WorldWideScience

Sample records for suppresses jc virus

  1. Asymptomatic reactivation of JC virus in patients treated with natalizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiping; Bord, Evelyn; Tompkins, Troy; Miller, Janice; Tan, Chen S; Kinkel, R Philip; Stein, Marion C; Viscidi, Raphael P; Ngo, Long H; Koralnik, Igor J

    2009-09-10

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) occurs in a fraction of patients with multiple sclerosis who were treated with natalizumab. Most adults who are infected with the JC virus, the etiologic agent in PML, do not have symptoms. We sought to determine whether exposure to natalizumab causes subclinical reactivation and neurotropic transformation of JC virus. We followed 19 consecutive patients with multiple sclerosis who were treated with natalizumab over an 18-month period, performing quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction assays in blood and urine for JC virus reactivation; BK virus, a JC virus-related polyomavirus, was used as a control. We determined JC virus-specific T-cell responses by means of an enzyme-linked immunospot assay and antibody responses by means of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and analyzed JC virus regulatory-region sequences. After 12 months of natalizumab therapy, the prevalence of JC virus in the urine of the 19 patients increased from a baseline value of 19% to 63% (P=0.02). After 18 months of treatment, JC virus was detectable in 3 of 15 available plasma samples (20%) and in 9 of 15 available samples of peripheral-blood mononuclear cells (60%) (P=0.02). JC virus regulatory-region sequences in blood samples and in most of the urine samples were similar to those usually found in PML. Conversely, BK virus remained stable in urine and was undetectable in blood. The JC virus-specific cellular immune response dropped significantly between 6 and 12 months of treatment, and variations in the cellular immune response over time tended to be greater in patients in whom JC viremia developed. None of the patients had clinical or radiologic signs of PML. Subclinical reactivation of JC virus occurs frequently in natalizumab-treated patients with multiple sclerosis. Viral shedding is associated with a transient drop in the JC virus-specific cellular immune response. 2009 Massachusetts Medical Society

  2. JC virus detection and JC virus-specific immunity in natalizumab-treated Multiple Sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancuso Roberta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of natalizumab in multiple sclerosis (MS may favour JC virus reactivation; this phenomenon is usually asymptomatic but can, albeit rarely, evolve into frank progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML. Methods JCV-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes were evaluated by flow cytometry over a 24-month period in 24 natalizumab-treated MS patients in whom JCV DNA was or was not detected in blood using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction; all these cases were asymptomatic. Results Perforin- and grazymes-containing VP-1-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes were reduced whereas CD107a-expressing cells were increased in JCV positive patients, suggesting an active degranulation of these cells; naïve CD8+ T lymphocytes were also decreased whereas memory cells were increased in patients in whom JCV reactivation was observed. Conclusion The presence of a CD8+ T lymphocyte-mediated effector immune response offers a greater insight into reactivation of JCV and its clinical sequelae, and may help the monitoring of patients on natalizumab therapy.

  3. The human polyoma JC virus agnoprotein acts as a viroporin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadaki Suzuki

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Virus infections can result in a range of cellular injuries and commonly this involves both the plasma and intracellular membranes, resulting in enhanced permeability. Viroporins are a group of proteins that interact with plasma membranes modifying permeability and can promote the release of viral particles. While these proteins are not essential for virus replication, their activity certainly promotes virus growth. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML is a fatal demyelinating disease resulting from lytic infection of oligodendrocytes by the polyomavirus JC virus (JCV. The genome of JCV encodes six major proteins including a small auxiliary protein known as agnoprotein. Studies on other polyomavirus agnoproteins have suggested that the protein may contribute to viral propagation at various stages in the replication cycle, including transcription, translation, processing of late viral proteins, assembly of virions, and viral propagation. Previous studies from our and other laboratories have indicated that JCV agnoprotein plays an important, although as yet incompletely understood role in the propagation of JCV. Here, we demonstrate that agnoprotein possesses properties commonly associated with viroporins. Our findings demonstrate that: (i A deletion mutant of agnoprotein is defective in virion release and viral propagation; (ii Agnoprotein localizes to the ER early in infection, but is also found at the plasma membrane late in infection; (iii Agnoprotein is an integral membrane protein and forms homo-oligomers; (iv Agnoprotein enhances permeability of cells to the translation inhibitor hygromycin B; (v Agnoprotein induces the influx of extracellular Ca(2+; (vi The basic residues at amino acid positions 8 and 9 of agnoprotein key are determinants of the viroporin activity. The viroporin-like properties of agnoprotein result in increased membrane permeability and alterations in intracellular Ca(2+ homeostasis leading to membrane

  4. JC virus reactivation during prolonged natalizumab monotherapy for multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkias, Spyridon; Dang, Xin; Bord, Evelyn; Stein, Marion C; Kinkel, R Philip; Sloane, Jacob A; Donnelly, Maureen; Ionete, Carolina; Houtchens, Maria K; Buckle, Guy J; Batson, Stephanie; Koralnik, Igor J

    2014-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of JC virus (JCV) reactivation and JCV-specific cellular immune response during prolonged natalizumab treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). We enrolled 43 JCV-seropositive MS patients, including 32 on natalizumab monotherapy >18 months, 6 on interferon β-1a monotherapy >36 months, and 5 untreated controls. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), blood, and urine for JCV DNA, and we determined JCV-specific T-cell responses using enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assays, ex vivo and after in vitro stimulation with JCV peptides. JCV DNA was detected in the CSF of 2 of 27 (7.4%) natalizumab-treated MS patients who had no symptoms or magnetic resonance imaging-detected lesions consistent with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. JCV DNA was detected in blood of 12 of 43 (27.9%) and in urine of 11 of 43 (25.6%) subjects without a difference between natalizumab-treated patients and controls. JC viral load was higher in CD34(+) cells and in monocytes compared to other subpopulations. ICS was more sensitive than ELISpot. JCV-specific T-cell responses, mediated by both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes, were detected more frequently after in vitro stimulation. JCV-specific CD4(+) T cells were detected ex vivo more frequently in MS patients with JCV DNA in CD34(+) (p = 0.05) and B cells (p = 0.03). Asymptomatic JCV reactivation may occur in CSF of natalizumab-treated MS patients. JCV DNA load is higher in circulating CD34(+) cells and monocytes compared to other mononuclear cells, and JCV in blood might trigger a JCV-specific CD4(+) T-cell response. JCV-specific cellular immune response is highly prevalent in all JCV-seropositive MS patients, regardless of treatment. © 2014 American Neurological Association.

  5. A fulminant case of JC virus encephalopathy supporting a novel syndrome associated with JC virus infection of cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Ciocca

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The JC virus ( JCV is well known for causing progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML, a potentially fatal, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS. PML almost exclusively affects immunosuppressed patients, whereas it is rare in immunocompetent subjects. Recently, a new clinical entity, named JCV encephalopathy ( JCVE, has been observed. We present the case of a 62-year-old male, with no identifiable immunosuppression, who developed aphasia and progressive reduction in consciousness. He had a six months insidious history of psychiatric symptoms. He passed away 3 weeks after onset of symptoms. On admission, brain MRI demonstrated a prominent grey matter involvement. Serological tests and cerebrospinal fluid analysis were all negative for infectious diseases. A whole-body CT scan was negative for cancer. Several EEGs showed a diffuse anterior theta activity with bilateral parietal epileptic periodic discharges. A second MRI imaging showed a more prominent non-enhancing grey and white matter involvement, compatible with PML. Finally, CSF- PCR for JCV was performed and resulted positive. To the best of our knowledge, our report is the second case of JCVE described so far. Similarly to our patient, the previous case developed symptoms consistent with a CNS disease with progressive clinical course. MRI abnormalities were initially restricted to the hemispheric grey matter and only later extended to the subcortical regions. Our case suggests that JCV infection should be considered even in immunocompetent patients presenting with unexplained cortical lesions and rapidly progressive encephalopathy.

  6. Adaptive mutations in the JC virus protein capsid are associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamil R Sunyaev

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available PML is a progressive and mostly fatal demyelinating disease caused by JC virus infection and destruction of infected oligodendrocytes in multiple brain foci of susceptible individuals. While JC virus is highly prevalent in the human population, PML is a rare disease that exclusively afflicts only a small percentage of immunocompromised individuals including those affected by HIV (AIDS or immunosuppressive drugs. Viral- and/or host-specific factors, and not simply immune status, must be at play to account for the very large discrepancy between viral prevalence and low disease incidence. Here, we show that several amino acids on the surface of the JC virus capsid protein VP1 display accelerated evolution in viral sequences isolated from PML patients but not in sequences isolated from healthy subjects. We provide strong evidence that at least some of these mutations are involved in binding of sialic acid, a known receptor for the JC virus. Using statistical methods of molecular evolution, we performed a comprehensive analysis of JC virus VP1 sequences isolated from 55 PML patients and 253 sequences isolated from the urine of healthy individuals and found that a subset of amino acids found exclusively among PML VP1 sequences is acquired via adaptive evolution. By modeling of the 3-D structure of the JC virus capsid, we showed that these residues are located within the sialic acid binding site, a JC virus receptor for cell infection. Finally, we go on to demonstrate the involvement of some of these sites in receptor binding by demonstrating a profound reduction in hemagglutination properties of viral-like particles made of the VP1 protein carrying these mutations. Collectively, these results suggest that a more virulent PML causing phenotype of JC virus is acquired via adaptive evolution that changes viral specificity for its cellular receptor(s.

  7. Anti-JC virus antibody prevalence in a multinational multiple sclerosis cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Tomas; Achiron, Anat; Alfredsson, Lars

    2013-01-01

    JC virus (JCV) is an opportunistic virus known to cause progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Anti-JC virus (Anti-JCV) antibody prevalence in a large, geographically diverse, multi-national multiple sclerosis (MS) cohort was compared in a cross-sectional study. Overall, anti-JCV antibody...... prevalence was 57.6%. Anti-JCV antibody prevalence in MS patients ranged from approximately 47% to 68% across these countries: Norway, 47.4%; Denmark, 52.6%; Israel, 56.6%; France, 57.6%; Italy, 58.3%; Sweden, 59.0%; Germany, 59.1%; Austria, 66.7% and Turkey, 67.7%. Prevalence increased with age (from 49...

  8. Differential Distribution of the JC Virus Receptor-Type Sialic Acid in Normal Human Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Eash, Sylvia; Tavares, Rosemarie; Stopa, Edward G; Robbins, Scott H; Brossay, Laurent; Atwood, Walter J.

    2004-01-01

    JC virus (JCV), a member of the polyomavirus family, causes a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) in humans known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Although glial cells are the principal target of JCV productive infection in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy patients, little is known regarding the site of JCV persistence and the mechanisms by which the virus spreads to the CNS to cause disease. Previous work has demonstrated the presence of replicat...

  9. Increased p53 immunopositivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma and supratentorial PNET is not caused by JC virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Keerti V

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p53 mutations are relatively uncommon in medulloblastoma, but abnormalities in this cell cycle pathway have been associated with anaplasia and worse clinical outcomes. We correlated p53 protein expression with pathological subtype and clinical outcome in 75 embryonal brain tumors. The presence of JC virus, which results in p53 protein accumulation, was also examined. Methods p53 protein levels were evaluated semi-quantitatively in 64 medulloblastomas, 3 atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT, and 8 supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET using immunohistochemistry. JC viral sequences were analyzed in DNA extracted from 33 frozen medulloblastoma and PNET samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results p53 expression was detected in 18% of non-anaplastic medulloblastomas, 45% of anaplastic medulloblastomas, 67% of ATRT, and 88% of sPNET. The increased p53 immunoreactivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma, ATRT, and sPNET was statistically significant. Log rank analysis of clinical outcome revealed significantly shorter survival in patients with p53 immunopositive embryonal tumors. No JC virus was identified in the embryonal brain tumor samples, while an endogenous human retrovirus (ERV-3 was readily detected. Conclusion Immunoreactivity for p53 protein is more common in anaplastic medulloblastomas, ATRT and sPNET than in non-anaplastic tumors, and is associated with worse clinical outcomes. However, JC virus infection is not responsible for increased levels of p53 protein.

  10. Giant-cell glioblastoma of childhood associated with HIV-1 and JC virus coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassesco, María Sol; Darrigo, Luiz Guilherme; Valera, Elvis Terci; Oliveira, Ricardo Santos; Yamamoto, Yulie Aparecida; de Castro Barros, Marcus Vinícius; Tone, Luiz Gonzaga

    2013-08-01

    John Cunningham (JC) viral DNA sequence has seldom been reported in patients with brain tumors such as high grade gliomas and medulloblastomas, pointing to a role in the etiopathogenesis of such tumors. We present a unique clinical case of an HIV-positive pediatric patient with multifocal leukoencephalopathy and confirmed JC virus (JCV) infection that developed a giant-cell glioblastoma. Experimental data with infected primates has previously hypothesized an association of human giant-cell glioblastoma with JCV or progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, though such association has not been documented in the literature for humans. Future studies with larger cohorts and molecular pathological analyses are still needed to corroborate the role of the widely spread human neurotropic virus in early transformation and in the development of brain tumors with different histology in the setting of HIV-related severe immunosuppression.

  11. Replication of JC Virus DNA in the G144 Oligodendrocyte Cell Line Is Dependent Upon Akt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jesse N; Lin, Brian; Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J; Tsichlis, Philip; Schwob, James E; Bullock, Peter A

    2017-10-15

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is an often-fatal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. PML results when oligodendrocytes within immunocompromised individuals are infected with the human JC virus (JCV). We have identified an oligodendrocyte precursor cell line, termed G144, that supports robust levels of JCV DNA replication, a central part of the JCV life cycle. In addition, we have determined that JC virus readily infects G144 cells. Furthermore, we have determined that JCV DNA replication in G144 cells is stimulated by myristoylated (i.e., constitutively active) Akt and reduced by the Akt-specific inhibitor MK2206. Thus, this oligodendrocyte-based model system will be useful for a number of purposes, such as studies of JCV infection, establishing key pathways needed for the regulation of JCV DNA replication, and identifying inhibitors of this process.IMPORTANCE The disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by the infection of particular brain cells, termed oligodendrocytes, by the JC virus. Studies of PML, however, have been hampered by the lack of an immortalized human cell line derived from oligodendrocytes. Here, we report that the G144 oligodendrocyte cell line supports both infection by JC virus and robust levels of JCV DNA replication. Moreover, we have established that the Akt pathway regulates JCV DNA replication and that JCV DNA replication can be inhibited by MK2206, a compound that is specific for Akt. These and related findings suggest that we have established a powerful oligodendrocyte-based model system for studies of JCV-dependent PML. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Tracing Jomon and Yayoi ancestries in Japan using ALDH2 and JC virus genotype distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamori, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Noboru; Idota, Nozomi; Kakiuchi, Yasuhiro; McLean, Stuart; Kitamura, Tadaichi; Ikegaya, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    According to the dual structure model, the modern Japanese ethnic population consists of a mixture of the Jomon people, who have existed in Japan since at least the New Stone Age, and the Yayoi people, who migrated to western Japan from China around the year 300 bc Some reports show that the Yayoi are linked to a mutation of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene (ALDH2). Recent viral studies indicate two major groups found in the Japanese population: a group with the CY genotype JC virus (JCV) and a group with the MY genotype JCV. It is unclear whether either genotype of the JC virus is related to the Jomon or Yayoi. In this study, we attempted to detect JCV genotypes and ALDH2 mutations from the DNA of 247 Japanese urine samples to clarify the relationship between the dual structure model and the JCV genotype through ALDH2 mutation analysis and JCV genotyping. The ALDH2 polymorphism among 66 JC virus-positive samples was analyzed, and it was found that the ALDH2 variant is significantly higher in the population with CY genotype JCV (51.5 %) than in the population with the MY genotype (24.2 %) (p Yayoi, is related to CY genotype JCV. When the Yayoi migrated to the Japanese archipelago, they brought the ALDH2 mutation as well as the CY genotype JCV.

  13. JC virus/human immunodeficiency virus 1 co-infection in the Brazilian Amazonian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izaura Maria Vieira Cayres-Vallinoto

    Full Text Available Abstract JC virus (JCV is a member of the Polyomaviridae family and is associated to a severe disease known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, PML, which is gradually increasing in incidence as an opportunistic infection among AIDS patients. The present study aimed to investigate the occurrence of JCV among HIV-1 carriers including their types and molecular subtypes and the possible association with disease. Urine samples from 66 HIV-1 infected subjects were investigated for the presence of the virus by amplifying VP1 (215 bp and IG (610 bp regions using the polymerase chain reaction. JCV was detected in 32% of the samples. The results confirmed the occurrence of type B (subtype Af2; in addition, another polyomavirus, BKV, was also detected in 1.5% of samples of the HIV-1 infected subjects. Apparently, there was no significant difference between mono- (HIV-1 only and co-infected (HIV-1/JCV subjects regarding their TCD4+/TCD8+ lymphocyte counts or HIV-1 plasma viral load. Self admitted seizures, hearing and visual loses were not significantly different between the two groups.

  14. JC virus/human immunodeficiency virus 1 co-infection in the Brazilian Amazonian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izaura Maria Vieira Cayres-Vallinoto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available JC virus (JCV is a member of the Polyomaviridae family and is associated to a severe disease known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, PML, which is gradually increasing in incidence as an opportunistic infection among AIDS patients. The present study aimed to investigate the occurrence of JCV among HIV-1 carriers including their types and molecular subtypes and the possible association with disease. Urine samples from 66 HIV-1 infected subjects were investigated for the presence of the virus by amplifying VP1 (215 bp and IG (610 bp regions using the polymerase chain reaction. JCV was detected in 32% of the samples. The results confirmed the occurrence of type B (subtype Af2; in addition, another polyomavirus, BKV, was also detected in 1.5% of samples of the HIV-1 infected subjects. Apparently, there was no significant difference between mono- (HIV-1 only and co-infected (HIV-1/JCV subjects regarding their TCD4+/TCD8+ lymphocyte counts or HIV-1 plasma viral load. Self admitted seizures, hearing and visual loses were not significantly different between the two groups.

  15. A fatal case of JC virus meningitis presenting with hydrocephalus in an HIV-seronegative patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Shruti P.; Wuthrich, Christian; Dang, Xin; Nauen, David; Karimi, Reza; Viscidi, Raphael; Bord, Evelyn; Batson, Stephanie; Troncoso, Juan; Koralnik, Igor J.

    2014-01-01

    JC virus (JCV) is the etiologic agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, JCV granule cell neuronopathy and JCV encephalopathy. Whether JCV can also cause meningitis, has not yet been demonstrated. We report a case of aseptic meningitis resulting in symptomatic hydrocephalus in an HIV-seronegative patient. Brain imaging showed enlargement of ventricles but no parenchymal lesion. She had a very high JC viral load in the CSF and developed progressive cognitive dysfunction despite ventricular drainage. She was diagnosed with pancytopenia and passed away after 5 ½ months. Post-mortem exam revealed productive JCV infection of leptomeningeal and choroid plexus cells, and limited parenchymal involvement. Sequencing of JCV CSF strain showed an archetype-like regulatory region. Further studies of the role of JCV in aseptic meningitis and in idiopathic hydrocephalus are warranted. PMID:24895208

  16. A fatal case of JC virus meningitis presenting with hydrocephalus in a human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Shruti P; Wuthrich, Christian; Dang, Xin; Nauen, David; Karimi, Reza; Viscidi, Raphael; Bord, Evelyn; Batson, Stephanie; Troncoso, Juan; Koralnik, Igor J

    2014-07-01

    JC virus (JCV) is the etiologic agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, JCV granule cell neuronopathy, and JCV encephalopathy. Whether JCV can also cause meningitis has not yet been demonstrated. We report a case of aseptic meningitis resulting in symptomatic hydrocephalus in a human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative patient. Brain imaging showed enlargement of ventricles but no parenchymal lesion. She had a very high JC viral load in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and developed progressive cognitive dysfunction despite ventricular drainage. She was diagnosed with pancytopenia and passed away after 5.5 months. Postmortem examination revealed productive JCV infection of leptomeningeal and choroid plexus cells, and limited parenchymal involvement. Sequencing of JCV CSF strain showed an archetype-like regulatory region. Further studies of the role of JCV in aseptic meningitis and in idiopathic hydrocephalus are warranted. © 2014 American Neurological Association.

  17. Differential distribution of the JC virus receptor-type sialic acid in normal human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eash, Sylvia; Tavares, Rosemarie; Stopa, Edward G; Robbins, Scott H; Brossay, Laurent; Atwood, Walter J

    2004-02-01

    JC virus (JCV), a member of the polyomavirus family, causes a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) in humans known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Although glial cells are the principal target of JCV productive infection in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy patients, little is known regarding the site of JCV persistence and the mechanisms by which the virus spreads to the CNS to cause disease. Previous work has demonstrated the presence of replicating JCV DNA in B lymphocytes from peripheral blood, tonsil, and spleen and it has been hypothesized that lymphocytes may be one site of JCV persistence. Detection of viral gene products in renal tubules and excretion of JC virions in the urine suggests JCV persistence in the kidney. A respiratory route of viral transmission has also been hypothesized implicating the lung as another possible site of persistent JCV infection. Earlier studies from our laboratory have shown that terminal alpha 2,6-linked sialic acid is a critical component of the JCV receptor. In this report we examined the tissue distribution of this JCV receptor-type sialic acid in a panel of normal human tissues. Our results demonstrate that in normal brain JCV receptor-type sialic acids are expressed on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, but not on cortical neurons. The receptor-type sialic acid is also more highly expressed on B lymphocytes than on T lymphocytes in normal human spleen and tonsil. In addition, both the kidney and lung express abundant levels of alpha 2-6-linked sialic acids. Our data show a striking correlation between the expression of the JCV receptor-type sialic acid on cells and their susceptibility to infection by the virus. These findings also support the hypothesis of JCV persistence in lymphoid tissue and B-cell-facilitated viral dissemination to the CNS.

  18. Regulation of human neurotropic JC virus replication by alternative splicing factor SF2/ASF in glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariyer, Ilker Kudret; Khalili, Kamel

    2011-01-31

    The human neurotropic virus, JC virus (JCV), is the etiologic agent of the fatal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) that is seen primarily in immunodeficient individuals. Productive infection of JCV occurs only in glial cells, and this restriction is, to a great extent, due to the activation of the viral promoter that has cell type-specific characteristics. Earlier studies led to the hypothesis that glial-specific activation of the JCV promoter is mediated through positive and negative transcription factors that control reactivation of the JCV genome under normal physiological conditions and suppress its activation in non-glial cells. Using a variety of virological and molecular biological approaches, we demonstrate that the alternative splicing factor SF2/ASF has the capacity to exert a negative effect on transcription of the JCV promoter in glial cells through direct association with a specific DNA sequence within the viral enhancer/promoter region. Our results show that down-regulation of SF2/ASF in fetal and adult glial cells increases the level of JCV gene expression and its replication indicating that negative regulation of the JCV promoter by SF2/ASF may control reactivation of JCV replication in brain. Our results establish a new regulatory role for SF2/ASF in controlling gene expression at the transcriptional level.

  19. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert; Gagnon, David; Gjoerup, Ole; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J.; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert; Gagnon, David; Gjoerup, Ole; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. PMID:25155200

  1. SF2/ASF binding region within JC virus NCCR limits early gene transcription in glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uleri, Elena; Regan, Patrick; Dolei, Antonina; Sariyer, Ilker Kudret

    2013-05-14

    Patients undergoing immune modulatory therapies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, and individuals with an impaired-immune system, most notably AIDS patients, are in the high risk group of developing progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a fatal demyelinating disease of the white matter caused by human neurotropic polyomavirus, JC virus. It is now widely accepted that pathologic strains of JCV shows unique rearrangements consist of deletions and insertions within viral NCCR. While these kinds of rearrangements are related to viral tropism and pathology of the disease, their roles in molecular regulation of JCV gene expression and replication are unclear. We have previously identified SF2/ASF as a negative regulator of JCV gene expression in glial cells. This negative impact of SF2/ASF was dependent on its ability to bind a specific region mapped to the tandem repeat within viral promoter. In this report, functional role of SF2/ASF binding region in viral gene expression and replication was investigated by using deletion mutants of viral regulatory sequences. The second 98-base-pair tandem repeat on Mad1 strain was first mutated by deletion and named Mad1-(1X98). In addition to this mutant, the CR3 region which served the binding side for SF2/ASF was also mutated and named Mad1-ΔCR3 (1X73). Both mutations were tested for SF2/ASF binding by ChIP assay. While SF2/ASF was associated with Mad1-WT and Mad1-(1X98), its interaction was completely abolished on Mad1-ΔCR3 (1X73) construct as expected. Surprisingly, reporter gene analysis of Mad1-(1X98) and Mad1-ΔCR3 (1X73) early promoter sequences showed two and three fold increase in promoter activities, respectively. The impact of "CR3" region on JCV propagation was also tested on the viral background. While replication of Mad1-(1X98) strain in glial cells was similar to Mad1-WT strain, propagation of Mad1-ΔCR3 (1X73) was less productive. Further analysis of the

  2. Investigation of Jc-Suppressing Factors in Flat-Rolled Sr0.6K0.4Fe2As2Fe Tapes Via Microstructure Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xianping

    2015-01-13

    Pnictide superconductors will be very promising for applications if wires with high critical current density Jc can allow reel-to-reel large-scale fabrication at low costs. To understand the mechanism(s) that limited Jc in flat-rolled Sr0.6K0.4Fe2As2(Sr122) tapes, microstructure analysis has been considered the most direct and efficient way. Here, we report on high-resolution microstructure imaging and analysis on Fe-sheathed flat-rolled Sr122 tapes, which have a Jc as high as 2.3 × 104 A/cm2 at 10 T and 4.2 K. The overlapping nature of the Sr122 plates was clearly observed. Transmission electron microscopy/scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that, besides the cracks formed during the fabrication process, the SrO2 phase and cavities caused by the inhomogeneously dispersed Sr and K are the other important factors suppressing Jc. The wetting phase FeAs at the grain boundaries can be partially substituted by Sn in Sn-added samples. Our findings provide insights that pave the way to further enhance the critical current of the rolled 122 tapes up to the practical level.

  3. Tracing Jomon and Yayoi ancestries in Japan using ALDH2 and JC virus genotype distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Miyamori, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Noboru; Idota, Nozomi; Kakiuchi, Yasuhiro; McLean, Stuart; Kitamura, Tadaichi; Ikegaya, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background According to the dual structure model, the modern Japanese ethnic population consists of a mixture of the Jomon people, who have existed in Japan since at least the New Stone Age, and the Yayoi people, who migrated to western Japan from China around the year 300?bc Some reports show that the Yayoi are linked to a mutation of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene (ALDH2). Recent viral studies indicate two major groups found in the Japanese population: a group with the CY genotype JC vir...

  4. Immune reconstitution after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is associated with selective control of JC virus reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chen Sabrina; Broge, Thomas A; Ngo, Long; Gheuens, Sarah; Viscidi, Raphael; Bord, Evelyn; Rosenblatt, Jacalyn; Wong, Michael; Avigan, David; Koralnik, Igor J

    2014-07-01

    JC virus (JCV) causes progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) in immunocompromised patients. The mechanism of JCV reactivation and immunity in a transplanted immune system remains unclear. We prospectively studied 30 patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and collected blood and urine samples before HSCT and 3, 6, and 12 to 18 months after HSCT. Before HSCT, JCV DNA was detected in 7 of 30 urine, 5 of 30 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and 6 of 30 plasma samples. Although JC viruria remained stable after HSCT with detection in 5 of 21 samples, viremia was detected in only 1 of 22 plasma and none of 22 PBMC samples 12 to 18 months after HSCT. Prevalence of anti-JCV IgG was 83% before HSCT and decreased to 72% at 12 to 18 months. Anti-JCV IgM was rarely detected. JCV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses increased 12 to 18 months after HSCT. Although JC viruria correlated directly with detection of anti-JCV IgG, the cellular immune response to JCV measured by ELISpot was inversely correlated with anti-JCV IgG response. The diagnosis of acute myelogenous leukemia and age group were 2 independent patient factors associated with significantly reduced cellular immune responses to JCV. This prospective study in HSCT patients provides a model of interactions between the host immune response and viral activation in multiple compartments during the recovery of the immune system. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. In Vivo siRNA Delivery Using JC Virus-like Particles Decreases the Expression of RANKL in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B Hoffmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone remodeling requires a precise balance between formation and resorption. This complex process involves numerous factors that orchestrate a multitude of biochemical events. Among these factors are hormones, growth factors, vitamins, cytokines, and, most notably, osteoprotegerin (OPG and the receptor activator for nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL. Inflammatory cytokines play a major role in shifting the RANKL/OPG balance toward excessive RANKL, resulting in osteoclastogenesis, which in turn initiates bone resorption, which is frequently associated with osteoporosis. Rebalancing RANKL/OPG levels may be achieved through either upregulation of OPG or through transient silencing of RANKL by means of RNA interference. Here, we describe the utilization of a viral capsid-based delivery system for in vivo and in vitro RNAi using synthetic small interfering RNA (siRNA molecules in rat osteoblasts. Polyoma JC virus-derived virus-like particles are capable of delivering siRNAs to target RANKL in osteoblast cells both in vitro and in a rat in vivo system. Expression levels were monitored using quantitative real-time polymerase reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after single and repeated injections over a 14-day period. Our data indicate that this is an efficient and safe route for in vivo delivery of gene modulatory tools to study important molecular factors in a rat osteoporosis model.

  6. Human glial chimeric mice reveal astrocytic dependence of JC virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondo, Yoichi; Windrem, Martha S; Zou, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    that was chimeric for human astrocytes and GPCs. JCV effectively propagated in these mice, which indicates that astroglial infection is sufficient for JCV spread. Sequencing revealed progressive mutation of the JCV capsid protein VP1 after infection, suggesting that PML may evolve with active infection....... These results indicate that the principal CNS targets for JCV infection are astrocytes and GPCs and that infection is associated with progressive mutation, while demyelination is a secondary occurrence, following T antigen-triggered oligodendroglial apoptosis. More broadly, this study provides a model by which...... to further assess the biology and treatment of human-specific gliotropic viruses....

  7. Neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor suppressor protein, NF2, induces proteasome-mediated degradation of JC virus T-antigen in human glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Beltrami

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 2 protein (NF2 has been shown to act as tumor suppressor primarily through its functions as a cytoskeletal scaffold. However, NF2 can also be found in the nucleus, where its role is less clear. Previously, our group has identified JC virus (JCV tumor antigen (T-antigen as a nuclear binding partner for NF2 in tumors derived from JCV T-antigen transgenic mice. The association of NF2 with T-antigen in neuronal origin tumors suggests a potential role for NF2 in regulating the expression of the JCV T-antigen. Here, we report that NF2 suppresses T-antigen protein expression in U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells, which subsequently reduces T-antigen-mediated regulation of the JCV promoter. When T-antigen mRNA was quantified, it was determined that increasing expression of NF2 correlated with an accumulation of T-antigen mRNA; however, a decrease in T-antigen at the protein level was observed. NF2 was found to promote degradation of ubiquitin bound T-antigen protein via a proteasome dependent pathway concomitant with the accumulation of the JCV early mRNA encoding T-antigen. The interaction between T-antigen and NF2 maps to the FERM domain of NF2, which has been shown previously to be responsible for its tumor suppressor activity. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed a ternary complex among NF2, T-antigen, and the tumor suppressor protein, p53 within a glioblastoma cell line. Further, these proteins were detected in various degrees in patient tumor tissue, suggesting that these associations may occur in vivo. Collectively, these results demonstrate that NF2 negatively regulates JCV T-antigen expression by proteasome-mediated degradation, and suggest a novel role for NF2 as a suppressor of JCV T-antigen-induced cell cycle regulation.

  8. Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma and Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus Extracts Effectively Inhibit BK Virus and JC Virus Infection of Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, San-Yuan; Teng, Ru-Hsiou; Wang, Meilin; Chen, Pei-Lain; Lin, Mien-Chun; Chao, Chun-Nun; Chiang, Ming-Ko

    2017-01-01

    The human polyomaviruses BK (BKPyV) and JC (JCPyV) are ubiquitous pathogens long associated with severe disease in immunocompromised individuals. BKPyV causes polyomavirus-associated nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis, whereas JCPyV is the causative agent of the fatal demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. No effective therapies targeting these viruses are currently available. The goal of this study was to identify Chinese medicinal herbs with antiviral activity against BKPyV and JCPyV. We screened extracts of Chinese medicinal herbs for the ability to inhibit hemagglutination by BKPyV and JCPyV virus-like particles (VLPs) and the ability to inhibit BKPyV and JCPyV binding and infection of host cells. Two of the 40 herbal extracts screened, Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma and Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus, had hemagglutination inhibition activity on BKPyV and JCPyV VLPs and further inhibited infection of the cells by BKPyV and JCPyV, as evidenced by reduced expression of viral proteins in BKPyV-infected and JCPyV-infected cells after treatment with Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma or Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus extract. The results in this work show that both Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma and Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus may be sources of potential antiviral compounds for treating BKPyV and JCPyV infections. PMID:28757888

  9. Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma and Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus Extracts Effectively Inhibit BK Virus and JC Virus Infection of Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San-Yuan Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The human polyomaviruses BK (BKPyV and JC (JCPyV are ubiquitous pathogens long associated with severe disease in immunocompromised individuals. BKPyV causes polyomavirus-associated nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis, whereas JCPyV is the causative agent of the fatal demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. No effective therapies targeting these viruses are currently available. The goal of this study was to identify Chinese medicinal herbs with antiviral activity against BKPyV and JCPyV. We screened extracts of Chinese medicinal herbs for the ability to inhibit hemagglutination by BKPyV and JCPyV virus-like particles (VLPs and the ability to inhibit BKPyV and JCPyV binding and infection of host cells. Two of the 40 herbal extracts screened, Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma and Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus, had hemagglutination inhibition activity on BKPyV and JCPyV VLPs and further inhibited infection of the cells by BKPyV and JCPyV, as evidenced by reduced expression of viral proteins in BKPyV-infected and JCPyV-infected cells after treatment with Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma or Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus extract. The results in this work show that both Rhodiolae Kirliowii Radix et Rhizoma and Crataegus pinnatifida Fructus may be sources of potential antiviral compounds for treating BKPyV and JCPyV infections.

  10. Trans-activation of the JC virus late promoter by the tat protein of type 1 human immunodeficiency virus in glial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Hiroomi; Lashgari, M.; Amini, S.; Khalili, K. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA)); Rappaport, J.; Wong-Staal, F. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system caused by the JC virus (JCV), a human papovavirus. PML is a relatively rare disease seen predominantly in immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent complication observed in AIDS patients. The significantly higher incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders has suggested that the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the brain may directly or indirectly contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. In the present study the authors have examined the expression of the JCV genome in both glial and non-glial cells in the presence of HIV-1 regulatory proteins. They find that the HIV-1-encoded trans-regulatory protein tat increases the basal activity of the JCV late promoter, JCV{sub L}, in glial cells. They conclude that the presence of the HIV-1-encoded tat protein may positively affect the JCV lytic cycle in glial cells by stimulating JCV gene expression. The results suggest a mechanism for the relatively high incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders. Furthermore, the findings indicate that the HIV-1 regulatory protein tat may stimulate other viral and perhaps cellular promoters, in addition to its own.

  11. Insights into the initiation of JC virus DNA replication derived from the crystal structure of the T-antigen origin binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul J; Kalekar, Radha; Shin, Jong; Archambault, Jacques; Bohm, Andrew; Bullock, Peter A

    2014-02-01

    JC virus is a member of the Polyomavirus family of DNA tumor viruses and the causative agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). PML is a disease that occurs primarily in people who are immunocompromised and is usually fatal. As with other Polyomavirus family members, the replication of JC virus (JCV) DNA is dependent upon the virally encoded protein T-antigen. To further our understanding of JCV replication, we have determined the crystal structure of the origin-binding domain (OBD) of JCV T-antigen. This structure provides the first molecular understanding of JCV T-ag replication functions; for example, it suggests how the JCV T-ag OBD site-specifically binds to the major groove of GAGGC sequences in the origin. Furthermore, these studies suggest how the JCV OBDs interact during subsequent oligomerization events. We also report that the OBD contains a novel "pocket"; which sequesters the A1 & B2 loops of neighboring molecules. Mutagenesis of a residue in the pocket associated with the JCV T-ag OBD interfered with viral replication. Finally, we report that relative to the SV40 OBD, the surface of the JCV OBD contains one hemisphere that is highly conserved and one that is highly variable.

  12. JC Virus T-Antigen in Colorectal Cancer Is Associated with p53 Expression and Chromosomal Instability, Independent of CpG Island Methylator Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko Nosho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available JC virus has a transforming gene encoding JC virus T-antigen (JCVT. JCVT may inactivate wild-type p53, cause chromosomal instability (CIN, and stabilize β-catenin. A link between JCVT and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP has been suggested. However, no large-scale study has examined the relations of JCVT with molecular alterations, clinical outcome, or prognosis in colon cancer. We detected JCVT expression (by immunohistochemistry in 271 (35% of 766 colorectal cancers. We quantified DNA methylation in eight CIMP-specific promoters (CACNA1G, CDKN2A, CRABP1, IGF2, MLH1, NEUROG1, RUNX3, and SOCS1 and eight other loci (CHFR, HIC1, IGFBP3, MGMT, MINT1, MINT31, p14, WRN by MethyLight. We examined loss of heterozygosity in 2p, 5q, 17q, and 18q. JCVT was significantly associated with p53 expression (P < .0001, p21 loss (P < .0001, CIN (≥2 chromosomal segments with LOH; P < .0001, nuclear β-catenin (P = .006, LINE-1 hypomethylation (P = .002, and inversely with CIMP-high (P = .0005 and microsatellite instability (MSI (P < .0001, but not with PIK3CA mutation. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, the associations of JCVT with p53 [adjusted odds ratio (OR, 8.45; P < .0001], CIN (adjusted OR, 2.53; P = .003, cyclin D1 (adjusted OR, 1.57; P = .02, LINE-1 hypomethylation (adjusted OR, 1.97 for a 30% decline as a unit; P = .03, BRAF mutation (adjusted OR, 2.20; P = .04, and family history of colorectal cancer (adjusted OR, 0.64; P = .04 remained statistically significant. However, JCVT was no longer significantly associated with CIMP, MSI, β-catenin, or cyclooxygenase-2 expression in multivariate analysis. JCVT was unrelated with patient survival. In conclusion, JCVT expression in colorectal cancer is independently associated with p53 expression and CIN, which may lead to uncontrolled cell proliferation.

  13. J.C. Christensen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duedahl, Poul

    J.C. Christensen var kun regeringsleder i tre år, men i en lille menneskealder kunne stort set intet ske i dansk politik uden om ham. I et kvart århundrede var han et magtcentrum. Centralt i J.C. Christensens politiske virke i årene 1890-1924 stod kampen for det parlamentariske folkestyre....... Parlamentarismen har lige siden udgjort fundamentet for vores styreform, og dens fortsatte betydning og grundlovsfæstede status gør den til den betydeligste arv, J.C. Christensen har efterladt sig. Men hvem var J.C. Christensen egentlig? Han satte sit afgørende fingeraftryk på indførelsen af kvindelig valgret......, stiftelsen af Det Radikale Venstre og Venstre, tilblivelsen af det norske kongehus, Albertiaffæren, salget af De Vestindiske Øer, Påskekrisen og genforeningen med Sønderjylland. Nu har J.C. Christensens efterkommere for første gang givet adgang til hans efterladte dagbøger og breve. Det har gjort det muligt...

  14. J.C. Christensen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duedahl, Poul

    I mange år var det en almindelig antagelse, at statsminister J.C. Christensens dagbøger var blevet brændt efter hans død. Nu er hans dagbøger fra årene 1900-09 imidlertid dukket op, og de giver et indblik i dansk politik i årene omkring Systemskiftet. Dagbøgerne dækker den periode, hvor J.C...... af justitsminister P.A. Albertis bedragerier og optakten til en rigsretssag. De tyve små dagbøger indeholder optegnelser om stort og småt fra perioden. De tjente som et sted, hvor den normalt tillukkede J.C. Christensen fik luft for private og ikke mindst politiske bekymringer, og mange af aktørerne...... i det politiske liv blev i dagbøgerne udsat for skarpe bemærkninger. J.C. Christensens dagbøger giver et enestående indblik i et stykke Danmarkshistorie set fra første række....

  15. Gene Therapy for Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Suicide Gene Driven by a Lung-Specific Promoter Delivered by JC Virus-Like Particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Nun Chao

    Full Text Available Lung adenocarcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed type of lung cancer, has a poor prognosis even with combined surgery, chemotherapy, or molecular targeted therapies. Most patients are diagnosed with an in-operable advanced or metastatic disease, both pointing to the necessity of developing effective therapies for lung adenocarcinoma. Surfactant protein B (SP-B has been found to be overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, it has also been demonstrated that human lung adenocarcinoma cells are susceptible to the JC polyomavirus (JCPyV infection. Therefore, we designed that the JCPyV virus-like particle (VLP packaged with an SP-B promoter-driven thymidine kinase suicide gene (pSPB-tk for possible gene therapy of human lung adenocarcinoma. Plasmids expressing the GFP (pSPB-gfp or thymidine kinase gene (pSPB-tk under the control of the human SP-B promoter were constructed. The promoter's tissue specificity was tested by transfection of pSPB-gfp into A549, CH27, and H460 human lung carcinoma cells and non-lung cells. The JCPyV VLP's gene transfer efficiency and the selective cytotoxicity of pSPB-tk combined with ganciclovir (GCV were tested in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. In the current study, we found that SP-B promoter-driven GFP was specifically expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549 and large cell carcinoma (H460 cells. JCPyV VLPs were able to deliver a GFP reporter gene into A549 cells for expression. Selective cytotoxicity was observed in A549 but not non-lung cells that were transfected with pSPB-tk or infected with pSPB-tk-carrying JCPyV VLPs. In mice injected with pSPB-tk-carrying JCPyV VLPs through the tail vein and treated with ganciclovir (GCV, a potent 80% inhibition of growth of human lung adenocarcinoma nodules resulted. The JCPyV VLPs combined with the use of SP-B promoter demonstrates effectiveness as a potential gene therapy against human lung adenocarcinoma.

  16. Gene Therapy for Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Suicide Gene Driven by a Lung-Specific Promoter Delivered by JC Virus-Like Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chun-Nun; Lin, Mien-Chun; Fang, Chiung-Yao; Chen, Pei-Lain; Chang, Deching; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Wang, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed type of lung cancer, has a poor prognosis even with combined surgery, chemotherapy, or molecular targeted therapies. Most patients are diagnosed with an in-operable advanced or metastatic disease, both pointing to the necessity of developing effective therapies for lung adenocarcinoma. Surfactant protein B (SP-B) has been found to be overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, it has also been demonstrated that human lung adenocarcinoma cells are susceptible to the JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) infection. Therefore, we designed that the JCPyV virus-like particle (VLP) packaged with an SP-B promoter-driven thymidine kinase suicide gene (pSPB-tk) for possible gene therapy of human lung adenocarcinoma. Plasmids expressing the GFP (pSPB-gfp) or thymidine kinase gene (pSPB-tk) under the control of the human SP-B promoter were constructed. The promoter's tissue specificity was tested by transfection of pSPB-gfp into A549, CH27, and H460 human lung carcinoma cells and non-lung cells. The JCPyV VLP's gene transfer efficiency and the selective cytotoxicity of pSPB-tk combined with ganciclovir (GCV) were tested in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. In the current study, we found that SP-B promoter-driven GFP was specifically expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and large cell carcinoma (H460) cells. JCPyV VLPs were able to deliver a GFP reporter gene into A549 cells for expression. Selective cytotoxicity was observed in A549 but not non-lung cells that were transfected with pSPB-tk or infected with pSPB-tk-carrying JCPyV VLPs. In mice injected with pSPB-tk-carrying JCPyV VLPs through the tail vein and treated with ganciclovir (GCV), a potent 80% inhibition of growth of human lung adenocarcinoma nodules resulted. The JCPyV VLPs combined with the use of SP-B promoter demonstrates effectiveness as a potential gene therapy against human lung adenocarcinoma.

  17. [Investigation of BK and JC virus DNA positivities by real-time polymerase chain reaction in the clinical samples of patients with high risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, Seyyal; Fidan, Kibriya; Bozdayı, Gülendam; Dalgıç, Aydın; Fidan, Işıl; Sucak, Gülsan; Müderris, Tuba

    2011-04-01

    Human polyomaviruses, namely BK (BKV) and JC (JCV) viruses are small DNA viruses that cause latent infections worldwide. Primary infections are usually acquired in the early periods of life and are generally asymptomatic. However BKV/JCV infections may cause severe clinical conditions in immunosuppressive patients such as bone marrow and solid organ transplantation or cancer patients. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the presence of BKV and JCV nucleic acids by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in the clinical samples of patients with high risk. A total of 268 (62 blood, 206 urine) samples obtained from 115 immunocompromised patients hospitalized in Gazi University Hospital between July 2007 to January 2009, were included to the study. Viral nucleic acids were extracted from the samples with High Pure PCR Template Preparation Kit (Roche, Germany). By using amplification mix (TIB Molbiol GmbH, Germany) that included primers targeting 174 (JCV) and 219 (BKV) base pair fragments of the small t antigen, and hybridization probes (Roche, Germany), nucleic acids were amplified with LightCycler (Roche Applied Science, Germany) system. As a result, total polyomavirus DNA positivity rate was found as 33.2% (89/268). When BKV and JCV DNA positivities were evaluated according to the samples, 25.2% (53/206) of urine samples yielded positive results for BKV, 14.5% (30/206) for JCV and 2.4% (5/206) for both BKV and JCV. Only one of the blood samples (1/62; 1.6%) were found positive by means of BKV DNA, while none of the blood samples were positive for JCV DNA. The distribution of BKV and JCV DNA positivity rates according to the inpatient clinics were as follows, respectively; 24.3% and 9.5% for pediatric nephrology, 9.6% and 8.2% for renal transplantation unit, 13.5% and 18.9% for adult nephrology, 30.8% and 15.4% for bone marrow transplantation unit, 22.9% and 8.6% for pediatric clinics. In samples from pediatric hematology patients, BKV

  18. Virus-mediated suppression of host non-self recognition facilitates horizontal transmission of heterologous viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songsong; Cheng, Jiasen; Fu, Yanping; Chen, Tao; Jiang, Daohong; Ghabrial, Said A.

    2017-01-01

    Non-self recognition is a common phenomenon among organisms; it often leads to innate immunity to prevent the invasion of parasites and maintain the genetic polymorphism of organisms. Fungal vegetative incompatibility is a type of non-self recognition which often induces programmed cell death (PCD) and restricts the spread of molecular parasites. It is not clearly known whether virus infection could attenuate non-self recognition among host individuals to facilitate its spread. Here, we report that a hypovirulence-associated mycoreovirus, named Sclerotinia sclerotiorum mycoreovirus 4 (SsMYRV4), could suppress host non-self recognition and facilitate horizontal transmission of heterologous viruses. We found that cell death in intermingled colony regions between SsMYRV4-infected Sclerotinia sclerotiorum strain and other tested vegetatively incompatible strains was markedly reduced and inhibition barrage lines were not clearly observed. Vegetative incompatibility, which involves Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) signaling pathway, is controlled by specific loci termed het (heterokaryon incompatibility) loci. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a key role in vegetative incompatibility-mediated PCD. The expression of G protein subunit genes, het genes, and ROS-related genes were significantly down-regulated, and cellular production of ROS was suppressed in the presence of SsMYRV4. Furthermore, SsMYRV4-infected strain could easily accept other viruses through hyphal contact and these viruses could be efficiently transmitted from SsMYRV4-infected strain to other vegetatively incompatible individuals. Thus, we concluded that SsMYRV4 is capable of suppressing host non-self recognition and facilitating heterologous viruses transmission among host individuals. These findings may enhance our understanding of virus ecology, and provide a potential strategy to utilize hypovirulence-associated mycoviruses to control fungal diseases. PMID:28334041

  19. Virus-mediated suppression of host non-self recognition facilitates horizontal transmission of heterologous viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songsong Wu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-self recognition is a common phenomenon among organisms; it often leads to innate immunity to prevent the invasion of parasites and maintain the genetic polymorphism of organisms. Fungal vegetative incompatibility is a type of non-self recognition which often induces programmed cell death (PCD and restricts the spread of molecular parasites. It is not clearly known whether virus infection could attenuate non-self recognition among host individuals to facilitate its spread. Here, we report that a hypovirulence-associated mycoreovirus, named Sclerotinia sclerotiorum mycoreovirus 4 (SsMYRV4, could suppress host non-self recognition and facilitate horizontal transmission of heterologous viruses. We found that cell death in intermingled colony regions between SsMYRV4-infected Sclerotinia sclerotiorum strain and other tested vegetatively incompatible strains was markedly reduced and inhibition barrage lines were not clearly observed. Vegetative incompatibility, which involves Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins signaling pathway, is controlled by specific loci termed het (heterokaryon incompatibility loci. Reactive oxygen species (ROS plays a key role in vegetative incompatibility-mediated PCD. The expression of G protein subunit genes, het genes, and ROS-related genes were significantly down-regulated, and cellular production of ROS was suppressed in the presence of SsMYRV4. Furthermore, SsMYRV4-infected strain could easily accept other viruses through hyphal contact and these viruses could be efficiently transmitted from SsMYRV4-infected strain to other vegetatively incompatible individuals. Thus, we concluded that SsMYRV4 is capable of suppressing host non-self recognition and facilitating heterologous viruses transmission among host individuals. These findings may enhance our understanding of virus ecology, and provide a potential strategy to utilize hypovirulence-associated mycoviruses to control fungal diseases.

  20. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Nancy Y; Wasserfall, Clive H; Meacham, Amy M; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R

    2015-06-11

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) can be curative for certain hematologic malignancies, but the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major limitation for wider application. Ideally, strategies to improve allo-HCT would involve suppression of T lymphocytes that drive GVHD while sparing those that mediate graft-versus-malignancy (GVM). Recently, using a xenograft model, we serendipitously discovered that myxoma virus (MYXV) prevented GVHD while permitting GVM. In this study, we show that MYXV binds to resting, primary human T lymphocytes but will only proceed into active virus infection after the T cells receive activation signals. MYXV-infected T lymphocytes exhibited impaired proliferation after activation with reduced expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and soluble IL-2Rα, but did not affect expression of IL-4 and IL-10. MYXV suppressed T-cell proliferation in 2 patterns (full vs partial) depending on the donor. In terms of GVM, we show that MYXV-infected activated human T lymphocytes effectively deliver live oncolytic virus to human multiple myeloma cells, thus augmenting GVM by transfer of active oncolytic virus to residual cancer cells. Given this dual capacity of reducing GVHD plus increasing the antineoplastic effectiveness of GVM, ex vivo virotherapy with MYXV may be a promising clinical adjunct to allo-HCT regimens. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. Human polyoma JC virus minor capsid proteins, VP2 and VP3, enhance large T antigen binding to the origin of viral DNA replication: evidence for their involvement in regulation of the viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saribas, A Sami; Mun, Sarah; Johnson, Jaslyn; El-Hajmoussa, Mohammad; White, Martyn K; Safak, Mahmut

    2014-01-20

    JC virus (JCV) lytically infects the oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system in a subset of immunocompromized patients and causes the demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. JCV replicates and assembles into infectious virions in the nucleus. However, understanding the molecular mechanisms of its virion biogenesis remains elusive. In this report, we have attempted to shed more light on this process by investigating molecular interactions between large T antigen (LT-Ag), Hsp70 and minor capsid proteins, VP2/VP3. We demonstrated that Hsp70 interacts with VP2/VP3 and LT-Ag; and accumulates heavily in the nucleus of the infected cells. We also showed that VP2/VP3 associates with LT-Ag through their DNA binding domains resulting in enhancement in LT-Ag DNA binding to Ori and induction in viral DNA replication. Altogether, our results suggest that VP2/VP3 and Hsp70 actively participate in JCV DNA replication and may play critical roles in coupling of viral DNA replication to virion encapsidation. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Role of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses against JC virus in the outcome of patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and PML with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheuens, Sarah; Bord, Evelyn; Kesari, Santosh; Simpson, David M; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Clifford, David B; Berger, Joseph R; Ngo, Long; Koralnik, Igor J

    2011-07-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a severe demyelinating disease of the brain caused by JC virus (JCV). To assess the role of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells against JCV in the clinical outcome of PML and PML in the setting of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), we tested gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in 117 subjects, including 66 PML patients with different clinical outcomes. Both assays were concordant and demonstrated that the cellular immune response against JCV is associated with better clinical outcome. PML survivors had an early CD8(+) T-cell response more frequently than PML progressors (100% versus 27.3%; P = 0.001), while only a trend was observed for the early CD4(+) T-cell response between these two groups (80% versus 45.5%; P = 0.18). Although IRIS itself was more frequent in the PML survivor group, there was no difference in IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells between IRIS and non-IRIS PML patients, suggesting that T-cells expressing other cytokines likely have a role in the immunopathogenesis of IRIS. ELISpot and ICS assays are useful prognostic markers of PML evolution and may help in the clinical management of these patients.

  3. Role of CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Responses against JC Virus in the Outcome of Patients with Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) and PML with Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheuens, Sarah; Bord, Evelyn; Kesari, Santosh; Simpson, David M.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Clifford, David B.; Berger, Joseph R.; Ngo, Long; Koralnik, Igor J.

    2011-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a severe demyelinating disease of the brain caused by JC virus (JCV). To assess the role of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells against JCV in the clinical outcome of PML and PML in the setting of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), we tested gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in 117 subjects, including 66 PML patients with different clinical outcomes. Both assays were concordant and demonstrated that the cellular immune response against JCV is associated with better clinical outcome. PML survivors had an early CD8+ T-cell response more frequently than PML progressors (100% versus 27.3%; P = 0.001), while only a trend was observed for the early CD4+ T-cell response between these two groups (80% versus 45.5%; P = 0.18). Although IRIS itself was more frequent in the PML survivor group, there was no difference in IFN-γ-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells between IRIS and non-IRIS PML patients, suggesting that T-cells expressing other cytokines likely have a role in the immunopathogenesis of IRIS. ELISpot and ICS assays are useful prognostic markers of PML evolution and may help in the clinical management of these patients. PMID:21543472

  4. Association between the JC polyomavirus infection and male infertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manola Comar

    Full Text Available In recent years the incidence of male infertility has increased. Many risk factors have been taken into consideration, including viral infections. Investigations into viral agents and male infertility have mainly been focused on human papillomaviruses, while no reports have been published on polyomaviruses and male infertility. The aim of this study was to verify whether JC virus and BK virus are associated with male infertility. Matched semen and urine samples from 106 infertile males and 100 fertile males, as controls, were analyzed. Specific PCR analyses were carried out to detect and quantify large T (Tag coding sequences of JCV and BKV. DNA sequencing, carried out in Tag JCV-positive samples, was addressed to viral protein 1 (VP1 coding sequences. The prevalence of JCV Tag sequences in semen and urine samples from infertile males was 34% (72/212, whereas the BKV prevalence was 0.94% (2/212. Specifically, JCV Tag sequences were detected in 24.5% (26/106 of semen and 43.4% (46/106 of urine samples from infertile men. In semen and urine samples from controls the prevalence was 11% and 28%, respectively. A statistically significant difference (p<0.05 in JCV prevalence was disclosed in semen and urine samples of cases vs. controls. A higher JC viral DNA load was detected in samples from infertile males than in controls. In samples from infertile males the JC virus type 2 strain, subtype 2b, was more prevalent than ubiquitous type 1. JCV type 2 strain infection has been found to be associated with male infertility. These data suggest that the JC virus should be taken into consideration as an infectious agent which is responsible for male infertility.

  5. Inhibition of dengue virus through suppression of host pyrimidine biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Yin; Bushell, Simon; Qing, Min; Xu, Hao Ying; Bonavia, Aurelio; Nunes, Sandra; Zhou, Jing; Poh, Mee Kian; Florez de Sessions, Paola; Niyomrattanakit, Pornwaratt; Dong, Hongping; Hoffmaster, Keith; Goh, Anne; Nilar, Shahul; Schul, Wouter; Jones, Susan; Kramer, Laura; Compton, Teresa; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2011-07-01

    Viral replication relies on the host to supply nucleosides. Host enzymes involved in nucleoside biosynthesis are potential targets for antiviral development. Ribavirin (a known antiviral drug) is such an inhibitor that suppresses guanine biosynthesis; depletion of the intracellular GTP pool was shown to be the major mechanism to inhibit flavivirus. Along similar lines, inhibitors of the pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway could be targeted for potential antiviral development. Here we report on a novel antiviral compound (NITD-982) that inhibits host dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH), an enzyme required for pyrimidine biosynthesis. The inhibitor was identified through screening 1.8 million compounds using a dengue virus (DENV) infection assay. The compound contains an isoxazole-pyrazole core structure, and it inhibited DENV with a 50% effective concentration (EC(50)) of 2.4 nM and a 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC(50)) of >5 μM. NITD-982 has a broad antiviral spectrum, inhibiting both flaviviruses and nonflaviviruses with nanomolar EC(90)s. We also show that (i) the compound inhibited the enzymatic activity of recombinant DHODH, (ii) an NITD-982 analogue directly bound to the DHODH protein, (iii) supplementing the culture medium with uridine reversed the compound-mediated antiviral activity, and (iv) DENV type 2 (DENV-2) variants resistant to brequinar (a known DHODH inhibitor) were cross resistant to NITD-982. Collectively, the results demonstrate that the compound inhibits DENV through depleting the intracellular pyrimidine pool. In contrast to the in vitro potency, the compound did not show any efficacy in the DENV-AG129 mouse model. The lack of in vivo efficacy is likely due to the exogenous uptake of pyrimidine from the diet or to a high plasma protein-binding activity of the current compound.

  6. Plum pox virus capsid protein suppresses plant pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicaise, Valerie; Candresse, Thierry

    2017-08-01

    The perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by immune receptors launches defence mechanisms referred to as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Successful pathogens must suppress PTI pathways via the action of effectors to efficiently colonize their hosts. So far, plant PTI has been reported to be active against most classes of pathogens, except viruses, although this defence layer has been hypothesized recently as an active part of antiviral immunity which needs to be suppressed by viruses for infection success. Here, we report that Arabidopsis PTI genes are regulated upon infection by viruses and contribute to plant resistance to Plum pox virus (PPV). Our experiments further show that PPV suppresses two early PTI responses, the oxidative burst and marker gene expression, during Arabidopsis infection. In planta expression of PPV capsid protein (CP) was found to strongly impair these responses in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis, revealing its PTI suppressor activity. In summary, we provide the first clear evidence that plant viruses acquired the ability to suppress PTI mechanisms via the action of effectors, highlighting a novel strategy employed by viruses to escape plant defences. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  7. Targeting cell surface HIV-1 Env protein to suppress infectious virus formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Arangassery Rosemary; Ang, Charles G.; Kamanna, Kantharaju; Shaheen, Farida; Huang, Yu-Hung; McFadden, Karyn; Duffy, Caitlin; Bailey, Lauren D.; Sundaram, Ramalingam Venkat Kalyana; Chaiken, Irwin

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 Env protein is essential for host cell entry, and targeting Env remains an important antiretroviral strategy. We previously found that a peptide triazole thiol KR13 and its gold nanoparticle conjugate AuNP-KR13 directly and irreversibly inactivate the virus by targeting the Env protein, leading to virus gp120 shedding, membrane disruption and p24 capsid protein release. Here, we examined the consequences of targeting cell-surface Env with the virus inactivators. We found that both agents led to formation of non-infectious virus from transiently transfected 293T cells. The budded non-infectious viruses lacked Env gp120 but contained gp41. Importantly, budded virions also retained the capsid protein p24, in stark contrast to p24 leakage from viruses directly treated by these agents and arguing that the agents led to deformed viruses by transforming the cells at a stage before virus budding. We found that the Env inactivators caused gp120 shedding from the transiently transfected 293T cells as well as non-producer CHO-K1-gp160 cells. Additionally, AuNP-KR13 was cytotoxic against the virus-producing 293T and CHO-K1-gp160 cells, but not untransfected 293T or unmodified CHO-K1 cells. The results obtained reinforce the argument that cell-surface HIV-1 Env is metastable, as on virus particles, and provides a conformationally vulnerable target for virus suppression and infectious cell inactivation. PMID:28390972

  8. Suppression of RNA interference by adenovirus virus-associated RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersson, M. Gunnar; Haasnoot, P. C. Joost; Xu, Ning; Berenjian, Saideh; Berkhout, Ben; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2005-01-01

    We show that human adenovirus inhibits RNA interference (RNAi) at late times of infection by suppressing the activity of two key enzyme systems involved, Dicer and RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). To define the mechanisms by which adenovirus blocks RNAi, we used a panel of mutant adenoviruses

  9. Proteasome Inhibition Suppresses Dengue Virus Egress in Antibody Dependent Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milly M Choy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV is a cause of significant global health burden, with an estimated 390 million infections occurring annually. However, no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatment for dengue is available. DENV interacts with host cell factors to complete its life cycle although this virus-host interplay remains to be fully elucidated. Many studies have identified the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP to be important for successful DENV production, but how the UPP contributes to DENV life cycle as host factors remains ill defined. We show here that proteasome inhibition decouples infectious virus production from viral RNA replication in antibody-dependent infection of THP-1 cells. Molecular and imaging analyses in β-lactone treated THP-1 cells suggest that proteasome function does not prevent virus assembly but rather DENV egress. Intriguingly, the licensed proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, is able to inhibit DENV titers at low nanomolar drug concentrations for different strains of all four serotypes of DENV in primary monocytes. Furthermore, bortezomib treatment of DENV-infected mice inhibited the spread of DENV in the spleen as well as the overall pathological changes. Our findings suggest that preventing DENV egress through proteasome inhibition could be a suitable therapeutic strategy against dengue.

  10. Strategies underlying RNA silencing suppression by negative strand RNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focused on the strategies of negative strand RNA viruses to counteract antiviral RNA silencing. In plants and insects, RNA silencing has been shown to act as a sequence specific antiviral defence mechanism that is characterised by the processing of double

  11. Induction and suppression of antiviral RNA interference by influenza A virus in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Basavappa, Megha; Lu, Jinfeng; Dong, Shuwei; Cronkite, D Alexander; Prior, John T; Reinecker, Hans-Christian; Hertzog, Paul; Han, Yanhong; Li, Wan-Xiang; Cheloufi, Sihem; Karginov, Fedor V; Ding, Shou-Wei; Jeffrey, Kate L

    2016-12-05

    Influenza A virus (IAV) causes annual epidemics and occasional pandemics, and is one of the best-characterized human RNA viral pathogens1. However, a physiologically relevant role for the RNA interference (RNAi) suppressor activity of the IAV non-structural protein 1 (NS1), reported over a decade ago2, remains unknown3. Plant and insect viruses have evolved diverse virulence proteins to suppress RNAi as their hosts produce virus-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that direct specific antiviral defence4-7 by an RNAi mechanism dependent on the slicing activity of Argonaute proteins (AGOs)8,9. Recent studies have documented induction and suppression of antiviral RNAi in mouse embryonic stem cells and suckling mice10,11. However, it is still under debate whether infection by IAV or any other RNA virus that infects humans induces and/or suppresses antiviral RNAi in mature mammalian somatic cells12-21. Here, we demonstrate that mature human somatic cells produce abundant virus-derived siRNAs co-immunoprecipitated with AGOs in response to IAV infection. We show that the biogenesis of viral siRNAs from IAV double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) precursors in infected cells is mediated by wild-type human Dicer and potently suppressed by both NS1 of IAV as well as virion protein 35 (VP35) of Ebola and Marburg filoviruses. We further demonstrate that the slicing catalytic activity of AGO2 inhibits IAV and other RNA viruses in mature mammalian cells, in an interferon-independent fashion. Altogether, our work shows that IAV infection induces and suppresses antiviral RNAi in differentiated mammalian somatic cells.

  12. Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 accessory proteins that suppress beta interferon production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Kenji; Gotoh, Bin

    2007-07-01

    The paramyxovirus P gene encodes accessory proteins antagonistic to interferon (IFN). Viral proteins responsible for the IFN antagonism, however, are distinct among paramyxoviruses. Here we determine bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (bPIV3) IFN antagonists that suppress IFN-beta production, and investigate the underlying molecular mechanism. Of bPIV3 P gene products, C and V proteins were found to suppress double-stranded RNA-stimulated IFN-beta production. The V protein of bPIV3 and Sendai virus in the same genus Respirovirus significantly inhibits double-stranded RNA-stimulated IFN-beta production and the IFN-beta promoter activation enhanced by overexpression of MDA5 but not RIG-I, and yet does not suppress IFN-beta production induced by TRIF, TBK1, and IKKi. The V protein of both viruses specifically binds to MDA5 but not RIG-I. These results suggest that the V protein targets MDA5 for blockage of the IFN-beta gene activation signal. On the other hand, both bPIV3 and Sendai virus C proteins modestly inhibited IFN-beta production irrespective of a species of the signaling molecules used as an inducer. Interestingly, reporter gene expression driven by various promoters was also suppressed by the C proteins irrespective of the promoter species. These results demonstrate that the target of the respirovirus C protein is undoubtedly different from that of the V protein.

  13. Rad51 activates polyomavirus JC early transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn K White

    Full Text Available The human neurotropic polyomavirus JC (JCV causes the fatal CNS demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. JCV infection is very common and after primary infection, the virus is able to persist in an asymptomatic state. Rarely, and usually only under conditions of immune impairment, JCV re-emerges to actively replicate in the astrocytes and oligodendrocytes of the brain causing PML. The regulatory events involved in the reactivation of active viral replication in PML are not well understood but previous studies have implicated the transcription factor NF-κB acting at a well-characterized site in the JCV noncoding control region (NCCR. NF-κB in turn is regulated in a number of ways including activation by cytokines such as TNF-α, interactions with other transcription factors and epigenetic events involving protein acetylation--all of which can regulate the transcriptional activity of JCV. Active JCV infection is marked by the occurrence of rapid and extensive DNA damage in the host cell and the induction of the expression of cellular proteins involved in DNA repair including Rad51, a major component of the homologous recombination-directed double-strand break DNA repair machinery. Here we show that increased Rad51 expression activates the JCV early promoter. This activation is co-operative with the stimulation caused by NF-κB p65, abrogated by mutation of the NF-κB binding site or siRNA to NFκB p65 and enhanced by the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate. These data indicate that the induction of Rad51 resulting from infection with JCV acts through NF-κB via its binding site to stimulate JCV early transcription. We suggest that this provides a novel positive feedback mechanism to enhance viral gene expression during the early stage of JCV infection.

  14. Carbon monoxide and biliverdin suppress bovine viral diarrhoea virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiqian; Pu, Fengxing; Zhang, Xiaobin; Yan, Yunhuan; Zhao, Lijuan; Zhang, Angke; Li, Na; Zhou, En-Min; Xiao, Shuqi

    2017-12-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) causes significant economic losses to the cattle industry worldwide. Previously, we demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) can inhibit BVDV replication via an unknown molecular mechanism. To elucidate the mechanism involved, we assess whether the HO-1 downstream metabolites carbon monoxide (CO), biliverdin (BV) and iron affect BVDV replication. We treated Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with an exogenous CO donor, CORM-2. We found that CORM-2 but not its inactive form (iCORM-2) inhibited BVDV replication in a dose-dependent and time duration-dependent manner, suggesting a CO-specific mediation of the CORM-2 antiviral effect. Direct incubation of BVDV with high-dose CORM-2 reduced virus titres, suggesting that CORM-2 attenuates BVDV growth by both physically inactivating virus particles in the extracellular environment and affecting intracellular BVDV replication, but mainly via an intracellular mechanism. Exogenous BV treatment, both post-infection and co-incubation with BVDV, inhibited BVDV replication in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that BV has potent antiviral activity against BVDV. Direct incubation of BVDV with BV had no significant effect on virus titres, indicating that BV is not virucidal and attenuates BVDV growth by affecting intracellular BVDV replication. Furthermore, BV was found to affect BVDV penetration but not attachment. However, increased iron via addition of FeCl3 did not interfere with BVDV replication. Collectively, the results of the present study demonstrate that the HO-1 metabolites BV and CO, but not iron, inhibit BVDV replication. These findings not only provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of HO-1 inhibition of BVDV replication but also suggest potential new control measures for future BVDV infection.

  15. Suppression of terpenoid synthesis in plants by a virus promotes its mutualism with vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Jun-Bo; Yao, Dan-Mei; Zhang, Tong; Walling, Linda L; Yang, Mei; Wang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2013-03-01

    Vectors often perform better on plants infected with pathogens, and this promotes the spread of pathogens. However, few studies have examined how plant defensive compounds mediate such mutualistic relationships. Although tobacco plants are relatively poor host plants for the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, tobacco's suitability to the whitefly was substantially increased when infected by the begomovirus Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus. The change in suitability was associated with induced terpenoid synthesis in whitefly-infested plants and repressed terpenoid synthesis in virus-infected plants. Elevation of terpenoid levels via exogenous stem applications reduced the performance of whiteflies. In contrast, suppression of terpenoid synthesis via gene silencing improved whitefly fitness. By integrating genomics, transcriptomics and metabolomics, this study demonstrated that virus infection depleted the terpenoid-mediated plant defence against whiteflies, thereby favouring vector-virus mutualism. These data suggest that plant terpenoids play a key role in shaping vector-pathogen relationships. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  16. Isolation and characterization of an ubiquitin extension protein gene (JcUEP) promoter from Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yan-Bin; He, Liang-Liang; Niu, Long-Jian; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2015-04-01

    The JcUEP promoter is active constitutively in the bio-fuel plant Jatropha curcas , and is an alternative to the widely used CaMV35S promoter for driving constitutive overexpression of transgenes in Jatropha. Well-characterized promoters are required for transgenic breeding of Jatropha curcas, a biofuel feedstock with great potential for production of bio-diesel and bio-jet fuel. In this study, an ubiquitin extension protein gene from Jatropha, designated JcUEP, was identified to be ubiquitously expressed. Thus, we isolated a 1.2 kb fragment of the 5' flanking region of JcUEP and evaluated its activity as a constitutive promoter in Arabidopsis and Jatropha using the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. As expected, histochemical GUS assay showed that the JcUEP promoter was active in all Arabidopsis and Jatropha tissues tested. We also compared the activity of the JcUEP promoter with that of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S) promoter, a well-characterized constitutive promoter conferring strong transgene expression in dicot species, in various tissues of Jatropha. In a fluorometric GUS assay, the two promoters showed similar activities in stems, mature leaves and female flowers; while the CaMV35S promoter was more effective than the JcUEP promoter in other tissues, especially young leaves and inflorescences. In addition, the JcUEP promoter retained its activity under stress conditions in low temperature, high salt, dehydration and exogenous ABA treatments. These results suggest that the plant-derived JcUEP promoter could be an alternative to the CaMV35S promoter for driving constitutive overexpression of transgenes in Jatropha and other plants.

  17. RNA viruses can hijack vertebrate microRNAs to suppress innate immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trobaugh, Derek W.; Gardner, Christina L.; Sun, Chengqun; Haddow, Andrew D.; Wang, Eryu; Chapnik, Elik; Mildner, Alexander; Weaver, Scott C.; Ryman, Kate D.; Klimstra, William B.

    2014-02-01

    Currently, there is little evidence for a notable role of the vertebrate microRNA (miRNA) system in the pathogenesis of RNA viruses. This is primarily attributed to the ease with which these viruses mutate to disrupt recognition and growth suppression by host miRNAs. Here we report that the haematopoietic-cell-specific miRNA miR-142-3p potently restricts the replication of the mosquito-borne North American eastern equine encephalitis virus in myeloid-lineage cells by binding to sites in the 3' non-translated region of its RNA genome. However, by limiting myeloid cell tropism and consequent innate immunity induction, this restriction directly promotes neurologic disease manifestations characteristic of eastern equine encephalitis virus infection in humans. Furthermore, the region containing the miR-142-3p binding sites is essential for efficient virus infection of mosquito vectors. We propose that RNA viruses can adapt to use antiviral properties of vertebrate miRNAs to limit replication in particular cell types and that this restriction can lead to exacerbation of disease severity.

  18. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hashimoto

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR. MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3 via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1 mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection.

  19. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Meacham, Amy M.; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    MYXV binds human T lymphocytes but does not enter and infect T cells until after activation.MYXV-infected T lymphocytes proliferate less and secrete less inflammatory cytokines but deliver oncolytic virus to augment GVM.

  20. Ectopic expression of Jatropha curcas APETALA1 (JcAP1 caused early flowering in Arabidopsis, but not in Jatropha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyong Tang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas is a promising feedstock for biofuel production because Jatropha oil is highly suitable for the production of biodiesel and bio-jet fuels. However, Jatropha exhibits a low seed yield as a result of unreliable and poor flowering. APETALA1 (AP1 is a floral meristem and organ identity gene in higher plants. The flower meristem identity genes of Jatropha have not yet been identified or characterized. To better understand the genetic control of flowering in Jatropha, an AP1 homolog (JcAP1 was isolated from Jatropha. An amino acid sequence analysis of JcAP1 revealed a high similarity to the AP1 proteins of other perennial plants. JcAP1 was expressed in inflorescence buds, flower buds, sepals and petals. The highest expression level was observed during the early developmental stage of the flower buds. The overexpression of JcAP1 using the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV 35S promoter resulted in extremely early flowering and abnormal flowers in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Several flowering genes downstream of AP1 were up-regulated in the JcAP1-overexpressing transgenic plant lines. Furthermore, JcAP1 overexpression rescued the phenotype caused by the Arabidopsis AP1 loss-of-function mutant ap1-11. Therefore, JcAP1 is an ortholog of AtAP1, which plays a similar role in the regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis. However, the overexpression of JcAP1 in Jatropha using the same promoter resulted in little variation in the flowering time and floral organs, indicating that JcAP1 may be insufficient to regulate flowering by itself in Jatropha. This study helps to elucidate the function of JcAP1 and contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of flower development in Jatropha.

  1. Ectopic expression of Jatropha curcas APETALA1 (JcAP1) caused early flowering in Arabidopsis, but not in Jatropha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mingyong; Tao, Yan-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Jatropha curcas is a promising feedstock for biofuel production because Jatropha oil is highly suitable for the production of biodiesel and bio-jet fuels. However, Jatropha exhibits a low seed yield as a result of unreliable and poor flowering. APETALA1 (AP1) is a floral meristem and organ identity gene in higher plants. The flower meristem identity genes of Jatropha have not yet been identified or characterized. To better understand the genetic control of flowering in Jatropha, an AP1 homolog (JcAP1) was isolated from Jatropha. An amino acid sequence analysis of JcAP1 revealed a high similarity to the AP1 proteins of other perennial plants. JcAP1 was expressed in inflorescence buds, flower buds, sepals and petals. The highest expression level was observed during the early developmental stage of the flower buds. The overexpression of JcAP1 using the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter resulted in extremely early flowering and abnormal flowers in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Several flowering genes downstream of AP1 were up-regulated in the JcAP1-overexpressing transgenic plant lines. Furthermore, JcAP1 overexpression rescued the phenotype caused by the Arabidopsis AP1 loss-of-function mutant ap1-11. Therefore, JcAP1 is an ortholog of AtAP1, which plays a similar role in the regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis. However, the overexpression of JcAP1 in Jatropha using the same promoter resulted in little variation in the flowering time and floral organs, indicating that JcAP1 may be insufficient to regulate flowering by itself in Jatropha. This study helps to elucidate the function of JcAP1 and contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of flower development in Jatropha. PMID:27168978

  2. Interferon induction by viruses. XV. Biological characteristics of interferon induction-suppressing particles of vesicular stomatitis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, P.I.; Sekellick, M.J.

    1987-06-01

    A single interferon (IFN) induction-suppressing particle (ISP) of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) blocked completely the yield of IFN in a cell otherwise programmed to produce IFN. With mouse L cells as hosts, one lethal hit of UV radiation (D37 = 52.5 ergs/mm2) to the VSV genome sufficed to inactivate ISP activity; however, with ''aged'' primary chick embryo cells as hosts, it took 198 lethal hits (D37 = 10,395 ergs/mm2). ISP expression in chick cells did not require virus replication or amplified RNA synthesis, but did involve functional virion-associated L protein. ISP in chick cells also were capable of inhibiting, in a multiplicity-dependent manner, the plaquing efficiency of two viruses that require cellular polymerase II (pol II) for replication, e.g., pseudorabies and influenza. The refractory state to IFN inducibility that resulted from infection of chick cells with ISP (VSV tsO5 (UV = 100 hits)) was still extant after 6 days. In contrast, the plaquing efficiency of pseudorabies virus returned to control levels by 5 h after ISP infection. Chick cells infected with UV ISP remained viable, served as hosts for the replication of other viruses, and could be subcultured. Models are presented to account for these contrasting effects. The involvement of viral plus-strand leader RNA as an inhibitor of cellular pol II-dependent RNA synthesis, and the multifunctional activities of the virion-associated L protein, are discussed as possible molecules involved in the action of ISP in chick cells.

  3. Heterologous expression of plant virus genes that suppress post-transcriptional gene silencing results in suppression of RNA interference in Drosophila cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canto Tomas

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi in animals and post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS in plants are related phenomena whose functions include the developmental regulation of gene expression and protection from transposable elements and viruses. Plant viruses respond by expressing suppressor proteins that interfere with the PTGS system. Results Here we demonstrate that both transient and constitutive expression of the Tobacco etch virus HC-Pro silencing suppressor protein, which inhibits the maintenance of PTGS in plants, prevents dsRNA-induced RNAi of a lacZ gene in cultured Drosophila cells. Northern blot analysis of the RNA present in Drosophila cells showed that HC-Pro prevented degradation of lacZ RNA during RNAi but that there was accumulation of the short (23nt RNA species associated with RNAi. A mutant HC-Pro that does not suppress PTGS in plants also does not affect RNAi in Drosophila. Similarly, the Cucumber mosaic virus 2b protein, which inhibits the systemic spread of PTGS in plants, does not suppress RNAi in Drosophila cells. In addition, we have used the Drosophila system to demonstrate that the 16K cysteine-rich protein of Tobacco rattle virus, which previously had no known function, is a silencing suppressor protein. Conclusion These results indicate that at least part of the process of RNAi in Drosophila and PTGS in plants is conserved, and that plant virus silencing suppressor proteins may be useful tools to investigate the mechanism of RNAi.

  4. A new class of dual-targeted antivirals: monophosphorylated acyclovir prodrug derivatives suppress both human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and herpes simplex virus type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanpouille, Christophe; Lisco, Andrea; Derudas, Marco; Saba, Elisa; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Brichacek, Beda; Scrimieri, Francesca; Schinazi, Raymond; Schols, Dominique; McGuigan, Christopher; Balzarini, Jan; Margolis, Leonid

    2010-02-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) are responsible for 2 intersecting epidemics in which the disease caused by 1 virus facilitates the transmission of and pathogenesis by the other. Therefore, suppression of one virus infection will affect the other. Acyclovir, a common antiherpetic drug, was shown to directly suppress both viruses in coinfected tissues. However, both antiviral activities of acyclovir are dependent on phosphorylation by the nucleoside kinase activity of coinfecting human herpesviruses. We developed acyclovir ProTides, monophosphorylated acyclovir with the phosphate group masked by lipophilic groups to allow efficient cellular uptake, and investigated their antiviral potential in cell lines and in human tissues ex vivo. Acyclovir ProTides suppressed both HIV-1 and HSV-2 at median effective concentrations in the submicromolar range in ex vivo lymphoid and cervicovaginal human tissues and at 3-12 micromol/L in CD4(+) T cells. Acyclovir ProTides retained activity against acyclovir-resistant HSV-2. Acyclovir ProTides represent a new class of antivirals that suppress both HIV-1 and HSV-2 by directly and independently blocking the key replicative enzymes of both viruses. Further optimization of such compounds may lead to double-targeted antivirals that can prevent viral transmission and treat the 2 synergistic diseases caused by HIV-1 and HSV-2. To our knowledge, the acyclovir ProTides described here represent the first example of acyclic nucleoside monophosphate prodrugs being active against HIV-1.

  5. Herpes Simplex Virus Suppressive Therapy in Herpes Simplex Virus-2/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Coinfected Women Is Associated With Reduced Systemic CXCL10 But Not Genital Cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen-Nissen, Erica; Chang, Joanne T; Thomas, Katherine K; Adams, Devin; Celum, Connie; Sanchez, Jorge; Coombs, Robert W; McElrath, M Juliana; Baeten, Jared M

    2016-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) may heighten immune activation and increase human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) replication, resulting in greater infectivity and faster HIV-1 disease progression. An 18-week randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial of 500 mg valacyclovir twice daily in 20 antiretroviral-naive women coinfected with HSV-2 and HIV-1 was conducted and HSV-2 suppression was found to significantly reduce both HSV-2 and HIV-1 viral loads both systemically and the endocervical compartment. To determine the effect of HSV-2 suppression on systemic and genital mucosal inflammation, plasma specimens, and endocervical swabs were collected weekly from volunteers in the trial and cryopreserved. Plasma was assessed for concentrations of 31 cytokines and chemokines; endocervical fluid was eluted from swabs and assayed for 14 cytokines and chemokines. Valacyclovir significantly reduced plasma CXCL10 but did not significantly alter other cytokine concentrations in either compartment. These data suggest genital tract inflammation in women persists despite HSV-2 suppression, supporting the lack of effect on transmission seen in large scale efficacy trials. Alternative therapies are needed to reduce persistent mucosal inflammation that may enhance transmission of HSV-2 and HIV-1.

  6. Optimization of human immunodeficiency virus treatment during incarceration: viral suppression at the prison gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jaimie P; Cepeda, Javier; Wu, Johnny; Trestman, Robert L; Altice, Frederick L; Springer, Sandra A

    2014-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) management in correctional settings is logistically feasible, but HIV-related outcomes before release have not been recently systematically examined. To evaluate HIV treatment outcomes throughout incarceration, including jail and prison. Retrospective cohort study of longitudinally linked demographic, pharmacy, and laboratory data on 882 prisoners within the Connecticut Department of Correction (2005-2012) with confirmed HIV infection, who were continually incarcerated 90 days or more, had at least 2 HIV-1 RNA and CD4 lymphocyte measurements, and were prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Three electronic databases (correctional, laboratory, and pharmacy) were integrated to assess HIV viral suppression (HIV-1 RNA levels, HIV-1 RNA levels and mean change in CD4 lymphocyte count during incarceration. Demographic characteristics, prescribed pharmacotherapies, receipt of directly observed therapy, and duration of incarceration were analyzed as possible explanatory variables for HIV viral suppression in logistic regression models. Among 882 HIV-infected prisoners with 1185 incarceration periods, mean HIV-1 RNA level decreased by 1.1 log10 and CD4 lymphocyte count increased by 98 cells/µL over time, with a higher proportion achieving viral suppression by release compared with entry (70.0% vs 29.8%; P HIV-1 RNA level, prerelease viral suppression correlated with female sex (adjusted odds ratio, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.26-2.59) and psychiatric disorder severity below the sample median (adjusted odds ratio, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.12-1.99), but not race/ethnicity, incarceration duration, ART regimen or dosing strategy, or directly observed therapy. Though just one-third of HIV-infected prisoners receiving ART entered correctional facilities with viral suppression, HIV treatment was optimized during incarceration, resulting in the majority achieving viral suppression by release. Treatment for HIV within prison is facilitated by a highly structured

  7. Antiviral Hammerhead Ribozymes Are Effective for Developing Transgenic Suppression of Chikungunya Virus in Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Mishra

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an emerging pathogen with widespread distribution in regions of Africa, India, and Asia that threatens to spread into temperate climates with the introduction of its major vector, Aedes albopictus. CHIKV causes a disease frequently misdiagnosed as dengue fever, with potentially life-threatening symptoms that can result in a longer-term debilitating arthritis. The increasing risk of spread from endemic regions via human travel and commerce and the current absence of a vaccine put a significant proportion of the world population at risk for this disease. In this study we designed and tested hammerhead ribozymes (hRzs targeting CHIKV structural protein genes of the RNA genome as potential antivirals both at the cellular and in vivo level. We employed the CHIKV strain 181/25, which exhibits similar infectivity rates in both Vero cell cultures and mosquitoes. Virus suppression assay performed on transformed Vero cell clones of all seven hRzs demonstrated that all are effective at inhibiting CHIKV in Vero cells, with hRz #9 and #14 being the most effective. piggyBac transformation vectors were constructed using the Ae. aegypti t-RNAval Pol III promoted hRz #9 and #14 effector genes to establish a total of nine unique transgenic Higgs White Eye (HWE Ae. aegypti lines. Following confirmation of transgene expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, comparative TCID50-IFA analysis, in situ Immuno-fluorescent Assays (IFA and analysis of salivary CHIKV titers demonstrated effective suppression of virus replication at 7 dpi in heterozygous females of each of these transgenic lines compared with control HWE mosquitoes. This report provides a proof that appropriately engineered hRzs are powerful antiviral effector genes suitable for population replacement strategies

  8. Immune activation suppresses initiation of lytic Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladell, Kristin; Dorner, Marcus; Zauner, Ludwig; Berger, Christoph; Zucol, Franziska; Bernasconi, Michele; Niggli, Felix K; Speck, Roberto F; Nadal, David

    2007-08-01

    Primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is asymptomatic in children with immature immune systems but may manifest as infectious mononucleosis, a vigorous immune activation, in adolescents or adults with mature immune systems. Infectious mononucleosis and chronic immune activation are linked to increased risk for EBV-associated lymphoma. Here we show that EBV initiates progressive lytic infection by expression of BZLF-1 and the late lytic genes gp85 and gp350/220 in cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) but not in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from EBV-naive adults after EBV infection ex vivo. Lower levels of proinflammatory cytokines in CBMC, used to model a state of minimal immune activation and immature immunity, than in PBMC were associated with lytic EBV infection. Triggering the innate immunity specifically via Toll-like receptor-9 of B cells substantially suppressed BZLF-1 mRNA expression in acute EBV infection ex vivo and in anti-IgG-stimulated chronically latently EBV-infected Akata Burkitt lymphoma cells. This was mediated in part by IL-12 and IFN-gamma. These results identify immune activation as critical factor for the suppression of initiation of lytic EBV infection. We hypothesize that immune activation contributes to EBV-associated lymphomagenesis by suppressing lytic EBV and in turn promotes latent EBV with transformation potential.

  9. Targeting Localized Immune Suppression Within the Tumor Through Repeat Cycles of Immune Cell-oncolytic Virus Combination Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Thorne, Stephen H; Liang, Wenchun; Sampath, Padma; Schmidt, Tobi; Sikorski, Rachel; Beilhack, Andreas; Contag, Christopher H.

    2010-01-01

    A major limitation to the use of immunotherapy in the treatment of cancer has been the localized immune suppressive environment within the tumor. Although there is evidence that tumor-selective (oncolytic) viruses may help to overcome this immune suppression, a primary limitation to their use has been limited systemic delivery potential, especially in the face of antiviral immunity. We recently demonstrated that tumor-trafficking immune cells can efficiently deliver oncolytic viral therapies ...

  10. Isolation and characterization of the Jatropha curcas APETALA1 (JcAP1) promoter conferring preferential expression in inflorescence buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yan-Bin; He, Liang-Liang; Niu, Longjian; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2016-08-01

    The 1.5 kb JcAP1 promoter from the biofuel plant Jatropha curcas is predominantly active in the inflorescence buds of transgenic plants, in which the -1313/-1057 region is essential for maintaining the activity. Arabidopsis thaliana APETALA1 (AP1) is a MADS-domain transcription factor gene that functions primarily in flower development. We isolated a homolog of AP1 from Jatropha curcas (designated JcAP1), which was shown to exhibit flower-specific expression in Jatropha. JcAP1 is first expressed in inflorescence buds and continues to be primarily expressed in the sepals. We isolated a 1.5 kb JcAP1 promoter and evaluated its activity in transgenic Arabidopsis and Jatropha using the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. In transgenic Arabidopsis and Jatropha, the inflorescence buds exhibited notable GUS activity, whereas the sepals did not. Against expectations, the JcAP1 promoter was active in the anthers of Arabidopsis and Jatropha and was highly expressed in Jatropha seeds. An analysis of promoter deletions in transgenic Arabidopsis revealed that deletion of the -1313/-1057 region resulted in loss of JcAP1 promoter activity in the inflorescence buds and increased activity in the anthers. These results suggested that some regulatory sequences in the -1313/-1057 region are essential for maintaining promoter activity in inflorescence buds and can partly suppress activity in the anthers. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that other elements located upstream of the 1.5 kb JcAP1 promoter may be required for flower-specific activation. The JcAP1 promoter characterized in this study can be used to drive transgene expression in both the inflorescence buds and seeds of Jatropha.

  11. Mechanism of herpes simplex virus type 2 suppression by propolis extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolkemper, Silke; Reichling, Jürgen; Sensch, Karl Heinz; Schnitzler, Paul

    2010-02-01

    Genital herpes caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a chronic, persistent infection spreading efficiently and silently as sexually transmitted disease through the population. Antiviral agents currently applied for the treatment of herpesvirus infections include acyclovir and derivatives. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts of propolis were phytochemically analysed, different polyphenols, flavonoids and phenylcarboxylic acids were identified as major constituents. The aqueous propolis extract revealed a relatively high amount of phenylcarboxylic acids and low concentrations flavonoids when compared to the ethanolic special extract GH 2002. The cytotoxic and antiherpetic effect of propolis extracts against HSV-2 was analysed in cell culture, and revealed a moderate cytotoxicity on RC-37 cells. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of aqueous and ethanolic GH 2002 propolis extracts for HSV-2 plaque formation was determined at 0.0005% and 0.0004%, respectively. Both propolis extracts exhibited high levels of antiviral activity against HSV-2 in viral suspension tests, infectivity was significantly reduced by >99% and a direct concentration- and time-dependent antiherpetic activity could be demonstrated for both extracts. In order to determine the mode of virus suppression by propolis, the extracts were added at different times during the viral infection cycle. Addition of these drugs to uninfected cells prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells during intracellular replication had no effect on virus multiplication. However both propolis extracts exhibited high anti-herpetic activity when viruses were pretreated with these drugs prior to infection. Selectivity indices were determined at 80 and 42.5 for the aqueous and ethanolic extract, respectively, thus propolis extracts might be suitable for topical therapy in recurrent herpetic infection. Copyright 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolation and functional characterization of JcFT, a FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) homologous gene from the biofuel plant Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaoqiong; Luo, Li; Fu, Qiantang; Niu, Longjian; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2014-05-08

    Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) is a potential feedstock for biofuel production because Jatropha oil is highly suitable for the production of the biodiesel and bio-jet fuels. However, Jatropha exhibits low seed yield as a result of unreliable and poor flowering. FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) -like genes are important flowering regulators in higher plants. To date, the flowering genes in Jatropha have not yet been identified or characterized. To better understand the genetic control of flowering in Jatropha, an FT homolog was isolated from Jatropha and designated as JcFT. Sequence analysis and phylogenetic relationship of JcFT revealed a high sequence similarity with the FT genes of Litchi chinensis, Populus nigra and other perennial plants. JcFT was expressed in all tissues of adult plants except young leaves, with the highest expression level in female flowers. Overexpression of JcFT in Arabidopsis and Jatropha using the constitutive promoter cauliflower mosaic virus 35S or the phloem-specific promoter Arabidopsis SUCROSE TRANSPORTER 2 promoter resulted in an extremely early flowering phenotype. Furthermore, several flowering genes downstream of JcFT were up-regulated in the JcFT-overexpression transgenic plant lines. JcFT may encode a florigen that acts as a key regulator in flowering pathway. This study is the first to functionally characterize a flowering gene, namely, JcFT, in the biofuel plant Jatropha.

  13. Dimethyl fumarate suppresses Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease by modifying the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kunitoshi; Tomiki, Hiroki; Inaba, Yuji; Ichikawa, Motoki; Kim, Byung S; Koh, Chang-Sung

    2015-07-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is a modifier of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-2 (Nrf2)-kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway. DMF treatment in the effector phase significantly suppressed the development of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) both clinically and histologically. DMF treatment leads to an enhanced Nrf2 antioxidant response in TMEV-IDD mice. DMF treatment in the effector phase significantly suppressed the level of IL-17A mRNA. DMF is known to inhibit differentiation of T helper 17 (Th17) cells via suppressing NF-κB. Taken together, our data suggest that DMF treatment in the effector phase may suppress TMEV-IDD not only via enhancing the antioxidant response but also via suppressing IL-17A. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Suppression of RNAi by dsRNA-degrading RNaseIII enzymes of viruses in animals and plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Weinheimer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Certain RNA and DNA viruses that infect plants, insects, fish or poikilothermic animals encode Class 1 RNaseIII endoribonuclease-like proteins. dsRNA-specific endoribonuclease activity of the RNaseIII of rock bream iridovirus infecting fish and Sweet potato chlorotic stunt crinivirus (SPCSV infecting plants has been shown. Suppression of the host antiviral RNA interference (RNAi pathway has been documented with the RNaseIII of SPCSV and Heliothis virescens ascovirus infecting insects. Suppression of RNAi by the viral RNaseIIIs in non-host organisms of different kingdoms is not known. Here we expressed PPR3, the RNaseIII of Pike-perch iridovirus, in the non-hosts Nicotiana benthamiana (plant and Caenorhabditis elegans (nematode and found that it cleaves double-stranded small interfering RNA (ds-siRNA molecules that are pivotal in the host RNA interference (RNAi pathway and thereby suppresses RNAi in non-host tissues. In N. benthamiana, PPR3 enhanced accumulation of Tobacco rattle tobravirus RNA1 replicon lacking the 16K RNAi suppressor. Furthermore, PPR3 suppressed single-stranded RNA (ssRNA--mediated RNAi and rescued replication of Flock House virus RNA1 replicon lacking the B2 RNAi suppressor in C. elegans. Suppression of RNAi was debilitated with the catalytically compromised mutant PPR3-Ala. However, the RNaseIII (CSR3 produced by SPCSV, which cleaves ds-siRNA and counteracts antiviral RNAi in plants, failed to suppress ssRNA-mediated RNAi in C. elegans. In leaves of N. benthamiana, PPR3 suppressed RNAi induced by ssRNA and dsRNA and reversed silencing; CSR3, however, suppressed only RNAi induced by ssRNA and was unable to reverse silencing. Neither PPR3 nor CSR3 suppressed antisense-mediated RNAi in Drosophila melanogaster. These results show that the RNaseIII enzymes of RNA and DNA viruses suppress RNAi, which requires catalytic activities of RNaseIII. In contrast to other viral silencing suppression proteins, the RNaseIII enzymes are

  15. Peretinoin, an Acyclic Retinoid, Inhibits Hepatitis B Virus Replication by Suppressing Sphingosine Metabolic Pathway In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Murai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC frequently develops from hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. We previously reported that peretinoin, an acyclic retinoid, inhibits HCV replication. This study aimed to examine the influence of peretinoin on the HBV lifecycle. HBV-DNA and covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA were evaluated by a qPCR method in HepG2.2.15 cells. Peretinoin significantly reduced the levels of intracellular HBV-DNA, nuclear cccDNA, and HBV transcript at a concentration that did not induce cytotoxicity. Conversely, other retinoids, such as 9-cis, 13-cis retinoic acid (RA, and all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA, had no effect or rather increased HBV replication. Mechanistically, although peretinoin increased the expression of HBV-related transcription factors, as observed for other retinoids, peretinoin enhanced the binding of histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1 to cccDNA in the nucleus and negatively regulated HBV transcription. Moreover, peretinoin significantly inhibited the expression of SPHK1, a potential inhibitor of HDAC activity, and might be involved in hepatic inflammation, fibrosis, and HCC. SPHK1 overexpression in cells cancelled the inhibition of HBV replication induced by peretinoin. This indicates that peretinoin activates HDAC1 and thereby suppresses HBV replication by inhibiting the sphingosine metabolic pathway. Therefore, peretinoin may be a novel therapeutic agent for HBV replication and chemoprevention against HCC.

  16. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Suppresses Innate Immune Responses via a Ubiquitin and ISG15 Specific Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florine E.M. Scholte

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral responses are regulated by conjugation of ubiquitin (Ub and interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15 to proteins. Certain classes of viruses encode Ub- or ISG15-specific proteases belonging to the ovarian tumor (OTU superfamily. Their activity is thought to suppress cellular immune responses, but studies demonstrating the function of viral OTU proteases during infection are lacking. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV, family Nairoviridae is a highly pathogenic human virus that encodes an OTU with both deubiquitinase and deISGylase activity as part of the viral RNA polymerase. We investigated CCHFV OTU function by inactivating protease catalytic activity or by selectively disrupting its deubiquitinase and deISGylase activity using reverse genetics. CCHFV OTU inactivation blocked viral replication independently of its RNA polymerase activity, while deubiquitinase activity proved critical for suppressing the interferon responses. Our findings provide insights into viral OTU functions and support the development of therapeutics and vaccines.

  17. Nasal lavage natural killer cell function is suppressed in smokers after live attenuated influenza virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Haibo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modified function of immune cells in nasal secretions may play a role in the enhanced susceptibility to respiratory viruses that is seen in smokers. Innate immune cells in nasal secretions have largely been characterized by cellular differentials using morphologic criteria alone, which have successfully identified neutrophils as a significant cell population within nasal lavage fluid (NLF cells. However, flow cytometry may be a superior method to fully characterize NLF immune cells. We therefore characterized immune cells in NLF by flow cytometry, determined the effects of live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV on NLF and peripheral blood immune cells, and compared responses in samples obtained from smokers and nonsmokers. Methods In a prospective observational study, we characterized immune cells in NLF of nonsmokers at baseline using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Nonsmokers and smokers were inoculated with LAIV on day 0 and serial nasal lavages were collected on days 1-4 and day 9 post-LAIV. LAIV-induced changes of NLF cells were characterized using flow cytometry. Cell-free NLF was analyzed for immune mediators by bioassay. Peripheral blood natural killer (NK cells from nonsmokers and smokers at baseline were stimulated in vitro with LAIV followed by flow cytometric and mediator analyses. Results CD45(+CD56(-CD16(+ neutrophils and CD45(+CD56(+ NK cells comprised median 4.62% (range 0.33-14.52 and 23.27% (18.29-33.97, respectively, of non-squamous NLF cells in nonsmokers at baseline. LAIV did not induce changes in total NK cell or neutrophil percentages in either nonsmokers or smokers. Following LAIV inoculation, CD16(+ NK cell percentages and granzyme B levels increased in nonsmokers, and these effects were suppressed in smokers. LAIV inoculation enhanced expression of activating receptor NKG2D and chemokine receptor CXCR3 on peripheral blood NK cells from both nonsmokers and smokers in vitro but did not induce

  18. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1O9JC-3EK1H [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1O9JC-3EK1H 1O9J 3EK1 C H DLPAPLTNIKIQHTKLFINNEWHESVSGKTFPVFNPATEEKICEVEEADKEDVDKA...1O9J C 1O9JC RTIPV-DGEFF ...1O9J C 1O9JC REAFQMGSPWRTM...1O9J C 1O9JC FASAYLMDLDY ...1O9J C 1O9JC EAAAKSNLKRV

  19. Suppression of a Natural Killer Cell Response by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie L Schafer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cell responses in primates are regulated in part through interactions between two highly polymorphic molecules, the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs on NK cells and their major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I ligands on target cells. We previously reported that the binding of a common MHC class I molecule in the rhesus macaque, Mamu-A1*002, to the inhibitory receptor Mamu-KIR3DL05 is stabilized by certain simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV peptides, but not by others. Here we investigated the functional implications of these interactions by testing SIV peptides bound by Mamu-A1*002 for the ability to modulate Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cell responses. Twenty-eight of 75 SIV peptides bound by Mamu-A1*002 suppressed the cytolytic activity of primary Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cells, including three immunodominant CD8+ T cell epitopes previously shown to stabilize Mamu-A1*002 tetramer binding to Mamu-KIR3DL05. Substitutions at C-terminal positions changed inhibitory peptides into disinhibitory peptides, and vice versa, without altering binding to Mamu-A1*002. The functional effects of these peptide variants on NK cell responses also corresponded to their effects on Mamu-A1*002 tetramer binding to Mamu-KIR3DL05. In assays with mixtures of inhibitory and disinhibitory peptides, low concentrations of inhibitory peptides dominated to suppress NK cell responses. Consistent with the inhibition of Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cells by viral epitopes presented by Mamu-A1*002, SIV replication was significantly higher in Mamu-A1*002+ CD4+ lymphocytes co-cultured with Mamu-KIR3DL05+ NK cells than with Mamu-KIR3DL05- NK cells. These results demonstrate that viral peptides can differentially affect NK cell responses by modulating MHC class I interactions with inhibitory KIRs, and provide a mechanism by which immunodeficiency viruses may evade NK cell responses.

  20. Respiratory syncytial virus interferon antagonist NS1 protein suppresses and skews the human T lymphocyte response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Munir

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We recently demonstrated that the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV NS1 protein, an antagonist of host type I interferon (IFN-I production and signaling, has a suppressive effect on the maturation of human dendritic cells (DC that was only partly dependent on released IFN-I. Here we investigated whether NS1 affects the ability of DC to activate CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. Human DC were infected with RSV deletion mutants lacking the NS1 and/or NS2 genes and assayed for the ability to activate autologous T cells in vitro, which were analyzed by multi-color flow cytometry. Deletion of the NS1, but not NS2, protein resulted in three major effects: (i an increased activation and proliferation of CD8+ T cells that express CD103, a tissue homing integrin that directs CD8+ T cells to mucosal epithelial cells of the respiratory tract and triggers cytolytic activity; (ii an increased activation and proliferation of Th17 cells, which have recently been shown to have anti-viral effects and also indirectly attract neutrophils; and (iii decreased activation of IL-4-producing CD4+ T cells--which are associated with enhanced RSV disease--and reduced proliferation of total CD4+ T cells. Except for total CD4+ T cell proliferation, none of the T cell effects appeared to be due to increased IFN-I signaling. In the infected DC, deletion of the NS1 and NS2 genes strongly up-regulated the expression of cytokines and other molecules involved in DC maturation. This was partly IFN-I-independent, and thus might account for the T cell effects. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the NS1 protein suppresses proliferation and activation of two of the protective cell populations (CD103+ CD8+ T cells and Th17 cells, and promotes proliferation and activation of Th2 cells that can enhance RSV disease.

  1. An Oncogenic Virus Promotes Cell Survival and Cellular Transformation by Suppressing Glycolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic glycolysis is essential for supporting the fast growth of a variety of cancers. However, its role in the survival of cancer cells under stress conditions is unclear. We have previously reported an efficient model of gammaherpesvirus Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV-induced cellular transformation of rat primary mesenchymal stem cells. KSHV-transformed cells efficiently induce tumors in nude mice with pathological features reminiscent of Kaposi's sarcoma tumors. Here, we report that KSHV promotes cell survival and cellular transformation by suppressing aerobic glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation under nutrient stress. Specifically, KSHV microRNAs and vFLIP suppress glycolysis by activating the NF-κB pathway to downregulate glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3. While overexpression of the transporters rescues the glycolytic activity, it induces apoptosis and reduces colony formation efficiency in softagar under glucose deprivation. Mechanistically, GLUT1 and GLUT3 inhibit constitutive activation of the AKT and NF-κB pro-survival pathways. Strikingly, GLUT1 and GLUT3 are significantly downregulated in KSHV-infected cells in human KS tumors. Furthermore, we have detected reduced levels of aerobic glycolysis in several KSHV-infected primary effusion lymphoma cell lines compared to a Burkitt's lymphoma cell line BJAB, and KSHV infection of BJAB cells reduced aerobic glycolysis. These results reveal a novel mechanism by which an oncogenic virus regulates a key metabolic pathway to adapt to stress in tumor microenvironment, and illustrate the importance of fine-tuning the metabolic pathways for sustaining the proliferation and survival of cancer cells, particularly under stress conditions.

  2. Anti-hepatitis C virus activity of Acacia confusa extract via suppressing cyclooxygenase-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Ching; Chen, Wei-Chun; Wu, Shou-Fang; Tseng, Chin-Kai; Chiou, Ching-Yi; Chang, Fang-Rong; Hsu, Shih-hsien; Wu, Yang-Chang

    2011-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection continues to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality by chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) throughout the world. It is of tremendous importance to discover more effective and safer agents to improve the clinical treatment on HCV carriers. Here we report that the n-butanol-methanol extract obtained from Acacia confusa plant, referred as ACSB-M4, exhibited the inhibition of HCV RNA replication in the HCV replicon assay system, with an EC(50) value and CC(50)/EC(50) selective index (SI) of 5 ± 0.3 μg/ml and >100, respectively. Besides, ACSB-M4 showed antiviral synergy in combination with IFN-α and as HCV protease inhibitor (Telaprevir; VX-950) and polymerase inhibitor (2'-C-methylcytidine; NM-107) by a multiple linear logistic model and isobologram analysis. A complementary approach involving the overexpression of COX-2 protein in ACSB-M4-treated HCV replicon cells was used to evaluate the antiviral action at the molecular level. ACSB-M4 significantly suppressed COX-2 expression in HCV replicon cells. Viral replication was gradually restored if COX-2 was added simultaneously with ACSB-M4, suggesting that the anti-HCV activity of ACSB-M4 was associated with down-regulation of COX-2, which was correlated with the suppression of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation. ACSB-M4 may serve as a potential protective agent for use in the management of patients with chronic HCV infection. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Adenovirus-encoding virus-associated RNAs suppress HDGF gene expression to support efficient viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saki Kondo

    Full Text Available Non-coding small RNAs are involved in many physiological responses including viral life cycles. Adenovirus-encoding small RNAs, known as virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs, are transcribed throughout the replication process in the host cells, and their transcript levels depend on the copy numbers of the viral genome. Therefore, VA RNAs are abundant in infected cells after genome replication, i.e. during the late phase of viral infection. Their function during the late phase is the inhibition of interferon-inducible protein kinase R (PKR activity to prevent antiviral responses; recently, mivaRNAs, the microRNAs processed from VA RNAs, have been reported to inhibit cellular gene expression. Although VA RNA transcription starts during the early phase, little is known about its function. The reason may be because much smaller amount of VA RNAs are transcribed during the early phase than the late phase. In this study, we applied replication-deficient adenovirus vectors (AdVs and novel AdVs lacking VA RNA genes to analyze the expression changes in cellular genes mediated by VA RNAs using microarray analysis. AdVs are suitable to examine the function of VA RNAs during the early phase, since they constitutively express VA RNAs but do not replicate except in 293 cells. We found that the expression level of hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF significantly decreased in response to the VA RNAs under replication-deficient condition, and this suppression was also observed during the early phase under replication-competent conditions. The suppression was independent of mivaRNA-induced downregulation, suggesting that the function of VA RNAs during the early phase differs from that during the late phase. Notably, overexpression of HDGF inhibited AdV growth. This is the first report to show the function, in part, of VA RNAs during the early phase that may be contribute to efficient viral growth.

  4. Inhibition of Translation Initiation by Protein 169: A Vaccinia Virus Strategy to Suppress Innate and Adaptive Immunity and Alter Virus Virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavla Strnadova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV is the prototypic orthopoxvirus and the vaccine used to eradicate smallpox. Here we show that VACV strain Western Reserve protein 169 is a cytoplasmic polypeptide expressed early during infection that is excluded from virus factories and inhibits the initiation of cap-dependent and cap-independent translation. Ectopic expression of protein 169 causes the accumulation of 80S ribosomes, a reduction of polysomes, and inhibition of protein expression deriving from activation of multiple innate immune signaling pathways. A virus lacking 169 (vΔ169 replicates and spreads normally in cell culture but is more virulent than parental and revertant control viruses in intranasal and intradermal murine models of infection. Intranasal infection by vΔ169 caused increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, infiltration of pulmonary leukocytes, and lung weight. These alterations in innate immunity resulted in a stronger CD8+ T-cell memory response and better protection against virus challenge. This work illustrates how inhibition of host protein synthesis can be a strategy for virus suppression of innate and adaptive immunity.

  5. Inhibition of Translation Initiation by Protein 169: A Vaccinia Virus Strategy to Suppress Innate and Adaptive Immunity and Alter Virus Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strnadova, Pavla; Ren, Hongwei; Valentine, Robert; Mazzon, Michela; Sweeney, Trevor R; Brierley, Ian; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2015-09-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is the prototypic orthopoxvirus and the vaccine used to eradicate smallpox. Here we show that VACV strain Western Reserve protein 169 is a cytoplasmic polypeptide expressed early during infection that is excluded from virus factories and inhibits the initiation of cap-dependent and cap-independent translation. Ectopic expression of protein 169 causes the accumulation of 80S ribosomes, a reduction of polysomes, and inhibition of protein expression deriving from activation of multiple innate immune signaling pathways. A virus lacking 169 (vΔ169) replicates and spreads normally in cell culture but is more virulent than parental and revertant control viruses in intranasal and intradermal murine models of infection. Intranasal infection by vΔ169 caused increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, infiltration of pulmonary leukocytes, and lung weight. These alterations in innate immunity resulted in a stronger CD8+ T-cell memory response and better protection against virus challenge. This work illustrates how inhibition of host protein synthesis can be a strategy for virus suppression of innate and adaptive immunity.

  6. JcDREB2, a Physic Nut AP2/ERF Gene, Alters Plant Growth and Salinity Stress Responses in Transgenic Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuehui; Liu, Kun; Zhang, Ju; Li, Xiaoli; Xu, Kedong; Zhang, Yi; Qi, Jing; Yu, Deshui; Wang, Jian; Li, Chengwei

    2017-01-01

    Transcription factors of the AP2/ERF family play important roles in plant growth, development, and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, a physic nut AP2/ERF gene, JcDREB2, was functionally characterized. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that JcDREB2 was expressed mainly in the leaf and could be induced by abscisic acid but suppressed by gibberellin (GA) and salt. Transient expression of a JcDREB2-YFP fusion protein in Arabidopsis protoplasts cells suggested that JcDREB2 is localized in the nucleus. Rice plants overexpressing JcDREB2 exhibited dwarf and GA-deficient phenotypes with shorter shoots and roots than those of wild-type plants. The dwarfism phenotype could be rescued by the application of exogenous GA3. The expression levels of GA biosynthetic genes including OsGA20ox1, OsGA20ox2, OsGA20ox4, OsGA3ox2, OsCPS1, OsKO2, and OsKAO were significantly reduced in plants overexpressing JcDREB2. Overexpression of JcDREB2 in rice increased sensitivity to salt stress. Increases in the expression levels of several salt-tolerance-related genes in response to salt stress were impaired in JcDREB2-overexpressing plants. These results demonstrated not only that JcDREB2 influences GA metabolism, but also that it can participate in the regulation of the salt stress response in rice.

  7. Effective suppression of Dengue fever virus in mosquito cell cultures using retroviral transduction of hammerhead ribozymes targeting the viral genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Ahmed

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Outbreaks of Dengue impose a heavy economic burden on developing countries in terms of vector control and human morbidity. Effective vaccines against all four serotypes of Dengue are in development, but population replacement with transgenic vectors unable to transmit the virus might ultimately prove to be an effective approach to disease suppression, or even eradication. A key element of the refractory transgenic vector approach is the development of transgenes that effectively prohibit viral transmission. In this report we test the effectiveness of several hammerhead ribozymes for suppressing DENV in lentivirus-transduced mosquito cells in an attempt to mimic the transgenic use of these effector molecules in mosquitoes. A lentivirus vector that expresses these ribozymes as a fusion RNA molecule using an Ae. aegypti tRNAval promoter and terminating with a 60A tail insures optimal expression, localization, and activity of the hammerhead ribozyme against the DENV genome. Among the 14 hammerhead ribozymes we designed to attack the DENV-2 NGC genome, several appear to be relatively effective in reducing virus production from transduced cells by as much as 2 logs. Among the sequences targeted are 10 that are conserved among all DENV serotype 2 strains. Our results confirm that hammerhead ribozymes can be effective in suppressing DENV in a transgenic approach, and provide an alternative or supplementary approach to proposed siRNA strategies for DENV suppression in transgenic mosquitoes.

  8. Esterase D enhances type I interferon signal transduction to suppress foot-and-mouth disease virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwei; Zhu, Zixiang; Cao, Weijun; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Xiangle; Li, Dan; Zhang, Keshan; Li, Pengfei; Mao, Ruoqing; Liu, Xiangtao; Zheng, Haixue

    2016-07-01

    The enzymatic activities of esterase D (ESD) are involved in many human diseases. However, no antiviral property of ESD has been described to date. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the etiological agent of foot-and-mouth disease. In this study, we showed that FMDV infection triggered ESD expression. Overexpression of ESD significantly suppressed FMDV replication and knockdown of ESD expression enhanced virus replication, showing an essential antiviral role of ESD. Furthermore, we found that Sendai-virus-induced interferon (IFN) signaling was enhanced by upregulation of ESD, and ESD promoted activation of the IFN-β promoter simulated by IFN regulatory factor (IRF)3 or its upstream molecules (retinoic acid-inducible gene-I, melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5, virus-induced signaling adaptor and TANK binding kinase 1). Detailed analysis revealed that ESD protein enhanced IRF3 phosphorylation during FMDV infection. Overexpression of ESD also promoted the expression of various antiviral interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and knockdown of ESD impaired the expression of these antiviral genes during FMDV infection. Our findings demonstrate a new mechanism evolved by ESD to enhance type I IFN signal transduction and suppress viral replication during FMDV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. SATAC Knowledge Representation and Automated Reasoning with JC3IEDM: Task 4 - Knowledge Representation Capabilities and Limitations of JC3IEDM and P-JC3IEDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    utilisés pour supporter le raisonnement automatique pour les exemples de raisonnement développés dans la tâche 3 de ce contrat . [1] DRDC Valcartier CR...proceeds with proposing some modifications to P-JC3IEDM in order to facilitate this task. Significance: The discoveries of this report shows that encoding... contrat Représentation de la connaissance et raisonnement automatisé avec JC3IEDM (W7701- 061941/001/QCL). Ce contrat a été réalisé sous les

  10. Tin oxide nanowires suppress herpes simplex virus-1 entry and cell-to-cell membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Trigilio

    Full Text Available The advent of nanotechnology has ushered in the use of modified nanoparticles as potential antiviral agents against diseases such as herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1 (HSV-2, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, monkeypox virus, and hepatitis B virus. Here we describe the application of tin oxide (SnO(2 nanowires as an effective treatment against HSV-1 infection. SnO(2 nanowires work as a carrier of negatively charged structures that compete with HSV-1 attachment to cell bound heparan sulfate (HS, therefore inhibiting entry and subsequent cell-to-cell spread. This promising new approach can be developed into a novel form of broad-spectrum antiviral therapy especially since HS has been shown to serve as a cellular co-receptor for a number of other viruses as well, including the respiratory syncytial virus, adeno-associated virus type 2, and human papilloma virus.

  11. High-dose survival in the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection is accompanied by suppressed DTH but unaffected T-cell cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Volkert, M

    1985-01-01

    Provided that intracerebral inoculation is applied, an increase in the virus dose from 10(2) to 10(4) LD50 of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) leads to strikingly reduced mortality. To analyse the background for this autointerference, we measured several virologic and immunologic variables...... into the footpad of newly virus-challenged mice, DTH was markedly suppressed as compared with the response after transfer of spleen cells from low-dose mice. We therefore conclude that autointerference in the LCMV infection is due to a selective suppression of Td function. Large amounts of persistent virus late...... after infection with high doses of virus suggest a central role for Td function also in virus clearance. Finally, our results indicate the existence of two subsets of K,D region-restricted T cells, one mediating cytotoxicity and the other mediating DTH. This possibility is discussed....

  12. Transient immune suppression of inapparent carriers infected with a principal neutralizing domain-deficient equine infectious anaemia virus induces neutralizing antibodies and lowers steady-state virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigo, Jodi K; Leroux, Caroline; Howe, Laryssa; Steckbeck, Jonathan D; Cook, Sheila J; Issel, Charles J; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2002-06-01

    The genetic variation of equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) clearly affects the antigenic properties of the viral envelope; however, effects on immunogenicity remain undefined, although widely assumed. Here, the immunogenicity is reported of a novel, neutralization-resistant, pony-isolate envelope EIAV(PV564DeltaPND) that contains a 14-residue deletion in the designated principal neutralizing domain (PND) of the gp90 protein. Two ponies inoculated with a chimeric virus, EIAV(DeltaPND), containing the EIAV(PV564DeltaPND) envelope in a reference provirus strain, remained asymptomatic through 14 months post-inoculation, producing high steady-state levels of envelope-specific antibodies but no detectable serum-neutralizing antibodies. Consequent dexamethasone-induced immune suppression produced characteristic EIA that resolved concomitantly with the development of high-titre, strain-specific, neutralizing antibodies and a 100-fold reduction in steady-state virus loads. These results demonstrate: natural variations in the EIAV envelope have profound effects on both antigenic and immunogenic properties; the PND is not required for neutralizing antibody responses; and transient immune suppression can enhance established host immunity to achieve more effective control of steady-state lentivirus replication.

  13. Jasmonic acid-mediated defense suppresses brassinosteroid-mediated susceptibility to Rice black streaked dwarf virus infection in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuqing; Zhang, Hehong; Sun, Zongtao; Li, Junmin; Hong, Gaojie; Zhu, Qisong; Zhou, Xuebiao; MacFarlane, Stuart; Yan, Fei; Chen, Jianping

    2017-04-01

    Plant hormones play a vital role in plant immune responses. However, in contrast to the relative wealth of information on hormone-mediated immunity in dicot plants, little information is available on monocot-virus defense systems. We used a high-throughput-sequencing approach to compare the global gene expression of Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV)-infected rice plants with that of healthy plants. Exogenous hormone applications and transgenic rice were used to test RBSDV infectivity and pathogenicity. Our results revealed that the jasmonic acid (JA) pathway was induced while the brassinosteroid (BR) pathway was suppressed in infected plants. Foliar application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) or brassinazole (BRZ) resulted in a significant reduction in RBSDV incidence, while epibrassinolide (BL) treatment increased RBSDV infection. Infection studies using coi1-13 and Go mutants demonstrated JA-mediated resistance and BR-mediated susceptibility to RBSDV infection. A mixture of MeJA and BL treatment resulted in a significant reduction in RBSDV infection compared with a single BL treatment. MeJA application efficiently suppressed the expression of BR pathway genes, and this inhibition depended on the JA coreceptor OsCOI1. Collectively, our results reveal that JA-mediated defense can suppress the BR-mediated susceptibility to RBSDV infection. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. A cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus shows enhanced suppression of stem-cell like colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, So Young; Bang, Seo Young; Jeong, Su-Nam; Kang, Dae Hwan; Heo, Jeong

    2016-03-29

    Stem cell-like colon cancer cells (SCCs) pose a major challenge in colon cancer treatment because of their resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Oncolytic virus-based therapy has shown promising results in uncured cancer patients; however, its effects on SCCs are not well studied yet. Here, we engineered a cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus (CVV) as a potent biotherapeutic and investigated its therapeutic efficacy in terms of killing SCCs. CVV is an evolved Wyeth strain vaccinia virus (EVV) lacking the viral thymidine kinase. SCC models were established using human or mouse colon cancer spheres, which continuously expressed stemness markers. The cancer-favoring characteristics and different cytotoxic pathways for killing cancer cells successfully overrode general drug resistance, thereby killing colon cancer cells regardless of the presence of SCCs. Subcutaneously injected HT29 spheres showed lower growth in CVV-treated models than in 5-Fu-treated models. Intraperitoneally injected CT26 spheres induced tumor masses in the abdominal region. CVV-treated groups showed higher survival rates and smaller tumor mass formation, compared to 5-Fu-treated groups. Interestingly, the combined treatment of CVV with 5-Fu showed improved survival rates and complete suppression of tumor mass. The CVV developed in this study, thus, effectively suppresses SCCs, which can be synergistically enhanced by simultaneous treatment with the anticancer drug 5-Fu. Our novel CVV is highly advantageous as a next-generation therapeutic for treating colon cancer.

  15. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1O9JC-1A4SD [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1O9JC-1A4SD 1O9J 1A4S C D ------DLPAPLTNIKIQHTKLFINNEWHESVSG-KTFPVFNPATEEKICEVEEAD...1O9J C 1O9JC ESVSG-KTFPV ...1O9J C 1O9JC FASAYLMDLDY ...1O9J C 1O9JC IVPGYGPTAGA ...1O9J C 1O9JC EAAAKSNLKRV

  16. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1A0JC-1ELAA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1A0JC-1ELAA 1A0J 1ELA C A IVGGYECRKNSASYQASLQS--GYHF---CGGSLISSTWVVSAAHCYKS--RIQVR...1A0J C 1A0JC HCYKS--RIQVR...1A0J C 1A0JC PVVCN----GQLQG...1A0J C 1A0JC VSWGY--GCAQR...1A0J C 1A0JC LSGSSSNYPDT

  17. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1A0JC-2G4UA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1A0JC-2G4UA 1A0J 2G4U C A IVGGYECRKNSASYQASLQS--GYHF---CGGSLISSTWVVSAAHCY-KS-RIQVR...1A0J C 1A0JC PVVCN----GQLQG...1A0J C 1A0JC VSWGY--GCAQR...1A0J C 1A0JC LSGSSSNYPDT ...1A0J C 1A0JC MFCAGFMEGGK

  18. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1A0JC-2A7JA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1A0JC-2A7JA 1A0J 2A7J C A IVGGYECRKNSASYQASLQS--GYHF---CGGSLISSTWVVSAAHCY-KS-RIQVR...1A0J C 1A0JC PVVCN----GQLQG...1A0J C 1A0JC VSWGY--GCAQR...1A0J C 1A0JC LSGSSSNYPDT ...1A0J C 1A0JC MFCAGFMEGGK

  19. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1A0JC-1DDJB [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1A0JC-1DDJB 1A0J 1DDJ C B -----------------IVGGYECRKNSASYQASLQSG--YHFCGGSLISSTWVVS...1A0J C 1A0JC AHCYK-----SRIQV...1A0J C 1A0JC SCNSA--YPGQI...1A0J C 1A0JC PVVCN----GQLQG...1A0J C 1A0JC SGWGNLSGSSSN

  20. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1A0JC-2FOBA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1A0JC-2FOBA 1A0J 2FOB C A IVGGYECRKNSASYQASLQS--GYHF---CGGSLISSTWVVSAAHCYKS--RIQVR...1A0J C 1A0JC HCYKS--RIQVR...1A0J C 1A0JC PVVCN----GQLQG...1A0J C 1A0JC VSWGY--GCAQR...1A0J C 1A0JC LSGSSSNYPDT

  1. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1A0JC-1OP8C [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1A0JC-1OP8C 1A0J 1OP8 C C IVGGYECRKNSASYQASLQSGY-HFCGGSLISSTWVVSAAHCY-KSRIQVRLGEHN...1A0J C 1A0JC AAHCY-KSRIQ ...1A0J C 1A0JC VSWGY--GCAQR...1A0J C 1A0JC VYTKV-CNYRS ...1A0J C 1A0JC GWGNLSGSSSN

  2. J.C. Christensens ministermødereferater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duedahl, Poul

    J.C. Christensen (1856-1930) var i mere end et kvart århundrede en af Danmarks ledende politikere. Dette kildeskrift indeholder hans private ministermødeprotokol for de år, hvor han sad som kontrolminister i den radikale C.Th. Zahles regering. På væsentlige punkter supplerer og korrigerer...... protokollen de hidtidige kendte officielle referater, ligesom den indeholder skildringer af statsrådsmøder og nogle private samtaler, J.C. Christensen førte med Christian 10. Protokollen rummer væsentlige detaljer om den vanskelige tid under 1. verdenskrig og om J.C. Christensen som politiker, særlig om hans...

  3. Suppression of Jasmonic Acid-Mediated Defense by Viral-Inducible MicroRNA319 Facilitates Virus Infection in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Ding, Zuomei; Wu, Kangcheng; Yang, Liang; Li, Yang; Yang, Zhen; Shi, Shan; Liu, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Shanshan; Yang, Zhirui; Wang, Yu; Zheng, Luping; Wei, Juan; Du, Zhenguo; Zhang, Aihong; Miao, Hongqin; Li, Yi; Wu, Zujian; Wu, Jianguo

    2016-09-06

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are pivotal modulators of plant development and host-virus interactions. However, the roles and action modes of specific miRNAs involved in viral infection and host susceptibility remain largely unclear. In this study, we show that Rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV) infection caused increased accumulation of miR319 but decreased expression of miR319-regulated TCP (TEOSINTE BRANCHED/CYCLOIDEA/PCF) genes, especially TCP21, in rice plants. Transgenic rice plants overexpressing miR319 or downregulating TCP21 exhibited disease-like phenotypes and showed significantly higher susceptibility to RRSV in comparison with the wild-type plants. In contrast, only mild disease symptoms were observed in RRSV-infected lines overexpressing TCP21 and especially in the transgenic plants overexpressing miR319-resistant TCP21. Both RRSV infection and overexpression of miR319 caused the decreased endogenous jasmonic acid (JA) levels along with downregulated expression of JA biosynthesis and signaling-related genes in rice. However, treatment of rice plants with methyl jasmonate alleviated disease symptoms caused by RRSV and reduced virus accumulation. Taken together, our results suggest that the induction of miR319 by RRSV infection in rice suppresses JA-mediated defense to facilitate virus infection and symptom development. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic variability of the VP1 gene of BK and JC polyomaviruses in HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karalić Danijela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human polyomaviruses, BK virus (BKV and JC virus (JCV, are world widely distributed in human population. After primary infection, BKV and JCV establish latency in kidneys and upper part of urinary tract. In seropositive healthy individuals asymptomatic reactivation of both viruses occurs in in 0.5-20%. On the other hand, reactivation of these viruses in imunosuppressed patients, primarily in patients with T cell immunodeficiency, can lead to development of polyomavirus-associated diseases. Some of these diseases such as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML, polyomavirus-induced nephropathy (PVN, hemorrhagic cystitis (HC are life-threatening diseases with high mortality and morbidity rate. However, they do not affect all immunosuppressed patients, suggesting that other factors, such as genetic variability of BKV and JCV, can contribute to their occurrence. Immunosuppression leads to increased levels of replication of both viruses. Increased levels of replication are associated with higher incidence of mutations in the VP1 gene. Mutations, especially those located in outer loops, may lead to changed tropism and generation of more aggressive variants of BKV and JCV. This review is focused on clinical significance of BK and JC virus infection in immunosuppressed patients, especially in HIV-infected, and sequence changes in the VP1 gene that can contribute to selection of more virulent variants of BKV and JCV via adaptive evolution.

  5. A novel, polymer-coated oncolytic measles virus overcomes immune suppression and induces robust antitumor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaname Nosaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although various therapies are available to treat cancers, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, cancer has been the leading cause of death in Japan for the last 30 years, and new therapeutic modalities are urgently needed. As a new modality, there has recently been great interest in oncolytic virotherapy, with measles virus being a candidate virus expected to show strong antitumor effects. The efficacy of virotherapy, however, was strongly limited by the host immune response in previous clinical trials. To enhance and prolong the antitumor activity of virotherapy, we combined the use of two newly developed tools: the genetically engineered measles virus (MV-NPL and the multilayer virus-coating method of layer-by-layer deposition of ionic polymers. We compared the oncolytic effects of this polymer-coated MV-NPL with the naked MV-NPL, both in vitro and in vivo. In the presence of anti-MV neutralizing antibodies, the polymer-coated virus showed more enhanced oncolytic activity than did the naked MV-NPL in vitro. We also examined antitumor activities in virus-treated mice. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity and antitumor activities were higher in mice treated with polymer-coated MV-NPL than in mice treated with the naked virus. This novel, polymer-coated MV-NPL is promising for clinical cancer therapy in the future.

  6. Amino acid sequences mediating vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 binding to integrin alpha 4: homologous DSP sequence found for JC polyoma VP1 coat protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Andrew Meyer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The JC polyoma viral coat protein VP1 was analyzed for amino acid sequences homologies to the IDSP sequence which mediates binding of VLA-4 (integrin alpha 4 to vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Although the full sequence was not found, a DSP sequence was located near the critical arginine residue linked to infectivity of the virus and binding to sialic acid containing molecules such as integrins (3. For the JC polyoma virus, a DSP sequence was found at residues 70, 71 and 72 with homology also noted for the mouse polyoma virus and SV40 virus. Three dimensional modeling of the VP1 molecule suggests that the DSP loop has an accessible site for interaction from the external side of the assembled viral capsid pentamer.

  7. The Dependence of 1 J(C, H)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The INDO-FTP calculated 3J(C-5, H) values depend on the corresponding dihedral angle and the spatial relationships of the C=N double bond and the aryl group. Key Words: (C, H) coupling constants, Nitrogen lone-pair, Carbonyl group, INDO-FPT calculations, Diazepam South African Journal of Chemistry Vol.57 2004: ...

  8. Adeno-associated virus-mediated doxycycline-regulatable TRAIL expression suppresses growth of human breast carcinoma in nude mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Liu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL functions as a cytokine to selectively kill various cancer cells without toxicity to most normal cells. Numerous studies have demonstrated the potential use of recombinant soluble TRAIL as a cancer therapeutic agent. We have showed previous administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV vector expressing soluble TRAIL results in an efficient suppression of human tumor growth in nude mice. In the present study, we introduced Tet-On gene expression system into the rAAV vector to control the soluble TRAIL expression and evaluate the efficiency of the system in cancer gene therapy. Methods Controllability of the Tet-On system was determined by luciferase activity assay, and Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. Cell viability was determined by MTT assay. The breast cancer xenograft animal model was established and recombinant virus was administrated through tail vein injection to evaluate the tumoricidal activity. Results The expression of soluble TRAIL could be strictly controlled by the Tet-On system in both normal and cancer cells. Transduction of human cancer cell lines with rAAV-TRE-TRAIL&rAAV-Tet-On under the presence of inducer doxycycline resulted in a considerable cell death by apoptosis. Intravenous injection of the recombinant virus efficiently suppressed the growth of human breast carcinoma in nude mice when activated by doxycycline. Conclusion These data suggest that rAAV-mediated soluble TRAIL expression under the control of the Tet-On system is a promising strategy for breast cancer therapy.

  9. Perinatal Exposure to Insecticide Methamidophos Suppressed Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines Responding to Virus Infection in Lung Tissues in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Watanabe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methamidophos, a representative organophosphate insecticide, is regulated because of its severe neurotoxicity, but it is suspected of contaminating agricultural foods in many countries due to illicit use. To reveal unknown effects of methamidophos on human health, we evaluated the developmental immunotoxicity of methamidophos using a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection mouse model. Pregnant mice were exposed to methamidophos (10 or 20 ppm in their drinking water from gestation day 10 to weaning on postnatal day 21. Offsprings born to these dams were intranasally infected with RSV. The levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interferon-gamma in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids after infection were significantly decreased in offspring mice exposed to methamidophos. Treatment with methamidophos did not affect the pulmonary viral titers but suppressed moderately the inflammation of lung tissues of RSV-infected offspring, histopathologically. DNA microarray analysis revealed that gene expression of the cytokines in the lungs of offspring mice exposed to 20 ppm of methamidophos was apparently suppressed compared with the control. Methamidophos did not suppress IL-6 production in RSV-infected J774.1 cell cultures. Thus, exposure of the mother to methamidophos during pregnancy and nursing was suggested to cause an irregular immune response in the lung tissues in the offspring mice.

  10. The VP3 factor from viruses of Birnaviridae family suppresses RNA silencing by binding both long and small RNA duplexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Valli

    Full Text Available RNA silencing is directly involved in antiviral defense in a wide variety of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, fungi, invertebrates, and presumably vertebrate animals. The study of RNA silencing-mediated antiviral defences in vertebrates is hampered by the overlap with other antiviral mechanisms; thus, heterologous systems are often used to study the interplay between RNA silencing and vertebrate-infecting viruses. In this report we show that the VP3 protein of the avian birnavirus Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV displays, in addition to its capacity to bind long double-stranded RNA, the ability to interact with double-stranded small RNA molecules. We also demonstrate that IBDV VP3 prevents the silencing mediated degradation of a reporter mRNA, and that this silencing suppression activity depends on its RNA binding ability. Furthermore, we find that the anti-silencing activity of IBDV VP3 is shared with the homologous proteins expressed by both insect- and fish-infecting birnaviruses. Finally, we show that IBDV VP3 can functionally replace the well-characterized HCPro silencing suppressor of Plum pox virus, a potyvirus that is unable to infect plants in the absence of an active silencing suppressor. Altogether, our results support the idea that VP3 protects the viral genome from host sentinels, including those of the RNA silencing machinery.

  11. The VP3 factor from viruses of Birnaviridae family suppresses RNA silencing by binding both long and small RNA duplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, Adrian; Busnadiego, Idoia; Maliogka, Varvara; Ferrero, Diego; Castón, José R; Rodríguez, José Francisco; García, Juan Antonio

    2012-01-01

    RNA silencing is directly involved in antiviral defense in a wide variety of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, fungi, invertebrates, and presumably vertebrate animals. The study of RNA silencing-mediated antiviral defences in vertebrates is hampered by the overlap with other antiviral mechanisms; thus, heterologous systems are often used to study the interplay between RNA silencing and vertebrate-infecting viruses. In this report we show that the VP3 protein of the avian birnavirus Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) displays, in addition to its capacity to bind long double-stranded RNA, the ability to interact with double-stranded small RNA molecules. We also demonstrate that IBDV VP3 prevents the silencing mediated degradation of a reporter mRNA, and that this silencing suppression activity depends on its RNA binding ability. Furthermore, we find that the anti-silencing activity of IBDV VP3 is shared with the homologous proteins expressed by both insect- and fish-infecting birnaviruses. Finally, we show that IBDV VP3 can functionally replace the well-characterized HCPro silencing suppressor of Plum pox virus, a potyvirus that is unable to infect plants in the absence of an active silencing suppressor. Altogether, our results support the idea that VP3 protects the viral genome from host sentinels, including those of the RNA silencing machinery.

  12. Comparative Inactivation of Murine Norovirus, Human Adenovirus, and Human JC Polyomavirus by Chlorine in Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu Corrêa, Adriana; Carratala, Anna; Barardi, Celia Regina Monte; Calvo, Miquel; Bofill-Mas, Sílvia

    2012-01-01

    Viruses excreted by humans affect the commercial and recreational use of coastal water. Shellfish produced in contaminated waters have been linked to many episodes and outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis, as well as other food-borne diseases worldwide. The risk can be reduced by appropriate treatment following harvesting and by depuration. The kinetics of inactivation of murine norovirus 1 and human adenovirus 2 in natural and artificial seawater by free available chlorine was studied by quantifying genomic copies (GC) using quantitative PCR and infectious viral particles (PFU). Human JC polyomavirus Mad4 kinetics were evaluated by quantitative PCR. DNase or RNase were used to eliminate free genomes and assess potential viral infectivity when molecular detection was performed. At 30 min of assay, human adenovirus 2 showed 2.6- and 2.7-log10 GC reductions and a 2.3- and 2.4-log10 PFU reductions in natural and artificial seawater, respectively, and infectious viral particles were still observed at the end of the assay. When DNase was used prior to the nucleic acid extraction the kinetic of inactivation obtained by quantitative PCR was statistically equivalent to the one observed by infectivity assays. For murine norovirus 1, 2.5, and 3.5-log10 GC reductions were observed in natural and artificial seawater, respectively, while no viruses remained infectious after 30 min of contact with chlorine. Regarding JC polyomavirus Mad4, 1.5- and 1.1-log10 GC reductions were observed after 30 min of contact time. No infectivity assays were conducted for this virus. The results obtained provide data that might be applicable to seawater used in shellfish depuration. PMID:22773637

  13. Adenovirus vectors lacking virus-associated RNA expression enhance shRNA activity to suppress hepatitis C virus replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zheng; Shi, Guoli; Kondo, Saki; Ito, Masahiko; Maekawa, Aya; Suzuki, Mariko; Saito, Izumu; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Kanegae, Yumi

    2013-12-01

    First-generation adenovirus vectors (FG AdVs) expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) effectively downregulate the expressions of target genes. However, this vector, in fact, expresses not only the transgene product, but also virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs) that disturb cellular RNAi machinery. We have established a production method for VA-deleted AdVs lacking expression of VA RNAs. Here, we showed that the highest shRNA activity was obtained when the shRNA was inserted not at the popularly used E1 site, but at the E4 site. We then compared the activities of shRNAs against hepatitis C virus (HCV) expressed from VA-deleted AdVs or conventional AdVs. The VA-deleted AdVs inhibited HCV production much more efficiently. Therefore, VA-deleted AdVs were more effective than the currently used AdVs for shRNA downregulation, probably because of the lack of competition between VA RNAs and the shRNAs. These VA-deleted AdVs might enable more effective gene therapies for chronic hepatitis C.

  14. Influenza Virus Reassortment Is Enhanced by Semi-infectious Particles but Can Be Suppressed by Defective Interfering Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonville, Judith M; Marshall, Nicolle; Tao, Hui; Steel, John; Lowen, Anice C

    2015-10-01

    A high particle to infectivity ratio is a feature common to many RNA viruses, with ~90-99% of particles unable to initiate a productive infection under low multiplicity conditions. A recent publication by Brooke et al. revealed that, for influenza A virus (IAV), a proportion of these seemingly non-infectious particles are in fact semi-infectious. Semi-infectious (SI) particles deliver an incomplete set of viral genes to the cell, and therefore cannot support a full cycle of replication unless complemented through co-infection. In addition to SI particles, IAV populations often contain defective-interfering (DI) particles, which actively interfere with production of infectious progeny. With the aim of understanding the significance to viral evolution of these incomplete particles, we tested the hypothesis that SI and DI particles promote diversification through reassortment. Our approach combined computational simulations with experimental determination of infection, co-infection and reassortment levels following co-inoculation of cultured cells with two distinct influenza A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2)-based viruses. Computational results predicted enhanced reassortment at a given % infection or multiplicity of infection with increasing semi-infectious particle content. Comparison of experimental data to the model indicated that the likelihood that a given segment is missing varies among the segments and that most particles fail to deliver ≥1 segment. To verify the prediction that SI particles augment reassortment, we performed co-infections using viruses exposed to low dose UV. As expected, the introduction of semi-infectious particles with UV-induced lesions enhanced reassortment. In contrast to SI particles, inclusion of DI particles in modeled virus populations could not account for observed reassortment outcomes. DI particles were furthermore found experimentally to suppress detectable reassortment, relative to that seen with standard virus stocks, most likely by

  15. Influenza Virus Reassortment Is Enhanced by Semi-infectious Particles but Can Be Suppressed by Defective Interfering Particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith M Fonville

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A high particle to infectivity ratio is a feature common to many RNA viruses, with ~90-99% of particles unable to initiate a productive infection under low multiplicity conditions. A recent publication by Brooke et al. revealed that, for influenza A virus (IAV, a proportion of these seemingly non-infectious particles are in fact semi-infectious. Semi-infectious (SI particles deliver an incomplete set of viral genes to the cell, and therefore cannot support a full cycle of replication unless complemented through co-infection. In addition to SI particles, IAV populations often contain defective-interfering (DI particles, which actively interfere with production of infectious progeny. With the aim of understanding the significance to viral evolution of these incomplete particles, we tested the hypothesis that SI and DI particles promote diversification through reassortment. Our approach combined computational simulations with experimental determination of infection, co-infection and reassortment levels following co-inoculation of cultured cells with two distinct influenza A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2-based viruses. Computational results predicted enhanced reassortment at a given % infection or multiplicity of infection with increasing semi-infectious particle content. Comparison of experimental data to the model indicated that the likelihood that a given segment is missing varies among the segments and that most particles fail to deliver ≥1 segment. To verify the prediction that SI particles augment reassortment, we performed co-infections using viruses exposed to low dose UV. As expected, the introduction of semi-infectious particles with UV-induced lesions enhanced reassortment. In contrast to SI particles, inclusion of DI particles in modeled virus populations could not account for observed reassortment outcomes. DI particles were furthermore found experimentally to suppress detectable reassortment, relative to that seen with standard virus stocks

  16. Nasal lavage natural killer cell function is suppressed in smokers after live attenuated influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background Modified function of immune cells in nasal secretions may playa role in the enhanced susceptibility to resp iratory viruses that is seen in smokers. Innate immune cells in nasal secretions have largely been characterized by cellular differentials using morphologic c...

  17. The NS3 protein of rice hoja blanca virus suppresses RNA silencing in mammalian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnettler, E.; Hemmes, J.C.; Goldbach, R.W.; Prins, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    The NS3 protein of the tenuivirus rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV) has previously been shown to represent the viral RNA interference (RNAi) suppressor and is active in both plant and insect cells by binding short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in vitro. Using a firefly luciferase-based silencing assay it is

  18. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1A0JC-1DDJC [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1A0JC-1DDJC 1A0J 1DDJ C C -----------------IVGGYECRKNSASYQASLQSG--YHFCGGSLISSTWVVS...1A0J C 1A0JC AHCYK-----SRIQV...1DDJ C 1DDJC AHCLEKSPRPSSYKV...1A0J C 1A0JC SCNSA--YPGQI...1DDJ C 1DDJC VCNRYEFLNGRV

  19. Performance of Microbial Concrete Developed Using Bacillus Subtilus JC3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. V. Seshagiri; Reddy, V. Srinivasa; Sasikala, Ch.

    2017-12-01

    Concrete is vulnerable to deterioration, corrosion, and cracks, and the consequent damage and loss of strength requires immensely expensive remediation and repair. So need for special concrete that they would respond to crack formation with an autonomous self-healing action lead to research and development of microbial concrete. The microbial concrete works on the principle of calcite mineral precipitation by a specific group of alkali-resistant spore-forming bacteria related to the genus Bacillus called Bacillus subtilis JC3, this phenomenon is called biomineralization or Microbiologically Induced Calcite Crystal Precipitation. Bacillus subtilis JC3, a common soil bacterium, has inherent ability to precipitate calcite crystals continuously which enhances the strength and durability performance of concrete enormously. This microbial concrete can be called as a "Self healing Bacterial Concrete" because it can remediate its cracks by itself without any human intervention and would make the concrete more durable and sustainable. This paper discuss the incorporation of microorganism Bacillus subtilis JC3 (developed at JNTU, India) into concrete and presents the results of experimental investigations carried out to study the improved durability and sustainability characteristics of microbial concrete.

  20. Hepatitis C virus coinfection does not influence the CD4 cell recovery in HIV-1-infected patients with maximum virologic suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Mocroft, Amanda; Soriano, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conflicting data exist whether hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects the CD4 cell recovery in patients with HIV starting antiretroviral treatment. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of HCV coinfection on the CD4 recovery in patients with maximum virologic suppression within the Euro...

  1. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in macaques is not suppressed by intranasal sprays of pyrimidine biosynthesis inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandin, Clément; Hourani, Marianne-Lucas; Janin, Yves L; Dauzonne, Daniel; Munier-Lehmann, Hélène; Paturet, Adeline; Taborik, Fabrice; Vabret, Astrid; Contamin, Hugues; Tangy, Frédéric; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier

    2016-01-01

    There is imperious need for efficient therapies against ubiquitous and life-threatening respiratory viruses, foremost among them being the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Several research groups who performed functional screens for broad-spectrum antivirals identified compounds targeting the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway. Despite their strong antiviral activity in vitro, whether such antimetabolites are effective in vivo remains highly controversial. Here, we evaluated two potent pyrimidine biosynthesis inhibitors developed in our laboratory, IPPA17-A04 and GAC50, in a model of mild hRSV-infection in cynomolgus macaques. In this model, hRSV replication is restricted to the epithelium of the upper respiratory tract, and is compatible with a topical treatment by intranasal sprays. The local administration of palivizumab, a neutralizing anti-hRSV antibody used in clinics, significantly reduced virus replication. In contrast, pyrimidine biosynthesis inhibitors did not show any inhibitory effect on hRSV growth when delivered topically as experimented in our model. Our results should help to better define the potential applications of this class of antimetabolites in the treatment of viral infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Suppressive Effects of the Site 1 Protease (S1P) Inhibitor, PF-429242, on Dengue Virus Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Leo; Urata, Shuzo; Ulanday, Gianne Eduard L; Takamatsu, Yuki; Yasuda, Jiro; Morita, Kouichi; Hayasaka, Daisuke

    2016-02-10

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes one of the most widespread mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Despite the great need, effective vaccines and practical antiviral therapies are still under development. Intracellular lipid levels are regulated by sterol regulatory elements-binding proteins (SREBPs), which are activated by serine protease, site 1 protease (S1P). Small compound PF-429242 is known as a S1P inhibitor and the antivirus effects have been reported in some viruses. In this study, we examined the anti-DENV effects of PF-429242 using all four serotypes of DENV by several primate-derived cell lines. Moreover, emergence of drug-resistant DENV mutants was assessed by sequential passages with the drug. DENV dependency on intracellular lipids during their infection was also evaluated by adding extracellular lipids. The addition of PF-429242 showed suppression of viral propagation in all DENV serotypes. We showed that drug-resistant DENV mutants are unlikely to emerge after five times sequential passages through treatment with PF-429242. Although the levels of intracellular cholesterol and lipid droplets were reduced by PF-429242, viral propagations were not recovered by addition of exogenous cholesterol or fatty acids, indicating that the reduction of LD and cholesterol caused by PF-429242 treatment is not related to its mechanism of action against DENV propagation. Our results suggest that PF-429242 is a promising candidate for an anti-DENV agent.

  3. Suppressive Effects of the Site 1 Protease (S1P Inhibitor, PF-429242, on Dengue Virus Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Uchida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV infection causes one of the most widespread mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Despite the great need, effective vaccines and practical antiviral therapies are still under development. Intracellular lipid levels are regulated by sterol regulatory elements-binding proteins (SREBPs, which are activated by serine protease, site 1 protease (S1P. Small compound PF-429242 is known as a S1P inhibitor and the antivirus effects have been reported in some viruses. In this study, we examined the anti-DENV effects of PF-429242 using all four serotypes of DENV by several primate-derived cell lines. Moreover, emergence of drug-resistant DENV mutants was assessed by sequential passages with the drug. DENV dependency on intracellular lipids during their infection was also evaluated by adding extracellular lipids. The addition of PF-429242 showed suppression of viral propagation in all DENV serotypes. We showed that drug-resistant DENV mutants are unlikely to emerge after five times sequential passages through treatment with PF-429242. Although the levels of intracellular cholesterol and lipid droplets were reduced by PF-429242, viral propagations were not recovered by addition of exogenous cholesterol or fatty acids, indicating that the reduction of LD and cholesterol caused by PF-429242 treatment is not related to its mechanism of action against DENV propagation. Our results suggest that PF-429242 is a promising candidate for an anti-DENV agent.

  4. Characterization of a Suppressive Cis-acting Element in the Epstein–Barr Virus LMP1 Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Yoshida

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 is a major oncogene encoded by Epstein–Barr virus (EBV and is essential for immortalization of B cells by the virus. Previous studies suggested that several transcription factors, such as PU.1, RBP-Jκ, NFκB, EBF1, AP-2 and STAT, are involved in LMP1 induction; however, the means by which the oncogene is negatively regulated remains unclear. Here, we introduced short mutations into the proximal LMP1 promoter that includes recognition sites for the E-box and Ikaros transcription factors in the context of EBV-bacterial artificial chromosome. Upon infection, the mutant exhibited increased LMP1 expression and EBV-mediated immortalization of B cells. However, single mutations of either the E-box or Ikaros sites had limited effects on LMP1 expression and transformation. Our results suggest that this region contains a suppressive cis-regulatory element, but other transcriptional repressors (apart from the E-box and Ikaros transcription factors may remain to be discovered.

  5. Citrus tristeza virus p23: determinants for nucleolar localization and their influence on suppression of RNA silencing and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Soler, Nuria; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús; Fagoaga, Carmen; López, Carmelo; Navarro, Luis; Moreno, Pedro; Peña, Leandro; Flores, Ricardo

    2013-03-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) encodes a singular protein (p23, 209 amino acids) with multiple functions, including RNA silencing suppression (RSS). Confocal laser-scanning microscopy of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-p23 agroexpressed in Nicotiana benthamiana revealed its accumulation in the nucleolus, Cajal bodies, and plasmodesmata. To dissect the nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) typically associated with basic motifs, seven truncated and 10 point-mutated versions of p23 were assayed. Deletion mutants showed that regions 50 to 86 and 100 to 157 (excluding fragment 106 to 114), both with basic motifs and the first with a zinc-finger, contain the (bipartite) NoLS. Alanine substitutions delimited this signal to three cysteines of the Zn-finger and some basic amino acids. RSS activity of p23 in N. benthamiana was abolished by essentially all mutants, indicating that it involves most p23 regions. The necrotic-inducing ability of p23 when launched in N. benthamiana from Potato virus X was only retained by deletion mutant 158-209 and one substitution mutant, showing that the Zn-finger and flanking basic motifs form part of the pathogenic determinant. Ectopic expression of p23 and some deletion mutants in transgenic Mexican lime demarcated a similar determinant, suggesting that p23 affects related pathways in citrus and N. benthamiana. Both RSS activity and pathogenicity of p23 appear related to its nucleolar localization.

  6. T-705 (Favipiravir) suppresses tumor necrosis factor α production in response to influenza virus infection: A beneficial feature of T-705 as an anti-influenza drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, T; Kamiyama, T; Daikoku, T; Takahashi, K; Nomura, N; Kurokawa, M; Shiraki, K

    Influenza virus infection induces the production of various cytokines, which play important roles in the pathogenesis of infection. Among the cytokines induced by influenza, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) production has been correlated with the severity of lung lesions. We investigated the effects of T-705 (Favipiravir, 6-fluoro-3-hydroxy-2-pyrazinecarboxamide) on cytokine production due to influenza virus infection in vitro and in vivo, compared with oseltamivir or GS 4071, an active form of oseltamivir. TNF-α production in mouse macrophage-derived P388D1 cells infected with the influenza virus was lower following treatment with T-705 at concentrations of 0.3 to 100 µg/ml than treatment with GS 4071 at the same concentrations. The effect of treatment with T-705 on the cytokine production induced by the influenza virus infection was investigated in mouse influenza virus infection model. At 48 h post-infection (p.i.) T-705 significantly suppressed the viral load in the lungs and TNF-α production in the airways of infected mice even when viral loads were high. Furthermore, T-705 suppressed only TNF-α production from the early phase of infection. In this study, T-705 showed the antiviral activity of reducing pulmonary viral load compared with oseltamivir, thereby suppressing the TNF-α production. This feature of T-705 is benefit against severe influenza infection.

  7. Ethanol suppression of peripheral blood mononuclear cell trafficking across brain endothelial cells in immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola C Hudson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lola C Hudson1, Brenda A Colby1, Rick B Meeker21Department of Molecular Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA; 2Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: Earlier studies suggested that the combination of alcohol use and immunodeficiency virus infection resulted in more severe neurologic disease than either condition individually. These deleterious interactions could be due to increased immune cell and virus trafficking or may result from interactions between ethanol and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-associated toxicity within the brain. To determine the extent to which increased trafficking played a role, we examined the effect of ethanol on the migration of different peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMCs subsets across a brain endothelial cell monolayer. We utilized combinations of feline brain endothelial cells with astrocytes, and/or microglia with either acute exposure to 0.08 g/dL ethanol, a combination of ethanol and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, or FIV alone. Adherence of PBMCs to endothelium was increased in all combinations of cells with the addition of ethanol. Despite increased PBMC adhesion with ethanol treatment, transmigration of B cells, monocytes, CD4 T cells and CD8 T cells was not increased and was actually decreased in the presence of astrocytes. Expression of three common adhesion molecules, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1, ICAM2, and vascular cell adhesion molecule, was unchanged or slightly decreased by ethanol. This indicated that although adherence is increased by ethanol it is not due to an increased expression of adhesion molecules. RANTES, MIP1α, MIP1β, and MCP-1 mRNA expression was also studied in brain endothelial cells, astrocytes and microglia by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Ethanol treatment of astrocytes resulted in modest changes of

  8. In situ vaccination with cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles suppresses metastatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizotte, P. H.; Wen, A. M.; Sheen, M. R.; Fields, J.; Rojanasopondist, P.; Steinmetz, N. F.; Fiering, S.

    2016-03-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential to contribute to cancer immunotherapy. The ‘in situ vaccination’ immunotherapy strategy directly manipulates identified tumours to overcome local tumour-mediated immunosuppression and subsequently stimulates systemic antitumour immunity to treat metastases. We show that inhalation of self-assembling virus-like nanoparticles from cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) reduces established B16F10 lung melanoma and simultaneously generates potent systemic antitumour immunity against poorly immunogenic B16F10 in the skin. Full efficacy required Il-12, Ifn-γ, adaptive immunity and neutrophils. Inhaled CPMV nanoparticles were rapidly taken up by and activated neutrophils in the tumour microenvironment as an important part of the antitumour immune response. CPMV also exhibited clear treatment efficacy and systemic antitumour immunity in ovarian, colon, and breast tumour models in multiple anatomic locations. CPMV nanoparticles are stable, nontoxic, modifiable with drugs and antigens, and their nanomanufacture is highly scalable. These properties, combined with their inherent immunogenicity and demonstrated efficacy against a poorly immunogenic tumour, make CPMV an attractive and novel immunotherapy against metastatic cancer.

  9. Suppression of collagen-induced arthritis with a serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) derived from myxoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahn, Ernest; Lee, Sarah; Lucas, Alexandra; McFadden, Grant; Macaulay, Colin

    2014-08-01

    Many viruses encode virulence factors to facilitate their own survival by modulating a host's inflammatory response. One of these factors, secreted from cells infected with myxoma virus, is the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) Serp-1. Because Serp-1 had demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties in arterial injury models and viral infections, it was cloned and evaluated for therapeutic efficacy in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Clinical severity was significantly lower in the Serp-1 protocols (p<0.0001) and blinded radiographs indicated that the Serp-1 group had significantly less erosions than the controls (p<0.01). Delayed-type hypersensitivity was lower in the Serp-1 group but antibody titers to type II collagen were not significantly altered. Recipients had minimal histopathologic synovial changes and did not develop neutralizing antibodies to Serp-1. These results indicate that Serp-1 impedes the pathogenesis of CIA and suggests that the therapeutic potential of serine proteinase inhibitors in inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, should be investigated further. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus that encodes nonstructural proteins of the hepatitis C virus suppresses viral protein levels in mouse liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Sekiguchi

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C, which is caused by infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV, is a global health problem. Using a mouse model of hepatitis C, we examined the therapeutic effects of a recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV that encodes an HCV protein. We generated immunocompetent mice that each expressed multiple HCV proteins via a Cre/loxP switching system and established several distinct attenuated rVV strains. The HCV core protein was expressed consistently in the liver after polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid injection, and these mice showed chronic hepatitis C-related pathological findings (hepatocyte abnormalities, accumulation of glycogen, steatosis, liver fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Immunization with one rVV strain (rVV-N25, which encoded nonstructural HCV proteins, suppressed serum inflammatory cytokine levels and alleviated the symptoms of pathological chronic hepatitis C within 7 days after injection. Furthermore, HCV protein levels in liver tissue also decreased in a CD4 and CD8 T-cell-dependent manner. Consistent with these results, we showed that rVV-N25 immunization induced a robust CD8 T-cell immune response that was specific to the HCV nonstructural protein 2. We also demonstrated that the onset of chronic hepatitis in CN2-29((+/-/MxCre((+/- mice was mainly attributable to inflammatory cytokines, (tumor necrosis factor TNF-α and (interleukin IL-6. Thus, our generated mice model should be useful for further investigation of the immunological processes associated with persistent expression of HCV proteins because these mice had not developed immune tolerance to the HCV antigen. In addition, we propose that rVV-N25 could be developed as an effective therapeutic vaccine.

  11. Suppression of Zika virus infection and replication in endothelial cells and astrocytes by PKA inhibitor PKI 14-22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fan; Ramos da Silva, Suzane; Huang, I-Chueh; Jung, Jae U; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2017-12-06

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV), a re-emerging flavivirus, and its associated neurological disorders, such as Guillain-Barré (GB) syndrome and microcephaly, have generated an urgent need for developing effective ZIKV vaccines and therapeutic agents. Here, we used human endothelial cells and astrocytes, both of which represent key cell types for ZIKV infection, to identify potential inhibitors for ZIKV replication. Because several pathways, including AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), protein kinase A (PKA), and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, have been reported to play important roles in flavivirus replication, we tested inhibitors or agonists of these pathways for their effects on ZIKV replication. We identified PKA inhibitor, PKI 14-22 (PKI), as a potent inhibitor of ZIKV replication. PKI effectively suppressed the replication of ZIKV from both African and Asian/American lineages with high efficiency and minimal cytotoxicity. While ZIKV infection did not induce PKA activation, endogenous PKA activity was essential for supporting ZIKV replication. Interestingly, in addition to PKA, PKI also inhibited other unknown target(s) to block ZIKV replication. PKI inhibited ZIKV replication at the post-entry stage by preferentially affecting negative-sense RNA synthesis as well as viral protein translation. Together, these results have identified a potential inhibitor of ZIKV replication, which could be further explored for future therapeutic application.ImportanceThere is an urgent need to develop effective vaccines and therapeutic agents against Zika virus (ZIKV) infection, a re-emerging flavivirus associated with neurological disorders including Guillain-Barré (GB) syndrome and microcephaly. By screening for inhibitors of several cellular pathways, we have identified PKA inhibitor PKI 14-22 (PKI) as a potent inhibitor of ZIKV replication. We have shown that PKI effectively suppresses the replication of ZIKV of all the strains

  12. Suppression of NK cells and regulatory T lymphocytes in cats naturally infected with feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Ben L; Devriendt, Bert; Olyslaegers, Dominique A; Dedeurwaerder, Annelike; Desmarets, Lowiese M; Favoreel, Herman W; Dewerchin, Hannah L; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2013-05-31

    A strong cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is thought to be indispensable for protection against infection with feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) in cats. In this study, the role of natural killer (NK) cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs), central players in the innate and adaptive CMI respectively, was examined during natural FIPV infection. When quantified, both NK cells and Tregs were drastically depleted from the peripheral blood, mesenteric lymph node (LN) and spleen in FIP cats. In contrast, mesentery and kidney from FIP cats did not show any difference when compared to healthy non-infected control animals. In addition, other regulatory lymphocytes (CD4+CD25-Foxp3+ and CD3+CD8+Foxp3+) were found to be depleted from blood and LN as well. Phenotypic analysis of blood-derived NK cells in FIP cats revealed an upregulation of activation markers (CD16 and CD25) and migration markers (CD11b and CD62L) while LN-derived NK cells showed upregulation of only CD16 and CD62L. LN-derived NK cells from FIPV-infected cats were also significantly less cytotoxic when compared with healthy cats. This study reveals for the first time that FIPV infection is associated with severe suppression of NK cells and Tregs, which is reflected by cell depletion and lowered cell functionality (only NK cells). This will un-doubtfully lead to a reduced capacity of the innate immune system (NK cells) to battle FIPV infection and a decreased capacity (Tregs) to suppress the immunopathology typical for FIP. However, these results will also open possibilities for new therapies targeting specifically NK cells and Tregs to enhance their numbers and/or functionality during FIPV infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Targeting PI3K-p110α Suppresses Influenza Virus Infection in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Alan Chen-Yu; Starkey, Malcolm R; Hanish, Irwan; Parsons, Kristy; Haw, Tatt Jhong; Howland, Linda J; Barr, Ian; Mahony, James B; Foster, Paul S; Knight, Darryl A; Wark, Peter A; Hansbro, Philip M

    2015-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and influenza virus infections are major global health issues. Patients with COPD are more susceptible to infection, which exacerbates their condition and increases morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms of increased susceptibility remain poorly understood, and current preventions and treatments have substantial limitations. To characterize the mechanisms of increased susceptibility to influenza virus infection in COPD and the potential for therapeutic targeting. We used a combination of primary bronchial epithelial cells (pBECs) from COPD and healthy control subjects, a mouse model of cigarette smoke-induced experimental COPD, and influenza infection. The role of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway was characterized using molecular methods, and its potential for targeting assessed using inhibitors. COPD pBECs were susceptible to increased viral entry and replication. Infected mice with experimental COPD also had more severe infection (increased viral titer and pulmonary inflammation, and compromised lung function). These processes were associated with impaired antiviral immunity, reduced retinoic acid-inducible gene-I, and IFN/cytokine and chemokine responses. Increased PI3K-p110α levels and activity in COPD pBECs and/or mice were responsible for increased infection and reduced antiviral responses. Global PI3K, specific therapeutic p110α inhibitors, or exogenous IFN-β restored protective antiviral responses, suppressed infection, and improved lung function. The increased susceptibility of individuals with COPD to influenza likely results from impaired antiviral responses, which are mediated by increased PI3K-p110α activity. This pathway may be targeted therapeutically in COPD, or in healthy individuals, during seasonal or pandemic outbreaks to prevent and/or treat influenza.

  14. Hepatitis C virus coinfection does not influence the CD4 cell recovery in HIV-1-infected patients with maximum virologic suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Mocroft, Amanda; Soriano, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conflicting data exist whether hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects the CD4 cell recovery in patients with HIV starting antiretroviral treatment. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of HCV coinfection on the CD4 recovery in patients with maximum virologic suppression within the Euro...... for HCV treatment and HCV-RNA VL did not change the findings. CONCLUSIONS: HCV serostatus did not influence the CD4 recovery in patients with HIV with maximum virologic suppression after starting combination antiretroviral therapy. Furthermore, no difference in CD4 gain was found when comparing distinct...

  15. Salmonella mediated the hemagglutinating virus of Japan-envelope transfer suppresses tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Che-Hsin; Nishikawa, Tomoyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2017-05-23

    Salmonella can target to tumor microenvironments after systemic treatment. The hemagglutinating virus of Japan-envelope (HVJ-E) induced apoptosis in tumor cells without toxicity in normal cells. Current HVJ-E therapeutic strategies, aimed at using HVJ-E for intratumor treatment, have shown great promise in animal models but have achieved only limited systemic treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the modulation of the anti-tumor efficiency of HVJ-E by coating the particles with poly (allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), designated as P-HVJ-E. Treatment with P-HVJ-E resulted in decreased hemagglutinating activity and maintained tumor cell-selective apoptosis and anti-tumor immunity. The use of Salmonella as a coating for P-HVJ-E (PHS) enhanced the antitumor activity and maintained the tumor-targeting activity. Treatment with PHS resulted in delayed tumor growth in tumor-bearing mice. Furthermore, a Western blot assay of the tumors revealed that HVJ-E targeted to the tumor after systemic treatment with PHS. These results indicate that Salmonella coating viral particles may provide a new approach for tumor therapy.

  16. Hepatitis C virus suppresses C9 complement synthesis and impairs membrane attack complex function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hangeun; Meyer, Keith; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M; Ray, Ranjit

    2013-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) proteins inhibit complement component expression, which may attenuate immunity against infection. In this study, we examined whether HCV regulates the membrane attack complex (MAC) via complement component C9. MAC is composed of C5b to C9 (C5b-9) and mediates cell lysis of invaded pathogens. Liver biopsy specimens from chronically HCV-infected patients exhibited a lower level of C9 mRNA expression than liver biopsy specimens from unrelated disease or healthy control human liver RNA. Hepatocytes infected with cell culture-grown HCV or expressing HCV core protein also displayed significant repression of C9 mRNA and protein levels. Promoter analysis suggested that the T cell factor-4 (TCF-4E) transcription factor is responsible for HCV core-mediated C9 promoter regulation. Sera from chronically HCV-infected patients displayed a lower level of C5b-9 and a reduced antimicrobial effect on model organisms compared to unrelated patient sera or sera from healthy volunteers. Together, these results for C9 regulation by HCV core protein coupled with functional impairment of the membrane attack complex underscore HCV-mediated attenuation of immune mechanisms.

  17. Differentially expressed genes in a flock of Chinese local-breed chickens infected with a subgroup J avian leukosis virus using suppression subtractive hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Guiping Zhao; Maiqing Zheng; Jilan Chen; Jie Wen; Chunmei Wu; Wenjuan Li; Libo Liu; Yuan Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is a new type of virus that mainly induces myeloid leukosis (ML) in chickens. To further elucidate the pathogenesis of ALV-J infection and tumor development, expression profiles from the bone marrow tissue of 15 infected and 18 non-infected birds from a local-breed poultry-farm under naturally infected conditions, were analyzed by suppression-subtractive hybridization. The birds were diagnosed as ML+ (or ML-) by specific ALV-J detection methods, involvi...

  18. Hepatitis C Virus Driven AXL Expression Suppresses the Hepatic Type I Interferon Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Read

    Full Text Available Treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is evolving rapidly with the development of novel direct acting antivirals (DAAs, however viral clearance remains intimately linked to the hepatic innate immune system. Patients demonstrating a high baseline activation of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs, termed interferon refractoriness, are less likely to mount a strong antiviral response and achieve viral clearance when placed on treatment. As a result, suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS 3 and other regulators of the IFN response have been identified as key candidates for the IFN refractory phenotype due to their regulatory role on the IFN response. AXL is a receptor tyrosine kinase that has been identified as a key regulator of interferon (IFN signalling in myeloid cells of the immune system, but has not been examined in the context of chronic HCV infection. Here, we show that AXL is up-regulated following HCV infection, both in vitro and in vivo and is likely induced by type I/III IFNs and inflammatory signalling pathways. AXL inhibited type IFNα mediated ISG expression resulting in a decrease in its antiviral efficacy against HCV in vitro. Furthermore, patients possessing the favourable IFNL3 rs12979860 genotype associated with treatment response, showed lower AXL expression in the liver and a stronger induction of AXL in the blood, following their first dose of IFN. Together, these data suggest that elevated AXL expression in the liver may mediate an IFN-refractory phenotype characteristic of patients possessing the unfavourable rs12979860 genotype, which is associated with lower rates of viral clearance.

  19. The C2 Protein from the Geminivirus Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Sardinia Virus Decreases Sensitivity to Jasmonates and Suppresses Jasmonate-Mediated Defences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tábata Rosas-Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing body of evidence points at a role of the plant hormones jasmonates (JAs in determining the outcome of plant-virus interactions. Geminiviruses, small DNA viruses infecting a wide range of plant species worldwide, encode a multifunctional protein, C2, which is essential for full pathogenicity. The C2 protein has been shown to suppress the JA response, although the current view on the extent of this effect and the underlying molecular mechanisms is incomplete. In this work, we use a combination of exogenous hormone treatments, microarray analysis, and pathogen infections to analyze, in detail, the suppression of the JA response exerted by C2. Our results indicate that C2 specifically affects certain JA-induced responses, namely defence and secondary metabolism, and show that plants expressing C2 are more susceptible to pathogen attack. We propose a model in which C2 might interfere with the JA response at several levels.

  20. Do polyomavirus hominis strains BK and JC play a role in oral squamous cell carcinoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Polz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Head and neck cancers are the most common cancers worldwide. It is estimated that approximately 90% of all head and neck cancers are represented by squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. There are many risk factors causing this type of cancer, including environmental factors and lifestyle choices, such as tobacco smoking or abusing alcohol. Other important risk factor include infectious factors. [b]Objective[/b]. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of BK and JC virus infections among patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. [b]Materials and method[/b]. The correlation between BKV infection and OSCC, and correlation between BKV, OSCC, alcohol abuse, tobacco smoking, demographic data, pre-treatment staging, metastases of lymph node evidence, and grading, was analyzed. The study group consisted of 92 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, 75 males, and 17 females, aged between 40 – 87 (average 56.8. All the patients underwent surgery and were not subjected to chemotherapy or radiotherapy prior to treatment. The analyzed samples were collected from paraffin sections. [b]Results[/b]. BKV DNA was detected in 18.5% of patients with OSCC. In the control group, BKV DNA was detected in 3.3%. BKV DNA was statistically more frequently detected among patients with squamous carcinoma, compared to the control group (p<0.05. [b]Conclusions[/b]. The obtained results suggest that the BKV virus may play an important role in the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  1. Pathological Role of Anti-CD4 Antibodies in HIV-Infected Immunologic Nonresponders Receiving Virus-Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhenwu; Li, Zhen; Martin, Lisa; Wan, Zhuang; Meissner, Eric G; Espinosa, Enrique; Wu, Hao; Yu, Xiaocong; Fu, Pingfu; Julia Westerink, Maria Anna; Kilby, J Michael; Wu, Jennifer; Huang, Lei; Heath, Sonya L; Li, Zihai; Jiang, Wei

    2017-07-01

    Increased mortality and morbidity occur among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients in whom CD4+ T-cell counts do not increase despite viral suppression with antiretroviral therapy (ART). Here we identified an underlying mechanism. Significantly elevated plasma levels of anti-CD4 immunoglobulin G (IgG) were found in HIV-positive immunologic nonresponders (ie, HIV-positive individuals with CD4+ T-cell counts of ≤350 cells/μL), compared with levels in HIV-positive immunologic responders (ie, HIV-positive individuals with CD4+ T-cell counts of ≥500 cells/μL) and healthy controls. Higher plasma level of anti-CD4 IgG correlated with blunted CD4+ T-cell recovery. Furthermore, purified anti-CD4 IgG from HIV-positive immunologic nonresponders induced natural killer (NK) cell-dependent CD4+ T-cell cytolysis and apoptosis through antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro. We also found that anti-CD4 IgG-mediated ADCC exerts greater apoptosis of naive CD4+ T cells relative to memory CD4+ T cells. Consistently, increased frequencies of CD107a+ NK cells and profound decreases of naive CD4+ T cells were observed in immunologic nonresponders as compared to responders and healthy controls ex vivo. These data indicate that autoreactive anti-CD4 IgG may play an important role in blunted CD4+ T-cell reconstitution despite effective ART. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Dominant CD8+ T-lymphocyte responses suppress expansion of vaccine-elicited subdominant T lymphocytes in rhesus monkeys challenged with pathogenic simian-human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Edwin R; Yeh, Wendy W; Seaman, Michael S; Furr, Kathryn; Lifton, Michelle A; Hulot, Sandrine L; Autissier, Patrick; Letvin, Norman L

    2009-10-01

    Emerging data suggest that a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response against a diversity of epitopes confers greater protection against a human immunodeficiency virus/simian immunodeficiency virus infection than does a more focused response. To facilitate the creation of vaccine strategies that will generate cellular immune responses with the greatest breadth, it will be important to understand the mechanisms employed by the immune response to regulate the relative magnitudes of dominant and nondominant epitope-specific cellular immune responses. In this study, we generated dominant Gag p11C- and subdominant Env p41A-specific CD8(+) T-lymphocyte responses in Mamu-A*01(+) rhesus monkeys through vaccination with plasmid DNA and recombinant adenovirus encoding simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) proteins. Infection of vaccinated Mamu-A*01(+) rhesus monkeys with a SHIV Gag Deltap11C mutant virus generated a significantly increased expansion of the Env p41A-specific CD8(+) T-lymphocyte response in the absence of secondary Gag p11C-specific CD8(+) T-lymphocyte responses. These results indicate that the presence of the Gag p11C-specific CD8(+) T-lymphocyte response following virus challenge may exert suppressive effects on primed Env p41A-specific CD8(+) T-lymphocyte responses. These findings suggest that immunodomination exerted by dominant responses during SHIV infection may diminish the breadth of recall responses primed during vaccination.

  3. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1A0JC-2ASUB [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available in>1A0JC SLQSG--YHFCG >EEEE -- EEEEucture...ure>EEE EEture> ATOM 121 CA SER B 497 77.7...ain>C 1A0JC NIAVN--EGTEQ ...> -- E> ATOM 3730 CA ASN C 72 46.150 6...IDChain>2ASUB FQNPQHGEPSLQ ture> Ee>

  4. Suppression of RNA silencing by a plant DNA virus satellite requires a host calmodulin-like protein to repress RDR6 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In plants, RNA silencing plays a key role in antiviral defense. To counteract host defense, plant viruses encode viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs that target different effector molecules in the RNA silencing pathway. Evidence has shown that plants also encode endogenous suppressors of RNA silencing (ESRs that function in proper regulation of RNA silencing. The possibility that these cellular proteins can be subverted by viruses to thwart host defense is intriguing but has not been fully explored. Here we report that the Nicotiana benthamiana calmodulin-like protein Nbrgs-CaM is required for the functions of the VSR βC1, the sole protein encoded by the DNA satellite associated with the geminivirus Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV. Nbrgs-CaM expression is up-regulated by the βC1. Transgenic plants over-expressing Nbrgs-CaM displayed developmental abnormities reminiscent of βC1-associated morphological alterations. Nbrgs-CaM suppressed RNA silencing in an Agrobacterium infiltration assay and, when over-expressed, blocked TYLCCNV-induced gene silencing. Genetic evidence showed that Nbrgs-CaM mediated the βC1 functions in silencing suppression and symptom modulation, and was required for efficient virus infection. Moreover, the tobacco and tomato orthologs of Nbrgs-CaM also possessed ESR activity, and were induced by betasatellite to promote virus infection in these Solanaceae hosts. We further demonstrated that βC1-induced Nbrgs-CaM suppressed the production of secondary siRNAs, likely through repressing RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 6 (RDR6 expression. RDR6-deficient N. benthamiana plants were defective in antiviral response and were hypersensitive to TYLCCNV infection. More significantly, TYLCCNV could overcome host range restrictions to infect Arabidopsis thaliana when the plants carried a RDR6 mutation. These findings demonstrate a distinct mechanism of VSR for suppressing PTGS through usurpation of a host ESR, and

  5. Doubly Spliced RNA of Hepatitis B Virus Suppresses Viral Transcription via TATA-Binding Protein and Induces Stress Granule Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuen-Nan; Chong, Chin-Liew; Chou, Yu-Chi; Huang, Chien-Chiao; Wang, Yi-Ling; Wang, Shao-Win; Chen, Mong-Liang; Chen, Chun-Hong; Chang, Chungming

    2015-11-01

    The risk of liver cancer in patients infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and their clinical response to interferon alpha therapy vary based on the HBV genotype. The mechanisms underlying these differences in HBV pathogenesis remain unclear. In HepG2 cells transfected with a mutant HBV(G2335A) expression plasmid that does not transcribe the 2.2-kb doubly spliced RNA (2.2DS-RNA) expressed by wild-type HBV genotype A, the level of HBV pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) was higher than that in cells transfected with an HBV genotype A expression plasmid. By using cotransfection with HBV genotype D and 2.2DS-RNA expression plasmids, we found that a reduction of pgRNA was observed in the cells even in the presence of small amounts of the 2.2DS-RNA plasmid. Moreover, ectopic expression of 2.2DS-RNA in the HBV-producing cell line 1.3ES2 reduced the expression of pgRNA. Further analysis showed that exogenously transcribed 2.2DS-RNA inhibited a reconstituted transcription in vitro. In Huh7 cells ectopically expressing 2.2DS-RNA, RNA immunoprecipitation revealed that 2.2DS-RNA interacted with the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and that nucleotides 432 to 832 of 2.2DS-RNA were required for efficient TBP binding. Immunofluorescence experiments showed that 2.2DS-RNA colocalized with cytoplasmic TBP and the stress granule components, G3BP and poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABP1), in Huh7 cells. In conclusion, our study reveals that 2.2DS-RNA acts as a repressor of HBV transcription through an interaction with TBP that induces stress granule formation. The expression of 2.2DS-RNA may be one of the viral factors involved in viral replication, which may underlie differences in clinical outcomes of liver disease and responses to interferon alpha therapy between patients infected with different HBV genotypes. Patients infected with certain genotypes of HBV have a lower risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and exhibit a more favorable response to antiviral therapy than patients infected with other HBV

  6. Magnetization Measurements of High-Jc Nb3Sn strands

    CERN Document Server

    Bordini, B; Alknes, P; Ballarino, A; Bottura, L; Oberli, L

    2013-01-01

    High critical current density Nb3Sn wires (Jc > 2500 A/mm2 at 4.2 K and 12 T) are the conductors considered for next generation accelerator magnets. At present, the large magnetization of these strands is a concern within the scientific community because of the impact it might have on the magnet field quality. In order to characterize the magnetic behavior of these wires, an extensive campaign of magnetization measurements was launched at CERN. Powder In Tube (PIT) strands by Bruker-EAS and Restacked Rod Process (RRP®) strands by Oxford Superconducting Technology (OST) were measured between 0 T and 10.5 T at different temperatures (ranging from 1.9 K to 14.5 K). The samples, based on strands with different sub-elements dimensions (35 to 80 μm), were measured with a Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). The experimental data were analyzed to: 1) calculate the effective filament size and the optimal parameters for the pinning force scaling law; 2) define the field-temperature region where there are flux...

  7. Hepatitis C Virus Frameshift/Alternate Reading Frame Protein Suppresses Interferon Responses Mediated by Pattern Recognition Receptor Retinoic-Acid-Inducible Gene-I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Bum Park

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV actively evades host interferon (IFN responses but the mechanisms of how it does so are not completely understood. In this study, we present evidence for an HCV factor that contributes to the suppression of retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I-mediated IFN induction. Expression of frameshift/alternate reading frame protein (F/ARFP from HCV -2/+1 frame in Huh7 hepatoma cells suppressed type I IFN responses stimulated by HCV RNA pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP and poly(IC. The suppression occurred independently of other HCV factors; and activation of interferon stimulated genes, TNFα, IFN-λ1, and IFN-λ2/3 was likewise suppressed by HCV F/ARFP. Point mutations in the full-length HCV sequence (JFH1 genotype 2a strain were made to introduce premature termination codons in the -2/+1 reading frame coding for F/ARFP while preserving the original reading frame, which enhanced IFNα and IFNβ induction by HCV. The potentiation of IFN response by the F/ARFP mutations was diminished in Huh7.5 cells, which already have a defective RIG-I, and by decreasing RIG-I expression in Huh7 cells. Furthermore, adding F/ARFP back via trans-complementation suppressed IFN induction in the F/ARFP mutant. The F/ARFP mutants, on the other hand, were not resistant to exogenous IFNα. Finally, HCV-infected human liver samples showed significant F/ARFP antibody reactivity, compared to HCV-uninfected control livers. Therefore, HCV F/ARFP likely cooperates with other viral factors to suppress type I and III IFN induction occurring through the RIG-I signaling pathway. This study identifies a novel mechanism of pattern recognition receptor modulation by HCV and suggests a biological function of the HCV alternate reading frame in the modulation of host innate immunity.

  8. JC polyomavirus infection is strongly controlled by human leucocyte antigen class II variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Sundqvist

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available JC polyomavirus (JCV carriers with a compromised immune system, such as in HIV, or subjects on immune-modulating therapies, such as anti VLA-4 therapy may develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML which is a lytic infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain. Serum antibodies to JCV mark infection occur only in 50-60% of infected individuals, and high JCV-antibody titers seem to increase the risk of developing PML. We here investigated the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA, instrumental in immune defense in JCV antibody response. Anti-JCV antibody status, as a surrogate for JCV infection, were compared to HLA class I and II alleles in 1621 Scandinavian persons with MS and 1064 population-based Swedish controls and associations were replicated in 718 German persons with MS. HLA-alleles were determined by SNP imputation, sequence specific (SSP kits and a reverse PCR sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO method. An initial GWAS screen displayed a strong HLA class II region signal. The HLA-DRB1*15 haplotype was strongly negatively associated to JCV sero-status in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 0.42, p = 7×10(-15 and controls (OR = 0.53, p = 2×10(-5. In contrast, the DQB1*06:03 haplotype was positively associated with JCV sero-status, in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 1.63, p = 0.006, and controls (OR = 2.69, p = 1×10(-5. The German dataset confirmed these findings (OR = 0.54, p = 1×10(-4 and OR = 1.58, p = 0.03 respectively for these haplotypes. HLA class II restricted immune responses, and hence CD4+ T cell immunity is pivotal for JCV infection control. Alleles within the HLA-DR1*15 haplotype are associated with a protective effect on JCV infection. Alleles within the DQB1*06:03 haplotype show an opposite association. These associations between JC virus antibody response and human leucocyte antigens supports the notion that CD4+ T cells are crucial in the immune defence to JCV and

  9. Complete suppression of viral gene expression is associated with the onset and progression of lymphoid malignancy: observations in Bovine Leukemia Virus-infected sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burny Arsène

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During malignant progression, tumor cells need to acquire novel characteristics that lead to uncontrolled growth and reduced immunogenicity. In the Bovine Leukemia Virus-induced ovine leukemia model, silencing of viral gene expression has been proposed as a mechanism leading to immune evasion. However, whether proviral expression in tumors is completely suppressed in vivo was not conclusively demonstrated. Therefore, we studied viral expression in two selected experimentally-infected sheep, the virus or the disease of which had features that made it possible to distinguish tumor cells from their nontransformed counterparts. Results In the first animal, we observed the emergence of a genetically modified provirus simultaneously with leukemia onset. We found a Tax-mutated (TaxK303 replication-deficient provirus in the malignant B-cell clone while functional provirus (TaxE303 had been consistently monitored over the 17-month aleukemic period. In the second case, both non-transformed and transformed BLV-infected cells were present at the same time, but at distinct sites. While there was potentially-active provirus in the non-leukemic blood B-cell population, as demonstrated by ex-vivo culture and injection into naïve sheep, virus expression was completely suppressed in the malignant B-cells isolated from the lymphoid tumors despite the absence of genetic alterations in the proviral genome. These observations suggest that silencing of viral genes, including the oncoprotein Tax, is associated with tumor onset. Conclusion Our findings suggest that silencing is critical for tumor progression and identify two distinct mechanisms-genetic and epigenetic-involved in the complete suppression of virus and Tax expression. We demonstrate that, in contrast to systems that require sustained oncogene expression, the major viral transforming protein Tax can be turned-off without reversing the transformed phenotype. We propose that suppression

  10. Viral suppression of multiple escape mutants by de novo CD8(+) T cell responses in a human immunodeficiency virus-1 infected elite suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Karen A; Hegarty, Robert W; Siliciano, Robert F; Blankson, Joel N

    2011-08-03

    Elite suppressors or controllers (ES) are HIV-1 infected patients who maintain undetectable viral loads without treatment. While HLA-B*57-positive ES are usually infected with virus that is unmutated at CTL epitopes, a single, dominant variant containing CTL escape mutations is typically seen in plasma during chronic infection. We describe an ES who developed seven distinct and rare escape variants at an HLA-B*57-restricted Gag epitope over a five year period. Interestingly, he developed proliferative, de novo CTL responses that suppressed replication of each of these variants. These responses, in combination with low viral fitness of each variant, may contribute to sustained elite control in this ES.

  11. Double Plant Homeodomain Fingers 2 (DPF2) Promotes the Immune Escape of Influenza Virus by Suppressing Beta Interferon Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongjo; Lee, Jihye; Park, Ji Hoon; Min, Ji-Young

    2017-06-15

    The high mutation rates of the influenza virus genome facilitate the generation of viral escape mutants, rendering vaccines and drugs against influenza virus-encoded targets potentially ineffective. Therefore, we identified host cell determinants dispensable for the host but crucial for virus replication, with the goal of preventing viral escape and finding effective antivirals. To identify these host factors, we screened 2,732 human genes using RNA interference and focused on one of the identified host factors, the double plant homeodomain fingers 2 (DPF2/REQ) gene, for this study. We found that knockdown of DPF2 in cells infected with influenza virus resulted in decreased expression of viral proteins and RNA. Furthermore, production of progeny virus was reduced by two logs in the multiple-cycle growth kinetics assay. We also found that DPF2 was involved in the replication of seasonal influenza A and B viruses. Because DPF2 plays a crucial role in the noncanonical NF-κB pathway, which negatively regulates type I interferon (IFN) induction, we examined the relationship between DPF2 and IFN responses during viral infection. The results showed that knockdown of DPF2 resulted in increased expression of IFN-β and induced phosphorylation of STAT1 in infected cells. In addition, high levels of several cytokines/chemokines (interleukin-8 [IL-8], IP-10, and IL-6) and antiviral proteins (MxA and ISG56) were produced by DPF2 knockdown cells. In conclusion, we identified a novel host factor, DPF2, that is required for influenza virus to evade the host immune response and that may serve as a potential antiviral target.IMPORTANCE Influenza virus is responsible for seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics and is an ongoing threat to public health worldwide. Influenza virus relies heavily on cellular factors to complete its life cycle. Here we identified a novel host factor, DPF2, which is involved in influenza virus infection. Our results showed that DPF2 plays a crucial

  12. Structure of the Lassa virus nucleoprotein reveals a dsRNA-specific 3' to 5' exonuclease activity essential for immune suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Kathryn M; Kimberlin, Christopher R; Zandonatti, Michelle A; MacRae, Ian J; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2011-02-08

    Lassa fever virus, a member of the family Arenaviridae, is a highly endemic category A pathogen that causes 300,000-500,000 infections per year in Western Africa. The arenaviral nucleoprotein NP has been implicated in suppression of the host innate immune system, but the mechanism by which this occurs has remained elusive. Here we present the crystal structure at 1.5 Å of the immunosuppressive C-terminal portion of Lassa virus NP and illustrate that, unexpectedly, its 3D fold closely mimics that of the DEDDh family of exonucleases. Accompanying biochemical experiments illustrate that NP indeed has a previously unknown, bona fide exonuclease activity, with strict specificity for double-stranded RNA substrates. We further demonstrate that this exonuclease activity is essential for the ability of NP to suppress translocation of IFN regulatory factor 3 and block activation of the innate immune system. Thus, the nucleoprotein is a viral exonuclease with anti-immune activity, and this work provides a unique opportunity to combat arenaviral infections.

  13. High Temperature, High Ambient CO2 Affect the Interactions between Three Positive-Sense RNA Viruses and a Compatible Host Differentially, but not Their Silencing Suppression Efficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Toro, Francisco J.; Aguilar, Emmanuel; Hernández-Walias, Francisco J.; Tenllado, Francisco; Chung, Bong-Nam; Canto, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    We compared infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants by the positive-sense RNA viruses Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Potato virus Y (PVY), and by a Potato virus X (PVX) vector, the latter either unaltered or expressing the CMV 2b protein or the PVY HCPro suppressors of silencing, at 25°C vs. 30°C, or at standard (~401 parts per million, ppm) vs. elevated (970 ppm) CO2 levels. We also assessed the activities of their suppressors of silencing under those conditions. We found that at 30°C, accumulation of the CMV isolate and infection symptoms remained comparable to those at 25°C, whereas accumulation of the PVY isolate and those of the three PVX constructs decreased markedly, even when expressing the heterologous suppressors 2b or HCPro, and plants had either very attenuated or no symptoms. Under elevated CO2 plants grew larger, but contained less total protein/unit of leaf area. In contrast to temperature, infection symptoms remained unaltered for the five viruses at elevated CO2 levels, but viral titers in leaf disks as a proportion of the total protein content increased in all cases, markedly for CMV, and less so for PVY and the PVX constructs. Despite these differences, we found that neither high temperature nor elevated CO2 prevented efficient suppression of silencing by their viral suppressors in agropatch assays. Our results suggest that the strength of antiviral silencing at high temperature or CO2 levels, or those of the viral suppressors that counteract it, may not be the main determinants of the observed infection outcomes. PMID:26313753

  14. Agonistic anti-CD40 antibody profoundly suppresses the immune response to infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Christina; Kauffmann, Susanne Ørding; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2007-01-01

    Previous work has shown that agonistic Abs to CD40 (anti-CD40) can boost weak CD8 T cell responses as well as substitute for CD4 T cell function during chronic gammaherpes virus infection. Agonistic anti-CD40 treatment has, therefore, been suggested as a potential therapeutic strategy in immunoco......Previous work has shown that agonistic Abs to CD40 (anti-CD40) can boost weak CD8 T cell responses as well as substitute for CD4 T cell function during chronic gammaherpes virus infection. Agonistic anti-CD40 treatment has, therefore, been suggested as a potential therapeutic strategy...... also collapsed prematurely, and virus clearance was delayed. Additional analysis revealed that, following anti-CD40 treatment, the virus-specific CD8 T cells initially proliferated normally, but an increased cell loss compared with that in untreated mice was observed. The anti-CD40-induced abortion...

  15. TRIM5 suppresses cross-species transmission of a primate immunodeficiency virus and selects for emergence of resistant variants in the new species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Kirmaier

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Simian immunodeficiency viruses of sooty mangabeys (SIVsm are the source of multiple, successful cross-species transmissions, having given rise to HIV-2 in humans, SIVmac in rhesus macaques, and SIVstm in stump-tailed macaques. Cellular assays and phylogenetic comparisons indirectly support a role for TRIM5alpha, the product of the TRIM5 gene, in suppressing interspecies transmission and emergence of retroviruses in nature. Here, we investigate the in vivo role of TRIM5 directly, focusing on transmission of primate immunodeficiency viruses between outbred primate hosts. Specifically, we retrospectively analyzed experimental cross-species transmission of SIVsm in two cohorts of rhesus macaques and found a significant effect of TRIM5 genotype on viral replication levels. The effect was especially pronounced in a cohort of animals infected with SIVsmE543-3, where TRIM5 genotype correlated with approximately 100-fold to 1,000-fold differences in viral replication levels. Surprisingly, transmission occurred even in individuals bearing restrictive TRIM5 genotypes, resulting in attenuation of replication rather than an outright block to infection. In cell-culture assays, the same TRIM5 alleles associated with viral suppression in vivo blocked infectivity of two SIVsm strains, but not the macaque-adapted strain SIVmac239. Adaptations appeared in the viral capsid in animals with restrictive TRIM5 genotypes, and similar adaptations coincide with emergence of SIVmac in captive macaques in the 1970s. Thus, host TRIM5 can suppress viral replication in vivo, exerting selective pressure during the initial stages of cross-species transmission.

  16. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 bZIP factor selectively suppresses the classical pathway of NF-kappaB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tiejun; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Satou, Yorifumi; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Fujii, Masahiro; Matsuoka, Masao

    2009-03-19

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a highly aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The activation of NF-kappaB by Tax has been reported to play a crucial role in HTLV-1-induced transformation. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ), which is encoded by an mRNA of the opposite polarity of the viral genomic RNA, is involved in both T cell proliferation and suppression of Tax-mediated viral gene transcription, suggesting that HBZ cooperates closely with Tax. In the present study, we observed that HBZ specifically suppressed NF-kappaB-driven transcription mediated by p65 (the classical pathway) without inhibiting the alternative NF-kappaB signaling pathway. In an immunoprecipitation assay, HBZ bound to p65 and diminished the DNA binding capacity of p65. In addition, HBZ induced p65 degradation through increasing the expression of the PDLIM2 gene, which encodes a ubiquitin E3 ligase for p65. Finally, HBZ actually repressed the transcription of some classical NF-kappaB target genes, such as IL-8, IL2RA, IRF4, VCAM-1, and VEGF. Selective suppression of the classical NF-kappaB pathway by HBZ renders the alternative NF-kappaB pathway predominant after activation of NF-kappaB by Tax or other stimuli, which might be critical for oncogenesis.

  17. Nonstructural 5A Protein of Hepatitis C Virus Interferes with Toll-Like Receptor Signaling and Suppresses the Interferon Response in Mouse Liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeya Tsutsumi

    Full Text Available The hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS5A is involved in resistance to the host immune response, as well as the viral lifecycle such as replication and maturation. Here, we established transgenic mice expressing NS5A protein in the liver and examined innate immune responses against lipopolysaccharide (LPS in vivo. Intrahepatic gene expression levels of cytokines such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ were significantly suppressed after LPS injection in the transgenic mouse liver. Induction of the C-C motif chemokine ligand 2, 4, and 5 was also suppressed. Phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, which is activated by cytokines, was also reduced, and expression levels of interferon-stimulated genes, 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthase, interferon-inducible double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase, and myxovirus resistance 1 were similarly suppressed. Since LPS binds to toll-like receptor 4 and stimulates the downstream pathway leading to induction of these genes, we examined the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and IκB-α. The phosphorylation levels of these molecules were reduced in transgenic mouse liver, indicating that the pathway upstream of the molecules was disrupted by NS5A. Further analyses revealed that the interaction between interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 and tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor-6 was dispersed in transgenic mice, suggesting that NS5A may interfere with this interaction via myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, which was shown to interact with NS5A. Since the gut microbiota, a source of LPS, is known to be associated with pathological conditions in liver diseases, our results suggest the involvement of NS5A in the pathogenesis of HCV infected-liver via the suppression of innate immunity.

  18. Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Suppress NK Cell IFN-γ Production by Altering Cellular Metabolism via Arginase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Celeste C; Roggerson, Krystal M; Lee, Hai-Chon; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Rosen, Hugo R; Hahn, Young S

    2016-03-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects ∼ 200 million people worldwide. The majority of infected individuals develop persistent infection, resulting in chronic inflammation and liver disease, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The ability of HCV to establish persistent infection is partly due to its ability to evade the immune response through multiple mechanisms, including suppression of NK cells. NK cells control HCV replication during the early phase of infection and regulate the progression to chronic disease. In particular, IFN-γ produced by NK cells limits viral replication in hepatocytes and is important for the initiation of adaptive immune responses. However, NK cell function is significantly impaired in chronic HCV patients. The cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for impaired NK cell function in HCV infection are not well defined. In this study, we analyzed the interaction of human NK cells with CD33(+) PBMCs that were exposed to HCV. We found that NK cells cocultured with HCV-conditioned CD33(+) PBMCs produced lower amounts of IFN-γ, with no effect on granzyme B production or cell viability. Importantly, this suppression of NK cell-derived IFN-γ production was mediated by CD33(+)CD11b(lo)HLA-DR(lo) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) via an arginase-1-dependent inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin activation. Suppression of IFN-γ production was reversed by l-arginine supplementation, consistent with increased MDSC arginase-1 activity. These novel results identify the induction of MDSCs in HCV infection as a potent immune evasion strategy that suppresses antiviral NK cell responses, further indicating that blockade of MDSCs may be a potential therapeutic approach to ameliorate chronic viral infections in the liver. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Suppression of type I interferon production by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and degradation of CREB-binding protein by nsp1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qingzhan; Shi, Kaichuang; Yoo, Dongwan, E-mail: dyoo@illinois.edu

    2016-02-15

    Type I interferons (IFN-α/β) are the major components of the innate immune response of hosts, and in turn many viruses have evolved to modulate the host response during infection. We found that the IFN-β production was significantly suppressed during PEDV infection in cells. To identify viral IFN antagonists and to study their suppressive function, viral coding sequences for the entire structural and nonstructural proteins were cloned and expressed. Of 16 PEDV nonstructural proteins (nsps), nsp1, nsp3, nsp7, nsp14, nsp15 and nsp16 were found to inhibit the IFN-β and IRF3 promoter activities. The sole accessory protein ORF3, structure protein envelope (E), membrane (M), and nucleocapsid (N) protein were also shown to inhibit such activities. PEDV nsp1 did not interfere the IRF3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation but interrupted the enhanceosome assembly of IRF3 and CREB-binding protein (CBP) by degrading CBP. A further study showed that the CBP degradation by nsp1 was proteasome-dependent. Our data demonstrate that PEDV modulates the host innate immune responses by degrading CBP and suppressing ISGs expression. - Highlights: • PEDV modulates the host innate immune system by suppressing the type I interferon production and ISGs expression. • Ten viral proteins were identified as IFN antagonists, and nsp1 was the most potent viral IFN antagonist. • PEDV nsp1 did not interfere the IRF3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation but interrupted the enhanceosome assembly of IRF3 and CREB-binding protein (CBP). • PEDV nsp1 caused the CBP degradation in the nucleus, which may be the key mechanism for PEDV-mediated IFN downregulation.

  20. Filariae-Retrovirus Co-infection in Mice is Associated with Suppressed Virus-Specific IgG Immune Response and Higher Viral Loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Kirsten Katrin; Dittmer, Ulf; Koudaimi, Daniel Karim; Schimmer, Simone; Reitz, Martina; Breloer, Minka; Hartmann, Wiebke

    2016-12-01

    Worldwide more than 2 billion people are infected with helminths, predominantly in developing countries. Co-infections with viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are common due to the geographical overlap of these pathogens. Helminth and viral infections induce antagonistic cytokine responses in their hosts. Helminths shift the immune system to a type 2-dominated immune response, while viral infections skew the cytokine response towards a type 1 immune response. Moreover, chronic helminth infections are often associated with a generalized suppression of the immune system leading to prolonged parasite survival, and also to a reduced defence against unrelated pathogens. To test whether helminths affect the outcome of a viral infection we set up a filarial/retrovirus co-infection model in C57BL/6 mice. Although Friend virus (FV) infection altered the L. sigmodontis-specific immunoglobulin response towards a type I associated IgG2 isotype in co-infected mice, control of L. sigmodontis infection was not affected by a FV-superinfection. However, reciprocal control of FV infection was clearly impaired by concurrent L. sigmodontis infection. Spleen weight as an indicator of pathology and viral loads in spleen, lymph nodes (LN) and bone marrow (BM) were increased in L. sigmodontis/FV-co-infected mice compared to only FV-infected mice. Numbers of FV-specific CD8+ T cells as well as cytokine production by CD4+ and CD8+ cells were alike in co-infected and FV-infected mice. Increased viral loads in co-infected mice were associated with reduced titres of neutralising FV-specific IgG2b and IgG2c antibodies. In summary our findings suggest that helminth infection interfered with the control of retroviral infection by dampening the virus-specific neutralising antibody response.

  1. Suppressing active replication of a live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine does not abrogate protection from challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, Benjamin; Fiebig, Uwe; Hohn, Oliver [Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin (Germany); Plesker, Roland; Coulibaly, Cheick; Cichutek, Klaus; Mühlebach, Michael D. [Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Langen (Germany); Bannert, Norbert; Kurth, Reinhard [Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin (Germany); Norley, Stephen, E-mail: NorleyS@rki.de [Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Although safety concerns preclude the use of live attenuated HIV vaccines in humans, they provide a useful system for identifying the elusive correlates of protective immunity in the SIV/macaque animal model. However, a number of pieces of evidence suggest that protection may result from prior occupancy of susceptible target cells by the vaccine virus rather than the immune response. To address this, we developed a Nef-deletion variant of an RT-SHIV whose active replication could be shut off by treatment with RT-inhibitors. Groups of macaques were inoculated with the ∆Nef-RT-SHIV and immune responses allowed to develop before antiretroviral treatment and subsequent challenge with wild-type SIVmac239. Vaccinated animals either resisted infection fully or significantly controlled the subsequent viremia. However, there was no difference between animals undergoing replication of the vaccine virus and those without. This strongly suggests that competition for available target cells does not play a role in protection. - Highlights: • A Nef-deleted RT-SHIV was used as a live attenuated vaccine in macaques. • Vaccine virus replication was shut down to investigate its role in protection. • Ongoing vaccine virus replication did not appear to be necessary for protection. • An analysis of T- and B-cell responses failed to identify a correlate of protection.

  2. Viral suppression of multiple escape mutants by de novo CD8+ T cell responses in a human immunodeficiency virus-1 Infected elite suppressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siliciano Robert F

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Elite suppressors or controllers (ES are HIV-1 infected patients who maintain undetectable viral loads without treatment. While HLA-B*57-positive ES are usually infected with virus that is unmutated at CTL epitopes, a single, dominant variant containing CTL escape mutations is typically seen in plasma during chronic infection. We describe an ES who developed seven distinct and rare escape variants at an HLA-B*57-restricted Gag epitope over a five year period. Interestingly, he developed proliferative, de novo CTL responses that suppressed replication of each of these variants. These responses, in combination with low viral fitness of each variant, may contribute to sustained elite control in this ES.

  3. NK cells are strongly activated by Lassa and Mopeia virus-infected human macrophages in vitro but do not mediate virus suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russier, Marion; Reynard, Stéphanie; Tordo, Noël; Baize, Sylvain

    2012-07-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) and Mopeia virus (MOPV) are closely related Arenaviruses. LASV causes hemorrhagic fever, whereas MOPV is not pathogenic. Both viruses display tropism for APCs such as DCs and macrophages. During viral infections, NK cells are involved in the clearance of infected cells and promote optimal immune responses by interacting with APCs. We used an in vitro model of human NK and APC coculture to study the role of NK cells and to characterize their interactions with APCs during LASV and MOPV infections. As expected, NK cells alone were neither infected nor activated by LASV and MOPV, and infected DCs did not activate NK cells. By contrast, LASV- and MOPV-infected macrophages activated NK cells, as shown by the upregulation of CD69, NKp30, and NKp44, the downregulation of CXCR3, and an increase in NK-cell proliferation. NK cells acquired enhanced cytotoxicity, as illustrated by the increase in granzyme B (GrzB) expression and killing of K562 targets, but did not produce IFN-γ. Contact between NK cells and infected macrophages and type I IFNs were essential for activation; however, NK cells could not kill infected cells and control infection. Overall, these findings show that MOPV- as well as pathogenic LASV-infected macrophages mediate NK-cell activation. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Identification of genes expressed in response to yellow head virus infection in the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prapavorarat, Adisak; Pongsomboon, Siriporn; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2010-06-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was employed to identify yellow head virus (YHV)-responsive genes from the hemocytes of the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon. Two SSH cDNA libraries were constructed to identify viral responsive genes in the early (24I) and late (48/72I) phases of YHV infection. From 240 randomly selected clones from each library, 155 and 30 non-redundant transcripts were obtained for the early and late libraries, respectively. From these clones, 72 and 16, respectively, corresponded to known genes (E-values SSH library, but not in 48/72I SSH library implying that these immune molecules participate in viral defense immunity in the early phase of YHV infection whereas their expressions were suppressed in the late phase of infection. Novel YHV-responsive genes were uncovered from these SSH libraries including caspases, histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 2, Rab11, beta-integrin, tetraspanin, prostaglandin E synthase, transglutaminase, Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor and antimicrobial peptides. Among these YHV-responsive genes, several have been previously reported to participate in defense against white-spot syndrome virus (WSSV) implying that YHV infection in shrimp induces similar host immune responses as observed during WSSV infection. The expression of four apparently upregulated immune-related genes identified from the two SSH libraries, anti-lipopolysaccharide factor isoform 6 (ALFPm6), crustin isoform 1 (crustinPm1), transglutaminase and Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor isoform 2 (SPIPm2), was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR to reveal differential expression in response to YHV infection at 6, 24, 48 and 72 h post-infection. The results confirmed their differential expression and upregulation, and thus verified the success of the SSHs and the likely involvement of these genes in shrimp antiviral mechanisms. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Activation of lytic cycle of Epstein-Barr virus by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid leads to apoptosis and tumor growth suppression of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, K F; Ho, Dona N; Tsang, C M; Middeldorp, Jaap M; Tsao, George S W; Chiang, Alan K S

    2012-10-15

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is strongly associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We reported that suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) induced EBV lytic cycle in EBV-positive gastric carcinoma cells and mediated enhanced cell death. However, expression of EBV lytic proteins was thought to exert antiapoptotic effect in EBV-infected cells. Here, we examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of SAHA on EBV lytic cycle induction in NPC cells and investigated the cellular consequences. Micromolar concentrations of SAHA significantly induced EBV lytic cycle in EBV-positive NPC cells. Increased apoptosis and proteolytic cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and caspase-3, -7 and -9 in EBV-positive versus EBV-negative NPC cells were observed. More than 85% of NPC cells expressing immediate-early (Zta), early (BMRF1) or late (gp350/220) lytic proteins coexpressed cleaved caspase-3. Tracking of expression of EBV lytic proteins and cleaved caspase-3 over time demonstrated that NPC cells proceeded to apoptosis following EBV lytic cycle induction. Inhibition of EBV DNA replication and late lytic protein expression by phosphonoformic acid did not impact on SAHA's induced cell death in NPC, indicating that early rather than late phase of EBV lytic cycle contributed to the apoptotic effect. In vivo effects of SAHA on EBV lytic cycle induction and tumor growth suppression were also observed in NPC xenografts in nude mice. Taken together, our data indicated that activation of lytic cycle from latent cycle of EBV by SAHA leads to apoptosis and tumor growth suppression of NPC thereby providing experimental evidence for virus-targeted therapy against EBV-positive cancer. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  6. Soilborne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV 19K protein belongs to a class of cysteine rich proteins that suppress RNA silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Amanda

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Amino acid sequence analyses indicate that the Soilborne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV 19K protein is a cysteine-rich protein (CRP and shares sequence homology with CRPs derived from furo-, hordei-, peclu- and tobraviruses. Since the hordei- and pecluvirus CRPs were shown to be pathogenesis factors and/or suppressors of RNA silencing, experiments were conducted to determine if the SBWMV 19K CRP has similar activities. The SBWMV 19K CRP was introduced into the Potato virus X (PVX viral vector and inoculated to tobacco plants. The SBWMV 19K CRP aggravated PVX-induced symptoms and restored green fluorescent protein (GFP expression to GFP silenced tissues. These observations indicate that the SBWMV 19K CRP is a pathogenicity determinant and a suppressor of RNA silencing.

  7. Oncolytic vaccine virus harbouring the IL-24 gene suppresses the growth of lung cancer by inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chunwei; Su, Qunshu; Liang, Yupei; Hu, Jinqing; Yuan, Sujing

    2016-07-15

    Lung cancer has an especially high incidence rate worldwide, and its resistance to cell death and chemotherapeutic drugs increases its intractability. The vaccinia virus has been shown to destroy neoplasm within a short time and disseminate rapidly and extensively as an enveloped virion throughout the circulatory system, and this virus has also demonstrated a strong ability to overexpress exogenous genes. Interleukin-24 (IL-24/mda-7) is an important cytokine that belongs to the activating caspase family and facilitates the inhibition of STAT3 when a cell enters the apoptosis pathway. In this study, we constructed a cancer-targeted vaccinia virus carrying the IL-24 gene knocked in the region of the viral thymidine kinase (TK) gene (VV-IL-24). Our results showed that VV-IL-24 efficiently infected and destroyed lung cancer cells via caspase-dependent apoptosis and decreased the expression of STAT3. In vivo, VV-IL-24 expressed IL-24 at a high level in the transplanted tumour, reduced STAT3 activity, and eventually led to apoptosis. In conclusion, we demonstrated that vv-IL-24 has the potential for use as a new human lung cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Suppressive Effects of Chronic Stress on Influenza Virus Protection after Vaccination with Plasmid DNA-Encoded Nucleoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezam, Fatemeh Sadat; Hosseini, Seyed Masoud; Kheiri, Masoumeh Tavassoti; Abdoli, Asghar; Memarnejadian, Arash; Shenagari, Mohammad; Gholami, Shima; Sohani, Hesam; Rahmatollahi, Hamidreza; Jamali, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a highly infectious and acute respiratory disease caused by an infection of the host respiratory tract mucosa by the influenza virus. The use of DNA vaccines that express conserved genes such as nucleoprotein (NP) represents a new method of vaccination against influenza. In this study, the effect of chronic stress on the efficiency of this type of vaccine has been evaluated in a mouse model. The NP DNA vaccine was administered intradermally 3 times on days 0, 3 and 6 to stressed and nonstressed male BALB/c mice. Two weeks after the last immunization, half of these mice were challenged with A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) influenza virus and were weighed for 12 days, and their mortality rate was assessed during this period. The cellular immune response of the other half of the mice was evaluated by cytotoxicity assay. The results indicate a significant reduction in the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response of stressed mice in comparison with unstressed mice. Also, the percentage of weight loss and mortality after the challenge in stressed mice was significantly increased compared to the other group. These results indicate that the NP DNA vaccine is not able to induce any effective cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response against influenza virus in stressed mice and cannot induce protective immunity against influenza infection in this group of mice. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Sulforaphane Suppresses Hepatitis C Virus Replication by Up-Regulating Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression through PI3K/Nrf2 Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Sheng Yu

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection-induced oxidative stress is a major risk factor for the development of HCV-associated liver disease. Sulforaphane (SFN is an antioxidant phytocompound that acts against cellular oxidative stress and tumorigenesis. However, there is little known about its anti-viral activity. In this study, we demonstrated that SFN significantly suppressed HCV protein and RNA levels in HCV replicon cells and infectious system, with an IC50 value of 5.7 ± 0.2 μM. Moreover, combination of SFN with anti-viral drugs displayed synergistic effects in the suppression of HCV replication. In addition, we found nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2/HO-1 induction in response to SFN and determined the signaling pathways involved in this process, including inhibition of NS3 protease activity and induction of IFN response. In contrast, the anti-viral activities were attenuated by knockdown of HO-1 with specific inhibitor (SnPP and shRNA, suggesting that anti-HCV activity of SFN is dependent on HO-1 expression. Otherwise, SFN stimulated the phosphorylation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K leading Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression against HCV replication. Overall, our results indicated that HO-1 is essential in SFN-mediated anti-HCV activity and provide new insights in the molecular mechanism of SFN in HCV replication.

  10. A virus-based miRNA suppression (VbMS) system for miRNA loss-of-function analysis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Guo, Weixia; Wu, Gentu; Lu, Yuwen; Peng, Jiejun; Zheng, Hongying; Lin, Lin; Chen, Jianping

    2014-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in plant development and defense against pathogens. To establish the function of individual miRNAs, gain-of-function analysis is usually done by overexpressing a specific miRNA in transgenic plants and has proved very effective. Loss-of-function analysis by the target mimic method is now also increasingly being used. The mimics expressed in the transgenic plants sequester a specific miRNA and lead to changed phenotypes that elucidate miRNA function. However, it takes time to obtain the transgenic plants. To avoid using transgenic plants, we have developed a virus-based miRNA suppression system (VbMS) based on a Tobacco rattle virus vector. The target mimic sequences of miR156, miR319, or miR164 were introduced into the viral genomic RNA, which was then inoculated to Arabidopsis thaliana plants. The resulting phenotypes were consistent with previous reports from transgenic plants, and the expression of targets of the miRNAs was also increased showing that the activity of the miRNAs had been inhibited. VbMS developed here is validated for loss-of-function analysis of miRNA in plants. Moreover, since only simple agroinfiltration rather than transformation is needed, VbMS is suitable for large-scale approaches to miRNA function analysis in plants. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Differentially expressed genes in a flock of Chinese local-breed chickens infected with a subgroup J avian leukosis virus using suppression subtractive hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiping Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J is a new type of virus that mainly induces myeloid leukosis (ML in chickens. To further elucidate the pathogenesis of ALV-J infection and tumor development, expression profiles from the bone marrow tissue of 15 infected and 18 non-infected birds from a local-breed poultry-farm under naturally infected conditions, were analyzed by suppression-subtractive hybridization. The birds were diagnosed as ML+ (or ML- by specific ALV-J detection methods, involving serological tests for antigens and antibodies, and RT-PCR to detect viral RNA. A total of 59 partial gene sequences were revealed by differential screening of 496 forward and 384 reverse subtracted cDNA clones. Of these, 22 identified genes, including 8 up-regulated and 14 down-regulated, were related to immune functions, these genes being, MHC B-G antigen, translationally-controlled tumor protein (TPT1/TPTC, transferrin and ferritin, hemoglobin and Carbonic anhydrase. Four of the down-regulated genes were selected for further analysis, in view of their predicted roles in infection and immunity by real-time qRT-PCR, using RNA collected from the same birds as those used for SSH. The four genes were expressed at significantly lower levels (p < 0.001 in ALV-J infected birds than in non-infected ones.

  12. Differentially expressed genes in a flock of Chinese local-breed chickens infected with a subgroup J avian leukosis virus using suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guiping; Zheng, Maiqing; Chen, Jilan; Wen, Jie; Wu, Chunmei; Li, Wenjuan; Liu, Libo; Zhang, Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is a new type of virus that mainly induces myeloid leukosis (ML) in chickens. To further elucidate the pathogenesis of ALV-J infection and tumor development, expression profiles from the bone marrow tissue of 15 infected and 18 non-infected birds from a local-breed poultry-farm under naturally infected conditions, were analyzed by suppression-subtractive hybridization. The birds were diagnosed as ML+ (or ML-) by specific ALV-J detection methods, involving serological tests for antigens and antibodies, and RT-PCR to detect viral RNA. A total of 59 partial gene sequences were revealed by differential screening of 496 forward and 384 reverse subtracted cDNA clones. Of these, 22 identified genes, including 8 up-regulated and 14 down-regulated, were related to immune functions, these genes being, MHC B-G antigen, translationally-controlled tumor protein (TPT1/TPTC), transferrin and ferritin, hemoglobin and Carbonic anhydrase. Four of the down-regulated genes were selected for further analysis, in view of their predicted roles in infection and immunity by real-time qRT-PCR, using RNA collected from the same birds as those used for SSH. The four genes were expressed at significantly lower levels (p < 0.001) in ALV-J infected birds than in non-infected ones.

  13. Two interferon-independent double-stranded RNA-induced host defense strategies suppress the common cold virus at warm temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxman, Ellen F; Storer, James A; Vanaja, Kiran; Levchenko, Andre; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-07-26

    Most strains of rhinovirus (RV), the common cold virus, replicate better at cool temperatures found in the nasal cavity (33-35 °C) than at lung temperature (37 °C). Recent studies found that although 37 °C temperature suppressed RV growth largely by engaging the type 1 IFN response in infected epithelial cells, a significant temperature dependence to viral replication remained in cells devoid of IFN induction or signaling. To gain insight into IFN-independent mechanisms limiting RV replication at 37 °C, we studied RV infection in human bronchial epithelial cells and H1-HeLa cells. During the single replication cycle, RV exhibited temperature-dependent replication in both cell types in the absence of IFN induction. At 37 °C, earlier signs of apoptosis in RV-infected cells were accompanied by reduced virus production. Furthermore, apoptosis of epithelial cells was enhanced at 37 °C in response to diverse stimuli. Dynamic mathematical modeling and B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) overexpression revealed that temperature-dependent host cell death could partially account for the temperature-dependent growth observed during RV amplification, but also suggested additional mechanisms of virus control. In search of a redundant antiviral pathway, we identified a role for the RNA-degrading enzyme RNAseL. Simultaneous antagonism of apoptosis and RNAseL increased viral replication and dramatically reduced temperature dependence. These findings reveal two IFN-independent mechanisms active in innate defense against RV, and demonstrate that even in the absence of IFNs, temperature-dependent RV amplification is largely a result of host cell antiviral restriction mechanisms operating more effectively at 37 °C than at 33 °C.

  14. #GeriMedJC: The Twitter Complement to the Traditional-Format Geriatric Medicine Journal Club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardhouse, Amanda I; Budd, Laura; Yang, Seu Y C; Wong, Camilla L

    2017-06-01

    Twitter is a public microblogging platform that overcomes physical limitations and allows unrestricted participation beyond academic silos, enabling interactive discussions. Twitter-based journal clubs have demonstrated growth, sustainability, and worldwide communication, using a hashtag (#) to follow participation. This article describes the first year of #GeriMedJC, a monthly 1-hour live, 23-hour asynchronous Twitter-based complement to the traditional-format geriatric medicine journal club. The Twitter moderator tweets from the handle @GeriMedJC; encourages use of #GeriMedJC; and invites content experts, study authors, and followers to participate in critical appraisal of medical literature. Using the hashtag #GeriMedJC, tweets were categorized according to thematic content, relevance to the journal club, and authorship. Third-party analytical tools Symplur and Twitter Analytics were used for growth and effect metrics (number of followers, participants, tweets, retweets, replies, impressions). Qualitative analysis of follower and participant profiles was used to establish country of origin and occupation. A semistructured interview of postgraduate trainees was conducted to ascertain qualitative aspects of the experience. In the first year, @GeriMedJC has grown to 541 followers on six continents. Most followers were physicians (43%), two-thirds of which were geriatricians. Growth metrics increased over 12 months, with a mean of 121 tweets, 25 participants, and 105,831 impressions per journal club. Tweets were most often related to the article being appraised (87.5%) and ranged in thematic content from clinical practice (29%) to critical appraisal (24%) to medical education (20%). #GeriMedJC is a feasible example of using social media platforms such as Twitter to encourage international and interprofessional appraisal of medical literature. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  15. Monkeypox virus infection of rhesus macaques induces massive expansion of natural killer cells but suppresses natural killer cell functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Song

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells play critical roles in innate immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses against viral infection. However, the response of NK cells to monkeypox virus (MPXV infection is not well characterized. In this intravenous challenge study of MPXV infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta, we analyzed blood and lymph node NK cell changes in absolute cell numbers, cell proliferation, chemokine receptor expression, and cellular functions. Our results showed that the absolute number of total NK cells in the blood increased in response to MPXV infection at a magnitude of 23-fold, manifested by increases in CD56+, CD16+, CD16-CD56- double negative, and CD16+CD56+ double positive NK cell subsets. Similarly, the frequency and NK cell numbers in the lymph nodes also largely increased with the total NK cell number increasing 46.1-fold. NK cells both in the blood and lymph nodes massively proliferated in response to MPXV infection as measured by Ki67 expression. Chemokine receptor analysis revealed reduced expression of CXCR3, CCR7, and CCR6 on NK cells at early time points (days 2 and 4 after virus inoculation, followed by an increased expression of CXCR3 and CCR5 at later time points (days 7-8 of infection. In addition, MPXV infection impaired NK cell degranulation and ablated secretion of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. Our data suggest a dynamic model by which NK cells respond to MPXV infection of rhesus macaques. Upon virus infection, NK cells proliferated robustly, resulting in massive increases in NK cell numbers. However, the migrating capacity of NK cells to tissues at early time points might be reduced, and the functions of cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion were largely compromised. Collectively, the data may explain, at least partially, the pathogenesis of MPXV infection in rhesus macaques.

  16. VIRUSES

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and-mouth disease in livestock was an infectious particle smaller than any bacteria. This was the first clue to the nature of viruses, genetic entities that lie somewhere in the gray area between living and non-living states.

  17. Search for and Study of Novel Superconductor with Higher Tc and Jc

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-22

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0025 SEARCH FOR AND STUDY OF NOVEL SUPERCONDUCTOR WITH HIGHER TC AND JC Ching-Wu Chu UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON SYSTEM Final Report...SUBTITLE Search for and Study of Novel Superconductor with Higher Tc and Jc 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-09-1-0656 5c. PROGRAM...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The AFOSR support has enabled us to discover new superconductors with higher Tc, for science and potential new applications, or with

  18. Shrimp miR-12 Suppresses White Spot Syndrome Virus Infection by Synchronously Triggering Antiviral Phagocytosis and Apoptosis Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Shu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence has indicated that the innate immune system can be regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs. However, the mechanism underlying miRNA-mediated simultaneous activation of multiple immune pathways remains unknown. To address this issue, the role of host miR-12 in shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus antiviral immune responses was characterized in the present study. The results indicated that miR-12 participated in virus infection, host phagocytosis, and apoptosis in defense against white spot syndrome virus invasion. miR-12 could simultaneously trigger phagocytosis, apoptosis, and antiviral immunity through the synchronous downregulation of the expression of shrimp genes [PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog and BI-1(transmembrane BAX inhibitor motif containing 6] and the viral gene (wsv024. Further analysis showed that miR-12 could synchronously mediate the 5′–3′ exonucleolytic degradation of its target mRNAs, and this degradation terminated in the vicinity of the 3′ untranslated region sequence complementary to the seed sequence of miR-12. Therefore, the present study showed novel aspects of the miRNA-mediated simultaneous regulation of multiple immune pathways.

  19. Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus in a Population of Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOMCS2

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus in a population of pregnant women and commercial ... Forbi JC,. Virology laboratory,. Innovative Biotech-Keffi, PO Box 30 Keffi,. 1. Abdu Abubakar Street ... neurological syndromes 6. Over 20 million persons ...

  20. Inactivated Sendai virus suppresses murine melanoma growth by inducing host immune responses and down-regulating β-catenin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan; Yuan, Wei Feng; Zhai, Guo Qin; Zhu, Shan Yuan; Xue, Zheng Feng; Zhu, Hong Fei; Xu, Xiang Ming

    2012-10-01

    This paper aims to investigate the anti-tumor mechanism of inactivated Sendai virus (Hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope, HVJ-E) for murine melanoma (B16F10). The murine dendritic cells (DCs) were treated with HVJ-E, and then the cytokines secreted from DCs and costimulation-related molecules on DCs were measured. Meanwhile, the expression of β-catenin in HVJ-E treated murine melanoma cells was detected. In addition, HVJ-E was intratumorally injected into the melanoma on C57BL/6 mice, and the immune cells, CTL response and tumor volume were analyzed. HVJ-E injected into B16F10 melanoma obviously inhibited the growth of the tumor and prolonged the survival time of the tumor-bearing mice. Profiles of cytokines secreted by dendritic cells (DCs) after HVJ-E stimulation showed that the number of cytokines released was significantly higher than that elicited by PBS (1PHVJ-E treatment. Meanwhile, real-time reverse transcription PCR revealed that HVJ-E induced a remarkable infiltration of CD11c positive cells, chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) molecules, interleukin-2 (IL-2) molecule, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells into HVJ-E injected tumors. Furthermore, the mRNA expression level of β-catenin in the HVJ-E injected tumors was also down-regulated. In addition, B16F10-specific CTLs were induced significantly after HVJ-E was injected into the tumor-bearing mice. This is the first report to show the effective inhibition of melanoma tumors by HVJ-E alone and the mechanism through which it induces antitumor immune responses and regulates important signal pathways for melanoma invasion. Therefore, HVJ-E shows its prospect as a novel therapeutic for melanoma therapy. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cellular Transcription Factors Sp1 and Sp3 Suppress Varicella-Zoster Virus Origin-Dependent DNA Replication▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohamed I.; Hay, John; Ruyechan, William T.

    2008-01-01

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) origin of DNA replication (oriS) contains a 46-bp AT-rich palindrome and three consensus binding sites for the VZV origin binding protein (OBP) encoded by VZV ORF51. All three OBP binding sites are upstream of the palindrome in contrast to the sequence of the herpes simplex virus oriS, which has required OBP binding sites upstream and downstream of the AT-rich region. We are investigating the roles that sequences downstream of the palindrome play in VZV oriS-dependent DNA replication. Computer analysis identified two GC boxes, GC box 1 and GC box 2, in the downstream region which were predicted to be binding sites for the cellular transcription factor Sp1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and supershift assays showed that two members of the Sp family (Sp1 and Sp3) stably bind to GC box 1, but not to GC box 2. A predicted binding site for the cellular factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) that overlaps with GC box 2 was also identified. Supershift and mutational analyses confirmed the binding of YY1 to this site. Mutation of GC box 1 resulted in loss of Sp1 and Sp3 binding and an increase in origin-dependent replication efficiency in DpnI replication assays. In contrast, mutation of the YY1 site had a statistically insignificant effect. These results suggest a model where origin-dependent DNA replication and viral transcription are coupled by the binding of Sp1 and Sp3 to the downstream region of the VZV replication origin during lytic infection. They may also have implications regarding establishment or reactivation of viral latency. PMID:18815296

  2. Tracing Jomon and Yayoi ancestries in Japan using ALDH2 and JC virus genotype distributions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miyamori, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Noboru; Idota, Nozomi; Kakiuchi, Yasuhiro; McLean, Stuart; Kitamura, Tadaichi; Ikegaya, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    According to the dual structure model, the modern Japanese ethnic population consists of a mixture of the Jomon people, who have existed in Japan since at least the New Stone Age, and the Yayoi people...

  3. Involvement of Wnt signaling pathway in murine medulloblastoma induced by human neurotropic JC virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, D D; Reiss, K; Carrill, T; Del Valle, L; Croul, S; Giordano, A; Fishman, P; Khalili, K

    2001-08-09

    By using the early genome of the human neurotropic polyomavirus, JCV, we have created transgenic animals that develop cerebellar primitive neuroectodermal tumors which model human medulloblastoma. Expression of T-antigen was found in some, but not all, tumor cells, and examination of the clonal cell lines derived from the tumor population showed enhanced tumorigenicity of cells expressing T-antigen in comparison to T-antigen negative cells. Considering the earlier notion on the potential involvement of beta-catenin with human medulloblastoma, we investigated various components of the Wnt signaling pathway including beta-catenin, its partner transcription factor, LEF-1, and their downstream target gene c-myc in these two cell populations. Immunohistochemical staining of the cells revealed enhanced nuclear appearance of beta-catenin in T-antigen positive cells. Results from Western blot showed higher levels of beta-catenin and LEF-1 in T-antigen positive cells in comparison to those in T-antigen negative cells. The enhanced level of LEF-1 expression correlated with the increase in DNA binding activity of this protein in nuclear extracts of T-antigen positive cells. Results from Northern and Western blot analyses revealed that the level of c-myc expression is augmented both at the RNA and protein levels in T-antigen positive cells. These observations corroborated results from transfection studies indicating the ability of JCV T-antigen to stimulate c-myc promoter activity. Further, co-transfection experiments revealed that the amount of c-myc and T-antigen protein in tumor cells may dictate the activity of JCV early promoter in these cells. These observations are interesting in light of recent discoveries on the association of JCV with human medulloblastoma and suggest that communication between JCV and the Wnt pathway may be an important event in the genesis of these tumors.

  4. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1O9JC-2BHPA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1O9JC-2BHPA 1O9J 2BHP C A ---DLPAPLTNIKI---------------------QHTKLFINNEWHESVSGKTFP...2BHP A 2BHPA NPSAPSEVVGT ...2BHP A 2BHPA IGKNE-GQLVL ...2BHP A 2BHPA AVEVVPYPGEDN...2BHP A 2BHPA EAAGRLAPGQTWFKR

  5. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1A0JC-1ELCA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1A0JC-1ELCA 1A0J 1ELC C A IVGGYECRKNSASYQASLQS--GYHF---CGGSLISSTWVVSAAHCY-KS-RIQVR...1ELC A 1ELCA PLHCLVNGQYAVHG...1ELC A 1ELCA TSFVSRLGCNVT...1ELC A 1ELCA TRTNG-QLAQT ...1ELC A 1ELCA MVCAG-GDGVR

  6. Peel v Hamon J&C engineering (pty) ltd: Ignoring the result ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This case note provides a concise and understandable version of the confusing facts in Peel v Hamon J&C Engineering (Pty) Ltd, and deals with the remedy provided for in section 163 of the Companies Act (the oppression remedy). The importance of drawing a distinction between the application of this section and the ...

  7. Spendere meno, spendere meglio: una proposta panottica di J.-C. Guédon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Pievatolo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available J.-C. Guédon ha commentato la nostra campagna di crowdsourcing in merito alle spese delle biblioteche sulla mailing list Nexa. Offriamo, qui di seguito, la versione italiana delle sue osservazioni – che presuppongono un mondo accademico molto diverso da quello impostoci...

  8. Polo-like kinase 1 inhibition suppresses hepatitis B virus X protein-induced transformation in an in vitro model of liver cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studach, Leo L; Rakotomalala, Lova; Wang, Wen-Horng; Hullinger, Ronald L; Cairo, Stefano; Buendia, Marie-Annick; Andrisani, Ourania M

    2009-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is linked to development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The HBV X protein (pX) is implicated in HCC pathogenesis acting as a weak oncogene or a cofactor in hepatocarcinogenesis. pX induces DNA re-replication, DNA damage, and partial polyploidy in a poorly differentiated, immortalized hepatocyte cell line. In this study we employed sorted, pX-induced polyploid cells to investigate their growth and oncogenic transformation potential over the course of 70 cell doublings. Immediately after live cell-sorting, nearly 40% of pX-induced polyploid cells undergo apoptosis, whereas the surviving cells exhibit proliferation sensitive to p53. After 40 cell generations the pX-expressing polyploid cultures exhibit loss of p53 function and become growth factor- and anchorage-independent, indicative of oncogenic transformation. The pX-induced polyploid cultures in the course of 70 cell generations undergo progressively increasing DNA damage, propagate damaged DNA to daughter cells, and display increased expression of a cluster of proliferation genes shown to be elevated in human HCC, including HBV-HCC. One of these genes is the mitotic kinase Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1). Oncogenic transformation is suppressed in the absence of pX expression, and significantly, by inhibition of Plk1. These results identify Plk1 as crucial in pX-mediated oncogenic transformation. Partial polyploidy induced by pX is not immediately associated with oncogenic transformation. Continued DNA damage for 40 cell generations is reproducibly associated with loss of p53 function, enhanced expression of Plk1, and oncogenic transformation. Because Plk1 expression is also elevated in HBV-HCC tumors, this in vitro cellular model simulates liver cancer progression and pathogenesis in chronic HBV patients. Inhibition of Plk1 activity suppresses pX-mediated oncogenic transformation, identifying Plk1 as a promising therapeutic target for HBV-mediated HCC.

  9. SCH 503034, a mechanism-based inhibitor of hepatitis C virus NS3 protease, suppresses polyprotein maturation and enhances the antiviral activity of alpha interferon in replicon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, B A; Liu, R; Lahser, F; Agrawal, S; Belanger, B; Butkiewicz, N; Chase, R; Gheyas, F; Hart, A; Hesk, D; Ingravallo, P; Jiang, C; Kong, R; Lu, J; Pichardo, J; Prongay, A; Skelton, A; Tong, X; Venkatraman, S; Xia, E; Girijavallabhan, V; Njoroge, F G

    2006-03-01

    Cleavage of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) polyprotein by the viral NS3 protease releases functional viral proteins essential for viral replication. Recent studies by Foy and coworkers strongly suggest that NS3-mediated cleavage of host factors may abrogate cellular response to alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) (E. Foy, K. Li, R. Sumpter, Jr., Y.-M. Loo, C. L. Johnson, C. Wang, P. M. Fish, M. Yoneyama, T. Fujita, S. M. Lemon, and M. Gale, Jr., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 102:2986-2991, 2005, and E. Foy, K. Li, C. Wang, R. Sumpter, Jr., M. Ikeda, S. M. Lemon, and M. Gale, Jr., Science 300:1145-1148, 2003). Blockage of NS3 protease activity therefore is expected to inhibit HCV replication by both direct suppression of viral protein production as well as by restoring host responsiveness to IFN. Using structure-assisted design, a ketoamide inhibitor, SCH 503034, was generated which demonstrated potent (overall inhibition constant, 14 nM) time-dependent inhibition of the NS3 protease in cell-free enzyme assays as well as robust in vitro activity in the HCV replicon system, as monitored by immunofluorescence and real-time PCR analysis. Continuous exposure of replicon-bearing cell lines to six times the 90% effective concentration of SCH 503034 for 15 days resulted in a greater than 4-log reduction in replicon RNA. The combination of SCH 503034 with IFN was more effective in suppressing replicon synthesis than either compound alone, supporting the suggestion of Foy and coworkers that combinations of IFN with protease inhibitors would lead to enhanced therapeutic efficacy.

  10. J.C. Nalle Community School: A Study of a School Turnaround Effort. Publication #2015-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, Zakia; Princiotta, Daniel; Stratford, Brandon; Caal, Selma; Li, Weilin; Murphy, Kelly; Coffey, Amelia; Carrington, Nicholas; Carney, Rachel; Oster, Maryjo; Horton, Susannah

    2015-01-01

    J.C. Nalle is a Community School located in the Marshall Heights neighborhood of Ward 7 in Washington, D.C. The community in which J.C. Nalle is located, historically one of the more economically disadvantaged areas of the city, has experienced a number of changes in recent years. This report of evaluation findings begins with an introduction to…

  11. Suppression subtractive hybridization coupled with microarray analysis to examine differential expression of genes in virus infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munir Shirin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available High throughput detection of differential expression of genes is an efficient means of identifying genes and pathways that may play a role in biological systems under certain experimental conditions. There exist a variety of approaches that could be used to identify groups of genes that change in expression in response to a particular stimulus or environment. We here describe the application of suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH coupled with cDNA microarray analysis for isolation and identification of chicken transcripts that change in expression on infection of host cells with a paramyxovirus. SSH was used for initial isolation of differentially expressed transcripts, a large-scale validation of which was accomplished by microarray analysis. The data reveals a large group of regulated genes constituting many biochemical pathways that could serve as targets for future investigations to explore their role in paramyxovirus pathogenesis. The detailed methods described herein could be useful and adaptable to any biological system for studying changes in gene expression.

  12. Baicalin inhibits TLR7/MYD88 signaling pathway activation to suppress lung inflammation in mice infected with influenza A virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    WAN, QIAOFENG; WANG, HAO; HAN, XUEBO; LIN, YUAN; YANG, YANHUI; GU, LIGANG; ZHAO, JIAQING; WANG, LI; HUANG, LING; LI, YANBIN; YANG, YURONG

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects and underlying mechanisms of baicalin on imprinting control region mice infected with influenza A/FM/1/47 (H1N1) virus. Oral administration of baicalin into mice infected with H1N1 prevented death, increased the mean time to death and inhibited lung index and lung consolidation. Subsequently, fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to assess the mRNA expression of toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MYD88), and western blot analysis was used to determine the expression of phosphorylated nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)-P65 and c-jun/activator protein 1 (AP-1). An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was applied to test for the inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, in the lung tissue. The findings indicated that baicalin downregulated the mRNA expression of TLR7 and MYD88, significantly downregulated the protein expression of NF-κB-P65 and AP-1 and also inhibited the secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. In conclusion, baicalin effectively reduced the pathological damage and inflammation of the lungs by downregulating the TLR7/MYD88-mediated signaling pathway. PMID:24748990

  13. A novel transcription factor JcNAC1 response to stress in new model woody plant Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaobo; Zheng, Xiaojiang; Huang, Xiaoqi; Lii, Yifan; Shao, Caixia; Xu, Ying; Chen, Fang

    2014-02-01

    Jatropha curcas, a biodiesel plant with a short life cycle, has great potentials to be a new model woody plant. In this study, we found a plant-specific transcription factor JcNAC1, an intriguing regulator modulating plant responses to abiotic stresses and pathogen infection. Expression of JcNAC1 was strongly increased when plants were treated with abscisic acid, salt and polyethylene glycol, and was decreased with salicylic acid, ethylene, and pathogens. Overexpressing JcNAC1 plants showed enhanced tolerance to drought and increased susceptibility to pathogens. Furthermore, over-expression of JcNAC1 in plants also resulted in the expression changes of some stress-related maker genes including curcin-L, which is a special stress-inducible ribosome-inactivating protein gene in J. curcas. These results indicate that JcNAC1 is responsible for stress responses in J. curcas.

  14. Foot-and-mouth disease virus infection suppresses autophagy and NF-кB antiviral responses via degradation of ATG5-ATG12 by 3Cpro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xuxu; Han, Shichong; Yan, Dan; Gao, Yuan; Wei, Yanquan; Liu, Xiangtao; Liao, Ying; Guo, Huichen; Sun, Shiqi

    2017-01-19

    Autophagy-related protein ATG5-ATG12 is an essential complex for the autophagophore elongation in autophagy, which has been reported to be involved in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) replication. Previous reports show that ATG5-ATG12 positively or negatively regulates type I interferon (IFN-α/β) pathway during virus infection. In this study, we found that FMDV infection rapidly induced LC3 lipidation and GFP-LC3 subcellular redistribution at the early infection stage in PK-15 cells. Along with infection time course to 2-5 h.p.i., the levels of LC3II and ATG5-ATG12 were gradually reduced. Further study showed that ATG5-ATG12 was degraded by viral protein 3Cpro, demonstrating that FMDV suppresses autophagy along with viral protein production. Depletion of ATG5-ATG12 by siRNA knock down significantly increased the FMDV yields, whereas overexpression of ATG5-ATG12 had the opposite effects, suggesting that degradation of ATG5-ATG12 benefits virus growth. Further experiment showed that overexpression of ATG5-ATG12 positively regulated NF-кB pathway during FMDV infection, marked with promotion of IKKα/β phosphorylation and IκBα degradation, inhibition of p65 degradation, and facilitation of p65 nuclear translocation. Meanwhile, ATG5-ATG12 also promoted the phosphorylation of TBK1 and activation of IRF3 via preventing TRAF3 degradation. The positive regulation of NF-кB and IRF3 pathway by ATG5-ATG12 resulted in enhanced expression of IFN-β, chemokines/cytokines, and IFN stimulated genes, including anti-viral protein PKR. Altogether, above findings suggest that ATG5-ATG12 positively regulate anti-viral NF-κB and IRF3 signaling during FMDV infection, thereby limiting FMDV proliferation. FMDV has evolved mechanisms to counteract the antiviral function of ATG5-ATG12, via degradation of them by viral protein 3Cpro.

  15. JC Polyomavirus Abundance and Distribution in Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML Brain Tissue Implicates Myelin Sheath in Intracerebral Dissemination of Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith A Wharton

    Full Text Available Over half of adults are seropositive for JC polyomavirus (JCV, but rare individuals develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML, a demyelinating JCV infection of the central nervous system. Previously, PML was primarily seen in immunosuppressed patients with AIDS or certain cancers, but it has recently emerged as a drug safety issue through its association with diverse immunomodulatory therapies. To better understand the relationship between the JCV life cycle and PML pathology, we studied autopsy brain tissue from a 70-year-old psoriasis patient on the integrin alpha-L inhibitor efalizumab following a ~2 month clinical course of PML. Sequence analysis of lesional brain tissue identified PML-associated viral mutations in regulatory (non-coding control region DNA, capsid protein VP1, and the regulatory agnoprotein, as well as 9 novel mutations in capsid protein VP2, indicating rampant viral evolution. Nine samples, including three gross PML lesions and normal-appearing adjacent tissues, were characterized by histopathology and subject to quantitative genomic, proteomic, and molecular localization analyses. We observed a striking correlation between the spatial extent of demyelination, axonal destruction, and dispersion of JCV along white matter myelin sheath. Our observations in this case, as well as in a case of PML-like disease in an immunocompromised rhesus macaque, suggest that long-range spread of polyomavirus and axonal destruction in PML might involve extracellular association between virus and the white matter myelin sheath.

  16. JC Polyomavirus Abundance and Distribution in Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) Brain Tissue Implicates Myelin Sheath in Intracerebral Dissemination of Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, Keith A; Quigley, Catherine; Themeles, Marian; Dunstan, Robert W; Doyle, Kathryn; Cahir-McFarland, Ellen; Wei, Jing; Buko, Alex; Reid, Carl E; Sun, Chao; Carmillo, Paul; Sur, Gargi; Carulli, John P; Mansfield, Keith G; Westmoreland, Susan V; Staugaitis, Susan M; Fox, Robert J; Meier, Werner; Goelz, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Over half of adults are seropositive for JC polyomavirus (JCV), but rare individuals develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a demyelinating JCV infection of the central nervous system. Previously, PML was primarily seen in immunosuppressed patients with AIDS or certain cancers, but it has recently emerged as a drug safety issue through its association with diverse immunomodulatory therapies. To better understand the relationship between the JCV life cycle and PML pathology, we studied autopsy brain tissue from a 70-year-old psoriasis patient on the integrin alpha-L inhibitor efalizumab following a ~2 month clinical course of PML. Sequence analysis of lesional brain tissue identified PML-associated viral mutations in regulatory (non-coding control region) DNA, capsid protein VP1, and the regulatory agnoprotein, as well as 9 novel mutations in capsid protein VP2, indicating rampant viral evolution. Nine samples, including three gross PML lesions and normal-appearing adjacent tissues, were characterized by histopathology and subject to quantitative genomic, proteomic, and molecular localization analyses. We observed a striking correlation between the spatial extent of demyelination, axonal destruction, and dispersion of JCV along white matter myelin sheath. Our observations in this case, as well as in a case of PML-like disease in an immunocompromised rhesus macaque, suggest that long-range spread of polyomavirus and axonal destruction in PML might involve extracellular association between virus and the white matter myelin sheath.

  17. Interleukin-10 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide suppresses IL-10 expression and effects on proinflammatory cytokine responses to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charerntantanakul, Wasin; Kasinrerk, Watchara

    2010-08-01

    Upregulation of interleukin-10 (IL-10) expression has been suggested to be the mechanism by which the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) suppresses the innate and adaptive immune response in infected pigs. In this study we evaluated the potential of phosphorothioate-modified IL-10 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide specific to the translation initiation region of porcine IL-10 mRNA (IL-10AS) in enhancing proinflammatory cytokine responses to PRRSV. Naïve peripheral blood mononuclear cells from eight PRRSV-seronegative pigs were transfected with IL-10AS in vitro prior to PRRSV inoculation and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin or concanavalin A stimulation. The effects of IL-10AS on mRNA expression of IL-10, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), IFN-alpha, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-2, and IL-4 were tested by real-time PCR. The percentages of IFN-gamma-producing T-cell subsets were determined by flow cytometry. Compared to the controls, the levels of IL-10 and IL-2 mRNA were significantly reduced, while those of IFN-gamma mRNA were increased, and TNF-alpha, IFN-alpha, and IL-4 mRNA were unchanged. An increase in the percentage of the IFN-gamma+ population was also observed in lymphocytes and CD8beta+ T cells. Our results suggest that IL-10AS has the potential to enhance proinflammatory cytokine responses to PRRSV infection.

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus integrase inhibitors efficiently suppress feline immunodeficiency virus replication in vitro and provide a rationale to redesign antiretroviral treatment for feline AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciervo Alessandra

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV infection has been hampered by the absence of a specific combination antiretroviral treatment (ART. Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs are emerging as a promising new drug class for HIV-1 treatment, and we evaluated the possibility of inhibiting FIV replication using INSTIs. Methods Phylogenetic analysis of lentiviral integrase (IN sequences was carried out using the PAUP* software. A theoretical three-dimensional structure of the FIV IN catalytic core domain (CCD was obtained by homology modeling based on a crystal structure of HIV-1 IN CCD. The interaction of the transferred strand of viral DNA with the catalytic cavity of FIV IN was deduced from a crystal structure of a structurally similar transposase complexed with transposable DNA. Molecular docking simulations were conducted using a genetic algorithm (GOLD. Antiviral activity was tested in feline lymphoblastoid MBM cells acutely infected with the FIV Petaluma strain. Circular and total proviral DNA was quantified by real-time PCR. Results The calculated INSTI-binding sites were found to be nearly identical in FIV and HIV-1 IN CCDs. The close similarity of primate and feline lentivirus IN CCDs was also supported by phylogenetic analysis. In line with these bioinformatic analyses, FIV replication was efficiently inhibited in acutely infected cell cultures by three investigational INSTIs, designed for HIV-1 and belonging to different classes. Of note, the naphthyridine carboxamide INSTI, L-870,810 displayed an EC50 in the low nanomolar range. Inhibition of FIV integration in situ was shown by real-time PCR experiments that revealed accumulation of circular forms of FIV DNA within cells treated with L-870,810. Conclusion We report a drug class (other than nucleosidic reverse transcriptase inhibitors that is capable of inhibiting FIV replication in vitro. The present study helped establish L-870,810, a compound

  19. In vivo evolution of the gp90 gene and consistently low plasma viral load during transient immune suppression demonstrate the safety of an attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Jiang, Chenggang; Lin, Yuezhi; Wang, Xuefeng; Zhao, Liping; Xiang, Wenhua; Shao, Yiming; Shen, Rongxian; Kong, Xiangang; Zhou, Jianhua

    2009-01-01

    To study the in vivo evolution of the attenuated Chinese equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine, viral gp90 gene variation and virus replication in immunosuppressed hosts were investigated. The results showed that after vaccination, the gp90 gene followed an evolutionary trend of declining diversity. The trend coincided with the maturation of immunity to EIAV, and eventually, the gp90 gene became highly homologous. The sequences of these predominant quasispecies were consistently detected up to 18 months after vaccination. Furthermore, after transient immune suppression with dexamethasone, the plasma viral RNA copy number of the vaccine strain in three vaccinated ponies remained consistently below the "pathogenic threshold" level, while the viral load increased by 25,000-fold in the positive control of an inapparent carrier of the parental virulent strain. This study is the first to provide evidence for the safety of an attenuated lentiviral vaccine with decreased genomic diversity and consistently low viral replication under suppressed immunity.

  20. Estimation of lower-bound K{sub Jc} on pressure vessel steels from invalid data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCable, D.E.; Merkle, J.G.

    1996-10-01

    Statistical methods are currently being introduced into the transition temperature characterization of ferritic steels. Objective is to replace imprecise correlations between empirical impact test methods and universal K{sub Ic} or K{sub Ia} lower-bound curves with direct use of material-specific fracture mechanics data. This paper introduces a computational procedure that couples order statistics, weakest-link statistical theory, and a constraint model to arrive at estimates of lower-bound K{sub Jc} values. All of the above concepts have been used before to meet various objectives. In the present case, scheme is to make a best estimate of lower-bound fracture toughness when resource K{sub Jc} data are too few to use conventional statistical analyses. Utility of the procedure is of greatest value in the middle-to-high toughness part of the transition range where specimen constraint loss and elevated lower-bound toughness interfere with conventional statistical analysis methods.

  1. Isolation and application of Gordonia sp. JC11 for removal of boat lubricants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanthamalee, Jirapat; Luepromchai, Ekawan

    2012-01-01

    Boat lubricants are continuously released into the marine environment and thereby cause chronic oil pollution. This study aims to isolate lubricant-degrading microorganisms from Thai coastal areas as well as to apply a selected strain for removal of boat lubricants. Ten microorganisms in the genera of Gordonia, Microbacterium, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Brucella, Enterococcus and Candida were initially isolated by crude oil enrichment culture techniques. The lubricant-removal activity of these isolates was investigated with mineral-based lubricants that had been manufactured for the 4-stroke diesel engines of fishing boats. Gordonia sp. JC11, the most effective strain was able to degrade 25-55% of 1,000 mg L(-1) total hydrocarbons in six tested lubricants, while only 0-15% of the lubricants was abiotically removed. The bacterium had many characteristics that promoted lubricant degradation such as hydrocarbon utilization ability, emulsification activity and cell surface hydrophobicity. For bioaugmentation treatment of lubricant contaminated seawater, the inoculum of Gordonia sp. JC11 was prepared by immobilizing the bacterium on polyurethane foam (PUF). PUF-immobilized Gordonia sp. JC11 was able to remove 42-56% of 100-1,000 mg L(-1) waste lubricant No. 2 within 5 days. This lubricant removal efficiency was higher than those of free cells and PUF without bacterial cells. The bioaugmentation treatment significantly increased the number of lubricant-degrading microorganisms in the fishery port seawater microcosm and resulted in rapid removal of waste lubricant No. 2.

  2. bta-miR-29b attenuates apoptosis by directly targeting caspase-7 and NAIF1 and suppresses bovine viral diarrhea virus replication in MDBK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Shi, Huijun; Shi, Mengting; Meng, Luping; Zhang, Hui; Ren, Yan; Guo, Fei; Jia, Bin; Wang, Pengyan; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu

    2014-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, endogenous, noncoding RNA molecules that serve as powerful regulators of multiple cellular processes, including apoptosis, differentiation, growth, and proliferation. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) contributes significantly to health-related economic losses in the beef and dairy industries. Although BVDV-induced apoptosis correlates with increased intracellular viral RNA accumulation and with bta-miR-29b (miR-29b) expression upregulation in Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells infected with BVDV strain NADL, the role of miR-29b in regulating BVDV-infection-related apoptosis remains unexplored. Here, we report that miR-29b serves as a new miRNA regulating apoptosis. We showed that miR-29b target sequences were present in the 3' untranslated regions of 2 key apoptosis regulators mRNAs, cysteine aspartases-7 (caspase-7) and nuclear apoptosis-inducing factor 1 (NAIF1). Indeed, upon miRNA overexpression, both mRNA and protein levels of caspase-7 and NAIF1 were decreased. We further found that miR-29b attenuated apoptosis by directly regulating intracellular levels of caspase-7 and NAIF1. Moreover, apoptosis blockage by miR-29b was rescued upon co-infection of MDBK cells with lentiviruses expressing caspase-7 and NAIF1. Importantly, miR-29b decreased BVDV NADL envelope glycoprotein E1 mRNA levels and suppressed viral replication. These studies advance our understanding of the mechanisms of miRNAs in mediating the cells combating viral infections.

  3. IRAK4 is essential for TLR9-induced suppression of Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 transcription in Akata Burkitt's lymphoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Jordi

    Full Text Available Burkitt's lymphoma (BL is the most common childhood cancer in equatorial Africa, and is endemic to areas where people are chronically co-infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and the malaria pathogen Plasmodium falciparum. The contribution of these pathogens in the oncogenic process remains poorly understood. We showed earlier that the activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR 9 by hemozoin, a disposal product formed from the digestion of blood by P. falciparum, suppresses the lytic reactivation of EBV in BL cells. EBV lytic reactivation is regulated by the expression of transcription factor Zta (ZEBRA, encoded by the EBV gene BZLF1. Here, we explore in the BL cell line Akata, the mechanism involved in repression by TLR9 of expression of BZLF1. We show that BZLF1 repression is mediated upon TLR9 engagement by a mechanism that is largely independent of de novo protein synthesis. By CRISPR/Cas9-induced inactivation of TLR9, MyD88, IRAK4 and IRAK1 we confirm that BZLF1 repression is dependent on functional TLR9 and MyD88 signaling, and identify IRAK4 as an essential element for TLR9-induced repression of BZLF1 expression upon BCR cross-linking. Our results unprecedentedly show that TLR9-mediated inhibition of lytic EBV is largely independent of new protein synthesis and demonstrate the central roles of MyD88 and IRAK4 in this process contributing to EBV's persistence in the host's B-cell pool.

  4. Retraction: "An enhanced transient expression system in plants based on suppression of gene silencing by the p19 protein of tomato bushy stunt virus".

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Retracted: An enhanced transient expression system in plants based on suppression of gene silencing by the p19 protein of tomato bushy stunt virus Volume 33, Issue 5, 949–956, Article first published online: 28 February 2003. The above article, first published online on 28 February 2003 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), and in volume 33, pp. 949–956, has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief, Christoph Benning, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.This notice updates and replaces a recent correction notice, published on 8 June 2015.In the above article, it has recently been noted that the original Figure 3b in this paper was assembled incorrectly and included image duplications. As the original data are no longer available for assembly of a corrected figure, the experiment was repeated, in agreement with the editors, by co-author S. Rivas. The data from the repeated experiment, presented below together with the original figure legend, lead to the same interpretation and conclusions as in the original paper.Since publication of the above notice the corresponding author has become aware of additional image duplications involving the loading control lanes of Figures 2g, 3a, 4e and 4f. The authors accept that integrity of the scientific literature is compromised by the data manipulation and, for that reason, they wish to retract the article. However, researchers wishing to use the method described in this paper can still obtain the necessary clones from the corresponding author (dcb40@cam.ac.uk). The authors apologise for having allowed this flawed article to be published.

  5. HABITAT and SPECIES IDENTIFICATION fish examination data collected in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska, Gulf of Alaska and North Pacific Ocean on NOAA Ship JOHN N. COBB cruises SECM, jc0009 and others as part of the NEP project from 1997-05-21 to 2006-08-20 (NODC Accession 0115195)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115195 includes biological and fish examination data collected aboard NOAA Ship JOHN N. COBB during cruises SECM, jc0009, jc0012, jc0016, jc0018,...

  6. SPECIES IDENTIFICATION - ORGANISM LENGTH, HABITAT, STOMACH CONTENTS - FULLNESS, STOMACH CONTENTS - CONTENT WEIGHT and other fish examination data collected in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska, Gulf of Alaska and North Pacific Ocean on NOAA Ship JOHN N. COBB cruises SECM, jc0009 and others as part of the NEP project from 1997-05-21 to 2006-07-31 (NODC Accession 0115196)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115196 includes biological and fish examination data collected aboard NOAA Ship JOHN N. COBB during cruises SECM, jc0009, jc0012, jc0016, jc0018,...

  7. Broadly neutralizing human monoclonal JC polyomavirus VP1–specific antibodies as candidate therapeutics for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelcic, Ivan; Combaluzier, Benoit; Jelcic, Ilijas; Faigle, Wolfgang; Senn, Luzia; Reinhart, Brenda J.; Ströh, Luisa; Nitsch, Roger M.; Stehle, Thilo; Sospedra, Mireia; Grimm, Jan; Martin, Roland

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompromised individuals, JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) may mutate and gain access to the central nervous system resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), an often fatal opportunistic infection for which no treatments are currently available. Despite recent progress, the contribution of JCPyV-specific humoral immunity to controlling asymptomatic infection throughout life and to eliminating JCPyV from the brain is poorly understood. We examined antibody responses against JCPyV major capsid protein VP1 (viral protein 1) variants in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy donors (HDs), JCPyV-positive multiple sclerosis patients treated with the anti-VLA-4 monoclonal antibody natalizumab (NAT), and patients with NAT-associated PML. Before and during PML, CSF antibody responses against JCPyV VP1 variants show “recognition holes”; however, upon immune reconstitution, CSF antibody titers rise, then recognize PML-associated JCPyV VP1 variants, and may be involved in elimination of the virus. We therefore reasoned that the memory B cell repertoire of individuals who recovered from PML could be a source for the molecular cloning of broadly neutralizing antibodies for passive immunization. We generated a series of memory B cell-derived JCPyV VP1-specific human monoclonal antibodies from HDs and a patient with NAT-associated PML-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). These antibodies exhibited diverse binding affinity, cross-reactivity with the closely related BK polyomavirus, recognition of PML-causing VP1 variants, and JCPyV neutralization. Almost all antibodies with exquisite specificity for JCPyV, neutralizing activity, recognition of all tested JCPyV PML variants, and high affinity were derived from one patient who had recovered from PML. These antibodies are promising drug candidates for the development of a treatment of PML. PMID:26400911

  8. T-cell effector function and unresponsiveness in the murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. I. On the mechanism of a selective suppression of the virus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    1986-01-01

    When the virus dose is increased from 10(2) (low dose) to 10(4) LD50 (high dose) a fatal lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection is changed into a subclinical one, and a selective virus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) unresponsiveness is induced, while the cytotoxic T...

  9. Long-Term Suppression of Hepatitis B Virus Replication by Short Hairpin RNA Expression Using the Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Region-Based Replicating Vector System pEPI-1▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, Andreas C. W.; Wilhelm, Andreas D.; Orth, Valerie; Lipps, Hans Joachim; Protzer, Ulrike; Wirth, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Since the emergence of viral resistance of hepatitis B virus (HBV) during treatment is becoming an important issue even with newer drugs, there is a need for alternative treatment options such as, for example, RNA interference (RNAi) technology. While short-term suppression of HBV replication is easily achieved with small interfering RNA oligonucleotides, this is not the case for long-term suppression due to the lack of an optimal vector system. Based on the nonviral scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR)-based vector system pEPI-1, which is free of common side effects and is stably retained as an episome even in the absence of selection, we designed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vector called pEPI-RNAi for HBV suppression. HBV-replicating HepG2.2.15 cells were transfected with pEPI-RNAi, and the intracellular status of the plasmid was followed by PCR and Southern analysis. HBV replication was measured on the DNA, RNA, and protein level. HBV RNA expression was reduced by almost 85% 3 months posttransfection with pEPI-RNAi. At 8 months posttransfection in the absence of antibiotic selection pressure, the suppression level was still 70% and the vector was retained as an episome. The reduction of total intracellular HBV DNA at this point was 77%, showing a marked suppression of HBV DNA replication. At a comparable level, secretion of viral antigens, as well as progeny HBV virions, was inhibited. The S/MAR-based vector system pEPI-1 allows long-term suppression of HBV replication by the expression of suitable shRNAs. Due to its unique properties compared to commonly used vectors, it provides an interesting option for the treatment of chronically HBV-infected individuals. PMID:18474581

  10. JigCell Run Manager (JC-RM): a tool for managing large sets of biochemical model parametrizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Alida; Hoops, Stefan; Watson, Layne T; Jones, Thomas C; Tyson, John J; Shaffer, Clifford A

    2015-12-24

    Most biomolecular reaction modeling tools allow users to build models with a single list of parameter values. However, a common scenario involves different parameterizations of the model to account for the results of related experiments, for example, to define the phenotypes for a variety of mutations (gene knockout, over expression, etc.) of a specific biochemical network. This scenario is not well supported by existing model editors, forcing the user to manually generate, store, and maintain many variations of the same model. We developed an extension to our modeling editor called the JigCell Run Manager (JC-RM). JC-RM allows the modeler to define a hierarchy of parameter values, simulations, and plot settings, and to save them together with the initial model. JC-RM supports generation of simulation plots, as well as export to COPASI and SBML (L3V1) for further analysis. Developing a model with its initial list of parameter values is just the first step in modeling a biological system. Models are often parameterized in many different ways to account for mutations of the organism and/or for sets of related experiments performed on the organism. JC-RM offers two critical features: it supports the everyday management of a large model, complete with its parameterizations, and it facilitates sharing this information before and after publication. JC-RM allows the modeler to define a hierarchy of parameter values, simulation, and plot settings, and to maintain a relationship between this hierarchy and the initial model. JC-RM is implemented in Java and uses the COPASI API. JC-RM runs on all major operating systems, with minimal system requirements. Installers, source code, user manual, and examples can be found at the COPASI website ( http://www.copasi.org/Projects ).

  11. Marek's disease virus-encoded analog of microRNA-155 activates the oncogene c-Myc by targeting LTBP1 and suppressing the TGF-β signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Jia-Qi; Teng, Man; Yu, Zu-Hua; Xu, Hui; Su, Jing-Wei; Zhao, Pu; Xing, Guang-Xu; Liang, Hong-De; Deng, Rui-Guang; Qu, Liang-Hu; Zhang, Gai-Ping; Luo, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a representative alpha herpes virus able to induce rapid-onset T-cell lymphoma in its natural host and regarded as an ideal model for the study of virus-induced tumorigenesis. Recent studies have shown that the mdv1-miR-M4-5p, a viral analog of cellular miR-155, is critical for MDV׳s oncogenicity. However, the precise mechanism whereby it was involved in MD lymphomagenesis remained unknown. We have presently identified the host mRNA targets of mdv1-miR-M4-5 and identified the latent TGF-β binding protein 1 (LTBP1) as a critical target for it. We found that during MDV infection, down-regulation of LTBP1 expression by mdv1-miR-M4-5p led to a significant decrease of the secretion and activation of TGF-β1, with suppression of TGF-β signaling and a significant activation of expression of c-Myc, a well-known oncogene which is critical for virus-induced tumorigenesis. Our findings reveal a novel and important mechanism of how mdv1-miR-M4-5p potentially contributes to MDV-induced tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ectopic expression of JcWRKY transcription factor confers salinity tolerance via salicylic acid signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parinita Agarwal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants, being sessile, have developed intricate signalling network to specifically respond to the diverse environmental stress. The crop performance and yield is limited due to exposure of multiple stresses simultaneously. The coordinated crosstalk between different signalling components, including phytohormones and transcription factor(s play a crucial role towards increased stress resistance in crops. Transcription factors play an important role in regulating the downstream processes during stress. The plant-specific WRKY TFs form one of the largest TF family and are involved in diverse plant processes, involving growth, development and stress signalling through auto and cross regulation with different genes and TFs. The salicylic acid -inducible JcWRKY TF confers salinity tolerance in transgenic tobacco, as was evident by increased chlorophyll content and seed germination potential. The transgenic plants showed increased soluble sugar, membrane stability, reduced electrolyte leakage and generation of reactive oxygen species (H2O2 and O2•− as compared to the wild type (WT. Furthermore, the low SA treatment along with salinity improved the tolerance potential of the transgenics by maintaining ROS homeostasis and high K+/Na+ ratio. The transcript expression of SA biosynthetic gene ICS1 and antioxidative enzymes (CAT and SOD showed upregulation during stress. Thus, the present study reflects that JcWRKY might be working in co-ordination with SA and salt stress signalling to orchestrate the different biochemical and molecular pathways to manoeuvre stress tolerance of the transgenic plants.

  13. Bioactivities of Jc-SCRIP, a type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein from Jatropha curcas seed coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuchsuk, Chanthakan; Wetprasit, Nuanchawee; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; T-Thienprasert, Nattanan; Yokthongwattana, Chotika; Arpornsuwan, Theerakul; Ratanapo, Sunanta

    2013-10-01

    In this study, a type 1 RIP, designated as Jc-SCRIP, was first isolated from the seed coat of Jatropha curcas Linn. It was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel™ and CM-cellulose columns. Purification fold of Jc-SCRIP increased 113.8 times, and the yield was 1.13% of the total protein in the final step. It was shown to be a monomeric glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 38 938 Da, as determined by MALDI-TOF/MS. It exhibited hemagglutination activity and possessed strong N-glycosidase activity. The antimicrobial activity of Jc-SCRIP was tested against nine human pathogenic bacteria and one fungus; the most potent inhibitory activity was against Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228, with minimum inhibitory concentration value of 0.20 μm. Jc-SCRIP demonstrated in vitro cytotoxicity against human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7), a colon adenocarcinoma (SW620), and a liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2), with IC50 values of 0.15, 0.25, and 0.40 mm, respectively. The results suggested that Jc-SCRIP may be a potential natural antimicrobial and anticancer agent in medical applications. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Jc and a.c. losses of Bi2223 Multifilamentary tapes with SVO barriers; Fuiramento kan ni SVO baria wo motsu Bi2223 tashin tepu no Jc to koryu sonshitsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaba, T.; Maeda, H.; Sato, M. [Kitama Institute of Technology, Hokkaido (Japan); Zhang, P. [Toyohashi Univ. of Technology, Aichi (Japan); Chen, W. [Tohoku Univ., Miyagi (Japan). Institute for Materials Research

    2000-05-29

    For application of Bi-2223 wire, decrease of AC losses is important. For this, Bi-2223 multifilamentary tape where Sr{sub 6}V{sub 2}O{sub 1}1(SVO) powders arranged between filaments of high temperature superconductor was fabricated and the AC loss was evaluated. Slurry of blended SVO with polymer was produced. Wire where inside surface and outside surface of pipe was coated with this showed high Jc. But wire where both side of Ag pipe was coated with this showed low Jc. This is caused by disconnection of wires. (NEDO)

  15. Viral suppression of multiple escape mutants by de novo CD8(+) T cell responses in a human immunodeficiency virus-1 infected elite suppressor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Connell, Karen A; Hegarty, Robert W; Siliciano, Robert F; Blankson, Joel N

    2011-01-01

    ...*57-positive ES are usually infected with virus that is unmutated at CTL epitopes, a single, dominant variant containing CTL escape mutations is typically seen in plasma during chronic infection...

  16. Sequential Onset of Varicella-Zoster Virus Encephalomeningitis and Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy in an Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Yukiko; Kusakabe, Shinsuke; Toda, Jun; Ohshima, Kenji; Masaie, Hiroaki; Yagi, Toshinari; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Jun

    2016-12-12

    Here, we describe a case of sequential varicella-zoster virus encephalomeningitis and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy following an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant procedure. A 37-year-old male patient presented with fever, incomplete paralysis of bilateral legs, and bullous eruptions 8 months after allogeneic transplant. Polymerase chain reaction assays of cerebrospinal fluid samples for varicella-zoster virus were positive. Bullous eruptions and incomplete paralysis of bilateral legs improved after administration of acyclovir. However, higher brain dysfunction was present and getting worse. We detected no herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, Cytomegalovirus, human herpes virus 6, Epstein-Barr virus, or JC virus in cerebrospinal fluid samples with polymerase chain reaction assays. Pathologic findings and polymerase chain reaction assays with brain biopsy samples revealed that the patient had progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. This is the first report of a case showing dual central nervous system infections due to varicella-zoster virus and JC virus after allogeneic stem cell transplant.

  17. Host-parasite dynamics and outgrowth of virus containing a single K70R amino acid change in reverse transcriptase are responsible for the loss of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA load suppression by zidovudine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M.D. de; Veenstra, J.; Stilianakis, N.I.; Schuurman, R.; Lange, Joep M.A.; Boer, R.J. de; Boucher, C.A.B.

    1996-01-01

    The association between human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) RNA load changes and the emergence of resistant virus variants was investigated in 24 HIV-1-infected asymptomatic persons during 2 years of treatment with zidovudine by sequentially measuring serum HIV-1 RNA load and the relative

  18. Potato Virus Y HCPro Suppression of Antiviral Silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana Plants Correlates with Its Ability To Bind In Vivo to 21- and 22-Nucleotide Small RNAs of Viral Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Toro, Francisco J; Donaire, Livia; Aguilar, Emmanuel; Chung, Bong-Nam; Tenllado, Francisco; Canto, Tomás

    2017-06-15

    We have investigated short and small RNAs (sRNAs) that were bound to a biologically active hexahistidine-tagged Potato virus Y (PVY) HCPro suppressor of silencing, expressed from a heterologous virus vector in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, and purified under nondenaturing conditions. We found that RNAs in purified preparations were differentially enriched in 21-nucleotide (nt) and, to a much lesser extent, 22-nt sRNAs of viral sequences (viral sRNAs [vsRNAs]) compared to those found in a control plant protein background bound to nickel resin in the absence of HCPro or in a purified HCPro alanine substitution mutant (HCPro mutB) control that lacked suppressor-of-silencing activity. In both controls, sRNAs were composed almost entirely of molecules of plant sequence, indicating that the resin-bound protein background had no affinity for vsRNAs and also that HCPro mutB failed to bind to vsRNAs. Therefore, PVY HCPro suppressor activity correlated with its ability to bind to 21- and 22-nt vsRNAs. HCPro constituted at least 54% of the total protein content in purified preparations, and we were able to calculate its contribution to the 21- and the 22-nt pools of sRNAs present in the purified samples and its binding strength relative to the background. We also found that in the 21-nt vsRNAs of the HCPro preparation, 5'-terminal adenines were overrepresented relative to the controls, but this was not observed in vsRNAs of other sizes or of plant sequences.IMPORTANCE It was previously shown that HCPro can bind to long RNAs and small RNAs (sRNAs) in vitro and, in the case of Turnip mosaic virus HCPro, also in vivo in arabidopsis AGO2-deficient plants. Our data show that PVY HCPro binds in vivo to sRNAs during infection in wild-type Nicotiana benthamiana plants when expressed from a heterologous virus vector. Using a suppression-of-silencing-deficient HCPro mutant that can accumulate in this host when expressed from a virus vector, we also show that sRNA binding correlates

  19. Suppressed Belief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komarine Romdenh-Romluc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Moran’s revised conception of conscious belief requires us to reconceptualise suppressed belief. The work of Merleau-Ponty offers a way to do this. His account of motor-skills allows us to understand suppressed beliefs as pre-reflective ways of dealing with the world.

  20. JC Polyomavirus Infection Is Strongly Controlled by Human Leucocyte Antigen Class II Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundqvist, Emilie; Buck, Dorothea; Warnke, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    mark infection occur only in 50-60% of infected individuals, and high JCV-antibody titers seem to increase the risk of developing PML. We here investigated the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA), instrumental in immune defense in JCV antibody response. Anti-JCV antibody status, as a surrogate...... antibody response and human leucocyte antigens supports the notion that CD4+ T cells are crucial in the immune defence to JCV and lays the ground for risk stratification for PML and development of therapy and prevention.......JC polyomavirus (JCV) carriers with a compromised immune system, such as in HIV, or subjects on immune-modulating therapies, such as anti VLA-4 therapy may develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) which is a lytic infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain. Serum antibodies to JCV...

  1. Pathogenicity of Alternanthera mosaic virus is affected by determinants in RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and by reduced efficacy of silencing suppression in a movement-competent TGB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Vaira, Anna Maria; Reinsel, Michael D; Bae, Hanhong; Bailey, Bryan A; Domier, Leslie L; Hammond, John

    2010-01-01

    Four biologically active cDNA clones were derived from the Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV; genus Potexvirus) isolate, AltMV-SP, which differ in symptoms in infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Two clones induced necrosis and plant death; a mixture of all four clones induced milder symptoms than AltMV-SP. Replication of all clones was enhanced by a minimum of fourfold at 15 degrees C. A mixture of clones 4-7 (severe) and 3-1 (mild) was indistinguishable from AltMV-SP, but the ratio of 4-7 to 3-1 differed at 25 and 15 degrees C. RNA copy numbers of mixed infections were always below those of 4-7 alone. Determinants of symptom severity were identified in both Pol and TGB1; the mildest (4-1) and most severe (3-7) clones differed at three residues in the 'core' Pol domain [R(1110)P, K(1121)R, R(1255)K] and one [S(1535)P] in the C-terminal Pol domain of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and one in TGB1 [P(88)L]. Pol [P(1110),R(1121),K(1255)]+TGB1(L(88))] always induced systemic necrosis at 15 degrees C. Gene exchanges of Pol and TGB1 each affected replication and symptom expression, with TGB1(P(88)) significantly reducing silencing suppression. The difference in silencing suppression between TGB1(P(88)) and TGB1(L(88)) was confirmed by an agroinfiltration assay. Further, co-expression of TGB1(P(88)) and TGB1(L(88)) resulted in interference in the suppression of silencing by TGB1(L(88)). Yeast two-hybrid analysis confirmed that TGB1(P(88)) and TGB1(L(88)) interact. These results identify a TGB1 residue that significantly affects replication and silencing suppression, but maintains full movement functions.

  2. Effect of mixed pinning landscapes produced by 6 MeV oxygen irradiation on the resulting critical current densities Jc in 1.3 μm thick GdBa2Cu3O7-d coated conductors grown by co-evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberkorn, N.; Suárez, S.; Pérez, P. D.; Troiani, H.; Granell, P.; Golmar, F.; Lee, Jae-Hun; Moon, S. H.

    2017-11-01

    We report the influence of crystalline defects introduced by 6 MeV 16O3+ irradiation on the critical current densities Jc and flux creep rates in 1.3 μm thick GdBa2Cu3O7-δ coated conductor produced by co-evaporation. Pristine films with pinning produced mainly by random nanoparticles with diameter close to 50 nm were irradiated with doses between 2 × 1013 cm-2 and 4 × 1014 cm-2. The irradiations were performed with the ion beam perpendicular to the surface of the samples. The Jc and the flux creep rates were analyzed for two magnetic field configurations: magnetic field applied parallel (H║c) and at 45° (H║45°) to the c-axis. The results show that at temperatures below 40 K the in-field Jc dependences can be significantly improved by irradiation. For doses of 1 × 1014 cm-2 the Jc values at μ0H = 5 T are doubled without affecting significantly the Jc at small fields. Analyzing the flux creep rates as function of the temperature in both magnetic field configurations, it can be observed that the irradiation suppresses the peak associated with double-kink relaxation and increases the flux creep rates at intermediate and high temperatures. Under 0.5 T, the flux relaxation for H‖c and H||45° in pristine films presents characteristic glassy exponents μ = 1.63 and μ = 1.45, respectively. For samples irradiated with 1 × 1014 cm-2, these values drop to μ = 1.45 and μ = 1.24, respectively

  3. Molecular characterization of the Jatropha curcas JcR1MYB1 gene encoding a putative R1-MYB transcription factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Liang Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The cDNA encoding the R1-MYB transcription factor, designated as JcR1MYB1, was isolated from Jatropha curcas using rapid amplification of cDNA ends. JcR1MYB1 contains a 951 bp open reading frame that encodes 316 amino acids. The deduced JcR1MYB1 protein was predicted to possess the conserved, 56-amino acid-long DNA-binding domain, which consists of a single helix-turn-helix module and usually occurs in R1-MYBs. JcR1MYB1 is a member of the R1-MYB transcription factor subfamily. A subcellular localization study confirmed the nuclear localization of JcR1MYB1. Expression analysis showed that JcR1MYB1 transcripts accumulated in various examined tissues, with high expression levels in the root and low levels in the stem. JcR1MYB1 transcription was up-regulated by polyethylene glycol, NaCl, and cold treatments, as well as by abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and ethylene treatment. Analysis of transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing JcR1MYB1 indicates an inportant function for this gene in salt stress.

  4. Thalidomide suppresses Up-regulation of human immunodeficiency virus coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5 on CD4+ T cells in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juffermans, N. P.; Verbon, A.; Olszyna, D. P.; van Deventer, S. J.; Speelman, P.; van der Poll, T.

    2000-01-01

    Concurrent infection in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection increases the expression of HIV coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5. Thalidomide has beneficial effects in a number of HIV-associated diseases. The effect of thalidomide on CXCR4 and CCR5 expression on CD4+ T cells was

  5. Suppression of virus replication via down-modulation of mitochondrial short chain enoyl-CoA hydratase in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Megumi; Watari, Eiji; Shinya, Eiji; Shimizu, Takako; Takahashi, Hidemi

    2007-08-01

    Several viruses have been demonstrated to be the etiologic agent in chronic progressive diseases, associated with persistence; however, major questions concerning the pathogenic mechanisms of viral persistence are still unanswered. With the aim of identifying host cellular proteins that may play a role in viral replication, we established long-term persistently infected human glioblastoma cell lines with mutant measles virus (MV) and analyzed the host proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) with mass spectrometry. We observed significant down-modulation in the expression of mitochondrial short chain enoyl-CoA hydratase (ECHS), which catalyzes the beta-oxidation pathway of fatty acid. Knockdown of this gene by a short interference RNA (siRNA) apparently impaired wild-type MV replication and the cytopathic effects (CPEs) of MV were significantly reduced in siRNA-transfected cells. These findings will shed light upon a new important notion for the interaction between virus replication and lipid metabolism in host cells and might provide a new strategy for virus control.

  6. Switching patients with lamivudine resistant chronic hepatitis B virus from tenofovir to adefovir results in less potent HBV-DNA suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemans, W F; Janssen, H L A; Niesters, H G M; de Man, R A

    The nucleotide analogues, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and adefovir dipivoxil, inhibit viral replication and are both effective against the hepatitis B virus (HBV). In our department, tenofovir was prescribed in addition to lamivudine for the treatment of lamivudine resistant chronic hepatitis B.

  7. Comparison of helper component-protease RNA silencing suppression activity, subcellular localization, and aggregation of three Korean isolates of Turnip mosaic virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2014, we performed a nationwide survey in Korean radish fields to investigate the distribution of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV). Brassica chinensis sap-inoculated with TuMV-infected radish tissue showed different symptom severity with three isolates. In order to investigate variation among Korean Tu...

  8. Sequence variability in HC-Pro genes of Korean Soybean mosaic virus isolates is associated with differences in gene silencing suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), a member of the family Potyviridae, is an important viral pathogen affecting soybean production in Korea. The variability in helper component proteinase (HC-Pro) sequence and pathogenicity of SMV isolates from seven provinces of Korea was investigated and compared with th...

  9. Thought suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzlaff, R M; Wegner, D M

    2000-01-01

    Although thought suppression is a popular form of mental control, research has indicated that it can be counterproductive, helping assure the very state of mind one had hoped to avoid. This chapter reviews the research on suppression, which spans a wide range of domains, including emotions, memory, interpersonal processes, psychophysiological reactions, and psychopathology. The chapter considers the relevant methodological and theoretical issues and suggests directions for future research.

  10. Excitability of jcBNST neurons is reduced in alcohol-dependent animals during protracted alcohol withdrawal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Szücs

    Full Text Available Alcohol dependence and withdrawal has been shown to cause neuroadaptive changes at multiple levels of the nervous system. At the neuron level, adaptations of synaptic connections have been extensively studied in a number of brain areas and accumulating evidence also shows the importance of alcohol dependence-related changes in the intrinsic cellular properties of neurons. At the same time, it is still largely unknown how such neural adaptations impact the firing and integrative properties of neurons. To address these problems, here, we analyze physiological properties of neurons in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (jcBNST in animals with a history of alcohol dependence. As a comprehensive approach, first we measure passive and active membrane properties of neurons using conventional current clamp protocols and then analyze their firing responses under the action of simulated synaptic bombardment via dynamic clamp. We find that most physiological properties as measured by DC current injection are barely affected during protracted withdrawal. However, neuronal excitability as measured from firing responses under simulated synaptic inputs with the dynamic clamp is markedly reduced in all 3 types of jcBNST neurons. These results support the importance of studying the effects of alcohol and drugs of abuse on the firing properties of neurons with dynamic clamp protocols designed to bring the neurons into a high conductance state. Since the jcBNST integrates excitatory inputs from the basolateral amygdala (BLA and cortical inputs from the infralimbic and the insular cortices and in turn is believed to contribute to the inhibitory input to the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA the reduced excitability of the jcBNST during protracted withdrawal in alcohol-dependent animals will likely affect ability of the jcBNST to shape the activity and output of the CeA.

  11. Genome-wide identification of the Jatropha curcas MYB family and functional analysis of the abiotic stress responsive gene JcMYB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xianjun; Liu, Hui; Wang, Dan; Shen, Shihua

    2016-03-22

    The MYB family is one of the most abundant transcription factor families in plants. MYB proteins are involved in plant development, abiotic stress tolerance, hormone signal transduction and disease resistance. Here we perform genome-wide identification of MYB family transcription factors in an energy plant J. curcas, including determining family composition, phylogenetic evolution and functional prediction analysis. In addition, we further elucidate the function of the JcMYB2 gene. The phylogenetic trees were constructed by using the neighbor-joining method in MEGA 5.2. The biological functions of some JcMYBs were predicted according to orthology. The full length cDNA of JcMYB2 was cloned by using the RACE method. GUS histochemical staining was used to test the activity of the JcMYB2 promoter. Expression patterns of JcMYB2 were detected by using qPCR Transcriptional activity JcMYB2 were confirmed through yeast one hybrid. Subcellular Localization of JcMYB2 Protein were demonstrated by transient expression in the tobacco leaf. The function of JcMYB2 in salt and freezing tolerance were detected in transgenic plants. A genome-wide analysis identified 128 MYB genes, including 123 R2R3-MYBs, 4 R1R2R3-MYBs and 1 4R-MYB. All of the R2R3-MYBs are further classified into 19 groups which indicated functional conservation among previously identified groups of R2R3-MYB proteins. Among of these newly identified MYBs, the JcMYB2 belongs to group G11 and its expression is induced obviously by cold, salt and MeJA (Methyl Jasmonate) and slightly by ABA (abscisic acid). JcMYB2 is localized to the nucleus and has transcriptional activity. JcMYB2 overexpressing plants are more tolerant to salt and cold stress than wild type plants. Tissue specific expression profiles showed that the JcMYB2 gene was expressed ubiquitously throughout the plant, with higher expression levels observed in the root. A comprehensive genome-wide analysis and phylogenetic relationship of R2R3-MYB subfamily in

  12. Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies provide a scaffold for human polyomavirus JC replication and are disrupted after development of viral inclusions in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishido-Hara, Yukiko; Higuchi, Kayoko; Ohara, Sinji; Duyckaerts, Charles; Hauw, Jean-Jacques; Uchihara, Toshiki

    2008-04-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is a fatal demyelinating disorder due to human polyomavirus JC infection in which there are viral inclusions in enlarged nuclei of infected oligodendrocytes. We report that the pathogenesis of this disease is associated with distinct subnuclear structures known as promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs). Postmortem brain tissues from 5 patients with the disease were examined. Affected cells with enlarged nuclei contained distinct dot-like subnuclear PML-NBs that were immunopositive for PML protein and nuclear body protein Sp100. Major and minor viral capsid proteins and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, an essential component for DNA replication, colocalized with PML-NBs. By in situ hybridization, viral genomic DNA showed dot-like nuclear accumulation, and by electron microscopy, virus-like structures clustered in subnuclear domains, indicating that PML-NBs are the site of viral DNA replication and capsid assembly. Molecules involved in the ubiquitin proteosome pathway (i.e. ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-like modifier 1) did not accumulate in the nuclei with viral inclusions, indicating that cell degeneration may not be dependent on this pathway. When viral progeny production was advanced, PML-NBs were disrupted. These data suggest that: 1) PML-NBs allow for efficient viral propagation by providing scaffolds, 2) disruption of PML-NBs is independent of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, and 3) this disruption probably heralds oligodendrocyte degeneration and the resulting demyelination.

  13. Polyomavirus JC in the Context of Immunosuppression: A Series of Adaptive, DNA Replication-Driven Recombination Events in the Development of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward M. Johnson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyomavirus JC (JCV is the etiological agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML, a demyelinating infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain. PML, a frequently fatal opportunistic infection in AIDS, has also emerged as a consequence of treatment with several new immunosuppressive therapeutic agents. Although nearly 80% of adults are seropositive, JCV attains an ability to infect glial cells in only a minority of people. Data suggest that JCV undergoes sequence alterations that accompany this ability, and these changes can be derived from an archetype strain by mutation, deletion, and duplication. While the introductory source and primary tissue reservoir of JCV remain unknown, lymphoid cells have been identified as potential intermediaries in progression of JCV to the brain. This review is focused on sequence changes in the noncoding control region (NCCR of the virus. We propose an adaptive mechanism that involves a sequential series of DNA replication-driven NCCR recombination events involving stalled DNA replication forks at NCCR palindromic secondary structures. We shall describe how the NCCR sequence changes point to a model in which viral DNA replication drives NCCR recombination, allowing JCV adaptation to different cell types in its progression to neurovirulence.

  14. Interaction of CtBP with adenovirus E1A suppresses immortalization of primary epithelial cells and enhances virus replication during productive infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, T.; Zhao, Ling-jun; Chinnadurai, G., E-mail: chinnag@slu.edu

    2013-09-01

    Adenovirus E1A induces cell proliferation, oncogenic transformation and promotes viral replication through interaction with p300/CBP, TRRAP/p400 multi-protein complex and the retinoblastoma (pRb) family proteins through distinct domains in the E1A N-terminal region. The C-terminal region of E1A suppresses E1A/Ras co-transformation and interacts with FOXK1/K2, DYRK1A/1B/HAN11 and CtBP1/2 (CtBP) protein complexes. To specifically dissect the role of CtBP interaction with E1A, we engineered a mutation (DL→AS) within the CtBP-binding motif, PLDLS, and investigated the effect of the mutation on immortalization and Ras cooperative transformation of primary cells and viral replication. Our results suggest that CtBP–E1A interaction suppresses immortalization and Ras co-operative transformation of primary rodent epithelial cells without significantly influencing the tumorigenic activities of transformed cells in immunodeficient and immunocompetent animals. During productive infection, CtBP–E1A interaction enhances viral replication in human cells. Between the two CtBP family proteins, CtBP2 appears to restrict viral replication more than CtBP1 in human cells. - Highlights: • Adenovirus E1A C-terminal region suppresses E1A/Ras co-transformation. • This E1A region binds with FOXK, DYRK1/HAN11 and CtBP cellular protein complexes. • We found that E1A–CtBP interaction suppresses immortalization and transformation. • The interaction enhances viral replication in human cells.

  15. Viral suppression of multiple escape mutants by de novo CD8+ T cell responses in a human immunodeficiency virus-1 Infected elite suppressor

    OpenAIRE

    Siliciano Robert F; Hegarty Robert W; O'Connell Karen A; Blankson Joel N

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Elite suppressors or controllers (ES) are HIV-1 infected patients who maintain undetectable viral loads without treatment. While HLA-B*57-positive ES are usually infected with virus that is unmutated at CTL epitopes, a single, dominant variant containing CTL escape mutations is typically seen in plasma during chronic infection. We describe an ES who developed seven distinct and rare escape variants at an HLA-B*57-restricted Gag epitope over a five year period. Interestingly, he devel...

  16. Critical current measurements of High-Jc Nb3Sn Rutherford cables under Transverse Compression

    CERN Document Server

    Bordini, B; Ballarino, A; Bottura, L; Oberli, L

    2013-01-01

    For the LHC upgrade, CERN has launched a large program to develop next generation accelerator magnets based on high-Jc Nb3Sn Rutherford cables. These magnets are characterized by a magnetic field and/or an aperture significantly larger than that of current Nb-Ti LHC magnets. The increased field/aperture will require coil pre-stresses much larger than 100 MPa. Since Nb3Sn cables are extremely sensitive to strain, critical current measurements under traverse compression are essential to estimate the transport current properties of the conductor within the magnet. To this purpose CERN has developed a sample holder (to be used in the FRESCA test station) that allows testing Rutherford cables under a transverse force of up to 2 MN/m. The new holder can house cable samples up to 1.8 m long and 20 mm wide. The large transverse force is only applied over the sample high field region, which is 70 cm long and over which the FRESCA dipole magnet generates a homogeneous fields of up to 10 T. Recently the critical current...

  17. Interocular suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Ana Rita; Almeida Neves Carrega, Filipa; Nunes, Amélia Fernandes

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this work is to quantify the suppressive imbalance, based on the manipulation of ocular luminance, between a group of subjects with normal binocular vision and a group of subjects with amblyopia. The result reveals that there are statistically significant differences in interocular dominance between two groups, evidencing a greater suppressive imbalance in amblyopic subjects. The technique used, proved to be a simple, easy to apply and economic method, for quantified ocular dominance. It is presented as a technique with the potential to accompany subjects with a marked dominance in one of the eyes that makes fusion difficult.

  18. Switch to Rilpivirine/Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Single-Tablet Regimen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 RNA-Suppressed Patients, Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA et les Hépatites Virales CO3 Aquitaine Cohort, 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazanave, Charles; Reigadas, Sandrine; Mazubert, Cyril; Bellecave, Pantxika; Hessamfar, Mojgan; Le Marec, Fabien; Lazaro, Estibaliz; Peytavin, Gilles; Bruyand, Mathias; Fleury, Hervé; Dabis, François; Neau, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Background.  The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 virologically suppressed patients who switched to rilpivirine (RPV)/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)/emtricitabine (FTC) as a single-tablet regimen (STR). Methods.  A retrospective multicenter cohort study was performed between September 2012 and February 2014 in Bordeaux University Hospital-affiliated clinics. Patients with a plasma HIV viral load (VL) lower than 50 copies/mL and switching to STR were evaluated at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months from switch time (M3, M6, M9, M12) for VL and other biological parameters. Change from baseline in CD4 cell counts was evaluated at M6 and M12. Virological failure (VF) was defined as 2 consecutive VL >50 copies/mL. Results.  Three hundred four patients were included in the analysis. Single-tablet regimen switch was proposed to 116 patients with adverse events, mostly efavirenz (EFV)-based (n = 59), and to 224 patients for cART simplification. Thirty of 196 patients with available genotype resistance test results displayed virus with ≥1 drug resistance mutation on reverse-transcriptase gene. After 12 months of follow-up, 93.4% (95.5% confidence interval, 89.9-96.2) of patients remained virologically suppressed. There was no significant change in CD4 cell count. During the study period, 5 patients experienced VF, one of them harboring RPV resistance mutation. Clinical cART tolerability improved in 79 patients overall (29.9%) at M6, especially neurological symptoms related to EFV. Fasting serum lipid profiles improved, but a significant estimated glomerular function rate decrease (-11 mL/min/1.73 m(2); P < 10(-4)) was observed. Conclusions.  Overall, virologic suppression was maintained in patients after switching to RPV/TDF/ FTC. This STR strategy was associated with improved tolerability.

  19. RNA binding is more critical to the suppression of silencing function of Cucumber mosaic virus 2b protein than nuclear localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Inmaculada; Rakitina, Daria; Semashko, Maria; Taliansky, Michael; Praveen, Shelly; Palukaitis, Peter; Carr, John P.; Kalinina, Natalia; Canto, Tomás

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we found that silencing suppression by the 2b protein and six mutants correlated both with their ability to bind to double-stranded (ds) small RNAs (sRNAs) in vitro and with their nuclear/nucleolar localization. To further discern the contribution to suppression activity of sRNA binding and of nuclear localization, we have characterized the kinetics of in vitro binding to a ds sRNA, a single-stranded (ss) sRNA, and a micro RNA (miRNA) of the native 2b protein and eight mutant variants. We have also added a nuclear export signal (NES) to the 2b protein and assessed how it affected subcellular distribution and suppressor activity. We found that in solution native protein bound ds siRNA, miRNA, and ss sRNA with high affinity, at protein:RNA molar ratios ∼2:1. Of the four mutants that retained suppressor activity, three showed sRNA binding profiles similar to those of the native protein, whereas the remaining one bound ss sRNA at a 2:1 molar ratio, but both ds sRNAs with 1.5–2 times slightly lower affinity. Three of the four mutants lacking suppressor activity failed to bind to any sRNA, whereas the remaining one bound them at far higher ratios. NES-tagged 2b protein became cytoplasmic, but suppression activity in patch assays remained unaffected. These results support binding to sRNAs at molar ratios at or near 2:1 as critical to the suppressor activity of the 2b protein. They also show that cytoplasmically localized 2b protein retained suppressor activity, and that a sustained nuclear localization was not required for this function. PMID:22357910

  20. Tim-3-expressing macrophages are functionally suppressed and expanded in oral squamous cell carcinoma due to virus-induced Gal-9 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jianfeng; Cheng, Lijun; Zhao, Minchao; Pan, Xiangfeng; Feng, Zhiqiang; Wang, Dawei

    2017-05-01

    Oropharyngeal head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is a common malignant tumor in the oral cavity. High-risk human papillomavirus 16 infection is a major cause of oropharyngeal head and neck squamous cell carcinoma development. Strong antitumor immune responses, especially CD8+ T cell responses, are thought to be essential to effective cancer treatment and are associated with better prognosis in oropharyngeal head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. In this study, we examined the role of the Tim-3/Gal-9 pathway in oropharyngeal head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients. We found that Gal-9 expression by CD4+ T cells was increased in human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients, but not in human papillomavirus-negative oropharyngeal head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients. Increased Gal-9 secretion by CD4+ T cells presented multiple immunosuppressive effects. Coculturing monocytes with high Gal-9-expressing CD4+ T cells resulted in the expansion of Tim-3+ monocytes, which suppressed interferon gamma production by activated CD8+ T cells. Subsequently, total monocytes incubated with exogenous Gal-9, or high Gal-9-expressing CD4+ T cells, suppressed the expression of interferon gamma by CD8+ T cells. Exogenous Gal-9 and high Gal-9-expressing CD4+ T cells also suppressed the secretion of both interleukin 10 and interleukin 12 by monocytes. These effects are Tim-3/Gal-9-dependent because blocking Tim-3 and/or Gal-9 could enhance the support of CD8+ T cell interferon gamma production and the interleukin 10 and interleukin 12 secretion by monocytes. Together, these data suggest that the high Tim-3 expression in monocytes could be utilized by tumor-promoting Gal-9 expression on CD4+ T cells. Immunotherapy in human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients therefore faces an additional challenge posed by Tim-3 and Gal-9 and likely requires the blockade of these molecules.

  1. Recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV/Anh-IL-2 expressing human IL-2 as a potential candidate for suppresses growth of hepatoma therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhou Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Newcastle disease virus (NDV have shown oncolytic therapeutic efficacy in preclinical study and are currently approved for clinical trials. NDV Anhinga strain which is a mesogenic strain should be classified as lytic strain and has a therapeutic efficacy in hepatocellular cancer. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of NDV Anhinga strain to elicit immune reaction in vivo and the possibility for using as a vaccine vector for expressing tumor therapeutic factors. Interleukin-2 (IL-2 could boost the immune response against the tumor cells. Therefore, we use NDV Anhinga strain as backbone to construct a recombinant virus (NDV/Anh-IL-2 expressing IL-2. The virus growth curve showed that the production of recombinant NDV/Anh-IL-2 was slightly delayed compared to the wild type. The NDV/Anh-IL-2 strain could express soluble IL-2 and effectively inhibit the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma in vivo. 60 days post-treatment, mice which were completely cured by previous treatment were well protected when rechallenged with the same tumor cell. From the H&E-stained sections, intense infiltration of lymphocyte was observed in the NDV Anhinga strain treated group, especially in NDV/Anh-IL-2 group. The NDV Anhinga strain could not only kill the tumor directly, but could also elicit immune reaction and a potent immunological memory when killing tumor in vivo. In conclusion, the Anhinga strain could be an effective vector for tumor therapy; the recombinant NDV/Anh-IL-2 strain expressing soluble IL-2 is a promising candidate for hepatoma therapy.

  2. Efficient Gene Suppression in Dorsal Root Ganglia and Spinal Cord Using Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors Encoding Short-Hairpin RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Hirai, Takashi; Kaburagi, Hidetoshi; Yokota, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference is a powerful tool used to induce loss-of-function phenotypes through post-transcriptional gene silencing. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules have been used to target the central nervous system (CNS) and are expected to have clinical utility against refractory neurodegenerative diseases. However, siRNA is characterized by low transduction efficiency, insufficient inhibition of gene expression, and short duration of therapeutic effects, and is thus not ideal for treatment of neural tissues and diseases. To address these problems, viral delivery of short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression cassettes that support more efficient and long-lasting transduction into target tissues is expected to be a promising delivery tool. Various types of gene therapy vectors have been developed, such as adenovirus, adeno-associated virus (AAV), herpes simplex virus and lentivirus; however, AAV is particularly advantageous because of its relative lack of immunogenicity and lack of chromosomal integration. In human clinical trials, recombinant AAV vectors are relatively safe and well-tolerated. In particular, serotype 9 of AAV (AAV9) vectors show the highest tropism for neural tissue and can cross the blood-brain barrier, and we have shown that intrathecal delivery of AAV9 yields relatively high gene transduction into dorsal root ganglia or spinal cord. This chapter describes how to successfully use AAV vectors encoding shRNA in vivo, particularly for RNA interference in the central and peripheral nervous system.

  3. JC virus in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer, an etiological agent or another component in a multistep process?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazo Pedro A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract JCV infection occurs early in childhood and last throughout life. JCV has been associated to colorectal cancer and might contribute to the cancer phenotype by several mechanisms. Among JCV proteins, particularly two of them, large T-antigen and agnoprotein, can interfere with cell cycle control and genomic instability mechanisms, but other viral proteins might also contribute to the process. Part of viral DNA sequences are detected in carcinoma lesions, but less frequently in adenomas, and not in the normal surrounding tissue, suggesting they are integrated in the host cell genome and these integrations have been selected; in addition viral integration can cause a gene, or chromosomal damage. The inflammatory infiltration caused by a local chronic viral infection in the intestine can contribute to the selection and expansion of a tumor prone cell in a cytokine rich microenvironment. JCV may not be the cause of colorectal cancer, but it can be a relevant risk factor and able to facilitate progression at one or several stages in tumor progression. JCV transient effects might lead to selective expansion of tumor cells. Since there is not a direct cause and effect relationship, JCV infection may be an alternative to low frequency cancer predisposition genes.

  4. Leisingera sp. JC1, a Bacterial Isolate from Hawaiian Bobtail Squid Eggs, Produces Indigoidine and Differentially Inhibits Vibrios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha M. Gromek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Female members of many cephalopod species house a bacterial consortium that is part of their reproductive system, the accessory nidamental gland (ANG. These bacteria are deposited into eggs that are then laid in the environment where they must develop unprotected from predation, pathogens and fouling. In this study, we characterized the genome and secondary metabolite production of Leisingera sp. JC1, a member of the roseobacter clade (Rhodobacteraceae of Alphaproteobacteria isolated from the jelly coat of eggs from the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes. Whole genome sequencing and MLSA analysis revealed that Leisingera sp. JC1 falls within a group of roseobacters associated with squid ANGs. Genome and biochemical analyses revealed the potential for and production of a number of secondary metabolites, including siderophores and acyl-homoserine lactones involved with quorum sensing. The complete biosynthetic gene cluster for the pigment indigoidine was detected in the genome and mass spectrometry confirmed the production of this compound. Furthermore, we investigated the production of indigoidine under co-culture conditions with Vibrio fischeri, the light organ symbiont of E. scolopes, and with other vibrios. Finally, both Leisingera sp. JC1 and secondary metabolite extracts of this strain had differential antimicrobial activity against a number of marine vibrios, suggesting that Leisingera sp. JC1 may play a role in host defense against other marine bacteria either in the eggs and/or ANG. These data also suggest that indigoidine may be partially, but not wholly, responsible for the antimicrobial activity of this squid-associated bacterium. □

  5. Asymmetric behaviour of Jc(ɛ) in Nb3Sn wires and correlation with the stress induced elastic tetragonal distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flükiger, R.; Uglietti, D.; Abächerli, V.; Seeber, B.

    2005-12-01

    The effect of uniaxial strain on the critical current of 0.8 m long Nb3Sn wires up to 21 T is studied by the modified Walters spring (WASP). For Nb3Sn wires, prepared by both the bronze route and the internal Sn diffusion process, the critical current density as a function of the uniaxial strain ɛ is found to exhibit an asymmetric behaviour on both sides of the strain ɛm, where Jc reaches its maximum. Revisiting earlier x-ray and neutron diffraction measurements on bronze route processed wires between 10 and 600 K, it is shown that the asymmetric behaviour of Jc(ɛ) on both sides of the strain value ɛm is connected to individual variations of the stress-induced tetragonal lattice parameters a and c. The present measurements of Jc versus strain for Nb3Sn wires show stronger strain dependence for wires prepared by the internal Sn diffusion method with respect to those obtained by the bronze route. The reasons for this difference are attributed to the individual details of the filament configuration in both types of wire, for example the different Sn distributions inside the filaments and the very different filament sizes, 4 and 80 µm, respectively.

  6. Influence of HIV-associated degree of immune suppression on molecular heterogeneity of hepatitis B virus among HIV co-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Ananya; Panigrahi, Rajesh; Biswas, Avik; Datta, Sibnarayan; Sarkar, Neelakshi; Guha, Subhashish Kamal; Saha, Bibhuti; Banerjee, Arup; Chakrabarti, Sekhar; Chakravarty, Runu

    2013-02-05

    We have investigated the molecular diversity of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) among the HIV co-infected patients from eastern-India. HBsAg/HBV-DNA positive subjects (n=73) from 874 HIV-infected patients were analyzed by sequencing followed by genetic diversity quantification. HBV/genotype-D and HBV/sugenotype-D2 were predominant. HBV/D2 isolates from patients with low CD4 count manifested significantly lower non-synonymous substitutions (ptype characteristics in the low CD4 count, leading to its increased prevalence in this group. Interestingly, genetic diversity in HBV/A1, the next common subgenotype, was modified in the opposite manner. Together our results underscore the need for proper HBV molecular monitoring in HIV co-infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus noncoding polyadenylated nuclear RNA interacts with virus- and host cell-encoded proteins and suppresses expression of genes involved in immune modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Cyprian C; Pari, Gregory S

    2011-12-01

    During lytic infection, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) expresses a polyadenylated nuclear RNA (PAN RNA). This noncoding RNA (ncRNA) is localized to the nucleus and is the most abundant viral RNA during lytic infection; however, to date, the role of PAN RNA in the virus life cycle is unknown. Many examples exist where ncRNAs have a defined key regulatory function controlling gene expression by various mechanisms. Our goal for this study was to identify putative binding partners for PAN RNA in an effort to elucidate a possible function for the transcript in KSHV infection. We employed an in vitro affinity protocol where PAN RNA was used as bait for factors present in BCBL-1 cell nuclear extract to show that PAN RNA interacts with several virus- and host cell-encoded factors, including histones H1 and H2A, mitochondrial and cellular single-stranded binding proteins (SSBPs), and interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4). RNA chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed that PAN RNA interacted with these factors in the infected cell environment. A luciferase reporter assay showed that PAN RNA expression interfered with the ability of IRF4/PU.1 to activate the interleukin-4 (IL-4) promoter, strongly suggesting a role for PAN RNA in immune modulation. Since the proteomic screen and functional data suggested a role in immune responses, we investigated if constitutive PAN RNA expression could affect other genes involved in immune responses. PAN RNA expression decreased expression of gamma interferon, interleukin-18, alpha interferon 16, and RNase L. These data strongly suggest that PAN RNA interacts with viral and cellular proteins and can function as an immune modulator.

  8. Grape Seed Proanthocyanidin Inhibits Mucin Synthesis and Viral Replication by Suppression of AP-1 and NF-κB via p38 MAPKs/JNK Signaling Pathways in Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Infected A549 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Woo; Kim, Young Il; Im, Chang-Nim; Kim, Sung Wan; Kim, Su Jin; Min, Seoyeon; Joo, Yong Hoon; Yim, Sung-Vin; Chung, Namhyun

    2017-06-07

    Airway epithelial cells are often infected by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), one of the most common causes of asthma, bronchiolitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pneumonia. During the infection process, excessive mucins instigate airway inflammation. However, the mechanism underlying RSV-induced airway hyper-responsiveness and inflammation is poorly understood. Furthermore, no reliable vaccines or drugs for antiviral therapy are available. In this study, the effect of the natural compound grape seed proanthocyanidin (GSP) on RSV-infected human airway epithelial cells A549 was evaluated. After pretreatment of the cells with or without exposure to RSV with 5-10 μg GSP/mL, the expression of various mucins (MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC, MUC5B, and MUC8) was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blotting, as well as confocal microscopy. We found that GSP significantly decreased RSV-induced mucin synthesis at the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, GSP suppressed the RSV-induced signaling pathways, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38, together with nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activating protein-1 family members (c-Jun and c-Fos). Concomitantly, GSP inhibited the replication of RSV within A549 cells. Taken together, all our results suggest that GSP could be a potent therapeutic agent to suppress excessive mucus production and viral replication in RSV-induced airway inflammatory disorders.

  9. CD4+CD25+CD127low regulatory T cells play predominant anti-tumor suppressive role in hepatitis B virus associated hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreya eSharma

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide and hepatitis B is one of the commonest causes. T regulatory cells (Tregs are strong immunomodulators and are likely to play a major role in HCC development. HBV infection is reported to induce expansion of Tregs. We investigated the CD4+CD25+CD127-veFoxP3+ Tregs in HBV related HCC as compared to non-HBV-HCC. Patients and Methods: Whole blood Immunophenotyping was analysed by multicolor flow cytometry in patients with HBV related HCC (HBV-HCC, n=17, non-HBV-HCC (n=22; NASH =16, alcohol related=6 and chronic hepatitis B infection (CHBV; n=10.T regulatory cells and functionality was checked by in vitro suppression assays using CD4+ CD25+ CD127low T regulatory cells. Levels of serum alpha fetoprotein(AFP,expression of FoxP3, IL-10, PD-1, TGF-β and Notch in Tregs and liver explants was analyzed by flow cytometry, immuno-histochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR.Results:CD4+CD25+hi and Foxp3 expression in CD4+CD25+hiCD127low was significantly increased (P=0.04, P=0.007 in HBVHCC compared to non-HBVHCC and CHBV patients. HBVHCC also showed high IL-10and TGF-β secreting CD4+CD25+hiTregs.The PD1 expression in CD4+CD25+hi was significantly decreased in the HBVHCC than non-HBVHCC. In HBVHCC, AFP levels were significantly high (median 941, range 2-727940 than non-HBVHCC (median 13.5, range 2-18,900. In HBVHCC,patients with high AFP (range;3982-727940 ng/ml showed positive correlation with Foxp3 expression in CD4+CD25+hi CD127low(r=0.857,p=0.014. Reduced PD1 expression in HBVHCC also had negative correlation with FOXP3 in CD4+CD25+hi CD127low(r=-0.78, p=0.04. However, AFP levels in non-HBVHCC showed negative correlation with (R=-0.67, p=0.005 with CD4+CD25+hi Tregs. Conclusions:Our results demonstrates that CD4+ CD25+hi Tregs from HBVHCC patients have decreased expression of PD-1, resulting in higher IL-10 and TGF-β secretion. Increased suppressive ability of

  10. A promoter analysis of MOTHER OF FT AND TFL1 1 (JcMFT1), a seed-preferential gene from the biofuel plant Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yan-Bin; Luo, Li; He, Liang-Liang; Ni, Jun; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2014-07-01

    MOTHER OF FT AND TFL1 (MFT)-like genes belong to the phosphatidylethanoamine-binding protein (PEBP) gene family in plants. In contrast to their homologs FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT)-like and TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1)-like genes, which are involved in the regulation of the flowering time pathway, MFT-like genes function mainly during seed development and germination. In this study, a full-length cDNA of the MFT-like gene JcMFT1 from the biodiesel plant Jatropha curcas (L.) was isolated and found to be highly expressed in seeds. The promoter of JcMFT1 was cloned and characterized in transgenic Arabidopsis. A histochemical β-glucuronidase (GUS) assay indicated that the JcMFT1 promoter was predominantly expressed in both embryos and endosperms of transgenic Arabidopsis seeds. Fluorometric GUS analysis revealed that the JcMFT1 promoter was highly active at the mid to late stages of seed development. After seed germination, the JcMFT1 promoter activity decreased gradually. In addition, both the JcMFT1 expression in germinating Jatropha embryos and its promoter activity in germinating Arabidopsis embryos were induced by abscisic acid (ABA), possibly due to two ABA-responsive elements, a G-box and an RY repeat, in the JcMFT1 promoter region. These results show that the JcMFT1 promoter is seed-preferential and can be used to control transgene expression in the seeds of Jatropha and other transgenic plants.

  11. HSP70 induced by Hantavirus infection interacts with viral nucleocapsid protein and its overexpression suppresses virus infection in Vero E6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lu; Ye, Ling; Zhao, Rong; Liu, Yan Fang; Yang, Shou Jing

    2009-07-15

    Hantavirus (HTV) infection is known to induce innate cellular response, a more specified cellular response in the host cells. However, whether it stimulates synthesis of stress proteins, particularly associations of viral proteins, is entirely unknown. The primary focus of this research is using Vero E6 cells infected with Hantaan 76-118 (HTNV) as an in vitro infection model to examine the individual contribution of HTV infection to heat shock response. This study shows that HTNV infection rapidly induced HSP70 expression in Vero E6 cells, which underwent a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttle that lasted for more than 3 d. The increased HSP70 was preceded by induction of HSP70 mRNA. The physical association of HSP70 with viral nucleocapsid protein (NP) in infected cells was demonstrated by co-localization and immunoprecipation. Vero E6 cells that constitutively overexpress HSP70 after stable transfection with HSP70 gene, when infected with HTNV, showed selectively reduced NP synthesis. These findings suggest HSP70 is actively involved in the control of the expression level of viral structural proteins and possibly involved in virus assembly by binding of NP to HSP70. Overexpression of HSP70 does not favor viral propagation.

  12. Adeno-associated virus (AAV-mediated suppression of Ca2+/calmodulin kinase IV activity in the nucleus accumbens modulates emotional behaviour in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bading Hilmar

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV controls activity-dependent gene transcription by regulating the activity of the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB. This signaling pathway is involved in gating emotional responses in the CNS but previous studies did not address the potential roles of CaMKIV in discrete brain regions. In the present study, we aimed at specifically dissecting the role of CaMKIV in the nucleus accumbens of adult mice. Results We used recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV-mediated gene transfer of a dominant-negative CaMKIV variant (rAAV-dnCaMKIV to inhibit endogenous CaMKIV in the nucleus accumbens. rAAV-dnCaMKIV treated animals were subjected to a battery of tests including, prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response, open field, social interaction and anxiety-related behaviour. We found that basal locomotor activity in the open field, and prepulse inhibition or startle performance were unaltered in mice infected with rAAV-dnCaMKIV in the nucleus accumbens. However, anxiogenic effects were revealed in social interaction testing and the light/dark emergence test. Conclusion Our findings suggest a modulatory role of CaMKIV in the nucleus accumbens in anxiety-like behaviour but not sensorimotor gating.

  13. Liver cancer-derived hepatitis C virus core proteins shift TGF-beta responses from tumor suppression to epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Battaglia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and associated liver cirrhosis represent a major risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC development. TGF-beta is an important driver of liver fibrogenesis and cancer; however, its actual impact in human cancer progression is still poorly known. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of HCC-derived HCV core natural variants on cancer progression through their impact on TGF-beta signaling. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We provide evidence that HCC-derived core protein expression in primary human or mouse hepatocyte alleviates TGF-beta responses in terms or growth inhibition or apoptosis. Instead, in these hepatocytes TGF-beta was still able to induce an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT, a process that contributes to the promotion of cell invasion and metastasis. Moreover, we demonstrate that different thresholds of Smad3 activation dictate the TGF-beta responses in hepatic cells and that HCV core protein, by decreasing Smad3 activation, may switch TGF-beta growth inhibitory effects to tumor promoting responses. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data illustrate the capacity of hepatocytes to develop EMT and plasticity under TGF-beta, emphasize the role of HCV core protein in the dynamic of these effects and provide evidence for a paradigm whereby a viral protein implicated in oncogenesis is capable to shift TGF-beta responses from cytostatic effects to EMT development.

  14. A novel aldo-keto reductase from Jatropha curcas L. (JcAKR) plays a crucial role in the detoxification of methylglyoxal, a potent electrophile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudalkar, Shalini; Sreeharsha, Rachapudi Venkata; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2016-05-20

    Abiotic stress leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which further results in the production of reactive carbonyls (RCs) including methylglyoxal (MG). MG, an α, β-dicarbonyl aldehyde, is highly toxic to plants and the mechanism behind its detoxification is not well understood. Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) play a role in detoxification of reactive aldehydes and ketones. In the present study, we cloned and characterised a putative AKR from Jatropha curcas (JcAKR). Phylogenetically, it forms a small clade with AKRs of Glycine max and Rauwolfia serpentina. JcAKR was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL-21(DE3) cells and the identity of the purified protein was confirmed through MALDI-TOF analysis. The recombinant protein had high enzyme activity and catalytic efficiency in assays containing MG as the substrate. Protein modelling and docking studies revealed MG was efficiently bound to JcAKR. Under progressive drought and salinity stress, the enzyme and transcript levels of JcAKR were higher in leaves compared to roots. Further, the bacterial and yeast cells expressing JcAKR showed more tolerance towards PEG (5%), NaCl (200mM) and MG (5mM) treatments compared to controls. In conclusion, our results project JcAKR as a possible and potential target in crop improvement for abiotic stress tolerance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Overexpression of Jatropha Gibberellin 2-oxidase 6 (JcGA2ox6 Induces Dwarfism and Smaller Leaves, Flowers and Fruits in Arabidopsis and Jatropha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Xiong Hu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gibberellins (GAs are plant hormones that play fundamental roles in plant growth and development. Gibberellin 2-oxidase (GA2ox plays a direct role in determining the levels of bioactive GAs by catalyzing bioactive GAs or their immediate precursors to inactive forms. In this study, a GA2ox gene, designated JcGA2ox6, was isolated from Jatropha curcas. JcGA2ox6 is expressed in all tissues of adult Jatropha, with the highest expression level in male flowers and the lowest expression level in young leaves. Overexpression of JcGA2ox6 in Arabidopsis resulted in a typical dwarf phenotype, along with late flowering, smaller leaves and flowers, shorter siliques and smaller seeds. Similarly, when JcGA2ox6 was overexpressed in Jatropha, the transgenic plants exhibited a dwarf phenotype with dark-green leaves and smaller inflorescences, flowers, fruits and seeds. However, the flowering time of Jatropha was not affected by overexpression of JcGA2ox6, unlike that in the transgenic Arabidopsis. Moreover, the number of flowers per inflorescence, the weight of 10 seeds and the seed oil content were significantly decreased in transgenic Jatropha. The results indicated that overexpression of JcGA2ox6 had a great impact on the vegetative and reproductive growth of transgenic Jatropha. Furthermore, we found that the dwarf phenotype of transgenic Jatropha was caused by a decrease in endogenous bioactive GA4, which was correlated with the degree of dwarfism.

  16. Características técnicas de pontas de pulverização LA-1JC e SR-1 Technical characteristics of LA-1JC and SR-1 spray nozzles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.G. Viana

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se neste trabalho avaliar as características técnicas das pontas de pulverização tipo espuma LA-1JC e SR-1, sob diferentes pressões de trabalho e altura de barra de pulverização. Avaliaram-se, nas pressões de 100, 200 e 300 kPa, o perfil de distribuição de cada ponta, o coeficiente de variação da distribuição volumétrica, a vazão, o diâmetro da mediana volumétrica (DMV, o diâmetro da mediana numérica (DMN, o coeficiente de homogeneidade (CH, o índice de simetria das pontas e os ângulos de abertura esquerdo, direito e total. A ponta LA-1JC, em todas as pressões, e a ponta SR-1, na pressão de 100 kPa, apresentaram perfil de distribuição contínuo. Nas pressões de 200 e 300 kPa a ponta SR-1 apresentou perfil de distribuição descontínuo. Ambas as pontas apresentaram melhor perfil de distribuição com menor espaçamento entre pontas, maior pressão e maior altura da barra. Houve aumento na abertura do ângulo e vazão com incremento na pressão em ambas as pontas. O espectro de gotas obtido é adequado para aplicação de herbicidas sistêmicos em pós-emergência e para herbicidas aplicados em pré-emergência. As pontas LA-1JC, na pressão de 100 kPa, e SR-1, em todas as pressões, não devem ser utilizadas com sobreposição de jatos.This study aimed to evaluate the technical characteristics of LA-1JC and SR-1 skim nozzles, at different pressures and spray boom heights. Each nozzle distribution profile, volumetric distribution quotient in one spray boom, rate, volumetric median diameter (VMD, numeric median diameter( NMD,coefficient of homogeneity, nozzle symmetry index and left, right and total opening angles were evaluated at 100, 200, and 300 kPa. Nozzles showed continuous profile at 100 kPa for SR-1 nozzle and at all pressures for LA-1JC nozzle. The SR-1 nozzle showed discontinuous distribution profile at pressures 200 and 300 kPa. The best profile for both nozzles was verified when nozzles were smaller

  17. MiR-34b-5p Suppresses Melanoma Differentiation-Associated Gene 5 (MDA5) Signaling Pathway to Promote Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J (ALV-J)-Infected Cells Proliferaction and ALV-J Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenhui; Luo, Qingbin; Xu, Haiping; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Feng, Min; Cai, Bolin; Zhang, Xiaocui; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2017-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is an oncogenic retrovirus that has a similar replication cycle to multiple viruses and therefore can be used as a model system for viral entry into host cells. However, there are few reports on the genes or microRNAs (miRNAs) that are responsible for the replication of ALV-J. Our previous miRNA and RNA sequencing data showed that the expression of miR-34b-5p was significantly upregulated in ALV-J-infected chicken spleens compared to non-infected chicken spleens, but melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) had the opposite expression pattern. In this study, a dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that MDA5 is a direct target of miR-34b-5p. In vitro, overexpression of miR-34b-5p accelerated the proliferation of ALV-J-infected cells by inducing the progression from G2 to S phase and it promoted cell migration. Ectopic expression of MDA5 inhibited ALV-J-infected cell proliferation, the cell cycle and cell migration, and knockdown of MDA5 promoted proliferation, the cell cycle and migration. In addition, during ALV-J infections, MDA5 can detect virus invasion and it triggers the MDA5 signaling pathway. MDA5 overexpression can activate the MDA5 signaling pathway, and thus it can inhibit the mRNA and protein expression of the ALV-J env gene and it can suppress virion secretion. In contrast, in response to the knockdown of MDA5 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) or an miR-34b-5p mimic, genes in the MDA5 signaling pathway were significantly downregulated (P J env and the sample-to-positive ratio of virion in the supernatants were increased. This indicates that miR-34b-5p is able to trigger the MDA5 signaling pathway and affect ALV-J infections. Together, these results suggest that miR-34b-5p targets MDA5 to accelerate the proliferation and migration of ALV-J-infected cells, and it promotes ALV-J replication, via the MDA5 signaling pathway.

  18. Assessing host-virus codivergence for close relatives of Merkel cell polyomavirus infecting African great apes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Madinda, N. F.; Ehlers, B.; Wertheim, J. O.; Akoua-Koffi, C.; Bergl, R. A.; Boesch, C.; Akonkwa, D. B. M.; Eckardt, W.; Fruth, B.; Gillespie, T. R.; Gray, M.; Hohmann, G.; Karhemere, S.; Kujirakwinja, D.; Langergraber, K.; Muyembe, J.-J.; Nishuli, R.; Pauly, M.; Petrželková, Klára Judita; Robbins, M. M.; Todd, A.; Schubert, G.; Stoinski, T. S.; Wittig, R. M.; Zuberbühler, K.; Peeters, M.; Leendertz, F. H.; Calvignac-Spencer, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 19 (2016), s. 8531-8541 ISSN 0022-538X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0927 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : JC virus * divergence times * evolution * phylogenies * selection * bats * coevolution * population * chimpanzee * diversity Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 4.663, year: 2016

  19. Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma and the Importance of Considering the Oncogenic and Immune-Suppressant Role of the Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Lupo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionSoft-tissue sarcomas account for 0.7% of all malignant tumors, with an incidence rate of 3 per 100,000 persons/year. The undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS with giant cells, a high grade tumor of soft tissue, is very unusual, especially in young adults before the age of 40. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a human retrovirus, classified as group 1 human carcinogens by The International Agency for Research on Cancer, that causes an aggressive malignancy known as adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia and a progressive chronic inflammatory neurological disease named HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. HTLV-1 causes accumulation of genetic mutations in the host genome that could contribute to cellular transformation, one of the oncogenic features of HTLV-1.Case reportWe describe a case of a young woman with UPS who suffered from HAM/TSP with 3 years of evolution. In 2013, the patient started with neurological symptoms: weakness in the legs and bladder dysfunction. One year later, the patient developed a mild paraparesis in both extremities, anti-HTLV-1 antibodies were detected in plasma and in cerebrospinal fluid, and HAM/TSP was confirmed. In November 2015, a benign ganglion cyst was first suspected without intervention and by March 2016 a sarcoma was diagnosed. Three weeks after surgical resection, the tumor aroused in deep tissue and behaved aggressively, implicating a curative wide resection of the fibula, joint reconstruction, and soft-tissue graft. Histopathological examination confirmed UPS with giant cells.Concluding remarksThe unapparent subclinical immunodeficiency state due to HTLV-1 infection deserves to be considered in order to carefully monitor the possibility of developing any type of cancer. Besides, reaching an accurate and timely diagnosis of UPS can be challenging due to the difficulty in diagnosis/classification and delayed consultation. In this particular case

  20. Enhancement of the in-field Jc of MgB2 via SiCl4 doping

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiao-Lin; Dou, S. X.; Hossain, M. S. A.; Cheng, Z. X.; Liao, X. Z.; Ghorbani, S. R.; Yao, Q. W.; Kim, J. H.; Silver, T.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we present the following important results: 1) We introduce a new Si source, liquid SiCl4, which is free of C, to significantly enhance the irreversibility field (Hirr), the upper critical field (Hc2), and the critical current density (Jc), with little reduction in the critical temperature (Tc). 2) Although Si can not incorporate into the crystal lattice, we found a reduction in the a-axis lattice parameter, to the same extent as for carbon doping. 3) The SiCl4 treated MgB2 show...

  1. Suppression of Poxvirus Replication by Resveratrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Cao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Poxviruses continue to cause serious diseases even after eradication of the historically deadly infectious human disease, smallpox. Poxviruses are currently being developed as vaccine vectors and cancer therapeutic agents. Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol stilbenoid found in plants that has been shown to inhibit or enhance replication of a number of viruses, but the effect of resveratrol on poxvirus replication is unknown. In the present study, we found that resveratrol dramatically suppressed the replication of vaccinia virus (VACV, the prototypic member of poxviruses, in various cell types. Resveratrol also significantly reduced the replication of monkeypox virus, a zoonotic virus that is endemic in Western and Central Africa and causes human mortality. The inhibitory effect of resveratrol on poxviruses is independent of VACV N1 protein, a potential resveratrol binding target. Further experiments demonstrated that resveratrol had little effect on VACV early gene expression, while it suppressed VACV DNA synthesis, and subsequently post-replicative gene expression.

  2. Carbon-coated boron using low-cost naphthalene for substantial enhancement of Jc in MgB2 superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranot, Mahipal; Shinde, K. P.; Oh, Y. S.; Kang, S. H.; Jang, S. H.; Hwang, D. Y.; Chung, K. C. [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Carbon coating approach is used to prepare carbon-doped MgB{sub 2} bulk samples using low-cost naphthalene (C{sub 10}H{sub 8}) as a carbon source. The coating of carbon (C) on boron (B) powders was achieved by direct pyrolysis of naphthalene at 120 degrees C and then the C-coated B powders were mixed well with appropriate amount of Mg by solid state reaction method. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that there is a noticeable shift in (100) and (110) Bragg reflections towards higher angles, while no shift was observed in (002) reflections for MgB2 doped with carbon. As compared to un-doped MgB{sub 2}, a systematic enhancement in Jc(H) properties with increasing carbon doping level was observed for naphthalene-derived C-doped MgB{sub 2} samples. The substantial enhancement in Jc is most likely due to the incorporation of C into MgB{sub 2} lattice and the reduction in crystallite size, as evidenced by the increase in the FWHM values for doped samples.

  3. CD31 (JC70) expression in plasma cells: an immunohistochemical analysis of reactive and neoplastic plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, D; Harilal, P; Dada, M; Chetty, R

    1997-06-01

    To investigate the immunohistochemical expression of CD31 (JC70) in normal and neoplastic plasma cells. Plasma cells in bone marrow biopsies and extramedullary locations were examined. All extramedullary biopsies were formalin fixed and paraffin embedded. The bone marrow biopsies were fixed in formal acetic acid and embedded in paraffin wax. Twenty multiple myelomas (12 bone marrow and eight extramedullary deposits), 10 extramedullary plasmacytomas, and 30 biopsies with reactive plasma cells (10 bone marrow, 20 extramedullary biopsies) were stained with anti-CD31 (JC70) using the streptavidin-biotin detection system with diaminobenzidine as a chromogen. Antigen retrieval in bone marrow biopsies was achieved by pressure cooking. In all other biopsies, antigen retrieval was achieved by microwave pretreatment. All 20 extramedullary cases with reactive plasma cells showed intense membrane staining. Focal staining was detected in reactive plasma cells in bone marrow biopsies. Five of 10 plasmacytomas showed membrane staining. None of the cases of multiple myeloma, either medullary or extramedullary, showed any immunoreactivity for CD31. CD31, a member of the immunoglobulin supergene family of cell adhesion molecules, is strongly expressed in extramedullary reactive plasma cells, focally in bone marrow reactive plasma cells, and occasionally in extramedullary plasmacytomas.

  4. Citrus leprosis virus C infection results in hypersensitive-like response, suppression of the JA/ET plant defense pathway and promotion of the colonization of its mite vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Dias Arena

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Leprosis is a serious disease of citrus caused by Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C, genus Cilevirus whose transmission is mediated by false-spider mites of the genus Brevipalpus. CiLV-C infection does not systemically spread in any of its known host plants, thus remaining restricted to local lesions around the feeding sites of viruliferous mites. To get insight into this unusual pathosystem, we evaluated the expression profiles of genes involved in defense mechanisms of Arabidopsis thaliana and Citrus sinensis upon infestation with non-viruliferous and viruliferous mites by using reverse transcriptase-qPCR. These results were analyzed together with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the appearance of dead cells as assessed by histochemical assays. After interaction with non-viruliferous mites, plants locally accumulated ROS and triggered the salicylic acid (SA and jasmonate/ethylene (JA/ET pathways. ERF branch of the JA/ET pathways was highly activated. In contrast, JA pathway genes were markedly suppressed upon the CiLV-C infection mediated by viruliferous mites. Viral infection also intensified the ROS burst and cell death, and enhanced the expression of genes involved in the RNA silencing mechanism and SA pathway. After 13 days of infestation of two sets of Arabidopsis plants with non-viruliferous and viruliferous mites, the number of mites in the CiLV-C infected Arabidopsis plants was significantly higher than in those infested with the non-viruliferous ones. Oviposition of the viruliferous mites occurred preferentially in the CiLV-C infected leaves. Based on these results, we postulated the first model of plant/Brevipalpus mite/cilevirus interaction in which cells surrounding the feeding sites of viruliferous mites typify the outcome of a hypersensitive-like response, whereas viral infection induces changes in the behavior of its vector.

  5. Características técnicas de pontas de pulverização LA-1JC e SR-1 Technical characteristics of LA-1JC and SR-1 spray nozzles

    OpenAIRE

    Viana,R.G.; L.R. Ferreira; Teixeira, M M; P.R. Cecon; F.C.L. Freitas; A.L.S. Quirino; Santos,M.V.

    2007-01-01

    Objetivou-se neste trabalho avaliar as características técnicas das pontas de pulverização tipo espuma LA-1JC e SR-1, sob diferentes pressões de trabalho e altura de barra de pulverização. Avaliaram-se, nas pressões de 100, 200 e 300 kPa, o perfil de distribuição de cada ponta, o coeficiente de variação da distribuição volumétrica, a vazão, o diâmetro da mediana volumétrica (DMV), o diâmetro da mediana numérica (DMN), o coeficiente de homogeneidade (CH), o índice de simetria das pontas e os â...

  6. Enhanced Jc's of YBa2Cu3O7-x-Ag ex situ annealed coevaporated films on LaAlO3 (100) substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Thomas; Ejrnæs, Mikkel; Olesen, Michael Wiinberg

    1995-01-01

    A 5x increase of the critical current density (J(c)) at 77 K was obtained by coating a coevaporated 500 nm thick Y, BaF2, Cu film with 50 nm Ag prior to the ex situ annealing. J(c) increased from 0.2 for uncoated samples to 1 MA/cm(2) for the Ag-coated sample without severely affecting the zero r...... of the film is c-axis oriented or that the single-crystalline grains are larger. (C) 1994 American Institute of Physics....

  7. Morfologia da flor, fruto e plântula de Victoria amazonica (Poepp.) J.C. Sowerby (Nymphaeaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa-Osman,Sônia Maciel da; Rodrigues,Robson; Mendonça,Maria Sílvia de; Souza,Luiz Antonio de; Piedade,Maria Teresa Fernandez

    2011-01-01

    Victoria amazonica (Poepp.) J.C. Sowerby é uma hidrófita que ocorre nas várzeas de águas brancas e igapós da Bacia Amazônica e na Bacia do rio Paraguai. A morfologia da flor, fruto e plântula/"tirodendro" é objeto do presente trabalho. O material botânico foi coletado em Parintins e Manaus, estado do Amazonas, Brasil. A análise morfológica foi feita em material fresco e fixado em FAA 50. O desenvolvimento das plântulas foi realizado no escuro em frascos com água com teor reduzido de oxigênio....

  8. Inhibition of large T antigen ATPase activity as a potential strategy to develop anti-polyomavirus JC drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Parmjeet; Zeng, G; Bueno, M; Salgarkar, A; Lesniak, Andrew; Isse, K; Seyb, K; Perry, A; Charles, I; Hustus, C; Huang, M; Smith, M; Glicksman, Marcie A

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluates polyomavirus JC (JCV) large T antigen (LTA) as a potential target for drug development. LTA is a hexameric protein with a helicase activity that is powered by ATP binding and hydrolysis. The helicase and ATPase function is critical for viral replication. Recombinant JCV LTA was produced in an Escherichia coli based expression plasmid. ATPase activity was measured using the malachite green assay. A high throughput screen was completed using a brain-biased library of 75,000 drug-like compounds selected for physicochemical properties consistent with blood-brain barrier permeability. Five compounds showed non-competitive inhibition of ATPase activity with an EC50 ⩽ 15 μM. Modest antiviral activity was demonstrated in an immunofluorescence assay for JCV VP-1 expression in COS7 cells (EC50 15, 18, 20, 27, and 52 μM respectively). The compounds also inhibited viral replication in a real time PCR assay at comparable concentrations. LD50 in the MTS96 and Cell TiterGlo assays was >100 μM for all compounds in COS7 as well as HEK293 cells. However, two compounds inhibited cell proliferation in culture with IC50 values of 43 and 34 μM respectively. Despite substantial amino acid similarity between polyomavirus JC, BK and SV40 proteins, these compounds differ from those previously reported to inhibit SV40 LTA ATPase in chemical structure as well as a non-competitive mechanism of inhibition. LTA ATPase is a valid target for discovery. Additional screening and chemical optimization is needed to develop clinically useful compounds with less toxicity, which should be measured by metabolic as well as cell proliferation assays. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Suppression of Coronavirus Replication by Cyclophilin Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Sasaki

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses infect a variety of mammalian and avian species and cause serious diseases in humans, cats, mice, and birds in the form of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP, mouse hepatitis, and avian infectious bronchitis, respectively. No effective vaccine or treatment has been developed for SARS-coronavirus or FIP virus, both of which cause lethal diseases. It has been reported that a cyclophilin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA, could inhibit the replication of coronaviruses. CsA is a well-known immunosuppressive drug that binds to cellular cyclophilins to inhibit calcineurin, a calcium-calmodulin-activated serine/threonine-specific phosphatase. The inhibition of calcineurin blocks the translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells from the cytosol into the nucleus, thus preventing the transcription of genes encoding cytokines such as interleukin-2. Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases with physiological functions that have been described for many years to include chaperone and foldase activities. Also, many viruses require cyclophilins for replication; these include human immunodeficiency virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and hepatitis C virus. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the suppression of viral replication differ for different viruses. This review describes the suppressive effects of CsA on coronavirus replication.

  10. Suppression in simultaneous masking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastl, H; Bechly, M

    1983-09-01

    Suppression, i.e., the decrease of masked threshold caused by the addition of a second masker M2 to a first masker M1, is measured for the case of simultaneous masking. The magnitude of suppression decreases with increasing test tone duration; pulsed maskers elicit somewhat more suppression than continuous maskers. In comparison to suppression effects obtained in nonsimultaneous masking (post-masking, pulsation threshold) suppression in simultaneous masking is considerably smaller and was found only at the lower slopes of the two maskers. Suppression in simultaneous masking would not be predicted by those models of suppression which require nonsimultaneous presentation of maskers and test sound.

  11. Intracutaneous DNA Vaccination with the E8 Gene of Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus Induces Protective Immunity against Virus Challenge in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jiafen; Han, Ricai; Cladel, Nancy M.; Pickel, Martin D; Christensen, Neil D.

    2002-01-01

    The cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV)-rabbit model has been used in several studies for testing prophylactic and therapeutic papillomavirus vaccines. Earlier observations had shown that the CRPV nonstructural genes E1, E2, and E6 induced strong to partial protective immunity against CRPV infection. In this study, we found that CRPV E8 immunization eliminated virus-induced papillomas in EIII/JC inbred rabbits (100%) and provided partial protection (55%) against virus challenge in outbred...

  12. Magnetic phase diagram slightly below the saturation field in the stacked J1-J2 model in the square lattice with the JC interlayer coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Hiroaki

    We study the effect of adding interlayer coupling to the square lattice, J1-J2 Heisenberg model in high external magnetic field. In particular, we consider a cubic lattice formed from stacked J1-J2 layers, with interlayer exchange coupling JC. For the 2-dimensional model (JC = 0) it has been shown that a spin-nematic phase appears close to the saturation magnetic field for the parameter range - 0 . 4 0 . We determine the phase diagram for 3-dimensional model at high magnetic field by representing spin flips out of the saturated state as bosons, considering the dilute boson limit and using the Bethe-Salpeter equation to determine the first instability of the saturated paramagnet. Close to the highly frustrated point J2 /J1 0 . 5 , we find that the spin-nematic state is stable even for | JC /J1 | 1 . For larger values of J2 /J1 , interlayer coupling favors a broad, phase-separated region. Further increase of | JC | stabilizes a collinear antiferromagnet, which is selected via the order-by-disorder mechanism.

  13. Morfologia da flor, fruto e plântula de Victoria amazonica (Poepp. J.C. Sowerby (Nymphaeaceae Morphology of flower, fruit and seedling of Victoria amazonica (Poepp. J.C. Sowerby (Nymphaeaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Maciel da Rosa-Osman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Victoria amazonica (Poepp. J.C. Sowerby é uma hidrófita que ocorre nas várzeas de águas brancas e igapós da Bacia Amazônica e na Bacia do rio Paraguai. A morfologia da flor, fruto e plântula/"tirodendro" é objeto do presente trabalho. O material botânico foi coletado em Parintins e Manaus, estado do Amazonas, Brasil. A análise morfológica foi feita em material fresco e fixado em FAA 50. O desenvolvimento das plântulas foi realizado no escuro em frascos com água com teor reduzido de oxigênio. As flores possuem pedicelo longo e são hemicíclicas, diclamídeas, monoclinas e com antese vespertina. Os frutos são carnosos, indeiscentes, com pseudossincarpia. As sementes apresentam arilo que atua na dispersão pela água. As plântulas se desenvolvem em condições de hipoxia e apresentam um cotilédone exposto acicular. O "tirodendro" apresenta eofilos com heterofilia. As flores apresentam caracteres morfológicos básicos da família, a definição do tipo de fruto exige estudo ontogenético e a heterofilia é um caráter típico de plântulas/"tirodendros"de Nymphaeaceae.Victoria amazonica (Poepp. J.C. Sowerby is a hydrophyte that occurs in the white water leas and igapos of the Amazonian and Paraguay Basin. The flower, fruit and seedling/"tirodendro" morphology is the object of the present work. The botanical material was collected at Parintins and Manaus, Amazonian state, Brazil. The morphological analysis was made in both fresh and fixed material. The seedling development was accomplished in flasks with water containing little oxygen and maintained in the darkness. Flowers present long pedicel and they are hemicyclic, dichlamydeous, bisexual with vespertine anthesis. Fruits are fleshy, indehiscent with pseudo-syncarpy. Seeds present aril that acts in the water dispersion. Seedlings grow in hypoxy conditions and they present an acicular and exposed cotyledon. The "tirodendro" stage presents eophylls with heterophylly. Flowers

  14. Over-expression of JcDGAT1 from Jatropha curcas increases seed oil levels and alters oil quality in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Aparna; Khan, Kasim; Niranjan, Abhishek; Nath, Pravendra; Sane, Vidhu A

    2013-12-01

    The increasing consumption of fossil fuels and petroleum products is leading to their rapid depletion and is a matter of concern around the globe. Substitutes of fossil fuels are required to sustain the pace of economic development. In this context, oil from the non food crops (biofuel) has shown potential to substitute fossil fuels. Jatropha curcas is an excellent shrub spread and naturalized across the globe. Its oil contains a high percentage of unsaturated fatty acids (about 78-84% of total fatty acid content) making the oil suitable for biodiesel production. Despite its high oil content, it has been poorly studied in terms of important enzymes/genes responsible for oil biosynthesis. Here, we describe the isolation of the full length cDNA clone of JcDGAT1, a key enzyme involved in oil biosynthesis, from J. curcas seeds and manipulation of oil content and composition in transgenic Arabidopsis plants by its expression. Transcript analysis of JcDGAT1 reveals a gradual increase from early seed development to its maturation. Homozygous transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing JcDGAT1 both under CaMV35S promoter and a seed specific promoter show an enhanced level of total oil content (up by 30-41%) in seeds but do not show any phenotypic differences. In addition, our studies also show alterations in the oil composition through JcDGAT1 expression. While the levels of saturated FAs such as palmitate and stearate in the oil do not change, there is significant reproducible decrease in the levels of oleic acid and a concomitant increase in levels of linolenic acid both under the CaMV35S promoter as well as the seed specific promoter. Our studies thus confirm that DGAT is involved in flux control in oil biosynthesis and show that JcDGAT1 could be used specifically to manipulate and improve oil content and composition in plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebola virus and Marburg virus Overview Ebola virus and Marburg virus are related viruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers — illnesses marked by severe bleeding (hemorrhage), organ failure and, in many ...

  16. Pur-Alpha Induces JCV Gene Expression and Viral Replication by Suppressing SRSF1 in Glial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilker Kudret Sariyer

    Full Text Available PML is a rare and fatal demyelinating disease of the CNS caused by the human polyomavirus, JC virus (JCV, which occurs in AIDS patients and those on immunosuppressive monoclonal antibody therapies (mAbs. We sought to identify mechanisms that could stimulate reactivation of JCV in a cell culture model system and targeted pathways which could affect early gene transcription and JCV T-antigen production, which are key steps of the viral life cycle for blocking reactivation of JCV. Two important regulatory partners we have previously identified for T-antigen include Pur-alpha and SRSF1 (SF2/ASF. SRSF1, an alternative splicing factor, is a potential regulator of JCV whose overexpression in glial cells strongly suppresses viral gene expression and replication. Pur-alpha has been most extensively characterized as a sequence-specific DNA- and RNA-binding protein which directs both viral gene transcription and mRNA translation, and is a potent inducer of the JCV early promoter through binding to T-antigen.Pur-alpha and SRSF1 both act directly as transcriptional regulators of the JCV promoter and here we have observed that Pur-alpha is capable of ameliorating SRSF1-mediated suppression of JCV gene expression and viral replication. Interestingly, Pur-alpha exerted its effect by suppressing SRSF1 at both the protein and mRNA levels in glial cells suggesting this effect can occur independent of T-antigen. Pur-alpha and SRSF1 were both localized to oligodendrocyte inclusion bodies by immunohistochemistry in brain sections from patients with HIV-1 associated PML. Interestingly, inclusion bodies were typically positive for either Pur-alpha or SRSF1, though some cells appeared to be positive for both proteins.Taken together, these results indicate the presence of an antagonistic interaction between these two proteins in regulating of JCV gene expression and viral replication and suggests that they play an important role during viral reactivation leading to

  17. La chronologie du royaume de Qatabân du Ier siècle avant J.-C. au Ier siècle après J.-C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounir Arbach

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Les nouvelles découvertes archéologiques et épigraphiques de ces dernières années, effectuées au cours des fouilles franco-italiennes à Tamna`, l'ancienne capitale du royaume de Qatabân, permettent d'établir une nouvelle chronologie des souverains de Qatabân entre le Ier siècle avant J.-C. et le Ier siècle après J.- C.The chronology of the kingdom of Qatabân, from the 1st century BC to the 1st century AD. Archaeological and epigraphical discoveries made in recent years by the Franco-Italian excavations at Tamna`, the ancient capital of the kingdom of Qatabân, allows us to establish a new chronology for the kings of Qatabân during the 1st century BC and the 1st century AD.

  18. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  19. Dexamethasone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medicine. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  20. Growth hormone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  1. Jc enhancement by La-Al-O doping in Y-Ba-Cu-O films both in self-field and under magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yan; Suo, Hong-Li; Yue, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    a good epitaxial growth relationship with LAO. Compared with a pure YBCO film, the Jc value of a 5.0% LAO-doped sample is enhanced more than three times in self-field 77 K and seven times at 77 K and 1.5 T, respectively. These results indicate that LAO doping can effectively enhance the Jc of YBCO films......To enhance the Jc of YBa2Cu3O7−X (YBCO) films both in self-field and under magnetic field, an effective strategy is to introduce artificial pinning centers and keep a good YBCO matrix at the same time. Here, we propose a new dopant: LaAlO3 (LAO), based on its chemical stability and small mismatch...... toward YBCO. A series of YBCO films with different LAO doping contents was fabricated on LAO single-crystal substrates by metal organic deposition. We observed by X-ray diffractometer measurements and scanning electron microscopy observations that although a large amount of LAO is added, YBCO still keeps...

  2. How Hepatitis D Virus Can Hinder the Control of Hepatitis B Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Xiridou; Barbara Borkent-Raven; Joost Hulshof; Jacco Wallinga

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis D (or hepatitis delta) virus is a defective virus that relies on hepatitis B virus (HBV) for transmission; infection with hepatitis D can occur only as coinfection with HBV or superinfection of an existing HBV infection. Because of the bond between the two viruses, control measures for HBV may have also affected the spread of hepatitis D, as evidenced by the decline of hepatitis D in recent years. Since the presence of hepatitis D is associated with suppressed HBV replic...

  3. Author: JC Knobel

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10332324

    status which would significantly benefit from the international co-operation that could be achieved by an ..... network will remain in private ownership, but will be subject to the provisions of the. Birds and Habitats Directives for the .... the animal species on which the Spanish Imperial Eagle preys. [2006] ECR I-2775 para 40.

  4. Deconstructing continuous flash suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eunice; Blake, Randolph

    2012-03-08

    In this paper, we asked to what extent the depth of interocular suppression engendered by continuous flash suppression (CFS) varies depending on spatiotemporal properties of the suppressed stimulus and CFS suppressor. An answer to this question could have implications for interpreting the results in which CFS influences the processing of different categories of stimuli to different extents. In a series of experiments, we measured the selectivity and depth of suppression (i.e., elevation in contrast detection thresholds) as a function of the visual features of the stimulus being suppressed and the stimulus evoking suppression, namely, the popular "Mondrian" CFS stimulus (N. Tsuchiya & C. Koch, 2005). First, we found that CFS differentially suppresses the spatial components of the suppressed stimulus: Observers' sensitivity for stimuli of relatively low spatial frequency or cardinally oriented features was more strongly impaired in comparison to high spatial frequency or obliquely oriented stimuli. Second, we discovered that this feature-selective bias primarily arises from the spatiotemporal structure of the CFS stimulus, particularly within information residing in the low spatial frequency range and within the smooth rather than abrupt luminance changes over time. These results imply that this CFS stimulus operates by selectively attenuating certain classes of low-level signals while leaving others to be potentially encoded during suppression. These findings underscore the importance of considering the contribution of low-level features in stimulus-driven effects that are reported under CFS.

  5. Evaluation of virus removal efficiency of coagulation-sedimentation and rapid sand filtration processes in a drinking water treatment plant in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Tatsuya; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Torrey, Jason Robert; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2016-09-15

    In order to properly assess and manage the risk of infection by enteric viruses in tap water, virus removal efficiency should be evaluated quantitatively for individual processes in actual drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs); however, there have been only a few studies due to technical difficulties in quantifying low virus concentration in water samples. In this study, the removal efficiency of indigenous viruses was evaluated for coagulation-sedimentation (CS) and rapid sand filtration (RSF) processes in a DWTP in Bangkok, Thailand by measuring the concentration of viruses before and after treatment processes using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Water samples were collected and concentrated from raw source water, after CS, and after RSF, and inhibitory substances in water samples were reduced by use of a hydrophobic resin (DAX-8). Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) and JC polyomavirus (JC PyV) were found to be highly prevalent in raw waters, with concentrations of 10(2.88 ± 0.35) and 10(3.06 ± 0.42) copies/L (geometric mean ± S.D.), respectively. Step-wise removal efficiencies were calculated for individual processes, with some variation observed between wet and dry seasons. During the wet season, PMMoV was removed less by CS and more by RSF on average (0.40 log10 vs 1.26 log10, respectively), while the reverse was true for JC PyV (1.91 log10 vs 0.49 log10, respectively). Both viruses were removed similarly during the dry season, with CS removing the most virus (PMMoV, 1.61 log10 and 0.78 log10; JC PyV, 1.70 log10, and 0.59 log10; CS and RSF, respectively). These differences between seasons were potentially due to variations in raw water quality and the characteristics of the viruses themselves. These results suggest that PMMoV and JC PyV, which are more prevalent in environmental waters than the other enteric viruses evaluated in this study, could be useful in determining viral fate for the risk management of viruses in water treatment

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis of the AP2/ERF Gene Family in Physic Nut and Overexpression of the JcERF011 Gene in Rice Increased Its Sensitivity to Salinity Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuehui; Qin, Shanshan; Guo, Yali; Chen, Yanbo; Wu, Pingzhi; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Jiang, Huawu; Wu, Guojiang

    2016-01-01

    The AP2/ERF transcription factors play crucial roles in plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. A total of 119 AP2/ERF genes (JcAP2/ERFs) have been identified in the physic nut genome; they include 16 AP2, 4 RAV, 1 Soloist, and 98 ERF genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that physic nut AP2 genes could be divided into 3 subgroups, while ERF genes could be classed into 11 groups or 43 subgroups. The AP2/ERF genes are non-randomly distributed across the 11 linkage groups of the physic nut genome and retain many duplicates which arose from ancient duplication events. The expression patterns of several JcAP2/ERF duplicates in the physic nut showed differences among four tissues (root, stem, leaf, and seed), and 38 JcAP2/ERF genes responded to at least one abiotic stressor (drought, salinity, phosphate starvation, and nitrogen starvation) in leaves and/or roots according to analysis of digital gene expression tag data. The expression of JcERF011 was downregulated by salinity stress in physic nut roots. Overexpression of the JcERF011 gene in rice plants increased its sensitivity to salinity stress. The increased expression levels of several salt tolerance-related genes were impaired in the JcERF011-overexpressing plants under salinity stress.

  7. Propagation Effect of a Virus Outbreak on a Network with Limited Anti-Virus Ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghong Xu

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new computer virus spreading model which takes into account the possibility of a virus outbreak on a network with limited anti-virus ability. Then, the model is investigated for the existence of equilibria and their stabilities are proved and illustrated. Moreover, it is found that these two factors are not only relative to the threshold value determining whether the virus becomes extinct or not, but that they are also relative to the virus epidemic levels. Theoretical and experimental results indicate that, in some ways, it would be practically possible to eradicate the virus or suppress its prevalence below a suitable level. Consequently, some suggestions are proposed that may help eradicate or suppress virus propagation over a real computer network.

  8. Strains of Lentinula edodes suppress growth of phytopathogenic fungi and inhibit Alagoas serotype of vesicular stomatitis virus Linhagens de Lentinula edodes inibem fungos fitopatogênicos e o vírus da estomatite vesicular, sorotipo Alagoas

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Selma H.; Rosa E.C. Linhares; Nozawa,Carlos M.; Ricardo Montalván; Paccola-Meirelles,Luzia D.

    2001-01-01

    Four Lentinula edodes strains (Le10, 46, K2, Assai) were assessed for their antagonistic effect on four filamentous fungus species of agricultural importance (Helminthosporium euphorbiae, Helminthosporium sp, Fusarium solani and Phomopsis sojae) and on Alagoas serotype of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSA). The L. edodes strains studied had variable effects on the filamentous fungi and on VSA. The K2 and Le10 strains were antagonistic on the fungi assessed and the 46 and K2 strains were efficie...

  9. ECHO virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that can lead ...

  10. Innate Immunity and BK Virus: Prospective Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariminik, Ashraf; Yaghobi, Ramin; Dabiri, Shahriar

    2016-03-01

    Recent information demonstrated that BK virus reactivation is a dominant complication after kidney transplantation, which occurs because of immunosuppression. BK virus reactivation is the main reason of transplanted kidney losing. Immune response against BK virus is the major inhibitor of the virus reactivation. Therefore, improving our knowledge regarding the main parameters that fight against BK viruses can shed light on to direct new treatment strategies to suppress BK infection. Innate immunity consists of numerous cell systems and also soluble molecules, which not only suppress virus replication, but also activate adaptive immunity to eradicate the infection. Additionally, it appears that immune responses against reactivated BK virus are the main reasons for induction of BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKAN). Thus, improving our knowledge regarding the parameters and detailed mechanisms of innate immunity and also the status of innate immunity of the patients with BK virus reactivation and its complications can introduce new prospective strategies to either prevent or as therapy of the complication. Therefore, this review was aimed to collate the most recent data regarding the roles played by innate immunity against BK virus and also the status of innate immunity in the patients with reactivation BK virus and BKAN.

  11. Suppression of hepatitis B virus antigen production and replication by wild-type HBV dependently replicating HBV shRNA vectors in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baosheng; Sun, Shuo; Li, Minran; Cheng, Xin; Li, Haijun; Kang, Fubiao; Kang, Jiwen; Dörnbrack, Katharina; Nassal, Michael; Sun, Dianxing

    2016-10-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), a small DNA virus that replicates by reverse transcription of a pregenomic (pg) RNA precursor, greatly increases the risk for terminal liver disease. RNA interference (RNAi) based therapy approaches have shown potential to overcome the limited efficacy of current treatments. However, synthetic siRNAs as well as small hairpin (sh) RNAs expressed from non-integrating vectors require repeated applications; integrating vectors suffer from safety concerns. We pursue a new concept by which HBV itself is engineered into a conditionally replicating, wild-type HBV dependent anti-HBV shRNA vector. Beyond sharing HBV's hepatocyte tropism, such a vector would be self-renewing, but only as long as wild-type HBV is present. Here, we realized several important aspects of this concept. We identified two distinct regions in the 3.2 kb HBV genome which tolerate replacement by shRNA expression cassettes without compromising reverse transcription when complemented in vitro by HBV helper constructs or by wild-type HBV; a representative HBV shRNA vector was infectious in cell culture. The vector-encoded shRNAs were active, including on HBV as target. A dual anti-HBV shRNA vector delivered into HBV transgenic mice, which are not susceptible to HBV infection, by a chimeric adenovirus-HBV shuttle reduced serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) up to ∼4-fold, and virus particles up to ∼20-fold. Importantly, a fraction of the circulating particles contained vector-derived DNA, indicating successful complementation in vivo. These data encourage further investigations to prove antiviral efficacy and the predicted self-limiting vector spread in a small animal HBV infection model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Strains of Lentinula edodes suppress growth of phytopathogenic fungi and inhibit Alagoas serotype of vesicular stomatitis virus Linhagens de Lentinula edodes inibem fungos fitopatogênicos e o vírus da estomatite vesicular, sorotipo Alagoas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma H. Sasaki

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Four Lentinula edodes strains (Le10, 46, K2, Assai were assessed for their antagonistic effect on four filamentous fungus species of agricultural importance (Helminthosporium euphorbiae, Helminthosporium sp, Fusarium solani and Phomopsis sojae and on Alagoas serotype of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSA. The L. edodes strains studied had variable effects on the filamentous fungi and on VSA. The K2 and Le10 strains were antagonistic on the fungi assessed and the 46 and K2 strains were efficient on the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus. The results widened the list of beneficial effects of L. edodes on the control and prevention of animal pathogenic virus and filamentous fungi.Quatro linhagens de Lentinula edodes (Le10, 46, K2, ASSAI foram avaliadas quanto ao seu efeito inibitório sobre quatro espécies de fungos filamentosos de importância agrícola (Helminthosporium euphorbiae, Helminthosporium sp., Fusarium solani, Phomopsis sojae e sobre o sorotipo Alagoas vírus da estomatite vesicular (VSA. Foi observado que as linhagens de L. edodes estudadas apresentaram variabilidade quanto ao seu efeito, tanto sobre os fungos filamentosos quanto sobre o vírus VSA. As linhagens K2 e Le10 apresentaram-se antagônicas sobre os fungos e as linhagens 46 e K2 foram eficientes na inibição do vírus VSA. Os resultados obtidos permitem ampliar a lista de efeitos benéficos de algumas linhagens de L. edodes no controle e prevenção de vírus patogênicos animais e de fungos filamentosos.

  13. Menstrual suppression for adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Anna Lea; Hillard, Paula J Adams

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the recent literature and emerging data describing clinical situations in which menstrual suppression may improve symptoms and quality of life for adolescents. A variety of conditions occurring frequently in adolescents and young adults, including heavy menstrual bleeding, and dysmenorrhea as well as gynecologic conditions such as endometriosis and pelvic pain, can safely be improved or alleviated with appropriate menstrual management. Recent publications have highlighted the efficacy and benefit of extended cycle or continuous combined oral contraceptives, the levonorgestrel intrauterine device, and progestin therapies for a variety of medical conditions. This review places menstrual suppression in an historical context, summarizes methods of hormonal therapy that can suppress menses, and reviews clinical conditions for which menstrual suppression may be helpful.

  14. Enhanced Production of Androst-1,4-Diene-3,17-Dione by Mycobacterium neoaurum JC-12 Using Three-Stage Fermentation Strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minglong Shao

    Full Text Available To improve the androst-1,4-diene-3,17-dione (ADD production from phytosterol by Mycobacterium neoaurum JC-12, fructose was firstly found favorable as the initial carbon source to increase the biomass and eliminate the lag phase of M. neoaurum JC-12 in the phytosterol transformation process. Based on this phenomenon, two-stage fermentation by using fructose as the initial carbon source and feeding glucose to maintain strain metabolism was designed. By applying this strategy, the fermentation duration was decreased from 168 h to 120 h with the ADD productivity increased from 0.071 g/(L·h to 0.108 g/(L·h. Further, three-stage fermentation by adding phytosterol to improve ADD production at the end of the two-stage fermentation was carried out and the final ADD production reached 18.6 g/L, which is the highest reported ADD production using phytosterol as substrate. Thus, this strategy provides a possible way in enhancing the ADD production in pharmaceutical industry.

  15. Enhanced Production of Androst-1,4-Diene-3,17-Dione by Mycobacterium neoaurum JC-12 Using Three-Stage Fermentation Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Minglong; Zhang, Xian; Rao, Zhiming; Xu, Meijuan; Yang, Taowei; Li, Hui; Xu, Zhenghong

    2015-01-01

    To improve the androst-1,4-diene-3,17-dione (ADD) production from phytosterol by Mycobacterium neoaurum JC-12, fructose was firstly found favorable as the initial carbon source to increase the biomass and eliminate the lag phase of M. neoaurum JC-12 in the phytosterol transformation process. Based on this phenomenon, two-stage fermentation by using fructose as the initial carbon source and feeding glucose to maintain strain metabolism was designed. By applying this strategy, the fermentation duration was decreased from 168 h to 120 h with the ADD productivity increased from 0.071 g/(L·h) to 0.108 g/(L·h). Further, three-stage fermentation by adding phytosterol to improve ADD production at the end of the two-stage fermentation was carried out and the final ADD production reached 18.6 g/L, which is the highest reported ADD production using phytosterol as substrate. Thus, this strategy provides a possible way in enhancing the ADD production in pharmaceutical industry.

  16. A theoretical method for assessing disruptive computer viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yingbo; Li, Pengdeng; Yang, Lu-Xing; Yang, Xiaofan; Tang, Yuan Yan

    2017-09-01

    To assess the prevalence of disruptive computer viruses in the situation that every node in a network has its own virus-related attributes, a heterogeneous epidemic model is proposed. A criterion for the global stability of the virus-free equilibrium and a criterion for the existence of a unique viral equilibrium are given, respectively. Furthermore, extensive simulation experiments are conducted, and some interesting phenomena are found from the experimental results. On this basis, some policies of suppressing disruptive viruses are recommended.

  17. My Cousin, My Enemy: quasispecies suppression of drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkegaard, Karla; van Buuren, Nicholas J; Mateo, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    If a freshly minted genome contains a mutation that confers drug resistance, will it be selected in the presence of the drug? Not necessarily. During viral infections, newly synthesized viral genomes occupy the same cells as parent and other progeny genomes. If the antiviral target is chosen so that the drug-resistant progeny’s growth is dominantly inhibited by the drug-susceptible members of its intracellular family, its outgrowth can be suppressed. Precedent for ‘dominant drug targeting’ as a deliberate approach to suppress the outgrowth of inhibitor-resistant viruses has been established for envelope variants of vesicular stomatitis virus and for capsid variants of poliovirus and dengue virus. Small molecules that stabilize oligomeric assemblages are a promising means to an unfit family to destroy the effectiveness of a newborn drug-resistant relative due to the co-assembly of drug-susceptible and drug-resistant monomers. PMID:27764731

  18. DNA/MVA Vaccination of HIV-1 Infected Participants with Viral Suppression on Antiretroviral Therapy, followed by Treatment Interruption: Elicitation of Immune Responses without Control of Re-Emergent Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Thompson

    Full Text Available GV-TH-01, a Phase 1 open-label trial of a DNA prime—Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA boost vaccine (GOVX-B11, was undertaken in HIV infected participants on antiretroviral treatment (ART to evaluate safety and vaccine-elicited T cell responses, and explore the ability of elicited CD8+ T cells to control viral rebound during analytical treatment interruption (TI. Nine men who began antiretroviral therapy (ART within 18 months of seroconversion and had sustained plasma HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL for at least 6 months were enrolled. Median age was 38 years, median pre-ART HIV-1 RNA was 140,000 copies/ml and mean baseline CD4 count was 755/μl. Two DNA, followed by 2 MVA, inoculations were given 8 weeks apart. Eight subjects completed all vaccinations and TI. Clinical and laboratory adverse events were generally mild, with no serious or grade 4 events. Only reactogenicity events were considered related to study drug. No treatment emergent viral resistance was seen. The vaccinations did not reduce viral reservoirs and virus re-emerged in all participants during TI, with a median time to re-emergence of 4 weeks. Eight of 9 participants had CD8+ T cells that could be stimulated by vaccine-matched Gag peptides prior to vaccination. Vaccinations boosted these responses as well as eliciting previously undetected CD8+ responses. Elicited T cells did not display signs of exhaustion. During TI, temporal patterns of viral re-emergence and Gag-specific CD8+ T cell expansion suggested that vaccine-specific CD8+ T cells had been stimulated by re-emergent virus in only 2 of 8 participants. In these 2, transient decreases in viremia were associated with Gag selection in known CD8+ T cell epitopes. We hypothesize that escape mutations, already archived in the viral reservoir, plus a poor ability of CD8+ T cells to traffic to and control virus at sites of re-emergence, limited the therapeutic efficacy of the DNA/MVA vaccine.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01378156.

  19. Immune suppression of challenged vaccinates as a rigorous assessment of sterile protection by lentiviral vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigo, Jodi K; Durkin, Shannon; Sturgeon, Timothy J; Tagmyer, Tara; Cook, Sheila J; Issel, Charles J; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2007-01-15

    We previously reported that an experimental live-attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine, containing a mutated S2 accessory gene, provided protection from disease and detectable infection after virulent virus (EIAV(PV)) challenge [Li F, Craigo JK, Howe L, Steckbeck JD, Cook S, Issel C, et al. A live-attenuated equine infectious anemia virus proviral vaccine with a modified S2 gene provides protection from detectable infection by intravenous virulent virus challenge of experimentally inoculated horses. J Virol 2003;77(13):7244-53; Craigo JK, Li F, Steckbeck JD, Durkin S, Howe L, Cook SJ, et al. Discerning an effective balance between equine infectious anemia virus attenuation and vaccine efficacy. J Virol 2005;79(5):2666-77]. To determine if attenuated EIAV vaccines actually prevent persistent infection by challenge virus, we employed a 14-day dexamethasone treatment of vaccinated horses post-challenge to suppress host immunity and amplify replication levels of any infecting EIAV. At 2 months post-challenge the horses were all protected from virulent-virus challenge, evidenced by a lack of EIA signs and detectable challenge plasma viral RNA. Upon immune suppression, 6/12 horses displayed clinical EIA. Post-immune suppression characterizations demonstrated that the attenuated vaccine evidently prevented detectable challenge virus infection in 50% of horses. These data highlight the utility of post-challenge immune suppression for evaluating persistent viral vaccine protective efficacy.

  20. Analysis of Tospovirus NSs Proteins in Suppression of Systemic Silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Hedil

    Full Text Available RNA silencing is a sequence-specific gene regulation mechanism that in plants also acts antiviral. In order to counteract antiviral RNA silencing, viruses have evolved RNA silencing suppressors (RSS. In the case of tospoviruses, the non-structural NSs protein has been identified as the RSS. Although the tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV tospovirus NSs protein has been shown to exhibit affinity to long and small dsRNA molecules, its ability to suppress the non-cell autonomous part of RNA silencing has only been studied to a limited extent. Here, the NSs proteins of TSWV, groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV and tomato yellow ring virus (TYRV, representatives for three distinct tospovirus species, have been studied on their ability and strength to suppress local and systemic silencing. A system has been developed to quantify suppression of GFP silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana 16C lines, to allow a comparison of relative RNA silencing suppressor strength. It is shown that NSs of all three tospoviruses are suppressors of local and systemic silencing. Unexpectedly, suppression of systemic RNA silencing by NSsTYRV was just as strong as those by NSsTSWV and NSsGRSV, even though NSsTYRV was expressed in lower amounts. Using the system established, a set of selected NSsTSWV gene constructs mutated in predicted RNA binding domains, as well as NSs from TSWV isolates 160 and 171 (resistance breakers of the Tsw resistance gene, were analyzed for their ability to suppress systemic GFP silencing. The results indicate another mode of RNA silencing suppression by NSs that acts further downstream the biogenesis of siRNAs and their sequestration. The findings are discussed in light of the affinity of NSs for small and long dsRNA, and recent mutant screen of NSsTSWV to map domains required for RSS activity and triggering of Tsw-governed resistance.

  1. B-cell-rich T-cell lymphoma associated with Epstein-Barr virus-reactivation and T-cell suppression following antithymocyte globulin therapy in a patient with severe aplastic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyoshi Hanaoka

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (B-LPD is generally characterized by the proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-infected B lymphocytes. We here report the development of EBV-negative B-LPD associated with EBV-reactivation following antithymocyte globulin (ATG therapy in a patient with aplastic anemia. The molecular autopsy study showed the sparse EBV-infected clonal T cells could be critically involved in the pathogenesis of EBV-negative oligoclonal B-LPD through cytokine amplification and escape from T-cell surveillances attributable to ATG-based immunosuppressive therapy, leading to an extremely rare B-cell-rich T-cell lymphoma. This report helps in elucidating the complex pathophysiology of intractable B-LPD refractory to rituximab.

  2. IMMUNE SUPPRESSION OF CHALLENGED VACCINATES AS A RIGOROUS ASSESSMENT OF STERILE PROTECTION BY LENTIVIRAL VACCINES

    OpenAIRE

    Craigo, Jodi K.; Durkin, Shannon; Sturgeon, Timothy J.; Tagmyer, Tara; Cook, Sheila J.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported that an experimental live-attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine, containing a mutated S2 accessory gene, provided protection from disease and detectable infection after virulent virus (EIAVPV) challenge [1,2]. To determine if attenuated EIAV vaccines actually prevent persistent infection by challenge virus, we employed a 14-day dexamethasone treatment of vaccinated horses post-challenge to suppress host immunity and amplify replication levels of any i...

  3. Explosion suppression system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapko, Michael J.; Cortese, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  4. Polyoma BK virus: an emerging opportunistic infectious agent of the human central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Lopes da Silva

    Full Text Available BK virus, a double-stranded DNA virus, is a member of the Polyomaviridae family which is known to infect humans. Clinical evidence of disease is mostly encountered in immunosuppressed individuals such as AIDS patients or those who undergo renal or bone marrow transplantation where complications associated with BKV infection manifest commonly as a polyomavirus nephropathy or hemorrhagic cystitis, respectively. Recent evidence suggests that in addition to the JC virus (the other member of the same family known to be strongly neurotropic and responsible for the progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, BK virus can infect and cause clinically relevant disease in the human central nervous system. In this mini-review, an analysis of the literature is made. A special focus is given to alert clinicians to the possibility of this association during the differential diagnosis of infections of the central nervous system in the immunocompromised host.

  5. Plant RNA binding proteins for control of RNA virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Un eHuh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant RNA viruses have effective strategies to infect host plants through either direct or indirect interactions with various host proteins, thus suppressing the host immune system. When plant RNA viruses enter host cells exposed RNAs of viruses are recognized by the host immune system through processes such as siRNA-dependent silencing. Interestingly, some host RNA binding proteins have been involved in the inhibition of RNA virus replication, movement, and translation through RNA-specific binding. Host plants intensively use RNA binding proteins for defense against viral infections in nature. In this mini review, we will summarize the function of some host RNA binding proteins which act in a sequence-specific binding manner to the infecting virus RNA. It is important to understand how plants effectively suppresses RNA virus infections via RNA binding proteins, and this defense system can be potentially developed as a synthetic virus defense strategy for use in crop engineering.

  6. ALTERNATIVA DE MODELO LINEAR PARA ESTIMAÇÃO DA BIOMASSA VERDE DE Bambusa vulgaris SCHRAD. EX J.C. WENDL NA EXISTÊNCIA DE MULTICOLINEARIDADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Victor Lopes da Silva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to use a multivariate statistical method as an alternative to estimate the green biomass of the main bamboo rod, Bambusa vulgaris Schrad. i.e.: J.C. Wendl., in the presence of multicollinearity. The data came from an experiment carried out for the Agroindustrial Excelsior S. A. (Agrimex company located in the city of Goiana - PE. Quantified by their green biomass weight, 450 bamboo rods were used and 4 independent variables measured in the rod. Initially, the presence of the multicollinearity could be verified through the correlation matrix of the independent variables and the varience inflation factors, the alternative used was the regression of the principal components based on the covariate matrix. The result indicates that, when there is an interpretation to the main components, the model shows a satisfactory data adjust, and it could be used to estimate the green biomass of the main bamboo rod.

  7. The interaction between human papillomavirus and other viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, J T; Scott, R S

    2017-03-02

    The etiological role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in anogenital tract and head and neck cancers is well established. However, only a low percentage of HPV-positive women develop cancer, indicating that HPV is necessary but not sufficient in carcinogenesis. Several biological and environmental cofactors have been implicated in the development of HPV-associated carcinoma that include immune status, hormonal changes, parity, dietary habits, tobacco usage, and co-infection with other sexually transmissible agents. Such cofactors likely contribute to HPV persistent infection through diverse mechanisms related to immune control, efficiency of HPV infection, and influences on tumor initiation and progression. Conversely, HPV co-infection with other factors may also harbor anti-tumor effects. Here, we review epidemiological and experimental studies investigating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and 2, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), BK virus (BKV), JC virus (JCV), and adeno-associated virus (AAV) as viral cofactors in or therapeutic factors against the development of genital and oral HPV-associated carcinomas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Chikungunya virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikungunya virus infection; Chikungunya ... Where Chikungunya is Found Before 2013, the virus was found in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Indian and Pacific oceans. In late 2013, outbreaks occurred for the first time in the ...

  9. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through blood transfusions. There have been outbreaks of Zika virus in the United States, Africa, Southeast Asia, the ... not travel to areas where there is a Zika virus outbreak. If you do decide to travel, first ...

  10. Chikungunya Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gaines, PhD, MPH, MA, CHES Differentiating Chikungunya From Dengue: A Clinical Challenge For Travelers CDC Travelers' Health Chikungunya Virus Home Prevention Transmission Symptoms & Treatment Geographic Distribution Chikungunya virus in the United States ...

  11. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funding CDC Activities For Healthcare Providers Clinical Evaluation & Disease Sexual Transmission HIV Infection & Zika Virus Testing for Zika Test Specimens – At Time of Birth Diagnostic Tests Understanding Zika Virus Test Results ...

  12. Determination of high mitochondrial membrane potential in spermatozoa loaded with the mitochondrial probe 5,5',6,6'tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolyl-carbocyanine iodide (JC-1) using flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A flow cytometric method was developed to identify viable, energized sperm cells with high mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (''m), > 80-100 mV using the mitochondrial probe 5, 5', 6, 6'-tetrachloro-1, 1', 3, 3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1) and the impermeant nuclear ...

  13. IL-10 Suppression of NK/DC Crosstalk Leads to Poor Priming of MCMV-Specific CD4 T Cells and Prolonged MCMV Persistence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Mandaric (Sanja); S.M. Walton (Senta ); T. Rülicke (Thomas); K. Richter (Kirsten); M.J.H. Girard-Madoux (Mathilde); B.E. Clausen (Bjorn); A. Zurunic (Antonija); M. Kamanaka (Masahito); R.A. Flavell (Richard); S. Jonjic (Stipan); A. Oxenius (Annette)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIL-10 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that regulates the extent of host immunity to infection by exerting suppressive effects on different cell types. Herpes viruses induce IL-10 to modulate the virus-host balance towards their own benefit, resulting in prolonged virus persistence. To

  14. Filovirus pathogenesis and immune evasion: insights from Ebola virus and Marburg virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messaoudi, Ilhem; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Basler, Christopher F.

    2015-10-06

    Ebola viruses and Marburg viruses, members of the filovirus family, are zoonotic pathogens that cause severe disease in people, as highlighted by the latest Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa. Filovirus disease is characterized by uncontrolled virus replication and the activation of host responses that contribute to pathogenesis. Underlying these phenomena is the potent suppression of host innate antiviral responses, particularly the type I interferon response, by viral proteins, which allows high levels of viral replication. In this Review, we describe the mechanisms used by filoviruses to block host innate immunity and discuss the links between immune evasion and filovirus pathogenesis.

  15. Measles Virus Host Invasion and Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitta M. Laksono

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Measles virus is a highly contagious negative strand RNA virus that is transmitted via the respiratory route and causes systemic disease in previously unexposed humans and non-human primates. Measles is characterised by fever and skin rash and usually associated with cough, coryza and conjunctivitis. A hallmark of measles is the transient immune suppression, leading to increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. At the same time, the disease is paradoxically associated with induction of a robust virus-specific immune response, resulting in lifelong immunity to measles. Identification of CD150 and nectin-4 as cellular receptors for measles virus has led to new perspectives on tropism and pathogenesis. In vivo studies in non-human primates have shown that the virus initially infects CD150+ lymphocytes and dendritic cells, both in circulation and in lymphoid tissues, followed by virus transmission to nectin-4 expressing epithelial cells. The abilities of the virus to cause systemic infection, to transmit to numerous new hosts via droplets or aerosols and to suppress the host immune response for several months or even years after infection make measles a remarkable disease. This review briefly highlights current topics in studies of measles virus host invasion and pathogenesis.

  16. DNA-A of a highly pathogenic Indian cassava mosaic virus isolated from Jatropha curcas causes symptoms in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Sun, Yanwei; Xu, Ruirui; Qu, Jing; Tee, Chuansia; Jiang, Xiyuan; Ye, Jian

    2014-04-01

    Jatropha curcas mosaic disease (JcMD) is a newly emerging disease that has been reported in Africa and India. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of a new Indian cassava mosaic virus isolate (ICMV-SG) from Singapore. Infection of ICMV-SG showed more severe JcMD in Jatropha curcas and Nicotiana benthamiana than the other ICMV isolates reported previously, though ICMV-SG shares high sequence identity with the other ICMV isolates. Agroinfectious DNA-A alone sufficiently induced systemic symptoms in N. benthamiana, but not in J. curcas. Results from agroinfection assays showed that systemic infection of ICMV-SG in J. curcas required both DNA-A and DNA-B components.

  17. CHLORELLA VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takashi; Onimatsu, Hideki; Van Etten, James L.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorella viruses or chloroviruses are large, icosahedral, plaque‐forming, double‐stranded‐DNA—containing viruses that replicate in certain strains of the unicellular green alga Chlorella. DNA sequence analysis of the 330‐kbp genome of Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV‐1), the prototype of this virus family (Phycodnaviridae), predict ∼366 protein‐encoding genes and 11 tRNA genes. The predicted gene products of ∼50% of these genes resemble proteins of known function, including many that are completely unexpected for a virus. In addition, the chlorella viruses have several features and encode many gene products that distinguish them from most viruses. These products include: (1) multiple DNA methyltransferases and DNA site‐specific endonucleases, (2) the enzymes required to glycosylate their proteins and synthesize polysaccharides such as hyaluronan and chitin, (3) a virus‐encoded K+ channel (called Kcv) located in the internal membrane of the virions, (4) a SET domain containing protein (referred to as vSET) that dimethylates Lys27 in histone 3, and (5) PBCV‐1 has three types of introns; a self‐splicing intron, a spliceosomal processed intron, and a small tRNA intron. Accumulating evidence indicates that the chlorella viruses have a very long evolutionary history. This review mainly deals with research on the virion structure, genome rearrangements, gene expression, cell wall degradation, polysaccharide synthesis, and evolution of PBCV‐1 as well as other related viruses. PMID:16877063

  18. Virus Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Elizabeth; Logan, Derek; Stuart, David

    Crystallography provides a means of visualizing intact virus particles as well as their isolated constituent proteins and enzymes (1-3) at near-atomic resolution, and is thus an extraordinarily powerful tool in the pursuit of a fuller understanding of the functioning of these simple biological systems. We have already expanded our knowledge of virus evolution, assembly, antigenic variation, and host-cell interactions; further studies will no doubt reveal much more. Although the rewards are enormous, an intact virus structure determination is not a trivial undertaking and entails a significant scaling up in terms of time and resources through all stages of data collection and processing compared to a traditional protein crystallographic structure determination. It is the methodology required for such studies that will be the focus of this chapter. The computational requirements were satisfied in the late 1970s, and when combined with the introduction of phase improvement techniques utilizing the virus symmetry (4,5), the application of crystallography to these massive macromolecular assemblies became feasible. This led to the determination of the first virus structure (the small RNA plant virus, tomato bushy stunt virus), by Harrison and coworkers in 1978 (6). The structures of two other plant viruses followed rapidly (7,8). In the 1980s, a major focus of attention was a family of animal RNA viruses; the Picornaviridae.

  19. A new class of synthetic peptide inhibitors blocks attachment and entry of human pathogenic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krepstakies, Marcel; Lucifora, Julie; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Holstermann, Barbara; Hohenberg, Heinrich; Kowalski, Ina; Gutsmann, Thomas; Baumert, Thomas F; Brandenburg, Klaus; Hauber, Joachim; Protzer, Ulrike

    2012-06-01

    Many enveloped viruses, including herpes viruses, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), are among the most important human pathogens and are often responsible for coinfections involving ≥2 types of viruses. However, therapies that are effective against multiple virus classes are rare. Here we present a new class of synthetic anti-lipopolysaccharide peptides (SALPs) that bind to heparan sulfate moieties on the cell surface and inhibit infection with a variety of enveloped viruses. We demonstrate that SALPs inhibit entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and 2, HBV, and HCV to their respective host cells. Despite their high antiviral efficiency, SALPs were well tolerated, and neither toxicity nor measurable inhibitor-induced adverse effects were observed. Since these broad-spectrum antiviral peptides target a host cell rather than a viral component, they may also be useful for suppression of viruses that are resistant to antiviral drugs.

  20. CHANDIPURA VIRUS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. CHANDIPURA VIRUS. First isolated from a village called Chandipura near Nagpur in 1965 in India. Belongs to rhabdoviridae family. Used as a Model System to study RNA virus multiplication in the infected cell at molecular level. Notes:

  1. Profiles of Everyday Thought Suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Ie, Amanda Yen Lin

    2014-01-01

    The present research assessed whether levels of depression, anxiety and worry, obsessive-compulsive distress, and psychopathy were differentially related to distinct thought suppression profiles. As a means to achieving this goal, the Profiles of Everyday Thought Suppression (PETS) scale was constructed to measure the frequencies with which various target thoughts are suppressed. The PETS scale demonstrated good internal consistency and test-retest reliability, and scores were positively co...

  2. Convergent evolution of argonaute-2 slicer antagonism in two distinct insect RNA viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël T van Mierlo

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a major antiviral pathway that shapes evolution of RNA viruses. We show here that Nora virus, a natural Drosophila pathogen, is both a target and suppressor of RNAi. We detected viral small RNAs with a signature of Dicer-2 dependent small interfering RNAs in Nora virus infected Drosophila. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Nora virus VP1 protein contains RNAi suppressive activity in vitro and in vivo that enhances pathogenicity of recombinant Sindbis virus in an RNAi dependent manner. Nora virus VP1 and the viral suppressor of RNAi of Cricket paralysis virus (1A antagonized Argonaute-2 (AGO2 Slicer activity of RNA induced silencing complexes pre-loaded with a methylated single-stranded guide strand. The convergent evolution of AGO2 suppression in two unrelated insect RNA viruses highlights the importance of AGO2 in antiviral defense.

  3. Screening for suppression in young children : the Polaroid Suppression test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pott, JWR; Oosterveen, DK; Van Hof-van Duin, J

    1998-01-01

    Background: Assessment of monocular visual impairment during screening of young children is often hampered by lack of cooperation. Because strabismus, amblyopia, or anisometropia may lead to monocular suppression during binocular viewing conditions, a test was developed to screen far suppression in

  4. Improvement in Jc performance below liquid nitrogen temperature for SmBa2Cu3Oy superconducting films with BaHfO3 nano-rods controlled by low-temperature growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Miura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For use in high-magnetic-field coil-based applications, the critical current density (Jc of REBa2Cu3Oy (REBCO, where RE = rare earth coated conductors must be isotropically improved, with respect to the direction of the magnetic field; these improvements must be realized at the operating conditions of these applications. In this study, improvement of the Jc for various applied directions of magnetic field was achieved by controlling the morphology of the BaHfO3 (BHO nano-rods in a SmBCO film. We fabricated the 3.0 vol. % BHO-doped SmBCO film at a low growth temperature of 720 °C, by using a seed layer technique (Ts = 720 °C film. The low-temperature growth resulted in a morphological change in the BHO nano-rods. In fact, a high number density of (3.1 ± 0.1 × 103 μm−2 of small (diameter: 4 ± 1 nm, discontinuous nano-rods that grew in various directions, was obtained. In Jc measurements, the Jc of the Ts = 720 °C film in all directions of the applied magnetic field was higher than that of the non-doped SmBCO film. The Jcmin (6.4 MA/cm2 of the former was more than 6 times higher than that (1.0 MA/cm2 of the latter at 40 K, under 3 T. The aforementioned results indicated that the discontinuous BHO nano-rods, which occurred with a high number density, exerted a 3D-like flux pinning at the measurement conditions considered. Moreover, at 4.2 K and under 17 T, a flux pinning force density of 1.6 TN/m3 was realized; this value was comparable to the highest value recorded, to date.

  5. Whole transcriptome sequencing enables discovery and analysis of viruses in archived primary central nervous system lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoever, Christopher; Reid, Erin G; Smith, Erin N; Wang, Xiaoyun; Dumaop, Wilmar; Harismendy, Olivier; Carson, Dennis; Richman, Douglas; Masliah, Eliezer; Frazer, Kelly A

    2013-01-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSL) have a dramatically increased prevalence among persons living with AIDS and are known to be associated with human Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection. Previous work suggests that in some cases, co-infection with other viruses may be important for PCNSL pathogenesis. Viral transcription in tumor samples can be measured using next generation transcriptome sequencing. We demonstrate the ability of transcriptome sequencing to identify viruses, characterize viral expression, and identify viral variants by sequencing four archived AIDS-related PCNSL tissue samples and analyzing raw sequencing reads. EBV was detected in all four PCNSL samples and cytomegalovirus (CMV), JC polyomavirus (JCV), and HIV were also discovered, consistent with clinical diagnoses. CMV was found to express three long non-coding RNAs recently reported as expressed during active infection. Single nucleotide variants were observed in each of the viruses observed and three indels were found in CMV. No viruses were found in several control tumor types including 32 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma samples. This study demonstrates the ability of next generation transcriptome sequencing to accurately identify viruses, including DNA viruses, in solid human cancer tissue samples.

  6. Whole transcriptome sequencing enables discovery and analysis of viruses in archived primary central nervous system lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher DeBoever

    Full Text Available Primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSL have a dramatically increased prevalence among persons living with AIDS and are known to be associated with human Epstein Barr virus (EBV infection. Previous work suggests that in some cases, co-infection with other viruses may be important for PCNSL pathogenesis. Viral transcription in tumor samples can be measured using next generation transcriptome sequencing. We demonstrate the ability of transcriptome sequencing to identify viruses, characterize viral expression, and identify viral variants by sequencing four archived AIDS-related PCNSL tissue samples and analyzing raw sequencing reads. EBV was detected in all four PCNSL samples and cytomegalovirus (CMV, JC polyomavirus (JCV, and HIV were also discovered, consistent with clinical diagnoses. CMV was found to express three long non-coding RNAs recently reported as expressed during active infection. Single nucleotide variants were observed in each of the viruses observed and three indels were found in CMV. No viruses were found in several control tumor types including 32 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma samples. This study demonstrates the ability of next generation transcriptome sequencing to accurately identify viruses, including DNA viruses, in solid human cancer tissue samples.

  7. Alimentación de Chirostoma humboldtianum (Valenciennes; (Pisces: atherinopsidae en el estanque JC en Soyaniquilpan, Estado de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Elías Fernández

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Los charales son peces endémicos del centro de México que han sido consumidos desde épocas prehispánicas, en la actualidad, el volumen de su captura ha disminuido por diversos motivos como la sobrepesca y la contaminación del hábitat, por lo cual es muy importante estudiar las poblaciones que quedan para conocer sus requerimientos ecológicos y alimenticios y poder plantear alternativas para su conservación. Por lo anterior, los objetivos de este trabajo fueron: determinar los grupos alimenticios que consume Chirostoma humboldtianum en el estanque JC en Soyaniquilpan, Estado de México y la variación de algunos parámetros físicos y químicos del agua. Se realizaron seis muestreos mensuales de diciembre de 2001 a mayo de 2002. Se registró la temperatura, la profundidad, la transparencia, la conductividad, la turbiedad, el pH, el oxígeno disuelto, la dureza y la alcalinidad. Los peces se capturaron con un chinchorro de 25 metros de longitud y 8 mm de abertura y fueron fijados con formalina al 10 %. El contenido alimenticio fue identificado con claves especializadas. Para determinar el porcentaje de los grupos alimenticios se utilizó el método volumétrico y de frecuencias. Se encontró que el agua es templada, turbia, con regular cantidad de oxígeno disuelto, de dureza moderada. Chirostoma humboldtianum consumió 21 tipos de organismos, destacando Keratella, Trichocerca, Asplanchna, Bosmina, además de copépodos, coríxidos y quironómidos. El método de frecuencias mostró a Cyclops y Keratella como el alimento preferencial.

  8. Computer viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    The worm, Trojan horse, bacterium, and virus are destructive programs that attack information stored in a computer's memory. Virus programs, which propagate by incorporating copies of themselves into other programs, are a growing menace in the late-1980s world of unprotected, networked workstations and personal computers. Limited immunity is offered by memory protection hardware, digitally authenticated object programs,and antibody programs that kill specific viruses. Additional immunity can be gained from the practice of digital hygiene, primarily the refusal to use software from untrusted sources. Full immunity requires attention in a social dimension, the accountability of programmers.

  9. An Alternative to Thought Suppression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Setting free the bears: Escape from thought suppression," by D. M. Wegner (see record 2011-25622-008). While Wegner supposed that we might have to learn to live with bad thoughts, the present author discusses the use of imagination and guided imagery as an alternative to forced thought suppression.

  10. PHEIFFER SE TAALPOLITIEK JC Steyn

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ment probeer gee: (Niemand minder as) Chomsky se dat ons deur n studie van die ... sigself maak tog nie Chomsky se teorie oor n aangebore taalaanleg en die ...... BIBLIOGRAFIE. Alcock, Anthony E., Brian K. en John M. Welton. 1979. The future of cultural minorities. London: The Macmil- lan Press. Chomsky, Noam. 1975.

  11. Jc Bose's Contributions to Chronobiology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 2. J. C. Bose's Contributions to Chronobiology. M K Chandrashekaran ... Author Affiliations. M K Chandrashekaran1. Animal Behaviour Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur PO, Bangalore 560 064, India ...

  12. JC Bose's Contributions to Chronobiology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    environment. It may interest students of sociology and history of scientific ideas that until about 1960 it was considered unscientific to proclaim the very existence of biological rhythms even by some ... of plants to the environmental stimuli such as light/darkness, .... dictionary-maker consulted Cuvier the zoologist, upon his.

  13. Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulbert, Justin C.; Henson, Richard N.; Anderson, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal damage profoundly disrupts the ability to store new memories of life events. Amnesic windows might also occur in healthy people due to disturbed hippocampal function arising during mental processes that systemically reduce hippocampal activity. Intentionally suppressing memory retrieval (retrieval stopping) reduces hippocampal activity via control mechanisms mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. Here we show that when people suppress retrieval given a reminder of an unwanted memory, they are considerably more likely to forget unrelated experiences from periods surrounding suppression. This amnesic shadow follows a dose-response function, becomes more pronounced after practice suppressing retrieval, exhibits characteristics indicating disturbed hippocampal function, and is predicted by reduced hippocampal activity. These findings indicate that stopping retrieval engages a suppression mechanism that broadly compromises hippocampal processes and that hippocampal stabilization processes can be interrupted strategically. Cognitively triggered amnesia constitutes an unrecognized forgetting process that may account for otherwise unexplained memory lapses following trauma. PMID:26977589

  14. Epidemiology of virus infection and human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Jen; Hsu, Wan-Lun; Yang, Hwai-I; Lee, Mei-Hsuan; Chen, Hui-Chi; Chien, Yin-Chu; You, San-Lin

    2014-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has comprehensively assessed the human carcinogenicity of biological agents. Seven viruses including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV), human immunodeficiency virus, type-1 (HIV-1), human T cell lymphotrophic virus, type-1 (HTLV-1), and human papillomavirus (HPV) have been classified as Group 1 human carcinogens by IARC. The conclusions are based on the findings of epidemiological and mechanistic studies. EBV, HPV, HTLV-1, and KSHV are direct carcinogens; HBV and HCV are indirect carcinogens through chronic inflammation; HIV-1 is an indirect carcinogen through immune suppression. Some viruses may cause more than one cancer, while some cancers may be caused by more than one virus. However, only a proportion of persons infected by these oncogenic viruses will develop specific cancers. A series of studies have been carried out to assess the viral, host, and environmental cofactors of EBV-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma, HBV/HCV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma, and HPV-associated cervical carcinoma. Persistent infection and high viral load are important risk predictors of these virus-caused cancers. Risk calculators incorporating host and viral factors have also been developed for the prediction of long-term risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. These risk calculators are useful for the triage and clinical management of infected patients. Both clinical trials and national programs of immunization or antiviral therapy have demonstrated a significant reduction in the incidence of cancers caused by HBV, HCV, and HPV. Future researches on gene-gene and gene-environment interaction of oncogenic viruses and human host are in urgent need.

  15. Extraterrestrial Viruses?

    OpenAIRE

    Jurado Hernández, Daniel José

    2017-01-01

    Fundamentals of Life - Origin and Fundamentals of Living Things. Evaluation rubric to evaluate the debate and presentation about the point of view regarding the possibility of viruses from the outer space.

  16. Zika Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Musso, Didier; Gubler, Duane J.

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) in the genus Flavivirus and the family Flaviviridae. ZIKV was first isolated from a nonhuman primate in 1947 and from mosquitoes in 1948 in Africa, and ZIKV infections in humans were sporadic for half a century before emerging in the Pacific and the Americas. ZIKV is usually transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes. The clinical presentation of Zika fever is nonspecific and can be misdiagnosed as other infectious diseases, especi...

  17. Menstrual suppression in the adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantartzis, Kelly L; Sucato, Gina S

    2013-06-01

    Menstrual suppression, the use of contraceptive methods to eliminate or decrease the frequency of menses, is often prescribed for adolescents to treat menstrual disorders or to accommodate patient preference. For young women using hormonal contraceptives, there is no medical indication for menstruation to occur monthly, and various hormonal contraceptives can be used to decrease the frequency of menstruation with different side effect profiles and rates of amenorrhea. This article reviews the different modalities for menstrual suppression, common conditions in adolescents which may improve with menstrual suppression, and strategies for managing common side effects. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Newcastle Disease Virus (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Ask about Your Treatment Research Newcastle Disease Virus (PDQ®)–Patient Version Overview Go to Health Professional ... Question 8 ). Questions and Answers About Newcastle Disease Virus What is Newcastle disease virus? Newcastle disease virus ( ...

  19. Powassan (POW) Virus Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Related Topics For International Travelers Powassan (POW) Virus Basics Download this fact sheet formatted for print: ... POW) Virus Fact Sheet (PDF) What is Powassan virus? Powassan (POW) virus is a flavivirus that is ...

  20. Latent BK virus infection and Kaposi's sarcoma pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monini, P; Rotola, A; de Lellis, L; Corallini, A; Secchiero, P; Albini, A; Benelli, R; Parravicini, C; Barbanti-Brodano, G; Cassai, E

    1996-06-11

    We have analyzed by PCR skin lesions from classic, endemic and AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), as well as from KS-derived cell lines, the presence of ubiquitous transforming viruses. BK virus (BKV), a transforming human papovavirus which has been associated with human tumors, was detected in 100% of KS skin lesions and 75% of KS cell lines. KS specimens contained a full-length, intact BKV early region, but minor rearrangements were observed in some tumors. BKV was also detected with a high prevalence (57-67%) in genital tissues and sperm, thus fulfilling the role of a sexually transmitted agent in KS. The closely related JC virus (JCV), which has never been associated with human malignancies, was present in 11-20% of KS specimens and was detected with a low prevalence (0-21%) in genital tissues and sperm. Simian virus 40 (SV40) was not detected in any KS lesions. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA sequences were detected in 20-25% of KS lesions. Malignant human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 and benign HPV types 6 and 11 were detected in KS specimens with a similar prevalence of 11-83%, suggesting that the presence of HPV-transforming sequences is not a specific trait of HPV interaction with KS tissue. Furthermore, JCV, SV40, HSV and HPV DNA sequences were not detected in KS cell lines, suggesting that these viruses are not associated to KS neoplastic cells in KS tissue. KS cell lines were also negative for DNA sequences of KS-HV, the novel herpesvirus detected in primary KS lesions. The constant association of BKV DNA with KS lesions and KS cell lines suggests that BKV-transforming functions may participate in the development of KS.

  1. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will explore and test the feasibility and effectiveness of using a cryogenic fluid (liquid nitrogen) to facilitate acoustic suppression in a...

  2. Computer Viruses. Technology Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Tim, Comp.; Ropog, Marty, Comp.; Keating, Joseph, Comp.

    This document provides general information on computer viruses, how to help protect a computer network from them, measures to take if a computer becomes infected. Highlights include the origins of computer viruses; virus contraction; a description of some common virus types (File Virus, Boot Sector/Partition Table Viruses, Trojan Horses, and…

  3. Risk of community-acquired pneumonia and use of gastric acid-suppressive drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, R.J.F.; Sturkenboom, M.C.; Hassing, R.J.; Dieleman, J.P.; Stricker, B.H.C.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT: Reduction of gastric acid secretion by acid-suppressive therapy allows pathogen colonization from the upper gastrointestinal tract. The bacteria and viruses in the contaminated stomach have been identified as species from the oral cavity. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between the

  4. Viruses Avian influenza, bovine herpes, bovine viral diarrhea virus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... human cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, human immunodeficiency virus I, influenza, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, measles, papilloma, rabies, respiratory syncitial virus, simian immunodeficiency virus, simian virus 40. Bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme disease), Moraxella bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, ...

  5. Computer viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, F.B.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis investigates a recently discovered vulnerability in computer systems which opens the possibility that a single individual with an average user's knowledge could cause widespread damage to information residing in computer networks. This vulnerability is due to a transitive integrity corrupting mechanism called a computer virus which causes corrupted information to spread from program to program. Experiments have shown that a virus can spread at an alarmingly rapid rate from user to user, from system to system, and from network to network, even when the best-availability security techniques are properly used. Formal definitions of self-replication, evolution, viruses, and protection mechanisms are used to prove that any system that allows sharing, general functionality, and transitivity of information flow cannot completely prevent viral attack. Computational aspects of viruses are examined, and several undecidable problems are shown. It is demonstrated that a virus may evolve so as to generate any computable sequence. Protection mechanisms are explored, and the design of computer networks that prevent both illicit modification and dissemination of information are given. Administration and protection of information networks based on partial orderings are examined, and probably correct automated administrative assistance is introduced.

  6. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoek, Hella Leonie [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  7. Bioinformatics prediction of swine MHC class I epitopes from Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welner, Simon; Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole

    Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) causes one of the most important diseases in all swine producing countries. The infection has a high impact on animal welfare, food safety and production economics. PRRSV possesses multiple immunoevasive strategies, from suppression...

  8. Hendra virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    Hendra virus infection of horses occurred sporadically between 1994 and 2010 as a result of spill-over from the viral reservoir in Australian mainland flying-foxes, and occasional onward transmission to people also followed from exposure to affected horses. An unprecedented number of outbreaks were recorded in 2011 leading to heightened community concern. Release of an inactivated subunit vaccine for horses against Hendra virus represents the first commercially available product that is focused on mitigating the impact of a Biosafety Level 4 pathogen. Through preventing the development of acute Hendra virus disease in horses, vaccine use is also expected to reduce the risk of transmission of infection to people. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Marburg virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdle, W R

    1976-01-01

    Marburg virus disease, which produced 20 per cent mortality when it first occured during 1967 in Germany and Yugoslavia, recently appeared again in South Africa. The source of the first outbreak was monkeys shipped from Africa; the origin of the second episode is unclear. Because distribution of the virus in nature is unknown, its threat to man cannot be readily determined. Differential laboratory diagnoses of hemorrhagic fevers should be encouraged in order to learn more about the epidemiology of these diseases and to better assess the risks which their etiologic agents may pose for attending medical personnel.

  10. The suppression of apoptosis by α-herpesvirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yu; Cheng, An-Chun; Wang, Ming-Shu; Jia, Ren-Yong; Sun, Kun-Feng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Zhu, Dekang; Chen, Shun; Liu, Ma-Feng; Zhao, Xin-Xin; Chen, Xiao-Yue

    2017-01-01

    Apoptosis, an important innate immune mechanism that eliminates pathogen-infected cells, is primarily triggered by two signalling pathways: the death receptor pathway and the mitochondria-mediated pathway. However, many viruses have evolved various strategies to suppress apoptosis by encoding anti-apoptotic factors or regulating apoptotic signalling pathways, which promote viral propagation and evasion of the host defence. During its life cycle, α-herpesvirus utilizes an elegant multifarious anti-apoptotic strategy to suppress programmed cell death. This progress article primarily focuses on the current understanding of the apoptosis-inhibition mechanisms of α-herpesvirus anti-apoptotic genes and their expression products and discusses future directions, including how the anti-apoptotic function of herpesvirus could be targeted therapeutically. PMID:28406478

  11. Global Bifurcation of a Novel Computer Virus Propagation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Ren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In a recent paper by J. Ren et al. (2012, a novel computer virus propagation model under the effect of the antivirus ability in a real network is established. The analysis there only partially uncovers the dynamics behaviors of virus spread over the network in the case where around bifurcation is local. In the present paper, by mathematical analysis, it is further shown that, under appropriate parameter values, the model may undergo a global B-T bifurcation, and the curves of saddle-node bifurcation, Hopf bifurcation, and homoclinic bifurcation are obtained to illustrate the qualitative behaviors of virus propagation. On this basis, a collection of policies is recommended to prohibit the virus prevalence. To our knowledge, this is the first time the global bifurcation has been explored for the computer virus propagation. Theoretical results and corresponding suggestions may help us suppress or eliminate virus propagation in the network.

  12. Des inhumations en position assise de La Tène C ou B (350 à 125 av. J.-C.), en périphérie de l’agglomération d’Argentomagus (Indre)

    OpenAIRE

    Salé, Philippe; Villenave, Céline

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Une opération de fouille préventive a été réalisée en 2014, au nord de l’agglomération secondaire d’Argentomagus (Saint-Marcel, Indre, fig. 1). D’une surface de 1800 m², cette opération a permis la découverte de nombreux vestiges dont cinq inhumations en position assise de La Tène C ou B (350 à 125 av. J.-C.).

  13. HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS — ONCOGENIC VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Mayansky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture is devoted to oncogenic viruses, particularly human papilloma virus. Papilloma viral infection is found in all parts of the globe and highly contagious. In addition to exhaustive current data on classification, specifics of papilloma viruses composition and epidemiology, the author describes in great detail the malignization mechanisms of papilloma viruses pockets. Also, issues of diagnostics and specific prevention and treatment of diseases caused by this virus are illustrated. Key words: oncogenic viruses, papilloma viruses, prevention, vaccination. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(4:48-55

  14. Circulation, échange et production de poteries dans les Andes Centrales au deuxième millénaire AV. J.C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Sont présentés tout d’abord les quatre types céramiques définis pour la séquence Pirwa de Piruru (1600/1500 - 800/600 av. J.C.. Puis, après quelques réflexions méthodologiques à propos de la détermination de groupes céramiques pertinents, particulièrement durant le Formatif Initial, Piruru Pirwa est replacé dans le contexte culturel de la cordillère centre-andine, des changements significatifs étant constatés entre les phases Pirwa II et III. Les analyses céramologiques montrent que trois types sont importés et que le quatrième résulte d’une production locale. Les variations dans l’organisation globale de l’habitat Pirwa II et Pirwa III permettent de proposer l’hypothèse que l’activité céramique, c’est-à-dire la production de vaisselles, pourrait, dans l’exemple de Piruru, dépendre de la sédentarité. Circulación, intercambio y producción de cerámica en los Andes Centrales durante el segundo milenio a. C. En primer lugar, se presentan los cuatro tipos cerámicos definidos para la secuencia Pirwa de Piruru (1600/1500 - 800/600 a.C.. Luego, después de unas reflexiones metodológicas acerca de la determinación de grupos cerámicos pertinentes, especialmente durante el período Formativo Inicial, se sitúa Piruru Pirwa en el contexto cultural de la sierra central, notando cambios significativos entre las fases Pirwa II y Pirwa III. Los análisis ceramológicos muestran que tres tipos son importados, y que el cuarto es resultado de una producción local. Tomando en cuenta las variaciones en la organización general del asentamiento Pirwa II y Pirwa III, se plantea la hipótesis que la actividad cerámica, es decir la producción alfarera, en Piruru, podría vincularse al sedentarismo. Circulation, exchange and production of wares in the Central Highlands of Peru during the secund millenium B.C. In this paper, four ceramic types are defined and described for the Piruru Pirwa sequence (1600/1500 - 800/600 a C, and

  15. Inhibition of influenza virus internalization by (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Meehyein; Kim, So-Yeon; Lee, Hye Won; Shin, Jin Soo; Kim, Pilho; Jung, Young-Sik; Jeong, Hyeong-Seop; Hyun, Jae-Kyung; Lee, Chong-Kyo

    2013-11-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), one of the major flavonoid components of green tea, is known to have a broad antiviral activity against several enveloped viruses, including the influenza virus. However, its mode of action and the mechanism that allows it to target influenza virus molecules have not been fully elucidated. Thus, this study investigated the molecular mechanism by which EGCG suppresses influenza virus infections. EGCG was found to block an early step in the influenza viral life cycle, but it did not affect viral adsorption to target cells or viral RNA replication. However, EGCG inhibited hemifusion events between virus particles and the cellular membrane by reducing the viral membrane integrity, thereby resulting in the loss of the cell penetration capacity of the influenza virus. EGCG also marginally suppressed the viral and nonviral neuraminidase (NA) activity in an enzyme-based assay system. In conclusion, it is suggested that the anti-influenza viral efficacy of EGCG is attributable to damage to the physical properties of the viral envelope and partial inhibition of the NA surface glycoprotein. These results may facilitate future investigations of the antiviral activity of EGCG against other enveloped viruses as well as influenza virus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Purging device for suppression chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Koichi.

    1987-11-14

    Purpose: To completely drive out air or the like in the suppression chamber in a short period of time thereby protect bent pipes from embrittled rupture. Constitution: Nitrogen gases, etc. entering through the inlet penetration to the inside of a reactor container are guided downwardly through communication pipeways, and the released downwardly in a stable manner while the blowing speed being retained by blowing mechanisms. Released nitrogen gases, etc. diffuse along the water surface of the suppression chamber and fill the inside of the chamber from below. Air, etc. in the suppression chamber prior to the supply of nitrogen gas, etc. is discharged through the exit penetration from the purging discharge pipe smoothly to the outside. In this way, air is replaced with nitrogen gas, etc., the released nitrogen is not directly blown to bent pipe, the operation is simplified, and the charge/discharge operation can be made in a short time efficiently. (Kamimura, M.).

  17. Visual surround suppression in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibber, Marc S; Anderson, Elaine J; Bobin, Tracy; Antonova, Elena; Seabright, Alice; Wright, Bernice; Carlin, Patricia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S; Dakin, Steven C

    2013-01-01

    Compared to unaffected observers patients with schizophrenia (SZ) show characteristic differences in visual perception, including a reduced susceptibility to the influence of context on judgments of contrast - a manifestation of weaker surround suppression (SS). To examine the generality of this phenomenon we measured the ability of 24 individuals with SZ to judge the luminance, contrast, orientation, and size of targets embedded in contextual surrounds that would typically influence the target's appearance. Individuals with SZ demonstrated weaker SS compared to matched controls for stimuli defined by contrast or size, but not for those defined by luminance or orientation. As perceived luminance is thought to be regulated at the earliest stages of visual processing our findings are consistent with a suppression deficit that is predominantly cortical in origin. In addition, we propose that preserved orientation SS in SZ may reflect the sparing of broadly tuned mechanisms of suppression. We attempt to reconcile these data with findings from previous studies.

  18. Beyond viral suppression of HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V.; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly; Barton, Simon E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) adopted a new Global Health Sector Strategy on HIV for 2016-2021. It establishes 15 ambitious targets, including the '90-90-90' target calling on health systems to reduce under-diagnosis of HIV, treat a greater number of those diagnosed......, and ensure that those being treated achieve viral suppression. DISCUSSION: The WHO strategy calls for person-centered chronic care for people living with HIV (PLHIV), implicitly acknowledging that viral suppression is not the ultimate goal of treatment. However, it stops short of providing an explicit target...... for health-related quality of life. It thus fails to take into account the needs of PLHIV who have achieved viral suppression but still must contend with other intense challenges such as serious non-communicable diseases, depression, anxiety, financial stress, and experiences of or apprehension about HIV...

  19. Oropuche virus: A virus present but ignored

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Mattar V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bunyaviruses are RNA viruses that affect animals and plants; they have five genera and four of them affect humans: Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Phlebovirus and Hantavirus. All of them are Arbovirus, except Hantavirus. The Orthobunyaviruses comprise Oropouche, Tahyna, La Crosse virus, California encephalitis virus and Heartland virus recently discovered (1. Except for Heartland virus which is transmitted by ticks of the genus Amblyoma, these Phleboviruses have as vectors mosquitoes, which bite small mammals which are able to be as reservoirs amplifiers.

  20. Teaching to suppress Polglish processes

    OpenAIRE

    Dziubalska-Kołaczyk, Katarzyna; Balas, Anna; Schwartz, Geoffrey; Rojczyk, Arkadiusz; Wrembel, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Advanced second language (henceforth L2) learners in a formal setting can suppress many first language (henceforth L1) processes in L2 pronunciation when provided with sufficient exposure to L2 and meta competence (see Sect. 4 for a definition of this term). This paper shows how imitation in L2 teaching can be enhanced on the basis of current phonetic research and how complex allophonic processes such as nasal vocalization and glottal stop insertion can be suppressed using “repair”—a method o...

  1. BK Virus-associated Hemorrhagic Cystitis in Patients with Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Report of Three Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Duygu; Batgi, Hikmetullah; Merdin, Alparslan; Çeken, Sabahat; Dal, Mehmet Sinan; Tekgündüz, Emre; Altuntaş, Fevzi; Ertek, Mustafa

    2017-06-01

    BK viras is a human polyoma viras. It is acquired in early childhood and remains life-long latent in the genitourinary system. BK virus replication is more common in receiving immunosuppressive therapy receiving patients and transplant patients. BK virus could cause hemorrhagic cystitis in patients with allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Hemorrhagic cystitis is a serious complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hemorrhagic cystitis could cause morbidity and long stay in the hospital. Diagnosis is more frequently determined by the presence of BK virus DNA detected with quantitative or real-time PCR testing in serum or plasma and less often in urine. The reduction of immunosuppression is effective in the treatment of BK virus infection. There are also several agents with anti-BK virus activity. Cidofovir is an active agent against a variety of DNA viruses including poliomyoma viruses and it is a cytosine nucleotide analogue. Intravenous immunoglobulin IgG (IVIG) also includes antibodies against BK and JC (John Cunningham) viruses. Hereby, we report three cases of hemorrhagic cystitis. Hemorrhagic cystitis developed in all these three cases of allogeneic stem cell transplantation due to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). BK virus were detected as the cause of hemorrhagic cystitis in these patients. Irrigation of the bladder was performed. Then levofloxacin 1 x750 mg intravenous and IVIG 0.5 gr/kg were started. But the hematuria did not decreased. In the first case, treatment with leflunomide was started, but patient died due to refractory AML and severe graft- versus -host disease after 4th day of leflunamide and levofloxacin treatments. Cidofovir treatment and the reduction of immunosuppressive treatment decreased the BK virus load and resulted symptomatic improvement in the second case. Initiation of cidofovir was planned in the third case. Administration of cidofovir together with the reduction of immunosuppression in the treatment of hemorrhagic

  2. Mengenal Hanta Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Wijayanti, Tri

    2009-01-01

    Virus Hanta kurang infeksius, kecuali di dalam lingkungan tertentu. Lamanya waktu virus ini dapat bertahan di lingkungan, setelah keluar dari tubuh tikus tidaklah diketahui secara pasti. Tetapi percobaan laboratorium menunjukkan bahwa, daya infektifitasnya tidak dijumpai setelah dua hari pengeringan. Genus hanta virus terdiri dari 22 spesies virus, dapat menyebabkan hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) dan hanta virus pulmonary syndrome (HPS).

  3. Viruses of hyperthermophilic Crenarchaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, D.; Garrett, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    , when one examines the archaeal viruses, the picture appears complex. Most viruses that are known to infect members of the kingdom Euryarchaeota resemble bacterial viruses, whereas those associated with the kingdom Crenarchaeota show little resemblance to either bacterial or eukaryal viruses....... This review summarizes our current knowledge of this group of exceptional and highly diverse archaeal viruses....

  4. Virus-encoded chemokine receptors--putative novel antiviral drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2005-01-01

    as such a paramount role in the antiviral immune responses. It is therefore not surprising that viruses have found ways to exploit and subvert the chemokine system by means of molecular mimicry. By ancient acts of molecular piracy and by induction and suppression of endogenous genes, viruses have utilized chemokines...

  5. Expanded Regulatory T Cells in Chronically Friend Retrovirus-Infected Mice Suppress Immunity to a Murine Cytomegalovirus Superinfection

    OpenAIRE

    Duppach, Janine; Francois, Sandra; Jara J Joedicke; Dittmer, Ulf; Kraft, Anke R. M.

    2014-01-01

    It is still unclear whether expanded and activated regulatory T cells (Tregs) in chronic viral infections can influence primary immune responses against superinfections with unrelated viruses. Expanded Tregs found in the spleens of chronically Friend virus (FV)-infected mice decreased murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV)-specific CD8+ T cell responses during acute mCMV superinfection. This suppression of mCMV-specific T cell immunity was found only in organs with FV-induced Treg expansion. Surprisin...

  6. Inhibition of influenza virus replication by adlay tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Emiko; Iwai, Miwa; Koketsu, Ritsuko; Sogabe, Riho; Morimoto, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Yuri; Ohta, Yoichiro; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Ohshima, Atsushi; Enomoto, Toshiki; Isegawa, Yuji

    2017-09-13

    The present study was conducted aiming to examine the antiviral activity of adlay tea and its components against influenza viruses. We further aimed to clarify the mechanism by which these components regulate virus replication. Adlay tea at a concentration suitable for drinking inhibited the multiplication of influenza viruses. Moreover, our results suggest that individual components of the tea had antiviral activities against the influenza A/PR/8/34 virus. Adlay tea inhibited multiplication of the H1N1, H3N2 and B types of influenza virus, including oseltamivir-resistant viruses. In addition, adlay tea inhibited influenza infection during the periods of virus adsorption to the cell and virus replication. Adlay tea did not suppress hemagglutination inhibition or cell fusion, although it slightly inhibited virus binding to Malin Darby canine kidney cells. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the antiviral compounds included in adlay tea were ingredients other than polyphenols and that there were several types of effective compounds in adlay tea inhibiting several steps of viral replication. The results of the present study demonstrate that adlay tea had antiviral effects against influenza viruses. Our findings with respect to adlay tea suggest that the polyphenols might have a small influence on its antiviral activity and that other ingredients might have more influence. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Didier; Gubler, Duane J

    2016-07-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) in the genus Flavivirus and the family Flaviviridae. ZIKV was first isolated from a nonhuman primate in 1947 and from mosquitoes in 1948 in Africa, and ZIKV infections in humans were sporadic for half a century before emerging in the Pacific and the Americas. ZIKV is usually transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes. The clinical presentation of Zika fever is nonspecific and can be misdiagnosed as other infectious diseases, especially those due to arboviruses such as dengue and chikungunya. ZIKV infection was associated with only mild illness prior to the large French Polynesian outbreak in 2013 and 2014, when severe neurological complications were reported, and the emergence in Brazil of a dramatic increase in severe congenital malformations (microcephaly) suspected to be associated with ZIKV. Laboratory diagnosis of Zika fever relies on virus isolation or detection of ZIKV-specific RNA. Serological diagnosis is complicated by cross-reactivity among members of the Flavivirus genus. The adaptation of ZIKV to an urban cycle involving humans and domestic mosquito vectors in tropical areas where dengue is endemic suggests that the incidence of ZIKV infections may be underestimated. There is a high potential for ZIKV emergence in urban centers in the tropics that are infested with competent mosquito vectors such as Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Cryptoporus volvatus extract inhibits influenza virus replication in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gao

    Full Text Available Influenza virus is the cause of significant morbidity and mortality, posing a serious health threat worldwide. Here, we evaluated the antiviral activities of Cryptoporus volvatus extract on influenza virus infection. Our results demonstrated that the Cryptoporus volvatus extract inhibited different influenza virus strain replication in MDCK cells. Time course analysis indicated that the extract exerted its inhibition at earlier and late stages in the replication cycle of influenza virus. Subsequently, we confirmed that the extract suppressed virus internalization into and released from cells. Moreover, the extract significantly reduced H1N1/09 influenza virus load in lungs and dramatically decreased lung lesions in mice. And most importantly, the extract protected mice from lethal challenge with H1N1/09 influenza virus. Our results suggest that the Cryptoporus volvatus extract could be a potential candidate for the development of a new anti-influenza virus therapy.

  9. Cryptoporus volvatus Extract Inhibits Influenza Virus Replication In Vitro and In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jianyong; Liu, Jinhua; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo; Cao, Li

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus is the cause of significant morbidity and mortality, posing a serious health threat worldwide. Here, we evaluated the antiviral activities of Cryptoporus volvatus extract on influenza virus infection. Our results demonstrated that the Cryptoporus volvatus extract inhibited different influenza virus strain replication in MDCK cells. Time course analysis indicated that the extract exerted its inhibition at earlier and late stages in the replication cycle of influenza virus. Subsequently, we confirmed that the extract suppressed virus internalization into and released from cells. Moreover, the extract significantly reduced H1N1/09 influenza virus load in lungs and dramatically decreased lung lesions in mice. And most importantly, the extract protected mice from lethal challenge with H1N1/09 influenza virus. Our results suggest that the Cryptoporus volvatus extract could be a potential candidate for the development of a new anti-influenza virus therapy. PMID:25437846

  10. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  11. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  12. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  13. Computer Viruses: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmion, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the early history and current proliferation of computer viruses that occur on Macintosh and DOS personal computers, mentions virus detection programs, and offers suggestions for how libraries can protect themselves and their users from damage by computer viruses. (LRW)

  14. Virus Ebola Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Wuryadi, Suharyono

    1996-01-01

    Virus Marburg dan Ebola diklasifikasikan sebagai virus yang sangat menular dan dimasukkan dalam klasifikasi sebagai virus/pathogen dengan derajat biosafety 4, sehingga untuk menanganinya diperlukan laboratorium khusus tingkat 4.

  15. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page ... Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus if you ...

  16. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your ...

  17. Consequences of stereotype suppression and internal suppression motivation : A self-regulation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, Ernestine H; Hindriks, Inge; Koomen, W; Dijksterhuis, Ap; van Knipppenberg, A.

    The present research studied the effects of suppression of stereotypes on subsequent stereotyping. Moreover, the moderating influence of motivation to suppress stereotypes was examined. The first three experiments showed that suppression of stereotypes leads to the experience of engaging in

  18. Computer Virus and Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Tutut Handayani; Soenarto Usna,Drs.MMSI

    2004-01-01

    Since its appearance the first time in the mid-1980s, computer virus has invited various controversies that still lasts to this day. Along with the development of computer systems technology, viruses komputerpun find new ways to spread itself through a variety of existing communications media. This paper discusses about some things related to computer viruses, namely: the definition and history of computer viruses; the basics of computer viruses; state of computer viruses at this time; and ...

  19. Nasal commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis counteracts influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Wen; Liu, Pei-Feng; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Kuo, Sherwin; Zhang, Xing-Quan; Schooley, Robert T.; Rohde, Holger; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Several microbes, including Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), a Gram-positive bacterium, live inside the human nasal cavity as commensals. The role of these nasal commensals in host innate immunity is largely unknown, although bacterial interference in the nasal microbiome may promote ecological competition between commensal bacteria and pathogenic species. We demonstrate here that S. epidermidis culture supernatants significantly suppressed the infectivity of various influenza viruses. Using high-performance liquid chromatography together with mass spectrometry, we identified a giant extracellular matrix-binding protein (Embp) as the major component involved in the anti-influenza effect of S. epidermidis. This anti-influenza activity was abrogated when Embp was mutated, confirming that Embp is essential for S. epidermidis activity against viral infection. We also showed that both S. epidermidis bacterial particles and Embp can directly bind to influenza virus. Furthermore, the injection of a recombinant Embp fragment containing a fibronectin-binding domain into embryonated eggs increased the survival rate of virus-infected chicken embryos. For an in vivo challenge study, prior Embp intranasal inoculation in chickens suppressed the viral titres and induced the expression of antiviral cytokines in the nasal tissues. These results suggest that S. epidermidis in the nasal cavity may serve as a defence mechanism against influenza virus infection. PMID:27306590

  20. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication prior to Reverse Transcription by Influenza Virus Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Ligia A.; Blazevic, Vesna; Patterson, Bruce K.; Mac Trubey, C.; Dolan, Matthew J.; Gene M Shearer

    2000-01-01

    It is now recognized that, in addition to drug-mediated therapies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the immune system can exert antiviral effects via CD8+ T-cell-generated anti-HIV factors. This study demonstrates that (i) supernatants from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with influenza A virus inhibit replication of CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 isolates prior to reverse transcription; (ii) the HIV-suppressive supernatants can be generated by CD4- or CD...

  1. Comparative analysis of RNA silencing suppression activities between viral suppressors and an endogenous plant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Han, Kyoung-Sik; Park, Han-Yong; Choi, Seung-Kook

    2012-06-01

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved system that functions as an antiviral mechanism in eukaryotes, including higher plants. To counteract this, several plant viruses express silencing suppressors that inhibit RNA silencing in host plants. Here, we show that both 2b protein from peanut stunt virus (PSV) and a hairpin construct (designated hp-RDR6) that silences endogenous RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) strongly suppress RNA silencing. The Agrobacterium infiltration system was used to demonstrate that both PSV 2b and hp-RDR6 suppressed local RNA silencing as strongly as helper component (HC-Pro) from potato virus Y (PVY) and P19 from tomato bush stunt virus (TBSV). The 2b protein from PSV eliminated the small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) associated with RNA silencing and prevented systemic silencing, similar to 2b protein from cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). On the other hand, hp-RDR6 suppressed RNA silencing by inhibiting the generation of secondary siRNAs. The small coat protein (SCP) of squash mosaic virus (SqMV) also displayed weak suppression activity of RNA silencing. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer was used to investigate whether viral silencing suppressors or hp-RDR6 enhanced accumulations of green fluorescence protein (GFP) and β-glucuronidase (GUS) as markers of expression in leaf tissues of Nicotina benthamiana. Expression of both GFP and GUS was significantly enhanced in the presence of PSV 2b or CMV 2b, compared to no suppression or the weak SqMV SCP suppressor. Co-expression with hp-RDR6 also significantly increased the expression of GFP and GUS to levels similar to those induced by PVY HC-Pro and TBSV P19.

  2. Association between simian virus 40 and non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilchez, Regis A.; Madden, Charles R.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Halvorson, Steven J.; White, Zoe S.; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L.; Finch, Chris J.; Butel, Janet S.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma has increased in frequency over the past 30 years, and is a common cancer in HIV-1-infected patients. Although no definite risk factors have emerged, a viral cause has been postulated. Polyomaviruses are known to infect human beings and to induce tumours in laboratory animals. We aimed to identify which one of the three polyomaviruses able to infect human beings (simian virus 40 [SV40], JC virus, and BK virus) was associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. METHODS: We analysed systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma from 76 HIV-1-infected and 78 HIV-1-uninfected patients, and non-malignant lymphoid samples from 79 HIV-1-positive and 107 HIV-1-negative patients without tumours; 54 colon and breast carcinoma samples served as cancer controls. We used PCR followed by Southern blot hybridisation and DNA sequence analysis to detect DNAs of polyomaviruses and herpesviruses. FINDINGS: Polyomavirus T antigen sequences, all of which were SV40-specific, were detected in 64 (42%) of 154 non-Hodgkin lymphomas, none of 186 non-malignant lymphoid samples, and none of 54 control cancers. This difference was similar for HIV-1-infected patients and HIV-1-uninfected patients alike. Few tumours were positive for both SV40 and Epstein-Barr virus. Human herpesvirus type 8 was not detected. SV40 sequences were found most frequently in diffuse large B-cell and follicular-type lymphomas. INTERPRETATION: SV40 is significantly associated with some types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. These results add lymphomas to the types of human cancers associated with SV40.

  3. Suppression of stratified explosive interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeks, M.K.; Shamoun, B.I.; Bonazza, R.; Corradini, M.L. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics

    1998-01-01

    Stratified Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) experiments with Refrigerant-134a and water were performed in a large-scale system. Air was uniformly injected into the coolant pool to establish a pre-existing void which could suppress the explosion. Two competing effects due to the variation of the air flow rate seem to influence the intensity of the explosion in this geometrical configuration. At low flow rates, although the injected air increases the void fraction, the concurrent agitation and mixing increases the intensity of the interaction. At higher flow rates, the increase in void fraction tends to attenuate the propagated pressure wave generated by the explosion. Experimental results show a complete suppression of the vapor explosion at high rates of air injection, corresponding to an average void fraction of larger than 30%. (author)

  4. Cancer metastasis and EGFR signaling is suppressed by amiodarone-induced versican V2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hung-Chieh; Su, Mai-Yan; Lo, Hao-Chan; Wu, Chin-Chieh; Hu, Jia-Rung; Lo, Dao-Ming; Chao, Tsu-Yi; Tsai, Huai-Jen; Dai, Ming-Shen

    2015-12-15

    Extracellular matrix components play an active role in cancer progression and prognosis. Versican, a large extracellular matrix proteoglycan, can promote cancer metastasis through facilitating cell proliferation, adhesion, migration and angiogenesis. We had previously demonstrated that amiodarone caused ectopic overexpression of similar to versican b (s-vcanb), inhibited EGFR/GSK3β/Snail signaling, and enhanced Cdh5 at the heart field of zebrafish, indicating interference with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Since S-vcanb is homologous to mammalian versican V2 isoform, we examined the effects of amiodarone on mammalian tumor proliferation, migration, invasion and metastasis in vitro and in vivo and on EMT signaling pathways. Monolayer wound assays and extracellular matrix transwell invasion assays showed reduced migration and invasion by 15 μM amiodarone treated B16OVA, JC, 4T-1, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 tumor cell lines. All cancer cell lines showed reduced metastatic capabilities in vivo after treatment with amiodarone in experimental animals. Western blots revealed that EMT-related transcription factors Snail and Twist were reduced and E-cadherin was enhanced in amiodarone treated cells through an EGFR/ERK/GSK3β-dependent pathway. Immunohistochemistry showed amiodarone lead to increased expression of versican V2 isoform concomitant with reduced versican V1. Our study illustrated the role of versican v2 in EMT modulation and cancer suppression by amiodarone treatment.

  5. Adaptive Filtering for Aeroservoelastic Response Suppression Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CSA Engineering proposes the design of an adaptive aeroelastic mode suppression for advanced fly-by-wire aircraft, which will partition the modal suppression...

  6. Charmonium suppression by thermal dissociation and percolation

    CERN Document Server

    Nardi, M

    2005-01-01

    I discuss the charmonium suppression in deconfined medium by thermal dissociation and parton percolation. I point out the differences and show predictions for J/psi suppression at different energy and/or for different interacting nuclei.

  7. Jet Suppression Measured in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Citron, Zvi Hirsh; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions, a hot medium with a high density of unscreened color charges is produced, and jets propagating through this medium are known to suffer energy loss. This results in a lower yield of jets emerging from the medium than expected in the absence of medium effects, and thus modifications of the jet yield are directly sensitive to the energy loss mechanism. Furthermore, jets with different flavor content are expected to be affected by the medium in different ways. Parton showers initiated by quarks tend to have fewer fragments carrying a larger fraction of the total jet energy than those resulting from gluons. In this talk, the latest ATLAS results on single jet suppression will be presented. Measurements of the nuclear modification factor, RAA, for fully reconstructed jets are shown. The rapidity dependence of jet suppression is discussed, which is sensitive to the relative energy loss between quark and gluon jets. New measurements of single hadron suppression out to pT~150 GeV ...

  8. Proteasomes raise the microtubule dynamics in influenza A (H1N1) virus-infected LLC-MK2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Conto, Flora; Chezzi, Carlo; Fazzi, Alessandra; Razin, Sergey V; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Medici, Maria Cristina; Gatti, Rita; Calderaro, Adriana

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of microtubule networks are known to have an impact on replication of influenza A virus in some cellular models. Here we present evidence suggesting that at late stages of LLC-MK2 cell infection by influenza A (H1N1) virus the ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation system participates in destabilization of microtubules, and favours virus replication. Chemical inhibition of proteasome activity partially suppresses influenza A virus replication, while stimulation of proteasome activity favours influenza A virus replication. Conversely, in another cellular model, A549 cells, inhibitors and activators of proteasomes have a small effect on influenza A virus replication. These data suggest that influenza A virus might take selective advantage of proteasome functions in order to set up a favourable cytoskeletal "environment" for its replication and spread. Furthermore, the relationship between influenza virus and the host cell is likely to depend on both the cellular model and the virus strain.

  9. Pathogen derived resistance to Potato virus Y: mechanisms and risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. MÄKI-VALKAMA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the concept of pathogen derived resistance (PDR was proposed in 1985, genetic transformation of plants to express virus-derived sequences has been used to engineer resistance to many viruses. This paper reviews PDR approaches to Potato virus Y (PVY, type member of the genus Potyvirus. PDR to viruses operates often through RNA-mediated resistance mechanisms that do not require protein expression. Studies on the RNA-mediated resistance have led to the discovery of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS, a mechanism that controls gene expression in eukaryotic cells and provides natural protection against virus infections. Viruses, in turn, can suppress the PTGS with some of their proteins, such as the helper component-proteinase protein of PVY. Expression of PVY proteins in transgenic plants entails a risk for heterologous encapsidation or synergism with viruses that infect the PVY-resistant transgenic plant. These risks are avoided using RNA-mediated resistance, but a risk still exists for recombination between the transgene transcript and the RNA genome of the infecting virus, which may create a virus with altered properties. The harmful consequences can be limited to some extent by removing functional motifs from the viral sequence used as a transgene.;

  10. Genetic Control of Mosquitoes: population suppression strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Barretto Bruno Wilke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, morbidity and mortality from malaria and dengue fever among other pathogens are an increasing Public Health problem. The increase in the geographic distribution of vectors is accompanied by the emergence of viruses and diseases in new areas. There are insufficient specific therapeutic drugs available and there are no reliable vaccines for malaria or dengue, although some progress has been achieved, there is still a long way between its development and actual field use. Most mosquito control measures have failed to achieve their goals, mostly because of the mosquito's great reproductive capacity and genomic flexibility. Chemical control is increasingly restricted due to potential human toxicity, mortality in no target organisms, insecticide resistance, and other environmental impacts. Other strategies for mosquito control are desperately needed. The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT is a species-specific and environmentally benign method for insect population suppression, it is based on mass rearing, radiation mediated sterilization, and release of a large number of male insects. Releasing of Insects carrying a dominant lethal gene (RIDL offers a solution to many of the drawbacks of traditional SIT that have limited its application in mosquitoes while maintaining its environmentally friendly and species-specific utility. The self-limiting nature of sterile mosquitoes tends to make the issues related to field use of these somewhat less challenging than for self-spreading systems characteristic of population replacement strategies. They also are closer to field use, so might be appropriate to consider first. The prospect of genetic control methods against mosquito vectored human diseases is rapidly becoming a reality, many decisions will need to be made on a national, regional and international level regarding the biosafety, social, cultural and ethical aspects of the use and deployment of these vector control methods.

  11. What's West Nile Virus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OK for Kids? Your Teeth Heart Murmurs What's West Nile Virus? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's West Nile Virus? Print A A A en español ¿Qué es ... Virus del Nilo Occidental? What exactly is the West Nile virus? And why is everyone talking about mosquitoes ? Even ...

  12. Measles immune suppression: lessons from the macaque model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory D de Vries

    Full Text Available Measles remains a significant childhood disease, and is associated with a transient immune suppression. Paradoxically, measles virus (MV infection also induces robust MV-specific immune responses. Current hypotheses for the mechanism underlying measles immune suppression focus on functional impairment of lymphocytes or antigen-presenting cells, caused by infection with or exposure to MV. We have generated stable recombinant MVs that express enhanced green fluorescent protein, and remain virulent in non-human primates. By performing a comprehensive study of virological, immunological, hematological and histopathological observations made in animals euthanized at different time points after MV infection, we developed a model explaining measles immune suppression which fits with the "measles paradox". Here we show that MV preferentially infects CD45RA(- memory T-lymphocytes and follicular B-lymphocytes, resulting in high infection levels in these populations. After the peak of viremia MV-infected lymphocytes were cleared within days, followed by immune activation and lymph node enlargement. During this period tuberculin-specific T-lymphocyte responses disappeared, whilst strong MV-specific T-lymphocyte responses emerged. Histopathological analysis of lymphoid tissues showed lymphocyte depletion in the B- and T-cell areas in the absence of apoptotic cells, paralleled by infiltration of T-lymphocytes into B-cell follicles and reappearance of proliferating cells. Our findings indicate an immune-mediated clearance of MV-infected CD45RA(- memory T-lymphocytes and follicular B-lymphocytes, which causes temporary immunological amnesia. The rapid oligoclonal expansion of MV-specific lymphocytes and bystander cells masks this depletion, explaining the short duration of measles lymphopenia yet long duration of immune suppression.

  13. Long-term mortality in HIV-positive individuals virally suppressed for >3 years with incomplete CD4 recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engsig, Frederik N.; Zangerle, Robert; Katsarou, Olga; Dabis, Francois; Reiss, Peter; Gill, John; Porter, Kholoud; Sabin, Caroline; Riordan, Andrew; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Gutiérrez, Félix; Raffi, Francois; Kirk, Ole; Mary-Krause, Murielle; Stephan, Christoph; de Olalla, Patricia Garcia; Guest, Jodie; Samji, Hasina; Castagna, Antonella; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Skaletz-Rorowski, Adriane; Ramos, Jose; Lapadula, Giuseppe; Mussini, Cristina; Force, Lluís; Meyer, Laurence; Lampe, Fiona; Boufassa, Faroudy; Bucher, Heiner C.; de Wit, Stéphane; Burkholder, Greer A.; Teira, Ramon; Justice, Amy C.; Sterling, Tim R.; M Crane, Heidi; Gerstoft, Jan; Grarup, Jesper; May, Margaret; Chêne, Geneviève; Ingle, Suzanne M.; Sterne, Jonathan; Obel, Niels; Burkholder, Greer; Justice, Amy; R Sterling, Tim; Crane, Heidi M.; Boulle, Andrew; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Casabona, Jordi; Cavassini, Matthias; Costagliola, Dominique; Dabis, François; del Amo, Julia; van Sighem, Ard; Hans-Ulrich Haerry, David; Hogg, Robert; Mocroft, Amanda; Kitahata, Mari; Saag, Michael; Williams, Matthew; Ingle, Suzanne; Touloumi, Giota; Warszawski, Josiane; Krause, Murielle Mary; Ghosn, Jade; Leport, Catherine; Wit, Ferdinand; Prins, Maria; Gibb, Diana; Thorne, Claire; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Hamouda, Osamah; Gussenheimer-Bartmeyer, Barbara; Noguera-Julian, Antoni; Antinori, Andrea; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Ramos, José; Battegay, Manuel; Rauch, Andri; Tookey, Pat; Miró, Jose M.; de Wit, Stephane; Goetghebuer, Tessa; Torti, Carlo; Garrido, Myriam; Judd, Ali; Conejo, Pablo Rojo; Haerry, David; Weller, Ian; D'Arminio-Monforte, Antonella; Colin, Céline; Schwimmer, Christine; Termote, Monique; Kjaer, Jesper; Campbell, Maria; Raben, Dorthe; Bohlius, Julia; Bouteloup, Vincent; Bucher, Heiner; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Dorrucci, Maria; Egger, Matthias; Engsig, Frederik; Furrer, Hansjakob; Lambotte, Olivier; Lewden, Charlotte; Lodi, Sara; Lodwick, Rebbeca; Matheron, Sophie; Miro, Jose; Monge, Susana; Nakagawa, Fumiyo; Paredes, Roger; Phillips, Andrew; Puoti, Massimo; Reekie, Joanne; Scherrer, Alexandra; Smit, Colette; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Wittkop, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals initiating combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) with low CD4 counts achieve viral suppression but not CD4 cell recovery. We aimed to identify (1) risk factors for failure to achieve CD4 count >200 cells/µL after 3 years of sustained

  14. Viruses infecting maize

    OpenAIRE

    Krstić, Branka; Stanković, Ivana; Bulajić, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Over 40 plant viruses has been known to cause diseases of maize, but economically the most important yield looses, which in certain years can be total, are caused by viruses from Potyvirus genera, known to be aphid-transmitted in a non-persistant maner. The most important viruses, pathogens of maize, sugar cane and sorghum are considered to be Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV), Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), and Johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV). In Serbia, the prese...

  15. Reactivation of multiple viruses in patients with sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew H Walton

    Full Text Available A current controversy is whether patients with sepsis progress to an immunosuppressed state. We hypothesized that reactivation of latent viruses occurred with prolonged sepsis thereby providing evidence of clinically-relevant immunosuppression and potentially providing a means to serially-monitor patients' immune status. Secondly, if viral loads are markedly elevated, they may contribute to morbidity and mortality. This study determined if reactivation of herpesviruses, polyomaviruses, and the anellovirus TTV occurred in sepsis and correlated with severity. Serial whole blood and plasma samples from 560 critically-ill septic, 161 critically-ill non-septic, and 164 healthy age-matched patients were analyzed by quantitative-polymerase-chain-reaction for cytomegalovirus (CMV, Epstein-Barr (EBV, herpes-simplex (HSV, human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6, and TTV. Polyomaviruses BK and JC were quantitated in urine. Detectable virus was analyzed with respect to secondary fungal and opportunistic bacterial infections, ICU duration, severity of illness, and survival. Patients with protracted sepsis had markedly increased frequency of detectable virus. Cumulative viral DNA detection rates in blood were: CMV (24.2%, EBV (53.2%, HSV (14.1%, HHV-6 (10.4%, and TTV (77.5%. 42.7% of septic patients had presence of two or more viruses. The 50% detection rate for herpesviruses was 5-8 days after sepsis onset. A small subgroup of septic patients had markedly elevated viral loads (>104-106 DNA copies/ml blood for CMV, EBV, and HSV. Excluding TTV, DNAemia was uncommon in critically-ill non-septic patients and in age-matched healthy controls. Compared to septic patients without DNAemia, septic patients with viremia had increased fungal and opportunistic bacterial infections. Patients with detectable CMV in plasma had higher 90-day mortality compared to CMV-negative patients; p<0.05. Reactivation of latent viruses is common with prolonged sepsis, with frequencies similar to

  16. Antibody-mediated immunotherapy of macaques chronically infected with SHIV suppresses viraemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingai, Masashi; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Klein, Florian; Mouquet, Hugo; Donau, Olivia K.; Plishka, Ronald; Buckler-White, Alicia; Seaman, Michael; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Martin, Malcolm A.

    2013-11-01

    Neutralizing antibodies can confer immunity to primate lentiviruses by blocking infection in macaque models of AIDS. However, earlier studies of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies administered to infected individuals or humanized mice reported poor control of virus replication and the rapid emergence of resistant variants. A new generation of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies, possessing extraordinary potency and breadth of neutralizing activity, has recently been isolated from infected individuals. These neutralizing antibodies target different regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein including the CD4-binding site, glycans located in the V1/V2, V3 and V4 regions, and the membrane proximal external region of gp41 (refs 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14). Here we have examined two of the new antibodies, directed to the CD4-binding site and the V3 region (3BNC117 and 10-1074, respectively), for their ability to block infection and suppress viraemia in macaques infected with the R5 tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-AD8, which emulates many of the pathogenic and immunogenic properties of HIV-1 during infections of rhesus macaques. Either antibody alone can potently block virus acquisition. When administered individually to recently infected macaques, the 10-1074 antibody caused a rapid decline in virus load to undetectable levels for 4-7days, followed by virus rebound during which neutralization-resistant variants became detectable. When administered together, a single treatment rapidly suppressed plasma viraemia for 3-5weeks in some long-term chronically SHIV-infected animals with low CD4+ T-cell levels. A second cycle of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody therapy, administered to two previously treated animals, successfully controlled virus rebound. These results indicate that immunotherapy or a combination of immunotherapy plus conventional antiretroviral drugs might be useful as a treatment for chronically HIV-1-infected

  17. Viruses in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemany, R

    2013-03-01

    Soon after the discovery that viruses cause human disease, started the idea of using viruses to treat cancer. After the initial indiscriminate use, crude preparations of each novel virus in the early twentieth century, a second wave of virotherapy blossomed in the 60s with purified and selected viruses. Responses were rare and short-lived. Immune rejection of the oncolytic viruses was identified as the major problem and virotherapy was abandoned. During the past two decades virotherapy has re-emerged with engineered viruses, with a trend towards using them as tumor-debulking immunostimulatory agents combined with radio or chemotherapy. Currently, oncolytic Reovirus, Herpes, and Vaccinia virus are in late phase clinical trials. Despite the renewed hope, efficacy will require improving systemic tumor targeting, overcoming stroma barriers for virus spread, and selectively stimulating immune responses against tumor antigens but not against the virus. Virotherapy history, viruses, considerations for clinical trials, and hurdles are briefly overviewed.

  18. Background Suppression Effects on Signal Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burr, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Gamma detectors at border crossings are intended to detect illicit nuclear material. One performance challenge involves the fact that vehicles suppress the natural background, thus potentially reducing detection probability for threat items. Methods to adjust for background suppression have been considered in related but different settings. Here, methods to adjust for background suppression are tested in the context of signal estimation. Adjustment methods include several clustering options. We find that for the small-to-moderate suppression magnitudes exhibited in the analyzed data, suppression adjustment is only moderatel helpful in locating the signal peak, and in estimating its width or magnitude.

  19. MENGENAL HANTA VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Wijayanti

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Virus Hanta kurang infeksius, kecuali di dalam lingkungan tertentu. Lamanya waktu virus ini dapat bertahan di lingkungan, setelah keluar dari tubuh tikus tidaklah diketahui secara pasti. Tetapi percobaan laboratorium menunjukkan bahwa, daya infektifitasnya tidak dijumpai setelah dua hari pengeringan. Genus hanta virus terdiri dari 22 spesies virus, dapat menyebabkan hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS dan hanta virus pulmonary syndrome (HPS.

  20. Suppression effects on musical and verbal memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendel, Zachary A; Palmer, Caroline

    2007-06-01

    Three experiments contrasted the effects of articulatory suppression on recognition memory for musical and verbal sequences. In Experiment 1, a standard/comparison task was employed, with digit or note sequences presented visually or auditorily while participants remained silent or produced intermittent verbal suppression (saying "the") or musical suppression (singing "la"). Both suppression types decreased performance by equivalent amounts, as compared with no suppression. Recognition accuracy was lower during suppression for visually presented digits than during that for auditorily presented digits (consistent with phonological loop predictions), whereas accuracy was equivalent for visually presented notes and auditory tones. When visual interference filled the retention interval in Experiment 2, performance with visually presented notes but not digits was impaired. Experiment 3 forced participants to translate visually presented music sequences by presenting comparison sequences auditorily. Suppression effects for visually presented music resembled those for digits only when the recognition task required sensory translation of cues.

  1. Suppressing Unwanted Memories Reduces Their Unintended Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Bergström, Zara M.; Gagnepain, Pierre; Anderson, Michael C.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to control unwanted memories is critical for maintaining cognitive function and mental health. Prior research has shown that suppressing the retrieval of unwanted memories impairs their retention, as measured using intentional (direct) memory tests. Here, we review emerging evidence revealing that retrieval suppression can also reduce the unintended influence of suppressed traces. In particular, retrieval suppression (a) gradually diminishes the tendency for memories to intrude into awareness and (b) reduces memories’ unintended expressions on indirect memory tests. We present a neural account in which, during suppression, retrieval cues elicit hippocampally triggered neocortical activity that briefly reinstates features of the original event, which, in turn, are suppressed by targeted neocortical and hippocampal inhibition. This reactivation-dependent reinstatement principle could provide a broad mechanism by which suppressing retrieval of intrusive memories limits their indirect influences. PMID:28458471

  2. Distracted by cues for suppressed memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Paula T; Hayes, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-01

    We examined the potential cost of practicing suppression of negative thoughts on subsequent performance in an unrelated task. Cues for previously suppressed and unsuppressed (baseline) responses in a think/no-think procedure were displayed as irrelevant flankers for neutral words to be judged for emotional valence. These critical flankers were homographs with one negative meaning denoted by their paired response during learning. Responses to the targets were delayed when suppression cues (compared with baseline cues and new negative homographs) were used as flankers, but only following direct-suppression instructions and not when benign substitutes had been provided to aid suppression. On a final recall test, suppression-induced forgetting following direct suppression and the flanker task was positively correlated with the flanker effect. Experiment 2 replicated these findings. Finally, valence ratings of neutral targets were influenced by the valence of the flankers but not by the prior role of the negative flankers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Ebola Virus ─ A Global Threat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mejbah Uddin Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus is a filamentous, enveloped, non-segmented, single-stranded, negative-sense RNA virus. It belongs to the Filoviridae and was first recognized near the Ebola River valley in Zaire in 1976. Since then most of the outbreaks have occurred to both human and nonhuman primates in sub-Saharan Africa. Ebola virus causes highly fatal hemorrhagic fever in human and nonhuman primates. In addition to hemorrhagic fever, it could be used as a bioterrorism agent. Although its natural reservoir is yet to be proven, current data suggest that fruit bats are the possibility. Infection has also been documented through the handling of infected chimpanzees, gorillas, monkeys, forest antelope and porcupines. Human infection is caused through close contact with the blood, secretion, organ or other body fluids of infected animal. Human-to-human transmission is also possible. Ebola virus infections are characterized by immune suppression and a systemic inflammatory response that causes impairment of the vascular, coagulation, and immune systems, leading to multiorgan failure and shock. The virus constitutes an important public health threat in Africa and also worldwide as no effective treatment or vaccine is available till now

  4. Nutrigenomics Therapy of Hepatisis C Virus Induced-hepatosteatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Nutrigenomics is a relatively new branch of nutrition science, which aim is to study the impact of the foods we eat on the function of our genes. Hepatosteatosis is strongly associated with hepatitis C virus infection, which is known to increase the risk of the disease progression and reduce the likelihood of responding to anti- virus treatment. It is well documented that hepatitis C virus can directly alter host cell lipid metabolism through nuclear transcription factors. To date, only a limited number of studies have been on the effect of human foods on the nuclear transcription factors of hepatitis C virus -induced hepatosteatosis. Three nutrients, selected among 46 different nutrients: β-carotene, vitamin D2, and linoleic acid were found in a cell culture system to inhibit hepatitis C virus RNA replication. In addition, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) especially arachidonic acid (AA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have been demonstrated to inhibit hepatitis C virus RNA replication. These PUFAs, in particular the highly unsaturated n-3 fatty acids change the gene expression of PPARa and SREBP, suppress the expression of mRNAs encoding key metabolic enzymes and hereby suppress hepatic lipogenesis and triglyceride synthesis, as well as secretion and accumulation in tissues. A recent prospective clinical trial of 1,084 chronic hepatitis C patients compared to 2,326 healthy subjects suggests that chronic hepatitis C patients may benefit from strict dietary instructions. Increasing evidence suggest that some crucial nuclear transcription factors related to hepatitis C virus -associated hepatosteatosis and hepatitis C virus RNA itself can be controlled by specific anti- hepatitis C virus nutrition. It seems important that these findings are taken into account and specific nutritional supplements developed to be used in combination with interferon as adjunctive therapy with the aim to improve both the early as well as the sustained

  5. Nutrigenomics therapy of hepatisis C virus induced-hepatosteatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Bengmark, Stig; Qu, Shen

    2010-05-20

    Nutrigenomics is a relatively new branch of nutrition science, which aim is to study the impact of the foods we eat on the function of our genes. Hepatosteatosis is strongly associated with hepatitis C virus infection, which is known to increase the risk of the disease progression and reduce the likelihood of responding to anti- virus treatment. It is well documented that hepatitis C virus can directly alter host cell lipid metabolism through nuclear transcription factors. To date, only a limited number of studies have been on the effect of human foods on the nuclear transcription factors of hepatitis C virus -induced hepatosteatosis.Three nutrients, selected among 46 different nutrients: beta-carotene, vitamin D2, and linoleic acid were found in a cell culture system to inhibit hepatitis C virus RNA replication. In addition, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) especially arachidonic acid (AA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have been demonstrated to inhibit hepatitis C virus RNA replication. These PUFAs, in particular the highly unsaturated n-3 fatty acids change the gene expression of PPARa and SREBP, suppress the expression of mRNAs encoding key metabolic enzymes and hereby suppress hepatic lipogenesis and triglyceride synthesis, as well as secretion and accumulation in tissues. A recent prospective clinical trial of 1,084 chronic hepatitis C patients compared to 2,326 healthy subjects suggests that chronic hepatitis C patients may benefit from strict dietary instructions.Increasing evidence suggest that some crucial nuclear transcription factors related to hepatitis C virus -associated hepatosteatosis and hepatitis C virus RNA itself can be controlled by specific anti- hepatitis C virus nutrition. It seems important that these findings are taken into account and specific nutritional supplements developed to be used in combination with interferon as adjunctive therapy with the aim to improve both the early as well as the sustained

  6. Plant immunity against viruses: antiviral immune receptors in focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calil, Iara P; Fontes, Elizabeth P B

    2017-03-01

    Among the environmental limitations that affect plant growth, viruses cause major crop losses worldwide and represent serious threats to food security. Significant advances in the field of plant-virus interactions have led to an expansion of potential strategies for genetically engineered resistance in crops during recent years. Nevertheless, the evolution of viral virulence represents a constant challenge in agriculture that has led to a continuing interest in the molecular mechanisms of plant-virus interactions that affect disease or resistance. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms of the antiviral immune system in plants and the latest breakthroughs reported in plant defence against viruses. Particular attention is given to the immune receptors and transduction pathways in antiviral innate immunity. Plants counteract viral infection with a sophisticated innate immune system that resembles the non-viral pathogenic system, which is broadly divided into pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity and effector-triggered immunity. An additional recently uncovered virus-specific defence mechanism relies on host translation suppression mediated by a transmembrane immune receptor. In all cases, the recognition of the virus by the plant during infection is central for the activation of these innate defences, and, conversely, the detection of host plants enables the virus to activate virulence strategies. Plants also circumvent viral infection through RNA interference mechanisms by utilizing small RNAs, which are often suppressed by co-evolving virus suppressors. Additionally, plants defend themselves against viruses through hormone-mediated defences and activation of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome system (UPS), which alternatively impairs and facilitates viral infection. Therefore, plant defence and virulence strategies co-evolve and co-exist; hence, disease development is largely dependent on the extent and rate at which these opposing

  7. Smallpox vaccination and bioterrorism with pox viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Anton

    2003-10-01

    Bioterrorist attacks occupy a special place amongst the innumerable potential types of terrorist attack, with the intentional release of pox viruses being especially feared in this connection. Apart from the variola virus, the agent responsible for smallpox in humans, the monkeypox virus and numerous other animal pox viruses pose potential risks for humans and animals. This risk scenario also includes recombinations between the various pox viruses, changes in hosts and genetically engineered manipulations of pox viruses. For over 200 years, the method of choice for combatting smallpox was via vaccination with a reproductive, original vaccinia virus. Worldwide eradication of smallpox at the end of the 1970s and the discontinuation of routine smallpox vaccination in 1980 can be credited to such vaccination. Unfortunately, these vaccinations were associated with a large number of postvaccinal impairments, sometimes resulting in death (e.g. postvaccinal encephalitis). The only way to restrict such postvaccinal complications was to carry out initial vaccination within the first 2 postnatal years. Initial vaccination at a later age led to such a sharp increase in the number of vaccines with complications that vaccination had to be discouraged. The dilemma of the smallpox vaccine stocks stems from the fact that a large portion of these stocks are produced with the same vaccinia strains as before. This is irresponsible, especially as the percentage of immune-suppressed persons in the population, for whom vaccination-related complications pose an especial threat, is increasing. One solution to the dilemma of the smallpox vaccine stocks is the MVA strain. It is harmless, protects humans and animals equally well against smallpox and can be applied parenterally.

  8. Ebola virus disease: past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Rajak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus disease is one of the most deadly ailments known to mankind due to its high mortality rate (up to 90% accompanying with the disease. Ebola haemorrhagic fever (EHF is an infectious disease of animal that can be transmitted to both human and non-human primates. The first epidemic of EHF occurred in 1976 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The incubation period of ebola is less than 21 days. Ebola virus infections are depicted by immune suppression and a systemic inflammatory response that leads to damage of the vascular, coagulation and immune systems, causing multi-organ failure and shock. Five genetically distinct members of the Filoviridae family responsible for EHF are as follows: Zaire ebolavirus, Sudan ebolavirus, Côte d’Ivoire ebolavirus, Bundibugyo ebolavirus and Reston ebolavirus. The ongoing 2014 West Africa ebola epidemic has been considered as the most serious panic in the medical field with respect to both the number of human cases and death toll. The natural host for ebola virus is unknown, thus it is not possible to carry out programs to regulate or abolish virus from transmission to people. The ebola virus infection provides little chance to develop acquired immunity causing rapid progression of the disease. It is pertinent to mention that at present, there is no antiviral therapy or vaccine that is helpful against ebola virus infection in humans. The impediment of EHF necessitates much better understanding of the epidemiology of the disease, particularly the role of wildlife, as well as bats, in the spread of ebola virus to humans.

  9. Viruses Infecting Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschang, Rachel E.

    2011-01-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch’s postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions. PMID:22163336

  10. Viruses Infecting Reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Marschang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch’s postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  11. Viruses infecting reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschang, Rachel E

    2011-11-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch's postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  12. Modeling the Propagation of Mobile Phone Virus under Complex Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Wei, Xi-liang; Guo, Hao; An, Gang; Guo, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phone virus is a rogue program written to propagate from one phone to another, which can take control of a mobile device by exploiting its vulnerabilities. In this paper the propagation model of mobile phone virus is tackled to understand how particular factors can affect its propagation and design effective containment strategies to suppress mobile phone virus. Two different propagation models of mobile phone viruses under the complex network are proposed in this paper. One is intended to describe the propagation of user-tricking virus, and the other is to describe the propagation of the vulnerability-exploiting virus. Based on the traditional epidemic models, the characteristics of mobile phone viruses and the network topology structure are incorporated into our models. A detailed analysis is conducted to analyze the propagation models. Through analysis, the stable infection-free equilibrium point and the stability condition are derived. Finally, considering the network topology, the numerical and simulation experiments are carried out. Results indicate that both models are correct and suitable for describing the spread of two different mobile phone viruses, respectively. PMID:25133209

  13. Modeling the propagation of mobile phone virus under complex network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Wei, Xi-liang; Guo, Hao; An, Gang; Guo, Lei; Yao, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phone virus is a rogue program written to propagate from one phone to another, which can take control of a mobile device by exploiting its vulnerabilities. In this paper the propagation model of mobile phone virus is tackled to understand how particular factors can affect its propagation and design effective containment strategies to suppress mobile phone virus. Two different propagation models of mobile phone viruses under the complex network are proposed in this paper. One is intended to describe the propagation of user-tricking virus, and the other is to describe the propagation of the vulnerability-exploiting virus. Based on the traditional epidemic models, the characteristics of mobile phone viruses and the network topology structure are incorporated into our models. A detailed analysis is conducted to analyze the propagation models. Through analysis, the stable infection-free equilibrium point and the stability condition are derived. Finally, considering the network topology, the numerical and simulation experiments are carried out. Results indicate that both models are correct and suitable for describing the spread of two different mobile phone viruses, respectively.

  14. Human tumor-associated viruses and new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D; Gutkind, J S

    2008-12-01

    The study of acute-transforming retroviruses and their oncogenes and of the multiple mechanisms deployed by DNA viruses to circumvent the growth-suppressive and proapoptotic function of tumor suppressor genes has provided the foundation of our current understanding of cancer biology. Unlike acute-transforming animal viruses, however, human tumor-associated viruses lead to malignancies with a prolonged latency and in conjunction with other environmental and host-related cooperating events. The relevance of viral infection to human cancer development has often been debated. We now know that at least six human viruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human papilloma virus (HPV), human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1) and Kaposi's associated sarcoma virus (KSHV) contribute to 10-15% of the cancers worldwide. Hence, the opportunity exists to fight cancer at the global scale by preventing the spread of these viruses, by the development and distribution of effective and safe antiviral vaccines, and by identifying their oncogenic mechanism. Here, we discuss the molecular events underlying the neoplastic potential of the human tumor-associated viruses, with emphasis on the enigmatic KSHV and its numerous virally hijacked proangiogenic, immune-evasive and tumor-promoting genes. The emerging information may facilitate the development of new molecular-targeted approaches to prevent and treat virally associated human malignancies.

  15. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  16. Intranasal corticosteroids and adrenal suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Francesca Maria; De Luca, Giuseppina; Venturoli, Vico; Boner, Attilio Loris

    2009-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common condition that frequently coexists with asthma and atopic dermatitis. It is commonly treated with intranasal corticosteroids which may increase the potential inception of side effects of the same type of drugs used for the treatment of other allergic diseases. A method to assess the systemic effect of corticosteroids is the evaluation of their effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. However, it is not clear which test is best for detection of clinically relevant HPA axis suppression in children Morning plasma cortisol levels are twice that of late afternoon and evening values and a delay in the time of onset in peak cortisol levels has been observed in children treated with inhaled corticosteroids. Single morning cortisol level has a low sensitivity for detecting adrenal insufficiency in children. 24-Hour plasma cortisol is a good test because it is a non-invasive measure of the biologically active free cortisol levels for the entire day. For research purposes, the 24-hour integrated concentration plasma cortisol test is preferred. Studies that have looked at HPA axis suppression with intranasal corticosteroids indicate that overall, intranasal corticosteroids have a minimal effect on the HPA axis. A review of the literature reveals one study in which there was a decreased output of urinary cortisol during treatment with either budesonide or fluticasone propionate in adults. Other studies with fluticasone propionate or budesonide have shown no effect on the HPA axis in children. Beclomethasone dipropionate was shown to affect urinary cortisol output in one study on healthy volunteers. However, in a long-term study in children, no effect on the HPA axis was found. Mometasone furoate has been extensively studied in more than 20 trials of adults and children. No effects on the HPA axis were detected in either children or adults. Fluticasone furoate nasal spray was not associated with HPA axis suppression. It is unlikely

  17. BK virus-associated hemorrhagıc cystitis in patients wıth allogeneıc hematopoıetıc cell transplantation: report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Mert

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BK virus is a human polyoma virus. It is acquired in early childhood and remains life-long latent in the genitourinary system. BK virus replication is more common in receiving immunosuppressive therapy receiving patients and transplant patients. BK virus could cause hemorrhagic cystitis in patients with allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Hemorrhagic cystitis is a serious complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hemorrhagic cystitis could cause morbidity and long stay in the hospital. Diagnosis is more frequently determined by the presence of BK virus DNA detected with quantitative or real-time PCR testing in serum or plasma and less often in urine. The reduction of immunosuppression is effective in the treatment of BK virus infection. There are also several agents with anti-BK virus activity. Cidofovir is an active agent against a variety of DNA viruses including poliomyoma viruses and it is a cytosine nucleotide analogue. Intravenous immunoglobulin IgG (IVIG also includes antibodies against BK and JC (John Cunningham viruses. Hereby, we report three cases of hemorrhagic cystitis. Hemorrhagic cystitis developed in all these three cases of allogeneic stem cell transplantation due to acute myeloid leukemia (AML. BK virus were detected as the cause of hemorrhagic cystitis in these patients. Irrigation of the bladder was performed. Then levofloxacin 1×750 mg intravenous and IVIG 0.5 gr/kg were started. But the hematuria did not decreased. In the first case, treatment with leflunomide was started, but patient died due to refractory AML and severe graft-versus-host disease after 4th day of leflunamide and levofloxacin treatments. Cidofovir treatment and the reduction of immunosuppressive treatment decreased the BK virus load and resulted symptomatic improvement in the second case. Initiation of cidofovir was planned in the third case. Administration of cidofovir together with the reduction of immunosuppression in the treatment of

  18. Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Abe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Of 168 patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection-related liver disease, 20 patients who had received 100 mg of lamivudine plus 10 mg/day of adefovir dipivoxil (ADV (ADV group and 124 patients who had received 0.5 mg/day of entecavir or 100 mg/day of lamivudine (non-ADV group for >1 year were enrolled. For comparative analyses, 19 well-matched pairs were obtained from the groups by propensity scores. At the time of enrollment, serum creatinine and phosphate concentrations were similar between the ADV and non-ADV groups; however, urinary phosphate ( and serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP ( concentrations were significantly higher in the ADV group than in the non-ADV group. Serum BAP was significantly higher at the time of enrollment than before ADV administration in the ADV group (, although there was no significant change in serum BAP concentration in the non-ADV group. There was a significant positive correlation between the period of ADV therapy and ΔBAP (, . Serum BAP concentration increased before increase in serum creatinine concentration and was useful for early detection of adverse events and for developing adequate measures for continuing ADV for chronic HBV infection-related liver disease.

  19. How to suppress undesired synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louzada, V. H. P.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Andrade, J. S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2012-09-01

    Examples of synchronization can be found in a wide range of phenomena such as neurons firing, lasers cascades, chemical reactions, and opinion formation. However, in many situations the formation of a coherent state is not pleasant and should be mitigated. For example, the onset of synchronization can be the root of epileptic seizures, traffic congestion in networks, and the collapse of constructions. Here we propose the use of contrarians to suppress undesired synchronization. We perform a comparative study of different strategies, either requiring local or total knowledge, and show that the most efficient one solely requires local information. Our results also reveal that, even when the distribution of neighboring interactions is narrow, significant improvement is observed when contrarians sit at the highly connected elements. The same qualitative results are obtained for artificially generated networks and two real ones, namely, the Routers of the Internet and a neuronal network.

  20. Efectos sobre la salud de la contaminación de agua y alimentos por virus emergentes humanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Bofill-Mas

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El desarrollo de tecnologías moleculares aplicadas a estudios ambientales ha permitido constatar que incluso en países altamente industrializados existe una alta prevalencia de virus en el medio ambiente, lo que causa un importante impacto en la salud pública e importantes pérdidas económicas, principalmente a través de la transmisión de virus por agua y alimentos. Concentraciones significativas de virus son detectadas en las aguas vertidas al ambiente y en los biosólidos generados en plantas de tratamiento de agua residual. En este trabajo se describen las características generales de la contaminaci ón ambiental por virus, principalmente por virus emergentes, analizándose con mayor profundidad los virus de la hepatitis E (VHE y los poliomavirus humanos como los virus contaminantes ambientales de más reciente identificación en países industrializados. Se ha demostrado que existe una elevada prevalencia de los poliomavirus humanos, BK y JC, en agua residual en todos los paí- ses estudiados, lo que implica la potencial transmisión de los virus y de genes potencialmente cancerígenos por vía oral. Estudios recientes demuestran que el patrón epidemiológico de la infección por VHE en países industrializados es complejo y que una gran diversidad de cepas del VHE infecta simultáneamente a la población. El control de la contaminación viral del medio ambiente requiere la estandarización de técnicas moleculares y el desarrollo de un programa de vigilancia que permita valorar parámetros víricos y reducir la diseminación de las enfermedades establecidas y de las infecciones víricas emergentes.

  1. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Japan Community Health Care Organization Osaka Hospital, 4-2-78 Fukushima, Fukushima Ward, Osaka City, Osaka 553-0003 (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Higuchi, Chikahisa, E-mail: c-higuchi@umin.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. - Highlights: • MEK5 inhibitor BIX02189 suppresses proliferation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 knockdown and MEK5 inhibitor promote differentiation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 overexpression inhibits differentiation of osteoblasts.

  2. [Proteolytic mechanism of deproteinization of influenza virus by plasmatic membranes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtiarenko, V I; Fedchuk, A S

    1977-01-01

    A mechanism responsible for proteolytic deproteinization of influenza virus A2 Hong-Kong (I)68 by plasmatic membranes of sensitive cells was studied. Presence of trypsinlike protease in plasmatic membranes of white mice lungs was demonstrated. A considerable inhibition of the membrane proteolitic activity was obtained in the presence of epsilon-aminocaproic acid. Disintegration of the virus labeled by [3H]uridine by plasmatic membranes was investigated and it was found that this process required ATP. Inhibition of the protease activity by epsilon-aminocaproic acid led to the suppression of deproteinization of influenza virus. The experimental data obtained indicate that the proteolytic enzymes of plasmatic membranes participate in the complex process of virus "uncoating".

  3. Serological evidence of increased susceptibility to varicella-zoster virus reactivation or reinfection in natalizumab-treated patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmann, Rebekka; Salmen, Anke; Chan, Andrew; Knabbe, Cornelius; Diekmann, Jürgen; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Skaletz-Rorowski, Adriane; Michalik, Claudia; Gold, Ralf; Überla, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Serious adverse drug reactions of disease-modifying drugs in multiple sclerosis (MS) therapy may include enhanced susceptibility to reactivation of neurotropic herpes viruses like varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and the John Cunningham (JC) polyomavirus. Because symptomatic reactivation of these viruses are rare events, we determined the incidence of rises in anti-VZV IgG antibody levels as a potential marker for enhanced susceptibility to subclinical and symptomatic reactivation of neurotropic viruses. Anti-VZV IgG levels were measured in paired serum samples taken 6-8 months apart from natalizumab-treated MS patients, healthy blood donors and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients. The incidence of significant rises in anti-VZV IgG levels in natalizumab-treated MS patients was 4.26 per 100 person-years, which was significantly higher than in healthy blood donors. Retrospective evaluation of the available medical records of patients with rises of anti-VZV IgG levels did not reveal herpes zoster (i.e. shingles) manifestations. The increased incidence of significant rises of anti-VZV IgG levels in natalizumab-treated MS patients might indicate an association of natalizumab treatment of MS with an elevated risk of a subclinical VZV reactivation and/or reinfection events. Whether this is predictive of an increased risk of herpes zoster or even symptomatic reactivation of other neurotropic viruses remains to be determined in larger prospective studies. © The Author(s), 2015.

  4. Deconstructing Interocular Suppression: Attention and Divisive Normalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hung Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In interocular suppression, a suprathreshold monocular target can be rendered invisible by a salient competitor stimulus presented in the other eye. Despite decades of research on interocular suppression and related phenomena (e.g., binocular rivalry, flash suppression, continuous flash suppression, the neural processing underlying interocular suppression is still unknown. We developed and tested a computational model of interocular suppression. The model included two processes that contributed to the strength of interocular suppression: divisive normalization and attentional modulation. According to the model, the salient competitor induced a stimulus-driven attentional modulation selective for the location and orientation of the competitor, thereby increasing the gain of neural responses to the competitor and reducing the gain of neural responses to the target. Additional suppression was induced by divisive normalization in the model, similar to other forms of visual masking. To test the model, we conducted psychophysics experiments in which both the size and the eye-of-origin of the competitor were manipulated. For small and medium competitors, behavioral performance was consonant with a change in the response gain of neurons that responded to the target. But large competitors induced a contrast-gain change, even when the competitor was split between the two eyes. The model correctly predicted these results and outperformed an alternative model in which the attentional modulation was eye specific. We conclude that both stimulus-driven attention (selective for location and feature and divisive normalization contribute to interocular suppression.

  5. Issues in Numerical Simulation of Fire Suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tieszen, S.R.; Lopez, A.R.

    1999-04-12

    This paper outlines general physical and computational issues associated with performing numerical simulation of fire suppression. Fire suppression encompasses a broad range of chemistry and physics over a large range of time and length scales. The authors discuss the dominant physical/chemical processes important to fire suppression that must be captured by a fire suppression model to be of engineering usefulness. First-principles solutions are not possible due to computational limitations, even with the new generation of tera-flop computers. A basic strategy combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation techniques with sub-grid model approximations for processes that have length scales unresolvable by gridding is presented.

  6. Transient noise suppression algorithm in speech system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Keyu; Wang, Mingjiang

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, I mainly introduce the algorithm of transient noise suppression in speech system. Firstly, it divides into impulsive noise and other types of transient noise according to the characteristics of transient noise. In the impulse noise suppression algorithm, I mainly use the averaging energy threshold method to detect the impulse noise, and then I use the amplitude threshold method to reduce the impulse noise which was detected. In the other types of transient noise suppression algorithm, I mainly use the Optimally Modified-Log Spectral Amplitude estimation (OM-LSA) algorithm and the Minimum Control Recursive Average (MCRA) algorithm to suppress the transient noise.

  7. Musca domestica Salivary Gland Hypertrophy Virus, a Globally Distributed Insect Virus That Infects and Sterilizes Female Houseflies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prompiboon, Pannipa; Lietze, Verena-Ulrike; Denton, John S S

    2010-01-01

    The housefly, Musca domestica, is a cosmopolitan pest of livestock and poultry and is of economic, veterinary, and public health importance. Populations of M. domestica are naturally infected with M. domestica salivary gland hypertrophy virus (MdSGHV), a nonoccluded double-stranded DNA virus that...... that was significantly greater than that displayed by newly eclosed adults. Regardless of the MdSGHV isolate tested, all susceptible insects displayed similar degrees of SGH and complete suppression of oogenesis....

  8. VIRUS FAMILIES – contd

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. VIRUS FAMILIES – contd. Minus strand RNA viruses. Rhabdovirus e.g. rabies. Paramyxovirus e.g. measles, mumps. Orthomyxovirus e.g. influenza. Retroviruses. RSV, HTLV, MMTV, HIV. Notes:

  9. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Zika virus Fact sheet Updated 6 September 2016 Key facts ... last for 2-7 days. Complications of Zika virus disease Based on a systematic review of the ...

  10. Hepatitis virus panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  11. Virus Assembly and Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, John E.

    2004-03-01

    We use two techniques to look at three-dimensional virus structure: electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) and X-ray crystallography. Figure 1 is a gallery of virus particles whose structures Timothy Baker, one of my former colleagues at Purdue University, used cryoEM to determine. It illustrates the variety of sizes of icosahedral virus particles. The largest virus particle on this slide is the Herpes simplex virus, around 1200Å in diameter; the smallest we examined was around 250Å in diameter. Viruses bear their genomic information either as positive-sense DNA and RNA, double-strand DNA, double-strand RNA, or negative-strand RNA. Viruses utilize the various structure and function "tactics" seen throughout cell biology to replicate at high levels. Many of the biological principles that we consider general were in fact discovered in the context of viruses ...

  12. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    RSV; Palivizumab; Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin; Bronchiolitis - RSV ... Crowe JE. Respiratory syncytial virus. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ...

  13. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Zika virus Fact sheet Updated 6 September 2016 Key facts ... and last for 2-7 days. Complications of Zika virus disease Based on a systematic review of the ...

  14. Zika Virus - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Zika Virus URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Zika Virus - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  15. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, James S., E-mail: james.lawson@unsw.edu.au; Heng, Benjamin [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2010-04-30

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix.

  16. West Nile Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an infectious disease that first appeared in the United States in 1999. Infected mosquitoes ... and usually go away on their own. If West Nile virus enters the brain, however, it can be life- ...

  17. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ...

  18. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy ...

  19. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Resources & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ...

  20. Human Parainfluenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Parainfluenza Viruses (HPIVs) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... CDC.gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) commonly cause respiratory illnesses in ...

  1. Pre-clinical carotid atherosclerosis and sCD163 among virally suppressed HIV patients in Botswana compared with uninfected controls

    OpenAIRE

    Mosepele, Mosepele; Hemphill, Linda C.; Moloi, Walter; Moyo, Sikhulile; Nkele, Isaac; Makhema, Joseph; Bennett, Kara,; Triant, Virginia A.; Lockman, Shahin

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Human immune deficiency virus (HIV) is associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, yet the relationship between HIV and carotid atherosclerosis / monocyte activation among virally suppressed HIV-infected patients in sub-Saharan Africa is not well understood. Methods We measured traditional CVD risk factors, bilateral distal common carotid intima media thickness (cIMT), presence of carotid plaque and plasma sCD163 levels among virally suppressed HIV-infected adults ...

  2. Risk factors for herpes simplex virus type 2 and HIV among women at high risk in northwestern Tanzania: preparing for an HSV-2 intervention trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watson-Jones, Deborah; Weiss, Helen A; Rusizoka, Mary; Baisley, Kathy; Mugeye, Kokugonza; Changalucha, John; Everett, Dean; Balira, Rebecca; Knight, Louise; Ross, David; Hayes, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    To determine prevalence of and risk factors for herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and HIV among women being screened for a randomized, controlled trial of HSV suppressive therapy in northwestern Tanzania...

  3. [Mumps vaccine virus transmission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrashevskaia, E V; Kulak, M V; Otrashevskaia, A V; Karpov, I A; Fisenko, E G; Ignat'ev, G M

    2013-01-01

    In this work we report the mumps vaccine virus shedding based on the laboratory confirmed cases of the mumps virus (MuV) infection. The likely epidemiological sources of the transmitted mumps virus were children who were recently vaccinated with the mumps vaccine containing Leningrad-Zagreb or Leningrad-3 MuV. The etiology of the described cases of the horizontal transmission of both mumps vaccine viruses was confirmed by PCR with the sequential restriction analysis.

  4. Nairobi sheep disease virus/Ganjam virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M D, Baron; B, Holzer

    2015-08-01

    Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV) is a tick-borne virus which causes a severe disease in sheep and goats, and has been responsible for several outbreaks of disease in East Africa. The virus is also found in the Indian subcontinent, where it is known as Ganjam virus. The virus only spreads through the feeding of competent infected ticks, and is therefore limited in its geographic distribution by the distribution of those ticks, Rhipicephalus appendiculata in Africa and Haemaphysalis intermedia in India. Animals bred in endemic areas do not normally develop disease, and the impact is therefore primarily on animals being moved for trade or breeding purposes. The disease caused by NSDV has similarities to several other ruminant diseases, and laboratory diagnosis is necessary for confirmation. There are published methods for diagnosis based on polymerase chain reaction, for virus growth in cell culture and for other simple diagnostic tests, though none has been commercialised. There is no established vaccine against NSDV, although cell-culture attenuated strains have been developed which show promise and could be put into field trials if it were deemed necessary. The virus is closely related to Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, and studies on NSDV may therefore be useful in understanding this important human pathogen.

  5. Surveillance of respiratory viruses.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surveillance of respiratory viruses. A 10-year laboratory-based study. J. M. McAnerney, S. Johnson, B. D. Schoub. Respiratory virus isolates made at the National Institute for. Virology from 1982 to 1991 were studied. An active virus surveillance programme, 'viral watch', which recruits throat swab specimens from a network ...

  6. Characteristic of pandemic virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Characteristic of pandemic virus. The virus was highly transmissible. Risk of hospitalization was 2X and risk of death was about 11X more in comparison to seasonal influenza. Virus continues to be susceptible to Osaltamivir, the only drug available. Vaccines are available but ...

  7. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmonds, Peter; Becher, Paul; Bukh, Jens

    2017-01-01

    borne, and many are important human and veterinary pathogens (e.g. yellow fever virus, dengue virus). This is a summary of the current International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) report on the taxonomy of the Flaviviridae, which is available at www.ictv.global/report/flaviviridae....

  8. Computer Virus Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajala, Judith B.

    2004-01-01

    A computer virus is a program--a piece of executable code--that has the unique ability to replicate. Like biological viruses, computer viruses can spread quickly and are often difficult to eradicate. They can attach themselves to just about any type of file, and are spread by replicating and being sent from one individual to another. Simply having…

  9. Flavivirus sfRNA suppresses antiviral RNA interference in cultured cells and mosquitoes and directly interacts with the RNAi machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Stephanie L; Dodd, Benjamin J T; Brackney, Doug E; Wilusz, Carol J; Ebel, Gregory D; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    Productive arbovirus infections require mechanisms to suppress or circumvent the cellular RNA interference (RNAi) pathway, a major antiviral response in mosquitoes. In this study, we demonstrate that two flaviviruses, Dengue virus and Kunjin virus, significantly repress siRNA-mediated RNAi in infected human cells as well as during infection of the mosquito vector Culex quinquefasciatus. Arthropod-borne flaviviruses generate a small structured non-coding RNA from the viral 3' UTR referred to as sfRNA. Analysis of infections with a mutant Kunjin virus that is unable to generate appreciable amounts of the major sfRNA species indicated that RNAi suppression was associated with the generation of the non-coding sfRNA. Co-immunoprecipitation of sfRNA with RNAi mediators Dicer and Ago2 suggest a model for RNAi suppression. Collectively, these data help to establish a clear role for sfRNA in RNAi suppression and adds to the emerging impact of viral long non-coding RNAs in modulating aspects of anti-viral immune processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Photoperiodic suppression of drug reinstatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorg, B A; Stark, G; Sergeeva, A; Jansen, H T

    2011-03-10

    The rewarding influence of drugs of abuse varies with time of day and appears to involve interactions between the circadian and the mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems. The circadian system is also intimately involved in measuring daylength. Thus, the present study examined the impact of changing daylength (photoperiod) on cocaine-seeking behaviors. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained and tested on a 12L:12D light:dark schedule for cocaine-induced reinstatement of conditioned place preference (CPP) at three times of day (Zeitgeber time (ZT): 4, 12, and 20) to determine a preference score. Rats were then shifted to either shorter (6L:18D) or longer (18L:6D) photoperiods and then to constant conditions, re-tested for cocaine-induced reinstatement under each different condition, and then returned to their original photoperiod (12L:12D) and tested once more. Rats exhibited a circadian profile of preference score in constant darkness with a peak at 12 h after lights-off. At both ZT4 and ZT20, but not at ZT12, shorter photoperiods profoundly suppressed cocaine reinstatement, which did not recover even after switching back to 12L:12D. In contrast, longer photoperiods did not alter reinstatement. Separate studies showed that the suppression of cocaine reinstatement was not due to repeated testing. In an additional experiment, we examined the photoperiodic regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT) proteins in drug-naive rats. These results revealed photoperiodic modulation of proteins in the prefrontal cortex and dorsal striatum, but not in the nucleus accumbens or ventral tegmental area. Together, these findings add further support to the circadian genesis of cocaine-seeking behaviors and demonstrate that drug-induced reinstatement is modulated by photoperiod. Furthermore, the results suggest that photoperiod partly contributes to the seasonal expression of certain drug-related behaviors in humans living at different latitudes and thus our

  11. Ozone suppression by dew formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, N.; Shimazaki, W.; Sadanaga, Y.; Bandow, H.

    2010-07-01

    Dew forms in the night and absorbs water-soluble gaseous substances near the ground surface. Some of the water-soluble gaseous substances, such as nitrous acid and formaldehyde, affect ozone buildup after the sunrise. These gaseous compounds are decomposed by sun light to produce OH radicals. OH radicals affect ozone concentrations. If these gaseous compounds are absorbed in the water droplets such as dew, fog or surface water, and if these compounds in the aqueous phase are decomposed before release into the atmosphere by drying, ozone concentration could be suppressed. We investigated the effect of dew on the ozone buildup by using real air sample. The ambient air was sucking by a pump and divided into two lines. The air in the one line was passed above water droplets and was introduced in a UV transmitting Teflon bag, and the air in the another line was introduced directly into the other Teflon bag without passing through water droplets. Two bags were placed outside and natural sun light was irradiated. After several hours of irradiation, ozone concentrations in two bags were measured. As a result, we found that the ozone production was depressed in the air passing through the water droplets compared to the air which did not pass through water droplets. This could be due to the removals of nitrous acid and formaldehyde by water droplets. The next questions are which compound of nitrous acid and formaldehyde is more effective on the ozone suppression, and is there any other water-soluble compounds to affect ozone concentrations. Now, we investigate the each effect on the ozone buildup, that is, only nitrous acid is removed from the ambient air by using a sodium carbonate denuder. The results will be reported in the conference. In the last conference, we reported that nitrous acid was decomposed when dew dries. However, the fate of formaldehyde in the dew has not been clarified. Therefore, the above results give us some information of the fate of formaldehyde. In

  12. Jinggangmycin-suppressed reproduction in the small brown planthopper (SBPH), Laodelphax striatellus (Fallen), is mediated by glucose dehydrogenase (GDH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun; Wu, You; You, Lin-Lin; Xu, Bin; Ge, Lin-Quan; Yang, Guo-Qing; Wu, Jin-Cai

    2017-06-01

    The small brown planthopper (SBPH), Laodelphax striatellus (Fallen), is a serious pest insect of rice, wheat, and maize in China. SBPH not only sucks plant sap but also transmits plant disease viruses, causing serious damage. These viruses include rice striped virus disease (RSV disease), black streaked dwarf, and maize rough disease virus. SBPH outbreaks are related to the overuse of pesticides in China. Some pesticides, such as triazophos, stimulate the reproduction of SBPH, but an antibiotic fungicide jinggangmycin (JGM) suppresses its reproduction. However, mechanisms of decreased reproduction of SBPH induced by JGM remain unclear. The present findings show that JGM suppressed reproduction of SBPH (↓approximately 35.7%) and resulted in the down-regulated expression of glucose dehydrogenase (GDH). GDH-silenced control females (control+dsGDH) show that the number of eggs laid was reduced by 48.6% compared to control females. Biochemical tests show that the total lipid and fatty acid contents in JGM-treated and control+dsGDH females decreased significantly. Thus, we propose that the suppression of reproduction in SBPH induced by JGM is mediated by GDH via metabolic pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrastructural Characterization of Zika Virus Replication Factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Cortese

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A global concern has emerged with the pandemic spread of Zika virus (ZIKV infections that can cause severe neurological symptoms in adults and newborns. ZIKV is a positive-strand RNA virus replicating in virus-induced membranous replication factories (RFs. Here we used various imaging techniques to investigate the ultrastructural details of ZIKV RFs and their relationship with host cell organelles. Analyses of human hepatic cells and neural progenitor cells infected with ZIKV revealed endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane invaginations containing pore-like openings toward the cytosol, reminiscent to RFs in Dengue virus-infected cells. Both the MR766 African strain and the H/PF/2013 Asian strain, the latter linked to neurological diseases, induce RFs of similar architecture. Importantly, ZIKV infection causes a drastic reorganization of microtubules and intermediate filaments forming cage-like structures surrounding the viral RF. Consistently, ZIKV replication is suppressed by cytoskeleton-targeting drugs. Thus, ZIKV RFs are tightly linked to rearrangements of the host cell cytoskeleton.

  14. Ultrastructural Characterization of Zika Virus Replication Factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Mirko; Goellner, Sarah; Acosta, Eliana Gisela; Neufeldt, Christopher John; Oleksiuk, Olga; Lampe, Marko; Haselmann, Uta; Funaya, Charlotta; Schieber, Nicole; Ronchi, Paolo; Schorb, Martin; Pruunsild, Priit; Schwab, Yannick; Chatel-Chaix, Laurent; Ruggieri, Alessia; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2017-02-28

    A global concern has emerged with the pandemic spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) infections that can cause severe neurological symptoms in adults and newborns. ZIKV is a positive-strand RNA virus replicating in virus-induced membranous replication factories (RFs). Here we used various imaging techniques to investigate the ultrastructural details of ZIKV RFs and their relationship with host cell organelles. Analyses of human hepatic cells and neural progenitor cells infected with ZIKV revealed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane invaginations containing pore-like openings toward the cytosol, reminiscent to RFs in Dengue virus-infected cells. Both the MR766 African strain and the H/PF/2013 Asian strain, the latter linked to neurological diseases, induce RFs of similar architecture. Importantly, ZIKV infection causes a drastic reorganization of microtubules and intermediate filaments forming cage-like structures surrounding the viral RF. Consistently, ZIKV replication is suppressed by cytoskeleton-targeting drugs. Thus, ZIKV RFs are tightly linked to rearrangements of the host cell cytoskeleton. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Financial Incentives for Linkage to Care and Viral Suppression Among HIV-Positive Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnell, Deborah; Beauchamp, Geetha; Hall, H. Irene; Torian, Lucia V.; Zingman, Barry; Lum, Garret; Kharfen, Michael; Elion, Richard; Leider, Jason; Gordin, Fred M.; Elharrar, Vanessa; Burns, David; Zerbe, Allison; Gamble, Theresa; Branson, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Importance Achieving linkage to care and viral suppression in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients improves their well-being and prevents new infections. Current gaps in the HIV care continuum substantially limit such benefits. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of financial incentives on linkage to care and viral suppression in HIV-positive patients. Design, Setting, and Participants A large community-based clinical trial that randomized 37 HIV test and 39 HIV care sites in the Bronx, New York, and Washington, DC, to financial incentives or standard of care. Interventions Participants at financial incentive test sites who had positive test results for HIV received coupons redeemable for $125 cash-equivalent gift cards upon linkage to care. HIV-positive patients receiving antiretroviral therapy at financial incentive care sites received $70 gift cards quarterly, if virally suppressed. Main Outcomes and Measures Linkage to care: proportion of HIV-positive persons at the test site who linked to care within 3 months, as indicated by CD4+ and/or viral load test results done at a care site. Viral suppression: proportion of established patients at HIV care sites with suppressed viral load (<400 copies/mL), assessed at each calendar quarter. Outcomes assessed through laboratory test results reported to the National HIV Surveillance System. Results A total of 1061 coupons were dispensed for linkage to care at 18 financial incentive test sites and 39 359 gift cards were dispensed to 9641 HIV-positive patients eligible for gift cards at 17 financial incentive care sites. Financial incentives did not increase linkage to care (adjusted odds ratio, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.73-1.67; P = .65). However, financial incentives significantly increased viral suppression. The overall proportion of patients with viral suppression was 3.8% higher (95% CI, 0.7%-6.8%; P = .01) at financial incentive sites compared with standard of care sites. Among patients not

  16. Suppressive soils: back on the radar screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppressive soils are those in which a pathogen does not establish or persist, establishes but causes little or no damage, or establishes and causes disease for a while but thereafter the disease is less important, although the pathogen may persist in the soil (Weller, 2002). ‘General suppression,’ ...

  17. Menstrual suppression for adolescents with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasi, I; Spitzer, R F; Allen, L M; Ornstein, M P

    2009-06-01

    The approach to menstrual suppression for adolescents with developmental disabilities has evolved considerably over the years due to changing philosophies and evolving treatment options. We review the medical management options available for menstrual suppression with a focus on the needs and treatment of adolescents with developmental disabilities.

  18. Tumor-suppressing gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bingliang; Roth, Jack A

    2003-01-01

    Tumor-suppressor genes play pivotal roles in maintaining genome integrity and in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Their loss-of-function mutations are related directly to tumorigenesis. Thus, use of tumor-suppressor genes as anticancer therapeutics has been investigated rigorously in both experimental and clinical researches. Transfer of various tumor-suppressor genes directly to cancer cells has been demonstrated to suppress tumor growth via induction of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest and, in some cases, with evidence for bystander effects. Various studies also have shown that combination of tumor-suppressor gene therapy with conventional anticancer therapy can yield synergistic therapeutic benefits. Clinical trials with tumor-suppressor genes, especially the p53 gene, have demonstrated that the treatment is well tolerated, and; favorable clinical responses, including a pathologically complete responses, have been observed in a subset of patients with advanced disease or with cancers resistant to conventional therapy. Yet, current gene replacement approaches in cancer gene therapy must be improved if they are to have a broader clinical impact. Efficient systemic gene delivery systems will be required ultimately for treatment of metastatic disease. In this review, we have recently summarized achievements in tumor-suppressor gene therapy with a focus on the p53 gene.

  19. Impacts of suppressing guide on information spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jinghong; Ma, Baojun; Wu, Ye

    2015-01-01

    It is quite common that guides are introduced to suppress the information spreading in modern society for different purposes. In this paper, an agent-based model is established to quantitatively analyze the impacts of suppressing guides on information spreading. We find that the spreading threshold depends on the attractiveness of the information and the topology of the social network with no suppressing guides at all. Usually, one would expect that the existence of suppressing guides in the spreading procedure may result in less diffusion of information within the overall network. However, we find that sometimes the opposite is true: the manipulating nodes of suppressing guides may lead to more extensive information spreading when there are audiences with the reversal mind. These results can provide valuable theoretical references to public opinion guidance on various information, e.g., rumor or news spreading.

  20. Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum)-Virus Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    At least six viruses have been found in highbush blueberry plantings in the Pacific Northwest: Blueberry mosaic virus, Blueberry red ringspot virus, Blueberry scorch virus, Blueberry shock virus, Tobacco ringspot virus, and Tomato ringspot virus. Six other virus and virus-like diseases of highbush b...

  1. Quantification of Human and Animal Viruses to Differentiate the Origin of the Fecal Contamination Present in Environmental Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Bofill-Mas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many different viruses are excreted by humans and animals and are frequently detected in fecal contaminated waters causing public health concerns. Classical bacterial indicator such as E. coli and enterococci could fail to predict the risk for waterborne pathogens such as viruses. Moreover, the presence and levels of bacterial indicators do not always correlate with the presence and concentration of viruses, especially when these indicators are present in low concentrations. Our research group has proposed new viral indicators and methodologies for determining the presence of fecal pollution in environmental samples as well as for tracing the origin of this fecal contamination (microbial source tracking. In this paper, we examine to what extent have these indicators been applied by the scientific community. Recently, quantitative assays for quantification of poultry and ovine viruses have also been described. Overall, quantification by qPCR of human adenoviruses and human polyomavirus JC, porcine adenoviruses, bovine polyomaviruses, chicken/turkey parvoviruses, and ovine polyomaviruses is suggested as a toolbox for the identification of human, porcine, bovine, poultry, and ovine fecal pollution in environmental samples.

  2. Virus, Oncolytic Virus and Human Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guang Bin; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Lifang; Zhao, Kong-Nan

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa), a disease, is characterized by abnormal cell growth in the prostate - a gland in the male reproductive system. Although older age and a family history of the disease have been recognized as the risk factors of PCa, the cause of this cancer remains unclear. Currently, PCa is one of the leading causes of cancer death among men of all races. In this review study, we first discuss the controversy of the contribution of virus infection to PCa, and subsequently summarize the development of oncolytic virotherapy for PCa in the past several years. Mounting evidence suggests that infections with various viruses are causally linked to PCa pathogenesis. Published studies have provided strong evidence that at least two viruses (RXMV and HPV) contribute to prostate tumourigenicity and impact on the survival of patients with malignant PCa. Traditional therapies including chemotherapy and radiotherapy are unable to distinguish cancer cells from normal cells, which are a significant drawback and leads to toxicities for PCa patients undergoing treatment. So far, few other options are available for treating patients with advanced PCa. For PCa treatment, oncolytic virotherapy appears to be much more attractive, which uses live viruses to selectively kill cancer cells. Oncolytic viruses can be genetically engineered to induce cancer cell lysis through virus replication and expression of cytotoxic proteins. Virotherapy is being developed to be a novel therapy for cancers, which uses oncotropic and oncolytic viruses with their abilities to find and destroy malignant cells in the body. As oncolytic viruses are a relatively new class of anti-cancer immunotherapy agents, several important barriers still exist on the road to the use of oncolytic viruses for PCa therapy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Anion content of snow by suppressed and non-suppressed ion chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenke, D.R.; Mitchell, P.K.; Pagenkopf, G.K.

    1983-11-01

    Both suppressed and non-suppressed ion chromatographic methods were employed in the analysis of snow sampled from the Rocky Mountains for Cl/sup -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/, and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/. By suppressed ion chromatography the concentration of these anions was found to be less than 1 mg/liter. These concentrations are lower than what can be determined using commercially available non-suppressed systems. To overcome this problem, the samples may be preconcentrated or a larger sample used. Due to complications arising on using a larger sample, in the absence of preconcentration, each sample must be analyzed twice by the non-suppressed ion chromatographic procedure. By comparison, the suppressed procedure is a factor of 10 more sensitive than this non-suppressed procedure. Even so, the results obtained by each of these procedures are not significantly different one from the other. 14 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  4. Optimal Control of a Delay-Varying Computer Virus Propagation Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Jianguo; Xu, Yonghong; Zhang, Chunming

    2013-01-01

    By incorporating the objective of keeping a low number of infected nodes and a high number of recovered nodes at a lower cost into a known computer virus model (the delay-varying SIRC model) extended by introducing quarantine, a novel model is described by means of the optimal control strategy and theoretically analyzed. Through the comparison of simulation results, it is shown that the propagation of computer virus with varying latency period can be suppressed effectively by the optimal cont...

  5. Temporal analysis of image-rivalry suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi Bhardwaj

    Full Text Available During binocular rivalry, perception alternates between two different images presented one to each eye. At any moment, one image is visible, dominant, while the other is invisible, suppressed. Alternations in perception during rivalry could involve competition between eyes, eye-rivalry, or between images, image-rivalry, or both. We measured response criteria, sensitivities, and thresholds to brief contrast increments to one of the rival stimuli in conventional rivalry displays and in a display in which the rival stimuli swapped between the eyes every 333 ms-swap rivalry-that necessarily involves image rivalry. We compared the sensitivity and threshold measures in dominance and suppression to assess the strength of suppression. We found that response criteria are essentially the same during dominance and suppression for the two sorts of rivalry. Critically, we found that swap-rivalry suppression is weak after a swap and strengthens throughout the swap interval. We propose that image rivalry is responsible for weak initial suppression immediately after a swap and that eye rivalry is responsible for the stronger suppression that comes later.

  6. Psychopathology and Thought Suppression: A Quantitative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Joshua C.; Harden, K. Paige; Teachman, Bethany A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent theories of psychopathology have suggested that thought suppression intensifies the persistence of intrusive thoughts, and proposed that difficulty with thought suppression may differ between groups with and without psychopathology. The current meta-analytic review evaluates empirical evidence for difficulty with thought suppression as a function of the presence and specific type of psychopathology. Based on theoretical proposals from the psychopathology literature, diagnosed and analogue samples were expected to show greater recurrence of intrusive thoughts during thought suppression attempts than non-clinical samples. However, results showed no overall differences in the recurrence of thoughts due to thought suppression between groups with and without psychopathology. There was, nevertheless, variation in the recurrence of thoughts across different forms of psychopathology, including relatively less recurrence during thought suppression for samples with symptoms of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, compared to non-clinical samples. However, these differences were typically small and provided only mixed support for existing theories. Implications for cognitive theories of intrusive thoughts are discussed, including proposed mechanisms underlying thought suppression. PMID:22388007

  7. Expression of the herpes simplex virus type 1 latency-associated transcripts does not influence latency establishment of virus mutants deficient for neuronal replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, M P; Efstathiou, S

    2013-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 establishes latency within neurons of the trigeminal ganglion. During latency, viral gene expression is largely restricted to the latency-associated transcripts (LATs), which, whilst not essential for any aspect of latency, function to suppress lytic gene expression and enhance the survival of virus-infected neurons. The latent cell population comprises primary-order neurons infected directly from peripheral tissues and cells infected following further virus spread within the ganglion. In order to assess the role of LAT expression on latency establishment within first-order neurons, we infected ROSA26R reporter mice with Cre recombinase-expressing recombinant viruses harbouring deletion of the thymidine kinase lytic gene and/or the core LAT promoter. We found that LAT expression did not impact on latency establishment in viruses unable to replicate in neurons, and under these conditions, it was not required for the survival of neurons between 3 and 31 days post-infection.

  8. Virus-like particle vaccine primes immune responses preventing inactivated-virus vaccine-enhanced disease against respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Ko, Eun-Ju; Lee, Youri; Kwon, Young-Man; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2017-11-01

    Formalin inactivated respiratory syncytial virus (FI-RSV) vaccination caused vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease (ERD) upon exposure to RSV in children. Virus-like particles presenting RSV F fusion protein (F VLP) are known to increase T helper type-1 (Th1) immune responses and avoid ERD in animal models. We hypothesized that F VLP would prime immune responses preventing ERD upon subsequent exposure to ERD-prone FI-RSV. Here, we demonstrated that heterologous F VLP priming and FI-RSV boosting of mice prevented FI-RSV vaccine-enhanced lung inflammation and eosinophilia upon RSV challenge. F VLP priming redirected pulmonary T cells toward effector CD8 T cells producing Th1 cytokines and significantly suppressed pulmonary Th2 cytokines. This study suggests that RSV F VLP priming would modulate and shift immune responses to subsequent exposure to ERD-prone FI-RSV vaccine and RSV infection, suppressing Th2 immune-mediated pulmonary histopathology and eosinophilia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Mechanisms of CD8+ T cell-mediated suppression of HIV/SIV replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBrien, Julia Bergild; Kumar, Nitasha A; Silvestri, Guido

    2018-02-10

    In this article, we summarize the role of CD8+ T cells during natural and ART-treated HIV and SIV infections, discuss the mechanisms responsible for their suppressive activity, and review the rationale for CD8+ T cell-based HIV cure strategies. Evidence suggests that CD8+ T cells are involved in the control of virus replication during HIV and SIV infections. During early HIV infection, the cytolytic activity of CD8+ T cells is responsible for control of viremia. However, it has been proposed that CD8+ T cells also use non-cytolytic mechanisms to control SIV infection. More recently, CD8+ T cells were shown to be required to fully suppress virus production in ART-treated SIV-infected macaques, suggesting that CD8+ T cells are involved in the control of virus transcription in latently infected cells that persist under ART. A better understanding of the complex antiviral activities of CD8+ T cells during HIV/SIV infection will pave the way for immune interventions aimed at harnessing these functions to target the HIV reservoir. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 is associated with hepatitis C virus replication complex and regulates viral replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, LN; Lim, YS; Pham, Long

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle is tightly regulated by lipid metabolism of host cells. In order to identify host factors involved in HCV propagation, we have recently screened a small interfering RNA (siRNA) library targeting host genes that control lipid metabolism and lipid droplet...... formation using cell culture-grown HCV (HCVcc)-infected cells. We selected and characterized the gene encoding stearoyl coenzyme A (CoA) desaturase 1 (SCD1). siRNA-mediated knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of SCD1 abrogated HCV replication in both subgenomic replicon and Jc1-infected cells, while...... exogenous supplementation of either oleate or palmitoleate, products of SCD1 activity, resurrected HCV replication in SCD1 knockdown cells. SCD1 was coimmunoprecipitated with HCV nonstructural proteins and colocalized with both double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and HCV nonstructural proteins, indicating that SCD1...

  11. Postmortem stability of Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Joseph; Bushmaker, Trenton; Fischer, Robert; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Judson, Seth; Munster, Vincent J

    2015-05-01

    The ongoing Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has highlighted questions regarding stability of the virus and detection of RNA from corpses. We used Ebola virus-infected macaques to model humans who died of Ebola virus disease. Viable virus was isolated <7 days posteuthanasia; viral RNA was detectable for 10 weeks.

  12. Virus-Vectored Influenza Virus Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Tripp, Ralph A.; Tompkins, S. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of an inactivated vaccine that has been licensed for >50 years, the influenza virus continues to cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. Constant evolution of circulating influenza virus strains and the emergence of new strains diminishes the effectiveness of annual vaccines that rely on a match with circulating influenza strains. Thus, there is a continued need for new, efficacious vaccines conferring cross-clade protection to avoid the need for biannual reformul...

  13. DNA Virus Replication Compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Melanie; Speiseder, Thomas; Dobner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Viruses employ a variety of strategies to usurp and control cellular activities through the orchestrated recruitment of macromolecules to specific cytoplasmic or nuclear compartments. Formation of such specialized virus-induced cellular microenvironments, which have been termed viroplasms, virus factories, or virus replication centers, complexes, or compartments, depends on molecular interactions between viral and cellular factors that participate in viral genome expression and replication and are in some cases associated with sites of virion assembly. These virus-induced compartments function not only to recruit and concentrate factors required for essential steps of the viral replication cycle but also to control the cellular mechanisms of antiviral defense. In this review, we summarize characteristic features of viral replication compartments from different virus families and discuss similarities in the viral and cellular activities that are associated with their assembly and the functions they facilitate for viral replication. PMID:24257611

  14. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basta, T.; Garrett, Roger Antony; Prangishvili,, David

    2009-01-01

    Double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) viruses that infect members of the third domain of life, the Archaea, are diverse and exceptional in both their morphotypes and their genomic properties. The majority of characterized species infect hyperthermophilic hosts and carry morphological features...... which have not been observed for viruses from the other domains of life, the Bacteria and the Eukarya. This exceptional status of the archaeal viruses is reinforced by the finding that a large majority of their predicted genes yield no sequence matches in public sequence databases, and their functions...... remain unknown. One of the viruses, the bicaudavirus ATV (Acidianus two-tailed virus), is quite unique in that it undergoes a major morphological change, growing long tail structures, extracellularly. A small minority of archaeal viruses, which exclusively infect mesophilic or moderately thermophilic...

  15. Constructing computer virus phylogenies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, L.A. [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom) Dept. of Computer Science; Goldberg, P.W. [Aston Univ., Birmingham (United Kingdom) Dept. of Applied Mathematics; Phillips, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorkin, G.B. [International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center

    1996-03-01

    There has been much recent algorithmic work on the problem of reconstructing the evolutionary history of biological species. Computer virus specialists are interested in finding the evolutionary history of computer viruses--a virus is often written using code fragments from one or more other viruses, which are its immediate ancestors. A phylogeny for a collection of computer viruses is a directed acyclic graph whose nodes are the viruses and whose edges map ancestors to descendants and satisfy the property that each code fragment is ``invented`` only once. To provide a simple explanation for the data, we consider the problem of constructing such a phylogeny with a minimal number of edges. In general, this optimization problem cannot be solved in quasi-polynomial time unless NQP=QP; we present positive and negative results for associated approximated problems. When tree solutions exist, they can be constructed and randomly sampled in polynomial time.

  16. Suppression of displacement in severely slowed saccades

    OpenAIRE

    MacAskill, Michael R; Tim J. Anderson; Jones, Richard D

    2000-01-01

    Severely slowed saccades in spinocerebellar ataxia have previously been shown to be at least partially closed-loop in nature: their long duration means that they can be modified in-flight in response to intrasaccadic target movements. In this study, a woman with these pathologically slowed saccades could modify them in-flight in response to target movements, even when saccadic suppression of displacement prevented conscious awareness of those movements. Thus saccadic suppression of displace...

  17. Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougnet, Laurence; Thill, Chloé; Pougnet, Richard; Auvinet, Henri; Giacardi, Christophe; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2016-12-01

    A 21-year old woman from New-Caledonia had 40 ̊C fever with vomiting, arthralgia, myalgia, and measles-like rash. Etiological analyses showed primary infection with Zika virus. Because of severe clinical presentation, she was hospitalized in the intensive care unit of the Brest military Hospital. Zika virus is mainly transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. If they settle in Metropolitan France, Zika virus might also spread there.

  18. Personal computer viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremonesi, C.; Martella, G. (Milan Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienza dell' Informazione)

    1991-01-01

    This article reveals the origin and nature of what is known as the 'computer virus'. For illustrative purposes, the most common types of computer viruses are described and classified; the relative contagion and damage mechanisms are analyzed. Then techniques are presented to assist wary users in detecting and removing viruses, as well as, in protecting their computer systems from becoming contaminated.

  19. PEEL V HAMON J&C ENGINEERING (PTY LTD: Ignoring The Result-Requirement of Section 163(1(A of the Companies Act And Extending the Oppression Remedy Beyond its statutorily intended reach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HGJ Beukes

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This case note provides a concise and understandable version of the confusing facts in Peel v Hamon J&C Engineering (Pty Ltd, and deals with the remedy provided for in section 163 of the Companies Act (the oppression remedy. The importance of drawing a distinction between the application of this section and the orders that the Court can make to provide relief in terms of subsection (2 is explained, after which each requirement contained in subsection (1(a is analysed. With reference to the locus standi-requirement, it is indicated that the judgment is not to be regarded as authority for the contention that a shareholder or a director who wants to exercise the oppression remedy need not have been a shareholder or a director of the company at the time of the conduct. With reference to the conduct-requirement, it is indicated that it would have been more appropriate for the applicants to have made use of a remedy in terms of the law of contract. Most importantly, the result-requirement is indicated to have been ignored, as a lack of certainty that there will be a result is argued not to constitute a result. Ignoring the result-requirement is explained to have resulted in ignoring the detriment-requirement, in turn. Accordingly, it is concluded that the oppression remedy was utilised without the specified statutory criteria having been satisfied and that the applicants' interests were protected by a remedy which should not have found application under the circumstances, as this was beyond the remedy's statutorily intended reach.

  20. Microstructure of a high Jc, laser-ablated YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ/sol-gel deposited NdGaO 3 buffer layer/(001) SrTiO 3 multi-layer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chau-Yun; Ichinose, Ataru; Babcock, S. E.; Morrell, J. S.; Mathis, J. E.; Verebelyi, D. T.; Paranthaman, M.; Beach, D. B.; Christen, D. K.

    A YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ (YBCO) film with a transport critical current density ( Jc) value of 1 mA/cm 2 (77 K, 0 T) was grown on a solution deposited NdGaO 3 (NGO) buffer layer on (100) SrTiO 3 (STO). The 25-nm thick NGO buffer layer was dip-coated onto the STO single crystal from a solution of metal methoxyethoxides in 2-methoxyethanol. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was used to grow a 250-nm-thick YBCO film on the NGO. The epitaxial relationships are cube-on-cube throughout the structure when the pseudo cubic and pseudo tetragonal unit cells are used to describe the NGO and YBCO crystal structures, respectively: (001) YBCO∥(001) NGO∥(001) STO and [100] YBCO∥[100] NGO∥[100] STO. High resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the bare NGO surface revealed ∼40 nm diameter pinholes with number density of ∼2×10 13 m -2, corresponding to an area fraction coverage of 2.5%, in an otherwise featureless surface. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that these pinholes penetrate to the STO; otherwise the NGO layer was uniformly thick to within approximately ±5 nm and defect free. The X-ray diffraction φ- and ω-scans indicated that the YBCO film was highly oriented with a full-width-half maximum peak breadth of 1.14° for in-plane and 0.46° for out-of-plane alignment, respectively. The film contained sparse a-axis oriented grains, an appreciable density of (001) stacking faults and apparently insulating second phase precipitates of the type that typically litter the surface of PLD films. All of these defects are typical of YBCO thin films. High-resolution cross-sectional TEM images indicate that no chemical reaction occurs at the YBCO/NGO interface.

  1. Noise suppression in surface microseismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Batzle, Mike; Behura, Jyoti; Willis, Mark; Haines, Seth S.; Davidson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform. We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform.

  2. Saccadic suppression during voluntary versus reactive saccades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremmler, Svenja; Lappe, Markus

    2017-07-01

    Saccades are fast eye movements that reorient gaze. They can be performed voluntarily-for example, when viewing a scene-but they can also be triggered in reaction to suddenly appearing targets. The generation of these voluntary and reactive saccades have been shown to involve partially different cortical pathways. However, saccades of either type confront the visual system with a major challenge from massive image motion on the retina. Despite the fact that the whole scene is swept across the retina, a saccade usually does not elicit a percept of motion. This saccadic omission has been linked to a transient decrease of visual sensitivity during the eye movement, a phenomenon called saccadic suppression. A passive origin of saccadic suppression based on temporal masking has been proposed as well as an active central process that inhibits visual processing during the saccade. The latter one would need to include an extraretinal signal, which is generated already during saccade preparation. Since saccade generation differs for voluntary and reactive saccades, timing and nature of this extraretinal signal as well as its impact on visual sensitivity might also differ. We measured detection thresholds for luminance stimuli that were flashed during voluntary and reactive saccades and during fixation. Detection thresholds were higher during voluntary than during reactive saccades such that suppression appeared stronger during voluntary saccades. Stronger suppression in voluntary saccades could arise from a stronger extraretinal signal that activates suppression or could indicate that a suppression underlying process itself partially differs between voluntary and reactive saccades.

  3. Electron microscopy of viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laue, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Electron microscopy is widely used in virology because viruses are generally too small for a direct inspection by light microscopy. Analysis of virus morphology is necessary in many circumstances, e.g., for the diagnosis of a virus in particular clinical situations or the analysis of virus entry and assembly. Moreover, quality control of virus particle integrity is required if a virus is propagated in cell culture, particularly if the virus genome has changed. In most cases already the basic methodology for transmission electron microscopy, i.e., negative staining and ultrathin sectioning, is sufficient to give relevant information on virus ultrastructure. This chapter gives detailed information on the principles of these basic methodologies and provides simple but reliable protocols for a quick start. Moreover, the description of standard protocols for negative staining and ultrathin sectioning are supplemented by protocols on immuno-negative staining and rapid ultrathin sectioning. Finally, principles of methods for an extended ultrastructural research using more elaborate techniques, such as cryotechniques or methods to reveal the three-dimensional virus architecture, are briefly reviewed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Viruses infecting marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzul, Isabelle; Corbeil, Serge; Morga, Benjamin; Renault, Tristan

    2017-07-01

    Although a wide range of viruses have been reported in marine molluscs, most of these reports rely on ultrastructural examination and few of these viruses have been fully characterized. The lack of marine mollusc cell lines restricts virus isolation capacities and subsequent characterization works. Our current knowledge is mostly restricted to viruses affecting farmed species such as oysters Crassostrea gigas, abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta or the scallop Chlamys farreri. Molecular approaches which are needed to identify virus affiliation have been carried out for a small number of viruses, most of them belonging to the Herpesviridae and birnaviridae families. These last years, the use of New Generation Sequencing approach has allowed increasing the number of sequenced viral genomes and has improved our capacity to investigate the diversity of viruses infecting marine molluscs. This new information has in turn allowed designing more efficient diagnostic tools. Moreover, the development of experimental infection protocols has answered some questions regarding the pathogenesis of these viruses and their interactions with their hosts. Control and management of viral diseases in molluscs mostly involve active surveillance, implementation of effective bio security measures and development of breeding programs. However factors triggering pathogen development and the life cycle and status of the viruses outside their mollusc hosts still need further investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Yeast for virus research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Richard Yuqi

    2017-01-01

    Budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) are two popular model organisms for virus research. They are natural hosts for viruses as they carry their own indigenous viruses. Both yeasts have been used for studies of plant, animal and human viruses. Many positive sense (+) RNA viruses and some DNA viruses replicate with various levels in yeasts, thus allowing study of those viral activities during viral life cycle. Yeasts are single cell eukaryotic organisms. Hence, many of the fundamental cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation or programed cell death are highly conserved from yeasts to higher eukaryotes. Therefore, they are particularly suited to study the impact of those viral activities on related cellular activities during virus-host interactions. Yeasts present many unique advantages in virus research over high eukaryotes. Yeast cells are easy to maintain in the laboratory with relative short doubling time. They are non-biohazardous, genetically amendable with small genomes that permit genome-wide analysis of virologic and cellular functions. In this review, similarities and differences of these two yeasts are described. Studies of virologic activities such as viral translation, viral replication and genome-wide study of virus-cell interactions in yeasts are highlighted. Impacts of viral proteins on basic cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation and programed cell death are discussed. Potential applications of using yeasts as hosts to carry out functional analysis of small viral genome and to develop high throughput drug screening platform for the discovery of antiviral drugs are presented. PMID:29082230

  6. Suppression sours sacrifice: emotional and relational costs of suppressing emotions in romantic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impett, Emily A; Kogan, Aleksandr; English, Tammy; John, Oliver; Oveis, Christopher; Gordon, Amie M; Keltner, Dacher

    2012-06-01

    What happens when people suppress their emotions when they sacrifice for a romantic partner? This multimethod study investigates how suppressing emotions during sacrifice shapes affective and relationship outcomes. In Part 1, dating couples came into the laboratory to discuss important romantic relationship sacrifices. Suppressing emotions was associated with emotional costs for the partner discussing his or her sacrifice. In Part 2, couples participated in a 14-day daily experience study. Within-person increases in emotional suppression during daily sacrifice were associated with decreases in emotional well-being and relationship quality as reported by both members of romantic dyads. In Part 3, suppression predicted decreases in relationship satisfaction and increases in thoughts about breaking up with a romantic partner 3 months later. In the first two parts of the study, authenticity mediated the costly effects of suppression. Implications for research on close relationships and emotion regulation are discussed.

  7. The temporal frequency tuning of continuous flash suppression reveals peak suppression at very low frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shui'er; Lunghi, Claudia; Alais, David

    2016-10-21

    Continuous flash suppression (CFS) is a psychophysical technique where a rapidly changing Mondrian pattern viewed by one eye suppresses the target in the other eye for several seconds. Despite the widespread use of CFS to study unconscious visual processes, the temporal tuning of CFS suppression is currently unknown. In the present study we used spatiotemporally filtered dynamic noise as masking stimuli to probe the temporal characteristics of CFS. Surprisingly, we find that suppression in CFS peaks very prominently at approximately 1 Hz, well below the rates typically used in CFS studies (10 Hz or more). As well as a strong bias to low temporal frequencies, CFS suppression is greater for high spatial frequencies and increases with increasing masker contrast, indicating involvement of parvocellular/ventral mechanisms in the suppression process. These results are reminiscent of binocular rivalry, and unifies two phenomenon previously thought to require different explanations.

  8. The Heterologous Expression of the p22 RNA Silencing Suppressor of the Crinivirus Tomato Chlorosis Virus from Tobacco Rattle Virus and Potato Virus X Enhances Disease Severity but Does Not Complement Suppressor-Defective Mutant Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeo-Ríos, Yazmín; Navas-Castillo, Jesús; Moriones, Enrique; Cañizares, M. Carmen

    2017-11-24

    To counteract host antiviral RNA silencing, plant viruses express suppressor proteins that function as pathogenicity enhancers. The genome of the Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV) (genus Crinivirus, family Closteroviridae) encodes an RNA silencing suppressor, the protein p22, that has been described as having one of the longest lasting local suppressor activities when assayed in Nicotiana benthamiana. Since suppression of RNA silencing and the ability to enhance disease severity are closely associated, we analyzed the effect of expressing p22 in heterologous viral contexts. Thus, we studied the effect of the expression of ToCV p22 from viral vectors Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) and Potato virus X (PVX), and from attenuated suppressor mutants in N. benthamiana plants. Our results show that although an exacerbation of disease symptoms leading to plant death was observed in the heterologous expression of ToCV p22 from both viruses, only in the case of TRV did increased viral accumulation occur. The heterologous expression of ToCV p22 could not complement suppressor-defective mutant viruses.

  9. The Heterologous Expression of the p22 RNA Silencing Suppressor of the Crinivirus Tomato Chlorosis Virus from Tobacco Rattle Virus and Potato Virus X Enhances Disease Severity but Does Not Complement Suppressor-Defective Mutant Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazmín Landeo-Ríos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available To counteract host antiviral RNA silencing, plant viruses express suppressor proteins that function as pathogenicity enhancers. The genome of the Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV (genus Crinivirus, family Closteroviridae encodes an RNA silencing suppressor, the protein p22, that has been described as having one of the longest lasting local suppressor activities when assayed in Nicotiana benthamiana. Since suppression of RNA silencing and the ability to enhance disease severity are closely associated, we analyzed the effect of expressing p22 in heterologous viral contexts. Thus, we studied the effect of the expression of ToCV p22 from viral vectors Tobacco rattle virus (TRV and Potato virus X (PVX, and from attenuated suppressor mutants in N. benthamiana plants. Our results show that although an exacerbation of disease symptoms leading to plant death was observed in the heterologous expression of ToCV p22 from both viruses, only in the case of TRV did increased viral accumulation occur. The heterologous expression of ToCV p22 could not complement suppressor-defective mutant viruses.

  10. Human Ubc9 Contributes to Production of Fully Infectious Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Virions▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jaber, Tareq; Bohl, Christopher R; Lewis, Gentry L.; Wood, Charles; West, John T.; Weldon, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Ubc9 was identified as a cellular protein that interacts with the Gag protein of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus. We show here that Ubc9 also interacts with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag protein and that their interaction is important for virus replication. Gag was found to colocalize with Ubc9 predominantly at perinuclear puncta. While cells in which Ubc9 expression was suppressed with RNA interference produced normal numbers of virions, these particles were 8- to 10-fold les...

  11. Local introduction and heterogeneous spatial spread of dengue-suppressing Wolbachia through an urban population of Aedes aegypti

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Tom L.; Barton, Nicholas H.; Ra?i?, Gordana; Turley, Andrew P.; Montgomery, Brian L.; Iturbe-Ormaetxe, Inaki; Cook, Peter E.; Ryan, Peter A; Scott A. Ritchie; Hoffmann, Ary A.; O'Neill, Scott L.; Turelli, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Author summary Wolbachia are bacteria that live inside insect cells. In insects that act as viral vectors, Wolbachia can suppress virus transmission to new hosts. Wolbachia have been experimentally introduced into Aedes aegypti mosquito populations to reduce the transmission of dengue, Zika, and other arboviruses that cause human disease. Wolbachia invade populations by causing cytoplasmic incompatibility, a phenomenon whereby embryos from crosses between infected males and uninfected females...

  12. Effects of human respiratory syncytial virus, metapneumovirus, parainfluenza virus 3 and influenza virus on CD4+ T cell activation by dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Le Nouën

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV, and to a lesser extent human metapneumovirus (HMPV and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3, re-infect symptomatically throughout life without antigenic change, suggestive of incomplete immunity. One causative factor is thought to be viral interference with dendritic cell (DC-mediated stimulation of CD4+ T cells. METHODOLOGY, PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We infected human monocyte-derived DC with purified HRSV, HMPV, HPIV3, or influenza A virus (IAV and compared their ability to induce activation and proliferation of autologous CD4+ T cells in vitro. IAV was included because symptomatic re-infection without antigenic change is less frequent, suggesting that immune protection is more complete and durable. We examined virus-specific memory responses and superantigen-induced responses by multiparameter flow cytometry. Live virus was more stimulatory than inactivated virus in inducing DC-mediated proliferation of virus-specific memory CD4+ T cells, suggesting a lack of strong suppression by live virus. There were trends of increasing proliferation in the order: HMPVviruses are similar in their ability to induce DC to activate CD4+ T cells. Thus, the results do not support the common model in which viral suppression of CD4+ T cell activation and

  13. The Future of the JC3IEDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    code runway-pavement-maximum- tyre -pressure-code runway-pavement-evaluation-method-code SLIPWAY slipway-id (FK) slipway-gradient-angle slipway-location...quantity quay-crane-offloading-lift-quantity quay-crane-offloading-type-code quay-day-limit-net- explosive -quantity quay-draught-dimension quay-maximum...deadweight-tonnage-quantity quay-night-limit-net- explosive -quantity quay-rail-capacity-count quay-rail-served-indicator-code quay-storage-code quay-vessel

  14. Tomato Leaf Curl New Delhi Virus: An Emerging Virus Complex Threatening Vegetable and Fiber Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Moriones

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae represents an important constraint to tomato production, as it causes the most predominant and economically important disease affecting tomato in the Indian sub-continent. However, in recent years, ToLCNDV has been fast extending its host range and spreading to new geographical regions, including the Middle East and the western Mediterranean Basin. Extensive research on the genome structure, protein functions, molecular biology, and plant–virus interactions of ToLCNDV has been conducted in the last decade. Special emphasis has been given to gene silencing suppression ability in order to counteract host plant defense responses. The importance of the interaction with DNA alphasatellites and betasatellites in the biology of the virus has been demonstrated. ToLCNDV genetic variability has been analyzed, providing new insights into the taxonomy, host adaptation, and evolution of this virus. Recombination and pseudorecombination have been shown as motors of diversification and adaptive evolution. Important progress has also been made in control strategies to reduce disease damage. This review highlights these various achievements in the context of the previous knowledge of begomoviruses and their interactions with plants.

  15. Clinical aspects of feline immunodeficiency and feline leukemia virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Katrin

    2011-10-15

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are retroviruses with a global impact on the health of domestic cats. The two viruses differ in their potential to cause disease. FIV can cause an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome that increases the risk of developing opportunistic infections, neurological diseases, and tumors. In most naturally infected cats, however, FIV itself does not cause severe clinical signs, and FIV-infected cats may live many years without any health problems. FeLV is more pathogenic, and was long considered to be responsible for more clinical syndromes than any other agent in cats. FeLV can cause tumors (mainly lymphoma), bone marrow suppression syndromes (mainly anemia) and lead to secondary infectious diseases caused by suppressive effects of the virus on bone marrow and the immune system. Today, FeLV is less important as a deadly infectious agent as in the last 20 years prevalence has been decreasing in most countries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. HIV-1 viral escape in cerebrospinal fluid of subjects on suppressive antiretroviral treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edén, Arvid; Fuchs, Dietmar; Hagberg, Lars; Nilsson, Staffan; Spudich, Serena; Svennerholm, Bo; Price, Richard W; Gisslén, Magnus

    2010-12-15

    Occasional cases of viral escape in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) despite suppression of plasma human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA have been reported. We investigated CSF viral escape in subjects treated with commonly used antiretroviral therapy regimens in relation to intrathecal immune activation and central nervous system penetration effectiveness (CPE) rank. Sixty-nine neurologically asymptomatic subjects treated with antiretroviral therapy >6 months and plasma HIV-1 RNA penetration effectiveness rank was not a significant predictor of detectable CSF virus or CSF neopterin levels. Viral escape in CSF is more common than previously reported, suggesting that low-grade central nervous system infection may continue in treated patients. Although these findings need extension in longitudinal studies, they suggest the utility of monitoring CSF responses, as new treatment combinations and strategies modify clinical practice.

  17. Non-coding RNAs and heme oxygenase-1 in vaccinia virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meseda, Clement A. [Division of Viral Products, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Srinivasan, Kumar [Division of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wise, Jasen [Qiagen, Frederick, MD (United States); Catalano, Jennifer [Center for Tobacco Products, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dhawan, Subhash, E-mail: subhash.dhawan@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. • Reduced infectivity inversely correlated with increased expression of non-coding RNAs. • The regulation of HO-1 and ncRNAs suggests a novel host defense response against vaccinia virus infection. - Abstract: Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are <200 nucleotide non-coding uridylate-rich RNAs. Although the functions of many snRNAs remain undetermined, a population of snRNAs is produced during the early phase of infection of cells by vaccinia virus. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct correlation between expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suppression of selective snRNA expression, and inhibition of vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. Hemin induced HO-1 expression, completely reversed virus-induced host snRNA expression, and suppressed vaccinia virus infection. This involvement of specific virus-induced snRNAs and associated gene clusters suggests a novel HO-1-dependent host-defense pathway in poxvirus infection.

  18. Toxicant-disease-environment interactions associated with suppression of immune system, growth, and reproduction. [PCB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, W.P.; Hinsdill, R.; Fairbrother, A.; Olson, L.J.; Jaeger, J.; Yuill, T.; Bisgaard, S.; Hunter, W.G.; Nolan, K.

    1984-06-01

    The effects of marginal malnourishment, infections, and environmental chemicals on growth and reproductive success in Swiss-Webster white mice and wild deer mice were studied with fractional factorial designs. Interaction effects were discovered. For example, malnourished mice were more sensitive to virus exposure and environmental chemicals (a plant growth regulator or polychlorinated biphenyls). Since several commercial plant growth regulators also appear to suppress the immune system, these results cast doubt on the adequacy of current toxicity testing procedures in which factors are studied individually and not in combination.

  19. Heterologous RNA-silencing suppressors from both plant- and animal-infecting viruses support plum pox virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliogka, Varvara I; Calvo, María; Carbonell, Alberto; García, Juan Antonio; Valli, Adrian

    2012-07-01

    HCPro, the RNA-silencing suppressor (RSS) of viruses belonging to the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae, is a multifunctional protein presumably involved in all essential steps of the viral infection cycle. Recent studies have shown that plum pox potyvirus (PPV) HCPro can be replaced successfully by cucumber vein yellowing ipomovirus P1b, a sequence-unrelated RSS from a virus of the same family. In order to gain insight into the requirement of a particular RSS to establish a successful potyviral infection, we tested the ability of different heterologous RSSs from both plant- and animal-infecting viruses to substitute for HCPro. Making use of engineered PPV chimeras, we show that PPV HCPro can be replaced functionally by some, but not all, unrelated RSSs, including the NS1 protein of the mammal-infecting influenza A virus. Interestingly, the capacity of a particular RSS to replace HCPro does not correlate strictly with its RNA silencing-suppression strength. Altogether, our results suggest that not all suppression strategies are equally suitable for efficient escape of PPV from the RNA-silencing machinery. The approach followed here, based on using PPV chimeras in which an under-consideration RSS substitutes for HCPro, could further help to study the function of diverse RSSs in a 'highly sensitive' RNA-silencing context, such as that taking place in plant cells during the process of a viral infection.

  20. HIV-1 antibody 3BNC117 suppresses viral rebound in humans during treatment interruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheid, Johannes F.; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Bar-On, Yotam; Kreider, Edward F.; Lu, Ching-Lan; Lorenzi, Julio C. C.; Feldmann, Anna; Braunschweig, Malte; Nogueira, Lilian; Oliveira, Thiago; Shimeliovich, Irina; Patel, Roshni; Burke, Leah; Cohen, Yehuda Z.; Hadrigan, Sonya; Settler, Allison; Witmer-Pack, Maggi; West, Anthony P.; Juelg, Boris; Keler, Tibor; Hawthorne, Thomas; Zingman, Barry; Gulick, Roy M.; Pfeifer, Nico; Learn, Gerald H.; Seaman, Michael S.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Klein, Florian; Schlesinger, Sarah J.; Walker, Bruce D.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Caskey, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Interruption of combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected individuals leads to rapid viral rebound. Here we report the results of a phase IIa open label clinical trial evaluating 3BNC117, a broad and potent neutralizing antibody (bNAb) against the CD4 binding site of HIV-1 Env1, in the setting of analytical treatment interruption in 13 HIV-1-infected individuals. Participants with 3BNC117-sensitive virus outgrowth cultures were enrolled. Two or four 30 mg kg−1 infusions of 3BNC117, separated by 3 or 2 weeks, respectively, are generally well tolerated. Infusions are associated with a delay in viral rebound for 5–9 weeks after two infusions, and up to 19 weeks after four infusions, or an average of 6.7 and 9.9 weeks respectively, compared with 2.6 weeks for historical controls (P < 0.00001). Rebound viruses arise predominantly from a single provirus. In most individuals, emerging viruses show increased resistance, indicating escape. However, 30% of participants remained suppressed until antibody concentrations waned below 20 μg ml−1, and the viruses emerging in all but one of these individuals showed no apparent resistance to 3BCN117, suggesting failure to escape over a period of 9–19 weeks. We conclude that administration of 3BNC117 exerts strong selective pressure on HIV-1 emerging from latent reservoirs during analytical treatment interruption in humans. PMID:27338952