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Sample records for suppressed oral carcinogenesis

  1. Role of bacteria in oral carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Rajeev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in Indian men and is the leading cause of cancer deaths. It is considered as a multistep and multifactorial disease. Besides accumulation of genetic mutations, numerous other carcinogens are involved. In this category, viral and chemical carcinogens are well studied and documented. However, in the oral cavity, the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites, and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies, but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the complex metabolic pathways, and may thus be involved in carcinogenesis. Poor oral health associates statistically with prevalence of many types of cancer such as pancreatic and gastrointestinal cancer. This review presents possible carcinogenesis pathway involved in bacterial carcinogenesis, commonly implicated bacteria in oral carcinogenesis, and their role in cancer therapeutics as well.

  2. Oral mucosal carcinogenesis in SENCAR mice.

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    Kim, Tae-Won; Chen, Qianming; Shen, Xiaodong; Regezi, Joseph A; Ramos, Daniel M; Tanaka, Hironori; Jordan, Richard C K; Kramer, Randall H

    2002-01-01

    Animal models of oral carcinogenesis have been developed but most use the hamster buccal pouch or rat oral mucosa. With completion of human and murine genome sequencing, the development of a mouse model of oral carcinogenesis may prove useful for future genomic studies of oral carcinogenesis. To achieve this objective, 30 SENCAR mice were initiated by brush application of palatal, buccal and tongue mucosa with 200 nmol 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) using 3 treatment regimens, and promoted by brush application with 5 nmol 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) for a total of 28 weeks. Alternatively, 5 mice were treated with 0.5% 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) alone by brush application for 28 weeks. There were another 6 control mice treated with vehicle alone. The tumor samples were analyzed for the presence of H-ras codon 61 gene mutations using a mutant-allele-specific amplification-polymerase chain reaction (MASA-PCR) technique. The results showed that among the group of 24 mice initiated with DMBA for 2 or 6 weeks, a range of papilliferous lesions were seen on the buccal mucosa comprising papillomas, papillomas with dysplasia and 7 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). In those 6 mice initiated with 1 week of DMBA, only papillomas developed. In the 5 mice treated with 4NQO, one developed papillomas with dysplasia and two had SCCs in the tongue mucosa but not the buccal mucosa. Both carcinogens induced codon 61 mutation of the H-ras gene at a high frequency. The results indicated that DMBA/TPA and 4NQO in SENCAR mice reliably produced preneoplastic and malignant oral cavity lesions, which resemble the multistages for human oral carcinogenesis, and targeted to site-specific zones of the oral mucosa, namely the buccal mucosa and tongue, respectively. These results show that SENCAR mice can be used as a unique model of oral carcinogenesis with the potential for detailed molecular studies of neoplastic progression to SCC.

  3. Blueberry inhibits invasion and angiogenesis in 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced oral squamous cell carcinogenesis in hamsters via suppression of TGF-β and NF-κB signaling pathways.

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    Baba, Abdul Basit; Kowshik, Jaganathan; Krishnaraj, Jayaraman; Sophia, Josephraj; Dixit, Madhulika; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2016-09-01

    Aberrant activation of oncogenic signaling pathways plays a pivotal role in tumor initiation and progression. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the chemopreventive and therapeutic efficacy of blueberry in the hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model based on its ability to target TGF-β, PI3K/Akt, MAPK and NF-κB signaling and its impact on invasion and angiogenesis. Squamous cell carcinomas were induced in the HBP by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). The effect of blueberry on the oncogenic signaling pathways and downstream events was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblotting. Experiments with the ECV304 cell line were performed to explore the mechanism by which blueberry regulates angiogenesis. Blueberry supplementation inhibited the development and progression of HBP carcinomas by abrogating TGF-β and PI3K/Akt pathways. Although blueberry failed to influence MAPK, it suppressed NF-κB activation by preventing nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. Blueberry also modulated the expression of the oncomiR miR-21 and the tumor suppressor let-7. Collectively, these changes induced a shift to an anti-invasive and anti-angiogenic phenotype as evidenced by downregulating matrix metalloproteinases and vascular endothelial growth factor. Blueberry also inhibited angiogenesis in ECV304 cells by suppressing migration and tube formation. The results of the present study suggest that targeting oncogenic signaling pathways that influence acquisition of cancer hallmarks is an effective strategy for chemointervention. Identification of modulatory effects on phosphorylation, intracellular localization of oncogenic transcription factors and microRNAs unraveled by the present study as key mechanisms of action of blueberry is critical from a therapeutic perspective. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Relevance of CCL3/CCR5 axis in oral carcinogenesis.

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    da Silva, Janine Mayra; Moreira Dos Santos, Tálita Pollyanna; Sobral, Lays Martin; Queiroz-Junior, Celso Martins; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga; Proudfoot, Amanda E I; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Leopoldino, Andréia Machado; Russo, Remo Castro; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida

    2017-08-01

    The chemokine CCL3 is a chemotactic cytokine crucial for inflammatory cell recruitment in homeostatic and pathological conditions. CCL3 might stimulate cancer progression by promoting leukocyte accumulation, angiogenesis and tumour growth. The expression of CCL3 and its receptors CCR1 and CCR5 was demonstrated in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), but their role was not defined. Here, the functions of CCL3 were assessed using a model of chemically induced tongue carcinogenesis with 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). Lineages of OSCC were used to analyse the effects of CCL3 in vitro . The 4NQO-induced lesions exhibited increased expression of CCL3, CCR1 and CCR5. CCL3 -/- and CCR5 -/- mice presented reduced incidence of tongue tumours compared to wild-type (WT) and CCR1 -/- mice. Consistently, attenuated cytomorphological atypia and reduced cell proliferation were observed in lesions of CCL3 -/- and CCR5 -/- mice. OSCC from CCL3 -/- mice exhibited lower infiltration of eosinophils and reduced expression of Egf, Fgf1, Tgf-β1, Vegfa, Vegfb, Itga-4, Vtn, Mmp-1a, Mmp-2 and Mmp-9 than WT mice. In vitro , CCL3 induced invasion and production of CCL5, IL-6, MMP -2, -8, -9. Blockage of CCL3 in vitro using α-CCL3 or Evasin-1 (a CCL3-binding protein) impaired tumour cell invasion. In conclusion, CCL3/CCR5 axis has pro-tumourigenic effects in oral carcinogenesis. The induction of inflammatory and angiogenic pathways and eosinophils recruitment appear to be the underlying mechanism explaining these effects. These data reveal potential protective effects of CCL3 blockade in oral cancer.

  5. Carcinogenesis

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    Fry, R.J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The long-term aims are concerned with various aspects of the natural history and biology of cancer, the mechanism of induction and of the advancement of time of appearance of tumors, the development of systems suitable for the assay of oncogenesis and cocarcinogenesis, and the elucidation of some of the factors important to the problem of extrapolation of estimates of risk made in experimental systems to the estimate of risk in man. It is necessary to have a number of test systems in order to study the various factors related to cocarcinogenesis; some of these are clearly tissue specific. The liver tumor system is clearly useful for certain compounds, and the liver is an excellent tissue for the study of the mechanisms of cocarcinogenesis. This year we report on the relatively rapid induction of what appears histologically to be carcinoma of the thyroid by aminotriazole. In a collaborative study with the Neutron and Gamma-Ray Toxicity Group, we have established a new example of synergism in carcinogenesis, namely between radiation and pituitary hormone(s) in the production of Harderian gland tumors. Not only does a synergistic effect on incidence occur, but also on the degree of malignancy of the tumor induced. We thus have three different model systems for the study of various aspects of cocarcinogenesis: various chemicals, including nononcogenic polycyclic hydrocarbons, in liver tumorigenesis; ionizing radiation and aminotriazole in thyroid tumorigenesis; and in conjunction with the JANUS Program, the interaction of radiation and hormones in the production of Harderian gland, mammary gland, and other tumors

  6. Oral-specific ablation of Klf4 disrupts epithelial terminal differentiation and increases premalignant lesions and carcinomas upon chemical carcinogenesis.

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    Paparella, María L; Abrigo, Marianela; Bal de Kier Joffe, Elisa; Raimondi, Ana R

    2015-11-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SSC) of the head and neck is the sixth most common cancer and is rarely diagnosed in early stages. The transcription factor Krϋppel-like factor 4 (Klf4) suppresses cell proliferation and promotes differentiation. Inducible mice carrying an oral-specific ablation of Klf4 (K14-CreER(tam) /Klf4(flox/flox) ) develop mild dysplastic lesions and abnormal differentiation in the tongue. Aiming to analyze whether Klf4 cooperate in oral chemical carcinogenesis,we applied 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO), a tobacco surrogate, to this conditional Klf4 knockout mice. K14-CreER(tam) /Klf4(flox/flox) and control mice were treated with 4NQO for 16 weeks and monitored until week 30. Histopathological samples were used for diagnostic purposes and immunofluorescence detection of epithelial differentiation markers. 4NQO-treated K14-CreER(tam) /Klf4(flox/flox) mice (Klf4KO 4NQO) showed a significant weight loss and developed more severe dysplastic lesions than control mice with 4NQO (P oral SCC and a marked keratinization pattern in dysplasias, in situ carcinomas and SCC. Also, tongues derived from Klf4KO 4NQO mice exhibited reduced terminal differentiation as judged by cytokeratin 1 staining when compared with 4NQO-treated controls. Klf4 ablation results in more severe dysplastic lesions in oral mucosa, with a tendency to higher incidence of SCC, after chemical carcinogenesis. We show here, in a context similar to the human carcinogenesis, that absence of Klf4 accelerates carcinogenesis and correlates with the absence of cytokeratin 1 expression. These results suggest a potential role for KLF4 as a tumor suppressor gene for the tongue epithelium. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Gut Microbe-Mediated Suppression of Inflammation-Associated Colon Carcinogenesis by Luminal Histamine Production.

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    Gao, Chunxu; Ganesh, Bhanu Priya; Shi, Zhongcheng; Shah, Rajesh Rasik; Fultz, Robert; Major, Angela; Venable, Susan; Lugo, Monica; Hoch, Kathleen; Chen, Xiaowei; Haag, Anthony; Wang, Timothy C; Versalovic, James

    2017-10-01

    Microbiome-mediated suppression of carcinogenesis may open new avenues for identification of therapeutic targets and prevention strategies in oncology. Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) deficiency has been shown to promote inflammation-associated colorectal cancer by accumulation of CD11b + Gr-1 + immature myeloid cells, indicating a potential antitumorigenic effect of histamine. Here, we demonstrate that administration of hdc + Lactobacillus reuteri in the gut resulted in luminal hdc gene expression and histamine production in the intestines of Hdc -/- mice. This histamine-producing probiotic decreased the number and size of colon tumors and colonic uptake of [ 18 F]-fluorodeoxyglucose by positron emission tomography in Hdc -/- mice. Administration of L. reuteri suppressed keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), Il22, Il6, Tnf, and IL1α gene expression in the colonic mucosa and reduced the amounts of proinflammatory, cancer-associated cytokines, keratinocyte chemoattractant, IL-22, and IL-6, in plasma. Histamine-generating L. reuteri also decreased the relative numbers of splenic CD11b + Gr-1 + immature myeloid cells. Furthermore, an isogenic HDC-deficient L. reuteri mutant that was unable to generate histamine did not suppress carcinogenesis, indicating a significant role of the cometabolite, histamine, in suppression of chronic intestinal inflammation and colorectal tumorigenesis. These findings link luminal conversion of amino acids to biogenic amines by gut microbes and probiotic-mediated suppression of colorectal neoplasia. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Antibiotic suppression of intestinal microbiota reduces heme-induced lipoperoxidation associated with colon carcinogenesis in rats.

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    Martin, O C B; Lin, C; Naud, N; Tache, S; Raymond-Letron, I; Corpet, D E; Pierre, F H

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that heme iron from red meat is associated with increased colorectal cancer risk. In carcinogen-induced-rats, a heme iron-rich diet increases the number of precancerous lesions and raises associated fecal biomarkers. Heme-induced lipoperoxidation measured by fecal thiobarbituric acid reagents (TBARs) could explain the promotion of colon carcinogenesis by heme. Using a factorial design we studied if microbiota could be involved in heme-induced carcinogenesis, by modulating peroxidation. Rats treated or not with an antibiotic cocktail were given a control or a hemoglobin-diet. Fecal bacteria were counted on agar and TBARs concentration assayed in fecal water. The suppression of microbiota by antibiotics was associated with a reduction of crypt height and proliferation and with a cecum enlargement, which are characteristics of germ-free rats. Rats given hemoglobin diets had increased fecal TBARs, which were suppressed by the antibiotic treatment. A duplicate experiment in rats given dietary hemin yielded similar results. These data show that the intestinal microbiota is involved in enhancement of lipoperoxidation by heme iron. We thus suggest that microbiota could play a role in the heme-induced promotion of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  9. Connexin subtype expression during oral carcinogenesis: A pilot study in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Brockmeyer, Phillipp; Hemmerlein, Bernhard; Jung, Klaus; Fialka, Florian; Brodmann, Tobias; Gruber, Rudolf Matthias; Schliephake, Henning; Kramer, Franz-Josef

    2016-02-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and connexin (Cx) expression were reported in association with carcinogenesis in various types of tumours. In an earlier histomorphometric study, the protein levels of Cx subtypes 26, 43 and 45 were differentially expressed in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), corresponding lymph node metastases and dysplasia-free oral mucosa. Moreover, membrane Cx43 acted as an independent prognostic marker in OSCC tissues. This study aimed to confirm the expression of described Cx subtypes at the mRNA level. Hence, a reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis of Cx26, Cx43 and Cx45 gene expressions was performed in paired carcinoma and mucosa samples of 15 OSCC patients. Additionally, we assessed the interaction between Cx subtype expression and clinicopathological routine parameters. The RT-qPCR analysis revealed that Cx26 was downregulated in OSCC (P=0.01), while Cx43 was marginally upregulated in cancer tissue (P=0.04). Cx45 was significantly overexpressed in OSCC tissue compared with the intraoral mucosa controls (P<0.01), and remained unchanged at different tumour stages. No significant interactions between differential Cx subtype expression and clinicopathological routine parameters were observed. In conclusion, Cx regulation at the transcriptional level appears to be an early event during the initiation and development of OSCC, and is maintained during further progression. However, the mRNA-protein correlation is variable. This may be indicative of post-transcriptional, translational and degradation regulations being associated with the determination of Cx protein concentration during oral carcinogenesis.

  10. Tumor suppressive role of sestrin2 during colitis and colon carcinogenesis

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    Ro, Seung-Hyun; Xue, Xiang; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K; Cho, Chun-Seok; Namkoong, Sim; Jang, Insook; Semple, Ian A; Ho, Allison; Park, Hwan-Woo; Shah, Yatrik M; Lee, Jun Hee

    2016-01-01

    The mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathways are critical regulators of intestinal inflammation and colon cancer growth. Sestrins are stress-inducible proteins, which suppress both mTORC1 and ER stress; however, the role of Sestrins in colon physiology and tumorigenesis has been elusive due to the lack of studies in human tissues or in appropriate animal models. In this study, we show that human SESN2 expression is elevated in the colon of ulcerative colitis patients but is lost upon p53 inactivation during colon carcinogenesis. In mouse colon, Sestrin2 was critical for limiting ER stress and promoting the recovery of epithelial cells after inflammatory injury. During colitis-promoted tumorigenesis, Sestrin2 was shown to be an important mediator of p53’s control over mTORC1 signaling and tumor cell growth. These results highlight Sestrin2 as a novel tumor suppressor, whose downregulation can accelerate both colitis and colon carcinogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12204.001 PMID:26913956

  11. Role of atypical chemokine receptor ACKR2 in experimental oral squamous cell carcinogenesis.

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    da Silva, Janine Mayra; Dos Santos, Tálita Pollyanna Moreira; Saraiva, Adriana Machado; Fernandes de Oliveira, Ana Laura; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Batista, Aline Carvalho; de Mesquita, Ricardo Alves; Russo, Remo Castro; da Silva, Tarcília Aparecida

    2018-03-14

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors are critical in oral tumourigenesis. The atypical chemokine receptor ACKR2 is a scavenger of CC chemokines controlling the availability of these molecules at tumour sites, but the role of ACKR2 in the context of oral carcinogenesis is unexplored. In this study, wild-type (WT) and ACKR2 deficient mice (ACKR2 -/- ) were treated with chemical carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) for induction of oral carcinogenesis. Tongues were collected for macro and microscopic analysis and to evaluate the expression of ACKRs, CC chemokines and its receptors, inflammatory cytokines, angiogenic factors, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components. An increased expression of ACKR2 in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) lesions of 4NQO-treated WT mice was observed. No significant differences were seen in the ACKR1, ACKR3 and ACKR4 mRNA expression comparing SCC lesions from WT and ACKR2 -/- treated mice. Significantly higher expression of CCL2, IL-6 and IL-17 was detected in ACKR2 -/- treated mice. In contrast, the expression of other CC-chemokines, and receptors, angiogenic factors, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components were similarly increased in SCC lesions of both groups. Clinical and histopathological analysis revealed no differences in inflammatory cell recruitment and in the SCC incidence comparing WT and ACKR2 -/- treated mice. The results suggest that ACKR2 expression regulates inflammation in tumour-microenvironment but the absence of ACKR2 does not impact chemically-induced oral carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunological and Biochemical Markers in Oral Carcinogenesis: The Public Health Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunali Khanna

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Oral health is an integral component of general health and well being and a basic human right. Dental public health is probably the most challenging specialty of dentistry. Because of the lack of adequate resources among other factors, many people are likely to suffer from dental diseases. Despite great improvements in the oral health status of populations across the world, the burden and impact of dental diseases are still high. This is particularly true among underprivileged groups in both developed and developing communities. Oral diseases and conditions, including oral cancer, oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS, dental trauma, craniofacial anomalies, and noma, all have broad impacts on health and well-being. Oral cancer, the sixth most common cancer worldwide continues to be most prevalent cancer related to the consumption of tobacco, alcohol and other carcinogenic products. Nevertheless, significant reduction in mortality can be achieved by advances in early diagnosis and implementation of multidisciplinary treatment programs leading to improvement of survivorship and better quality of life. The present study was designed to evaluate the immunologic and biochemical markers in oral carcinogenesis using circulating immune complexes (CIC, copper, iron, and selenium concentrations as assessment endpoints. Study results indicated an increase in CIC and copper levels, and a decrease in iron and selenium concentrations in oral cancer patients compared to controls. The implications of these findings for public health are discussed.

  13. Alterations in keratins and associated proteins during 4- Nitroquinoline-1-oxide induced rat oral carcinogenesis

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    Deepak Kanojia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is the sixth largest group of malignancies globally and the single largest group of malignancies in the Indian subcontinent. Despite the advances in treatment and therapeutic modalities the five year survival rate of OSCC has not changed in the last few decades, and remains less than 40%. Several studies have focused on defining molecular markers that can either detect cancer at an early stage or can predict patient′s outcome. However, such markers are still undefined. Keratins (K are epithelia predominant intermediate filament proteins which are expressed in a differentiation dependent and site specific manner. Keratins are being used as biomarkers in different epithelial disorders including cancer. They are associated with desmoplakin and α6β4 integrin which are components of desmosomes and hemidesmosomes respectively. Materials and Methods: 4-Nitroquinoline 1-Oxide (4NQO was used as a carcinogen for the development of various stages of oral carcinogenesis in rat lingual mucosa. Two-Dimentional gel electrophoresis was performed for the separation of Keratins followed by western blotting for their specific identification. Western blotting and RT PCR was carried out for desmoplakin and α6β4 integrin respectively to understand their levels. Immunohistochemical analysis was carried out to further study the localization of desmoplakin and α6 integrin. Results: In this study we have analysed the alterations in Keratins and associated proteins during sequential stages of 4NQO induced rat oral carcinogenesis. Our results showed that the alterations primarily begin after the dysplastic changes in the lingual epithelium like the elevation of Keratins 5/6a, ectopic expression of Keratin 8, increase in suprabasal expression of α6 integrin and increase in desmoplakin levels. Most of these alterations persisted till the development of SCC except desmoplakin, the levels of which were downregulated in

  14. Dynamic changes in the gene expression profile during rat oral carcinogenesis induced by 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide.

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    Ge, Shuyun; Zhang, Ji; Du, Yanzhi; Hu, Bin; Zhou, Zengtong; Lou, Jianing

    2016-03-01

    The typical progression of oral cancer is from hyperplastic epithelial lesions through dysplasia to invasive carcinoma. It is important to investigate malignant oral cancer progression and development in order to determine useful approaches of prevention of dysplastic lesions. The present study aimed to gain insights into the underlying molecular mechanism of oral carcinogenesis by establishing a rat model of oral carcinogenesis using 4‑nitroquinoline 1‑oxide. Subsequently, transcription profile analysis using an integrating microarray was performed. The dynamic gene expression changes of the six stages of rat oral carcinogenesis (normal, mild epithelial dysplasia, moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia, carcinoma in situ and oral squamous cell carcinomas) were analyzed using component plane presentations (CPP)‑self‑organizing map (SOM). Six genes were verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity assay kit. Numerous differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified during rat oral carcinogenesis. CPP‑SOM determined that these DEGs were primarily enriched during cell cycle, apoptosis, inflammatory response and tricarboxylic acid cycle, indicating the coordinated regulation of molecular networks. In addition, the expression of specific DEGs, such as janus kinase 3, cyclin‑dependent kinase A‑1, B‑cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia/lymphoma 2‑like 2, nuclear factor‑κB, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1A, cyclin D1 and SDH were identified to have high concordance with the results from microarray data. The current study demonstrated that oral carcinogenesis is a multi‑step and multi‑gene process, with a distinct pattern alteration along a continuum of malignant transformation. In addition, this comprehensive investigation provided a theoretical basis for the understanding of the molecular alterations associated with oral carcinogenesis.

  15. TFF1 expression suppresses H. pylori-induced inflammation in gastric carcinogenesis

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    Soutto, Mohammed; Chen, Zheng; Katsha, Ahmed; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Krishna, Uma; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Washington, M. Kay; Peek, Richard M.; Belkhiri, Abbes; El-Rifai, Wael

    2015-01-01

    Background Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a high-risk factor for gastric cancer, is frequently associated with chronic inflammation through activation of NFκB. TFF1 is a constitutively expressed protein in the stomach that has tumor suppressor functions and plays a critical role in maintaining mucosal integrity. In this study, we investigated the role of TFF1 in regulating the proinflammatory response to H. pylori infection. Methods For in vitro studies, we performed immunofluorescence, luciferase reporter assay, Western blot, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to investigate activation of NFκB and its target genes in response to infection with H. pylori strains J166 and 7.13. In addition, we utilized the Tff1 knockout (KO) and Tff1 wild-type (WT) mice for infection with PMSS1 H. pylori strain. Results The reconstitution of TFF1 expression in gastric cancer cells significantly suppressed an H. pylori-mediated increase of NFκB-p65 nuclear staining, transcriptional activity and expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes (TNFα, IL1β, CXCL5, and IL4R) that were associated with reduction in expression and phosphorylation of NFκB-p65 and IKKα/β proteins. The in vivo studies using the Tff1-KO mouse model of gastric neoplasia confirmed the in vitro findings. Furthermore, they demonstrated an increase in chronic inflammation scores and frequency of invasive gastric adenocarcinoma in the Tff1-KO mice infected with H. pylori, as compared to uninfected Tff1-KO mice. Conclusion These findings underscore an important protective role of TFF1 in abrogating H. pylori-mediated inflammation, a crucial hallmark of gastric tumorigenesis. Therefore, loss of TFF1 expression could be an important step in the H. pylori-mediated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26372254

  16. Raman spectroscopy detects biomolecular changes associated with nanoencapsulated hesperetin treatment in experimental oral carcinogenesis

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    Gurushankar, K.; Gohulkumar, M.; Kumar, Piyush; Krishna, C. Murali; Krishnakumar, N.

    2016-03-01

    Recently it has been shown that Raman spectroscopy possesses great potential in the investigation of biomolecular changes of tumor tissues with therapeutic drug response in a non-invasive and label-free manner. The present study is designed to investigate the antitumor effect of hespertin-loaded nanoparticles (HETNPs) relative to the efficacy of native hesperetin (HET) in modifying the biomolecular changes during 7,12-dimethyl benz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced oral carcinogenesis using a Raman spectroscopic technique. Significant differences in the intensity and shape of the Raman spectra between the control and the experimental tissues at 1800-500 cm-1 were observed. Tumor tissues are characterized by an increase in the relative amount of proteins, nucleic acids, tryptophan and phenylalanine and a decrease in the percentage of lipids when compared to the control tissues. Further, oral administration of HET and its nanoparticulates restored the status of the lipids and significantly decreased the levels of protein and nucleic acid content. Treatment with HETNPs showed a more potent antitumor effect than treatment with native HET, which resulted in an overall reduction in the intensity of several biochemical Raman bands in DMBA-induced oral carcinogenesis being observed. Principal component and linear discriminant analysis (PC-LDA), together with leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV) on Raman spectra yielded diagnostic sensitivities of 100%, 80%, 91.6% and 65% and specificities of 100%, 65%, 60% and 55% for classification of control versus DMBA, DMBA versus DMBA  +  HET, DMBA versus DMBA  +  HETNPs and DMBA  +  HET versus DMBA  +  HETNPs treated tissue groups, respectively. These results further demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy associated with multivariate statistical algorithms could be a valuable tool for developing a comprehensive understanding of the process of biomolecular changes, and could reveal the signatures of the

  17. An essential role of Ffar2 (Gpr43) in dietary fibre-mediated promotion of healthy composition of gut microbiota and suppression of intestinal carcinogenesis.

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    Sivaprakasam, S; Gurav, A; Paschall, A V; Coe, G L; Chaudhary, K; Cai, Y; Kolhe, R; Martin, P; Browning, D; Huang, L; Shi, H; Sifuentes, H; Vijay-Kumar, M; Thompson, S A; Munn, D H; Mellor, A; McGaha, T L; Shiao, P; Cutler, C W; Liu, K; Ganapathy, V; Li, H; Singh, N

    2016-06-27

    Composition of the gut microbiota has profound effects on intestinal carcinogenesis. Diet and host genetics play critical roles in shaping the composition of gut microbiota. Whether diet and host genes interact with each other to bring specific changes in gut microbiota that affect intestinal carcinogenesis is unknown. Ability of dietary fibre to specifically increase beneficial gut microbiota at the expense of pathogenic bacteria in vivo via unknown mechanism is an important process that suppresses intestinal inflammation and carcinogenesis. Free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFAR2 or GPR43) is a receptor for short-chain fatty acids (acetate, propionate and butyrate), metabolites of dietary fibre fermentation by gut microbiota. Here, we show FFAR2 is down modulated in human colon cancers than matched adjacent healthy tissue. Consistent with this, Ffar2(-/-) mice are hypersusceptible to development of intestinal carcinogenesis. Dietary fibre suppressed colon carcinogenesis in an Ffar2-dependent manner. Ffar2 played an essential role in dietary fibre-mediated promotion of beneficial gut microbiota, Bifidobacterium species (spp) and suppression of Helicobacter hepaticus and Prevotellaceae. Moreover, numbers of Bifidobacterium is reduced, whereas those of Prevotellaceae are increased in human colon cancers than matched adjacent normal tissue. Administration of Bifidobacterium mitigated intestinal inflammation and carcinogenesis in Ffar2(-/-) mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that interplay between dietary fibre and Ffar2 play a key role in promoting healthy composition of gut microbiota that stimulates intestinal health.

  18. Ulva lactuca polysaccharides prevent Wistar rat breast carcinogenesis through the augmentation of apoptosis, enhancement of antioxidant defense system, and suppression of inflammation

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    Abd-Ellatef GF

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gamal-Eldein F Abd-Ellatef,1 Osama M Ahmed,2 Eman S Abdel-Reheim,2 Abdel-Hamid Z Abdel-Hamid,1 1Pharmaceutical and Drug Industries Research Division, Therapeutic Chemistry Department, National Research Centre, Cairo, Egypt; 2Division of Physiology, Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef, Egypt Background: Recently, several research studies have been focused on the isolation and function of the polysaccharides derived from different algal species, which revealed multiple biological activities such as antioxidant and antitumor activities. This study assesses the possible breast cancer chemopreventive properties of common seaweeds, sea lettuce, Ulva lactuca (ulvan polysaccharides using in vitro bioassays on human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7 and an in vivo animal model of breast carcinogenesis. Methods: Cytotoxic effect of ulvan polysaccharides on MCF-7 was tested in vitro. For an in vivo investigation, a single dose of 25 mg/kg body weight 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA and ulvan polysaccharides (50 mg/kg body weight every other day for 10 weeks were administered orally to the Wistar rats. Results: Deleterious histopathological alterations in breast tissues including papillary cyst adenoma and hyperplasia of ductal epithelial lining with intraluminal necrotic materials and calcifications were observed in the DMBA-administered group. These lesions were prevented in the DMBA-administered group treated with ulvan polysaccharides. The immunohistochemical sections depicted that the treatment of DMBA-administered rats with ulvan polysaccharides markedly increased the lowered pro-apoptotic protein, p53, and decreased the elevated anti-apoptotic marker, bcl2, expression in the breast tissue. The elevated lipid peroxidation and the suppressed antioxidant enzyme activities in DMBA-administered control were significantly prevented by the treatment with ulvan polysaccharides. The elevated levels of inflammatory

  19. Predictive Role of p53 Protein as a Single Marker or Associated to Ki67 Antigen in Oral Carcinogenesis

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    Montebugnoli, L.; Felicetti, L.; Gissi, D.B.; Cervellati, F.; Servidio, D.; Marchetti, C.; Prati, C.; Flamminio, F.; Foschini, M.P.

    2008-01-01

    p53 over-expression has been proposed as a reliable marker associated to oral carcinogenesis, although only about 50% of oral carcinomas (OSCC) are associated with p53 over-expression and even p53-negative lesions can progress to OSCC. The aim of the study was to determine whether the combination of p53 over-expression and p53 low-expression associated with Ki67 over-expression (high Ki67/p53 ratio) could lead to a more sensitive parameter. Immunohistochemical expression of Ki67 and p53 was m...

  20. A20 restricts wnt signaling in intestinal epithelial cells and suppresses colon carcinogenesis.

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    Ling Shao

    Full Text Available Colon carcinogenesis consists of a multistep process during which a series of genetic and epigenetic adaptations occur that lead to malignant transformation. Here, we have studied the role of A20 (also known as TNFAIP3, a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that restricts NFκB and cell death signaling, in intestinal homeostasis and tumorigenesis. We have found that A20 expression is consistently reduced in human colonic adenomas than in normal colonic tissues. To further investigate A20's potential roles in regulating colon carcinogenesis, we have generated mice lacking A20 specifically in intestinal epithelial cells and interbred these with mice harboring a mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC(min. While A20(FL/FL villin-Cre mice exhibit uninflamed intestines without polyps, A20(FL/FL villin-Cre APC(min/+ mice contain far greater numbers and larger colonic polyps than control APC(min mice. We find that A20 binds to the β-catenin destruction complex and restricts canonical wnt signaling by supporting ubiquitination and degradation of β-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, acute deletion of A20 from intestinal epithelial cells in vivo leads to enhanced expression of the β-catenin dependent genes cyclinD1 and c-myc, known promoters of colon cancer. Taken together, these findings demonstrate new roles for A20 in restricting β-catenin signaling and preventing colon tumorigenesis.

  1. Raman spectroscopic investigation of the chemopreventive response of naringenin and its nanoparticles in DMBA-induced oral carcinogenesis

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    Krishnakumar, N.; Sulfikkarali, N. K.; Manoharan, S.; Venkatachalam, P.

    2013-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational spectroscopic technique that can be used to optically probe the biomolecular changes associated with tumor progression. The aim of the present study is to investigate the biomolecular changes in chemopreventive response of prepared naringenin-loaded nanoparticles (NARNPs) relative to efficacy of free naringenin (NAR) during 7,12-dimethyl benz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced oral carcinogenesis by Fourier Transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectroscopy. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) was developed in the buccal pouch of golden Syrian hamsters by painting with 0.5% DMBA in liquid paraffin three times a week for 14 weeks. Raman spectra differed significantly between the control and tumor tissues, with tumors showing higher percentage signals for nucleic acids, phenylalanine and tryptophan and a lower in the percentage of phospholipids. Moreover, oral administration of free NAR and NARNPs significantly increased phospholipids and decreased the levels of tryptophan, phenylalanine and nucleic acid contents. On a comparative basis, NARNPs was found to have a more potent antitumor effect than free NAR in completely preventing the formation of squamous cell carcinoma and in improving the biochemical status to a normal range in DMBA-induced oral carcinogenesis. The present study further suggest that Raman spectroscopy could be a valuable tool for rapid and sensitive detection of specific biomolecular changes in response to chemopreventive agents.

  2. Dietary Fiber Treatment Corrects the Composition of Gut Microbiota, Promotes SCFA Production, and Suppresses Colon Carcinogenesis

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    Faraz Bishehsari

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies propose a protective role for dietary fiber in colon cancer (CRC. One possible mechanism of fiber is its fermentation property in the gut and ability to change microbiota composition and function. Here, we investigate the role of a dietary fiber mixture in polyposis and elucidate potential mechanisms using TS4Cre × cAPCl°x468 mice. Stool microbiota profiling was performed, while functional prediction was done using PICRUSt. Stool short-chain fatty acid (SCFA metabolites were measured. Histone acetylation and expression of SCFA butyrate receptor were assessed. We found that SCFA-producing bacteria were lower in the polyposis mice, suggesting a decline in the fermentation product of dietary fibers with polyposis. Next, a high fiber diet was given to polyposis mice, which significantly increased SCFA-producing bacteria as well as SCFA levels. This was associated with an increase in SCFA butyrate receptor and a significant decrease in polyposis. In conclusion, we found polyposis to be associated with dysbiotic microbiota characterized by a decline in SCFA-producing bacteria, which was targetable by high fiber treatment, leading to an increase in SCFA levels and amelioration of polyposis. The prebiotic activity of fiber, promoting beneficial bacteria, could be the key mechanism for the protective effects of fiber on colon carcinogenesis. SCFA-promoting fermentable fibers are a promising dietary intervention to prevent CRC.

  3. Dietary Fiber Treatment Corrects the Composition of Gut Microbiota, Promotes SCFA Production, and Suppresses Colon Carcinogenesis.

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    Bishehsari, Faraz; Engen, Phillip A; Preite, Nailliw Z; Tuncil, Yunus E; Naqib, Ankur; Shaikh, Maliha; Rossi, Marco; Wilber, Sherry; Green, Stefan J; Hamaker, Bruce R; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Voigt, Robin M; Forsyth, Christopher B; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2018-02-16

    Epidemiological studies propose a protective role for dietary fiber in colon cancer (CRC). One possible mechanism of fiber is its fermentation property in the gut and ability to change microbiota composition and function. Here, we investigate the role of a dietary fiber mixture in polyposis and elucidate potential mechanisms using TS4Cre×cAPC l ° x468 mice. Stool microbiota profiling was performed, while functional prediction was done using PICRUSt. Stool short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) metabolites were measured. Histone acetylation and expression of SCFA butyrate receptor were assessed. We found that SCFA-producing bacteria were lower in the polyposis mice, suggesting a decline in the fermentation product of dietary fibers with polyposis. Next, a high fiber diet was given to polyposis mice, which significantly increased SCFA-producing bacteria as well as SCFA levels. This was associated with an increase in SCFA butyrate receptor and a significant decrease in polyposis. In conclusion, we found polyposis to be associated with dysbiotic microbiota characterized by a decline in SCFA-producing bacteria, which was targetable by high fiber treatment, leading to an increase in SCFA levels and amelioration of polyposis. The prebiotic activity of fiber, promoting beneficial bacteria, could be the key mechanism for the protective effects of fiber on colon carcinogenesis. SCFA-promoting fermentable fibers are a promising dietary intervention to prevent CRC.

  4. Association of cancer metabolism-related proteins with oral carcinogenesis - indications for chemoprevention and metabolic sensitizing of oral squamous cell carcinoma?

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    Grimm, Martin; Cetindis, Marcel; Lehmann, Max; Biegner, Thorsten; Munz, Adelheid; Teriete, Peter; Kraut, Wiebke; Reinert, Siegmar

    2014-07-21

    Tumor metabolism is a crucial factor for the carcinogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Expression of IGF-R1, glycolysis-related proteins (GLUT-1, HK 2, PFK-1, LDHA, TKTL1), mitochondrial enzymes (SDHA, SDHB, ATP synthase) were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n = 5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n = 11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n = 35), and OSCC specimen (n = 42) by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis in OSCC cell lines. Metabolism-related proteins were correlated with proliferation activity (Ki-67) and apoptotic properties (TUNEL assay) in OSCC. Specificity of antibodies was confirmed by western blotting in cancer cell lines. Expression of IGF-R1, glycolysis-related proteins (GLUT-1, HK 2, LDHA, TKTL1), and mitochondrial enzymes (SDHA, SDHB, ATP synthase) were significantly increased in the carcinogenesis of OSCC. Metabolic active regions of OSCC were strongly correlated with proliferating cancer (Ki-67+) cells without detection of apoptosis (TUNEL assay). This study provides the first evidence of the expression of IGF-R1, glycolysis-related proteins GLUT-1, HK 2, PFK-1, LDHA, and TKTL1, as well as mitochondrial enzymes SDHA, SDHB, and ATP synthase in the multi-step carcinogenesis of OSCC. Both, hypoxia-related glucose metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation characteristics are associated with the carcinogenesis of OSCC. Acidosis and OXPHOS may drive a metabolic shift towards the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Therefore, inhibition of the PPP, glycolysis, and targeted anti-mitochondrial therapies (ROS generation) by natural compounds or synthetic vitamin derivatives may act as sensitizer for apoptosis in cancer cells mediated by adjuvant therapies in OSCC.

  5. Association of cancer metabolism-related proteins with oral carcinogenesis – indications for chemoprevention and metabolic sensitizing of oral squamous cell carcinoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor metabolism is a crucial factor for the carcinogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Methods Expression of IGF-R1, glycolysis-related proteins (GLUT-1, HK 2, PFK-1, LDHA, TKTL1), mitochondrial enzymes (SDHA, SDHB, ATP synthase) were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n = 5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n = 11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n = 35), and OSCC specimen (n = 42) by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis in OSCC cell lines. Metabolism-related proteins were correlated with proliferation activity (Ki-67) and apoptotic properties (TUNEL assay) in OSCC. Specificity of antibodies was confirmed by western blotting in cancer cell lines. Results Expression of IGF-R1, glycolysis-related proteins (GLUT-1, HK 2, LDHA, TKTL1), and mitochondrial enzymes (SDHA, SDHB, ATP synthase) were significantly increased in the carcinogenesis of OSCC. Metabolic active regions of OSCC were strongly correlated with proliferating cancer (Ki-67+) cells without detection of apoptosis (TUNEL assay). Conclusions This study provides the first evidence of the expression of IGF-R1, glycolysis-related proteins GLUT-1, HK 2, PFK-1, LDHA, and TKTL1, as well as mitochondrial enzymes SDHA, SDHB, and ATP synthase in the multi-step carcinogenesis of OSCC. Both, hypoxia-related glucose metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation characteristics are associated with the carcinogenesis of OSCC. Acidosis and OXPHOS may drive a metabolic shift towards the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Therefore, inhibition of the PPP, glycolysis, and targeted anti-mitochondrial therapies (ROS generation) by natural compounds or synthetic vitamin derivatives may act as sensitizer for apoptosis in cancer cells mediated by adjuvant therapies in OSCC. PMID:25048361

  6. Red Mold Rice Mitigates Oral Carcinogenesis in 7,12-Dimethyl-1,2-Benz[a]anthracene-Induced Oral Carcinogenesis in Hamster

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    Ruei-Lan Tsai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of oral tumor has exponentially increased in recent years; however, the effective therapies or prevention strategies are not sufficient. Red mold rice is a traditional Chinese food, and several reports have demonstrated that red mold rice had an anti-tumor effect. However, the possible anti-tumor mechanisms of the red mold rice are unclear. In this study, we examined the anti-tumor effect of red mold rice on 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA-induced oral tumor in hamster. The ethanol extract of red mold rice (RMRE treatment significantly decreases the levels of DMBA-induced reactive oxygen species, nitro oxide and prostaglandin E2 than those of the lovastatin-treated group (P < .001. Moreover, RMRE decreases the formation of oral tumor induced by DMBA. Monacolin K, monascin, ankaflavin or other red mold rice metabolites had been reported to decrease inflammation and oxidative stress and exerted anti-tumor effects. Therefore, we evaluated the anti-inflammation and anti-oxidative stress effects of monacolin K, monascin, ankaflavin and citrinin in lipopolysaccharide-treated RAW264.7 cells. We found that RMRE reduced the LPS-induced nitrite levels in RAW264.7 cells better than monacolin K, monascin, ankaflavin or citrinin (P < .05.

  7. p27Kip1 deficiency promotes prostate carcinogenesis but does not affect the efficacy of retinoids in suppressing the neoplastic process

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    Kiyokawa Hiroaki

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p27 is a cell cycle suppressor gene, whose protein is a negative regulator of cyclin/cdk complexes. p27 is also a potential target of retinoids in cancer prevention studies. In benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH, and in most carcinomas, p27Kip1 is down-regulated, suggesting its potential resistance to retinoids. To test this hypothesis, we examined the efficacy of 9-cis retinoic acid (9cRA to suppress prostate cell proliferation (PECP and carcinogenesis in p27Kip1 deficient mice. Methods p27Kip1 deficient (-/-, heterozygous (+/- and homozygous (+/+ mice were treated for 7 days with testosterone, 9cRA, or with both, and cell proliferation in dorsolateral prostate (DLP was determined by BrdU labeling. Prostate carcinogenesis was induced by N-Methyl-N-Nitrosourea (MNU and hormone stimulation. Results PECP in DLP of two-month-old mice of all genotypes was similar but significantly increased in old p27-/- mice only. Testosterone treatment increased PECP in all three p27 genotypes with the highest values in p27-/- mice. p27Kip1 deficiency did not affect the response of PEC to 9cRA and to 9cRA+testosterone. The decrease of p27Kip1 in p27+/- and p27-/- mice progressively increased the incidence and frequency of PIN and tumors. 9cRA suppressed PIN in all three p27 genotypes and this was associated with decreased PECP and increased cellular senescence. Conclusions This data indicates that p27Kip1 deficiency promotes prostate cell proliferation and carcinogenesis but does not affect 9cRA's potential to suppress prostate carcinogenesis, suggesting that patients with PIN and carcinomas lacking or having a low level of p27Kip1 expression may also benefit from clinical trials with retinoids.

  8. Eugenol inhibits cell proliferation via NF-κB suppression in a rat model of gastric carcinogenesis induced by MNNG.

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    Manikandan, P; Vinothini, G; Vidya Priyadarsini, R; Prathiba, D; Nagini, S

    2011-02-01

    The modulation of intracellular nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling pathway involved in the deregulated expression of cell proliferation and cell cycle regulatory molecules is a pragmatic approach for chemoprevention. Eugenol (4-allyl-1-hydroxy-2-methoxybenzene), a natural phenolic constituent of oils of cloves is known to possess attractive remedial features. In the present study, we investigated the modulatory effects of eugenol on NF-κB signaling in a rat model of gastric carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N(')-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) by analysing the expression of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) family members ((NF-κB (p50 and p65), inhibitor of kappaB alpha (IκBα), phosphorylated IκBα (p-IκBα), IκB kinase β (IKKβ)) and the NF-κB target genes that promote (e.g., cyclin D1, cyclin B and PCNA) or inhibit (e.g., p53, p21, and Gadd45) cell proliferation and cell survival. MNNG-induced gastric tumours were characterized by NF-κB activation that correlated with upregulation of IKKβ, and phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. Furthermore, upregulation of cyclins and PCNA with downregulation of p21, p53, and Gadd45 suggested that the proliferative advantage in gastric carcinomas is dependent on elevated constitutive NF-κB activity. Administration of eugenol significantly reduced the incidence of MNNG-induced gastric tumours by suppressing NF-κB activation and modulating the expression of NF-κB target genes that regulate cell proliferation and cell survival. The targeting of NF-κB signaling pathway by eugenol may have a significant impact on chemopreventive and therapeutic approaches for cancer.

  9. Evaluation of the chemopreventive response of naringenin-loaded nanoparticles in experimental oral carcinogenesis using laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy

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    Sulfikkarali, N. K.; Krishnakumar, N.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the chemopreventive effects of prepared naringenin-loaded nanoparticles (NARNPs) relative to the efficacy of free naringenin (NAR) in modifying the carcinogenic process and to study the changes in the endogenous fluorophores during DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis by laser-induced autofluorescence (LIAF) spectroscopy. LIAF emission spectra from the hamster buccal mucosa of the control and experimental groups of animals were recorded in the 350-700 nm spectral range on a miniature fiber optic spectrometer from different anatomical sites of each group, with excitation at 404 nm from a diode laser. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) was developed in the buccal pouch of golden Syrian hamsters by painting with 0.5% DMBA in liquid paraffin three times a week for 14 weeks. DMBA-painted animals revealed morphological changes, hyperplasia, dysplasia and well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. LIAF emission spectra showed significant difference between the control and tumor tissues. The tumor tissues are characterized by an increase in the emission of porphyrins and a decrease in the emission of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogenase (NADH) and flavin adenine nucleotide (FAD) when compared to the control tissues. Furthermore, oral administration of NAR and its nanoparticulates restored the status of endogenous fluorophores in the buccal mucosa of DMBA-painted animals. On a comparative basis, the treatment of nanoparticulate naringenin was found to be more effective than free naringenin in completely preventing the formation of squamous cell carcinoma and in improving the status of endogenous porphyrins to a normal range in DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis. The result of the present study further suggests that LIAF spectroscopy may be a very valuable tool for rapid and sensitive detection of endogenous fluorophore changes in response to chemopreventive agents.

  10. HPV e carcinogênese oral: revisão bibliográfica HPV and oral carcinogenesis: a bibliographic review

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    Márcio C. Oliveira

    2003-08-01

    largely publicated in literature doesn't allow inferences more accurate in relation to its role in carcinogenesis (if main or coadjuvant etiological agent or simple covering epithelium inhabitant of oral mucosa. They are already more than 100 types identified which 24 were already located in oral cavity. Of these, 4 are particularly important, the HPVs types 6 and 11 (which are involved in benign lesions of oral epithelium, 16 and 18 (proved carcinogenics and possibly involved in the etiology of determined oral squamous cell carcinomas. The action of these two last types is mainly associated to the E6 and E7 oncoproteins produced by themselves. The E6 binds, sequestrates and degrades the p53, an important tumour supressor protein. The second binds and sequestrates the pRb, also tumour supressor, facilitating the release of E2F. In spite of the refinement HPV detection techniques in oral mucosa lesions, its direct involvement with the oral carcinomas wasn't still duly proved, however, in our opinion, the association of virus with chemical and physical carcinogens in some squamous cell carcinomas, such as the tobacco and alcohol, may represents a plausible explanation regarding the role of human papillomavirus in oral carcinogenesis.

  11. Vital-dye-enhanced multimodal imaging of neoplastic progression in a mouse model of oral carcinogenesis

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    Hellebust, Anne; Rosbach, Kelsey; Wu, Jessica Keren; Nguyen, Jennifer; Gillenwater, Ann; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    In this longitudinal study, a mouse model of 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide chemically induced tongue carcinogenesis was used to assess the ability of optical imaging with exogenous and endogenous contrast to detect neoplastic lesions in a heterogeneous mucosal surface. Widefield autofluorescence and fluorescence images of intact 2-NBDG-stained and proflavine-stained tissues were acquired at multiple time points in the carcinogenesis process. Confocal fluorescence images of transverse fresh tissue slices from the same specimens were acquired to investigate how changes in tissue microarchitecture affect widefield fluorescence images of intact tissue. Widefield images were analyzed to develop and evaluate an algorithm to delineate areas of dysplasia and cancer. A classification algorithm for the presence of neoplasia based on the mean fluorescence intensity of 2-NBDG staining and the standard deviation of the fluorescence intensity of proflavine staining was found to separate moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia, and cancer from non-neoplastic regions of interest with 91% sensitivity and specificity. Results suggest this combination of noninvasive optical imaging modalities can be used in vivo to discriminate non-neoplastic from neoplastic tissue in this model with the potential to translate this technology to the clinic.

  12. Carcinogenesis mechanisms of Fusobacterium nucleatum.

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    Gholizadeh, Pourya; Eslami, Hosein; Kafil, Hossein Samadi

    2017-05-01

    Transformed cells of cancers may be related to stromal cells, immune cells, and some bacteria such as Fusobacterium nucleatum. This review aimed to evaluate carcinogenesis mechanisms of Fusobacterium spp. in the oral cavity, pancreatic and colorectal cancers. These cancers are the three of the ten most prevalence cancer in the worldwide. Recent findings demonstrated that F. nucleatum could be considered as the risk factor for these cancers. The most important carcinogenesis mechanisms of F. nucleatum are chronic infection, interaction of cell surface molecules of these bacteria with immune system and stromal cells, immune evasion and immune suppression. However, there are some uncertainty carcinogenesis mechanisms about these bacteria, but this review evaluates almost all the known mechanisms. Well-characterized virulence factors of F. nucleatum such as FadA, Fap2, LPS and cell wall extracts may act as effector molecules in the shift of normal epithelial cells to tumor cells. These molecules may provide new targets, drugs, and strategies for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway proteins are differently expressed in oral carcinogenesis.

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    Martins, Fabiana; de Sousa, Suzana Com; Dos Santos, Elisa; Woo, Sook-Bin; Gallottini, Marina

    2016-11-01

    PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling pathway is associated with several cellular functions and is frequently changed in several malignancies. The aim of this study was to characterize the immunohistochemical expression pattern of components in PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling pathway in oral epithelial dysplasia (OED), comparing to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and non-dysplastic oral tissues (NDOT). A total of 186 cases of NDOT, OED and OSCC were retrieved. Nuclear staining and cytoplasmic staining of the keratinocytes were considered positive, and the percentage of positive cells was calculated. Increased immunoreactivity from NDOT to OED and OSCC was seen for all proteins. In NDOT cases, positivity was found only for pS6 (52.9%) and p4EBP1 (13.5%). In OED, immunoreactivity was observed for pAKT (62.2%), pmTOR (28.6%), pS6 (70.8%), and p4EBP1 (42.9%). In OSCC cases, immunoreactivity was found for pAKT (83.3%), pmTOR (50%), pS6 (77.4%), and p4EBP1 (50%). The pAKT and pmTOR expression was higher in OED (oral mucosa, differing considerably among OED and OSCC specimens when compared to NDOT. These proteins can be considered potential diagnostic markers for early detection of cancer. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Citrus auraptene suppresses cyclin D1 and significantly delays N-methyl nitrosourea induced mammary carcinogenesis in female Sprague-Dawley rats

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    Grand Robert

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is a major problem in the United States leading to tens of thousands of deaths each year. Although citrus auraptene suppresses cancer in numerous rodent models, its role in breast cancer prevention previously has not been reported. Thus, our goal was to determine the anticarcinogenic effects of auraptene against breast cancer. Methods The effects of auraptene on cell proliferation of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells in culture was assessed by measuring metabolism of a substrate to a formazan dye. Dietary effects of auraptene on tumor incidence, multiplicity and latency were studied in the N-methyl nitrosourea (MNU induced mammary carcinogenesis model in female Sprague Dawley rats. The concentration of auraptene in rat tissues was analyzed by reverse phase HPLC. Cyclin D1 expression in MCF-7 cells and rat tumors was measured by western blot. Results Auraptene (500 ppm significantly delayed median time to tumor by 39 days compared to the MNU only group (p Conclusion Overall, these observations suggest that the predominant effect of auraptene was to delay the development of tumors possibly through the suppression of cyclin D1 expression. These results point to the potential chemopreventive effects of auraptene in mammary carcinogenesis.

  15. Hyperspectral Imaging of Neoplastic Progression in a Mouse Model of Oral Carcinogenesis.

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    Lu, Guolan; Qin, Xulei; Wang, Dongsheng; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2016-02-27

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging modality for medical applications and holds great potential for noninvasive early detection of cancer. It has been reported that early cancer detection can improve the survival and quality of life of head and neck cancer patients. In this paper, we explored the possibility of differentiating between premalignant lesions and healthy tongue tissue using hyperspectral imaging in a chemical induced oral cancer animal model. We proposed a novel classification algorithm for cancer detection using hyperspectral images. The method detected the dysplastic tissue with an average area under the curve (AUC) of 0.89. The hyperspectral imaging and classification technique may provide a new tool for oral cancer detection.

  16. Chemical carcinogenesis

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    Paula A. Oliveira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of chemical compounds benefits society in a number of ways. Pesticides, for instance, enable foodstuffs to be produced in sufficient quantities to satisfy the needs of millions of people, a condition that has led to an increase in levels of life expectancy. Yet, at times, these benefits are offset by certain disadvantages, notably the toxic side effects of the chemical compounds used. Exposure to these compounds can have varying effects, ranging from instant death to a gradual process of chemical carcinogenesis. There are three stages involved in chemical carcinogenesis. These are defined as initiation, promotion and progression. Each of these stages is characterised by morphological and biochemical modifications and result from genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. These genetic modifications include: mutations in genes that control cell proliferation, cell death and DNA repair - i.e. mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressing genes. The epigenetic factors, also considered as being non-genetic in character, can also contribute to carcinogenesis via epigenetic mechanisms which silence gene expression. The control of responses to carcinogenesis through the application of several chemical, biochemical and biological techniques facilitates the identification of those basic mechanisms involved in neoplasic development. Experimental assays with laboratory animals, epidemiological studies and quick tests enable the identification of carcinogenic compounds, the dissection of many aspects of carcinogenesis, and the establishment of effective strategies to prevent the cancer which results from exposure to chemicals.A sociedade obtém numerosos benefícios da utilização de compostos químicos. A aplicação dos pesticidas, por exemplo, permitiu obter alimento em quantidade suficiente para satisfazer as necessidades alimentares de milhões de pessoas, condição relacionada com o aumento da esperança de vida. Os benefícios estão, por

  17. Elevated Bmi-1 expression is associated with dysplastic cell transformation during oral carcinogenesis and is required for cancer cell replication and survival.

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    Kang, M K; Kim, R H; Kim, S J; Yip, F K; Shin, K-H; Dimri, G P; Christensen, R; Han, T; Park, N-H

    2007-01-15

    Bmi-1 is a polycomb group protein that was identified as c-myc cooperating oncogene in murine lymphomagenesis. The current study was undertaken to determine the role of Bmi-1 in human oral carcinogenesis. Bmi-1 protein and RNA expression levels were markedly enhanced in the cells of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) compared with that of normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK). Enhanced-Bmi-1 expression was also detected in situ in the archived oral mucosal tissues with cancerous and precancerous histopathology, including that of mild epithelial dysplasia. Thus, Bmi-1 expression occurs at a very early stage in oral carcinogenesis. To determine the biological role of Bmi-1 in cell proliferation, endogenous Bmi-1 was knocked down in actively proliferating SCC4 cells and NHOK by RNA interference. After Bmi-1 knockdown, cell replication was severely retarded. However, the expression of p16(INK4A), a known cellular target of Bmi-1, was not changed in cells with or without Bmi-1 knockdown. Furthermore, Bmi-1 knockdown in HOK-16B-BaP-T cells, in which the p16(INK4A)/pRb pathway was abrogated, led to immediate arrest of replication and loss of viable cells. Thus, our data suggest that Bmi-1 may act through p16(INK4A)-independent pathways to regulate cellular proliferation during oral cancer progression.

  18. The expression profile of microRNAs in a model of 7,12-dimethyl-benz[a]anthrance-induced oral carcinogenesis in Syrian hamster

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    Wen Yu-ming

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-coding RNA molecules, such as microRNAs, may play an important role in carcinogenesis. Recent studies have indicated that microRNAs are involved in initiation and progression of various malignancies. However, little work has been done to compare the microRNA expression patterns in oral cancer. In this study, we constructed an animal model of oral squamous cell carcinoma to investigate expression profiles of microRNAs in oral carcinogenesis. Methods The animal model of oral squamous cell carcinoma was conducted by tri-weekly (Monday, Wednesday, and Friday painting with 5% DMBA in acetone. Six Syrian hamsters, including three from the treated group and three from the control group, were used as a training group for microRNA microarray analysis. All microarray data were analyzed by Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM and CLUSTER 3.0 software, and this result was further confirmed by qRT-PCR assay. Results Seventeen microRNAs were differentially expressed in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Five microRNAs (hsa-miR-21, hsa-miR-200b, hsa-miR-221, hsa-miR-338, and mmu-miR-762 were significantly upregulated and twelve microRNAs (hsa-miR-16, hsa-miR-26a, hsa-miR-29a, hsa-miR-124a, hsa-miR-125b, mmu-miR-126-5p, hsa-miR-143, hsa-miR-145, hsa-miR-148b, hsa-miR-155, hsa-miR-199a, and hsa-miR-203 were down-regulated in cancer tissues. The expression levels of hsa-miR-21 and hsa-miR-16 seen with Stem-loop qRT-PCR were also seen in microarray analysis in all samples. Conclusion Our findings identified specific microRNA expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma and suggested that microRNAs have a role in oral carcinogenesis.

  19. Citrus auraptene suppresses cyclin D1 and significantly delays N-methyl nitrosourea induced mammary carcinogenesis in female Sprague-Dawley rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Prasad; Yan, Karen J; Windler, David; Tubbs, Jesse; Grand, Robert; Li, Benjamin DL; Aldaz, C Marcelo; McLarty, Jerry; Kleiner-Hancock, Heather E

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major problem in the United States leading to tens of thousands of deaths each year. Although citrus auraptene suppresses cancer in numerous rodent models, its role in breast cancer prevention previously has not been reported. Thus, our goal was to determine the anticarcinogenic effects of auraptene against breast cancer. The effects of auraptene on cell proliferation of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells in culture was assessed by measuring metabolism of a substrate to a formazan dye. Dietary effects of auraptene on tumor incidence, multiplicity and latency were studied in the N-methyl nitrosourea (MNU) induced mammary carcinogenesis model in female Sprague Dawley rats. The concentration of auraptene in rat tissues was analyzed by reverse phase HPLC. Cyclin D1 expression in MCF-7 cells and rat tumors was measured by western blot. Auraptene (500 ppm) significantly delayed median time to tumor by 39 days compared to the MNU only group (p < 0.05, n = 24–26). Auraptene (10 μM) reduced Insulin like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1, 10 ng/mL)-induced cyclin D1 expression by 40% in MCF-7 cells. In comparison, western blot analysis of rat mammary tumors (n = 10 per group) confirmed that auraptene (500 ppm) significantly reduced (p < 0.05) cyclin D1 expression by 49% compared to the MNU only group. Analysis of rat mammary tissue extract by HPLC with fluorescence detection indicated an average concentration (means ± S.E.) of 1.4 ± 0.5 μM and 1.8 ± 0.3 μM in the normal mammary glands of the auraptene 200 ppm and 500 ppm groups, respectively. The concentration (means ± S.E.) of auraptene in the mammary tumors of the auraptene 200 ppm group was 0.31 ± 0.98 μM. Overall, these observations suggest that the predominant effect of auraptene was to delay the development of tumors possibly through the suppression of cyclin D1 expression. These results point to the potential chemopreventive effects of auraptene in mammary carcinogenesis

  20. Retraction: erbB expression changes in ethanol and 7,12- dimethylbenz (a)anthracene-induced oral carcinogenesis. Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal. 2013 Mar 1;18(2):e325-31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The authors (Garcia Carrancá A, Zentero Galindo E, Jiménez Farfán MD and Hernandez Guerrero JC) express that one of the figures of the original article (Jacinto-Alemán LF, García-Carrancá A, LeybaHuerta ER, Zenteno-Galindo E, Jiménez-Farfán MD, Hernández-Guerrero JC. erbB expression changes in ethanol and 7,12- dimethylbenz (a)anthracene-induced oral carcinogenesis. Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal. 2013 Mar 1;18(2):e325-31.) corresponding to Western blots have not been found and the voluntary alteration of this figure is evident. The coauthors Alejandro García Carranca, Edgar Zenteno Galindo, Maria Dolores Jiménez Farfán and Juan Carlos Hernández Guerrero have made the decision to take back what has been published, as they have come to the conclusion, that at least this result is false. The editor declare that the journal had the signed copyright by the authors when the article was initially published. This copyright document certifies that the undersigned authors warrants that the article is original; is not under consideration by another publication; and its tables or figures have not been previously published. The authors confirmed that the final article had been read and each author´s contribution had been approved by the appropriate author. The editor has made the decision to retract the article due to the above comments of some authors against the rest. The editors apologize to the readers and reviewers of Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal for the inconvenience caused by the authors of the article. PMID:24378357

  1. Localization of liposomal mTHPC formulations within normal epithelium, dysplastic tissue, and carcinoma of oral epithelium in the 4NQO-carcinogenesis rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visscher, Sebastiaan A H J; Witjes, Max J H; van der Vegt, Bert; de Bruijn, Henriëtte S; van der Ploeg-van den Heuvel, Angélique; Amelink, Arjen; Sterenborg, Henricus J C M; Roodenburg, Jan L N; Robinson, Dominic J

    2013-12-01

    Foslip and Fospeg are liposomal formulations of the photosensitizer mTHPC (Foscan), which is used for photodynamic therapy (PDT) of malignancies. Literature suggests that liposomal mTHPC formulations have better properties and increased tumor uptake compared to Foscan. To investigate this, we used the 4NQO-induced carcinogen model to compare the localization of the different mTHPC formulations within normal, precancerous, and cancerous tissue. In contrast to xenograft models, the 4NQO model closely mimics the carcinogenesis of human oral dysplasia. Fifty-four rats drank water with the carcinogen 4NQO. When oral examination revealed tumor, the rats received 0.15 mg/kg mTHPC (Foscan, Foslip, or Fospeg). At 2, 4, 8, 24, 48, or 96 hours after injection the rats were sacrificed. Oral tissue was sectioned for HE slides and for fluorescence confocal microscopy. The HE slides were scored on the severity of dysplasia by the epithelial atypia index (EAI). The calibrated fluorescence intensity per formulation or time point was correlated to EAI. Fospeg showed higher mTHPC fluorescence in normal and tumor tissue compared to both Foscan and Foslip. Significant differences in fluorescence between tumor and normal tissue were found for all formulations. However, at 4, 8, and 24 hours only Fospeg showed a significant difference. The Pearson's correlation between EAI and mTHPC fluorescence proved weak for all formulations. In our induced carcinogenesis model, Fospeg exhibited a tendency for higher fluorescence in normal and tumor tissue compared to Foslip and Foscan. In contrast to Foscan and Foslip, Fospeg showed significantly higher fluorescence in tumor versus normal tissue at earlier time points, suggesting a possible clinical benefit compared to Foscan. Low correlation between grade of dysplasia and mTHPC fluorescence was found. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Promotion versus suppression of rat colon carcinogenesis by chlorophyllin and chlorophyll: modulation of apoptosis, cell proliferation, and {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Carmen A.; Xu Meirong; Orner, Gayle A.; Dario Diaz, G.; Li Qingjie; Dashwood, Wan Mohaiza; Bailey, George S.; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2003-03-01

    The carcinogens 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) and 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induce colon tumors in the rat that contain mutations in {beta}-catenin, but the mutation pattern can be influenced by exposure to dietary phytochemicals, such as the water-soluble derivative of chlorophyll called chlorophyllin. Whereas chlorophyllin is an effective blocking agent during the initiation phase, post-initiation responses depend upon the exposure protocol, and can be influenced by the initiating agent and the concentration of chlorophyllin. Post-initiation treatment with 0.001% chlorophyllin (w/v) in the drinking water promoted colon carcinogenesis in the rat, but much higher concentrations (1.0% chlorophyllin) led to suppression. Bromodeoxyuridine and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL) indices revealed that the promotional concentration of 0.001% chlorophyllin increased the ratio of cell proliferation to apoptosis in the colonic crypts, whereas concentrations in the range 0.01-1.0% chlorophyllin modestly reduced this ratio. Molecular studies showed that the spectrum of {beta}-catenin mutations was markedly different in chlorophyllin-promoted colon tumors--many of the mutations led to direct substitutions of critical Ser/Thr residues within the glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) region, whereas in all other groups, including DMH and IQ controls, the mutations typically affected amino acids adjacent to Ser{sup 33}. Substitution of critical Ser/Thr residues caused {beta}-catenin and c-Jun proteins to be markedly over-expressed compared with tumors in which the mutations substituted amino acid residues flanking these critical Ser/Thr sites. In a separate study, rats were exposed to IQ or azoxymethane (AOM), a metabolite of DMH, and they were treated post-initiation with chlorophyllin, chlorophyll, copper, or phytol in the diet. Natural chlorophyll (0.08%) suppressed AOM- and IQ-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF

  3. Age Effects and Temporal Trends in HPV-Related and HPV-Unrelated Oral Cancer in the United States: A Multistage Carcinogenesis Modeling Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F Brouwer

    Full Text Available Differences in prognosis in HPV-positive and HPV-negative oral (oropharyngeal and oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs and increasing incidence of HPV-related cancers have spurred interest in demographic and temporal trends in OSCC incidence. We leverage multistage clonal expansion (MSCE models coupled with age-period-cohort (APC epidemiological models to analyze OSCC data in the SEER cancer registry (1973-2012. MSCE models are based on the initiation-promotion-malignant conversion paradigm in carcinogenesis and allow for interpretation of trends in terms of biological mechanisms. APC models seek to differentiate between the temporal effects of age, period, and birth cohort on cancer risk. Previous studies have looked at the effect of period and cohort on tumor initiation, and we extend this to compare model fits of period and cohort effects on each of tumor initiation, promotion, and malignant conversion rates. HPV-related, HPV-unrelated except oral tongue, and HPV-unrelated oral tongue sites are best described by placing period and cohort effects on the initiation rate. HPV-related and non-oral-tongue HPV-unrelated cancers have similar promotion rates, suggesting similar tumorigenesis dynamics once initiated. Estimates of promotion rates at oral tongue sites are lower, corresponding to a longer sojourn time; this finding is consistent with the hypothesis of an etiology distinct from HPV or alcohol and tobacco use. Finally, for the three subsite groups, men have higher initiation rates than women of the same race, and black people have higher promotion than white people of the same sex. These differences explain part of the racial and sex differences in OSCC incidence.

  4. Age Effects and Temporal Trends in HPV-Related and HPV-Unrelated Oral Cancer in the United States: A Multistage Carcinogenesis Modeling Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Andrew F; Eisenberg, Marisa C; Meza, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Differences in prognosis in HPV-positive and HPV-negative oral (oropharyngeal and oral cavity) squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) and increasing incidence of HPV-related cancers have spurred interest in demographic and temporal trends in OSCC incidence. We leverage multistage clonal expansion (MSCE) models coupled with age-period-cohort (APC) epidemiological models to analyze OSCC data in the SEER cancer registry (1973-2012). MSCE models are based on the initiation-promotion-malignant conversion paradigm in carcinogenesis and allow for interpretation of trends in terms of biological mechanisms. APC models seek to differentiate between the temporal effects of age, period, and birth cohort on cancer risk. Previous studies have looked at the effect of period and cohort on tumor initiation, and we extend this to compare model fits of period and cohort effects on each of tumor initiation, promotion, and malignant conversion rates. HPV-related, HPV-unrelated except oral tongue, and HPV-unrelated oral tongue sites are best described by placing period and cohort effects on the initiation rate. HPV-related and non-oral-tongue HPV-unrelated cancers have similar promotion rates, suggesting similar tumorigenesis dynamics once initiated. Estimates of promotion rates at oral tongue sites are lower, corresponding to a longer sojourn time; this finding is consistent with the hypothesis of an etiology distinct from HPV or alcohol and tobacco use. Finally, for the three subsite groups, men have higher initiation rates than women of the same race, and black people have higher promotion than white people of the same sex. These differences explain part of the racial and sex differences in OSCC incidence.

  5. Radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    In this contribution about carcinogenesis induced by ionizing radiation some radiation dose-response relationships are discussed. Curves are shown of the relation between cell survival and resp. low and high LET radiation. The difference between both curves can be ascribed to endogenous repair mechanisms in the cell. The relation between single-gen mutation frequency and the surviving fractions of irradiated cells indicates that these repairing mechanisms are not error free. Some examples of reverse dose-response relationships are presented in which decreasing values of dose-rate (LET) correspond with increasing radiation induced cell transformation. Finally some molecular aspects of radiation carcinogenesis are discussed. (H.W.). 22 refs.; 4 figs

  6. Oral caffeine during voluntary exercise markedly inhibits skin carcinogenesis and decreases inflammatory cytokines in UVB-treated mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, YouRong; Peng, QingYun; Li, Tao; Nolan, Bonnie; Bernard, Jamie J.; Wagner, George C.; Lin, Yong; Shih, Weichung Joe; Conney, Allan H; Lu, YaoPing

    2013-01-01

    UVB-pretreated SKH-1 mice were treated with water, caffeine (0.1 mg/ml), voluntary running wheel exercise (RW) or caffeine together with RW for 14 weeks. Treatment of the mice with caffeine, RW, or caffeine plus RW decreased skin tumors per mouse by 27, 35 and 62%, and the tumor volume per mouse was decreased by 61, 70 and 85%, respectively. In mechanistic studies, mice were treated with water, caffeine, RW, or caffeine plus RW for 2 weeks prior to a single irradiation with UVB. Caffeine plus RW increased RW activity by 22% when compared with RW alone. Caffeine ingestion was not significantly different between groups. Treatment of mice with caffeine plus RW for 2 weeks decreased the weight of the parametrial fat pads and stimulated the formation of UVB-induced apoptosis to a greater extent than treatment with caffeine or RW alone. An antibody array revealed that caffeine plus RW administered to mice fed a high fat diet and irradiated with UVB decreased the epidermal levels of LIX, sTNFR1 and MIP-1γ. Overall, caffeine during RW exerts a stronger effect than either treatment alone for decreasing tissue fat, increasing UVB-induced apoptosis, lowering the levels of cytokines associated with inflammation and for inhibiting UVB-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:24070239

  7. Oral activated charcoal suppresses hyperphosphataemia in haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zunsong; Cui, Meiyu; Tang, Lijun; Li, Wenbin; Wei, Yong; Zhu, Zhuxian; Jia, Xiaoyan; Kong, Xianglei; Xu, Dongmei

    2012-09-01

    Hyperphosphataemia is almost inevitable in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. In this study we examined whether oral activated charcoal (oAC) reduces serum phosphate level in haemodialysis patients. This was an open-label, prospective, uncontrolled study. One hundred and thirty-five haemodialysis patients were included in this study, with cessation of treatment with any phosphate binders during a 2 week washout period. Patients with serum phosphate levels greater than 5.5 mg/dL during the washout period were included for treatment with oAC. oAC was started at a dose of 600 mg three times per day with meals and was administered for 24 weeks. oAC dose was titrated up during the 24 week period to achieve phosphate control (3.5-5.5 mg/dL). A second 2 week washout period followed the end of oAC treatment. In the 114 patients who successfully completed the trial, the mean dose of activated charcoal was 3190 ± 806 mg/day. oAC reduced mean phosphate levels to below 5.5 mg/dL, with mean decreases of 2.60 ± 0.11 mg/dL (P < 0.01) and 103 (90.4%) of the patients reached the phosphate target. After the second washout period the phosphate levels increased to 7.50 ± 1.03 mg/dL (P < 0.01). Serum intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels declined from 338.75 ± 147.77 pg/mL to 276.51 ± 127.82 pg/mL (P < 0.05) during the study. oAC had no influence on serum prealbumin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, serum ferritin, haemoglobin or platelet levels and the levels of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were stable during the study. In this open-label uncontrolled study, oAC effectively controls hyperphosphataemia and hyperparathyroidism in haemodialysis patients. The safety and efficacy of oAC needs to be assessed in a randomized controlled trial. © 2012 The Authors. Nephrology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  8. Primary peri-implant oral intra-epithelial neoplasia/carcinoma in situ: a case report considering risk factors for carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Makoto; Tsuno, Hiroaki; Ishizaka, Risa; Fujiwara, Kumiko; Imaue, Shuichi; Tomihara, Kei; Minamisaka, Takashi

    2017-11-16

    Major risk factors for oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are tobacco smoking, a betel quid chewing habit, and heavy alcohol consumption. However, around 15% of oral SCCs cannot be explained by these risk factors. Although oral SCC associated with dental implants is quite rare, there has been a recent gradual accumulation of reports about it. Here, we report a case of primary peri-implant oral intra-epithelial neoplasia/carcinoma in situ (OIN/CIS) in a woman without the major risk factors for oral SCC. A 65-year-old woman was referred to our clinic with a tumor in the right lower gingiva. She had no history of tobacco smoking and only drank socially. Ten years previously, mandibular right posterior teeth had been replaced with an implant-supported porcelain-fused-to-metal restoration in a dental clinic. About 7 years later, she noticed swelling on the lingual side of the gingiva around the implant-supported restoration, and was eventually referred to our clinic with the suspicion of a neoplasia around the dental implant. The upper part of the implant body was exposed on the implant corresponding to the first molar of the right side of the mandible; this was associated with painless, elastic soft, and relatively well circumscribed gingival swelling on the lingual site. A panoramic radiograph showed slight vertical bone resorption around the implants. An incisional biopsy was conducted under the suspicion of neoplasia. Pathological microscopic examination of the biopsy specimen revealed thickened squamous epithelia with slight nuclear atypism and disorders of the epithelial rete pegs. Immunohistochemical findings showed positive staining for keratin 17 and a negative staining mosaic pattern for keratin 13. High p53, p63, and Ki-67 reactivity was also observed. From these findings, OIN/CIS of the gingiva was pathologically diagnosed, and a wide local excision with rim resection of the mandible, including the implants, was performed. The pathological findings for the

  9. Oral administration of bepotastine besilate suppressed scratching behavior of atopic dermatitis model NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Hideaki; Kambe, Naotomo; Nakamura, Yuumi; Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2008-01-01

    Pruritus is the most severe problem in atopic dermatitis. Even though its mechanism is still not fully understood, antihistamines have been prescribed for atopic dermatitis. To evaluate the effect of antihistamine on atopic dermatitis, we analyzed the scratching behavior in atopic dermatitis model NC/Nga mice. BALB/c mice, in which scratching behavior was induced by intradermal injection of compound 48/80 (100 microg/100 microl/mouse), and NC/Nga mice, housed in a conventional environment and having developed spontaneous eczematous regions, were monitored with a SCLABA system after oral administration of bepotastine besilate. The number of eosinophils in the ear skin and the serum leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) levels were also evaluated. Bepotastine at doses of 3 and 10 mg/kg effectively inhibited the compound 48/80-induced scratching behavior of BALB/c mice 1 h after oral administration, comparable with the blood T(max), which was reached within 0.8-1.6 h in humans. Bepotastine also significantly inhibited the scratching behavior of NC/Nga mice 1 h after oral administration. Even though 10 mg/kg bepotastine could not influence the number of tissue eosinophils, it effectively suppressed the serum LTB(4) levels, just comparable with the suppression of scratch behavior of NC/Nga mice. Bepotastin effectively suppressed the scratch behavior of atopic dermatitis model mice, which may not simply be explained by the suppression of histamine but also by the suppression of other mediators like LTB(4). Bepotastine could be useful in the treatment of pruritus, especially early after oral administration. 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. Improvement of endocytoscopic findings after per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM in esophageal achalasia; does POEM reduce the risk of developing esophageal carcinoma? Per oral endoscopic myotomy, endocytoscopy and carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minami Hitomi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM has been reported to be a new therapeutic option for esophageal achalasia. The possibility that POEM could reduce the risk of developing esophageal squamous cell carcinoma was evaluated. Methods This was a single-centre, retrospective study. Fifteen consecutive patients with esophageal achalasia who underwent POEM in our institution between August 2010 and January 2012 were enrolled. Ultra-high magnification with endocytoscopy was performed, and both histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluations for Ki-67 and p53 were assessed before and 3 months after POEM. Results POEM was successfully performed and effectively released the dysphagia symptom in all patients without severe complications. Subjective symptoms (mean Ekcardt score, before 7.4 vs. after 0.5, p Conclusions POEM appears to be an effective and less invasive treatment of choice against achalasia and may reduce the risk of esophageal carcinogenesis. Endocytoscopy can be useful for the assessment of esophageal cellular proliferation.

  11. Promotion or suppression of experimental metastasis of B16 melanoma cells after oral administration of lapachol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Masayo; Murakami, Manabu; Takegami, Tsutomu; Ota, Takahide

    2008-06-01

    Lapachol [2-hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-1,4-naphthoquinone] is a vitamin K antagonist with antitumor activity. The effect of lapachol on the experimental metastasis of murine B16BL6 melanoma cells was examined. A single oral administration of a high toxic dose of lapachol (80-100 mg/kg) 6 h before iv injection of tumor cells drastically promoted metastasis. This promotion of metastasis was also observed in T-cell-deficient mice and NK-suppressed mice. In vitro treatment of B16BL6 cells with lapachol promoted metastasis only slightly, indicating that lapachol promotes metastasis primarily by affecting host factors other than T cells and NK cells. A single oral administration of warfarin, the most commonly used vitamin K antagonist, 6 h before iv injection of tumor cells also drastically promoted the metastasis of B16BL6 cells. The promotion of metastasis by lapachol and warfarin was almost completely suppressed by preadministration of vitamin K3, indicating that the promotion of metastasis by lapachol was derived from vitamin K antagonism. Six hours after oral administration of lapachol or warfarin, the protein C level was reduced maximally, without elongation of prothrombin time. These observations suggest that a high toxic dose of lapachol promotes metastasis by inducing a hypercoagulable state as a result of vitamin K-dependent pathway inhibition. On the other hand, serial oral administration of low non-toxic doses of lapachol (5-20 mg/kg) weakly but significantly suppressed metastasis by an unknown mechanism, suggesting the possible use of lapachol as an anti-metastatic agent.

  12. Promotion or suppression of experimental metastasis of B16 melanoma cells after oral administration of lapachol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Masayo; Murakami, Manabu; Takegami, Tsutomu; Ota, Takahide

    2008-01-01

    Lapachol [2-hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-1,4-naphthoquinone] is a vitamin K antagonist with antitumor activity. The effect of lapachol on the experimental metastasis of murine B16BL6 melanoma cells was examined. A single oral administration of a high toxic dose of lapachol (80-100 mg/kg) 6 h before iv injection of tumor cells drastically promoted metastasis. This promotion of metastasis was also observed in T-cell-deficient mice and NK-suppressed mice. In vitro treatment of B16BL6 cells with lapachol promoted metastasis only slightly, indicating that lapachol promotes metastasis primarily by affecting host factors other than T cells and NK cells. A single oral administration of warfarin, the most commonly used vitamin K antagonist, 6 h before iv injection of tumor cells also drastically promoted the metastasis of B16BL6 cells. The promotion of metastasis by lapachol and warfarin was almost completely suppressed by preadministration of vitamin K3, indicating that the promotion of metastasis by lapachol was derived from vitamin K antagonism. Six hours after oral administration of lapachol or warfarin, the protein C level was reduced maximally, without elongation of prothrombin time. These observations suggest that a high toxic dose of lapachol promotes metastasis by inducing a hypercoagulable state as a result of vitamin K-dependent pathway inhibition. On the other hand, serial oral administration of low non-toxic doses of lapachol (5-20 mg/kg) weakly but significantly suppressed metastasis by an unknown mechanism, suggesting the possible use of lapachol as an anti-metastatic agent

  13. Carcinogenesis. Genetics and circumstances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Okio

    2005-01-01

    Described are the author's study and aspect concerning carcinogenesis and radiation carcinogenesis, where he thinks cancer is not automatic, has a process and takes time. For radiation carcinogenic studies, he has used a model of the rat with genetically determined kidney cancer which is highly radiosensitive. That is, mutation by the so-called 2nd-hit of the causal gene (tumor suppressing gene Tsc2) is studied in the animal where the 1st-hit has been done by retrotransposon insertion, with and without exposure to radiations (X-ray, heavy particle beam and cosmic ray) for elucidating the mutation spectrum of the causal gene, the carcinogenic target, for the ultimate aim to prevent human cancer. He discusses the drama-type molecular mechanisms leading to cancer, gene abnormality and disease crisis, discontinuity in continuity in cancer formation, and importance of the timely diagnosis and appropriate therapy, and concludes the present age is becoming such one as that the nature of cancer even if genetic can be controlled by circumstances like timely and appropriate intervention. (S.I.)

  14. Human papillomavirus-mediated carcinogenesis and HPV-associated oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Part 2: Human papillomavirus associated oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khammissa Razia AG

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human papillomavirus (HPV infection of the mouth and oropharynx can be acquired by a variety of sexual and social forms of transmission. HPV-16 genotype is present in many oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomata. It has an essential aetiologic role in the development of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in a subset of subjects who are typically younger, are more engaged with high-risk sexual behaviour, have higher HPV-16 serum antibody titer, use less tobacco and have better survival rates than in subjects with HPV-cytonegative oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. In this subset of subjects the HPV-cytopositive carcinomatous cells have a distinct molecular profile. In contrast to HPV-cytopositive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, the causal association between HPV-16 and other high-risk HPV genotypes and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral mucosa is weak, and the nature of the association is unclear. It is likely that routine administration of HPV vaccination against high-risk HPV genotypes before the start of sexual activity will bring about a reduction in the incidence of HPV-mediated oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. This article focuses on aspects of HPV infection of the mouth and the oropharynx with emphasis on the link between HPV and squamous cell carcinoma, and on the limitations of the available diagnostic tests in identifying a cause-and-effect relationship of HPV with squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth and oropharynx.

  15. Induction of anergy or active suppression following oral tolerance is determined by antigen dosage.

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, A; Weiner, H L

    1994-01-01

    Oral tolerance was generated to hen egg white lysozyme in the mouse or to guinea pig myelin basic protein in the rat by a low-dose (1 mg) or a high-dose (5-20 mg) feeding regimen. High doses of antigen induced tolerance characterized by anergy with little or no active suppression and increased secretion of interleukin 4 (IL-4). Anergy was shown by an increase in frequency of IL-2-secreting cells following culture in recombinant IL-2. Low doses of antigen induced tolerance characterized by ant...

  16. Opioid withdrawal suppression efficacy of oral dronabinol in opioid dependent humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofwall, Michelle R; Babalonis, Shanna; Nuzzo, Paul A; Elayi, Samy Claude; Walsh, Sharon L

    2016-07-01

    The cannabinoid (CB) system is a rational novel target for treating opioid dependence, a significant public health problem around the world. This proof-of-concept study examined the potential efficacy of a CB1 receptor partial agonist, dronabinol, in relieving signs and symptoms of opioid withdrawal. Twelve opioid dependent adults participated in this 5-week, inpatient, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Volunteers were maintained on double-blind oxycodone (30mg oral, four times/day) and participated in a training session followed by 7 experimental sessions, each testing a single oral test dose (placebo, oxycodone 30 and 60mg, dronabinol 5, 10, 20, and 30mg [decreased from 40mg]). Placebo was substituted for oxycodone maintenance doses for 21h before each session in order to produce measurable opioid withdrawal. Outcomes included observer- and participant-ratings of opioid agonist, opioid withdrawal and psychomotor/cognitive performance. Oxycodone produced prototypic opioid agonist effects (i.e. suppressing withdrawal and increasing subjective effects indicative of abuse liability). Dronabinol 5 and 10mg produced effects most similar to placebo, while the 20 and 30mg doses produced modest signals of withdrawal suppression that were accompanied by dose-related increases in high, sedation, bad effects, feelings of heart racing, and tachycardia. Dronabinol was not liked more than placebo, showed some impairment in cognitive performance, and was identified as marijuana with increasing dose. CB1 receptor activation is a reasonable strategy to pursue for the treatment of opioid withdrawal; however, dronabinol is not a likely candidate given its modest withdrawal suppression effects of limited duration and previously reported tachycardia during opioid withdrawal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Chronic Inflammation-Related HPV: A Driving Force Speeds Oropharyngeal Carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC has been known to be a highly aggressive disease associated with human papilloma virus (HPV infection. To investigate the relationship between HPV and chronic inflammation in oropharyngeal carcinogenesis, we collected 140 oral mucous fresh specimens including 50 OPSCC patients, 50 cancer in situ, 30 precancerous lesions, and 10 normal oral mucous. Our data demonstrated that there was a significantly higher proportion of severe chronic inflammation in dysplastic epithelia in comparison with that in normal tissues (P<0.001. The positive rate of HPV 16 was parallel with the chronic inflammation degrees from mild to severe inflammation (P<0.05. The positive rate of HPV 16 was progressively improved with the malignant progression of oral mucous (P<0.05. In addition, CD11b+ LIN- HLA-DR-CD33+ MDSCs were a critical cell population that mediates inflammation response and immune suppression in HPV-positive OPSCC. These indicated that persistent chronic inflammation-related HPV infection might drive oropharyngeal carcinogenesis and MDSCs might pay an important role during this process. Thus, a combination of HPV infection and inflammation expression might become a helpful biomedical marker to predict oropharyngeal carcinogenesis.

  18. Suppression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by oral administration of myelin antigens: IV. Suppression of chronic relapsing disease in the Lewis rat and strain 13 guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brod, S A; al-Sabbagh, A; Sobel, R A; Hafler, D A; Weiner, H L

    1991-06-01

    Oral administration of proteins is a long-recognized method of inducing antigen-specific peripheral immune tolerance. We previously showed that oral administration of myelin basic protein suppresses monophasic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the Lewis rat when it is given in association with immunization and prior to disease onset. As a potential therapy for human autoimmune disease, it is crucial to determine whether oral tolerance can ameliorate an ongoing immune response. We therefore asked whether oral administration of myelin antigens, after sensitization and disease expression has occurred, could affect immunological, clinical, or pathological features of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Chronic relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was induced in the Lewis rat and strain 13 guinea pig by immunization with whole guinea pig cord homogenate, complete Freund's adjuvant, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Following recovery from the first attack, animals were orally given bovine myelin, guinea pig myelin, or guinea pig myelin basic protein three times per week for up to 3 months. Animals receiving myelin products orally had decreased severity and frequency of clinical relapses, decreased delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to myelin antigens, diminished inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS), and decreased areas of CNS demyelination. In the rat, guinea pig myelin basic protein was as effective as guinea pig myelin in ameliorating the disease and also resulted in decreased serum anti-myelin basic protein antibody levels. No exacerbation of disease or worsening of pathological findings occurred in the animals given myelin products. These results demonstrate that oral administration of myelin antigens can suppress chronic relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and have direct relevance to therapy of human demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis.

  19. Improvement of endocytoscopic findings after per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) in esophageal achalasia; does POEM reduce the risk of developing esophageal carcinoma? Per oral endoscopic myotomy, endocytoscopy and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hitomi; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Inoue, Haruhiro; Nakao, Kazuhiko; Isomoto, Hajime

    2013-01-30

    Per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been reported to be a new therapeutic option for esophageal achalasia. The possibility that POEM could reduce the risk of developing esophageal squamous cell carcinoma was evaluated. This was a single-centre, retrospective study. Fifteen consecutive patients with esophageal achalasia who underwent POEM in our institution between August 2010 and January 2012 were enrolled. Ultra-high magnification with endocytoscopy was performed, and both histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluations for Ki-67 and p53 were assessed before and 3 months after POEM. POEM was successfully performed and effectively released the dysphagia symptom in all patients without severe complications. Subjective symptoms (mean Ekcardt score, before 7.4 vs. after 0.5, p<0.05) and manometric pressure studies (mean lower esophageal sphincter pressure), before 82.7 vs. after 22.9 mmHg, p<0.05) showed substantial improvement following POEM. The average numbers of esophageal epithelial nuclei before and after POEM on endocytoscopic images were 128.0 and 78.0, respectively (p<0.05). The mean Ki-67-positive ratio was 26.0 (median 25.4, range, 10.3-33.2) before and 20.7 (median 20.0, 13.1-29.9; p=0.07) after POEM, and the mean p53-positive ratio was 2.35 (median 2.61, 0.32-4.23) before and 0.97 (median 1.49, 0.32-1.56; p<0.05) after POEM. A significant positive correlation was seen between the number of nuclei and the Ki-67-positive ratio (p<0.05). POEM appears to be an effective and less invasive treatment of choice against achalasia and may reduce the risk of esophageal carcinogenesis. Endocytoscopy can be useful for the assessment of esophageal cellular proliferation.

  20. Citric Acid Suppresses the Bitter Taste of Olopatadine Hydrochloride Orally Disintegrating Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoyama, Mai; Uchida, Shinya; Tanaka, Shimako; Hakamata, Akio; Odagiri, Keiichi; Inui, Naoki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Namiki, Noriyuki

    2017-01-01

    Orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs) are formulated to disintegrate upon contact with saliva, allowing administration without water. Olopatadine hydrochloride, a second-generation antihistamine, is widely used for treating allergic rhinitis. However, it has a bitter taste; therefore, the development of taste-masked olopatadine ODTs is essential. Some studies have suggested that citric acid could suppress the bitterness of drugs. However, these experiments were performed using solutions, and the taste-masking effect of citric acid on ODTs has not been evaluated using human gustatory sensation tests. Thus, this study evaluated citric acid's taste-masking effect on olopatadine ODTs. Six types of olopatadine ODTs containing 0-10% citric acid were prepared and subjected to gustatory sensation tests that were scored using the visual analog scale. The bitterness and overall palatability of olopatadine ODTs during disintegration in the mouth and after spitting out were evaluated in 11 healthy volunteers (age: 22.8±2.2 years). The hardness of the ODTs was >50 N. Disintegration time and dissolution did not differ among the different ODTs. The results of the gustatory sensation tests suggest that citric acid could suppress the bitterness of olopatadine ODTs in a dose-dependent manner. Olopatadine ODTs with a high content of citric acid (5-10%) showed poorer overall palatability than that of those without citric acid despite the bitterness suppression. ODTs containing 2.5% citric acid, yogurt flavoring, and aspartame were the most suitable formulations since they showed low bitterness and good overall palatability. Thus, citric acid is an effective bitterness-masking option for ODTs.

  1. Optimization Aspects of Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Brutovsky, B.; Horvath, D.

    2009-01-01

    Any process in which competing solutions replicate with errors and numbers of their copies depend on their respective fitnesses is the evolutionary optimization process. As during carcinogenesis mutated genomes replicate according to their respective qualities, carcinogenesis obviously qualifies as the evolutionary optimization process and conforms to common mathematical basis. The optimization view accents statistical nature of carcinogenesis proposing that during it the crucial role is actu...

  2. Oral fluconazole as suppressive therapy of disseminated cryptococcosis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, A M; Saunders, C

    1988-10-01

    Because of the increasing numbers of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) who will require treatment for cryptococcosis and because of the problems associated with long-term administration of intravenous amphotericin B, an alternative therapeutic approach in the form of an efficacious and easily administered oral antifungal drug would be of great benefit. Fluconazole, a new triazole antifungal agent, represents such an alternative. We therefore conducted an open, non-randomized trial of oral fluconazole as maintenance suppressive therapy of disseminated cryptococcosis in patients with AIDS. Twenty patients with AIDS, 19 of whom had cryptococcal meningitis, were studied. Patients were followed for up to 21 months. All patients received amphotericin B as primary therapy, from 20 to 257 days prior to entry (500 to 5,080 mg total dose). Eight also received flucytosine. After administration of amphotericin B for acute disseminated cryptococcosis, and prior to initiation of fluconazole therapy, Cryptococcus neoformans was isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in two patients and from the blood in one patient. Fluconazole was given once daily, in doses of 50 to 200 mg/day. Following initiation of fluconazole, results of CSF and blood cultures continued to be negative, except for the CSF culture in one patient who had a relapse in the 32nd week of therapy. Fluconazole therapy has been successfully continued in nine patients, for a median of 11 months (nine to 21 months). Seven patients died; five had no evidence of active cryptococcosis at the time of death. Two patients had a relapse, although the CSF culture showed growth of the fungus in only one patient. One patient was lost to follow-up after five months of therapy and one was unevaluable. Fluconazole had to be discontinued in only one patient in whom thrombocytopenia developed, and then resolved when the drug was stopped. We conclude that oral fluconazole represents a significant advance in

  3. Suppression of pro-inflammatory and pro-survival biomarkers in oral cancer patients consuming a black raspberry phytochemical-rich troche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Thomas J.; Uhrig, Lana K.; Pearl, Dennis K.; Casto, Bruce C.; Warner, Blake M.; Clinton, Steven K.; Sardo-Molmenti, Christine L.; Ferguson, Jeanette M.; Daly, Brett T.; Riedl, Kenneth; Schwartz, Steven J.; Vodovotz, Yael; Buchta, Anthony J.; Schuller, David E.; Ozer, Enver; Agrawal, Amit; Weghorst, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Black raspberries (BRBs) demonstrate potent inhibition of aerodigestive tract carcinogenesis in animal models. However, translational clinical trials evaluating the ability of BRB phytochemicals to impact molecular biomarkers in the oral mucosa remain limited. The present phase 0 study addresses a fundamental question for oral cancer food-based prevention: Do BRB phytochemicals successfully reach the targeted oral tissues and reduce pro-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic gene expression profiles? Patients with biopsy-confirmed oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) administered oral troches containing freeze-dried BRB powder from the time of enrollment to the date of curative intent surgery (13.9 ± 1.27 days). Transcriptional biomarkers were evaluated in patient-matched OSCCs and non-involved high at-risk mucosa (HARM) for BRB-associated changes. Significant expression differences between baseline OSCC and HARM tissues were confirmed using a panel of genes commonly deregulated during oral carcinogenesis. Following BRB troche administration, the expression of pro-survival genes (AURKA, BIRC5, EGFR) and pro-inflammatory genes (NFKB1, PTGS2) were significantly reduced. There were no BRB-associated Grade 3–4 toxicities or adverse events and 79.2% (N = 30) of patients successfully completed the study with high levels of compliance (97.2%). The BRB phytochemicals cyanidin-3-rutinoside and cyanidin-3-xylosylrutinoside were detected in all OSCC tissues analyzed, demonstrating that bioactive components were successfully reaching targeted OSCC tissues. We confirmed that hallmark anti-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory molecular biomarkers were over-expressed in OSCCs and that their gene expression was significantly reduced following BRB troche administration. Since these molecular biomarkers are fundamental to oral carcinogenesis and are modifiable, they may represent emerging biomarkers of molecular efficacy for BRB-mediated oral cancer chemoprevention. PMID:26701664

  4. Melatonin exerts anti-oral cancer effect via suppressing LSD1 in patient-derived tumor xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Chih-Kung; Tsao, Chang-Huei; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Gu-Jiun; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Shieh, Yi-Shing; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Chen, Yuan-Wu

    2017-05-16

    Aberrant activation of histone lysine-specific demethylase (LSD1) increases tumorigenicity; hence, LSD1 is considered a therapeutic target for various human cancers. Although melatonin, an endogenously produced molecule, may defend against various cancers, the precise mechanism involved in its anti-oral cancer effect remains unclear. Patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDTX) models are preclinical models that can more accurately reflect human tumor biology compared with cell line xenograft models. Here, we evaluated the anticancer activity of melatonin by using LSD1-overexpressing oral cancer PDTX models. By assessing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissue arrays through immunohistochemistry, we examined whether aberrant LSD1 overexpression in OSCC is associated with poor prognosis. We also evaluated the action mechanism of melatonin against OSCC with lymphatic metastases by using the PDTX models. Our results indicated that melatonin, at pharmacological concentrations, significantly suppresses cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The observed suppression of proliferation was accompanied by the melatonin-mediated inhibition of LSD1 in oral cancer PDTXs and oral cancer cell lines. In conclusion, we determined that the beneficial effects of melatonin in reducing oral cancer cell proliferation are associated with reduced LSD1 expression in vivo and in vitro.

  5. Melatonin exerts anti-oral cancer effect via suppressing LSD1 in patient-derived tumor xenograft models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Chih-Kung; Tsao, Chang-Huei; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Gu-Jiun; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Shieh, Yi-Shing; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Chen, Yuan-Wu

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant activation of histone lysine-specific demethylase (LSD1) increases tumorigenicity; hence, LSD1 is considered a therapeutic target for various human cancers. Although melatonin, an endogenously produced molecule, may defend against various cancers, the precise mechanism involved in its anti-oral cancer effect remains unclear. Patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDTX) models are preclinical models that can more accurately reflect human tumor biology compared with cell line xenograft models. Here, we evaluated the anticancer activity of melatonin by using LSD1-overexpressing oral cancer PDTX models. By assessing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissue arrays through immunohistochemistry, we examined whether aberrant LSD1 overexpression in OSCC is associated with poor prognosis. We also evaluated the action mechanism of melatonin against OSCC with lymphatic metastases by using the PDTX models. Our results indicated that melatonin, at pharmacological concentrations, significantly suppresses cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The observed suppression of proliferation was accompanied by the melatonin-mediated inhibition of LSD1 in oral cancer PDTXs and oral cancer cell lines. In conclusion, we determined that the beneficial effects of melatonin in reducing oral cancer cell proliferation are associated with reduced LSD1 expression in vivo and in vitro. PMID:28422711

  6. Oral corticosteroids for asthma exacerbations might be associated with adrenal suppression: Are physicians aware of that?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina B. Barra

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Oral corticosteroids (OCS are a mainstay of treatment for asthma exacerbations, and short-term OCS courses were generally considered to be safe. Nevertheless, frequent short-term OCS courses could lead to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis dysfunction. Our study aimed at investigating the integrity of the HPA axis in children with persistent asthma or recurrent wheezing at the beginning of an inhaled corticosteroids (ICS trial. Method: Morning basal cortisol was assessed just before the beginning of ICS, and 30, 60, and 90 days later, using Immulite® Siemens Medical Solutions Diagnostic chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (Los Angeles, USA; 2006. Results: In all, 140 children (0.3-15 years old with persistent asthma or recurrent wheezing have been evaluated and 40% of them reported short-term OCS courses for up to 30 days before evaluation. Out of these, 12.5% had biochemical adrenal suppression but showed adrenal recovery during a three-month ICS trial treatment. No significant differences were observed among children with or without adrenal suppression, neither in the number of days free of OCS treatment before cortisol evaluation (p=0.29 nor in the last OCS course duration (p=0.20. The number of short-term OCS courses reported in the year preceding the cortisol evaluation was also not different (p=0.89. Conclusion: Short-term systemic courses of corticosteroids at conventional doses can put children at risk of HPA axis dysfunction. ICS treatment does not impair adrenal recovery from occurring. Health practitioners should be aware of the risk of a blunted cortisol response upon exposure to stress during the follow-up of patients with persistent asthma or recurrent wheezing.

  7. Evidence about extending the duration of oral contraceptive use to suppress menstruation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, Christine L; Prior, Jerilynn C

    2004-01-01

    For many years, individual women and doctors have experimented with extending the duration of active oral contraceptive (OC) pills between pill-free intervals (long OC) to control menstruation. The U.S. approval of an OC with 84 active days and 7 pill-free days in 2003 has attracted considerable media attention. In this review we consider the published evidence on the effectiveness, side effects, and risks of menstrual suppression with long OC. We performed a systematic review of published literature on long OC, up to April 2003. Ten papers were located; two were randomized trials comparing long OC to standard OC; the remaining studies were single-group observational studies. Women on long OC schedules had fewer days of scheduled bleeding during days without pills but more days of unscheduled bleeding and spotting than those on standard OC. These problems were worse for women new to OC and diminished over time. Women on long OC were more likely to discontinue due to poor control of bleeding; women on standard OC were more likely to stop because of problems with headaches. Women on long OC and standard OC both showed increases in physiological factors related to clotting, with a nonsignificant tendency for those on long OC to be more affected. No studies considered the effects of long OC on breast tissue, breast density, endometrial safety, or adolescent maturation and reproductive development. No systematic data were available on the return to reproductive function and fertility after taking long OC. There were no placebo-controlled trials and no information on how long OC compares to normal, unmedicated menstrual cycles. Therefore we believe scientific evidence for safety of long OC use is presently lacking.

  8. Sites of origin of oral cavity cancer in nonsmokers vs smokers: possible evidence of dental trauma carcinogenesis and its importance compared with human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Brendan J; Zammit, Andrew P; Lewandowski, Andrew W; Bashford, Julia J; Dragovic, Adrian S; Perry, Emily J; Hayatbakhsh, Reza; Perry, Christopher F L

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high and possibly rising incidence of mouth squamous cell carcinoma in nonsmokers, especially women, without obvious cause has been noted by previous authors. Is chronic dental trauma and irritation a carcinogen, and what is its importance compared with human papillomavirus (HPV) oropharyngeal cancer in nonsmokers? To determine whether oral cavity cancers occurred more commonly at sites of dental trauma and how the position of these cancers varied between nonsmokers lacking major identified carcinogens and smokers. If these cancers occurred more frequently at sites of chronic trauma, especially in nonsmokers, it would suggest chronic dental trauma as a possible carcinogen. A retrospective analysis of 881 patients with oral cavity or oropharyngeal cancers seen through a tertiary referral hospital between 2001 and 2011 was performed. Patient medical records were analyzed to determine the location of the tumor within the oral cavity and oropharynx and how it relates to patient demographics, smoking and alcohol histories, and comorbidities. Dental histories were also sought, including use of dentures. Nonsmokers comprised 87 of 390 patients with mouth cancer (22%) and 48 of 334 patients with oropharyngeal cancer (14%). Female nonsmoking patients included 53 with oral cancer (61%) but only 12 with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (25%). Oral cancers occurred on the lateral tongue, a potential site of chronic dental trauma, in 57 nonsmokers (66%) compared with 107 smokers/ex-smokers (33%) (P Oral cavity cancers occur predominantly at sites of potential dental and denture trauma, especially in nonsmokers without other risk factors. Recognizing teeth irritation as a potential carcinogen would have an impact on prevention and treatment strategies.

  9. Phenotypically non-suppressive cells predominate among FoxP3-positive cells in oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Olav; Karatsaidis, Andreas; Schenck, Karl

    2016-11-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a common T-cell-dominated oral chronic inflammatory disease occurring in periods of remission, quiescence, activity with pronounced inflammation, and acute ulceration. Cell infiltrates in OLP contain varying numbers of CD4 + T cells expressing the transcription factor FoxP3. FoxP3 + CD4 + T cells are, however, a heterogeneous cell population containing suppressive and non-suppressive cells, and their distribution in infiltrates from OLP is unknown. Biopsies were taken from normal oral mucosa (n = 8) and OLP lesions (n = 19), and a set of in situ methods for the determination of the functional phenotype of FoxP3 + CD4 + T cells was applied. Numbers of FoxP3 + CD4 + T cells were highest in the atrophic form of the disease, yet low in the ulcerative form. The main FoxP3 + CD4 + T-cell population observed was FoxP3 + CD45RA - CD25 + CD45RO + and CD15s - , a phenotype delineating a non-suppressive subset. Numbers of cells with an actively suppressing phenotype (FoxP3 + CD45RA - CD25 + CD45RO + and CD15s + ) were, however, about twice as high in reticular lesions as compared with the atrophic form. Many FoxP3 + CD4 + T cells expressed T-bet, the hallmark transcription factor for IFN-γ-producing T cells, indicating that they may enhance immune and inflammatory responses rather than suppress them. The absence of actively suppressing FoxP3 + CD4 + T cells may in part explain why OLP is a remarkably persisting condition, in spite of the presence of substantially high numbers of FoxP3 + CD4 + T cells. The findings emphasize that it is crucial to examine not only numbers but also functional phenotype of FoxP3 + CD4 + T cells in human tissues. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Optimization aspects of carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutovsky, B; Horvath, D

    2010-05-01

    Any process in which competing solutions replicate with errors and numbers of their copies depend on their respective fitnesses is the evolutionary optimization process. As during carcinogenesis mutated genomes replicate according to their respective qualities, carcinogenesis obviously qualifies as the evolutionary optimization process and conforms to common mathematical basis. The optimization view accents statistical nature of carcinogenesis proposing that during it the crucial role is actually played by the allocation of trials. Optimal allocation of trials requires reliable schemas' fitnesses estimations which necessitate appropriate, fitness landscape dependent, statistics of population. In the spirit of the applied conceptual framework, features which are known to decrease efficiency of any evolutionary optimization procedure (or inhibit it completely) are anticipated as "therapies" and reviewed. Strict adherence to the evolutionary optimization framework leads us to some counterintuitive implications which are, however, in agreement with recent experimental findings, such as sometimes observed more aggressive and malignant growth of therapy surviving cancer cells.

  11. [Suppression of VEGF protein expression by arctigenin in oral squamous cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Guang-rui; Liu, Fa-yu; Wang, Bo

    2015-08-01

    To observe arctigenin's inhibitory effect on oral squamous cell carcinoma, and explore the possible mechanism. The expression of VEGF in 32 cases of oral squamous cell cancer and 20 adjacent tissue specimen were detected with immunohistochemistry. Human nude mouse transplantation tumor model of oral squamous cell cancer was prepared with HSC-3 cells line. Transplanted tumor growth and VEGF expression in transplanted tumor tissues were assayed after treatment with arctigenin. One-way ANOVA was used for comparison between groups with SPSS 16.0 software package. Compared with the adjacent tissue, immunohistochemical staining score of VEGF was significantly higher (Parctigenin, the growth of oral squamous cell transplanted tumors in nude mouse was inhibited (Parctigenin group (PArctigenin can dose-dependently inhibit the growth of oral squamous cell carcinomas, and this effect may be related to down regulation of VEGF expression.

  12. Experimental radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walburg, H.E. Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Literature on radioinduced carcinogenesis in experimental animals is reviewed with emphasis on the basic principles which could lead to a better predictability of radiation effects in man. It was concluded that the animal systems studied thus far are quantitatively inadequate for determining radiation risk estimates in man. (350 references.) (U.S.)

  13. Oral and nasal administration of chicken type II collagen suppresses adjuvant arthritis in rats with intestinal lesions induced by meloxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong-Qiu; Wei, Wei; Shen, Yu-Xian; Dai, Min; Liu, Li-Hua

    2004-11-01

    To investigate the curative effects of oral and nasal administration of chicken type II collagen (CII) on adjuvant arthritis (AA) in rats with meloxicam-induced intestinal lesions. AA model in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with or without intestinal lesions induced by meloxicam was established and those rats were divided randomly into six groups which included AA model, AA model+meloxicam, AA model+oral CII, AA model+nasal CII, AA model+ meloxicam+oral C II and AA model+meloxicam+nasal CII (n = 12). Rats was treated with meloxicam intragastrically for 7 d from d 14 after immunization with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and then treated with chicken CII intragastrically or nasally for 7 d. Histological changes of right hind knees were examined. Hind paw secondary swelling and intestinal lesions were evaluated. Synoviocyte proliferation was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H tetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. Activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and diamine oxidase (DAO) from supernatants of intestinal homogenates were assayed by spectrophotometric analysis. Intragastrical administration of meloxicam (1.5 mg/kg) induced multiple intestinal lesions in AA rats. There was a significant decrease of intestinal DAO activities in AA+meloxicam group (P<0.01) and AA model group (P<0.01) compared with normal group. DAO activities of intestinal homogenates in AA+meloxicam group were significantly less than those in AA rats (P<0.01). There was a significant increase of intestinal MPO activities in AA+meloxicam group compared with normal control (P<0.01). Oral or nasal administration of CII (20 microg/kg) could suppress the secondary hind paw swelling(P<0.05 for oral CII; P<0.01 for nasal CII), synoviocyte proliferation (P<0.01) and histopathological degradation in AA rats, but they had no significant effects on DAO and MPO changes. However, oral administration of CII (20 microg/kg) showed the limited efficacy on arthritis in AA+meloxicam model and the

  14. Korean Solar Salt Ameliorates Colon Carcinogenesis in an AOM/DSS-Induced C57BL/6 Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jaehyun; Kim, Yeung-Ju; Park, Eui Seong; Park, Kun-Young

    2017-06-01

    The effects of Korean solar salt on an azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colon cancer C57BL/6 mouse model were studied. Korean solar salt samples (SS-S, solar salt from S salt field; SS-Yb, solar salt from Yb salt field), nine-time-baked bamboo salt (BS-9x, made from SS-Yb), purified salt (PS), and SS-G (solar salt from Guérande, France) were orally administered at a concentration of 1% during AOM/DSS colon cancer induction, and compared for their protective effects during colon carcinogenesis in C57BL/6 mice. SS-S and SS-Yb suppressed colon length shortening and tumor counts in mouse colons. Histological evaluation by hematoxylin and eosin staining also revealed suppression of tumorigenesis by SS-S. Conversely, PS and SS-G did not show a similar suppressive efficacy as Korean solar salt. SS-S and SS-Yb promoted colon mRNA expression of an apoptosis-related factor and cell-cycle-related gene and suppressed pro-inflammatory factor. SS-Yb baked into BS-9x further promoted these anti-carcinogenic efficacies. Taken together, the results indicate that Korean solar salt, especially SS-S and SS-Yb, exhibited anti-cancer activity by modulating apoptosis- and inflammation-related gene expression during colon carcinogenesis in mice, and bamboo salt baked from SS-Yb showed enhanced anti-cancer functionality.

  15. Carcinogenesis of cutaneous malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzell, R A

    1996-03-01

    Over the past several years significant progress has been made in identifying the cellular and biochemical mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis. This review summarizes recent advances that have helped clarify the process of malignant transformation in cutaneous tumors. Ultraviolet radiation-induced mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene and human papilloma virus inhibition of the p53 and retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene products appear to play significant roles in the development of many cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas. Studies of patients with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome suggest the existence of an additional regulatory gene that may be involved in the development of basal cell carcinomas. Carcinogenesis is multistep process involving genetic and epigenetic alterations to specific proto-oncogene and tumor suppressor gene products that progressively release the cell from normal controlled growth and replication.

  16. Radiation carcinogenesis, laboratory studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shellabarger, C.J.

    1974-01-01

    Laboratory studies on radioinduced carcinogenesis are reviewed. Some topics discussed are: radioinduced neoplasia in relation to life shortening; dose-response relationships; induction of skin tumors in rats by alpha particles and electrons; effects of hormones on tumor response; effects of low LET radiations delivered at low dose-rates; effects of fractionated neutron radiation; interaction of RBE and dose rate effects; and estimates of risks for humans from animal data. (U.S.)

  17. Oral administration of nano-emulsion curcumin in mice suppresses inflammatory-induced NFκB signaling and macrophage migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Young

    Full Text Available Despite the widespread use of curcumin for centuries in Eastern medicine as an anti-inflammatory agent, its molecular actions and therapeutic viability have only recently been explored. While curcumin does have potential therapeutic efficacy, both solubility and bioavailability must be improved before it can be more successfully translated to clinical care. We have previously reported a novel formulation of nano-emulsion curcumin (NEC that achieves significantly greater plasma concentrations in mice after oral administration. Here, we confirm the immunosuppressive effects of NEC in vivo and further examine its molecular mechanisms to better understand therapeutic potential. Using transgenic mice harboring an NFκB-luciferase reporter gene, we demonstrate a novel application of this in vivo inflammatory model to test the efficacy of NEC administration by bioluminescent imaging and show that LPS-induced NFκB activity was suppressed with NEC compared to an equivalent amount of curcumin in aqueous suspension. Administration of NEC by oral gavage resulted in a reduction of blood monocytes, decreased levels of both TLR4 and RAGE expression, and inhibited secretion of MCP-1. Mechanistically, curcumin blocked LPS-induced phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NFκB and IκBα in murine macrophages. In a mouse model of peritonitis, NEC significantly reduced macrophage recruitment, but not T-cell or B-cell levels. In addition, curcumin treatment of monocyte derived cell lines and primary human macrophages in vitro significantly inhibited cell migration. These data demonstrate that curcumin can suppress inflammation by inhibiting macrophage migration via NFκB and MCP-1 inhibition and establish that NEC is an effective therapeutic formulation to increase the bioavailability of curcumin in order to facilitate this response.

  18. Carvacrol suppresses proliferation and invasion in human oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai W

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wei Dai,1,2 Changfu Sun,1,2 Shaohui Huang,1,2 Qing Zhou1,21Department of Oromaxillofacial-Head and Neck Surgery, 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, as a novel antitumor agent, has been implicated in several types of cancer cells. However, the mechanisms underlying the effect of carvacrol in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC remain unclear. Here, we report that carvacrol significantly inhibits tumor cell proliferation, metastasis and invasion, and induces apoptosis in OSCC. Our results demonstrated that the molecular mechanisms of the effect of carvacrol in Tca-8113 induces G1/S cell cycle arrest through downregulation of CDK regulator CCND1 and CDK4, and upregulation of CDK inhibitor P21. Further analysis demonstrated that carvacrol also inhibited Tca-8113 cells’ clone formation in clonogenic cell survival assay. Student’s t-test (two-tailed was used to compare differences between groups, and the significance level was P<0.01. Then, treatment of Tca-8113 cells with carvacrol resulted in downregulation of Bcl-2, Cox2, and upregulation of Bax. Carvacrol significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of human OSCC cells by blocking the phosphorylation of FAK and MMP-9 and MMP-2, transcription factor ZEB1, and β-catenin proteins’ expression. Taken together, these results provide novel insights into the mechanism of carvacrol and suggest potential therapeutic strategies for human OSCC.Keywords: carvacrol, proliferation, metastasis and invasion, oral squamous cell carcinoma

  19. Oral delivery of Acid Alpha Glucosidase epitopes expressed in plant chloroplasts suppresses antibody formation in treatment of Pompe mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Doerfler, Phillip A; Byrne, Barry J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-10-01

    Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease in which the patients systemically accumulate lysosomal glycogen in muscles and nervous systems, often resulting in infant mortality. Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is effective in treating patients with Pompe disease, formation of antibodies against rhGAA complicates treatment. In this report, we investigated induction of tolerance by oral administration of GAA expressed in chloroplasts. Because full-length GAA could not be expressed, N-terminal 410-amino acids of GAA (as determined by T-cell epitope mapping) were fused with the transmucosal carrier CTB. Tobacco transplastomic lines expressing CTB-GAA were generated through site-specific integration of transgenes into the chloroplast genome. Homoplasmic lines were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Despite low-level expression of CTB-GAA in chloroplasts, yellow or albino phenotype of transplastomic lines was observed due to binding of GAA to a chloroplast protein that has homology to mannose-6 phosphate receptor. Oral administration of the plant-made CTB-GAA fusion protein even at 330-fold lower dose (1.5 μg) significantly suppressed immunoglobulin formation against GAA in Pompe mice injected with 500 μg rhGAA per dose, with several-fold lower titre of GAA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a. Lyophilization increased CTB-GAA concentration by 30-fold (up to 190 μg per g of freeze-dried leaf material), facilitating long-term storage at room temperature and higher dosage in future investigations. This study provides the first evidence that oral delivery of plant cells is effective in reducing antibody responses in ERT for lysosomal storage disorders facilitating further advances in clinical investigations using plant cell culture system or in vitro propagation. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Suppression of inhibitor formation against FVIII in a murine model of hemophilia A by oral delivery of antigens bioencapsulated in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Alexandra; Su, Jin; Lin, Shina; Wang, Xiaomei; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2014-09-04

    Hemophilia A is the X-linked bleeding disorder caused by deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). To address serious complications of inhibitory antibody formation in current replacement therapy, we created tobacco transplastomic lines expressing FVIII antigens, heavy chain (HC) and C2, fused with the transmucosal carrier, cholera toxin B subunit. Cholera toxin B-HC and cholera toxin B-C2 fusion proteins expressed up to 80 or 370 µg/g in fresh leaves, assembled into pentameric forms, and bound to GM1 receptors. Protection of FVIII antigen through bioencapsulation in plant cells and oral delivery to the gut immune system was confirmed by immunostaining. Feeding of HC/C2 mixture substantially suppressed T helper cell responses and inhibitor formation against FVIII in mice of 2 different strain backgrounds with hemophilia A. Prolonged oral delivery was required to control inhibitor formation long-term. Substantial reduction of inhibitor titers in preimmune mice demonstrated that the protocol could also reverse inhibitor formation. Gene expression and flow cytometry analyses showed upregulation of immune suppressive cytokines (transforming growth factor β and interleukin 10). Adoptive transfer experiments confirmed an active suppression mechanism and revealed induction of CD4(+)CD25(+) and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells that potently suppressed anti-FVIII formation. In sum, these data support plant cell-based oral tolerance for suppression of inhibitor formation against FVIII. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. Oral prednisolone suppresses allergic but not irritant patch test reactions in individuals hypersensitive to nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anveden, Ingegärd; Lindberg, Magnus; Andersen, Klaus E

    2004-01-01

    A multicentre, randomized, double-blind, crossover study was designed to investigate the effects of prednisone on allergic and irritant patch test reactions. 24 subjects with known allergy to nickel were recruited and patch tested with a nickel sulfate dilution series in aqueous solution, 5% nickel...... sulfate in petrolatum and 2 dilution series of the irritants nonanoic acid and sodium lauryl sulfate. The subjects were tested x2, both during treatment with prednisone 20 mg oral daily and during placebo treatment. The total number of positive nickel patch test reactions decreased significantly...... in patients during prednisone treatment. The threshold concentration to elicit a patch test reaction increased and the overall degree of reactivity to nickel sulfate shifted towards weaker reactions. The effect of prednisone treatment on the response to irritants was divergent with both increased...

  2. Suppression of Inflammation and Arthritis by Orally Administrated Cardiotoxin from Naja naja atra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao-Xin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiotoxin (CTX from Naja naja atra venom (NNAV reportedly had analgesic effect in animal models but its role in inflammation and arthritis was unknown. In this study, we investigated the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antiarthritic actions of orally administered CTX-IV isolated from NNAV on rodent models of inflammation and adjuvant arthritis. CTX had significant anti-inflammatory effects in models of egg white induced nonspecific inflammation, filter paper induced rat granuloma formation, and capillary osmosis tests. CTX significantly reduced the swelling of paw induced by egg white, the inflammatory exudation, and the formation of granulomas. CTX reduced the swelling of paw, the AA clinical scores, and pathological alterations of joint. CTX significantly decreased the number of the CD4 T cells and inhibited the expression of relevant proinflammatory cytokines IL-17 and IL-6. CTX significantly inhibited the secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and reduced the level of p-STAT3 in FLS. These results suggest that CTX inhibits inflammation and inflammatory pain and adjuvant-induced arthritis. CTX may be a novel therapeutic drug for treatment of arthritis.

  3. Cell proliferation in carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, S.M.; Ellwein, L.B. (Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha (USA))

    1990-08-31

    Chemicals that induce cancer at high doses in animal bioassays often fail to fit the traditional characterization of genotoxins. Many of these nongenotoxic compounds (such as sodium saccharin) have in common the property that they increase cell proliferation in the target organ. A biologically based, computerized description of carcinogenesis was used to show that the increase in cell proliferation can account for the carcinogenicity of nongenotoxic compounds. The carcinogenic dose-response relationship for genotoxic chemicals (such as 2-acetylaminofluorene) was also due in part to increased cell proliferation. Mechanistic information is required for determination of the existence of a threshold for the proliferative (and carcinogenic) response of nongenotoxic chemicals and the estimation of risk for human exposure.

  4. A randomized clinical trial of treatment of clomiphene citrate-resistant anovulation with the use of oral contraceptive pill suppression and repeat clomiphene citrate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branigan, Emmett F; Estes, M Antoinette

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and endocrine response of oral contraceptive ovarian suppression followed by clomiphene citrate in patients who previously were clomiphene citrate resistant. Forty-eight patients from a private tertiary infertility clinic were assigned randomly prospectively to either group 1 (oral contraceptive/clomiphene citrate), which received continuous oral contraceptives followed by clomiphene citrate, or to group 2 (control) received no treatment in the cycle before clomiphene citrate treatment. On day 3, 17 beta-estradiol, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and androgens were assayed before and after treatment. Follicle growth, ovulation, and pregnancy were evaluated. The Student t test and analysis of variance were used for statistical significance. The oral contraceptive/clomiphene citrate group had a significantly higher percentage of patients who ovulated and of ovulatory cycles and pregnancies. Significantly lower levels of 17 beta-estradiol, luteinizing hormone, and androgen levels were seen in the oral contraceptive/clomiphene citrate group, with no significant changes in group 2. Suppression of the ovary with oral contraceptives results in excellent rates of ovulation and pregnancy in patients who previously were resistant to clomiphene citrate. The decreases in ovarian androgens, luteinizing hormone, and 17 beta-estradiol may be responsible for the improved response.

  5. Nutraceutical Approach for Preventing Obesity-Related Colorectal and Liver Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisataka Moriwaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and its related metabolic abnormalities, including insulin resistance, alterations in the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1/IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R axis, and the state of chronic inflammation, increase the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. However, these findings also indicate that the metabolic disorders caused by obesity might be effective targets to prevent the development of CRC and HCC in obese individuals. Green tea catechins (GTCs possess anticancer and chemopreventive properties against cancer in various organs, including the colorectum and liver. GTCs have also been known to exert anti-obesity, antidiabetic, and anti-inflammatory effects, indicating that GTCs might be useful for the prevention of obesity-associated colorectal and liver carcinogenesis. Further, branched-chain amino acids (BCAA, which improve protein malnutrition and prevent progressive hepatic failure in patients with chronic liver diseases, might be also effective for the suppression of obesity-related carcinogenesis because oral supplementation with BCAA reduces the risk of HCC in obese cirrhotic patients. BCAA shows these beneficial effects because they can improve insulin resistance. Here, we review the detailed relationship between metabolic abnormalities and the development of CRC and HCC. We also review evidence, especially that based on our basic and clinical research using GTCs and BCAA, which indicates that targeting metabolic abnormalities by either pharmaceutical or nutritional intervention may be an effective strategy to prevent the development of CRC and HCC in obese individuals.

  6. Recent advances in metal carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.

    Recent advances in metal carcinogenesis are comprehensively reviewed, including (a) epidemiological and clinical aspects, (b) carcinogenesis bioassays, (c) bacterial mutagenesis, (d) mammalian cell mutagenesis, (e) chromosomal damage, (f) mammalian cell transformation, (g) microsomal metabolism, (h) DNA strandbreaks and crosslinks, (i) DNA polymerase infidelity, (j) RNA strand initiation, and (k) helical transition of B-DNA to Z-DNA. Based upon these observations, several hypotheses are proposed for the molecular pathogenesis of carcinogenesis by metal compounds. These hypotheses are amenable to experimental test by existing techniques of molecular biology.

  7. Gene amplification in carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimari Bizari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene amplification increases the number of genes in a genome and can give rise to karyotype abnormalities called double minutes (DM and homogeneously staining regions (HSR, both of which have been widely observed in human tumors but are also known to play a major role during embryonic development due to the fact that they are responsible for the programmed increase of gene expression. The etiology of gene amplification during carcinogenesis is not yet completely understood but can be considered a result of genetic instability. Gene amplification leads to an increase in protein expression and provides a selective advantage during cell growth. Oncogenes such as CCND1, c-MET, c-MYC, ERBB2, EGFR and MDM2 are amplified in human tumors and can be associated with increased expression of their respective proteins or not. In general, gene amplification is associated with more aggressive tumors, metastases, resistance to chemotherapy and a decrease in the period during which the patient stays free of the disease. This review discusses the major role of gene amplification in the progression of carcinomas, formation of genetic markers and as possible therapeutic targets for the development of drugs for the treatment of some types of tumors.

  8. contribution to carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Białkowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The centrosomes are subcellular organelles composed of two centrioles surrounded by a pericentriolar material. In animal cells they are responsible for the organization of the interphase microtubule cytoskeleton including microtubule nucleation and elongation, their attachment and release. The centrosomes are also involved in the construction of the mitotic spindle and chromosome segregation. More than a century ago it was suggested that these structures might be involved in human diseases, including cancer. Cancer cells show a high frequency of centrosome aberrations, especially amplification. Centrosome defects may increase the incidence of multipolar mitoses that lead to chromosomal segregation abnormalities and aneuploidy, which is the predominant type of genomic instability found in human solid tumors. The number of these organelles in cells is strictly controlled and is dependent on the proper process of centrosome duplication. Multiple genes that are frequently found mutated in cancers encode proteins which participate in the regulation of centrosome duplication and the numeral integrity of centrosomes. In recent years there has been growing interest in the potential participation of centrosomes in the process of carcinogenesis, especially because centrosome abnormalities are observed in premalignant stages of cancer development. The common presence of abnormal centrosomes in cancer cells and the role these organelles play in the cells suggest that the factors controlling the number of centrosomes may be potential targets for cancer therapy.

  9. The 'nonmenstrual woman' in the new millennium? Discourses on menstrual suppression in the first decade of extended cycle oral contraception use in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granzow, Kara

    2014-06-01

    In the early-twenty-first century, extended cycle oral contraception (ECOC) became available by physician prescription in North America. Researchers speculate that this drug, with its capacity to reduce or eliminate menstrual bleeding, may shift not only women's biological processes but also their experiences of menstruation. In this paper, I discuss women's experiences of menstrual suppression drawing on findings from a qualitative study conducted before ECOC was available, and examine these findings against recently published research on menstrual suppression in an ECOC era. Findings suggest that the body as a natural entity figures strongly in women's discourses on suppression. They further suggest that suppression is a contingent, paradoxical and practical achievement, not a securely or fully realised embodied state. This paper reads women's accounts of menstrual suppression prior to ECOC as a challenge to the modern artifice of a mind/body split, and questions whether this challenge is perhaps made less discernible in an ECOC era, where attention may no longer be paid to the daily practices of menstrual suppression. Hence, a case is made for the varied political effects of ongoing non-menstruation versus event-specific practices of non-menstruation.

  10. Suppression of inflammatory reactions by terpinen-4-ol, a main constituent of tea tree oil, in a murine model of oral candidiasis and its suppressive activity to cytokine production of macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Kentaro; Hayama, Kazumi; Ishijima, Sanae A; Maruyama, Naho; Irie, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Junichi; Abe, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The onset of oral candidiasis is accompanied by inflammatory symptoms such as pain in the tongue, edema or tissue damage and lowers the quality of life (QOL) of the patient. In a murine oral candidiasis model, the effects were studied of terpinen-4-ol (T-4-ol), one of the main constituents of tea tree oil, Melaleuca alternifolia, on inflammatory reactions. When immunosuppressed mice were orally infected with Candida albicans, their tongues showed inflammatory symptoms within 24 h after the infection, which was monitored by an increase of myeloperoxidase activity and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 in their tongue homogenates. Oral treatment with 50 µL of 40 mg/mL terpinen-4-ol 3h after the Candida infection clearly suppressed the increase of these inflammatory parameters. In vitro analysis of the effects of terpinen-4-ol on cytokine secretion of macrophages indicated that 800 µg/mL of this substance significantly inhibited the cytokine production of the macrophages cultured in the presence of heat-killed C. albicans cells. Based on these findings, the role of the anti-inflammatory action of T-4-ol in its therapeutic activity against oral candidiasis was discussed.

  11. Oncogenomic disruptions in arsenic-induced carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Adam P; Minatel, Brenda C; Ng, Kevin W; Stewart, Greg L; Dummer, Trevor J B; Lam, Wan L; Martinez, Victor D

    2017-04-11

    Chronic exposure to arsenic affects more than 200 million people worldwide, and has been associated with many adverse health effects, including cancer in several organs. There is accumulating evidence that arsenic biotransformation, a step in the elimination of arsenic from the human body, can induce changes at a genetic and epigenetic level, leading to carcinogenesis. At the genetic level, arsenic interferes with key cellular processes such as DNA damage-repair and chromosomal structure, leading to genomic instability. At the epigenetic level, arsenic places a high demand on the cellular methyl pool, leading to global hypomethylation and hypermethylation of specific gene promoters. These arsenic-associated DNA alterations result in the deregulation of both oncogenic and tumour-suppressive genes. Furthermore, recent reports have implicated aberrant expression of non-coding RNAs and the consequential disruption of signaling pathways in the context of arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. This article provides an overview of the oncogenomic anomalies associated with arsenic exposure and conveys the importance of non-coding RNAs in the arsenic-induced carcinogenic process.

  12. 3-Deazaneplanocin A suppresses aggressive phenotype-related gene expression in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatta, Mitsutoki; Naganuma, Kaori; Kato, Kenichi; Yamazaki, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In tumor tissues, alterations of gene expression caused by aberrant epigenetic modifications confer phenotypic diversity on malignant cells. Although 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep) has been shown to reactivate tumor suppressor genes in several cancer cells, it remains unclear whether DZNep attenuates the malignant phenotypes of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of DZNep on the expression of genes related to aggressive phenotypes, such as epithelial–mesenchymal transition, in OSCC cells. We found that DZNep reduced the cellular levels of polycomb group proteins (EZH2, SUZ12, BMI1, and RING1A) and the associated trimethylation of Lys27 on histone H3 and monoubiquitination of Lys119 on histone H2A in the poorly differentiated OSCC cell line SAS. Immunocytochemical staining demonstrated that DZNep induced the reorganization of filamentous actin and the membrane localization of E-cadherin associated with cell–cell adhesions. We also found an inhibitory effect of DZNep on cell proliferation using a WST assay. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that genes involved in the aggressive phenotypes (TWIST2, EGFR, ACTA2, TGFB1, WNT5B, and APLIN) were down-regulated, whereas epithelial phenotype genes (CDH1, CLDN4, IVL, and TGM1) were up-regulated in SAS cells treated with DZNep. Collectively, our findings suggest that DZNep reverses the aggressive characteristics of OSCC cells through the dynamic regulation of epithelial plasticity via the reprogramming of gene expression patterns. - Highlights: • DZNep reduced PcG proteins and associated histone modifications in OSCC cells. • DZNep enhanced cell–cell adhesion indicative of epithelial phenotype in OSCC cells. • DZNep suppressed the aggressive phenotype-related gene expression in OSCC cells. • DZNep activated the gene expression of epithelial markers in OSCC cells.

  13. 3-Deazaneplanocin A suppresses aggressive phenotype-related gene expression in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatta, Mitsutoki, E-mail: hatta@college.fdcnet.ac.jp [Department of Physiological Science and Molecular Biology, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka (Japan); Naganuma, Kaori [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka (Japan); Kato, Kenichi; Yamazaki, Jun [Department of Physiological Science and Molecular Biology, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2015-12-04

    In tumor tissues, alterations of gene expression caused by aberrant epigenetic modifications confer phenotypic diversity on malignant cells. Although 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep) has been shown to reactivate tumor suppressor genes in several cancer cells, it remains unclear whether DZNep attenuates the malignant phenotypes of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of DZNep on the expression of genes related to aggressive phenotypes, such as epithelial–mesenchymal transition, in OSCC cells. We found that DZNep reduced the cellular levels of polycomb group proteins (EZH2, SUZ12, BMI1, and RING1A) and the associated trimethylation of Lys27 on histone H3 and monoubiquitination of Lys119 on histone H2A in the poorly differentiated OSCC cell line SAS. Immunocytochemical staining demonstrated that DZNep induced the reorganization of filamentous actin and the membrane localization of E-cadherin associated with cell–cell adhesions. We also found an inhibitory effect of DZNep on cell proliferation using a WST assay. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that genes involved in the aggressive phenotypes (TWIST2, EGFR, ACTA2, TGFB1, WNT5B, and APLIN) were down-regulated, whereas epithelial phenotype genes (CDH1, CLDN4, IVL, and TGM1) were up-regulated in SAS cells treated with DZNep. Collectively, our findings suggest that DZNep reverses the aggressive characteristics of OSCC cells through the dynamic regulation of epithelial plasticity via the reprogramming of gene expression patterns. - Highlights: • DZNep reduced PcG proteins and associated histone modifications in OSCC cells. • DZNep enhanced cell–cell adhesion indicative of epithelial phenotype in OSCC cells. • DZNep suppressed the aggressive phenotype-related gene expression in OSCC cells. • DZNep activated the gene expression of epithelial markers in OSCC cells.

  14. Optimal conditions for cordycepin production in surface liquid-cultured Cordyceps militaris treated with porcine liver extracts for suppression of oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Tzung Lin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordycepin is one of the most crucial bioactive compounds produced by Cordyceps militaris and has exhibited antitumor activity in various cancers. However, industrial production of large amounts of cordycepin is difficult. The porcine liver is abundant in proteins, vitamins, and adenosine, and these ingredients may increase cordycepin production and bioconversion during C. militaris fermentation. We observed that porcine liver extracts increased cordycepin production. In addition, air supply (2 h/d significantly increased the cordycepin level in surface liquid-cultured C. militaris after 14 days. Moreover, blue light light-emitting diode irradiation (16 h/d increased cordycepin production. These findings indicated that these conditions are suitable for increasing cordycepin production. We used these conditions to obtain water extract from the mycelia of surface liquid-cultured C. militaris (WECM and evaluated the anti-oral cancer activity of this extract in vitro and in vivo. The results revealed that WECM inhibited the cell viability of SCC-4 oral cancer cells and arrested the cell cycle in the G2/M phase. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction (mitochondrial fission were observed in SCC-4 cells treated with WECM for 12 hours. Furthermore, WECM reduced tumor formation in 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis through the downregulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, vascular endothelial growth factor, and c-fos expression. The results indicated that porcine liver extracts irradiated with blue light light-emitting diode and supplied with air can be used as a suitable medium for the growth of mycelia and production of cordycepin, which can be used in the treatment of oral cancer.

  15. oral

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chlorhexidine 0,2% gluconate is used as a mouth rinse and is an effective antibacterial agent. Its primary side- effects are staining of the teeth and the oral mucosa, particularly the dorsal surface of the tongue. However, this is transient. It has been shown to be effective as a prophylactic agent in preventing oral candidosis in ...

  16. Comfrey (Symphytum officinale. L. and Experimental Hepatic Carcinogenesis: A Short-Term Carcinogenesis Model Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Pereira Lavieri Gomes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Comfrey or Symphytum officinale (L. (Boraginaceae is a very popular plant used for therapeutic purposes. Since the 1980s, its effects have been studied in long-term carcinogenesis studies, in which Comfrey extract is administered at high doses during several months and the neoplastic hepatic lesions are evaluated. However, the literature on this topic is very poor considering the studies performed under short-term carcinogenesis protocols, such as the ‘resistant hepatocyte model’ (RHM. In these studies, it is possible to observe easily the phenomena related to the early phases of tumor development, since pre-neoplastic lesions (PNLs rise in about 1–2 months of chemical induction. Herein, the effects of chronic oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey ethanolic extract were evaluated in a RHM. Wistar rats were sequentially treated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (ip and 2-acetilaminofluorene (po, and submitted to hepatectomy to induce carcinogenesis promotion. Macroscopic/microscopic quantitative analysis of PNL was performed. Non-parametric statistical tests (Mann–Whitney and χ2 were used, and the level of significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Comfrey treatment reduced the number of pre-neoplastic macroscopic lesions up to 1 mm (P ≤ 0.05, the percentage of oval cells (P = 0.0001 and mitotic figures (P = 0.007, as well as the number of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA positive cells (P = 0.0001 and acidophilic pre-neoplastic nodules (P = 0.05. On the other hand, the percentage of cells presenting megalocytosis (P = 0.0001 and vacuolar degeneration (P = 0.0001 was increased. Scores of fibrosis, glycogen stores and the number of nucleolus organizing regions were not altered. The study indicated that oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey alcoholic extract reduced cell proliferation in this model.

  17. Comfrey (Symphytum Officinale. l.) and Experimental Hepatic Carcinogenesis: A Short-term Carcinogenesis Model Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Maria Fernanda Pereira Lavieri; de Oliveira Massoco, Cristina; Xavier, José Guilherme; Bonamin, Leoni Villano

    2010-06-01

    Comfrey or Symphytum officinale (L.) (Boraginaceae) is a very popular plant used for therapeutic purposes. Since the 1980s, its effects have been studied in long-term carcinogenesis studies, in which Comfrey extract is administered at high doses during several months and the neoplastic hepatic lesions are evaluated. However, the literature on this topic is very poor considering the studies performed under short-term carcinogenesis protocols, such as the 'resistant hepatocyte model' (RHM). In these studies, it is possible to observe easily the phenomena related to the early phases of tumor development, since pre-neoplastic lesions (PNLs) rise in about 1-2 months of chemical induction. Herein, the effects of chronic oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey ethanolic extract were evaluated in a RHM. Wistar rats were sequentially treated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (ip) and 2-acetilaminofluorene (po), and submitted to hepatectomy to induce carcinogenesis promotion. Macroscopic/microscopic quantitative analysis of PNL was performed. Non-parametric statistical tests (Mann-Whitney and χ(2)) were used, and the level of significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Comfrey treatment reduced the number of pre-neoplastic macroscopic lesions up to 1 mm (P ≤ 0.05), the percentage of oval cells (P = 0.0001) and mitotic figures (P = 0.007), as well as the number of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) positive cells (P = 0.0001) and acidophilic pre-neoplastic nodules (P = 0.05). On the other hand, the percentage of cells presenting megalocytosis (P = 0.0001) and vacuolar degeneration (P = 0.0001) was increased. Scores of fibrosis, glycogen stores and the number of nucleolus organizing regions were not altered. The study indicated that oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey alcoholic extract reduced cell proliferation in this model.

  18. Epigenetic mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Ohtsura

    1995-01-01

    Carcinogenic action of radiations has long been thought to be due to its mutagenic activity. Since DNA damage is induced and distributes in a stochastic fashion, radiation induction of cancers was also assumed to follow a stochastic kinetics. However, recent progress in radiation research has revealed that some features of radiation carcinogenesis are not explainable by the simple action of radiation as a DNA damaging and mutagenic agent. Firstly, frequencies of radiation-induced transformation in vitro and radiation-induced mammary cancers in rats are too high to be accounted for by the frequency of radiation-induced mutation. Secondly, trans-generation carcinogenesis among F1 mice born to irradiated parents occurs also much more frequently than to be predicted by the frequency of radiation induced germline mutation. Thirdly, multistage carcinogenesis theory predicts that carcinogens give hits to the target cells so as to shorten the latency of cancers. However, latencies of radiation induced solid cancers among atomic bomb survivors are similar to those of the control population. Fourthly, although radiation elevates the frequency of cancers, the induced cancers seem to share the same spectrum of cancer types as in the unirradiated control populations. This suggests that radiation induces cancer by enhancement of the spontaneous carcinogenesis process. These data suggest that the first step of radiation carcinogenesis may not be the direct induction of mutation. Radiation may induce genetic instability which increases the spontaneous mutation rate in the cells to produce carcinogenic mutations. Growth stimulatory effect of radiation may also contribute to the process. Thus, epigenetic, but not genetic effect of radiation might better contribute in the process of carcinogenesis. (author)

  19. Pharmacokinetics and Acid Suppressant Efficacy of Esomeprazole after Intravenous, Oral, and Subcutaneous Administration to Healthy Beagle Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J-H; Jeong, J-W; Song, G-H; Koo, T-S; Seo, K-W

    2017-05-01

    Esomeprazole is an S-enantiomer of omeprazole that has favorable pharmacokinetics and efficacious acid suppressant properties in humans. However, the pharmacokinetics and effects on intragastric pH of esomeprazole in dogs have not been reported. To determine the pharmacokinetics of esomeprazole administered via various routes (PK study) and to investigate the effect of esomeprazole on intragastric pH with a Bravo pH monitoring system (PD study). Seven adult male Beagle dogs and 5 adult male Beagle dogs were used for PK and PD study, respectively. Both studies used an open, randomized, and crossover design. In the PK study, 7 dogs received intravenous (IV), subcutaneous (SC), and oral doses (PO) of esomeprazole (1 mg/kg). Each treatment period was separated by a washout period of at least 10 days. Esomeprazole plasma concentrations were measured by HPLC/MS/MS. In the efficacy study, intragastric pH was recorded without medication (baseline pH) and following IV, SC, and PO esomeprazole dosing regimens (1 mg/kg) in 5 dogs. The bioavailability of esomeprazole administered as PO enteric-coated granules and as SC injections was 71.4 and 106%, respectively. The half-life was approximately 1 hour. Mean ± SD percent time intragastric pH was ≥3 and ≥4 was 58.9 ± 21.1% and 40.9 ± 17.3% for IV group, 75.8 ± 16.4% and 62.7 ± 17.7% for SC group, 88.2 ± 8.9% and 82.5 ± 7.7% for PO group, and 12.5 ± 3.6% and 3.7 ± 1.8% for baseline. The mean percent time with intragastric pH was ≥3 or ≥4 was significantly increased regardless of the dosing route (P esomeprazole administration were favorable, and esomeprazole significantly increased intragastric pH after IV, PO, and SC administration. IV and SC administration of esomeprazole might be useful when PO administration is not possible. No significant adverse effects were observed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College

  20. [Histologic study on impeding leukoplakia carcinogenesis of golden hamster cheek pouch about Erigeron breviscapus (Vant) Hand-Mazz].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, C T; Zhong, W J; Hua, L; Hu, H F; Jin, Z G

    2000-06-01

    To observe the effect of Erigeron breviscapus (Vant) Hand Mazz (HEr) in impeding oral leukoplakia carcinogenesis, and to seek effective Chinese herb medicine that can impede precarcinoma of oral mucosas. 132 golden hamsters were randomly divided into model group (60 animals), HEr group (60 animals), and control group 12 animals. Salley's leukoplakia carcinogenesis model of golden hamster cheek pouch was used in this study. HEr was injected into the stomach to impede evolution of carcinogenesis. Pathological specimens were observed via naked eye and light microscope between model group and HEr group. Results were compared. Observation via naked-eye showed that leukoplakia rate of HEr group (18.2%) was lower than that of model group (27.3%). Observation via light microscope showed that carcinogenesis rate descended one fold and displasia rate descended 0.4 fold in HEr group. HEr has exact effect in impeding leukoplakia carcinogenesis.

  1. Experimental radiation carcinogenesis is studies at NIRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sado, Toshihiko

    1992-01-01

    Experimental radiation carcinogenesis studies conducted during the past decade at NIRS are briefly reviewed. They include the following: 1) Age dependency of susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis. 2) Radiation-induced myeloid leukemia. 3) Mechanism of fractionated X-irradiation (FX) induced thymic lymphomas. 4) Significance of radiation-induced immunosuppression in radiation carcinogenesis in vivo. 5) Other ongoing studies. (author)

  2. Radiation carcinogenesis: radioprotectors and photosensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper outlines 1) some of the salient features of radiation carcinogenesis that are pertinent to the questions of how the carcinogenic effects might be influenced, 2) the effects of radioprotectors on ionizing radiation-induced cancer, and 3) the effect of photosensitizers on UVR-induced skin cancer

  3. Radiation carcinogenesis: radioprotectors and photosensitizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper outlines 1) some of the salient features of radiation carcinogenesis that are pertinent to the questions of how the carcinogenic effects might be influenced, 2) the effects of radioprotectors on ionizing radiation-induced cancer, and 3) the effect of photosensitizers on UVR-induced skin cancer.

  4. The relevance of cell transformation to carcinogenesis in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Despite the caveats concerning rodent as opposed to human cell transformation systems, the author concludes there are several areas in which cell transformation studies with rodent cells have shown clear relevance to carcinogenesis in vivo, especially studies of carcinogenic effects of high LET radiation, particularly dependence on dose rate. In vitro studies firmly established the generality of promotion by phorbol esters tumour promotors. Initial studies on suppression of transformation, notably by protease inhibitors, has led to the confirmation of this phenomenon in in vivo carcinogenesis; development of inhibitor preparations from natural sources suitable for long-term supplementation in human diet, is under investigation. The potential importance of these modifiers is further emphasized by mechanistic studies suggesting that radiation may initiate a large fraction of exposed cell population, and expression of transformation may be controlled to a large extent by environmental conditions including the presence of promoting or suppressing agents. Finally, cell transformation systems offer the opportunity for mechanistic studies of the initial stages of carcinogenesis. Provocative results have arisen in several areas consistent with findings in experimental animals. (author)

  5. Dietary thylakoids suppress blood glucose and modulate appetite-regulating hormones in pigs exposed to oral glucose tolerance test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montelius, Caroline; Szwiec, Katarzyna; Kardas, Marek

    2014-01-01

    , either with or without addition of 0.5 g/kg body weight of thylakoid powder. RESULTS: The supplementation of thylakoids to the oral glucose tolerance test resulted in decreased blood glucose concentrations during the first hour, increased plasma cholecystokinin concentrations during the first two hours...... metabolism and appetite-regulating hormones during an oral glucose tolerance test in pigs fed a high fat diet. METHODS: Six pigs were fed a high fat diet (36 energy% fat) for one month before oral glucose tolerance test (1 g/kg d-glucose) was performed. The experiment was designed as a cross-over study...

  6. Tanshinone Suppresses Arecoline-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Oral Submucous Fibrosis By Epigenetically Reactivating the p53 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lian; Guan, Zhen-Jie; Pan, Wen-Ting; Du, Tian-Fang; Zhai, Yu-Jia; Guo, Jia

    2017-05-21

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) induced by the chewing of areca nut has been considered as a precancerous lesion with a higher probability of developing oral squamous cell carcinoma. Tanshinone (TSN) is the main component extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza , a traditional Chinese medicine, which was found to have diverse pharmacological effects such as anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor effects. In current study, we aim to identify inhibitory effects and the underlying mechanism of Tanshinone on OSF progress. We found that treatment of TSN inhibited arecoline-mediated proliferation of primary human oral mucosal fibroblasts, and reversed the promotive effects of arecoline on EMT process. By RNA-deep sequencing, we screened two possible targets of TSN, LSD1 and p53. We confirmed that p53 is extremely lower in OSF than in normal mucous tissues. In addition, p53 and its downstream molecules were decreased by arecoline treatment in oral mucosal fibroblasts, which was reversed by treatment of TSN in a dose-dependent manner. Our results also revealed that arecoline stimulation resulted in hypermethylation of promoter of p53, and subsequent downregulation of p53 levels, which was reversed by TSN. Furthermore, we identified that LSD1 could epigenetically activate p53 by recruiting H3K27me1 and H3K4m2 to its promoter. Our findings provide new insights into the mechanism by which tanshinone influences on arecoline-induced OSF and rational for the development of clinical intervention strategies for OSF and even oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  7. Social isolation impairs oral palatal wound healing in sprague-dawley rats: a role for miR-29 and miR-203 via VEGF suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linglan Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of social isolation on oral mucosal healing in rats, and to determine if wound-associated genes and microRNAs (miRNAs may contribute to this response. METHODS: Rats were group housed or socially isolated for 4 weeks before a 3.5 mm wound was placed on the hard oral palate. Wound closure was assessed daily and tissues were collected for determination of gene expression levels and miRNAs (i.e., miR-29a,b,c and miR-203. The predicted target of these microRNAs (i.e., vascular endothelial growth factor A, VEGFA was functionally validated. RESULTS: Social isolation stress delayed the healing process of oral palatal mucosal wounds in rats. Lower mRNA levels of interleukin-1β (IL1β, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP1α, fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF7, and VEGFA were found in the biopsied tissues of isolated animals on days 1 and/or 3 post-wounding. Intriguingly, the isolated rats persistently exhibited higher levels of miR-29 family members and miR-203. Our results confirmed that VEGFA is a direct target of these miRNAs, as both miR-29a,c and miR-203 strongly and specifically suppressed endogenous VEGFA expression in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: This study in rats demonstrates for the first time that social isolation delays oral mucosal healing, and suggests a potential role for healing-associated gene and miRNA interactions during this process via modulation of VEGF expression.

  8. Social Isolation Impairs Oral Palatal Wound Healing in Sprague-Dawley Rats: A Role for miR-29 and miR-203 via VEGF Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linglan; Engeland, Christopher G.; Cheng, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of social isolation on oral mucosal healing in rats, and to determine if wound-associated genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) may contribute to this response. Methods Rats were group housed or socially isolated for 4 weeks before a 3.5 mm wound was placed on the hard oral palate. Wound closure was assessed daily and tissues were collected for determination of gene expression levels and miRNAs (i.e., miR-29a,b,c and miR-203). The predicted target of these microRNAs (i.e., vascular endothelial growth factor A, VEGFA) was functionally validated. Results Social isolation stress delayed the healing process of oral palatal mucosal wounds in rats. Lower mRNA levels of interleukin-1β (IL1β), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP1α), fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF7), and VEGFA were found in the biopsied tissues of isolated animals on days 1 and/or 3 post-wounding. Intriguingly, the isolated rats persistently exhibited higher levels of miR-29 family members and miR-203. Our results confirmed that VEGFA is a direct target of these miRNAs, as both miR-29a,c and miR-203 strongly and specifically suppressed endogenous VEGFA expression in vitro. Conclusions This study in rats demonstrates for the first time that social isolation delays oral mucosal healing, and suggests a potential role for healing-associated gene and miRNA interactions during this process via modulation of VEGF expression. PMID:23951316

  9. Oral administration of type-II collagen peptide 250-270 suppresses specific cellular and humoral immune response in collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping; Li, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Hong-Kun; Jia, Jun-Feng; Zheng, Zhao-Hui; Ding, Jin; Fan, Chun-Mei

    2007-01-01

    Oral antigen is an attractive approach for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Establishment of immune markers and methods in evaluating the effects of antigen-specific cellular and humoral immune responses will help the application of oral tolerance in the treatment of human diseases. The present article observed the effects of chicken collagen II (CII), the recombinant polymerized human collagen II 250-270 (rhCII 250-270) peptide and synthesized human CII 250-270 (syCII 250-270) peptide on the induction of antigen-specific autoimmune response in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and on the specific cellular and humoral immune response in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and mice fed with CII (250-270) prior to immunization with CII. In the study, proliferation, activation and intracellular cytokine production of antigen-specific T lymphocytes were simultaneously analyzed by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and flow cytometry at the single-cell level. The antigen-specific antibody and antibody-forming cells were detected by ELISA and ELISPOT, respectively. CII (250-270) was found to have stimulated the response of specific lymphocytes in PBMC from RA patients, including the increase expression of surface activation antigen marker CD69 and CD25, and DNA synthesis. Mice, fed with CII (250-270) before CII immunization, had significantly lower arthritic scores than the mice immunized with CII alone, and the body weight of the former increased during the study period. Furthermore, the specific T cell activity, proliferation and secretion of interferon (IFN)-gamma in spleen cells were actively suppressed in CII (250-270)-fed mice, and the serum anti-CII, anti-CII (250-270) antibody activities and the frequency of specific antibody-forming spleen cells were significantly lower in CII (250-270)-fed mice than in mice immunized with CII alone. These observations suggest that oral administration of CII (250-270) can

  10. Resveratrol suppresses TPA-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression through the inhibition of MAPK pathways in oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feng-Yan; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Yang, Shun-Fa; Chen, Chang-Tai; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Chou, Ming-Yung; Chuang, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chiao-Wen; Chen, Mu-Kuan

    2015-10-01

    Naturally occurring agents, such as resveratrol, have been determined to benefit health. Numerous studies have demonstrated that resveratrol has antioxidative, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective properties. However, the effect of resveratrol exerts on the metastasis of oral cancer cells remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect the anti-invasive activity of resveratrol on a human oral cancer cell line (SCC-9) in vitro and the underlying mechanisms. Cell viability was examined by MTT assay, whereas cell motility was measured by migration and wound-healing assays. Zymography, reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and promoter assays confirmed the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression in oral cancer cells. We established that various concentrations (0-100 μM) of resveratrol inhibited the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced migration capacities of SCC-9 cells and caused no cytotoxic effects. Zymography and Western blot analyses suggested that resveratrol inhibited TPA-induced MMP-9 gelatinolytic activity and protein expression. In addition, the results indicated that resveratrol inhibited the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)1/2 and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 involved in downregulating protein expression and the transcription of MMP-9. In summary, resveratrol inhibited MMP-9 expression and oral cancer cell metastasis by downregulating JNK1/2 and ERK1/2 signals pathways and, thus, exerts beneficial effects in chemoprevention. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Oral administration of royal jelly restores tear secretion capacity in rat blink-suppressed dry eye model by modulating lacrimal gland function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Imada

    Full Text Available Tears are secreted from the lacrimal gland (LG, a dysfunction in which induces dry eye, resulting in ocular discomfort and visual impairment. Honey bee products are used as a nutritional source in daily life and medicine; however, little is known about their effects on dry eye. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of honey bee products on tear secretion capacity in dry eye. We selected raw honey, propolis, royal jelly (RJ, pollen, or larva from commercially available honey bee products. Tear secretion capacity was evaluated following the oral administration of each honey bee product in a rat blink-suppressed dry eye model. Changes in tear secretion, LG ATP content, and LG mitochondrial levels were measured. RJ restored the tear secretion capacity and decrease in LG ATP content and mitochondrial levels to the largest extent. Royal jelly can be used as a preventative intervention for dry eye by managing tear secretion capacity in the LG.

  12. Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, C.A. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    This section contains summaries of research in the following areas: use of liver for mechanistic studies of multistage hepatocarcinogenesis and for screening of environmental contaminants for tumor initiating and promoting activity; molecular properties of rat liver ornithine aminotransferase; regulation of gene expression in rat liver; methods of tumor detection; mechanisms of radiation and viral oncogenesis; biphenyl metabolism by rat liver microsomes; and studies on aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity

  13. Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buess, E.M.; Cerny, E.A.; Chan, E.W.

    1977-01-01

    The first section deals with the assessment of carcinogens and cocarcinogens and the underlying mechanisms of their actions. The second concerns cancer induction by bone-seeking radionuclides and seeks to provide a firm foundation for estimating cancer risks to human populations in the event of accidental incorporation of radionuclides. The third is aimed at defining the role of oncornavirus activation in tumor induction by radiation and other environmental pollutants. The other two sections describe the new studies, one dealing with the development of an in vitro cell system (murine teratocarcinoma cells) to screen chemicals rapidly for carcinogenic and mutagenic capacity, and the other investigating the potential use of plasma isozymes as indicators of mutagenesis in mammals. Accomplishments and projections for each of these studies follow

  14. MiR-376c-3p regulates the proliferation, invasion, migration, cell cycle and apoptosis of human oral squamous cancer cells by suppressing HOXB7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Jin, Jun; Ma, Tengxiao; Zhai, Hongfeng

    2017-07-01

    To test the influence of miR-376c-3p on the proliferation, invasion, migration, cell cycle and apoptosis of human oral squamous cancer cells (OSCC) and the relevant mechanism. We applied qRT-PCR and Western blot to compare the expression level of miR-376c-3p and HOXB7 in SCC-4, SCC-9, SCC-15, SCC-25 OSCC cell lines and 49 paired OSCC and normal oral epithelial tissue specimens were included in our present study. Also we analyzed the relative relationship of expression level between miR-376c-3p and HOXB7 in cancer tissues. Luciferase assay was used to confirm the target relationship between miR-376c-3p and HOXB7. Besides, MTT, Transwell, wound healing, colony formation and flow cytometer experiments were applied to evaluate the proliferation, cell viability, apoptosis, invasion and migration of transfected OSCC. MiR-376c-3p was down-regulated while HOXB7 was up-regulated in OSCC tissues and cells than the normal ones. MiR-376c-3p directly targeted HOXB7 and reduced the expression of HOXB7. Overexpression of miR-376c-3p attenuated proliferation of SCC-9, SCC-15, SCC-24 and SCC-25 cells. Moreover, miR-376c-3p suppressed proliferation, viability, migration and invasion and induced G1/G0 arrest and cell apoptosis of SCC-25 cells. Besides, overexpression of HOXB7 efficiently abrogates these influences caused by overexpression of miR-376c-3p. MiR-376c-3p suppresses the fission, proliferation, migration and invasion and induces cell apoptosis of OSCC via targeting HOXB7. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Liver Development, Regeneration, and Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet W. C. Kung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of putative liver stem cells has brought closer the previously separate fields of liver development, regeneration, and carcinogenesis. Significant overlaps in the regulation of these processes are now being described. For example, studies in embryonic liver development have already provided the basis for directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells. As a result, the understanding of the cell biology of proliferation and differentiation in the liver has been improved. This knowledge can be used to improve the function of hepatocyte-like cells for drug testing, bioartificial livers, and transplantation. In parallel, the mechanisms regulating cancer cell biology are now clearer, providing fertile soil for novel therapeutic approaches. Recognition of the relationships between development, regeneration, and carcinogenesis, and the increasing evidence for the role of stem cells in all of these areas, has sparked fresh enthusiasm in understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms and has led to new targeted therapies for liver cirrhosis and primary liver cancers.

  16. Luteolin inhibits matrix metalloproteinase 9 and 2 in azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandurangan, A K; Dharmalingam, P; Sadagopan, S K A; Ganapasam, S

    2014-11-01

    The present investigation deals with the antimetastatic role of luteolin (LUT) by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and -2 in azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon carcinogenesis in Balb/C mice. Animals received AOM at a dosage of 15 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally once a week for 3 weeks. AOM-induced mice was treated with LUT (1.2 mg of LUT/kg body weight/day orally). After the experimental period, the tumor markers such as γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT), 5' nucleotidase (5'ND), cathepsin-D (Cat-D), and carcinoembroyonic antigen (CEA) were elevated upon induction with AOM. Subsequent treatment with LUT results in the reduction of the tumor markers was recorded. The expressions of MMP-9 and MMP-2 were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence methods. The expressions of MMP-9 and MMP-2 were increased during AOM induction and upon treatment with LUT reduced the expressions. RT-PCR analysis of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2 was limited during AOM-induced colorectal cancer (CRC). Supplementation of LUT increased the expression of TIMP-2. To conclude, LUT acts as an antimetastatic agent by suppressing MMP-9 and MMP-2 productions and upregulating TIMP-2 expression, thereby suggesting that LUT can be a chemotherapeutic agent against CRC. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome prevention strategies: oral contraceptive pills-dual gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist suppression with step-down gonadotropin protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damario, Mark A

    2010-11-01

    The identification of patients at high risk for excessive responses to ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer is essential in the tailoring of safe and effective treatment strategies. Known factors associated with increased sensitivity to gonadotropins include polycystic ovary syndrome, young age, prior ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), high baseline antral follicle count, and high baseline ovarian volume. Although several treatment strategies have been proposed for these patients, this report describes the experience using the dual suppression with gonadotropin step-down protocol. This protocol uses oral contraceptive pretreatment in combination with a long gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist followed by a programmed step-down in gonadotropin dosing. Hormonal characteristics of dual suppression include an improved luteinizing hormone-to-follicle-stimulating hormone ratio and lower serum androgens, particularly dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. Clinical characteristics of the protocol include a lower cancellation rate and favorable clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates per initiated cycle while mitigating the risk of OHSS. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  18. Molecular Action of a Potential Tumor Suppression in Mammary Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    breast tumor. Reference: 1. Salomon, D. S., R. Brandt , F. Ciardiello, and N. Normanno. 1995. Epidermal growth factor-related...quantified by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay (Fig. 4D). Approximately 35% of the ErbB-2–overexpressing

  19. Orally Administrated Ascorbic Acid Suppresses Neuronal Damage and Modifies Expression of SVCT2 and GLUT1 in the Brain of Diabetic Rats with Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naohiro Iwata

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is known to exacerbate cerebral ischemic injury. In the present study, we investigated antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects of oral supplementation of ascorbic acid (AA on cerebral injury caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion (MCAO/Re in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. We also evaluated the effects of AA on expression of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2 and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1 after MCAO/Re in the brain. The diabetic state markedly aggravated MCAO/Re-induced cerebral damage, as assessed by infarct volume and edema. Pretreatment with AA (100 mg/kg, p.o. for two weeks significantly suppressed the exacerbation of damage in the brain of diabetic rats. AA also suppressed the production of superoxide radical, activation of caspase-3, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β in the ischemic penumbra. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that expression of SVCT2 was upregulated primarily in neurons and capillary endothelial cells after MCAO/Re in the nondiabetic cortex, accompanied by an increase in total AA (AA + dehydroascorbic acid in the tissue, and that these responses were suppressed in the diabetic rats. AA supplementation to the diabetic rats restored these responses to the levels of the nondiabetic rats. Furthermore, AA markedly upregulated the basal expression of GLUT1 in endothelial cells of nondiabetic and diabetic cortex, which did not affect total AA levels in the cortex. These results suggest that daily intake of AA attenuates the exacerbation of cerebral ischemic injury in a diabetic state, which may be attributed to anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects via the improvement of augmented oxidative stress in the brain. AA supplementation may protect endothelial function against the exacerbated ischemic oxidative injury in the diabetic state and improve AA transport through SVCT2 in the cortex.

  20. Differences in phenotype, homing properties and suppressive activities of regulatory T cells induced by epicutaneous, oral or sublingual immunotherapy in mice sensitized to peanut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioszeghy, Vincent; Mondoulet, Lucie; Puteaux, Emilie; Dhelft, Véronique; Ligouis, Mélanie; Plaquet, Camille; Dupont, Christophe; Benhamou, Pierre-Henri

    2017-09-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy has been proposed as an attractive strategy to actively treat food allergy using the following three different immunotherapy routes: oral (OIT), sublingual (SLIT) and epicutaneous (EPIT) immunotherapy. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to have a pivotal role in the mechanisms of immunotherapy. The aim of this study was to compare the phenotype and function of Tregs induced in peanut-sensitized BALB/c mice using these three routes of treatment. We show that although EPIT, OIT and SLIT were all able to effectively desensitize peanut-sensitized mice, they induced different subsets of Tregs. Foxp3+ Tregs were induced by the three treatment routes but with greater numbers induced by EPIT. EPIT and OIT also increased the level of LAP+ Tregs, whereas SLIT induced IL-10+ cells. The suppressive activity of EPIT-induced Tregs did not depend on IL-10 but required CTLA-4, whereas OIT acted through both mechanisms and SLIT was strictly dependent on IL-10. Moreover, the three routes influenced the homing properties of induced Tregs differently, with a larger repertoire of chemokine receptors expressed by EPIT-induced Tregs compared with OIT- and SLIT- induced cells, resulting in different protective consequences against allergen exposure. Furthermore, whereas OIT- or SLIT-induced Tregs lost their suppressive activities after treatment was discontinued, the suppressive activities of EPIT-induced Tregs were still effective 8 weeks after the end of treatment, suggesting the induction of a more long-lasting tolerance. In summary, EPIT, OIT and SLIT mediated desensitization through the induction of different subsets of Tregs, leading to important differences in the subsequent protection against allergen exposure and the possible induction of tolerance.

  1. Essentials of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators.

  2. Synergistic chemopreventive effects of nobiletin and atorvastatin on colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xian; Song, Mingyue; Qiu, Peiju; Rakariyatham, Kanyasiri; Li, Fang; Gao, Zili; Cai, Xiaokun; Wang, Minqi; Xu, Fei; Zheng, Jinkai; Xiao, Hang

    2017-04-01

    Different cancer chemopreventive agents may act synergistically and their combination may produce enhanced protective effects against carcinogenesis than each individual agent alone. Herein, we investigated the chemopreventive effects of nobiletin (NBT, a citrus polymethoxyflavone) and atorvastatin (ATST, a lipid-lowering drug) in colon cancer cells/macrophages and an azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon carcinogenesis rat model. The results demonstrated that co-treatments of NBT/ATST produced enhanced growth inhibitory and anti-inflammatory effects on the colon cancer cells and macrophages, respectively. Isobologram analysis confirmed that these interactions between NBT and ATST were synergistic. NBT/ATST co-treatment also synergistically induced extensive cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Oral administration of NBT (0.1%, w/w in diet) or ATST (0.04%, w/w in diet) significantly decreased colonic tumor incidence and multiplicity in AOM-treated rats. Most importantly, co-treatment of NBT/ATST at their half doses (0.05% NBT + 0.02% ATST, w/w in diet) resulted in even stronger inhibitory effects on colonic tumor incidence and multiplicity than did NBT or ATST alone at higher doses. Statistical analysis confirmed that the enhanced chemopreventive activities against colon carcinogenesis in rats by the NBT/ATST combination were highly synergistic. Our results further demonstrated that NBT/ATST co-treatment profoundly modulated key cellular signaling regulators associated with inflammation, cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, angiogenesis and metastasis in the colon of AOM-treated rats. In conclusion, for the first time, our results demonstrated a strong synergy in inhibiting colon carcinogenesis produced by the co-treatment of NBT and ATST, which provided a scientific basis for using NBT in combination with ATST for colon cancer chemoprevention in humans. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

  3. Oral administration of Aloe vera gel powder prevents UVB-induced decrease in skin elasticity via suppression of overexpression of MMPs in hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Marie; Tanaka, Miyuki; Misawa, Eriko; Yao, Ruiquing; Nabeshima, Kazumi; Yamauchi, Kouji; Abe, Fumiaki; Yamamoto, Yuki; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2016-07-01

    This study reports the effects of oral Aloe vera gel powder (AVGP) containing Aloe sterols on skin elasticity and the extracellular matrix in ultraviolet B (UVB)-irradiated hairless mice. Ten-week-old hairless mice were fed diets containing 0.3% AVGP for 8 weeks and irradiated UVB for 6 weeks. Mice treated with AVGP showed significant prevention of the UVB-induced decrease in skin elasticity. To investigate the mechanism underlying this suppression of skin elasticity loss, we measured the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, -9, and -13. AVGP prevented both the UVB-induced increases in MMPs expressions. Moreover, we investigated hyaluronic acid (HA) content of mice dorsal skin and gene expression of HA synthase-2 (Has2). In the results, AVGP oral administration prevented UVB-induced decreasing in skin HA content and Has2 expression and attenuates the UVB-induced decrease in serum adiponectin, which promotes Has2 expression. These results suggested that AVGP has the ability to prevent the skin photoaging.

  4. Oral administration of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subspecies bulgaricus OLL1073R-1 suppresses inflammation by decreasing interleukin-6 responses in a murine model of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Hiroshi; Kita, Junko; Makino, Seiya; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki

    2013-06-01

    The oral intake of Lactobacillus spp. can provide beneficial effects to the host by modulating the immune response. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an allergic inflammatory disease mediated by various immune responses. In this study, we examined the effect of a Lactobacillus strain, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1 (OLL1073R-1), on AD development in a murine model of AD that was developed by the topical application of mite antigen in NC/Nga mice. The oral intake of heat-killed OLL1073R-1 cells inhibited both the development of dermatitis and the elevation of an acute inflammation marker, serum amyloid A. Another bacterial strain, Lactobacillus rhamnosus OLL2984, exerted no inhibitory effects on dermatitis. The oral intake of heat-killed OLL1073R-1 cells also attenuated secretion of IL-6 from lymph node cells in response to mite antigen and reduced IL-6 levels in inflamed tissues, such as auricles. Production of IFN-γ or IL-4 was not influenced by OLL1073R-1 intake. We also found that inhibition of IL-6 signaling by gp130-Fc (a fusion protein consisting of the extracellular portion of glycoprotein 130 fused to the Fc region of human IgG1) markedly decreased the severity of dermatitis in NC/Nga mice. Moreover, secretion of IL-6 by lymph node cells was augmented in NC/Nga mice compared with that in BALB/c mice. These results indicate that IL-6 plays an essential role in the development of dermatitis in the NC/Nga mouse model of AD, and that OLL1073R-1 inhibits dermatitis, at least in part, by suppressing the IL-6 response. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Biological aspects of radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upton, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been observed to increase the incidence of virtually every type of neoplasm, and carcinogenic effects have been noted in all species investigated. Susceptibility varies markedly, however, with species, strain, organ, cell type, sex, age at irradiation, physiological condition, exposure to other physical or chemical agents, and additional variables. Because of the multicausal, multistage nature of the cancer process, and the diversity of mechanisms through which carcinogenesis may be influenced by irradiation, the variety of observed dose-incidence relationships is not unexpected. The data are consistent with the concept that cancer arises from a single transformed cell, through a stepwise succession of undefined changes, and that the process of transformation may be initiated by radiation-induced damage to the DNA of the affected cell. There is also evidence that intercellular interactions may play an important role in the evolution of the neoplastic process, the nature and radiobiology of which remain to be determined

  6. Genetic factors for breast carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Enrique Miguel-Soca

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a multifactorial genenetic disease in which oncogenes derived from normal cellular genes intervene, which constitute positive signals of cellular proliferation and tumour suppressor genes and represent negative signals of cells multiplication and differentiation. Although these alterations which affect germinal cells produce inherited cancers, in most of the cases somatic cell genes are affected. To the susceptibility of cancer due to genes as BRCA1 and BCRA2, the effect of factors associated to environment, life style and toxic habits are added, these determine a complex interrelation genes-environment which imply an activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumour suppressors. The objective of this review in to offer an updated view about the main genes implied in breast carcinogenesis. The topic is controversial y currently deeply investigated.

  7. Environmental carcinogenesis and genetic variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, A.G. Jr

    1977-01-01

    It was found that carcinogenesis in man may involve the interaction of genetic and environmental forces, and that mutation, whether germinal or somatic, seems to be involved in the origin of many, perhaps all cancers. The cancers of man may be visualized as occurring in four groups of individuals according to whether (1) neither genetic nor environmental factors are dominant, i.e. 'background' or 'spontaneous' cancer, (2) heredity alone is dominant, (3) environment alone is important, or (4) both are operating (Knudsen, 1977). The last two groups together are widely thought to contribute 70-80% of cancer cases in the United States; the relative contribution of each group is a major question to be answered

  8. Time factors in radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Shunsaku

    1995-01-01

    Results of experiments using B6C3F 1 female mice were made subject of analysis on the time factors in radiation carcinogenesis. In the experiment for examination of influence of age at irradiation on the lifetime risk and on distribution of ages at death, mice were irradiated at day 12, 14 or 17 of the prenatal period, or day 0, 7, 35, 105, 240 or 365 of the postnatal period with doses ranging from 0.48 to 5.7 Gy gamma-rays from 137 Cs. In the experiment to examine the reduction factor for carcinogenic effect by multiple fractionation of gamma-rays dose 1.9 or 3.8 Gy was divided into 10 fractions, which were delivered once a week during period from 5 to 15 weeks of age. All mice were allowed to live out their life spans under a specific pathogen free condition. The cumulative relative risk for mortality from all causes except lymphoma and leukemia was shown to decrease with age when mice were irradiated at the fetal, neonatal, suckling, adolescent or young adult period, whereas, the decrease in the cumulative relative risk was very little when gamma-rays were given at the intermediate adult period. The lifetime risk for the increase in mortality and for the induction of solid tumors was highest in mice irradiated during neonatal, suckling or adolescent period. Age-dependence of susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis was different for each type of neoplasm. However, the most susceptible period for induction of each type of neoplasm concentrated in the age from neonatal to adolescent period. Radiation-induced late effects were apparently reduced by multiple fractionation of radiation dose, but the reduction factor for the increase in the long-term mortality did not exceed 2.0. (author)

  9. Suppression of GPI-induced arthritis by oral administration of transgenic rice seeds expressing altered peptide ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Tomoya; Tsuboi, Hiroto; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Asashima, Hiromitsu; Ohta, Masaru; Wakasa, Yuhya; Matsumoto, Isao; Takaiwa, Fumio; Sumida, Takayuki

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects and mechanisms of transgenic rice seeds expressing the altered peptide ligand (APL) of human glucose-6-phosphate-isomerase (hGPI 325-339 ) in mice model of GPI induced arthritis (GIA). We generated transgenic rice expressing APL12 which was analog peptide of hGPI 325-339 . The transgenic rice seeds were orally administered prophylactically before the induction of GIA. The severity of arthritis and titers of serum anti-GPI antibodies were evaluated. We examined IL-17 production from splenocytes and inguinal lymph node (iLN) and mesenteric lymph nodes (mLN) cells and analyzed the expression levels of functional molecules from splenocytes and iLN cells. Prophylactic treatment of GIA mice with APL12 transgenic rice seeds (APL12-TG) significantly improved the severity of arthritis, histopathological arthritis scores, and decreased titers of serum anti-GPI antibodies, BAFF mRNA in iLN cells, IL-17 production in splenocytes and iLN cells compared with non-transgenic rice-treated mice. APL12-TG-treated GIA mice showed upregulation of Foxp3 and GITR protein in CD4 + CD25 + cells in the spleen. APL12-TG improved the severity of GIA through a decrease in production of IL-17 and anti-GPI antibodies via upregulation of Foxp3 and GITR expression on regulatory T cells in spleen.

  10. Oral immunotherapy induces IgG antibodies that act through FcγRIIb to suppress IgE-mediated hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Oliver T; Logsdon, Stephanie L; Zhou, Joseph S; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Abdel-Gadir, Azza; Noval Rivas, Magali; Koleoglou, Kyle J; Chatila, Talal A; Schneider, Lynda C; Rachid, Rima; Umetsu, Dale T; Oettgen, Hans C

    2014-12-01

    Food-induced anaphylaxis is triggered by specific IgE antibodies. Paradoxically, some subjects with significant IgE levels can ingest allergenic foods without incident. Similarly, subjects completing oral immunotherapy (OIT) tolerate food challenges despite persistent high-titer food-specific IgE. We sought to test whether IgG antibodies induced by food immunotherapy prevent food-induced anaphylaxis and whether this occurs through the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIb. Food allergy-susceptible Il4raF709 mice were enterally sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA). Similarly sensitized IgE-deficient (IgE(-/-)) Il4raF709 mice, which can ingest OVA without anaphylaxis, were subjected to a high-dose enteral OVA desensitization protocol (OIT). Sera from both groups were tested for the ability to activate or inhibit bone marrow mast cells (BMMCs) exposed to allergen or to passively transfer allergy to naive hosts. In parallel experiments sera obtained from patients with peanut allergy before and after undergoing OIT were interrogated for their ability to enhance or suppress peanut-induced activation in an indirect assay by using basophils from nonallergic donors. Il4raF709 mice exhibited strong OVA-specific IgE responses. Their sera efficiently sensitized BMMCs for activation by antigen challenge. Sera from Il4raF709/IgE(-/-) mice subjected to OVA OIT suppressed BMMC responses. This inhibition was IgG mediated and FcγRIIb dependent. Similarly, pre-OIT but not post-OIT sera from patients efficiently sensitized basophils for peanut-induced activation. IgG antibodies in post-OIT sera suppressed basophil activation by pre-OIT sera. This inhibition was blocked by antibodies against FcγRII. Food-specific IgG antibodies, such as those induced during OIT, inhibit IgE-mediated reactions. Strategies that favor IgG responses might prove useful in the management of food allergy. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Statistical modeling and extrapolation of carcinogenesis data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krewski, D.; Murdoch, D.; Dewanji, A.

    1986-01-01

    Mathematical models of carcinogenesis are reviewed, including pharmacokinetic models for metabolic activation of carcinogenic substances. Maximum likelihood procedures for fitting these models to epidemiological data are discussed, including situations where the time to tumor occurrence is unobservable. The plausibility of different possible shapes of the dose response curve at low doses is examined, and a robust method for linear extrapolation to low doses is proposed and applied to epidemiological data on radiation carcinogenesis

  12. Recent progress in nickel carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Positive bacterial mutagenesis tests have been obtained with Ni(II) in Corynybacterium, but not in E. coli, S. typhimurium, or B. subtilis. Transformation assays of several soluble and crystalline Ni compounds have been positive in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Ni(II) binds to DNA, RNA, and nucleoproteins, and becomes localized in nucleoli. Genotoxic effects of Ni include: (a) chromosomal aberrations, including sister-chromatid exchanges, (b) DNA strandbreaks and DNA-protein crosslinks, (c) inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis, (d) infidelity of DNA transcription, and (e) mutations at the HGPRTase locus in Chinese hamster cells and the TK locus in mouse lymphoma cells. These findings are consistent with somatic mutation as the mechanism for initiation of nickel carcinogenesis. Ni compounds cause reversible transition of double-stranded poly(dG-dC) DNA from the right-handed B-helix to the left-handed Z-helix, suggesting a mechanism whereby nickel might modulate oncogene expression. 99 references, 4 tables.

  13. Inherent aerobic capacity-dependent differences in breast carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Henry J; Jones, Lee W; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Neil, Elizabeth S; McGinley, John N

    2017-09-01

    Although regular physical activity is associated with improvement in aerobic capacity and lower breast cancer risk, there are heritable sets of traits that affect improvement in aerobic capacity in response to physical activity. Although aerobic capacity segregates risk for a number of chronic diseases, the effect of the heritable component on cancer risk has not been evaluated. Therefore, we investigated breast carcinogenesis in rodent models of heritable fitness in the absence of induced physical activity. Female offspring of N:NIH rats selectively bred for low (LIAC) or high (HIAC) inherent aerobic capacity were injected intraperitoneally with 1-methyl-1-nitrosurea (70 mg/kg body wt). At study termination 33 weeks post-carcinogen, cancer incidence (14.0 versus 47.3%; P < 0.001) and multiplicity (0.18 versus 0.85 cancers per rat; P < 0.0001) were significantly decreased in HIAC versus LIAC rats, respectively. HIAC had smaller visceral and subcutaneous body fat depots than LIAC and activity of two proteins that regulated the mammalian target of rapamycin, protein kinase B (Akt), and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase were suppressed and activated, respectively, in HIAC. Although many factors distinguish between HIAC and LIAC, it appears that the protective effect of HIAC against breast carcinogenesis is mediated, at least in part, via alterations in core metabolic signaling pathways deregulated in the majority of human breast cancers. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. E-cadherin: Its dysregulation in carcinogenesis and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sonia How Ming; Fang, Chee Mun; Chuah, Lay-Hong; Leong, Chee Onn; Ngai, Siew Ching

    2018-01-01

    E-cadherin is a transmembrane glycoprotein which connects epithelial cells together at adherens junctions. In normal cells, E-cadherin exerts its tumour suppressing role mainly by sequestering β-catenin from its binding to LEF (Lymphoid enhancer factor)/TCF (T cell factor) which serves the function of transcribing genes of the proliferative Wnt signaling pathway. Despite the ongoing debate on whether the loss of E-cadherin is the cause or effect of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), E-cadherin functional loss has frequently been associated with poor prognosis and survival in patients of various cancers. The dysregulation of E-cadherin expression that leads to carcinogenesis happens mostly at the epigenetic level but there are cases of genetic alterations as well. E-cadherin expression has been linked to the cellular functions of invasiveness reduction, growth inhibition, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and differentiation. Studies on various cancers have shown that these different cellular functions are also interdependent. Recent studies have reported a rapid expansion of E-cadherin clinical relevance in various cancers. This review article summarises the multifaceted effect E-cadherin expression has on cellular functions in the context of carcinogenesis as well as its clinical implications in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Immunomodulation of antiretroviral drug-suppressed chronic HIV-1 infection in an oral probiotic double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Otto O; Kelesidis, Theodoros; Cordova, Robert; Khanlou, Homayoon

    2014-10-01

    A putative source of inappropriate immune activation that drives human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 immunopathogenesis is the gastrointestinal tract. Even with effective antiretroviral treatment, residual activation persists. We hypothesized that an oral probiotic could improve the residual immune activation in chronic treated HIV-1 infection, and tested a Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 capsule probiotic in HIV-1-infected persons with suppressed viremia on stable antiretroviral therapy in a 3-month double-blind placebo-controlled trial (10 probiotic, 7 placebo). The Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) was administered monthly. Blood was tested at the start and end of placebo/probiotic administration for viremia, CD4(+) T cell percentage/concentration, soluble (s)CD14, soluble intestinal fatty acid binding protein, sCD163, D-dimer, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α. All participants maintained viremia probiotic was safe and well tolerated, and appeared to improve chronic gastrointestinal symptoms. Its administration was associated with a significant increase in the percentage of blood CD4(+) T cells compared to placebo (+2.8% versus -1.8%, p=0.018) although CD4(+) T cell concentrations were generally unchanged in both groups. None of the biomarkers showed significant changes on probiotic treatment or between-group differences in change (although significance was borderline for a greater sCD163 drop in the probiotic versus placebo group, p=0.05). Some biomarkers showed significant correlations to each other, particularly D-dimer with CRP and sCD14 with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. These data demonstrate the safety and possible benefit of this probiotic for residual inflammation in treated HIV-1 infection, although further study will be required to determine the immune pathways involved.

  16. Deficiency of the Erc/mesothelin gene ameliorates renal carcinogenesis in Tsc2 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Danqing; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Tetsuo; Kanenishi, Kenji; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Abe, Masaaki; Okura, Hidehiro; Hamano, Yoshitomo; Sun, Guodong; Maeda, Masahiro; Jishage, Kou-ichi; Noda, Tetsuo; Hino, Okio

    2011-04-01

    Genetic crossing experiments were performed between tuberous sclerosis-2 (Tsc2) KO and expressed in renal carcinoma (Erc) KO mice to analyze the function of the Erc/mesothelin gene in renal carcinogenesis. We found the number and size of renal tumors were significantly less in Tsc2+/-;Erc-/- mice than in Tsc2+/-;Erc+/+ and Tsc2+/-;Erc+/- mice. Tumors from Tsc2+/-;Erc-/- mice exhibited reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis, as determined by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Ki67) and TUNEL analysis, respectively. Adhesion to collagen-coated plates in vitro was enhanced in Erc-restored cells and decreased in Erc-suppressed cells with siRNA. Tumor formation by Tsc2-deficient cells in nude mice was remarkably suppressed by stable knockdown of Erc with shRNA. Western blot analysis showed that the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, Akt and signal transducer and activator of transcription protein 3 were weaker in Erc-deficient/suppressed cells compared with Erc-expressed cells. These results indicate that deficiency of the Erc/mesothelin gene ameliorates renal carcinogenesis in Tsc2 KO mice and inhibits the phosphorylation of several kinases of cell adhesion mechanism. This suggests that Erc/mesothelin may have an important role in the promotion and/or maintenance of carcinogenesis by influencing cell-substrate adhesion via the integrin-related signal pathway. © 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

  17. Modeling Multiple Causes of Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T D

    1999-01-24

    multiple causes of carcinogenesis and shifts the risk-assessment logic to considerations of "what dose does?" in contrast to the current process of the substance-specific question of "what dose is?" Whether reactive oxygen is the proximate or contributing cause of disease or simply a better estimate of biologically effective dose, it has enormous advantages for improved risk- and policy-based decisions. Various estimates of immune system modulation will be given based on radiobiology.

  18. Bacterionomics and vironomics in carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratiwi Sudarmono

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Virus and bacteria are microbes which are very common cause human infection. Most of the bacterial infection can be eradicated by antibiotics and infection symptoms disappear. But for virus infection, once infected, the virus will persistently stay in the host, even undergo not only a lytic cycle but also integrated into host genome. Nowadays, at least 6 virus type are consistently related to human cancer, such as EBV,HPV,HTLV,HBV,HCV,HKSV, and the new one Merkel Virus (MCV. Although not every infected people will get cancer, but around 20% of the whole cancer in human are caused by viral oncogene. Class one oncogenic bacterial is Helicobacter pylori. Infection with this bacteria can cause persistent gastro duodenal inflammation which cause some alteration in gastric cell growth into transformation. Expression of Cag gene and Vac gene and some expression of OMP protein usually link to gastric cancer. Molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis for every virus which cause infection  is a very complex , which include several processes caused by cell transformation. Besides, other host and environmental factors are also play a significant role in cancer development. Some scientist put a Hallmark analysis as a model to quickly summarize what pathobiology process will happen and what gene or protein caused the process. The Hallmark analysis comprise of several process which may happen simultaneously because some of the Hallmark is caused by the same protein. The Hallmark consists of various virus strategies in oncogenesis such as promoting angiogenesis, avoiding immune destruction, genome instability and mutation, deregulating cellular energetic, resisting cell death, sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, enabling cellular immortality, promoting inflammation and activation metastasis. For example, infection by HPV, will cause low grade dysplasia which can continue to invasive cervical cancer. After host cell transformation, in

  19. Diet, lifestyle, and molecular alterations that drive colorectal carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.

    2004-01-01

    Environmental factors have been repeatedly implicated in the etiology of colorectal cancer, and much is known about the molecular events involved in colorectal carcinogenesis. The relationships between environmental risk factors and the molecular alterations that drive colorectal carcinogenesis are

  20. Molecular and cellular pathways associated with chromosome 1p deletions during colon carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payne CM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Claire M Payne, Cheray Crowley-Skillicorn, Carol Bernstein, Hana Holubec, Harris BernsteinDepartment of Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, University of Arizona Tucson, AZ, USAAbstract: Chromosomal instability is a major pathway of sporadic colon carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p appears to be one of the “hot spots” in the non-neoplastic mucosa that, when deleted, is associated with the initiation of carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p contains genes associated with DNA repair, spindle checkpoint function, apoptosis, multiple microRNAs, the Wnt signaling pathway, tumor suppression, antioxidant activities, and defense against environmental toxins. Loss of 1p is dangerous since it would likely contribute to genomic instability leading to tumorigenesis. The 1p deletion-associated colon carcinogenesis pathways are reviewed at the molecular and cellular levels. Sporadic colon cancer is strongly linked to a high-fat/low-vegetable/low-micronutrient, Western-style diet. We also consider how selected dietary-related compounds (eg, excess hydrophobic bile acids, and low levels of folic acid, niacin, plant-derived antioxidants, and other modulatory compounds might affect processes leading to chromosomal deletions, and to the molecular and cellular pathways specifically altered by chromosome 1p loss.Keywords: chromosome 1p, colon carcinogenesis, molecular pathways, cellular pathways

  1. Experimental radiation carcinogenesis: what have we learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The author reviews the need for animal experiments in development of a biological model for radioinduced carcinogenesis. He concludes they are vital for: (1) study of mechanisms; (2) establishment of generalizations; (3) elucidation of dose-response and time-dose relationships; and (4) determination of dose-distributions and their results, particularly for radionuclides

  2. Molecular mechanisms in radiation carcinogenesis: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.B.

    1975-01-01

    Molecular studies of radiation carcinogenesis are discussed in relation to theories for extrapolating from cellular and animal models to man. Skin cancer is emphasized because of sunlight-induced photochemical damage to DNA. It is emphasized that cellular and animal models are needed as well as molecular theories for quantitative evaluation of hazardous environmental agents. (U.S.)

  3. Radiation carcinogenesis and related radiobiology. Special listing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The special listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Human cancer and exposure to radiation; Experimental radiation carcinogenesis and radiation biology

  4. MicroRNA-34a and microRNA-21 play roles in the chemopreventive effects of 3,6-dihydroxyflavone on 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea-induced breast carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Chang; Yujie, Fu; Lijia, Yuan; Long, Yi; Hongxia, Xu; Yong, Zhou; Jundong, Zhu; Qianyong, Zhang; Mantian, Mi

    2012-05-22

    miRNAs are very important regulators in biological processes such as development, cellular differentiation, and carcinogenesis. Given the important role of miRNAs in tumorigenesis and development, it is worth investigating whether some miRNAs play roles in the anticancer mechanism of flavonoids. However, such a role has not yet been reported. We previously selected the promising anticancer agent 3,6-dihydroxyflavone (3,6-DHF) in pharmacodynamic experiments, which may serve as a leading compound for developing more potent anticancer drugs or chemopreventive supplements. The present study aims to investigate the chemopreventive activities of 3,6-DHF against mammary carcinogenesis. The experimental model of breast carcinogenesis was developed by intraperitoneal injection of 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea (MNU). The bioavailability of 3,6-DHF in rats was detected by HPLC. The expression of microRNA-34a (miR-34a) and microRNA-21 (miR-21) was evaluated by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Cell apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry or terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling assay. The mitochondrial membrane potential was assayed using 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethyl-imidacarbocyanine iodide dye by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The level of cytochrome C in cytosol was evaluated by western blotting. Our study showed that oral administration of 3,6-DHF effectively suppressed MNU-induced breast carcinogenesis in rats, decreasing the cancer incidence by 35.7%. The detection of bioavailability indicated that the concentration of 3,6-DHF was 2.5 ± 0.4 μg/ml in plasma of rats within 2 hours after administration, and was 21.7 ± 3.8 μg/ml in urine within 24 hours. Oral administration of 3,6-DHF to BALB/c nude mice bearing breast cancer cell xenografts also significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, our study revealed that the global upregulation of miR-21 and downregulation of miR-34a in breast carcinogenesis could be reversed by 3

  5. Mushroom Ganoderma lucidum prevents colitis-associated carcinogenesis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Sliva

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest that mushroom intake is inversely correlated with gastric, gastrointestinal and breast cancers. We have recently demonstrated anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity of triterpene extract isolated from mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (GLT. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether GLT prevents colitis-associated carcinogenesis in mice.Colon carcinogenesis was induced by the food-borne carcinogen (2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazol[4,5-b]pyridine [PhIP] and inflammation (dextran sodium sulfate [DSS] in mice. Mice were treated with 0, 100, 300 and 500 mg GLT/kg of body weight 3 times per week for 4 months. Cell proliferation, expression of cyclin D1 and COX-2 and macrophage infiltration was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The effect of GLT on XRE/AhR, PXR and rPXR was evaluated by the reporter gene assays. Expression of metabolizing enzymes CYP1A2, CYP3A1 and CYP3A4 in colon tissue was determined by immunohistochemistry. GLT treatment significantly suppressed focal hyperplasia, aberrant crypt foci (ACF formation and tumor formation in mice exposed to PhIP/DSS. The anti-proliferative effects of GLT were further confirmed by the decreased staining with Ki-67 in colon tissues. PhIP/DSS-induced colon inflammation was demonstrated by the significant shortening of the large intestine and macrophage infiltrations, whereas GLT treatment prevented the shortening of colon lengths, and reduced infiltration of macrophages in colon tissue. GLT treatment also significantly down-regulated PhIP/DSS-dependent expression of cyclin D1, COX-2, CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 in colon tissue.Our data suggest that GLT could be considered as an alternative dietary approach for the prevention of colitis-associated cancer.

  6. Mushroom Ganoderma lucidum Prevents Colitis-Associated Carcinogenesis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliva, Daniel; Loganathan, Jagadish; Jiang, Jiahua; Jedinak, Andrej; Lamb, John G.; Terry, Colin; Baldridge, Lee Ann; Adamec, Jiri; Sandusky, George E.; Dudhgaonkar, Shailesh

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest that mushroom intake is inversely correlated with gastric, gastrointestinal and breast cancers. We have recently demonstrated anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity of triterpene extract isolated from mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (GLT). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether GLT prevents colitis-associated carcinogenesis in mice. Methods/Principal Findings Colon carcinogenesis was induced by the food-borne carcinogen (2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazol[4,5-b]pyridine [PhIP]) and inflammation (dextran sodium sulfate [DSS]) in mice. Mice were treated with 0, 100, 300 and 500 mg GLT/kg of body weight 3 times per week for 4 months. Cell proliferation, expression of cyclin D1 and COX-2 and macrophage infiltration was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The effect of GLT on XRE/AhR, PXR and rPXR was evaluated by the reporter gene assays. Expression of metabolizing enzymes CYP1A2, CYP3A1 and CYP3A4 in colon tissue was determined by immunohistochemistry. GLT treatment significantly suppressed focal hyperplasia, aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation and tumor formation in mice exposed to PhIP/DSS. The anti-proliferative effects of GLT were further confirmed by the decreased staining with Ki-67 in colon tissues. PhIP/DSS-induced colon inflammation was demonstrated by the significant shortening of the large intestine and macrophage infiltrations, whereas GLT treatment prevented the shortening of colon lengths, and reduced infiltration of macrophages in colon tissue. GLT treatment also significantly down-regulated PhIP/DSS-dependent expression of cyclin D1, COX-2, CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 in colon tissue. Conclusions Our data suggest that GLT could be considered as an alternative dietary approach for the prevention of colitis-associated cancer. PMID:23118901

  7. Induction of human breast cell carcinogenesis by triclocarban and intervention by curcumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sood, Shilpa; Choudhary, Shambhunath; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert, E-mail: hcrwang@utk.edu

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Triclocarban exposure induces breast epithelial cell carcinogenesis. •Triclocarban induces the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, and DNA damage. •Physiological doses of triclocarban induce cellular carcinogenesis. •Non-cytotoxic curcumin blocks triclocarban-induced carcinogenesis and pathways. -- Abstract: More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to environmental carcinogens and co-carcinogens. To identify co-carcinogens with abilities to induce cellular pre-malignancy, we studied the activity of triclocarban (TCC), an antimicrobial agent commonly used in household and personal care products. Here, we demonstrated, for the first time, that chronic exposure to TCC at physiologically-achievable nanomolar concentrations resulted in progressive carcinogenesis of human breast cells from non-cancerous to pre-malignant. Pre-malignant carcinogenesis was measured by increasingly-acquired cancer-associated properties of reduced dependence on growth factors, anchorage-independent growth and increased cell proliferation, without acquisition of cellular tumorigenicity. Long-term TCC exposure also induced constitutive activation of the Erk–Nox pathway and increases of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells. A single TCC exposure induced transient induction of the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, increased cell proliferation, and DNA damage in not only non-cancerous breast cells but also breast cancer cells. Using these constitutively- and transiently-induced changes as endpoints, we revealed that non-cytotoxic curcumin was effective in intervention of TCC-induced cellular pre-malignancy. Our results lead us to suggest that the co-carcinogenic potential of TCC should be seriously considered in epidemiological studies to reveal the significance of TCC in the development of sporadic breast cancer. Using TCC-induced transient and constitutive endpoints as targets will likely help identify non-cytotoxic preventive

  8. The properties of red seaweed (Kappaphycus alvarezii) and its effect on mammary carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Vi-Sion; Okechukwu, Patrick N; Teo, Swee-Sen

    2017-03-01

    The edible red seaweed (Kappaphycus alvarezii) is one of the algae species which was found to be rich in nutrients and nutraceutical. Hence, K. alvarezii may have the ability to suppress cancer through its antiproliferative properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential compounds of K. alvarezii, cytotoxicity properties of K. alvarezii extract on breast cancer cell line (MCF-7), investigated toxicity effect of high dosage K. alvarezii extract in rats and determined the effect of K. alvarezii on 7, 12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) mammary carcinogenesis in rats. The method of LCMS/MS and MTT assay were used. For animal study, sub-chronic toxicity method was used, the rats were supplemented with 2000mg/kg body weight daily of K. alvarezii crude extracts by oral gavage. For the anticancer effect of K. alvarezii crude extracts, this study consisted of three groups of the experimental, untreated and normal group of rats. The experimental and untreated groups of rats were induced with mammary tumour with DMBA. The experimental group of rats was given with K. alvarezii crude extracts orally. The results were being used to compare with the untreated group of rats and normal group of rats. All the rats were fed with standard diet and water ad libitum. Mortality, behavior changes and tumour sizes were observed specifically. The differences between the three groups of rats were evaluated by using the ANOVA test. By using LCMS/MS method, six unknown compounds were analysed. K. alvarezii crude extract reduced the cell viability of MCF-7 from 84.91% to 0.81% and the IC 50 value is 4.1±0.69mg/mL. For sub-chronic and heavy metal toxicity studies, no significant difference was found in haematological and biochemical values of the control group and experimental group. The growth rate of tumours in the untreated group of rats was found significantly higher than the experimental group of rats. Besides that, the white blood cells level in untreated group was

  9. Somatic Host Cell Alterations in HPV Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Tamara R. Litwin; Megan A. Clarke; Michael Dean; Nicolas Wentzensen

    2017-01-01

    High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) infections cause cancers in different organ sites, most commonly cervical and head and neck cancers. While carcinogenesis is initiated by two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, increasing evidence shows the importance of specific somatic events in host cells for malignant transformation. HPV-driven cancers share characteristic somatic changes, including apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC)-driven mutations and genomic instability ...

  10. Radiation carcinogenesis and related radiobiology. Special listing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) program of the National Cancer Institute. Each listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The descriptions are provided by cancer scientists in about 50 different countries. Research areas covered in this listing are: Human cancer and exposure to radiation; experimental radiation carcinogenesis and radiation biology

  11. Inhibition of carcinogenesis by retinoids. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nettesheim, P.

    1979-01-01

    Progress made in recent years in the search for retinoids with anticarcinogenic activity is reviewed. There are many studies to be found in the literature which show no substantial effect of retinoids on carcinogenesis or tumor growth. Some of these negative findings may be related to the carcinogen dose used, the type of retinoid used, the dose, dose schedule or mode of administration of the retinoid. Others may indicate that the particular type of tumor or tumor system is, indeed, refractory to retinoids in general or to those retinoids that were tested. A great gap still exists in our knowledge concerning the pharmake-kinetics of most retinoids their availability to various normal and cancerous tissues, and the role and existence of transport and binding proteins. There are studies which indicate that under certain conditions, particularly conditions of topical application, some retinoids may even enhance carcinogenesis. It seems, however, indisputable by now that some retinoids are effective inhibitors of carcinogenesis in some organ systems and can even inhibit the growth of some established tumors. While the mechanisms of these inhibitory effects are presently not understood, it does seem clear that they are not mediated via the cytotoxic mechanisms typical of chemotherapeutic agents. The hope that retinoids might become an effective tool to halt the progression of some neoplastic diseases, seems to be justified.

  12. Genetic alterations during radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews radiation-induced genetic alterations and its carcinogenesis, focusing on the previous in vitro assay outcome. A colony formation assay using Syrian hamster fetal cells and focus formation assay using mouse C3H10T1/2 cells are currently available to find malignant transformation of cells. Such in vitro assays has proposed the hypothesis that radiation-induced carcinogenesis arises from at least two-stage processes; i.e., that an early step induced by irradiation plays an important role in promoting the potential to cause the subsequent mutation. A type of genetic instability induced by radiation results in a persistently elevated frequency of spontaneous mutations, so-called the phenomenon of delayed reproductive death. One possible mechanism by which genetic instability arises has been shown to be due to the development of abnormality in the gene group involved in the maintenance mechanism of genome stability. Another possibility has also been shown to stem from the loss of telomere (the extremities of a chromosome). The importance of search for radiation-induced genetic instability is emphasized in view of the elucidation of carcinogenesis. (N.K.)

  13. Oxidative stress in prostate hypertrophy and carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar M. Przybyszewski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Aging, significant impairment of the oxidation/reduction balance, infection, and inflammation are recognized risk factors of benign hyperplasia and prostate cancer. Chronic symptomatic and asymptomatic prostate inflammatory processes generate significantly elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and halogenated compounds. Prostate cancer patients showed significantly higher lipid peroxidation and lower antioxidant levels in peripheral blood than healthy controls, whereas patients with prostate hyperplasia did not show such symptoms. Oxidative/nitrosative/halogenative stress causes DNA modifications leading to genome instability that may initiate carcinogenesis; however, it was shown that oxidative damage alone is not sufficient to initiate this process. Peroxidation products induced by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species seem to take part in epigenetic mechanisms regulating genome activity. One of the most common changes occurring in more than 90�0of all analyzed prostate cancers is the silencing of GSTP1 gene activity. The gene encodes glutathione transferase, an enzyme participating in detoxification processes. Prostate hyperplasia is often accompanied by chronic inflammation and such a relationship was not observed in prostate cancer. The participation of infection and inflammation in the development of hyperplasia is unquestionable and these factors probably also take part in initiating the early stages of prostate carcinogenesis. Thus it seems that therapeutic strategies that prevent genome oxidative damage in situations involving oxidative/nitrosative/halogenative stress, i.e. use of antioxidants, plant steroids, antibiotics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, could help prevent carcinogenesis.

  14. Oral insulin treatment suppresses virus-induced antigen-specific destruction of beta cells and prevents autoimmune diabetes in transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    von Herrath, M G; Dyrberg, T; Oldstone, M B

    1996-01-01

    Oral administration of self-antigens has been proposed as a therapy to prevent and treat autoimmune diseases. Here we report that oral treatment with insulin prevents virus-induced insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in a transgenic (tg) mouse model. Such mice express the viral nucleoprotein (NP) of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) under control of the rat insulin promoter in their pancreatic beta cells and < 2% spontaneously develop diabetes. However, 2 mo after challenge wit...

  15. Menstrual suppression for adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Anna Lea; Hillard, Paula J Adams

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the recent literature and emerging data describing clinical situations in which menstrual suppression may improve symptoms and quality of life for adolescents. A variety of conditions occurring frequently in adolescents and young adults, including heavy menstrual bleeding, and dysmenorrhea as well as gynecologic conditions such as endometriosis and pelvic pain, can safely be improved or alleviated with appropriate menstrual management. Recent publications have highlighted the efficacy and benefit of extended cycle or continuous combined oral contraceptives, the levonorgestrel intrauterine device, and progestin therapies for a variety of medical conditions. This review places menstrual suppression in an historical context, summarizes methods of hormonal therapy that can suppress menses, and reviews clinical conditions for which menstrual suppression may be helpful.

  16. Human RecQL4 helicase plays critical roles in prostate carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Yanrong; Meador, Jarah A; Calaf, Gloria M

    2010-01-01

    ) synthesis and RecQL4-suppressed prostate cancer cells underwent an extensive apoptotic death in a PARP-1-dependent manner. Most notably, RecQL4 knockdown in metastatic prostate cancer cells drastically reduced their cell invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, showing that RecQL4 is essential...... suppression of RecQL4 by small interfering RNA and short hairpin RNA vectors drastically reduced the growth and survival of metastatic prostate cancer cells, indicating that RecQL4 is a prosurvival factor for prostate cancer cells. RecQL4 suppression led to increased poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP...... for prostate cancer promotion. Observation of a direct interaction of retinoblastoma (Rb) and E2F1 proteins with RecQL4 promoter suggests that Rb-E2F1 pathway may regulate RecQL4 expression. Collectively, our study shows that RecQL4 is an essential factor for prostate carcinogenesis....

  17. 1,8-cineole prevents UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis by targeting the aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joon; Kim, Yong Ho; Lee, Nam Hyouck; Kim, Young Eon; Kim, Yoonsook; Song, Kyung-Mo; Jung, Sung Keun

    2017-01-01

    1,8-cineole is a natural monoterpene cyclic ether present in Eucalyptus, and has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. However, the preventive effect of 1,8-cineole on skin carcinogenesis and the molecular mechanism of action responsible remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of 1,8-cineole on UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis. 1,8-cineole inhibited UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein and mRNA expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) generation in HaCaT cells. 1,8-cineole also inhibited phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, and phosphorylation of its upstream kinases, c-Src and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and drug affinity responsive target stability (DARTS) assay results showed that 1,8-cineole suppressed UVB-induced expression of a target gene of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), cyp1a1, and directly binds to AhR. Knockdown of AhR suppressed COX-2 expression as well as phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in HaCaT cells. Furthermore, topical treatment of 1,8-cineole on mouse skin delayed tumor incidence and reduced tumor numbers, while inhibiting COX-2 expression in vivo. Taken together, these results suggest that 1,8-cineole is a potent chemopreventive agent that inhibits UVB-induced COX-2 expression by targeting AhR to suppress UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis. PMID:29285309

  18. Detouring the Undesired Route of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Hong, Kyung-Sook; Hong, Hua; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence has emerged that a dysregulated inflammation is associated with most of the tumors, and many studies have begun to unravel the molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. As a typical example linking these associations, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-associated atrophic gastritis has been recognized as precursor lesion of gastric cancer. The identification of transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT3, and their gene products such as IL-8, COX-2, iNOS, cytokines, chemokines and their receptors, etc have laid the molecular foundation for our understanding of the decisive role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. In addition to the role as the initiator of cancer, inflammation contributes to survival and proliferation of malignant cells, tumor angiogenesis, and even metastasis. In this review, the fundamental mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis as well as the possibility of cancer prevention through suppressing H. pylori-induced inflammation are introduced. We infer that targeting inflammatory pathways have a potential role to detour the unpleasant journey to H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis

  19. Detouring the Undesired Route of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Baik Hahm

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and experimental evidence has emerged that a dysregulated inflammation is associated with most of the tumors, and many studies have begun to unravel the molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. As a typical example linking these associations, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection-associated atrophic gastritis has been recognized as precursor lesion of gastric cancer. The identification of transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT3, and their gene products such as IL-8, COX-2, iNOS, cytokines, chemokines and their receptors, etc have laid the molecular foundation for our understanding of the decisive role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. In addition to the role as the initiator of cancer, inflammation contributes to survival and proliferation of malignant cells, tumor angiogenesis, and even metastasis. In this review, the fundamental mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis as well as the possibility of cancer prevention through suppressing H. pylori-induced inflammation are introduced. We infer that targeting inflammatory pathways have a potential role to detour the unpleasant journey to H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  20. Detouring the Undesired Route of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Hong, Kyung-Sook; Hong, Hua [Lab of Translational Medicine, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Hahm, Ki Baik, E-mail: hahmkb@gachon.ac.kr [Lab of Translational Medicine, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Gastroenterology, Gachon Graduate School of Medicine, Gil Hospital, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-25

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence has emerged that a dysregulated inflammation is associated with most of the tumors, and many studies have begun to unravel the molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. As a typical example linking these associations, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-associated atrophic gastritis has been recognized as precursor lesion of gastric cancer. The identification of transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT3, and their gene products such as IL-8, COX-2, iNOS, cytokines, chemokines and their receptors, etc have laid the molecular foundation for our understanding of the decisive role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. In addition to the role as the initiator of cancer, inflammation contributes to survival and proliferation of malignant cells, tumor angiogenesis, and even metastasis. In this review, the fundamental mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis as well as the possibility of cancer prevention through suppressing H. pylori-induced inflammation are introduced. We infer that targeting inflammatory pathways have a potential role to detour the unpleasant journey to H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  1. Suppression of EAE by oral tolerance is independent of endogenous IFN-beta whereas treatment with recombinant IFN-beta ameliorates EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yawei; Teige, Ingrid; Ericsson, Ida

    2010-01-01

    IFN-beta is anticipated to have an important function in mucosal tolerance, as it is one of the major cytokines produced by plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and has recently been suggested as central to the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Here, we have investigated whether oral tolerance is depe......, however this was not a prerequisite for establishment of oral tolerance.Immunology and Cell Biology advance online publication, 12 January 2010; doi:10.1038/icb.2009.111.......IFN-beta is anticipated to have an important function in mucosal tolerance, as it is one of the major cytokines produced by plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and has recently been suggested as central to the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Here, we have investigated whether oral tolerance...... is dependent on endogenous IFN-beta by feeding low-dose self-antigen myelin basic protein to IFN-beta(-/-) mice with subsequent induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Our study shows that oral tolerance was readily induced in IFN-beta(-/-) mice compared with their wild-type littermates...

  2. The Role of the Stroma in Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurija Bilalović

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This systematic review considers the most recent attitudes and news regarding the influence of the stroma on tumor initiation and progression. It is now widely accepted that tumor stroma plays an active role in carcinogenesis. Many different signaling molecules, ligands and signaling pathways recently have been discovered. This review considers the complexity of interactions between malignant cells and its stroma (cross-talk. The recent advances and better understanding of the tumor-stroma interactions will have important impact on the new and combined therapeutic approaches and modalities.

  3. Mechanisms of carcinogenesis prevention by flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Belitsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of anticancerogenic effects of flavanoids and isocyanates from the plants widely consumed in the midland belt of Russia were reviewed. Data of studies both in vitro and in vivo were analyzed. Special attention was paid to inhibition of targets responsible for carcinogen metabolic activation, carcinogenesis promotion and tumor progression as well as neoangiogenesis. Besides that the antioxidant properties of flavonoids and their effects on cell cycle regulation, apoptosis initiation and cell mobility were considered.

  4. Chemopreventive effects of nobiletin and its colonic metabolites on colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xian; Song, Mingyue; Wang, Minqi; Zheng, Jinkai; Gao, Zili; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Guodong; Xiao, Hang

    2015-12-01

    Nobiletin (NBT) is a major citrus flavonoid with various health benefits. Herein, we investigated the colon cancer chemopreventive effects of NBT and its colonic metabolites in a colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis mouse model as well as in human colon cancer cell models. In azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium treated mice, oral administration of NBT effectively decreased both incidence and multiplicity of colonic tumors. NBT showed significant antiproliferative, proapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory effects in the mouse colon. HPLC analysis revealed that oral administration of NBT resulted in high levels of metabolites, i.e. 3'-demethylnobiletin (M1), 4'-demethylnobiletin (M2), and 3',4'-didemethylnobiletin (M3) in the colonic mucosa. In contrast, the colonic level of NBT was about 20-fold lower than the total colonic level of three metabolites. Cell culture studies demonstrated that the colonic metabolites of NBT significantly inhibited the growth of human colon cancer cells, caused cell-cycle arrest, induced apoptosis, and profoundly modulated signaling proteins related with cell proliferation and cell death. All of these effects were much stronger than those produced by NBT alone. Our results demonstrated that oral administration of NBT significantly inhibited colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis in mice, and this chemopreventive effect was strongly associated with its colonic metabolites. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Natural chemopreventive alternatives in oral cancer chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrobota, I; Bolfa, P; Filip, A G; Catoi, C; Alb, C; Pop, O; Tatomir, C; Baciut, G

    2016-02-01

    We studied the effect of grape seed extract Burgund Mare (BM) on oral carcinogenesis and compared it with that of curcumin (CU). Wistar rats were divided into six groups (n = 10): 4-nitro-quinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) oral carcinogenesis was induced to groups 1 - 5; groups 2 and 3 received BM and CU respectively during initiation and groups 4 and 5 BM and CU during post-initiation of carcinogenesis; group 6 represented the negative control group. Total malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were assayed fluorometrically in oral tissue (gingival, jugal, palatal, lingual mucosa) and serum. Histopathological exam was performed and a dysplasia score given to each oral mucosal lesion. Ki67, cyclin D1, p63, Bcl2 and p53 were immunohistochemically evaluated. BM and CU reduced tissue MDA values elevated by 4NQO (P = 0.000). The difference between CU and BM effect was significant in the initiation (P = 0.02) but not in the post-initiation phase of carcinogenesis (P = 0.58). Tissue GSH levels decreased by 4NQO (P < 0.001) were not significantly modified by BM or CU. Serum MDA levels increased by 4NQO (P = 0.000) were significantly lowered by CU (P = 0.04) and BM (P = 0.04) during initiation and by CU during post-initiation of carcinogenesis (P = 0.01). CU was more potent than BM during post-initiation of carcinogenesis (P = 0.01). Serum GSH lowered by 4NQO (P = 0.55) was significantly decreased by BM and CU (P < 0.012), with no significant difference between groups receiving BM or CU. Moderate dysplasia was the most advanced dysplasia induced and gingival localization the most frequent. Both BM and CU lowered dysplasia scores, with BM being the most efficient during post-initiation of carcinogenesis (P = 0.001). Ki67, cyclin D1, p63, Bcl2 and p53 expression increased with dysplasia scores. BM showed chemopreventive properties during initiation and post-initiation of oral carcinogenesis, reducing local and general oxidative stress and the intensity of dysplasia

  6. Short-term carcinogenesis evaluation of Casearia sylvestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleide A.S. Tirloni

    Full Text Available Abstract Casearia sylvestris Sw., Salicaceae, is an important medicinal plant widely used in Brazil for the treatment of various cardiovascular disorders. This species was included as of interest by Brazilian Unified Health System. Although preclinical studies described cardiovascular protective effects and apparent absence of toxicity, no studies have evaluated its carcinogenic potential. In this study, we proposed a short-term carcinogenesis evaluation of C. sylvestris in Wistar rats, aiming to check the safety of this species to use it as proposed by Brazilian Unified Health System. C. sylvestris leaves were obtained and the crude extract was prepared by maceration from methanol/water. Wistar rats were orally treated for 12 weeks with 50, 250 or 500 mg kg−1 of crude extract or vehicle. Body weight, daily morbidity and mortality were monitored. Blood and bone marrow samples were collect for micronucleus test, comet assay and tumor markers evaluation. Vital organs were removed to macro and histopathological analyses. The crude extract did not induce mutagenic and genotoxic effects and no alterations were observed in important tumor markers. Finally, no detectable signs of injury through gross pathology or histopathological examinations were observed. Our results certify the absence of the crude extract toxicity, indicating its safety, even at prolonged exposure as proposed by Brazilian Unified Health System.

  7. Effects of retinoids on ultraviolet-induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The evidence for effects of the retinoids on UV-induced carcinogenesis is sparse. Clinical observations indicate that topical RA can cause significant regression of premalignant actinic keratoses. Also there is some evidence that this agent can cause dissolution of some basal cell epitheliomas. However this latter effect does not appear to be of therapeutic value. Systemic retinoids are of little value in the treatment of premalignant and malignant cutaneous lesions though 13-cis-retinoic acid might be of use in the basal cell nevus syndrome. Examination of the influence of the retinoids on photocarcinogenesis essentially has been confined to RA and animal experimentation. RA in nontoxic concentrations can both stimulate and inhibit photocarcinogenesis depending upon the circumstances of the study. The mechanisms of these responses are not clear. Influences on DNA synthesis directly and/or indirectly or on immune responses may be involved in both effects. Preliminary studies with oral 13-cis-retinoic acid have not demonstrated any effects to date on UV-induced skin cancer formation

  8. Curcumin: the spicy modulator of breast carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Urmila; Parasuraman, Subramani; Adhikary, Arun Kumar; Othman, Nor Hayati

    2017-07-19

    Worldwide breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. For many years clinicians and the researchers are examining and exploring various therapeutic modalities for breast cancer. Yet the disease has remained unconquered and the quest for cure is still going on. Present-day strategy of breast cancer therapy and prevention is either combination of a number of drugs or a drug that modulates multiple targets. In this regard natural products are now becoming significant options. Curcumin exemplifies a promising natural anticancer agent for this purpose. This review primarily underscores the modulatory effect of curcumin on the cancer hallmarks. The focus is its anticancer effect in the complex pathways of breast carcinogenesis. Curcumin modulates breast carcinogenesis through its effect on cell cycle and proliferation, apoptosis, senescence, cancer spread and angiogenesis. Largely the NFkB, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, MAPK and JAK/STAT are the key signaling pathways involved. The review also highlights the curcumin mediated modulation of tumor microenvironment, cancer immunity, breast cancer stem cells and cancer related miRNAs. Using curcumin as a therapeutic and preventive agent in breast cancer is perplexed by its diverse biological activity, much of which remains inexplicable. The information reviewed here should point toward potential scope of future curcumin research in breast cancer.

  9. Modifying factors in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Nobuyuki; Fukushima, Shoji; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Nakanishi, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Ryohei; Imaida, Katsumi

    1983-01-01

    N-Butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) is a potent carcinogen in the urinary bladder of animals. The BBN model of bladder cancer is an excellent model of human urinary bladder cancer and has already led to a greater knowledge of its pathogenesis. In our studies, histogenesis and morphological characteristics of BBN urinary bladder cancer were analyzed in different animal species such as rats, mice, hamsters and guinea pigs and also in different rat strains. Papillary or nodular hyperplasia (PN hyperplasia) is found to be a preneoplastic lesion of the rat urinary bladder. Therefore, the promoting and inhibitory effects of various chemicals in two-stage urinary bladder carcinogenesis were judged by measuring PN hyperplasia in rats. Dose-dependent and organ-specific effects of the urinary bladder promoter, saccharin, in the induction of PN hyperplasia were shown in rats after initiation by BBN. The promoting effect of saccharin was seen more clearly in the urinary bladder of rats after potent initiation. A strain difference in susceptibility of the urinary bladder to the promoter was also shown. These results suggest that the above various factors may also have modifying activities on urinary bladder carcinogenesis in man. PMID:6832095

  10. Radiation carcinogenesis: Epidemiology and biological significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boice, J.D.; Fraumeni, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of populations exposed to radiation have led to the identification of a preventable cause of cancer, but in the long run perhaps the most important contribution of radiation studies will be to provide insights into the basic processes of human carcinogenesis. In this volume, key investigators of major epidemiologic projects summarize their observations to date, including information to help assess the effects of low-level exposures. Experimentalists and theorists emphasize the relevance of laboratory and epidemiologic data in elucidating carcinogenic risks and mechanisms in man. This volume was prepared with several objectives in mind: (a) organize and synthesize knowledge on radiation carcinogenesis through epidemiologic and experimental approaches; (b) illustrate and explore ways of utilizing this information to gain insights into the fundamental mechanisms of cancer development; (c) stimulate the formation of hypotheses suited to experimental or epidemiologic testing, theoretical modeling, and multidisciplinary approaches; and (d) identify recent advances that clarify dose-response relationships and the influence of low-dose exposures, provide leads to carcinogenic mechanisms and host-environmental interactions, and suggest strategies for future research and preventive action

  11. Transgenerational teratogenesis and carcinogenesis by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Taisei

    2000-01-01

    This paper thoroughly reviews studies on transgenerational teratogenesis and carcinogenesis induced by radiation and summarizes currently available data from animal studies. The discussions focus on the incidence of tumors, malformations, and mutations in the offspring after parental exposure to radiation, as well as estimated relative risks of congenital malformations and stillbirths in the offspring after parental X-ray exposure. The data suggest that different types of tumors are induced in offspring, because of strain differences in the experimental animals. The results of epidemiological studies in human populations, such as the children of atomic bomb survivors, conflict with the findings in animal studies. The author points to the following reasons for the differences between the results in animals and humans: differences in radiation doses, timing of exposure, and genetic predisposition, etc. While pointing out issues that need to be investigated further, the author indicates that clear strain differences exist in types of tumors induced and in tumor incidences in the offspring of animals that were irradiated before the offspring were conceived, and that genetic predisposition is therefore important in transgenerational carcinogenesis. (K.H.)

  12. Transgenerational teratogenesis and carcinogenesis by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Taisei [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2000-07-01

    This paper thoroughly reviews studies on transgenerational teratogenesis and carcinogenesis induced by radiation and summarizes currently available data from animal studies. The discussions focus on the incidence of tumors, malformations, and mutations in the offspring after parental exposure to radiation, as well as estimated relative risks of congenital malformations and stillbirths in the offspring after parental X-ray exposure. The data suggest that different types of tumors are induced in offspring, because of strain differences in the experimental animals. The results of epidemiological studies in human populations, such as the children of atomic bomb survivors, conflict with the findings in animal studies. The author points to the following reasons for the differences between the results in animals and humans: differences in radiation doses, timing of exposure, and genetic predisposition, etc. While pointing out issues that need to be investigated further, the author indicates that clear strain differences exist in types of tumors induced and in tumor incidences in the offspring of animals that were irradiated before the offspring were conceived, and that genetic predisposition is therefore important in transgenerational carcinogenesis. (K.H.)

  13. Oral treatment with herbal formula B307 alleviates cardiac failure in aging R6/2 mice with Huntington’s disease via suppressing oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin CL

    2015-07-01

    reduced under oral B307 treatment (P<0.05. Oral B307 treatment may briefly alleviate cardiac failure in aging HD R6/2 mice via suppressing cardiac oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. We suggested that the herbal formula B307 may be further developed as a potential health supplement for ameliorating cardiac failure associated with aging. Keywords: Chinese herbal medicines, cardiomyocytes, echocardiography, aging, transgenic mouse model

  14. Differences in phenotype, homing properties and suppressive activities of regulatory T cells induced by epicutaneous, oral or sublingual immunotherapy in mice sensitized to peanut

    OpenAIRE

    Dioszeghy, Vincent; Mondoulet, Lucie; Puteaux, Emilie; Dhelft, V?ronique; Ligouis, M?lanie; Plaquet, Camille; Dupont, Christophe; Benhamou, Pierre-Henri

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy has been proposed as an attractive strategy to actively treat food allergy using the following three different immunotherapy routes: oral (OIT), sublingual (SLIT) and epicutaneous (EPIT) immunotherapy. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to have a pivotal role in the mechanisms of immunotherapy. The aim of this study was to compare the phenotype and function of Tregs induced in peanut-sensitized BALB/c mice using these three routes of treatment. We show ...

  15. Total glucosides of paeony (TGP) inhibits the production of inflammatory cytokines in oral lichen planus by suppressing the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanni; Zhang, Han; Du, Guanhuan; Wang, Yufeng; Cao, Tianyi; Luo, Qingqiong; Chen, Junjun; Chen, Fuxiang; Tang, Guoyao

    2016-07-01

    Total glucosides of paeony (TGP) is a bioactive compound extracted from paeony roots and has been widely used to ameliorate inflammation in several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of TGP on oral lichen planus (OLP), a chronic inflammatory oral condition characterized by T-cell infiltration and abnormal epithelial keratinization cycle remains unclear. In this study, we found that TLR4 was highly expressed and activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway was obviously observed in the OLP tissues. Moreover, there was significant higher mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in OLP keratinocytes than normal oral epithelial keratinocytes. With the help of the cell culture model by stimulating the keratinocyte HaCaT cells with lipopolysaccharides (LPS), we mimicked the local inflammatory environment of OLP. And we further confirmed that TGP could inhibit LPS-induced production of IL-6 and TNF-α in HaCaT cells via a dose-dependent manner. TGP treatment decreased the phosphorylation of IκBα and NF-κB p65 proteins, thus leading to less nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in HaCaT cells. Therefore, our data suggested that TGP may be a new potential candidate for the therapy of OLP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Suppression of ovarian activity with a low-dose 21/7-day regimen oral contraceptive containing ethinylestradiol 20 mcg/drospirenone 3 mg in Japanese and Caucasian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Yuzuru; Heger-Mahn, Doris; Schellschmidt, Ilka; Marr, Joachim

    2012-07-01

    Two studies assessed the effect of a low-estrogen-dose 21/7-day oral contraceptive containing ethinylestradiol and drospirenone (EE 20 mcg/drsp 3 mg) on ovarian activity in Japanese and Caucasian women. Study 1 was conducted in Japanese women (20-35 years), and Study 2 was conducted in Caucasian women (18-35 years). All women received EE 20 mcg/drsp 3 mg in a 21-day active pill regimen. The primary endpoint was the proportion of women with ovulation inhibition (Hoogland score day regimen provides comparable ovarian suppression in Japanese and Caucasian women, with normal ovarian function resuming shortly after treatment end in both populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Kimchi protects against azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Young; Song, Jia-Le; Chang, Hee-Kyung; Kang, Soon-Ah; Park, Kun-Young

    2014-08-01

    The chemopreventive effects of different types and quantities of kimchi prepared with different subingredients, including commercial kimchi (CK), standardized kimchi (SK), cancer-preventive kimchi (CPK), and anticancer kimchi (ACK), on colorectal carcinogenesis in mice were evaluated. The development of colon cancer was induced in male BALB/c mice with a single intraperitoneal injection of azoxymethane (AOM, 10 mg/kg body weight) and subsequent treatment with 2% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days for two cycles. After exposure to AOM and DSS, treatment with the methanolic extracts from different kimchis, particularly 1.89 g/kg of ACK, significantly increased colon length, decreased the ratio of colon weight/length, and resulted in the lowest number of tumors compared with the other kimchi-treated groups. Histological observation revealed that ACK was able to suppress AOM- and DSS-induced colonic mucosal damage and neoplasia. ACK also significantly decreased the mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-γ) as well as the mRNA and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). In addition, the mRNA and protein expression of p53 and p21 was elevated in colon tissues from the ACK-treated mice compared with the other kimchi-treated groups. Our results suggest that kimchi exerted a suppressive effect on AOM- and DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in the BALB/c mice. The anticancer effects of ACK were particularly potent. Thus, it is possible that the health-promoting subingredients added to ACK might be used to prevent colon carcinogenesis in humans.

  18. Kimchi Protects Against Azoxymethane/Dextran Sulfate Sodium–Induced Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Young; Song, Jia-Le; Chang, Hee-Kyung; Kang, Soon-Ah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The chemopreventive effects of different types and quantities of kimchi prepared with different subingredients, including commercial kimchi (CK), standardized kimchi (SK), cancer-preventive kimchi (CPK), and anticancer kimchi (ACK), on colorectal carcinogenesis in mice were evaluated. The development of colon cancer was induced in male BALB/c mice with a single intraperitoneal injection of azoxymethane (AOM, 10 mg/kg body weight) and subsequent treatment with 2% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days for two cycles. After exposure to AOM and DSS, treatment with the methanolic extracts from different kimchis, particularly 1.89 g/kg of ACK, significantly increased colon length, decreased the ratio of colon weight/length, and resulted in the lowest number of tumors compared with the other kimchi-treated groups. Histological observation revealed that ACK was able to suppress AOM- and DSS-induced colonic mucosal damage and neoplasia. ACK also significantly decreased the mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-γ) as well as the mRNA and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). In addition, the mRNA and protein expression of p53 and p21 was elevated in colon tissues from the ACK-treated mice compared with the other kimchi-treated groups. Our results suggest that kimchi exerted a suppressive effect on AOM- and DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in the BALB/c mice. The anticancer effects of ACK were particularly potent. Thus, it is possible that the health-promoting subingredients added to ACK might be used to prevent colon carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:25029638

  19. Effects of selenium on Pteridium aquilinum and urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Sheila B R; Sanches, Daniel S; Caniceiro, Beatriz D; Wysochi, Harry L; da Silva, Graziela B; Latorre, Andreia O

    2013-10-01

    The results of our previous study demonstrated that ptaquiloside, the main toxic agent found in Pteridium aquilinum, suppresses natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity. However, the ability of ptaquiloside to suppress the cytotoxicity of NK cells was prevented by selenium supplementation. NK cells play an important role in the innate immune response and have the ability to kill tumor cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that selenium may prevent the higher susceptibility to urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis that has been observed in mice treated with P. aquilinum. The immunosuppressive effects of ptaquiloside have been associated with a higher number of urethane-induced lung nodules in mice. Hence, we assessed the effects of P. aquilinum-induced immunosuppression on urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis in C57BL/6 mice that had been supplemented with selenium. For these experiments, mice were treated with both an aqueous extract of P. aquilinum (20 g/kg/day) and selenium (1.3 mg/kg) by gavage once daily for 14 days followed by a once-weekly intraperitoneal injection of urethane (1 g/kg) for 10 weeks that was accompanied by gavage 5 days a week. Lung adenomas in mice that had been treated with P. aquilinum plus urethane occurred with a frequency that was 44% higher than that in mice that had been treated with only urethane. In mice that had been supplemented with selenium and treated with P. aquilinum plus urethane, the occurrence of lung adenomas was reduced to 26%. These results suggest that selenium prevents the immunosuppressive effects of P. aquilinum on urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis.

  20. Expression and assembly of largest foreign protein in chloroplasts: oral delivery of human FVIII made in lettuce chloroplasts robustly suppresses inhibitor formation in haemophilia A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Sherman, Alexandra; Chang, Wan-Jung; Kamesh, Aditya; Biswas, Moanaro; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2017-11-06

    Inhibitor formation is a serious complication of factor VIII (FVIII) replacement therapy for the X-linked bleeding disorder haemophilia A and occurs in 20%-30% of patients. No prophylactic tolerance protocol currently exists. Although we reported oral tolerance induction using FVIII domains expressed in tobacco chloroplasts, significant challenges in clinical advancement include expression of the full-length CTB-FVIII sequence to cover the entire patient population, regardless of individual CD4 + T-cell epitope responses. Codon optimization of FVIII heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) increased expression 15- to 42-fold higher than the native human genes. Homoplasmic lettuce lines expressed CTB fusion proteins of FVIII-HC (99.3 kDa), LC (91.8 kDa), C2 (31 kDa) or single chain (SC, 178.2 kDa) up to 3622, 263, 3321 and 852 μg/g in lyophilized plant cells, when grown in a cGMP hydroponic facility (Fraunhofer). CTB-FVIII-SC is the largest foreign protein expressed in chloroplasts; despite a large pentamer size (891 kDa), assembly, folding and disulphide bonds were maintained upon lyophilization and long-term storage as revealed by GM1-ganglioside receptor binding assays. Repeated oral gavages (twice/week for 2 months) of CTB-FVIII-HC/CTB-FVIII-LC reduced inhibitor titres ~10-fold (average 44 BU/mL to 4.7 BU/mL) in haemophilia A mice. Most importantly, increase in the frequency of circulating LAP-expressing CD4 + CD25 + FoxP3 + Treg in tolerized mice could be used as an important cellular biomarker in human clinical trials for plant-based oral tolerance induction. In conclusion, this study reports the first clinical candidate for oral tolerance induction that is urgently needed to protect haemophilia A patients receiving FVIII injections. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Experimental Animal Models of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis for Prevention Studies and Their Relevance to Human Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Mami; Hori, Mika; Mutoh, Michihiro; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5′ CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequently observed in common in both the hamster and humans. Thus, this chemical carcinogenesis model has an advantage of histopathological and genetic similarity to human pancreatic cancer, and it is useful to study promotive and suppressive factors. Syrian golden hamsters are in a hyperlipidemic state even under normal dietary conditions, and a ligand of peroxizome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was found to improve the hyperlipidemia and suppress pancreatic carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation is a known important risk factor, and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 also have protective effects against pancreatic cancer development. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic agents can thus be considered candidate chemopreventive agents deserving more attention

  2. Experimental Animal Models of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis for Prevention Studies and Their Relevance to Human Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Mami, E-mail: mtakahas@ncc.go.jp; Hori, Mika; Mutoh, Michihiro [Division of Cancer Development System, Carcinogenesis Research Group, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Keiji [Graduate School of Nutritional and Environmental Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Yada 52-1, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Nakagama, Hitoshi [Division of Cancer Development System, Carcinogenesis Research Group, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2011-02-09

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5′ CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequently observed in common in both the hamster and humans. Thus, this chemical carcinogenesis model has an advantage of histopathological and genetic similarity to human pancreatic cancer, and it is useful to study promotive and suppressive factors. Syrian golden hamsters are in a hyperlipidemic state even under normal dietary conditions, and a ligand of peroxizome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was found to improve the hyperlipidemia and suppress pancreatic carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation is a known important risk factor, and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 also have protective effects against pancreatic cancer development. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic agents can thus be considered candidate chemopreventive agents deserving more attention.

  3. Experimental Animal Models of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis for Prevention Studies and Their Relevance to Human Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Nakagama

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropylamine (BOP into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5’ CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequently observed in common in both the hamster and humans. Thus, this chemical carcinogenesis model has an advantage of histopathological and genetic similarity to human pancreatic cancer, and it is useful to study promotive and suppressive factors. Syrian golden hamsters are in a hyperlipidemic state even under normal dietary conditions, and a ligand of peroxizome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was found to improve the hyperlipidemia and suppress pancreatic carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation is a known important risk factor, and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 also have protective effects against pancreatic cancer development. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic agents can thus be considered candidate chemopreventive agents deserving more attention.

  4. Experimental animal models of pancreatic carcinogenesis for prevention studies and their relevance to human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mami; Hori, Mika; Mutoh, Michihiro; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2011-02-09

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5' CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequently observed in common in both the hamster and humans. Thus, this chemical carcinogenesis model has an advantage of histopathological and genetic similarity to human pancreatic cancer, and it is useful to study promotive and suppressive factors. Syrian golden hamsters are in a hyperlipidemic state even under normal dietary conditions, and a ligand of peroxizome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was found to improve the hyperlipidemia and suppress pancreatic carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation is a known important risk factor, and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 also have protective effects against pancreatic cancer development. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic agents can thus be considered candidate chemopreventive agents deserving more attention.

  5. MECHANISM OF CARCINOGENESIS OF THE POLYCYCLIC AROMATICHYDROCARBONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalieri, E.; Calvin, M.

    1970-08-01

    The carcinogenic activity of the benzo[a]pyrene 1, the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene 2 and the 3-methylcholanthrene 3 is suggested to be determine by the electrophilic attack of the active oxygen, induced by the hydroxylating enzyme systems, on the most reactive substituting carbon atom(s). The cationic intermediate(s) with the charge mainly localized on a complementary, interrelated position(s) of the hydroxyl substituted position(s) reacts further with the cellular nucleophiles. The electrophilic nature of the ultimate chemical carcinogens constitutes the common distinctive feature that correlates their different structures and allows us to understand their carcinogenicity. The formation of a covalent bond with the nucleophiles of the biological macromolecules, nucleic acids and proteins, appears to be the essential requirement in the primary process of carcinogenesis.

  6. Angiogenesis, Thrombospondin-1 and Cervical Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ping Wu

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, the growth of new vessels from existing vasculature, plays an essential role in tumor development. The process involves interaction among cancer cells, endothelial cells, and components of the extracellular matrix, and is regulated by the balance of angiogenesis activators and angiogenesis inhibitors. This review profiles some fundamental concepts of angiogenesis, the importance of angiogenesis in cervical neoplasm, and the role of thrombospondin-1 as an angiogenesis inhibitor in cervical carcinogenesis. The usefulness and limitations of microvessel density in evaluation of angiogenic status are also discussed. Recent research and evolving concepts have led to a paradigm shift in anticancer therapy, from conventional cancer-centered chemotherapy to angiogenic or “metronomic” chemotherapy and/or combined angiogenesis inhibitors. The epigenetic strategy, which views the tumor system as a whole, transcends the cancer gene-centered approach.

  7. (Radiation carcinogenesis in the whole body system)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1990-12-14

    The objectives of the trip were: to take part in and to give the summary of a Symposium on Radiation Carcinogenesis at Tokyo, and to give a talk at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences at Chiba. The breadth of the aspects considered at the conference was about as broad as is possible, from effects at the molecular level to human epidemiology, from the effects of tritium to cancer induction by heavy ions. The events induced by cancer that lead to cancer and the events that are secondary are beginning to come into better focus but much is still not known. Interest in suppressor genes is increasing rapidly in the studies of human tumors and many would predict that the three or four suppressor genes associated with cancer are only the first sighting of a much larger number.

  8. Parasite Infection, Carcinogenesis and Human Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang van Tong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer may be induced by many environmental and physiological conditions. Infections with viruses, bacteria and parasites have been recognized for years to be associated with human carcinogenicity. Here we review current concepts of carcinogenicity and its associations with parasitic infections. The helminth diseases schistosomiasis, opisthorchiasis, and clonorchiasis are highly carcinogenic while the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causing agent of Chagas disease, has a dual role in the development of cancer, including both carcinogenic and anticancer properties. Although malaria per se does not appear to be causative in carcinogenesis, it is strongly associated with the occurrence of endemic Burkitt lymphoma in areas holoendemic for malaria. The initiation of Plasmodium falciparum related endemic Burkitt lymphoma requires additional transforming events induced by the Epstein-Barr virus. Observations suggest that Strongyloides stercoralis may be a relevant co-factor in HTLV-1-related T cell lymphomas. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms of parasitic infection-induced carcinogenicity.

  9. Corellation of p53 expressions and histopathological grading in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvi Kintawati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Squamous cell carcinoma is a malignancy of oral cavity mostly occurred and can also metastasize. p53 gene is a tumor suppressor gene that plays an important role in carcinogenesis. The role of wild-type p53 is very important in suppressing the formation of a malignancy. p53 also has many other important functions. p53 is a suppressor of tumor/ cancer progression through the response of cell cycle to DNA damage and by giving time to repair DNA prior to replication of genes. p53 mutation, mostly occurs in a malignancy, so earlier histopathological transformation can be detected by observing p53 mutation. The prognosis of squamous cell carcinoma in oral cavity, therefore, depends on histopathological grading and clinical staging of the tumor. To enforce the histopathological grading, in addition based on histopathology differentiation, the earlier histopathological transformation can also be assessed. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the correlation of p53 expressions and histopathological grading in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Method: This study was a retrospective study on 20 cases of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma examined at Department of Pathology Anatomy in Hasan Sadikin Hospital in Bandung. Immunohistochemical examination was then performed using p53 antibodies to determine the correlation of p53 expression and histopathological grading in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma to predict prognosis. Result: The overall results showed that there was no correlation between p53 expression and histopathological grading in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity although there was a very strong correlation between p53 expression and histopathological grading I (p<0.01. Conclusion: It can be concluded that there was no correlation between p53 expression and histopathological grading in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Thus, p53 expression cannot be used to predict a prognosis.

  10. Suppressed Belief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komarine Romdenh-Romluc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Moran’s revised conception of conscious belief requires us to reconceptualise suppressed belief. The work of Merleau-Ponty offers a way to do this. His account of motor-skills allows us to understand suppressed beliefs as pre-reflective ways of dealing with the world.

  11. Betel nut chewing, oral premalignant lesions, and the oral microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Y Hernandez

    Full Text Available Oral cancers are attributed to a number of causal agents including tobacco, alcohol, human papillomavirus (HPV, and areca (betel nut. Although betel nut chewing has been established as an independent cause of oral cancer, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are poorly understood. An investigation was undertaken to evaluate the influence of betel nut chewing on the oral microbiome and oral premalignant lesions. Study participants were recruited from a dental clinic in Guam. Structured interviews and oral examinations were performed. Oral swabbing and saliva samples were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3- V5 region of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene and genotyped for HPV. One hundred twenty-two adults were enrolled including 64 current betel nut chewers, 37 former chewers, and 21 with no history of betel nut use. Oral premalignant lesions, including leukoplakia and submucous fibrosis, were observed in 10 chewers. Within-sample bacterial diversity was significantly lower in long-term (≥10 years chewers vs. never chewers and in current chewers with oral lesions vs. individuals without lesions. Between-sample bacterial diversity based on Unifrac distances significantly differed by chewing status and oral lesion status. Current chewers had significantly elevated levels of Streptococcus infantis and higher and lower levels of distinct taxa of the Actinomyces and Streptococcus genera. Long-term chewers had reduced levels of Parascardovia and Streptococcus. Chewers with oral lesions had significantly elevated levels of Oribacterium, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus, including Streptococcus anginosus. In multivariate analyses, controlling for smoking, oral HPV, S.anginosus, and S. infantis levels, current betel nut chewing remained the only predictor of oral premalignant lesions. Our study provides evidence that betel nut chewing alters the oral bacterial microbiome including that of chewers who develop oral premalignant lesions. Nonetheless, whether

  12. Suppression of Penaeus merguiensis densovirus following oral delivery of live bacteria expressing dsRNA in the house cricket (Acheta domesticus) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Fauce, Kathy; Owens, Leigh

    2013-02-01

    Penaeus merguiensis densovirus (PmergDNV) is a serious pathogen of the banana prawn, Penaeus merguiensis leading to at least 28% production loss due to reduced growth rates and mortality of juveniles. In the present study, we reduced PmergDNV titres and subsequent mortality by feeding Acheta domesticus (previously determined as an appropriate animal model for P. merguiensis) with dsRNA specific to the capsid protein by mixing it into their food. Feeding A. domesticus with PmergDNV-specific dsRNA in advance of viral challenge increased their longevity, decreased mortality by 84.4% and reduced viral loads 24-fold below the threshold level required for mortality. Mortalities and viral loads were significantly (both P < 0.001) lower in treatments challenged with PmergDNV following exposure to bacterially expressed PmergDNV-dsRNA. This is the first study to demonstrate gene silencing via RNAi against PmergDNV in vivo through oral administration of live bacteria expressing dsRNA in a model system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Suppression of glucose-6-phosphate-isomerase induced arthritis by oral administration of transgenic rice seeds expressing altered peptide ligands of glucose-6-phosphate-isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Tomoya; Tsuboi, Hiroto; Iizuka-Koga, Mana; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Asashima, Hiromitsu; Yokosawa, Masahiro; Kondo, Yuya; Ohta, Masaru; Wakasa, Yuhya; Matsumoto, Isao; Takaiwa, Fumio; Sumida, Takayuki

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effects of transgenic rice seeds expressing the altered peptide ligand (APL) of human glucose-6-phosphate-isomerase (hGPI 325-339 ) in mice model of GPI-induced arthritis (GIA). We generated transgenic rice expressing T-cell epitope of hGPI 325-339 and APL12 contained in the seed endosperm. The transgenic rice seeds were orally administered prophylactically before the induction of GIA. The severity of arthritis and titers of serum anti-GPI antibodies were evaluated. We examined for IL-17 production in splenocytes and inguinal lymph node (iLN) cells, and analyzed the expression levels of functional molecules in splenocytes. Prophylactic treatment of GIA mice with APL12 transgenic (APL12-TG) rice seeds significantly reduced the severity of arthritis and titers of serum anti-GPI antibodies compared with non-transgenic (Non-TG) rice-treated mice. APL12-TG and hGPI 325-339 transgenic (hGPI 325-339 -TG) rice seeds improved the histopathological arthritis scores and decreased IL-17 production compared with non-TG rice-treated mice. APL12-TG rice-treated GIA mice showed upregulation of Foxp3 and GITR protein in CD4  +  CD25  +  Foxp3 +  cells in the spleen compared with non-TG rice- and hGPI 325-339 -TG rice-treated mice. APL12-TG rice seeds improved the severity of GIA through a decrease in production of IL-17 and anti-GPI antibodies via upregulation of Foxp3 and GITR expression on Treg cells in spleen.

  14. Exocrine pancreatic carcinogenesis and autotaxin expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kadekar

    Full Text Available Exocrine pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease with an exceptionally high mortality rate. Genetic analysis suggests a causative role for environmental factors, but consistent epidemiological support is scarce and no biomarkers for monitoring the effects of chemical pancreatic carcinogens are available. With the objective to identify common traits for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors we studied the National Toxicology Program (NTP bioassay database. We found that male rats were affected more often than female rats and identified eight chemicals that induced exocrine pancreatic tumors in males only. For a hypothesis generating process we used a text mining tool to analyse published literature for suggested mode of actions (MOA. The resulting MOA analysis suggested inflammatory responses as common feature. In cell studies we found that all the chemicals increased protein levels of the inflammatory protein autotaxin (ATX in Panc-1, MIA PaCa-2 or Capan-2 cells. Induction of MMP-9 and increased invasive migration were also frequent effects, consistent with ATX activation. Testosterone has previously been implicated in pancreatic carcinogenesis and we found that it increased ATX levels. Our data show that ATX is a target for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors in rats. Several lines of evidence implicate ATX and its product lysophosphatidic acid in human pancreatic cancer. Mechanisms of action may include stimulated invasive growth and metastasis. ATX may interact with hormones or onco- or suppressor-genes often deregulated in exocrine pancreatic cancer. Our data suggest that ATX is a target for chemicals promoting pancreatic tumor development.

  15. Inflammation, oxidative DNA damage, and carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, J.G.; Adams, D.O.

    1987-01-01

    Inflammation has long been associated with carcinogenesis, especially in the promotion phase. The mechanism of action of the potent inflammatory agent and skin promoter 12-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is unknown. It is though that TPA selectively enhances the growth of initiated cells, and during this process, initiated cells progress to the preneoplastic state and eventually to the malignant phenotype. The authors and others have proposed that TPA may work, in part, by inciting inflammation and stimulating inflammatory cells to release powerful oxidants which then induce DNA damage in epidermal cells. Macrophages cocultured with target cells and TPA induce oxidized thymine bases in the target cells. This process is inhibited by both catalase and inhibitors of lipoxygenases, suggesting the involvement of both H 2 O 2 and oxidized lipid products. In vivo studies demonstrated that SENCAR mice, which are sensitive to promotion by TPA, have a more intense inflammatory reaction in skin that C57LB/6 mice, which are resistant to promotion by TPA. In addition, macrophages from SENCAR mice release more H 2 O 2 and metabolites of AA, and induce more oxidative DNA damage in cocultured cells than macrophages from C57LB/6 mice. These data support the hypothesis that inflammation and the release of genotoxic oxidants may be one mechanism whereby initiated cells receive further genetic insults. They also further complicate risk assessment by suggesting that some environmental agents may work indirectly by subverting host systems to induce damage rather than maintaining homeostasis

  16. Somatic Host Cell Alterations in HPV Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Tamara R; Clarke, Megan A; Dean, Michael; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2017-08-03

    High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) infections cause cancers in different organ sites, most commonly cervical and head and neck cancers. While carcinogenesis is initiated by two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, increasing evidence shows the importance of specific somatic events in host cells for malignant transformation. HPV-driven cancers share characteristic somatic changes, including apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC)-driven mutations and genomic instability leading to copy number variations and large chromosomal rearrangements. HPV-associated cancers have recurrent somatic mutations in phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha ( PIK3CA ) and phosphatase and tensin homolog ( PTEN ), human leukocyte antigen A and B ( HLA-A and HLA-B ) -A/B , and the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) pathway, and rarely have mutations in the tumor protein p53 ( TP53 ) and RB transcriptional corepressor 1 ( RB1 ) tumor suppressor genes. There are some variations by tumor site, such as NOTCH1 mutations which are primarily found in head and neck cancers. Understanding the somatic events following HPV infection and persistence can aid the development of early detection biomarkers, particularly when mutations in precancers are characterized. Somatic mutations may also influence prognosis and treatment decisions.

  17. Somatic Host Cell Alterations in HPV Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara R. Litwin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV infections cause cancers in different organ sites, most commonly cervical and head and neck cancers. While carcinogenesis is initiated by two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, increasing evidence shows the importance of specific somatic events in host cells for malignant transformation. HPV-driven cancers share characteristic somatic changes, including apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC-driven mutations and genomic instability leading to copy number variations and large chromosomal rearrangements. HPV-associated cancers have recurrent somatic mutations in phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN, human leukocyte antigen A and B (HLA-A and HLA-B-A/B, and the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ pathway, and rarely have mutations in the tumor protein p53 (TP53 and RB transcriptional corepressor 1 (RB1 tumor suppressor genes. There are some variations by tumor site, such as NOTCH1 mutations which are primarily found in head and neck cancers. Understanding the somatic events following HPV infection and persistence can aid the development of early detection biomarkers, particularly when mutations in precancers are characterized. Somatic mutations may also influence prognosis and treatment decisions.

  18. Hypoxia and Angiogenesis in Endometrioid Endometrial Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Horrée

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α plays an essential role in the adaptive response of cells to hypoxia, triggering biologic events associated with aggressive tumor behavior. Methods: Expression of HIF-1α and proteins in the HIF-1α pathway (Glut-1, CAIX, VEGF in paraffin-embedded specimens of normal (n = 17, premalignant (n = 17 and endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (n = 39 was explored by immunohistochemistry, in relation to microvessel density (MVD. Results: HIF-1α overexpression was absent in inactive endometrium but present in hyperplasia (61% and carcinoma (87%, with increasing expression in a perinecrotic fashion pointing to underlying hypoxia. No membranous expression of Glut-1 and CAIX was noticed in inactive endometrium, in contrast with expression in hyperplasia (Glut-1 0%, CAIX 61%, only focal and diffuse and carcinoma (Glut-1 94.6%, CAIX 92%, both mostly perinecrotically. Diffuse HIF-1α was accompanied by activation of downstream targets. VEGF was significantly higher expressed in hyperplasias and carcinomas compared to inactive endometrium. MVD was higher in hyperplasias and carcinomas than in normal endometrium (p < 0.001. Conclusion: HIF-1α and its downstream genes are increasingly expressed from normal through premalignant to endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the endometrium, paralleled by activation of its downstream genes and increased angiogenesis. This underlines the potential importance of hypoxia and its key regulator HIF-1α in endometrial carcinogenesis.

  19. Carcinogenesis induced by low-dose radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotrowski Igor

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the effects of high dose radiation on human cells and tissues are relatively well defined, there is no consensus regarding the effects of low and very low radiation doses on the organism. Ionizing radiation has been shown to induce gene mutations and chromosome aberrations which are known to be involved in the process of carcinogenesis. The induction of secondary cancers is a challenging long-term side effect in oncologic patients treated with radiation. Medical sources of radiation like intensity modulated radiotherapy used in cancer treatment and computed tomography used in diagnostics, deliver very low doses of radiation to large volumes of healthy tissue, which might contribute to increased cancer rates in long surviving patients and in the general population. Research shows that because of the phenomena characteristic for low dose radiation the risk of cancer induction from exposure of healthy tissues to low dose radiation can be greater than the risk calculated from linear no-threshold model. Epidemiological data collected from radiation workers and atomic bomb survivors confirms that exposure to low dose radiation can contribute to increased cancer risk and also that the risk might correlate with the age at exposure.

  20. Multistage chemical carcinogenesis in mouse skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaga, T.J.; Fischer, S.M.; Weeks, C.E.; Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.

    1979-01-01

    Skin tumors in mice can be induced by the sequential application of a subthreshold dose of a carcinogen (initiation phase) followed by repetitive treatment with a noncarcinogenic tumor promoter. The initiation phase requires only a single application of either a direct acting carcinogen or a procarcinogen which has to be metabolized before being active and is essentially an irreversible step which probably involves a somatic cell mutation. There is a good correlation between the skin tumor initiating activites of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their ability to bind covalently to epidermal DNA. Laboratory results suggest that bay region diol-epoxides are the ultimate carcinogenic form of PAH carcinogens. Potent inhibitors and stimulators of PAH tumor initiation appear to affect the level of the PAH diol-epoxide reacting with specific DNA bases. Reecent data suggests that the tumor promotion stage involves at least three important steps: (1) the induction of embryonic looking cells (dark cells) in adult epidermis; (2) an increased production of epidermal prostaglandins and polyamines; (3) sustained proliferation of dark cells. Retinoic acid specifically inhibits step two whereas the anti-inflammatory steriod fluocinolone acetonide is a potent inhibitor of steps one and three. The mechanism and the importance of a specific sequence for each step in chemical carcinogenesis in mouse skin are detailed.

  1. Experimental carcinogenesis induced by incorporated plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oghiso, Yoichi [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    The carcinogenic effects of an alpha-emitter, {sup 239}Pu, were investigated by animal experiments as focused on both pulmonary tumors after inhalation exposures to insoluble oxide aerosols and tumor spectra induced by injection of soluble citrate. The life-span study using Wistar strain rats exposed to Pu dioxide aerosols has shown differential dose-related responses of malignancies and histopathological phenotypes of lung tumors, suggesting a threshold dose around 1.0 Gy of the lung dose. As abnormality of tumor-related genes could be supposed for the background of pulmonary carcinogenesis, the mutations of p53 tumor suppressor gene were examined by PCR-SSCP analysis using DNA fragments extracted from lung tumors. While mutations were detected in 23 cases (about 28%) among 82 lung tumors, their relations to either malignancies, histological phenotypes, dose, or oncogenesis are not yet to be elucidated. The life-span study using C3H strain mice injected with Pu citrate has shown contrast dose responses between osteosarcomas and lymphoid tumors around 10 Gy of the skeletal dose, and further indicated specific tumor spectra differed from low LET radiation exposures as shown by much more frequency of B cell type leukemic lymphomas and none of myeloid leukemias. (author)

  2. Loss of HLTF function promotes intestinal carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhu Sumit

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HLTF (Helicase-like Transcription Factor is a DNA helicase protein homologous to the SWI/SNF family involved in the maintenance of genomic stability and the regulation of gene expression. HLTF has also been found to be frequently inactivated by promoter hypermethylation in human colon cancers. Whether this epigenetic event is required for intestinal carcinogenesis is unknown. Results To address the role of loss of HLTF function in the development of intestinal cancer, we generated Hltf deficient mice. These mutant mice showed normal development, and did not develop intestinal tumors, indicating that loss of Hltf function by itself is insufficient to induce the formation of intestinal cancer. On the Apcmin/+ mutant background, Hltf- deficiency was found to significantly increase the formation of intestinal adenocarcinoma and colon cancers. Cytogenetic analysis of colon tumor cells from Hltf -/-/Apcmin/+ mice revealed a high incidence of gross chromosomal instabilities, including Robertsonian fusions, chromosomal fragments and aneuploidy. None of these genetic alterations were observed in the colon tumor cells derived from Apcmin/+ mice. Increased tumor growth and genomic instability was also demonstrated in HCT116 human colon cancer cells in which HLTF expression was significantly decreased. Conclusion Taken together, our results demonstrate that loss of HLTF function promotes the malignant transformation of intestinal or colonic adenomas to carcinomas by inducing genomic instability. Our findings highly suggest that epigenetic inactivation of HLTF, as found in most human colon cancers, could play an important role in the progression of colon tumors to malignant cancer.

  3. Pulmonary carcinogenesis from plutonium-containing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.G.; Smith, D.M.; Anderson, E.C.

    1980-01-01

    Induction of lung tumors by various types of radiation is of paramount concern to the nuclear industry. The data presented were obtained by exposing the pulmonary system of Syrian hamsters to particles of zirconium oxide containing various amounts of either plutonium-238 or -239 as the alpha radiation source. These particles were injected intravenously and lodged permanently in the capillary bed of the lung. When less than 20% of the lung tissue was irradiated, simulating the ''hot particle'' mode, tumors were not evident with lung burdens up to 500 nCi plutonium. More diffuse irradiation significantly increased the tumor incidence, with lung burdens of 50 to 150 nCi. When plutonium-laden microspheres were administered intratracheally, tumor production was considerably increased and the addition of 3 mg of iron oxide intratracheally further increased the incidence. Using the zirconium oxide matrix for the carrier of plutonium in aerosol particles produced tumor incidences of up to 50% in Syrian hamsters exposed by inhalation. Initial pulmonary (alveolar) burdens reached 100 nCi of plutonium. Similar inhalation studies using plutonium dioxide alone (no matrix) failed to produce any increase in lung tumorigenesis. The results are discussed in terms of possible mechanisms necessary for lung carcinogenesis. (H.K.)

  4. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR promotes carcinogenesis and invasion of gastric adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Na Keum; Lee, Jung Hwa; Park, Chan Hyuk; Yu, Dayeon; Lee, Yong Chan [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Jae-Ho; Noh, Sung Hoon [Department of Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Kil, E-mail: sklee@yuhs.ac [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • HOTAIR expression was tested in fifty patients with gastric cancer. • Cell proliferation was measured after HOTAIR silencing in gastric cancer cell line. • siRNA–HOTAIR suppresses cell invasiveness and capacity of migration. • Knock down of HOTAR leads to decreased expression of EMT markers. • Inhibition of HOTAIR induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. - Abstract: Gastric cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide; however, the mechanism of carcinogenesis is complex and poorly understood. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR (HOX transcript antisense RNA) recently emerged as a promoter of metastasis in various cancers including gastric cancer. Here we investigated the impact of HOTAIR on apoptosis, cell proliferation and cell cycle to dissect the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. We examined the mechanism of invasion and metastasis and analyzed the clinical significance of HOTAIR. Downregulation of HOTAIR was confirmed by two different siRNAs. The expression of HOTAIR was significantly elevated in various gastric cancer cell lines and tissues compared to normal control. si-HOTAIR significantly reduced viability in MKN 28, MKN 74, and KATO III cells but not in AGS cells. si-HOTAIR induced apoptosis in KATO III cells. Lymphovascular invasion and lymph node metastasis were more common in the high level of HOTAIR group. si-HOTAIR significantly decreased invasiveness and migration. si-HOTAIR led to differential expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition markers. We found that HOTAIR was involved in inhibition of apoptosis and promoted invasiveness, supporting a role for HOTAIR in carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer.

  5. Molecular piracy: the viral link to carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaitz, C M; Hicks, M J

    1998-11-01

    The vast majority of the human experience with viral infections is associated with acute symptoms, such as malaise, fever, chills, rhinitis and diarrhea. With this acute or lytic phase, the immune system mounts a response and eliminates the viral agent while acquiring antibodies to that specific viral subtype. With latent or chronic infections, the viral agent becomes incorporated into the human genome. Viral agents capable of integration into the host's genetic material are particularly dangerous and may commandeer the host's ability to regulate normal cell growth and proliferation. The oncogenic viruses may immortalize the host cell, and facilitate malignant transformation. Cell growth and proliferation may be enhanced by viral interference with tumor suppressor gene function (p53 and pRb). Viruses may act as vectors for mutated proto-oncogenes (oncogenes). Overexpression of these oncogenes in viral-infected cells interferes with normal cell function and allows unregulated cell growth and proliferation, which may lead to malignant transformation and tumour formation. Development of oral neoplasms, both benign and malignant, has been linked to several viruses. Epstein-Barr virus is associated with oral hairy leukoplakia, lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoepithelial carcinoma, B-cell lymphomas, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Human herpesvirus-8 has been implicated in all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphomas, multiple myeloma, angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy, and Castleman's disease. Human herpesvirus-6 has been detected in lymphoproliferative disease, lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. The role of human papillomavirus in benign (squamous papilloma, focal epithelial hyperplasia, condyloma acuminatum, verruca vulgaris), premalignant (oral epithelial dysplasia), and malignant (squamous cell carcinoma) neoplasms within the oral cavity is well recognized. Herpes simplex virus may participate as a cofactor in oral squamous

  6. Chemoresistance to concanamycin A1 in human oral squamous cell carcinoma is attenuated by an HDAC inhibitor partly via suppression of Bcl-2 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamotsu Kiyoshima

    Full Text Available V-ATPase is involved in the acidification of the microenvironment around/in solid tumors, such as oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. V-ATPase is thought to induce tumor invasion and multi-drug resistance in several malignant tumors, and it also contributes to maintaining the intracellular pH under an acidic microenvironment by inducing proton extrusion into the extracellular medium. However, there is little information regarding the effects of V-ATPase inhibitors on OSCCs. In this study, the effects of a V-ATPase inhibitor, concanamycin A1 (CMA, on the proliferation and apoptosis of OSCC were investigated in vitro. We used four OSCC cell lines, MISK81-5, SAS, HSC-4 and SQUU-B. Acridine orange staining revealed that the red fluorescence was reduced in all of the low concentration CMA-treated OSCC cells, indicating that the acidification of vesicular organelles in the OSCCs was prevented by the treatment with low-concentration of CMA. CMA treatment induced apoptosis in MISK81-5, SAS and HSC-4 cells, but not in SQUU-B cells. The p-p38 expression was not altered in CMA-treated SQUU-B cells, but their levels were increased in the other cells. The Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in CMA-treated SQUU-B cells was dramatically decreased in comparison with that in the other cell lines treated with CMA. However, when the SQUU-B cells were treated with CMA and a histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, the SQUU-B cells became more susceptible to the CMA-induced apoptosis. SAHA treatment led to a significantly decrease in the Bcl-2 expression in CMA-treated SQUU-B cells, resulting in a dramatically increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in comparison with that observed in the SQUU-B cells treated with CMA alone. These findings suggest that CMA could have an anti-tumor effect on OSCCs. In addition, combination of CMA with other agents, such as SAHA, could help improve the pro-apoptotic effects of CMA even in CMA-resistant OSCC cells.

  7. Protective Effect of Lactobacillus casei on DMH-Induced Colon Carcinogenesis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irecta-Nájera, Cesar Antonio; Del Rosario Huizar-López, María; Casas-Solís, Josefina; Castro-Félix, Patricia; Santerre, Anne

    2017-06-01

    The administration of probiotics is a promising approach to reduce the prevalence of colon cancer, a multifactorial disease, with hereditary factors, as well as environmental lifestyle-related risk factors. Biogenic polyamines, putrescine, spermidine, and spermine are small cationic molecules with great roles in cell proliferation and differentiation as well as regulation of gene expression. Ornithine decarboxylase is the first rate-limiting enzyme for polyamine synthesis, and upregulation of ornithine decarboxylase activity and polyamine metabolism has been associated with abnormal cell proliferation. This paper is focused on studying the protective role of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 in a chemically induced mouse model of colon carcinogenesis, directing our attention on aberrant crypt foci as preneoplastic markers, and on polyamine metabolism as a possible key player in carcinogenesis. BALB/c mice were administered 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) to induce colon cancer (20 mg/kg body weight, subcutaneous, twice a week for 24 weeks). L. casei ATCC 393 was given orally (10 6  CFU, twice a week), 2 weeks before DMH administration. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, high-performance liquid chromatography, and Western blotting were used to evaluate aberrant crypt foci, urinary polyamines, and ornithine decarboxylase expression in the colon. The experimental data showed that the preventive administration of L. casei ATCC 393 may delay the onset of cancer as it significantly reduced the number of DMH-induced aberrant crypt foci, the levels of putrescine, and the expression of ornithine decarboxylase. Hence, this probiotic strain has a prospective role in protection against colon carcinogenesis, and its antimutagenic activity may be associated with the maintenance of polyamine metabolism.

  8. Preventive Effects of Fermented Brown Rice and Rice Bran against Prostate Carcinogenesis in TRAP Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiya Kuno

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fermented brown rice and rice bran with Aspergillus oryzae (FBRA is considered to have the potential to prevent chemically-induced carcinogenesis in multiple organs of rodents. In the present study, we evaluated the possible chemopreventive effects of FBRA against prostate tumorigenesis. Six-week-old male rats of the transgenic rat for adenocarcinoma of prostate (TRAP strain were fed diets containing 5% or 10% FBRA for 15 weeks. Animals were sacrificed at 21 weeks of age, and the ventral and lateral prostate were removed for histopathological evaluation and immunoblot analyses. FBRA decreased the incidence of adenocarcinoma in the lateral prostate and suppressed the progression of prostate carcinogenesis. Treatment with FBRA induced apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation in histologically high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasias. Phospho-AMP-activated kinase α (Thr172 was up-regulated in the prostate of rats fed the diet supplemented with FBRA. These results indicate that FBRA controls tumor growth by activating pathways responsive to energy deprivation and suggest that FBRA has translational potential for the prevention of human prostate cancer.

  9. Implications of tyrosine phosphoproteomics in cervical carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeFord James

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide cervical cancer remains a leading cause of mortality from gynecologic malignancies. The link between cervical cancer and persistent infection with HPV has been established. At a molecular level little is known about the transition from the precancerous state to invasive cancer. To elucidate this process, cervical biopsies from human specimens were obtained from precancerous state to stage III disease. Methods Cervical biopsies were obtained from patients with a diagnosis of cervical cancer undergoing definitive surgery or staging operation. Biopsies were obtained from patients with precancerous lesions at the time of their excisional procedure. Control samples were obtained from patients undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions such as fibroids. Samples were subjected to proteomic profiling using two dimensional gel electrophoresis with subsequent trypsin digestion followed by MALDI-TOF protein identification. Candidate proteins were then further studied using western blotting, immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry. Results Annexin A1 and DNA-PKcs were found to be differentially expressed. Phosphorylated annexin A1 was up regulated in diseased states in comparison to control and its level was strongly detected in the serum of cervical cancer patients compared to controls. DNA-PKcs was noted to be hyperphosphorylated and fragmented in cancer when compared to controls. By immunohistochemistry annexin A1 was noted in the vascular environment in cancer and certain precancerous samples. Conclusion This study suggests a probable role for protein tyrosine phosphorylation in cervical carcinogenesis. Annexin A1 and DNA-PK cs may have synergistic effects with HPV infection. Precancerous lesions that may progress to cervical cancer may be differentiated from lesions that will not base on similar immunohistochemical profile to invasive squamous cell carcinoma.

  10. Mustard gas exposure and carcinogenesis of lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini-khalili, Alireza; Haines, David D; Modirian, Ehsan; Soroush, Mohammadreza; Khateri, Shahriar; Joshi, Rashmi; Zendehdel, Kazem; Ghanei, Mostafa; Giardina, Charles

    2009-08-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM), also known as mustard gas, is an alkylating compound used as a chemical weapon in World War I and by Iraqi forces against Iranians and indigenous Iraqi Kurds during the Iran-Iraq War of the 1980s. Although SM is a proven carcinogen there are conflicting views regarding the carcinogenicity of a single exposure. The present study characterizes lung cancers formed in mustard gas victims from the Iran-Iraq War. Demographic information and tumor specimens were collected from 20 Iranian male lung cancer patients with single high-dose SM exposures during the Iran-Iraq War. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung cancers were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for p53 protein. In addition, DNA was extracted from the tissues, PCR amplified and sequenced to identify mutations in the p53 and KRAS genes associated with SM exposure. A relatively early age of lung cancer onset (ranging from 28 to 73 with a mean of 48) in mustard gas victims, particularly those in the non-smoking population (mean age of 40.7), may be an indication of a unique etiology for these cancers. Seven of the 20 patients developed lung cancer before the age of 40. Five of 16 cancers from which DNA sequence data was obtainable provided information on eight p53 mutations (within exons 5-8). These mutations were predominately G to A transitions; a mutation consistent with the DNA lesion caused by SM. Two of the lung cancers had multiple p53 point mutations, similar to results obtained from factory workers chronically exposed to mustard agent. No mutations were detected in the KRAS gene. The distinguishing characteristics of lung carcinogenesis in these mustard gas victims suggest that a single exposure may increase the risk of lung cancer development in some individuals.

  11. Tea Polysaccharide Prevents Colitis-Associated Carcinogenesis in Mice by Inhibiting the Proliferation and Invasion of Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Qiao Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The imbalance between cell proliferation and apoptosis can lead to tumor progression, causing oncogenic transformation, abnormal cell proliferation and cell apoptosis suppression. Tea polysaccharide (TPS is the major bioactive component in green tea, it has showed antioxidant, antitumor and anti-inflammatory bioactivities. In this study, the chemoprophylaxis effects of TPS on colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis, especially the cell apoptosis activation and inhibition effects on cell proliferation and invasion were analyzed. The azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS was used to induce the colorectal carcinogenesis in mice. Results showed that the tumor incidence was reduced in TPS-treated AOM/DSS mice compared to AOM/DSS mice. TUNEL staining and Ki-67 immunohistochemistry staining showed that the TPS treatment increased significantly the cell apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation among AOM/DSS mice. Furthermore, TPS reduced the expression levels of the cell cycle protein cyclin D1, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2, and MMP-9. In addition, in vitro studies showed that TPS, suppressed the proliferation and invasion of the mouse colon cancer cells. Overall, our findings demonstrated that TPS could be a potential agent in the treatment and/or prevention of colon tumor, which promoted the apoptosis and suppressed the proliferation and invasion of the mouse colon cancer cells via arresting cell cycle progression.

  12. [Biological effects of arsenic and diseases: The mechanisms involved in arsenic-induced carcinogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takehiro; Takumi, Shota; Okamura, Kazuyuki; Nohara, Keiko

    2016-07-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is associated with many diseases, including cancers. Our study using in vivo assay in gpt-delta transgenic mice showed that arsenic particularly induces G : C to T : A transversions, a mutation type induced through oxidative-stress-induced 8-OHdG formation. Gestational arsenic exposure of C3H mice was reported to increase hepatic tumor incidence. We showed that gestational arsenic exposure increased hepatic tumors having activated oncogene Ha-ras by C to A mutation. We also showed that DNA methylation status of Fosb region is implicated in tumor augmentation by gestational arsenic exposure. We further showed that long-term arsenic exposure induces premature senescence. Recent studies reported that senescence is involved in not only tumor suppression, but also tumorgenesis. All these effects of arsenic might be involved in arsenic-induced carcinogenesis.

  13. Effect of luteolin on the levels of glycoproteins during azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandurangan, Ashok Kumar; Dharmalingam, Prakash; Ananda Sadagopan, Suresh Kumar; Ganapasam, Sudhandiran

    2012-01-01

    Luteolin (LUT), a bioflavonoid has been used as a chemopreventive agent world-wide against chemically induced cancer. Hence we designed an experiment to assess chemopreventive action of LUT on lipid peroxidation (LPO) and glycoconjugates in azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon carcinogenesis. Colon cancer was induced by 15 mg/body kg. body weight of AOM and administration of LUT (at the dose of 1.2 mg/kg. body weight) was till end of the study. Analysis of lipid peroxidative end products such as protein carbonyl (PC), malonadehyde (MDA) and conjucated dienes (CD) demonstrated significant increase in in AOM-induced animals with reduction by LUT (pLUT l(pLUT decreased the incidence of MDF. These results suggest that LUT alters the expression of glycoconjugates and suppress colon cancer. Hence, we speculate that LUT can be used as a chemopreventive agent to treat colon cancer.

  14. Effects of arecoline on proliferation of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells by dysregulating c-Myc and miR-22, directly targeting oncostatin M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuerduangphui, Jureeporn; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya; Chaiyarit, Ponlatham; Patarapadungkit, Natcha; Chotiyano, Apinya; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Promthet, Supannee; Pientong, Chamsai

    2018-01-01

    Arecoline, the major alkaloid of areca nut, is known to induce oral carcinogenesis, however, its mechanism is still needed to elucidate. This study investigated the effects of arecoline on cell viability and cell-cycle progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells as well as a relevant cellular gene expression. The results showed that a low concentration of arecoline (0.025 μg/ml) increased OSCC cell viability, proportion of cells in G2/M phase and cell proliferation. Simultaneously, it induced IL-6, STAT3 and c-Myc expression. Interestingly, c-myc promoter activity was also induced by arecoline. MiR-22 expression in arecoline-treated OSCC cells was suppressed and comparable to an upregulated c-Myc expression. In arecoline-treated OSCC cells, oncostatin M (OSM) expression was significantly upregulated and inversely correlated with miR-22 expression. Likewise, OSM expression and its post-transcriptional activity were significantly decreased in miR-22-transfected OSCC and 293FT cells. This result demonstrated that miR-22 directly targeted OSM. Interestingly, miR-22 played an important role as a tumor suppresser on suppressing cell proliferation, migration and cell-cycle progression of OSCC cells. This result suggested the effect of arecoline to promote cell proliferation and cell-cycle progression of OSCC cells might be involved in induction of c-Myc expression and reduction of miR-22 resulting in OSM upregulation.

  15. Suppression chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Akio.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To miniaturize the storage tank of condensated water in BWR reactor. Constitution: A diaphragm is provided in a suppression chamber thereby to partition the same into an inner compartment and an outer compartment. In one of said compartments there is stored clean water to be used for feeding at the time of separating the reactor and for the core spray system, and in another compartment there is stored water necessary for accomplishing the depressurization effect at the time of coolant loss accident. To the compartment in which clean water is stored there is connected a water cleaning device for constantly maintaining water in clean state. As this cleaning device an already used fuel pool cleaning device can be utilized. Further, downcomers for accomplishing the depressurization function are provided in both inner compartment and outer compartment. The capacity of the storage tank can be reduced by the capacity of clean water within the suppression chamber. (Ikeda, J.)

  16. Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... section Home A-Z Health Topics Oral health Oral health > A-Z Health Topics Oral health (PDF, 154 ... To receive Publications email updates Enter email Submit Oral health Women have unique oral health concerns. Changing hormone ...

  17. Colorectal Carcinogenesis: Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carini, Francesco; Mazzola, Margherita; Rappa, Francesca; Jurjus, Abdo; Geagea, Alice Gerges; Al Kattar, Sahar; Bou-Assi, Tarek; Jurjus, Rosalyn; Damiani, Provvidenza; Leone, Angelo; Tomasello, Giovanni

    2017-09-01

    One of the contributory causes of colon cancer is the negative effect of reactive oxygen species on DNA repair mechanisms. Currently, there is a growing support for the concept that oxidative stress may be an important etiological factor for carcinogenesis. The purpose of this review is to elucidate the role of oxidative stress in promoting colorectal carcinogenesis and to highlight the potential protective role of antioxidants. Several studies have documented the importance of antioxidants in countering oxidative stress and preventing colorectal carcinogenesis. However, there are conflicting data in the literature concerning its proper use in humans, since these studies did not yield definitive results and were performed mostly in vitro on cell populations, or in vivo in experimental animal models. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  18. Experimental, statistical, and biological models of radon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1991-09-01

    Risk models developed for underground miners have not been consistently validated in studies of populations exposed to indoor radon. Imprecision in risk estimates results principally from differences between exposures in mines as compared to domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between cigarette-smoking and exposure to radon decay products. Uncertainties in extrapolating miner data to domestic exposures can be reduced by means of a broad-based health effects research program that addresses the interrelated issues of exposure, respiratory tract dose, carcinogenesis (molecular/cellular and animal studies, plus developing biological and statistical models), and the relationship of radon to smoking and other copollutant exposures. This article reviews experimental animal data on radon carcinogenesis observed primarily in rats at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Recent experimental and mechanistic carcinogenesis models of exposures to radon, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke are presented with statistical analyses of animal data. 20 refs., 1 fig

  19. Experimental, statistical and biological models of radon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1992-01-01

    Risk models developed for underground miners have not been consistently validated in studies of populations exposed to indoor radon. Imprecision in risk estimates results principally from differences between exposures in mines as compared with domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between cigarette smoking and exposure to radon decay products. Uncertainties in extrapolating miner data to domestic exposures can be reduced by means of a broad-based health effects research programme that addresses the interrelated issues of exposure, respiratory tract dose, carcinogenesis (molecular/cellular and animal studies, plus developing biological and statistical models) and the relationship of radon to smoking and other co-pollutant exposures. This article reviews experimental animal data on radon carcinogenesis observed primarily in rats at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Recent experimental and mechanistic carcinogenesis models of exposures to radon, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke are presented with statistical analyses of animal data. (author)

  20. Deferasirox induces mesenchymal-epithelial transition in crocidolite-induced mesothelial carcinogenesis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Hirotaka; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Chew, Shan Hwu; Misawa, Nobuaki; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2013-11-01

    Asbestos was used worldwide in huge quantities in the past century. However, because of the unexpected carcinogenicity to mesothelial cells with an extremely long incubation period, many countries face this long-lasting social problem. Mesothelioma is often diagnosed in an advanced stage, for which no effective therapeutic protocols are yet established. We previously reported on the basis of animal experiments that the major pathology in asbestos-induced mesothelial carcinogenesis is local iron overload. Here, we undertook to find an effective strategy to prevent, delay, or lower the malignant potential of mesothelioma during asbestos-induced carcinogenesis. We used intraperitoneal injections of crocidolite to rats. We carried out a 16-week study to seek the maximal-tolerated intervention for iron reduction via oral deferasirox administration or intensive phlebotomy. Splenic iron deposition was significantly decreased with either method, and we found that Perls' iron staining in spleen is a good indicator for iron reduction. We injected a total of 10 mg crocidolite at the age of six weeks, and the preventive measures were via repeated oral administration of 25 to 50 mg/kg/d deferasirox or weekly to bimonthly phlebotomy of 4 to 10 mL/kg/d. The animals were observed until 110 weeks. Deferasirox administration significantly increased the fraction of less malignant epithelioid subtype. Although we found a slightly prolonged survival in deferasirox-treated female rats, larger sample size and refinement of the current protocol are necessary to deduce the cancer-preventive effects of deferasirox. Still, our results suggest deferasirox serves as a potential preventive strategy in people already exposed to asbestos via iron reduction. ©2013 AACR.

  1. Local Acetaldehyde—An Essential Role in Alcohol-Related Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko T. Nieminen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The resident microbiome plays a key role in exposure of the upper gastrointestinal (GI tract mucosa to acetaldehyde (ACH, a carcinogenic metabolite of ethanol. Poor oral health is a significant risk factor for oral and esophageal carcinogenesis and is characterized by a dysbiotic microbiome. Dysbiosis leads to increased growth of opportunistic pathogens (such as Candida yeasts and may cause an up to 100% increase in the local ACH production, which is further modified by organ-specific expression and gene polymorphisms of ethanol-metabolizing and ACH-metabolizing enzymes. A point mutation in the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene has randomized millions of alcohol consumers to markedly increased local ACH exposure via saliva and gastric juice, which is associated with a manifold risk for upper GI tract cancers. This human cancer model proves conclusively the causal relationship between ACH and upper GI tract carcinogenesis and provides novel possibilities for the quantitative assessment of ACH carcinogenicity in the human oropharynx. ACH formed from ethanol present in “non-alcoholic” beverages, fermented food, or added during food preparation forms a significant epidemiologic bias in cancer epidemiology. The same also concerns “free” ACH present in mutagenic concentrations in multiple beverages and foodstuffs. Local exposure to ACH is cumulative and can be reduced markedly both at the population and individual level. At best, a person would never consume tobacco, alcohol, or both. However, even smoking cessation and moderation of alcohol consumption are associated with a marked decrease in local ACH exposure and cancer risk, especially among established risk groups.

  2. Risk, assessment and multiple stages in radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, F.J.; Sawey, M.J.; Hosselet, S.; Garte, S.J.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss the multistage theory of carcinogenesis in terms of time-response and dose-response function, considering various workers' studies using irradiated rat skin. The authors' own results of experiments conducted to determine if two or more individual radiation doses add together to produce carcinogenic effects are presented (no such effect was observed due to skin cell repair), together with their data comparing the induction and repair kinetics of DNA breaks with carcinogenesis in the rat skin, which indicated that single strand breaks are not the initial lesion in the dual action theory. (UK)

  3. Carcinogenesis related to intense pulsed light and UV exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedelund, L; Lerche, C; Wulf, H C

    2006-01-01

    This study examines whether intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment has a carcinogenic potential itself or may influence ultraviolet (UV)-induced carcinogenesis. Secondly, it evaluates whether UV exposure may influence IPL-induced side effects. Hairless, lightly pigmented mice (n=144) received three...

  4. Chronology of p53 protein accumulation in gastric carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craanen, M. E.; Blok, P.; Dekker, W.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1995-01-01

    p53 Protein accumulation in early gastric carcinoma was studied in relation to the histological type (Lauren classification) and the type of growth pattern, including the chronology of p53 protein accumulation during carcinogenesis. Forty five, paraffin embedded gastrectomy specimens from early

  5. Lack of cyclin D1 overexpression in gastric carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, P.; Craanen, M. E.; van Diest, P. J.; Dekker, W.; Tytgat, G. N.

    2000-01-01

    Cyclin D1 overexpression was examined in early gastric carcinomas and precursor lesions with the following aims; (1) to assess the chronology of cyclin D1 overexpression in various stages of gastric carcinogenesis, (2) to correlate cyclin D1 overexpression with the Lauren type, the grade of

  6. Hypoxia and cell cycle deregulation in endometrial carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horrée, N.

    2007-01-01

    Because uterine endometrial carcinoma is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract and 1 of every 5 patients dies of this disease, understanding the mechanisms of carcinogenesis and progression of endometrial carcinoma is important. In general, this thesis can be summarized as a study

  7. Early diagnosis in primary oral cancer: is it possible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, I.; de Bree, R.; Brakenhoff, R.; Coebergh, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    In this treatise oral carcinogenesis is briefly discussed, particularly with regard to the number of cell divisions that is required before cancer reaches a measurable size. At that stage, metastatic spread may have already taken place. Therefore, the term "early diagnosis" is somewhat misleading.

  8. Replicative Stress and the FHIT Gene: Roles in Tumor Suppression, Genome Stability and Prevention of Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karras, Jenna R.; Paisie, Carolyn A.; Huebner, Kay, E-mail: kay.huebner@osumc.edu [Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2014-06-04

    The fragile FHIT gene, encompassing the chromosomal fragile site FRA3B, is an early target of DNA damage in precancerous cells. While vulnerable to DNA damage itself, FHIT protein expression is essential to protect from DNA damage-induced cancer initiation and progression by modulating genome stability, oxidative stress and levels of accumulating DNA damage. Thus, FHIT, whose expression is lost or reduced in many human cancers, is a tumor suppressor and genome caretaker whose loss initiates genome instability in preneoplastic lesions. Ongoing studies are seeking more detailed understanding of the role of FHIT in the cellular response to oxidative damage. This review discusses the relationship between FHIT, reactive oxygen species production, and DNA damage in the context of cancer initiation and progression.

  9. Glycyrrhizic acid suppresses the development of precancerous lesions via regulating the hyperproliferation, inflammation, angiogenesis and apoptosis in the colon of Wistar rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehan Khan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colon carcinogenesis is a multistep process and it emanates from a series of molecular and histopathological alterations. Glycyrrhizic acid (GA is a natural and major pentacyclic triterpenoid glycoside of licorice roots extracts. It has several pharmacological and biological properties such as anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, and anti-cancer. In the present study, we investigated the chemopreventive potential of GA against 1,2-dimethyhydrazine (DMH-induced precancerous lesions i.e., aberrant crypt foci (ACF and mucin depleted foci (MDF, and its role in regulating the hyperproliferation, inflammation, angiogenesis and apoptosis in the colon of Wistar rats. METHODS: Animals were divided into 5 groups. In group III, IV and V, GA was administered at the dose of 15 mg/kg b. wt. orally while in group II, III and IV, DMH was administered subcutaneously in the groin at the dose of 20 mg/kg b.wt once a week for first 5 weeks and animals were euthanized after 9 weeks. RESULTS: GA supplementation suppressed the development of precancerous lesions and it also reduced the infiltration of mast cells, suppressed the immunostaining of Ki-67, NF-kB-p65, COX-2, iNOS and VEGF while enhanced the immunostaining of p53, connexin-43, caspase-9 and cleaved caspase-3. GA treatment significantly attenuated the level of TNF-α and it also reduced the depletion of the mucous layer as well as attenuated the shifting of sialomucin to sulphomucin. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that GA has strong chemopreventive potential against DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis but further studies are warranted to elucidate the precise mechanism of action of GA.

  10. Breast cancer as heterogeneous disease: contributing factors and carcinogenesis mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Julia; Akushevich, Igor; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Abernethy, Amy P; Lyerly, H Kim

    2011-07-01

    The observed bimodal patterns of breast cancer incidence in the U.S. suggested that breast cancer may be viewed as more than one biological entity. We studied the factors potentially contributing to this phenomenon, specifically focusing on how disease heterogeneity could be linked to breast carcinogenesis mechanisms. Using empirical analyses and population-based biologically motivated modeling, age-specific patterns of incidence of ductal and lobular breast carcinomas from the SEER registry (1990-2003) were analyzed for heterogeneity and characteristics of carcinogenesis, stratified by race, stage, grade, and estrogen (ER)/progesterone (PR) receptor status. The heterogeneity of breast carcinoma age patterns decreased after stratification by grade, especially for grade I and III tumors. Stratification by ER/PR status further reduced the heterogeneity, especially for ER(+)/PR(-) and ER(-)/(-) tumors; however, the residual heterogeneity was still observed. The number of rate-limiting events of carcinogenesis and the latency of ductal and lobular carcinomas differed, decreasing from grade I to III, with poorly differentiated tumors associated with the least number of carcinogenesis stages and the shortest latency. Tumor grades play important role in bimodal incidence of breast carcinoma and have distinct mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Race and cancer subtype could play modifying role. ER/PR status contributes to the observed heterogeneity, but is subdominant to tumor grade. Further studies on sources of "remaining" heterogeneity of population with breast cancer (such as genetic/epigenetic characteristics) are necessary. The results of this study could suggest stratification rather than unification of breast cancer prevention strategies, risk assessment, and treatment.

  11. Circadian clock and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirvani, Minou; Khuu, Cuong; Utheim, Tor Paaske; Sand, Lars Peter; Sehic, Amer

    2018-02-01

    The circadian clock is comprised of a master component situated in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus and subordinate clock genes in almost every cell of the body. The circadian clock genes and their encoded proteins govern the organism to follow the natural signals of time, and adapt to external changes in the environment. The majority of physiological processes in mammals exhibit variable circadian rhythms, which are generated and coordinated by an oscillation in the expression of the clock genes. A number of studies have reported that alteration in the expression level of clock genes is correlated with several pathological conditions, including cancer. However, little is known about the role of clock genes in homeostasis of the oral epithelium and their disturbances in oral carcinogenesis. The present review summarizes the current state of knowledge of the implications of clock genes in oral cancer. It has been demonstrated that the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma undergoes circadian oscillation in relation to tumor volume and proliferation rate. The circadian clock gene period ( PER)1 has been associated with oral cancer pathogenesis and it is suggested that changes in the expression of PER1 may exhibit an important role in the development, invasion, and metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma. However, its role remains elusive and there is a need for further research in order to understand the underlying mechanisms of the clock genes in oral cancer pathogenesis.

  12. High-risk human papilloma virus in archival tissues of oral pathosis and normal oral mucosa

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    Raghu Dhanapal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Oral cancer ranks third among all cancers in the Indian population. Human papilloma virus (HPV plays a significant role in oral carcinogenesis. Population-based subtype variations are present in the HPV prevalence. This study gives an emphasis on the parameters to be considered in formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues for polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based research work. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional study on archival paraffin-embedded tissue samples of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, epithelial dysplasia, and normal oral mucosa surrounding impacted tooth was amplified by PCR for the E6 gene of HPV type 16 and E1 gene of HPV type 18. Results: HPV 18 was positive in three OSCC cases. There was no statistically significant association of the positivity of HPV with the age, gender or habit. The HPV positive patients had a tobacco habit and were of a younger age group. Conclusion: The presence of HPV in carcinomatous tissue highlights the possible role of HPV in carcinogenesis and archival paraffin embedded tissue specimen can be used for this analysis. Recent studies on genomic analyses have highlighted that the HPV positive tumors are a separate subgroup based on genomic sequencing. The results of a larger retrospective study will help further in our understanding of the role of HPV in carcinogenesis, this study could form the baseline for such follow-up studies.

  13. The significance of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV & DNA Topoisomerase II alpha (DNA-Topo II alpha immunoreactivity in normal oral mucosa, Oral Epithelial Dysplasia (OED and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC

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    Osman Mohamed M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck cancer including oral cancer is considered to develop by accumulated genetic alterations and the major pathway is cancerization from lesions such as intraepithelial dysplasia in oral leukoplakia and erythroplakia. The relationship of proliferation markers with the grading of dysplasia is uncertain. The involvement of EBV in oral carcinogenesis is not fully understood. Aim The present study was designed to investigate the role of EBV and DNA Topoisomerase II∝ (DNA-Topo II∝ during oral carcinogenesis and to examine the prognostic significance of these protein expressions in OSCCs. Methods Using specific antibodies for EBV and DNA-Topo II∝, we examined protein expressions in archival lesion tissues from 16 patients with oral epithelial dysplasia, 22 oral squamous cell carcinoma and 20 normal oral mucosa by immunohistochemistry. Clinical information was obtained through the computerized retrospective database from the tumor registry. Results DNA-Topo II∝ was expressed in all examined specimens. Analysis of Variance ANOVA revealed highly significant difference (P 0.05 in inferior surface of tongue and in hard palatal tissues. Significant differences were observed between OEDs and NSE (P Conclusion EBV and DNA Topo II-αLI expression are possible indicators in oral carcinogenesis and may be valuable diagnostic and prognostic indices in oral carcinoma.

  14. Promoter hypermethylation of KLF4 inactivates its tumor suppressor function in cervical carcinogenesis.

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    Wen-Ting Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The KLF4 gene has been shown to be inactivated in cervical carcinogenesis as a tumor suppressor. However, the mechanism of KLF4 silencing in cervical carcinomas has not yet been identified. DNA methylation plays a key role in stable suppression of gene expression. METHODS: The methylation status of the KLF4 promoter CpG islands was analyzed by bisulfite sequencing (BSQ in tissues of normal cervix and cervical cancer. KLF4 gene expression was detected by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot. KLF4 promoter methylation in cervical cancer cell line was determined by BSQ and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR. Cell proliferation ability was detected by cell growth curve and MTT assay. RESULTS: The methylated allele was found in 41.90% of 24 cervical cancer tissues but only in 11.11% of 11 normal cervix tissues (P<0.005. KLF4 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in cervical cancer tissues compared with normal cervix tissues (P<0.01 and KLF4 mRNA expression showed a significant negative correlation with the promoter hypermethylation (r = -0.486, P = 0.003. Cervical cancer cell lines also showed a significant negative correlation between KLF4 expression and hypermethylation. After treatment with the demethylating agent 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza, the expression of KLF4 in the cervical cancer cell lines at both mRNA and protein levels was drastically increased, the cell proliferation ability was inhibited and the chemosensitivity for cisplatin was significantly increased. CONCLUSION: KLF4 gene is inactivated by methylation-induced silencing mechanisms in a large subset of cervical carcinomas and KLF4 promoter hypermethylation inactivates the gene's function as a tumor suppressor in cervical carcinogenesis.

  15. Liaison between micro-organisms and oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasprasad, Vijayan; Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Sathiyajeeva, J.; Karthikeyan, M.; Sunitha, J.; Ragunathan, Ramachandran

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer which is a subtype of head and neck, cancer is any neoplastic tissue growth in the oral cavity. It comprises an abnormal mass of cells that foists genetic mutation and impedes the normal cell cycle, resulting in its unrestrained growth. Various studies on the plausible link between oral microbial flora and cancer notwithstanding, our understanding of their link remains obscure and inadequate. The multitude of mechanisms by which the microflora initiate or spur Carcinogenesis are still under study and scrutiny. As is widely known, the oral cavity is an abode to a wide assortment of microbes, each present in contrasting amounts. It is observed that increased growth of the microflora is concomitant with known clinical risk factors for oral cancer. Manifold bacterial species have been found to interfere directly with eukaryotic cellular signaling, adopting a style typical of tumor promoters. Bacteria are also known to impede apoptosis thereby potentially promoting carcinogenesis. The viral role in carcinogenesis (by annulling of p53 tumor suppressor gene and other cellular proteins with subsequent alteration in host genome function) is well documented. Furthermore, the changes occurring in the commensal microflora in accompaniment with cancer development could possibly be used as a diagnostic indicator for early cancer detection. The intention of this review is to obtain a better understanding of the “role” that micro-organisms play in oral cancer etiology. PMID:26538877

  16. Icaritin Reduces Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Progression via the Inhibition of STAT3 Signaling

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    Jian-Guang Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Icaritin, a traditional Chinese medicine, possesses antitumor activity. The current study aimed to investigate icaritin effect and potential mechanism on oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC development. OSCC cells proliferation, apoptosis, and autophagy were analyzed after incubation with icaritin at different concentrations and incubation times. The expressions of proteins related to proliferation, apoptosis, and autophagy, as well as signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 signal network, were also evaluated by western blot. Furthermore, STAT3 was knocked down by siRNA transfection to determine STAT3 role in OSCC cell proliferation and apoptosis. An oral specific carcinogenesis mouse model was used to explore icaritin effect on OSCC in vivo. Icaritin significantly inhibited OSCC proliferation in vitro and reduced the expression of both the cell-cycle progression proteins cyclin A2 and cyclin D1. Besides, icaritin increased cleaved caspase 3 and cleaved poly-(ADP-ribose polymerase expression leading to apoptosis, and it activated autophagy. Icaritin significantly inhibited the expression of phospho-STAT3 (p-STAT3 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In the in vivo experiment, the number of malignant tumors in the icaritin-treated group was significantly lower than the control. Overall, icaritin suppressed proliferation, promoted apoptosis and autophagy, and inhibited STAT3 signaling in OSCC in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, icaritin might be a potential therapeutic agent against OSCC development.

  17. Enhancement of esophageal carcinogenesis induced in rats by N-amyl-N-methylnitrosamine in the presence of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsufuji, H; Ueo, H; Mori, M; Kuwano, H; Sugimachi, K

    1987-11-01

    The effects of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a tumor-promoting phorbol diester, were determined with regard to the induction of esophageal cancer in Wistar rats following a low-dose initial administration of the esophageal carcinogen N-amyl-N-methylnitrosamine [(AMN) CAS: 13256-07-0]. The induction of esophageal cancer was enhanced by TPA given in drinking water after AMN administration; i.e., the incidence of developing esophageal cancers and the multiplicity (number of esophageal cancers per rat) were significantly higher in groups given TPA solution orally after an oral administration of AMN than in those given the AMN solution alone. The enhancement of carcinogenesis with TPA was not affected by the interval between the administration of AMN and the administration of TPA. However, pretreatment with TPA before AMN administration did not enhance the induction of esophageal cancer. Neoplasms were not detected in groups given only TPA or tap water. Because this approach is similar to the phenomenon of two-stage carcinogenesis in the skin, it should provide a meaningful experimental model for studying two-stage carcinogenesis in the esophagus.

  18. Detection and delineation of squamous neoplasia with hyperspectral imaging in a mouse model of tongue carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guolan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qin, Xulei; Muller, Susan; Wang, Xu; Chen, Amy Y; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2018-03-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) holds the potential for the noninvasive detection of cancers. Oral cancers are often diagnosed at a late stage when treatment is less effective and the mortality and morbidity rates are high. Early detection of oral cancer is, therefore, crucial in order to improve the clinical outcomes. To investigate the potential of HSI as a noninvasive diagnostic tool, an animal study was designed to acquire hyperspectral images of in vivo and ex vivo mouse tongues from a chemically induced tongue carcinogenesis model. A variety of machine-learning algorithms, including discriminant analysis, ensemble learning, and support vector machines, were evaluated for tongue neoplasia detection using HSI and were validated by the reconstructed pathological gold-standard maps. The diagnostic performance of HSI, autofluorescence imaging, and fluorescence imaging were compared in this study. Color-coded prediction maps were generated to display the predicted location and distribution of premalignant and malignant lesions. This study suggests that hyperspectral imaging combined with machine-learning techniques can provide a noninvasive tool for the quantitative detection and delineation of squamous neoplasia. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Modifying effects of Terminalia catappa on azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis in male F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, T; Suzui, M; Nabandith, V; Inamine, M; Aniya, Y; Nakayama, T; Ichiba, T; Yoshimi, N

    2005-04-01

    The modifying effects of dietary administration of an herb, Terminalia catappa (TC), were investigated on rat colon carcinogenesis induced by a carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). The number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and beta-catenin accumulated crypts (BCACs) in the colon, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labelling index in the colonic epithelium were examined in a total of 36 male F344 rats. All animals were randomly divided into five experimental groups (4-10 rats in each group). At 6 weeks of age, rats in groups 1, 2 and 3 were given s.c. injections of AOM once a week for 2 weeks at a concentration of 20 mg/kg body weight. One week before the first injection of AOM, rats in groups 2 and 3 were fed a diet containing 0.02 and 0.1% TC, respectively, throughout the experiment. Rats in group 4 were fed a diet containing 0.1% TC. Rats in group 5 were served as untreated controls. All animals were sacrificed at the experimental week 5 after the start of the experiment. Oral administration of TC at both doses significantly decreased the numbers of both ACF/colon/rat (P<0.05 for 0.02% TC, P<0.005 for 0.1% TC) and BCAC/cm/rat (P<0.05 for both 0.02 and 0.1% TC), when compared with the control group (group 1). Colonic PCNA labelling index in groups 2 and 3 was also significantly lower than that in group 1 (P<0.001 for 0.02% TC, P<0.005 for 0.1% TC). These results suggest that TC has a potent short-term chemopreventive effect on biomarkers of colon carcinogenesis and this effect may be associated with the inhibition of the development of ACF and BCACs.

  20. Apoptotic role of natural isothiocyanate from broccoli (Brassica oleracea italica) in experimental chemical lung carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpana Deepa Priya, D; Gayathri, R; Gunassekaran, G R; Murugan, S; Sakthisekaran, D

    2013-05-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) [1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylsulfinyl)butane] is a naturally occurring isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli [Brassica oleracea L. var. italica Plenck. (Brassicaceae)]. Since it is among the most potent bioactive components with antioxidant and antitumor properties, it has received intense attention in the recent years for its chemopreventive properties. The present work determined the rehabilitating role in alleviating the oxidative damage caused by benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] to biomolecules and the apoptotic cascade mediated by orally administered isothiocyanate-SFN (9 µmol/mouse/day) against B(a)P (100 mg/kg body weight, i.p.) induced pulmonary carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice. Oxidative damage was assessed by measuring lipid peroxidation, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, glycoprotein components, protein carbonyl levels and DNA-protein crosslinks. DNA fragmentation by agarose gel electrophoresis and caspase-3 activity by ELISA proved apoptotic induction by SFN along with the protein expression of Bcl-2, Bax and Cyt c. SFN treatment was found to decrease the H2O2 production (p < 0.001) in cancer induced animals, proving its antioxidant potential. Apoptosis was induced by increasing the release of Cyt c (p < 0.001) from mitochondria, decreasing and increasing the expression of Bcl-2 (p < 0.01) and Bax (p < 0.001), respectively. Caspase-3 activity was also enhanced (p < 0.001) which leads to DNA fragmentation in SFN treated groups. Our results reflect the rehabilitating role of SFN in B(a)P induced lung carcinogenesis.

  1. Cervical Carcinogenesis and Immune Response Gene Polymorphisms: A Review

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    Akash M. Mehta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The local immune response is considered a key determinant in cervical carcinogenesis after persistent infection with oncogenic, high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV infections. Genetic variation in various immune response genes has been shown to influence risk of developing cervical cancer, as well as progression and survival among cervical cancer patients. We reviewed the literature on associations of immunogenetic single nucleotide polymorphism, allele, genotype, and haplotype distributions with risk and progression of cervical cancer. Studies on HLA and KIR gene polymorphisms were excluded due to the abundance on literature on that subject. We show that multiple genes and loci are associated with variation in risk of cervical cancer. Rather than one single gene being responsible for cervical carcinogenesis, we postulate that variations in the different immune response genes lead to subtle differences in the effectiveness of the antiviral and antitumour immune responses, ultimately leading to differences in risk of developing cervical cancer and progressive disease after HPV infection.

  2. Regulatory miRNAs in Colorectal Carcinogenesis and Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yongchen; Bao, Yonghua; Yang, Wancai

    2017-04-22

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies and is the second-leading cause of cancer-related death world-wide, which is linked to genetic mutations, epigenetic alterations, and oncogenic signaling activation. MicroRNAs, one of the categories of epigenetics, have been demonstrated significant roles in carcinogenesis and progression through regulating of oncogenic signaling pathways, stem cells, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis. This review summarizes the roles of microRNAs in the regulating of Wnt, Ras, TGF-β, and inflammatory signaling pathways, stemness, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, for carcinogenesis and metastasis in colorectal cancer. Improving our understanding of the mechanisms of regulatory interactions of microRNAs with signaling pathways in colorectal cancer formation and progression will aid in determining the genes responsible for colorectal cancer initiation, progression, metastasis, and recurrence and, finally, in developing personalized approaches for cancer prevention and therapy.

  3. Nucleophilic targets in carcinogenesis, mutagenesis and chemotherapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikov, Z D; Christova-Georgieva, N I; Raikova, E T

    1987-01-01

    A hypothesis is suggested, which emphasizes the role in carcinogenesis of the attack on low molecular nucleophilic substances (LMN) by electrophilic agents - chemical carcinogens, phisical factors, and antitumor alkylating agents. The significance of the degree of nucleophilicity (electronic charge, order of bonds, index of valence) as a locus minoris resistentiae of the LMN in the electrophilic attack on the latter is emphasized as well as the probable role of the hydrogenated pteridines in influencing carcinogenesis by means of ascorbate, tocopherol, SH-containing compounds etc. In support of this hypothesis the preference of electrophilic agents (derivatives of nitrogen mustard and nitrosoureas) for the places with highest degree of nucleophilicity as targets, in experiments in vitro with nucleic bases and pteridines is emphasized.

  4. Plastics and carcinogenesis: The example of vinyl chloride

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    Paul Wesley Brandt-Rauf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The manufacture, use and disposal of various plastics can pose numerous health risks, including the risk of cancer. A model example of carcinogenic risk from plastics is provided by polyvinyl chloride, since it is composed of the known human carcinogen vinyl chloride (VC. In recent years, much has been learned about the molecular biological pathways of VC carcinogenesis. This has led to molecular epidemiologic studies of VC carcinogenesis in exposed human populations which have identified useful biomarkers of exposure, effect and susceptibility for VC. These studies have in turn provided the basis for new molecular approaches for the prevention and treatment of VC cancers. This model could have much wider applicability for many other carcinogenic exposures and many other human cancers.

  5. Inhibitory effects of acetylsalicylic acid on exocrine pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldız, H; Oztas, H; Yıldız, D; Koc, A; Kalipci, E

    2013-05-01

    We investigated short (6 months) and long (12 months) term inhibitory effects of low (200 ppm) and high (400 ppm) dosages of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) on exocrine pancreatic carcinogenesis. It is known that exocrine pancreatic carcinogenesis can be detected by the presence of atypical acinar cell foci (AACF) in pancreas. We investigated possible inhibitory effects of acetylsalicylic acid in an azaserine-treated rat model. AACF were produced in rats by injection with azaserine according to previous studies. Our findings showed that the number, volume and diameter of pancreatic AACF were reduced after acetylsalicylic acid application. These observations suggest that acetylsalicylic acid may exert a protective effect against neoplastic development of pancreatic acinar cells in azaserine injected rats. Our findings corroborate reports in the literature concerning the effects of aspirin in reducing neoplastic development.

  6. Basic concepts of inflammation and its role in carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Stephen G; Reynolds, John V

    2011-01-01

    While the normal inflammatory cascade is self-limiting and crucial for host protection against invading pathogens and in the repair of damaged tissue, a wealth of evidence suggests that chronic inflammation is the engine driving carcinogenesis. Over a period of almost 150 years the link between inflammation and cancer development has been well established. In this chapter we discuss the fundamental concepts and mechanisms behind normal inflammation as it pertains to wound healing. We further discuss the association of inflammation and its role in carcinogenesis, highlighting the different stages of cancer development, namely tumour initiation, promotion and progression. With both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system being central to the inflammatory process, we examine the role of a number of immune effectors in contributing to the carcinogenic process. In addition, we highlight the influences of host genetics in altering cancer risk.

  7. MicroRNA, SND1, and alterations in translational regulation in colon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Naoto; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by microRNA (miRNA) has recently attracted major interest in relation to its involvement in cancer development. miRNA is a member of small non-coding RNA, consists of 22-24 nucleotides and regulates expression of target mRNA species in a post-transcriptional manner by being incorporated with RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Staphylococcal nuclease homology domain containing 1 (SND1), a component of RISC, is frequently up-regulated in human colon cancers and also chemically induced colon cancers in animals. We here showed that SDN1 is involved in miRNA-mediated gene suppression and overexpression of SND1 in colon cancer cells causes down-regulation of APC without altering APC mRNA levels. As for the miRNA expression profile in human colon cancer, miR-34a was among the list of down-regulated miRNA. Expression of miR-34a is tightly regulated by p53, and ectopic expression of miR-34a in colon cancer cells causes remarkable reduction of cell proliferation and induces senescence-like phenotypes. MiR-34a also participates in the positive feedback loop of the p53 tumor suppressor network. This circuitry mechanism for p53 activation is of interest in understanding the tumor suppressive function of miR-34a in colon carcinogenesis. miRNA should also be considered as novel anti-cancer agents in tumor suppressive therapeutic applications.

  8. Wnt Lipidation and Modifiers in Intestinal Carcinogenesis and Cancer

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    Elke Kaemmerer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The wingless (Wnt signaling is suggested as a fundamental hierarchical pathway in regulation of proliferation and differentiation of cells. The Wnt ligands are small proteins of about 40 kDa essentially for regulation and initiation of the Wnt activity. They are secreted proteins requiring acylation for activity in the Wnt signaling cascade and for functional interactivity with transmembrane proteins. Dual lipidation is important for posttranslational activation of the overwhelming number of Wnt proteins and is probably involved in their spatial distribution. The intestinal mucosa, where Wnt signaling is essential in configuration and maintenance, is an established model to study Wnt proteins and their role in carcinogenesis and cancer. The intestinal crypt-villus/crypt-plateau axis, a cellular system with self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation, is tightly coordinated by a Wnt gradient. In the review, some attention is given to Wnt3, Wnt3A, and Wnt2B as important members of the Wnt family to address the role of lipidation and modifiers of Wnt proteins in intestinal carcinogenesis. Wnt3 is an important player in establishing the Wnt gradient in intestinal crypts and is mainly produced by Paneth cells. Wnt2B is characterized as a mitochondrial protein and shuttles between mitochondria and the nucleus. Porcupine and ACSL5, a long-chain fatty acid activating enzyme, are introduced as modifiers of Wnts and as interesting strategy to targeting Wnt-driven carcinogenesis.

  9. Molecular insight of arsenic-induced carcinogenesis and its prevention.

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    Mandal, Paramita

    2017-05-01

    Population of India and Bangladesh and many other parts of the world are badly exposed to arsenic through drinking water. Due to non-availability of safe drinking water, they are dependent on arsenic-contaminated water. Generally, poverty level is high in those areas with lack of proper nutrition. Arsenic is considered to be an environmental contaminant and widely distributed in the environment due to its natural existence and anthropogenic applications. Contamination of arsenic in both human and animal could occur through air, soil, and other sources. Arsenic exposure mainly occurs in food materials through drinking water with high levels of arsenic in it. High levels of arsenic in groundwater have been found to be associated with various health-related problems including arsenicosis, skin lesions, cardiovascular diseases, reproductive problems, psychological, neurological, immunotoxic, and carcinogenesis. The mechanism of arsenic toxicity consists in its transformation in metaarsenite, which acylates protein sulfhydryl groups, affect on mitochondria by inhibiting succinic dehydrogenase activity and can uncouple oxidative phosphorylation with production of active oxygen species by tissues. A variety of dietary antioxidant supplements are useful to protect the carcinogenetic effects of arsenic. They play crucial role for counteracting oxidative damage and protect carcinogenesis by chelating with heavy metal moiety. Phytochemicals and chelating agents will be beneficial for combating heavy metal-induced carcinogenesis through its biopharmaceutical properties.

  10. Role of the Vanins–Myeloperoxidase Axis in Colorectal Carcinogenesis

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    Francesco Mariani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The presence of chronic inflammation in the colonic mucosa leads to an increased risk of cancer. Among proteins involved in the regulation of mucosal inflammation and that may contribute both to structural damage of the intestinal mucosa and to intestinal carcinogenesis, there are myeloperoxidase (MPO and vanins. The infiltration of colonic mucosa by neutrophils may promote carcinogenesis through MPO, a key enzyme contained in the lysosomes of neutrophils that regulates local inflammation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and mutagenic species. The human vanin gene family consists of three genes: vanin-1, vanin-2 and vanin-3. All vanin molecules are pantetheinases, that hydrolyze pantetheine into pantothenic acid (vitamin B5, and cysteamine, a sulfhydryl compound. Vanin-1 loss confers an increased resistance to stress and acute intestinal inflammation, while vanin-2 regulates adhesion and transmigration of activated neutrophils. The metabolic product of these enzymes has a prominent role in the inflammation processes by affecting glutathione levels, inducing ulcers through a reduction in mucosal blood flow and oxygenation, decreasing local defense mechanisms, and in carcinogenesis by damaging DNA and regulating pathways involved in cell apoptosis, metabolism and growth, as Nrf2 and HIF-1α.

  11. Heel spur radiotherapy and radiation carcinogenesis risk estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surenkok, Serdar; Dirican, Bahar; Beyzadeoglu, Murat; Oysul, Kaan

    2006-10-01

    Radiotherapy is a nonsurgical alternative therapy of painful heel spur patients. Nonetheless, cancer induction is the most important somatic effect of ionizing radiation. This study was designed to evaluate the carcinogenesis risk factor in benign painful heel spur patients treated by radiotherapy. Between 1974 and 1999, a total of 20 patients received mean 8.16 Gy total irradiation dose in two fractions. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD(100)) were placed on multiple phantom sites in vivo within the irradiated volume to verify irradiation accuracy and carcinogenesis risk factor calculation. The 20 still-alive patients, who had a minimum 5-year and maximum 29-year follow-up (mean 11.9 years), have been evaluated by carcinogenic radiation risk factor on the basis of tissue weighting factors as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 60. Reasonable pain relief has been obtained in all 20 patients. The calculated mean carcinogenesis risk factor is 1.3% for radiation portals in the whole group, and no secondary cancer has been clinically observed. Radiotherapy is an effective treatment modality for relieving pain in calcaneal spur patients. The estimated secondary cancer risk factor for irradiation of this benign lesion is not as high as was feared.

  12. Cellular adaptation as an important response during chemical carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farber, E.

    1992-01-01

    Since disease processes are largely expressions of how living organisms react and respond to perturbations in the external and internal environments, adaptive or protective responses and their modulations and mechanisms are of the greatest concern in fundamental studies of disease pathogenesis. Such considerations are also of the greatest relevance in toxicology, including how living organisms respond to low levels of single and multiple xenobiotics and radiations. As the steps and mechanisms during cancer development are studied in greater depth, phenomena become apparent that suggest that adaptive reactions and responses may play important or even critical roles in the process of carcinogenesis. The question becomes whether the process of carcinogenesis is fundamentally an adversarial one (i.e., an abnormal cell in a vulnerable host), or is it more in the nature of a physiological selection or differentiation, which has survival value for the host as an adaptive phenomena? The very early initial interactions of mutagenic chemical carcinogens, radiations and viruses with DNA prejudice most to consider the adversarial 'abnormal' view as the appropriate one. Yet, the unusually common nature of the earliest altered rare cells that appear during carcinogenesis, their unusually bland nature, and their spontaneous differentiation to normal-appearing adult liver should be carefully considered

  13. Chemokines and Cytokines as Salivary Biomarkers for the Early Diagnosis of Oral Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gareema Prasad; Michael McCullough

    2013-01-01

    Chemokines have been shown to be important in both inflammation and carcinogenesis and are able to be measured in saliva with relatively robust methods including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Thus it has been hypothesized that patients with oral cancer and oral potentially malignant lesions will have elevated levels of specific chemokines in oral fluids and that this may be used as a marker of both the early detection of malignant disease and progression to malignancy. The conce...

  14. Patterns of Global DNA and Histone Methylation Appear to be Similar in Normal, Dysplastic and Neoplastic Oral Epithelium of Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika J. Piyathilake

    2005-01-01

    H3-Lys4 and H3-Lys9 were statistically significant in all tissue types and strongest in normal oral epithelium from non-cancer subjects (r = 0.77, p < 0.001. Patterns of DNA and histone methylation are similar in tissues across the spectrum of oral carcinogenesis, and there is a significant positive association between these two epigenetic mechanisms.

  15. [Expression of Prion protein and its clinical significance in oral squamous cells carcinoma and oral leukoplakia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Zeng, Yan; Zheng, Jun; Xu, Jiang

    2013-12-01

    To examine Prion protein(PrP) expression and its clinical significance in oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia, oral squamous cell carcinoma(OSCC) and its subgroups. Expression of PrP in OSCC, oral leukoplakia and mucosa specimen was detected by immunohistochemistry. The association between the expression and gender, TNM clinical stages, pathological grades was evaluated. The positive expression rate of PrP in normal, oral leukoplakia and OSCC tissues was 15% (3/20) , 42% (11/26) and 95% (80/84) , respectively. There was a significant difference between the expression of PrP in leukoplakia and in high, moderately and poorly differentiated OSCC(P 0.05). Between stages I+II and III+IV in the overa II expression of PrP, there was a significant difference(P leukoplakia to OSCC was closely related to the carcinogenesis of OSCC, pathologic stage and clinical TNM stage.

  16. Chemomodulatory Potential of Bartogenic Acid Against DMBA/Croton Oil Induced Two-Step Skin Carcinogenesis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Chandragouda R; Sonara, Bhavin M; Mahajan, Umesh B; Patil, Kalpesh R; Patil, Dipak D; Jadhav, Ramchandra B; Goyal, Sameer N; Ojha, Shreesh

    2016-01-01

    Barringtonia racemosa fruits are believed to be useful in cancer treatment in Ayurveda, the Indian system of medicine. In present study, bartogenic acid (BA), a triterpenoid constituent of Barringtonia fruits was evaluated for its cytotoxicity property using the human skin carcinoma cell line (SCC-13) and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The chemopreventive efficacy of BA was evaluated against the DMBA/Croton oil-induced skin carcinogenesis in mice.BA was orally administered at the doses of 1, 2 or 4 mg/kg/day or applied topically every day for 12 weeks following DMBA application. The in vitro data from cell lines revealed that BA induces cytotoxicity against the SCC-13 cells (IC 50 =7.5 µM). It was found 4.05 times more selective to exert cytotoxicity against SCC-13 as compared to the PBMC (IC 50 =30.4 µM). The in vivo datacollected from mice model of DMBA/Croton oil-induced skin carcinogenesis revealed that BA administered orally or applied topically, both reduced the precancerous skin lesions andthe incidence of tumor bearing. The oral doses of BA (2 and 4 mg/kg) and topical treatment significantly reduced the incidence and number of skin papillomas. At these doses, BA also increased the activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase and induced an increase in glutathionecontent and inhibited lipid peroxidation in the skin. These findings reveal the chemopreventive efficacy of BA and also demonstrate that it contributes to the cytotoxic and antioxidative effects of Barringtonia racemosa fruits. The study also validates the traditional claims of Barringtonia fruits and provides a scientific basis of its chemopreventive property.

  17. Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the ... your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are ...

  18. Histone Lysine Methyltransferase Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome Candidate 1 Is Involved in Human Carcinogenesis through Regulation of the Wnt Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouji Toyokawa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A number of histone methyltransferases have been identified and biochemically characterized, but the pathologic roles of their dysfunction in human diseases like cancer are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome candidate 1 (WHSC1 plays important roles in human carcinogenesis. Transcriptional levels of this gene are significantly elevated in various types of cancer including bladder and lung cancers. Immunohistochemical analysis using a number of clinical tissues confirmed significant up-regulation of WHSC1 expression in bladder and lung cancer cells at the protein level. Treatment of cancer cell lines with small interfering RNA targeting WHSC1 significantly knocked down its expression and resulted in the suppression of proliferation. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry indicated that knockdown of WHSC1 decreased the cell population of cancer cells at the S phase while increasing that at the G2/M phase. WHSC1 interacts with some proteins related to the WNT pathway including β-catenin and transcriptionally regulates CCND1, the target gene of the β-catenin/Tcf-4 complex, through histone H3 at lysine 36 trimethylation. This is a novel mechanism for WNT pathway dysregulation in human carcinogenesis, mediated by the epigenetic regulation of histone H3. Because expression levels of WHSC1 are significantly low in most normal tissue types, it should be feasible to develop specific and selective inhibitors targeting the enzyme as antitumor agents that have a minimal risk of adverse reaction.

  19. [Determination of human papillomavirus in oral leukoplakia,oral lichen planus and oral squamous cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jie; Jin, Jian-qiu; Deng, Da-jun; Liu, Hong-wei

    2016-02-18

    To investigate the possibility for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to be a predictable signal for the carcinogenesis of oral mucosa by comparing the prevalences of HPV in each stage of oral mucosal carcinogenesis and to compare the sensitivity differences of the two methods in detecting HPV infection in oral cavity. The hybrid capture (HC-II) was used to detect infection of HPV in 255 samples taken from 12 cases of healthy oral mucosa, 211 cases of patients with pathological diagnosis and 32 cases of patients with clinical diagnosis. The diagnosed cases included 8 cases of benign lesions of the oral mucosa, precancerous lesions [74 cases of oral leukoplakia (OLK) with hyperplasia and 42 cases of OLK with oral epithelial dysplasia (OED)], 91 cases of precancerous condition [oral lichen planus (OLP)] and 28 cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). And in situ hybridization (ISH) was used to detect infection of HPV in 33 cases of OSCC and 76 cases of OLK, including 30 cases of hyperplasia, 15 cases of mild OED, 15 cases of moderate OED and 16 cases of severe OED. The prevalence of HPV in OLP samples was higher (12.12%, 8/66) than that of OLK (2.59%, 3/116) (χ(2)=4.666, P=0.031) and OSCC(7.14%, 2/28, χ(2)=0.513, P=0.474). The prevalence of HPV in OSCC (7.14%, 2/28) was higher than that of OLK (2.59%, 3/116), and no significant difference was found. There was only one case of smoke spot and statistical analysis was not carried out. ISH was used to detect type 16/18 and type 31/33 HPV DNA in 109 cases of oral mucosal lesions in paraffin sections and only one case of OSCC was HPV positive. Thirty-seven cases were detected by HC-II and ISH methods at the same time. The same negative results by the two methods were found in 94.6% samples (35/37). In the other two samples, one was OSCC with early infiltration and the other was OLK with hyperplasia, The HC-II results were positive while the ISH results were negative. The patients with OLP and HPV testing results

  20. Charles River Sprague Dawley rats lack early age-dependent susceptibility to DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gear, R B; Yan, M; Schneider, J; Succop, P; Heffelfinger, S C; Clegg, D J

    2007-10-04

    Developmental stages of mammary glands influence their susceptibility to initiating events related to carcinogenesis. The "window of susceptibility" to mammary carcinogenesis is classically defined as the time in early puberty when the mammary gland morphology is most sensitive to initiation events. Administration of the polyaromatic hydrocarbon, 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), in a single oral dose yields maximal mammary tumor formation when administered in this "window". We examined the DMBA treated mammary glands, precursor lesions, and morphology of the uninvolved mammary epithelium for the first 100 days of life for Charles River Sprague Dawley CD(R) IGS. Our goal was to determine the DMBA dose at which 50% of the rats (IC50) developed carcinoma in situ (CIS) within three months of dosing. Here we demonstrate, rather than the classical U-shaped dose curve in which there is maximum sensitivity for DMBA at 50 days, there is an increasing degree of sensitivity with age in the CD(R) IGS rat. Additionally, we report that vehicle-treated animals developed mammary CIS without any known initiator, and 100 day virgin animals demonstrated lactational changes, independent of DMBA exposure or dose. Lastly, we demonstrate this strain of virgin female rats has elevated pituitary prolactin immunoreactivity independent of the level of mammary differentiation. We conclude this strain of Charles River Sprague Dawley rats has prolactin-induced pituitary stimulation, and therefore, the window of susceptibility for mammary tumorigenesis is absent.

  1. Deletion of epidermal Rac1 inhibits HPV-8 induced skin papilloma formation and facilitates HPV-8- and UV-light induced skin carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Pfister, Herbert; Haase, Ingo

    2016-09-06

    Overexpression and increased activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1 has been linked to squamous cell carcinoma of the epidermis and mucosa in humans. Targeted deletion of Rac1 or inhibition of Rac1 activity in epidermal keratinocytes reduced papilloma formation in a chemical skin carcinogenesis mouse model. However, a potential role of Rac1 in HPV- and UV-light induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far, solar UV radiation being an important carcinogen to the skin.To investigate this, we deleted Rac1 or modulated its activity in mice with transgenic expression of Human papilloma virus type-8 (HPV-8) in epidermal keratinocytes. Our data show that inhibition or deletion of Rac1 results in reduced papilloma formation upon UV-irradiation with a single dose, whereas constitutive activation of Rac1 strongly increases papilloma frequency in these mice. Surprisingly, we observed that, upon chronic UV-irradiation, the majority of mice with transgenic expression of HPV-8 and epidermis specific Rac1 deletion developed squamous cell carcinomas. Taken together, our data show that Rac1 exerts a dual role in skin carcinogenesis: its activation is, on one hand, required for HPV-8- and UV-light induced papilloma formation but, on the other, suppresses the development of squamous cell carcinomas.

  2. Pharmacological inhibition of MAGL attenuates experimental colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Ester; Borrelli, Francesca; Orlando, Pierangelo; Romano, Barbara; Monti, Martina; Morbidelli, Lucia; Aviello, Gabriella; Imperatore, Roberta; Capasso, Raffaele; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Buono, Lorena; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Izzo, Angelo A

    2017-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health problem in Western countries. The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG) exerts antiproliferative actions in a number of tumoral cell lines, including CRC cells. Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), a serine hydrolase that inactivates 2-AG, is highly expressed in aggressive human cancer cells. Here, we investigated the role of MAGL in experimental colon carcinogenesis. The role of MAGL was assessed in vivo by using the xenograft and the azoxymethane models of colon carcinogenesis; MAGL expression was evaluated by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry; 2-AG levels were measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry; angiogenesis was evaluated in tumor tissues [by microvessel counting and by investigating the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) proteins] as well as in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC); cyclin D1 was evaluated by RT-PCR. MAGL and 2-AG were strongly expressed in tumor tissues. The MAGL inhibitor URB602 reduced xenograft tumor volume, this effect being associated to down-regulation of VEGF and FGF-2, reduction in the number of vessels and down-regulation of cyclin D1. In HUVEC, URB602 exerted a direct antiangiogenic effect by inhibiting FGF-2 induced proliferation and migration, and by modulating pro/anti-angiogenic agents. In experiments aiming at investigating the role of MAGL in chemoprevention, URB602 attenuated azoxymethane-induced preneoplastic lesions, polyps and tumors. MAGL, possibly through modulation of angiogenesis, plays a pivotal role in experimental colon carcinogenesis. Pharmacological inhibition of MAGL could represent an innovative therapeutic approach to reduce colorectal tumor progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Imbalance between apoptosis and cell proliferation during early stages of mammary gland carcinogenesis in ACI rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutanzi, Kristy R.; Koturbash, Igor; Bronson, Roderick T.; Pogribny, Igor P.; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen and ionizing radiation are well-documented human breast carcinogens, yet the exact mechanisms of their deleterious effects on mammary gland remain to be discerned. Here we analyze the balance between cellular proliferation and apoptosis in the mammary glands of rats exposed to estrogen and X-ray radiation and the combined action of these carcinogenic agents. For the first time, we show that combined exposure to estrogen and radiation has a synergistic effect on cell proliferation in the mammary glands of ACI rats, as evidenced by a substantially greater magnitude of cell proliferation, especially after 12 and 18 weeks of treatment, when compared to mammary glands of rats exposed to estrogen or radiation alone. We also demonstrate that an imbalance between cell proliferation and apoptosis, rather than enhanced cell proliferation or apoptosis suppression alone, may be a driving force for carcinogenesis. Our studies further suggest that compromised functional activity of p53 may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the proliferation/apoptosis imbalance. In sum, the results of our study indicate that evaluation of the extent of cell proliferation and apoptosis before the onset of preneoplastic lesions may be a potential biomarker of breast cancer risk after exposure to breast carcinogens.

  4. Pathogenesis and biomarkers of carcinogenesis in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Sigrun; Gudjonsson, Thorkell; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2011-01-01

    -driven mechanisms of DNA damage, including the generation and effects of reactive oxygen species, microsatellite instability, telomere shortening and chromosomal instability, are reviewed, as are the molecular responses to genomic stress. We also discuss how these mechanisms can be translated into usable biomarkers....... Although progress has been made in the understanding of inflammation-driven carcinogenesis, markers based on these findings possess insufficient sensitivity or specificity to be usable as reliable biomarkers for risk of colorectal cancer development in patients with ulcerative colitis. However, screening...

  5. Bacterial infection increases risk of carcinogenesis by targeting mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strickertsson, Jesper A.B.; Desler, Claus; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2017-01-01

    pathways, and compares the impact of the bacterial alteration of mitochondrial function to that of cancer. Bacterial virulence factors have been demonstrated to induce mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and to modulate DNA repair pathways of the mitochondria. Furthermore, virulence factors can induce...... or impair the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. The effect of bacterial targeting of mitochondria is analogous to behavior of mitochondria in a wide array of tumours, and this strongly suggests that mitochondrial targeting of bacteria is a risk factor for carcinogenesis....

  6. The dimethylhydrazine induced colorectal tumours in rat - experimental colorectal carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perse, M.; Cerar, A.

    2005-01-01

    Animal models of colorectal carcinogenesis represent invaluable research tool for investigating colorectal cancer (CRC). Experimentally induced tumours in laboratory animals provide opportunity for studying certain aspects of tumours that cannot be effectively studied in humans. Significant information on human CRC aetiology or factors influencing it has derived from studies using dimethylhydrazine (DMH) model that is one of the experimental models appreciated for its morphological similarity to human CRC. Today, DMH model represents useful research tool for the studies of colon carcinogens and chemopreventive agents. The review offers insight into morphogenesis and genetic alterations of DMH induced colorectal epithelial tumours in rats. (author)

  7. Perspectives in the paradigm of radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugakhara, T.; Vatanabe, M.; Niva, O.; Nikajdo, O.

    1995-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is analysed as a multistage process consisting of initiation, promotion and progression. This model includes the mutation of oncogenes and the loss of hetrezygosity by tumor-suppressor genes. The threshold concept of radiation cancerogenesis is proposed, under which ionizing radiation can induce in somatic cell genetic effects a s result of DNA damage and epigenetic changes as well. The epigenetic changes (through DNA or cytoplasma) can be stabilized as mutations observed in many cancer cells and play a dominant role in radiation cancerogenesis induction. The ration of epigenetic and genetic effects largely depends on radiation doses

  8. Carnitines slow down tumor development of colon cancer in the DMH-chemical carcinogenesis mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscilli, Giuseppe; Marra, Emanuele; Mori, Federica; Di Napoli, Arianna; Mancini, Rita; Serlupi-Crescenzi, Ottaviano; Virmani, Ashraf; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2013-07-01

    Dietary agents are receiving much attention for the chemoprevention of cancer. While curcumin is known to influence several pathways and affect tumor growth in vivo, carnitin and its congeners play a variety of important metabolic functions: are involved in the oxydation of long-chain fatty acids, regulate acyl-CoA levels and influence protein activity and stability by modifying the extent of protein acetylation. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of carnitines in the prevention of cancer development using the 1,2,-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis model. We also assessed whether their combination was able to give rise to increased protection from cancer development. Mice treated with DMH were dosed orally with curcumin and/or carnitine and acylcarnitines for 20 weeks. At the end of the treatment colon samples were collected, and scored for multiple ACF and adenomas. We observed that carnitine and acyl-carnitines had same, if not higher, efficacy than curcumin alone in inhibiting the formation of neoplastic lesions induced by DMH treatment. Interestingly, the combination of curcumin and acetyl-L-carnitine was able to fully inhibit the development of advanced adenoma lesions. Our data unveil the antitumor effects of carnitines and warrant additional studies to further support the adoption of carnitines as cancer chemopreventative agents. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Mismatch repair pathway: molecules, functions, and role in colorectal carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameer, Aga Syed; Nissar, Saniya; Fatima, Kaneez

    2014-07-01

    The microsatellite instability (MSI) pathway is one of the important mutational pathways that play a critical role in colorectal carcinogenesis. About 15% of colorectal cancers (CRCs) are characterized by MSI. MSI tumors usually arise because of a genetic defect in mismatch repair (MMR) genes, one of the main DNA-repairing systems. MMR is a highly conserved biological pathway that plays a key role in maintaining genomic stability by correcting the base-base mismatches and insertion/deletion mispairs generated during DNA replication and recombination. Escherichia coli MutS and MutL and their eukaryotic homologs, MutSα and MutLα, respectively, are key players in MMR-associated genome maintenance. Mutations in at least five pivotal genes of MMR, namely, in those encoding mutS homolog 2 (MSH2), mutL homolog 1 (MLH1), mutS homolog 6 (MSH6), postmeiotic segregation increased 1 (PMS1), and postmeiotic segregation, increased 2 (PMS2) have been found in CRC, highlighting the importance of understanding the basic structure and functions of the essential molecules that make up the MMR system. In this review, we have attempted to focus on this aspect, that is, the role that MMR molecules play in CRC carcinogenesis.

  10. Experimental photoimmunology: immunologic ramifications of UV-induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daynes, R.A.; Bernhard, E.J.; Gurish, M.F.; Lynch, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of animal model systems to investigate the sequence of events which lead to the induction and progression of skin tumors following chronic ultraviolet light (UVL) exposure has clearly shown that the direct mutagenic effects of UVL is only one of the components involved in this process. In spite of the fact that overt carcinogenesis is only one of the many effects produced by UV light, most hypotheses as to the mechanism by which UVL can cause the mutations necessary to achieve the transformed phenotype have focused on the direct effects of UVL on DNA and the generation of carcinogenic compounds. Investigations during the last 5 yr, however, have clearly demonstrated that immunologic factors are also critically important in the pathogenesis of UV-induced skin cancers. A complete understanding of UV-carcinogenesis must therefore consider the mechanisms which allow the transformed cell to evade immunologic rejection by the host in addition to those aspects which deal with conversion of a normal cell to a cancer cell. It is the object of this review to provide both a historical account of the work which established the immunologic consequences of chronic UVL exposure and the results of recent experiments designed to investigate the kinetics and mechanisms by which UVL affects the immunologic apparatus. In addition, a hypothetical model is presented to explain the sequence of events which ultimately lead to the emergence of the suppressor T-cells which regulate antitumor immune responses

  11. Radiation carcinogenesis in context: how do irradiated tissues become tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Nguyen, David H

    2009-11-01

    It is clear from experimental studies that genotype is an important determinant of cancer susceptibility in general, and for radiation carcinogenesis specifically. It has become increasingly clear that genotype influences not only the ability to cope with DNA damage but also influences the cooperation of other tissues, like the vasculature and immune system, necessary for the establishment of cancer. Our experimental data and that of others suggest that the carcinogenic action of ionizing radiation (IR) can also be considered a two-compartment problem: while IR can alter genomic sequence as a result of DNA damage, it can also induce signals that alter multicellular interactions and phenotypes that underpin carcinogenesis. Rather than being accessory or secondary to genetic damage, we propose that such non-targeted radiation effects create the critical context that promotes cancer development. This review focuses on experimental studies that clearly define molecular mechanisms by which cell interactions contribute to cancer in different organs, and addresses how non-targeted radiation effects may similarly act though the microenvironment. The definition of non-targeted radiation effects and their dose dependence could modify the current paradigms for radiation risk assessment since radiation non-targeted effects, unlike DNA damage, are amenable to intervention. The implications of this perspective in terms of reducing cancer risk after exposure are discussed.

  12. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Paula Regina Pereira; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2012-01-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4-liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3rd week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P+ AHF). Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs) registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group. PMID:23055806

  13. Considerations for skin carcinogenesis experiments using inducible transgenic mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popis, Martyna C; Wagner, Rebecca E; Constantino-Casas, Fernando; Blanco, Sandra; Frye, Michaela

    2018-01-24

    This study was designed to estimate the percentage of non-malignant skin tumours (papillomas) progressing to malignant squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in a carcinogenesis study using established transgenic mouse models. In our skin cancer model, we conditionally induced oncogenic point mutant alleles of p53 and k-ras in undifferentiated, basal cells of the epidermis. Upon activation of the transgenes through administration of tamoxifen, the vast majority of mice (> 80%) developed skin papillomas, yet primarily around the mouth. Since these tumours hindered the mice eating, they rapidly lost weight and needed to be culled before the papillomas progressed to SCCs. The mouth papillomas formed regardless of the route of application, including intraperitoneal injections, local application to the back skin, or subcutaneous insertion of a tamoxifen pellet. Implantation of a slow releasing tamoxifen pellet into 18 mice consistently led to papilloma formation, of which only one progressed to a malignant SCC. Thus, the challenges for skin carcinogenesis studies using this particular cancer mouse model are low conversion rates of papillomas to SCCs and high frequencies of mouth papilloma formation.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA variants in colorectal carcinogenesis: Drivers or passengers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errichiello, Edoardo; Venesio, Tiziana

    2017-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA alterations have widely been reported in many age-related degenerative diseases and tumors, including colorectal cancer. In the past few years, the discovery of inter-genomic crosstalk between nucleus and mitochondria has reinforced the role of mitochondrial DNA variants in perturbing this essential signaling pathway and thus indirectly targeting nuclear genes involved in tumorigenic and invasive phenotype. Mitochondrial dysfunction is currently considered a crucial hallmark of carcinogenesis as well as a promising target for anticancer therapy. Mitochondrial DNA alterations include point mutations, deletions, inversions, and copy number variations, but numerous studies investigating their pathogenic role in cancer have provided inconsistent evidence. Furthermore, the biological impact of mitochondrial DNA variants may vary tremendously, depending on the proportion of mutant DNA molecules carried by the neoplastic cells (heteroplasmy). In this review, we discuss the role of different type of mitochondrial DNA alterations in colorectal carcinogenesis and, in particular, we revisit the issue of whether they may be considered as causative driver or simply genuine passenger events. The advent of high-throughput techniques as well as the development of genetic and pharmaceutical interventions for the treatment of mitochondrial dysfunction in colorectal cancer are also explored.

  15. Role of the chronic bacterial infection in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgy, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether or not bacterial infection of the urinary bladder had a role in urinary bladder carcinogenesis. To investigate this proposition, four separate studies were conducted. The first study developed an experimental animal model where bacterial infection of the urinary bladder could be introduced and maintained for a period in excess of one year. The method of infection, inoculation of bacteria (Escherichia coli type 04) subserosally into the vesical wall, successfully caused persistent infection in the majority of animals. In the second study the temporal effects of bacterial infection on the induction of urothelial ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and 3 H-thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis were examined. Bacterial infection of the urinary bladder induced urothelial ODC with a peak in enzyme activity 6 hr after infection. 3 H-Thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis peaked 48 hr after infection and coincided with the urothelial hyperplasia that occurred in response to the infection. In the third study the specific bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) was given to rats concurrent with the urinary bacterial infection. In the fourth study rats were administered sodium nitrate and either dibutylamine or piperazine in the drinking water. The infected group developed bladder tumors while none were detected in the non-infected rats. From these studies it may be concluded that bacterial infection may have a significant role in the process of urinary bladder carcinogenesis

  16. [THE ROLE OF ESTROGENS IN THE CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG CANCER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikova, E; Uchikov, A; Dimitrakova, E; Uchikov, P

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from lung cancer has dramatically increased in women as compared to men over the past few years. Historically, smoking has been considered the major risk factor for lung cancer regardless of gender. Several recent lines of evidence implicate gender differences in the observed differences in prevalence and histologic type which cannot be explained based on the carcinogenic action of nicotine. Several recent studies underscore the importance of reproductive and hormonal factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer Lung cancer morbidity and mortality in Bulgaria was 16.2/100000 women and 14.6/ 100000 women, resp. Lung cancer morbidity in Europe was 39/100000 women. Lung cancer is extremely sensitive to estrogens. The latter act directly or as effect modifiers for the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. Further research examining the relationship between serum estrogen levels and the estrogen receptor expression in normal and tumor lung tissue samples can help elucidate the importance of reproductive and hormonal (exogenous and endogenous) factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer.

  17. Low-dose oral tolerance due to antigen in the diet suppresses differentially the cholera toxin-adjuvantized IgE, IgA and IgG response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Risager; Kjær, Tanja; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2003-01-01

    Background: Cholera toxin (CT) is used as a mucosal adjuvant amongst other applications for studying food allergy because oral administration of antigen with CT induces an antigen-specific type 2 response, including IgE and IgA production. Priorly established oral tolerance due to antigen...... in the diet may radically impact on the CT-adjuvantized immune response. The present study served to evaluate the effect of priorly established low-dose oral tolerance on the CT-adjuvantized immune response towards a food antigen. Methods: Mice fed a diet containing microgram levels of the soy protein Kunitz...... soy-trypsin inhibitor (KSTI) (F0 mice) and mice fed a soy-free diet (F2 mice) were orally immunized with KSTI and CT. KSTI-specific serum IgG1, IgG2a, IgA and IgE and fecal IgA were monitored. KSTI-stimulated cell proliferation and interleukin (IL)-6 production were determined. Results: The anti...

  18. Association between human papilloma virus/Epstein-Barr virus coinfection and oral carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ru; Ekshyyan, Oleksandr; Moore-Medlin, Tara; Rong, Xiaohua; Nathan, Sean; Gu, Xin; Abreo, Fleurette; Rosenthal, Eben L; Shi, Mingxia; Guidry, Joseph T; Scott, Rona S; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M; Nathan, Cherie-Ann O

    2015-01-01

    The recent epidemic of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas associated with human papilloma virus (HPV) has not addressed its association with lymphoid tissue in the oropharynx or the potential role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)/HPV coinfection. The prevalence of HPV and EBV infection/coinfection and CD21 mRNA expression were determined in normal and cancerous tissues from the oropharynx using in situ hybridization (ISH), p16, and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). The effects of coinfection on tumorigenicity were evaluated using proliferation and invasion assays. Normal oropharynx, tonsil, non-cancer base of tongue (BOT), and BOT from sleep apnea patients demonstrated EBV positivity ranging from 7% to 36% depending on the site and methods of detection used (qRT-PCR or ISH). Among non-malignant BOT samples, HPV positivity was noted only in 20%. The percent of tonsil and BOT cancers positive for HPV (up to 63% and 80%, respectively) or coinfected with HPV/EBV (up to 25% and 70%, respectively) were both significantly associated with cancer status. Notably, HPV/EBV coinfection was observed only in malignant tissue originating in lymphoid-rich oropharynx sites (tonsil, BOT). CD21 mRNA (the major EBV attachment receptor) was detected in tonsil and BOT epithelium, but not in soft-palate epithelium. Coinfected cell lines showed a significant increase in invasiveness (P < 0.01). There is a high prevalence of HPV/EBV infection and coinfection in BOT and tonsil cancers, possibly reflecting their origins in lymphoid-rich tissue. In vitro, cells modeling coinfection have an increased invasive potential. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalaimalai Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy.

  20. Growth hormone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  1. TWIST and p-Akt immunoexpression in normal oral epithelium oral dysplasia and in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Fernanda-Paula; Corrêa Pontes, Flávia-Sirotheau; Cury, Sérgio-Elias; Fonseca, Felipe-Paiva; Rebelo-Pontes, Hélder; Pinto-Júnior, Décio-dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunoexpression of TWIST and p-Akt proteins in oral leukoplakia (OL) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), correlating their expressions with the histological features of the lesions. Study design: Immunohistochemical studies were carried out on 10 normal oral epithelium, 30 OL and 20 OSCC formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Immunoperoxidase reactions for TWIST and p-Akt proteins were applied on the specimens and the positivity of the reactions was calculated for 1000 epithelial cells. Results: Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s post tests revealed a significant difference in TWIST and p-Akt immunoexpression among normal oral mucosa, OL and OSCC. In addition, a significant positive correlation was found between TWIST and p-Akt expressions according to the Pearson’s correlation test. Conclusions: The results obtained in the current study suggest that TWIST and p-Akt may participate of the multi-step process of oral carcinogenesis since its early stages. Key words: Oral cancer, oral leukoplakia, dysplasia, immunohistochemistry. PMID:21743395

  2. Serum Uric Acid Levels in Oral Cancer Patients Seen at Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Toxicity by oxygen radicals has been considered as an important cause of cancer. It is proposed that the antioxidant properties of uric acid may act to prevent formation of oxygen radicals and thereby protect against carcinogenesis. This study aims to assess the role of uric acid in the aetiology of oral cancer.

  3. [The role of sonic hedgehog pathway in skin carcinogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesiak, Aleksandra; Sysa-Jedrzejowska, Anna; Narbutt, Joanna

    2010-08-01

    Non melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) involving basal (BCC)--and squamosus cell carcinomas (SCC) and are the most frequent skin cancers in Caucasians. Ultraviolet radiation is the main environmental risk factor for NMSC development. The aim of this paper is to review the latest opinions concerning the role of sonic hedgehog pathway in non-melanoma skin cancers development. Experimental data indicate that sonic hedgehog pathway might be involved in skin carcinogenesis. Under physiological conditions sonic hedgehog pathway is responsible for normal embryogenesis, regeneration of damaged tissues and for regulation of cell proliferation. It was revealed that UVR caused inactivated mutation in PATCHED gene encoding Ptch1 protein. These events lead to deregulation of sonic hedgehog pathway trough activation of Smo protein and Gli transcriptional factors what stimulates cell proliferation and in consequence NMSC development. Literature data indicate that understanding of molecular background of skin cancers might be a reason for introduction of new therapeutic approaches including sonic hedgehog pathway inhibitors.

  4. Chemical and radiation carcinogenesis in man and experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.A.; Miller, E.C.

    1975-01-01

    It is now well established that some cancer in man results from exposures to certain chemicals and radiations, both ultraviolet and ionizing radiations. These chemical and physical agents are also carcinogenic in experimental animals and, where adequately tested, in mammalian cell cultures. However, only very limited data are available on the relative roles of and the interrelationships, if any, between these various environmental agents in the causation of the majority of the cancers in man. Nothing is known of the relationship between these agents and possible carcinogenic viral information in the etiology of cancer in man. Furthermore, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which chemicals and radiations induce cancers in either man or experimental animals. The objective of this brief review is to present certain aspects of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis in man and experimental animals and some of the problems in the elucidation of their roles in carinogenesis in the human

  5. Thymus in experimental carcinogenesis of the prostate gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodin, Yu I; Lomshakov, A A; Astashov, V V; Kazakov, O V; Mayorov, A P; Larionov, P M

    2014-10-01

    We studied structural changes in the prostate gland, thymus, and lymph nodes in CBA mice after transplantation of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells into the prostate gland. On experimental day 5, the number of blood and lymph vessels decreased in the gland; the percentage of connective tissue elements and glandular tissue and the number of immunoblasts in the thymus increased. On day 18, the number of blood vessels in the tumor decreased; the width of the cortex and glandular tissue increased in the thymus, while the number of immunoblasts was reduced. On day 28, tumor infiltration and increased number of lymphatic vessels in its stroma were observed; parenchyma was reduced, and the area of the connective tissue increased in the thymus. These structural changes indicated the development of accidental involution of the thymus during carcinogenesis of the prostate.

  6. Ovarian serous carcinoma: recent concepts on its origin and carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent morphologic and molecular genetic studies have led to a paradigm shift in our conceptualization of the carcinogenesis and histogenesis of pelvic (non-uterine serous carcinomas. It appears that both low-grade and high-grade pelvic serous carcinomas that have traditionally been classified as ovarian in origin, actually originate, at least in a significant subset, from the distal fallopian tube. Clonal expansions of the tubal secretory cell probably give rise to serous carcinomas, and the degree of ciliated conversion is a function of the degree to which the genetic hits deregulate normal differentiation. In this article, the authors review the evidentiary basis for aforementioned paradigm shift, as well as its potential clinical implications.

  7. Pathogenesis and biomarkers of carcinogenesis in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Sigrun; Gudjonsson, Thorkell; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2011-01-01

    One of the most serious complications of ulcerative colitis is the development of colorectal cancer. Screening patients with ulcerative colitis by standard histological examination of random intestinal biopsy samples might be inefficient as a method of cancer surveillance. This Review focuses...... on the current understanding of the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis-associated colorectal cancer and how this knowledge can be transferred into patient management to assist clinicians and pathologists in identifying patients with ulcerative colitis who have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Inflammation....... Although progress has been made in the understanding of inflammation-driven carcinogenesis, markers based on these findings possess insufficient sensitivity or specificity to be usable as reliable biomarkers for risk of colorectal cancer development in patients with ulcerative colitis. However, screening...

  8. Studies on the multistage nature of radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.; Ley, R.D.; Grube, D.; Staffeldt, E.

    1980-01-01

    With low dose levels of ionizing or ultraviolet radiation, the number of initiation events exceeds the number of tumors that grow to a detectable size. Ionizing radiation, which is a complete carcinogen, appears to be a more effective initiator than an enhancer or promoter. However, the initiation and promotion aspects of ionizing radiation have been studied in very few organ systems. In the case of UVR, with or without photosensitizers such as psoralens, the requirement of a relatively large number of exposures for carcinogenesis suggests that the expression of the initiated cells as frank tumors requires a number of events spread out over the time of the development of the tumor. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation are, perhaps, underutilized as tools for probing the mechanism of both initiation and promotion

  9. Collagen mRNA levels changes during colorectal cancer carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Hanne; Anthonsen, Dorit; Lothe, Inger M B

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Invasive growth of epithelial cancers is a complex multi-step process which involves dissolution of the basement membrane. Type IV collagen is a major component in most basement membranes. Type VII collagen is related to anchoring fibrils and is found primarily in the basement membrane...... zone of stratified epithelia. Immunohistochemical studies have previously reported changes in steady-state levels of different alpha(IV) chains in several epithelial cancer types. In the present study we aimed to quantitatively determine the mRNA levels of type IV collagen (alpha1/alpha 4/alpha 6......) and type VII collagen (alpha1) during colorectal cancer carcinogenesis. METHODS: Using quantitative RT-PCR, we have determined the mRNA levels for alpha1(IV), alpha 4(IV), alpha 6(IV), and alpha1(VII) in colorectal cancer tissue (n = 33), adenomas (n = 29) and in normal tissue from the same individuals...

  10. Mechanistic modelling of genetic and epigenetic events in radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, S. G.; Eidelman, Y. A.; Salnikov, I. V.; Khvostunov, I. K.

    2006-01-01

    Methodological problems arise on the way of radiation carcinogenesis modelling with the incorporation of radiobiological and cancer biology mechanistic data. The results of biophysical modelling of different endpoints [DNA DSB induction, repair, chromosome aberrations (CA) and cell proliferation] are presented and applied to the analysis of RBE-LET relationships for radiation-induced neoplastic transformation (RINT) of C3H/10T1/2 cells in culture. Predicted values for some endpoints correlate well with the data. It is concluded that slowly repaired DSB clusters, as well as some kind of CA, may be initiating events for RINT. As an alternative interpretation, it is possible that DNA damage can induce RINT indirectly via epigenetic process. A hypothetical epigenetic pathway for RINT is discussed. (authors)

  11. Carcinogenesis related to intense pulsed light and UV exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedelund, L; Lerche, C; Wulf, H C

    2006-01-01

    This study examines whether intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment has a carcinogenic potential itself or may influence ultraviolet (UV)-induced carcinogenesis. Secondly, it evaluates whether UV exposure may influence IPL-induced side effects. Hairless, lightly pigmented mice (n=144) received three...... IPL treatments at 2-week intervals. Simulated solar radiation was administered preoperatively [six standard erythema doses (SED) four times weekly for 11 weeks] as well as pre- and postoperatively (six SED four times weekly up to 26 weeks). Skin tumors were assessed weekly during a 12-month...... observation period. Side effects were evaluated clinically. No tumors appeared in untreated control mice or in just IPL-treated mice. Skin tumors developed in UV-exposed mice independently of IPL treatments. The time it took for 50% of the mice to first develop skin tumor ranged from 47 to 49 weeks...

  12. Human papillomaviruses and carcinogenesis: well-established and novel models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viarisio, Daniele; Gissmann, Lutz; Tommasino, Massimo

    2017-10-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect the cutaneous or mucosal epithelia and are classified phylogenetically as genera and species. Persistent infections by the mucosal high-risk (HR) HPV types from genus alpha are associated with cancer development of the genital and upper respiratory tracts. The products of two early genes, E6 and E7, are the major HR HPV oncoproteins, being essential in all steps of the carcinogenic process. Cutaneous beta HPV types are proposed, together with ultraviolet (UV) radiation, to promote non-melanoma skin cancer development. However, in contrast to the HR HPV types, beta HPV types appear to be required only at an early stage of carcinogenesis, facilitating the accumulation of UV-induced DNA mutations. Although findings in experimental models also suggest that beta HPV types and other carcinogens may synergize in the induction of malignancies, these possibilities need to be confirmed in human studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Protein expression analysis of inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasui Yumiko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC development. The aim of this study was to determine the differences in protein expression between CRC and the surrounding nontumorous colonic tissues in the mice that received azoxymethane (AOM and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS using a proteomic analysis. Materials and Methods: Male ICR mice were given a single intraperitoneal injection of AOM (10 mg/kg body weight, followed by 2% (w/v DSS in their drinking water for seven days, starting one week after the AOM injection. Colonic adenocarcinoma developed after 20 weeks and a proteomics analysis based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and ultraflex TOF/TOF mass spectrometry was conducted in the cancerous and nontumorous tissue specimens. Results: The proteomic analysis revealed 21 differentially expressed proteins in the cancerous tissues in comparison to the nontumorous tissues. There were five markedly increased proteins (beta-tropomyosin, tropomyosin 1 alpha isoform b, S100 calcium binding protein A9, and an unknown protein and 16 markedly decreased proteins (Car1 proteins, selenium-binding protein 1, HMG-CoA synthase, thioredoxin 1, 1 Cys peroxiredoxin protein 2, Fcgbp protein, Cytochrome c oxidase, subunit Va, ETHE1 protein, and 7 unknown proteins. Conclusions: There were 21 differentially expressed proteins in the cancerous tissues of the mice that received AOM and DSS. Their functions include metabolism, the antioxidant system, oxidative stress, mucin production, and inflammation. These findings may provide new insights into the mechanisms of inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis and the establishment of novel therapies and preventative strategies to treat carcinogenesis in the inflamed colon.

  14. NADPH Oxidases and Their Roles in Skin Homeostasis and Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Jana; Raad, Houssam; Taieb, Alain; Rezvani, Hamid Reza

    2017-11-17

    Skin protects the body from dehydration, pathogens, and external mutagens. NADPH oxidases are central components for regulating the cellular redox balance. There is increasing evidence indicating that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by members of this enzyme family play important roles in the physiology and pathophysiology of the skin. Recent Advances: NADPH oxidases are active producers of ROS such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. Different isoforms are found in virtually all tissues. They play pivotal roles in normal cell homeostasis and in the cellular responses to various stressors. In particular, these enzymes are integral parts of redox-sensitive prosurvival and proapoptotic signaling pathways, in which they act both as effectors and as modulators. However, continuous (re)activation of NADPH oxidases can disturb the redox balance of cells, in the worst-case scenario in a permanent manner. Abnormal NADPH oxidase activity has been associated with a wide spectrum of diseases, as well as with aging and carcinogenesis. Sunlight with its beneficial and deleterious effects induces the activation of NADPH oxidases in the skin. Evidence for the important roles of this enzyme family in skin cancer and skin aging, as well as in many chronic skin diseases, is now emerging. Understanding the precise roles of NADPH oxidases in normal skin homeostasis, in the cellular responses to solar radiation, and during carcinogenesis will pave the way for their validation as therapeutic targets not only for the prevention and treatment of skin cancers but also for many other skin-related disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  15. Paradoxes in carcinogenesis: New opportunities for research directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer Barnett S

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevailing paradigm in cancer research is the somatic mutation theory that posits that cancer begins with a single mutation in a somatic cell followed by successive mutations. Much cancer research involves refining the somatic mutation theory with an ever increasing catalog of genetic changes. The problem is that such research may miss paradoxical aspects of carcinogenesis for which there is no likely explanation under the somatic mutation theory. These paradoxical aspects offer opportunities for new research directions that should not be ignored. Discussion Various paradoxes related to the somatic mutation theory of carcinogenesis are discussed: (1 the presence of large numbers of spatially distinct precancerous lesions at the onset of promotion, (2 the large number of genetic instabilities found in hyperplastic polyps not considered cancer, (3 spontaneous regression, (4 higher incidence of cancer in patients with xeroderma pigmentosa but not in patients with other comparable defects in DNA repair, (5 lower incidence of many cancers except leukemia and testicular cancer in patients with Down's syndrome, (6 cancer developing after normal tissue is transplanted to other parts of the body or next to stroma previously exposed to carcinogens, (7 the lack of tumors when epithelial cells exposed to a carcinogen were transplanted next to normal stroma, (8 the development of cancers when Millipore filters of various pore sizes were was inserted under the skin of rats, but only if the holes were sufficiently small. For the latter paradox, a microarray experiment is proposed to try to better understand the phenomena. Summary The famous physicist Niels Bohr said "How wonderful that we have met with a paradox. Now we have some hope of making progress." The same viewpoint should apply to cancer research. It is easy to ignore this piece of wisdom about the means to advance knowledge, but we do so at our peril.

  16. Mechanisms of caffeine-induced inhibition of UVB carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan H Conney

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sunlight-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer is the most prevalent cancer in the United States with more than 2 million cases per year. Several studies have shown an inhibitory effect of caffeine administration on UVB-induced skin cancer in mice, and these studies are paralleled by epidemiology studies that indicate an inhibitory effect of coffee drinking on nonmelanoma skin cancer in humans. Strikingly, decaffeinated coffee consumption had no such inhibitory effect.Mechanism studies indicate that caffeine has a sunscreen effect that inhibits UVB-induced formation of thymine dimers and sunburn lesions in the epidermis of mice. In addition, caffeine administration has a biological effect that enhances UVB-induced apoptosis thereby enhancing the elimination of damaged precancerous cells, and caffeine administration also enhances apoptosis in tumors. Caffeine administration enhances UVB-induced apoptosis by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. Exploration of the p53-independent effect indicated that caffeine administration enhanced UVB-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the UVB-induced increase in ATR-mediated formation of phospho-Chk1 (Ser345 and abolishing the UVB-induced decrease in cyclin B1 which resulted in caffeine-induced premature and lethal mitosis in mouse skin. In studies with cultured primary human keratinocytes, inhibition of ATR with siRNA against ATR inhibited Chk1 phosphorylation and enhanced UVB-induced apoptosis. Transgenic mice with decreased epidermal ATR function that were irradiated chronically with UVB had 69% fewer tumors at the end of the study compared with irradiated littermate controls with normal ATR function. These results, which indicate that genetic inhibition of ATR (like pharmacologic inhibition of ATR via caffeine inhibits UVB-induced carcinogenesis and supports the concept that ATR-mediated phosphorylation of Chk1 is an important target for caffeine’s inhibitory effect on UVB-induced carcinogenesis.

  17. Langerhans cell counts in oral epithelial dysplasia and their correlation to clinicopathological parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ping Wang

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: The significant and gradual elevation in LC count from NOM through mild and moderate OED to severe OED lesions suggests an upregulation of immunosurveillance ability in OED patients during the early oral carcinogenesis process. A low LC count in OED lesions may suggest the partial loss of immunosurveillance ability against dysplastic cells; this in turn favors the malignant transformation of an OED lesion into oral cancer.

  18. Present status of theories and data analyses of mathematical models for carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Michiaki; Kawaguchi, Isao

    2007-01-01

    Reviewed are the basic mathematical models (hazard functions), present trend of the model studies and that for radiation carcinogenesis. Hazard functions of carcinogenesis are described for multi-stage model and 2-event model related with cell dynamics. At present, the age distribution of cancer mortality is analyzed, relationship between mutation and carcinogenesis is discussed, and models for colorectal carcinogenesis are presented. As for radiation carcinogenesis, models of Armitage-Doll and of generalized MVK (Moolgavkar, Venson, Knudson, 1971-1990) by 2-stage clonal expansion have been applied to analysis of carcinogenesis in A-bomb survivors, workers in uranium mine (Rn exposure) and smoking doctors in UK and other cases, of which characteristics are discussed. In analyses of A-bomb survivors, models above are applied to solid tumors and leukemia to see the effect, if any, of stage, age of exposure, time progression etc. In miners and smokers, stages of the initiation, promotion and progression in carcinogenesis are discussed on the analyses. Others contain the analyses of workers in Canadian atomic power plant, and of patients who underwent the radiation therapy. Model analysis can help to understand the carcinogenic process in a quantitative aspect rather than to describe the process. (R.T.)

  19. Human Infection with Ascaris lumbricoides Is Associated with Suppression of the Interleukin-2 Response to Recombinant Cholera Toxin B Subunit following Vaccination with the Live Oral Cholera Vaccine CVD 103-HgR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Philip J.; Chico, Martha; Sandoval, Carlos; Espinel, Ivan; Guevara, Angel; Levine, Myron M.; Griffin, George E.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the potential immunomodulatory effects of concurrent ascariasis on the cytokine response to a live oral vaccine, we measured cytokine responses to cholera toxin B subunit (CT-B) following vaccination with the live oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR in Ascaris lumbricoides-infected subjects randomized in a double-blind study to receive two doses of either albendazole or placebo prior to vaccination and in a group of healthy U.S. controls. Postvaccination cytokine responses to CT-B were characterized by transient increases in the production of interleukin-2 (IL-2; P = 0.02) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ; P = 0.001) in the three study groups combined; however, postvaccination increases in IFN-γ were significant only in the albendazole-treated A. lumbricoides infection group (P = 0.008). Postvaccination levels of IL-2 were significantly greater in the albendazole-treated group compared with the placebo group (P = 0.03). No changes in levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokines in response to control ascaris antigens were observed over the same period. These findings indicate that vaccination with CVD 103-HgR is associated with a Th1 cytokine response (IL-2 and IFN-γ) to CT-B, that infection with A. lumbricoides diminishes the magnitude of this response, and that albendazole treatment prior to vaccination was able to partially reverse the deficit in IL-2. The potential modulation of the immune response to oral vaccines by geohelminth parasites has important implications for the design of vaccination campaigns in geohelminth-endemic areas. PMID:11179329

  20. Immunosuppressive effects of Pteridium aquilinum enhance susceptibility to urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniceiro, Beatriz D; Latorre, Andreia O; Fukumasu, Heidge; Sanches, Daniel S; Haraguchi, Mitsue; Górniak, Silvana L

    2015-01-01

    Pteridium aquilinum (bracken fern), one of the most important toxic plants in the world, contains the toxic norsequiterpene ptaquiloside that induces cancers in humans and farm animals. Previous studies in the laboratory demonstrated immunotoxic effects produced by ptaquiloside, which are characterized by suppression of natural killer (NK) cell activity (i.e. cytotoxicity and interferon [IFN]-γ production). However, it is unknown whether these immunosuppressive effects could contribute to carcinogenesis in situ in general because of the important function of NK cells in innate killing of tumor cells. This study assessed the impact of P. aquilinum-induced immunosuppression on urethane-induced lung cancer in C57BL/6 mice. Adult mice were treated with an extract of P. aquilinum (30 g/kg/day) by gavage once daily for 14 days, followed by gavage (5 days/week) during an 11-week period that was accompanied by treatment with urethane (1 g/kg) via once-weekly intraperitoneal injection; 20 weeks after the end of the treatment period, all lungs were evaluated. The results indicated there was a significant increase in lung nodule number as well as in multiplicity of lesions in mice treated with both P. aquilinum and urethane (PU group) compared to values in mice treated only with the urethane (U group). In addition, histologic evaluation revealed a 76% increase in the rate of lung adenomas and a 41% increase in rate of bronchiolization of alveoli in the mice from the PU group compared to levels seen in mice within the U group. Taken together, the results here show for the first time that immunosuppressive effects of P. aquilinum could increase the risk of cancer formation in exposed hosts.

  1. Chemopreventive Effect of Aster glehni on Inflammation-Induced Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Sook Chung

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Although Aster glehni is a common dietary herb that has various bioactivities, including anti-diabetic, anti-adipogenic, and anti-inflammatory effects, A. glehni has not been studied in colon cancer. Therefore, we hypothesized the chemopreventive effects of an ethanol extract of A. glehni (AG on azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS-induced colitis-associated cancer (CAC in mice. In this study, we found that treatment with AG significantly attenuated the AOM/DSS-induced enlargement of the spleen and shortening of the colon. In addition, colonic tumor formation, colonic damage, and increased muscle thickness were significantly reduced in AOM/DSS-induced mice fed AG. Treatment with AG also reduced intestinal interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α production and decreased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase (COX-2 protein expression in mice with AOM/DSS-induced CAC. Furthermore, AG reduced nuclear factor (NF-κB activation via phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor of kappa Bα (IκBα, leading to inhibition of NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. It also downregulated the expression of NF-κB-related proteins, including the B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 family and inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs, in mice with AOM/DSS-induced CAC. Taken together, these findings suggest that the treatment with AG inhibited colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis in mice, and this chemopreventive effect was strongly mediated by suppression of the NF-κB signaling pathway, indicating that AG could be a promising protective agent against CAC.

  2. Nuclear factor κB and cyclooxygenase-2 immunoexpression in oral dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Hélder Antônio Rebelo; Pontes, Flávia Sirotheau Corrêa; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; de Carvalho, Pedro Luiz; Pereira, Erika Martins; de Abreu, Michelle Carvalho; de Freitas Silva, Brunno Santos; dos Santos Pinto, Décio

    2013-02-01

    Oral leukoplakia is the main potentially malignant oral lesion, and oral squamous cell carcinoma accounts for more than 95% of all malignant neoplasms in the oral cavity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify the immunoexpression of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) proteins in dysplastic oral lesions and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemical reactions were performed on 6 inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia, 28 oral leukoplakia, and 15 oral squamous cell carcinoma paraffin-embedded samples. Immunoperoxidase reaction for NF-κB and COX-2 was applied on the specimens, and the positivity of the reactions was calculated for 1000 epithelial cells. Using the analysis of variance and the Tukey post hoc statistical analyses, a significantly increased immunoexpression for NF-κB was observed when oral squamous cell carcinoma samples were compared with the other groups studied. However, using the Kruskal-Wallis and the Dunn post hoc tests, a statistically significant result for COX-2 expression was obtained only when the moderate dysplasia group was compared with the inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia group. Nuclear factor κB may participate in the malignant phenotype acquisition process of the oral squamous cell carcinoma in its late stages, whereas COX-2 may be involved in the early stages of oral carcinogenesis process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Oral Candida colonization in oral cancer patients and its relationship with traditional risk factors of oral cancer: a matched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnuaimi, Ali D; Wiesenfeld, David; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Reynolds, Eric C; McCullough, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Candida, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, has been implicated in oral and oesophageal cancers. This study aimed to examine oral Candida carriage in 52 oral cancer patients and 104 age-, gender- and denture status-matched oral cancer-free subjects. We assessed general health, smoking and alcohol drinking habits, use of alcohol-containing mouthwash and periodontal status (community periodontal index of treatment needs). Yeasts were isolated using oral rinse technique and genetically identified via Real-Time PCR-High resolution melting curve analysis of conserved ribosomal DNA. Conditional and binary logistic regressions were used to identify explanatory variables that are risk factors for oral cancer. The frequencies of oral yeasts' presence and high oral colonization were significantly higher in oral cancer than non-oral cancer patients (p=001; p=0.033, respectively). No significant difference in the isolation profile of Candida species was found between the two groups, except C. parapsilosis was more frequent in non-oral cancer group. Differences were noticed in the incidence of C. albicans strains where significantly more C. albicans genotype-A was isolated from cancer patients and significantly more C. albicans genotype-B isolated from non-cancer patients. Multiple regression analyses showed significant association with cancer observed for alcohol drinking (OR=4.253; 95% CI=1.351, 13.386), Candida presence (OR=3.242; 95% CI=1.505, 6.984) and high oral colonization (OR=3.587; 95% CI=1.153, 11.162). These results indicate that there is a significant association between oral cancer occurrence and Candida oral colonization and that the observed genotypic diversity of C. albicans strains may play a role in oral carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Reactive oxygen species mediate Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through PI3K/AKT-dependent activation of GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Young-Ok; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Fan, Jia; Kim, Dong-Hern; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biosciences, Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Cr(VI) compounds are known human carcinogens that primarily target the lungs. Cr(VI) produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the exact effects of ROS on the signaling molecules involved in Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis have not been extensively studied. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells to Cr(VI) at nanomolar concentrations (10–100 nM) for 3 months not only induced cell transformation, but also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of Cr(VI)-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) increased levels of intracellular ROS and antiapoptotic proteins. Transfection with catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD) prevented Cr(VI)-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion, migration, and xenograft tumors. While chronic Cr(VI) exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin and PI3K/AKT/mTOR, transfection with catalase or SOD markedly inhibited Cr(VI)-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or β-catenin almost completely suppressed the Cr(VI)-mediated increase in total and active β-catenin proteins and colony formation. In particular, Cr(VI) suppressed autophagy of epithelial cells under nutrition deprivation. Furthermore, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3β, β-catenin, mTOR, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with Cr(VI)-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that ROS is a key mediator of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through the activation of PI3K/AKT-dependent GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling and the promotion of cell survival mechanisms via the inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy. - Highlights: • Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. • ROS play an important role in Cr(VI)-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. • PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling involved in Cr

  5. Reactive oxygen species mediate Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through PI3K/AKT-dependent activation of GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Young-Ok; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Fan, Jia; Kim, Dong-Hern; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Zhang, Zhuo; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Shi, Xianglin

    2013-01-01

    Cr(VI) compounds are known human carcinogens that primarily target the lungs. Cr(VI) produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the exact effects of ROS on the signaling molecules involved in Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis have not been extensively studied. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells to Cr(VI) at nanomolar concentrations (10–100 nM) for 3 months not only induced cell transformation, but also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of Cr(VI)-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) increased levels of intracellular ROS and antiapoptotic proteins. Transfection with catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD) prevented Cr(VI)-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion, migration, and xenograft tumors. While chronic Cr(VI) exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin and PI3K/AKT/mTOR, transfection with catalase or SOD markedly inhibited Cr(VI)-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or β-catenin almost completely suppressed the Cr(VI)-mediated increase in total and active β-catenin proteins and colony formation. In particular, Cr(VI) suppressed autophagy of epithelial cells under nutrition deprivation. Furthermore, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3β, β-catenin, mTOR, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with Cr(VI)-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that ROS is a key mediator of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through the activation of PI3K/AKT-dependent GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling and the promotion of cell survival mechanisms via the inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy. - Highlights: • Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. • ROS play an important role in Cr(VI)-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. • PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling involved in Cr

  6. Amelioration of azoxymethane induced-carcinogenesis by reducing oxidative stress in rat colon by natural extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waly, Mostafa I; Al-Rawahi, Amani S; Al Riyami, Marwa; Al-Kindi, Mohamed A; Al-Issaei, Halima K; Farooq, Sardar A; Al-Alawi, Ahmed; Rahman, Mohammad S

    2014-02-18

    Azoxymethane (AOM) is a potent carcinogenic agent commonly used to induce colon cancer in rats; the cytotoxicity of AOM is considered to mediate oxidative stress. This study investigated the chemopreventive effect of three natural extracts [pomegranate peel extract (PomPE), papaya peel extract (PapPE) and seaweed extract (SE)] against AOM-induced oxidative stress and carcinogenesis in rat colon. Eighty Sprague-Dawley rats (aged 4 weeks) were randomly divided into 8 groups (10 rats/group). Control group was fed a basal diet; AOM-treated group was fed a basal diet and received AOM intraperitonial injections for two weeks at a dose of 15 mg/kg bodyweight, whereas the other six groups were received oral supplementation of PomPE, PapPE or SE, in the presence or absence of AOM injection. All animals were continuously fed ad-libitum until aged 16 weeks, then all rats were sacrificed and the colon tissues were examined microscopically for pathological changes and aberrant crypt foci (ACF) development, genotoxicity (induced micronuclei (MN) cells enumeration), and glutathione and lipid peroxidation. Our results showed that AOM-induced ACF development and pathological changes in the colonic mucosal tissues, increased bone marrow MN cells and oxidative stress (glutathione depletion, lipid peroxidation) in rat colonic cells. The concomitant treatment of AOM with PomPE, PapPE or SE significantly ameliorated the cytotoxic effects of AOM. The results of this study provide in-vivo evidence that PomPE, PapPE and SE reduced the AOM-induced colon cancer in rats, through their potent anti-oxidant activities.

  7. Omeprazole promotes carcinogenesis of fore-stomach in mice with co-stimulation of nitrosamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Qi, Dong-Jiang; He, Wei; Xu, A-Man

    2017-09-19

    To investigate if oral omeprazole application induces cancers of fore and glandular stomach in mice. A total of 66 eligible male mice were randomly divided into 6 groups, which were treated with control reagent, low (6 mg/kg) and high dose omeprazole (30 mg/kg), N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG, 100 mg/L water), and MNNG plus low and high dose omeprazole, respectively. After 24 weeks, concentrations of acid phosphatase (ACP) and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase(NAG) in serum and spleen was examined, and p21 and mTOR levels in stomach were detected. The mouse spleen weight index was smaller in the omeprazole group than the control group, and in the MNNG plus omeprazole groups than the MNNG group. In the fore-stomach, more carcinomas were observed in the MNNG plus omeprazole groups than in the MNNG group. In the glandular stomach, there existed more atypical hyperplasia cases in the MNNG plus omeprazole groups than the MNNG-treated group, and one carcinoma was induced in the MNNG plus high dose omeprazole group. Omeprazole alone caused minor gastric pathological changes. Omeprazole treatment lowered both serum and spleen ACP and NAG levels in both the non-MNNG-treated and MNNG-treated subgroups. In fore-stomach, there existed decreased p21 and mTOR levels in the omeprazole-treated groups than in the control group, and in the MNNG plus omeprazole groups than the MNNG-treated group. Omeprazole promotes carcinogenesis of the mouse fore-stomach but not the glandular stomach following treatment with MNNG. Lysosomal hydrolase activity was inhibited and some cancer-associated proteins was dysregulated, which requires further explorations.

  8. Comparative evaluation of antiproliferative, antiangiogenic and apoptosis inducing potential of black tea polyphenols in the hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prathiba Duvuru

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the relative chemopreventive efficacy of two black tea polyphenols, Polyphenon-B [P-B] and BTF-35 on 7,12-dimethylbenz [a]anthracene (DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP carcinogenesis. Methods Hamsters were divided into 6 groups. The right buccal pouches of animals in groups 1–3 were painted with 0.5% of DMBA three times a week for 14 weeks. While hamsters in group 1 received no further treatment, animals in groups 2 and 3 received diet containing 0.05% P-B and BTF-35 respectively, four weeks before DMBA painting that was continued until the end of the experiments. Animals in groups 4 and 5 were given P-B and BTF-35 alone respectively as in groups 2 and 3. Group 6 animals served as the untreated control. All the animals were sacrificed after 18 weeks. The expression of p21, cyclin D1, glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-P, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, Bcl-2, Bax, cytochrome C, caspase-3, caspase-9, poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, cytokeratins and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF was analysed by RT-PCR, immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses. Results DMBA treated animals developed buccal pouch carcinomas that displayed increased expression of p21, cyclin D1, GST-P, NF-κB, cytokeratins, VEGF and Bcl-2 with decreased expression of Bax, cytochrome C, caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP. Dietary administration of both P-B and BTF-35 reduced the incidence of DMBA-induced HBP carcinomas by modulating markers of cell proliferation, cell survival, tumour infiltration, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. Conclusion The results of the present study provide a mechanistic basis for the chemopreventive potential of black tea polyphenols. The greater efficacy of BTF-35 in inhibiting HBP carcinogenesis and modulating multiple molecular targets may have a potential role in the prevention of oral cancer.

  9. Protective role of luteolin on the status of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defense against azoxymethane-induced experimental colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashokkumar, Pandurangan; Sudhandiran, Ganapasam

    2008-11-01

    The modifying effect of dietary exposure to a flavonoid, luteolin (LUT) during the azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon carcinogenesis was investigated in this study. Aberrant crypt foci (ACF), lipid peroxidation (LPO), enzymic and non-enzymic antioxidants and histopathological analysis were performed. Colon carcinogenesis was induced by injecting 15 mg/body kg weight of AOM, intraperitoneally (i.p.), once in a week for 3 weeks in male Balb/c mice. AOM-induced mice were treated with LUT (1.2mg of LUT/kg body weight/day orally). After the experimental period, frequency of ACF, levels of thiobarbutaric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and hydroxy radical (OH ) were found to be increased, whereas glutathione (GSH), Vitamins C, E and A were decreased in the plasma and colon of AOM-induced mice. However, LUT treatment to AOM-induced mice significantly decreased the incidence of ACF, levels of TBARS and OH with a concordant increase in non-enzymic antioxidants in plasma and colon tissue. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) were found to be decreased due to the induction of colon cancer in mouse. LUT treatment ameliorated the activities of these antioxidant enzymes. The histological study revealed a significant increase in the enlarged nuclei and hyperchromatism of cells in AOM-induced mice whereas LUT significantly reduced the signs in the colon. The immunohistochemical expression of MDA-DNA adduct was studied. In AOM-induced group, the expression was increased and treatment with LUT decreased significantly. The present study depicts that LUT can act as an effective chemopreventive agent against colon cancer.

  10. Effects of environmental stressors on histone modifications and their relevance to carcinogenesis: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dik, S.; Scheepers, P.T.J.; Godderis, L.

    2012-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a complex process involving both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The cellular molecular epigenetic machinery, including histone modifications, is associated with changes in gene expression induced by exposure to environmental agents. In this paper, we systematically reviewed

  11. Preclinical Cancer Chemoprevention Studies Using Animal Model of Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Takuji [Cytopatholgy Division, Tohkai Cytopathology Institute, Cancer Research and Prevention (TCI-CaRP), 5-1-2 Minami-uzura, Gifu 500-8285 (Japan); Department of Tumor Pathology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan)

    2012-07-16

    Inflammation is involved in all stages of carcinogenesis. Inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease is a longstanding inflammatory disease of intestine with increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Several molecular events involved in chronic inflammatory process are reported to contribute to multi-step carcinogenesis of CRC in the inflamed colon. They include over-production of free radicals, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, up-regulation of inflammatory enzymes in arachidonic acid biosynthesis pathway, up-regulation of certain cytokines, and intestinal immune system dysfunction. In this article, firstly I briefly introduce our experimental animal models where colorectal neoplasms rapidly develop in the inflamed colorectum. Secondary, data on preclinical cancer chemoprevention studies of inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis by morin, bezafibrate, and valproic acid, using this novel inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis model is described.

  12. Modulation of Estrogen Chemical Carcinogenesis by Botanical Supplements used for Postmenopausal Women’s Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelten, Courtney S.; Dietz, Birgit; Bolton, Judy L.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer risk has been associated with long-term estrogen exposure including traditional hormone therapy (HT, formally hormone replacement therapy). To avoid traditional HT and associated risks, women have been turning to botanical supplements such as black cohosh, red clover, licorice, hops, dong gui, and ginger to relieve menopausal symptoms despite a lack of efficacy evidence. The mechanisms of estrogen carcinogenesis involve both hormonal and chemical pathways. Botanical supplements could protect women from estrogen carcinogenesis by modulating key enzymatic steps [aromatase, P4501B1, P4501A1, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging] in estradiol metabolism leading to estrogen carcinogenesis as outlined in Figure 1. This review summarizes the influence of popular botanical supplements used for women’s health on these key steps in the estrogen chemical carcinogenesis pathway, and suggests that botanical supplements may have added chemopreventive benefits by modulating estrogen metabolism. PMID:24223609

  13. Preclinical Cancer Chemoprevention Studies Using Animal Model of Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takuji

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is involved in all stages of carcinogenesis. Inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease is a longstanding inflammatory disease of intestine with increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Several molecular events involved in chronic inflammatory process are reported to contribute to multi-step carcinogenesis of CRC in the inflamed colon. They include over-production of free radicals, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, up-regulation of inflammatory enzymes in arachidonic acid biosynthesis pathway, up-regulation of certain cytokines, and intestinal immune system dysfunction. In this article, firstly I briefly introduce our experimental animal models where colorectal neoplasms rapidly develop in the inflamed colorectum. Secondary, data on preclinical cancer chemoprevention studies of inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis by morin, bezafibrate, and valproic acid, using this novel inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis model is described

  14. Age and Space Irradiation Modulate Tumor Progression: Implications for Carcinogenesis Risk

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Age plays a major role in tumor incidence and is an important consideration when modeling the carcinogenesis process or estimating cancer risks. Epidemiological data...

  15. Investigating the Role of FIP200 in Mammary Carcinogenesis Using a Transgenic Mouse Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nagy, Tamas

    2007-01-01

    ...) deletion in mammary-specific polyoma middle-T transgenic mice. We monitored mammary carcinogenesis in positive control (FAKFlox/Flox; MMTV-PyVT) and target (FAKFlox/Flox; MMTV-Cre; MMTV-PyVT) females...

  16. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. C. Faria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10 and Th3 (TGF-β regulatory T cells (Tregs plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral, formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy.

  17. Oral histoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Karthikeya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis is a systemic fungal disease that takes various clinical forms, among which oral lesions are rare. The disseminated form of the disease that usually occurs in association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV is one of the AIDS-defining diseases. Isolated oral histoplasmosis, without systemic involvement, with underlying immunosuppression due to AIDS is very rare. We report one such case of isolated oral histoplasmosis in a HIV-infected patient.

  18. Chronic Inflammation in Colorectal Carcinogenesis: Role of Inflammatory Mediators, Intestinal Microbes, and Chemoprevention Potency

    OpenAIRE

    Tedja, Irwin; Abdullah, Murdani

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal carcinogenesis is a multi-factorial process which involves accumulation of genetic defect, protein modification, and cell interaction with matrix in colonic epithelial cells. Chronic inflammation is suspected to play role in carcinogenesis by inhibiting apoptosis, impairing DNA, and chronically stimulating mucosal proliferation. Alteration in intestinal microbes' population, either in one particular species or in overall composition, may also cause chronic inflammation which increa...

  19. The level of claudin-7 is reduced as an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Jette Bornholdt; Friis, Stine; Godiksen, Sine

    2011-01-01

    -regulation of the oncogenic serine protease, matriptase, induces leakiness in epithelial barriers both in vivo and in vitro. We found in an in-silico search tight co-regulation between matriptase and claudin-7 expression. We have previously shown that the matriptase expression level decreases during colorectal carcinogenesis....... In the present study we investigated whether claudin-7 expression is likewise decreased during colorectal carcinogenesis, thereby causing or contributing to the compromised epithelial leakiness of dysplastic tissue....

  20. Chemoprevention of glandular stomach carcinogenesis through duodenogastric reflux in rats by a COX-2 inhibitor.

    OpenAIRE

    Oba, Masaru; Miwa, Koichi; Fujimura, Takashi; Harada, Shin-ichi; Sasaki, Shozo; Hattori, Takanori

    2008-01-01

    Duodenogastric reflux (DGR) causes glandular stomach carcinogenesis in rats without carcinogens. We aimed to investigate how this carcinogenesis might be prevented by a selective COX-2 inhibitor, meloxicam. A series of 188 Fisher 344 rats underwent a surgical DGR procedure and were divided into 2 groups. One group was given commercial chow (control group), and the other an experimental chow containing meloxicam [0.3 mg/kg bw/day] (meloxicam group). The animals were sequentially sacrificed at ...

  1. Recent Concepts of Ovarian Carcinogenesis: Type I and Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Koshiyama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type I ovarian tumors, where precursor lesions in the ovary have clearly been described, include endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous, low grade serous, and transitional cell carcinomas, while type II tumors, where such lesions have not been described clearly and tumors may develop de novo from the tubal and/or ovarian surface epithelium, comprise high grade serous carcinomas, undifferentiated carcinomas, and carcinosarcomas. The carcinogenesis of endometrioid and clear cell carcinoma (CCC arising from endometriotic cysts is significantly influenced by the free iron concentration, which is associated with cancer development through the induction of persistent oxidative stress. A subset of mucinous carcinomas develop in association with ovarian teratomas; however, the majority of these tumors do not harbor any teratomatous component. Other theories of their origin include mucinous metaplasia of surface epithelial inclusions, endometriosis, and Brenner tumors. Low grade serous carcinomas are thought to evolve in a stepwise fashion from benign serous cystadenoma to a serous borderline tumor (SBT. With regard to high grade serous carcinoma, the serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs of the junction of the fallopian tube epithelium with the mesothelium of the tubal serosa, termed the “tubal peritoneal junction” (TPJ, undergo malignant transformation due to their location, and metastasize to the nearby ovary and surrounding pelvic peritoneum. Other theories of their origin include the ovarian hilum cells.

  2. BRAFV600E: implications for carcinogenesis and molecular therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cantwell-Dorris, Emma R

    2012-02-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)\\/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is frequently mutated in human cancer. This pathway consists of a small GTP protein of the RAS family that is activated in response to extracellular signaling to recruit a member of the RAF kinase family to the cell membrane. Active RAF signals through MAP\\/ERK kinase to activate ERK and its downstream effectors to regulate a wide range of biological activities including cell differentiation, proliferation, senescence, and survival. Mutations in the v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogenes homolog B1 (BRAF) isoform of the RAF kinase or KRAS isoform of the RAS protein are found as activating mutations in approximately 30% of all human cancers. The BRAF pathway has become a target of interest for molecular therapy, with promising results emerging from clinical trials. Here, the role of the most common BRAF mutation BRAF(V600E) in human carcinogenesis is investigated through a review of the literature, with specific focus on its role in melanoma, colorectal, and thyroid cancers and its potential as a therapeutic target.

  3. [Gut microbiota: What impact on colorectal carcinogenesis and treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneau, Antoine; Baylatry, Minh-Tam; Joly, Anne Christine; Sokol, Harry

    2018-01-01

    The gut microbiota, composed of 10 14 microorganisms, is now considered as a "hidden organ", regarding to its digestive, metabolic and immune functions, which are helpful to its host. For the last 15 years, advances in molecular biology have highlighted the association of gut microbiota dysbiosis with several diseases, including colorectal cancer. An increased abundance of some bacteria (including Fusobacterium nucleatum, Bacteroides fragilis, Escherichia coli) is associated with cancer, whereas others seem to be protective (Faecalibacterium prausnitzii). Several mechanisms, which are species-specific, are involved in colorectal carcinogenesis. Most of the time, bacterial toxins are involved in pro-inflammatory processes and in activation of angiogenesis and cellular proliferation pathways. The identification of these bacteria leads to envisage the gut microbiota as potential screening tool for colorectal cancer. Recent studies showed a relation between the gut microbiota and the efficacy and toxicity of chemotherapies (oxaliplatin, irinotecan) and immunotherapies (including ipilimumab). Therapeutic approaches targeting the gut microbiota are now available (probiotics, fecal microbiota transplantation…). New therapeutic strategy combining both chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy with an adjuvant treatment targeting the gut microbiota can now be developed in order to improve treatment response and tolerance. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. HPV16 E7 Genetic Conservation Is Critical to Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabello, Lisa; Yeager, Meredith; Yu, Kai; Clifford, Gary M; Xiao, Yanzi; Zhu, Bin; Cullen, Michael; Boland, Joseph F; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Nelson, Chase W; Raine-Bennett, Tina; Chen, Zigui; Bass, Sara; Song, Lei; Yang, Qi; Steinberg, Mia; Burdett, Laurie; Dean, Michael; Roberson, David; Mitchell, Jason; Lorey, Thomas; Franceschi, Silvia; Castle, Philip E; Walker, Joan; Zuna, Rosemary; Kreimer, Aimée R; Beachler, Daniel C; Hildesheim, Allan; Gonzalez, Paula; Porras, Carolina; Burk, Robert D; Schiffman, Mark

    2017-09-07

    Although most cervical human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) infections become undetectable within 1-2 years, persistent HPV16 causes half of all cervical cancers. We used a novel HPV whole-genome sequencing technique to evaluate an exceptionally large collection of 5,570 HPV16-infected case-control samples to determine whether viral genetic variation influences risk of cervical precancer and cancer. We observed thousands of unique HPV16 genomes; very few women shared the identical HPV16 sequence, which should stimulate a careful re-evaluation of the clinical implications of HPV mutation rates, transmission, clearance, and persistence. In case-control analyses, HPV16 in the controls had significantly more amino acid changing variants throughout the genome. Strikingly, E7 was devoid of variants in precancers/cancers compared to higher levels in the controls; we confirmed this in cancers from around the world. Strict conservation of the 98 amino acids of E7, which disrupts Rb function, is critical for HPV16 carcinogenesis, presenting a highly specific target for etiologic and therapeutic research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. LTA4H regulates cell cycle and skin carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oi, Naomi; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Langfald, Alyssa; Bai, Ruihua; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2017-07-01

    Leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H), a bifunctional zinc metallo-enzyme, is reportedly overexpressed in several human cancers. Our group has focused on LTA4H as a potential target for cancer prevention and/or therapy. In the present study, we report that LTA4H is a key regulator of cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase acting by negatively regulating p27 expression in skin cancer. We found that LTA4H is overexpressed in human skin cancer tissue. Knocking out LTA4H significantly reduced skin cancer development in the 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted two-stage skin cancer mouse model. LTA4H depletion dramatically decreased anchorage-dependent and -independent skin cancer cell growth by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase. Moreover, our findings showed that depletion of LTA4H enhanced p27 protein stability, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation of CDK2 at Thr160 and inhibition of the CDK2/cyclin E complex, resulting in down-regulated p27 ubiquitination. These findings indicate that LTA4H is critical for skin carcinogenesis and is an important mediator of cell cycle and the data begin to clarify the mechanisms of LTA4H's role in cancer development. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Oral cyclosporine therapy for refractory severe vernal keratoconjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil S Gokhale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the success of oral cyclosporine therapy in a patient with severe vision-threatening vernal keratoconjunctivitis. A child presented with severe allergy which was not controlled with topical steroids, cyclosporine and mast cell stabilizers. Oral steroids were required repeatedly to suppress inflammation. Child showed a dramatic improvement and stabilization with oral cyclosporine therapy. Oral cyclosporine therapy can be tried in severe vision-threatening allergy refractory to conventional therapy.

  7. Emdogain in carcinogenesis: a systematic review of in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaksonen, Matti; Sorsa, Timo; Salo, Tuula

    2010-03-01

    Emdogain is a commercial product of unknown composition and is clinically used to induce periodontal regeneration. This study aims to review current knowledge of the in vitro effects of Emdogain on oral tissues and, in particular, factors related to carcinoma. A systematic approach was used to review studies from the Embase and Pubmed databases; a total of 76 studies were included. These comprised in vitro studies of the cytokines in, or regulated by, Emdogain and assays designed to study the effects of EMD on human cells in oral tissues or malignant cells. Several studies have shown that EMD regulates the proliferation, migration, adhesion, gene expression, and cytokine production of (pre-)osteoblasts, periodontal fibroblasts, and gingival fibroblasts. However, the effects of EMD on malignant oral cells are not well understood. EMD seems to have broad regulatory effects on malignant cells and on several carcinoma-related factors. Evidence suggests that patients with premalignant or malignant mucosal lesions should not be treated with EMD.

  8. TP53 mutation and human papilloma virus status of oral squamous cell carcinomas in young adult patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakhuis, B.J.M.; Rietbergen, M.M.; Buijze, M.; Snijders, P.J.F.; Bloemena, E.; Brakenhoff, R.H.; Leemans, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the molecular carcinogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in young adult patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the detailed TP53 mutation and human papilloma virus (HPV) status of OSCC in patients, younger than 45 years. Methods TP53 mutations

  9. Pressure suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu; Funahashi, Toshihiro.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a structure which permits the absorption of shocks and vibratory load produced on the floor of a pressure suppression chamber due to nitrogen gas or the like discharged into pool water in the pressure suppression chamber at the time of a loss-of-coolant accident. Constitution: A pressure suppression chamber accommodating pool water is comprised of a bottom wall and side walls constructed of concrete on the inner side of a liner. By providing concrete on the bottom surface and side wall surfaces of a pressure suppression chamber, it is possible to prevent non-condensing gas and steam exhausted from the vent duct and exhaust duct of a main vapor escapement safety valve exhaust duct from exerting impact forces and vibratory forces upon the bottom and side surfaces of the pressure suppression chamber. (Horiuchi, T.)

  10. Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP gene-silencing inhibits key tumorigenic activities in human oral cancer cell line, OSC2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeshree Joshi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We determined recently that dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP, a member of the SIBLING (Small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins family of phosphoglycoproteins, is highly upregulated in human oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs where upregulation is associated with tumor aggressiveness. To investigate the effects of DSPP-silencing on the tumorigenic profiles of the oral cancer cell line, OSC2, short-hairpin RNA (shRNA interference was employed to silence DSPP in OSC2 cells.Multiple regions of DSPP transcript were targeted for shRNA interference using hDSP-shRNA lentiviral particles designed to silence DSPP gene expression. Control shRNA plasmid encoding a scrambled sequence incapable of degrading any known cellular mRNA was used for negative control. Following puromycin selection of stable lines of DSSP-silenced OSC2 cells, phenotypic hallmarks of oral carcinogenesis were assayed by western blot and RT-PCR analyses, MTT (cell-viability, colony-formation, modified Boyden-Chamber (migration and invasion, and flow cytometry (cell-cycle and apoptosis analyses. DSPP-silenced OSC2 cells showed altered cell morphology, reduced viability, decreased colony-formation ability, decreased migration and invasion, G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest, and increased tumor cell sensitivity to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, VEGF, Ki-67, p53, and EGFR were down-regulated. There was a direct correlation between the degree of DSPP-silencing and MMP suppression, as indicated by least squares regression: MMP-2 {(y = 0.850x, p<0.001 (y = 1.156x, p<0.001}, MMP-3 {(y = 0.994x, p<0.001 (y = 1.324x, p = 0.004}, and MMP-9 {(y = 1.248x, p = 0.005, y = 0.809, p = 0.013}.DSPP-silencing in OSC2 cell decreased salient hallmarks of oral tumorigenesis and provides the first functional evidence of a potential key role for DSPP in oral cancer biology. The down-regulation of MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, p53 and VEGF in DSPP

  11. The administration of multipotent stromal cells at precancerous stage precludes tumor growth and epithelial dedifferentiation of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Flavia; Arango-Rodríguez, Martha; Plaza, Anita; Espinoza, Iris; Conget, Paulette

    2017-01-01

    Multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) are envisioned as a powerful therapeutic tool. As they home into tumors, secrete trophic and vasculogenic factors, and suppress immune response their role in carcinogenesis is a matter of controversy. Worldwide oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the fifth most common epithelial cancer. Our aim was to determine whether MSC administration at precancerous stage modifies the natural progression of OSCC. OSCC was induced in Syrian hamsters by topical application of DMBA in the buccal pouch. At papilloma stage, the vehicle or 3×10 6 allogenic bone marrow-derived MSCs were locally administered. Four weeks later, the lesions were studied according to: volume, stratification (histology), proliferation (Ki-67), apoptosis (Caspase 3 cleaved), vasculature (ASMA), inflammation (Leukocyte infiltrate), differentiation (CK1 and CK4) and gene expression profile (mRNA). Tumors found in individuals that received MSCs were smaller than those presented in the vehicle group (87±80 versus 54±62mm 3 , p<0.05). The rate of proliferation was two times lower and the apoptosis was 2.5 times higher in lesions treated with MSCs than in untreated ones. While the laters presented dedifferentiated cells, the former maintained differentiated cells (cytokeratin and gene expression profile similar to normal tissue). Thus, MSC administration at papilloma stage precludes tumor growth and epithelial dedifferentiation of OSCC. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Doenjang prepared with mixed starter cultures attenuates azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Kang Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: Doenjang is traditional Korean fermented soybean paste and widely known for its various health benefits including anticancer effect. In this study, we manufactured doenjang with the grain-type meju using probiotic mixed starter cultures of Aspegillus oryzae, Bacillus subtilis-SKm, and Lactococcus lactis-GAm to improve the qualities and beneficial properties of doenjang. Materials and Methods: The inhibitory effects of the doenjang prepared with the grain-type meju using mixed starter cultures were investigated in azoxymethane (AOM and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colon carcinogenesis mice model. AOM and DSS colon carcinogenesis was induced in female C57BL/6 mice, and doenjang was orally administered for 4 weeks. Body weight, colon length, and colon weight of mice were determined, and colonic tissues were histologically evaluated. The serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines as well as the expression of inflammation- and apoptosis-related genes in colonic tissue were also analyzed. Results: Administration of the doenjang using probiotic mixed starter cultures ameliorated the symptoms of colon cancer, and reduced the incidence of neoplasia, and reduced the levels of serum proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α and inducible nitric oxide synthase and cycloooxygenase-2 expression levels in colonic tissue. In addition, it increased Bax and reduced Bcl-2 expression levels and increased p21 and p53 expression in the colonic tissues. Conclusion: These findings indicate that the doenjang attenuated colon carcinogenesis induced by AOM and DSS by ameliorating the symptoms of colon cancer, reducing the occurrence of neoplasia, regulating proinflammatory cytokine levels, and controlling the expressions of inflammation- and apoptosis-related genes in the colonic tissue.

  13. Physicochemical and nutraceutical properties of moringa (Moringa oleifera) leaves and their effects in an in vivo AOM/DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar-Nuñez, M L; Luzardo-Ocampo, I; Campos-Vega, R; Gallegos-Corona, M A; González de Mejía, E; Loarca-Piña, G

    2018-03-01

    Moringa (Moringa oleifera) is a plant that has generated great interest in recent years because of its attributed medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to characterize the bioactive compounds of moringa leaves (MO) and evaluate their effect on a colorectal carcinogenesis model. Twenty-four male CD-1 mice were divided into 4 groups: Group 1 fed with basal diet (negative control/NC); Group 2 received AOM/DSS (positive control); Groups 3 and 4 were fed with basal diet supplemented with moringa leaves (2.5% w/w and 5% w/w, respectively) for 12weeks. Moringa leaves exhibited a high content of dietary fiber (~18.75%) and insoluble dietary fiber (2.29%). There were identified 9 phenolic compounds whereas the chlorogenic and ρ-coumaric acid showed the higher contents (44.23-63.34μg/g and 180.45-707.42μg/g, respectively). Moringa leaves decreased the activity of harmful fecal enzymes (β-glucosidase, β-glucuronidase, tryptophanase and urease up to 40%, 43%, 103% and 266%, respectively) as well tumors incidence in male CD1-mice (~50% with 5% w/v of moringa dose). These findings suggest that the bioactive compounds of moringa such as total dietary fiber and phenolic compounds may have chemopreventive capacity. This is the first study of the suppressive effect of moringa leaves in an in vivo model of AOM/DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Immunophenotypic Analysis in Early Müllerian Serous Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafisi, Houman; Ghorab, Zeina; Ismill, Nadia; Dubé, Valerie; Plotkin, Anna; Han, Guangming; Cesari, Matthew; Lu, Fang-I; Saad, Reda; Khalifa, Mahmoud; Nofech-Mozes, Sharon

    2015-09-01

    Studies on the immunophenotypes of early forms of serous carcinoma arising from female genital tract are limited. We aimed to examine p53, p16(Ink4a), estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), ERBB2, WT1, and Ki-67 protein expression in endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma (n=29), serous tubal intraepithelial lesion (n=4) and carcinoma (STIC, n=10), and the putative precursor p53 signature (n=11). Among endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma, 80% demonstrated p53 overexpression and 10% were consistent with a null phenotype. p16(Ink4a) immunostaining were observed in all endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma cases. ER, PR, ERBB2, and WT1 were positive in 54%, 25%, 11%, and 18% of cases, respectively. STIC cases demonstrated p53 overexpression and null phenotype in 90% and 10%, respectively. All STIC cases were p16(Ink4a) and WT1 positive, whereas ER and PR were positive in 70% and 20%, respectively. All STICs were negative for ERBB2. Among serous tubal intraepithelial lesion cases, 75% demonstrated p53 overexpression and 25% a null phenotype. p53 was positive in all 11 p53 signature cases, whereas p16(Ink4a) was universally negative. Finally, ER and PR were positive in 100% and 73% of p53 signature cases, respectively. These results suggest that p16(Ink4a) has a role in early Müllerian serous carcinogenesis but is absent in the earliest noncommitted lesion. p16(Ink4a) immunohistochemistry can be used as an adjunct confirmatory tool in p53-null cases with limited surface area.

  15. Thymoquinone Attenuates Diethylnitrosamine Induction of Hepatic Carcinogenesis Through Antioxidant Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M. Sayed-Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma accounts for about 80–90% of all liver cancer and is the fourth most common cause of cancer mortality. Although there are many strategies for the treatment of liver cancer, chemoprevention seems to be the best strategy for lowering the incidence of this disease. Therefore, this study has been initiated to investigate whether thymoquinone (TQ, Nigella sativa derived-compound with strong antioxidant properties, supplementation could prevent initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis-induced by diethylnitrosamine (DENA, a potent initiator and hepatocarcinogen, in rats. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups. Rats of Group 1 received a single intraperitoneal (I.P. injection of normal saline. Animals in Group 2 were given TQ (4 mg/kg/day in drinking water for 7 consecutive days. Rats of Group 3 were injected with a single dose of DENA (200 mg/kg, I.P.. Animals in Group 4 were received TQ and DENA. DENA significantly increased alanine transaminase (ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, total bilirubin, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS and total nitrate/nitrite (NOx and decreased reduced glutathione (GSH, glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx, glutathione-s-transferase (GST and catalase (CAT activity in liver tissues. Moreover, DENA decreased gene expression of GSHPx, GST and CAT and caused severe histopathological lesions in liver tissue. Interestingly, TQ supplementation completely reversed the biochemical and histopathological changes induced by DENA to the control values. In conclusion, data from this study suggest that: (1 decreased mRNA expression of GSHPx, CAT and GST during DENA-induced initiation of hepatic carcinogenesis, (2 TQ supplementation prevents the development of DENA-induced initiation of liver cancer by decreasing oxidative stress and preserving both the activity and mRNA expression of antioxidant enzymes.

  16. Oral Hygiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Marie Toftdahl; Villadsen, Dorte Buxbom

    The aim of the study was to explore how adults with schizo- phrenia describe their lived experiences with oral hygiene. 23 adults with schizophrenia were interviewed within a period of four months in late 2015. Transcriptions of the interviews were analysed using the Reflective Lifeworld Research...... phenomenological approach of Dahlberg, Dahlberg, and Nyström. The essence of the phenomenon, oral hygiene, is described as a challenge: a mixture of ability and assigning priority; a challenge in which significant others, for better or worse, play an important role. We recommend a systematic cooperation between...... health care professionals and adults with schizophrenia in order to improve oral health, well-being and recovery....

  17. Oral Hygiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Dorte Buxbom; Sørensen, Marie Toftdahl

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore how adults with schizophrenia describe their lived experiences with oral hygiene. 23 adults with schizophrenia were interviewed within a period of four months in late 2015. Transcriptions of the interviews were analysed using the Reflective Lifeworld Research...... phenomenological approach of Dahlberg, Dahlberg, and Nyström. The essence of the phenomenon, oral hygiene, is described as a challenge: a mixture of ability and assigning priority; a challenge in which significant others, for better or worse, play an important role. We recommend a systematic cooperation between...... health care professionals and adults with schizophrenia in order to improve oral health, well-being and recovery....

  18. Oral Histoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, Gillian A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2017-12-01

    A 44-year-old female presented to her general dentist with the chief complaint of a painful mouth sore of 2 weeks duration. Clinical examination revealed an irregularly shaped ulcer of the buccal and lingual attached gingiva of the anterior mandible. A biopsy was performed and microscopic evaluation revealed histoplasmosis. Histoplasmosis, caused by Histoplasma capsulate, is the most common fungal infection in the United States. Oral lesions of histoplasmosis are generally associated with the disseminated form of histoplasmosis and may present as a fungating or ulcerative lesion of the oral mucosa. The histologic findings and differential diagnosis for oral histoplasmosis are discussed.

  19. Oral Mucoadhesive Buccal Film of Ciprofloxacin for Periodontitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Actinobacillus) actinomyce- temcomitans. The treatment of periodontitis includes the suppression and elimination of subgingival periodontal pathogens, which require sustained delivery of antibacterial agents [1-4]. Oral controlled delivery can be ...

  20. Cadmium induces carcinogenesis in BEAS-2B cells through ROS-dependent activation of PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Lei; Poyil, Pratheeshkumar; Budhraja, Amit; Hitron, J. Andrew; Zhang, Zhuo; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Shi, Xianglin

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium has been widely used in industry and is known to be carcinogenic to humans. Although it is widely accepted that chronic exposure to cadmium increases the incidence of cancer, the mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced carcinogenesis are unclear. The main aim of this study was to investigate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and the signal transduction pathways involved. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells to cadmium induced cell transformation, as evidenced by anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and clonogenic assays. Chronic cadmium treatment also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of cadmium-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. In contrast, the cadmium-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion and migration were prevented by transfection with catalase, superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), or SOD2. In particular, chronic cadmium exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K, AKT, GSK-3β, and β-catenin and transfection with each of the above antioxidant enzymes markedly inhibited cadmium-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or β-catenin almost completely suppressed the cadmium-mediated increase in total and active β-catenin proteins and colony formation. Moreover, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3β, β-catenin, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with cadmium-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest a direct involvement of ROS in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and implicate a role of AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling in this process. -- Highlights: ► Chronic exposure to cadmium induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. ► ROS involved in cadmium-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. ► Cadmium activates ROS-dependent AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin-mediated signaling. ► ROS

  1. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A proof-of-concept method utilizing a cryogenic fluid for acoustic suppression in rocket engine testing environments will be demonstrated. It is hypothesized that...

  2. Sodium fire suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malet, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Ignition and combustion studies have provided valuable data and guidelines for sodium fire suppression research. The primary necessity is to isolate the oxidant from the fuel, rather than to attempt to cool the sodium below its ignition temperature. Work along these lines has led to the development of smothering tank systems and a dry extinguishing powder. Based on the results obtained, the implementation of these techniques is discussed with regard to sodium fire suppression in the Super-Phenix reactor. (author)

  3. Herpes - oral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... virus type 2 (HSV-2) most often causes genital herpes . However, sometimes HSV-2 is spread to the ... the virus to the genitals. Both oral and genital herpes viruses can sometimes be spread, even when you ...

  4. Chemoprevention of oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Chhaparwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is one among the ten most common cancers in the world and shows a marked geographic variation in occurrence. It causes considerable morbidity and is associated with a 5-year survival rate of less than 50%. Current treatment primarily consists of surgery and radiotherapy and improvement in long-term cure rates with these modalities has reached a plateau. As, curative therapy available for oral cancer often results in debilitating changes in appearance, speech, swallowing and breathing, preventive strategies are desirable. Cancer chemoprevention is the use of natural, synthetic or biologic chemical agents to reverse, suppress, or prevent carcinogenic progression. Chemoprevention has been an extensively-studied strategy and continues to hold promise in the management of oral cancer. Many agents have been evaluated as possible chemopreventive agents including vitamin A and retinoids, betacarotene, vitamin E and dietary agents. Recently, molecularly targeted approach has generated interest among researchers worldwide which includes cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitors, EGFR inhibitors and adenovirus vectors. This article reviews the various aspects of chemoprevention and describes important chemopreventive agents and design of chemopreventive trials.

  5. [Oral contraceptives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenbaum, H

    1976-10-23

    The author presents an alphabetical list of oral contraceptives. To classify the commercial names of oral contraceptives all over the world is practically impossible for the following reasons: some agents are discontinued without the medical profession being aware of it; the same product can have various names depending on the country and the laboratory. Some products exist in different forms (21 pills including 7 inactive tablets). Finally, some laboratories change the posology of a product without changing its name.

  6. Disparities in Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2020: Oral Health Objectives Site Map Disparities in Oral Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Oral health ... to get and keep dental insurance. Disparities in Oral Health Some of the oral health disparities that exist ...

  7. Butyrate Inhibits Indices of Colorectal Carcinogenesis via Enhancing α-Ketoglutarate-Dependent DNA Demethylation of Mismatch Repair Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaofei; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2018-03-26

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC), one of the most common cancers, is inversely proportional to dietary fiber intake. Butyrate, the fermentation end product of dietary fibers in the colon, is known for its antitumor effects. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of butyrate on colorectal adenocarcinoma cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, metabolism, and their mechanistic links using HT-29 and Caco-2 cells. Butyrate suppressed proliferation, potentiated differentiation and induced apoptosis in both HT-29 and Caco-2 cells, associated with enhanced expression of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). Furthermore, butyrate upregulated acetyl-CoA and α-ketoglutarate (α-KG), concomitant with enhanced histone acetylation and DNA demethylation in the promoter of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene. Knocking down IDH1 abolished the positive effects of butyrate on CRC apoptosis and MMR protein expression, in junction with reduced α-KG content. Importantly, α-KG supplementation recovered the beneficial effects of butyrate in IDH1 deficient cells. In summary, butyrate inhibits indices of colorectal carcinogenesis in an α-ketoglutarate-dependent manner. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Deficiency in Poly(ADP-ribose Polymerase-1 (PARP-1 Accelerates Aging and Spontaneous Carcinogenesis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana S. Piskunova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and biochemical studies have shown that PARP-1 and poly(ADP-ribosylation play an important role in DNA repair, genomic stability, cell death, inflammation, telomere maintenance, and suppressing tumorigenesis, suggesting that the homeostasis of poly(ADP-ribosylation and PARP-1 may also play an important role in aging. Here we show that PARP-1−/− mice exhibit a reduction of life span and a significant increase of population aging rate. Analysis of noninvasive parameters, including body weight gain, body temperature, estrous function, behavior, and a number of biochemical indices suggests the acceleration of biological aging in PARP-1−/− mice. The incidence of spontaneous tumors in both PARP-1−/− and PARP-1+/+ groups is similar; however, malignant tumors including uterine tumors, lung adenocarcinomas and hepatocellular carcinomas, develop at a significantly higher frequency in PARP-1−/− mice than PARP-1+/+ mice (72% and 49%, resp.; < .05. In addition, spontaneous tumors appear earlier in PARP-1−/− mice compared to the wild type group. Histopathological studies revealed a wide spectrum of tumors in uterus, ovaries, liver, lungs, mammary gland, soft tissues, and lymphoid organs in both groups of the mice. These results demonstrate that inactivation of DNA repair gene PARP-1 in mice leads to acceleration of aging, shortened life span, and increased spontaneous carcinogenesis.

  9. The adaptive immune system promotes initiation of prostate carcinogenesis in a human c-Myc transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Monique H M; Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; van Burgsteden, Johan; Cioni, Bianca; van Zeeburg, Hester J T; Song, Ji-Ying; Zevenhoven, John; Hawinkels, Lukas J A C; de Visser, Karin E; Bergman, Andries M

    2017-11-07

    Increasing evidence from epidemiological and pathological studies suggests a role of the immune system in the initiation and progression of multiple cancers, including prostate cancer. Reports on the contribution of the adaptive immune system are contradictive, since both suppression and acceleration of disease development have been reported. This study addresses the functional role of lymphocytes in prostate cancer development using a genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) of human c-Myc driven prostate cancer (Hi-Myc mice) combined with B and T cell deficiency (RAG1 -/- mice). From a pre-cancerous stage on, Hi-Myc mice showed higher accumulation of immune cells in their prostates then wild-type mice, of which macrophages were the most abundant. The onset of invasive adenocarcinoma was delayed in Hi-MycRAG1 -/- compared to Hi-Myc mice and associated with decreased infiltration of leukocytes into the prostate. In addition, lower levels of the cytokines CXCL2, CCL5 and TGF-β1 were detected in Hi-MycRAG1 -/- compared to Hi-Myc mouse prostates. These results from a GEMM of prostate cancer provide new insights into the promoting role of the adaptive immune system in prostate cancer development. Our findings indicate that the endogenous adaptive immune system does not protect against de novo prostate carcinogenesis in Hi-Myc transgenic mice, but rather accelerates the formation of invasive adenocarcinomas. This may have implications for the development of novel treatment strategies.

  10. [Suppression of WIFI transcript and protein in non-small cell lung carcinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobko, E V; Kalinichenko, S V; Shepelev, M V; Zborovskaia, I B; Allakhverdiev, A K; Zinov'eva, M V; Vinogradova, T V; Sverdlov, E D; Korobko, I V

    2007-01-01

    Changes in WIFI expression, an extracellular inhibitor of Wnt pathway, in non-small cell lung carcinomas were analyzed. Frequent (67% cases) suppression of WIFI transcript in non-small cell lung carcinomas were found. Our results, together with previously published data, suggest that inhibition of WIFI expression often occurs in squamous cell carcinomas and is less typical of adenocarcinomas. It was also found that a decrease in the WIFI transcript in tumors is parallel to concomitant suppression of the WIFI protein level. Our results provide further evidence that the WIFI suppression is a frequent event in the lung carcinogenesis, which might lead to disregulation of Wnt signaling pathway and contribute to tumor progression.

  11. Suppression of Th1 differentiation by tryptophan supplementation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanz, Tobias V; Becker, Simon; Mohapatra, Soumya R; Opitz, Christiane A; Wick, Wolfgang; Platten, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Metabolism of the essential amino acid tryptophan (trp) is a key endogenous immunosuppressive pathway restricting inflammatory responses. Tryptophan metabolites promote regulatory T cell (Treg) differentiation and suppress proinflammatory T helper cell (Th)1 and Th17 phenotypes. It has been shown that treatment with natural and synthetic tryptophan metabolites can suppress autoimmune neuroinflammation in preclinical animal models. Here, we tested if oral intake of tryptophan would increase immunosuppressive tryptophan metabolites and ameliorate autoimmune neuroinflammation as a safe approach to treat autoimmune disorders like multiple sclerosis (MS). Without oral supplementation, systemic kynurenine levels decrease during the initiation phase of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of MS, indicating systemic activation of tryptophan metabolism. Daily oral gavage of up to 10 mg/mouse/day was safe and increased serum kynurenine levels by more than 20-fold for more than 3 h after the gavage. While this treatment resulted in suppression of myelin-specific Th1 responses, there was no relevant impact on clinical disease activity. These data show that oral trp supplementation at subtoxic concentrations suppresses antigen-specific Th1 responses, but suggest that the increase in trp metabolites is not sustained enough to impact neuroinflammation.

  12. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Stromal-Epithelial Communication in Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Janice; Patel, Zarana; Grugan, Katharine; Rustgi, Anil; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of cancer death worldwide and is associated with a variety of risk factors including tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus infection, and certain dietary factors such as trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies. A connection with ionizing radiation exposure is revealed by the high excess relative risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma observed in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. Esophageal carcinomas are also seen as secondary malignancies in patients who received radiotherapy for breast and thoracic cancers; additionally, patients with head/neck and oral squamous cell cancers are at increased risk for metachronous esophageal squamous cell cancers. This malignancy is rapidly fatal, mainly because it remains asymptomatic until late, advanced stages when the disease is rarely responsive to treatment. In normal epithelium, the stromal microenvironment is essential for the maintenance and modulation of cell growth and differentiation. Cross talk between the epithelial and stromal compartments can influence many aspects of malignant progression, including tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and recruitment of new blood vessels. To test the hypothesis that radiation exposure plays a role in esophageal carcinogenesis via non-targeted mechanisms involving stromal-epithelial cell communication, we are studying radiation effects on hTERT-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells and genetic variants grown in co-culture with human esophageal stromal fibrob-lasts (Okawa et al., Genes Dev. 2007. 21: 2788-2803). We examined how irradiation of stromal fibroblasts affected epithelial migration and invasion, behaviors associated with cancer promotion and progression. These assays were conducted in modified Boyden chambers using conditioned media from irradiated fibroblasts. Our results using low LET gamma radiation showed a dose-dependent increase in migration of epithelial

  13. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Stromal-Epithelial Intercellular Communication in Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Kalabis, Jiri; Rustgi, Anil K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Huff, Janice L.

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Its development is associated with a variety of risk factors including tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus infection, and certain dietary factors such as trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies. An association with ionizing radiation exposure is revealed by the high excess relative risk for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus observed in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. It is also seen as a secondary malignancy in patients who received radiotherapy for breast and thoracic cancers; additionally, patients with head/neck and oral squamous cell cancers are at increased risk for metachronous esophageal squamous cell cancers. This malignancy is rapidly fatal, mainly because it remains asymptomatic until late, advanced stages when the disease is rarely curable. The stromal microenvironment plays an essential role in the maintenance and modulation of normal epithelial cell growth and differentiation and cross talk between the epithelial and stromal compartments can influence many aspects of malignant progression, including tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and recruitment of new blood vessels. To test the hypothesis that radiation exposure plays a role in esophageal carcinogenesis via non-targeted mechanisms involving stromal-epithelial cell communication, we are studying radiation effects on hTERT-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells and genetic variants grown in co-culture with human esophageal stromal fibroblasts (Okawa et al., Genes & Dev. 2007. 21: 2788-2803). We examined how radiation treatment of stromal fibroblasts affected epithelial migration and invasion, behaviors associated with cancer promotion and progression. Chemotactic and haptotactic migration of epithelial cells stimulated by conditioned media from irradiated fibroblasts was measured using assays conducted in Transwell cell culture chambers. Our results using

  14. Chemopreventive Strategies for Inflammation-Related Carcinogenesis: Current Status and Future Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Yusuke; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Okada, Futoshi

    2017-01-01

    A sustained and chronically-inflamed environment is characterized by the presence of heterogeneous inflammatory cellular components, including neutrophils, macrophages, lymphocytes and fibroblasts. These infiltrated cells produce growth stimulating mediators (inflammatory cytokines and growth factors), chemotactic factors (chemokines) and genotoxic substances (reactive oxygen species and nitrogen oxide) and induce DNA damage and methylation. Therefore, chronic inflammation serves as an intrinsic niche for carcinogenesis and tumor progression. In this article, we summarize the up-to-date findings regarding definitive/possible causes and mechanisms of inflammation-related carcinogenesis derived from experimental and clinical studies. We also propose 10 strategies, as well as candidate agents for the prevention of inflammation-related carcinogenesis. PMID:28422073

  15. Chronic inflammation-associated genomic instability paves the way for human esophageal carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Dongping; Lei, Zhijin; Chen, Donglin; Xu, Zexin; Su, Min

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with increased risk of cancer development, whereas the link between chronic inflammation and esophageal carcinogenesis is still obscure heretofore. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between chronic inflammation and DNA damage, as well as the possible role of DNA damage in esophageal carcinogenic process. Endoscopic esophageal biopsies from 109 individuals from Chaoshan littoral, a high-risk region for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), were examined to evaluate the association between chronic inflammation and histological severity, while additional 204 esophageal non-tumor samples from patients with ESCC were collected. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the oxidative DNA damage and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Significantly positive correlation was observed between degree of chronic inflammation and esophageal precursor lesions (rs = 0.37, P inflammation (rs = 0.21, P inflammation degree (P inflammation-associated genomic instability with esophageal carcinogenesis and suggest possibilities for early detection and intervention of esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:27028857

  16. Polyyne-Enriched Extract from Oplopanax elatus Significantly Ameliorates the Progression of Colon Carcinogenesis in ApcMin/+ Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Qiao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer in the world. Oplopanax elatus is widely used in traditional medicine. However, little is known about its pharmacological effects and bioactive compounds. We evaluated the effects of the polyyne-enriched extract from O. elatus (PEO on the progression of colon carcinogenesis in ApcMin/+ mice. In addition, these effects were also investigated in HCT116 and SW480 cells. After PEO oral administration (0.2% diet for 12 weeks, PEO significantly improved body weight changes and reduced the tumor burden and tumor multiplicity compared with the untreated mice. Meanwhile, western blot and immunohistochemistry results showed PEO significantly reduced the expression of β-catenin and cyclinD1 in both small intestine and the colon tissues compared with the untreated mice. In addition, PEO treatment significant decreased the cell viability in both HCT116 and SW480 cell lines. It also decreased the levels of β-catenin, cyclinD1, c-myc and p-GSK-3β in HCT116 and SW480 cells at 25 μM. These results indicate that PEO may have potential value in prevention of colon cancer by down-regulating Wnt-related protein.

  17. The Combination of Three Natural Compounds Effectively Prevented Lung Carcinogenesis by Optimal Wound Healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linxin Liu

    Full Text Available The tumor stroma has been described as "normal wound healing gone awry". We explored whether the restoration of a wound healing-like microenvironment may facilitate tumor healing. Firstly, we screened three natural compounds (shikonin, notoginsenoside R1 and aconitine from wound healing agents and evaluated the efficacies of wound healing microenvironment for limiting single agent-elicited carcinogenesis and two-stage carcinogenesis. The results showed that three compounds used alone could promote wound healing but had unfavorable efficacy to exert wound healing, and that the combination of three compounds made up treatment disadvantage of a single compound in wound healing and led to optimal wound healing. Although individual treatment with these agents may prevent cancer, they were not effective for the treatment of established tumors. However, combination treatment with these three compounds almost completely prevented urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis and reduced tumor burden. Different from previous studies, we found that urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis was associated with lung injury independent of pulmonary inflammation. LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation did not increase lung carcinogenesis, whereas decreased pulmonary inflammation by macrophage depletion promoted lung carcinogenesis. In addition, urethane damaged wound healing in skin excision wound model, reversed lung carcinogenic efficacy by the combination of three compounds was consistent with skin wound healing. Further, the combination of these three agents reduced the number of lung cancer stem cells (CSCs by inducing cell differentiation, restoration of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC and blockade of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Our results suggest that restoration of a wound healing microenvironment represents an effective strategy for cancer prevention.

  18. Biological Complexities in Radiation Carcinogenesis and Cancer Radiotherapy: Impact of New Biological Paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Mozdarani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although radiation carcinogenesis has been shown both experimentally and epidemiologically, the use of ionizing radiation is also one of the major modalities in cancer treatment. Various known cellular and molecular events are involved in carcinogenesis. Apart from the known phenomena, there could be implications for carcinogenesis and cancer prevention due to other biological processes such as the bystander effect, the abscopal effect, intrinsic radiosensitivity and radioadaptation. Bystander effects have consequences for mutation initiated cancer paradigms of radiation carcinogenesis, which provide the mechanistic justification for low-dose risk estimates. The abscopal effect is potentially important for tumor control and is mediated through cytokines and/or the immune system (mainly cell-mediated immunity. It results from loss of growth and stimulatory and/or immunosuppressive factors from the tumor. Intrinsic radiosensitivity is a feature of some cancer prone chromosomal breakage syndromes such as ataxia telangectiasia. Radiosensitivity is manifested as higher chromosomal aberrations and DNA repair impairment is now known as a good biomarker for breast cancer screening and prediction of prognosis. However, it is not yet known whether this effect is good or bad for those receiving radiation or radiomimetic agents for treatment. Radiation hormesis is another major concern for carcinogenesis. This process which protects cells from higher doses of radiation or radio mimic chemicals, may lead to the escape of cells from mitotic death or apoptosis and put cells with a lower amount of damage into the process of cancer induction. Therefore, any of these biological phenomena could have impact on another process giving rise to genome instability of cells which are not in the field of radiation but still receiving a lower amount of radiation. For prevention of radiation induced carcinogenesis or risk assessment as well as for successful radiation

  19. Estimating radiation-induced cancer risk using MVK two-stage model for carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, M.; Kusama, T.; Aoki, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Based on the carcinogenesis model as proposed by Moolgavkar et al., time-dependent relative risk models were derived for projecting the time variation in excess relative risk. If it is assumed that each process is described by time-independent linear dose-response relationship, the time variation in excess relative risk is influenced by the parameter related with the promotion process. The risk model based carcinogenesis theory would play a marked role in estimating radiation-induced cancer risk in constructing a projection model or transfer model

  20. TRIM45 negatively regulates NF-κB-mediated transcription and suppresses cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Mio; Sato, Tomonobu; Nukiwa, Ryota; Ariga, Tadashi; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NF-κB plays an important role in cell survival and carcinogenesis. ► TRIM45 negatively regulates TNFα-induced NF-κB-mediated transcription. ► TRIM45 overexpression suppresses cell growth. ► TRIM45 acts as a repressor for the NF-κB signal and regulates cell growth. -- Abstract: The NF-κB signaling pathway plays an important role in cell survival, immunity, inflammation, carcinogenesis, and organogenesis. Activation of NF-κB is regulated by several posttranslational modifications including phosphorylation, neddylation and ubiquitination. The NF-κB signaling pathway is activated by two distinct signaling mechanisms and is strictly modulated by the ubiquitin–proteasome system. It has been reported that overexpression of TRIM45, one of the TRIM family ubiquitin ligases, suppresses transcriptional activities of Elk-1 and AP-1, which are targets of the MAPK signaling pathway. In this study, we showed that TRIM45 also negatively regulates TNFα-induced NF-κB-mediated transcription by a luciferase reporter assay and that TRIM45 lacking a RING domain also has an activity to inhibit the NF-κB signal. Moreover, we found that TRIM45 overexpression suppresses cell growth. These findings suggest that TRIM45 acts as a repressor for the NF-κB signal and regulates cell growth.

  1. Pressure suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumachi, Wataru; Fukuda, Akira; Kitaguchi, Hidemi; Shimizu, Toshiaki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To relieve and absorb impact wave vibrations caused by steam and non-condensed gases releasing into the pressure suppression chamber at the time of an accident. Structure: The reactor container is filled with inert gases. A safety valve attached main steam pipe is provided to permit the excessive steam to escape, the valve being communicated with the pressure suppression chamber through an exhaust pipe. In the pressure suppression chamber, a doughnut-like cylindrical outer wall is filled at its bottom with pool water to condense the high temperature vapor released through the exhaust pipe. A head portion of a vent tube which leads the exhaust pipe is positioned at the top, and a down comer and an exhaust vent tube are locked by means of steady rests. At the bottom is mounted a pressure adsorber device which adsorbs a pressure from the pool water. (Kamimura, M.)

  2. SIX1 Oncoprotein as a Biomarker in a Model of Hormonal Carcinogenesis and in Human Endometrial Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The oncofetal protein sine oculis-related homeobox 1 (SIX1) is a developmental transcription factor associated with carcinogenesis in animal models and humans. In a model of hormonal carcinogenesis, mice neonatally exposed to the soy phytoestrogen, genistein (GEN), or the synthet...

  3. Thyroxin hormone suppression treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the important modalities of treatment of thyroid cancer (TC) after surgery is the administration of thyroxin as an adjuvant treatment. The analysis supports the theory that thyroid suppression plays an important role in patient management. 300 μg of thyroxin, as this is an adequate dose for suppression is given. Ideally the dose should be tailored by testing s-TSH levels. However, since a large number of the patients come from out station cities and villages this is impractical. We therefore depend on clinical criteria of hyperthyroid symptoms and adjust the dose. Very few patients need such adjustment

  4. Oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millsop, Jillian W; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is a common fungal disease encountered in dermatology, most commonly caused by an overgrowth of Candida albicans in the mouth. Although thrush is a well-recognized presentation of OC, it behooves clinicians to be aware of the many other presentations of this disease and how to accurately diagnose and manage these cases. The clinical presentations of OC can be broadly classified as white or erythematous candidiasis, with various subtypes in each category. The treatments include appropriate oral hygiene, topical agents, and systemic medications. This review focuses on the various clinical presentations of OC and treatment options. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treville Pereira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency.

  6. Plasma suppression of beamstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.; Stewart, J.J.; Yu, S.S.

    1988-06-01

    We investigate the use of a plasma at the interaction point of two colliding beams to suppress beamsstrahlung and related phenomena. We derive conditions for good current cancellation via plasma return currents and report on numerical simulations conducted to confirm our analytic results. 10 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancers tend to spread quickly. Smoking and other tobacco use are linked to most cases of oral cancer. Heavy alcohol use also increases the risk for ... cancer greatly increases the chance of survival. Prevention ... Avoiding smoking or other tobacco use Having dental problems corrected Limiting or avoiding alcohol ...

  8. Oral leukoplakia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    nature is oral leukoplakia, and for decades it has been discussed how to treat these lesions. Various treatment modalities, such as systemic therapies and surgical removal, have been suggested. The systemic therapies tested so far include retinoids, extracts of green tea, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2...

  9. Oral leukoplakia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard Larsen, Marie; Sorensen, J. A.; Godballe, C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Oral leukoplakia (OL) is a common premalignant lesion. The possible benefits of specific interventions in preventing a malignant transformation of OL are not well understood. This review assesses different invasive treatment techniques for OL and evaluate the optimal treatment...

  10. Early diagnosis in primary oral cancer: is it possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Waal, Isaäc; de Bree, Remco; Brakenhoff, Ruud; Coebergh, Jan-Willem

    2011-05-01

    In this treatise oral carcinogenesis is briefly discussed, particularly with regard to the number of cell divisions that is required before cancer reaches a measurable size. At that stage, metastatic spread may have already taken place. Therefore, the term "early diagnosis" is somewhat misleading. The delay in diagnosis of oral cancer is caused both by patients' delay and doctors' delay. The total delay, including scheduling delay, work-up delay and treatment planning delay, varies in different studies, but averages some six months. The total delay is more or less evenly distributed between patients' and doctors' delay and is partly due to the unawareness of oral cancer among the public and professionals, and partly to barriers in the health care system that may prevent patients from seeking dental and medical care. Due to the relatively low incidence of oral cancer it will be difficult to increase the awareness of this cancer type among the public, thereby reducing patients' delay. However, it should be possible to considerably reduce doctors' delay by increasing the awareness of oral cancer among professionals and by improving their diagnostic ability. Population-based annual or semi-annual screening for oral cancer is not cost-effective, high-risk groups such as heavy smokers and drinkers perhaps excluded. Dentists and physicians, and also oral hygienists and nurse practitioners, may play a valuable role in such screening programs.

  11. Oral calcitonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy RC

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald C Hamdy,1,2 Dane N Daley11Osteoporosis Center, College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, 2Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Johnson City, TN, USAAbstract: Calcitonin is a hormone secreted by the C-cells of the thyroid gland in response to elevations of the plasma calcium level. It reduces bone resorption by inhibiting mature active osteoclasts and increases renal calcium excretion. It is used in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone, and malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. Synthetic and recombinant calcitonin preparations are available; both have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. As calcitonin is a peptide, the traditional method of administration has been parenteral or intranasal. This hinders its clinical use: adherence with therapy is notoriously low, and withdrawal from clinical trials has been problematic. An oral formulation would be more attractive, practical, and convenient to patients. In addition to its effect on active osteoclasts and renal tubules, calcitonin has an analgesic action, possibly mediated through β-endorphins and the central modulation of pain perception. It also exerts a protective action on cartilage and may be useful in the management of osteoarthritis and possibly rheumatoid arthritis. Oral formulations of calcitonin have been developed using different techniques. The most studied involves drug-delivery carriers such as Eligen® 8-(N-2hydroxy-5-chloro-benzoyl-amino-caprylic acid (5-CNAC (Emisphere Technologies, Cedar Knolls, NJ. Several factors affect the bioavailability and efficacy of orally administered calcitonin, including amount of water used to take the tablet, time of day the tablet is taken, and proximity to intake of a meal. Preliminary results looked promising. Unfortunately, in two Phase III studies, oral calcitonin (0.8 mg with 200 mg 5-CNAC, once a day for postmenopausal osteoporosis and twice a day for osteoarthritis failed to

  12. Adlay (薏苡 yì yĭ; “soft-shelled job's tears”; the seeds of Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf is a Potential Cancer Chemopreventive Agent toward Multistage Carcinogenesis Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chuan Kuo, Ph.D.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Adlay (薏苡 yì yĭ; “soft-shelled job’s tears”, the seeds of Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf is a grass crop that has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM and as a nourishing food in China for the treatment of warts, chapped skin, rheumatism, neuralgia, inflammatory, and neoplastic diseases. In addition, adlay also has been said to have stomachic, diuretic, antipholgistic, anodynic, and antispasmodic effects. Carcinogenesis is a multistage process that begins with exposure of viruses or chemicals that are found in the environment. Chemoprevention refers to the use of natural or synthetic, non-toxic chemical substances to reverse, repress, or prevent carcinogenesis. In this review, we summarize recent research attempting to study the chemopreventive blocking and suppressing potential of adlay and its active components in scavenging electrophiles and reactive oxygen species, antimutagenicity, enhancing Nrf2-mediated detoxification and antioxidant effect, altering carcinogen metabolism, suppressing proliferation, decreasing inflammation, and enhancing antitumor immunity. In addition, several active components with diverse chemopreventive properties have been also mentioned in this review article.

  13. Diet, lifestyle, heritable factors and colorectal carcinogenesis: associations with histopathological and molecular endpoints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wark, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Diet, lifestyle and heritable factors have been related to colorectal cancer risk; to date, their relevance to the overall scope of colorectal carcinogenesis, has not been clearly established.Aim and Methods: To evaluate whether distinguishing colorectal tissue by its histopathological

  14. Effects of dietary fat on virus-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in guinea fowl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirev, T.; Woutersen, R.A.; Kril, A.

    2002-01-01

    The present study was performed to assess the effects of diets supplemented with low (5%) and high (20%) corn oil on a Pts 56 retrovirus-induced model of pancreatic carcinogenesis in guinea fowl. The early microscopic lesions appear after 3 mo after virus treatment and progress over time. Eight to

  15. Palytoxin: exploiting a novel skin tumor promoter to explore signal transduction and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattenberg, Elizabeth V

    2007-01-01

    Palytoxin is a novel skin tumor promoter, which has been used to help probe the role of different types of signaling mechanisms in carcinogenesis. The multistage mouse skin model indicates that tumor promotion is an early, prolonged, and reversible phase of carcinogenesis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying tumor promotion is therefore important for developing strategies to prevent and treat cancer. Naturally occurring tumor promoters that bind to specific cellular receptors have proven to be useful tools for investigating important biochemical events in multistage carcinogenesis. For example, the identification of protein kinase C as the receptor for the prototypical skin tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (also called phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA) provided key evidence that tumor promotion involves the aberrant modulation of signaling cascades that govern cell fate and function. The subsequent discovery that palytoxin, a marine toxin isolated from zoanthids (genus Palythoa), is a potent skin tumor promoter yet does not activate protein kinase C indicated that investigating palytoxin action could help reveal new aspects of tumor promotion. Interestingly, the putative receptor for palytoxin is the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. This review focuses on palytoxin-stimulated signaling and how palytoxin has been used to investigate alternate biochemical mechanisms by which important targets in carcinogenesis can be modulated.

  16. Mammary carcinogenesis in rats: basic facts and recent results in Brookhaven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shellabarger, C.J.; Stone, J.P.; Holtzman, s.

    1982-01-01

    Some research results from experiments investigating neutron-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats are presented. The additive effects of neutrons and 3-methylcholanthrene on mammary adenocarcinoma were determined. Synergism between diethylstilbestrol and neutrons was likewise studied. Differences in mammary neoplastic response between strains of laboratory rats was also investigated

  17. Dietary fish oil (MaxEPA) enhances pancreatic carcinogenesis in azaserine-treated rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appel, M.J.; Woutersen, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study the putative chemopreventive effect of dietary fish oil (MaxEPA) on azaserine-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in rats was investigated. Groups of rats were maintained on a semipurified low-fat (LF; 5 wt%) diet or on semipurified high-fat (HF; 25 wt%) diets containing 5 wt%

  18. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-05-01

    The current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in man is considered. The discussion is restricted to dose-incidence data in humans, particularly to certain of those epidemiological studies of human populations that are used most frequently for risk estimation for low-dose radiation carcinogenesis in man. Emphasis is placed solely on those surveys concerned with nuclear explosions and medical exposures

  19. Radiation carcinogenesis. Comprehensive three-year progress report, 1 May 1972--15 March 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, S.; Gates, O.

    1976-03-01

    Progress is reported on studies on the pathological effects of various doses of x radiation on rats and mice, with emphasis on radioinduced carcinogenesis in parabiont rats with one of the pair exposed to 1000 R of whole body x radiation and the other shielded. Results are included from studies on alterations in metabolic parameters and life span induced by irradiation

  20. p21 Ablation in Liver Enhances DNA Damage, Cholestasis, and Carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehedego, H.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Hu, W.; Doler, C.; Haybaeck, J.; Gassler, N.; Muller, M.R.; Liedtke, C.; Trautwein, C.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mouse studies suggest that the NF-¿B pathway regulator NEMO (also known as IKK¿) controls chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis in the liver. However, the molecular mechanisms explaining the function of NEMO are not well defined. Here, we report that overexpression of the cell-cycle

  1. Myosin light chain kinase expression induced via tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 signaling in the epithelial cells regulates the development of colitis-associated carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Suzuki

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that prolonged inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD may lead to colitis-associated carcinogenesis (CAC. We previously observed that the NF-κB activation in colonic epithelial cells is associated with increased tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2 expression in CAC development. However, the mechanism by which epithelial NF-κB activation leading to CAC is still unclear. Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK has been reported to be responsible for the epithelial permeability associated with TNF signaling. Therefore we focused on the role of MLCK expression via TNFR2 signaling on CAC development. Pro-tumorigenic cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6 and MIP-2 production as well as INF-γ and TNF production at the lamina propria were increased in the setting of colitis, and further in tumor tissues in associations with up-regulated TNFR2 and MLCK expressions in the epithelial cells of a CAC model. The up-regulated MLCK expression was observed in TNF-stimulated colonic epithelial cells in a dose-dependent fashion in association with up-regulation of TNFR2. Silencing TNFR2, but not TNFR1, resulted in restoration of epithelial tight junction (TJ associated with decreased MLCK expression. Antibody-mediated blockade of TNF signaling also resulted in restoration of TJ in association with suppressed MLCK expression, and interestingly, similar results were observed with suppressing TNFR2 and MLCK expressions by inhibiting MLCK in the epithelial cells. Silencing of MLCK also resulted in suppressed TNFR2, but not TNFR1, expression, suggesting that the restored TJ leads to reduced TNFR2 signaling. Such suppression of MLCK as well as blockade of TNFR2 signaling resulted in restored TJ, decreased pro-tumorigenic cytokines and reduced CAC development. These results suggest that MLCK may be a potential target for the prevention of IBD-associated tumor development.

  2. SODIUM BICARBONATE FACILITATES LOW-DOSE ORAL TOLERANCE TO PEANUT IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Oral tolerance specifically inhibits production of allergic IgE antibody and is therefore a potential method for suppressing food allergy. We have previously demonstrated that a single oral dose of one mg is sufficient to induce oral tolerance to egg white but not pean...

  3. J/Ψ suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubellino, P.; Abreu, M.C.; Alessandro, B.; Alexa, C.; Arnaldi, R.; Astruc, J.; Atayan, M.; Baglin, C.; Baldit, A.; Bedjidian, M.; Bellaiche, F.; Beole, S.; Boldea, V.; Bordalo, P.; Bussiere, A.; Capony, V.; Casagrande, L.; Castor, J.; Chambon, T.; Chaurand, B.; Chevrot, I.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalo, C.; Comets, M.P.; Constantinescu, S.; Cruz, J.; De Falco, A.; De Marco, N.; Dellacasa, G.; Devaux, A.; Dita, S.; Drapier, O.; Espagnon, B.; Fargeix, J.; Filippov, S.N.; Fleuret, F.; Force, P.; Gallio, M.; Gavrilov, Y.K.; Gerschel, C.; Giubellino, P.; Golubeva, M.B.; Gonin, M.; Grigorian, A.A.; Grossiord, J.Y.; Guber, F.F.; Guichard, A.; Gulkaninan, H.; Hakobyan, R.; Haroutunian, R.; Idzik, M.; Jouan, D.; Karavitcheva, T.L.; Kluberg, L.; Kurepin, A.B.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lourenco, C.; Mac Cormick, M.; Macciotta, P.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mourgues, S.; Musso, A.; Ohlsson-Malek, F.; Petiau, P.; Piccotti, A.; Pizzi, J.R.; Prado da Silva, W.L.; Puddu, G.; Quintans, C.; Racca, C.; Ramello, L.; Ramos, S.; Rato-Mendes, P.; Riccati, L.; Romana, A.; Sartori, S.; Saturnini, P.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Shahoyan, R.; Silva, S.; Soave, C.; Sonderegger, P.; Tarrago, X.; Temnikov, P.; Topilskaya, N.S.; Usai, G.; Vale, C.; Vercellin, E.; Willis, N.

    1999-01-01

    The cross section for J/Ψ production in Pb-Pb interactions at 158 GeV per nucleon is measured at the CERN SPS by the NA50 experiment. The final results from the 1995 run are presented here together with preliminary ones from the high-statistics 1996 run. An anomalous J/Ψ suppression is observed in Pb-Pb collisions as compared to extrapolations of the previous results obtained by the NA38 experiment with proton and lighter ion beams. The results of the two runs are in good agreement. The results from the 1996 run allow the study of the onset of the anomalous suppression within the same set of data, showing evidence of a sharp change of behaviour around a value of neutral transverse energy, as measured by our electromagnetic calorimeter, of about 50 GeV

  4. Oral Histoplasmosis

    OpenAIRE

    Folk, Gillian A.; Nelson, Brenda L.

    2017-01-01

    A 44-year-old female presented to her general dentist with the chief complaint of a painful mouth sore of 2 weeks duration. Clinical examination revealed an irregularly shaped ulcer of the buccal and lingual attached gingiva of the anterior mandible. A biopsy was performed and microscopic evaluation revealed histoplasmosis. Histoplasmosis, caused by Histoplasma capsulate, is the most common fungal infection in the United States. Oral lesions of histoplasmosis are generally associated with the...

  5. Potent suppression of both spontaneous and carcinogen-induced colitis-associated colorectal cancer in mice by dietary celastrol supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Emily C; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Yoon, Ji Hee; Tochtrop, Gregory P; Letterio, John J; Choi, Sung Hee

    2018-01-12

    Celastrol is an anti-inflammatory natural triterpenoid, isolated from the herb Tripterygium wilfordii or thunder god vine. Here, we define mechanisms mediating anti-inflammatory activity of celastrol and demonstrate efficacy of a dietary celastrol supplement for chemoprevention of inflammation-driven carcinogenesis in mice. Dietary celastrol (31.25 ppm in rodent diet from 8 weeks to 25 weeks of age) is well tolerated and protects against LPS-induced acute inflammation in C57BL/6 mice, potently suppressing LPS-induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, Interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β. To test whether dietary celastrol suppresses inflammation-driven colorectal cancer (CRC), we employed a unique model of spontaneous, inflammation-driven CRC in mice harboring a germ line deletion of the p27Kip1 gene and a T cell-specific deletion of Smad4 gene (Smad4co/co;Lck-crep27Kip1-/-or DKO), which develop severe intestinal inflammation and carcinogenesis as early as 3 months of age. Exposure of DKO mice to daily dietary celastrol (12.5 ppm in diet) from 6 weeks of age significantly suppressed development of colitis-associated CRC (CAC). Celastrol chemoprevention of CAC in this new model of intestinal neoplasia was associated with significant suppression of iNOS at 4 months of age, and iNOS, COX-2 and NFκB at 6 months of age, with significant reduction in inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and IL-1β. Chemoprevetion of CAC by dietary celastrol was further confirmed in the model of azoxymethane (AOM) plus dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced carcinogenesis in C57BL/6 mice. These data suggest the potential for celastrol as a safe and effective dietary supplement in the chemoprevention of CAC in humans. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The effects of nifekalant hydrochloride on the spatial dispersion of repolarization after direct current defibrillation in patients with oral amiodarone and β-blocker therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Maeda

    2014-06-01

    Conclusions: NIF suppressed the deterioration of the SDR after ICD shock. This might be one of the mechanisms by which NIF suppresses recurrence of ventricular tachyarrhythmia just after ICD shock in patients with oral amiodarone and β-blocker therapy.

  7. Changes in the host lymphocyte subsets during chemical carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodt, P.; Lala, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    Changes in small lymphocyte subsets in the lymphoid organs of young C3H mice were studied following i.m. injection of a carcinogenic dose of 3-methylcholanthrene (mc). Using monoclonal anti-Lyt antibodies and a sandwich radiolabeling method with 125 I-labeled rabbit anti-mouse Immunoglobulin, the lymphocyte subpopulations in the thymus, spleen, and draining lymph node were examined by radioautography. During the fifth week following the administration of the carcinogen a sharp decrease in the level of Ly-1,2+ small lymphocyte population in the thymus was noted which coincided with a considerable increase (10-fold) in the Ly-2+. During the same period, a similar increase in the Ly-2+ population was also observed in the draining. The high levels of Ly-2+ cells lasted for more than 4 weeks in the thymus while, in the draining node, they lasted for 2 weeks and dropped to normal levels (0 to 2%) simultaneously with the appearance of tumor cells identified in histological preparations. These systemic increases coincided with the appearance of macroscopic tumor nodules. The mixed lymphocyte reaction response of the draining node cells, but not of the spleen, was suppressed during the period of increased level of Ly-2+ cells. Furthermore, during this period, s.c. transplantation of a syngeneic mammary tumor in the same leg resulted in enhanced local growth as well as metastatic spread of the tumor to the lungs in mc treated mice. These findings suggest that a localized immunosuppression associated with the rise in the Ly-2+ cells may be of functional significance during carcinogen-induced tumor development

  8. Colon carcinogenesis: influence of Western diet-induced obesity and targeting stem cells using dietary bioactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasdagly, Maria; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Reddivari, Lavanya; Veeramachaneni, D N Rao; Vanamala, Jairam

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer strikes more than 1 million people annually and is responsible for more than 500,000 cancer deaths worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that the majority of malignancies, including colon cancer are driven by cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are resistant to current chemotherapeutic approaches leading to cancer relapse. Wnt signaling plays a critical role in colon stem cell renewal and carcinogenesis. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (LGR5), a Wnt target gene, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 B1 (ALDH1B1) are good markers for normal and malignant human colon stem cells. Diet contributes to 20% to 42% of all human cancers and 50% to 90% of colon cancer. Recent evidence shows that the Western diet has a causative link to colon cancer; however, mechanisms of action are not fully elucidated. Western diet-induced obesity elevates systemic insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin levels, which could lead to elevated proliferation and suppressed apoptosis of CSCs through PI3K/AKT/Wnt pathway. Although conventional chemotherapy targets the PI3K/AKT pathways and can significantly reduce tumor size, it fails to eliminate CSCs and has serious side effects. Dietary bioactive compounds such as grape seed extract, curcumin, lycopene, and resveratrol have promising chemopreventive effects, without serious side effects on various types of cancers due to their direct and indirect actions on CSC self-renewal pathways such as the Wnt pathway. Understanding the role of CSCs in diet-induced colon cancer will aid in development of evidence-based dietary chemopreventive strategies and/or therapeutic agents targeting CSCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Chemopreventive Activity of MGN-3/Biobran Against Chemical Induction of Glandular Stomach Carcinogenesis in Rats and Its Apoptotic Effect in Gastric Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr El-Din, Nariman K; Abdel Fattah, Salma M; Pan, Deyu; Tolentino, Lucilene; Ghoneum, Mamdooh

    2016-12-01

    In the current study, we investigated the chemopreventive activity of arabinoxylan rice bran, MGN-3/Biobran, against chemical induction of glandular stomach carcinogenesis in rats. Gastric cancer was induced by carcinogen methylnitronitrosoguanidine (MNNG), and rats received MNNG alone or MNNG plus Biobran (40 mg/kg body weight) for a total of 8 months. Averaged results from 2 separate readings showed that exposure to MNNG plus Biobran caused gastric dysplasia and cancer (adenocarcinoma) in 4.5/12 rats (9/24 readings, 37.5%), with 3.5/12 rats (7/24 readings, 29.2%) showing dysplasia and 1/12 rats (8.3%) developing adenocarcinoma. In contrast, in rats treated with MNNG alone, 8/10 (80%) developed dysplasia and adenocarcinoma, with 6/10 rats (60%) showing dysplasia and 2/10 rats (20%) developing adenocarcinoma. The effect of combining both agents was also associated with significant suppression of the expression of the tumor marker Ki-67 and remarkable induction in the apoptotic gastric cancer cells via mitochondrial-dependent pathway as indicated by the upregulation in p53 expression, Bax expression, downregulation in Bcl-2 expression, an increase in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and an activation of caspase-3. In addition, Biobran treatment induced cell-cycle arrest in the subG1 phase, where the hypodiploid cell population was markedly increased. Moreover, Biobran treatment protected rats against MNNG-induced significant decrease in lymphocyte levels. We conclude that Biobran provides protection against chemical induction of glandular stomach carcinogenesis in rats and may be useful for the treatment of human patients with gastric cancer. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Raman spectroscopy and oral exfoliative cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Aditi; Shah, Nupur; Mahimkar, Manoj; Garud, Mandavi; Pagare, Sandeep; Nair, Sudhir; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Early detection of oral cancers can substantially improve disease-free survival rates. Ex vivo and in vivo Raman spectroscopic (RS) studies on oral cancer have demonstrated the applicability of RS in identifying not only malignant and premalignant conditions but also cancer-field-effects: the earliest events in oral carcinogenesis. RS has also been explored for cervical exfoliated cells analysis. Exfoliated cells are associated with several advantages like non-invasive sampling, higher patient compliance, transportation and analysis at a central facility: obviating need for on-site instrumentation. Thus, oral exfoliative cytology coupled with RS may serve as a useful adjunct for oral cancer screening. In this study, exfoliated cells from healthy controls with and without tobacco habits, premalignant lesions (leukoplakia and tobacco-pouch-keratosis) and their contralateral mucosa were collected using a Cytobrush. Cells were harvested by vortexing and centrifugation at 6000 rpm. The cellular yield was ascertained using Neubauer's chamber. Cell pellets were placed on a CaF2 window and Raman spectra were acquired using a Raman microprobe (40X objective) coupled HE-785 Raman spectrometer. Approximately 7 spectra were recorded from each pellet, following which pellet was smeared onto a glass slide, fixed in 95% ethanol and subjected to Pap staining for cytological diagnosis (gold standard). Preliminary PC-LDA followed by leave-one-out cross validation indicate delineation of cells from healthy and all pathological conditions. A tendency of classification was also seen between cells from contralateral, healthy tobacco and site of premalignant lesions. These results will be validated by cytological findings, which will serve as the basis for building standard models of each condition.

  11. 14C glucose uptake and turnover, a biomarker in benzo(a)pyrene induced lung carcinogenesis: role of curcumin and resveratrol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, Anshoo; Nair, P.; Dhawan, D.K.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The aim of the present study was to explore the synergistic potential of curcumin and resveratrol in modulation of glucose metabolism by studying 14 C glucose uptake, turnover in the lung slices and ultra-histoarchitectural changes during benzo(a)pyrene (BP) induced lung carcinogenesis in mice. The mice were segregated into five treatment groups which included group I (normal control), group II (BP treated), group III (BP+curcumin treated), group IV (BP+resveratrol treated) and group V (BP+curcumin+resveratrol treated). Animals in Group II were given a single intraperitoneal injection of Benzo(a)pyrene in corn oil at a dose level of 100mg/Kg body weight. Group III animals were given curcumin orally in drinking water at a dose level of 60 mg /Kg/ body weight, thrice a week. Animals in Group IV were given resveratrol orally at a dose level of 5.7 microgram/ml drinking water, thrice a week. Animals in group V were given a combined treatment of curcumin and resveratrol in a similar manner as was given to group III and group IV animals, respectively. All the animals had free access to the diet and water and the treatments continued for a total duration of 22 weeks. The morphological and ultra-histoachitectural analyses confirmed lung carcinogenesis, in the BP treated mice. Tumor incidence and tumor multiplicity were observed to be 88% and 1.75 respectively in the BP treated mice. A statistically significant increase in the uptake of 14 C glucose was observed in the lung slices of BP treated mice. Further, radiorespirometric analyses of 14 C turnover also showed a significant increase in the lung slices of BP treated mice. The ultra-histoarchitecture of the BP treated mice revealed disruption in cellular integrity along with nuclear deformation. Mitochondria were swollen and cytoplasm appeared granular along with extensive vacuolization. Further, spaces between the endothelium, epithelium and basement membrane indicative of lung injury and edema were observed

  12. Suppression of gross chromosomal rearrangements by a new alternative replication factor C complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Soma; Sikdar, Nilabja; Myung, Kyungjae

    2007-01-01

    Defects in DNA replication fidelity lead to genomic instability. Gross chromosomal rearrangement (GCR), a type of genomic instability, is highly enhanced by various initial mutations affecting DNA replication. Frequent observations of GCRs in many cancers strongly argue the importance of maintaining high fidelity of DNA replication to suppress carcinogenesis. Recent genome wide screens in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identified a new GCR suppressor gene, ELG1, enhanced level of genome instability gene 1. Its physical interaction with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and complex formation with Rfc2-5p proteins suggest that Elg1 functions to load/unload PCNA onto DNA during a certain DNA metabolism. High level of DNA damage accumulation and enhanced phenotypes with mutations in genes involved in cell cycle checkpoints, homologous recombination (HR), or chromatin assembly in the elg1 strain suggest that Elg1p-Rfc2-5p functions in a fundamental DNA metabolism to suppress genomic instability

  13. Contribution of DNA double-strand break repair gene XRCC3 genotypes to oral cancer susceptibility in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Wen-Shin; Liu, Juhn-Cherng; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Bau, Da-Tian

    2014-06-01

    The DNA repair gene X-ray repair cross complementing protein 3 (XRCC3) is thought to play a major role in double-strand break repair and in maintaining genomic stability. Very possibly, defective double-strand break repair of cells can lead to carcinogenesis. Therefore, a case-control study was performed to reveal the contribution of XRCC3 genotypes to individual oral cancer susceptibility. In this hospital-based research, the association of XRCC3 rs1799794, rs45603942, rs861530, rs3212057, rs1799796, rs861539, rs28903081 genotypes with oral cancer risk in a Taiwanese population was investigated. In total, 788 patients with oral cancer and 956 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were genotyped. The results showed that there was significant differential distribution among oral cancer and controls in the genotypic (p=0.001428) and allelic (p=0.0013) frequencies of XRCC3 rs861539. As for the other polymorphisms, there was no difference between case and control groups. In gene-lifestyle interaction analysis, we have provided the first evidence showing that there is an obvious joint effect of XRCC3 rs861539 genotype with individual areca chewing habits on oral cancer risk. In conclusion, the T allele of XRCC3 rs861539, which has an interaction with areca chewing habit in oral carcinogenesis, may be an early marker for oral cancer in Taiwanese. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Neuropilin-1 promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by stimulating nuclear factor-kappa B and is associated with poor prognosis in human oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiming Chu

    Full Text Available The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT is a key process in carcinogenesis, invasion, and metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. In our previous studies, we found that neuropilin-1 (NRP1 is overexpressed in tongue squamous cell carcinoma and that this overexpression is associated with cell migration and invasion. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB plays an essential role both in the induction and the maintenance of EMT and tumor metastasis. Therefore, we hypothesized that NRP1 induces EMT, and that NRP1-induced migration and invasion may be an important mechanism for promoting invasion and metastasis of OSCC through NF-κB activation.The variations in gene and protein expression and the changes in the biological behavior of OSCC cell lines transfected with a vector encoding NRP1, or the corresponding vector control, were evaluated. NRP1 overexpression promoted EMT and was associated with enhanced invasive and metastatic properties. Furthermore, the induction of EMT promoted the acquisition of some cancer stem cell (CSC-like characteristics in OSCC cells. We addressed whether selective inhibition of NF-κB suppresses the NRP1-mediated EMT by treating cells with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate ammonium (PDTC, an inhibitor of NF-κB. Immunohistochemical analysis of NRP1 in OSCC tissue samples further supported a key mediator role for NRP1 in tumor progression, lymph node metastasis, and indicated that NRP1 is a predictor for poor prognosis in OSCC patients.Our results indicate that NRP1 may regulate the EMT process in OSCC cell lines through NF-κB activation, and that higher NRP1 expression levels are associated with lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis in OSCC patients. Further investigation of the role of NRP1 in tumorigenesis may help identify novel targets for the prevention and therapy of oral cancers.

  15. Long non-coding RNA TUG1 promotes progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma through upregulating FMNL2 by sponging miR-219.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guangqi; Wang, Xue; Yang, Mingliang; Lu, Li; Zhou, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a prevalent oral disease with a high morbidity and mortality rate. Several long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were identified as important regulators of carcinogenesis. However, the pathogenic implications of TUG1 in OSCC are still unclear. In the present study, the expression of TUG1 was increased in OSCC cells. Knockdown of TUG1 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, and induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, whereas overexpression of TUG1 exerted the opposite effect on OSCC cells. A reciprocal repressive interaction between TUG1 and miR-219 was found, and miR-219 inhibition abolished the tumor-suppressive effect of TUG1 knockdown on cell growth and motility. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis and luciferase reporter assay showed that FMNL2 was a direct target of miR-219. Restoration of FMNL2 abrogated the miR-219-induced inhibition of cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, migration, and invasion. Besides, overexpression of TUG1 promoted tumor growth and metastasis in vivo . Clinically, the expression of TUG1 and FMNL2 were increased, but miR-219 was decreased in primary tumors compared to non-tumor tissues. Both the upregulated TUG1, and FMNL2 and the downregulated miR-219 was associated with advanced stage of OSCC and poor overall survival. Notably, multivariate analyses confirmed that FMNL2 was an independent risk factor for OSCC. In conclusion, our data revealed that TUG1 confers oncogenic function in OSCC and TUG1/miR-219/FMNL2 axis may be a novel therapeutic strategy in this disease.

  16. Toxicogenomic outcomes predictive of forestomach carcinogenesis following exposure to benzo(a)pyrene: Relevance to human cancer risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labib, Sarah, E-mail: Sarah.Labib@hc-sc.gc.ca; Guo, Charles H., E-mail: Charles.Guo@hc-sc.gc.ca; Williams, Andrew, E-mail: Andrew.Williams@hc-sc.gc.ca; Yauk, Carole L., E-mail: Carole.Yauk@hc-sc.gc.ca; White, Paul A., E-mail: Paul.White@hc-sc.gc.ca; Halappanavar, Sabina, E-mail: Sabina.Halappanavar@hc-sc.gc.ca

    2013-12-01

    Forestomach tumors are observed in mice exposed to environmental carcinogens. However, the relevance of this data to humans is controversial because humans lack a forestomach. We hypothesize that an understanding of early molecular changes after exposure to a carcinogen in the forestomach will provide mode-of-action information to evaluate the applicability of forestomach cancers to human cancer risk assessment. In the present study we exposed mice to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), an environmental carcinogen commonly associated with tumors of the rodent forestomach. Toxicogenomic tools were used to profile gene expression response in the forestomach. Adult Muta™Mouse males were orally exposed to 25, 50, and 75 mg BaP/kg-body-weight/day for 28 consecutive days. The forestomach was collected three days post-exposure. DNA microarrays, real-time RT-qPCR arrays, and protein analyses were employed to characterize responses in the forestomach. Microarray results showed altered expression of 414 genes across all treatment groups (± 1.5 fold; false discovery rate adjusted P ≤ 0.05). Significant downregulation of genes associated with phase II xenobiotic metabolism and increased expression of genes implicated in antigen processing and presentation, immune response, chemotaxis, and keratinocyte differentiation were observed in treated groups in a dose-dependent manner. A systematic comparison of the differentially expressed genes in the forestomach from the present study to differentially expressed genes identified in human diseases including human gastrointestinal tract cancers using the NextBio Human Disease Atlas showed significant commonalities between the two models. Our results provide molecular evidence supporting the use of the mouse forestomach model to evaluate chemically-induced gastrointestinal carcinogenesis in humans. - Highlights: • Benzo(a)pyrene-mediated transcriptomic response in the forestomach was examined. • The immunoproteosome subunits and MHC class I

  17. Pteridium aquilinum and its ptaquiloside toxin induce DNA damage response in gastric epithelial cells, a link with gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Joana; Magalhães, Ana; Michel, Valérie; Amado, Inês F; Aranha, Paulo; Ovesen, Rikke G; Hansen, Hans C B; Gärtner, Fátima; Reis, Celso A; Touati, Eliette

    2012-03-01

    The multifactorial origin of gastric cancer encompasses environmental factors mainly associated with diet. Pteridium aquilinum-bracken fern-is the only higher plant known to cause cancer in animals. Its carcinogenic toxin, ptaquiloside, has been identified in milk of cows and groundwater. Humans can be directly exposed by consumption of the plant, contaminated water or milk, and spore inhalation. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between bracken exposure and gastric cancer. In the present work, the genotoxicity of P. aquilinum and ptaquiloside, including DNA damaging effects and DNA damage response, was characterized in human gastric epithelial cells and in a mouse model. In vitro, the highest doses of P. aquilinum extracts (40 mg/ml) and ptaquiloside (60 μg/ml) decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis. γH2AX and P53-binding protein 1 analysis indicated induction of DNA strand breaks in treated cells. P53 level also increased after exposure, associated with ATR-Chk1 signaling pathway activation. The involvement of ptaquiloside in the DNA damage activity of P. aquilinum was confirmed by deregulation of the expression of a panel of genes related to DNA damage signaling pathways and DNA repair, in response to purified ptaquiloside. Oral administration of P. aquilinum extracts to mice increased gastric cell proliferation and led to frameshift events in intron 2 of the P53 gene. Our data demonstrate the direct DNA damaging and mutagenic effects of P. aquilinum. These results are in agreement with the carcinogenic properties attributed to this fern and its ptaquiloside toxin and support their role in promoting gastric carcinogenesis.

  18. How to suppress obsessive thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Eric; Diepstraten, Philip

    2003-01-01

    Thought suppression (i.e. consciously trying to avoid certain thoughts from entering consciousness) has been argued to be an inadequate strategy in case of unwanted intrusions. That is, thought suppression seems to result in more rather than less intrusions. Although this experimental finding has been explained in terms of failing attempts to distract oneself from the target thought, the White Bear Suppression Inventory (WBSI; a scale that measures chronic thought suppression tendencies) does not address the means by which respondents try to suppress unwanted thoughts. To examine which strategies of mental control people use to suppress unwanted thoughts, obsessive-compulsive disorder patients (N=47) completed the WBSI, the Thought Control Questionnaire, and two measures of psychopathology. Results suggest that the crucial mechanism in thought suppression may not be distraction, but self-punishment.

  19. Impact of CCL4 gene polymorphisms and environmental factors on oral cancer development and clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Ming-Yu; Lin, Chiao-Wen; Tsai, Hsiao-Chi; Chen, Yng-Tay; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Hua, Chun-Hung; Yang, Shun-Fa; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2017-05-09

    In Taiwan, oral cancer has causally been associated with environmental carcinogens. CCL4 (C-C chemokine ligand 4), a macrophage inflammatory protein with a key role in inflammation and immune-regulation, was implicated in carcinogenesis by facilitating instability in the tumor environment. The purpose of this study was to identify gene polymorphisms of CCL4 specific to patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) susceptibility and clinicopathological characteristics. A total of 2,053 participants, including 1192 healthy people and 861 patients with oral cancer, were recruited for this study. Three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the CCL4 gene were analyzed by a real-time PCR. We found that the T/T homozygotes of CCL4 rs1634507 G/T polymorphism and the GG haplotype of 2 CCL4 SNPs (rs1634507 and rs10491121) combined were associated with oral-cancer susceptibility. In addition, TA haplotype significantly decreased the risks for oral cancer by 0.118 fold. Among 1420 smokers, CCL4 polymorphisms carriers with the betel-nut chewing habit had a 15.476-20.247-fold greater risk of having oral cancer compared to CCL4 wild-type (WT) carriers without the betel-nut chewing habit. Finally, patients with oral cancer who had A/G heterozygotes of CCL4 rs10491121 A/G polymorphism showed a lower risk for an advanced tumor size (> T2) (p=0.046), compared to those patients with AA homozygotes. Our results suggest that the CCL4 rs1634507 SNP have potential predictive significance in oral carcinogenesis. Gene-environment interactions of CCL4 polymorphisms might influence oral-cancer susceptibility. CCL4 rs10491121 may be a factor to predict the tumor size in OSCC patients.

  20. Efficacy of Miswak on Oral Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Sukkarwalla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The oral cavity harbors a diverse and abundant number of complex oral pathogens causing different oral diseases. The development of dental caries and periodontal diseases has been found to be closely associated with various gram positive and gram negative microrganisms. Miswak, a natural toothbrush, has been documented as a potent antibacterial aid and its use is encouraged in different countries because of its good taste, texture, availability, cost and beneficial effect on teeth and supporting tissues. Different researches have been carried out to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of Miswak. This review encompasses the efficacy of Miswak on suppression of oral pathogens with respect to conducted on fungi as well as cariogenic, periodontal and endodontic bacteria.

  1. Efficacy of miswak on oral pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukkarwalla, Adnan; Ali, Salima Mehboob; Lundberg, Pranee; Tanwir, Farzeen

    2013-05-01

    The oral cavity harbors a diverse and abundant number of complex oral pathogens causing different oral diseases. The development of dental caries and periodontal diseases has been found to be closely associated with various gram positive and gram negative microrganisms. Miswak, a natural toothbrush, has been documented as a potent antibacterial aid and its use is encouraged in different countries because of its good taste, texture, availability, cost and beneficial effect on teeth and supporting tissues. Different researches have been carried out to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of Miswak. This review encompasses the efficacy of Miswak on suppression of oral pathogens with respect to conducted on fungi as well as cariogenic, periodontal and endodontic bacteria.

  2. Advances in Understanding of Penile Carcinogenesis: The Search for Actionable Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipollini, Juan; Chaing, Sharon; Azizi, Mounsif; Kidd, Laura C; Kim, Patricia; Spiess, Philippe E

    2017-08-16

    Penile cancer (PeCa) is a rare malignancy with potentially devastating effects. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common variant with distinct precancerous lesions before development into invasive disease. Involvement of the inguinal lymph nodes is the most important prognostic factor in PeCa, and once disease is present outside the groin, prognosis is poor. Metastatic PeCa is challenging to treat and often requires multidisciplinary approaches in management. Due to its rarity, molecular understanding of the disease continues to be limited with most studies based on small, single center series. Thus far, it appears PeCa has diverse mechanisms of carcinogenesis affecting similar molecular pathways. In this review, we evaluate the current landscape of the molecular carcinogenesis of PeCa and explore ongoing research on potential actionable targets of therapy. The emergence of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and other immunotherapeutic strategies may improve outcomes for PeCa patients.

  3. The pleiotropic roles of transforming growth factor beta inhomeostasis and carcinogenesis of endocrine organs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleisch, Markus C.; Maxwell, Christopher A.; Barcellos-Hoff,Mary-Helen

    2006-01-13

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a ubiquitous cytokine that plays a critical role in numerous pathways regulating cellular and tissue homeostasis. TGF-beta is regulated by hormones and is a primary mediator of hormone response in uterus, prostate and mammary gland. This review will address the role of TGF-beta in regulating hormone dependent proliferation and morphogenesis. The subversion of TGF-beta regulation during the processes of carcinogenesis, with particular emphasis on its effects on genetic stability and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), will also be examined. An understanding of the multiple and complex mechanisms of TGF-beta regulation of epithelial function, and the ultimate loss of TGF-beta function during carcinogenesis, will be critical in the design of novel therapeutic interventions for endocrine-related cancers.

  4. Defining the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis using mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A Ignatenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetics and diet are both considered important risk determinants for colorectal cancer, a leading cause of death in the US and worldwide. Genetically engineered mouse (GEM models have made a significant contribution to the characterization of colorectal cancer risk factors. Reliable, reproducible, and clinically relevant animal models help in the identification of the molecular events associated with disease progression and in the development of effictive treatment strategies. This review is focused on the use of mouse models for studying the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis. We describe how the available mouse models of colon cancer such as the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min mice and knockout genetic models facilitate understanding of the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis and help in the development of a rational strategy for colon cancer chemoprevention.

  5. Use of medaka as a tool in studies of radiation effects and chemical carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyodo-Taguchi, Y.; Aoki, K.; Matsudaira, H.

    1982-01-01

    The medaka, Oryzias latipes, a small freshwater oviparous fish, is common in Japan and found in some parts of Asia. Adult fish are 3.0-3.5 cm long and weigh 0.5-0.7 g. The small fish have been used extensively in this laboratory for analysis of radiation effects and for study of chemical carcinogenesis. These fish are relatively easy to rear and their reproductive biology is well known. Recently, inbred strains of the fish have been established by full sister-brother mating. In this report, we will review experimental results using medaka in studies of : 1) radiation effects on spermatogenesis, and 2) induction of hepatic tumors by MAM acetate, we will also review use of medaka in related studies of radiation effects and chemical carcinogenesis. (author)

  6. Cervical carcinogenesis: the role of co-factors and generation of reactive oxygen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Anna

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Several HPV co-factors have been proposed, some more or less consistently associated with cervical dysplasia and cancer risk. More research, using prospective cohort designs, is needed to further describe where in carcinogenesis these factors are working and to assess the biological mechanism of these factors. In addition, further research is needed to define the role of various hormonal contraceptive formulations in promoting cervical carcinogenesis. While many interesting scientific questions remain to be answered, results from the numerous epidemiological studies conducted to date indicate that cervical dysplasia and cancer may be reduced if the oxidant antioxidant ratio is shifted to more of and antioxidant profile. In addition to cervical cancer screening, a reduction in cervical cancer incidence may be accomplished by reducing tobacco use, increasing nutritional status, and utilizing barrier contraception to prevent infection with other sexually acquired infections.

  7. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Links Ovulation-Induced Inflammation and Serous Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stav Sapoznik

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the notion that ovarian carcinoma results from ovulation-induced inflammation of the fallopian tube epithelial cells (FTECs has gained evidence. However, the mechanistic pathway for this process has not been revealed yet. In the current study, we propose the mutator protein activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID as a link between ovulation-induced inflammation in FTECs and genotoxic damage leading to ovarian carcinogenesis. We show that AID, previously shown to be functional only in B lymphocytes, is expressed in FTECs under physiological conditions, and is induced in vitro upon ovulatory-like stimulation and in vivo in carcinoma-associated FTECs. We also report that AID activity results in epigenetic, genetic and genomic damage in FTECs. Overall, our data provides new insights into the etiology of ovarian carcinogenesis and may set the ground for innovative approaches aimed at prevention and early detection.

  8. The 9th Conference on Metal Toxicity and Carcinogenesis: The conference overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, James T F; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin

    2017-09-15

    Heavy metals, such as arsenic, chromium, cadmium, nickel, mercury, and uranium are known to cause many human diseases and health complications after occupational or environmental exposure. Consequently, metals are environmental health concerns. This manuscript is an overview of the 9th Conference on Metal Toxicity and Carcinogenesis held in October 2016 in Lexington, Kentucky. Since 2000, this biennial meeting brings together experts in the field to discuss current and prospective research in an effort to advance research pertaining to metal toxicity and carcinogenesis. In this review we summarize the major topics discussed and provide insight regarding current research in the field and an account of the direction in which the field is progressing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Biologically-based mechanistic models of radiation-related carcinogenesis applied to epidemiological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühm, Werner; Eidemüller, Markus; Kaiser, Jan Christian

    2017-10-01

    Biologically-based mechanistic models that are used in combining current understanding of human carcinogenesis with epidemiological studies were reviewed. Assessment was made of how well they fit the data, whether they account for non-linear radiobiological low-dose effects, and whether they suggest any implications for the dose response at low doses and dose rates. However, the present paper does not make an attempt to provide a complete review of the existing literature on biologically-based models and their application to epidemiological data. In most studies the two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE) model of carcinogenesis was used. The model provided robust estimates of identifiable parameters and radiation risk. While relatively simple, it is flexible, so that more stages can easily be added, and tests made of various types of radiation action. In general, the model performed similarly or better than descriptive excess absolute and excess relative risk models, in terms of quality of fit and number of parameters. Only very rarely the shape of dose-response predicted by the models was investigated. For some tumors, when more detailed biological information was known, additional pathways were included in the model. The future development of these models will benefit from growing knowledge on carcinogenesis processes, and in particular from use of biobank tissue samples and advances in omics technologies. Their use appears a promising approach to investigate the radiation risk at low doses and low dose rates. However, the uncertainties involved are still considerable, and the models provide only a simplified description of the underlying complexity of carcinogenesis. Current assumptions in radiation protection including the linear-non-threshold (LNT) model are not in contradiction to what is presently known on the process of cancer development.

  10. Gastric microbiota and carcinogenesis: the role of non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Dias-Jácome

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer. However, recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have revealed a complex microbial community in the stomach that could also contribute to the development of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to present recent scientific evidence regarding the role of non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria in gastric carcinogenesis. Methods: A systematic review of original articles published in PubMed in the last ten years related to gastric microbiota and gastric cancer in humans was performed. Results: Thirteen original articles were included. The constitution of gastric microbiota appears to be significantly affected by gastric cancer and premalignant lesions. In fact, differences in gastric microbiota have been documented, depending on Helicobacter pylori status and gastric conditions, such as non-atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and cancer. Gastric carcinogenesis can be associated with an increase in many bacteria (such as Lactobacillus coleohominis, Klebsiella pneumoniae or Acinetobacter baumannii as well as decrease in others (such as Porphyromonas spp, Neisseria spp, Prevotella pallens or Streptococcus sinensis. However, there is no conclusive data that confirms if these changes in microbiota are a cause or consequence of the process of carcinogenesis. Conclusions: Even though there is limited evidence in humans, microbiota differences between normal individuals, pre-malignant lesions and gastric cancer could suggest a progressive shift in the constitution of gastric microbiota in carcinogenesis, possibly resulting from a complex cross-talk between gastric microbiota and Helicobacter pylori. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the specific role (if any of different microorganisms.

  11. The substrate of the biopsychosocial influences in the carcinogenesis of the digestive tract

    OpenAIRE

    Georgică C. Târtea; Cristina Florescu; Daniel Pirici; Daniel Caragea; Elena A. Târtea; Cristin C. Vere

    2016-01-01

    Digestive cancer represents a severe public health problem, being one of the main causes of death. It is considered a multifactorial disease, with hereditary predisposition, environmental factors, and other factors involved in carcinogenesis. Both the evolution and the pathogenesis of digestive neoplasms remain incompletely elucidated. As a multifactorial disease, it can be approached by taking into account the biopsychosocial influences via enteric nervous system. Many peptides and non-pepti...

  12. Dynamic landscape of pancreatic carcinogenesis reveals early molecular networks of malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Bo; Bruns, Philipp; Behler, Nora A; Chang, Ligong; Schlitter, Anna Melissa; Cao, Jing; Gewies, Andreas; Ruland, Jürgen; Fritzsche, Sina; Valkovskaya, Nataliya; Jian, Ziying; Regel, Ivonne; Raulefs, Susanne; Irmler, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; Friess, Helmut; Erkan, Mert; Mueller, Nikola S; Roth, Susanne; Hackert, Thilo; Esposito, Irene; Theis, Fabian J; Kleeff, Jörg; Michalski, Christoph W

    2018-01-01

    The initial steps of pancreatic regeneration versus carcinogenesis are insufficiently understood. Although a combination of oncogenic Kras and inflammation has been shown to induce malignancy, molecular networks of early carcinogenesis remain poorly defined. We compared early events during inflammation, regeneration and carcinogenesis on histological and transcriptional levels with a high temporal resolution using a well-established mouse model of pancreatitis and of inflammation-accelerated Kras G12D -driven pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Quantitative expression data were analysed and extensively modelled in silico. We defined three distinctive phases-termed inflammation, regeneration and refinement-following induction of moderate acute pancreatitis in wild-type mice. These corresponded to different waves of proliferation of mesenchymal, progenitor-like and acinar cells. Pancreas regeneration required a coordinated transition of proliferation between progenitor-like and acinar cells. In mice harbouring an oncogenic Kras mutation and challenged with pancreatitis, there was an extended inflammatory phase and a parallel, continuous proliferation of mesenchymal, progenitor-like and acinar cells. Analysis of high-resolution transcriptional data from wild-type animals revealed that organ regeneration relied on a complex interaction of a gene network that normally governs acinar cell homeostasis, exocrine specification and intercellular signalling. In mice with oncogenic Kras, a specific carcinogenic signature was found, which was preserved in full-blown mouse pancreas cancer. These data define a transcriptional signature of early pancreatic carcinogenesis and a molecular network driving formation of preneoplastic lesions, which allows for more targeted biomarker development in order to detect cancer earlier in patients with pancreatitis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Allergic inflammation does not impact chemical-induced carcinogenesis in the lungs of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Konstantinos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the relationship between allergic inflammation and lung carcinogenesis is not clearly defined, several reports suggest an increased incidence of lung cancer in patients with asthma. We aimed at determining the functional impact of allergic inflammation on chemical carcinogenesis in the lungs of mice. Methods Balb/c mice received single-dose urethane (1 g/kg at day 0 and two-stage ovalbumin during tumor initiation (sensitization: days -14 and 0; challenge: daily at days 6-12, tumor progression (sensitization: days 70 and 84; challenge: daily at days 90-96, or chronically (sensitization: days -14 and 0; challenge: daily at days 6-12 and thrice weekly thereafter. In addition, interleukin (IL-5 deficient and wild-type C57BL/6 mice received ten weekly urethane injections. All mice were sacrificed after four months. Primary end-points were number, size, and histology of lung tumors. Secondary end-points were inflammatory cells and mediators in the airspace compartment. Results Ovalbumin provoked acute allergic inflammation and chronic remodeling of murine airways, evident by airspace eosinophilia, IL-5 up-regulation, and airspace enlargement. Urethane resulted in formation of atypical alveolar hyperplasias, adenomas, and adenocarcinomas in mouse lungs. Ovalbumin-induced allergic inflammation during tumor initiation, progression, or continuously did not impact the number, size, or histologic distribution of urethane-induced pulmonary neoplastic lesions. In addition, genetic deficiency in IL-5 had no effect on urethane-induced lung tumorigenesis. Conclusions Allergic inflammation does not impact chemical-induced carcinogenesis of the airways. These findings suggest that not all types of airway inflammation influence lung carcinogenesis and cast doubt on the idea of a mechanistic link between asthma and lung cancer.

  14. Disease Heterogeneity and Immune Biomarkers in Preclinical Mouse Models of Ovarian Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    the cancer risk, including the cervical epithelial transformation zone with HPV [41], the esophageal-gastric junction and Barrett’s esophagus [42], and...Sweetwood JP, Cheng Y, Pace JL, et al. (2000) Development of a syngeneic mouse model for events related to ovarian cancer . Carcinogenesis 21: 585–591...endometriosis-associated ovarian cancer (EAOC, endometrial and clear cell). Of these genes, complement pathway genes were consistently present, suggesting

  15. In Vivo Testing of Chemopreventive Agents Using the Dog Model of Spontaneous Prostate Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    that there would be tional health survey of 211 Irish setter dogs (L.T. Glick- no advantage for members of a highly domesticated man, unpublished results...understand the mechanisms of prostate cancer development. This research will benefit the health and welfare of both dogs and humans. ACKNOWLEDGMENT This...AD Award Number: DAMD17-98-1-8550 TITLE: In Vivo Testing of Chemopreventive Agents Using the Dog Model of Spontaneous Prostate Carcinogenesis

  16. Digestive forms of Chagas disease and carcinogenesis: a study of association

    OpenAIRE

    Gullo, Caio Eduardo; Estofolete, Cássia Fernanda; Gil, Cristiane Damas; Christiano, Adriana Borgonovi; Netinho, João Gomes

    2012-01-01

    The authors analyze the relation between gastrointestinal carcinogenesis and Chagas disease, based on detailed review of the literature. To this end, epidemiological, experimental and human material pathology description studies have been selected. The article discusses the possibility of protection being afforded by not fully known morphokinetic cellular, immune and neuroendocrine factors that would be secondary to plexus degeneration. Also aspects related to the parasite-host interaction fr...

  17. Differentiation and carcinogenesis: an integrated multilevel study of mechanisms from molecules to man. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This study sought to identify and characterize mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) in vitro, to identify the in vivo equivalent of the in vitro MPCs, and to determine the relationship between the presence or response of these cells both in vitro and eventually in vivo to altered proliferative capacity (in vitro cellular senescence, in vivo organismal aging) and altered susceptibility to carcinogenesis (frequency of in vitro neoplastic transformation and age-related frequency of in vivo cancer incidence). 16 refs

  18. Colonic protein fermentation and promotion of colon carcinogenesis by thermolyzed casein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpet, Denis E.; Yin, Y.; Zhang, X. M.; Rémésy, C.; Stamp, D.; Medline, A.; Thompson, L.U.; Bruce, W. R.; Archer, M. C.

    1995-01-01

    Thermolyzed casein is known to promote the growth of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and colon cancer when it is fed to rats that have been initiated with azoxymethane. We speculated that the promotion was a consequence of increased colonic protein fermentation (i.e., that the thermolysis of the casein decreases its digestibility, increases the amount of protein reaching the colon, and increases colonic protein fermentation and that the potentially toxic products of this fermentation promote colon carcinogenesis). We found that the thermolysis of casein reduces its digestibility and increases colonic protein fermentation, as assessed by fecal ammonium and urinary phenol, cresol, and indol-3-ol. Thermolysis of two other proteins, soy and egg white protein, also increases colonic protein fermentation with increased fecal ammonia and urinary phenols, and thermolysis of all three proteins increases the levels of ammonia and butyric, valeric, and i-valeric acids in the cecal contents. We found, however, that the increased protein fermentation observed with thermolysis is not associated with promotion of colon carcinogenesis. With casein, the kinetics of protein fermentation with increasing thermolysis time are clearly different from the kinetics of promotion of ACF growth. The formation of the fermentation products was highest when the protein was thermolyzed for one hour, whereas promotion was highest for protein that had been thermolyzed for two or more hours. With soy and egg white, thermolysis increased colonic protein fermentation but did not promote colon carcinogenesis. Thus, although thermolysis of dietary casein increases colonic protein fermentation, products of this fermentation do not appear to be responsible for the promotion of colon carcinogenesis. Indeed, the results suggest that protein fermentation products do not play an important role in colon cancer promotion. PMID:7603887

  19. A selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor prevents inflammation-related squamous cell carcinogenesis of the forestomach via duodenogastric reflux in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Oba, Masaru; Miwa, Koichi; Fujimura, Takeshi; Harada, Shin-ichi; Sasaki, Shozo; Oyama, Katsunobu; Ohta, Tetsuo; Hattori, Takanori

    2009-01-01

    Background: Duodenal reflux causes inflammation-related squamous cell carcinogenesis in the forestomach of rats without any carcinogens. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, meloxicam, in preventing this carcinogenesis. Methods: A series of 188 rats underwent a surgical duodenogastric reflux procedure and were divided into 2 groups. One group was given commercial chow (control group), and the other was given experimental chow c...

  20. Unihemispheric burst suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward C. Mader Jr.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression (BS consists of bursts of high-voltage slow and sharp wave activity alternating with periods of background suppression in the electroencephalogram (EEG. When induced by deep anesthesia or encephalopathy, BS is bihemispheric and is often viewed as a non-epileptic phenomenon. In contrast, unihemispheric BS is rare and its clinical significance is poorly understood. We describe here two cases of unihemispheric BS. The first patient is a 56-year-old woman with a left temporoparietal tumor who presented in convulsive status epilepticus. EEG showed left hemispheric BS after clinical seizure termination with lorazepam and propofol. The second patient is a 39-year-old woman with multiple medical problems and a vague history of seizures. After abdominal surgery, she experienced a convulsive seizure prompting treatment with propofol. Her EEG also showed left hemispheric BS. In both cases, increasing the propofol infusion rate resulted in disappearance of unihemispheric BS and clinical improvement. The prevailing view that typical bihemispheric BS is non-epileptic should not be extrapolated automatically to unihemispheric BS. The fact that unihemispheric BS was associated with clinical seizure and resolved with propofol suggests that, in both cases, an epileptic mechanism was responsible for unihemispheric BS.

  1. Oral Thrush (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Parents / Oral Thrush Print en español Muguet (candidiasis oral) What Is Oral Thrush? Oral thrush is a ... Candida overgrowth also causes diaper rash and vaginal yeast infections . Babies can have oral thrush and a diaper rash at the same ...

  2. Towards understanding oral health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaura, E.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term ‘oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain

  3. Modification of N-Methyl-N-Nitrosourea initiated bladder carcinogenesis in Wistar rats by terephthalic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Lunbiao; Shi Yuan; Dai Guidong; Pan Hongxin; Chen Jianfeng; Song Ling; Wang Shouling; Chang, Hebron C.; Sheng Hongbing; Wang Xinru

    2006-01-01

    The effect of terephthalic acid (TPA) on urinary bladder carcinogenesis was examined. Male Wistar rats were initiated by injection of N-Methyl-N-Nitrosourea (MNU) (20 mg/kg b.w. ip) twice a week for 4 weeks, then given basal diet containing 5% TPA, 5% TPA plus 4% Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 ) or 1% TPA for the next 22 weeks, and then euthanized. 5% TPA treatment induced a high incidence of urinary bladder calculi and a large amount of precipitate. Though 5% TPA plus 4% Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 ) and 1% TPA treatment did not induce urinary bladder calculi formation, they resulted in a moderate increase in urinary precipitate. Histological examination of urinary bladder revealed that MNU-5% TPA treatment resulted in a higher incidence of simple hyperplasia, papillary or nodular hyperplasia (PN hyperplasia), papilloma and cancer than MNU control. MNU-5% TPA plus 4% Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 ) and 1% TPA treatment increased slightly the incidence of simple hyperplasia and PN hyperplasia (not statistically significant). The major elements of the precipitate are phosphorus, potassium, sulfur, chloride, calcium and TPA. The present study indicated that the calculi induced by TPA had a strong promoting activity on urinary bladder carcinogenesis and the precipitate containing calcium terephthalate (CaTPA) may also have weak promoting activity on urinary bladder carcinogenesis

  4. 65Zn kinetics as a biomarker of DMH induced colon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadha, Vijayta Dani

    2012-01-01

    Dietary factors are considered crucial for the prevention of initiating events in the multistep progression of colon carcinoma. There is substantial evidence that zinc may play a pivotal role in host defense against several malignancies, including colon cancer. The present study was conducted to evaluate the kinetics of zinc utilization following experimental colon carcinogenesis in rat model. The rats were segregated into two groups viz., untreated control and DMH treated. Colon carcinogenesis was established through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30mg/Kg body weight) for 16 weeks. Whole body 65 Zn kinetics followed two compartment kinetics, with Tb1 representing the initial fast component of the biological half-life and Tb2, the slower component. The present study revealed a significant depression in the Tb1 and Tb2 components of 65 Zn in DMH treated rats. Further, DMH treatment caused a significant increase in the percent uptake values of 65 Zn in the colon, small intestine, kidney and blood, whereas a significant decrease was observed in the liver. Subcellular distribution revealed a significant increase in 65 Zn uptake in the mitochondrial and microsomal fractions following 16 weeks of DMH supplementation. The present study demonstrated a slow mobilization of zinc during promotion of experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis and provides a physiological basis for the role of zinc in colon tumorigenesis, a paradigm which may have clinical implications in the management of colon cancer. (author)

  5. The scientific basis for the establishment of threshold levels and dose response relationships of carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency hosted a two day Symposium from 2-3 December 1974 at its Headquarters, organized by the 'International Academy for Environmental Safety and the Forum fur Wissenschaft, Wirtschaft und Politik' on the subject 'Scientific Basis for the Establishment of Threshold. Levels and Dose Response Relationships of Carcinogenesis'. Following an introductory paper by the Radiation Biology Section of the Agency on 'Radiation Carcinogenesis - Dose Response Relationship, Threshold and Risk Estimates', a series of papers dealt with this problem in chemical carcinogenesis.It was suggested that more experiments should be done using non-human primates for tests of carcinogens, especially chemicals. Preliminary experiments using monkeys with a potent carcinogen - nitrosoamine - indicate that there could possibly be a dose where no effect can be observed during the 5 year period of study. It was also pointed out that the overall cost/benefit and risk/ benefit relationships should be taken into consideration in determining limits for chemicals which are potentially carcinogenic but are used routinely by the public and industries; these considerations have been weighed in setting exposure limits for radiation

  6. Recent progress in nickel carcinogenesis. [Cornybacterium; E. coli; S. typhimurium; B. subtillis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Research on nickel carcinogenesis from 1979 to 1983 is reviewed. Epidemiological studies have strengthened the evidence that workers in nickel refineries have increased risks of lung and sinonasal cancers, but have not substantiated increased risks of respiratory cancers in other nickel-exposed workers. Carcinogenesis bioassays have demonstrated carcinogenicity of certain nickel sulfide, hydroxide, selenide, arsenide, antimonide, and telluride compounds following parenteral administration to rodents. Positive bacterial mutagenesis tests have been obtained with Ni(II) in Cornybacterium, but not in E. coli, S. typhimurium, or B. subtilis. Transformation assays of several soluble and crystalline Ni compounds have been positive in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Ni(II) binds to DNA, RNA, and nucleoproteins, and becomes localized in nucleoli. Genotoxic effects of Ni include: (a) chromosomal aberrations, including sister-chromatid exchanges, (b) DNA strandbreaks and DNA-protein cross-links, (c) inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis, (d) infidelity of DNA transcription, and (e) mutations at the HGPRTase locus in Chinese hamster cells and the TK locus in mouse lymphoma cells. These findings are consistent with somatic mutation as the mechanism for initiation of nickel carcinogenesis. Ni compounds cause reversible transition of double-stranded poly(dG-dC) DNA from the right-handed B-helix to the left-handed Z-helix, suggesting a mechanism whereby nickel might modulate oncogene expression. 99 references, 6 tables.

  7. DNA Damage in Inflammation-Related Carcinogenesis and Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiho Ohnishi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection and chronic inflammation have been recognized as important factors for carcinogenesis. Under inflammatory conditions, reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS are generated from inflammatory and epithelial cells and result in oxidative and nitrative DNA damage, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG and 8-nitroguanine. The DNA damage can cause mutations and has been implicated in the initiation and/or promotion of inflammation-mediated carcinogenesis. It has been estimated that various infectious agents are carcinogenic to humans (IARC group 1, including parasites (Schistosoma haematobium (SH and Opisthorchis viverrini (OV, viruses (hepatitis C virus (HCV, human papillomavirus (HPV, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, and bacterium Helicobacter pylori (HP. SH, OV, HCV, HPV, EBV, and HP are important risk factors for bladder cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, cervical cancer, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and gastric cancer, respectively. We demonstrated that 8-nitroguanine was strongly formed via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression at these cancer sites of patients. Moreover, 8-nitroguanine was formed in Oct3/4-positive stem cells in SH-associated bladder cancer tissues and in Oct3/4- and CD133-positive stem cells in OV-associated cholangiocarcinoma tissues. Therefore, it is considered that oxidative and nitrative DNA damage in stem cells may play a key role in inflammation-related carcinogenesis.

  8. Oral sex, oral health and orogenital infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex.

  9. Oral Health Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Oral Health and Overal Health Gum Disease and Cardiovascular Health ... news feeds delivered directly to your desktop! more... Oral Health Glossary Article Chapters Oral Health Glossary print full ...

  10. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us Home Health Info Health Information The Oral Cancer Exam See a step-by-step video explaining what happens during an oral cancer examination. An oral cancer exam is painless and ...

  11. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Us Home Health Info Health Information The Oral Cancer Exam See a step-by-step video explaining what happens during an oral cancer examination. An oral cancer exam is painless and ...

  12. Suppression of sympathetic detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. C., Jr.; Gunger, M. E.; Craig, B. G.; Parsons, G. H.

    1984-08-01

    There are two basic approaches to suppression of sympathetic detonation. Minimizing the shock sensitivity of the explosive to long duration pressure will obviously reduce interround separation distances. However, given that the explosive sensitivity is fixed, then much can be gained through the use of simple barriers placed between the rounds. Researchers devised calculational methods for predicting shock transmission; experimental methods have been developed to characterize explosive shock sensitivity and observe the response of acceptors to barriers. It was shown that both EAK and tritonal can be initiated to detonation with relatively low pressure shocks of long durations. It was also shown that to be an effective barrier between the donor and acceptor, the material must attenuate shock and defect fragments. Future actions will concentrate on refining the design of barriers to minimize weight, volume, and cost.

  13. Oral health and elite sport performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needleman, Ian; Ashley, Paul; Fine, Peter; Haddad, Fares; Loosemore, Mike; de Medici, Akbar; Donos, Nikos; Newton, Tim; van Someren, Ken; Moazzez, Rebecca; Jaques, Rod; Hunter, Glenn; Khan, Karim; Shimmin, Mark; Brewer, John; Meehan, Lyndon; Mills, Steve; Porter, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    While the research base is limited, studies have consistently reported poor oral health in elite athletes since the first report from the 1968 Olympic Games. The finding is consistent both across selected samples attending dental clinics at major competitions and more representative sampling of teams and has led to calls from the International Olympic Committee for more accurate data on oral health. Poor oral health is an important issue directly as it can cause pain, negative effects on appearance and psychosocial effects on confidence and quality of life and may have long-term consequences for treatment burden. Self-reported evidence also suggests an impact on training and performance of athletes. There are many potential challenges to the oral health of athletes including nutritional, oral dehydration, exercise-induced immune suppression, lack of awareness, negative health behaviours and lack of prioritisation. However, in theory, oral diseases are preventable by simple interventions with good evidence of efficacy. The consensus statement aims to raise awareness of the issues of oral health in elite sport and recommends strategies for prevention and health promotion in addition to future research strategies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Oral health and elite sport performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needleman, Ian; Ashley, Paul; Fine, Peter; Haddad, Fares; Loosemore, Mike; de Medici, Akbar; Donos, Nikos; Newton, Tim; van Someren, Ken; Moazzez, Rebecca; Jaques, Rod; Hunter, Glenn; Khan, Karim; Shimmin, Mark; Brewer, John; Meehan, Lyndon; Mills, Steve; Porter, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    While the research base is limited, studies have consistently reported poor oral health in elite athletes since the first report from the 1968 Olympic Games. The finding is consistent both across selected samples attending dental clinics at major competitions and more representative sampling of teams and has led to calls from the International Olympic Committee for more accurate data on oral health. Poor oral health is an important issue directly as it can cause pain, negative effects on appearance and psychosocial effects on confidence and quality of life and may have long-term consequences for treatment burden. Self-reported evidence also suggests an impact on training and performance of athletes. There are many potential challenges to the oral health of athletes including nutritional, oral dehydration, exercise-induced immune suppression, lack of awareness, negative health behaviours and lack of prioritisation. However, in theory, oral diseases are preventable by simple interventions with good evidence of efficacy. The consensus statement aims to raise awareness of the issues of oral health in elite sport and recommends strategies for prevention and health promotion in addition to future research strategies. PMID:25263651

  15. Influence of rofecoxib on experimental colonic carcinogenesis in rats Influencia del rofecoxib sobre la carcinogénesis cólica experimental en ratas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Noguera Aguilar

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to investigate the effect of a selective cyclooxigenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitor, rofecoxib, in the prevalence of experimental colon tumors in rats. Experimental design: experimental study with 35 male Sprague-Dawley rats, divided into four groups: a control group without experimental manipulation (n = 5; b pharmacological carcinogenesis with 1-2 dimethylhydrazine dihydrocloride (n = 10; c pharmacological carcinogenesis and addition of acetylsalicylic acid (AAS (n = 10; and d carcinogenesis and addition of rofecoxib (n = 10. Carcinogenesis was induced with 1-2 dimethylhydrazine at a weekly dose of 25 mg/kg for 18 weeks. Colon tumors were isolated at 20 weeks. Antiinflammatory agents were given at a dose of AAS 30 mg/kg and rofecoxib at 3 mg/kg. Results: the percentage of colonic tumors was significantly reduced in the rofecoxib group. This result was found for all tumors and for the malignant lesions, adenocarcinomas. Conclusions: rofecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, reduced the percentage of drug-induced neoplastic glandular tissue in rats.Objetivo: investigar el efecto de un inhibidor selectivo de la ciclooxigenasa-2, rofecoxib, en la incidencia de tumores cólicos a nivel experimental. Diseño experimental: estudio experimental con 35 ratas Sprague-Dawley macho, asignadas aleatoriamente a uno de los cuatro grupos: a control (n=5, sin manipulación experimental; b carcinogénesis farmacológica (n=10; c carcinogénesis farmacológica y ácido acetilsalicílico (n=10, con administración de este fármaco al tiempo de la carcinogénesis farmacológica; y d carcinogénesis farmacológica y rofecoxib (n=10 con administración de este fármaco junto a la carcinogénesis farmacológica. La inducción carcinogénica se realizó con 1-2 dimetilhidrazina dihidrocloruro a dosis semanal de 25 mg/kg de peso durante 18 semanas. Se analizaron los tumores cólicos inducidos en la semana 20. Los antiinflamatorios se administraron por vía oral a razón de

  16. Mucosite oral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Spezzia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A mucosite consta de irritação ou inflamação da mucosa bucal, provocada por ação da radioterapia de cabeça e pescoço e da quimioterapia. O objetivo deste artigo foi verificar como a ocorrência de mucosite oral pode influir na saúde bucal dos pacientes com câncer. Para tratamento odontológico o laser de baixa intensidade é o de opção. O emprego do laser de baixa potência tem cunho, tanto preventivo, como curativo para tratamento das lesões causadas. Concluiu-se que se pode evitar intercorrências no transcorrer do tratamento oncológico radioterápico e quimioterápico, fazendo-se uso da terapia laser, o que vai permitir melhores condições e qualidade de vida aos pacientes acometidos por mucosite.

  17. An Alternative to Thought Suppression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Setting free the bears: Escape from thought suppression," by D. M. Wegner (see record 2011-25622-008). While Wegner supposed that we might have to learn to live with bad thoughts, the present author discusses the use of imagination and guided imagery as an alternative to forced thought suppression.

  18. Chronic ultraviolet exposure-induced p53 gene alterations in sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Ying; Smith, M.A.; Tucker, S.B.

    1997-01-01

    Alterations of the tumor suppressor gene p53 have been found in ultraviolet radiation (UVR) related human skin cancers and in UVR-induced murine skin tumors. However, links between p53 gene alterations and the stages of carcinogenesis induced by UVR have not been clearly defined. We established a chronic UVR exposure-induced Sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model to determine the frequency of p53 gene alterations in different stages of carcinogenesis, including UV-exposed skin, papillomas, squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs), and malignant spindle-cell tumors (SCTs). A high incidence of SCCs and SCTs were found in this model. Positive p53 nuclear staining was found in 10137 (27%) of SCCs and 12124 (50%) of SCTs, but was not detected in normal skin or papillomas. DNA was isolated from 40 paraffin-embedded normal skin, UV-exposed skin, and tumor sections. The p53 gene (exons 5 and 6) was amplified from the sections by using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay and sequencing analysis revealed one point mutation in exon 6 (coden 193, C → A transition) from a UV-exposed skin sample, and seven point mutations in exon 5 (codens 146, 158, 150, 165, and 161, three C → T, two C → A, one C → G, and one A → T transition, respectively) from four SCTs, two SCCs and one UV-exposed skin sample. These experimental results demonstrate that alterations in the p53 gene are frequent events in chronic UV exposure-induced SCCs and later stage SCTs in Sencar mouse skin. 40 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. Dysregulation of microRNAs in colonic field carcinogenesis: implications for screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay P Kunte

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC screening tests often have a trade-off between efficacy and patient acceptability/cost. Fecal tests (occult blood, methylation engender excellent patient compliance but lack requisite performance underscoring the need for better population screening tests. We assessed the utility of microRNAs (miRNAs as markers of field carcinogenesis and their potential role for CRC screening using the azoxymethane (AOM-treated rat model. We found that 63 miRNAs were upregulated and miR-122, miR-296-5p and miR-503# were downregulated in the uninvolved colonic mucosa of AOM rats. We monitored the expression of selected miRNAs in colonic biopsies of AOM rats at 16 weeks and correlated it with tumor development. We noted that the tumor bearing rats had significantly greater miRNA modulation compared to those without tumors. The miRNAs showed good diagnostic performance with an area under the receiver operator curve (AUROC of >0.7. We also noted that the miRNA induction in the colonic mucosa was mirrorred in the mucus layer fecal colonocytes isolated from AOM rat stool and the degree of miRNA induction was greater in the tumor bearing rats compared to those without tumors. Lastly, we also noted significant miRNA modulation in the Pirc rats- the genetic model of colon carcinogenesis, both in the uninvolved colonic mucosa and the fecal colonocytes. We thus demonstrate that miRNAs are excellent markers of field carcinogenesis and could accurately predict future neoplasia. Based on our results, we propose an accurate, inexpensive, non-invasive miRNA test for CRC risk stratification based on rectal brushings or from abraded fecal colonocytes.

  20. Chemoprevention by Probiotics During 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine-Induced Colon Carcinogenesis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Sohini; Kamal, Rozy; Dhawan, D K; Kanwar, S S

    2018-04-01

    Probiotics are believed to have properties that lower the risk of colon cancer. However, the mechanisms by which they exert their beneficial effects are relatively unknown. To assess the impact of probiotics in preventing induction of colon carcinogenesis in rats. The rats were divided into six groups viz., normal control, Lactobacillus plantarum (AdF10)-treated, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-treated, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-treated, L. plantarum (AdF10) + DMH-treated and L. rhamnosus GG (LGG) + DMH-treated. Both the probiotics were supplemented daily at a dose of 2 × 10 10 cells per day. DMH at a dose of 30 mg/kg body weight was administered subcutaneously twice a week for the first 4 weeks and then once every week for a duration of 16 weeks. Glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and catalase as protein expression of genes involved in apoptosis were assessed during DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats. DMH treatment decreased the activity of GSH, GPx, GST, SOD and catalase. However, AdF10 and LGG supplementation to DMH-treated rats significantly increased the activity of these enzymes. Further, DMH treatment revealed alterations in the protein expressions of various genes involved in the p53-mediated apoptotic pathway such as p53, p21, Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-9 and caspase-3, which, however, were shifted towards normal control levels upon simultaneous supplementation with probiotics. The present study suggests that probiotics can provide protection against oxidative stress and apoptotic-related protein disregulation during experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis.

  1. Iron and thiols as two major players in carcinogenesis: friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    Iron is the most abundant metal in the human body and mainly works as a cofactor for proteins such as hemoglobin and various enzymes. No independent life forms on earth can survive without iron. However, excess iron is intimately associated with carcinogenesis by increasing oxidative stress via its catalytic activity to generate hydroxyl radicals. Biomolecules with redox-active sulfhydryl function(s) (thiol compounds) are necessary for the maintenance of mildly reductive cellular environments to counteract oxidative stress, and for the execution of redox reactions for metabolism and detoxification. Involvement of glutathione S-transferase and thioredoxin has long attracted the attention of cancer researchers. Here, I update recent findings on the involvement of iron and thiol compounds during carcinogenesis and in cancer cells. It is now recognized that the cystine/glutamate transporter (antiporter) is intimately associated with ferroptosis, an iron-dependent, non-apoptotic form of cell death, observed in cancer cells, and also with cancer stem cells; the former with transporter blockage but the latter with its stabilization. Excess iron in the presence of oxygen appears the most common known mutagen. Ironically, the persistent activation of antioxidant systems via genetic alterations in Nrf2 and Keap1 also contributes to carcinogenesis. Therefore, it is difficult to conclude the role of iron and thiol compounds as friends or foes, which depends on the quantity/distribution and induction/flexibility, respectively. Avoiding further mutation would be the most helpful strategy for cancer prevention, and myriad of efforts are being made to sort out the weaknesses of cancer cells.

  2. Thrombospondin-2 overexpression in the skin of transgenic mice reduces the susceptibility to chemically induced multistep skin carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunstfeld, Rainer; Hawighorst, Thomas; Streit, Michael; Hong, Young-Kwon; Nguyen, Lynh; Brown, Lawrence F; Detmar, Michael

    2014-05-01

    We have previously reported stromal upregulation of the endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor thrombospondin-2 (TSP-2) during multistep carcinogenesis, and we found accelerated and enhanced skin angiogenesis and carcinogenesis in TSP-2 deficient mice. To investigate whether enhanced levels of TSP-2 might protect from skin cancer development. We established transgenic mice with targeted overexpression of TSP-2 in the skin and subjected hemizygous TSP-2 transgenic mice and their wild-type littermates to a chemical skin carcinogenesis regimen. TSP-2 transgenic mice showed a significantly delayed onset of tumor formation compared to wild-type mice, whereas the ratio of malignant conversion to squamous cell carcinomas was comparable in both genotypes. Computer-assisted morphometric analysis of blood vessels revealed pronounced tumor angiogenesis already in the early stages of carcinogenesis in wild type mice. TSP-2 overexpression significantly reduced tumor blood vessel density in transgenic mice but had no overt effect on LYVE-1 positive lymphatic vessels. The percentage of desmin surrounded, mature tumor-associated blood vessels and the degree of epithelial differentiation remained unaffected. The antiangiogenic effect of transgenic TSP-2 was accompanied by a significantly increased number of apoptotic tumor cells in transgenic mice. Our results demonstrate that enhanced levels of TSP-2 in the skin result in reduced susceptibility to chemically-induced skin carcinogenesis and identify TSP-2 as a new target for the prevention of skin cancer. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Kaempferol targets RSK2 and MSK1 to suppress ultraviolet radiation-induced skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langfald, Alyssa; Yang, Ge; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Dong Hoon; Kim, Myoung Ok; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Li, Haitao; Bae, Ki Beom; Kim, Hong-Gyum; Ma, Wei-Ya; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Ziming; Dong, Zigang

    2014-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (SUV) irradiation is a major factor in skin carcinogenesis, the most common form of cancer in the USA. The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades are activated by SUV irradiation. The 90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) and mitogen and stress activated protein kinase (MSK) proteins constitute a family of protein kinases that mediate signal transduction downstream of the MAP kinase cascades. In this study, phosphorylation of RSK and MSK1 was up-regulated in human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and solar UV-treated mouse skin. Kaempferol, a natural flavonol, found in tea, broccoli, grapes, apples and other plant sources, is known to have anticancer activity, but its mechanisms and direct target(s) in cancer chemoprevention are unclear. Kinase array results revealed that kaempferol inhibited RSK2 and MSK1. Pull-down assay results, ATP competition and in vitro kinase assay data revealed that kaempferol interacts with RSK2 and MSK1 at the ATP-binding pocket and inhibits their respective kinase activities. Mechanistic investigations showed that kaempferol suppresses RSK2 and MSK1 kinase activities to attenuate solar UV-induced phosphorylation of CREB and histone H3 in mouse skin cells. Kaempferol was a potent inhibitor of solar UV-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis. Further analysis showed that skin from the kaempferol-treated group exhibited a substantial reduction in solar UV-induced phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), c-Fos and histone H3. Overall, our results identify kaempferol as a safe and novel chemopreventive agent against solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis that acts by targeting RSK2 and MSK1. PMID:24994661

  4. Kaempferol targets RSK2 and MSK1 to suppress UV radiation-induced skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ke; Chen, Hanyong; Liu, Kangdong; Langfald, Alyssa; Yang, Ge; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Dong Hoon; Kim, Myoung Ok; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Li, Haitao; Bae, Ki Beom; Kim, Hong-Gyum; Ma, Wei-Ya; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Ziming; Dong, Zigang

    2014-09-01

    Solar UV (SUV) irradiation is a major factor in skin carcinogenesis, the most common form of cancer in the United States. The MAPK cascades are activated by SUV irradiation. The 90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) and mitogen and stress-activated protein kinase (MSK) proteins constitute a family of protein kinases that mediate signal transduction downstream of the MAPK cascades. In this study, phosphorylation of RSK and MSK1 was upregulated in human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and SUV-treated mouse skin. Kaempferol, a natural flavonol, found in tea, broccoli, grapes, apples, and other plant sources, is known to have anticancer activity, but its mechanisms and direct target(s) in cancer chemoprevention are unclear. Kinase array results revealed that kaempferol inhibited RSK2 and MSK1. Pull-down assay results, ATP competition, and in vitro kinase assay data revealed that kaempferol interacts with RSK2 and MSK1 at the ATP-binding pocket and inhibits their respective kinase activities. Mechanistic investigations showed that kaempferol suppresses RSK2 and MSK1 kinase activities to attenuate SUV-induced phosphorylation of cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and histone H3 in mouse skin cells. Kaempferol was a potent inhibitor of SUV-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis. Further analysis showed that skin from the kaempferol-treated group exhibited a substantial reduction in SUV-induced phosphorylation of CREB, c-Fos, and histone H3. Overall, our results identify kaempferol as a safe and novel chemopreventive agent against SUV-induced skin carcinogenesis that acts by targeting RSK2 and MSK1. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Environmental pollution and DNA methylation: carcinogenesis, clinical significance, and practical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Environmental pollution is one of the main causes of human cancer. Exposures to environmental carcinogens result in genetic and epigenetic alterations which induce cell transformation. Epigenetic changes caused by environmental pollution play important roles in the development and progression of environmental pollution-related cancers. Studies on DNA methylation are among the earliest and most conducted epigenetic research linked to cancer. In this review, the roles of DNA methylation in carcinogenesis and their significance in clinical medicine were summarized, and the effects of environmental pollutants, particularly air pollutants, on DNA methylation were introduced. Furthermore, prospective applications of DNA methylation to environmental pollution detection and cancer prevention were discussed.

  6. Thyroid cancer. Reevaluation of an experimental model for radiogenic endocrine carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, K.H.

    1984-11-01

    The status of experimental studies of radiogenic thyroid cancer is appraised, and some older data are reinterpreted in the light of more recent findings. Problems of thyroid dosimetry, particularly the dosimetry of internal radioiodides, are discussed. The steps in radiation carcinogenesis during the acute phase, the latent phase, and the phase of tumor growth are discussed in terms of thyroid epithelial cell population changes. The roles of three cell populations (undamaged or completely repaired epithelial cells, oncogenically initiated cells, and terminally damaged but functionally competent cells) in neoplasia are described. Finally, the implications for man of these experimental results and conclusions are discussed. 89 refs., 4 figs

  7. Thermodynamic considerations on the role of heat and mass transfer in biochemical causes of carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Umberto; Grisolia, Giulia; Ponzetto, Antonio; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    2018-01-01

    Cellular homoeostasis involves a continuous interaction between the cell and its microenvironment. As such, active and passive transport of ions, nutrients, molecules and water are the basis for biochemical-physical cell life. These transport phenomena change the internal and external ionic concentrations, and, as a consequence, the cell membrane's electric potential and the pH. In this paper we focus on the relationship between these ion transport-induced pH and membrane voltage changes to highlight their impact on carcinogenesis. The preliminary results suggest a critical role for Cl- in driving tumour transformation towards a more malignant phenotype.

  8. Predicting cancer rates in astronauts from animal carcinogenesis studies and cellular markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. R.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, H.; Osman, M.; Cha, D.; Kavet, R.; Cuccinotta, F.; Dicello, J. F.; Dillehay, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    The radiation space environment includes particles such as protons and multiple species of heavy ions, with much of the exposure to these radiations occurring at extremely low average dose-rates. Limitations in databases needed to predict cancer hazards in human beings from such radiations are significant and currently do not provide confidence that such predictions are acceptably precise or accurate. In this article, we outline the need for animal carcinogenesis data based on a more sophisticated understanding of the dose-response relationship for induction of cancer and correlative cellular endpoints by representative space radiations. We stress the need for a model that can interrelate human and animal carcinogenesis data with cellular mechanisms. Using a broad model for dose-response patterns which we term the "subalpha-alpha-omega (SAO) model", we explore examples in the literature for radiation-induced cancer and for radiation-induced cellular events to illustrate the need for data that define the dose-response patterns more precisely over specific dose ranges, with special attention to low dose, low dose-rate exposure. We present data for multiple endpoints in cells, which vary in their radiosensitivity, that also support the proposed model. We have measured induction of complex chromosome aberrations in multiple cell types by two space radiations, Fe-ions and protons, and compared these to photons delivered at high dose-rate or low dose-rate. Our data demonstrate that at least three factors modulate the relative efficacy of Fe-ions compared to photons: (i) intrinsic radiosensitivity of irradiated cells; (ii) dose-rate; and (iii) another unspecified effect perhaps related to reparability of DNA lesions. These factors can produce respectively up to at least 7-, 6- and 3-fold variability. These data demonstrate the need to understand better the role of intrinsic radiosensitivity and dose-rate effects in mammalian cell response to ionizing radiation. Such

  9. Development of Carcinogenesis Bioassay Models: Response of Small Fish Species to Various Classes of Carcinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-20

    453-465. I Hawkins, W.E., R.M. Overstreet, and W.W. Walker. 1988. Carcinogenicity tests with small fish species. Aquatic Toxicology 11:113-128. I...Journal of Aquatic Animal Health 3: 213-220. I Hendricks, J.D. 1982. Chemical carcinogenesis in fish. In: Aquatic Toxicology , LJ. Weber (Editor...Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology 9: I 5-22. Malins, D.C. and G.K. Ostrander. 1991. Perspectives in aquatic toxicology . Annual Review I of

  10. Oral tolerance induction with altered forms of ovalbumin

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    Stransky B.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available As a T cell-dependent phenomenon, oral tolerance is not expected to depend necessarily on native configuration of antigens. We investigated the induction of oral tolerance with modified ovalbumin (Ova. Oral administration of heat-denatured (HD-Ova and cyanogen bromide-degraded ovalbumin was less effective than native Ova in inducing oral tolerance in B6D2F1 mice. HD-Ova was effective in suppressing delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH reactions but did not suppress specific antibody formation. Injection of Ova directly into the stomach, but not into the ileum or cecum, suppressed subsequent immunization to DTH reactions. Gavage with protease inhibitors (aprotinin or ovomucoid before gavage with Ova was ineffective in blocking tolerance induction. Treatment with hydroxyurea to destroy cycling cells 24 h before gavage with Ova blocked oral tolerance induction and also the possibility to passively transfer tolerance to naive recipients with the serum of mice gavaged with Ova 1 h before. The implications of these findings about oral tolerance induction are discussed

  11. High prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV in oral mucosal lesions of patients at the Ambulatory of Oral Diagnosis of the Federal University of Sergipe, Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Goveia Melo RIBEIRO

    Full Text Available Abstract The role of human papillomavirus (HPV in oral carcinogenesis is still controversial as detection rates of the virus in oral cavity reported in the literature varies greatly. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of HPV infection and its genotypes in patients with oral lesions at the Ambulatory of Oral Diagnosis of the Federal University of Sergipe, Brazil. Material and Methods We conducted a molecular study with 21 patients (15 females aged from two to 83 years with clinically detectable oral lesions. Samples were collected through exfoliation of lesions and HPV-DNA was identified using MY09/11 and GP5+/6+ primers. Genotyping was performed by multiplex PCR. Results Benign, premalignant and malignant lesions were diagnosed by histopathology. HPV was detected in 17 samples. Of these, HPV-6 was detected in 10 samples, HPV-18 in four and HPV-16 in one sample. When samples were categorized by lesion types, HPV was detected in two papilloma cases (2/3, five carcinomas (5/6, one hyperplasia (1/1 and nine dysplasia cases (9/11. Conclusion Unlike other studies in the literature, we reported high occurrence of HPV in oral lesions. Further studies are required to enhance the comprehension of natural history of oral lesions.

  12. Apigenin suppresses migration and invasion of transformed cells through down-regulation of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei; Kuang, Lisha; Hitron, John Andrew; Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Xin; Budhraja, Amit [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Institute of Oral Biosciences and BK21 Program, Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Pratheeshkumar, Poyil [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Chen, Gang [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Luo, Jia [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Environmental exposure to arsenic is known to cause various cancers. There are some potential relationships between cell malignant transformation and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) expressions. Metastasis, one of the major characteristics of malignantly transformed cells, contributes to the high mortality of cells. CXCR4 and its natural chemokine ligand C-X-C motif ligand 12 (CXCL12) play a critical role in metastasis. Therefore, identification of nutritional factors which are able to inhibit CXCR4 is important for protection from environmental arsenic-induced carcinogenesis and for abolishing metastasis of malignantly transformed cells. The present study demonstrates that apigenin (4′,5,7-trihydroxyflavone), a natural dietary flavonoid, suppressed CXCR4 expression in arsenic-transformed Beas-2B cells (B-AsT) and several other types of transformed/cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Neither proteasome nor lysosome inhibitor had any effect in reducing the apigenin-induced down-regulation of CXCR4, indicating that apigenin-induced down-regulation of CXCR4 is not due to proteolytic degradation. The down-regulation of CXCR4 is mainly due to the inhibition of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity. Apigenin also abolished migration and invasion of transformed cells induced by CXCL12. In a xenograft mouse model, apigenin down-regulated CXCR4 expression and suppressed tumor growth. Taken together, our results show that apigenin is a novel inhibitor of CXCR4 expression. This dietary flavonoid has the potential to suppress migration and invasion of transformed cells and prevent environmental arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Apigenin has a potential in preventing environmental arsenic induced carcinogenesis. • Apigenin suppresses CXCR4 in malignant transformed cells in vitro and in vivo. • The down-regulation of CXCR4 is mainly due to inhibition of NF-κB activity.

  13. Menstrual suppression in the adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantartzis, Kelly L; Sucato, Gina S

    2013-06-01

    Menstrual suppression, the use of contraceptive methods to eliminate or decrease the frequency of menses, is often prescribed for adolescents to treat menstrual disorders or to accommodate patient preference. For young women using hormonal contraceptives, there is no medical indication for menstruation to occur monthly, and various hormonal contraceptives can be used to decrease the frequency of menstruation with different side effect profiles and rates of amenorrhea. This article reviews the different modalities for menstrual suppression, common conditions in adolescents which may improve with menstrual suppression, and strategies for managing common side effects. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The risk of iatrogenic tumors with radiation therapy is so outweighed by the benefit of cure that estimates of risk have not been considered necessary. However, with the introduction of chemotherapy, combined therapy, and particle radiation therapy, the comparative risks should be examined. In the case of radiation, total dose, fractionation, dose rate, dose distribution, and radiation quality should be considered in the estimation of risk. The biological factors that must be considered include incidence of tumors, latent period, degree of malignancy, and multiplicity of tumors. The risk of radiation induction of tumors is influenced by the genotype, sex, and age of the patient, the tissues that will be exposed, and previous therapy. With chemotherapy the number of cells at risk is usually markedly higher than with radiation therapy. Clearly the problem of the estimation of comparative risks is complex. This paper presents the current views on the comparative risks and the importance of the various factors that influence the estimation of risk

  15. Transgenic expression of nonclassically secreted FGF suppresses kidney repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Kirov

    Full Text Available FGF1 is a signal peptide-less nonclassically released growth factor that is involved in angiogenesis, tissue repair, inflammation, and carcinogenesis. The effects of nonclassical FGF export in vivo are not sufficiently studied. We produced transgenic mice expressing FGF1 in endothelial cells (EC, which allowed the detection of FGF1 export to the vasculature, and studied the efficiency of postischemic kidney repair in these animals. Although FGF1 transgenic mice had a normal phenotype with unperturbed kidney structure, they showed a severely inhibited kidney repair after unilateral ischemia/reperfusion. This was manifested by a strong decrease of postischemic kidney size and weight, whereas the undamaged contralateral kidney exhibited an enhanced compensatory size increase. In addition, the postischemic kidneys of transgenic mice were characterized by hyperplasia of interstitial cells, paucity of epithelial tubular structures, increase of the areas occupied by connective tissue, and neutrophil and macrophage infiltration. The continuous treatment of transgenic mice with the cell membrane stabilizer, taurine, inhibited nonclassical FGF1 export and significantly rescued postischemic kidney repair. It was also found that similar to EC, the transgenic expression of FGF1 in monocytes and macrophages suppresses kidney repair. We suggest that nonclassical export may be used as a target for the treatment of pathologies involving signal peptide-less FGFs.

  16. The Neurobiological Impact of Ghrelin Suppression after Oesophagectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor F. Murphy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ghrelin, discovered in 1999, is a 28-amino-acid hormone, best recognized as a stimulator of growth hormone secretion, but with pleiotropic functions in the area of energy homeostasis, such as appetite stimulation and energy expenditure regulation. As the intrinsic ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R, ghrelin appears to have a broad array of effects, but its primary role is still an area of debate. Produced mainly from oxyntic glands in the stomach, but with a multitude of extra-metabolic roles, ghrelin is implicated in complex neurobiological processes. Comprehensive studies within the areas of obesity and metabolic surgery have clarified the mechanism of these operations. As a stimulator of growth hormone (GH, and an apparent inducer of positive energy balance, other areas of interest include its impact on carcinogenesis and tumour proliferation and its role in the cancer cachexia syndrome. This has led several authors to study the hormone in the cancer setting. Ghrelin levels are acutely reduced following an oesophagectomy, a primary treatment modality for oesophageal cancer. We sought to investigate the nature of this postoperative ghrelin suppression, and its neurobiological implications.

  17. Coordinated Increased Expression of Cyclooxygenase2 and Nuclear Factor B Is a Steady Feature of Urinary Bladder Carcinogenesis

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    Stylianos Kontos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The inescapable relationship between chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis has long been established. Our objective was to investigate COX-2 and NF-B immunohistochemical expression in a large series of normal epithelium and bladder carcinomas. Methods. Immunohistochemical methodology was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections from urinary bladder carcinomas of 140 patients (94 males and 46 females with bladder carcinomas. Results. COX-2 expression is increased in the cytoplasm of bladder cells, during loss of cell differentiation (s=0.61, -value<.001 and in muscle invasive carcinomas (-value<.001. A strong positive association between tumor grade and nuclear expression of NFB has been established. A positive correlation between COX-2 and nuclear NFB immunoreactivity was observed. Conclusions. The possible coordinated upregulation of NFB and COX-2, during bladder carcinogenesis, indicates that agents inhibitors of these two molecules may represent a possible new treatment strategy, by virtue of their role in bladder carcinogenesis.

  18. End-Binding Protein 1 (EB1) Up-regulation is an Early Event in Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Mutyal, Nikhil N.; Cruz, Mart Angelo Dela; Kunte, Dhananjay P.; Radosevich, Andrew J.; Wali, Ramesh; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    End-binding protein (EB1) is a microtubule protein that binds to the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC). While EB1 is implicated as a potential oncogene, its role in cancer progression is unknown. Therefore, we analyzed EB1/APC expression at the earliest stages of colorectal carcinogenesis and in the uninvolved mucosa ("field effect") of human and animal tissue. We also performed siRNA-knockdown in colon cancer cell lines. EB1 is up-regulated in early and field carcinogenesis in the colon, and the cellular/nano-architectural effect of EB1 knockdown depended on the genetic context. Thus, dysregulation of EB1 is an important early event in colon carcinogenesis. PMID:24492008

  19. Expression of E-cadherin in oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma: An in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avadhoot Avadhani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There is evidence that E-cadherins may also play a role in progression of dysplasia to cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of E-cadherin during the process of oral carcinogenesis by comparing their expression in normal and oral dysplastic epithelium (OED with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSSC.Materials and methods: The patients who were clinical suspected of having premalignant lesion and oral squamous cell carcinoma were included in the study after the histopathological diagnosis. Totally 20 cases of OED and 20 Cases of OSSC were included in the study. From each case the following data were recorded: patient’s age and sex, tumour location, TNM classification and clinical stage (I-IV. After preliminary examination of sections stained with haematoxylin/eosin, representative parts of each piece were selected and sectioned at 5 micron for immunohistochemical study.Results: There was reduced expression of E-cadherin from mild to severe degree of dysplasia suggesting the negative correlation with E-cadherin expression. However, there was no significant correlation between E-cadherin expression, clinical TNM stage and prognosis score.Conclusion: The E-cadherin expression is reduced with increase grade of dysplasia and in oral squamous cell carcinoma. The reduced expression of E-cadherin may be a reliable indicator of increase in invasiveness in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Reduced E-cadherin expression can be considered a useful marker for progression of dysplasia to oral cancer. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 2 (4: 347-353

  20. Norathyriol Suppresses Skin Cancers Induced by Solar Ultraviolet Radiation by Targeting ERK Kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jixia; Malakhova, Margarita; Mottamal, Madhusoodanan; Reddy, Kanamata; Kurinov, Igor; Carper, Andria; Langfald, Alyssa; Oi, Naomi; Kim, Myoung Ok; Zhu, Feng; Sosa, Carlos P.; Zhou, Keyuan; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang (Cornell); (Guangdong); (UMM)

    2012-06-27

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is the leading factor in the development of skin cancer, prompting great interest in chemopreventive agents for this disease. In this study, we report the discovery of norathyriol, a plant-derived chemopreventive compound identified through an in silico virtual screening of the Chinese Medicine Library. Norathyriol is a metabolite of mangiferin found in mango, Hypericum elegans, and Tripterospermum lanceolatum and is known to have anticancer activity. Mechanistic investigations determined that norathyriol acted as an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 activity to attenuate UVB-induced phosphorylation in mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling cascades. We confirmed the direct and specific binding of norathyriol with ERK2 through a cocrystal structural analysis. The xanthone moiety in norathyriol acted as an adenine mimetic to anchor the compound by hydrogen bonds to the hinge region of the protein ATP-binding site on ERK2. Norathyriol inhibited in vitro cell growth in mouse skin epidermal JB6 P+ cells at the level of G{sub 2}-M phase arrest. In mouse skin tumorigenesis assays, norathyriol significantly suppressed solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Further analysis indicated that norathyriol mediates its chemopreventive activity by inhibiting the ERK-dependent activity of transcriptional factors AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B during UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Taken together, our results identify norathyriol as a safe new chemopreventive agent that is highly effective against development of UV-induced skin cancer.

  1. MiR-519d suppresses breast cancer tumorigenesis and metastasis via targeting MMP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chengling; Liu, Xin; Bai, Xue; Zhao, Tong; Wang, Mengxue; Xu, Ranchen; Li, Mingqi; Hu, Yingying; Li, Weihua; Yang, Lida; Qin, Youyou; Yang, Meng; Yan, Chaoqi; Zhang, Yong

    2018-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cause of death in women throughout the world. Although microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as novel regulators in carcinogenesis, there are still abundant hidden treasure needed to be excavated. In the present study, we found that miR-519d expression was remarkably decreased in both human BC tissues and MCF-7 cells. CCK8 and 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) assays were used to evaluate cell proliferation. Wound-healing and transwell assays were performed for detection of cell migration and invasion. The results demonstrated miR-519d overexpression dramatically suppressed MCF-7 cells proliferation, migration and invasion. While downregulation of miR-519d by miR-519d inhibitor substantially increased MCF-7 cell carcinogenesis. Further analysis identified Matrix Metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) as a direct target of miR-519d. QRT-PCR and western blot results indicated the correlative expression of miR-519d and MMP3 in BC tissues and MCF-7 cells. In summary, our data uncovered the novel molecular interaction between miR-519d and MMP3, indicating a therapeutic strategy of miR-519d for BC.

  2. STICS, SCOUTs and p53 signatures; a new language for pelvic serous carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Karishma; Mehrad, Mitra; Ning, Geng; Drapkin, Ronny; McKeon, Frank D; Xian, Wa; Crum, Christopher P

    2011-01-01

    The events leading to the most common and most lethal ovarian carcinoma - high grade serous carcinoma - have been poorly understood. However, the detailed pathologic study of asymptomatic women with germ-line BRCA 1 or BRCA2 (BCRA+) mutations has unearthed an early malignancy, serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STIC), which has linked many peritoneal and ovarian serous carcinomas to the fimbria. The distinction between high-grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas continues to narrow, with shared alterations in expression of pTEN, PAX2 and p53. Moreover, the discovery of clonal alterations in p53 in benign tubal epithelium, - p53 signatures - has established a foundation for a serous cancer precursor in the fimbria. We have expanded this concept to include a generic secretory cell outgrowth (SCOUT) in the fallopian tube that is associated with altered PAX2 expression. As the repertoire of gene alterations is expanded and its link to serous carcinogenesis clarified, a cogent pathway to high-grade Mullerian carcinomas will emerge. This will challenge conventional thinking about ovarian carcinogenesis but will provide a new template for studies of ovarian cancer prevention.

  3. Molecular Mechanism of Gastric Carcinogenesis in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Rodent Models

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    Takeshi Toyoda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, many efforts have been made to establish animal models for the investigation of the pathological features and molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis. Among the animal models, Mongolian gerbils and mice are particularly useful for the analysis of H. pylori-associated inflammatory reactions and gastric cancer development. Inhibitors of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and nuclear factor-κB, exert preventive effects on chronic gastritis and the development of adenocarcinomas in H. pylori-infected gerbils. Genetically-modified mouse models, including transgenic and knockout mice, have also revealed the importance of p53, COX-2/prostaglandin, Wnt/β-catenin, proinflammatory cytokines, gastrin and type III mucin in the molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis. Microarray technology is available for comprehensive gene analysis in the gastric mucosa of mouse models, and epigenetics, such as DNA methylation, could be an alternative approach to correlate the observations in animal models with the etiology in humans.

  4. Environment and breast cancer - the role of xenooestrogens in breast cancer carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plesnicar, A.; Kralj, B.; Druzina, B.; Kovac, V.

    2002-01-01

    Background. The survival rate of breast cancer patients has not changed much in the last few decades in developed countries. In order to improve the efficacy of breast cancer prevention and treatment, the role of xenooestrogens in the mechanisms of its development has been evaluated. These industrial chemicals bear little structural resemblance to each other and bind to the oestrogen receptors of exposed cells and/or trigger oestrogenic responses in laboratory test systems. Exposure to xenooestrogens has been regarded as a risk factor for carcinogenesis and a preventable cause of breast carcinoma. Several epidemiological and experimental studies in in vivo and in in vitro conditions of the influence of xenooestrogens on the occurrence of breast cancer have been conducted in the last decades and have shown ambiguous results. Conclusions. No increase in breast carcinoma incidence could be found in women who were exposed to relatively high concentrations of xenooestrogens for extended periods and small quantities of these compounds that are present in the environment probably cannot act as etiological agents for the occurrence of this disease. A multi step approach is suggested regarding the sequence of studies and measures that should be taken to further assess the importance of xenooestrogens on breast cancer carcinogenesis. (author)

  5. Evaluation of carcinogenic potential of diuron in a rat mammary two-stage carcinogenesis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Tony Fernando; Rodrigues, Maria Aparecida Marchesan; de Camargo, João Lauro Viana; Barbisan, Luís Fernando

    2011-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the carcinogenic potential of the herbicide Diuron in a two-stage rat medium-term mammary carcinogenesis model initiated by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA). Female seven-week-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were allocated to six groups: groups G1 to G4 received intragastrically (i.g.) a single 50 mg/kg dose of DMBA; groups G5 and G6 received single administration of canola oil (vehicle of DMBA). Groups G1 and G5 received a basal diet, and groups G2, G3, G4, and G6 were fed the basal diet with the addition of Diuron at 250, 1250, 2500, and 2500 ppm, respectively. After twenty-five weeks, the animals were euthanized and mammary tumors were histologically confirmed and quantified. Tumor samples were also processed for immunohistochemical evaluation of the expressions of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cleaved caspase-3, estrogen receptor-α (ER-α), p63, bcl-2, and bak. Diuron treatment did not increase the incidence or multiplicity of mammary tumors (groups G2 to G4 versus Group G1). Also, exposure to Diuron did not alter tumor growth (cell proliferation and apoptosis indexes) or immunoreactivity to ER-α, p63 (myoephitelial marker), or bcl-2 and bak (apoptosis regulatory proteins). These findings indicate that Diuron does not have a promoting potential on mammary carcinogenesis in female SD rats initiated with DMBA.

  6. Gene Systems Network Inferred from Expression Profiles in Hepatocellular Carcinogenesis by Graphical Gaussian Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito Shigeru

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in a liver with advanced-stage chronic hepatitis C (CHC is induced by hepatitis C virus, which chronically infects about 170 million people worldwide. To elucidate the associations between gene groups in hepatocellular carcinogenesis, we analyzed the profiles of the genes characteristically expressed in the CHC and HCC cell stages by a statistical method for inferring the network between gene systems based on the graphical Gaussian model. A systematic evaluation of the inferred network in terms of the biological knowledge revealed that the inferred network was strongly involved in the known gene-gene interactions with high significance , and that the clusters characterized by different cancer-related responses were associated with those of the gene groups related to metabolic pathways and morphological events. Although some relationships in the network remain to be interpreted, the analyses revealed a snapshot of the orchestrated expression of cancer-related groups and some pathways related with metabolisms and morphological events in hepatocellular carcinogenesis, and thus provide possible clues on the disease mechanism and insights that address the gap between molecular and clinical assessments.

  7. [In vitro and in vivo effects of mango pulp (Mangifera indica cv. Azucar) in colon carcinogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales-Bernal, Andrea; Amparo Urango, Luz; Rojano, Benjamín; Maldonado, Maria Elena

    2014-03-01

    Mango pulp contains ascorbic acid, carotenoids, polyphenols, terpenoids and fiber which are healthy and could protect against colon cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiproliferative and preventive capacity of an aqueous extract of Mangifera indica cv. Azúcar on a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (SW480) and in a rodent model of colorectal cancer, respectively. The content of total phenolics, flavonoids and carotenoids were also analyzed in the extract. SW480 cell growth was inhibited in a dose and time dependent manner by 22.3% after a 72h exposure to the extract (200 µg/ mL). Colon carcinogenesis was initiated in Balb/c mice by two intra-peritoneal injections of azoxymethane (AOM) at the third and fourth week of giving mango in drinking water (0.3%, 0.6%, 1.25%). After 10 weeks of treatment, in the colon of mice receiving 0.3% mango, aberrant crypt foci formation was inhibited more than 60% (p=0,05) and the inhibition was dose-dependent when compared with controls receiving water. These results show that mango pulp, a natural food, non toxic, part of human being diet, contains bioactive compounds able to reduce growth of tumor cells and to prevent the appearance of precancerous lesions in colon during carcinogenesis initiation.

  8. Influence of Chronic Moderate Sleep Restriction and Exercise on Inflammation and Carcinogenesis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Mark R.; Davis, J. Mark; Fadel, James R.; Youngstedt, Shawn D.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of chronic moderate sleep restriction and exercise training on carcinogenesis were examined in adenomatous polyposis coli multiple intestinal neoplasma (APC Min+/-) mice, a genetic strain which is predisposed to developing adenomatous polyposis. The mice were randomized to one of four 11 week treatments in a 2×2 design involving sleep restriction (by 4 h/day) vs. normal sleep and exercise training (1 h/day) vs. sedentary control. Wild-type control mice underwent identical experimental treatments. Compared with the wild-type mice, APC Min+/- mice had disrupted hematology and enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production from peritoneal exudate cells. Among the APC Min+/- mice, consistent interactions of sleep loss and exercise were found for measures of polyp formation, inflammation, and hematology. Sleep loss had little effect on these variables under sedentary conditions, but sleep loss had clear detrimental effects under exercise conditions. Exercise training resulted in improvements in these measures under normal sleep conditions, but exercise tended to elicit no effect or to exacerbate the effects of sleep restriction. Significant correlations of inflammation with polyp burden were observed. Among wild-type mice, similar, but less consistent interactions of sleep restriction and exercise were found. These data suggest that the benefits of exercise on carcinogenesis and immune function were impaired by chronic moderate sleep restriction, and that harmful effects of sleep restriction were generally realized only in the presence of exercise. PMID:22433899

  9. Enhancement of broccoli indole glucosinolates by methyl jasmonate treatment and effects on prostate carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ann G; Juvik, John A; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Clinton, Steven K; Erdman, John W

    2014-11-01

    Broccoli is rich in bioactive components, such as sulforaphane and indole-3-carbinol, which may impact cancer risk. The glucosinolate profile of broccoli can be manipulated through treatment with the plant stress hormone methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Our objective was to produce broccoli with enhanced levels of indole glucosinolates and determine its impact on prostate carcinogenesis. Brassica oleracea var. Green Magic was treated with a 250 μM MeJA solution 4 days prior to harvest. MeJA-treated broccoli had significantly increased levels of glucobrassicin, neoglucobrassicin, and gluconasturtiin (P broccoli powder, or 10% MeJA broccoli powder. Diets were fed throughout the study until termination at 20 weeks of age. Hepatic CYP1A was induced with MeJA broccoli powder feeding, indicating biological activity of the indole glucosinolates. Following ∼ 15 weeks on diets, neither of the broccoli treatments significantly altered genitourinary tract weight, pathologic score, or metastasis incidence, indicating that broccoli powder at 10% of the diet was ineffective at reducing prostate carcinogenesis in the TRAMP model. Whereas broccoli powder feeding had no effect in this model of prostate cancer, our work demonstrates the feasibility of employing plant stress hormones exogenously to stimulate changes in phytochemical profiles, an approach that may be useful for optimizing bioactive component patterns in foods for chronic-disease-prevention studies.

  10. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric carcinogenesis: Current knowledge and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokic-Milutinovic, Aleksandra; Alempijevic, Tamara; Milosavljevic, Tomica

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) plays a role in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. The outcome of the infection depends on environmental factors and bacterial and host characteristics. Gastric carcinogenesis is a multistep process that is reversible in the early phase of mucosal damage, but the exact point of no return has not been identified. Therefore, two main therapeutic strategies could reduce gastric cancer incidence: (1) eradication of the already present infection; and (2) immunization (prior to or during the course of the infection). The success of a gastric cancer prevention strategy depends on timing because the prevention strategy must be introduced before the point of no return in gastric carcinogenesis. Although the exact point of no return has not been identified, infection should be eradicated before severe atrophy of the gastric mucosa develops. Eradication therapy rates remain suboptimal due to increasing H. pylori resistance to antibiotics and patient noncompliance. Vaccination against H. pylori would reduce the cost of eradication therapies and lower gastric cancer incidence. A vaccine against H. pylori is still a research challenge. An effective vaccine should have an adequate route of delivery, appropriate bacterial antigens and effective and safe adjuvants. Future research should focus on the development of rescue eradication therapy protocols until an efficacious vaccine against the bacterium becomes available. PMID:26556993

  11. Multistage models of carcinogenesis and their implications for dose-response models and risk projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoel, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Multistage models are used to both describe the biological steps in developing a cancer and as a mathematical description of the relationship of exposure to tumor incidence. With the rapid development of molecular biology the stages of tumor development are becoming understood. Specifically, the effect and role of proto-oncogenes and suppressor genes are exciting developments in the field of carcinogenesis. Mathematically the field has moved from the original Armitage-Doll multistage model to the more current cell kinetic models. These latter models attempt to describe both the rate of cell mutation and the birth-death process involved in clonal expansion. This then allows modeling of both initiation and promotion or cellular proliferation. The field of radiation carcinogenesis has a considerable body of data and knowledge. Unfortunately, relatively little work has been done with the cell kinetic models as to estimation of tumor incidence. This may be due to the newness of kinetic models in general. The field holds promise and it is essential if we are to develop better human risk estimates from exposure to ionizing radiation. (author)

  12. Folate and cancer: how DNA damage, repair and methylation impact on colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, Susan J

    2011-02-01

    Inappropriate diet may contribute to one third of cancer deaths. Folates, a group of water-soluble B vitamins present in high concentrations in green, leafy vegetables, maintain DNA stability through their ability to donate one-carbon units for cellular metabolism. Folate deficiency has been implicated in the development of several cancers, including cancer of the colorectum, breast, ovary, pancreas, brain, lung and cervix. Generally, data from the majority of human studies suggest that people who habitually consume the highest level of folate, or with the highest blood folate concentrations, have a significantly reduced risk of developing colon polyps or cancer. However, an entirely protective role for folate against carcinogenesis has been questioned, and recent data indicate that an excessive intake of synthetic folic acid (from high-dose supplements or fortified foods) may increase human cancers by accelerating growth of precancerous lesions. Nonetheless, on balance, evidence from the majority of human studies indicates that dietary folate is genoprotective against colon cancer. Suboptimal folate status in humans is widespread. Folate maintains genomic stability by regulating DNA biosynthesis, repair and methylation. Folate deficiency induces and accelerates carcinogenesis by perturbing each of these processes. This review presents recent evidence describing how these mechanisms act, and interact, to modify colon cancer risk.

  13. Aggravation of serum Hepatocyte Growth Factor levels during hepato carcinogenesis in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelgawad, M.R.; Ghareeb, N.A.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has an essential role during liver development and it plays an important role in the regeneration and repair of injured tissues and acting as a mitogen, motogen and morphogens for a variety of epithelial cells. The role of HGF in carcinogenesis is in straggle and so, the present study aimed to through light through the level of HGF during different steps of carcinogenesis. Forty male rats were given diethylnitrosamine (DEN) in drinking water (100 mg/l) for up to 16 weeks. Eight rats were sacrificed at 8, 12 and 16 weeks. Besides, 8 hepatoma bearing rats were exposed to a single dose gamma irradiation (3 Gy) were sacrificed after 2 weeks from exposure (2 rats died, 36 hrs post irradiation) and 8 hepatoma bearing rats were sacrificed after 4 weeks from receiving a combined antioxidant (N-acetylcysteine and Lmethionine). Serum HGF was assayed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Serum HGF level in DEN treated rats and in exposed hepatoma bearing rats was significantly higher than in control rats whereas, serum HGF level after treatment with N acetylcysteine and L-methionine for 4 weeks was significantly decreased than DEN treated rats and concluded that serum HGF may play a role during promotion and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and during treatment

  14. Cell Cycle Phase Abnormalities Do Not Account for Disordered Proliferation in Barrett's Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Lao-Sirieix

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Barrett's esophagus (BE epithelium is the precursor lesion for esophageal adenocarcinoma. Cell cycle proteins have been advocated as biomarkers to predict the malignant potential in BE. However, whether disruption of the cell cycle plays a causal role in Barrett's carcinogenesis is not clear. Specimens from the Barrett's dysplasia—carcinoma sequence were immunostained for cell cycle phase markers (cyclin D1 for G1; cyclin A for S, G2, and M; cytoplasmic cyclin B1 for G2; and phosphorylated histone 3 for M phase and expressed as a proportion of proliferating cells. Flow cytometric analysis of the cell cycle phase of prospective biopsies was also performed. The proliferation status of nondysplastic BE was similar to gastric antrum and D2, but the proliferative compartment extended to the luminal surface. In dysplastic samples, the number of proliferating cells correlated with the degree of dysplasia (P < .001. The overall levels of cyclins A and B1 correlated with the degree of dysplasia (P < .001. However, the cell cycle phase distribution measured with both immunostaining and flow cytometry was conserved during all stages of BE, dysplasia, and cancer. Hence, the increased proliferation seen in Barrett's carcinogenesis is due to abnormal cell cycle entry or exit, rather than a primary abnormality within the cell cycle.

  15. Compton suppression gamma ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsberger, S.; Iskander, F.Y.; Niset, M.; Heydorn, K.

    2002-01-01

    In the past decade there have been many studies to use Compton suppression methods in routine neutron activation analysis as well as in the traditional role of low level gamma ray counting of environmental samples. On a separate path there have been many new PC based software packages that have been developed to enhance photopeak fitting. Although the newer PC based algorithms have had significant improvements, they still suffer from being effectively used in weak gamma ray lines in natural samples or in neutron activated samples that have very high Compton backgrounds. We have completed a series of experiments to show the usefulness of Compton suppression. As well we have shown the pitfalls when using Compton suppression methods for high counting deadtimes as in the case of neutron activated samples. We have also investigated if counting statistics are the same both suppressed and normal modes. Results are presented in four separate experiments. (author)

  16. Modelling carcinogenesis after radiotherapy using Poisson statistics: implications for IMRT, protons and ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bleddyn

    2009-06-01

    Current technical radiotherapy advances aim to (a) better conform the dose contours to cancers and (b) reduce the integral dose exposure and thereby minimise unnecessary dose exposure to normal tissues unaffected by the cancer. Various types of conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using x-rays can achieve (a) while charged particle therapy (CPT)-using proton and ion beams-can achieve both (a) and (b), but at greater financial cost. Not only is the long term risk of radiation related normal tissue complications important, but so is the risk of carcinogenesis. Physical dose distribution plans can be generated to show the differences between the above techniques. IMRT is associated with a dose bath of low to medium dose due to fluence transfer: dose is effectively transferred from designated organs at risk to other areas; thus dose and risk are transferred. Many clinicians are concerned that there may be additional carcinogenesis many years after IMRT. CPT reduces the total energy deposition in the body and offers many potential advantages in terms of the prospects for better quality of life along with cancer cure. With C ions there is a tail of dose beyond the Bragg peaks, due to nuclear fragmentation; this is not found with protons. CPT generally uses higher linear energy transfer (which varies with particle and energy), which carries a higher relative risk of malignant induction, but also of cell death quantified by the relative biological effect concept, so at higher dose levels the frank development of malignancy should be reduced. Standard linear radioprotection models have been used to show a reduction in carcinogenesis risk of between two- and 15-fold depending on the CPT location. But the standard risk models make no allowance for fractionation and some have a dose limit at 4 Gy. Alternatively, tentative application of the linear quadratic model and Poissonian statistics to chromosome breakage and cell kill simultaneously allows estimation of

  17. Taste matters-effects of bypassing oral stimulation on hormone and appetite responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spetter, M.S.; Mars, M.; Viergever, M.A.; Graaf, de C.; Smeets, P.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between oral and gastric signals is an important part of food intake regulation. Previous studies suggest that bypassing oral stimulation diminishes the suppression of hunger and increases gastric emptying rate. However, the role of appetite hormones, like cholecystokinin-8 and

  18. Thyroid suppression test with dextrothyroxine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, D.; Fridman, J.; Ribeiro, H.B.

    1978-01-01

    The classic thyroid suppression test with triiodothyronine (l-T 3 ) has been shown to be efficient as an auxiliary method in the diagnosis of thyroid diseases, but should not be performed on elderly patients or on those with heart disease or a tendency to tachycardia. Since these subjects seem able to support a short period of dextro-thyronine (d-T 4 ) feeding, we compared the effect of d-T 4 and l-T 3 on the 24 hours thyroid uptake in euthyroid and hyperthyroid subjects. After basal radio-iodine uptake determination, 99 patients without hyperthyroidism and 27 with Graves' disease were randomly divided in 2 groups; one received 100μg of l-T 3 per day and the other 4 mg of d-T 4 per day, both groups being treated for a period of 10 days. At the end of this suppression period the 24 hours radio-iodine uptake was measured again and the percentual suppression index (S.I.) calculated. Since the comparison of the two groups showed no difference between the suppressive effect of l-T 3 and d-T 4 in euthyroid subjects, while dextro-thyronine, as levo-triiodothyronine, did not suppress the 24 hours uptake of hyperthyroid patients, l-T 3 or d-T 4 can be used interchangeably to test thyroid suppressibility. In the euthyroid subjects the normal range for the post-suppression uptake was 0-17.1% and for the suppression index 54,7.100% [pt

  19. In vivo Treg suppression assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Creg J; Collison, Lauren W; Bettini, Maria; Pillai, Meenu R; Rehg, Jerold E; Vignali, Dario A A

    2011-01-01

    To fully examine the functionality of a regulatory T cell (T(reg)) population, one needs to assess their ability to suppress in a variety of in vivo models. We describe five in vivo models that examine the suppressive capacity of T(regs) upon different target cell types. The advantages and disadvantages of each model including resources, time, and technical expertise required to execute each model are also described.

  20. In Vivo Treg Suppression Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Workman, Creg J.; Collison, Lauren W.; Bettini, Maria; Pillai, Meenu R.; Rehg, Jerold E.; Vignali, Dario A.A.

    2011-01-01

    To fully examine the functionality of a regulatory T cell (Treg) population, one needs to assess their ability to suppress in a variety of in vivo models. We describe five in vivo models that examine the suppressive capacity of Tregs upon different target cell types. The advantages and disadvantages of each model includ ing resources, time, and technical expertise required to execute each model are also described.

  1. The Effect of the Bujeonghangam-tang Extract on Hepatocellular Carcinogenesis and Hepatic Cirrhosis Induced by Diethylnitrosamine and CCl4 in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Ho Moon

    2010-06-01

    observation were similar to 8th week groups. Conclusion : These results suggest that administration of BH extract suppress or retard DENA and CCl4-induced hepatocellular carcinogenesis and hepatic cirrhosis in rats.

  2. Molecular conservation of estrogen-response associated with cell cycle regulation, hormonal carcinogenesis and cancer in zebrafish and human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Siew Hong; Lee, Serene G P; Lin, Chin Y; Thomsen, Jane S; Fu, Pan Y; Murthy, Karuturi R K; Li, Haixia; Govindarajan, Kunde R; Nick, Lin C H; Bourque, Guillaume; Gong, Zhiyuan; Lufkin, Thomas; Liu, Edison T; Mathavan, Sinnakaruppan

    2011-05-16

    The zebrafish is recognized as a versatile cancer and drug screening model. However, it is not known whether the estrogen-responsive genes and signaling pathways that are involved in estrogen-dependent carcinogenesis and human cancer are operating in zebrafish. In order to determine the potential of zebrafish model for estrogen-related cancer research, we investigated the molecular conservation of estrogen responses operating in both zebrafish and human cancer cell lines. Microarray experiment was performed on zebrafish exposed to estrogen (17β-estradiol; a classified carcinogen) and an anti-estrogen (ICI 182,780). Zebrafish estrogen-responsive genes sensitive to both estrogen and anti-estrogen were identified and validated using real-time PCR. Human homolog mapping and knowledge-based data mining were performed on zebrafish estrogen responsive genes followed by estrogen receptor binding site analysis and comparative transcriptome analysis with estrogen-responsive human cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D and Ishikawa). Our transcriptome analysis captured multiple estrogen-responsive genes and signaling pathways that increased cell proliferation, promoted DNA damage and genome instability, and decreased tumor suppressing effects, suggesting a common mechanism for estrogen-induced carcinogenesis. Comparative analysis revealed a core set of conserved estrogen-responsive genes that demonstrate enrichment of estrogen receptor binding sites and cell cycle signaling pathways. Knowledge-based and network analysis led us to propose that the mechanism involving estrogen-activated estrogen receptor mediated down-regulation of human homolog HES1 followed by up-regulation cell cycle-related genes (human homologs E2F4, CDK2, CCNA, CCNB, CCNE), is highly conserved, and this mechanism may involve novel crosstalk with basal AHR. We also identified mitotic roles of polo-like kinase as a conserved signaling pathway with multiple entry points for estrogen regulation. The findings

  3. Molecular conservation of estrogen-response associated with cell cycle regulation, hormonal carcinogenesis and cancer in zebrafish and human cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govindarajan Kunde R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The zebrafish is recognized as a versatile cancer and drug screening model. However, it is not known whether the estrogen-responsive genes and signaling pathways that are involved in estrogen-dependent carcinogenesis and human cancer are operating in zebrafish. In order to determine the potential of zebrafish model for estrogen-related cancer research, we investigated the molecular conservation of estrogen responses operating in both zebrafish and human cancer cell lines. Methods Microarray experiment was performed on zebrafish exposed to estrogen (17β-estradiol; a classified carcinogen and an anti-estrogen (ICI 182,780. Zebrafish estrogen-responsive genes sensitive to both estrogen and anti-estrogen were identified and validated using real-time PCR. Human homolog mapping and knowledge-based data mining were performed on zebrafish estrogen responsive genes followed by estrogen receptor binding site analysis and comparative transcriptome analysis with estrogen-responsive human cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D and Ishikawa. Results Our transcriptome analysis captured multiple estrogen-responsive genes and signaling pathways that increased cell proliferation, promoted DNA damage and genome instability, and decreased tumor suppressing effects, suggesting a common mechanism for estrogen-induced carcinogenesis. Comparative analysis revealed a core set of conserved estrogen-responsive genes that demonstrate enrichment of estrogen receptor binding sites and cell cycle signaling pathways. Knowledge-based and network analysis led us to propose that the mechanism involving estrogen-activated estrogen receptor mediated down-regulation of human homolog HES1 followed by up-regulation cell cycle-related genes (human homologs E2F4, CDK2, CCNA, CCNB, CCNE, is highly conserved, and this mechanism may involve novel crosstalk with basal AHR. We also identified mitotic roles of polo-like kinase as a conserved signaling pathway with multiple entry

  4. Outcome of patients over 80 years of age on prolonged suppressive antibiotic therapy for at least 6 months for prosthetic joint infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Prendki

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Prolonged suppressive antibiotic therapy is an alternative therapy in elderly patients with PJI when surgery is contraindicated and when the bacteria are susceptible to well-tolerated oral antimicrobial therapy such as beta-lactams.

  5. Burst Suppression for ICP Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, Frederick A; Akoth, Eva; Gillman, Lawrence M; West, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The goal of our study was to perform a systematic review of the literature to determine the effect that burst suppression has on intracranial pressure (ICP) control. All articles from MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Scopus, Cochrane Library, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (inception to January 2015), reference lists of relevant articles, and gray literature were searched. The strength of evidence was adjudicated using both the Oxford and the Grading of Recommendation Assessment Development and Education (GRADE) methodology. Seven articles were considered for review. A total of 108 patients were studied, all receiving burst suppression therapy. Two studies failed to document a decrease in ICP with burst suppression therapy. There were reports of severe hypotension and increased infection rates with barbiturate-based therapy. Etomidate-based suppressive therapy was linked to severe renal dysfunction. There currently exists both Oxford level 2b and GRADE C evidence to support that achieving burst suppression reduces ICP, and also has no effect on ICP, in severe traumatic brain injury. The literature suggests burst suppression therapy may be useful for ICP reduction in certain cases, although these situations are currently unclear. In addition, the impact on patient functional outcome is unclear. Further prospective study is warranted.

  6. Oral cancer prevention and control--the approach of the World Health Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality today. It is estimated that around 43% of cancer deaths are due to tobacco use, unhealthy diets, alcohol consumption, inactive lifestyles and infection. Low-income and disadvantaged groups are generally more exposed to avoidable risk factors such as environmental carcinogens, alcohol, infectious agents, and tobacco use. These groups also have less access to the health services and health education that would empower them to make decisions to protect and improve their own health. Oro-pharyngeal cancer is significant component of the global burden of cancer. Tobacco and alcohol are regarded as the major risk factors for oral cancer. The population-attributable risks of smoking and alcohol consumption have been estimated to 80% for males, 61% for females, and 74% overall. The evidence that smokeless tobacco causes oral cancer was confirmed recently by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Studies have shown that heavy intake of alcoholic beverages is associated with nutrient deficiency, which appears to contribute independently to oral carcinogenesis. Oral cancer is preventable through risk factors intervention. Prevention of HIV infection will also reduce the incidence of HIV/AIDS-related cancers such as Kaposi sarcoma and lymphoma. The WHO Global Oral Health Programme is committed to work for country capacity building in oral cancer prevention, inter-country exchange of information and experiences from integrated approaches in prevention and health promotion, and the development of global surveillance systems for oral cancer and risk factors. The WHO Global Oral Health Programme has established a global surveillance system of oral cavity cancer in order to assess risk factors and to help the planning of effective national intervention programmes. Epidemiological data on oral cancer (ICD-10: C00-C08) incidence and mortality are stored in the Global Oral Health Data Bank. In 2007, the World

  7. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoek, Hella Leonie [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  8. Resveratrol suppresses IGF-1 induced human colon cancer cell proliferation and elevates apoptosis via suppression of IGF-1R/Wnt and activation of p53 signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Sridhar

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a global phenomenon and is associated with various types of cancer, including colon cancer. There is a growing interest for safe and effective bioactive compounds that suppress the risk for obesity-promoted colon cancer. Resveratrol (trans-3, 4', 5,-trihydroxystilbene, a stilbenoid found in the skin of red grapes and peanuts suppresses many types of cancers by regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis through a variety of mechanisms, however, resveratrol effects on obesity-promoted colon cancer are not clearly established. Methods We investigated the anti-proliferative effects of resveratrol on HT-29 and SW480 human colon cancer cells in the presence and absence of insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1; elevated during obesity and elucidated the mechanisms of action using IGF-1R siRNA in HT-29 cells which represents advanced colon carcinogenesis. Results Resveratrol (100-150 μM exhibited anti-proliferative properties in HT-29 cells even after IGF-1 exposure by arresting G0/G1-S phase cell cycle progression through p27 stimulation and cyclin D1 suppression. Treatment with resveratrol suppressed IGF-1R protein levels and concurrently attenuated the downstream Akt/Wnt signaling pathways that play a critical role in cell proliferation. Targeted suppression of IGF-1R using IGF-1R siRNA also affected these signaling pathways in a similar manner. Resveratrol treatment induced apoptosis by activating tumor suppressor p53 protein, whereas IGF-1R siRNA treatment did not affect apoptosis. Our data suggests that resveratrol not only suppresses cell proliferation by inhibiting IGF-1R and its downstream signaling pathways similar to that of IGF-1R siRNA but also enhances apoptosis via activation of the p53 pathway. Conclusions For the first time, we report that resveratrol suppresses colon cancer cell proliferation and elevates apoptosis even in the presence of IGF-1 via suppression of IGF-1R/Akt/Wnt signaling pathways and

  9. Resveratrol suppresses IGF-1 induced human colon cancer cell proliferation and elevates apoptosis via suppression of IGF-1R/Wnt and activation of p53 signaling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanamala, Jairam; Reddivari, Lavanya; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Tarver, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is a global phenomenon and is associated with various types of cancer, including colon cancer. There is a growing interest for safe and effective bioactive compounds that suppress the risk for obesity-promoted colon cancer. Resveratrol (trans-3, 4', 5,-trihydroxystilbene), a stilbenoid found in the skin of red grapes and peanuts suppresses many types of cancers by regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis through a variety of mechanisms, however, resveratrol effects on obesity-promoted colon cancer are not clearly established. We investigated the anti-proliferative effects of resveratrol on HT-29 and SW480 human colon cancer cells in the presence and absence of insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1; elevated during obesity) and elucidated the mechanisms of action using IGF-1R siRNA in HT-29 cells which represents advanced colon carcinogenesis. Resveratrol (100-150 μM) exhibited anti-proliferative properties in HT-29 cells even after IGF-1 exposure by arresting G 0 /G 1 -S phase cell cycle progression through p27 stimulation and cyclin D1 suppression. Treatment with resveratrol suppressed IGF-1R protein levels and concurrently attenuated the downstream Akt/Wnt signaling pathways that play a critical role in cell proliferation. Targeted suppression of IGF-1R using IGF-1R siRNA also affected these signaling pathways in a similar manner. Resveratrol treatment induced apoptosis by activating tumor suppressor p53 protein, whereas IGF-1R siRNA treatment did not affect apoptosis. Our data suggests that resveratrol not only suppresses cell proliferation by inhibiting IGF-1R and its downstream signaling pathways similar to that of IGF-1R siRNA but also enhances apoptosis via activation of the p53 pathway. For the first time, we report that resveratrol suppresses colon cancer cell proliferation and elevates apoptosis even in the presence of IGF-1 via suppression of IGF-1R/Akt/Wnt signaling pathways and activation of p53, suggesting its potential role as a

  10. Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk On This Page What are oral contraceptives? What is known about the relationship between oral ...

  11. Lack of interaction between orlistat and oral contraceptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, D.; Güzelhan, C.; Zuiderwijk, P.B.M.; Odink, J.

    1996-01-01

    Objectives: Orlistat, a potent and selective inhibitor of gastrointestinal lipases, is designed for the treatment of obesity. A double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, 2-way crossover study investigated the possible influence of orlistat on the ovulation-suppressing action of combination oral

  12. Pokemon proto-oncogene in oral cancer: potential role in the early phase of tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartini, D; Lo Muzio, L; Morganti, S; Pozzi, V; Di Ruscio, G; Rocchetti, R; Rubini, C; Santarelli, A; Emanuelli, M

    2015-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents about 90% of all oral neoplasms with a poor clinical progno