summary, the current study suggests that THC treatment during DTH response can simultaneously inhibit Th1/Th17 activation via regulation of microRNA (miRNA) expression. • THC treatment inhibits simultaneous Th1/Th17 driven inflammation. • THC treatment corrects DTH-mediated microRNA dysregulation. • THC treatment regulates proinflammatory cytokines and transcription factors.

  1. Immunity to Schistosoma mansoni in congenitally athymic, irradiated and mast cell-depleted rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, M.J.; Bickle, Q.D.; Taylor, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Immunity to Schistosoma mansoni was investigated in congenitally athymic (Nu/Nu) rats, irradiated rats and in mast cell-depleted rats. Nu/Nu rats failed to develop significant resistance following vaccination with irradiated cercariae, although Nu/Nu recipients of serum from vaccinated Fischer rats (VRS) manifested resistance comparable to heterozygous controls, suggesting that T-cells were required in the induction of resistance but were not involved in the efferent arm of antibody-dependent elimination. Radiosensitive cells (including eosinophils, basophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes and mast cells) were apparently not essential for the antibody-dependent elimination of lung or post-lung stages since irradiated (700-750 rad.) recipients of VRS manifested comparable degrees of resistance to unirradiated controls in spite of a greater than 85% reduction in total blood leucocyte counts after irradiation. Depletion of 99% of tissue mast cells by treatment of rats with Compound 48/80 had no significant effect on the attrition of a challenge infection in rats rendered immune by vaccination with irradiated cercariae or by transfer of VRS. However, there was a significant increase in worm recovery in unimmunized and mast cell-depleted or irradiated rats, indicating that mast cells and perhaps other radio-isotope sensitive cells may be involved in innate resistance. (author)

  2. Human mast cell activation through Fc receptors and Toll-like receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimichi Okayama

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells express high-affinity IgE receptors (FcεRI on their surface and can be activated to secrete a variety of biologically active mediators by cross-linking of receptor-bound IgE. Recent studies in animal models indicate that mouse mast cells may play a protective role in host defense against bacteria through the production of tumor necrosis factor-α, mainly as a result of Toll-like receptor (TLR 4- or CD48-mediated activation. Moreover, several recent observations in animal models have indicated that mast cells may also play a pivotal role in coordinating the early phases of autoimmune diseases, particularly those involving auto-antibodies. We recently identified functional TLR4 and FcγRI on human mast cells, in which their expression had been upregulated by interferon-γ. We compared each of the receptor-mediated gene expression profiles with the FcεRI-mediated gene expression profile using high-density oligonucleotide probe arrays and discovered that human mast cells may modulate the immune system in a receptor-specific manner.

  3. Effect of Omegaven on mast cell concentration in diabetic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Saeid; Ansarihadipour, Hadi; Nakhaei, Mahmoodreza; Darabi, Mohammadreza; Bayat, Parvindokht; Sakhaei, Mohammadhassan; Baazm, Maryam; Mohammadhoseiny, Atefe

    2017-05-01

    Diabetic wound healing is a complicated process. In all over the world 15% of 200 million diabetic people suffer from diabetic foot problems. Mast cells are known to participate in three phases of wound healing: the inflammatory reaction, angiogenesis and extracellular-matrix reabsorption. The inflammatory reaction is mediated by released histamine and arachidonic acid metabolites. Omega-3 fatty acids alter proinflammatory cytokine production during wound healing which affects the presence of inflammatory cells in wound area as well, but how this events specifically influences the presence of mast cells in wound healing is not clearly understood. This study is conducted to determine the effect of Omegaven, eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) on pattern of presence of mast cells in diabetic wound area. Diabetic male wistar rats were euthanized at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 15 days after the excision was made. To estimate the number of mast cells histological sections were provided from wound area and stained with toluidine blue. In this relation wound area (8400 microscopic field, 45.69 mm 2 ) were examined by stereological methods by light microscope. We found that comparing experimental and control group, omega-3 fatty acids significantly decreased wound area in day 7 and also the number of grade three mast cells in day 3 and 5. We also found that wound strength has significantly increased in experimental group at day 15. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Critical Role for Mast Cell Stat5 Activity in Skin Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoaki Ando

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Here, we show that phospholipase C-β3 (PLC-β3-deficient mice spontaneously develop AD-like skin lesions and more severe allergen-induced dermatitis than wild-type mice. Mast cells were required for both AD models and remarkably increased in the skin of Plcb3−/− mice because of the increased Stat5 and reduced SHP-1 activities. Mast cell-specific deletion of Stat5 gene ameliorated allergen-induced dermatitis, whereas that of Shp1 gene encoding Stat5-inactivating SHP-1 exacerbated it. PLC-β3 regulates the expression of periostin in fibroblasts and TSLP in keratinocytes, two proteins critically involved in AD pathogenesis. Furthermore, polymorphisms in PLCB3, SHP1, STAT5A, and STAT5B genes were associated with human AD. Mast cell expression of PLC-β3 was inversely correlated with that of phospho-STAT5, and increased mast cells with high levels of phospho-STAT5 were found in lesional skin of some AD patients. Therefore, STAT5 regulatory mechanisms in mast cells are important for AD pathogenesis.

  5. Polyamines are present in mast cell secretory granules and are important for granule homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Faroldi, Gianni; Rodríguez, Carlos E; Urdiales, José L; Pérez-Pomares, José M; Dávila, José C; Pejler, Gunnar; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Fajardo, Ignacio

    2010-11-30

    Mast cell secretory granules accommodate a large number of components, many of which interact with highly sulfated serglycin proteoglycan (PG) present within the granules. Polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) are absolutely required for the survival of the vast majority of living cells. Given the reported ability of polyamines to interact with PGs, we investigated the possibility that polyamines may be components of mast cell secretory granules. Spermidine was released by mouse bone marrow derived mast cells (BMMCs) after degranulation induced by IgE/anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187. Additionally, both spermidine and spermine were detected in isolated mouse mast cell granules. Further, depletion of polyamines by culturing BMMCs with α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) caused aberrant secretory granule ultrastructure, impaired histamine storage, reduced serotonin levels and increased β-hexosaminidase content. A proteomic approach revealed that DFMO-induced polyamine depletion caused an alteration in the levels of a number of proteins, many of which are connected either with the regulated exocytosis or with the endocytic system. Taken together, our results show evidence that polyamines are present in mast cell secretory granules and, furthermore, indicate an essential role of these polycations during the biogenesis and homeostasis of these organelles.

  6. Polyamines are present in mast cell secretory granules and are important for granule homeostasis.

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    Gianni García-Faroldi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Mast cell secretory granules accommodate a large number of components, many of which interact with highly sulfated serglycin proteoglycan (PG present within the granules. Polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine are absolutely required for the survival of the vast majority of living cells. Given the reported ability of polyamines to interact with PGs, we investigated the possibility that polyamines may be components of mast cell secretory granules.Spermidine was released by mouse bone marrow derived mast cells (BMMCs after degranulation induced by IgE/anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187. Additionally, both spermidine and spermine were detected in isolated mouse mast cell granules. Further, depletion of polyamines by culturing BMMCs with α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO caused aberrant secretory granule ultrastructure, impaired histamine storage, reduced serotonin levels and increased β-hexosaminidase content. A proteomic approach revealed that DFMO-induced polyamine depletion caused an alteration in the levels of a number of proteins, many of which are connected either with the regulated exocytosis or with the endocytic system.Taken together, our results show evidence that polyamines are present in mast cell secretory granules and, furthermore, indicate an essential role of these polycations during the biogenesis and homeostasis of these organelles.

  7. CD117 immunoexpression in canine mast cell tumours: correlations with pathological variables and proliferation markers

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    Pires Maria A

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cutaneous mast cell tumours are one of the most common neoplasms in dogs and show a highly variable biologic behaviour. Several prognosis tools have been proposed for canine mast cell tumours, including histological grading and cell proliferation markers. CD117 is a receptor tyrosine kinase thought to play a key role in human and canine mast cell neoplasms. Normal (membrane-associated and aberrant (cytoplasmic, focal or diffuse CD117 immunoexpression patterns have been identified in canine mast cell tumours. Cytoplasmic CD117 expression has been found to correlate with higher histological grade and with a worsened post-surgical prognosis. This study addresses the role of CD117 in canine mast cell tumours by studying the correlations between CD117 immunoexpression patterns, two proliferation markers (Ki67 and AgNORs histological grade, and several other pathological variables. Results Highly significant (p Conclusion These findings highlight the key role of CD117 in the biopathology of canine MCTs and confirm the relationship between aberrant CD117 expression and increased cell proliferation and higher histological grade. Further studies are needed to unravel the cellular mechanisms underlying focal and diffuse cytoplasmic CD117 staining patterns, and their respective biopathologic relevance.

  8. Chronic Pain Treatment: The Influence of Tricyclic Antidepressants on Serotonin Release and Uptake in Mast Cells

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    Ilonka Ferjan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of serotonin (5-HT in chronic pain mechanisms is established. 5-HT inhibits central painful stimuli, but recent data suggests that 5-HT could also enhance pain stimulus from the periphery, where mast cells play an important role. We aimed in our study to clarify the influence of selected tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs on mast cell function: secretion, uptake, and reuptake of 5-HT, that could interfere with 5-HT levels and in this way contribute to the generation of pain. As an experimental model, we used isolated rat peritoneal mast cells and incubated them with selected TCAs (clomipramine, amitriptyline, doxepin, and imipramine under different experimental conditions. 5-HT release, uptake, and reuptake were determined spectrofluorometrically. We showed that TCAs were able to inhibit 5-HT secretion from mast cells, as well as uptake of exogenous 5-HT and reuptake of secreted 5-HT back into mast cells. The effects of TCAs were concentration dependent; higher concentrations of TCAs inhibited the secretion of 5-HT induced by compound 48/80, whereas lower concentrations of TCAs inhibited 5-HT uptake. The most effective TCA was halogenated clomipramine. As TCAs are well introduced in chronic pain treatment, the insight into mechanisms of action is important for an understanding of their effect in various pain conditions.

  9. Effect of fruits of Opuntia elatior Mill on mast cell degranulation

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    Chauhan, Sanjay P.; Sheth, N. R.; Suhagia, B. N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The presence of potentially active nutrients and their multifunctional properties make prickly pear a perfect candidate for the production of phytopharmaceutical products. Among the numerous Opuntia species, bioactive compounds have been isolated and characterized primarily from Opuntia ficus-indica, Opuntia polycantha, Opuntia stricta, Opuntia dilleni for various medicinal properties. Objective: Based on the traditional use of prickly pear for enhancement of immune function, the objective of the present study to evaluate the effect of prickly pear on mast cell degranulation function. Materials and Methods: The Opuntia fruit juice (OFJ) (10-200 μl/ml) were studied for the effect on sensitized rat peritoneal mast cell degranulation induced by immunological (egg albumin), and nonimmunological (compound 48/80) stimuli and compared with that of the reference standard, sodium cromoglycate and ketotifen (10 μg/ml). Results and Conclusion: The OFJ exhibited significantly (P < 0.001) concentration dependent inhibition of mast cell degranulation. The IC50 value of OFJ was found 12.24 and 18 μl/ml for immunological and nonimmunological induced mast cell degranulation, respectively. The betacyanin is an active principle compound in prickly pear that may responsible for mast cell stabilizing action. PMID:25883521

  10. Effect of LED phototherapy (λ630 +/- 20nm) on mast cells during wound healing in hypothyroid

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    Paraguassú, Gardênia M.; De Castro, Isabele Cardoso V.; Vasconcelos, Rebeca M.; da Guarda, Milena G.; Rodriguez, Tânia T.; Ramalho, Maria José P.; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz B.; Ramalho, Luciana Maria P.

    2014-02-01

    Hypothyroidism has been associated with the disruption of the body's metabolism, including the healing process. LED phototherapy has been studied using several healing models, but their effects on mast cells proliferation associated to hypothyroidism remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effect LED (λ630+/-20nm) phototherapy on mast cells proliferation during tissue repair in hypothyroid rats. Under general anesthesia, a standard surgical wound (1cm2) was created on the dorsum of 24 male Wistar rats divided into 4 groups of 6 animals each: EC-Control Euthyroid; ED-Euthyroid+LED; HC-Control Hypothyroid and HD-Hypothyroid+LED. The irradiation started immediately after surgery and was repeated every other day for 7 days, when animals death occurred. Hypothyroidism was induced in rats with propylthiouracil (0.05g/100mL) administered orally for 4 weeks and maintained until the end of the experiment. The specimens removed were processed to wax and stained with toluidine blue for mast cell identification. The mast cell proliferation was significantly higher in HC group than in EC group (Mann Whitney, pLED light has a biomodulative effect on mast cell population, even when hipothyroidism was present.

  11. Mast cell adenosine receptors function: a focus on the A3 adenosine receptor and inflammation

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    Noam eRudich

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine is a metabolite, which has long been implicated in a variety of inflammatory processes. Inhaled adenosine provokes bronchoconstriction in asthmatics or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients, but not in non-asthmatics. This hyper responsiveness to adenosine appears to be mediated by mast cell activation. These observations have marked the receptor that mediates the bronchoconstrictor effect of adenosine on mast cells, as an attractive drug candidate. Four subtypes (A1, A2a, A2b and A3 of adenosine receptors have been cloned and shown to display distinct tissue distributions and functions. Animal models have firmly established the ultimate role of the A3 adenosine receptor (A3R in mediating hyper responsiveness to adenosine in mast cells, although the influence of the A2b adenosine receptor was confirmed as well. In contrast, studies of the A3R in humans have been controversial. In this review, we summarize data on the role of different adenosine receptors in mast cell regulation of inflammation and pathology, with a focus on the common and distinct functions of the A3R in rodent and human mast cells. The relevance of mouse studies to the human is discussed.

  12. Mast cells and eosinophils in rat mammary gland tumours induced by N-Nitroso-N-methylurea

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    Kissová Viktória

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the distribution and number of mast cells and eosinophils in rat mammary gland tumours induced by N-Nitroso-N-methylurea. The highest density of mast cells was found in cystic papillary adenocarcinomas of grade II. Eosinophils were detected only in the cystic papillary adenocarcinoma of grades I and II, in non-invasive cribriform adenocarcinoma and comedo-type carcinoma. Mast cell populations were observed perivascularly in the tumour stroma, in the host tumour interface, as well as in necrotic areas of neoplasms. Mast cells were observed to be intact according to their morphological changes, collectively referred to as degranulation. The obtained results indicate that mast cells and eosinophils play an important role in tumour micro-environment formation. The increased density of these cells in experimentally-induced rat mammary gland tumours suggests a poor prognosis in these cancers. Our results also confirmed that rat mammary gland tumours are good models for the study of breast cancers.

  13. Tyrosine hydroxylase positive nerves and mast cells in the porcine gallbladder

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    I. Stefanov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to detect the localisation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH positive nerve fibres (THN and distribution of tyrosine hydroxylase positive mast cells (THMC in the wall of porcine gallbladder. THN were observed as single fibres, nerve fibres forming perivascular plexuses and nerve fibres grouped within the nerve fascicles. In the gallbladder`s fundus, body and neck, the TH+ fibres formed mucosal, muscular and serosal nonganglionated nerve plexuses. Toluidine blue (TB staining was used to confirm that the TH positive cells were mast cells. The number of THMC in the propria of gallbladder`s fundus, body and neck was significantly higher than in the muscular and serosal layers in both genders. The number of mast cells in the musculature was higher than in the serosa. The density and location of the THMC were similar to the TB positive (with gamma meta-chromasia mast cells in both males and females, and statistically significant difference was not established. In conclusion, original data concerning the existence and localisation of catecholaminergic nerves and THMC distribution in the porcine gallbladder’s wall are presented. The results could con-tribute to the body of knowledge of functional communication between autonomic nerves and mast cells in the gallbladder.

  14. Novel anti-ulcer alpha,beta-unsaturated lactones inhibit compound 48/80-induced mast cell degranulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penissi, Alicia B; Vera, Mariano E; Mariani, María L; Rudolph, María I; Ceñal, Juan P; de Rosas, Juan C; Fogal, Teresa H; Tonn, Carlos E; Favier, Laura S; Giordano, Oscar S; Piezzi, Ramón S

    2009-06-10

    The present study was designed to examine the effects of a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Artemisia douglasiana Besser (dehydroleucodine), a xanthanolide sesquiterpene isolated from Xanthium cavanillesii Schouw (xanthatin) and a semisynthetic butenolide (3-benzyloxymethyl-5H-furan-2-one) on mast cell degranulation induced by compound 48/80. Peritoneal mast cells from male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were purified in Percoll, preincubated in the presence of test lactones (dehydroleucodine, xanthatin or 3-benzyloxymethyl-5H-furan-2-one) and then challenged with the mast cell activator compound 48/80 (10 microg/ml). Concentration-response and kinetic studies of mast cell serotonin release evoked by compound 48/80, evaluation of mast cell viability and morphology by light and electron microscopy, and comparative studies using ketotifen and sodium chromoglycate were carried out. Serotonin release studies, carried out together with morphological studies, showed the effectiveness of the above lactones to stabilize mast cells. The comparative study with ketotifen and sodium chromoglycate, well known mast cell stabilizers, showed the following order of potency dehydroleucodine=xanthatin>3-benzyloxymethyl-5H-furan-2-one> or =ketotifen/sodium chromoglycate to inhibit mast cell serotonin release induced by compound 48/80. The present study provides the first strong evidence in favour of the hypothesis that dehydroleucodine, xanthatin and 3-benzyloxymethyl-5H-furan-2-one inhibit compound 48/80-induced serotonin release from peritoneal mast cells, acting thus as mast cell stabilizers. Our findings may provide an insight into the design of novel pharmacological agents which may be used to regulate the mast cell response.

  15. Mast cells express CYP27A1 and CYP27B1 in epithelial skin cancers and psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukinen, Antti; Pelkonen, Jukka; Harvima, Ilkka T

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation and the vitamin D system are involved in immunosuppression in the skin. Previous in vitro and animal studies suggest a role for mast cells in these mechanisms. To study vitamin D3 metabolizing enzymes, CYP27A1 and CYP27B1, in mast cells in epithelial skin cancers and psoriasis. Biopsies were collected from the non-lesional and lesional skin of patients with actinic keratosis (AK), Bowen's disease/squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and psoriasis. CYP27A1 and CYP27B1 in mast cells were analysed using a sequential double-staining method. The percentage of mast cells containing CYP27A1 was significantly higher in lesional than non-lesional skin in all diseases, especially in SCC and BCC. In addition, the percentage of mast cells containing CYP27B1 was significantly increased in BCC, AK, and psoriatic lesions as well. Interestingly, only about 5-6% and 2% of the mast cells expressed CYP27A1 and CYP27B1, respectively, in the non-lesional skin of psoriatic and AK patients. In contrast, 23-38% and 6-9% of the mast cells were immunopositive for CYP27A1 and CYP27B1, respectively, in the non-lesional skin of BCC and SCC patients. In human LAD2 mast cell cultures, about 30% and 15% of the mast cells showed CYP27A1 and CYP27B1, respectively, though the immunostainings of these enzymes were not markedly affected by UVB irradiation. Increased proportions of mast cells express vitamin D3 metabolizing enzymes in the lesional skin. Therefore, mast cells may promote an immunosuppressive environment, e.g., in skin carcinoma.

  16. Antiallergic effect of fisetin on IgE-mediated mast cell activation in vitro and on passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Woo-Ri; Park, Hye-Jin

    2017-10-01

    Fisetin (3,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), a naturally occurring bioactive flavonoid, has been shown to inhibit inflammation. However, little is known about the effect of fisetin on immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergic responses. In this study, the effect of fisetin on rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cell-mediated allergic reactions was investigated. Fisetin inhibited β-hexosaminidase release and decreased the level of interleukin-4 and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA in IgE/antigen (IgE/Ag)-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells. To elucidate the antiallergic mechanism, we examined the levels of signaling molecules responsible for degranulation and release of inflammatory cytokines. Fisetin decreased the levels of activated spleen tyrosine kinase, Gab2 proteins, linker of activated T cells, extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 in the IgE/Ag-stimulated RBL2H3 cells, and NFκB and STAT3 proteins activated in the ear tissue of mice with passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA). In addition, fisetin significantly lowered of FcɛRI α-subunit mRNA expression. Consistent with the cellular data, fisetin markedly suppressed RBL-2H3 cell-dependent PCA in IgE/Ag-sensitized mice. These results suggest that fisetin may have potential as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of allergic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Human Lactobacillus Strains from the Intestine can Suppress IgE-Mediated Degranulation of Rat Basophilic Leukaemia (RBL-2H3 Cells

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    Gaku Harata

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells play a critical role in immunoglobulin E (IgE-mediated allergic diseases, and the degranulation of mast cells is important in the pathogenesis of these diseases. A disturbance of the intestinal microflora, especially of endogenous lactic acid bacteria, might be a contributing factor for IgE-mediated allergic diseases. Additional knowledge regarding the interaction of human intestinal Lactobacilli with mast cells is still necessary. Twenty-three strains of Lactobacilli, including commercial and reference strains and strains from the human intestine, were tested for their ability to regulate degranulation of cells from rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells (RBL-2H3 in vitro based on a β-hexosaminidase release assay. Each of the tested Lactobacilli characteristically suppressed IgE-mediated degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells, and Lactobacillus GG showed the strongest inhibitory effect on the cells. Furthermore, the bacteria isolated from the human intestine significantly suppressed degranulation of RBL-2H3 cellsin comparison with the reference strains. These results suggest that Lactobacilli, particularly those from the human intestine, can affect the activation of mast cells in a strain-dependent manner. Further study should be conducted to analyse the understanding mechanism.

  18. Ultra-estrutura dos mastócitos de diferentes tipos histológicos de mastocitoma em cães Mast cell ultrastructure in different types of canine mast cell tumor

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    F.A.R. Sueiro

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo estudar as diferenças ultraes