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Sample records for suppressed immune system

  1. Suppression of systemic autoimmunity by the innate immune adaptor STING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shruti; Campbell, Allison M.; Chan, Jennie; Schattgen, Stefan A.; Orlowski, Gregory M.; Nayar, Ribhu; Huyler, Annie H.; Nündel, Kerstin; Mohan, Chandra; Berg, Leslie J.; Shlomchik, Mark J.; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Cytosolic DNA-sensing pathways that signal via Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) mediate immunity to pathogens and also promote autoimmune pathology in DNaseII- and DNaseIII-deficient mice. In contrast, we report here that STING potently suppresses inflammation in a model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Lymphoid hypertrophy, autoantibody production, serum cytokine levels, and other indicators of immune activation were markedly increased in STING-deficient autoimmune-prone mice compared with STING-sufficient littermates. As a result, STING-deficient autoimmune-prone mice had significantly shorter lifespans than controls. Importantly, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent systemic inflammation during 2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane (TMPD)-mediated peritonitis was similarly aggravated in STING-deficient mice. Mechanistically, STING-deficient macrophages failed to express negative regulators of immune activation and thus were hyperresponsive to TLR ligands, producing abnormally high levels of proinflammatory cytokines. This hyperreactivity corresponds to dramatically elevated numbers of inflammatory macrophages and granulocytes in vivo. Collectively these findings reveal an unexpected negative regulatory role for STING, having important implications for STING-directed therapies. PMID:25646421

  2. The paradox of chronic neuroinflammation, systemic immune suppression, autoimmunity after traumatic chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Jan M; Zhang, Yi; Kopp, Marcel A; Brommer, Benedikt; Popovich, Phillip G

    2014-08-01

    During the transition from acute to chronic stages of recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI), there is an evolving state of immunologic dysfunction that exacerbates the problems associated with the more clinically obvious neurologic deficits. Since injury directly affects cells embedded within the "immune privileged/specialized" milieu of the spinal cord, maladaptive or inefficient responses are likely to occur. Collectively, these responses qualify as part of the continuum of "SCI disease" and are important therapeutic targets to improve neural repair and neurological outcome. Generic immune suppressive therapies have been largely unsuccessful, mostly because inflammation and immunity exert both beneficial (plasticity enhancing) and detrimental (e.g. glia- and neurodegenerative; secondary damage) effects and these functions change over time. Moreover, "compartimentalized" investigations, limited to only intraspinal inflammation and associated cellular or molecular changes in the spinal cord, neglect the reality that the structure and function of the CNS are influenced by systemic immune challenges and that the immune system is 'hardwired' into the nervous system. Here, we consider this interplay during the progression from acute to chronic SCI. Specifically, we survey impaired/non-resolving intraspinal inflammation and the paradox of systemic inflammatory responses in the context of ongoing chronic immune suppression and autoimmunity. The concepts of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) and "neurogenic" spinal cord injury-induced immune depression syndrome (SCI-IDS) are discussed as determinants of impaired "host-defense" and trauma-induced autoimmunity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The paradox of chronic neuroinflammation, systemic immune suppression and autoimmunity after traumatic chronic spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Marcel A.; Brommer, Benedikt; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2014-01-01

    During the transition from acute to chronic stages of recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI), there is an evolving state of immunologic dysfunction that exacerbates the problems associated with the more clinically obvious neurologic deficits. Since injury directly affects cells embedded within the “immune privileged/specialized” milieu of the spinal cord, maladaptive or inefficient responses are likely to occur. Collectively, these responses qualify as part of the continuum of “SCI disease” and are important therapeutic targets to improve neural repair and neurological outcome. Generic immune suppressive therapies have been largely unsuccessful, mostly because nflammation and immunity exert both beneficial (plasticity enhancing) and detrimental (e.g. glia- and neurodegenerative; secondary damage) effects and these functions change over time. Moreover, “compartmentalized” investigations, limited to only intraspinal inflammation and associated cellular or molecular changes in the spinal cord, neglect the reality that the structure and function of the CNS is influenced by systemic immune challenges and that the immune system is hardwired into the nervous system. Here, we consider this interplay during the progression from acute to chronic SCI. Specifically, we survey impaired/non-resolving intraspinal inflammation and the paradox of systemic inflammatory responses in the face of ongoing chronic immune suppression and autoimmunity. The concepts of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) and ‘neurogenic’ spinal cord injury-induced immune depression syndrome (SCI-IDS) are discussed as determinants of impaired ‘host-defense’ and trauma-induced autoimmunity. PMID:25017893

  4. Aeromonas salmonicida type III secretion system-effectors-mediated immune suppression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Origgi, F C; Benedicenti, O; Segner, H; Sattler, U; Wahli, T; Frey, J

    2017-01-01

    Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, the etiologic agent of furunculosis, is a major pathogen in aquaculture. Together with other pathogens, it is characterized by the presence of a type 3 secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS is the main virulence mechanism of A. salmonicida. It is used by the bacterium to secrete and translocate several toxins and effector proteins into the host cell. Some of these factors have a detrimental impact on the integrity of the cell cytoskeleton, likely contributing to impair phagocytosis. Furthermore, it has been suggested that effectors of the T3SS are able to modulate the host's immune response. Here we present the first partial characterization of the immune response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) infected with distinct strains of A. salmonicida either carrying (i) a fully functional T3SS or (ii) a functionally impaired T3SS or (iii) devoid of T3SS ("cured" strain). Infection with an A. salmonicida strain either carrying a fully functional or a secretion-impaired T3SS was associated with a strong and persistent immune suppression. However, the infection appeared to be fatal only in the presence of a fully functional T3SS. In contrast, the absence of T3SS was neither associated with immune suppression nor fish death. These findings suggest that the T3SS and T3SS-delivered effector molecules and toxins of A. salmonicida do not only impair the host cells' cytoskeleton thus damaging cell physiology and phagocytosis, but also heavily affect the transcription of critical immune mediators including the shut-down of important warning signals to recognize infection and induce immune defense. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Targeting Immune Regulatory Networks to Counteract Immune Suppression in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Camisaschi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The onset of cancer is unavoidably accompanied by suppression of antitumor immunity. This occurs through mechanisms ranging from the progressive accumulation of regulatory immune cells associated with chronic immune stimulation and inflammation, to the expression of immunosuppressive molecules. Some of them are being successfully exploited as therapeutic targets, with impressive clinical results achieved in patients, as in the case of immune checkpoint inhibitors. To limit immune attack, tumor cells exploit specific pathways to render the tumor microenvironment hostile for antitumor effector cells. Local acidification might, in fact, anergize activated T cells and facilitate the accumulation of immune suppressive cells. Moreover, the release of extracellular vesicles by tumor cells can condition distant immune sites contributing to the onset of systemic immune suppression. Understanding which mechanisms may be prevalent in specific cancers or disease stages, and identifying possible strategies to counterbalance would majorly contribute to improving clinical efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Here, we intend to highlight these mechanisms, how they could be targeted and the tools that might be available in the near future to achieve this goal.

  6. Immune system deregulation in hypertensive patients chronically RAS suppressed developing albuminuria

    OpenAIRE

    Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Gonzalez-Calero, Laura; Martinez, Paula J.; Baldan-Martin, Montserrat; Lopez, Juan Antonio; Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Segura, Juli?n; Vazquez, Jes?s; Vivanco, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G.; Ruilope, Luis M.; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2017-01-01

    Albuminuria development in hypertensive patients is an indicator of higher cardiovascular (CV) risk and renal damage. Chronic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) suppression facilitates blood pressure control but it does not prevent from albuminuria development. We pursued the identification of protein indicators in urine behind albuminuria development in hypertensive patients under RAS suppression. Urine was collected from 100 patients classified in three groups according to albuminuria developme...

  7. Visualizing and Quantifying the Suppressive Effects of Glucocorticoids on the Tadpole Immune System in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Alexander M.

    2011-01-01

    A challenging topic in undergraduate physiology courses is the complex interaction between the vertebrate endocrine system and the immune system. There are relatively few established and accessible laboratory exercises available to instructors to help their students gain a working understanding of these interactions. The present laboratory module…

  8. PERIPHERAL IMMUNE SYSTEM SUPPRESSION IN EARLY ABSTINENT ALCOHOL DEPENDENT INDIVIDUALS: LINKS TO STRESS AND CUE-RELATED CRAVING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Helen C; Milivojevic, Verica; Angarita, Gustavo A; Stowe, Raymond; Sinha, Rajita

    2017-01-01

    Background Peripheral immune system cytokines may play an integral role in underlying sensitized stress response and alcohol craving during early withdrawal. To date, the nature of these immune changes during early abstinence have not been examined. Methods Thirty-nine early abstinent, treatment-seeking alcohol dependent individuals and 46 socially drinking controls were exposed to three guided imageries: stress, alcohol cue and neutral. These were presented randomly across consecutive days. Plasma measures of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-10 (IL-10), were collected at baseline, immediately after imagery and at various recovery time-points. Ratings of alcohol craving, negative mood and anxiety were also obtained at the same time-points. Results The alcohol group demonstrated decreased basal IL-10 compared with controls particularly following exposure to alcohol cue. They also showed a dampened TNFα and TNFR1 response to stress and cue, respectively, and a generalized suppression of IL-6. In the alcohol group, these immune system adaptations occurred alongside significant elevations in anxiety, negative mood and alcohol craving. Conclusions Findings demonstrate that broad immuno-suppression is still observed in alcohol dependent individuals after three weeks of abstinence and may be linked to motivation for alcohol. PMID:28675117

  9. [Immune system and tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terme, Magali; Tanchot, Corinne

    2017-02-01

    Despite having been much debated, it is now well established that the immune system plays an essential role in the fight against cancer. In this article, we will highlight the implication of the immune system in the control of tumor growth and describe the major components of the immune system involved in the antitumoral immune response. The immune system, while exerting pressure on tumor cells, also will play a pro-tumoral role by sculpting the immunogenicity of tumors cells as they develop. Finally, we will illustrate the numerous mechanisms of immune suppression that take place within the tumoral microenvironment which allow tumor cells to escape control from the immune system. The increasingly precise knowledge of the brakes to an effective antitumor immune response allows the development of immunotherapy strategies more and more innovating and promising of hope. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  11. The Entomopathogenic Fungi Isaria fumosorosea Plays a Vital Role in Suppressing the Immune System of Plutella xylostella: RNA-Seq and DGE Analysis of Immunity-Related Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin; Xu, Xiaoxia; Shakeel, Muhammad; Li, Shuzhong; Wang, Shuang; Zhou, Xianqiang; Yu, Jialin; Xu, Xiaojing; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Jin, Fengliang

    2017-01-01

    Most, if not all, entomopathogenic fungi have been used as alternative control agents to decrease the insect resistance and harmful effects of the insecticides on the environment. Among them, Isaria fumosorosea has also shown great potential to control different insect pests. In the present study, we explored the immune response of P. xylostella to the infection of I. fumosorosea at different time points by using RNA-Sequencing and differential gene expression technology at the genomic level. To gain insight into the host-pathogen interaction at the genomic level, five libraries of P. xylostella larvae at 12, 18, 24, and 36 h post-infection and a control were constructed. In total, 161 immunity-related genes were identified and grouped into four categories; immune recognition families, toll and Imd pathway, melanization, and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). The results of differentially expressed immunity-related genes depicted that 15, 13, 53, and 14 up-regulated and 38, 51, 56, and 49 were down-regulated in P. xylostella at 12, 18, 24, and 36 h post-treatment, respectively. RNA-Seq results of immunity-related genes revealed that the expression of AMPs was reduced after treatment with I. fumosorosea . To validate RNA-Seq results by RT-qPCR, 22 immunity-related genes were randomly selected. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that I. fumosorosea has the potential to suppress the immune response of P. xylostella and can become a potential biopesticide for controlling P. xylostella .

  12. The Entomopathogenic Fungi Isaria fumosorosea Plays a Vital Role in Suppressing the Immune System of Plutella xylostella: RNA-Seq and DGE Analysis of Immunity-Related Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Xu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Most, if not all, entomopathogenic fungi have been used as alternative control agents to decrease the insect resistance and harmful effects of the insecticides on the environment. Among them, Isaria fumosorosea has also shown great potential to control different insect pests. In the present study, we explored the immune response of P. xylostella to the infection of I. fumosorosea at different time points by using RNA-Sequencing and differential gene expression technology at the genomic level. To gain insight into the host-pathogen interaction at the genomic level, five libraries of P. xylostella larvae at 12, 18, 24, and 36 h post-infection and a control were constructed. In total, 161 immunity-related genes were identified and grouped into four categories; immune recognition families, toll and Imd pathway, melanization, and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs. The results of differentially expressed immunity-related genes depicted that 15, 13, 53, and 14 up-regulated and 38, 51, 56, and 49 were down-regulated in P. xylostella at 12, 18, 24, and 36 h post-treatment, respectively. RNA-Seq results of immunity-related genes revealed that the expression of AMPs was reduced after treatment with I. fumosorosea. To validate RNA-Seq results by RT-qPCR, 22 immunity-related genes were randomly selected. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that I. fumosorosea has the potential to suppress the immune response of P. xylostella and can become a potential biopesticide for controlling P. xylostella.

  13. Effects of carotenoids, immune activation and immune suppression on the intensity of chronic coccidiosis in greenfinches.

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    Sepp, Tuul; Karu, Ulvi; Sild, Elin; Männiste, Marju; Hõrak, Peeter

    2011-03-01

    Allocation trade-offs of carotenoids between their use in the immune system and production of integumentary colouration have been suggested as a proximate mechanism maintaining honesty of signal traits. We tested how dietary carotenoid supplementation, immune activation and immune suppression affect intensity of coccidian infection in captive greenfinches Carduelis chloris, a passerine with carotenoid-based plumage. Immune activation with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) decreased body mass among birds not supplemented with lutein, while among the carotenoid-fed birds, PHA had no effect on mass dynamics. Immune suppression with dexamethasone (DEX) induced loss of body mass and reduced the swelling response to PHA. DEX and PHA increased the concentration of circulating heterophils. Lutein supplementation increased plasma carotenoid levels but had no effect on the swelling response induced by PHA. PHA and DEX treatments did not affect plasma carotenoids. Immune stimulation by PHA suppressed the infection, but only among carotenoid-supplemented birds. Priming of the immune system can thus aid in suppressing chronic infection but only when sufficient amount of carotenoids is available. Our experiment shows the importance of carotenoids in immune response, but also the complicated nature of this impact, which could be the reason for inconsistent results in studies investigating the immunomodulatory effects of carotenoids. The findings about involvement of carotenoids in modulation of an immune response against coccidiosis suggest that carotenoid-based ornaments may honestly signal individuals' ability to manage chronic infections. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanisms underlying UV-induced immune suppression

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    Ullrich, Stephen E. [Department of Immunology, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, South Campus Research Building 1, 7455 Fannin St., P.O. Box 301402, Houston, TX 77030-1903 (United States)]. E-mail: sullrich@mdanderson.org

    2005-04-01

    Skin cancer is the most prevalent form of human neoplasia. Estimates suggest that in excess of one million new cases of skin cancer will be diagnosed this year alone in the United States (www.cancer.org/statistics). Fortunately, because of their highly visible location, skin cancers are more rapidly diagnosed and more easily treated than other types of cancer. Be that as it may, approximately 10,000 Americans a year die from skin cancer. The cost of treating non-melanoma skin cancer is estimated to be in excess of US$ 650 million a year [J.G. Chen, A.B. Fleischer, E.D. Smith, C. Kancler, N.D. Goldman, P.M. Williford, S.R. Feldman, Cost of non-melanoma skin cancer treatment in the United States, Dermatol. Surg. 27 (2001) 1035-1038], and when melanoma is included, the estimated cost of treating skin cancer in the United States is estimated to rise to US$ 2.9 billion annually (www.cancer.org/statistics). Because the morbidity and mortality associated with skin cancer is a major public health problem, it is important to understand the mechanisms underlying skin cancer development. The primary cause of skin cancer is the ultraviolet (UV) radiation found in sunlight. In addition to its carcinogenic potential, UV radiation is also immune suppressive. In fact, data from studies with both experimental animals and biopsy proven skin cancer patients suggest that there is an association between the immune suppressive effects of UV radiation and its carcinogenic potential. The focus of this manuscript will be to review the mechanisms underlying the induction of immune suppression following UV exposure. Particular attention will be directed to the role of soluble mediators in activating immune suppression.

  15. Mechanisms underlying UV-induced immune suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2005-01-01

    Skin cancer is the most prevalent form of human neoplasia. Estimates suggest that in excess of one million new cases of skin cancer will be diagnosed this year alone in the United States (www.cancer.org/statistics). Fortunately, because of their highly visible location, skin cancers are more rapidly diagnosed and more easily treated than other types of cancer. Be that as it may, approximately 10,000 Americans a year die from skin cancer. The cost of treating non-melanoma skin cancer is estimated to be in excess of US$ 650 million a year [J.G. Chen, A.B. Fleischer, E.D. Smith, C. Kancler, N.D. Goldman, P.M. Williford, S.R. Feldman, Cost of non-melanoma skin cancer treatment in the United States, Dermatol. Surg. 27 (2001) 1035-1038], and when melanoma is included, the estimated cost of treating skin cancer in the United States is estimated to rise to US$ 2.9 billion annually (www.cancer.org/statistics). Because the morbidity and mortality associated with skin cancer is a major public health problem, it is important to understand the mechanisms underlying skin cancer development. The primary cause of skin cancer is the ultraviolet (UV) radiation found in sunlight. In addition to its carcinogenic potential, UV radiation is also immune suppressive. In fact, data from studies with both experimental animals and biopsy proven skin cancer patients suggest that there is an association between the immune suppressive effects of UV radiation and its carcinogenic potential. The focus of this manuscript will be to review the mechanisms underlying the induction of immune suppression following UV exposure. Particular attention will be directed to the role of soluble mediators in activating immune suppression

  16. Novel "Elements" of Immune Suppression within the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Devikala; Clever, David; Eil, Robert; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2017-06-01

    Adaptive evolution has prompted immune cells to use a wide variety of inhibitory signals, many of which are usurped by tumor cells to evade immune surveillance. Although tumor immunologists often focus on genes and proteins as mediators of immune function, here we highlight two elements from the periodic table-oxygen and potassium-that suppress the immune system in previously unappreciated ways. While both are key to the maintenance of T-cell function and tissue homeostasis, they are exploited by tumors to suppress immuno-surveillance and promote metastatic spread. We discuss the temporal and spatial roles of these elements within the tumor microenvironment and explore possible therapeutic interventions for effective and promising anticancer therapies. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(6); 426-33. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Infection with host-range mutant adenovirus 5 suppresses innate immunity and induces systemic CD4+ T cell activation in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Huma; Genescà, Meritxell; Fritts, Linda; McChesney, Michael B; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Miller, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Ad5 is a common cause of respiratory disease and an occasional cause of gastroenteritis and conjunctivitis, and seroconversion before adolescence is common in humans. To gain some insight into how Ad5 infection affects the immune system of rhesus macaques (RM) 18 RM were infected with a host-range mutant Ad5 (Ad5hr) by 3 mucosal inoculations. There was a delay of 2 to 6 weeks after the first inoculation before plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) frequency and function increased in peripheral blood. Primary Ad5hr infection suppressed IFN-γ mRNA expression, but the second Ad5hr exposure induced a rapid increase in IFN-gamma mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Primary Ad5hr infection suppressed CCL20, TNF and IL-1 mRNA expression in PBMC, and subsequent virus exposures further dampened expression of these pro-inflammatory cytokines. Primary, but not secondary, Ad5hr inoculation increased the frequency of CXCR3+ CD4+ T cells in blood, while secondary, but not primary, Ad5hr infection transiently increased the frequencies of Ki67+, HLADR+ and CD95+/CCR5+ CD4+ T cells in blood. Ad5hr infection induced polyfunctional CD4 and CD8+ T cells specific for the Ad5 hexon protein in all of the animals. Thus, infection with Ad5hr induced a complex pattern of innate and adaptive immunity in RM that included transient systemic CD4+ T cell activation and suppressed innate immunity on re-exposure to the virus. The complex effects of adenovirus infection on the immune system may help to explain the unexpected results of testing Ad5 vector expressing HIV antigens in Ad5 seropositive people.

  18. Suppression of adoptive antituberculosis immunity by normal recipient animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefford, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    Adoptive immunity is poorly expressed in normal syngeneic mice. This phenomenon was studied by using experimental antituberculosis immunity as a model system representing pure cell-mediated immunity. Expression of adoptive immunity was facilitated by pretreating recipients with sublethal ionizing radiation (500 rads) or high doses (200 mg/kg) of cyclophosphamide or by using adult thymectomized, lethally irradiated, bone-marrow-reconstituted (TXB) mice. Adult thymectomy was less effective, and a low dose of cyclophosphamide (20 mg/kg) was completely ineffective. The beneficial effect of sublethal irradiation was reduced over time; it persisted for 4 weeks and was absent after 8 weeks. Attempts to restore the suppressed state of normal mice to sublethally irradiated mice by using normal spleen or thymus cells did not succeed. Even in rats, which express adoptive antituberculosis immunity without immunosuppressive treatment, the use of sublethally irradiated or TXB recipients potentiated adoptive immunity. It was concluded that suppression of adoptive immunization in normal recipient mice is mediated predominantly, if not exclusively, by T lymphocytes that are sensitive to a number of immunosuppressive agents. The suppressor cells are long-lived and can be regenerated from precursors that are resistant to 500 but not to 900 rads of ionizing radiation

  19. Cooperative Immune Suppression by Escherichia coli and Shigella Effector Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Maarten F; Alto, Neal M

    2018-04-01

    The enteric attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and the invasive pathogens enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and Shigella encode type III secretion systems (T3SS) used to inject effector proteins into human host cells during infection. Among these are a group of effectors required for NF-κB-mediated host immune evasion. Recent studies have identified several effector proteins from A/E pathogens and EIEC/ Shigella that are involved in suppression of NF-κB and have uncovered their cellular and molecular functions. A novel mechanism among these effectors from both groups of pathogens is to coordinate effector function during infection. This cooperativity among effector proteins explains how bacterial pathogens are able to effectively suppress innate immune defense mechanisms in response to diverse classes of immune receptor signaling complexes (RSCs) stimulated during infection. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Oral immune therapy: targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilan, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an altered systemic immune response leading to inflammation-mediated damage to the gut and other organs. Oral immune therapy is a method of systemic immune modulation via alteration of the gut immune system. It uses the inherit ability of the innate system of the gut to redirect the systemic innate and adaptive immune responses. Oral immune therapy is an attractive clinical approach to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. It can induce immune modulation without immune suppression, has minimal toxicity and is easily administered. Targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system can serve as an attractive novel therapeutic method for IBD. This review summarizes the current data and discusses several examples of oral immune therapeutic methods for using the gut immune system to generate signals to reset systemic immunity as a treatment for IBD.

  1. Regulatory T cells: immune suppression and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Yisong Y

    2010-01-01

    Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells (Tregs) were originally identified as critical in maintaining self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. The immunosuppressive functions of Tregs are widely acknowledged and have been extensively studied. Recent studies have revealed many diverse roles of Tregs in shaping the immune system and the inflammatory response. This review will discuss our efforts as well as the efforts of others towards understanding the multifaceted function of Treg...

  2. Cell wall degrading enzyme induced rice innate immune responses are suppressed by the type 3 secretion system effectors XopN, XopQ, XopX and XopZ of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipanwita Sinha

    Full Text Available Innate immune responses are induced in plants and animals through perception of Damage Associated Molecular Patterns. These immune responses are suppressed by pathogens during infection. A number of studies have focussed on identifying functions of plant pathogenic bacteria that are involved in suppression of Pathogen Associated Molecular Pattern induced immune responses. In comparison, there is very little information on functions used by plant pathogens to suppress Damage Associated Molecular Pattern induced immune responses. Xanthomonasoryzae pv. oryzae, a gram negative bacterial pathogen of rice, secretes hydrolytic enzymes such as LipA (Lipase/Esterase that damage rice cell walls and induce innate immune responses. Here, we show that Agrobacterium mediated transient transfer of the gene for XopN, a X. oryzae pv. oryzae type 3 secretion (T3S system effector, results in suppression of rice innate immune responses induced by LipA. A xopN (- mutant of X. oryzae pv. oryzae retains the ability to suppress these innate immune responses indicating the presence of other functionally redundant proteins. In transient transfer assays, we have assessed the ability of 15 other X. oryzae pv. oryzae T3S secreted effectors to suppress rice innate immune responses. Amongst these proteins, XopQ, XopX and XopZ are suppressors of LipA induced innate immune responses. A mutation in any one of the xopN, xopQ, xopX or xopZ genes causes partial virulence deficiency while a xopN (- xopX (- double mutant exhibits a greater virulence deficiency. A xopN (- xopQ (- xopX (- xopZ (- quadruple mutant of X. oryzae pv. oryzae induces callose deposition, an innate immune response, similar to a X. oryzae pv. oryzae T3S(- mutant in rice leaves. Overall, these results indicate that multiple T3S secreted proteins of X. oryzae pv. oryzae can suppress cell wall damage induced rice innate immune responses.

  3. Immune System Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth / For Kids / Quiz: Immune System Print How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! Partner Message ...

  4. The reciprocal interaction of sympathetic nervous system and cAMP-PKA-NF-kB pathway in immune suppression after experimental stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lei; Shi, Luhang; Yan, Fuling

    2016-08-03

    Sympathetic nervous system(SNS) is involved in the mechanism of immune suppression after stroke. Furthermore, as the pro-inflammatory effect of nuclear factor kappa B(NF-kB) is inhibited after stroke, which is regulated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate(cAMP) and proteinkinase A(PKA). The cAMP-PKA-NF-kB pathway might play an important role in noradrenergic-mediated immune dysfunction. The purpose of our research is to analyze how SNS interfere with the immune system after acute stroke and the underlying mechanism of cAMP-PKA-NF-kB pathway in regulating the inflammation. 32 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups equally and randomly (1) Sham operation group; (2) middle cerebral artery occlusion; (MCAO) control group; (3) propranolol MCAO group; (4) isopropylarterenol sham group. 72h later after MCAO or sham operation, tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α)and interleukine-10(IL-10) in serum as well as cAMP, PKA and NF-kB in spleen cells were tested. TNF-α decreased while IL-10 increased in serum after acute ischemia stroke (pPKA in spleen both increased in MCAO model while the expression of NF-kB was inhibited (pPKA. Therefore, the level of nuclear factor NF-kB is down-regulated. Since the pro-inflammatory effect of NF-kB slacked, the immune system may be inhibited after stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Suppression of immune surveillance in melanoma [Immunotherapy of metastatic melanoma by reversal of immune suppression

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    Biggs, M. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eiselein, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2001-06-01

    In this paper we develop the hypothesis that a significant fraction of patients with advanced melanoma can be successfully treated with immunotherapy. Reversal of antigen-specific immune suppression to melanoma polypeptide antigens is an essential, first step. We postulate the key regulation of CTL responses resides within the CD4+ T-lymphocytes and macrophage/dendritic cells. There is a pluri-potential cell within this regulatory arm that functions either as a Th1 cell or as a suppressor T-cell, Ths, depending on how antigen is presented. We have shown that poliovirus 1 Sabin will lyse human melanoma cells in tissue culture, and a special "vaccine" prepared from this lysis actively stimulates Ths cell function. The Ths arm of the regulatory system can be down-regulated with cyclophosphamide given 24 hours after the vaccine. The capacity to generate a CTL response is retained. The summary conclusion is that a phase 1 clinical trial in advanced melanoma using the special viral-tumor-lysate followed by cyclophosphamide, plus expanded autologous dendritic cells sensitized with the polypeptide epitopes captained in the viral-lysate will produce beneficial results.

  6. Dynamics of immune system vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, Sean P.

    The adaptive immune system can be viewed as a complex system, which adapts, over time, to reflect the history of infections experienced by the organism. Understanding its operation requires viewing it in terms of tradeoffs under constraints and evolutionary history. It typically displays "robust, yet fragile" behavior, meaning common tasks are robust to small changes but novel threats or changes in environment can have dire consequences. In this dissertation we use mechanistic models to study several biological processes: the immune response, the homeostasis of cells in the lymphatic system, and the process that normally prevents autoreactive cells from entering the lymphatic system. Using these models we then study the effects of these processes interacting. We show that the mechanisms that regulate the numbers of cells in the immune system, in conjunction with the immune response, can act to suppress autoreactive cells from proliferating, thus showing quantitatively how pathogenic infections can suppress autoimmune disease. We also show that over long periods of time this same effect can thin the repertoire of cells that defend against novel threats, leading to an age correlated vulnerability. This vulnerability is shown to be a consequence of system dynamics, not due to degradation of immune system components with age. Finally, modeling a specific tolerance mechanism that normally prevents autoimmune disease, in conjunction with models of the immune response and homeostasis we look at the consequences of the immune system mistakenly incorporating pathogenic molecules into its tolerizing mechanisms. The signature of this dynamic matches closely that of the dengue virus system.

  7. Immune System (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Immune System KidsHealth / For Parents / Immune System What's in this ... can lead to illness and infection. About the Immune System The immune system is the body's defense against ...

  8. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... jobs to do: B lymphocytes are like the body's military intelligence system, seeking out their targets and sending defenses ... like the soldiers, destroying the invaders that the intelligence system has ... that invades the body is called an antigen (pronounced: AN-tih-jun). ...

  9. Systemic agonistic anti-CD40 treatment of tumor bearing mice modulates hepatic myeloid suppressive cells and causes immune-mediated liver damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Ma, Chi; Duffy, Austin; Eggert, Tobias; Hawk, Nga; Kleiner, David E.; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F.

    2015-01-01

    Immune stimulatory monoclonal antibodies are currently evaluated as anti tumor agents. Although overall toxicity appears to be moderate, liver toxicities have been reported and are not completely understood. We studied the effect of systemic CD40 antibody treatment on myeloid cells in spleen and liver. Naïve and tumor-bearing mice were treated systemically with agonistic anti-CD40 antibody. Immune cell subsets in liver and spleen, serum transaminases and liver histologies were analyzed after antibody administration. Nox2−/−, Cd40−/− as well as bone marrow chimeric mice were used to study the mechanism by which agonistic anti-CD40 mediates its effects in vivo. Suppressor function of murine and human tumor-induced myeloid derived suppressive cells was studied upon CD40 ligation. Agonistic CD40 antibody caused liver damage within 24 hours after injection in two unrelated tumor models and mice strains. Using bone marrow chimeras we demonstrated that CD40 antibody-induced hepatitis in tumor-bearing mice was dependent on the presence of CD40-expressing hematopoietic cells. Agonistic CD40 ligation-dependent liver damage was induced by the generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, agonistic CD40 antibody resulted in increased CD80 and CD40 positive liver CD11b+Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells. CD40 ligation on tumor-induced murine and human CD14+HLA-DRlow PBMC from cancer patients reduced their immune suppressor function. Collectively, agonistic CD40 antibody treatment activated tumor-induced, myeloid cells, caused myeloid dependent hepatotoxicity and ameliorated the suppressor function of murine and human MDSC. Collectively, our data suggests that CD40 may mature immunosuppressive myeloid cells and thereby cause liver damage in mice with an accumulation of tumor-induced hepatic MDSC. PMID:25637366

  10. Our Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our Immune System A story for children with primary immunodeficiency diseases Written by Sara LeBien IMMUNE DEFICIENCY FOUNDATION A note ... who are immune deficient to better understand their immune system. What is a “ B-cell, ” a “ T-cell, ” ...

  11. Immune System and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It ... t, to find and destroy them. If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be ...

  12. Pneumonia - weakened immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000093.htm Pneumonia - weakened immune system To use the sharing features on this page, ... fighting off infection because of problems with the immune system. This type of disease is called "pneumonia in ...

  13. Beyond the Immune Suppression: The Immunotherapy in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Ida; Cattarino, Susanna; Aglianò, Anna Maria; Collalti, Giulia; Sciarra, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most common cancer in men. As well in many other human cancers, inflammation and immune suppression have an important role in their development. We briefly describe the host components that interact with the tumor to generate an immune suppressive environment involved in PCa promotion and progression. Different tools provide to overcome the mechanisms of immunosuppression including vaccines and immune checkpoint blockades. With regard to this, we report results of most recent clinical trials investigating immunotherapy in metastatic PCa (Sipuleucel-T, ipilimumab, tasquinimod, Prostvac-VF, and GVAX) and provide possible future perspectives combining the immunotherapy to the traditional therapies. PMID:26161414

  14. Immune system simulation online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Lund, Ole; Castiglione, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The recognition of antigenic peptides is a major event of an immune response. In current mesoscopic-scale simulators of the immune system, this crucial step has been modeled in a very approximated way. RESULTS: We have equipped an agent-based model of the immune system with immuno...

  15. Immunotherapy: Shifting the Balance of Cell-Mediated Immunity and Suppression in Human Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Jo A.; Jochems, Caroline [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Gulley, James L. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Medical Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Schlom, Jeffrey, E-mail: js141c@nih.gov; Tsang, Kwong Y. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2012-12-11

    Active immunotherapy is dependent on the ability of the immune system to recognize and respond to tumors. Despite overwhelming evidence to support a cell-mediated immune response to prostate cancer, it is insufficient to eradicate the disease. This is likely due to a high level of suppression at the tumor site from a variety of sources, including immunosuppressive cells. Immune cells entering the tumor microenvironment may be inhibited directly by the tumor, stromal cells or other immune cells that have been induced to adopt a suppressive phenotype. The resurgence of interest in immunotherapy following the approval of sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab by the Food and Drug Administration has brought about new strategies for overcoming tumor-mediated suppression and bolstering anti-tumor responses. Improved understanding of the immune response to prostate cancer can lead to new combination therapies, such as the use of vaccine with small molecule and checkpoint inhibitors or other immunotherapies.

  16. Immunotherapy: Shifting the Balance of Cell-Mediated Immunity and Suppression in Human Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, Jo A.; Jochems, Caroline; Gulley, James L.; Schlom, Jeffrey; Tsang, Kwong Y.

    2012-01-01

    Active immunotherapy is dependent on the ability of the immune system to recognize and respond to tumors. Despite overwhelming evidence to support a cell-mediated immune response to prostate cancer, it is insufficient to eradicate the disease. This is likely due to a high level of suppression at the tumor site from a variety of sources, including immunosuppressive cells. Immune cells entering the tumor microenvironment may be inhibited directly by the tumor, stromal cells or other immune cells that have been induced to adopt a suppressive phenotype. The resurgence of interest in immunotherapy following the approval of sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab by the Food and Drug Administration has brought about new strategies for overcoming tumor-mediated suppression and bolstering anti-tumor responses. Improved understanding of the immune response to prostate cancer can lead to new combination therapies, such as the use of vaccine with small molecule and checkpoint inhibitors or other immunotherapies

  17. The Immune System Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Kirsten A.; Gibbs, Melissa A.; Friedman, Erich J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a card game that helps introductory biology students understand the basics of the immune response to pathogens. Students simulate the steps of the immune response with cards that represent the pathogens and the cells and molecules mobilized by the immune system. In the process, they learn the similarities and differences between the…

  18. Measles immune suppression: lessons from the macaque model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory D de Vries

    Full Text Available Measles remains a significant childhood disease, and is associated with a transient immune suppression. Paradoxically, measles virus (MV infection also induces robust MV-specific immune responses. Current hypotheses for the mechanism underlying measles immune suppression focus on functional impairment of lymphocytes or antigen-presenting cells, caused by infection with or exposure to MV. We have generated stable recombinant MVs that express enhanced green fluorescent protein, and remain virulent in non-human primates. By performing a comprehensive study of virological, immunological, hematological and histopathological observations made in animals euthanized at different time points after MV infection, we developed a model explaining measles immune suppression which fits with the "measles paradox". Here we show that MV preferentially infects CD45RA(- memory T-lymphocytes and follicular B-lymphocytes, resulting in high infection levels in these populations. After the peak of viremia MV-infected lymphocytes were cleared within days, followed by immune activation and lymph node enlargement. During this period tuberculin-specific T-lymphocyte responses disappeared, whilst strong MV-specific T-lymphocyte responses emerged. Histopathological analysis of lymphoid tissues showed lymphocyte depletion in the B- and T-cell areas in the absence of apoptotic cells, paralleled by infiltration of T-lymphocytes into B-cell follicles and reappearance of proliferating cells. Our findings indicate an immune-mediated clearance of MV-infected CD45RA(- memory T-lymphocytes and follicular B-lymphocytes, which causes temporary immunological amnesia. The rapid oligoclonal expansion of MV-specific lymphocytes and bystander cells masks this depletion, explaining the short duration of measles lymphopenia yet long duration of immune suppression.

  19. Tumor-Derived Exosomes and Their Role in Tumor-Induced Immune Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa L. Whiteside

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-derived exosomes (TEX are emerging as critical components of an intercellular information network between the tumor and the host. The tumor escapes from the host immune system by using a variety of mechanisms designed to impair or eliminate anti-tumor immunity. TEX carrying a cargo of immunoinhibitory molecules and factors represent one such mechanism. TEX, which are present in all body fluids of cancer patients, deliver negative molecular or genetic signals to immune cells re-programming their functions. Although TEX can also stimulate immune activity, in the microenvironments dominated by the tumor, TEX tend to mediate immune suppression thus promoting tumor progression. The TEX content, in part resembling that of the parent cell, may serve as a source of cancer biomarkers. TEX also interfere with immune therapies. A better understanding of TEX and their contribution to cancer progression and cancer patients’ response to immune therapies represents a challenging new field of investigation.

  20. The role of epidermal cytokines in the generation of cutaneous immune reactions and ultraviolet radiation-induced immune suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    The immune suppression generated by UV exposure is a major risk factor for skin cancer patients. This finding has fuelled efforts to understand the mechanisms involved in the immune suppression induced by exposure to UV radiation. This article reviews the recent findings on the role of epidermal cytokines in the generation of an immune response and their role in the induction of immune suppression induced by UV exposure. (UK)

  1. Purulent pericarditis in a dog administered immune-suppressing drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohri, T.; Takashima, K.; Yamane, T.; Sato, H.; Yamane, Y.

    2009-01-01

    A 5-year-old castrated mongrel dog was brought to our hospital with anorexia and vomiting. Laboratory testing revealed immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA), and so treatment was initiated with multiple immune-suppressing drugs, achieving partial remission from IMHA. However, cardiac tamponade due to purulent pericarditis was identified as a secondary disease. Culture of pericardial fluid yielded numerous Candida albicans and multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter sp. Pericardiocentesis was performed, and the condition of the dog improved. However, the dog died the next day

  2. Subversion of plant cellular functions by bacterial type-III effectors: beyond suppression of immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, Alberto P

    2016-04-01

    Most bacterial plant pathogens employ a type-III secretion system to inject type-III effector (T3E) proteins directly inside plant cells. These T3Es manipulate host cellular processes in order to create a permissive niche for bacterial proliferation, allowing development of the disease. An important role of T3Es in plant pathogenic bacteria is the suppression of plant immune responses. However, in recent years, research has uncovered T3E functions different from direct immune suppression, including the modulation of plant hormone signaling, metabolism or organelle function. This insight article discusses T3E functions other than suppression of immunity, which may contribute to the modulation of plant cells in order to promote bacterial survival, nutrient release, and bacterial replication and dissemination. © 2015 The Author. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. The skin microbiome: Is it affected by UV-induced immune suppression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaykumar Patra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Human skin apart from functioning as a physical barricade to stop the entry of pathogens, also hosts innumerable commensal organisms. The skin cells and the immune system constantly interact with microbes, to maintain cutaneous homeostasis, despite the challenges offered by various environmental factors. A major environmental factor affecting the skin is ultraviolet radiation UV-R from sunlight. UV-R is well known to modulate the immune system, which can be both beneficial and deleterious. By targeting the cells and molecules within skin, UV-R can trigger the production and release of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, affect the innate immune system and ultimately suppress the adaptive cellular immune response. This can contribute to skin carcinogenesis and the promotion of infectious agents such as herpes simplex virus and possibly others. On the other hand, a UV-established immunosuppressive environment may protect against the induction of immunologically mediated skin diseases including some of photodermatoses such as polymorphic light eruption. In this article, we share our perspective about the possibility that UV-induced immune suppression may alter the landscape of the skin's microbiome and its components. Alternatively, or in concert with this, direct UV-induced DNA and membrane damage to the microbiome may result in pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs that interfere with UV-induced immune suppression.

  4. Programmed Death Ligand 2 in Cancer-Induced Immune Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esdy N. Rozali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory molecules of the B7/CD28 family play a key role in the induction of immune tolerance in the tumor microenvironment. The programmed death-1 receptor (PD-1, with its ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2, constitutes an important member of these inhibitory pathways. The relevance of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in cancer has been extensively studied and therapeutic approaches targeting PD-1 and PD-L1 have been developed and are undergoing human clinical testing. However, PD-L2 has not received as much attention and its role in modulating tumor immunity is less clear. Here, we review the literature on the immunobiology of PD-L2, particularly on its possible roles in cancer-induced immune suppression and we discuss the results of recent studies targeting PD-L2 in cancer.

  5. Cystatins in Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špela Magister, Janko Kos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystatins comprise a large superfamily of related proteins with diverse biological activities. They were initially characterised as inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases, however, in recent years some alternative functions for cystatins have been proposed. Cystatins possessing inhibitory function are members of three families, family I (stefins, family II (cystatins and family III (kininogens. Stefin A is often linked to neoplastic changes in epithelium while another family I cystatin, stefin B is supposed to have a specific role in neuredegenerative diseases. Cystatin C, a typical type II cystatin, is expressed in a variety of human tissues and cells. On the other hand, expression of other type II cystatins is more specific. Cystatin F is an endo/lysosome targeted protease inhibitor, selectively expressed in immune cells, suggesting its role in processes related to immune response. Our recent work points on its role in regulation of dendritic cell maturation and in natural killer cells functional inactivation that may enhance tumor survival. Cystatin E/M expression is mainly restricted to the epithelia of the skin which emphasizes its prominent role in cutaneous biology. Here, we review the current knowledge on type I (stefins A and B and type II cystatins (cystatins C, F and E/M in pathologies, with particular emphasis on their suppressive vs. promotional function in the tumorigenesis and metastasis. We proposed that an imbalance between cathepsins and cystatins may attenuate immune cell functions and facilitate tumor cell invasion.

  6. Cystatins in immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magister, Spela; Kos, Janko

    2013-01-01

    Cystatins comprise a large superfamily of related proteins with diverse biological activities. They were initially characterised as inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases, however, in recent years some alternative functions for cystatins have been proposed. Cystatins possessing inhibitory function are members of three families, family I (stefins), family II (cystatins) and family III (kininogens). Stefin A is often linked to neoplastic changes in epithelium while another family I cystatin, stefin B is supposed to have a specific role in neuredegenerative diseases. Cystatin C, a typical type II cystatin, is expressed in a variety of human tissues and cells. On the other hand, expression of other type II cystatins is more specific. Cystatin F is an endo/lysosome targeted protease inhibitor, selectively expressed in immune cells, suggesting its role in processes related to immune response. Our recent work points on its role in regulation of dendritic cell maturation and in natural killer cells functional inactivation that may enhance tumor survival. Cystatin E/M expression is mainly restricted to the epithelia of the skin which emphasizes its prominent role in cutaneous biology. Here, we review the current knowledge on type I (stefins A and B) and type II cystatins (cystatins C, F and E/M) in pathologies, with particular emphasis on their suppressive vs. promotional function in the tumorigenesis and metastasis. We proposed that an imbalance between cathepsins and cystatins may attenuate immune cell functions and facilitate tumor cell invasion.

  7. Myc Cooperates with Ras by Programming Inflammation and Immune Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortlever, Roderik M; Sodir, Nicole M; Wilson, Catherine H; Burkhart, Deborah L; Pellegrinet, Luca; Brown Swigart, Lamorna; Littlewood, Trevor D; Evan, Gerard I

    2017-11-30

    The two oncogenes KRas and Myc cooperate to drive tumorigenesis, but the mechanism underlying this remains unclear. In a mouse lung model of KRas G12D -driven adenomas, we find that co-activation of Myc drives the immediate transition to highly proliferative and invasive adenocarcinomas marked by highly inflammatory, angiogenic, and immune-suppressed stroma. We identify epithelial-derived signaling molecules CCL9 and IL-23 as the principal instructing signals for stromal reprogramming. CCL9 mediates recruitment of macrophages, angiogenesis, and PD-L1-dependent expulsion of T and B cells. IL-23 orchestrates exclusion of adaptive T and B cells and innate immune NK cells. Co-blockade of both CCL9 and IL-23 abrogates Myc-induced tumor progression. Subsequent deactivation of Myc in established adenocarcinomas triggers immediate reversal of all stromal changes and tumor regression, which are independent of CD4 + CD8 + T cells but substantially dependent on returning NK cells. We show that Myc extensively programs an immune suppressive stroma that is obligatory for tumor progression. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Immune suppression of erythropoiesis in transient erythroblastopenia of childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, H M; Lightsey, A L; Nelson, D P; Diamond, L K

    1979-09-01

    Serum and IgG from four children with transient erythroblastopenia of childhood (TEC) was tested to see what effect it would have on development of erythroid colonies from bone marrow mononuclear cells. Serum and IgG specimens obtained at the time of diagnosis uniformly suppressed erythroid colony development from CFU-E. Washed bone marrow mononuclear cells from a child with TEC failed to grow in the presence of his own serum, but grew normally in the presence of isologous serum. Serum specimens obtained from patients after recovery from TEC had no effect on erythroid colony development. The anemia of TEC appears to be due to transient immune suppression of erythroid colony development.

  9. HMGB1 enhances immune suppression by facilitating the differentiation and suppressive activity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Katherine H; Sinha, Pratima; Horn, Lucas A; Clements, Virginia K; Yang, Huan; Li, Jianhua; Tracey, Kevin J; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2014-10-15

    Chronic inflammation often precedes malignant transformation and later drives tumor progression. Likewise, subversion of the immune system plays a role in tumor progression, with tumoral immune escape now well recognized as a crucial hallmark of cancer. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are elevated in most individuals with cancer, where their accumulation and suppressive activity are driven by inflammation. Thus, MDSCs may define an element of the pathogenic inflammatory processes that drives immune escape. The secreted alarmin HMGB1 is a proinflammatory partner, inducer, and chaperone for many proinflammatory molecules that MDSCs develop. Therefore, in this study, we examined HMGB1 as a potential regulator of MDSCs. In murine tumor systems, HMGB1 was ubiquitous in the tumor microenvironment, activating the NF-κB signal transduction pathway in MDSCs and regulating their quantity and quality. We found that HMGB1 promotes the development of MDSCs from bone marrow progenitor cells, contributing to their ability to suppress antigen-driven activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, HMGB1 increased MDSC-mediated production of IL-10, enhanced crosstalk between MDSCs and macrophages, and facilitated the ability of MDSCs to downregulate expression of the T-cell homing receptor L-selectin. Overall, our results revealed a pivotal role for HMGB1 in the development and cancerous contributions of MDSCs. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Rapamycin delays growth of Wnt-1 tumors in spite of suppression of host immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svirshchevskaya, Elena V; Mariotti, Jacopo; Wright, Mollie H; Viskova, Natalia Y; Telford, William; Fowler, Daniel H; Varticovski, Lyuba

    2008-01-01

    Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR), is an immunosuppressive agent that has anti-proliferative effects on some tumors. However, the role of Rapamycin-induced immune suppression on tumor progression has not been examined. We developed a transplantation model for generation of mammary tumors in syngeneic recipients that can be used to address the role of the immune system on tumor progression. We examined the effect of Rapamycin on the immune system and growth of MMTV-driven Wnt-1 mammary tumors which were transplanted into irradiated and bone marrow-reconstituted, or naïve mice. Rapamycin induced severe immunosuppression and significantly delayed the growth of Wnt-1 tumors. T cell depletion in spleen and thymus and reduction in T cell cytokine secretion were evident within 7 days of therapy. By day 20, splenic but not thymic T cell counts, and cytokine secretion recovered. We determined whether adoptive T cell therapy enhances the anti-cancer effect using ex vivo generated Rapamycin-resistant T cells. However, T cell transfer during Rapamycin therapy did not improve the outcome relative to drug therapy alone. Thus, we could not confirm that suppression of T cell immunity contributes to tumor growth in this model. Consistent with suppression of the mTOR pathway, decreased 4E-BP1, p70 S6-kinase, and S6 protein phosphorylation correlated with a decrease in Wnt-1 tumor cell proliferation. Rapamycin has a direct anti-tumor effect on Wnt-1 breast cancer in vivo that involves inhibition of the mTOR pathway at doses that also suppress host immune responses

  11. Topical calcitriol protects from UV-induced genetic damage but suppresses cutaneous immunity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, Diona L; Kim, Young Jin; Dixon, Katie M; Halliday, Gary M; Javeri, Arash; Mason, Rebecca S

    2010-08-01

    Calcitriol, the biologically active form of vitamin D, has been reported to cause both suppressive and protective immune effects in mice. Its immune effects in vivo in humans are unclear. We investigated the in vivo effects of topical calcitriol on minimal erythema dose and skin immune responses in healthy volunteers. We found that calcitriol did not protect from ultraviolet (UV)-induced erythema (sunburn) when applied either 24 h before or immediately after irradiation, although it decreased the density of sunburn cells and thymine dimers seen on biopsy when applied 24 h before and again immediately after irradiation. Using the Mantoux reaction as a model of skin immunity, we found that topical calcitriol applied at high total doses reduced the Mantoux responses of nearby untreated, unirradiated skin, suggesting a para-local or systemic immunosuppressive effect not observed with lower calcitriol doses. We then measured UV-induced suppression of Mantoux reactions at vehicle-treated sites and sites treated with low-dose calcitriol, and found that calcitriol neither reduced nor enhanced UV-induced immunosuppression. Despite calcitriol reducing UV-induced DNA damage, which should protect the immune system, it has immunosuppressive effects in our model which may help to explain the efficacy of analogues such as calcipotriol in the treatment of psoriasis.

  12. Immune System and Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Badri Man

    2017-01-01

    The immune system recognises a transplanted kidney as foreign body and mounts immune response through cellular and humoral mechanisms leading to acute or chronic rejection, which ultimately results in graft loss. Over the last five decades, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the immune responses to transplanted organs in both experimental and clinical transplant settings. Modulation of the immune response by using immunosuppressive agents has led to successful outcomes after kidney transplantation. The paper provides an overview of the general organisation and function of human immune system, immune response to kidney transplantation, and the current practice of immunosuppressive therapy in kidney transplantation in the United Kingdom.

  13. Play the Immune System Defender Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Double Helix Ear Pages ECG/Electrocardiogram Immune System Immune Responses Malaria MRI Nerve Signaling Pavlov's Dog Split ... Alfred Nobel's Life and Work Teachers' Questionnaire The Immune System Play the Immune System Game About the game ...

  14. Behavioral Immunity Suppresses an Epizootic in Caribbean Spiny Lobsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Butler

    Full Text Available Sociality has evolved in a wide range of animal taxa but infectious diseases spread rapidly in populations of aggregated individuals, potentially negating the advantages of their social interactions. To disengage from the coevolutionary struggle with pathogens, some hosts have evolved various forms of "behavioral immunity"; yet, the effectiveness of such behaviors in controlling epizootics in the wild is untested. Here we show how one form of behavioral immunity (i.e., the aversion of diseased conspecifics practiced by Caribbean spiny lobsters (Panulirus argus when subject to the socially transmitted PaV1 virus, appears to have prevented an epizootic over a large seascape. We capitalized on a "natural experiment" in which a die-off of sponges in the Florida Keys (USA resulted in a loss of shelters for juvenile lobsters over a ~2500km2 region. Lobsters were thus concentrated in the few remaining shelters, presumably increasing their exposure to the contagious virus. Despite this spatial reorganization of the population, viral prevalence in lobsters remained unchanged after the sponge die-off and for years thereafter. A field experiment in which we introduced either a healthy or PaV1-infected lobster into lobster aggregations in natural dens confirmed that spiny lobsters practice behavioral immunity. Healthy lobsters vacated dens occupied by PaV1-infected lobsters despite the scarcity of alternative shelters and the higher risk of predation they faced when searching for a new den. Simulations from a spatially-explicit, individual-based model confirmed our empirical results, demonstrating the efficacy of behavioral immunity in preventing epizootics in this system.

  15. Skin immunization by microneedle patch overcomes statin-induced suppression of immune responses to influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilieva, Elena V; Wang, Shelly; Li, Song; Prausnitz, Mark R; Compans, Richard W

    2017-12-19

    Recent studies indicated that in elderly individuals, statin therapy is associated with a reduced response to influenza vaccination. The present study was designed to determine effects on the immune response to influenza vaccination induced by statin administration in a mouse model, and investigate potential approaches to improve the outcome of vaccination on the background of statin therapy. We fed middle aged BALB/c mice a high fat "western" diet (WD) alone or supplemented with atorvastatin (AT) for 14 weeks, and control mice were fed with the regular rodent diet. Mice were immunized with a single dose of subunit A/Brisbane/59/07 (H1N1) vaccine, either systemically or with dissolving microneedle patches (MNPs). We observed that a greater age-dependent decline in the hemagglutinin inhibition titers occurred in systemically-immunized mice than in MNP- immunized mice. AT dampened the antibody response in the animals vaccinated by either route of vaccine delivery. However, the MNP-vaccinated AT-treated animals had ~20 times higher total antibody levels to the influenza vaccine than the systemically vaccinated group one month postvaccination. We propose that microneedle vaccination against influenza provides an approach to ameliorate the immunosuppressive effect of statin therapy observed with systemic immunization.

  16. Platelet activating factor receptor binding plays a critical role in jet fuel-induced immune suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Gerardo; Kazimi, Nasser; Nghiem, Dat X.; Walterscheid, Jeffrey P.; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2004-01-01

    Applying military jet fuel (JP-8) or commercial jet fuel (Jet-A) to the skin of mice suppresses the immune response in a dose-dependant manner. The release of biological response modifiers, particularly prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ), is a critical step in activating immune suppression. Previous studies have shown that injecting selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors into jet fuel-treated mice blocks immune suppression. Because the inflammatory phospholipid mediator, platelet-activating factor (PAF), up-regulates cyclooxygenase-2 production and PGE 2 synthesis by keratinocytes, we tested the hypothesis that PAF-receptor binding plays a role in jet fuel-induced immune suppression. Treating keratinocyte cultures with PAF and/or jet fuel (JP-8 and Jet-A) stimulates PGE 2 secretion. Jet fuel-induced PGE 2 production was suppressed by treating the keratinocytes with specific PAF-receptor antagonists. Injecting mice with PAF, or treating the skin of the mice with JP-8, or Jet-A, induced immune suppression. Jet fuel-induced immune suppression was blocked when the jet fuel-treated mice were injected with PAF-receptor antagonists before treatment. Jet fuel treatment has been reported to activate oxidative stress and treating the mice with anti-oxidants (Vitamins C, or E or beta-hydroxy toluene), before jet fuel application, interfered with immune suppression. These findings confirm previous studies showing that PAF-receptor binding can modulate immune function. Furthermore, they suggest that PAF-receptor binding may be an early event in the induction of immune suppression by immunotoxic environmental agents that target the skin

  17. Suppression of plant resistance gene-based immunity by a fungal effector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra M Houterman

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system of plants consists of two layers. The first layer, called basal resistance, governs recognition of conserved microbial molecules and fends off most attempted invasions. The second layer is based on Resistance (R genes that mediate recognition of effectors, proteins secreted by pathogens to suppress or evade basal resistance. Here, we show that a plant-pathogenic fungus secretes an effector that can both trigger and suppress R gene-based immunity. This effector, Avr1, is secreted by the xylem-invading fungus Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici (Fol and triggers disease resistance when the host plant, tomato, carries a matching R gene (I or I-1. At the same time, Avr1 suppresses the protective effect of two other R genes, I-2 and I-3. Based on these observations, we tentatively reconstruct the evolutionary arms race that has taken place between tomato R genes and effectors of Fol. This molecular analysis has revealed a hitherto unpredicted strategy for durable disease control based on resistance gene combinations.

  18. Suppression of the immune response to ovalbumin in vivo by anti-idiotypic antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinevich, A.S.; Pinegin, B.V.

    1986-01-01

    Conditions of suppression of the immune response to a food allergin (ovalbumin) were studied with the aid of anti-idiotypic (AID) antibodies. Hen ovalbumin was used and the experiments were performed on mice. Antibodies were isolated from the resulting protein fractions and tested for inhibitor activity by the method of direct radioimmunologic analysis. The test system consisted of the reaction of binding the globulin fraction to the total preparation of antibodies to ovalbumin from mice and a 125 I-labeled total preparation of antibodies to ovalbumin of the same animals

  19. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Oh; Okunishi, Katsuhide; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Harada, Hiroaki; Kawahata, Kimito; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Dohi, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4 + T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4 + T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects

  20. New concepts in immunity to Neisseria gonorrhoeae: innate responses and suppression of adaptive immunity favor the pathogen, not the host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingru eLiu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that gonorrhea can be acquired repeatedly with no apparent development of protective immunity arising from previous episodes of infection. Symptomatic infection is characterized by a purulent exudate, but the host response mechanisms are poorly understood. While the remarkable antigenic variability displayed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae and its capacity to inhibit complement activation allow it to evade destruction by the host’s immune defenses, we propose that it also has the capacity to avoid inducing specific immune responses. In a mouse model of vaginal gonococcal infection, N. gonorrhoeae elicits Th17-driven inflammatory- immune responses, which recruit innate defense mechanisms including an influx of neutrophils. Concomitantly, N. gonorrhoeae suppresses Th1- and Th2-dependent adaptive immunity, including specific antibody responses, through a mechanism involving TGF-β and regulatory T cells. Blockade of TGF-β alleviates the suppression of specific anti-gonococcal responses and allows Th1 and Th2 responses to emerge with the generation of immune memory and protective immunity. Genital tract tissues are naturally rich in TGF-β, which fosters an immunosuppressive environment that is important in reproduction. In exploiting this niche, N. gonorrhoeae exemplifies a well-adapted pathogen that proactively elicits from its host innate responses that it can survive and concomitantly suppresses adaptive immunity. Comprehension of these mechanisms of gonococcal pathogenesis should allow the development of novel approaches to therapy and facilitate the development of an effective vaccine.

  1. Diversity in the Immune System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghans, J.A.M.; Boer, R.J. de

    2000-01-01

    Diversity is one of the key characteristics of the vertebrate immune system. Lymphocyte repertoires of at least 3x10⁷ different clonotypes protect humans against infections, while avoiding unwanted immune responses against self-peptides and innocuous antigens. It is this lymphocyte diversity

  2. Simulation analysis of a wildfire suppression system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abílio Pereira Pacheco; João Claro; Tiago. Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Rekindles and false alarms are unusually high in the Portuguese wildfire management system, representing a high burden on suppression resources in particular, and fire management resources in general. In 20,049 occurrences that the suppression system handled in the summer of 2010, 12.5% were false alarms and 15.0% were rekindles. We present a discreteevent simulation...

  3. IMMUNE SUPPRESSION OF CHALLENGED VACCINATES AS A RIGOROUS ASSESSMENT OF STERILE PROTECTION BY LENTIVIRAL VACCINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigo, Jodi K.; Durkin, Shannon; Sturgeon, Timothy J.; Tagmyer, Tara; Cook, Sheila J.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2007-01-01

    We previously reported that an experimental live-attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine, containing a mutated S2 accessory gene, provided protection from disease and detectable infection after virulent virus (EIAVPV) challenge [1,2]. To determine if attenuated EIAV vaccines actually prevent persistent infection by challenge virus, we employed a 14-day dexamethasone treatment of vaccinated horses post-challenge to suppress host immunity and amplify replication levels of any infecting EIAV. At two months post-challenge the horses were all protected from virulent-virus challenge, evidenced by a lack of EIA signs and detectable challenge plasma viral RNA. Upon immune suppression, 6/12 horses displayed clinical EIA. Post-immune suppression characterizations demonstrated that the attenuated vaccine evidently prevented detectable challenge virus infection in 50% of horses. These data highlight the utility of post-challenge immune suppression for evaluating persistent viral vaccine protective efficacy. PMID:17023099

  4. Antiretroviral therapy, immune suppression and renal impairment in HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ryom; Mocroft, Amanda; Lundgren, Jens D

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review recent literature on antiretroviral treatment (ART) and immune suppression as risk factors for renal impairment in HIV-positive persons, and to discuss pending research questions within this field.......The purpose of this article is to review recent literature on antiretroviral treatment (ART) and immune suppression as risk factors for renal impairment in HIV-positive persons, and to discuss pending research questions within this field....

  5. Technique Selectively Represses Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... balance. It can also lead to paralysis. Current treatments for autoimmune disorders involve the use of immunosuppressant drugs. These work by tamping down immune system activity. However, they can also leave patients susceptible to infections and increase their risk of ...

  6. Overview of the Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at NIAID Visitor Information Contact Us Research > NIAID's Role in Research > Immune System Research share with facebook share with twitter share ... such as allergic reactions and autoimmune disease. The ... a unique role, with different ways of recognizing problems, communicating with ...

  7. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Guerrero

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed.

  8. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Vico, Antonio; Lardone, Patricia J.; Álvarez-Sánchez, Nuria; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Ana; Guerrero, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed. PMID:23609496

  9. TGF-β1/Smad2/3/Foxp3 signaling is required for chronic stress-induced immune suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiju; Caudle, Yi; Wheeler, Clay; Zhou, Yu; Stuart, Charles; Yao, Baozhen; Yin, Deling

    2018-01-15

    Depending on the duration and severity, psychological tension and physical stress can enhance or suppress the immune system in both humans and animals. Although it has been established that chronic stress exerts a significant suppressive effect on immune function, the mechanisms by which affects immune responses remain elusive. By employing an in vivo murine system, we revealed that TGF-β1/Smad2/3/Foxp3 axis was remarkably activated following chronic stress. Furthermore, TLR9 and p38 MAPK played a critical role in the activation of TGF-β1/Smad2/3/Foxp3 signaling cascade. Moreover, inhibition of TGF-β1/Smad2/3/Foxp3 or p38 significantly attenuated chronic stress-induced lymphocyte apoptosis and apoptosis-related proteins, as well as the differentiation of T regulatory cells in spleen. Interestingly, disequilibrium of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines balance caused by chronic stress was also rescued by blocking TGF-β1/Smad2/3/Foxp3 axis. These findings yield insight into a novel mechanism by which chronic stress modulates immune functions and identifies new targets for the development of novel anti-immune suppressant medications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of engineered nanoparticles on the innate immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanchang; Hardie, Joseph; Zhang, Xianzhi; Rotello, Vincent M

    2017-12-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) have broad applications in industry and nanomedicine. When NPs enter the body, interactions with the immune system are unavoidable. The innate immune system, a non-specific first line of defense against potential threats to the host, immediately interacts with introduced NPs and generates complicated immune responses. Depending on their physicochemical properties, NPs can interact with cells and proteins to stimulate or suppress the innate immune response, and similarly activate or avoid the complement system. NPs size, shape, hydrophobicity and surface modification are the main factors that influence the interactions between NPs and the innate immune system. In this review, we will focus on recent reports about the relationship between the physicochemical properties of NPs and their innate immune response, and their applications in immunotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Approaches Mediating Oxytocin Regulation of the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Stephani C; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamic neuroendocrine system is mainly composed of the neural structures regulating hormone secretion from the pituitary gland and has been considered as the higher regulatory center of the immune system. Recently, the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system (HNS) emerged as an important component of neuroendocrine-immune network, wherein the oxytocin (OT)-secreting system (OSS) plays an essential role. The OSS, consisting of OT neurons in the supraoptic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, their several accessory nuclei and associated structures, can integrate neural, endocrine, metabolic, and immune information and plays a pivotal role in the development and functions of the immune system. The OSS can promote the development of thymus and bone marrow, perform immune surveillance, strengthen immune defense, and maintain immune homeostasis. Correspondingly, OT can inhibit inflammation, exert antibiotic-like effect, promote wound healing and regeneration, and suppress stress-associated immune disorders. In this process, the OSS can release OT to act on immune system directly by activating OT receptors or through modulating activities of other hypothalamic-pituitary-immune axes and autonomic nervous system indirectly. However, our understandings of the role of the OSS in neuroendocrine regulation of immune system are largely incomplete, particularly its relationship with other hypothalamic-pituitary-immune axes and the vasopressin-secreting system that coexists with the OSS in the HNS. In addition, it remains unclear about the relationship between the OSS and peripherally produced OT in immune regulation, particularly intrathymic OT that is known to elicit central immunological self-tolerance of T-cells to hypophysial hormones. In this work, we provide a brief review of current knowledge of the features of OSS regulation of the immune system and of potential approaches that mediate OSS coordination of the activities of entire neuroendocrine-immune network.

  12. Role of the immune system in pancreatic cancer progression and immune modulating treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideras, K; Braat, H; Kwekkeboom, J; van Eijck, C H; Peppelenbosch, M P; Sleijfer, S; Bruno, M

    2014-05-01

    Traditional chemotherapeutics have largely failed to date to produce significant improvements in pancreatic cancer survival. One of the reasons for the resilience of pancreatic cancer towards intensive treatment is that the cancer is capable of high jacking the immune system: during disease progression the immune system is converted from a system that attacks tumor cells into a support structure for the cancer, exerting trophic actions on the cancer cells. This turn-around of immune system action is achieved through mobilization and activation of regulatory T cells, myeloid derived suppressor cells, tumor-associated macrophages and fibroblasts, all of which suppress CD8 T cells and NK cells. This immune suppression occurs both through the expression of tolerance-inducing cell surface molecules, such as PD-L1, as well as through the production of "tolerogenic" cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-β. Based on the accumulating insight into the importance of the immune system for the outcome of pancreatic cancer patients multiple new immunotherapeutic approaches against pancreatic cancer are being currently tested in clinical trials. In this review we give an overview of both the immune escaping mechanisms of pancreatic cancer as well as the new immune related therapeutic strategies currently being tested in pancreatic cancer clinical trials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Autophagy suppresses host adaptive immune responses toward Borrelia burgdorferi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buffen, Kathrin; Oosting, Marije; Li, Yang; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Netea, Mihai G.; Joosten, Leo A. B.

    Inhibition of autophagy increases the severity of murine Lyme arthritis and human adaptive immune responses against B. burgdorferi. We have previously demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy increased the Borrelia burgdorferi induced innate cytokine production in vitro, but little is known

  14. Sport, immune system and respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, F; Passalacqua, G; Senna, G; Mosca Frezet, M

    2003-02-01

    In the recent years, the importance of sports in everyday life has rapidly increased. Asthma and respiratory allergy are among the most common problems to be afforded in those individuals practising sports and therefore, the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of allergy in athletes have received in recent times a great interest. The experimental studies performed on allergy and sport have lead to take in consideration a more general aspect, that is the effects of exercise on the immune system. In fact, it has been observed that exercise can induce significant and measurable immunological changes, involving a transient immune suppression (changes in number and activity of neutrophils, lymphocytes, macrophages, and secretion of cytokines). This is probably the reason why athletes seem to be more prone to upper respiratory viral infections. These infections usually appear after exercise discontinuation (within 3 days) particularly in those athletes practising sports which require a long term effort and resistance. The problem is further complicated by the effect of nutrition, since nutrition regimen itself and dietary supplementation were demonstrated able to interfere with the immune response. In the present article we will review the present knowledge and experimental data concerning the effects of sport on immune system and some of the most important clinical implications.

  15. Safety system for pressure suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, L.E.; Ludwig, G.J.; Tulsa, O.

    1975-01-01

    The rupture disk with rated breaking points is constrained by two supporting elements and has a convex-concave shape. For pressure suppression, it is reversable inversely to its bulging. Its surface has notches which are the rated breaking points and respond to higher pressures. The centre of the rupture disk contains an area of relatively smaller thickness that will burst at lower pressure and thus makes it applicable for lower pressures. For the response of the rupture disk centre, a thrust ring with a central opening may also be used. Its edge is formed into a convex-concave section supported on the edge of the rupture disk on the exit side. The free centre of the rupture disk is then the area of relative weakness. (RW/AK) [de

  16. The Immune System in Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Daniel W.; Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely…

  17. Clonal variation in Xenorhabdus nematophila virulence and suppression of Manduca sexta immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youngjin; Herbert, Erin E; Cowles, Charles E; Cowles, Kimberly N; Menard, Megan L; Orchard, Samantha S; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi

    2007-03-01

    Virulence of the insect pathogen Xenorhabdus nematophila is attributed in part to its ability to suppress immunity. For example, X. nematophila suppresses transcripts encoding several antimicrobial proteins, even in the presence of Salmonella enterica, an inducer of these transcripts. We show here that virulence and immune suppression phenotypes can be lost in a subpopulation of X. nematophila. Cells that have undergone 'virulence modulation' (vmo) have attenuated virulence and fail to suppress antimicrobial transcript levels, haemocyte aggregation and nodulation in Manduca sexta insects. When plated on certain media, vmo cells have a higher proportion of translucent (versus opaque) colonies compared with non-vmo cells. Like vmo strains, translucent colony isolates are defective in virulence and immune suppression. The X. nematophila genome encodes two 'opacity' genes with similarity to the Ail/PagC/Rck family of outer membrane proteins involved in adherence, invasion and serum resistance. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis shows that RNA levels of one of these opacity genes, opaB, are higher in opaque relative to translucent colonies. We propose that in X. nematophila opaB may be one of several factors involved in immune suppression during infection, and expression of these factors can be co-ordinately eliminated in a subpopulation, possibly through a phase variation mechanism.

  18. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Oh; Okunishi, Katsuhide; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Harada, Hiroaki; Kawahata, Kimito; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko [Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Dohi, Makoto, E-mail: mdohi-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Institute of Respiratory Immunology, Shibuya Clinic for Respiratory Diseases and Allergology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4{sup +} T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4{sup +} T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects.

  19. Dynamics of Immune Checkpoints, Immune System, and BCG in the Treatment of Superficial Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farouk Tijjani Saad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the dynamics of immune suppressors/checkpoints, immune system, and BCG in the treatment of superficial bladder cancer. Programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β are some of the examples of immune suppressors/checkpoints. They are responsible for deactivating the immune system and enhancing immunological tolerance. Moreover, they categorically downregulate and suppress the immune system by preventing and blocking the activation of T-cells, which in turn decreases autoimmunity and enhances self-tolerance. In cancer immunotherapy, the immune checkpoints/suppressors prevent and block the immune cells from attacking, spreading, and killing the cancer cells, which leads to cancer growth and development. We formulate a mathematical model that studies three possible dynamics of the treatment and establish the effects of the immune checkpoints on the immune system and the treatment at large. Although the effect cannot be seen explicitly in the analysis of the model, we show it by numerical simulations.

  20. Programmed death ligand 2 in cancer-induced immune suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozali, Esdy N.; Hato, Stanleyson V.; Robinson, Bruce W.; Lake, Richard A.; Lesterhuis, W. Joost

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory molecules of the B7/CD28 family play a key role in the induction of immune tolerance in the tumor microenvironment. The programmed death-1 receptor (PD-1), with its ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2, constitutes an important member of these inhibitory pathways. The relevance of the PD-1/PD-L1

  1. Immune engineering: from systems immunology to engineering immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ning

    2017-03-01

    The smallpox vaccine represents the earliest attempt in engineering immunity. The recent success of chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR-T cells) in cancer once again demonstrates the clinical potential of immune engineering. Inspired by this success, diverse approaches have been used to boost various aspects of immunity: engineering dendritic cells (DCs), natural killer (NK) cells, T cells, antibodies, cytokines, small peptides, and others. With recent development of various high-throughput technologies (of which engineers, especially biomedical engineers/bioengineers contributed significantly), such as immune repertoire sequencing, and analytical methods, a systems level of understanding immunity (or the lack of it) beyond model animals has provided critical insights into the human immune system. This review focuses on recent progressed made in systems biology and the engineering of adaptive immunity.

  2. Adaptation in the innate immune system and heterologous innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stefan F

    2014-11-01

    The innate immune system recognizes deviation from homeostasis caused by infectious or non-infectious assaults. The threshold for its activation seems to be established by a calibration process that includes sensing of microbial molecular patterns from commensal bacteria and of endogenous signals. It is becoming increasingly clear that adaptive features, a hallmark of the adaptive immune system, can also be identified in the innate immune system. Such adaptations can result in the manifestation of a primed state of immune and tissue cells with a decreased activation threshold. This keeps the system poised to react quickly. Moreover, the fact that the innate immune system recognizes a wide variety of danger signals via pattern recognition receptors that often activate the same signaling pathways allows for heterologous innate immune stimulation. This implies that, for example, the innate immune response to an infection can be modified by co-infections or other innate stimuli. This "design feature" of the innate immune system has many implications for our understanding of individual susceptibility to diseases or responsiveness to therapies and vaccinations. In this article, adaptive features of the innate immune system as well as heterologous innate immunity and their implications are discussed.

  3. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells mediate immune suppression in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yu, Wei-bo; Tao, Lian-yuan; Xu, Qing

    2016-01-15

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is characterized by the loss of motor and sensory functions in areas below the level of the lesion and numerous accompanying deficits. Previous studies have suggested that myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC)-induced immune depression may play a pivotal role in the course of SCI. However, the concrete mechanism of these changes regarding immune suppression remains unknown. Here, we created an SCI mouse model to gain further evidence regarding the relationship between MDSCs following SCI and T lymphocyte suppression. We showed that in the SCI mouse model, the expanding MDSCs have the capacity to suppress T cell proliferation, and this suppression could be reversed by blocking the arginase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Surmounting tumor-induced immune suppression by frequent vaccination or immunization in the absence of B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oizumi, Satoshi; Deyev, Vadim; Yamazaki, Koichi; Schreiber, Taylor; Strbo, Natasa; Rosenblatt, Joseph; Podack, Eckhard R

    2008-05-01

    Tumor-induced immune suppression is one of the most difficult obstacles to the success of tumor immunotherapy. Here, we show that established tumors suppress CD8 T cell clonal expansion in vivo, which is normally observed in tumor-free mice upon antigen-specific glycoprotein (gp) 96-chaperone vaccination. Suppression of CD8 T-cell expansion by established tumors is independent of tumor-associated expression of the antigen that is recognized by the CD8-T-cell receptor. Vaccination of tumor-bearing mice is associated with increased cellular recruitment to the vaccine site compared with tumor-free mice. However, rejection of established, suppressive tumors required frequent (daily) gp96 vaccination. B cells are known to attenuate T helper cell-1 responses. We found that in B-cell deficient mice, tumor rejection of established tumors can be achieved by a single vaccination. Accordingly, in tumor-free B-cell deficient mice, cognate CD8 cytotoxic T lymphocyte clonal expansion is enhanced in response to gp96-chaperone vaccination. The data have implications for the study of tumor-induced immune suppression and for translation of tumor immunotherapy into the clinical setting. Frequent vaccination with cellular vaccines and concurrent B-cell depletion may greatly enhance the activity of anticancer vaccine therapy in patients.

  5. Increased dietary fat prevents sleep deprivation-induced immune suppression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horohov, D W; Pourciau, S S; Mistric, L; Chapman, A; Ryan, D H

    2001-06-01

    Fatty acid composition of rodent diets can affect baseline immune function as measured in vitro and in vivo. Stress, in a variety of forms, can also affect immune function. Possible interaction between diet and other stressors has not been fully explored. We examined the interaction between sleep deprivation stress and dietary fatty acid composition in altering lymphocyte responses to mitogen stimulation. Rats were fed diets containing various sources of fatty acids, then were subjected to sleep deprivation. Splenocytes were harvested and assayed for responsiveness to various mitogens, using a 72-h proliferation assay. Rats subjected to sleep deprivation experienced significant suppression of in vitro proliferative response to various mitogens. This immune suppression was dependent on duration of sleep deprivation. Feeding sleep deprived rats a diet enriched in fatty acids abrogated the effect of sleep deprivation. The fat content of rodent diets can have a marked effect on baseline and stress-modulated immune responses.

  6. Priming in Systemic Plant Immunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ho Won [University of Chicago; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wang, Lin [University of Minnesota; Glazebrook, Jane [University of Minnesota; Greenberg, Jean T. [University of Chicago

    2009-01-01

    Upon local infection, plants possess inducible systemic defense responses against their natural enemies. Bacterial infection results in the accumulation to high levels of the mobile metabolite C9-dicarboxylic acid azelaic acid in the vascular sap of Arabidopsis. Azelaic acid confers local and systemic resistance against Pseudomonas syringae. The compound primes plants to strongly accumulate salicylic acid (SA), a known defense signal, upon infection. Mutation of a gene induced by azelaic acid (AZI1) results in the specific loss in plants of systemic immunity triggered by pathogen or azelaic acid and of the priming of SA induction. AZI1, a predicted secreted protein, is also important for generating vascular sap that confers disease resistance. Thus, azelaic acid and AZI1 comprise novel components of plant systemic immunity involved in priming defenses.

  7. Pattern-triggered immunity suppresses programmed cell death triggered by fumonisin b1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Igarashi

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (PCD is a crucial process for plant innate immunity and development. In plant innate immunity, PCD is believed to prevent the spread of pathogens from the infection site. Although proper control of PCD is important for plant fitness, we have limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating plant PCD. Plant innate immunity triggered by recognition of effectors (effector-triggered immunity, ETI is often associated with PCD. However pattern-triggered immunity (PTI, which is triggered by recognition of elicitors called microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs, is not. Therefore we hypothesized that PTI might suppress PCD. Here we report that PCD triggered by the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1 can be suppressed by PTI in Arabidopsis. FB1-triggered cell death was suppressed by treatment with the MAMPs flg22 (a part of bacterial flagellin or elf18 (a part of the bacterial elongation factor EF-Tu but not chitin (a component of fungal cell walls. Although plant hormone signaling is associated with PCD and PTI, both FB1-triggered cell death and suppression of cell death by flg22 treatment were still observed in mutants deficient in jasmonic acid (JA, ethylene (ET and salicylic acid (SA signaling. The MAP kinases MPK3 and MPK6 are transiently activated and inactivated within one hour during PTI. We found that FB1 activated MPK3 and MPK6 about 36-48 hours after treatment. Interestingly, this late activation was attenuated by flg22 treatment. These results suggest that PTI suppression of FB1-triggered cell death may involve suppression of MPK3/MPK6 signaling but does not require JA/ET/SA signaling.

  8. The Immune System and Bodily Defence How Does the Immune ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 11. The Immune System and Bodily Defence How Does the Immune System Generate a Truly Infinite Repertoire Capability? Vineeta Bal Satyajit Rath. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 11 November 1997 pp 8-13 ...

  9. In acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, infiltrating macrophages are immune activated, whereas microglia remain immune suppressed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainchtein, I D; Vinet, J; Brouwer, N; Brendecke, S; Biagini, G; Biber, K; Boddeke, H W G M; Eggen, B J L

    2014-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by loss of myelin accompanied by infiltration of T-lymphocytes and monocytes. Although it has been shown that these infiltrates are important for the progression of MS, the role of microglia, the resident macrophages of the CNS, remains ambiguous. Therefore, we have compared the phenotypes of microglia and macrophages in a mouse model for MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In order to properly discriminate between these two cell types, microglia were defined as CD11b(pos) CD45(int) Ly-6C(neg) , and infiltrated macrophages as CD11b(pos) CD45(high) Ly-6C(pos) . During clinical EAE, microglia displayed a weakly immune-activated phenotype, based on the expression of MHCII, co-stimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86, and CD40) and proinflammatory genes [interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumour necrosis factor- α (TNF-α)]. In contrast, CD11b(pos) CD45(high) Ly-6C(pos) infiltrated macrophages were strongly activated and could be divided into two populations Ly-6C(int) and Ly-6C(high) , respectively. Ly-6C(high) macrophages contained less myelin than Ly-6C(int) macrophages and expression levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α were higher in Ly-6C(int) macrophages. Together, our data show that during clinical EAE, microglia are only weakly activated whereas infiltrated macrophages are highly immune reactive. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Probiotic cheese attenuates exercise-induced immune suppression in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lollo, P C B; Cruz, A G; Morato, P N; Moura, C S; Carvalho-Silva, L B; Oliveira, C A F; Faria, J A F; Amaya-Farfan, J

    2012-07-01

    Intense physical activity results in a substantial volume of stress and hence a significant probability of immunosuppression in athletes, with milk proteins being, perhaps, the most recommended protein supplements. Consumption of a probiotic cheese can attenuate immune suppression induced by exhausting exercise in rats. A popular Brazilian fresh cheese (Minas Frescal cheese) containing Lactobacillus acidophilus LA14 and Bifidobacterium longum BL05 was fed for 2wk to adult Wistar rats, which then were brought to exhaustion on the treadmill. Two hours after exhaustion, the rats were killed and material was collected for the determination of serum uric acid, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction, total protein, triacylglycerols, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatine kinase, and blood cell (monocyte, lymphocyte, neutrophil, and leukocyte) counts. Exercise was efficient in reducing lymphocyte counts, irrespective of the type of ingested cheese, but the decrease in the group fed the probiotic cheese was 22% compared with 48% in the animals fed regular cheese. Monocyte counts were unaltered in the rats fed probiotic cheese compared with a significant decrease in the rats fed the regular cheese. Most importantly, ingestion of the probiotic cheese resulted in a >100% increase in serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and a 50% decrease in triacylglycerols. We conclude that probiotic Minas Frescal cheese may be a viable alternative to enhance the immune system and could be used to prevent infections, particularly those related to the physical overexertion of athletes. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Progranulin Protects Hippocampal Neurogenesis via Suppression of Neuroinflammatory Responses Under Acute Immune Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanbo; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nishihara, Masugi

    2017-07-01

    Immune stress is well known to suppress adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. We have demonstrated that progranulin (PGRN) has a mitogenic effect on neurogenesis under several experimental conditions. We have also shown that PGRN suppresses excessive neuroinflammatory responses after traumatic brain injury. However, the role of PGRN in modulating neurogenesis under acute immune stress is yet to be elucidated. In the present study, we evaluated the involvement of PGRN in neurogenesis and inflammatory responses in the hippocampus using a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced immune stress model. Treatment of mice with LPS significantly increased the expression of PGRN in activated microglia and decreased neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. PGRN deficiency increased CD68-immunoreactive area and exacerbated suppression of neurogenesis following LPS treatment. The expression levels of lysosomal genes including lysozyme M, macrophage expressed gene 1, and cathepsin Z were higher in PGRN-deficient than in wild-type mice, while PGRN deficiency decreased mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) mRNA levels, suggesting that PGRN suppresses excessive lysosomal biogenesis by promoting mTOR signaling. LPS treatment also increased the expression of proinflammatory genes such as interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) in the hippocampus, and PGRN deficiency further enhanced gene expression of IL-6 and mPGES-1. These results suggest that PGRN plays a protecting role in hippocampal neurogenesis at least partially by attenuating neuroinflammatory responses during LPS-induced acute immune stress.

  12. The historical association between measles and pertussis: A case of immune suppression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Coleman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: According to historical medical reports, many children with measles subsequently contracted pertussis, often with fatal results. The likelihood of a child contracting pertussis after a measles infection is increased by its immune-suppressing effects. This research aims to verify the historical reports. Methods: The analysis examines statistically the historical relationship between average measles and pertussis incidence rates in the United States from 1938 to 1954 at the state level and in average weekly rates. Analysis of incidence rates is cross-sectional at the state level using public health data. Results: The results show that, on average and over time, states with higher measles rates have higher pertussis rates, and the peaks and nadirs of average weekly incidence rates of pertussis lag measles by a delay of about 3–4 weeks, well within the duration of immune suppression. Measles and pertussis have similar geographical distributions. Conclusion: The research tentatively supports the hypothesis that because of its immune-suppressing effects, measles causes an increase in pertussis, but other factors may be involved. Epidemic models should give more attention to the possibility of immune suppression for diseases such as measles where that might be a risk factor. The findings reemphasize the importance of measles vaccination for the prevention of other diseases.

  13. The historical association between measles and pertussis: A case of immune suppression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: According to historical medical reports, many children with measles subsequently contracted pertussis, often with fatal results. The likelihood of a child contracting pertussis after a measles infection is increased by its immune-suppressing effects. This research aims to verify the historical reports. Methods: The analysis examines statistically the historical relationship between average measles and pertussis incidence rates in the United States from 1938 to 1954 at the state level and in average weekly rates. Analysis of incidence rates is cross-sectional at the state level using public health data. Results: The results show that, on average and over time, states with higher measles rates have higher pertussis rates, and the peaks and nadirs of average weekly incidence rates of pertussis lag measles by a delay of about 3–4 weeks, well within the duration of immune suppression. Measles and pertussis have similar geographical distributions. Conclusion: The research tentatively supports the hypothesis that because of its immune-suppressing effects, measles causes an increase in pertussis, but other factors may be involved. Epidemic models should give more attention to the possibility of immune suppression for diseases such as measles where that might be a risk factor. The findings reemphasize the importance of measles vaccination for the prevention of other diseases. PMID:27092263

  14. Sex-dimorphic adverse drug reactions to immune suppressive agents in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Zelinkova (Zuzana); E. Bultman (Evelien); L. Vogelaar (Lauran); C. Bouziane (Cheima); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); C.J. van der Woude (Janneke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAIM: To analyze sex differences in adverse drug reactions (ADR) to the immune suppressive medication in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. METHODS: All IBD patients attending the IBD outpatient clinic of a referral hospital were identifed through the electronic diagnosis

  15. [Obesity and the immune system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, M; Mazure, R A; Culebras, J M

    2004-01-01

    With an increased prevalence of obesity in developed countries, associated chronic diseases rise in a parallel way. Morbidity secondary to overweight and obesity include type 2 diabetes, dislipemia, hypertension, heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, cholelithiasis, osteoarthritis, heart insufficiency, sleep apnoea, menstrual changes, sterility and psychological alterations. There is also a greater susceptibility to suffer some types of cancer, infections, greater risk of bacteremia and a prolonged time of wound healing after surgical operations. All these factors indicate that obesity exerts negative effects upon the immune system. Immune changes found in obesity and their possible interrelations are described in this article. Changes produced during obesity affect both humoral and cellular immunity. It is known that adipose tissue, together with its role as energy reserve in form of triglycerides, has important endocrine functions, producing several hormones and other signal molecules. Immune response can be deeply affected by obesity, playing leptin an important role. Properties of leptin, alterations of leptin levels in different situations and its changes with different medical and surgical therapies for obesity are described in this article.

  16. Tachykinins in the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Berger, Alexandra; Milne, Craig D; Paige, Christopher J

    2006-08-01

    Until recently, the mammalian tachykinins included substance P, neurokinin A and neurokinin B. Following the discovery of the fourth member of this family, hemokinin 1, a diverse group of novel tachykinins and tachykinin gene-related peptides have been identified in mammals. These newly identified members are preferentially expressed in peripheral tissues. Currently, the impact of these new tachykinin peptides on the immune system remains unclear. Some data imply an important role for hemokinin 1 in the generation of lymphocytes. Tachykinins are traditionally viewed as neuropeptides with well-defined functions as neurotransmitters. Many studies however, indicate that they may also be produced by non-neuronal cells, and exert profound influence on inflammatory responses by affecting multiple aspects of immune cell function. It is of great importance to determine whether the new tachykinin peptides have similar effects. A more detailed understanding of the interactions between tachykinins and immune cells may provide the basis for the development of new therapies for inflammatory and immune-mediated diseases.

  17. Signaling Circuits and Regulation of Immune Suppression by Ovarian Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J. Cannon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The barriers presented by immune suppression in the ovarian tumor microenvironment present one of the biggest challenges to development of successful tumor vaccine strategies for prevention of disease recurrence and progression following primary surgery and chemotherapy. New insights gained over the last decade have revealed multiple mechanisms of immune regulation, with ovarian tumor-associated macrophages/DC likely to fulfill a central role in creating a highly immunosuppressive milieu that supports disease progression and blocks anti-tumor immunity. This review provides an appraisal of some of the key signaling pathways that may contribute to immune suppression in ovarian cancer, with a particular focus on the potential involvement of the c-KIT/PI3K/AKT, wnt/β-catenin, IL-6/STAT3 and AhR signaling pathways in regulation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression in tumor-associated macrophages. Knowledge of intercellular and intracellular circuits that shape immune suppression may afford insights for development of adjuvant treatments that alleviate immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment and enhance the clinical efficacy of ovarian tumor vaccines.

  18. Immune-suppressive activity of punicalagin via inhibition of NFAT activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Ik; Kim, Byoung-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Shin; Lee, Samkeun; Shin, Kwang-Soo; Lim, Jong-Soon

    2008-01-01

    Since T cell activation is central to the development of autoimmune diseases, we screened a natural product library comprising 1400 samples of medicinal herbal extracts, to identify compounds that suppress T cell activity. Punicalagin (PCG) isolated from the fruit of Punica granatum was identified as a potent immune suppressant, based on its inhibitory action on the activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). PCG downregulated the mRNA and soluble protein expression of interleukin-2 from anti-CD3/anti-CD28-stimulated murine splenic CD4+ T cells and suppressed mixed leukocytes reaction (MLR) without exhibiting cytotoxicity to the cells. In vivo, the PCG treatment inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced chronic ear edema in mice and decreased CD3+ T cell infiltration of the inflamed tissue. These results suggest that PCG could be a potential candidate for the therapeutics of various immune pathologies

  19. Weakened Immune System and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Basics Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals Weakened Immune System and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... people with health conditions such as a weakened immune system. If you have cancer or other immunocompromising conditions, ...

  20. Suppression or Activation of Immune Responses by Predicted Secreted Proteins of the Soybean Rust Pathogen Phakopsora pachyrhizi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Mingsheng; Grayczyk, James P; Seitz, Janina M; Lee, Youngsill; Link, Tobias I; Choi, Doil; Pedley, Kerry F; Voegele, Ralf T; Baum, Thomas J; Whitham, Steven A

    2018-01-01

    Rust fungi, such as the soybean rust pathogen Phakopsora pachyrhizi, are major threats to crop production. They form specialized haustoria that are hyphal structures intimately associated with host-plant cell membranes. These haustoria have roles in acquiring nutrients and secreting effector proteins that manipulate host immune systems. Functional characterization of effector proteins of rust fungi is important for understanding mechanisms that underlie their virulence and pathogenicity. Hundreds of candidate effector proteins have been predicted for rust pathogens, but it is not clear how to prioritize these effector candidates for further characterization. There is a need for high-throughput approaches for screening effector candidates to obtain experimental evidence for effector-like functions, such as the manipulation of host immune systems. We have focused on identifying effector candidates with immune-related functions in the soybean rust fungus P. pachyrhizi. To facilitate the screening of many P. pachyrhizi effector candidates (named PpECs), we used heterologous expression systems, including the bacterial type III secretion system, Agrobacterium infiltration, a plant virus, and a yeast strain, to establish an experimental pipeline for identifying PpECs with immune-related functions and establishing their subcellular localizations. Several PpECs were identified that could suppress or activate immune responses in nonhost Nicotiana benthamiana, N. tabacum, Arabidopsis, tomato, or pepper plants.

  1. Immune System Toxicity and Immunotoxicity Hazard Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to chemicals may alter immune system health, increasing the risk of infections, allergy and autoimmune diseases. The chapter provides a concise overview of the immune system, host factors that affect immune system heal, and the effects that xenobiotic exposure may have ...

  2. The Immune System and Bodily Defence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Immune System and Bodily Defence. 3. How Does the Immune System Organize Itself so as to Connect. Target Recognition to Expected Functions? Vineeta Bal and Satyajit Rath. How is the immune system designed to choose between making antibodies against some targets, killer cells against viral infections and ...

  3. Protein A Suppresses Immune Responses during Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection in Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Thomer, Lena; Missiakas, Dominique M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Staphylococcus aureus infection is not associated with the development of protective immunity, and disease relapses occur frequently. We hypothesize that protein A, a factor that binds immunoglobulin Fcγ and cross-links VH3 clan B cell receptors (IgM), is the staphylococcal determinant for host immune suppression. To test this, vertebrate IgM was examined for protein A cross-linking. High VH3 binding activity occurred with human and guinea immunoglobulin, whereas mouse and rabbit immunoglobulins displayed little and no binding, respectively. Establishing a guinea pig model of S. aureus bloodstream infection, we show that protein A functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses host B cell responses. Immunization with SpAKKAA, which cannot bind immunoglobulin, elicits neutralizing antibodies that enable guinea pigs to develop protective immunity. Importance  Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of soft tissue and bloodstream infections; however, a vaccine with clinical efficacy is not available. Using mice to model staphylococcal infection, earlier work identified protective antigens; however, corresponding human clinical trials did not reach their endpoints. We show that B cell receptor (IgM) cross-linking by protein A is an important immune evasion strategy of S. aureus that can be monitored in a guinea pig model of bloodstream infection. Further, immunization with nontoxigenic protein A enables infected guinea pigs to elicit antibody responses that are protective against S. aureus. Thus, the guinea pig model may support preclinical development of staphylococcal vaccines. PMID:25564466

  4. Immune Evasion, Immunopathology and the Regulation of the Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Faivre

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Costs and benefits of the immune response have attracted considerable attention in the last years among evolutionary biologists. Given the cost of parasitism, natural selection should favor individuals with the most effective immune defenses. Nevertheless, there exists huge variation in the expression of immune effectors among individuals. To explain this apparent paradox, it has been suggested that an over-reactive immune system might be too costly, both in terms of metabolic resources and risks of immune-mediated diseases, setting a limit to the investment into immune defenses. Here, we argue that this view neglects one important aspect of the interaction: the role played by evolving pathogens. We suggest that taking into account the co-evolutionary interactions between the host immune system and the parasitic strategies to overcome the immune response might provide a better picture of the selective pressures that shape the evolution of immune functioning. Integrating parasitic strategies of host exploitation can also contribute to understand the seemingly contradictory results that infection can enhance, but also protect from, autoimmune diseases. In the last decades, the incidence of autoimmune disorders has dramatically increased in wealthy countries of the northern hemisphere with a concomitant decrease of most parasitic infections. Experimental work on model organisms has shown that this pattern may be due to the protective role of certain parasites (i.e., helminths that rely on the immunosuppression of hosts for their persistence. Interestingly, although parasite-induced immunosuppression can protect against autoimmunity, it can obviously favor the spread of other infections. Therefore, we need to think about the evolution of the immune system using a multidimensional trade-off involving immunoprotection, immunopathology and the parasitic strategies to escape the immune response.

  5. Identification of immune response-related genes in the Chinese oak silkworm, Antheraea pernyi by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiu-Ning; Zhu, Bao-Jian; Wang, Lei; Wei, Guo-Qing; Dai, Li-Shang; Lin, Kun-Zhang; Sun, Yu; Qiu, Jian-Feng; Fu, Wei-Wei; Liu, Chao-Liang

    2013-11-01

    Insects possess an innate immune system that responds to invading microorganisms. In this study, a subtractive cDNA library was constructed to screen for immune response-related genes in the fat bodies of Antheraea pernyi (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) pupa challenged with Escherichia coli. Four hundred putative EST clones were identified by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH), including 50 immune response-related genes, three cytoskeleton genes, eight cell cycle and apoptosis genes, five respiration and energy metabolism genes, five transport genes, 40 metabolism genes, ten stress response genes, four transcription and translation regulation genes and 77 unknown genes. To verify the reliability of the SSH data, the transcription of a set of randomly selected immune response-related genes were confirmed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). These identified immune response-related genes provide insight into understanding the innate immunity in A. pernyi. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Visual computing model for immune system and medical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tao; Cao, Xinxue; Xiong, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Natural immune system is an intelligent self-organizing and adaptive system, which has a variety of immune cells with different types of immune mechanisms. The mutual cooperation between the immune cells shows the intelligence of this immune system, and modeling this immune system has an important significance in medical science and engineering. In order to build a comprehensible model of this immune system for better understanding with the visualization method than the traditional mathematic model, a visual computing model of this immune system was proposed and also used to design a medical system with the immune system, in this paper. Some visual simulations of the immune system were made to test the visual effect. The experimental results of the simulations show that the visual modeling approach can provide a more effective way for analyzing this immune system than only the traditional mathematic equations.

  7. Suppression of Antitumor Immune Responses by Human Papillomavirus through Epigenetic Downregulation of CXCL14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Cicchini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs are causally associated with multiple human cancers. Previous studies have shown that the HPV oncoprotein E7 induces immune suppression; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. To understand the mechanisms by which HPV deregulates host immune responses in the tumor microenvironment, we analyzed gene expression changes of all known chemokines and their receptors using our global gene expression data sets from human HPV-positive and -negative head/neck cancer and cervical tissue specimens in different disease stages. We report that, while many proinflammatory chemokines increase expression throughout cancer progression, CXCL14 is dramatically downregulated in HPV-positive cancers. HPV suppression of CXCL14 is dependent on E7 and associated with DNA hypermethylation in the CXCL14 promoter. Using in vivo mouse models, we revealed that restoration of Cxcl14 expression in HPV-positive mouse oropharyngeal carcinoma cells clears tumors in immunocompetent syngeneic mice, but not in Rag1-deficient mice. Further, Cxcl14 reexpression significantly increases natural killer (NK, CD4+ T, and CD8+ T cell infiltration into the tumor-draining lymph nodes in vivo. In vitro transwell migration assays show that Cxcl14 reexpression induces chemotaxis of NK, CD4+ T, and CD8+ T cells. These results suggest that CXCL14 downregulation by HPV plays an important role in suppression of antitumor immune responses. Our findings provide a new mechanistic understanding of virus-induced immune evasion that contributes to cancer progression.

  8. Immune System Dysfunction in the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Fuentes, Manuel; Alarcón, Marcelo; Palomo, Iván

    2017-01-01

    Human aging is characterized by both physical and physiological frailty that profoundly affects the immune system. In this context aging is associated with declines in adaptive and innate immunity established as immunosenescence. Immunosenescence is a new concept that reflects the age-associated restructuring changes of innate and adaptive immune functions. Thus elderly individuals usually present chronic low-level inflammation, higher infection rates and chronic diseases. A study of alterations in the immune system during aging could provide a potentially useful biomarker for the evaluation of immune senescence treatment. The immune system is the result of the interplay between innate and adaptive immunity, yet the impact of aging on this function is unclear. In this article the function of the immune system during aging is explored.

  9. Systemic immune dysfunction in pancreatic cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poch, Bertram; Lotspeich, Errki; Ramadani, Marco; Gansauge, Susanne; Beger, Hans G; Gansauge, Frank

    2007-05-01

    We investigated the immune status in 32 pancreatic cancer patients (PC) in comparison with healthy controls (HC). Using flow cytometry, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were characterized by the expression of surface markers for T helper cells (CD4), T suppressor cells (CD8), B cells (CD19) and NK cells (CD56). The blastogenic response of PBL was analyzed after stimulation with concavalin A (ConA), phytohemagglutinin (PHA), pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and anti-CD3 antibodies. The serum levels of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-10, IL-12, IL-18, IL-1RA, sIL-2R and TGF-beta were determined by ELISA. No differences in the distribution of peripheral immunocytes in PC were found, whereas the blastogenic response of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) after stimulation with PHA or anti-CD3 antibodies was significantly decreased in PC. In PC, we found reduced serum levels of IL-2 and significantly elevated levels of TNF-alpha, TGF-beta1, IL-10, IL-2R, IL-1beta and IL-1RA. These data provide evidence for a systemic immune dysfunction in pancreatic cancer patients characterized by a shift towards a T helper cell type 2 cytokine profile, a significant elevation of substances related to T cell suppression and a reduced blastogenic response to PHA and anti-CD3 antibodies of PBL.

  10. [Panarteritis nodosa-Special aspects of glucocorticoid and immune suppressive therapy (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, B; Utz, G; Döhnert, G; Suchezky, H; Mörl, H; Horsch, A K

    1975-12-12

    Report dealing with the clinical and pathoanatomical course as well as the autopsy findings in a 54 year old female suffering from panarteritis nodosa. Onset of the illness with polyneuritis and arthralgia. One year later diagnosis of panarteritis nodosa verified by muscle biopsy. Deterioration of the disease leading to the development of peripheral gangrene could not be prevented in spite of intensive therapy with steroids, immune suppressive agents, digitalis and antihypertensive drugs. Death 4 years later by myocardial infarction. Autopsy revealed generalized healed panarteritis nodosa with scarring and obliteration of vessels. A short description of the symptoms of the disease is given and the efficacy of the therapy with steroids and immune suppressive drugs is discussed from the clinical as well as the pathoanatomical point of view. Immunopathologic mechanisms are considered to be the responsible factors for pathogenesis.

  11. Immune System and Its Link to Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Immune System & Its Link to Rheumatic Disease The Immune System and Its Link to Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts ... of a vessel of the body). What’s the immune system? The immune system allows us to identify and ...

  12. Secondary immunity to Legionella pneumophila and Th1 activity are suppressed by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, C A; Klein, T W; Friedman, H

    1994-01-01

    Resistance to infection with Legionella pneumophila is primarily dependent upon cell-mediated immunity rather than humoral immunity. Recent evidence suggests that activation of cell-mediated immunity depends on Th1 cells and activation of humoral immunity depends on Th2 cells. In this report, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive cannabinoid of marijuana and an immunomodulator, suppressed development of secondary immunity to L. pneumophila, which correlated with a reduction in Th1 activity. BALB/c mice, infected with a primary sublethal dose of L. pneumophila, developed resistance to a larger challenge infection 3 to 4 weeks later. However, intravenous injection of THC (4 mg/kg of body weight) 1 day prior to primary infection resulted in increased mortality after the challenge infection. The level of anti-L. pneumophila antibodies in serum increased in both THC-treated and control mice; however, in the THC group IgG1 antibodies which are stimulated by Th2 cells were elevated while Th1-regulated, IgG2a antibodies were depressed. Furthermore, cultured splenocytes from THC-treated mice had less L. pneumophila-specific lymphoproliferation, indicating a deficiency in cell-mediated immunity. Normal mouse splenocytes treated in vitro with THC and pokeweed mitogen showed suppressed production of gamma interferon, a cytokine associated with Th1 cells, but increased production of interleukin 4, a cytokine produced by Th2 cells. Splenocytes from THC-treated mice, stimulated in vitro with either pokeweed mitogen or anti-CD3 antibodies, also produced less gamma interferon, indicating less Th1 activity in these mice. These results suggest that THC decreases the development of anti-L. pneumophila immunity by causing a change in the balance of Th1 and Th2 activities. PMID:8063421

  13. Probiotic Cheese Attenuates Exercise-induced Immune Suppression In Wistar Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lollo P.C.B.; Cruz A.G.; Morato P.N.; Moura C.S.; Carvalho-Silva L.B.; Oliveira C.A.F.; Faria J.A.F.; Amaya-Farfan J.

    2012-01-01

    Intense physical activity results in a substantial volume of stress and hence a significant probability of immunosuppression in athletes, with milk proteins being, perhaps, the most recommended protein supplements. Consumption of a probiotic cheese can attenuate immune suppression induced by exhausting exercise in rats. A popular Brazilian fresh cheese (Minas Frescal cheese) containing Lactobacillus acidophilus LA14 and Bifidobacterium longum BL05 was fed for 2 wk to adult Wistar rats, which ...

  14. Human papillomavirus (HPV upregulates the cellular deubiquitinase UCHL1 to suppress the keratinocyte's innate immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaul Karim

    Full Text Available Persistent infection of basal keratinocytes with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV may cause cancer. Keratinocytes are equipped with different pattern recognition receptors (PRRs but hrHPV has developed ways to dampen their signals resulting in minimal inflammation and evasion of host immunity for sustained periods of time. To understand the mechanisms underlying hrHPV's capacity to evade immunity, we studied PRR signaling in non, newly, and persistently hrHPV-infected keratinocytes. We found that active infection with hrHPV hampered the relay of signals downstream of the PRRs to the nucleus, thereby affecting the production of type-I interferon and pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. This suppression was shown to depend on hrHPV-induced expression of the cellular protein ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1 in keratinocytes. UCHL1 accomplished this by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3 K63 poly-ubiquitination which lead to lower levels of TRAF3 bound to TANK-binding kinase 1 and a reduced phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3. Furthermore, UCHL1 mediated the degradation of the NF-kappa-B essential modulator with as result the suppression of p65 phosphorylation and canonical NF-κB signaling. We conclude that hrHPV exploits the cellular protein UCHL1 to evade host innate immunity by suppressing PRR-induced keratinocyte-mediated production of interferons, cytokines and chemokines, which normally results in the attraction and activation of an adaptive immune response. This identifies UCHL1 as a negative regulator of PRR-induced immune responses and consequently its virus-increased expression as a strategy for hrHPV to persist.

  15. Unique aspects of the perinatal immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhivaki, Dania; Lo-Man, Richard

    2017-08-01

    The early stages of life are associated with increased susceptibility to infection, which is in part due to an ineffective immune system. In the context of infection, the immune system must be stimulated to provide efficient protection while avoiding insufficient or excessive activation. Yet, in early life, age-dependent immune regulation at molecular and cellular levels contributes to a reduced immunological fitness in terms of pathogen clearance and response to vaccines. To enable microbial colonization to be tolerated at birth, epigenetic immune cell programming and early life-specific immune regulatory and effector mechanisms ensure that vital functions and organ development are supported and that tissue damage is avoided. Advancement in our understanding of age-related remodelling of immune networks and the consequent tuning of immune responsiveness will open up new possibilities for immune intervention and vaccine strategies that are designed specifically for early life.

  16. Suppression of the primary immune response in rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri, sublethally irradiated during embryogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, J.A.; Fujihara, M.P.; Burdett, R.D.

    1975-03-01

    Eggs of rainbow trout were spawned artificially in the laboratory, fertilized, and immediately immersed in 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μCi/ml tritium (biological grade) contaminated spring water (pathogen free). Rearing through 20 days of embryogenesis at 10.5 +- 0.2 0 C was facilitated within a recirculation drip incubation system of 150 liter capacity. Exposure of the embryos to 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μCi/ml tritium resulted in an estimated total dose of 0, 0.048, 0.470, 4.550, and 40.348 rads. At 5 months post hatch, control and irradiated test fish were administered intraperitoneally 0.1 cc of a heat killed antigen (1.8 X 10 8 cells per ml, Chondrococcus columnaris) in 25 percent Freund's incomplete adjuvant. A 0.1 cc sham vaccination containing saline and 25 percent Freund's incomplete adjuvant was similarly administered to another group of control fish. At 3 weeks post vaccination and at weekly intervals thereafter, a standard tube agglutination test for the specific antigen of vaccination was performed on serum from each fish. Results showed a marked suppression of the primary immune response in fish irradiated at the 4.550 and 40.348 rad levels. (U.S.)

  17. RNA viruses can hijack vertebrate microRNAs to suppress innate immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trobaugh, Derek W.; Gardner, Christina L.; Sun, Chengqun; Haddow, Andrew D.; Wang, Eryu; Chapnik, Elik; Mildner, Alexander; Weaver, Scott C.; Ryman, Kate D.; Klimstra, William B.

    2014-02-01

    Currently, there is little evidence for a notable role of the vertebrate microRNA (miRNA) system in the pathogenesis of RNA viruses. This is primarily attributed to the ease with which these viruses mutate to disrupt recognition and growth suppression by host miRNAs. Here we report that the haematopoietic-cell-specific miRNA miR-142-3p potently restricts the replication of the mosquito-borne North American eastern equine encephalitis virus in myeloid-lineage cells by binding to sites in the 3' non-translated region of its RNA genome. However, by limiting myeloid cell tropism and consequent innate immunity induction, this restriction directly promotes neurologic disease manifestations characteristic of eastern equine encephalitis virus infection in humans. Furthermore, the region containing the miR-142-3p binding sites is essential for efficient virus infection of mosquito vectors. We propose that RNA viruses can adapt to use antiviral properties of vertebrate miRNAs to limit replication in particular cell types and that this restriction can lead to exacerbation of disease severity.

  18. [Viral interactions with the host's immune system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humlová, Z

    2001-01-01

    Viruses are obligatory intracellular parasites, which differ in their structure and strategy of replication. The establishment of an antiviral state in uninfected cells and the elimination of virally infected cells are critical tasks in the host defence. Against the extensive array of immune modalities, viruses have successfully learned how to manipulate host immune control mechanisms. The study of viral strategies of immune evasion can provide insights into host-virus interactions and also illuminates essential functions of the immune system.

  19. Conditional immune-gene suppression of honeybees parasitized by Varroa mites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Pamela G.; Evans, Jay D.; Rinderer, Thomas; de Guzman, Lilia

    2005-01-01

    The ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor, is the most destructive parasite of managed honeybee colonies worldwide. Since V. destructor transfers pathogens to honeybees, it may be adaptive for bees to respond to mite infestation by upregulating their immune responses. Mites, however, may overcome the host's immune responses by suppressing them, which could facilitate the mite's ability to feed on hemolymph. A humoral immune response of bees parasitized by V. destructor may be detected by studying the expression levels of antibacterial peptides, such as abaecin and defensin, known to be immune-responsive. Expression levels for these two antibacterial peptides changed non-linearly with respect to the number of mites parasitizing honeybee pupae. Bees exposed to low or moderate number of mites had fewer immune-related transcripts than pupae that were never parasitized or pupae with high mite loads. Although many of the pupae tested indicated the presence of bacteria, no correlation with mite numbers or immune-response levels existed. All bees tested negative for acute paralysis and Kashmir bee viruses known to be vectored by V. destructor. PMID:16299597

  20. The role of type III effectors from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis in virulence and suppression of plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Cesar Augusto; Reyes, Paola Andrea; Trujillo, Cesar Augusto; Gonzalez, Juan Luis; Bejarano, David Alejandro; Montenegro, Nathaly Andrea; Jacobs, Jonathan M; Joe, Anna; Restrepo, Silvia; Alfano, James R; Bernal, Adriana

    2018-03-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam) causes cassava bacterial blight, the most important bacterial disease of cassava. Xam, like other Xanthomonas species, requires type III effectors (T3Es) for maximal virulence. Xam strain CIO151 possesses 17 predicted T3Es belonging to the Xanthomonas outer protein (Xop) class. This work aimed to characterize nine Xop effectors present in Xam CIO151 for their role in virulence and modulation of plant immunity. Our findings demonstrate the importance of XopZ, XopX, XopAO1 and AvrBs2 for full virulence, as well as a redundant function in virulence between XopN and XopQ in susceptible cassava plants. We tested their role in pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) using heterologous systems. AvrBs2, XopR and XopAO1 are capable of suppressing PTI. ETI suppression activity was only detected for XopE4 and XopAO1. These results demonstrate the overall importance and diversity in functions of major virulence effectors AvrBs2 and XopAO1 in Xam during cassava infection. © 2017 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  1. Inside the mucosal immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry R McGhee

    Full Text Available An intricate network of innate and immune cells and their derived mediators function in unison to protect us from toxic elements and infectious microbial diseases that are encountered in our environment. This vast network operates efficiently by use of a single cell epithelium in, for example, the gastrointestinal (GI and upper respiratory (UR tracts, fortified by adjoining cells and lymphoid tissues that protect its integrity. Perturbations certainly occur, sometimes resulting in inflammatory diseases or infections that can be debilitating and life threatening. For example, allergies in the eyes, skin, nose, and the UR or digestive tracts are common. Likewise, genetic background and environmental microbial encounters can lead to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs. This mucosal immune system (MIS in both health and disease is currently under intense investigation worldwide by scientists with diverse expertise and interests. Despite this activity, there are numerous questions remaining that will require detailed answers in order to use the MIS to our advantage. In this issue of PLOS Biology, a research article describes a multi-scale in vivo systems approach to determine precisely how the gut epithelium responds to an inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, given by the intravenous route. This article reveals a previously unknown pathway in which several cell types and their secreted mediators work in unison to prevent epithelial cell death in the mouse small intestine. The results of this interesting study illustrate how in vivo systems biology approaches can be used to unravel the complex mechanisms used to protect the host from its environment.

  2. Learning and Memory... and the Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Ioana; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The nervous system and the immune system are two main regulators of homeostasis in the body. Communication between them ensures normal functioning of the organism. Immune cells and molecules are required for sculpting the circuitry and determining the activity of the nervous system. Within the parenchyma of the central nervous system (CNS),…

  3. The Role of Non-specific and Specific Immune Systems in Poultry against Newcastle Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Ayu Hewajuli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Newcastle disease (ND is caused by avian paramyxovirus-1 which belong to Avulavirus genus and Paramyxoviridae family. The birds have abnormalities in humoral (bursa fabricius and cellular (thymus and spleen lymphoid organs. Lesions decrease the immune system. Immune system consists of non-specific and specific immune systems. The main components of non-specific immunity are physical and chemical barrier (feather and skin or mucosa, phagocytic cells (macrophages and natural killer, protein complement and the mediator of inflammation and cytokines. Interferons (IFNs belong to a group of cytokines that play a major role in the nonspecific or innate (natural immunity. The virulent ND virus encodes protein of V gene can be suppressed IFN type I. This leads to non-specific immune system fail to respond to the virulent strains resulting in severe pathogenicity. The defense mechanism of the host is replaced by specific immunity (adaptive immunity when natural immunity fails to overcome the infection. The specific immune system consists of humoral mediated immunity (HMI and cell-mediated immunity (CMI. The cells of immune system that react specifically with the antigen are B lymphocytes producing the antibodies, T lymphocytes that regulate the synthesis of antibodies and T cells as effector or the direct cytotoxic cells. Both non-specific and specific immunities are complementary against the invasion of ND virus in the birds. The objective of this article is to discuss the role of non specific and specific immune system in ND.

  4. The fungal quorum-sensing molecule farnesol activates innate immune cells but suppresses cellular adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ines; Spielberg, Steffi; Weber, Michael; Albrecht-Eckardt, Daniela; Bläss, Markus; Claus, Ralf; Barz, Dagmar; Scherlach, Kirstin; Hertweck, Christian; Löffler, Jürgen; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-03-17

    Farnesol, produced by the polymorphic fungus Candida albicans, is the first quorum-sensing molecule discovered in eukaryotes. Its main function is control of C. albicans filamentation, a process closely linked to pathogenesis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of farnesol on innate immune cells known to be important for fungal clearance and protective immunity. Farnesol enhanced the expression of activation markers on monocytes (CD86 and HLA-DR) and neutrophils (CD66b and CD11b) and promoted oxidative burst and the release of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] and macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha [MIP-1α]). However, this activation did not result in enhanced fungal uptake or killing. Furthermore, the differentiation of monocytes to immature dendritic cells (iDC) was significantly affected by farnesol. Several markers important for maturation and antigen presentation like CD1a, CD83, CD86, and CD80 were significantly reduced in the presence of farnesol. Furthermore, farnesol modulated migrational behavior and cytokine release and impaired the ability of DC to induce T cell proliferation. Of major importance was the absence of interleukin 12 (IL-12) induction in iDC generated in the presence of farnesol. Transcriptome analyses revealed a farnesol-induced shift in effector molecule expression and a down-regulation of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor during monocytes to iDC differentiation. Taken together, our data unveil the ability of farnesol to act as a virulence factor of C. albicans by influencing innate immune cells to promote inflammation and mitigating the Th1 response, which is essential for fungal clearance. Farnesol is a quorum-sensing molecule which controls morphological plasticity of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. As such, it is a major mediator of intraspecies communication. Here, we investigated the impact of farnesol on human innate immune cells known to be

  5. Expression of immune-response genes in lepidopteran host is suppressed by venom from an endoparasitoid, Pteromalus puparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Qi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationships between parasitoids and their insect hosts have attracted attention at two levels. First, the basic biology of host-parasitoid interactions is of fundamental interest. Second, parasitoids are widely used as biological control agents in sustainable agricultural programs. Females of the gregarious endoparasitoid Pteromalus puparum (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae inject venom along with eggs into their hosts. P. puparum does not inject polydnaviruses during oviposition. For this reason, P. puparum and its pupal host, the small white butterfly Pieris rapae (Lepidoptera: Pieridae, comprise an excellent model system for studying the influence of an endoparasitoid venom on the biology of the pupal host. P. puparum venom suppresses the immunity of its host, although the suppressive mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we tested our hypothesis that P. puparum venom influences host gene expression in the two main immunity-conferring tissues, hemocytes and fat body. Results At 1 h post-venom injection, we recorded significant decreases in transcript levels of 217 EST clones (revealing 113 genes identified in silico, including 62 unknown contigs derived from forward subtractive libraries of host hemocytes and in transcript levels of 288 EST clones (221 genes identified in silico, including 123 unknown contigs from libraries of host fat body. These genes are related to insect immune response, cytoskeleton, cell cycle and apoptosis, metabolism, transport, stress response and transcriptional and translational regulation. We verified the reliability of the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH data with semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of a set of randomly selected genes. This analysis showed that most of the selected genes were down-regulated after venom injection. Conclusions Our findings support our hypothesis that P. puparum venom influences gene expression in host hemocytes and fat body. Specifically

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Caused by Lipoprotein Accumulation Suppresses Immunity against Bacterial Pathogens and Contributes to Immunosenescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jogender Singh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The unfolded protein response (UPR is a stress response pathway that is activated upon increased unfolded and/or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, and enhanced ER stress response prolongs life span and improves immunity. However, the mechanism by which ER stress affects immunity remains poorly understood. Using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we show that mutations in the lipoproteins vitellogenins, which are homologs of human apolipoprotein B-100, resulted in upregulation of the UPR. Lipoprotein accumulation in the intestine adversely affects the immune response and the life span of the organism, suggesting that it could be a contributing factor to immunosenescence. We show that lipoprotein accumulation inhibited the expression of several immune genes encoding proteins secreted by the intestinal cells in an IRE-1-independent manner. Our studies provide a mechanistic explanation for adverse effects caused by protein aggregation and ER stress on immunity and highlight the role of an IRE-1-independent pathway in the suppression of the expression of genes encoding secreted proteins.

  7. Conceptual Spaces of the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierz, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The immune system can be looked at as a cognitive system. This is often done in analogy to the neuro-psychological system. Here, it is demonstrated that the cognitive functions of the immune system can be properly described within a new theory of cognitive science. Gärdenfors' geometrical framework of conceptual spaces is applied to immune cognition. Basic notions, like quality dimensions, natural properties and concepts, similarities, prototypes, saliences, etc., are related to cognitive phenomena of the immune system. Constraints derived from treating the immune system within a cognitive theory, like Gärdenfors' conceptual spaces, might well prove to be instrumental for the design of vaccines, immunological diagnostic tests, and immunotherapy.

  8. The Immune System and Bodily Defence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 2. The Immune System and Bodily Defence How Do Parasites and the Immune System Choose their Dances? ... Author Affiliations. Vineeta Bal1 Satyajit Rath1. National Institute of Immunology Aruna Asaf Ali Road New Delhi 110 067, India ...

  9. Nutritional support for the infant's immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niers, L.; Stasse-Wolthuis, M.; Rombouts, F.M.; Rijkers, G.T.

    2007-01-01

    Newborn babies possess a functional but immature immune system as a defense against a world teeming with microorganisms. Breast milk contains a number of biological, active compounds that support the infant's immune system. These include secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA), which confers specific

  10. The Immune System and Bodily Defence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 2. The Immune System and Bodily Defence How Do Parasites and the Immune System Choose their Dances? Vineeta Bal Satyajit Rath. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 2 February 1997 pp 17-24 ...

  11. The Immune System and Bodily Defence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 6. The Immune System and Bodily Defence How Does the Immune System Organize Itself so as to Connect Target Recognition to Expected Functions? Vineeta Bal Satyajit Rath. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 6 June 1997 pp 25-38 ...

  12. The Immune System and Bodily Defence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 9. The Immune System and Bodily Defence How Does the Immune System Recognize Everything Under the Sun? Vineeta Bal Satyajit Rath. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 9 September 1997 pp 6-10 ...

  13. The Immune System and Bodily Defence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Immune System and Bodily Defence. 4.How Does the Immune System Recognize Everything Under the Sun? ... A major exception to this is, of course, the fairly recent innovation in biology called Homo sapiens that ... To do all this, first it is necessary to break the receptor down to its basic functional elements, so that the ...

  14. Arctigenin protects against liver injury from acute hepatitis by suppressing immune cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xixi; Wang, Huafeng; Yang, Jinlai; Cheng, Yingnan; Wang, Dan; Yang, Fengrui; Li, Yan; Zhou, Dongmei; Wang, Yanxia; Xue, Zhenyi; Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Qi; Yang, Luhong; Zhang, Rongxin; Da, Yurong

    2018-03-23

    As a phenylpropanoid and dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan present in medical plants, such as those used in traditional Chinese herbal medicine, including Arctium lappa (Niubang), arctigenin exhibits antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities. In this study, we investigated the protective role of arctigenin in Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced acute hepatitis in mice. Arctigenin remarkably reduced the congestion and necroinflammation of livers, and improved hepatic function (ALT and AST) in ConA-induced acute hepatitis in vivo. The infiltration of CD4 T, NKT and macrophages into the livers was found to be reduced with arctigenin treatment. Arctigenin suppressed ConA-induced T lymphocyte proliferations that might have resulted from enhanced IL-10 production by macrophages and CD4 T cells. These results suggested that arctigenin could be a powerful drug candidate for acute hepatitis through immune suppression. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Gammaherpesvirus Co-infection with Malaria Suppresses Anti-parasitic Humoral Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caline G Matar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunity to non-cerebral severe malaria is estimated to occur within 1-2 infections in areas of endemic transmission for Plasmodium falciparum. Yet, nearly 20% of infected children die annually as a result of severe malaria. Multiple risk factors are postulated to exacerbate malarial disease, one being co-infections with other pathogens. Children living in Sub-Saharan Africa are seropositive for Epstein Barr Virus (EBV by the age of 6 months. This timing overlaps with the waning of protective maternal antibodies and susceptibility to primary Plasmodium infection. However, the impact of acute EBV infection on the generation of anti-malarial immunity is unknown. Using well established mouse models of infection, we show here that acute, but not latent murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 infection suppresses the anti-malarial humoral response to a secondary malaria infection. Importantly, this resulted in the transformation of a non-lethal P. yoelii XNL infection into a lethal one; an outcome that is correlated with a defect in the maintenance of germinal center B cells and T follicular helper (Tfh cells in the spleen. Furthermore, we have identified the MHV68 M2 protein as an important virus encoded protein that can: (i suppress anti-MHV68 humoral responses during acute MHV68 infection; and (ii plays a critical role in the observed suppression of anti-malarial humoral responses in the setting of co-infection. Notably, co-infection with an M2-null mutant MHV68 eliminates lethality of P. yoelii XNL. Collectively, our data demonstrates that an acute gammaherpesvirus infection can negatively impact the development of an anti-malarial immune response. This suggests that acute infection with EBV should be investigated as a risk factor for non-cerebral severe malaria in young children living in areas endemic for Plasmodium transmission.

  16. Gammaherpesvirus Co-infection with Malaria Suppresses Anti-parasitic Humoral Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Caline G.; Anthony, Neil R.; O’Flaherty, Brigid M.; Jacobs, Nathan T.; Priyamvada, Lalita; Engwerda, Christian R.; Speck, Samuel H.; Lamb, Tracey J.

    2015-01-01

    Immunity to non-cerebral severe malaria is estimated to occur within 1-2 infections in areas of endemic transmission for Plasmodium falciparum. Yet, nearly 20% of infected children die annually as a result of severe malaria. Multiple risk factors are postulated to exacerbate malarial disease, one being co-infections with other pathogens. Children living in Sub-Saharan Africa are seropositive for Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) by the age of 6 months. This timing overlaps with the waning of protective maternal antibodies and susceptibility to primary Plasmodium infection. However, the impact of acute EBV infection on the generation of anti-malarial immunity is unknown. Using well established mouse models of infection, we show here that acute, but not latent murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection suppresses the anti-malarial humoral response to a secondary malaria infection. Importantly, this resulted in the transformation of a non-lethal P. yoelii XNL infection into a lethal one; an outcome that is correlated with a defect in the maintenance of germinal center B cells and T follicular helper (Tfh) cells in the spleen. Furthermore, we have identified the MHV68 M2 protein as an important virus encoded protein that can: (i) suppress anti-MHV68 humoral responses during acute MHV68 infection; and (ii) plays a critical role in the observed suppression of anti-malarial humoral responses in the setting of co-infection. Notably, co-infection with an M2-null mutant MHV68 eliminates lethality of P. yoelii XNL. Collectively, our data demonstrates that an acute gammaherpesvirus infection can negatively impact the development of an anti-malarial immune response. This suggests that acute infection with EBV should be investigated as a risk factor for non-cerebral severe malaria in young children living in areas endemic for Plasmodium transmission. PMID:25996913

  17. Gammaherpesvirus Co-infection with Malaria Suppresses Anti-parasitic Humoral Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Caline G; Anthony, Neil R; O'Flaherty, Brigid M; Jacobs, Nathan T; Priyamvada, Lalita; Engwerda, Christian R; Speck, Samuel H; Lamb, Tracey J

    2015-05-01

    Immunity to non-cerebral severe malaria is estimated to occur within 1-2 infections in areas of endemic transmission for Plasmodium falciparum. Yet, nearly 20% of infected children die annually as a result of severe malaria. Multiple risk factors are postulated to exacerbate malarial disease, one being co-infections with other pathogens. Children living in Sub-Saharan Africa are seropositive for Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) by the age of 6 months. This timing overlaps with the waning of protective maternal antibodies and susceptibility to primary Plasmodium infection. However, the impact of acute EBV infection on the generation of anti-malarial immunity is unknown. Using well established mouse models of infection, we show here that acute, but not latent murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection suppresses the anti-malarial humoral response to a secondary malaria infection. Importantly, this resulted in the transformation of a non-lethal P. yoelii XNL infection into a lethal one; an outcome that is correlated with a defect in the maintenance of germinal center B cells and T follicular helper (Tfh) cells in the spleen. Furthermore, we have identified the MHV68 M2 protein as an important virus encoded protein that can: (i) suppress anti-MHV68 humoral responses during acute MHV68 infection; and (ii) plays a critical role in the observed suppression of anti-malarial humoral responses in the setting of co-infection. Notably, co-infection with an M2-null mutant MHV68 eliminates lethality of P. yoelii XNL. Collectively, our data demonstrates that an acute gammaherpesvirus infection can negatively impact the development of an anti-malarial immune response. This suggests that acute infection with EBV should be investigated as a risk factor for non-cerebral severe malaria in young children living in areas endemic for Plasmodium transmission.

  18. [Immune proteasomes in the development of rat immune system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpova, Ia D; Lyupina, Iu V; Astakhova, T M; Stepanova, A A; Erokhov, P A; Abramova, E B; Sharova, N P

    2013-01-01

    their plunge by P5 may be related to the loss of liver function of a primary lymphoid organ of the immune system by this stage and disappearance of B-lymphocytes enriched by immune proteasomes in it. In the spleen and liver, MHC class I molecules were revealed at the periods of the raise of proteasome immune subunits level. On E21 , the liver was enriched by neuronal NO-synthase, its level decreased after birth and enhanced to P18. This fact indicates the possibility of the induction of the immune subunits LMP7 [character: see text] LMP2 expression in hepatocytes in signal way with neuronal NO-synthase participation. The results obtained prove that T-cell immune response with spleen participation as regards rat liver cells is possible starting with P19-P21 stage. First, at this period, white pulp T-area is formed in the spleen. Second, enhanced immune proteasomes and MHC class I molecules levels in hepatocytes can procure antigenic epitopes formation from foreign proteins and their delivery to cell surface for their subsequent presentation for cytotoxic T-lymphocytes.

  19. Suppression of immune response to Lol pI by administration of idiotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Y; Hébert, J

    1995-03-01

    Allergic diseases are characterized by an increased production of specific IgE antibodies. Suppression of IgE antibody production may be accomplished through idiotypic manipulation. Using an animal model, we explored the effects of anti-Lol pI monoclonal antibody administration on the subsequent IgE and IgG antibody response against Lol pI. Mice were treated with an anti-Lol pI monoclonal antibody (290A-167), which resulted in the production of anti-idiotypic antibodies as evidenced by their ability to bind to the Fab fraction of 290A-167 and to inhibit the binding of rabbit polyclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies to 290A-167. The animals were then immunized with Lol pI adsorbed onto alum, and the immune response to the protein was analyzed. Antigen-specific IgG1 and IgE responses were strongly suppressed as determined by immunoassay. Suppression of anti-Lol pI IgE antibodies was confirmed by a reduction of end-point titers measured by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. The suppression of antigen-specific antibody was accompanied by a reduction of anti-Lol pI antibody-producing spleen cells. These data indicate that pretreatment with 290A-167 can strongly downregulate the IgE response to the main allergen of ryegrass pollen, which is associated with an increase in anti-idiotypic antibodies. This approach could provide rapid, long-term hyposensitization in patients with grass pollen allergy.

  20. Haloperidol suppresses murine dendritic cell maturation and priming of the T helper 1-type immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Atsuhiro; Ohta, Noriyuki; Goto, Yukiko; Kashiwa, Yozo; Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Fujino, Yuji

    2015-04-01

    Haloperidol has immunomodulatory effects when used to treat patients with schizophrenia and also is used to sedate critically ill patients in the intensive care unit. Although the mechanism by which haloperidol affects immune function is unclear, one possibility is that it alters dendritic cell (DC) function. DCs are potent antigen-presenting cells that influence the activation and maturation of T lymphocytes. In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo immunomodulatory effects of haloperidol on DC-mediated immune responses. Using bone marrow-derived DCs in cell culture, we evaluated the effect of haloperidol on expression of costimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86), major histocompatibility complex class ΙІ molecules, and the DC maturation marker CD83. DC culture supernatants also were evaluated for interleukin-12 p40 levels. In addition, we analyzed the effect of haloperidol on a mixed cell culture containing DCs and lymphocytes and measured the secretion of interferon-γ in the culture supernatants. We also assessed the in vivo effects of haloperidol on hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity responses. Haloperidol inhibited the expression of CD80, CD86, major histocompatibility complex class ΙІ, and CD83 molecules on DCs and the secretion of interleukin-12p40 in DC culture supernatants. In mixed cell cultures containing both T cells (CD4 and CD8α) and DCs, haloperidol-treated DCs suppressed the proliferation of allogeneic T cells and effectively inhibited the production of interferon-γ. In vivo, haloperidol reduced hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity responses. Furthermore, an antagonist to D2-like receptor suppressed the maturation of DCs in a manner similar to haloperidol. The results of our study suggest that haloperidol suppresses the functional maturation of DCs and plays an important role in the inhibition of DC-induced T helper 1 immune responses in the whole animal. Furthermore, the effect of haloperidol on DCs may be mediated by

  1. Feeding Our Immune System: Impact on Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Wolowczuk

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous intestinal microflora and environmental factors, such as diet, play a central role in immune homeostasis and reactivity. In addition, microflora and diet both influence body weight and insulin-resistance, notably through an action on adipose cells. Moreover, it is known since a long time that any disturbance in metabolism, like obesity, is associated with immune alteration, for example, inflammation. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on how nutrients-derived factors (mostly focusing on fatty acids and glucose impact the innate and acquired immune systems, including the gut immune system and its associated bacterial flora. We will try to show the reader how the highly energy-demanding immune cells use glucose as a main source of fuel in a way similar to that of insulin-responsive adipose tissue and how Toll-like receptors (TLRs of the innate immune system, which are found on immune cells, intestinal cells, and adipocytes, are presently viewed as essential actors in the complex balance ensuring bodily immune and metabolic health. Understanding more about these links will surely help to study and understand in a more fundamental way the common observation that eating healthy will keep you and your immune system healthy.

  2. T-cell autophagy deficiency increases mortality and suppresses immune responses after sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wen Lin

    Full Text Available Although the role of autophagy in sepsis has been characterized in several organs, its role in the adaptive immune system remains to be ascertained. This study aimed to investigate the role of autophagy in sepsis-induced T cell apoptosis and immunosuppression, using knockout mice with T cell specific deletion of autophagy essential gene Atg7.Sepsis was induced in a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP model, with T-cell-specific Atg7-knockout mice compared to control mice. Autophagic vacuoles examined by electron microscopy were decreased in the spleen after CLP. Autophagy proteins LC3-II and ATG7, and autophagosomes and autolysosomes stained by Cyto-ID Green and acridine orange were decreased in CD4+ and CD8+ splenocytes at 18 h and 24 h after CLP. This decrease in autophagy was associated with increased apoptosis of CD4+ and CD8+ after CLP. Moreover, mice lacking Atg7 in T lymphocytes showed an increase in sepsis-induced mortality, T cell apoptosis and loss of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, in comparison to control mice. This was accompanied by suppressed cytokine production of Th1/Th2/Th17 by CD4+ T cells, reduced phagocytosis in macrophages and decreased bacterial clearance in the spleen after sepsis.These results indicated that sepsis led to down-regulation of autophagy in T lymphocytes, which may result in enhanced apoptosis induction and decreased survival in sepsis. Autophagy may therefore play a protective role against sepsis-induced T lymphocyte apoptosis and immunosuppression.

  3. The carcinogenic potential of tacrolimus ointment beyond immune suppression: a hypothesis creating case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Jürgen C; Houben, Roland; Vetter, Claudia S; Bröcker, Eva B

    2006-01-01

    Since tacrolimus ointment was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a promising treatment for atopic dermatitis, it has been approved in more than 30 additional countries, including numerous European Union member nations. Moreover, in the current clinical routine the use of this drug is no longer restricted to the approved indication, but has been extended to a wide variety of inflammatory skin diseases including some with the potential of malignant transformation. So far, the side-effects reported from the topical use of tacrolimus have been relatively minor (e.g. burning, pruritus, erythema). Recently, however, the FDA reviewed the safety of topical tacrolimus, which resulted in a warning that the use of calcineurin inhibitors may be associated with an increased risk of cancer. Oral lichen planus (OLP) was diagnosed in a 56-year-old women in February 1999. After several ineffective local and systemic therapeutic measures an off-label treatment of this recalcitrant condition using Tacrolimus 0.1% ointment was initiated in May 2002. After a few weeks of treatment most of the lesions ameliorated, with the exception of the plaques on the sides of the tongue. Nevertheless, the patient became free of symptoms which, however, reoccurred once tacrolimus was weaned, as a consequence treatment was maintained. In April 2005, the plaques on the left side of the tongue appeared increasingly compact and a biopsy specimen confirmed the suspected diagnosis of an oral squamous cell carcinoma. The suspected causal relationship between topical use of tacrolimus and the development of a squamous cell carcinoma prompted us to test the notion that the carcinogenicity of tacrolimus may go beyond mere immune suppression. To this end, tacrolimus has been shown to have an impact on cancer signalling pathways such as the MAPK and the p53 pathway. In the given case, we were able to demonstrate that these pathways had also been altered subsequent to tacrolimus therapy

  4. The carcinogenic potential of tacrolimus ointment beyond immune suppression: a hypothesis creating case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vetter Claudia S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since tacrolimus ointment was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA as a promising treatment for atopic dermatitis, it has been approved in more than 30 additional countries, including numerous European Union member nations. Moreover, in the current clinical routine the use of this drug is no longer restricted to the approved indication, but has been extended to a wide variety of inflammatory skin diseases including some with the potential of malignant transformation. So far, the side-effects reported from the topical use of tacrolimus have been relatively minor (e.g. burning, pruritus, erythema. Recently, however, the FDA reviewed the safety of topical tacrolimus, which resulted in a warning that the use of calcineurin inhibitors may be associated with an increased risk of cancer. Case presentation Oral lichen planus (OLP was diagnosed in a 56-year-old women in February 1999. After several ineffective local and systemic therapeutic measures an off-label treatment of this recalcitrant condition using Tacrolimus 0.1% ointment was initiated in May 2002. After a few weeks of treatment most of the lesions ameliorated, with the exception of the plaques on the sides of the tongue. Nevertheless, the patient became free of symptoms which, however, reoccurred once tacrolimus was weaned, as a consequence treatment was maintained. In April 2005, the plaques on the left side of the tongue appeared increasingly compact and a biopsy specimen confirmed the suspected diagnosis of an oral squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion The suspected causal relationship between topical use of tacrolimus and the development of a squamous cell carcinoma prompted us to test the notion that the carcinogenicity of tacrolimus may go beyond mere immune suppression. To this end, tacrolimus has been shown to have an impact on cancer signalling pathways such as the MAPK and the p53 pathway. In the given case, we were able to demonstrate that these

  5. PDE4 inhibition suppresses IL-17-associated immunity in dry eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrai, Zahra; Stevenson, William; Okanobo, Andre; Chen, Yihe; Dohlman, Thomas H; Hua, Jing; Amparo, Francisco; Chauhan, Sunil K; Dana, Reza

    2012-06-14

    To determine the effect of phosphodiesterase type-4 (PDE4) inhibition on IL-17-associated immunity in experimental dry eye disease (DED). Murine DED was induced, after which a PDE4 inhibitor (cilomilast), dexamethasone, cyclosporine, or a relevant vehicle was administered topically. Real-time PCR, immunohistochemical staining, and flow cytometry were employed to evaluate the immuno-inflammatory parameters of DED with a focus on IL-17-associated immunity. Corneal fluorescein staining (CFS) was performed to evaluate clinical disease progression. DED induction increased proinflammatory cytokine expression, pathogenic immune cell infiltration, and CFS scores. Cilomilast significantly decreased the expression of TNF-α in the cornea (P ≤ 0.05) and IL-1α, IL-1β, and TNF-α in the conjunctiva (P ≤ 0.05) as compared with vehicle control. Cilomilast treatment markedly decreased the presence of CD11b+ antigen-presenting cells in the central and peripheral cornea (P ≤ 0.05), and led to decreased conjunctival expression of cytokines IL-6, IL-23, and IL-17 (P ≤ 0.05). Moreover, cilomilast decreased the expression of IL-17 and IL-23 in the draining lymph nodes (P ≤ 0.05). Topical cilomilast was significantly more effective than vehicle at reducing CFS scores (P ≤ 0.05). The therapeutic efficacy of cilomilast was comparable or superior to that of dexamethasone and cyclosporine in all tested measures. Topical cilomilast suppresses the generation of IL-17-associated immunity in experimental DED.

  6. Anopheles stephensi Heme Peroxidase HPX15 Suppresses Midgut Immunity to Support Plasmodium Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajla, Mithilesh; Kakani, Parik; Choudhury, Tania Pal; Kumar, Vikas; Gupta, Kuldeep; Dhawan, Rini; Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2017-01-01

    The heme peroxidase HPX15 is an evolutionary conserved anopheline lineage-specific gene. Previously, we found that this gene is present in the genome of 19 worldwide distributed different species of Anopheles mosquito and its orthologs are absent in other mosquitoes, insects, or human. In addition, 65–99% amino acid identity among these 19 orthologs permitted us to hypothesize that the functional aspects of this gene might be also conserved in different anophelines. In this study, we found that Anopheles stephensi AsHPX15 gene is mainly expressed in the midgut and highly induced after uninfected or Plasmodium berghei-infected blood feeding. RNA interference-mediated silencing of midgut AsHPX15 gene drastically reduced the number of developing P. berghei oocysts. An antiplasmodial gene nitric oxide synthase was induced 13-fold in silenced midguts when compared to the unsilenced controls. Interestingly, the induction of antiplasmodial immunity in AsHPX15-silenced midguts is in absolute agreement with Anopheles gambiae. In A. gambiae, AgHPX15 catalyzes the formation of a dityrosine network at luminal side of the midgut that suppresses the activation of mosquito immunity against the bolus bacteria. Thus, a low-immunity zone created by this mechanism indirectly supports Plasmodium development inside the midgut lumen. These indistinguishable functional behaviors and conserved homology indicates that HPX15 might be a potent target to manipulate the antiplasmodial immunity of the anopheline midgut, and it will open new frontiers in the field of malaria control. PMID:28352267

  7. Effects of Glucocorticoids in the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppong, Emmanuel; Cato, Andrew C B

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are steroid hormones with widespread effects. They control intermediate metabolism by stimulating gluconeogenesis in the liver, mobilize amino acids from extra hepatic tissues, inhibit glucose uptake in muscle and adipose tissue, and stimulate fat breakdown in adipose tissue. They also mediate stress response. They exert potent immune-suppressive and anti-inflammatory effects particularly when administered pharmacologically. Understanding these diverse effects of glucocorticoids requires a detailed knowledge of their mode of action. Research over the years has uncovered several details on the molecular action of this hormone, especially in immune cells. In this chapter, we have summarized the latest findings on the action of glucocorticoids in immune cells with a view of identifying important control points that may be relevant in glucocorticoid therapy.

  8. Recent Advances in Aptamers Targeting Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Piao-Ping

    2017-02-01

    The immune system plays important role in protecting the organism by recognizing non-self molecules from pathogen such as bacteria, parasitic worms, and viruses. When the balance of the host defense system is disturbed, immunodeficiency, autoimmunity, and inflammation occur. Nucleic acid aptamers are short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) or RNA ligands that interact with complementary molecules with high specificity and affinity. Aptamers that target the molecules involved in immune system to modulate their function have great potential to be explored as new diagnostic and therapeutic agents for immune disorders. This review summarizes recent advances in the development of aptamers targeting immune system. The selection of aptamers with superior chemical and biological characteristics will facilitate their application in the diagnosis and treatment of immune disorders.

  9. Test results of lithium pool-air reaction suppression systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppson, D.W.

    1987-02-01

    Engineered reaction suppression systems were demonstrated to be effective in suppressing lithium pool-air reactions for lithium quantities up to 100 kg. Lithium pool-air reaction suppression system tests were conducted to evaluate suppression system effectiveness for potential use in fusion facilities in mitigating consequences of postulated lithium spills. Small-scale perforated and sacrificial cover plate suppression systems with delayed inert gas purging proved effective in controlling the lithium-air interaction for lithium quantities near 15 kg at initial temperatures up to 450 0 C. A large-scale suppression system with a sacrificial cover, a diverter plate, an inert gas atmosphere, and remotely retrievable catch pans proved effective in controlling lithium pool-air interaction for a 100-kg lithium discharge at an initial temperature of 550 0 C. This suppression system limited the maximum pool temperature to about 600 0 C less than that expected for a similar lithium pool-air reaction without a suppression system. Lithium aerosol release from this large-scale suppression system was a factor of about 10,000 less than that expected for a lithium pool-air reaction with no suppression system. Remote retrieval techniques for lithium cleanup, such as (1) in-place lithium siphoning and overhead crane dismantling, and (2) lithium catch pan removal by use of an overhead crane, were demonstrated as part of this large-scale test

  10. In Acute Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis, Infiltrating Macrophages Are Immune Activated, Whereas Microglia Remain Immune Suppressed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vainchtein, I. D.; Vinet, J.; Brouwer, N.; Brendecke, S.; Biagini, G.; Biber, K.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.; Eggen, B. J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by loss of myelin accompanied by infiltration of T-lymphocytes and monocytes. Although it has been shown that these infiltrates are important for the progression of MS, the role of

  11. The Listeria monocytogenes ChiA chitinase enhances virulence through suppression of host innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Swarnava; Gantner, Benjamin N; Ye, Richard D; Cianciotto, Nicholas P; Freitag, Nancy E

    2013-03-19

    Environmental pathogens survive and replicate within the outside environment while maintaining the capacity to infect mammalian hosts. For some microorganisms, mammalian infection may be a relatively rare event. Understanding how environmental pathogens retain their ability to cause disease may provide insight into environmental reservoirs of disease and emerging infections. Listeria monocytogenes survives as a saprophyte in soil but is capable of causing serious invasive disease in susceptible individuals. The bacterium secretes virulence factors that promote cell invasion, bacterial replication, and cell-to-cell spread. Recently, an L. monocytogenes chitinase (ChiA) was shown to enhance bacterial infection in mice. Given that mammals do not synthesize chitin, the function of ChiA within infected animals was not clear. Here we have demonstrated that ChiA enhances L. monocytogenes survival in vivo through the suppression of host innate immunity. L. monocytogenes ΔchiA mutants were fully capable of establishing bacterial replication within target organs during the first 48 h of infection. By 72 to 96 h postinfection, however, numbers of ΔchiA bacteria diminished, indicative of an effective immune response to contain infection. The ΔchiA-associated virulence defect could be complemented in trans by wild-type L. monocytogenes, suggesting that secreted ChiA altered a target that resulted in a more permissive host environment for bacterial replication. ChiA secretion resulted in a dramatic decrease in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and ΔchiA mutant virulence was restored in NOS2(-/-) mice lacking iNOS. This work is the first to demonstrate modulation of a specific host innate immune response by a bacterial chitinase. Bacterial chitinases have traditionally been viewed as enzymes that either hydrolyze chitin as a food source or serve as a defense mechanism against organisms containing structural chitin (such as fungi). Recent evidence indicates

  12. Interactions between glia, the immune system and pain processes during early development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Gordon A; Hunter, Deirtra A

    2014-12-01

    Pain is a serious problem for infants and children and treatment options are limited. Moreover, infants born prematurely or hospitalized for illness likely have concurrent infection that activates the immune system. It is now recognized that the immune system in general and glia in particular influence neurotransmission and that the neural bases of pain are intimately connected to immune function. We know that injuries that induce pain activate immune function and suppressing the immune system alleviates pain. Despite this advance in our understanding, virtually nothing is known of the role that the immune system plays in pain processing in infants and children, even though pain is a serious clinical issue in pediatric medicine. This brief review summarizes the existing data on immune-neural interactions in infants, providing evidence for the immaturity of these interactions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The effect of ionizing radiation on immune system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyuleva, I.

    1999-01-01

    Delayed radiation effects of irradiation at relatively high doses - 0.52- 2 Gy in result of severe accidents are discussed. The immune response of lymphocyte populations manifested in formation of different kind of mutant cells at Hiroshima-A-bombing and Chernobyl accident are presented. It is of great interest the hypothesis presented launched by RERF (Japanese Foundation for Radiation Effect Research, Hiroshima) for radiation induced predominant of T H2 -lymphocytes in comparison to T H1 as delayed immune response at the Hiroshima-A-bomb survivors. The aspect of immune status is quite different at low doses irradiation (0.02 - 0.2 Gy). There is some stimulation in immune response known as hormesis effect. It is suggested that T-cell activation has key role in immune system stimulation at doses under 0.2 Gy. There is also activation of DNA-reparation mechanisms. Suppression of the hypothalamus-hypophysis-suprarenal axis brings to enhancing of immune potential. Chinese people living in a region with three-times higher background radiation, X-ray examined patients as well as occupationally exposed personnel have been investigated. Radioprotective effect of some cytokines and their influence on the individual radiosensitivity are also discussed.The investigations have to be continued because of some inconsistent results

  14. The Ustilago maydis effector Pep1 suppresses plant immunity by inhibition of host peroxidase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Hemetsberger

    Full Text Available The corn smut Ustilago maydis establishes a biotrophic interaction with its host plant maize. This interaction requires efficient suppression of plant immune responses, which is attributed to secreted effector proteins. Previously we identified Pep1 (Protein essential during penetration-1 as a secreted effector with an essential role for U. maydis virulence. pep1 deletion mutants induce strong defense responses leading to an early block in pathogenic development of the fungus. Using cytological and functional assays we show that Pep1 functions as an inhibitor of plant peroxidases. At sites of Δpep1 mutant penetrations, H₂O₂ strongly accumulated in the cell walls, coinciding with a transcriptional induction of the secreted maize peroxidase POX12. Pep1 protein effectively inhibited the peroxidase driven oxidative burst and thereby suppresses the early immune responses of maize. Moreover, Pep1 directly inhibits peroxidases in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. Using fluorescence complementation assays, we observed a direct interaction of Pep1 and the maize peroxidase POX12 in vivo. Functional relevance of this interaction was demonstrated by partial complementation of the Δpep1 mutant defect by virus induced gene silencing of maize POX12. We conclude that Pep1 acts as a potent suppressor of early plant defenses by inhibition of peroxidase activity. Thus, it represents a novel strategy for establishing a biotrophic interaction.

  15. Treatment of silymarin, a plant flavonoid, prevents ultraviolet light-induced immune suppression and oxidative stress in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Santosh K

    2002-12-01

    It is well documented that ultraviolet (UV) light-induced immune suppression and oxidative stress play an important role in the induction of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of silymarin, a plant flavonoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum L. Gaertn.), to mouse skin prevents photocarcinogenesis, but the preventive mechanism of photocarcinogenesis in vivo animal system by silymarin is not well defined and understood. To define the mechanism of prevention, we employed immunostaining, analytical assays and ELISA which revealed that topical treatment of silymarin (1 mg/cm2 skin area) to C3H/HeN mice inhibits UVB (90 mJ/cm2)-induced suppression of contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response to contact sensitizer dinitrofluorobenzene. Prevention of UVB-induced suppression of CHS by silymarin was found to be associated with the inhibition of infiltrating leukocytes, particularly CD11b+ cell type, and myeloperoxidase activity (50-71%). Silymarin treatment also resulted in significant reduction of UVB-induced immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin-10 producing cells and its production (58-72%, pskin cancer risk human population and ii) development of sunscreen containing silymarin as an antioxidant (chemopreventive agent) or silymarin can be supplemented in skin care products.

  16. Physical Theory of the Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deem, Michael

    2012-10-01

    I will discuss to theories of the immune system and describe a theory of the immune response to vaccines. I will illustrate this theory by application to design of the annual influenza vaccine. I will use this theory to explain limitations in the vaccine for dengue fever and to suggest a transport-inspired amelioration of these limitations.

  17. The Immune System and Bodily Defence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Immunology, New Delhi, and have been working there on various aspects of cellular and molecular immunology for the past six years or so. ..... can maintain immune memory and make vaccines possible. Of course, the complications of the clonally diverse system of immune target recognition leads to a variety of practical ...

  18. Innate immunity in the nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaglia, V.; Baas, F.

    2009-01-01

    The complement (C) system plays a central role in innate immunity and bridges innate and adaptive immune responses. A fine balance of C activation and regulation mediates the elimination of invading pathogens and the protection of the host from excessive C deposition on healthy tissues. If this

  19. Critical role of heme oxygenase-1 in Foxp3-mediated immune suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung-Min; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Jeong, Young-Ran; Kim, Young-Myeong; Chung, Hun-Taeg

    2005-01-01

    Foxp3, which encodes the transcription factor scurfin, is indispensable for the development and function of CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells (Treg). Recent data suggest conversion of peripheral CD4 + CD25 - naive T cells to CD4 + CD25 + Treg by acquisition of Foxp3 through costimulation with TCR and TGF-β or forced expression of the gene. One critical question is how Foxp3 causes T cells to become regulatory. In the present work, we demonstrate that Foxp3 can induce heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and subsequently such regulatory phenotypes as the suppression of nontransfected cells in a cell-cell contact-dependent manner as well as impaired proliferation and production of cytokines upon stimulation in Jurkat T cells. Moreover, we confirm the expression of both Foxp3 and HO-1 in peripheral CD4 + CD25 + Treg and suppressive function of the cells are relieved by the inhibition of HO-1 activity. In summary, we demonstrate that Foxp3 induces HO-1 expression and HO-1 engages in Foxp3-mediated immune suppression

  20. Glutamine antagonist-mediated immune suppression decreases pathology but delays virus clearance in mice during nonfatal alphavirus encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Victoria K; Glowinski, Rebecca; Braxton, Alicia M; Potter, Michelle C; Slusher, Barbara S; Griffin, Diane E

    2017-08-01

    Infection of weanling C57BL/6 mice with the TE strain of Sindbis virus (SINV) causes nonfatal encephalomyelitis associated with hippocampal-based memory impairment that is partially prevented by treatment with 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine (DON), a glutamine antagonist (Potter et al., J Neurovirol 21:159, 2015). To determine the mechanism(s) of protection, lymph node and central nervous system (CNS) tissues from SINV-infected mice treated daily for 1 week with low (0.3mg/kg) or high (0.6mg/kg) dose DON were examined. DON treatment suppressed lymphocyte proliferation in cervical lymph nodes resulting in reduced CNS immune cell infiltration, inflammation, and cell death compared to untreated SINV-infected mice. Production of SINV-specific antibody and interferon-gamma were also impaired by DON treatment with a delay in virus clearance. Cessation of treatment allowed activation of the antiviral immune response and viral clearance, but revived CNS pathology, demonstrating the ability of the immune response to mediate both CNS damage and virus clearance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Lymphatic System: Integral Roles in Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Ivanov, Stoyan; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H; Scallan, Joshua P

    2017-04-26

    The lymphatic vasculature is not considered a formal part of the immune system, but it is critical to immunity. One of its major roles is in the coordination of the trafficking of antigen and immune cells. However, other roles in immunity are emerging. Lymphatic endothelial cells, for example, directly present antigen or express factors that greatly influence the local environment. We cover these topics herein and discuss how other properties of the lymphatic vasculature, such as mechanisms of lymphatic contraction (which immunologists traditionally do not take into account), are nonetheless integral in the immune system. Much is yet unknown, and this nascent subject is ripe for exploration. We argue that to consider the impact of lymphatic biology in any given immunological interaction is a key step toward integrating immunology with organ physiology and ultimately many complex pathologies.

  2. The role of the immune system in neurofibromatosis type 1-associated nervous system tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Souvik; Reilly, Karlyne M

    2017-01-01

    With the recent development of new anticancer therapies targeting the immune system, it is important to understand which immune cell types and cytokines play critical roles in suppressing or promoting tumorigenesis. The role of mast cells in promoting neurofibroma growth in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patients was hypothesized decades ago. More recent experiments in mouse models have demonstrated the causal role of mast cells in neurofibroma development and of microglia in optic pathway glioma development. We review here what is known about the role of NF1 mutation in immune cell function and the role of immune cells in promoting tumorigenesis in NF1. We also review the therapies targeting immune cell pathways and their promise in NF1 tumors.

  3. The Immune System and Bodily Defence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , we have simply referred to 'cells of the immune system', as though they were a homogeneous population. But clearly, given the number of functions they are expected to carry out, ..... easily susceptible to such digestion themselves (Figure 3).

  4. Retnla (relmalpha/fizz1 suppresses helminth-induced Th2-type immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T Pesce

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Retnla (Resistin-like molecule alpha/FIZZ1 is induced during Th2 cytokine immune responses. However, the role of Retnla in Th2-type immunity is unknown. Here, using Retnla(-/- mice and three distinct helminth models, we show that Retnla functions as a negative regulator of Th2 responses. Pulmonary granuloma formation induced by the eggs of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni is dependent on IL-4 and IL-13 and associated with marked increases in Retnla expression. We found that both primary and secondary pulmonary granuloma formation were exacerbated in the absence of Retlna. The number of granuloma-associated eosinophils and serum IgE titers were also enhanced. Moreover, when chronically infected with S. mansoni cercariae, Retnla(-/- mice displayed significant increases in granulomatous inflammation in the liver and the development of fibrosis and progression to hepatosplenic disease was markedly augmented. Finally, Retnla(-/- mice infected with the gastrointestinal (GI parasite Nippostrongylus brasiliensis had intensified lung pathology to migrating larvae, reduced fecundity, and accelerated expulsion of adult worms from the intestine, suggesting Th2 immunity was enhanced. When their immune responses were compared, helminth infected Retnla(-/- mice developed stronger Th2 responses, which could be reversed by exogenous rRelmalpha treatment. Studies with several cytokine knockout mice showed that expression of Retnla was dependent on IL-4 and IL-13 and inhibited by IFN-gamma, while tissue localization and cell isolation experiments indicated that eosinophils and epithelial cells were the primary producers of Retnla in the liver and lung, respectively. Thus, the Th2-inducible gene Retnla suppresses resistance to GI nematode infection, pulmonary granulomatous inflammation, and fibrosis by negatively regulating Th2-dependent responses.

  5. PDE4 Inhibition Suppresses IL-17–Associated Immunity in Dry Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrai, Zahra; Stevenson, William; Okanobo, Andre; Chen, Yihe; Dohlamn, Thomas H.; Hua, Jing; Amparo, Francisco; Chauhan, Sunil K.; Dana, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the effect of phosphodiesterase type-4 (PDE4) inhibition on IL-17–associated immunity in experimental dry eye disease (DED). Methods. Murine DED was induced, after which a PDE4 inhibitor (cilomilast), dexamethasone, cyclosporine, or a relevant vehicle was administered topically. Real-time PCR, immunohistochemical staining, and flow cytometry were employed to evaluate the immuno-inflammatory parameters of DED with a focus on IL-17–associated immunity. Corneal fluorescein staining (CFS) was performed to evaluate clinical disease progression. Results. DED induction increased proinflammatory cytokine expression, pathogenic immune cell infiltration, and CFS scores. Cilomilast significantly decreased the expression of TNF-α in the cornea (P ≤ 0.05) and IL-1α, IL-1β, and TNF-α in the conjunctiva (P ≤ 0.05) as compared with vehicle control. Cilomilast treatment markedly decreased the presence of CD11b+ antigen-presenting cells in the central and peripheral cornea (P ≤ 0.05), and led to decreased conjunctival expression of cytokines IL-6, IL-23, and IL-17 (P ≤ 0.05). Moreover, cilomilast decreased the expression of IL-17 and IL-23 in the draining lymph nodes (P ≤ 0.05). Topical cilomilast was significantly more effective than vehicle at reducing CFS scores (P ≤ 0.05). The therapeutic efficacy of cilomilast was comparable or superior to that of dexamethasone and cyclosporine in all tested measures. Conclusions. Topical cilomilast suppresses the generation of IL-17–associated immunity in experimental DED. PMID:22577075

  6. Regional specialization within the intestinal immune system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mowat, Allan M.; Agace, William Winston

    2014-01-01

    The intestine represents the largest compartment of the immune system. It is continually exposed to antigens and immunomodulatory agents from the diet and the commensal microbiota, and it is the port of entry for many clinically important pathogens. Intestinal immune processes are also increasingly...... implicated in controlling disease development elsewhere in the body. In this Review, we detail the anatomical and physiological distinctions that are observed in the small and large intestines, and we suggest how these may account for the diversity in the immune apparatus that is seen throughout...... the intestine. We describe how the distribution of innate, adaptive and innate-like immune cells varies in different segments of the intestine and discuss the environmental factors that may influence this. Finally, we consider the implications of regional immune specialization for inflammatory disease...

  7. Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonist GS-9620 Induces HIV Expression and HIV-Specific Immunity in Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Angela; Irrinki, Alivelu; Kaur, Jasmine; Cihlar, Tomas; Kukolj, George; Sloan, Derek D; Murry, Jeffrey P

    2017-04-15

    Antiretroviral therapy can suppress HIV replication to undetectable levels but does not eliminate latent HIV, thus necessitating lifelong therapy. Recent efforts to target this persistent reservoir have focused on inducing the expression of latent HIV so that infected cells may be recognized and eliminated by the immune system. Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation stimulates antiviral immunity and has been shown to induce HIV from latently infected cells. Activation of TLR7 leads to the production of several stimulatory cytokines, including type I interferons (IFNs). In this study, we show that the selective TLR7 agonist GS-9620 induced HIV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. GS-9620 increased extracellular HIV RNA 1.5- to 2-fold through a mechanism that required type I IFN signaling. GS-9620 also activated HIV-specific T cells and enhanced antibody-mediated clearance of HIV-infected cells. Activation by GS-9620 in combination with HIV peptide stimulation increased CD8 T cell degranulation, production of intracellular cytokines, and cytolytic activity. T cell activation was again dependent on type I IFNs produced by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. GS-9620 induced phagocytic cell maturation and improved effector-mediated killing of HIV-infected CD4 T cells by the HIV envelope-specific broadly neutralizing antibody PGT121. Collectively, these data show that GS-9620 can activate HIV production and improve the effector functions that target latently infected cells. GS-9620 may effectively complement orthogonal therapies designed to stimulate antiviral immunity, such as therapeutic vaccines or broadly neutralizing antibodies. Clinical studies are under way to determine if GS-9620 can target HIV reservoirs. IMPORTANCE Though antiretroviral therapies effectively suppress viral replication, they do not eliminate integrated proviral DNA. This stable intermediate of viral infection is persistently

  8. Diagnostic value of FDG-PET/(CT) in children with fever of unknown origin and unexplained fever during immune suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blokhuis, Gijsbert J.; Diender, Marije G.; Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P. [Radboud University Medical Center, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Draaisma, Jos M.T. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Paediatrics, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee de [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); University of Twente, MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Biomedical Photonic Imaging Group, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-10-15

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) and unexplained fever during immune suppression in children are challenging medical problems. The aim of this study is to investigate the diagnostic value of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and FDG-PET combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in children with FUO and in children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. All FDG-PET/(CT) scans performed in the Radboud university medical center for the evaluation of FUO or unexplained fever during immune suppression in the last 10 years were reviewed. Results were compared with the final clinical diagnosis. FDG-PET/(CT) scans were performed in 31 children with FUO. A final diagnosis was established in 16 cases (52 %). Of the total number of scans, 32 % were clinically helpful. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT in these patients was 80 % and 78 %, respectively. FDG-PET/(CT) scans were performed in 12 children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. A final diagnosis was established in nine patients (75 %). Of the total number of these scans, 58 % were clinically helpful. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT in children with unexplained fever during immune suppression was 78 % and 67 %, respectively. FDG-PET/CT appears a valuable imaging technique in the evaluation of children with FUO and in the diagnostic process of children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. Prospective studies of FDG-PET/CT as part of a structured diagnostic protocol are warranted to assess the additional diagnostic value. (orig.)

  9. Vitamin D: modulator of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeke, Femke; Takiishi, Tatiana; Korf, Hannelie; Gysemans, Conny; Mathieu, Chantal

    2010-08-01

    1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)), the active form of vitamin D, is known to regulate calcium and phosphorus metabolism, thus being a key-player in bone-formation. However 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) also has a physiological role beyond its well-known role in skeletal homeostasis. Here, we describe 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) as an immunomodulator targeting various immune cells, including monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs), as well as T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes, hence modulating both innate and adaptive immune responses. Besides being targets, immune cells express vitamin D-activating enzymes, allowing local conversion of inactive vitamin D into 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) within the immune system. Taken together, these data indicate that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) plays a role in maintenance of immune homeostasis. Several epidemiological studies have linked inadequate vitamin D levels to a higher susceptibility of immune-mediated disorders, including chronic infections and autoimmune diseases. This review will discuss the complex immune-regulatory effects of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) on immune cells as well as its role in infectious and autoimmune diseases, more in particular in tuberculosis and type 1 diabetes (T1D). Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Control of immune ligands by members of a cytomegalovirus gene expansion suppresses natural killer cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Ceri A; Weekes, Michael P; Nobre, Luis V; Ruckova, Eva; Wilkie, Gavin S; Paulo, Joao A; Chang, Chiwen; Suárez, Nicolás M; Davies, James A; Antrobus, Robin; Stanton, Richard J; Aicheler, Rebecca J; Nichols, Hester; Vojtesek, Borek; Trowsdale, John; Davison, Andrew J; Gygi, Steven P; Tomasec, Peter; Lehner, Paul J; Wilkinson, Gavin W G

    2017-02-10

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US12 family consists of ten sequentially arranged genes (US12-21) with poorly characterized function. We now identify novel natural killer (NK) cell evasion functions for four members: US12, US14, US18 and US20. Using a systematic multiplexed proteomics approach to quantify ~1300 cell surface and ~7200 whole cell proteins, we demonstrate that the US12 family selectively targets plasma membrane proteins and plays key roles in regulating NK ligands, adhesion molecules and cytokine receptors. US18 and US20 work in concert to suppress cell surface expression of the critical NKp30 ligand B7-H6 thus inhibiting NK cell activation. The US12 family is therefore identified as a major new hub of immune regulation.

  11. Cell-mediated immune suppression effect of rocket kerosene through dermal exposure in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-xin XU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the effect of cell-mediated immune suppression effect of rocket kerosene (RK through dermal application in mice. Methods Skin delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH was used to observe the relation of the RK amount the skin exposed and the cellular immune inhibitory function. Different amount of the undiluted fuel was smeared directly onto the dorsal skin of mice. Mice in negative and positive control groups were treated with acetone. After the last exposure, all the mice except those in negative control group were allergized by evenly smearing with 1% dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB solution on their dorsum. Five days after allergy, 1% DNFB solution was smeared onto right ear of all mice to stimulate the allergic reaction. Twenty-four hours after attack, the auricle swelling, spleen index and thymus index in corresponding mice were determined. In the first series of experiments, different dosages of RK were applied once, and the ICR mice were randomly divided into negative control group, positive control group and experimental group (0.5ml/kg.BW×1, 1ml/kg.BW×1 and 2ml/kg.BW×1 group. In the second series of experiments, the certain and same dosage of RK was applied for different times, and the ICR mice were randomly divided into negative control group, positive control group and experimental group (0.5ml/kg.BW×1, 0.5mL/kg.BW×2, 0.5ml/kg.BW×3, 0.5ml/kg.BW×4 and 0.5mL/kg.BW×5 group. In the third series of experiments, the different dosages of RK were applied more than once, and the ICR mice were randomly divided into negative control group, positive control group and experimental group (0.5ml/kg.BW×5, 1ml/kg.BW×5 and 2ml/kg.BW×5 group. Lymphocyte proliferation experiment in vitrowas conducted to observe the persistent time of the cell-mediated immune suppression in mice by RK dermal exposure. The lymphocyte proliferation induced by concanavalin A (Con A was analyzed by MTT assay, and T lymphocyte subsets (CD3+, CD4+ and CD

  12. Signal transduction in cells of the immune system in microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Kathrin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Life on Earth developed in the presence and under the constant influence of gravity. Gravity has been present during the entire evolution, from the first organic molecule to mammals and humans. Modern research revealed clearly that gravity is important, probably indispensable for the function of living systems, from unicellular organisms to men. Thus, gravity research is no more or less a fundamental question about the conditions of life on Earth. Since the first space missions and supported thereafter by a multitude of space and ground-based experiments, it is well known that immune cell function is severely suppressed in microgravity, which renders the cells of the immune system an ideal model organism to investigate the influence of gravity on the cellular and molecular level. Here we review the current knowledge about the question, if and how cellular signal transduction depends on the existence of gravity, with special focus on cells of the immune system. Since immune cell function is fundamental to keep the organism under imnological surveillance during the defence against pathogens, to investigate the effects and possible molecular mechanisms of altered gravity is indispensable for long-term space flights to Earth Moon or Mars. Thus, understanding the impact of gravity on cellular functions on Earth will provide not only important informations about the development of life on Earth, but also for therapeutic and preventive strategies to cope successfully with medical problems during space exploration.

  13. Sulphonylurea usage in melioidosis is associated with severe disease and suppressed immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Melioidosis is a problem in the developing tropical regions of Southeast Asia and Northern Australia where the the Gram negative saprophytic bacillus Burkholderia pseudomallei is endemic with the risk of fulminant septicaemia. While diabetes mellitus is a well-established risk factor for melioidiosis, little is known if specific hypoglycemic agents may differentially influence the susceptibility and clinical course of infection with B. pseudomallei (Bp. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this cohort study, patients with pre-existing diabetes and melioidosis were retrospectively studied. OUTCOME MEASURES: mortality, length of stay and development of complications (namely hypotension, intubation, renal failure and septicaemia were studied in relation to prior diabetic treatment regimen. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from diabetic patients and healthy PBMC primed with metformin, glyburide and insulin were stimulated with purified Bp antigens in vitro. Immune response and specific immune pathway mediators were studied to relate to the clinical findings mechanistically. Of 74 subjects, 44 (57.9% had sulphonylurea-containing diabetic regimens. Patient receiving sulphonylureas had more severe septic complications (47.7% versus 16.7% p = 0.006, in particular, hypotension requiring intropes (p = 0.005. There was also a trend towards increased mortality in sulphonylurea-users (15.9% versus 3.3% p = 0.08. In-vitro, glyburide suppressed inflammatory cytokine production in a dose-dependent manner. An effect of the drug was the induction of IL-1R-associated kinase-M at the level of mRNA transcription. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Sulphonylurea treatment results in suppression of host inflammatory response and may put patients at higher risk for adverse outcomes in melioidosis.

  14. Suppression of plant resistance gene-based immunity by a fungal effector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houterman, P.M.; Cornelissen, B.J.C.; Rep, M.

    2008-01-01

    The innate immune system of plants consists of two layers. The first layer, called basal resistance, governs recognition of conserved microbial molecules and fends off most attempted invasions. The second layer is based on Resistance (R) genes that mediate recognition of effectors, proteins secreted

  15. The Activation and Suppression of Plant Innate Immunity by Parasitic Nematodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goverse, A.; Smant, G.

    2014-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes engage in prolonged and intimate relationships with their host plants, often involving complex alterations in host cell morphology and function. It is puzzling how nematodes can achieve this, seemingly without activating the innate immune system of their hosts. Secretions

  16. Modulating the immune system through nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacoba, Tamara G; Olivera, Ana; Torres, Dolores; Crecente-Campo, José; Alonso, María José

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, nanotechnology-based modulation of the immune system is presented as a cutting-edge strategy, which may lead to significant improvements in the treatment of severe diseases. In particular, efforts have been focused on the development of nanotechnology-based vaccines, which could be used for immunization or generation of tolerance. In this review, we highlight how different immune responses can be elicited by tuning nanosystems properties. In addition, we discuss specific formulation approaches designed for the development of anti-infectious and anti-autoimmune vaccines, as well as those intended to prevent the formation of antibodies against biologicals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Suppressive versus augmenting effect of the same pretreatment regimen in two murine tumor systems with distinct effector mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Hiromi; Hamaoka, Toshiyuki; Kitagawa, Masayasu

    1978-01-01

    The effect of presensitization with x-irradiated tumor cells on the development of host's immune resistance against the tumor-associated transplantation antigens (TATA) was investigated in two syngeneic tumor systems with distinct effector mechanisms. When X5563 plasmacytoma, to which immune resistance was mediated exclusively by killer T lymphocytes, was intravenously inoculated into syngeneic C3H/He mice with lower number after 7000 R x-irradiation, the mice failed to exhibit any protective immunity against the subsequent challenge with viable tumor cells. Moreover, these mice lost their capability to develop any immune resistance even after an appropriate immunization procedure. The immunodepression induced by such a pretreatment regimen was specific for X5563 tumor. While no suppressor cell activity was detected in the above pretreated mice, serum factor(s) from these mice was virtually responsible for this suppression. When the serum factor mediating this tumor-specific suppression was fractionated on the Sephadex G-200 column, the suppressive activity was found in albumin-corresponding fraction, free of any immunoglobulin component. In contrast, in MM102 mammary tumor system, in which immune resistance is solely mediated by tumor-specific antibody, the pretreatment with x-irradiated MM102 cells augmented the induction of anti-tumor immunity. These results indicate that while tumor antigens given in the form of x-irradiated tumor cells suppress the induction of killer T cell-mediated immunity in one system, the same presensitization regimen of tumor antigens augments the antibody-mediated immunity in another system, thus giving a divergent effect on the distinct effector mechanisms of syngeneic tumor immunity. (author)

  18. Complex role for the immune system in initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Kristin S; Francis, Amanda A; Murray, Nicole R

    2014-08-28

    The immune system plays a complex role in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer. Inflammation can promote the formation of premalignant lesions and accelerate pancreatic cancer development. Conversely, pancreatic cancer is characterized by an immunosuppressive environment, which is thought to promote tumor progression and invasion. Here we review the current literature describing the role of the immune response in the progressive development of pancreatic cancer, with a focus on the mechanisms that drive recruitment and activation of immune cells at the tumor site, and our current understanding of the function of the immune cell types at the tumor. Recent clinical and preclinical data are reviewed, detailing the involvement of the immune response in pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, including the role of specific cytokines and implications for disease outcome. Acute pancreatitis is characterized by a predominantly innate immune response, while chronic pancreatitis elicits an immune response that involves both innate and adaptive immune cells, and often results in profound systemic immune-suppression. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by marked immune dysfunction driven by immunosuppressive cell types, tumor-promoting immune cells, and defective or absent inflammatory cells. Recent studies reveal that immune cells interact with cancer stem cells and tumor stromal cells, and these interactions have an impact on development and progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Finally, current PDAC therapies are reviewed and the potential for harnessing the actions of the immune response to assist in targeting pancreatic cancer using immunotherapy is discussed.

  19. Viral subversion of the immune system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillet, L.; Vanderplasschen, A.

    2005-01-01

    The continuous interactions between host and viruses during their co-evolution have shaped not only the immune system but also the countermeasures used by viruses. Studies in the last decade have described the diverse arrays of pathways and molecular targets that are used by viruses to elude immune detection or destruction, or both. These include targeting of pathways for major histocompatibility complex class I and class II antigen presentation, natural killer cell recognition, apoptosis, cytokine signalling, and complement activation. This paper provides an overview of the viral immune-evasion mechanisms described to date. It highlights the contribution of this field to our understanding of the immune system, and the importance of understanding this aspect of the biology of viral infection to develop efficacious and safe vaccines. (author)

  20. The influence of pregnancy on systemic immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Michael; Sperling, Rhoda S; Moran, Thomas M; Kraus, Thomas A

    2012-12-01

    Adaptations in maternal systemic immunity are presumed to be responsible for observed alterations in disease susceptibility and severity as pregnancy progresses. Epidemiological evidence as well as animal studies have shown that influenza infections are more severe during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, resulting in greater morbidity and mortality, although the reason for this is still unclear. Our laboratory has taken advantage of 20 years of experience studying the murine immune response to respiratory viruses to address questions of altered immunity during pregnancy. With clinical studies and unique animal model systems, we are working to define the mechanisms responsible for altered immune responses to influenza infection during pregnancy and what roles hormones such as estrogen or progesterone play in these alterations.

  1. Effects of hyperthermia on the hamster immune system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangavalli, R.; Cain, C.A.; Tompkins, W.A.F.

    1984-01-01

    In previous studies, the authors have shown that hyperthermia can enhance antibody-complement chytotoxicity of hamster and human tumor cells. Moreover, whole body microwave exposure of hamsters resulted in activation of peritoneal macrophages to a viricidal state and transient suppression of natural killer (NK) cell activity. In this study, the authors compare the effects of whole body heating by microwaves or by an environmental chamber (hot air) on the hamster immune system. Microwave exposure (25mW/cm/sup 2/; 1 hr) caused viricidal activation of peritoneal macrophages which resulted in restriction of vaccinia and vesicular stomatitis virs (VSV) growth. However, heating in an environmental chamber (41 0 C; 1 hr) did not activate macrophages to a viricidal state. Both microwave and hot air hyperthermia caused significant augmentation of antibody producing spleen cell response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC), using the Jerne hymolytic plaque assay, four days post exposure and immunization with SRBC. Natural killer spleen cell cytotoxicity was suppressed by microwave and hot air hyperthermia showing that NK lymphocytes are extremely sensitive to changes in temperature. These alterations in cellular immune response due to hyperthermia could be of significance in treatment of tumors and viral infections

  2. Effects of ultraviolet radiation on the immune system in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morison, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    In experimental animals, exposure to UV-B radiation produces selective alterations of immune function which are mainly in the form of suppression of normal immune responses. This immune suppression is important in the development of nonmelanoma skin cancer, may influence the development and course of infectious disease and possibly protects against autoimmune reactions. The evidence that this form of immune suppression occurs in humans is less compelling and very incomplete. The wavelengths of radiation most affected by a depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer are those known to be most immunosuppressive in animals and it is likely that such depletion will increase any suppressive effect of sunlight on immunity in humans. In addition to establishing whether or not UV-B radiation can cause suppression of immune function in humans, studies are required to determine if melanin can provide protection against such suppression, the role of this suppression in the pathogenesis of skin cancer, the development of infectious disease and vaccine effectiveness, and the capacity for humans to develop adaptive, protective mechanisms which may limit damage from continued exposure to UV-B radiation. (author)

  3. The ontogeny of the porcine immune system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šinkora, Marek; Butler, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2009), s. 273-283 ISSN 0145-305X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/07/0087; GA ČR GA523/07/0088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : ontogeny of the porcine immune system * swine adaptive immunity * development of alpha beta and gamma delta T cells Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.290, year: 2009

  4. The immune system vs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Østrup; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Ilya Metchnikoff and Paul Ehrlich were awarded the Nobel price in 1908. Since then, numerous studies have unraveled a multitude of mechanistically different immune responses to intruding microorganisms. However, in the vast majority of these studies, the underlying infectious agents have appeared...... the present review on the immune system vs. biofilm bacteria is focused on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (mainly because this is the most thoroughly studied), many of the same mechanisms are also seen with biofilm infections generated by other microorganisms....

  5. Suppressive effects of aluminum trichloride on the T lymphocyte immune function of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanzhu; Hu, Chongwei; Li, Xinwei; Shao, Bing; Sun, Hao; Zhao, Hansong; Li, Yanfei

    2012-03-01

    Aluminum (Al) has increasingly been used in the daily life, and could cause the change of human health because it can accumulate in the organs. A rat model was thus used to examine potential effect of Al on the immune function. Forty male Wistar rats (5 weeks old) weighed 110-120 g were randomly allocated into four groups and were orally exposed to 0, 64.18, 128.36, and 256.72 mg/kg body weight aluminum trichloride (AlCl3) in drinking water for 120 days. The levels of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ T lymphocyte, acid non-specific activity esterase (ANAE+) in blood, and interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in serum were determined at the end of experiment. The results showed that the proportions of CD3+, CD4+ T lymphocyte, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+, and the levels of ANAE+, IL-2, and TNF-α were significantly reduced in AlCl3-treated rats, while the proportion of CD8+ T lymphocyte was increased in an AlCl3-dose dependent manner. Our findings indicate that a long term exposure of AlCl3 could suppress the T lymphocyte immune function of rats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Physical Activities, Exercises, and Their Effects to the Immune System

    OpenAIRE

    Nurmasitoh, Titis

    2015-01-01

    Every systems in human body correlate to maintain homeostasis. One of those systems which contribute to maintain homeostasis is the immune system. The immune system defends physiological functions against foreign substances and cancer cells through a complex and multilayered mechanism. The ability to defend against foreign substances and abnormal cells is done by two types of immune system, which are Innate immune system and adaptive/acquired immune system. There are also certain factors that...

  7. Neuroendocrine mechanisms for immune system regulation during stress in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardocci, Gino; Navarro, Cristina; Cortés, Paula P; Imarai, Mónica; Montoya, Margarita; Valenzuela, Beatriz; Jara, Pablo; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Fernández, Ricardo

    2014-10-01

    In the last years, the aquaculture crops have experienced an explosive and intensive growth, because of the high demand for protein. This growth has increased fish susceptibility to diseases and subsequent death. The constant biotic and abiotic changes experienced by fish species in culture are challenges that induce physiological, endocrine and immunological responses. These changes mitigate stress effects at the cellular level to maintain homeostasis. The effects of stress on the immune system have been studied for many years. While acute stress can have beneficial effects, chronic stress inhibits the immune response in mammals and teleost fish. In response to stress, a signaling cascade is triggered by the activation of neural circuits in the central nervous system because the hypothalamus is the central modulator of stress. This leads to the production of catecholamines, corticosteroid-releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone and glucocorticoids, which are the essential neuroendocrine mediators for this activation. Because stress situations are energetically demanding, the neuroendocrine signals are involved in metabolic support and will suppress the "less important" immune function. Understanding the cellular mechanisms of the neuroendocrine regulation of immunity in fish will allow the development of new pharmaceutical strategies and therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of diseases triggered by stress at all stages of fish cultures for commercial production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. HIV Immune Recovery Inflammatory Syndrome and Central Nervous System Paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Sérgio Monteiro; Roza, Thiago Henrique

    2017-04-01

    The immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is a deregulated inflammatory response to invading microorganisms. It is manifested when there is an abrupt change in host immunity from an anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive state to a pro-inflammatory state as a result of rapid depletion or removal of factors that promote immune suppression or inhibition of inflammation. The aim of this paper is to discuss and re-interpret the possibility of association of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) with IRIS in the central nervous system (CNS) in a case from Brazil published by Silva-Vergara ML. et al. (Mycopathologia 177:137-141, 6). An AIDS patient who was not receiving medical care developed pulmonary PCM successfully treated with itraconazole. The patient developed central nervous system PCM (NPCM) after starting the ARV therapy with recovery of immunity and control of HIV viral load, although it was not interpreted as IRIS by the authors, it fulfills the criteria for CNS IRIS. This could be the first case of NPCM associated with IRIS described. Although not frequent, IRIS must be considered in PCM patients and HIV, from endemic areas or patients that traveled to endemic areas, receiving ARV treatment and with worsening symptoms.

  9. Immune regulation in gut and cord : opportunities for directing the immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Roock, S.

    2012-01-01

    The gut is an important organ for the immune system. Microbes and immune cells interact directly or via epithelial cells. Both TH17 and Treg cells mature in this environment. The composition of the microbiota has an important influence on the immune homeostasis. Influencing the immune system via the

  10. Immune system modulation in the central nervous system: A possible role for endocannabinoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd-Allah, Adel R.A.

    2007-01-01

    The immune system is designed to protect the body from infection and tumor formation. To perform this function, cells of the immune system can be dangerous for the survival and function of the neuronal network in the brain under the influence of infection or immune imbalance. An attack of immune cells inside the brain includes the potential for severe neuronal damage or cell death and therefore impairment of the CNS function. To avoid such undesirable action of the immune system, the CNS performs a cascade of cellular and molecular mechanisms enabling strict control of immune reactions i mmune privilege . Under inflammatory and patholological conditions, uncontrolled immune system results in the activation of neuronal damage that is frequently associated with neurological diseases. On the other hand, processes of neuroprotection and neurorepair after neuronal damage depend on a steady and tightly controlled immunesurvelliance. Many immunoprotectants play a role to imbalance the immune reactions in the CNS and other organs which presents an important therapeutic target. It has been reported recently that endocannabinoids are secreted in abundance in the CNS following neuronal insult, probably for its protection. There are at least two types of cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. Both are coupled to G proteins. CB1 receptors exist primarily on central and peripheral neurons. CB2 receptors are present mainly on immune cells. Endogenous agonists for cannabinoid receptors (endocannabinoids), have been discovered, the most important being arachidonoyl ethanolamide (anandamide), 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2AG), and 2-archidonyl glyceryl ether. Following their release, endocannabinoids are removed from the extracellular space and then degraded by intracellular enzymic hydrolysis. Therapeutic uses of cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists include the management of many disease conditions. They are also involved in immune system suppression and in cell to cell communication

  11. The Immune System in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremon, Cesare; Carini, Giovanni; Bellacosa, Lara; Zecchi, Lisa; De Giorgio, Roberto; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    The potential relevance of systemic and gastrointestinal immune activation in the pathophysiology and symptom generation in the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is supported by a number of observations. Infectious gastroenteritis is the strongest risk factor for the development of IBS and increased rates of IBS-like symptoms have been detected in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in remission or in celiac disease patients on a gluten free diet. The number of T cells and mast cells in the small and large intestine of patients with IBS is increased in a large proportion of patients with IBS over healthy controls. Mediators released by immune cells and likely from other non-immune competent cells impact on the function of enteric and sensory afferent nerves as well as on epithelial tight junctions controlling mucosal barrier of recipient animals, isolated human gut tissues or cell culture systems. Antibodies against microbiota antigens (bacterial flagellin), and increased levels of cytokines have been detected systemically in the peripheral blood advocating the existence of abnormal host-microbial interactions and systemic immune responses. Nonetheless, there is wide overlap of data obtained in healthy controls; in addition, the subsets of patients showing immune activation have yet to be clearly identified. Gender, age, geographic differences, genetic predisposition, diet and differences in the intestinal microbiota likely play a role and further research has to be done to clarify their relevance as potential mechanisms in the described immune system dysregulation. Immune activation has stimulated interest for the potential identification of biomarkers useful for clinical and research purposes and the development of novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:22148103

  12. Bacterial effector HopF2 interacts with AvrPto and suppresses Arabidopsis innate immunity at the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant pathogenic bacteria inject a cocktail of effector proteins into host plant cells to modulate the host immune response, thereby promoting pathogenicity. How or whether these effectors work cooperatively is largely unknown. The Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 effector HopF2 suppresses the host plan...

  13. Diagnostic value of FDG-PET/(CT) in children with fever of unknown origin and unexplained fever during immune suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokhuis, Gijsbert J.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.; Diender, Marije G.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Draaisma, Jos M. Th.; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Fever of unknown origin (FUO) and unexplained fever during immune suppression in children are challenging medical problems. The aim of this study is to investigate the diagnostic value of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and FDG-PET combined with computed

  14. The Immune System: Basis of so much Health and Disease: 3. Adaptive Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Crispian; Georgakopoulou, Eleni A; Hassona, Yazan

    2017-04-01

    The immune system is the body’s primary defence mechanism against infections, and disturbances in the system can cause disease if the system fails in defence functions (in immunocompromised people), or if the activity is detrimental to the host (as in auto-immune and auto-inflammatory states). A healthy immune system is also essential to normal health of dental and oral tissues. This series presents the basics for the understanding of the immune system; this article covers adaptive immunity. Clinical relevance: Dental clinicians need a basic understanding of the immune system as it underlies health and disease.

  15. Neural Control of the Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundman, Eva; Olofsson, Peder S.

    2014-01-01

    Neural reflexes support homeostasis by modulating the function of organ systems. Recent advances in neuroscience and immunology have revealed that neural reflexes also regulate the immune system. Activation of the vagus nerve modulates leukocyte cytokine production and alleviates experimental shock and autoimmune disease, and recent data have…

  16. Type I Interferon Induced Epigenetic Regulation of Macrophages Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Acute Respiratory Viral Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle N Kroetz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV is an airborne pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality each year. Macrophages (Mϕ are the first immune population to encounter IAV virions in the lungs and are required to control infection. In the present study, we explored the mechanism by which cytokine signaling regulates the phenotype and function of Mϕ via epigenetic modification of chromatin. We have found that type I interferon (IFN-I potently upregulates the lysine methyltransferase Setdb2 in murine and human Mϕ, and in turn Setdb2 regulates Mϕ-mediated immunity in response to IAV. The induction of Setdb2 by IFN-I was significantly impaired upon inhibition of the JAK-STAT signaling cascade, and chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that both STAT1 and interferon regulatory factor 7 bind upstream of the transcription start site to induce expression. The generation of Setdb2LacZ reporter mice revealed that IAV infection results in systemic upregulation of Setdb2 in myeloid cells. In the lungs, alveolar Mϕ expressed the highest level of Setdb2, with greater than 70% lacZ positive on day 4 post-infection. Silencing Setdb2 activity in Mϕ in vivo enhanced survival in lethal IAV infection. Enhanced host protection correlated with an amplified antiviral response and less obstruction to the airways. By tri-methylating H3K9, Setdb2 silenced the transcription of Mx1 and Isg15, antiviral effectors that inhibit IAV replication. Accordingly, a reduced viral load in knockout mice on day 8 post-infection was linked to elevated Isg15 and Mx1 transcript in the lungs. In addition, Setdb2 suppressed the expression of a large number of other genes with proinflammatory or immunomodulatory function. This included Ccl2, a chemokine that signals through CCR2 to regulate monocyte recruitment to infectious sites. Consistently, knockout mice produced more CCL2 upon IAV infection and this correlated with a 2-fold increase in the number of inflammatory monocytes and

  17. Effects of microgravity on the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Taylor, Gerald R.

    1991-01-01

    Changes in resistance to bacterial and viral infections in Apollo crew members has stimulated interest in the study of immunity and space flight. Results of studies from several laboratories in both humans and rodents have indicated alterations after space flight that include the following immunological parameters: thymus size, lymphocyte blastogenesis, interferon and interleukin production, natural killer cell activity, cytotoxic T-cell activity, leukocyte subset population distribution, response of bone marrow cells to colony stimulating factors, and delayed hypersensitivity skin test reactivity. The interactions of the immune system with other physiological systems, including muscle, bone, and the nervous system, may play a major role in the development of these immunological parameters during and after flight. There may also be direct effects of space flight on immune responses.

  18. Artificial immune system applications in computer security

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This book provides state-of-the-art information on the use, design, and development of the Artificial Immune System (AIS) and AIS-based solutions to computer security issues. Artificial Immune System: Applications in Computer Security focuses on the technologies and applications of AIS in malware detection proposed in recent years by the Computational Intelligence Laboratory of Peking University (CIL@PKU). It offers a theoretical perspective as well as practical solutions for readers interested in AIS, machine learning, pattern recognition and computer security. The book begins by introducing the basic concepts, typical algorithms, important features, and some applications of AIS. The second chapter introduces malware and its detection methods, especially for immune-based malware detection approaches. Successive chapters present a variety of advanced detection approaches for malware, including Virus Detection System, K-Nearest Neighbour (KNN), RBF networ s, and Support Vector Machines (SVM), Danger theory, ...

  19. Cis-urocanic acid, a sunlight-induced immunosuppressive factor, activates immune suppression via the 5-HT2A receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walterscheid, Jeffrey P.; Nghiem, Dat X.; Kazimi, Nasser; Nutt, Leta K.; McConkey, David J.; Norval, Mary; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to UV radiation induces skin cancer and suppresses the immune response. To induce immune suppression, the electromagnetic energy of UV radiation must be absorbed by an epidermal photoreceptor and converted into a biologically recognizable signal. Two photoreceptors have been recognized: DNA and trans-urocanic acid (UCA). Trans-UCA is normally found in the outermost layer of skin and isomerizes to the cis isomer upon exposure to UV radiation. Although UCA was identified as a UV photoreceptor years ago, and many have documented its ability to induce immune suppression, its exact mode of action remains elusive. Particularly vexing has been the identity of the molecular pathway by which cis-UCA mediates immune suppression. Here we provide evidence that cis-UCA binds to the serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] receptor with relatively high affinity (Kd = 4.6 nM). Anti-cis-UCA antibody precipitates radiolabeled 5-HT, and the binding is inhibited by excess 5-HT and/or excess cis-UCA. Similarly, anti-5-HT antibody precipitates radiolabeled cis-UCA, and the binding is inhibited by excess 5-HT or excess cis-UCA. Calcium mobilization was activated when a mouse fibroblast line, stably transfected with the human 5-HT2A receptor, was treated with cis-UCA. Cis-UCA-induced calcium mobilization was blocked with a selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist. UV- and cis-UCA-induced immune suppression was blocked by antiserotonin antibodies or by treating the mice with 5-HT2A receptor antagonists. Our findings identify cis-UCA as a serotonin receptor ligand and indicate that the immunosuppressive effects of cis-UCA and UV radiation are mediated by activation of the 5-HT2A receptor. PMID:17085585

  20. Role of Osmolytes in Regulating Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Tarun; Yadav, Manisha; Singh, Laishram Rajendrakumar

    2016-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to protect the host organism from diverse range of pathogenic microbes that are themselves constantly evolving. It is a complex network of cells, humoral factors, chemokines and cytokines. Dysregulation of immune system results in various kinds of immunological disorders. There are several external agents which govern the regulation of immune system. Recent studies have indicated the role of osmolytes in regulation of various immunological processes such as Ag-Ab interaction, Ig assembly, Ag presentation etc. In this present review, we have systematically discussed the role of osmolytes involved in regulation of several key immunological processes. Osmolytes are involved in the regulation of several key immunological processes such as immunoglobulin assembly and folding, immune cells proliferation, regulation of immune cells function, Ag-Ab interaction, antigen presentation, inflammatory response and protection against photo-immunosuppression. Hence, osmolytes and their transporters might be used as potential drug and drug targets respectively. This review is therefore designed to help clinicians in development of osmolyte based therapeutic strategies in the treatment of various immunological disorders. Appropriate future perspectives have also been included.

  1. Role of the Immune System in Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Pons, Hector; Johnson, Richard J

    2017-07-01

    High blood pressure is present in more than one billion adults worldwide and is the most important modifiable risk factor of death resulting from cardiovascular disease. While many factors contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension, a role of the immune system has been firmly established by a large number of investigations from many laboratories around the world. Immunosuppressive drugs and inhibition of individual cytokines prevent or ameliorate experimental hypertension, and studies in genetically-modified mouse strains have demonstrated that lymphocytes are necessary participants in the development of hypertension and in hypertensive organ injury. Furthermore, immune reactivity may be the driving force of hypertension in autoimmune diseases. Infiltration of immune cells, oxidative stress, and stimulation of the intrarenal angiotensin system are induced by activation of the innate and adaptive immunity. High blood pressure results from the combined effects of inflammation-induced impairment in the pressure natriuresis relationship, dysfunctional vascular relaxation, and overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system. Imbalances between proinflammatory effector responses and anti-inflammatory responses of regulatory T cells to a large extent determine the severity of inflammation. Experimental and human studies have uncovered autoantigens (isoketal-modified proteins and heat shock protein 70) of potential clinical relevance. Further investigations on the immune reactivity in hypertension may result in the identification of new strategies for the treatment of the disease. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Aging and the skin immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderkötter, C; Kalden, H; Luger, T A

    1997-10-01

    To give a brief summary of age-related alterations that occur in the immune system (immunosenescence), with special regard to the skin immune system. MEDLINE and institutional libraries were searched for relevant articles on immunosenescence and corresponding key words. The immune system of aged animals and humans undergoes alterations that may account for an increased susceptibility to certain infections, autoimmune diseases, or malignancies. However, some data on the parameters of immunosenescence are controversial. This appears to be caused by variations in study designs or by the many external influences that superimpose on intrinsic alterations of the immune system. Well characterized are age-related changes of T cells and cell-mediated immunity. With advancing age, human and murine T cells undergo a shift from the naive to the memory phenotype, associated with a change in cytokine profile. The cells also reveal reductions in the proliferative response to activation, in diversity of the T-cell receptor antigen repertoire, and in cytolytic activity. B cells of aging individuals show a restricted diversity of their antibody repertoire due to a decline in somatic mutations, resulting in a reduced response to certain viral infections or vaccinations. The number of Langerhans cells appears to decline with age, contributing to a reduced rate of sensitizations. Macrophages and keratinocytes also undergo age-related changes, although these are less well characterized. They entail alterations in cytokine production, which could play a role in increased susceptibility to endotoxins in elderly individuals. With aging, the skin immune system shows a decline in its adaptive capability, one of its outstanding qualities. Manipulations to revert age-related dysfunctions are being tested and may help to extend a healthy life.

  3. Nutritional components regulate the gut immune system and its association with intestinal immune disease development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamichhane, Aayam; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Kunisawa, Jun

    2013-12-01

    The gut is equipped with a unique immune system for maintaining immunological homeostasis, and its functional immune disruption can result in the development of immune diseases such as food allergy and intestinal inflammation. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that nutritional components play an important role in the regulation of gut immune responses and also in the development of intestinal immune diseases. In this review, we focus on the immunological functions of lipids, vitamins, and nucleotides in the regulation of the intestinal immune system and as potential targets for the control of intestinal immune diseases. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. The intersection of cancer, cancer stem cells, and the immune system: therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Daniel J; Sinyuk, Maksim; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Lathia, Justin D

    2016-02-01

    During brain neoplasia, malignant cells subjugate the immune system to provide an environment that favors tumor growth. These mechanisms capitalize on tumor-promoting functions of various immune cell types and typically result in suppression of tumor immune rejection. Immunotherapy efforts are underway to disrupt these mechanisms and turn the immune system against developing tumors. While many of these therapies are already in early-stage clinical trials, understanding how these therapies impact various tumor cell populations, including self-renewing cancer stem cells, may help to predict their efficacy and clarify their mechanisms of action. Moreover, interrogating the biology of glioma cell, cancer stem cell, and immune cell interactions may provide additional therapeutic targets to leverage against disease progression. In this review, we begin by highlighting a series of investigations into immune cell-mediated tumor promotion that do not parse the tumor into stem and non-stem components. We then take a closer look at the immune-suppressive mechanisms derived specifically from cancer stem cell interactions with the immune system and end with an update on immunotherapy and cancer stem cell-directed clinical trials in glioblastoma. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Central nervous system stimulants and drugs that suppress appetite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise

    2014-01-01

    of the January 2012 to June 2013 publications on central nervous system stimulants and drugs that suppress appetite covers amphetamines (including metamfetamine, paramethoxyamfetamine and paramethoxymetamfetamine), fenfluramine and benfluorex, atomoxetine, methylphenidate, modafinil and armodafinil...

  6. Inmunoterapia del cáncer: Importancia de controlar la inmunosupresión Cancer immunotherapy: Importance of overcoming immune suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Malvicini

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Es cada vez mayor la evidencia experimental y clínica de que el sistema inmunitario interviene activamente en la patogénesis y el control de la progresión tumoral. Una respuesta antitumoral efectiva depende de la correcta interacción de varios componentes del sistema inmunitario, como las células presentadoras de antígeno y diferentes sub-poblaciones de linfocitos T. Sin embargo, los tumores malignos desarrollan numerosos mecanismos para evadir el reconocimiento y su eliminación por parte del sistema inmunitario. En esta revisión discutiremos algunos de esos mecanismos y posibles estrategias terapéuticas para contrarrestarlos.Increasing evidence indicates that the immune system is involved in the control of tumor progression. Effective antitumor immune response depends on the interaction between several components of the immune system, including antigen-presenting cells and different T cell subsets. However, tumor cells develop a number of mechanisms to escape recognition and elimination by the immune system. In this review we discuss these mechanisms and address possible therapeutic approaches to overcome the immune suppression generated by tumors.

  7. Immune System Model Calibration by Genetic Algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Presbitero, A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.; Mancini, E.; Brands, R.; Sloot, P.

    2016-01-01

    We aim to develop a mathematical model of the human immune system for advanced individualized healthcare where medication plan is fine-tuned to fit a patient's conditions through monitored biochemical processes. One of the challenges is calibrating model parameters to satisfy existing experimental

  8. Immune system alterations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovden, H; Frederiksen, J L; Pedersen, S W

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a disease of which the underlying cause and pathogenesis are unknown. Cumulatative data clearly indicates an active participation by the immune system in the disease. An increasingly recognized theory suggests a non-cell autonomous mechanism, meaning that multiple...

  9. Hibernation : the immune system at rest?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Hjalmar R.; Carey, Hannah V.; Kroese, Frans G. M.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian hibernation consists of torpor phases when metabolism is severely depressed, and T can reach as low as approximately -2 degrees C, interrupted by euthermic arousal phases. Hibernation affects the function of the innate and the adaptive immune systems. Torpor drastically reduces numbers of

  10. The Immune System and Bodily Defence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    receptor, making them potential levers for immunological con- fusion, especially if one of the two receptors recognises some target shape that is normal and intrinsic to the body itself! However, this is a problem that we must think about in the context of the larger issue of how the immune system weeds out such potentially ...

  11. [The liver and the immune system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Lajos

    2015-07-26

    The liver is known to be the metabolic centre of the organism and is under the control of the central nervous system. It has a peculiar tissue structure and its anatomic localisation defines it as part of the immune system having an individual role in the defence of the organism. The determinant of its particular tissue build-up is the sinusoid system. In addition to hepatocytes, one cell row "endothelium", stellate cells close to the external surface, Kupffer cells tightly to its inner surface, as well as dendritic cells and other cell types (T and B lymphocytes, natural killer and natural killer T-cells, mast cells, granulocytes) are present. The multitudes and variety of cells make it possible to carry out the tasks according to the assignment of the organism. The liver is a member of the immune system having immune cells largely in an activated state. Its principal tasks are the assurance of the peripheral immune tolerance of the organism with the help of the haemopoetic cells and transforming growth factor-β. The liver takes part in the determination of the manner of the non-specific immune response of the organism. In addition to acute phase reaction of the organism, the liver has a role in the adaptive/specific immune response. These functions include retardation of the T and B lymphocytes and the defence against harmful pathogens. With the collaboration of transforming growth factor-β, immunoglobulins and their subclasses are inhibited just as the response of the T lymphocytes. The only exception is the undisturbed immunoglobulin A production. Particularly important is the intensive participation of the liver in the acute phase reaction of the organism, which is organised and guided by the coordinated functions of the cortico-hypothalamo-hypophysis-adrenal axis. Beside cellular elements, hormones, adhesion molecules, chemokines and cytokines are also involved in the cooperation with the organs. Acute phase reactants play a central role in these processes

  12. Cigarette smoke-exposed saliva suppresses cellular and humoral immune responses in an animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafarzadeh, A.; Bakhshi, H.; Rezayati, M.T.; Nemati, M.

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of cigarette smoke (CS)-exposed saliva on cellular and antibody responses in an animal model. The stimulatory and non-stimulatory saliva samples were collected from 10 healthy subjects and were then exposed to CS for 20 or 80 minutes. The CS-exposed saliva samples were administrated intraperitoneally (i.p) to male Balb/c mice. Then the delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) and antibody responses to sheep red blood cell (SRBC) was assessed. Moreover, the total white blood cells (WBC) counts and the blood lymphocytes counts were determined. The mean of DTH responses of animal groups received 20 minutes or 80 minutes CS-exposed saliva samples was significantly lower than that observed in control group. Moreover, The mean titer of anti-SRBC antibody was significantly lower in animal groups who received 80 minutes CS-exposed stimulatory or non-stimulatory saliva as compared to control group (P<0.04 and P<0.002, respectively). The mean counts of blood lymphocytes in 80 minutes CS exposed-stimulatory saliva group was also significantly lower as compared to control group (P<0.05). These results show that the CS-exposed saliva samples have profound suppressive effects on both cellular and humoral immune response in a mouse animal model (JPMA 59:760; 2009). (author)

  13. A Murine Model of Persistent Inflammation, Immune Suppression, and Catabolism Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda M. Pugh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Critically ill patients that survive sepsis can develop a Persistent Inflammation, Immunosuppression, and Catabolism Syndrome (PICS, which often leads to extended recovery periods and multiple complications. Here, we utilized a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP method in mice with the goal of creating a model that concurrently displays all the characteristics of PICS. We observed that, after eight days, mice that survive the CLP develop persistent inflammation with significant myelopoiesis in the bone marrow and spleen. These mice also demonstrate ongoing immune suppression, as evidenced by the decreased total and naïve splenic CD4 and CD8 T cells with a concomitant increase in immature myeloid cells. The mice further display significant weight loss and decreased muscle mass, indicating a state of ongoing catabolism. When PICS mice are challenged with intranasal Pseudomonas aeruginosa, mortality is significantly elevated compared to sham mice. This mortality difference is associated with increased bacterial loads in the lung, as well as impaired neutrophil migration and neutrophil dysfunction in the PICS mice. Altogether, we have created a sepsis model that concurrently exhibits PICS characteristics. We postulate that this will help determine the mechanisms underlying PICS and identify potential therapeutic targets to improve outcomes for this patient population.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Mce2E suppresses the macrophage innate immune response and promotes epithelial cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Lihua; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yong; Ge, Pupu; Chai, Qiyao; Li, Bingxi; Shi, Yi; Zhang, Lingqiang; Gao, George Fu; Liu, Cui Hua

    2018-03-23

    The intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) can survive in the host and cause disease by interfering with a variety of cellular functions. The mammalian cell entry 2 (mce2) operon of Mtb has been shown to contribute to tuberculosis pathogenicity. However, little is known about the regulatory roles of Mtb Mce2 family proteins towards host cellular functions. Here we show that the Mce2 family protein Mce2E suppressed the macrophage innate immune response and promoted epithelial cell proliferation. Mce2E inhibited activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in a non-canonical D motif (a MAPK-docking motif)-dependent manner, leading to reduced expression of TNF and IL-6 in macrophages. Furthermore, Mce2E promoted proliferation of human lung epithelium-derived lung adenoma A549 cells by inhibiting K48-linked polyubiquitination of eEF1A1 in a β strand region-dependent manner. In summary, Mce2E is a novel multifunctional Mtb virulence factor that regulates host cellular functions in a niche-dependent manner. Our data suggest a potential novel target for TB therapy.

  15. Growth differentiation factor-15 suppresses maturation and function of dendritic cells and inhibits tumor-specific immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhizhong Zhou

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a key role in the initiation stage of an antigen-specific immune response. A variety of tumor-derived factors (TDFs can suppress DC maturation and function, resulting in defects in the tumor-specific immune response. To identify unknown TDFs that may suppress DCs maturation and function, we established a high-throughput screening technology based on a human liver tumor T7 phage cDNA library and screened all of the proteins derived from hepatoma cells that potentially interact with immature DCs. Growth/differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15 was detected and chosen for further study. By incubation of DCs cultures with GDF-15, we demonstrate that GDF-15 can inhibit surface protrusion formation during DC maturation; suppress the membrane expression of CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR on DCs; enhance phagocytosis by DCs; reduce IL-12 and elevate TGF-β1 secretion by DCs; inhibit T cell stimulation and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL activation by DCs. By building tumor-bearing mouse models, we demonstrate that GDF-15 can inhibit the ability of DCs to stimulate a tumor-specific immune response in vivo. These results indicate that GDF-15 may be one of the critical molecules that inhibit DC maturation and function and are involved in tumor immune escape. Thus, GDF-15 may be a novel target in tumor immunotherapy.

  16. TCDD adsorbed on silica as a model for TCDD contaminated soils: Evidence for suppression of humoral immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Barbara L F; Crawford, Robert B; Kovalova, Natalia; Arencibia, Amaya; Kim, Seong Su; Pinnavaia, Thomas J; Boyd, Stephen A; Teppen, Brian J; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2011-04-11

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the prototypical aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand, exhibits immune suppression in vivo and in vitro. Suppression of primary humoral immune responses in particular has been well characterized as one of the most sensitive functional immune endpoints in animals treated with TCDD. Previous studies have used purified TCDD to elucidate the mechanisms by which TCDD and dioxin-like compounds (DLC) impair IgM production by B cells, but did not represent the route by which animals and humans are likely to be exposed environmentally. In the studies reported here, mice were treated with TCDD adsorbed onto a well-defined synthetic silica phase of known purity and physical properties, followed by sensitization with sheep erythrocytes to initiate a humoral immune response. We found that surfactant-templated mesoporous forms of amorphous silica provided an ideal combination of purity, dispersibility and textural properties for immobilizing TCDD. TCDD-adsorbed silica distributed to the spleen and liver after oral administration as assessed by induction of cyp1a1 gene expression. Most notably, TCDD delivered in the adsorbed state on amorphous silica and as a solute in corn oil (CO) produced similar suppression of the anti-sheep red blood cell immunoglobulin M antibody forming cell (sRBC IgM AFC) response at equivalent doses of TCDD. These results suggest that TCDD immobilized on silicate particles found in soils distributes to the spleen and suppresses humoral immunity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Impacts of Low Temperature on the Teleost Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn H. Abram

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As poikilothermic vertebrates, fish can experience changes in water temperature, and hence body temperature, as a result of seasonal changes, migration, or efflux of large quantities of effluent into a body of water. Temperature shifts outside of the optimal temperature range for an individual fish species can have negative impacts on the physiology of the animal, including the immune system. As a result, acute or chronic exposure to suboptimal temperatures can impair an organisms’ ability to defend against pathogens and thus compromise the overall health of the animal. This review focuses on the advances made towards understanding the impacts of suboptimal temperature on the soluble and cellular mediators of the innate and adaptive immune systems of fishes. Although cold stress can result in varying effects in different fish species, acute and chronic suboptimal temperature exposure generally yield suppressive effects, particularly on adaptive immunity. Knowledge of the effects of environmental temperature on fish species is critical for both the optimal management of wild species and the best management practices for aquaculture species.

  18. Immune system investigations for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obreja, Doina; Tulbure, Rodica; Marinescu, Irina

    2001-01-01

    During the last decade a great deal of attention has been paid to the research in the field of the immune system. Some important steps forward have been achieved in understanding the mechanisms of action and control of the immunologic responses. At the same time the concern for the possible health effects of exposure to ionizing radiation has considerably increased. On the purpose of the evaluation of the modifications induced by the ionizing radiation for radiation workers, we have applied the method of lymphocytic subpopulations, a method that evinces the proportions for the various subtypes of lymphocytes having different roles within the immune system. A number of 62 persons, employees of the Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering at Bucharest - Magurele were involved in this study. All radiation workers from 2 departments characterized by a high exposure to ionizing radiation were included, as follows: Group no. 1, consisting of 20 persons working at RWTS (Radioactive Waste Treating Station), thus presenting both external and internal irradiation; Group no. 2, consisting of 18 persons working at RPC (Radioactive Isotopes Preparing Center), a place where besides the radioactive contamination, the chemical risk was also present. The control group (consisting of 24 persons) was formed of employees from the same institute, with the difference that they were not radiation workers. For the statistical processing of the results the programs EPI INFO 6 and CIA were used. Significantly, when analyzing globally the lymphocytic modifications for TT and/or B lymphocytes (either increments or decrements when compared to the normal values), a noticeable statistical difference among the groups in terms of the frequency of the immune system modifications (Hi square test p=0.001) occurs. The results are in accordance to those in special literature mentioning age as a factor having a role in the appearance of the immune modifications. The obtained results indicate a

  19. Effects of triterpenes on the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, José-Luis

    2010-03-02

    Triterpenes, which comprise a broad chemical group of active principles, are implicated in the mechanisms of action and pharmacological effects of many medicinal plants used in folk medicine against diseases in which the immune system is implicated. They have been described as anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antimicrobial, and antitumoral agents, as well as being immunomodulator compounds. Several of them are implicated in the resolution of immune diseases, although their effects have not always been clearly correlated. The aim of this review is to compile relevant data on the mechanisms of action of triterpenes isolated from active ethnomedicinal plants and their role in the resolution of diseases in which the immune system is implicated to examine the mechanism by which they are useful as ethnopharmacological medicines. The selection of papers was made using the most relevant databases for the biomedical sciences on the basis of their ethnopharmacological use. We principally chose those studies that examined the resolution of allergic responses in vivo and those that studied the effects of the more relevant mediators implicated in the immune response in vitro. The number of compounds actually studied is limited compared with the high number of principles that have been isolated and identified. Many studies focus on specific pathologies such cancer or inflammation, but in many cases they are clearly correlated with the immune response. Lanostanes, cucurbitanes, and oleananes are probably the most interesting groups; however, other compounds are also of potential importance. Studies of specific mechanisms against mediators or transcription factors could be the objective for future research on ethnomedicinal plants used to combat immune diseases since the results obtained with cucurbitacins or derivatives of oleanolic acid support the use of different medicinal plants, thereby opening up a new frontier for future studies. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  20. Regulation of vitamin D homeostasis: implications for the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Etten, Evelyne; Stoffels, Katinka; Gysemans, Conny; Mathieu, Chantal; Overbergh, Lut

    2008-10-01

    Vitamin D homeostasis in the immune system is the focus of this review. The production of both the activating (25- and 1alpha-hydroxylase) and the metabolizing (24-hydroxylase) enzymes by cells of the immune system itself, indicates that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) can be produced locally in immune reaction sites. Moreover, the strict regulation of these enzymes by immune signals is highly suggestive for an autocrine/paracrine role in the immune system, and opens new treatment possibilities.

  1. The twilight of immunity: emerging concepts in aging of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolich-Žugich, Janko

    2018-01-01

    Immunosenescence is a series of age-related changes that affect the immune system and, with time, lead to increased vulnerability to infectious diseases. This Review addresses recent developments in the understanding of age-related changes that affect key components of immunity, including the effect of aging on cells of the (mostly adaptive) immune system, on soluble molecules that guide the maintenance and function of the immune system and on lymphoid organs that coordinate both the maintenance of lymphocytes and the initiation of immune responses. I further address the effect of the metagenome and exposome as key modifiers of immune-system aging and discuss a conceptual framework in which age-related changes in immunity might also affect the basic rules by which the immune system operates.

  2. The Immune System: the ultimate fractionated cyber-physical system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Talcott

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this little vision paper we analyze the human immune system from a computer science point of view with the aim of understanding the architecture and features that allow robust, effective behavior to emerge from local sensing and actions. We then recall the notion of fractionated cyber-physical systems, and compare and contrast this to the immune system. We conclude with some challenges.

  3. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Salinas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT, skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT, the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT. Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT+ B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture.

  4. An image classification approach to analyze the suppression of plant immunity by the human pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schikora Marek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enteric pathogen Salmonella is the causative agent of the majority of food-borne bacterial poisonings. Resent research revealed that colonization of plants by Salmonella is an active infection process. Salmonella changes the metabolism and adjust the plant host by suppressing the defense mechanisms. In this report we developed an automatic algorithm to quantify the symptoms caused by Salmonella infection on Arabidopsis. Results The algorithm is designed to attribute image pixels into one of the two classes: healthy and unhealthy. The task is solved in three steps. First, we perform segmentation to divide the image into foreground and background. In the second step, a support vector machine (SVM is applied to predict the class of each pixel belonging to the foreground. And finally, we do refinement by a neighborhood-check in order to omit all falsely classified pixels from the second step. The developed algorithm was tested on infection with the non-pathogenic E. coli and the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and used to study the interaction between plants and Salmonella wild type and T3SS mutants. We proved that T3SS mutants of Salmonella are unable to suppress the plant defenses. Results obtained through the automatic analyses were further verified on biochemical and transcriptome levels. Conclusion This report presents an automatic pixel-based classification method for detecting “unhealthy” regions in leaf images. The proposed method was compared to existing method and showed a higher accuracy. We used this algorithm to study the impact of the human pathogenic bacterium Salmonella Typhimurium on plants immune system. The comparison between wild type bacteria and T3SS mutants showed similarity in the infection process in animals and in plants. Plant epidemiology is only one possible application of the proposed algorithm, it can be easily extended to other detection tasks, which also rely on color information, or

  5. An image classification approach to analyze the suppression of plant immunity by the human pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schikora, Marek; Neupane, Balram; Madhogaria, Satish; Koch, Wolfgang; Cremers, Daniel; Hirt, Heribert; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Schikora, Adam

    2012-07-19

    The enteric pathogen Salmonella is the causative agent of the majority of food-borne bacterial poisonings. Resent research revealed that colonization of plants by Salmonella is an active infection process. Salmonella changes the metabolism and adjust the plant host by suppressing the defense mechanisms. In this report we developed an automatic algorithm to quantify the symptoms caused by Salmonella infection on Arabidopsis. The algorithm is designed to attribute image pixels into one of the two classes: healthy and unhealthy. The task is solved in three steps. First, we perform segmentation to divide the image into foreground and background. In the second step, a support vector machine (SVM) is applied to predict the class of each pixel belonging to the foreground. And finally, we do refinement by a neighborhood-check in order to omit all falsely classified pixels from the second step. The developed algorithm was tested on infection with the non-pathogenic E. coli and the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and used to study the interaction between plants and Salmonella wild type and T3SS mutants. We proved that T3SS mutants of Salmonella are unable to suppress the plant defenses. Results obtained through the automatic analyses were further verified on biochemical and transcriptome levels. This report presents an automatic pixel-based classification method for detecting "unhealthy" regions in leaf images. The proposed method was compared to existing method and showed a higher accuracy. We used this algorithm to study the impact of the human pathogenic bacterium Salmonella Typhimurium on plants immune system. The comparison between wild type bacteria and T3SS mutants showed similarity in the infection process in animals and in plants. Plant epidemiology is only one possible application of the proposed algorithm, it can be easily extended to other detection tasks, which also rely on color information, or even extended to other features.

  6. Archaeal CRISPR-based immune systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garrett, Roger A; Vestergaard, Gisle Alberg; Shah, Shiraz Ali

    2011-01-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-based immune systems are essentially modular with three primary functions: the excision and integration of new spacers, the processing of CRISPR transcripts to yield mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs), and the targeting and cleavage...... of foreign nucleic acid. The primary target appears to be the DNA of foreign genetic elements, but the CRISPR/Cmr system that is widespread amongst archaea also specifically targets and cleaves RNA in vitro. The archaeal CRISPR systems tend to be both diverse and complex. Here we examine evidence...... of CRISPR loci and the evidence for intergenomic exchange of CRISPR systems....

  7. Serratia marcescens suppresses host cellular immunity via the production of an adhesion-inhibitory factor against immunosurveillance cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2014-02-28

    Injection of a culture supernatant of Serratia marcescens into the bloodstream of the silkworm Bombyx mori increased the number of freely circulating immunosurveillance cells (hemocytes). Using a bioassay with live silkworms, serralysin metalloprotease was purified from the culture supernatant and identified as the factor responsible for this activity. Serralysin inhibited the in vitro attachment of both silkworm hemocytes and murine peritoneal macrophages. Incubation of silkworm hemocytes or murine macrophages with serralysin resulted in degradation of the cellular immune factor BmSPH-1 or calreticulin, respectively. Furthermore, serralysin suppressed in vitro phagocytosis of bacteria by hemocytes and in vivo bacterial clearance in silkworms. Disruption of the ser gene in S. marcescens attenuated its host killing ability in silkworms and mice. These findings suggest that serralysin metalloprotease secreted by S. marcescens suppresses cellular immunity by decreasing the adhesive properties of immunosurveillance cells, thereby contributing to bacterial pathogenesis.

  8. Serratia marcescens Suppresses Host Cellular Immunity via the Production of an Adhesion-inhibitory Factor against Immunosurveillance Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Injection of a culture supernatant of Serratia marcescens into the bloodstream of the silkworm Bombyx mori increased the number of freely circulating immunosurveillance cells (hemocytes). Using a bioassay with live silkworms, serralysin metalloprotease was purified from the culture supernatant and identified as the factor responsible for this activity. Serralysin inhibited the in vitro attachment of both silkworm hemocytes and murine peritoneal macrophages. Incubation of silkworm hemocytes or murine macrophages with serralysin resulted in degradation of the cellular immune factor BmSPH-1 or calreticulin, respectively. Furthermore, serralysin suppressed in vitro phagocytosis of bacteria by hemocytes and in vivo bacterial clearance in silkworms. Disruption of the ser gene in S. marcescens attenuated its host killing ability in silkworms and mice. These findings suggest that serralysin metalloprotease secreted by S. marcescens suppresses cellular immunity by decreasing the adhesive properties of immunosurveillance cells, thereby contributing to bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:24398686

  9. CAREM 25: Suppression pool cooling and purification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlevaris, Rodolfo; Patrignani, Alberto; Vindrola, Carlos; Palmerio, Hector D.; Quiroz, Horacio; Ramilo, Lucia B.

    2000-01-01

    The suppression pool cooling and purification system has the following main functions: purify and cool water from the suppression pool, cool and send water to the residual heat extraction system, and transfer water to the fuel element transference channel. In case of Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), the system sends water from the suppression pool to the spray network, thus cooling and reducing pressure in the primary containment. The system has been designed in accordance with the requirements of the following standards: ANSI/ANS 52.1; ANSI/ANS 57.2; ANSI/ANS 56.2; ANSI/ANS 59.1; ANSI/ANS 58.3; ANSI/ANS 58.9; and ANSI/ANS 56.5. The design of the system fulfils all the assigned functions. (author)

  10. CAREM-25. Suppression Pool Cooling and Purification System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlevaris, Rodolfo; Palmerio, D.; Patrignani, A.; Quiroz, H.; Ramilo, L.; Vindrola, C.

    2000-01-01

    The Suppression Pool Cooling and Purification System has the following main functions: purify and cool water from the Suppression Pool, cool and send water to the Residual Heat Extraction System, and transfer water to the Fuel Element Transference Channel. In case of Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), the system sends water from the Suppression Pool to the spray network, thus cooling and reducing pressure in the primary containment.The system has been designed in accordance with the requirements of the following standards ANSI/ANS 52.1 [1], ANSI/ANS 57.2 [2], ANSI/ANS 56.2 [3], ANSI/ANS 59.1 [4] ANSI/ANS 58.3 [5], ANSI/ANS 58.9 [6], and ANSI/ANS 56.5 [7]. The design of the system fulfils all the assigned functions

  11. In immune defense: redefining the role of the immune system in chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinow, Katya B; Rubinow, David R

    2017-03-01

    The recognition of altered immune system function in many chronic disease states has proven to be a pivotal advance in biomedical research over the past decade. For many metabolic and mood disorders, this altered immune activity has been characterized as inflammation, with the attendant assumption that the immune response is aberrant. However, accumulating evidence challenges this assumption and suggests that the immune system may be mounting adaptive responses to chronic stressors. Further, the inordinate complexity of immune function renders a simplistic, binary model incapable of capturing critical mechanistic insights. In this perspective article, we propose alternative paradigms for understanding the role of the immune system in chronic disease. By invoking allostasis or systems biology rather than inflammation, we can ascribe greater functional significance to immune mediators, gain newfound appreciation of the adaptive facets of altered immune activity, and better avoid the potentially disastrous effects of translating erroneous assumptions into novel therapeutic strategies.

  12. [The interface between the immune system and autonomic nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakane, Shunya; Mukaino, Akihiro; Ando, Yukio

    2017-01-01

      The nervous system and the immune system are two major systems in human body. Although it was revealed these two systems correlated, the control of immune cell dynamics by the nervous system has come to draw a lot of attention at the present time. Recent advances in basic and preclinical science reveal that reflex neural circuits inhibit the production of cytokines and inflammation in several animal models. One well-characterized cytokine-inhibiting mechanism, termed the "inflammatory reflex", is dependent upon vagus nerve stimulation that inhibits cytokine production and attenuates the inflammation. And the mechanism for controlling lymphocyte trafficking becomes clear, and molecular basis of immune regulation by the nervous system was reported. On the other hand, the nervous system is protected from the invasion of harmful agents by the barrier. However, there are neuroimmunological disorders, which is associated with autoimmunity, tumor immunity, and infection immunity. Autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG) is an acquired immune-mediated disorder that leads to widespread autonomic manifestations, in which autoantibodies to ganglionic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors play a central role. Previously, we elucidated the prevalence of extra-autonomic manifestations in patients with AAG. It is necessary to establish the new systems for the detection of autoantibodies to other subunits of acetylcholine receptor.

  13. Leptin as immune mediator: Interaction between neuroendocrine and immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procaccini, Claudio; La Rocca, Claudia; Carbone, Fortunata; De Rosa, Veronica; Galgani, Mario; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone/cytokine that links nutritional status with neuroendocrine and immune functions. Initially described as an anti-obesity hormone, leptin has subsequently been shown to exert pleiotropic effects, being also able to influence haematopoiesis, thermogenesis, reproduction, angiogenesis, and more importantly immune homeostasis. As a cytokine, leptin can affect both innate and adaptive immunity, by inducing a pro-inflammatory response and thus playing a key role in the regulation of the pathogenesis of several autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances on the role of leptin as immune-modulator in mammals and we also provide an overview on its main functions in non-mammalian vertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Disease susceptibiliy in the zig-zag model of host-microbe Interactions: only a consequence of immune suppression?

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Harald; Boyer, Laurent; Abad, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    For almost ten years, the Zig-Zag model has provided a convenient framework for explaining the molecular bases of compatibility and incompatibility in plant-microbe interactions (Jones and Dangl, 2006). According to the Zig-Zag model, disease susceptibility is a consequence of the suppression of host immunity during the evolutionary arms race between plants and pathogens. The Zig-Zag model thus fits well with biotrophic interactions, but is less applicable to interactions involving pathogens ...

  15. Venom allergen-like proteins in secretions of plant-parasitic nematodes activate and suppress extracellular plant immune receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano Torres, J.L.

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic worms threaten human, animal and plant health by infecting people, livestock and crops worldwide. Animals and plants share an anciently evolved innate immune system. Parasites modulate this immune system by secreting proteins to maintain their parasitic lifestyle. This thesis

  16. Venom allergen-like proteins in secretions of plant-parasitic nematodes activate and suppress extracellular plant immune receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano Torres, J.L.

    2014-01-01

      Parasitic worms threaten human, animal and plant health by infecting people, livestock and crops worldwide. Animals and plants share an anciently evolved innate immune system. Parasites modulate this immune system by secreting proteins to maintain their parasitic lifestyle. This thesis

  17. Targeting of Immune Cells by Dual TLR2/7 Ligands Suppresses Features of Allergic Th2 Immune Responses in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Laiño

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. TLR ligands can promote Th1-biased immune responses, mimicking potent stimuli of viruses and bacteria. Aim. To investigate the adjuvant properties of dual TLR2/7 ligands compared to those of the mixture of both single ligands. Methods. Dual TLR2/7 ligands: CL401, CL413, and CL531, including CL264 (TLR7-ligand and Pam2CysK4 (TLR2-ligand, were used. Immune-modulatory capacity of the dual ligands with the individual ligands alone or as a mixture in mouse BMmDCs, BMmDC:TC cocultures, or BMCMCs was compared and assessed in naïve mice and in a mouse model of OVA-induced intestinal allergy. Results. CL413 and CL531 induced BMmDC-derived IL-10 secretion, suppressed rOVA-induced IL-5 secretion from OVA-specific DO11.10 CD4+ TCs, and induced proinflammatory cytokine secretion in vivo. In contrast, CL401 induced considerably less IL-10 secretion and led to IL-17A production in BMmDC:TC cocultures, but not BMCMC IL-6 secretion, or IL-6 or TNF-α production in vivo. No immune-modulating effects were observed with single ligands. All dual TLR2/7 ligands suppressed DNP-induced IgE-and-Ag-specific mast cell degranulation. Compared to vaccination with OVA, vaccination with the mixture CL531 and OVA, significantly suppressed OVA-specific IgE production in the intestinal allergy model. Conclusions. Based on beneficial immune-modulating properties, CL413 and CL531 may have utility as potential adjuvants for allergy treatment.

  18. Distributed Computation Environment Protection Based on Artificial Immune System Usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Andreevich Krasnopevtsev

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to a new approach to Grid-network protection against malware, based on artificial immune system usage. In the article possible Grid-network attacks, immune system coordinator architecture, immune system modules architecture, Grid-network system protection architecture are described.

  19. New Concepts in Immunity to Neisseria Gonorrhoeae: Innate Responses and Suppression of Adaptive Immunity Favor the Pathogen, Not the Host

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yingru; Feinen, Brandon; Russell, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that gonorrhea can be acquired repeatedly with no apparent development of protective immunity arising from previous episodes of infection. Symptomatic infection is characterized by a purulent exudate, but the host response mechanisms are poorly understood. While the remarkable antigenic variability displayed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae and its capacity to inhibit complement activation allow it to evade destruction by the host’s immune defenses, we propose that it also has the ...

  20. Immune Suppressive Effects of Tonsil-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Mouse Bone-Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minhwa Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are considered valuable sources for cell therapy because of their immune regulatory function. Here, we investigated the effects of tonsil-derived MSCs (T-MSCs on the differentiation, maturation, and function of dendritic cells (DCs. We examined the effect of T-MSCs on differentiation and maturation of bone-marrow- (BM- derived monocytes into DCs and we found suppressive effect of T-MSCs on DCs via direct contact as well as soluble mediators. Moreover, T cell proliferation, normally increased in the presence of DCs, was inhibited by T-MSCs. Differentiation of CD4+ T cell subsets by the DC-T cell interaction also was inhibited by T-MSCs. The soluble mediators suppressed by T-MSCs were granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, RANTES, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1. Taken together, T-MSCs exert immune modulatory function via suppression of the differentiation, maturation, and function of BM-derived DCs. Our data suggests that T-MSCs could be used as a novel source of stem cell therapy as immune modulators.

  1. Permanence of suppression of the primary immune response in rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri, sublethally exposed to tritiated water during embryognesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, J.A.; Fujihara, M.P.; Poston, T.M.; Abernethy, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    Previous experiments demonstrated that antibody synthesis in response to a challenge from the bacterium, Flexibacter columnaris, was significantly suppressed in juvenile (5 month) rainbow trout following exposure to tritium at doses as low as 4.0 rads when administered during the first 20 days of embryogenesis. In continuing studies, a secondary challenge to columnaris cells delivered to yearling (17 month) trout was used to test the hypothesis that early embryonic exposure to tritium irradiation (0, 0.04, 0.4, 4.0, and 40.0 rads) resulted in permanent injury to the primary immune process. Results indicated that under the prescribed experimental conditions, suppression of the primary immune response was permanent; that is, the degree of injury in yearling fish (17 months) equaled or exceeded that found in juvenile fish (5 months). At levels in the range of the maximum permissible concentration (MPC), tritium produced measurable, dose dependent, and irreversible suppression of immune capacity in affected fish. The threshold-free and exponential nature of the dose-response curve suggests extrapolation of effects to even lower exposures. (author)

  2. The immune system strikes back: cellular immune responses against indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Baek; Berge-Hansen, Linda; Junker, Niels

    2009-01-01

    of the major immune suppressive cell populations. CONCLUSION: IDO may serve as an important and widely applicable target for anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies. Furthermore, as emerging evidence suggests that IDO constitutes a significant counter-regulatory mechanism induced by pro-inflammatory signals...

  3. Medications that Weaken Your Immune System and Fungal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Medications that Weaken Your Immune System and Fungal Infections Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... They are most common among people with weak immune systems. People with certain health conditions may need to ...

  4. Analysis of Globodera rostochiensis effectors reveals conserved functions of SPRYSEC proteins in suppressing and eliciting plant immune responses

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Shawkat

    2015-08-11

    Potato cyst nematodes (PCNs), including Globodera rostochiensis (Woll.), are important pests of potato. Plant parasitic nematodes produce multiple effector proteins, secreted from their stylets, to successfully infect their hosts. These include proteins delivered to the apoplast and to the host cytoplasm. A number of effectors from G. rostochiensis predicted to be delivered to the host cytoplasm have been identified, including several belonging to the secreted SPRY domain (SPRYSEC) family. SPRYSEC proteins are unique to members of the genus Globodera and have been implicated in both the induction and the repression of host defense responses. We have tested the properties of six different G. rostochiensis SPRYSEC proteins by expressing them in Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabacum. We have found that all SPRYSEC proteins tested are able to suppress defense responses induced by NB-LRR proteins as well as cell death induced by elicitors, suggesting that defense repression is a common characteristic of members of this effector protein family. At the same time, GrSPRYSEC-15 elicited a defense responses in N. tabacum, which was found to be resistant to a virus expressing GrSPRYSEC-15. These results suggest that SPRYSEC proteins may possess characteristics that allow them to be recognized by the plant immune system.

  5. Recovery of the immune system after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peake, Jonathan M; Neubauer, Oliver; Walsh, Neil P; Simpson, Richard J

    2017-05-01

    The notion that prolonged, intense exercise causes an "open window" of immunodepression during recovery after exercise is well accepted. Repeated exercise bouts or intensified training without sufficient recovery may increase the risk of illness. However, except for salivary IgA, clear and consistent markers of this immunodepression remain elusive. Exercise increases circulating neutrophil and monocyte counts and reduces circulating lymphocyte count during recovery. This lymphopenia results from preferential egress of lymphocyte subtypes with potent effector functions [e.g., natural killer (NK) cells, γδ T cells, and CD8 + T cells]. These lymphocytes most likely translocate to peripheral sites of potential antigen encounter (e.g., lungs and gut). This redeployment of effector lymphocytes is an integral part of the physiological stress response to exercise. Current knowledge about changes in immune function during recovery from exercise is derived from assessment at the cell population level of isolated cells ex vivo or in blood. This assessment can be biased by large changes in the distribution of immune cells between blood and peripheral tissues during and after exercise. Some evidence suggests that reduced immune cell function in vitro may coincide with changes in vivo and rates of illness after exercise, but more work is required to substantiate this notion. Among the various nutritional strategies and physical therapies that athletes use to recover from exercise, carbohydrate supplementation is the most effective for minimizing immune disturbances during exercise recovery. Sleep is an important aspect of recovery, but more research is needed to determine how sleep disruption influences the immune system of athletes. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  6. A Small Cysteine-Rich Protein from the Asian Soybean Rust Fungus, Phakopsora pachyrhizi, Suppresses Plant Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingsheng Qi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Asian soybean rust fungus, Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is an obligate biotrophic pathogen causing severe soybean disease epidemics. Molecular mechanisms by which P. pachyrhizi and other rust fungi interact with their host plants are poorly understood. The genomes of all rust fungi encode many small, secreted cysteine-rich proteins (SSCRP. While these proteins are thought to function within the host, their roles are completely unknown. Here, we present the characterization of P. pachyrhizi effector candidate 23 (PpEC23, a SSCRP that we show to suppress plant immunity. Furthermore, we show that PpEC23 interacts with soybean transcription factor GmSPL12l and that soybean plants in which GmSPL12l is silenced have constitutively active immunity, thereby identifying GmSPL12l as a negative regulator of soybean defenses. Collectively, our data present evidence for a virulence function of a rust SSCRP and suggest that PpEC23 is able to suppress soybean immune responses and physically interact with soybean transcription factor GmSPL12l, a negative immune regulator.

  7. A Small Cysteine-Rich Protein from the Asian Soybean Rust Fungus, Phakopsora pachyrhizi, Suppresses Plant Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Mingsheng; Link, Tobias I; Müller, Manuel; Hirschburger, Daniela; Pudake, Ramesh N; Pedley, Kerry F; Braun, Edward; Voegele, Ralf T; Baum, Thomas J; Whitham, Steven A

    2016-09-01

    The Asian soybean rust fungus, Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is an obligate biotrophic pathogen causing severe soybean disease epidemics. Molecular mechanisms by which P. pachyrhizi and other rust fungi interact with their host plants are poorly understood. The genomes of all rust fungi encode many small, secreted cysteine-rich proteins (SSCRP). While these proteins are thought to function within the host, their roles are completely unknown. Here, we present the characterization of P. pachyrhizi effector candidate 23 (PpEC23), a SSCRP that we show to suppress plant immunity. Furthermore, we show that PpEC23 interacts with soybean transcription factor GmSPL12l and that soybean plants in which GmSPL12l is silenced have constitutively active immunity, thereby identifying GmSPL12l as a negative regulator of soybean defenses. Collectively, our data present evidence for a virulence function of a rust SSCRP and suggest that PpEC23 is able to suppress soybean immune responses and physically interact with soybean transcription factor GmSPL12l, a negative immune regulator.

  8. Possible Therapeutic Application of Targeting Type II Natural Killer T Cell-Mediated Suppression of Tumor Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shingo; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Terabe, Masaki

    2018-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique T cell subset that exhibits characteristics from both the innate immune cells and T cells. There are at least two subsets of NKT cells, type I and type II. These two subsets of NKT cells have opposite functions in antitumor immunity. Type I NKT cells usually enhance and type II NKT cells suppress antitumor immunity. In addition, these two subsets of NKT cells cross-regulate each other. In this review, we mainly focus on immunosuppressive NKT cells, type II NKT cells. After summarizing their definition, experimental tools to study them, and subsets of them, we will discuss possible therapeutic applications of type II NKT cell pathway targeted therapies. PMID:29520281

  9. Exploring the Homeostatic and Sensory Roles of the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Rafael Elias; Marques, Pedro Elias; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2016-01-01

    Immunology developed under the notion of the immune system exists to fight pathogens. Recently, the discovery of interactions with commensal microbiota that are essential to human health initiated a change in this old paradigm. Here, we argue that the immune system has major physiological roles extending far beyond defending the host. Immune and inflammatory responses share the core property of sensing, defining the immune system also as a sensory system. The inference with the immune system collects, interprets, and stores information, while creating an identity of self, places it in close relationship to the nervous system, which suggests that these systems may have a profound evolutionary connection.

  10. Integration of the immune system: a complex adaptive supersystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisman, Mark V.

    2001-10-01

    Immunity to pathogenic organisms is a complex process involving interacting factors within the immune system including circulating cells, tissues and soluble chemical mediators. Both the efficiency and adaptive responses of the immune system in a dynamic, often hostile, environment are essential for maintaining our health and homeostasis. This paper will present a brief review of one of nature's most elegant, complex adaptive systems.

  11. The deconvolution of complex spectra by artificial immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiakhmetova, D. I.; Sibgatullin, M. E.; Galimullin, D. Z.; Kamalova, D. I.

    2017-11-01

    An application of the artificial immune system method for decomposition of complex spectra is presented. The results of decomposition of the model contour consisting of three components, Gaussian contours, are demonstrated. The method of artificial immune system is an optimization method, which is based on the behaviour of the immune system and refers to modern methods of search for the engine optimization.

  12. Systemic activation of the immune system in HIV infection: The role of the immune complexes (hypothesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolevskaya, Larisa B; Shmagel, Konstantin V; Shmagel, Nadezhda G; Saidakova, Evgeniya V

    2016-03-01

    Currently, immune activation is proven to be the basis for the HIV infection pathogenesis and a strong predictor of the disease progression. Among the causes of systemic immune activation the virus and its products, related infectious agents, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and regulatory CD4+ T cells' decrease are considered. Recently microbial translocation (bacterial products yield into the bloodstream as a result of the gastrointestinal tract mucosal barrier integrity damage) became the most popular hypothesis. Previously, we have found an association between immune complexes present in the bloodstream of HIV infected patients and the T cell activation. On this basis, we propose a significantly modified hypothesis of immune activation in HIV infection. It is based on the immune complexes' participation in the immunocompetent cells' activation. Immune complexes are continuously formed in the chronic phase of the infection. Together with TLR-ligands (viral antigens, bacterial products coming from the damaged gut) present in the bloodstream they interact with macrophages. As a result macrophages are transformed into the type II activated forms. These macrophages block IL-12 production and start synthesizing IL-10. High level of this cytokine slows down the development of the full-scale Th1-response. The anti-viral reactions are shifted towards the serogenesis. Newly synthesized antibodies' binding to viral antigens leads to continuous formation of the immune complexes capable of interacting with antigen-presenting cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hidden Consequences of Living in a Wormy World : Nematode-Induced Immune Suppression Facilitates Tuberculosis Invasion in African Buffalo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezenwa, Vanessa O.; Etienne, Rampal S.; Luikart, Gordon; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Jolles, Anna E.

    2010-01-01

    Most hosts are infected with multiple parasites, and responses of the immune system to co occurring parasites may influence disease spread. Helminth infection can bias the host immune response toward a T-helper type 2 Th2) over a type 1 Th1) response, impairing the host's ability to control

  14. Immune Suppression in Tumors as a Surmountable Obstacle to Clinical Efficacy of Cancer Vaccines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieërs, Grégoire; Demotte, Nathalie; Godelaine, Danièle; Bruggen, Pierre van der, E-mail: pierre.vanderbruggen@bru.licr.org [Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research and Université catholique de Louvain, de Duve Institute, 74 av. Hippocrate, P.O. Box B1-7403, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2011-07-18

    Human tumors are usually not spontaneously eliminated by the immune system and therapeutic vaccination of cancer patients with defined antigens is followed by tumor regressions only in a small minority of the patients. The poor vaccination effectiveness could be explained by an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Because T cells that infiltrate tumor metastases have an impaired ability to lyse target cells or to secrete cytokine, many researchers are trying to decipher the underlying immunosuppressive mechanisms. We will review these here, in particular those considered as potential therapeutic targets. A special attention will be given to galectins, a family of carbohydrate binding proteins. These lectins have often been implicated in inflammation and cancer and may be useful targets for the development of new anti-cancer therapies.

  15. Immune Suppression in Tumors as a Surmountable Obstacle to Clinical Efficacy of Cancer Vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieërs, Grégoire; Demotte, Nathalie; Godelaine, Danièle; Bruggen, Pierre van der

    2011-01-01

    Human tumors are usually not spontaneously eliminated by the immune system and therapeutic vaccination of cancer patients with defined antigens is followed by tumor regressions only in a small minority of the patients. The poor vaccination effectiveness could be explained by an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Because T cells that infiltrate tumor metastases have an impaired ability to lyse target cells or to secrete cytokine, many researchers are trying to decipher the underlying immunosuppressive mechanisms. We will review these here, in particular those considered as potential therapeutic targets. A special attention will be given to galectins, a family of carbohydrate binding proteins. These lectins have often been implicated in inflammation and cancer and may be useful targets for the development of new anti-cancer therapies

  16. The mucosal immune system: From dentistry to vaccine development

    OpenAIRE

    KIYONO, Hiroshi; AZEGAMI, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is the beginning of the aero-digestive tract, which is covered by mucosal epithelium continuously under the threat of invasion of pathogens, it is thus protected by the mucosal immune system. In the early phase of our scientific efforts for the demonstration of mucosal immune system, dental science was one of major driving forces due to their foreseeability to use oral immunity for the control of oral diseases. The mucosal immune system is divided functionally into, but interc...

  17. Immune system and melanoma biology: a balance between immunosurveillance and immune escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarelli, Anna; Mannavola, Francesco; Stucci, Luigia Stefania; Tucci, Marco; Silvestris, Francesco

    2017-12-01

    Melanoma is one of the most immunogenic tumors and its relationship with host immune system is currently under investigation. Many immunomodulatory mechanisms, favoring melanomagenesis and progression, have been described to interfere with the disablement of melanoma recognition and attack by immune cells resulting in immune resistance and immunosuppression. This knowledge produced therapeutic advantages, such as immunotherapy, aiming to overcome the immune evasion. Here, we review the current advances in cancer immunoediting and focus on melanoma immunology, which involves a dynamic interplay between melanoma and immune system, as well as on effects of "targeted therapies" on tumor microenvironment for combination strategies.

  18. Network intrusion detection by the coevolutionary immune algorithm of artificial immune systems with clonal selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamatova, T.; Zhukov, V.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the application of the artificial immune systems apparatus as a heuristic method of network intrusion detection for algorithmic provision of intrusion detection systems. The coevolutionary immune algorithm of artificial immune systems with clonal selection was elaborated. In testing different datasets the empirical results of evaluation of the algorithm effectiveness were achieved. To identify the degree of efficiency the algorithm was compared with analogs. The fundamental rules based of solutions generated by this algorithm are described in the article.

  19. Next Generation Active Buffet Suppression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, Stephen C.; Ryall, Thomas G.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Moses, Robert W.; White, Edward V.; Zimcik, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon that is common to high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. These loads result in significant random stresses, which may cause fatigue damage leading to restricted capabilities and availability of the aircraft. This paper describes an international collaborative research activity among Australia, Canada and the United States involving the use of active structural control to alleviate the damaging structural response to these loads. The research program is being co-ordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and is being conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperative Program (TTCP). This truly unique collaborative program has been developed to enable each participating country to contribute resources toward a program that coalesces a broad range of technical knowledge and expertise into a single investigation. This collaborative program is directed toward a full-scale test of an F/A-18 empennage, which is an extension of an earlier initial test. The current program aims at applying advanced directional piezoactuators, the aircraft rudder, switch mode amplifiers and advanced control strategies on a full-scale structure to demonstrate the enhanced performance and capability of the advanced active BLA control system in preparation for a flight test demonstration.

  20. Memorizing innate instructions requires a sufficiently specific adaptive immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghans, J.A.M.; Boer, R.J. de

    2002-01-01

    During its primary encounter with a pathogen, the immune system has to decide which type of immune response is most appropriate. Based on signals from the innate immune system and the immunological context in which the pathogen is presented, responding lymphocytes will adopt a particular phenotype,

  1. Functional aspects of the adaptive immune system in arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, D.T.S.L.

    2017-01-01

    The adaptive immune system is the part of the immune system that is highly specific and generates memory resulting in a fast and specific immune response upon a second infection with the same pathogen. However, when this response is specific for a part of the body itself instead of a pathogen,

  2. IMMUNE SYSTEM MATURITY AND SENSITIVITY TO CHEMICAL EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is well established that human diseases associated with abnormal immune function, including some common infectious diseases and asthma, are considerably more prevalent at younger ages. The immune system continues to mature after birth, and functional immaturity accounts for m...

  3. Suppression of the primary immune response in rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri, sublethally exposed to tritiated water during embryogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Antibody synthesis in response to vaccination with a 0.1 cc (1.8 x 10 8 cells/cc) intraperitoneally injected heat-killed strain of Flexibacter columnaris was employed to investigate the effect of tritium irradiation (0, 0.04, 0.4, 4.0 and 40.0 rads total dose for 20 days during embryogenesis) on development of the primary immune response in 5-month rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri. Total serum protein measurements and electrophoretic separation of blood serum proteins followed by densitometric analyses were performed to assess the potential for qualitative and quantitative changes in blood serum components which conceivably accounted for suppressed immune responsiveness in tritium-irradiated fish. Data on the biological effects of tritium on early life stages in terms of hatchability, abnormality, latent mortality, and growth were also collected. A review of all experiments directed at determining the effects of early radiation exposure on the parameters of hatchability, incidence of abnormality, latent mortality and depressed growth, revealed considerable variation among similar treatments and indicated that significant effects at dose levels of 50 rads and below were not consistently demonstrated. While present experimental results demonstrated that the primary immune response in juvenile rainbow trout was significantly suppressed following embryonic exposure to tritium at essentially the 1.0 μCi/ml level, and perhaps at the 0.1 μCi/ml level, these concentrations are no less than 5 to 6 orders of magnitude above present levels for tritium in the aquatic environment

  4. Scaling of Adaptive Immune System Repertoires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethna, Zachary; Elhanati, Yuval; Callan, Curtis

    The adaptive immune system has evolved a stochastic method called VDJ recombination for the purpose of generating the necessary receptor diversity to identify all foreign pathogens. Recent work characterizing the probability distributions of this VDJ recombination process in mouse and human T-cell repertoires shows a massive difference in the corresponding diversities. The increased diversity of the human repertoire is wholly driven by an increase in the average number of nucleotide insertions in VDJ recombination. In this talk the impact of different insertion profiles is quantified and a model for the scaling of such repertoires with respect to the size of the repertoire is laid out.

  5. Immuno-epidemiology of a population structured by immune status: a mathematical study of waning immunity and immune system boosting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarossa, M V; Röst, G

    2015-12-01

    When the body gets infected by a pathogen the immune system develops pathogen-specific immunity. Induced immunity decays in time and years after recovery the host might become susceptible again. Exposure to the pathogen in the environment boosts the immune system thus prolonging the time in which a recovered individual is immune. Such an interplay of within host processes and population dynamics poses significant challenges in rigorous mathematical modeling of immuno-epidemiology. We propose a framework to model SIRS dynamics, monitoring the immune status of individuals and including both waning immunity and immune system boosting. Our model is formulated as a system of two ordinary differential equations (ODEs) coupled with a PDE. After showing existence and uniqueness of a classical solution, we investigate the local and the global asymptotic stability of the unique disease-free stationary solution. Under particular assumptions on the general model, we can recover known examples such as large systems of ODEs for SIRWS dynamics, as well as SIRS with constant delay.

  6. Suppression of Innate Immune Response by Primary Human Keratinocytes Expressing HPV-16 E6 and E7

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guess, Jennifer L

    2005-01-01

    Human papillomavims (HPV) types infect the skin and mucosal epithelium. Lesions resulting from HPV infection can linger for months or years suggesting that HPV - presence goes unnoticed by the host immune system...

  7. Indian Hedgehog Suppresses a Stromal Cell–Driven Intestinal Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Florien Westendorp

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: We show that epithelium-derived Indian Hedgehog signals exclusively to fibroblasts in the intestine. Loss of Ihh leads to a rapid immune response with up-regulation of fibroblast-derived CXCL12, and migration of immune cells into the lamina propria.

  8. Measuring the immune system: a comprehensive approach for the analysis of immune functions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Maren; Dychus, Nicole; Ebel, Melanie; Damaschke, Jürgen; Maydych, Viktoriya; Wolf, Oliver T; Kleinsorge, Thomas; Watzl, Carsten

    2016-10-01

    The immune system is essential to provide protection from infections and cancer. Disturbances in immune function can therefore directly affect the health of the affected individual. Many extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as exposure to chemicals, stress, nutrition and age have been reported to influence the immune system. These influences can affect various components of the immune system, and we are just beginning to understand the causalities of these changes. To investigate such disturbances, it is therefore essential to analyze the different components of the immune system in a comprehensive fashion. Here, we demonstrate such an approach which provides information about total number of leukocytes, detailed quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of lymphocyte subsets, cytokine levels in serum and functional properties of T cells, NK cells and monocytes. Using samples from a cohort of 24 healthy volunteers, we demonstrate the feasibility of our approach to detect changes in immune functions.

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation on the immune system with special emphasis on the interaction of dendritic and T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manda, Katrin; Glasow, Annegret; Paape, Daniel; Hildebrandt, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), as professional antigen-presenting cells, are members of the innate immune system and function as key players during the induction phase of adaptive immune responses. Uptake, processing, and presentation of antigens direct the outcome toward either tolerance or immunity. The cells of the immune system are among the most highly radiosensitive cells in the body. For high doses of ionizing radiation (HD-IR) both immune-suppressive effects after whole body irradiation and possible immune activation during tumor therapy were observed. On the other hand, the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation (LD-IR) on the immune system are controversial and seem to show high variability among different individuals and species. There are reports revealing that protracted LD-IR can result in radioresistance. But immune-suppressive effects of chronic LD-IR are also reported, including the killing or sensitizing of certain cell types. This article shall review the current knowledge of radiation-induced effects on the immune system, paying special attention to the interaction of DCs and T cells.

  10. The role of the immune system in kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecklenborg, J; Clayton, D; Siebert, S; Coley, S M

    2018-05-01

    The immune system and the kidneys are closely linked. In health the kidneys contribute to immune homeostasis, while components of the immune system mediate many acute forms of renal disease and play a central role in progression of chronic kidney disease. A dysregulated immune system can have either direct or indirect renal effects. Direct immune-mediated kidney diseases are usually a consequence of autoantibodies directed against a constituent renal antigen, such as collagen IV in anti-glomerular basement membrane disease. Indirect immune-mediated renal disease often follows systemic autoimmunity with immune complex formation, but can also be due to uncontrolled activation of the complement pathways. Although the range of mechanisms of immune dysregulation leading to renal disease is broad, the pathways leading to injury are similar. Loss of immune homeostasis in renal disease results in perpetual immune cell recruitment and worsening damage to the kidney. Uncoordinated attempts at tissue repair, after immune-mediated disease or non-immune mediated injury, result in fibrosis of structures important for renal function, leading eventually to kidney failure. As renal disease often manifests clinically only when substantial damage has already occurred, new diagnostic methods and indeed treatments must be identified to inhibit further progression and promote appropriate tissue repair. Studying cases in which immune homeostasis is re-established may reveal new treatment possibilities. © 2018 British Society for Immunology.

  11. [The role of the innate immune system in atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, T; Kaesler, S; Skabytska, Y; Biedermann, T

    2015-02-01

    The mechanisms how the innate immune system detects microbes and mounts a rapid immune response have been more and more elucidated in the past years. Subsequently it has been shown that innate immunity also shapes adaptive immune responses and determines their quality that can be either inflammatory or tolerogenic. As atopic dermatitis is characterized by disturbances of innate and adaptive immune responses, colonization with pathogens and defects in skin barrier function, insight into mechanisms of innate immunity has helped to understand the vicious circle of ongoing skin inflammation seen in atopic dermatitis patients. Elucidating general mechanisms of the innate immune system and its functions in atopic dermatitis paves the way for developing new therapies. Especially the novel insights into the human microbiome and potential functional consequences make the innate immune system a very fundamental and promising target. As a result atopic dermatitis manifestations can be attenuated or even resolved. These currently developed strategies will be introduced in the current review.

  12. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Suppresses Innate Immune Responses via a Ubiquitin and ISG15 Specific Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florine E.M. Scholte

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral responses are regulated by conjugation of ubiquitin (Ub and interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15 to proteins. Certain classes of viruses encode Ub- or ISG15-specific proteases belonging to the ovarian tumor (OTU superfamily. Their activity is thought to suppress cellular immune responses, but studies demonstrating the function of viral OTU proteases during infection are lacking. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV, family Nairoviridae is a highly pathogenic human virus that encodes an OTU with both deubiquitinase and deISGylase activity as part of the viral RNA polymerase. We investigated CCHFV OTU function by inactivating protease catalytic activity or by selectively disrupting its deubiquitinase and deISGylase activity using reverse genetics. CCHFV OTU inactivation blocked viral replication independently of its RNA polymerase activity, while deubiquitinase activity proved critical for suppressing the interferon responses. Our findings provide insights into viral OTU functions and support the development of therapeutics and vaccines.

  13. Multithreshold Segmentation Based on Artificial Immune Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Cuevas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bio-inspired computing has lately demonstrated its usefulness with remarkable contributions to shape detection, optimization, and classification in pattern recognition. Similarly, multithreshold selection has become a critical step for image analysis and computer vision sparking considerable efforts to design an optimal multi-threshold estimator. This paper presents an algorithm for multi-threshold segmentation which is based on the artificial immune systems(AIS technique, also known as theclonal selection algorithm (CSA. It follows the clonal selection principle (CSP from the human immune system which basically generates a response according to the relationship between antigens (Ag, that is, patterns to be recognized and antibodies (Ab, that is, possible solutions. In our approach, the 1D histogram of one image is approximated through a Gaussian mixture model whose parameters are calculated through CSA. Each Gaussian function represents a pixel class and therefore a thresholding point. Unlike the expectation-maximization (EM algorithm, the CSA-based method shows a fast convergence and a low sensitivity to initial conditions. Remarkably, it also improves complex time-consuming computations commonly required by gradient-based methods. Experimental evidence demonstrates a successful automatic multi-threshold selection based on CSA, comparing its performance to the aforementioned well-known algorithms.

  14. The Pseudomonas syringae type III effector HopF2 suppresses Arabidopsis stomatal immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenden Hurley

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae subverts plant immune signalling through injection of type III secreted effectors (T3SE into host cells. The T3SE HopF2 can disable Arabidopsis immunity through Its ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Proteomic analysis of HopF2 interacting proteins identified a protein complex containing ATPases required for regulating stomatal aperture, suggesting HopF2 may manipulate stomatal immunity. Here we report HopF2 can inhibit stomatal immunity independent of its ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Transgenic expression of HopF2 in Arabidopsis inhibits stomatal closing in response to P. syringae and increases the virulence of surface inoculated P. syringae. Further, transgenic expression of HopF2 inhibits flg22 induced reactive oxygen species production. Intriguingly, ADP-ribosyltransferase activity is dispensable for inhibiting stomatal immunity and flg22 induced reactive oxygen species. Together, this implies HopF2 may be a bifunctional T3SE with ADP-ribosyltransferase activity required for inhibiting apoplastic immunity and an independent function required to inhibit stomatal immunity.

  15. Olive oil and immune system functions: potential involvement in immunonutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez de Cienfuegos, Gerardo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Olive oil plays a crucial role as a main component of the Mediterranean diet, which has shown important benefits for the human health. According to the current knowledge, the administration of diets containing olive oil exerts some beneficial effects on the immune system functions due likely to the action of oleic acid rather than other substances contained in this fat. In the last few years, epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies have evidenced the potential of certain dietary lipids (containing polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fatty acids as modulators of immune system functions due to their ability to suppress several functions of immune system in both humans and animals. As a result, these fats have been applied in the reduction of symptoms from diseases characterized by an overactivation of the immune system (autoimmune diseases or in the reduction of cancer risk. Here, we review several relevant experimental and clinical data associated with the beneficial effects of olive oil upon the health, the mechanisms of action and the immune function susceptible of being be altered by the administration of dietary lipids and particularly of olive oil. In addition, we will also discuss the detrimental effects on the immune system functions caused by the administration of certain dietary lipids attributed mainly to a reduction of host natural resistance against infectious microorganisms as well as the involvement of olive oil diets in the regulation of immune resistance.El aceite de oliva tiene un papel crucial como componente de la dieta Mediterránea, con importantes beneficios sobre la salud humana. Dietas conteniendo aceite de oliva actúan de manera favorable en las funciones del sistema inmune por la acción sobretodo del ácido oleico. Los estudios epidemiológicos, clínicos y experimentales publicados en los últimos años demuestran que ciertos lípidos de la dieta [ácidos grasos monoinsaturados (MUFA y poliinsaturados (PUFA

  16. Role of Pathogen-Derived Cell Wall Carbohydrates and Prostaglandin E2 in Immune Response and Suppression of Fish Immunity by the Oomycete Saprolegnia parasitica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, Rodrigo; Wang, Tiehui; Duncan, Gary J.; Skaar, Ida; Mélida, Hugo; Bulone, Vincent; van West, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    Saprolegnia parasitica is a freshwater oomycete that is capable of infecting several species of fin fish. Saprolegniosis, the disease caused by this microbe, has a substantial impact on Atlantic salmon aquaculture. No sustainable treatment against saprolegniosis is available, and little is known regarding the host response. In this study, we examined the immune response of Atlantic salmon to S. parasitica infection and to its cell wall carbohydrates. Saprolegnia triggers a strong inflammatory response in its host (i.e., induction of interleukin-1β1 [IL-1β1], IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha), while severely suppressing the expression of genes associated with adaptive immunity in fish, through downregulation of T-helper cell cytokines, antigen presentation machinery, and immunoglobulins. Oomycete cell wall carbohydrates were recognized by fish leukocytes, triggering upregulation of genes involved in the inflammatory response, similar to what is observed during infection. Our data suggest that S. parasitica is capable of producing prostaglanding E2 (PGE2) in vitro, a metabolite not previously shown to be produced by oomycetes, and two proteins with homology to vertebrate enzymes known to play a role in prostaglandin biosynthesis have been identified in the oomycete genome. Exogenous PGE2 was shown to increase the inflammatory response in fish leukocytes incubated with cell wall carbohydrates while suppressing genes involved in cellular immunity (gamma interferon [IFN-γ] and the IFN-γ-inducible protein [γ-IP]). Inhibition of S. parasitica zoospore germination and mycelial growth by two cyclooxygenase inhibitors (aspirin and indomethacin) also suggests that prostaglandins may be involved in oomycete development. PMID:25114122

  17. Role of pathogen-derived cell wall carbohydrates and prostaglandin E2 in immune response and suppression of fish immunity by the oomycete Saprolegnia parasitica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, Rodrigo; Wang, Tiehui; Duncan, Gary J; Skaar, Ida; Mélida, Hugo; Bulone, Vincent; van West, Pieter; Secombes, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Saprolegnia parasitica is a freshwater oomycete that is capable of infecting several species of fin fish. Saprolegniosis, the disease caused by this microbe, has a substantial impact on Atlantic salmon aquaculture. No sustainable treatment against saprolegniosis is available, and little is known regarding the host response. In this study, we examined the immune response of Atlantic salmon to S. parasitica infection and to its cell wall carbohydrates. Saprolegnia triggers a strong inflammatory response in its host (i.e., induction of interleukin-1β1 [IL-1β1], IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha), while severely suppressing the expression of genes associated with adaptive immunity in fish, through downregulation of T-helper cell cytokines, antigen presentation machinery, and immunoglobulins. Oomycete cell wall carbohydrates were recognized by fish leukocytes, triggering upregulation of genes involved in the inflammatory response, similar to what is observed during infection. Our data suggest that S. parasitica is capable of producing prostaglandin [corrected] E2 (PGE2) in vitro, a metabolite not previously shown to be produced by oomycetes, and two proteins with homology to vertebrate enzymes known to play a role in prostaglandin biosynthesis have been identified in the oomycete genome. Exogenous PGE2 was shown to increase the inflammatory response in fish leukocytes incubated with cell wall carbohydrates while suppressing genes involved in cellular immunity (gamma interferon [IFN-γ] and the IFN-γ-inducible protein [γ-IP]). Inhibition of S. parasitica zoospore germination and mycelial growth by two cyclooxygenase inhibitors (aspirin and indomethacin) also suggests that prostaglandins may be involved in oomycete development. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Insecticidal activity of the metalloprotease AprA occurs through suppression of host cellular and humoral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Ah; Jang, Seong Han; Kim, Byung Hyun; Shibata, Toshio; Yoo, Jinwook; Jung, Yunjin; Kawabata, Shun-Ichiro; Lee, Bok Luel

    2018-04-01

    The biochemical characterization of virulence factors from entomopathogenic bacteria is important to understand entomopathogen-insect molecular interactions. Pseudomonas entomophila is a typical entomopathogenic bacterium that harbors virulence factors against several insects. However, the molecular actions of these factors against host innate immune responses are not clearly elucidated. In this study, we observed that bean bugs (Riptortus pedestris) that were injected with P. entomophila were highly susceptible to this bacterium. To determine how P. entomophila counteracts the host innate immunity to survive within the insect, we purified a highly enriched protein with potential host insect-killing activity from the culture supernatant of P. entomophila. Then, a 45-kDa protein was purified to homogeneity and identified as AprA which is an alkaline zinc metalloprotease of the genus Pseudomonas by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Purified AprA showed a pronounced killing effect against host insects and suppressed both host cellular and humoral innate immunity. Furthermore, to show that AprA is an important insecticidal protein of P. entomophila, we used an aprA-deficient P. entomophila mutant strain (ΔaprA). When ΔaprA mutant cells were injected to host insects, this mutant exhibited extremely attenuated virulence. In addition, the cytotoxicity against host hemocytes and the antimicrobial peptide-degrading ability of the ΔaprA mutant were greatly decreased. These findings suggest that AprA functions as an important insecticidal protein of P. entomophila via suppression of host cellular and humoral innate immune responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reciprocal Interactions of the Intestinal Microbiota and Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Craig L.; Elson, Charles O.; Hatton, Robin D.; Weaver, Casey T.

    2013-01-01

    Preface Emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates set the stage for evolution of an advanced symbiotic relationship with the intestinal microbiota. The defining features of specificity and memory that characterize adaptive immunity have afforded vertebrates mechanisms for efficiently tailoring immune responses to diverse types of microbes, whether to promote mutualism or host defense. These same attributes carry risk for immune-mediated diseases that are increasingly linked to the intestinal microbiota. Understanding how the adaptive immune system copes with the remarkable number and diversity of microbes that colonize the digestive tract, and how it integrates with more primitive innate immune mechanisms to maintain immune homeostasis, holds considerable promise for new approaches to modulate immune networks in order to treat and prevent disease. PMID:22972296

  20. The Immune System and Bodily Defence-How Does the Immune ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 1. The Immune System and Bodily Defence - How Does the Immune System Live With a Randomly Generated Repertoire? Vineeta Bal Satyajit Rath. Series Article Volume 3 Issue 1 January 1998 pp 15-20 ...

  1. Interactions of lactobacilli with the host immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to better understand the molecular mechanism of host res-ponses to probiotics. Probiotics can be used to stimulate or regulate immune responses in epithelial and immune cells of the intestinal mucosa and generate beneficial effects on the immune system. Carefully

  2. Immunizing digital systems against electromagnetic interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, P.D.; Korsah, K.; Antonescu, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of the technical basis for acceptance criteria applicable to the immunization of digital systems against electromagnetic interference (EMI). The work is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and stems from the safety-related issues that need to be addressed as a result of the application of digital instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants. Designers of digital circuits are incorporating increasingly higher clock frequencies and lower logic level voltages, thereby leading to potentially greater susceptibility of spurious interference being misinterpreted as legitimate logic. Development of the technical basis for acceptance criteria to apply to these digital systems centers around establishing good engineering practices to ensure that sufficient levels of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) are maintained between the nuclear power plant's electronic and electromechanical systems. First, good EMC design and installation practices are needed to control the emissions from interference sources and thereby their impact on other nearby circuits and systems. Second, a test and evaluation program is needed to outline the EMI tests to be performed, the associated test methods to be followed, and adequate test limits to ensure that the circuit or system under test meets the recommended guidelines. Test and evaluation should be followed by periodic maintenance to assess whether the recommended EMI control practices continue to be adhered to as part of the routine operation of the nuclear power plant. By following these steps, the probability of encountering safety-related instrumentation problems associated with EMI will be greatly reduced

  3. Epicutaneous immunization with protein antigen TNP-Ig and NOD2 ligand muramyl dipeptide (MDP) reverses skin-induced suppression of contact hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewska-Szczepanik, Monika; Dorożyńska, Iwona; Strzępa, Anna; Szczepanik, Marian

    2014-02-01

    Epicutaneous (EC) immunization offers a new method of a needle-free and self-administrable immunization by using a topically applied patch to deliver vaccine. We have previously shown that EC immunization with hapten-conjugated protein antigen TNP-Ig prior to hapten sensitization inhibits Th1-mediated contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in mice. Our further work showed that EC immunization with TNP-Ig and Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands prior to hapten sensitization reverses skin-induced suppression. Animal model of contact hypersensitivity was used to study reversal of skin-induced suppression. Current work showed that EC immunization with protein antigen TNP-Ig and MDP NOD2 agonist - muramyldipeptide (L isoform) reverses skin-induced suppression of CHS. On the other hand L18-MDP NOD2 agonist - muramyldipeptide with a C18 fatty acid chain and MDP control - negative control for MDP - muramyldipeptide (D isoform, inactive) did not reverse skin-induced suppression. "Transfer in" experiment showed that reversal of skin-induced suppression can be adoptively transferred with lymphoid cells isolated from donors EC treated with TNP-Ig and MDP NOD2 agonist. Moreover, experiment employing two non-cross-reacting antigens TNP-Ig and OX-Ig proved that reversal of skin-induced suppression is antigen specific. Additionally, lymph node cells isolated from mice EC immunized with TNP-Ig and MDP NOD2 agonist produced increased level of IFN-γ suggesting that this cytokine might be involved in reversal of skin-induced suppression. This work shows that EC immunization with protein antigen plus NOD2 ligand MDP may be a potential tool to increase the immunogenicity of weekly immunogenic antigens. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  4. Endocrine and Local IGF-I in the Bony Fish Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Anne-Constance; Faass, Oliver; Köllner, Bernd; Shved, Natallia; Link, Karl; Casanova, Ayako; Wenger, Michael; D'Cotta, Helena; Baroiller, Jean-François; Ullrich, Oliver; Reinecke, Manfred; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2016-01-26

    A role for GH and IGF-I in the modulation of the immune system has been under discussion for decades. Generally, GH is considered a stimulator of innate immune parameters in mammals and teleost fish. The stimulatory effects in humans as well as in bony fish often appear to be correlated with elevated endocrine IGF-I (liver-derived), which has also been shown to be suppressed during infection in some studies. Nevertheless, data are still fragmentary. Some studies point to an important role of GH and IGF-I particularly during immune organ development and constitution. Even less is known about the potential relevance of local (autocrine/paracrine) IGF-I within adult and developing immune organs, and the distinct localization of IGF-I in immune cells and tissues of mammals and fish has not been systematically defined. Thus far, IGF-I has been localized in different mammalian immune cell types, particularly macrophages and granulocytes, and in supporting cells, but not in T-lymphocytes. In the present study, we detected IGF-I in phagocytic cells isolated from rainbow trout head kidney and, in contrast to some findings in mammals, in T-cells of a channel catfish cell line. Thus, although numerous analogies among mammals and teleosts exist not only for the GH/IGF-system, but also for the immune system, there are differences that should be further investigated. For instance, it is unclear whether the primarily reported role of GH/IGF-I in the innate immune response is due to the lack of studies focusing on the adaptive immune system, or whether it truly preferentially concerns innate immune parameters. Infectious challenges in combination with GH/IGF-I manipulations are another important topic that has not been sufficiently addressed to date, particularly with respect to developmental and environmental influences on fish growth and health.

  5. Immunization of dogs with recombinant GnRH-1 suppresses the development of reproductive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya; Tian, Yuan; Zhao, Xijie; Jiang, Shudong; Li, Fubao; Zhang, Yunhai; Zhang, Xiaorong; Li, Yunsheng; Zhou, Jie; Fang, Fugui

    2015-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of active immunization using recombinant GnRH-I protein on reproductive function in dogs. Six male and six female dogs were randomly assigned to either a control group or an immunization group (n = 3 males or 3 females/group). Dogs (aged 16 weeks) were immunized against GnRH-I with a maltose-binding protein-gonadotropin-releasing hormone I hexamer generated by recombinant DNA technology. Blood samples were taken at 4-week intervals after immunization. The serum concentrations of testosterone and estradiol and anti-GnRH-I antibodies were determined by RIA and ELISA, respectively. The results showed that active immunization with recombinant GnRH-I increased the serum levels of anti-GnRH antibodies (P dogs and a significant reduction (P dogs. Microscopically, spermatogonia were visible, but no spermatids and spermatozoa were detected in the seminiferous tubules. Neither early antral nor antral follicles were found in the immunized group. These results demonstrate that recombinant GnRH-I is an effective immunogen in dogs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reciprocal Interactions of the Intestinal Microbiota and Immune System

    OpenAIRE

    Maynard, Craig L.; Elson, Charles O.; Hatton, Robin D.; Weaver, Casey T.

    2012-01-01

    Emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates set the stage for evolution of an advanced symbiotic relationship with the intestinal microbiota. The defining features of specificity and memory that characterize adaptive immunity have afforded vertebrates mechanisms for efficiently tailoring immune responses to diverse types of microbes, whether to promote mutualism or host defense. These same attributes carry risk for immune-mediated diseases that are increasingly linked to the intest...

  7. GYF-21, an Epoxide 2-(2-Phenethyl-Chromone Derivative, Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity via Inhibiting STAT1/3 and NF-κB Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Guo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterized by demyelinating plaques and axonal loss. Inhibition on over activation of innate and adaptive immunity provides a rationale strategy for treatment of multiple sclerosis. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of GYF-21, an epoxide 2-(2-phenethyl-chromone derivative isolated from Chinese agarwood, on innate and adaptive immunity for revealing its potential to treat multiple sclerosis. The results showed that GYF-21 markedly inhibited the activation of microglia, and dendritic cells as well as neutrophils, all of which play important roles in innate immunity. Furthermore, GYF-21 significantly suppressed adaptive immunity via inhibiting the differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells into T helper 1 (Th1 and T helper 17 (Th17 cells, and suppressing the activation, proliferation, and IFN-γ secretion of CD8+ T cells. The mechanism study showed that GYF-21 evidently inhibited the activation of STAT1/3 and NF-κB signaling pathways in microglia. In conclusion, we demonstrated that GYF-21 can significantly inhibit innate and adaptive immunity via suppressing STAT1/3 and NF-κB signaling pathways, and has potential to be developed into therapeutic drug for multiple sclerosis.

  8. The subversion of the immune system by francisella tularensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosio, Catharine M

    2011-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of tularemia. Perhaps the most impressive feature of this bacterium is its ability to cause lethal disease following inoculation of as few as 15 organisms. This remarkable virulence is, in part, attributed to the ability of this microorganism to evade, disrupt, and modulate host immune responses. The objective of this review is to discuss the mechanisms utilized by F. tularensis to evade and inhibit innate and adaptive immune responses. The capability of F. tularensis to interfere with developing immunity in the host was appreciated decades ago. Early studies in humans were the first to demonstrate the ability of F. tularensis to suppress innate immunity. This work noted that humans suffering from tularemia failed to respond to a secondary challenge of endotoxin isolated from unrelated bacteria. Further, anecdotal observations of individuals becoming repeatedly infected with virulent strains of F. tularensis suggests that this bacterium also interferes with the generation of adequate adaptive immunity. Recent advances utilizing the mouse model for in vivo studies and human cells for in vitro work have identified specific bacterial and host compounds that play a role in mediating ubiquitous suppression of the host immune response. Compilation of this work will undoubtedly aid in enhancing our understanding of the myriad of mechanisms utilized by virulent F. tularensis for successful infection, colonization, and pathogenesis in the mammalian host.

  9. The subversion of the immune system by Francisella tularensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharine eBosio

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of tularemia. Perhaps the most impressive feature of this bacterium is its ability to cause lethal disease following inoculation of as few as 15 organisms. This remarkable virulence is, in part, attributed to the ability of this microorganism to evade, disrupt and modulate host immune responses. The objective of this review is to discuss the mechanisms utilized by F. tularensis to evade and inhibit innate and adaptive immune responses. The capability of F. tularensis to interfere with developing immunity in the host was appreciated decades ago. Early studies in humans were the first to demonstrate the ability of F. tularensis to suppress innate immunity. This work noted that humans suffering from tularemia failed to respond to a secondary challenge of endotoxin isolated from unrelated bacteria. Further, anecdotal observations of individuals becoming repeatedly infected with virulent strains of F. tularensis suggests that this bacterium also interferes with the generation of adequate adaptive immunity. Recent advances utilizing the mouse model for in vivo studies and human cells for in vitro work have identified specific bacterial and host compounds that play a role in mediating ubiquitous suppression of the host immune response. Compilation of this work will undoubtedly aid in enhancing our understanding of the myriad of mechanisms utilized by virulent F. tularensis for successful infection, colonization and pathogenesis in the mammalian host.

  10. Diffuse endocrine system, neuroendocrine tumors and immunity: what's new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Pietro; Ferone, Diego

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, research into the modulation of immunity by the neuroendocrine system has flourished, unravelling significant effects of several neuropeptides, including somatostatin (SRIH), and especially cortistatin (CST), on immune cells. Scientists have learnt that the diffuse neuroendocrine system can regulate the immune system at all its levels: innate immunity, adaptive immunity, and maintenance of immune tolerance. Compelling studies with animal models have demonstrated that some neuropeptides may be effective in treating inflammatory disorders, such as sepsis, and T helper 1-driven autoimmune diseases, like Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Here, the latest findings concerning the neuroendocrine control of the immune system are discussed, with emphasis on SRIH and CST. The second part of the review deals with the immune response to neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). The anti-NET immune response has been described in the last years and it is still being characterized, similarly to what is happening for several other types of cancer. In parallel with investigations addressing the mechanisms by which the immune system contrasts NET growth and spreading, ground-breaking clinical trials of dendritic cell vaccination as immunotherapy for metastatic NETs have shown in principle that the immune reaction to NETs can be exploited for treatment. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The effect of anti-depressant Amitriptyline on the immune system

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    Dukan J

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the effect of amitriptyline, a tricyclic anti-depressant drug on several immune parameters of the Balb/c mice in order to evaluate its immunomodulatory effects. Results showed that amitriptyline will potentiates all of the immunocytes functions except for the production of PGE2 by LPS stimulated monocytes. We have also showed that amitriptyline can normalize the immunosuppressive effect of dexamethasone on mice (experimental stress. These results suggest that one of the mechanisms of action of the tricyclic anti-depressant drugs might be through the modulation of the immune system which has been suppressed by stress or distress

  12. The Effect of Sound on the Immune System

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    Mojgan Shaygan

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The immune system protects body against disturbing factors such as pathogens and tumor cells by means of its special cell and biological structures. It has been divided based on its components and soluble factors into two groups of specific and non-specific immune system. Since sound is considered as a stressor it can affect dramatically on the immune system. Stress caused by noise can reduce the immune system response to chemical stimulators have decreased. In Stead, deep relaxation has consistently been proven to be very effective at increasing T-Cells and strengthening the immune system. In the current article, we want to have a look on the adverse effects of sound on the immune system.

  13. Simplified slow anti-coincidence circuit for Compton suppression systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish [Department of Applied Sciences, College of Technological Studies, Public Authority for Applied Education and Training, P.O. Box 42325, Shuwaikh 70654 (Kuwait)], E-mail: ds.alazmi@paaet.edu.kw

    2008-08-15

    Slow coincidence circuits for the anti-coincidence measurements have been considered for use in Compton suppression technique. The simplified version of the slow circuit has been found to be fast enough, satisfactory and allows an easy system setup, particularly with the advantage of the automatic threshold setting of the low-level discrimination. A well-type NaI detector as the main detector surrounded by plastic guard detector has been arranged to investigate the performance of the Compton suppression spectrometer using the simplified slow circuit. The system has been tested to observe the improvement in the energy spectra for medium to high-energy gamma-ray photons from terrestrial and environmental samples.

  14. Simplified slow anti-coincidence circuit for Compton suppression systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish

    2008-01-01

    Slow coincidence circuits for the anti-coincidence measurements have been considered for use in Compton suppression technique. The simplified version of the slow circuit has been found to be fast enough, satisfactory and allows an easy system setup, particularly with the advantage of the automatic threshold setting of the low-level discrimination. A well-type NaI detector as the main detector surrounded by plastic guard detector has been arranged to investigate the performance of the Compton suppression spectrometer using the simplified slow circuit. The system has been tested to observe the improvement in the energy spectra for medium to high-energy gamma-ray photons from terrestrial and environmental samples

  15. Comprehensive immune profiling reveals substantial immune system alterations in a subset of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Gustafson

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with a median lifespan of 2-3 years after diagnosis. There are few meaningful treatments that alter progression in this disease. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that neuroinflammation may play a key role in the progression rate of ALS. Despite this, there are no validated biomarkers of neuroinflammation for use in clinical practice or clinical trials. Biomarkers of neuroinflammation could improve patient management, provide new therapeutic targets, and possibly help stratify clinical trial selection and monitoring. However, attempts to identify a singular cause of neuroinflammation have not been successful. Here, we performed multi-parameter flow cytometry to comprehensively assess 116 leukocyte populations and phenotypes from lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes in a cohort of 80 ALS patients. We identified 32 leukocyte phenotypes that were altered in ALS patients compared to age and gender matched healthy volunteers (HV that included phenotypes of both inflammation and immune suppression. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering and principle component analysis of ALS and HV immunophenotypes revealed two distinct immune profiles of ALS patients. ALS patients were clustered into a profile distinct from HVs primarily due to differences in a multiple T cell phenotypes, CD3+CD56+ T cells and HLA-DR on monocytes. Patients clustered into an abnormal immune profile were younger, more likely to have a familial form of the disease, and survived longer than those patients who clustered similarly with healthy volunteers (344 weeks versus 184 weeks; p = 0.012. The data set generated from this study establishes an extensive accounting of immunophenotypic changes readily suitable for biomarker validation studies. The extensive immune system changes measured in this study indicate that normal immune homeostatic mechanisms are disrupted in ALS patients, and that

  16. Neuroendocrine and Immune System Responses with Spaceflights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Charles M.; Greenleaf, John E.; Jackson, Catherine G. R.

    1996-01-01

    Despite the fact that the first human was in space during 1961 and individuals have existed in a microgravity environment for more than a year, there are limited spaceflight data available on the responses of the neuroendocrine and immune systems. Because of mutual interactions between these respective integrative systems, it is inappropriate to assume that the responses of one have no impact on functions of the other. Blood and plasma volume consistently decrease with spaceflight; hence, blood endocrine and immune constituents will be modified by both gravitational and measurement influences. The majority of the in-flight data relates to endocrine responses that influence fluids and electrolytes during the first month in space. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), aldo-sterone. and anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) appear to be elevated with little change in the atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP). Flight results longer than 60 d show increased ADH variability with elevations in angiotensin and cortisol. Although post-flight results are influenced by reentry and recovery events, ACTH and ADH appear to be consistently elevated with variable results being reported for the other hormones. Limited in-flight data on insulin and growth hormone levels suggest they are not elevated to counteract the loss in muscle mass. Post-flight results from short- and long-term flights indicate that thyroxine and insulin are increased while growth hormone exhibits minimal change. In-flight parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels are variable for several weeks after which they remain elevated. Post-flight PTH was increased on missions that lasted either 7 or 237 d, whereas calcitonin concentrations were increased after 1 wk but decreased after longer flights. Leukocytes are elevated in flights of various durations because of an increase in neutrophils. The majority of post-flight data indicates immunoglobulin concentrations are not significantly changed from pre-flight measurements. However, the numbers of T

  17. Corticosterone suppresses immune activity in territorial Galápagos marine iguanas during reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Silke; Martin, Lynn B; Wikelski, Martin; Romero, L Michael; Kalko, Elisabeth K V; Vitousek, Maren N; Rödl, Thomas

    2005-04-01

    Individuals that display elaborate sexually selected characters often show reduced immune function. According to the immunocompetence handicap hypothesis, testosterone (T) is responsible for this result as it drives the development and maintenance of sexual characters and causes immunosuppression. But glucocorticoids also have strong influences on immune function and may also be elevated in reproductively active males. Here, we compared immune activity using the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin test in three discrete groups of male marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus): territorials, satellites, and bachelors. Males of these three reproductive phenotypes had indistinguishable T concentrations during the height of the breeding season, but their corticosterone (cort) concentrations, body condition and hematocrit were significantly different. Territorial males, the animals with the most elaborate sexual ornaments and behaviors, had lower immune responses and body condition but higher cort concentrations and hematocrit than satellites or bachelors. To test directly cort's immunosuppressive role, we elevated cort by either restraining animals or additionally injecting cort and compared their PHA swelling response with the response of free-roaming animals. Such experimental elevation of cort significantly decreased immune activity in both restrained and cort-injected animals. Our data show that cort can induce immunosuppression, but they do not support the immunocompetence handicap hypothesis in its narrow sense because T concentrations were not related to immunosuppression.

  18. Multiscale model for the effects of adaptive immunity suppression on the viral therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva, Leticia R; Silva, Hallan S; Ferreira, Silvio C; Martins, Marcelo L

    2013-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy—the use of viruses that specifically kill tumor cells—is an innovative and highly promising route for treating cancer. However, its therapeutic outcomes are mainly impaired by the host immune response to the viral infection. In this paper, we propose a multiscale mathematical model to study how the immune response interferes with the viral oncolytic activity. The model assumes that cytotoxic T cells can induce apoptosis in infected cancer cells and that free viruses can be inactivated by neutralizing antibodies or cleared at a constant rate by the innate immune response. Our simulations suggest that reprogramming the immune microenvironment in tumors could substantially enhance the oncolytic virotherapy in immune-competent hosts. Viable routes to such reprogramming are either in situ virus-mediated impairing of CD8 + T cells motility or blockade of B and T lymphocytes recruitment. Our theoretical results can shed light on the design of viral vectors or new protocols with neat potential impacts on the clinical practice. (paper)

  19. Dairy Heifers Naturally Exposed to Fasciola hepatica Develop a Type 2 Immune Response and Concomitant Suppression of Leukocyte Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham-Brown, John; Hartley, Catherine; Clough, Helen; Kadioglu, Aras; Baylis, Matthew; Williams, Diana J L

    2018-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica is a parasitic trematode of global importance in livestock. Control strategies reliant on anthelmintics are unsustainable due to the emergence of drug resistance. Vaccines are under development, but efficacies are variable. Evidence from experimental infection suggests that vaccine efficacy may be affected by parasite-induced immunomodulation. Little is known about the immune response to F. hepatica following natural exposure. Hence, we analyzed the immune responses over time in calves naturally exposed to F. hepatica infection. Cohorts of replacement dairy heifer calves ( n = 42) with no prior exposure to F. hepatica , on three commercial dairy farms, were sampled over the course of a grazing season. Exposure was determined through an F. hepatica -specific serum antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and fluke egg counts. Concurrent changes in peripheral blood leukocyte subpopulations, lymphocyte proliferation, and cytokine responses were measured. Relationships between fluke infection and immune responses were analyzed by using multivariable linear mixed-effect models. All calves from one farm showed evidence of exposure, while cohorts from the remaining two farms remained negative over the grazing season. A type 2 immune response was associated with exposure, with increased interleukin-4 (IL-4) production, IL-5 transcription, and eosinophilia. Suppression of parasite-specific peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation was evident, while decreased mitogen-stimulated gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production suggested immunomodulation, which was not restricted to parasite-specific responses. Our findings show that the global immune response is modulated toward a nonproliferative type 2 state following natural challenge with F. hepatica This has implications in terms of the timing of the administration of vaccination programs and for host susceptibility to coinfecting pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Graham-Brown et al.

  20. Trauma equals danger—damage control by the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoecklein, Veit M.; Osuka, Akinori; Lederer, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic injuries induce a complex host response that disrupts immune system homeostasis and predisposes patients to opportunistic infections and inflammatory complications. The response to injuries varies considerably by type and severity, as well as by individual variables, such as age, sex, and genetics. These variables make studying the impact of trauma on the immune system challenging. Nevertheless, advances have been made in understanding how injuries influence immune system function as well as the immune cells and pathways involved in regulating the response to injuries. This review provides an overview of current knowledge about how traumatic injuries affect immune system phenotype and function. We discuss the current ideas that traumatic injuries induce a unique type of a response that may be triggered by a combination of endogenous danger signals, including alarmins, DAMPs, self-antigens, and cytokines. Additionally, we review and propose strategies for redirecting injury responses to help restore immune system homeostasis. PMID:22654121

  1. Experimental porcine eperythrozoonosis: T-lymphocyte suppression and misdirected immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary, J F; Smith, A R

    1985-04-01

    Immune responses and hematologic alterations were investigated in splenectomized pigs after IM inoculation with Eperythrozoon suis. Early hematologic alterations were massive parasitism of RBC, severe hypoglycemia, moderate bilirubinemia, and mild anemia; later findings included severe anemia, minimal parasitism of RBC, spontaneous agglutination of RBC at 25 C and 4 C which was reversible at 37 C, transient thrombocytopenia, and mild bilirubinemia. The humoral immune responses consisting of a transitory hyperglobulinemia and increase of indirect hemagglutination (IHA) titers against E suis were attributed to immunoglobulin M cold agglutinins. Cell-mediated immune responses, measured by phytohemagglutinin- and pokeweed mitogen-induced lymphocyte blastogenesis, were reduced after massive parasitemia. Blastogenesis induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide mitogen was increased before the hyperglobulinemia and an increase in IHA titer. There was an increase in the uptake of [3H]thymidine by lymphocytes cultured without mitogens after the decline in total globulin concentration and IHA titer.

  2. Distributed Computations Environment Protection Using Artificial Immune Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Moiseev

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article the authors describe possibility of artificial immune systems applying for distributed computations environment protection from definite types of malicious impacts.

  3. Transforming growth factor-beta promotes rhinovirus replication in bronchial epithelial cells by suppressing the innate immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bedke

    Full Text Available Rhinovirus (RV infection is a major cause of asthma exacerbations which may be due to a deficient innate immune response in the bronchial epithelium. We hypothesized that the pleiotropic cytokine, TGF-β, influences interferon (IFN production by primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs following RV infection. Exogenous TGF-β(2 increased RV replication and decreased IFN protein secretion in response to RV or double-stranded RNA (dsRNA. Conversely, neutralizing TGF-β antibodies decreased RV replication and increased IFN expression in response to RV or dsRNA. Endogenous TGF-β(2 levels were higher in conditioned media of PBECs from asthmatic donors and the suppressive effect of anti-TGF-β on RV replication was significantly greater in these cells. Basal SMAD-2 activation was reduced when asthmatic PBECs were treated with anti-TGF-β and this was accompanied by suppression of SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 expression. Our results suggest that endogenous TGF-β contributes to a suppressed IFN response to RV infection possibly via SOCS-1 and SOCS-3.

  4. Sodium methyldithiocarbamate inhibits MAP kinase activation through toll-like receptor 4, alters cytokine production by mouse peritoneal macrophages, and suppresses innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Stephen B; Zheng, Qiang; Schwab, Carlton; Fan, Ruping

    2005-09-01

    Sodium methyldithiocarbamate (SMD; trade name, Metam Sodium) is an abundantly used soil fumigant that can cause adverse health effects in humans, including some immunological manifestations. The mechanisms by which SMD acts, and its targets within the immune system are not fully understood. Initial experiments demonstrated that SMD administered by oral gavage substantially decreased IL-12 production and increased IL-10 production induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice. The present study was conducted to further characterize these effects and to evaluate our working hypothesis that the mechanism for these effects involves alteration in signaling through toll-like receptor 4 and that this would suppress innate immunity to infection. SMD decreased the activation of MAP kinases and AP-1 but not NF-kappaB in peritoneal macrophages. The expression of mRNA for IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-18, IFN-gamma, IL-12 p35, IL-12 p40, and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was inhibited by SMD, whereas mRNA for IL-10 was increased. SMD increased the IL-10 concentration in the peritoneal cavity and serum and decreased the concentration of IL-12 p40 in the serum, peritoneal cavity, and intracellularly in peritoneal cells (which are >80% macrophages). Similar effects on LPS-induced cytokine production were observed following dermal administration of SMD. The major breakdown product of SMD, methylisothiocyanate (MITC), caused similar effects on cytokine production at dosages as low as 17 mg/kg, a dosage relevant to human exposure levels associated with agricultural use of SMD. Treatment of mice with SMD decreased survival following challenge with non-pathogenic Escherichia coli within 24-48 h, demonstrating suppression of innate immunity.

  5. Suppression of adaptive immunity to heterologous antigens during Plasmodium infection through hemozoin-induced failure of dendritic cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips R

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs are central to the initiation and regulation of the adaptive immune response during infection. Modulation of DC function may therefore allow evasion of the immune system by pathogens. Significant depression of the host's systemic immune response to both concurrent infections and heterologous vaccines has been observed during malaria infection, but the mechanisms underlying this immune hyporesponsiveness are controversial. Results Here, we demonstrate that the blood stages of malaria infection induce a failure of DC function in vitro and in vivo, causing suboptimal activation of T cells involved in heterologous immune responses. This effect on T-cell activation can be transferred to uninfected recipients by DCs isolated from infected mice. Significantly, T cells activated by these DCs subsequently lack effector function, as demonstrated by a failure to migrate to lymphoid-organ follicles, resulting in an absence of B-cell responses to heterologous antigens. Fractionation studies show that hemozoin, rather than infected erythrocyte (red blood cell membranes, reproduces the effect of intact infected red blood cells on DCs. Furthermore, hemozoin-containing DCs could be identified in T-cell areas of the spleen in vivo. Conclusion Plasmodium infection inhibits the induction of adaptive immunity to heterologous antigens by modulating DC function, providing a potential explanation for epidemiological studies linking endemic malaria with secondary infections and reduced vaccine efficacy.

  6. The immunoreceptor adapter protein DAP12 suppresses B lymphocyte?driven adaptive immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano-Yokomizo, Takako; Tahara-Hanaoka, Satoko; Nakahashi-Oda, Chigusa; Nabekura, Tsukasa; Tchao, Nadia K.; Kadosaki, Momoko; Totsuka, Naoya; Kurita, Naoki; Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Tamaoka, Akira; Takai, Toshiyuki; Yasui, Teruhito; Kikutani, Hitoshi; Honda, Shin-ichiro; Shibuya, Kazuko

    2011-01-01

    DAP12, an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif?bearing adapter protein, is involved in innate immunity mediated by natural killer cells and myeloid cells. We show that DAP12-deficient mouse B cells and B cells from a patient with Nasu-Hakola disease, a recessive genetic disorder resulting from loss of DAP12, showed enhanced proliferation after stimulation with anti-IgM or CpG. Myeloid-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor (MAIR) II (Cd300d) is a DAP12-associated immune receptor. L...

  7. The impact of radiation therapy on the antitumor immunity: local effects and systemic consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumniczky, Katalin; Sáfrány, Géza

    2015-01-01

    The main antitumor efficacy of irradiation relies in its direct cytotoxic effect. Increasing evidence indicates a systemic effect of radiation though, mediated mainly by the immune system. In this review we wish to focus on the radiotherapy induced modifications of the soluble and cellular mediators of the antitumor immune response and summarize some of the mechanisms by which radiation driven local and systemic bystander effects can influence tumor immunogenicity. In different tumor types due to the intrinsic immunogenicity of the tumor cells and the immunological characteristics of the tumor microenvironment, different radiation induced immune modulatory mechanisms are predominant. Radiation most probably can only amplify or augment a pro-immunogenic phenotype and can hardly change by itself a net immune suppressing environment into an immune stimulating one. This immune modulatory potential of radiotherapy could be exploited in tumor treatment by developing combined radiotherapeutic and immunotherapeutic approaches. The last few years showed a dramatic increase in the knowledge of radiation induced out-of field and systemic effects, which foresees a rapid progress in the development and clinical application of these new, combined therapies for cancer cure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of the immune system in the peritoneal tumor spread of high grade serous ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Katharina; Bachmayr-Heyda, Anna; Sukhbaatar, Nyamdelger; Aust, Stefanie; Schmetterer, Klaus G; Meier, Samuel M; Gerner, Christopher; Grimm, Christoph; Horvat, Reinhard; Pils, Dietmar

    2016-09-20

    The immune system plays a critical role in cancer progression and overall survival. Still, it is unclear if differences in the immune response are associated with different patterns of tumor spread apparent in high grade serous ovarian cancer patients and previously described by us. In this study we aimed to assess the role of the immune system in miliary (widespread, millet-sized lesions) and non-miliary (bigger, exophytically growing implants) tumor spread. To achieve this we comprehensively analyzed tumor tissues, blood, and ascites from 41 patients using immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, RNA sequencing, multiplexed immunoassays, and immunohistochemistry. Results showed that inflammation markers were systemically higher in miliary. In contrast, in non-miliary lymphocyte and monocyte/macrophage infiltration into the ascites was higher as well as the levels of PD-1 expression in tumor associated cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and PD-L1 expression in tumor cells. Furthermore, in ascites of miliary patients more epithelial tumor cells were present compared to non-miliary, possibly due to the active down-regulation of anti-tumor responses by B-cells and regulatory T-cells. Summarizing, adaptive immune responses prevailed in patients with non-miliary spread, whereas in patients with miliary spread a higher involvement of the innate immune system was apparent while adaptive responses were counteracted by immune suppressive cells and factors.

  9. Suppression of host immune response by the core protein of hepatitis C virus: possible implications for hepatitis C virus persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large, M K; Kittlesen, D J; Hahn, Y S

    1999-01-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major human pathogen causing mild to severe liver disease worldwide. This positive strand RNA virus is remarkably efficient at establishing chronic infections. Although a high rate of genetic variability may facilitate viral escape and persistence in the face of Ag-specific immune responses, HCV may also encode proteins that facilitate evasion of immunological surveillance. To address the latter possibility, we examined the influence of specific HCV gene products on the host immune response to vaccinia virus in a murine model. Various vaccinia/HCV recombinants expressing different regions of the HCV polyprotein were used for i.p. inoculation of BALB/c mice. Surprisingly, a recombinant expressing the N-terminal half of the polyprotein (including the structural proteins, p7, NS2, and a portion of NS3; vHCV-S) led to a dose-dependent increase in mortality. Increased mortality was not observed for a recombinant expressing the majority of the nonstructural region or for a negative control virus expressing the beta-galactosidase protein. Examination of T cell responses in these mice revealed a marked suppression of vaccinia-specific CTL responses and a depressed production of IFN-gamma and IL-2. By using a series of vaccinia/HCV recombinants, we found that the HCV core protein was sufficient for immunosuppression, prolonged viremia, and increased mortality. These results suggest that the HCV core protein plays an important role in the establishment and maintenance of HCV infection by suppressing host immune responses, in particular the generation of virus-specific CTLs.

  10. Sunlight Effects on Immune System: Is There Something Else in addition to UV-Induced Immunosuppression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. González Maglio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sunlight, composed of different types of radiation, including ultraviolet wavelengths, is an essential source of light and warmth for life on earth but has strong negative effects on human health, such as promoting the malignant transformation of skin cells and suppressing the ability of the human immune system to efficiently detect and attack malignant cells. UV-induced immunosuppression has been extensively studied since it was first described by Dr. Kripke and Dr. Fisher in the late 1970s. However, skin exposure to sunlight has not only this and other unfavorable effects, for example, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, but also a positive one: the induction of Vitamin D synthesis, which performs several roles within the immune system in addition to favoring bone homeostasis. The impact of low levels of UV exposure on the immune system has not been fully reported yet, but it bears interesting differences with the suppressive effect of high levels of UV radiation, as shown by some recent studies. The aim of this article is to put some ideas in perspective and pose some questions within the field of photoimmunology based on established and new information, which may lead to new experimental approaches and, eventually, to a better understanding of the effects of sunlight on the human immune system.

  11. Microbial-immune cross-talk and regulation of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahenzli, Julia; Balmer, Maria L; McCoy, Kathy D

    2013-01-01

    We are all born germ-free. Following birth we enter into a lifelong relationship with microbes residing on our body's surfaces. The lower intestine is home to the highest microbial density in our body, which is also the highest microbial density known on Earth (up to 10(12) /g of luminal contents). With our indigenous microbial cells outnumbering our human cells by an order of magnitude our body is more microbial than human. Numerous immune adaptations confine these microbes within the mucosa, enabling most of us to live in peaceful homeostasis with our intestinal symbionts. Intestinal epithelial cells not only form a physical barrier between the bacteria-laden lumen and the rest of the body but also function as multi-tasking immune cells that sense the prevailing microbial (apical) and immune (basolateral) milieus, instruct the underlying immune cells, and adapt functionally. In the constant effort to ensure intestinal homeostasis, the immune system becomes educated to respond appropriately and in turn immune status can shape the microbial consortia. Here we review how the dynamic immune-microbial dialogue underlies maturation and regulation of the immune system and discuss recent findings on the impact of diet on both microbial ecology and immune function. © 2012 The Authors. Immunology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Immune genes undergo more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes in Daphnia pulex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McTaggart Seanna J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding which parts of the genome have been most influenced by adaptive evolution remains an unsolved puzzle. Some evidence suggests that selection has the greatest impact on regions of the genome that interact with other evolving genomes, including loci that are involved in host-parasite co-evolutionary processes. In this study, we used a population genetic approach to test this hypothesis by comparing DNA sequences of 30 putative immune system genes in the crustacean Daphnia pulex with 24 non-immune system genes. Results In support of the hypothesis, results from a multilocus extension of the McDonald-Kreitman (MK test indicate that immune system genes as a class have experienced more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes. However, not all immune system genes show evidence of adaptive evolution. Additionally, we apply single locus MK tests and calculate population genetic parameters at all loci in order to characterize the mode of selection (directional versus balancing in the genes that show the greatest deviation from neutral evolution. Conclusions Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that immune system genes undergo more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes, possibly as a result of host-parasite arms races. The results of these analyses highlight several candidate loci undergoing adaptive evolution that could be targeted in future studies.

  13. CMV immune evasion and manipulation of the immune system with aging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jackson, Sarah E; Redeker, Anke; Arens, Ramon; van Baarle, Debbie; van den Berg, Sara P H; Benedict, Chris A; Čičin-Šain, Luka; Hill, Ann B; Wills, Mark R

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes numerous proteins and microRNAs that function to evade the immune response and allow the virus to replicate and disseminate in the face of a competent innate and acquired immune system. The establishment of a latent infection by CMV, which if completely quiescent

  14. Extracellular Vesicles from a Helminth Parasite Suppress Macrophage Activation and Constitute an Effective Vaccine for Protective Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Coakley

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that many parasites release extracellular vesicles (EVs, yet little is known about the specific interactions of EVs with immune cells or their functions during infection. We show that EVs secreted by the gastrointestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus are internalized by macrophages and modulate their activation. EV internalization causes downregulation of type 1 and type 2 immune-response-associated molecules (IL-6 and TNF, and Ym1 and RELMα and inhibits expression of the IL-33 receptor subunit ST2. Co-incubation with EV antibodies abrogated suppression of alternative activation and was associated with increased co-localization of the EVs with lysosomes. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with EV-alum generated protective immunity against larval challenge, highlighting an important role in vivo. In contrast, ST2-deficient mice are highly susceptible to infection, and they are unable to clear parasites following EV vaccination. Hence, macrophage activation and the IL-33 pathway are targeted by H. polygyrus EVs, while neutralization of EV function facilitates parasite expulsion.

  15. Weed suppression by green manure in an agroecological system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Maria Garicoix Recalde

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Green manure promotes efficient suppression of weeds, but green manure species can exhibit distinct behaviors, depending on the environmental conditions. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of soil mulching and weed suppression by spring/summer green manure species grown in the spring/summer season, at different growth stages and after management (cut, for 90 days during the cassava crop cycle. The study was carried out in the 2010/2011 season, in a system managed under agroecological principles. The treatments consisted of different green manure species and arrangements: Crotalaria juncea, Cajanus cajan, Canavalia brasiliensis, Canavalia ensiformis, Pennisetum americanum, Crotalaria juncea and Pennisetum americanum intercropped; Mucuna aterrima, Sorghum bicolor, a mixture of all the green manures in study and a control plot under fallow. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design with four replications. The evaluations of the soil cover either by the green manures or weeds were performed at 45, 90 and 105 days after the emergence of the green manures. The cassava crop was planted under reduced tillage system at 11 days after the cut of the green manures. The percentage of soil covered by weeds and the dry matter produced were evaluated at 30, 60 and 90 days after planting. The results showed that the green manures had a suppressive effect on weeds during their life cycle, as well as during the first months after its management (cut, composing the mulch.

  16. Ideal and conventional feedback systems for RWM suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustovitov, V.D.

    2002-01-01

    Feedback suppression of resistive wall modes (RWM) is studied analytically using a model based on a standard cylindrical approximation. Two feedback systems are compared: 'ideal', creating only the field necessary for RMW suppression, and 'conventional', like that used in the DIII-D tokamak and considered as a candidate for ITER. The widespread opinion that the feedback with poloidal sensors is better than that with radial sensors is discussed. It is shown that the 'conventional' feedback with radial sensors can be effective only in a limited range, while using the input signal from internal poloidal sensors allows easy fulfilment of the stability criterion. This is a property of the 'conventional' feedback, but the 'ideal' feedback would stabilise RWM in both cases. (author)

  17. A single social defeat transiently suppresses the anti-viral immune response in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Johanna; Milligen, Florine J. van; Moonen-Leusen, Bernie W.M.; Thomas, Gethin; Koolhaas, Jaap M.

    1999-01-01

    Most of the studies dealing with effects of stress on anti-viral immunity have been carried out with stressors that are of long duration and that bear little relationship to the nature of the species. In this paper, we investigated the effect of a stressor mimicking real-life situations more

  18. Suppression of Long-Lived Humoral Immunity Following Borrelia burgdorferi Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Elsner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lyme Disease caused by infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is an emerging infectious disease and already by far the most common vector-borne disease in the U.S. Similar to many other infections, infection with B. burgdorferi results in strong antibody response induction, which can be used clinically as a diagnostic measure of prior exposure. However, clinical studies have shown a sometimes-precipitous decline of such antibodies shortly following antibiotic treatment, revealing a potential deficit in the host's ability to induce and/or maintain long-term protective antibodies. This is further supported by reports of frequent repeat infections with B. burgdorferi in endemic areas. The mechanisms underlying such a lack of long-term humoral immunity, however, remain unknown. We show here that B. burgdorferi infected mice show a similar rapid disappearance of Borrelia-specific antibodies after infection and subsequent antibiotic treatment. This failure was associated with development of only short-lived germinal centers, micro-anatomical locations from which long-lived immunity originates. These showed structural abnormalities and failed to induce memory B cells and long-lived plasma cells for months after the infection, rendering the mice susceptible to reinfection with the same strain of B. burgdorferi. The inability to induce long-lived immune responses was not due to the particular nature of the immunogenic antigens of B. burgdorferi, as antibodies to both T-dependent and T-independent Borrelia antigens lacked longevity and B cell memory induction. Furthermore, influenza immunization administered at the time of Borrelia infection also failed to induce robust antibody responses, dramatically reducing the protective antiviral capacity of the humoral response. Collectively, these studies show that B. burgdorferi-infection results in targeted and temporary immunosuppression of the host and bring new insight into the mechanisms underlying the failure

  19. Causes, consequences, and reversal of immune system aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecino-Rodriguez, Encarnacion; Berent-Maoz, Beata; Dorshkind, Kenneth

    2013-03-01

    The effects of aging on the immune system are manifest at multiple levels that include reduced production of B and T cells in bone marrow and thymus and diminished function of mature lymphocytes in secondary lymphoid tissues. As a result, elderly individuals do not respond to immune challenge as robustly as the young. An important goal of aging research is to define the cellular changes that occur in the immune system and the molecular events that underlie them. Considerable progress has been made in this regard, and this information has provided the rationale for clinical trials to rejuvenate the aging immune system.

  20. Immune response induction in the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Babcock, Alicia

    2002-01-01

    The primary function of the immune response is protection of the host against infection with pathogens, including viruses. Since viruses can infect any tissue of the body, including the central nervous system (CNS), it is logical that cells of the immune system should equally have access to all...... tissues. Nevertheless, the brain and spinal cord are noted for their lack of immune presence. Relative to other organ systems, the CNS appears immunologically privileged. Furthermore, when immune responses do occur in the CNS, they are frequently associated with deleterious effects such as inflammatory...

  1. The effects of early life adversity on the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwenspoek, Martha M C; Kuehn, Annette; Muller, Claude P; Turner, Jonathan D

    2017-08-01

    Early life adversity (ELA) is associated with a higher risk for diseases in adulthood. Although the pathophysiological effects of ELA are varied, there may be a unifying role for the immune system in all of the long-term pathologies such as chronic inflammatory disorders (autoimmune diseases, allergy, and asthma). Recently, significant efforts have been made to elucidate the long-term effects ELA has on immune function, as well as the mechanisms underlying these immune changes. In this review, we focus on data from human studies investigating immune parameters in relation to post-natal adverse experiences. We describe the current understanding of the 'ELA immune phenotype', characterized by inflammation, impairment of the cellular immune system, and immunosenescence. However, at present, data addressing specific immune functions are limited and there is a need for high-quality, well powered, longitudinal studies to unravel cause from effect. Besides the immune system, also the stress system and health behaviors are altered in ELA. We discuss probable underlying mechanisms based on epigenetic programming that could explain the ELA immune phenotype and whether this is a direct effect of immune programming or an indirect consequence of changes in behavior or stress reactivity. Understanding the underlying mechanisms will help define effective strategies to prevent or counteract negative ELA-associated outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Invited essay: Cognitive influences on the psychological immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachman, S J

    2016-12-01

    The construct of the psychological immune system is described and analysed. The direct and indirect cognitive influences on the system are discussed, and the implications of adding a cognitive construal to the influential model of a behavioural immune system are considered. The psychological immune system has two main properties: defensive and healing. It encompasses a good amount of health-related phenomena that is outside the scope of the behavioural model or the biological immune system. Evidence pertaining to the psychological immune system includes meta-analyses of the associations between psychological variables such as positive affect/wellbeing and diseases and mortality, and associations between wellbeing and positive health. The results of long-term prospective studies are consistent with the conclusions drawn from the meta-analyses. Laboratory investigations of the effects of psychological variables on the biological immune system show that negative affect can slow wound-healing, and positive affect can enhance resistance to infections, for example in experiments involving the introduction of the rhinovirus and the influenza A virus. A number of problems concerning the assessment of the functioning of the psychological immune system are considered, and the need to develop techniques for determining when the system is active or not, is emphasized. This problem is particularly challenging when trying to assess the effects of the psychological immune system during a prolonged psychological intervention, such as a course of resilience training. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Suppressing autoimmunity in Arabidopsis thaliana with dominant negative immune receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greeff, Michael Christiaan

    R genes, as we have recently found that transgenics with similarly mutated rpm1-DN alleles lose resistance to Pseudomonas syringae expressing the AvrRpm1 effector. Accordingly, we have constructed a collection of 100 R-DN alleles and transformed them into other autoimmune mutants including camta3......A small set of Resistance proteins (R-proteins), guards plants against a large set of pathogen effector proteins that can suppress or subvert plant defense responses. The guard model attempts to solve this discrepancy by proposing that a major function of R proteins is to monitor host effector...... Cell Death 11 (acd11) leads to inappropriate activation of hypersensitive cell death. We have previously performed a large-scale survival screen for suppressors of acd11 and found that cell death in acd11 is suppressed by mutations in a gene encoding an R protein. We have thus proposed that loss of ACD...

  4. Suppressing autoimmunity in Arabidopsis thaliana with dominant negative immune receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greeff, Michael Christiaan

    Cell Death 11 (acd11) leads to inappropriate activation of hypersensitive cell death. We have previously performed a large-scale survival screen for suppressors of acd11 and found that cell death in acd11 is suppressed by mutations in a gene encoding an R protein. We have thus proposed that loss of ACD......11 results in HR cell death because LAZ5 directly or indirectly guards it. The LAZ5 alleles we first found were dominant negative (laz5-DN). The laz-DN allele mutation was found in a conserved functionally important ATP binding region, the P-loop. Site-directed DN mutant alleles can be made for other......A small set of Resistance proteins (R-proteins), guards plants against a large set of pathogen effector proteins that can suppress or subvert plant defense responses. The guard model attempts to solve this discrepancy by proposing that a major function of R proteins is to monitor host effector...

  5. how to evade the immune system?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HCV usually induces robust immune responses, but it frequently escapes the immune defense to establish persistent infection. The fact that HCV exists as an evolving quasispecies plays an important role in the selection of escape mutants. Furthermore, several viral proteins interfere with cellular functions, in particular, ...

  6. Unanticipated Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex culture inhibition by immune modulators, immune suppressants, a growth enhancer, and vitamins A and D: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, Robert J; Su, Liya; Shahidi, Azra; Brown, William D; Clifford, Anya; Brown, Sheldon T

    2014-09-01

    The development of novel antibiotics to treat multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis is time-consuming and expensive. Multiple immune modulators, immune suppressants, anti-inflammatories, and growth enhancers, and vitamins A and D, inhibit Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in culture. We studied the culture inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by these agents. Biosafety level two M. tuberculosis complex (ATCC 19015 and ATCC 25177) was studied in radiometric Bactec or MGIT culture. Agents evaluated included clofazimine, methotrexate, 6-mercaptopurine, cyclosporine A, rapamycin, tacrolimus, monensin, and vitamins A and D. All the agents mentioned above caused dose-dependent inhibition of the M. tuberculosis complex. There was no inhibition by the anti-inflammatory 5-aminosalicylic acid, which causes bacteriostatic inhibition of MAP. We conclude that, at a minimum, studies with virulent M. tuberculosis are indicated with the agents mentioned above, as well as with the thioamide 5-propothiouricil, which has previously been shown to inhibit the M. tuberculosis complex in culture. Our data additionally emphasize the importance of vitamins A and D in treating mycobacterial diseases. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. The habitat disruption induces immune-suppression and oxidative stress in honey bees

    OpenAIRE

    Morimoto, Tomomi; Kojima, Yuriko; Toki, Taku; Komeda, Yayoi; Yoshiyama, Mikio; Kimura, Kiyoshi; Nirasawa, Keijiro; Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko

    2011-01-01

    The honey bee is a major insect used for pollination of many commercial crops worldwide. Although the use of honey bees for pollination can disrupt the habitat, the effects on their physiology have never been determined. Recently, honey bee colonies have often collapsed when introduced in greenhouses for pollination in Japan. Thus, suppressing colony collapses and maintaining the number of worker bees in the colonies is essential for successful long-term pollination in greenhouses and recycli...

  8. Suppression of inflammatory immune responses in celiac disease by experimental hookworm infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry J McSorley

    Full Text Available We present immunological data from two clinical trials where the effect of experimental human hookworm (Necator americanus infection on the pathology of celiac disease was evaluated. We found that basal production of Interferon- (IFN-γ and Interleukin- (IL-17A from duodenal biopsy culture was suppressed in hookworm-infected participants compared to uninfected controls. Increased levels of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells in the circulation and mucosa are associated with active celiac disease. We show that this accumulation also occurs during a short-term (1 week oral gluten challenge, and that hookworm infection suppressed the increase of circulating CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells during this challenge period. When duodenal biopsies from hookworm-infected participants were restimulated with the immunodominant gliadin peptide QE65, robust production of IL-2, IFN-γ and IL-17A was detected, even prior to gluten challenge while participants were strictly adhering to a gluten-free diet. Intriguingly, IL-5 was produced only after hookworm infection in response to QE65. Thus we hypothesise that hookworm-induced TH2 and IL-10 cross-regulation of the TH1/TH17 inflammatory response may be responsible for the suppression of these responses during experimental hookworm infection.

  9. Role of Vitamin D in the Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Tamer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is suggested to be an important immune system regulator. 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH2D3, which is the active form of vitamin D, decreases the proliferation of purified T-helper (Th1 cells as well as the production of interferon (IFN, interleukin (IL-2, IL-5 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-. In Th2 cells, 1,25 (OH2D3 stimulates IL-4 and transforming growth factor TGF production, which in turn may suppress inflammatory T cell activity. In the absence of vitamin D signaling, the T cell compartment has a potentially stronger Th1 phenotype. Furthermore, 1,25(OH2D3 inhibits dendritic cell (DC differentiation and maturation, leading to down-regulated expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHC-II, co-stimulatory molecules and IL-12; enhances IL-10 production and promotes DC apoptosis. Because of these effects, 1,25(OH2D3 inhibits DC-dependent T cell activation. In vitro, it is determined that 1,25(OH2D3 stimulates phagocytosis and killing of bacteria by macrophages, but suppresses the antigen presenting capacity of these cells and dendritic cells. Additionally, Chen et al. have suggested that vitamin D might have a role in regulating antibody production. They have found that 1,25(OH2D3 not only inhibits activated B cell proliferation but induces their apoptosis as well. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 5-7

  10. Alamethicin Suppresses Methanogenesis and Promotes Acetogenesis in Bioelectrochemical Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Xiuping

    2015-03-27

    Microbial electrosynthesis (MES) systems with mixed cultures often generate a variety of gaseous and soluble chemicals. Methane is the primary end product in mixed-culture MES because it is the thermodynamically most favorable reduction product of CO2. Here, we show that the peptaibol alamethicin selectively suppressed the growth of methanogens in mixed-culture MES systems, resulting in a shift of the solution and cathode communities to an acetate-producing system dominated by Sporomusa, a known acetogenic genus in MES systems. Archaea in the methane-producing control were dominated by Methanobrevibacter species, but no Archaea were detected in the alamethicin-treated reactors. No methane was detected in the mixed-culture reactors treated with alamethicin over 10 cycles (∼ 3 days each). Instead, acetate was produced at an average rate of 115 nmol ml(-1) day(-1), similar to the rate reported previously for pure cultures of Sporomusa ovata on biocathodes. Mixed-culture control reactors without alamethicin generated methane at nearly 100% coulombic recovery, and no acetate was detected. These results show that alamethicin is effective for the suppression of methanogen growth in MES systems and that its use enables the production of industrially relevant organic compounds by the inhibition of methanogenesis.

  11. Daily Plasmodium yoelii infective mosquito bites do not generate protection or suppress previous immunity against the liver stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Kurt A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human populations that are naturally subjected to Plasmodium infection do not acquire complete protection against the liver stage of this parasite despite prolonged and frequent exposure. However, sterile immunity against Plasmodium liver stage can be achieved after repeated exposure to radiation attenuated sporozoites. The reasons for this different response remain largely unknown, but a suppressive effect of blood stage Plasmodium infection has been proposed as a cause for the lack of liver stage protection. Methods Using Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL, the response generated in mice subjected to daily infective bites from normal or irradiated mosquitoes was compared. The effect of daily-infected mosquito bites on mice that were previously immunized against P. yoelii liver stage was also studied. Results It was observed that while the bites of normal infected mosquitoes do not generate strong antibody responses and protection, the bites of irradiated mosquitoes result in high levels of anti-sporozoite antibodies and protection against liver stage Plasmodium infection. Exposure to daily infected mosquito bites did not eliminate the protection acquired previously with a experimental liver stage vaccine. Conclusions Liver stage immunity generated by irradiated versus normal P. yoelii infected mosquitoes is essentially different, probably because of the blood stage infection that follows normal mosquito bites, but not irradiated. While infective mosquito bites do not induce a protective liver stage response, they also do not interfere with previously acquired liver stage protective responses, even if they induce a complete blood stage infection. Considering that the recently generated anti-malaria vaccines induce only partial protection against infection, it is encouraging that, at least in mouse models, immunity is not negatively affected by subsequent exposure and infection with the parasite.

  12. Somatostatin receptors in the immune system and immune-mediated disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. ten Bokum (Annemieke)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe veitebrate body has at its disposal three different systems, which together help it to maintain homeostasis and to respond to environmental signals: the nervous system. the endocrine system and the immune system. Traditionally, these systems have been studied as separate entities.

  13. A case of preventable pulmonary tuberculosis in a Greenlandic, heavily immune suppressed patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne-Sophie H; Johansen, Isik S

    2012-01-01

    Immune modulating therapy, such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha inhibitors, is becoming increasingly more widespread in the treatment of many autoimmune diseases. One of the well-documented side effects of TNF-alpha inhibitors is an increased risk of reactivating latent tuberculosis infection...... initiating anti-TNF-α treatment and secondly, as part of routine tuberculosis contact tracing. He subsequently developed severe pulmonary tuberculosis and was hospitalised for 6 weeks....

  14. The role of intestinal microbiota and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purchiaroni, F; Tortora, A; Gabrielli, M; Bertucci, F; Gigante, G; Ianiro, G; Ojetti, V; Scarpellini, E; Gasbarrini, A

    2013-02-01

    The human gut is an ecosystem consisting of a great number of commensal bacteria living in symbiosis with the host. Several data confirm that gut microbiota is engaged in a dynamic interaction with the intestinal innate and adaptive immune system, affecting different aspects of its development and function. To review the immunological functions of gut microbiota and improve knowledge of its therapeutic implications for several intestinal and extra-intestinal diseases associated to dysregulation of the immune system. Significant articles were identified by literature search and selected based on content, including atopic diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases and treatment of these conditions with probiotics. Accumulating evidence indicates that intestinal microflora has protective, metabolic, trophic and immunological functions and is able to establish a "cross-talk" with the immune component of mucosal immunity, comprising cellular and soluble elements. When one or more steps in this fine interaction fail, autoimmune or auto-inflammatory diseases may occur. Furthermore, it results from the data that probiotics, used for the treatment of the diseases caused by the dysregulation of the immune system, can have a beneficial effect by different mechanisms. Gut microbiota interacts with both innate and adaptive immune system, playing a pivotal role in maintenance and disruption of gut immune quiescence. A cross talk between the mucosal immune system and endogenous microflora favours a mutual growth, survival and inflammatory control of the intestinal ecosystem. Based on these evidences, probiotics can be used as an ecological therapy in the treatment of immune diseases.  

  15. Overview of fish immune system and infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brief overview of the fish immune system and the emerging or re-emerging bacterial, viral, parasitic and fungal diseases considered to currently have a negative impact on aquaculture is presented. The fish immune system has evolved with both innate (natural resistance) and adaptive (acquired) immu...

  16. The reaction of the immune system of fish to vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, C.H.J.

    1985-01-01

    The studies presented in this thesis deal with the effect of bacterial antigens of Yersinia ruckeri and Aeromonashydrophila on the immune system of carp. The antigens were administered by injection or by bath treatment. The effect on the immune system was studied by

  17. Breakdown of the innate immune system by bacterial proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarman, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria have developed many strategies to circumvent our immune system to survive and colonize human tissues. One of these strategies is by secreting proteases that specifically target the innate immune system. Aureolysin is a metalloprotease from Staphylococcus aureus which target the main

  18. The University Immune System: Overcoming Resistance to Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilley, Ann; Godek, Marisha; Gilley, Jerry W.

    2009-01-01

    A university, similar to any other organization, has an immune system that erects a powerful barrier against change. This article discusses the university immune system and what can be done to counteract its negative effects and thereby allow change to occur.

  19. Immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus that encodes nonstructural proteins of the hepatitis C virus suppresses viral protein levels in mouse liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Sekiguchi

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C, which is caused by infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV, is a global health problem. Using a mouse model of hepatitis C, we examined the therapeutic effects of a recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV that encodes an HCV protein. We generated immunocompetent mice that each expressed multiple HCV proteins via a Cre/loxP switching system and established several distinct attenuated rVV strains. The HCV core protein was expressed consistently in the liver after polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid injection, and these mice showed chronic hepatitis C-related pathological findings (hepatocyte abnormalities, accumulation of glycogen, steatosis, liver fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Immunization with one rVV strain (rVV-N25, which encoded nonstructural HCV proteins, suppressed serum inflammatory cytokine levels and alleviated the symptoms of pathological chronic hepatitis C within 7 days after injection. Furthermore, HCV protein levels in liver tissue also decreased in a CD4 and CD8 T-cell-dependent manner. Consistent with these results, we showed that rVV-N25 immunization induced a robust CD8 T-cell immune response that was specific to the HCV nonstructural protein 2. We also demonstrated that the onset of chronic hepatitis in CN2-29((+/-/MxCre((+/- mice was mainly attributable to inflammatory cytokines, (tumor necrosis factor TNF-α and (interleukin IL-6. Thus, our generated mice model should be useful for further investigation of the immunological processes associated with persistent expression of HCV proteins because these mice had not developed immune tolerance to the HCV antigen. In addition, we propose that rVV-N25 could be developed as an effective therapeutic vaccine.

  20. Physical model of lean suppression pressure oscillation phenomena: steam condensation in the light water reactor pressure suppression system (PSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCauley, E.W.; Holman, G.S.; Aust, E.; Schwan, H.; Vollbrandt, J.

    1980-01-01

    Using the results of large scale multivent tests conducted by GKSS, a physical model of chugging is developed. The unique combination of accurate digital data and cinematic data has provided the derivation of a detailed, quantified correlation between the dynamic physical variables and the associated two-phase thermo-hydraulic phenomena occurring during lean suppression (chugging) phases of the loss-of-coolant accident in a boiling water reactor pressure suppression system

  1. Agonistic anti-CD40 antibody profoundly suppresses the immune response to infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Christina; Kauffmann, Susanne Ørding; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2007-01-01

    -CD40 treatment of MHC class II-deficient mice infected with a moderate dose of LCMV resulted in severe suppression of the antiviral CD8 T cell response and uncontrolled virus spread, rather than improved CD8 T cell immune surveillance. In Ab-treated wild-type mice, the antiviral CD8 T cell response......Previous work has shown that agonistic Abs to CD40 (anti-CD40) can boost weak CD8 T cell responses as well as substitute for CD4 T cell function during chronic gammaherpes virus infection. Agonistic anti-CD40 treatment has, therefore, been suggested as a potential therapeutic strategy...... in immunocompromised patients. In this study, we investigated whether agonistic anti-CD40 could substitute for CD4 T cell help in generating a sustained CD8 T cell response and prevent viral recrudescence following infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Contrary to expectations, we found that anti...

  2. Role of Cortistatin in the Stressed Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Mario; Gonzalez-Rey, Elena

    2017-01-01

    The immune system is faced with the daunting job of defending the organism against invading pathogens, while at the same time preserving the body integrity and maintaining tolerance to its own tissues. Loss of self-tolerance compromises immune homeostasis and leads to the onset of autoimmune disorders. The identification of endogenous factors that control immune tolerance and inflammation is a key goal for immunologists. Evidences from the last decade indicate that the neuropeptide cortistatin is one of the endogenous factors. Cortistatin is produced by immune cells and through its binding to various receptors, it exerts potent anti-inflammatory actions and participates in the maintenance of immune tolerance at multiple levels, especially in immunological disorders. Cortistatin emerges as a key element in the bidirectional communication between the neuroendocrine and immune systems aimed at regulating body homeostasis. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Effects of microbes on the immune system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fujinami, Robert S; Cunningham, Madeleine W

    2000-01-01

    .... The book synthesizes recent discoveries on the various mechanisms by which microbes subvert the immune response and on the role of these immunologic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases...

  4. CMV immune evasion and manipulation of the immune system with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Sarah E; Redeker, Anke; Arens, Ramon; van Baarle, Debbie; van den Berg, Sara P H; Benedict, Chris A; Čičin-Šain, Luka; Hill, Ann B; Wills, Mark R

    2017-06-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes numerous proteins and microRNAs that function to evade the immune response and allow the virus to replicate and disseminate in the face of a competent innate and acquired immune system. The establishment of a latent infection by CMV, which if completely quiescent at the level of viral gene expression would represent an ultimate in immune evasion strategies, is not sufficient for lifelong persistence and dissemination of the virus. CMV needs to reactivate and replicate in a lytic cycle of infection in order to disseminate further, which occurs in the face of a fully primed secondary immune response. Without reactivation, latency itself would be redundant for the virus. It is also becoming clear that latency is not a totally quiescent state, but is characterized by limited viral gene expression. Therefore, the virus also needs immune evasion strategies during latency. An effective immune response to CMV is required or viral replication will cause morbidity and ultimately mortality in the host. There is clearly a complex balance between virus immune evasion and host immune recognition over a lifetime. This poses the important question of whether long-term evasion or manipulation of the immune response driven by CMV is detrimental to health. In this meeting report, three groups used the murine model of CMV (MCMV) to examine if the contribution of the virus to immune senescence is set by the (i) initial viral inoculum, (ii) inflation of T cell responses, (iii) or the balance between functionally distinct effector CD4+ T cells. The work of other groups studying the CMV response in humans is discussed. Their work asks whether the ability to make immune responses to new antigens is compromised by (i) age and HCMV carriage, (ii) long-term exposure to HCMV giving rise to an overall immunosuppressive environment and increased levels of latent virus, or (iii) adapted virus mutants (used as potential vaccines) that have the capacity to

  5. Defence mechanisms and immune evasion in the interplay between the humane immune system and Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theander, T G

    1992-01-01

    in the liver and the spleen are avoided by sequestration of the mature parasites to the vascular endothelium. The interplay between the human defence system and the malaria parasite governs the symptomatology, the pathology and the development of immunity to the disease. These interactions are extremely......Immunity to P. falciparum malaria is developed as a result of long term exposure to the parasite and depends on immunological memory. The key directors in immune recognition and regulation of the immunological responses are the T-cells. It seems reasonable to propose that immunity is acquired when...... a critical mass of T-cells, recognizing relevant malaria antigens, has been developed. These T-cells mediate immunity by regulating macrophage and B-cell activity, but they may also act directly as cytotoxic cells on infected hepatocytes and through production of parasite-toxic cytokines. The potential...

  6. Aging of immune system: Immune signature from peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in 1068 healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ling; Jing, Xie; Qiu, Zhifeng; Cao, Wei; Jiao, Yang; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Li, Taisheng

    2016-05-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for several conditions including neurodegenerative, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Functional impairments in cellular pathways controlling genomic stability, and immune control have been identified. Biomarker of immune senescence is needed to improve vaccine response and to develop therapy to improve immune control. To identify phenotypic signature of circulating immune cells with aging, we enrolled 1068 Chinese healthy volunteers ranging from 18 to 80 years old. The decreased naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, increased memory CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, loss of CD28 expression on T cells and reverse trend of CD38 and HLA-DR, were significant for aging of immune system. Conversely, the absolute counts and percentage of NK cells and CD19+B cells maintained stable in aging individuals. The Chinese reference ranges of absolute counts and percentage of peripheral lymphocyte in this study might be useful for future clinical evaluation.

  7. Suppression of Th2 immune responses by the sulfated polysaccharide from Porphyra haitanensis in tropomyosin-sensitized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chaolan; Pan, Tzuming; Cao, Minjie; Liu, Qingmei; Zhang, Lingjing; Liu, Guangming

    2015-02-01

    The sulfated polysaccharide from Porphyra was hypothesized to exhibit immunoregulatory, anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory activity, but its anti-allergic activity is not fully understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to isolate sulfated polysaccharide from Porphyra haitanensis (PHPS) and investigate its anti-allergic potential using a tropomyosin (TM)-induced mouse allergy model. Intraperitoneal injection of PHPS suppressed the allergic reaction by modulating serum IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a levels in mice. In particular, when PHPS was injected prior to the first immunization with TM, the IgE level decreased by 34.2% compared with the control (PBS) group. Oral therapeutic administration of PHPS to TM-sensitized mice decreased histamine release and repaired the pathology in the jejunum of the small intestine. In vitro, the mRNA expressions of the TM-induced Th2 cytokines (interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5 and IL-13) in splenic lymphocytes were reduced by PHPS; however, the expression of Th1 and regulatory cytokines (interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and IL-10) were up-regulated in PHPS-treated splenic lymphocytes. In the splenic lymphocyte supernatant, the IL-4, IL-13 and IFN-γ levels were also regulated by PHPS. Moreover, PHPS induced IFN-γ secretion via the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) signaling pathways. Therefore, these results suggest that PHPS suppresses the TM-induced allergic reaction, possibly by modulating the imbalance of the Th1/Th2 immune response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Suppression or activation of immune responses by predicted secreted proteins of the soybean rust pathogen Phakopsora pachyrhizi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust fungi, such as Phakopsora pachyrhizi, are major threats to crop production. They form specialized haustoria that are intimately associated with plant cells. These haustoria have roles in acquiring nutrients and secreting effector proteins that manipulate host immune systems. Functional characte...

  9. Vitamin D and the Immune System

    OpenAIRE

    Aranow, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    It is now clear that vitamin D has important roles in addition to its classic effects on calcium and bone homeostasis. As the vitamin D receptor is expressed on immune cells (B cells, T cells and antigen presenting cells) and these immunologic cells are all are capable of synthesizing the active vitamin D metabolite, vitamin D has the capability of acting in an autocrine manner in a local immunologic milieu. Vitamin D can modulate the innate and adaptive immune responses. Deficiency in vitami...

  10. Viral Evasion and Subversion Mechanisms of the Host Immune System

    OpenAIRE

    Mehran Ghaemi-Bafghi; Alireza Haghparast

    2013-01-01

    Viruses are the most abundant and versatile pathogens which challenge the immune system and cause major threats to human health. Viruses employ differ¬ent mechanisms to evade host immune responses that we describe them under the following headings: Inhibition of humoral responses, Interference with interferons, Inhibition and modulation of cytokines and chemokines, Inhibitors of apoptosis, Evading CTLs and NKs, and modulating MHC function.Viruses inhibit humoral immunity in different ways whi...

  11. Autopolyreactivity Confers a Holistic Role in the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrameas, S

    2016-04-01

    In this review, we summarize and discuss some key findings from the study of naturally occurring autoantibodies. The B-cell compartment of the immune system appears to recognize almost all endogenous and environmental antigens. This ability is accomplished principally through autopolyreactive humoral and cellular immune receptors. This extended autopolyreactivity (1) along immunoglobulin gene recombination contributes to the immune system's ability to recognize a very large number of self and non-self constituents; and (2) generates a vast immune network that creates communication channels between the organism's interior and exterior. Thus, the immune system continuously evolves depending on the internal and external stimuli it encounters. Furthermore, this far-reaching network's existence implies activities resembling those of classical biological factors or activities that modulate the function of other classical biological factors. A few such antibodies have already been found. Another important concept is that natural autoantibodies are highly dependent on the presence or absence of commensal microbes in the organism. These results are in line with past and recent findings showing the fundamental influence of the microbiota on proper immune system development, and necessitate the existence of a host-microbe homeostasis. This homeostasis requires that the participating humoral and cellular receptors are able to recognize self-antigens and commensal microbes without damaging them. Autopolyreactive immune receptors expressing low affinity for both types of antigens fulfil this role. The immune system appears to play a holistic role similar to that of the nervous system. © 2016 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  12. Development of novel DIF-1 derivatives that selectively suppress innate immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van Hai; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Kubohara, Yuzuru; Takahashi, Katsunori; Katou, Yasuhiro; Oshima, Yoshiteru

    2015-08-01

    The multiple pharmacological activities of differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum led us to examine the use of DIF-1 as a 'drug template' to develop promising seed compounds for drug discovery. DIF-1 and its derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their regulatory activities in innate immune responses. We found two new derivatives (4d and 5e) with highly selective inhibitory activities against production of the antimicrobial peptide attacin in Drosophila S2 cells and against production of interleukin-2 in Jurkat cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Role of the Immune System in Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal S. Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system provides organisms with rapid and well-coordinated protection from foreign pathogens. However, under certain conditions of metabolic dysfunction, components of the innate immune system may be activated in the absence of external pathogens, leading to pathologic consequences. Indeed, there appears to be an intimate relationship between metabolic diseases and immune dysfunction; for example, macrophages are prime players in the initiation of a chronic inflammatory state in obesity which leads to insulin resistance. In response to increases in free fatty acid release from obese adipose depots, M1-polarized macrophages infiltrate adipose tissues. These M1 macrophages trigger inflammatory signaling and stress responses within cells that signal through JNK or IKKβ pathways, leading to insulin resistance. If overnutrition persists, mechanisms that counteract inflammation (such as M2 macrophages and PPAR signaling are suppressed, and the inflammation becomes chronic. Although macrophages are a principal constituent of obese adipose tissue inflammation, other components of the immune system such as lymphocytes and mast cells also contribute to the inflammatory cascade. Thus it is not merely an increased mass of adipose tissue that directly leads to attenuation of insulin action, but rather adipose tissue inflammation activated by the immune system in obese individuals that leads to insulin resistance.

  14. Molecular Interactions of Autophagy with the Immune System and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunho Jin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a highly conserved catabolic mechanism that mediates the degradation of damaged cellular components by inducing their fusion with lysosomes. This process provides cells with an alternative source of energy for the synthesis of new proteins and the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis in stressful environments. Autophagy protects against cancer by mediating both innate and adaptive immune responses. Innate immune receptors and lymphocytes (T and B are modulated by autophagy, which represent innate and adaptive immune responses, respectively. Numerous studies have demonstrated beneficial roles for autophagy induction as well as its suppression of cancer cells. Autophagy may induce either survival or death depending on the cell/tissue type. Radiation therapy is commonly used to treat cancer by inducing autophagy in human cancer cell lines. Additionally, melatonin appears to affect cancer cell death by regulating programmed cell death. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of autophagy and its regulation in cancer.

  15. Perinatal Environmental Effects on the Neonatal Immune System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thysen, Anna Hammerich

    2014-01-01

    are thought to be programmed in utero supporting a role of the early environment. The aim of the present PhD thesis was to study if known risk factors are imprinted in the immune system of newborns. The hypotheses were that cesarean section and season of birth would influence the immune signature in early...... that the seasonal-related maternal exposome is reflected in the newborn immune system. These data supports the notion that environmental factors imprints immunological variation already in the perinatal life. In conclusion, studies on early immunological priming may be critical in order to understanding early...... disease programming and subsequent to be able to direct future research on disease preventative strategies. We identified mode of delivery and birth season as important risk factors acting on the perinatal immune system. Collectively, our results suggest that the neonatal immune system may be imprinted...

  16. An Immunity-Based Anomaly Detection System with Sensor Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiteru Ishida

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an immunity-based anomaly detection system with sensor agents based on the specificity and diversity of the immune system. Each agent is specialized to react to the behavior of a specific user. Multiple diverse agents decide whether the behavior is normal or abnormal. Conventional systems have used only a single sensor to detect anomalies, while the immunity-based system makes use of multiple sensors, which leads to improvements in detection accuracy. In addition, we propose an evaluation framework for the anomaly detection system, which is capable of evaluating the differences in detection accuracy between internal and external anomalies. This paper focuses on anomaly detection in user’s command sequences on UNIX-like systems. In experiments, the immunity-based system outperformed some of the best conventional systems.

  17. An immunity-based anomaly detection system with sensor agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Takeshi; Ishida, Yoshiteru

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes an immunity-based anomaly detection system with sensor agents based on the specificity and diversity of the immune system. Each agent is specialized to react to the behavior of a specific user. Multiple diverse agents decide whether the behavior is normal or abnormal. Conventional systems have used only a single sensor to detect anomalies, while the immunity-based system makes use of multiple sensors, which leads to improvements in detection accuracy. In addition, we propose an evaluation framework for the anomaly detection system, which is capable of evaluating the differences in detection accuracy between internal and external anomalies. This paper focuses on anomaly detection in user's command sequences on UNIX-like systems. In experiments, the immunity-based system outperformed some of the best conventional systems.

  18. Primary immune system responders to nucleus pulposus cells: evidence for immune response in disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Murai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although intervertebral disc herniation and associated sciatica is a common disease, its molecular pathogenesis is not well understood. Immune responses are thought to be involved. This study provides direct evidence that even non-degenerated nucleus pulposus (NP cells elicit immune responses. An in vitro colony forming inhibition assay demonstrated the suppressive effects of autologous spleen cells on NP cells and an in vitro cytotoxicity assay showed the positive cytotoxic effects of natural killer (NK cells and macrophages on NP cells. Non-degenerated rat NP tissues transplanted into wild type rats and immune-deficient mice demonstrated a significantly higher NP cell survival rate in immune-deficient mice. Immunohistochemical staining showed the presence of macrophages and NK cells in the transplanted NP tissues. These results suggest that even non-degenerated autologous NP cells are recognized by macrophages and NK cells, which may have an immunological function in the early phase of disc herniation. These findings contribute to understanding resorption and the inflammatory reaction to disc herniation.

  19. Suppressive effects of subchronic aluminum overload on the splenic immune function may be related to oxidative stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xue; Jia, Shujie; Ma, Qinlong; Zhong, Min; Gao, Peng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhang, Yanwen

    2014-03-01

    Aluminum (Al) is widely used in daily life and was recently recognized as a possible source of human intoxication because of its ability to accumulate in organs. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of subchronic Al overload on splenic immune function in mice. Furthermore, we have preliminarily explored its mechanism. The Al overload model was established via intragastric administration of Al once a day for 60 days. The body weight, spleen weight, and splenic coefficient were determined. The concentration of Al in the spleen was detected by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The cytokine mRNA expression of spleen tissues was detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Biochemical methods were used to detect superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents in spleen tissue. Body weight, spleen weight, and cytokine mRNA expression of spleen tissues were significantly reduced by Al overload. SOD and GSH-Px activities were also decreased, while the MDA content was increased in subchronic Al overload mice. The results indicate that subchronic exposure to aluminum trichloride (AlCl3) would result in Al accumulation, which suppressed spleen immune function through a mechanism related to oxidative stress.

  20. The Development of Antimicrobial α-AApeptides that Suppress Pro-inflammatory Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhee, Shruti; Smith, Christina; Wu, Haifan; Li, Yaqiong; Manoj, Namitha; Qiao, Qiao; Khan, Zoya; Cao, Chuanhai

    2014-01-01

    Herein we describe the development of a new class of antimicrobial and anti-infective peptidomimetics – cyclic lipo-α-AApeptides. They have potent and broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against a range of clinically relevant pathogens, including both multidrug-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Fluorescence microscopy suggests that cyclic lipo-α-AApeptides kill bacteria by disrupting bacterial membranes, possibly through a mechanism similar to that of cationic host defense peptides (HDPs). Furthermore, the cyclic lipo-α-AApeptide can mimic cationic host-defense peptides by antagonizing Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling responses and suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Our results suggest that by mimicking host-defense peptides (HDPs), cyclic lipo-α-AApeptides may emerge to be a new class of antibiotic agents through direct bacteria killing, as well as novel anti-infective agents through immunomodulation. PMID:24677440

  1. E-cigarette use results in suppression of immune and inflammatory-response genes in nasal epithelial cells similar to cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth M; Clapp, Phillip W; Rebuli, Meghan E; Pawlak, Erica A; Glista-Baker, Ellen; Benowitz, Neal L; Fry, Rebecca C; Jaspers, Ilona

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke is known to result in impaired host defense responses and immune suppressive effects. However, the effects of new and emerging tobacco products, such as e-cigarettes, on the immune status of the respiratory epithelium are largely unknown. We conducted a clinical study collecting superficial nasal scrape biopsies, nasal lavage, urine, and serum from nonsmokers, cigarette smokers, and e-cigarette users and assessed them for changes in immune gene expression profiles. Smoking status was determined based on a smoking history and a 3- to 4-wk smoking diary and confirmed using serum cotinine and urine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) levels. Total RNA from nasal scrape biopsies was analyzed using the nCounter Human Immunology v2 Expression panel. Smoking cigarettes or vaping e-cigarettes resulted in decreased expression of immune-related genes. All genes with decreased expression in cigarette smokers (n = 53) were also decreased in e-cigarette smokers. Additionally, vaping e-cigarettes was associated with suppression of a large number of unique genes (n = 305). Furthermore, the e-cigarette users showed a greater suppression of genes common with those changed in cigarette smokers. This was particularly apparent for suppressed expression of transcription factors, such as EGR1, which was functionally associated with decreased expression of 5 target genes in cigarette smokers and 18 target genes in e-cigarette users. Taken together, these data indicate that vaping e-cigarettes is associated with decreased expression of a large number of immune-related genes, which are consistent with immune suppression at the level of the nasal mucosa. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Functionally redundant RXLR effectors from Phytophthora infestans act at different steps to suppress early flg22-triggered immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangzi Zheng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Genome sequences of several economically important phytopathogenic oomycetes have revealed the presence of large families of so-called RXLR effectors. Functional screens have identified RXLR effector repertoires that either compromise or induce plant defense responses. However, limited information is available about the molecular mechanisms underlying the modes of action of these effectors in planta. The perception of highly conserved pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs/MAMPs, such as flg22, triggers converging signaling pathways recruiting MAP kinase cascades and inducing transcriptional re-programming, yielding a generic anti-microbial response. We used a highly synchronizable, pathogen-free protoplast-based assay to identify a set of RXLR effectors from Phytophthora infestans (PiRXLRs, the causal agent of potato and tomato light blight that manipulate early stages of flg22-triggered signaling. Of thirty-three tested PiRXLR effector candidates, eight, called Suppressor of early Flg22-induced Immune response (SFI, significantly suppressed flg22-dependent activation of a reporter gene under control of a typical MAMP-inducible promoter (pFRK1-Luc in tomato protoplasts. We extended our analysis to Arabidopsis thaliana, a non-host plant species of P. infestans. From the aforementioned eight SFI effectors, three appeared to share similar functions in both Arabidopsis and tomato by suppressing transcriptional activation of flg22-induced marker genes downstream of post-translational MAP kinase activation. A further three effectors interfere with MAMP signaling at, or upstream of, the MAP kinase cascade in tomato, but not in Arabidopsis. Transient expression of the SFI effectors in Nicotiana benthamiana enhances susceptibility to P. infestans and, for the most potent effector, SFI1, nuclear localization is required for both suppression of MAMP signaling and virulence function. The present study provides a framework to decipher the

  3. Zero Suppression with Scalable Readout System (SRS) and APV25 FE Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Goentoro, Steven Lukas

    2015-01-01

    Zero suppression is a very useful algorithm in data acquisition and transfer. In this report, I would like to present the basic procedures of the application of Zero Suppression in the ordinary DAQ system that we have ( Date and Amore)

  4. Trade-off between responsiveness and noise suppression in biomolecular system responses to environmental cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V Ratushny

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available When living systems detect changes in their external environment their response must be measured to balance the need to react appropriately with the need to remain stable, ignoring insignificant signals. Because this is a fundamental challenge of all biological systems that execute programs in response to stimuli, we developed a generalized time-frequency analysis (TFA framework to systematically explore the dynamical properties of biomolecular networks. Using TFA, we focused on two well-characterized yeast gene regulatory networks responsive to carbon-source shifts and a mammalian innate immune regulatory network responsive to lipopolysaccharides (LPS. The networks are comprised of two different basic architectures. Dual positive and negative feedback loops make up the yeast galactose network; whereas overlapping positive and negative feed-forward loops are common to the yeast fatty-acid response network and the LPS-induced network of macrophages. TFA revealed remarkably distinct network behaviors in terms of trade-offs in responsiveness and noise suppression that are appropriately tuned to each biological response. The wild type galactose network was found to be highly responsive while the oleate network has greater noise suppression ability. The LPS network appeared more balanced, exhibiting less bias toward noise suppression or responsiveness. Exploration of the network parameter space exposed dramatic differences in system behaviors for each network. These studies highlight fundamental structural and dynamical principles that underlie each network, reveal constrained parameters of positive and negative feedback and feed-forward strengths that tune the networks appropriately for their respective biological roles, and demonstrate the general utility of the TFA approach for systems and synthetic biology.

  5. Trade-off between responsiveness and noise suppression in biomolecular system responses to environmental cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratushny, Alexander V; Shmulevich, Ilya; Aitchison, John D

    2011-06-01

    When living systems detect changes in their external environment their response must be measured to balance the need to react appropriately with the need to remain stable, ignoring insignificant signals. Because this is a fundamental challenge of all biological systems that execute programs in response to stimuli, we developed a generalized time-frequency analysis (TFA) framework to systematically explore the dynamical properties of biomolecular networks. Using TFA, we focused on two well-characterized yeast gene regulatory networks responsive to carbon-source shifts and a mammalian innate immune regulatory network responsive to lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The networks are comprised of two different basic architectures. Dual positive and negative feedback loops make up the yeast galactose network; whereas overlapping positive and negative feed-forward loops are common to the yeast fatty-acid response network and the LPS-induced network of macrophages. TFA revealed remarkably distinct network behaviors in terms of trade-offs in responsiveness and noise suppression that are appropriately tuned to each biological response. The wild type galactose network was found to be highly responsive while the oleate network has greater noise suppression ability. The LPS network appeared more balanced, exhibiting less bias toward noise suppression or responsiveness. Exploration of the network parameter space exposed dramatic differences in system behaviors for each network. These studies highlight fundamental structural and dynamical principles that underlie each network, reveal constrained parameters of positive and negative feedback and feed-forward strengths that tune the networks appropriately for their respective biological roles, and demonstrate the general utility of the TFA approach for systems and synthetic biology.

  6. Immune response induction in the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Babcock, Alicia

    2002-01-01

    The primary function of the immune response is protection of the host against infection with pathogens, including viruses. Since viruses can infect any tissue of the body, including the central nervous system (CNS), it is logical that cells of the immune system should equally have access to all...... tissues. Nevertheless, the brain and spinal cord are noted for their lack of immune presence. Relative to other organ systems, the CNS appears immunologically privileged. Furthermore, when immune responses do occur in the CNS, they are frequently associated with deleterious effects such as inflammatory...... and/or demyelinating pathology. This article will review the molecular and cellular dynamics of immune responses in the CNS, with particular emphasis on autoimmune inflammation, as has been studied in the authors' laboratory....

  7. Nociception and role of immune system in pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vivek; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Ahmed, Ahad S

    2015-09-01

    Both pain and inflammation are protective responses. However, these self-limiting conditions (with well-established negative feedback loops) become pathological if left uncontrolled. Both pain and inflammation can interact with each other in a multi-dimensional manner. These interactions are known to create an array of 'difficult to manage' pathologies. This review explains in detail the role of immune system and the related cells in peripheral sensitization and neurogenic inflammation. Various neuro-immune interactions are analyzed at peripheral, sensory and central nervous system levels. Innate immunity plays a critical role in central sensitization and in establishing acute pain as chronic condition. Moreover, inflammatory mediators also exhibit psychological effects, thus contributing towards the emotional elements associated with pain. However, there is also a considerable anti-inflammatory and analgesic role of immune system. This review also attempts to enlist various novel pharmacological approaches that exhibit their actions through modification of neuro-immune interface.

  8. Evaluation of mucosal and systemic immune responses elicited by GPI-0100- adjuvanted influenza vaccine delivered by different immunization strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Liu

    Full Text Available Vaccines for protection against respiratory infections should optimally induce a mucosal immune response in the respiratory tract in addition to a systemic immune response. However, current parenteral immunization modalities generally fail to induce mucosal immunity, while mucosal vaccine delivery often results in poor systemic immunity. In order to find an immunization strategy which satisfies the need for induction of both mucosal and systemic immunity, we compared local and systemic immune responses elicited by two mucosal immunizations, given either by the intranasal (IN or the intrapulmonary (IPL route, with responses elicited by a mucosal prime followed by a systemic boost immunization. The study was conducted in BALB/c mice and the vaccine formulation was an influenza subunit vaccine supplemented with GPI-0100, a saponin-derived adjuvant. While optimal mucosal antibody titers were obtained after two intrapulmonary vaccinations, optimal systemic antibody responses were achieved by intranasal prime followed by intramuscular boost. The latter strategy also resulted in the best T cell response, yet, it was ineffective in inducing nose or lung IgA. Successful induction of secretory IgA, IgG and T cell responses was only achieved with prime-boost strategies involving intrapulmonary immunization and was optimal when both immunizations were given via the intrapulmonary route. Our results underline that immunization via the lungs is particularly effective for priming as well as boosting of local and systemic immune responses.

  9. Geometric Distribution-Based Readers Scheduling Optimization Algorithm Using Artificial Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litian Duan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the multiple-reader environment (MRE of radio frequency identification (RFID system, multiple readers are often scheduled to interrogate the randomized tags via operating at different time slots or frequency channels to decrease the signal interferences. Based on this, a Geometric Distribution-based Multiple-reader Scheduling Optimization Algorithm using Artificial Immune System (GD-MRSOA-AIS is proposed to fairly and optimally schedule the readers operating from the viewpoint of resource allocations. GD-MRSOA-AIS is composed of two parts, where a geometric distribution function combined with the fairness consideration is first introduced to generate the feasible scheduling schemes for reader operation. After that, artificial immune system (including immune clone, immune mutation and immune suppression quickly optimize these feasible ones as the optimal scheduling scheme to ensure that readers are fairly operating with larger effective interrogation range and lower interferences. Compared with the state-of-the-art algorithm, the simulation results indicate that GD-MRSOA-AIS could efficiently schedules the multiple readers operating with a fairer resource allocation scheme, performing in larger effective interrogation range.

  10. DAF-16-dependent suppression of immunity during reproduction in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Sachiko; Begun, Jakob; Troemel, Emily R; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2008-02-01

    To further understand how the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans defends itself against pathogen attack, we analyzed enhanced pathogen resistance (epr) mutants obtained from a forward genetic screen. We also examined several well-characterized sterile mutants that exhibit an Epr phenotype. We found that sterility and pathogen resistance are highly correlated and that resistance in both epr and sterile mutants is dependent on DAF-16 activity. Our data indicate that a DAF-16-dependent signaling pathway distinct from previously described pathways is involved in the activation of genes that confer resistance to bacterial pathogens. The timing of DAF-16-dependent gene activation in sterile mutants coincides with the onset of embryonic development in wild-type animals, suggesting that signals from developing embryos normally downregulate the immune response.

  11. Impact of aging immune system on neurodegeneration and potential immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhanfeng; Zhao, Yang; Ruan, Linhui; Zhu, Linnan; Jin, Kunlin; Zhuge, Qichuan; Su, Dong-Ming; Zhao, Yong

    2017-10-01

    The interaction between the nervous and immune systems during aging is an area of avid interest, but many aspects remain unclear. This is due, not only to the complexity of the aging process, but also to a mutual dependency and reciprocal causation of alterations and diseases between both the nervous and immune systems. Aging of the brain drives whole body systemic aging, including aging-related changes of the immune system. In turn, the immune system aging, particularly immunosenescence and T cell aging initiated by thymic involution that are sources of chronic inflammation in the elderly (termed inflammaging), potentially induces brain aging and memory loss in a reciprocal manner. Therefore, immunotherapeutics including modulation of inflammation, vaccination, cellular immune therapies and "protective autoimmunity" provide promising approaches to rejuvenate neuroinflammatory disorders and repair brain injury. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries linking the aging immune system with the development of neurodegeneration. Additionally, we discuss potential rejuvenation strategies, focusing aimed at targeting the aging immune system in an effort to prevent acute brain injury and chronic neurodegeneration during aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Memorizing innate instructions requires a sufficiently specific adaptive immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghans, José A M; De Boer, Rob J

    2002-05-01

    During its primary encounter with a pathogen, the immune system has to decide which type of immune response is most appropriate. Based on signals from the innate immune system and the immunological context in which the pathogen is presented, responding lymphocytes will adopt a particular phenotype, e.g. secrete a particular profile of cytokines. Once stimulated, lymphocytes store the appropriate type of response by differentiating from a naive to a memory phenotype. This allows the appropriate type of immune reaction to be regenerated upon re-stimulation of those memory clones. We developed a computer simulation model in which cross-reacting effector/memory clones contribute to the immunological context of pathogens. If a pathogen is recognized by both naive clones and pre-existing effector/memory clones, the naive lymphocytes adopt the effector mechanism of the memory clone. The adaptive immune system thereby stores immunological decisions and somatically learns to induce the right type of immune response to pathogens sharing epitopes. The influence of effector/memory lymphocytes may be detrimental when they cross-react to new pathogens that require a different kind of immune response. Here, we show that the immune system needs to be sufficiently specific to avoid such mistakes and to profit from the information that is stored in effector/memory lymphocytes. Repertoire diversity is required to reconcile this specificity with reactivity against many pathogens.

  13. Focusing on Ciona intestinalis (Tunicata) innate immune system. Evolutionary implications

    OpenAIRE

    N Parrinello

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses based on molecular data provide compelling evidence that ascidians are of critical importance for studying chordate immune system evolution. The Ciona intestinalis draft genome sequence allows searches for phylogenetic relationships, gene cloning and expression of immunorelevant molecules. Acidians lack of the pivotal components of the vertebrate recombinatory adaptive immunity, i.e., MHC, TCRs and dimeric immunoglobulins. However, bioinformatic sequence analyses recogni...

  14. Immune system dysregulation in first-onset postpartum psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergink, V.; Burgerhout, K.M.; Weigelt, K.; Pop, V.J.M.; de Wit, H.; Drexhage, R.C.; Kushner, S.A.; Drexhage, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that dysregulation of the immune system represents an important vulnerability factor for mood disorders. Postpartum psychosis (PP) is a severe mood disorder occurring within 4 weeks after delivery, a period of heightened immune responsiveness and an altered

  15. Tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibits the suppressive effect of regulatory T cells on the hepatitis B virus-specific immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, Jeroen N; Woltman, Andrea M; Biesta, Paula J; Kusters, Johannes G; Kuipers, Ernst J; Janssen, Harry L A; van der Molen, Renate G

    2007-09-01

    Chronicity of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is characterized by a weak immune response to the virus. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) are present in increased numbers in the peripheral blood of chronic HBV patients, and these Treg are capable of suppressing the HBV-specific immune response. The aim of this study was to abrogate Treg-mediated suppression of the HBV-specific immune response. Therefore, Treg and a Treg-depleted cell fraction were isolated from peripheral blood of chronic HBV patients. Subsequently, the suppressive effect of Treg on the response to HBV core antigen (HBcAg) and tetanus toxin was compared, and the effect of exogenous tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1-beta (IL-1beta), or neutralizing antibodies against interleukin-10 (IL-10) or transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) on Treg-mediated suppression was determined. The results show that Treg of chronic HBV patients had a more potent suppressive effect on the response to HBcAg compared with the response to tetanus toxin. Neutralization of IL-10 and TGF-beta or exogenous IL-1beta had no effect on Treg-mediated suppression of the anti-HBcAg response, whereas exogenous TNF-alpha partially abrogated Treg-mediated suppression. Preincubation of Treg with TNF-alpha demonstrated that TNF-alpha had a direct effect on the Treg. No difference was observed in the type II TNF receptor expression by Treg from chronic HBV patients and healthy controls. Treg-mediated suppression of the anti-HBV response can be reduced by exogenous TNF-alpha. Because chronic HBV patients are known to produce less TNF-alpha, these data implicate an important role for TNF-alpha in the impaired antiviral response in chronic HBV.

  16. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Nesbitt, Loyd B.

    1997-01-01

    A system for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs.

  17. Promoting tissue regeneration by modulating the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julier, Ziad; Park, Anthony J; Briquez, Priscilla S; Martino, Mikaël M

    2017-04-15

    The immune system plays a central role in tissue repair and regeneration. Indeed, the immune response to tissue injury is crucial in determining the speed and the outcome of the healing process, including the extent of scarring and the restoration of organ function. Therefore, controlling immune components via biomaterials and drug delivery systems is becoming an attractive approach in regenerative medicine, since therapies based on stem cells and growth factors have not yet proven to be broadly effective in the clinic. To integrate the immune system into regenerative strategies, one of the first challenges is to understand the precise functions of the different immune components during the tissue healing process. While remarkable progress has been made, the immune mechanisms involved are still elusive, and there is indication for both negative and positive roles depending on the tissue type or organ and life stage. It is well recognized that the innate immune response comprising danger signals, neutrophils and macrophages modulates tissue healing. In addition, it is becoming evident that the adaptive immune response, in particular T cell subset activities, plays a critical role. In this review, we first present an overview of the basic immune mechanisms involved in tissue repair and regeneration. Then, we highlight various approaches based on biomaterials and drug delivery systems that aim at modulating these mechanisms to limit fibrosis and promote regeneration. We propose that the next generation of regenerative therapies may evolve from typical biomaterial-, stem cell-, or growth factor-centric approaches to an immune-centric approach. Most regenerative strategies have not yet proven to be safe or reasonably efficient in the clinic. In addition to stem cells and growth factors, the immune system plays a crucial role in the tissue healing process. Here, we propose that controlling the immune-mediated mechanisms of tissue repair and regeneration may support

  18. Splenic CD8(+) T cells secrete TGF-beta 1 to exert suppression in mice with anterior chamber-associated immune deviation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, L.Q.; He, H.; Yang, P.Z.; Lin, X.M.; Zhou, H.Y.; Huang, X.K.; Kijlstra, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background CD8(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) have been considered to be involved in a model of ocular-induced tolerance, known as anterior chamber-associated immune deviation (ACAID). The mechanisms of suppression by CD8(+) T cells in ACAID remain only poorly understood. TGF-beta 1 is considered as

  19. Influence of physical activity on the immune system in breast cancer patients during chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Thorsten; Jonat, Walter; Wesch, Daniela; Oberg, Hans-Heinrich; Adam-Klages, Sabine; Keller, Lisa; Röcken, Christoph; Mundhenke, Christoph

    2018-03-01

    Physical activity can impact the immune system in different ways, e.g. by alteration of the humoral and cellular immune response. Physical activity at medium intensity enhances numbers of cytotoxic T cells, NK cells and macrophages in healthy people. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of endurance and resistance training on the immune system in breast cancer patients during adjuvant chemotherapy. In a prospective, controlled and randomized intervention exploratory trial, 12-week supervised endurance or resistance training were compared with usual care twice a week. Endpoints were the absolute numbers of the immune cells such as CD3 + T lymphocytes including CD4 + - and CD8 + , αβ T cells, γδT cells, CD3 - /CD16 + /56 + NK cells and CD19 + B cells, before and after 12 weeks of treatment. Cell numbers were analyzed using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Despite different physical interventions in all groups immune cell count decreased in CD3 T cells including TCR αβ and CD4 T cells, NK cells and CD19 B cells 12 weeks after initiation of chemotherapy and start of the physical intervention program, while the reduction of γδ T cells and CD8 T cells is less prominent in the RT and UC group. Chemotherapy led to a decrease in nearly all measured immune cells. In this study, physical intervention with endurance or resistance training did not suppress cellular immunity any further. Larger multicenter trials are needed to evaluate the exact impact of sports intervention on immune cell subpopulations.

  20. Suppression of tumor growth in vivo by local and systemic 90K level increase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jallal, B; Powell, J; Zachwieja, J

    1995-01-01

    Expression levels of the immunostimulatory 90K antigen in mammary carcinoma, glioblastoma, and other tumor-derived cell lines inversely correlate with their tumorigenicity in athymic mice. Engineered enhancement of 90K expression results in significant (> 80%) tumor growth inhibition, not by dire...... signal for the body's cellular defense against pathogens, which in a subset of tumors is suppressed to allow cancer progression....... action on the tumor cell, but by stimulation of the residual cell-mediated immune defense of the nude mouse. Enhanced 90K level effects are both localized and systemic and involve induction of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in the tumor endothelium. The findings presented suggest a role for 90K as a molecular alarm...

  1. Biological Immune System Applications on Mobile Robot for Disabled People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songmin Jia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the service quality of service robots for the disabled, immune system is applied on robot for its advantages such as diversity, dynamic, parallel management, self-organization, and self-adaptation. According to the immune system theory, local environment condition sensed by robot is considered an antigen while robot is regarded as B-cell and possible node as antibody, respectively. Antibody-antigen affinity is employed to choose the optimal possible node to ensure the service robot can pass through the optimal path. The paper details the immune system applications on service robot and gives experimental results.

  2. Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against things like measles, ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  3. Survival of primates following orthotopic cardiac transplantation treated with total lymphoid irradiation and chemical immune suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennock, J.L.; Reitz, B.A.; Beiber, C.P.; Aziz, S.; Oyer, P.E.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.; Kaplan, H.S.; Stinson, E.B.; Shumway, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    Fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) has been used for attempts at induction of a donor-specific tolerant-like state in allograft recipients and for immunosuppressive effects. Cyclosporin A (Cy A) has been shown to suppress rejection of organ grafts in many species including man. The present study was designed to test the effectiveness of TLI in combination with either Cy A or rabbit anticynomolgus thymocyte globulin (ATG) and azathioprine. Thirty-one orthotopic cardiac allografts were performed using surface cooling and total circulatory arrest in outbred cynomolgus monkeys. TLI was administered preoperatively in fractions of 100 rad until a total of 600 or 1800 rad was achieved. Cy A was administered 17 mg/kg/day. All treatment groups demonstrated extended survival. Myocardial biopsies as early as 4 weeks were consistent with mild rejection in all treatment groups. No significant synergistic effect upon survival could be demonstrated utilizing TLI (1800 rad) plus ATG and azathioprine was associated with a high incidence of early death attributable to leukopenia and infection. Cy A alone or in combination with TLI was associated with the development of lymphoid malignancy

  4. A cannabigerol derivative suppresses immune responses and protects mice from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Carrillo-Salinas

    Full Text Available Phytocannabinoids that do not produce psychotropic effects are considered of special interest as novel therapeutic agents in CNS diseases. A cannabigerol quinone, the compound VCE-003, has been shown to alleviate symptoms in a viral model of multiple sclerosis (MS. Hence, we studied T cells and macrophages as targets for VCE-003 and its efficacy in an autoimmune model of MS. Proliferation, cell cycle, expression of activation markers was assessed by FACs in human primary T cells, and cytokine and chemokine production was evaluated. Transcription was studied in Jurkat cells and RAW264.7 cells were used to study the effects of VCE-003 on IL-17-induced macrophage polarization to a M1 phenotype. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE was induced by myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG₃₅₋₅₅ immunization and spinal cord pathology was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Neurological impairment was evaluated using disease scores. We show here that VCE-003 inhibits CD3/CD28-induced proliferation, cell cycle progression and the expression of the IL-2Rα and ICAM-1 activation markers in human primary T cells. VCE-003 inhibits the secretion of Th1/Th17 cytokines and chemokines in primary murine T cells, and it reduces the transcriptional activity of the IL-2, IL-17 and TNFα promoters induced by CD3/CD28. In addition, VCE-003 and JWH-133, a selective CB2 agonist, dampened the IL-17-induced polarization of macrophages to a pro-inflammatory M1 profile. VCE-003 also prevented LPS-induced iNOS expression in microglia. VCE-003 ameliorates the neurological defects and the severity of MOG-induced EAE in mice through CB2 and PPARγ receptor activation. A reduction in cell infiltrates, mainly CD4+ T cells, was observed, and Th1 and Th17 responses were inhibited in the spinal cord of VCE-003-treated mice, accompanied by weaker microglial activation, structural preservation of myelin sheets and reduced axonal damage. This study highlights the

  5. A cannabigerol derivative suppresses immune responses and protects mice from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Salinas, Francisco J; Navarrete, Carmen; Mecha, Miriam; Feliú, Ana; Collado, Juan A; Cantarero, Irene; Bellido, María L; Muñoz, Eduardo; Guaza, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Phytocannabinoids that do not produce psychotropic effects are considered of special interest as novel therapeutic agents in CNS diseases. A cannabigerol quinone, the compound VCE-003, has been shown to alleviate symptoms in a viral model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Hence, we studied T cells and macrophages as targets for VCE-003 and its efficacy in an autoimmune model of MS. Proliferation, cell cycle, expression of activation markers was assessed by FACs in human primary T cells, and cytokine and chemokine production was evaluated. Transcription was studied in Jurkat cells and RAW264.7 cells were used to study the effects of VCE-003 on IL-17-induced macrophage polarization to a M1 phenotype. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced by myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG₃₅₋₅₅) immunization and spinal cord pathology was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Neurological impairment was evaluated using disease scores. We show here that VCE-003 inhibits CD3/CD28-induced proliferation, cell cycle progression and the expression of the IL-2Rα and ICAM-1 activation markers in human primary T cells. VCE-003 inhibits the secretion of Th1/Th17 cytokines and chemokines in primary murine T cells, and it reduces the transcriptional activity of the IL-2, IL-17 and TNFα promoters induced by CD3/CD28. In addition, VCE-003 and JWH-133, a selective CB2 agonist, dampened the IL-17-induced polarization of macrophages to a pro-inflammatory M1 profile. VCE-003 also prevented LPS-induced iNOS expression in microglia. VCE-003 ameliorates the neurological defects and the severity of MOG-induced EAE in mice through CB2 and PPARγ receptor activation. A reduction in cell infiltrates, mainly CD4+ T cells, was observed, and Th1 and Th17 responses were inhibited in the spinal cord of VCE-003-treated mice, accompanied by weaker microglial activation, structural preservation of myelin sheets and reduced axonal damage. This study highlights the therapeutic potential

  6. Modeling evolution and immune system by cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezzi, M.

    2001-01-01

    In this review the behavior of two different biological systems is investigated using cellular automata. Starting from this spatially extended approach it is also tried, in some cases, to reduce the complexity of the system introducing mean-field approximation, and solving (or trying to solve) these simplified systems. It is discussed the biological meaning of the results, the comparison with experimental data (if available) and the different features between spatially extended and mean-field versions. The biological systems considered in this review are the following: Darwinian evolution in simple ecosystems and immune system response. In the first section the main features of molecular evolution are introduced, giving a short survey of genetics for physicists and discussing some models for prebiotic systems and simple ecosystems. It is also introduced a cellular automaton model for studying a set of evolving individuals in a general fitness landscape, considering also the effects of co-evolution. In particular the process of species formation (speciation) is described in sect. 5. The second part deals with immune system modeling. The biological features of immune response are discussed, as well as it is introduced the concept of shape space and of idiotypic network. More detailed reviews which deal with immune system models (mainly focused on idiotypic network models) can be found. Other themes here discussed: the applications of CA to immune system modeling, two complex cellular automata for humoral and cellular immune response. Finally, it is discussed the biological data and the general conclusions are drawn in the last section

  7. Artificial immune system approach for air combat maneuvering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneshige, John; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2007-04-01

    Since future air combat missions will involve both manned and unmanned aircraft, the primary motivation for this research is to enable unmanned aircraft with intelligent maneuvering capabilities. During air combat maneuvering, pilots use their knowledge and experience of maneuvering strategies and tactics to determine the best course of action. As a result, we try to capture these aspects using an artificial immune system approach. The biological immune system protects the body against intruders by recognizing and destroying harmful cells or molecules. It can be thought of as a robust adaptive system that is capable of dealing with an enormous variety of disturbances and uncertainties. However, another critical aspect of the immune system is that it can remember how previous encounters were successfully defeated. As a result, it can respond faster to similar encounters in the future. This paper describes how an artificial immune system is used to select and construct air combat maneuvers. These maneuvers are composed of autopilot mode and target commands, which represent the low-level building blocks of the parameterized system. The resulting command sequences are sent to a tactical autopilot system, which has been enhanced with additional modes and an aggressiveness factor for enabling high performance maneuvers. Just as vaccinations train the biological immune system how to combat intruders, training sets are used to teach the maneuvering system how to respond to different enemy aircraft situations. Simulation results are presented, which demonstrate the potential of using immunized maneuver selection for the purposes of air combat maneuvering.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms Used bySalmonellato Evade the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Bayard, Joaquín; Ramos-Morales, Francisco

    2018-01-01

    Human and animal pathogens are able to circumvent, at least temporarily, the sophisticated immune defenses of their hosts. Several serovars of the Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica have been used as models for the study of pathogen-host interactions. In this review we discuss the strategies used by Salmonella to evade or manipulate three levels of host immune defenses: physical barriers, innate immunity and adaptive immunity. During its passage through the digestive system, Salmonella has to face the acidic pH of the stomach, bile and antimicrobial peptides in the intestine, as well as the competition with resident microbiota. After host cell invasion, Salmonella manipulates inflammatory pathways and the autophagy process. Finally, Salmonella evades the adaptive immune system by interacting with dendritic cells, and T and B lymphocytes. Mechanisms allowing the establishment of persistent infections are also discussed.

  9. Single-cell technologies to study the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proserpio, Valentina; Mahata, Bidesh

    2016-02-01

    The immune system is composed of a variety of cells that act in a coordinated fashion to protect the organism against a multitude of different pathogens. The great variability of existing pathogens corresponds to a similar high heterogeneity of the immune cells. The study of individual immune cells, the fundamental unit of immunity, has recently transformed from a qualitative microscopic imaging to a nearly complete quantitative transcriptomic analysis. This shift has been driven by the rapid development of multiple single-cell technologies. These new advances are expected to boost the detection of less frequent cell types and transient or intermediate cell states. They will highlight the individuality of each single cell and greatly expand the resolution of current available classifications and differentiation trajectories. In this review we discuss the recent advancement and application of single-cell technologies, their limitations and future applications to study the immune system. © 2015 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The Yin and Yang of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Tumor Immunity—Suppression of Tumor Immunity in the Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are known as early responding, potent regulatory cells of immune responses. Besides their established role in the regulation of inflammation and autoimmune disease, numerous studies have shown that iNKT cells have important functions in tumor immunosurveillance and control of tumor metastasis. Tumor-infiltrating T helper 1 (TH1/cytotoxic T lymphocytes have been associated with a positive prognosis. However, inflammation has a dual role in cancer and chronic inflammation is believed to be a driving force in many cancers as exemplified in patients with inflammatory bowel disease that have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Indeed, NKT cells promote intestinal inflammation in human ulcerative colitis, and the associated animal model, indicating that NKT cells may favor tumor development in intestinal tissue. In contrast to other cancers, recent data from animal models suggest that iNKT cells promote tumor formation in the intestine by supporting an immunoregulatory tumor microenvironment and suppressing TH1 antitumor immunity. Here, we review the role of iNKT cells in suppression of tumor immunity in light of iNKT-cell regulation of intestinal inflammation. We also discuss suppression of immunity in other situations as well as factors that may influence whether iNKT cells have a protective or an immunosuppressive and tumor-promoting role in tumor immunity.

  11. Clonal Selection Based Artificial Immune System for Generalized Pattern Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsberger, Terry

    2011-01-01

    The last two decades has seen a rapid increase in the application of AIS (Artificial Immune Systems) modeled after the human immune system to a wide range of areas including network intrusion detection, job shop scheduling, classification, pattern recognition, and robot control. JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) has developed an integrated pattern recognition/classification system called AISLE (Artificial Immune System for Learning and Exploration) based on biologically inspired models of B-cell dynamics in the immune system. When used for unsupervised or supervised classification, the method scales linearly with the number of dimensions, has performance that is relatively independent of the total size of the dataset, and has been shown to perform as well as traditional clustering methods. When used for pattern recognition, the method efficiently isolates the appropriate matches in the data set. The paper presents the underlying structure of AISLE and the results from a number of experimental studies.

  12. Crosstalk between cancer and the neuro-immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuol, Nyanbol; Stojanovska, Lily; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Nurgali, Kulmira

    2018-02-15

    In the last decade, understanding of cancer initiation and progression has been given much attention with studies mainly focusing on genetic abnormalities. Importantly, cancer cells can influence their microenvironment and bi-directionally communicate with other systems such as the immune system. The nervous system plays a fundamental role in regulating immune responses to a range of disease states including cancer. Its dysfunction influences the progression of cancer. The role of the immune system in tumor progression is of relevance to the nervous system since they can bi-directionally communicate via neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, common receptors, and, cytokines. However, cross-talk between these cells is highly complex in nature, and numerous variations are possible according to the type of cancer involved. The neuro-immune interaction is essential in influencing cancer development and progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The echinoderm immune system. Characters shared with vertebrate immune systems and characters arising later in deuterostome phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L C; Davidson, E H

    1994-04-15

    In summary, the characters of the echinoderm immune system that we review here can be considered to illuminate the baseline nonadaptive immune systems that were our original deuterostome heritage. We still retain--and greatly rely upon--similarly functioning, nonadaptive cellular defense systems. It is worth stressing that sea urchins are long lived, normally healthy animals that display remarkable abilities to heal wounds and combat major infections. From an external point of view, their immune systems obviously work very well. Thus, their cellular defense systems are extremely sensitive, and they respond rapidly to minor perturbations, all without any specific adaptive capabilities. These systems probably function through the transduction of signals conveying information on injury and infection, just as do the equivalent systems that underlie and back up our own adaptive immune systems, and that provide the initial series of defenses against pathogenic invasions. Many extremely interesting questions remain regarding the evolution of the deuterostome immune response. Are the echinoderm and tunicate systems the same, or have the protochordates augmented the basic phagocyte system with an as yet unidentified chordate-like character? Do the jawless fishes produce Igs that would make them similar to the sharks, or are they vertebrates without an Ig system that essentially rely on an invertebrate-like, nonspecific, activated phagocyte type of immune system? How do sharks regulate their immune system without T cells and MHC class I? How do they avoid producing autoantibodies? Future research will not only answer these questions, but those answers will also be enlightening with regard to the origins of the mammalian immune system in which ancient functions and subsystems remain.

  14. Pulmonary contusion primes systemic innate immunity responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, J Jason; Martin, R S; Yoza, Barbara K; Wells, Jonathan D; Meredith, J W; McCall, Charles E

    2009-07-01

    Traumatic injury may result in an exaggerated response to subsequent immune stimuli such as nosocomial infection. This "second hit" phenomenon and molecular mechanism(s) of immune priming by traumatic lung injury, specifically, pulmonary contusion, remain unknown. We used an animal model of pulmonary contusion to determine whether the injury resulted in priming of the innate immune response and to test the hypothesis that resuscitation fluids could attenuate the primed response to a second hit. Male, 8 to 9 weeks, C57/BL6 mice with a pulmonary contusion were challenged by a second hit of intratracheal administration of the Toll-like receptor 4 agonist, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 50 microg) 24 hours after injury (injury + LPS). Other experimental groups were injury + vehicle or LPS alone. A separate group was injured and resuscitated by 4 cc/kg of hypertonic saline (HTS) or Lactated Ringer's (LR) resuscitation before LPS challenge. Mice were killed 4 hours after LPS challenge and blood, bronchoalveolar lavage, and tissue were isolated and analyzed. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni multiple comparison posttest for significant differences (*p < or = 0.05). Injury + LPS showed immune priming observed by lung injury histology and increased bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophilia, lung myeloperoxidase and serum IL-6, CXCL1, and MIP-2 levels when compared with injury + vehicle or LPS alone. After injury, resuscitation with HTS, but not Lactated Ringer's was more effective in attenuating the primed response to a second hit. Pulmonary contusion primes innate immunity for an exaggerated response to a second hit with the Toll-like receptor 4 agonist, LPS. We observed synergistic increases in inflammatory mediator expression in the blood and a more severe lung injury in injured animals challenged with LPS. This priming effect was reduced when HTS was used to resuscitate the animal after lung contusion.

  15. Country Immunization Information System Assessments - Kenya, 2015 and Ghana, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Colleen; Clarke, Kristie E N; Grevendonk, Jan; Dolan, Samantha B; Ahmed, Hussein Osman; Kamau, Peter; Ademba, Peter Aswani; Osadebe, Lynda; Bonsu, George; Opare, Joseph; Diamenu, Stanley; Amenuvegbe, Gregory; Quaye, Pamela; Osei-Sarpong, Fred; Abotsi, Francis; Ankrah, Joseph Dwomor; MacNeil, Adam

    2017-11-10

    The collection, analysis, and use of data to measure and improve immunization program performance are priorities for the World Health Organization (WHO), global partners, and national immunization programs (NIPs). High quality data are essential for evidence-based decision-making to support successful NIPs. Consistent recording and reporting practices, optimal access to and use of health information systems, and rigorous interpretation and use of data for decision-making are characteristics of high-quality immunization information systems. In 2015 and 2016, immunization information system assessments (IISAs) were conducted in Kenya and Ghana using a new WHO and CDC assessment methodology designed to identify root causes of immunization data quality problems and facilitate development of plans for improvement. Data quality challenges common to both countries included low confidence in facility-level target population data (Kenya = 50%, Ghana = 53%) and poor data concordance between child registers and facility tally sheets (Kenya = 0%, Ghana = 3%). In Kenya, systemic challenges included limited supportive supervision and lack of resources to access electronic reporting systems; in Ghana, challenges included a poorly defined subdistrict administrative level. Data quality improvement plans (DQIPs) based on assessment findings are being implemented in both countries. IISAs can help countries identify and address root causes of poor immunization data to provide a stronger evidence base for future investments in immunization programs.

  16. Ageing and the immune system: focus on macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, E; Fitzgerald, D C

    2015-03-01

    A fully functioning immune system is essential in order to maintain good health. However, the immune system deteriorates with advancing age, and this contributes to increased susceptibility to infection, autoimmunity, and cancer in the older population. Progress has been made in identifying age-related defects in the adaptive immune system. In contrast, relatively little research has been carried out on the impact of ageing on the innate immune response. This area requires further research as the innate immune system plays a crucial role in protection against infection and represents a first line of defence. Macrophages are central effector cells of the innate immune system and have many diverse functions. As a result, age-related impairments in macrophage function are likely to have important consequences for the health of the older population. It has been reported that ageing in macrophages impacts on many processes including toll-like receptor signalling, polarisation, phagocytosis, and wound repair. A detailed understanding of the impact of ageing on macrophages is required in order to develop therapeutics that will boost immune responses in the older population.

  17. A novel, polymer-coated oncolytic measles virus overcomes immune suppression and induces robust antitumor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaname Nosaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although various therapies are available to treat cancers, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, cancer has been the leading cause of death in Japan for the last 30 years, and new therapeutic modalities are urgently needed. As a new modality, there has recently been great interest in oncolytic virotherapy, with measles virus being a candidate virus expected to show strong antitumor effects. The efficacy of virotherapy, however, was strongly limited by the host immune response in previous clinical trials. To enhance and prolong the antitumor activity of virotherapy, we combined the use of two newly developed tools: the genetically engineered measles virus (MV-NPL and the multilayer virus-coating method of layer-by-layer deposition of ionic polymers. We compared the oncolytic effects of this polymer-coated MV-NPL with the naked MV-NPL, both in vitro and in vivo. In the presence of anti-MV neutralizing antibodies, the polymer-coated virus showed more enhanced oncolytic activity than did the naked MV-NPL in vitro. We also examined antitumor activities in virus-treated mice. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity and antitumor activities were higher in mice treated with polymer-coated MV-NPL than in mice treated with the naked virus. This novel, polymer-coated MV-NPL is promising for clinical cancer therapy in the future.

  18. Measles, immune suppression and vaccination: direct and indirect nonspecific vaccine benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    The measles virus is among the most transmissible viruses known to infect humans. Prior to measles vaccination programs, measles infected over 95% of all children and was responsible for over 4 million deaths each year. Measles vaccination programs have been among the greatest public health achievements reducing, eliminating endemic measles in the whole of the Americas and across much of the globe. Where measles vaccines are introduced, unexpectedly large reductions in all-cause childhood mortality have been observed. These gains appear to derive in part from direct heterologous benefits of measles vaccines that enhance innate and adaptive immune responses. Additionally, by preventing measles infections, vaccination prevents measles-associated short- and long-term immunomodulating effects. Before vaccination, these invisible hallmarks of measles infections increased vulnerability to non-measles infections in nearly all children for weeks, months, or years following acute infections. By depleting measles incidence, vaccination has had important indirect benefits to reduce non-measles mortality. Delineating the relative importance of these two modes of survival benefits following measles vaccine introduction is of critical public health importance. While both support continued unwavering global commitments to measles vaccination programs until measles eradication is complete, direct heterologous benefits of measles vaccination further support continued commitment to measles vaccination programs indefinitely. We discuss what is known about direct and indirect nonspecific measles vaccine benefits, and their implications for continued measles vaccination programs. © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of Traditional Medicines III: The Mechanism of Immune ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These results show that PHELA did not stimulate Th1 cytokines of a normal immune system but stimulated them when the immune system was suppressed by cyclosporine-A. In conclusion, PHELA is an immune-stimulant to a compromised immune system. Key words: PHELA, traditional medicine, cyclosporine-A, cytokines, ...

  20. Ralstonia solanacearum Type III Effector RipAY Is a Glutathione-Degrading Enzyme That Is Activated by Plant Cytosolic Thioredoxins and Suppresses Plant Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takafumi Mukaihara

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum uses a large repertoire of type III effector proteins to succeed in infection. To clarify the function of effector proteins in host eukaryote cells, we expressed effectors in yeast cells and identified seven effector proteins that interfere with yeast growth. One of the effector proteins, RipAY, was found to share homology with the ChaC family proteins that function as γ-glutamyl cyclotransferases, which degrade glutathione (GSH, a tripeptide that plays important roles in the plant immune system. RipAY significantly inhibited yeast growth and simultaneously induced rapid GSH depletion when expressed in yeast cells. The in vitro GSH degradation activity of RipAY is specifically activated by eukaryotic factors in the yeast and plant extracts. Biochemical purification of the yeast protein identified that RipAY is activated by thioredoxin TRX2. On the other hand, RipAY was not activated by bacterial thioredoxins. Interestingly, RipAY was activated by plant h-type thioredoxins that exist in large amounts in the plant cytosol, but not by chloroplastic m-, f-, x-, y- and z-type thioredoxins, in a thiol-independent manner. The transient expression of RipAY decreased the GSH level in plant cells and affected the flg22-triggered production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and expression of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI marker genes in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. These results indicate that RipAY is activated by host cytosolic thioredoxins and degrades GSH specifically in plant cells to suppress plant immunity.

  1. Food allergens and mucosal immune systems with special reference to recognition of food allergens by gut-associated lymphoid tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Kaminogawa

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy, triggered by an aberrant immune response elicited by orally ingested food allergens, is generated through a complicated mechanism because the allergen interacts with the mucosal immune system (the gut- associated lymphoid tissue, GALT and the resulting immune response affects the generation of allergy. This review will describe the process by which antigens or allergens are recognized by the GALT and the characteristic immune responses induced thereafter. Orally administered antigens induce distinct immune responses in the Peyer's patches, lamina propria and the intestinal epithelium. In addition to these local immune responses in the gut, ingested antigens are known to affect systemic immunity. These may induce a suppressed state of systemic immune responsiveness, which is called oral tolerance, or in some cases they may elicit a systemic IgE antibody response which may lead to allergic reactions. Information on the regions on food allergens recognized by T cells and IgE antibodies is important in understanding the fates of food allergens after being recognized by the GALT. The structure of T and B cell epitopes on food allergens and the possibility of modulation of allergic reactions by amino-acid substituted analogs of allergen- derived peptides will also be discussed.

  2. The Immune System in Obesity: Developing Paradigms Amidst Inconvenient Truths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Madhur; Kern, Philip A; Nikolajczyk, Barbara S

    2017-08-15

    Adipose tissue (AT) houses both innate and adaptive immune systems that are crucial for preserving AT function and metabolic homeostasis. In this review, we summarize recent information regarding progression of obesity-associated AT inflammation and insulin resistance. We additionally consider alterations in AT distribution and the immune system in males vs. females and among different racial populations. Innate and adaptive immune cell-derived inflammation drives insulin resistance both locally and systemically. However, new evidence also suggests that the immune system is equally vital for adipocyte differentiation and protection from ectopic lipid deposition. Furthermore, roles of anti-inflammatory immune cells such as regulatory T cells, "M2-like" macrophages, eosinophils, and mast cells are being explored, primarily due to promise of immunotherapeutic applications. Both immune responses and AT distribution are strongly influenced by factors like sex and race, which have been largely underappreciated in the field of metabolically-associated inflammation, or meta-flammation. More studies are required to recognize factors that switch inflammation from controlled to uncontrolled in obesity-associated pathogenesis and to integrate the combined effects of meta-flammation and immunometabolism. It is critical to recognize that the AT-associated immune system can be alternately beneficial and destructive; therefore, simply blocking immune responses early in obesity may not be the best clinical approach. The dearth of information on gender and race-associated disparities in metabolism, AT distribution, and the immune system suggest that a greater understanding of such differences will be critical to develop personalized treatments for obesity and the associated metabolic dysfunction.

  3. New hybrid technique for impulsive noise suppression in OFDM systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, A.; Zeb, A.; Sheikh, S.A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new hybrid technique employing RS (Reed Solomon) coding and adaptive filter for impulsive noise suppression in OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) systems is presented. Adaptive filter creates a more accurate estimate of the original OFDM signal after impulsive noise cancellation. The residual impulsive noise is further mitigated by RS decoder in the second stage of proposed technique. Three members of adaptive filters family i.e. NLMS (Normalized Least Mean Square) algorithm, RLS (Recursive Least Square) algorithm and Bhagyashri algorithm are tested with RS decoder in the proposed hybrid technique. Furthermore, the results in terms of steady state MSE (Mean Square Error) reduction, BER (Bit Error Rate) improvement and SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) enhancement confirm the effectiveness of the proposed dual faceted technique when compared with the recently reported techniques in literature. (author)

  4. Noise Analysis of MAIA System and Possible Noise Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Svihlik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the noise analysis and noise suppression in a system for double station observation of the meteors now known as MAIA (Meteor Automatic Imager and Analyzer. The noise analysis is based on acquisition of testing video sequences in different light conditions and their further statistical evaluation. The main goal is to find a suitable noise model and subsequently determine if the noise is signal dependent or not. Noise and image model in the wavelet domain should be based on Gaussian mixture model (GMM or Generalized Laplacian Model (GLM and the model parameters should be estimated by moment method. Furthermore, noise should be modeled by GMM or GLM also in the space domain. GMM and GLM allow to model various types of probability density functions. Finally the advanced denoising algorithm using Bayesian estimator is applied and its performance is verified.

  5. The Immune System Bridges the Gut Microbiota with Systemic Energy Homeostasis: Focus on TLRs, Mucosal Barrier, and SCFAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiljar, Martina; Merkler, Doron; Trajkovski, Mirko

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiota is essential for the development and regulation of the immune system and the metabolism of the host. Germ-free animals have altered immunity with increased susceptibility to immunologic diseases and show metabolic alterations. Here, we focus on two of the major immune-mediated microbiota-influenced components that signal far beyond their local environment. First, the activation or suppression of the toll-like receptors (TLRs) by microbial signals can dictate the tone of the immune response, and they are implicated in regulation of the energy homeostasis. Second, we discuss the intestinal mucosal surface is an immunologic component that protects the host from pathogenic invasion, is tightly regulated with regard to its permeability and can influence the systemic energy balance. The short chain fatty acids are a group of molecules that can both modulate the intestinal barrier and escape the gut to influence systemic health. As modulators of the immune response, the microbiota-derived signals influence functions of distant organs and can change susceptibility to metabolic diseases.

  6. The Immune System Bridges the Gut Microbiota with Systemic Energy Homeostasis: Focus on TLRs, Mucosal Barrier, and SCFAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiljar, Martina; Merkler, Doron; Trajkovski, Mirko

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiota is essential for the development and regulation of the immune system and the metabolism of the host. Germ-free animals have altered immunity with increased susceptibility to immunologic diseases and show metabolic alterations. Here, we focus on two of the major immune-mediated microbiota-influenced components that signal far beyond their local environment. First, the activation or suppression of the toll-like receptors (TLRs) by microbial signals can dictate the tone of the immune response, and they are implicated in regulation of the energy homeostasis. Second, we discuss the intestinal mucosal surface is an immunologic component that protects the host from pathogenic invasion, is tightly regulated with regard to its permeability and can influence the systemic energy balance. The short chain fatty acids are a group of molecules that can both modulate the intestinal barrier and escape the gut to influence systemic health. As modulators of the immune response, the microbiota-derived signals influence functions of distant organs and can change susceptibility to metabolic diseases. PMID:29163467

  7. The mucosal immune system: From dentistry to vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyono, Hiroshi; Azegami, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is the beginning of the aero-digestive tract, which is covered by mucosal epithelium continuously under the threat of invasion of pathogens, it is thus protected by the mucosal immune system. In the early phase of our scientific efforts for the demonstration of mucosal immune system, dental science was one of major driving forces due to their foreseeability to use oral immunity for the control of oral diseases. The mucosal immune system is divided functionally into, but interconnected inductive and effector sites. Intestinal Peyer's patches (PPs) are an inductive site containing antigen-sampling M cells and immunocompetent cells required to initiate antigen-specific immune responses. At effector sites, PP-originated antigen-specific IgA B cells become plasma cells to produce polymeric IgA and form secretory IgA by binding to poly-Ig receptor expressed on epithelial cells for protective immunity. The development of new-generation mucosal vaccines, including the rice-based oral vaccine MucoRice, on the basis of the coordinated mucosal immune system is a promising strategy for the control of mucosal infectious diseases.

  8. The immune system strikes back: cellular immune responses against indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Baek Sørensen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO exerts an well established immunosuppressive function in cancer. IDO is expressed within the tumor itself as well as in antigen-presenting cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes, where it promotes the establishment of peripheral immune tolerance to tumor antigens. In the present study, we tested the notion whether IDO itself may be subject to immune responses.The presence of naturally occurring IDO-specific CD8 T cells in cancer patients was determined by MHC/peptide stainings as well as ELISPOT. Antigen specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL from the peripheral blood of cancer patients were cloned and expanded. The functional capacity of the established CTL clones was examined by chrome release assays. The study unveiled spontaneous cytotoxic T-cell reactivity against IDO in peripheral blood as well as in the tumor microenvironment of different cancer patients. We demonstrate that these IDO reactive T cells are indeed peptide specific, cytotoxic effector cells. Hence, IDO reactive T cells are able to recognize and kill tumor cells including directly isolated AML blasts as well as IDO-expressing dendritic cells, i.e. one of the major immune suppressive cell populations.IDO may serve as an important and widely applicable target for anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies. Furthermore, as emerging evidence suggests that IDO constitutes a significant counter-regulatory mechanism induced by pro-inflammatory signals, IDO-based immunotherapy holds the promise to boost anti-cancer immunotherapy in general.

  9. ALLERGIC ASTHMA AND THE DEVELOPING IMMUNE SYSTEM: A PILOT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: The predisposition towards atopic disease begins early in life, and that the risk of developing asthma is heightened following prenatal exposure to some compounds. Nonetheless, the effect of gestational aeroallergen exposure on the developing immune system is unclear....

  10. The Immune System, Cytokines, and Biomarkers in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Anne; Glozier, Nicholas; Dale, Russell; Guastella, Adam J

    2017-04-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental condition characterized by variable impairments in communication and social interaction as well as restricted interests and repetitive behaviors. Heterogeneity of presentation is a hallmark. Investigations of immune system problems in ASD, including aberrations in cytokine profiles and signaling, have been increasing in recent times and are the subject of ongoing interest. With the aim of establishing whether cytokines have utility as potential biomarkers that may define a subgroup of ASD, or function as an objective measure of response to treatment, this review summarizes the role of the immune system, discusses the relationship between the immune system, the brain, and behavior, and presents previously-identified immune system abnormalities in ASD, specifically addressing the role of cytokines in these aberrations. The roles and identification of biomarkers are also addressed, particularly with respect to cytokine profiles in ASD.

  11. Graphene and the Immune System: A Romance of Many Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sourav P; Bottini, Massimo; Fadeel, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    Graphene-based materials (GBMs) are emerging as attractive materials for biomedical applications. Understanding how these materials are perceived by and interact with the immune system is of fundamental importance. Phagocytosis is a major mechanism deployed by the immune system to remove pathogens, particles, and cellular debris. Here, we discuss recent studies on the interactions of GBMs with different phagocytic cells, including macrophages, neutrophils, and dendritic cells. The importance of assessing GBMs for endotoxin contamination is discussed as this may skew results. We also explore the role of the bio-corona for interactions of GBMs with immune cells. Finally, we highlight recent evidence for direct plasma membrane interactions of GBMs.

  12. A mathematical model of radiation effect on the immunity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnova, O.A.

    1984-01-01

    A mathematical model, simulating the effect of ionizing radiation on the dynamics of humoral immune reaction is suggested. It represents the system of nonlinear differential equations and is realized in the form of program in Fortran computer language. The model describes the primary immune reaction of nonirradiated organism on T-independent antigen, reflects the postradiation lymphopoiesis dynamics in nonimmunized mammals, simulates the processes of injury and recovery of the humoral immunity system under the combined effect of ionizing radiation and antigenic stimulation. The model can be used for forecasting imminity state in irradiated mammals

  13. HIV and Malnutrition: Effects on Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Duggal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV or human immunodeficiency virus infection has assumed worldwide proportions and importance in just a span of 25 years. Continuous research is being done in many parts of the world regarding its treatment and vaccine development, and a lot of money has flown into this. However, fully understanding the mechanisms of immune depletion has still not been possible. The focus has also been on improving the quality of life of people living with HIV/AIDS through education, counselling, and nutritional support. Malnutrition further reduces the capacity of the body to fight this infection by compromising various immune parameters. Knowledge of essential components of nutrition and incorporating them in the management goes a long way in improving quality of life and better survival in HIV-infected patients.

  14. Systems biology of neutrophil differentiation and immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilgaard-Mönch, Kim; Porse, Bo T; Borregaard, Niels

    2005-01-01

    Systems biology has emerged as a new scientific field, which aims at investigating biological processes at the genomic and proteomic levels. Recent studies have unravelled aspects of neutrophil differentiation and immune responses at the systems level using high-throughput technologies....... These studies have identified a plethora of novel effector proteins stored in the granules of neutrophils. In addition, these studies provide evidence that neutrophil differentiation and immune response are governed by a highly coordinated transcriptional programme that regulates cellular fate and function...

  15. Heat dissipation does not suppress an immune response in laboratory mice divergently selected for basal metabolic rate (BMR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Książek, Aneta; Konarzewski, Marek

    2016-05-15

    The capacity for heat dissipation is considered to be one of the most important constraints on rates of energy expenditure in mammals. To date, the significance of this constraint has been tested exclusively under peak metabolic demands, such as during lactation. Here, we used a different set of metabolic stressors, which do not induce maximum energy expenditures and yet are likely to expose the potential constraining effect of heat dissipation. We compared the physiological responses of mice divergently selected for high (H-BMR) and low basal metabolic rate (L-BMR) to simultaneous exposure to the keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) antigen and high ambient temperature (Ta). At 34°C (and at 23°C, used as a control), KLH challenge resulted in a transient increase in core body temperature (Tb) in mice of both line types (by approximately 0.4°C). Warm exposure did not produce line-type-dependent differences in Tb (which was consistently higher by ca. 0.6°C in H-BMR mice across both Ta values), nor did it result in the suppression of antibody synthesis. These findings were also supported by the lack of between-line-type differences in the mass of the thymus, spleen or lymph nodes. Warm exposure induced the downsizing of heat-generating internal organs (small intestine, liver and kidneys) and an increase in intrascapular brown adipose tissue mass. However, these changes were similar in scope in both line types. Mounting a humoral immune response in selected mice was therefore not affected by ambient temperature. Thus, a combined metabolic challenge of high Ta and an immune response did not appreciably compromise the capacity to dissipate heat, even in the H-BMR mice. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Inorganic nanoparticles and the immune system: detection, selective activation and tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastús, Neus G.; Sánchez-Tilló, Ester; Pujals, Silvia; Comenge, Joan; Giralt, Ernest; Celada, Antonio; Lloberas, Jorge; Puntes, Victor F.

    2012-03-01

    The immune system is the responsible for body integrity and prevention of external invasion. On one side, nanoparticles are no triggers that the immune system is prepared to detect, on the other side it is known that foreign bodies, not only bacteria, viruses and parasites, but also inorganic matter, can cause various pathologies such as silicosis, asbestosis or inflammatory reactions. Therefore, nanoparticles entering the body, after interaction with proteins, will be either recognized as self-agents or detected by the immune system, encompassing immunostimulation or immunosuppression responses. The nature of these interactions seems to be dictated not specially by the composition of the material but by modifications of NP coating (composition, surface charge and structure). Herein, we explore the use of gold nanoparticles as substrates to carry multifunctional ligands to manipulate the immune system in a controlled manner, from undetection to immunostimulation. Murine bone marrow macrophages can be activated with artificial nanometric objects consisting of a gold nanoparticle functionalized with peptides. In the presence of some conjugates, macrophage proliferation was stopped and pro-inflammatory cytokines were induced. The biochemical type of response depended on the type of conjugated peptide and was correlated with the degree of ordering in the peptide coating. These findings help to illustrate the basic requirements involved in medical NP conjugate design to either activate the immune system or hide from it, in order to reach their targets before being removed by phagocytes. Additionally, it opens up the possibility to modulate the immune response in order to suppress unwanted responses resulting from autoimmunity, or allergy or to stimulate protective responses against pathogens.

  17. Roles of Zinc Signaling in the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojyo, Shintaro; Fukada, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential micronutrient for basic cell activities such as cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Zn deficiency depresses both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the precise physiological mechanisms of the Zn-mediated regulation of the immune system have been largely unclear. Zn homeostasis is tightly controlled by the coordinated activity of Zn transporters and metallothioneins, which regulate the transport, distribution, and storage of Zn. There is growing evidence that Zn behaves like a signaling molecule, facilitating the transduction of a variety of signaling cascades in response to extracellular stimuli. In this review, we highlight the emerging functional roles of Zn and Zn transporters in immunity, focusing on how crosstalk between Zn and immune-related signaling guides the normal development and function of immune cells.

  18. The immune system and the impact of zinc during aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haase Hajo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The trace element zinc is essential for the immune system, and zinc deficiency affects multiple aspects of innate and adaptive immunity. There are remarkable parallels in the immunological changes during aging and zinc deficiency, including a reduction in the activity of the thymus and thymic hormones, a shift of the T helper cell balance toward T helper type 2 cells, decreased response to vaccination, and impaired functions of innate immune cells. Many studies confirm a decline of zinc levels with age. Most of these studies do not classify the majority of elderly as zinc deficient, but even marginal zinc deprivation can affect immune function. Consequently, oral zinc supplementation demonstrates the potential to improve immunity and efficiently downregulates chronic inflammatory responses in the elderly. These data indicate that a wide prevalence of marginal zinc deficiency in elderly people may contribute to immunosenescence.

  19. [The role of protein glycosylation in immune system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ząbczyńska, Marta; Pocheć, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most frequent post-translational modifications of proteins. The majority of cell surface and secreted proteins involved in immune response is glycosylated. The structural diversity of glycans depends on monosaccharide composition, type of glycosidic linkage and branching. These structural modifications determine a great variability of glycoproteins. The oligosaccharide components of proteins are regulated mostly by expression of glycosyltransferases and glycosidases and many environmental factors. Glycosylation influences the function of all immune cells. Glycans play a crucial role in intercellular contacts and leukocytes migration. These interactions are important in activation and proliferation of leukocytes and during immune response. The key immune proteins, such as TCR, MHC, TLR and antibodies are glycosylated. Sugars on the surface of pathogens and self-surface glycoproteins are recognized by special carbohydrate binding proteins called lectins. Changes of glycan structure are common in many pathological processes occurring in immune system, therefore they are used as molecular markers of different diseases.

  20. Evasion of the human innate immune system by dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagni, Sarah; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2012-12-01

    Dengue virus is a worldwide health problem, with billions of people at risk annually. Dengue virus causes a spectrum of diseases, namely dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome with the latter two being linked to death. Understanding how dengue is able to evade the immune system and cause enhanced severity of disease is the main topics of interest in the Fernandez-Sesma laboratory at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Using primary human immune cells, our group investigates the contribution of dengue virus-specific proteins to the evasion of innate immunity by this virus and the host factors that the virus interacts with in order to evade immune recognition and to establish infection in humans. Here, we review recent findings from our group as well as published data from other groups regarding immune modulation by dengue virus.

  1. Viral Evasion and Subversion Mechanisms of the Host Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Ghaemi-Bafghi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are the most abundant and versatile pathogens which challenge the immune system and cause major threats to human health. Viruses employ differ¬ent mechanisms to evade host immune responses that we describe them under the following headings: Inhibition of humoral responses, Interference with interferons, Inhibition and modulation of cytokines and chemokines, Inhibitors of apoptosis, Evading CTLs and NKs, and modulating MHC function.Viruses inhibit humoral immunity in different ways which contains change of viral antigens, production of regulatory proteins of complement system and receptors of the Fc part of antibodies. Viruses block interferon production and function via interruption of cell signaling JAK/STAT pathway, Inhibition of eIF-2α phosphorylation and translational arrest and 2'5'OS/RNAse L system. Also, Poxviruses produce soluble versions of receptors for interferons. One of the most important ways of viral evasion is inhibition and manipulation of cytokines; for example, Herpsviruses and Poxviruses produce viral cytokines (virokines and cytokine receptors (viroceptors. In addition, viruses change maturation and expression of MHC I and MHC II molecules to interrupt viral antigens presentation and hide them from immune system recognition. Also, they inhibit NK cell functions.In this review, we provide an overview of the viral evasion mechanisms of immune system. Since most viruses have developed strategies for evasion of immune system, if we know these mechanisms in detail we can fight them more successfully.

  2. Evasion of the Innate Immune Type I Interferon System by Monkeypox Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, William D; Cotsmire, Samantha; Trainor, Kelly; Harrington, Heather; Hauns, Kevin; Kibler, Karen V; Huynh, Trung P; Jacobs, Bertram L

    2015-10-01

    The vaccinia virus (VACV) E3 protein has been shown to be important for blocking activation of the cellular innate immune system and allowing viral replication to occur unhindered. Mutation or deletion of E3L severely affects viral host range and pathogenesis. While the monkeypox virus (MPXV) genome encodes a homologue of the VACV E3 protein, encoded by the F3L gene, the MPXV gene is predicted to encode a protein with a truncation of 37 N-terminal amino acids. VACV with a genome encoding a similarly truncated E3L protein (VACV-E3LΔ37N) has been shown to be attenuated in mouse models, and infection with VACV-E3LΔ37N has been shown to lead to activation of the host antiviral protein kinase R pathway. In this report, we present data demonstrating that, despite containing a truncated E3 homologue, MPXV phenotypically resembles a wild-type (wt) VACV rather than VACV-E3LΔ37N. Thus, MPXV appears to contain a gene or genes that can suppress the phenotypes associated with an N-terminal truncation in E3. The suppression maps to sequences outside F3L, suggesting that the suppression is extragenic in nature. Thus, MPXV appears to have evolved mechanisms to minimize the effects of partial inactivation of its E3 homologue. Poxviruses have evolved to have many mechanisms to evade host antiviral innate immunity; these mechanisms may allow these viruses to cause disease. Within the family of poxviruses, variola virus (which causes smallpox) is the most pathogenic, while monkeypox virus is intermediate in pathogenicity between vaccinia virus and variola virus. Understanding the mechanisms of monkeypox virus innate immune evasion will help us to understand the evolution of poxvirus innate immune evasion capabilities, providing a better understanding of how poxviruses cause disease. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Characterization of the opossum immune genome provides insights into the evolution of the mammalian immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Katherine; Sanderson, Claire E; Deakin, Janine E; Wong, Emily S W; Assange, Daniel; McColl, Kaighin A; Gout, Alex; de Bono, Bernard; Barrow, Alexander D; Speed, Terence P; Trowsdale, John; Papenfuss, Anthony T

    2007-07-01

    The availability of the first marsupial genome sequence has allowed us to characterize the immunome of the gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica). Here we report the identification of key immune genes, including the highly divergent chemokines, defensins, cathelicidins, and Natural Killer cell receptors. It appears that the increase in complexity of the mammalian immune system occurred prior to the divergence of the marsupial and eutherian lineages approximately 180 million years ago. Genomes of ancestral mammals most likely contained all of the key mammalian immune gene families, with evolution on different continents, in the presence of different pathogens leading to lineage specific expansions and contractions, resulting in some minor differences in gene number and composition between different mammalian lineages. Gene expansion and extensive heterogeneity in opossum antimicrobial peptide genes may have evolved as a consequence of the newborn young needing to survive without an adaptive immune system in a pathogen laden environment. Given the similarities in the genomic architecture of the marsupial and eutherian immune systems, we propose that marsupials are ideal model organisms for the study of developmental immunology.

  4. Metabolites: messengers between the microbiota and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Maayan; Thaiss, Christoph A; Elinav, Eran

    2016-07-15

    The mammalian intestine harbors one of the largest microbial densities on Earth, necessitating the implementation of control mechanisms by which the host evaluates the state of microbial colonization and reacts to deviations from homeostasis. While microbial recognition by the innate immune system has been firmly established as an efficient means by which the host evaluates microbial presence, recent work has uncovered a central role for bacterial metabolites in the orchestration of the host immune response. In this review, we highlight examples of how microbiota-modulated metabolites control the development, differentiation, and activity of the immune system and classify them into functional categories that illustrate the spectrum of ways by which microbial metabolites influence host physiology. A comprehensive understanding of how microbiota-derived metabolites shape the human immune system is critical for the rational design of therapies for microbiota-driven diseases. © 2016 Levy et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Current understanding of interactions between nanoparticles and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolskaia, Marina A; Shurin, Michael; Shvedova, Anna A

    2016-05-15

    The delivery of drugs, antigens, and imaging agents benefits from using nanotechnology-based carriers. The successful translation of nanoformulations to the clinic involves thorough assessment of their safety profiles, which, among other end-points, includes evaluation of immunotoxicity. The past decade of research focusing on nanoparticle interaction with the immune system has been fruitful in terms of understanding the basics of nanoparticle immunocompatibility, developing a bioanalytical infrastructure to screen for nanoparticle-mediated immune reactions, beginning to uncover the mechanisms of nanoparticle immunotoxicity, and utilizing current knowledge about the structure-activity relationship between nanoparticles' physicochemical properties and their effects on the immune system to guide safe drug delivery. In the present review, we focus on the most prominent pieces of the nanoparticle-immune system puzzle and discuss the achievements, disappointments, and lessons learned over the past 15years of research on the immunotoxicity of engineered nanomaterials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Systemic immune response to Acanthamoeba keratitis in the Chinese hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Klink, F; Leher, H; Jager, M J; Alizadeh, H; Taylor, W; Niederkorn, J Y

    1997-12-01

    Recrudescence is a common and troubling feature of Acanthamoeba keratitis and suggests that corneal infection with this organism fails to stimulate the systemic immune apparatus. The present study examined the cell-mediated and humoral immune responses to Acanthamoeba keratitis in the Chinese hamster. Corneal infection with A. castellanii failed to induce either delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) or serum IgG antibody against parasite antigens. The failure to induce cell-mediated and humoral immunity did not result in anergy or tolerance since subsequent intramuscular (i.m.) immunization with parasite antigens elicited robust DTH and IgG antibody responses. The inability of corneal infections to induce primary cell-mediated immune responses was due to the absence of resident antigen-presenting cells in the central cornea because induction of Langerhans cell (LC) migration into the central cornea prior to infection with Acanthamoeba promoted the development of parasite-specific DTH. Although the presence of resident LC did not promote the development of a primary humoral immune response, subsequent i.m. immunization elicited heightened parasite-specific IgG antibody production which was indicative of an anamnestic response. Collectively, the results indicate that in the absence of resident antigen-presenting cells, corneal infection with Acanthamoeba fails to stimulate primary cell-mediated or humoral immunity. Induction of peripheral LC into the central corneal epithelium promotes the development of parasite-specific DTH, but does not exacerbate corneal disease.

  7. The Mucosal Immune System and Its Regulation by Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Agnieszka M; Pott, Johanna; Maloy, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract presents a unique challenge to the mucosal immune system, which has to constantly monitor the vast surface for the presence of pathogens, while at the same time maintaining tolerance to beneficial or innocuous antigens. In the intestinal mucosa, specialized innate and adaptive immune components participate in directing appropriate immune responses toward these diverse challenges. Recent studies provide compelling evidence that the process of autophagy influences several aspects of mucosal immune responses. Initially described as a "self-eating" survival pathway that enables nutrient recycling during starvation, autophagy has now been connected to multiple cellular responses, including several aspects of immunity. Initial links between autophagy and host immunity came from the observations that autophagy can target intracellular bacteria for degradation. However, subsequent studies indicated that autophagy plays a much broader role in immune responses, as it can impact antigen processing, thymic selection, lymphocyte homeostasis, and the regulation of immunoglobulin and cytokine secretion. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of mucosal immune cells and discuss how autophagy influences many aspects of their physiology and function. We focus on cell type-specific roles of autophagy in the gut, with a particular emphasis on the effects of autophagy on the intestinal T cell compartment. We also provide a perspective on how manipulation of autophagy may potentially be used to treat mucosal inflammatory disorders.

  8. Active Suppression of Drilling System Vibrations For Deep Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, David W.; Blankenship, Douglas A.; Buerger, Stephen; Mesh, Mikhail; Radigan, William Thomas; Su, Jiann-Cherng

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic stability of deep drillstrings is challenged by an inability to impart controllability with ever-changing conditions introduced by geology, depth, structural dynamic properties and operating conditions. A multi-organizational LDRD project team at Sandia National Laboratories successfully demonstrated advanced technologies for mitigating drillstring vibrations to improve the reliability of drilling systems used for construction of deep, high-value wells. Using computational modeling and dynamic substructuring techniques, the benefit of controllable actuators at discrete locations in the drillstring is determined. Prototype downhole tools were developed and evaluated in laboratory test fixtures simulating the structural dynamic response of a deep drillstring. A laboratory-based drilling applicability demonstration was conducted to demonstrate the benefit available from deployment of an autonomous, downhole tool with self-actuation capabilities in response to the dynamic response of the host drillstring. A concept is presented for a prototype drilling tool based upon the technical advances. The technology described herein is the subject of U.S. Patent Application No. 62219481, entitled "DRILLING SYSTEM VIBRATION SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS AND METHODS", filed September 16, 2015.

  9. Trauma: the role of the innate immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rijkers GT

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Immune dysfunction can provoke (multiple organ failure in severely injured patients. This dysfunction manifests in two forms, which follow a biphasic pattern. During the first phase, in addition to the injury by trauma, organ damage is caused by the immune system during a systemic inflammatory response. During the second phase the patient is more susceptible for sepsis due to host defence failure (immune paralysis. The pathophysiological model outlined in this review encompasses etiological factors and the contribution of the innate immune system in the end organ damage. The etiological factors can be divided into intrinsic (genetic predisposition and physiological status and extrinsic components (type of injury or "traumaload" and surgery or "intervention load". Of all the factors, the intervention load is the only one which, can be altered by the attending emergency physician. Adjustment of the therapeutic approach and choice of the most appropriate treatment strategy can minimize the damage caused by the immune response and prevent the development of immunological paralysis. This review provides a pathophysiological basis for the damage control concept, in which a staged approach of surgery and post-traumatic immunomonitoring have become important aspects of the treatment protocol. The innate immune system is the main objective of immunomonitoring as it has the most prominent role in organ failure after trauma. Polymorphonuclear phagocytes and monocytes are the main effector-cells of the innate immune system in the processes that lead to organ failure. These cells are controlled by cytokines, chemokines, complement factors and specific tissue signals. The contribution of tissue barrier integrity and its interaction with the innate immune system is further evaluated.

  10. Aging of the Immune System. Mechanisms and Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyand, Cornelia M; Goronzy, Jörg J

    2016-12-01

    Beginning with the sixth decade of life, the human immune system undergoes dramatic aging-related changes, which continuously progress to a state of immunosenescence. The aging immune system loses the ability to protect against infections and cancer and fails to support appropriate wound healing. Vaccine responses are typically impaired in older individuals. Conversely, inflammatory responses mediated by the innate immune system gain in intensity and duration, rendering older individuals susceptible to tissue-damaging immunity and inflammatory disease. Immune system aging functions as an accelerator for other age-related pathologies. It occurs prematurely in some clinical conditions, most prominently in patients with the autoimmune syndrome rheumatoid arthritis (RA); and such patients serve as an informative model system to study molecular mechanisms of immune aging. T cells from patients with RA are prone to differentiate into proinflammatory effector cells, sustaining chronic-persistent inflammatory lesions in the joints and many other organ systems. RA T cells have several hallmarks of cellular aging; most importantly, they accumulate damaged DNA. Because of deficiency of the DNA repair kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated, RA T cells carry a higher burden of DNA double-strand breaks, triggering cell-indigenous stress signals that shift the cell's survival potential and differentiation pattern. Immune aging in RA T cells is also associated with metabolic reprogramming; specifically, with reduced glycolytic flux and diminished ATP production. Chronic energy stress affects the longevity and the functional differentiation of older T cells. Altered metabolic patterns provide opportunities to therapeutically target the immune aging process through metabolic interference.

  11. Effects of age and immune suppression of sheep on fecundity, hatching and larval feeding of different strains of Haemonchus contortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargison, N D; Jackson, F; Gilleard, J S

    2011-09-01

    The effects of host age and immune suppression on abomasal parasitic infection in sheep were investigated following single experimental oral infections with MHco3 (ISE), MHco4 (WRS) and MHco10 (CAVR) strains of Haemonchus contortus in naïve 5-month-old crossbred lambs (n=1 per group) and 15-month-old Greyface sheep treated with methyl prednisolone acetate (n=2 per group) or without corticosteroid treatment (n=2 per group). Adult female H. contortus in 5-month-old lambs (n=1 per group) shed on average 6.5, 3.1 and 8.0 times more eggs than in 15-month-old sheep (n=4 per group) following infection with MHco3 (ISE), MHco4 (WRS) and MHco10 (CAVR) strains of H. contortus, respectively, over a period of 28 days following the commencement of patency. There was no obvious effect of age of sheep or corticosteroid treatment on the abomasal establishment of H. contortus or on in vitro assays for egg hatching or larval feeding at different concentrations of anthelmintics, although statistical analysis could not be performed due to the small group sizes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. SUPPRESSION OF HUMORAL IMMUNE RESPONSES BY 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-p-DIOXIN INTERCALATED IN SMECTITE CLAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Stephen A.; Johnston, Cliff T.; Pinnavaia, Thomas J.; Kaminski, Norbert E.; Teppen, Brian J.; Li, Hui; Khan, Bushra; Crawford, Robert B.; Kovalova, Natalia; Kim, Seong-Su; Shao, Hua; Gu, Cheng; Kaplan, Barbara L.F.

    2018-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a highly toxic environmental contaminant found in soils and sediments. Because of its exceptionally low water solubility, this compound exists predominantly in the sorbed state in natural environments. Clay minerals, especially expandable smectite clays, are one of the major component geosorbents in soils and sediments that can function as an effective adsorbent for environmental dioxins, including TCDD. In this study, TCDD was intercalated in the smectite clay saponite by an incipient wetness method. The primary goal of this study was to intercalate TCDD in natural K-saponite clay and evaluate its immunotoxic effects in vivo. The relative bioavailability of TCDD was evaluated by comparing the metabolic activity of TCDD administered in the adsorbed state as an intercalate in saponite and freely dissolved in corn oil. This comparison revealed nearly identical TCDD-induced suppression of humoral immunity, a well-established and sensitive sequela, in a mammalian (mouse) model. This result suggests that TCDD adsorbed by clays is likely to be available for biouptake and biodistribution in mammals, consistent with previous observations of TCDD in livestock exposed to dioxin-contaminated ball clays that were used as feed additives. Adsorption of TCDD by clay minerals does not appear to mitigate risk associated with TCDD exposure substantially. PMID:21994089

  13. Distinct regions of the Phytophthora essential effector Avh238 determine its function in cell death activation and plant immunity suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Qunqing; Jing, Maofeng; Guo, Baodian; Wu, Jiawei; Wang, Haonan; Wang, Yang; Lin, Long; Wang, Yan; Ye, Wenwu; Dong, Suomeng; Wang, Yuanchao

    2017-04-01

    Phytophthora pathogens secrete effectors to manipulate host innate immunity, thus facilitating infection. Among the RXLR effectors highly induced during Phytophthora sojae infection, Avh238 not only contributes to pathogen virulence but also triggers plant cell death. However, the detailed molecular basis of Avh238 functions remains largely unknown. We mapped the regions responsible for Avh238 functions in pathogen virulence and plant cell death induction using a strategy that combines investigation of natural variation and large-scale mutagenesis assays. The correlation between cellular localization and Avh238 functions was also evaluated. We found that the 79 th residue (histidine or leucine) of Avh238 determined its cell death-inducing activity, and that the 53 amino acids in its C-terminal region are responsible for promoting Phytophthora infection. Transient expression of Avh238 in Nicotiana benthamiana revealed that nuclear localization is essential for triggering cell death, while Avh238-mediated suppression of INF1-triggered cell death requires cytoplasmic localization. Our results demonstrate that a representative example of an essential Phytophthora RXLR effector can evolve to escape recognition by the host by mutating one nucleotide site, and can also retain plant immunosuppressive activity to enhance pathogen virulence in planta. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. ATP Release from Chemotherapy-Treated Dying Leukemia Cells Elicits an Immune Suppressive Effect by Increasing Regulatory T Cells and Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecciso, Mariangela; Ocadlikova, Darina; Sangaletti, Sabina; Trabanelli, Sara; De Marchi, Elena; Orioli, Elisa; Pegoraro, Anna; Portararo, Paola; Jandus, Camilla; Bontadini, Andrea; Redavid, Annarita; Salvestrini, Valentina; Romero, Pedro; Colombo, Mario P; Di Virgilio, Francesco; Cavo, Michele; Adinolfi, Elena; Curti, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced immunogenic cell death can favor dendritic cell (DC) cross-priming of tumor-associated antigens for T cell activation thanks to the release of damage-associated molecular patterns, including ATP. Here, we tested the hypothesis that in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), ATP release, along with its well-known immune stimulatory effect, may also contribute to the generation of an immune suppressive microenvironment. In a cohort of AML patients, undergoing combined daunorubicin and cytarabine chemotherapy, a population of T regulatory cells (Tregs) with suppressive phenotype, expressing the immune checkpoint programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), was significantly increased. Moving from these results, initial in vitro data showed that daunorubicin was more effective than cytarabine in modulating DC function toward Tregs induction and such difference was correlated with the higher capacity of daunorubicin to induce ATP release from treated AML cells. DCs cultured with daunorubicin-treated AML cells upregulated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1), which induced anti-leukemia Tregs. These data were confirmed in vivo as daunorubicin-treated mice show an increase in extracellular ATP levels with increased number of Tregs, expressing PD-1 and IDO1 + CD39 + DCs. Notably, daunorubicin failed to induce Tregs and tolerogenic DCs in mice lacking the ATP receptor P2X7. Our data indicate that ATP release from chemotherapy-treated dying cells contributes to create an immune suppressive microenvironment in AML.

  15. ATP Release from Chemotherapy-Treated Dying Leukemia Cells Elicits an Immune Suppressive Effect by Increasing Regulatory T Cells and Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Lecciso

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced immunogenic cell death can favor dendritic cell (DC cross-priming of tumor-associated antigens for T cell activation thanks to the release of damage-associated molecular patterns, including ATP. Here, we tested the hypothesis that in acute myeloid leukemia (AML, ATP release, along with its well-known immune stimulatory effect, may also contribute to the generation of an immune suppressive microenvironment. In a cohort of AML patients, undergoing combined daunorubicin and cytarabine chemotherapy, a population of T regulatory cells (Tregs with suppressive phenotype, expressing the immune checkpoint programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1, was significantly increased. Moving from these results, initial in vitro data showed that daunorubicin was more effective than cytarabine in modulating DC function toward Tregs induction and such difference was correlated with the higher capacity of daunorubicin to induce ATP release from treated AML cells. DCs cultured with daunorubicin-treated AML cells upregulated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1, which induced anti-leukemia Tregs. These data were confirmed in vivo as daunorubicin-treated mice show an increase in extracellular ATP levels with increased number of Tregs, expressing PD-1 and IDO1+CD39+ DCs. Notably, daunorubicin failed to induce Tregs and tolerogenic DCs in mice lacking the ATP receptor P2X7. Our data indicate that ATP release from chemotherapy-treated dying cells contributes to create an immune suppressive microenvironment in AML.

  16. Melanoma: oncogenic drivers and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachaliou, Niki; Pilotto, Sara; Teixidó, Cristina; Viteri, Santiago; González-Cao, María; Riso, Aldo; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Molina, Miguel Angel; Chaib, Imane; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Richardet, Eduardo; Bria, Emilio; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Advances and in-depth understanding of the biology of melanoma over the past 30 years have contributed to a change in the consideration of melanoma as one of the most therapy-resistant malignancies. The finding that oncogenic BRAF mutations drive tumor growth in up to 50% of melanomas led to a molecular therapy revolution for unresectable and metastatic disease. Moving beyond BRAF, inactivation of immune regulatory checkpoints that limit T cell responses to melanoma has provided targets for cancer immunotherapy. In this review, we discuss the molecular biology of melanoma and we focus on the recent advances of molecularly targeted and immunotherapeutic approaches.

  17. Erwinia amylovora effector protein Eop1 suppresses PAMP-triggered immunity in Malus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwinia amylovora (Ea) utilizes a type three secretion system (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into plant host cells. Several Ea effectors have been identified based on their sequence similarity to plant and animal bacterial pathogen effectors; however, the function of the majority of Ea effecto...

  18. Effects of ionizing radiation on the immune system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    After reviewing the different lymphoid organs and the essential phases of the immune response, we studied the morphological and functional effects of ionizing radiation on the immunological system. Histologic changes in the lymph nodes, spleen, thymus, and different lymphocyte subpopulations were studied in relation with the radiation dose and irradiated volume (whole body irradiation, localized irradiation). Functional changes in the immune system induced by ionizing radiation were also investigated by a study of humoral-mediated immunity (antibody formation) and cell-mediated immunity (behavior of macrophages, B-cells, T suppressor cells, T helper cells, T effector cells, and natural killer cells). A study into the mechanisms of action of ionizing radiation and the immune processes it interferes with suggests several likely hypotheses (direct action on the immune cells, on their precursors, on seric mediators or on cell mediators). The effects on cancer patients' immune reactions of low radiation doses delivered to the various lymphoid organs are discussed, as well as the relationships between the host and the evolution of the tumor [fr

  19. Adoptive regulatory T-cell therapy preserves systemic immune homeostasis after cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peiying; Mao, Leilei; Zhou, Guoqing; Leak, Rehana K; Sun, Bao-Liang; Chen, Jun; Hu, Xiaoming

    2013-12-01

    Cerebral ischemia has been shown to result in peripheral inflammatory responses followed by long-lasting immunosuppression. Our recent study demonstrated that intravenous delivery of regulatory T cells (Tregs) markedly protected against transient cerebral ischemia by suppressing neutrophil-derived matrix metallopeptidase 9 production in the periphery. However, the effect of Tregs on systemic inflammatory responses and immune status has not been fully characterized. Cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion for 60 minutes in mice or 120 minutes in rats. Tregs were isolated from donor animals by CD4 and CD25 double selection and transferred intravenously to ischemic recipients at 2 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Animals were euthanized on different days after reperfusion. The effects of Tregs on systemic inflammation and immune status were evaluated using flow cytometry, ELISAs, and immunohistochemistry. Systemic administration of purified Tregs raises functional Tregs in the blood and peripheral organs, including spleen and lymph nodes. These exogenous Tregs remain in the blood and peripheral organs for ≥12 days. Functionally, Treg adoptive transfer markedly inhibits middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced elevation of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor α) in the blood. Furthermore, Treg treatment corrects long-term lymphopenia and improves cellular immune functions after ischemic brain injury. As a result, Treg-treated animals exhibit decreased bacterial loads in the blood during recovery from cerebral ischemic attack. Treg treatment did not exacerbate poststroke immunosuppression. On the contrary, Treg-treated animals displayed improved immune status after focal cerebral ischemia.

  20. Introduction to the role of the immune system in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolin, Kim

    2014-06-01

    The concept of immunosurveillance of cancer has been widely accepted for many years, but only recently have the precise mechanisms of tumor-host immune interactions been revealed. Inflammatory and immune reactions play a role in melanomagenesis, and may contribute to the eradication of tumor as well as potentiating its growth and proliferation. Studies of the role of tumor-immune system interactions are providing insights into the pathogenesis and opportunities for highly effective therapeutic strategies. Some patients, even with advanced disease, are now cured with immunotherapy, and increasing numbers of such cures are likely in future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Perinatal Environmental Effects on the Neonatal Immune System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thysen, Anna Hammerich

    2014-01-01

    that the seasonal-related maternal exposome is reflected in the newborn immune system. These data supports the notion that environmental factors imprints immunological variation already in the perinatal life. In conclusion, studies on early immunological priming may be critical in order to understanding early...... are thought to be programmed in utero supporting a role of the early environment. The aim of the present PhD thesis was to study if known risk factors are imprinted in the immune system of newborns. The hypotheses were that cesarean section and season of birth would influence the immune signature in early...... life. Both are known to be associated with disease. We analyzed the distribution of circulating immune cells from cord blood in the children part of the ongoing unselected COPSAC2010 birth cohort by multi-color flow cytometry. Moreover, airway mucosal cytokines and chemokines of 1-month-old children...

  2. CRISPR-Cas systems: prokaryotes upgrade to adaptive immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Marraffini, Luciano A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR), and associated proteins (Cas) comprise the CRISPR-Cas system, which confers adaptive immunity against exogenic elements in many bacteria and most archaea. CRISPR-mediated immunization occurs through the uptake of DNA from invasive genetic elements such as plasmids and viruses, followed by its integration into CRISPR loci. These loci are subsequently transcribed and processed into small interfering RNAs that guide nucleases for specific cleavage of complementary sequences. Conceptually, CRISPR-Cas shares functional features with the mammalian adaptive immune system, while also exhibiting characteristics of Lamarckian evolution. Because immune markers spliced from exogenous agents are integrated iteratively in CRISPR loci, they constitute a genetic record of vaccination events and reflect environmental conditions and changes over time. Cas endonucleases, which can be reprogrammed by small guide RNAs have shown unprecedented potential and flexibility for genome editing, and can be repurposed for numerous DNA targeting applications including transcriptional control. PMID:24766887

  3. Role of neuropilin-2 in the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenburg, S; Schulz, A; Poitz, D M; Muders, M H

    2017-10-01

    Neuropilins (NRPs) are single transmembrane receptors with short cytoplasmic tails and are dependent on receptors like VEGF receptors or Plexins for signal transduction. NRPs are known to be important in angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and axon guidance. The Neuropilin-family consists of two members, Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) and Neuropilin-2 (NRP2). They are up to 44 % homologous and conserved in all vertebrates. High levels of NRP2 are found on immune cells. Current research is very limited regarding the functions of NRP2 on these cells. Recent evidence suggests that NRP2 is important for migration, antigen presentation, phagocytosis and cell-cell contact within the immune system. Additionally, posttranslational NRP2 modifications like polysialylation are crucial for the function of some immune cells. This review is an overview about expression and functions of NRP2 in the immune system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Protective and Pathological Immunity during Central Nervous System Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Robyn S; Hunter, Christopher A

    2017-06-20

    The concept of immune privilege of the central nervous system (CNS) has dominated the study of inflammatory processes in the brain. However, clinically relevant models have highlighted that innate pathways limit pathogen invasion of the CNS and adaptive immunity mediates control of many neural infections. As protective responses can result in bystander damage, there are regulatory mechanisms that balance protective and pathological inflammation, but these mechanisms might also allow microbial persistence. The focus of this review is to consider the host-pathogen interactions that influence neurotropic infections and to highlight advances in our understanding of innate and adaptive mechanisms of resistance as key determinants of the outcome of CNS infection. Advances in these areas have broadened our comprehension of how the immune system functions in the brain and can readily overcome immune privilege. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Maintenance of systemic immune functions prevents accelerated presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Hiroshi; Baba, Susumu; Omae, Mariko; Lee, Shinryu; Yamashita, Toshio; Ikehara, Susumu

    2008-05-07

    There is no effective therapy for progressive hearing loss such as presbycusis, the causes of which remain poorly understood because of the difficulty of separating genetic and environmental contributions. In the present study, we show that the age-related dysfunctions of the systemic immune system in an animal model of accelerated presbycusis (SAMP1, senescence-accelerated mouse P1) can be corrected by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). We also demonstrate that this presbycusis can be prevented; BMT protects the recipients from age-related hearing impairment and the degeneration of spiral ganglion cells (SGCs) as well as the dysfunctions of T lymphocytes, which have a close relation to immune senescence. No donor cells are infiltrated to the spiral ganglia, confirming that this experimental system using BMT is connected to the systemic immune system and does not contribute to transdifferentiation or fusion by donor hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), or to the direct maintenance of ganglion cells by locally infiltrated donor immunocompetent cells. Therefore, another procedure which attempts to prevent the age-related dysfunctions of the recipient immune system is the inoculation of syngeneic splenocytes from young donors. These mice show no development of hearing loss, compared with the recipient mice with inoculation of saline or splenocytes from old donors. Our studies on the relationship between age-related systemic immune dysfunctions and neurodegeneration mechanisms open up new avenues of treatment for presbycusis, for which there is no effective therapy.

  6. Fixed cutaneous sporotrichosis treated with topical amphotericin B in an immune suppressed patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram K. Mahajan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Both fixed cutaneous and lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis are associated with significant morbidity due to chronicity. Although treatment with itraconazole, saturated solution of potassium iodide or terbinafine is recommended in most cases, the described patient with fixed cutaneous sporotrichosis could not tolerate any of these. Her lesion healed after 8weeks of topical amphotericin-B (0.1% w/w. Topical amphotericin-B appears useful treatment modality for uncomplicated cutaneous sporotrichosis when systemic treatment needs deferment, remains contraindicated, or in pediatric patients.

  7. Cyclic Dinucleotides in the Scope of the Mammalian Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankan, Arun K; Müller, Martina; Witte, Gregor; Hornung, Veit

    2017-01-01

    First discovered in prokaryotes and more recently in eukaryotes, cyclic dinucleotides (CDNs) constitute a unique branch of second messenger signaling systems. Within prokaryotes CDNs regulate a wide array of different biological processes, whereas in the vertebrate system CDN signaling is largely dedicated to activation of the innate immune system. In this book chapter we summarize the occurrence and signaling pathways of these small-molecule second messengers, most importantly in the scope of the mammalian immune system. In this regard, our main focus is the role of the cGAS-STING axis in the context of microbial infection and sterile inflammation and its implications for therapeutic applications.

  8. Small and long regulatory RNAs in the immune system and immune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stachurska, Anna; Zorro, Maria M.; van der Sijde, Marijke R.; Withoff, Sebo

    2014-01-01

    Cellular differentiation is regulated on the level of gene expression, and it is known that dysregulation of gene expression can lead to deficiencies in differentiation that contribute to a variety of diseases, particularly of the immune system. Until recently, it was thought that the dysregulation

  9. Evasion of the human innate immune system by dengue virus

    OpenAIRE

    Pagni, Sarah; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus is a worldwide health problem, with billions of people at risk annually. Dengue virus causes a spectrum of diseases, namely dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome with the latter two being linked to death. Understanding how dengue is able to evade the immune system and cause enhanced severity of disease is the main topics of interest in the Fernandez-Sesma laboratory at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Using primary human immune cells, our group investiga...

  10. Retroviruses as tools to study the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lois, C; Refaeli, Y; Qin, X F; Van Parijs, L

    2001-08-01

    Retrovirus-based vectors provide an efficient means to introduce and express genes in cells of the immune system and have become a popular tool to study immune function. They are easy to manipulate and provide stable, long-term gene expression because they integrate into the genome. Current retroviral vectors do have limitations that affect their usefulness in certain applications. However, recent advances suggest a number of ways in which these vectors might be improved to extend their utility in immunological research.

  11. Cancer Stem Cell-Secreted Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Stimulates Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cell Function and Facilitates Glioblastoma Immune Evasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otvos, Balint; Silver, Daniel J; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E

    2016-01-01

    populations, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which serve to suppress immune system function. We have identified immune-suppressive MDSCs in the brains of GBM patients and found that they were in close proximity to self-renewing cancer stem cells (CSCs). MDSCs were selectively depleted...... that MIF is primarily an indirect promoter of GBM progression, working to suppress immune rejection by activating and protecting immune suppressive MDSCs within the GBM tumor microenvironment. Stem Cells 2016;34:2026-2039....

  12. The Immune System of HIV-Exposed Uninfected Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Raya, Bahaa; Kollmann, Tobias R; Marchant, Arnaud; MacGillivray, Duncan M

    2016-01-01

    Infants born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected women are HIV-exposed but the majority remains uninfected [i.e., HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU)]. HEU infants suffer greater morbidity and mortality from infections compared to HIV-unexposed (HU) peers. The reason(s) for these worse outcomes are uncertain, but could be related to an altered immune system state. This review comprehensively summarizes the current literature investigating the adaptive and innate immune system of HEU infants. HEU infants have altered cell-mediated immunity, including impaired T-cell maturation with documented hypo- as well as hyper-responsiveness to T-cell activation. And although prevaccination vaccine-specific antibody levels are often lower in HEU than HU, most HEU infants mount adequate humoral immune response following primary vaccination with diphtheria toxoid, haemophilus influenzae type b, whole cell pertussis, measles, hepatitis B, tetanus toxoid, and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. However, HEU infants are often found to have lower absolute neutrophil counts as compared to HU infants. On the other hand, an increase of innate immune cytokine production and expression of co-stimulatory markers has been noted in HEU infants, but this increase appears to be restricted to the first few weeks of life. The immune system of HEU children beyond infancy remains largely unexplored.

  13. The sympathetic nerve--an integrative interface between two supersystems: the brain and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elenkov, I J; Wilder, R L; Chrousos, G P; Vizi, E S

    2000-12-01

    suppression of Th1 responses and cellular immunity, and a Th2 shift toward dominance of humoral immunity. On the other hand, in certain local responses, and under certain conditions, catecholamines may actually boost regional immune responses, through induction of IL-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and primarily IL-8 production. Thus, the activation of SNS during an immune response might be aimed to localize the inflammatory response, through induction of neutrophil accumulation and stimulation of more specific humoral immune responses, although systemically it may suppress Th1 responses, and, thus protect the organism from the detrimental effects of proinflammatory cytokines and other products of activated macrophages. The above-mentioned immunomodulatory effects of catecholamines and the role of SNS are also discussed in the context of their clinical implication in certain infections, major injury and sepsis, autoimmunity, chronic pain and fatigue syndromes, and tumor growth. Finally, the pharmacological manipulation of the sympathetic-immune interface is reviewed with focus on new therapeutic strategies using selective alpha(2)- and beta(2)-adrenoreceptor agonists and antagonists and inhibitors of phosphodiesterase type IV in the treatment of experimental models of autoimmune diseases, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue syndrome.

  14. The immune system and overtraining in athletes: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, Anthony C; Koltun, Kristen J

    2012-12-01

    The primary objective of this review is to provide an overview of how overtraining and the overtraining syndrome (OTS) affect the immune system of athletes. A secondary objective is to provide sports medicine clinicians with guidance as to how best to prevent and/or treat some of the health consequences of overtraining and the OTS as related to the development of a compromised immune system associated with exercise training. The OTS is a physically debilitating condition that results in athletes being totally compromised in their capacity to perform and compete. Many physiological systems are affected by the process of overtraining and the OTS; but one system in particular, the immune, is highly susceptible to degradation resulting in a reduction in overall health and performance. Monitoring of an athlete's exercise training load and other life stresses is critical to the determination of when their training regimen may be excessive, thereby increasing the risk of OTS developing. Taking steps to mitigate prolonged exposure to extreme stress (training + life or otherwise) in athletes as well as promoting a healthy immune system can significantly aid in the advancement of an athlete's training regimen progression and ultimate physical performance and overall health. In this light, this review provides approaches to aid sports medicine clinicians in promoting a healthy immune system in athletes.

  15. Role of the Immune System in Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Fionnuala B; Martin, Finian

    2018-03-12

    The purpose of this review is to examine the proposed role of immune modulation in the development and progression of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Diabetic kidney disease has not historically been considered an immune-mediated disease; however, increasing evidence is emerging in support of an immune role in its pathophysiology. Both systemic and local renal inflammation have been associated with DKD. Infiltration of immune cells, predominantly macrophages, into the kidney has been reported in a number of both experimental and clinical studies. In addition, increased levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines have been linked to disease progression. Consequently, a variety of therapeutic strategies involving modulation of the immune response are currently being investigated in diabetic kidney disease. Although no current therapies for DKD are directly based on immune modulation many of the therapies in clinical use have anti-inflammatory effects along with their primary actions. Macrophages emerge as the most likely beneficial immune cell target and compounds which reduce macrophage infiltration to the kidney have shown potential in both animal models and clinical trials.

  16. Immunity to transplantable nitrosourea-induced neurogenic tumors. III. Systemic adoptive transfer of immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, N.; Hochgeschwender, U.; Kida, Y.; Hochwald, G.M.; Thorbecke, G.J.; Cravioto, H.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of intravenously injected tumor immune spleen cells on growth of 3 X 10 5 gliosarcoma T 9 cells injected intradermally (ID) or intracerebrally (IC) into sublethally irradiated CDF rats was evaluated. Spleen cells from donor rats with sufficient immunity to reject 5 X 10 5 T 9 cells inhibited the growth of T 9 cells mixed with spleen cells in a ratio of 1:25 and injected ID, but could not act after intravenous transfer. However, donor rats which had rejected increasing T 9 challenge doses up to 1 X 10 7 cells produced immune spleen cells which, upon IV transfer, could inhibit growth of ID T 9 challenge but not of EB-679, an unrelated glioma, in recipient rats. Rejection of IC T 9 challenge was also obtained after IV transfer, in recipients of such ''hyperimmune'' spleen cells, but was less (60% maximum) than that noted after ID T 9 challenge (100% maximum). The removal of B cells from the transferred spleen cells did not affect the results, suggesting that the specific immunity was mediated by T cells. The authors conclude that the special immunological circumstances of tumors growing in the brain renders them less accessible to rejection by systemically transferred immune cells, but it is nevertheless possible to effect a significant incidence of rejection of syngeneic tumor growth in the brain by the intravenous transfer of hyperimmune spleen cells

  17. Influenza A Virus Protein PA-X Contributes to Viral Growth and Suppression of the Host Antiviral and Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; MacDonald, Leslie A; Takimoto, Toru

    2015-06-01

    Influenza virus infection causes global inhibition of host protein synthesis in infected cells. This host shutoff is thought to allow viruses to escape from the host antiviral response, which restricts virus replication and spread. Although the mechanism of host shutoff is unclear, a novel viral protein expressed by ribosomal frameshifting, PA-X, was found to play a major role in influenza virus-induced host shutoff. However, little is known about the impact of PA-X expression on currently circulating influenza A virus pathogenicity and the host antiviral response. In this study, we rescued a recombinant influenza A virus, A/California/04/09 (H1N1, Cal), containing mutations at the frameshift motif in the polymerase PA gene (Cal PA-XFS). Cal PA-XFS expressed significantly less PA-X than Cal wild type (WT). Cal WT, but not Cal PA-XFS, induced degradation of host β-actin mRNA and suppressed host protein synthesis, supporting the idea that PA-X induces host shutoff via mRNA decay. Moreover, Cal WT inhibited beta interferon (IFN-β) expression and replicated more rapidly than Cal PA-XFS in human respiratory cells. Mice infected with Cal PA-XFS had significantly lower levels of viral growth and greater expression of IFN-β mRNA in their lungs than mice infected with Cal WT. Importantly, more antihemagglutinin and neutralizing antibodies were produced in Cal PA-XFS-infected mice than in Cal WT-infected mice, despite the lower level of virus replication in the lungs. Our data indicate that PA-X of the pandemic H1N1 virus has a strong impact on viral growth and the host innate and acquired immune responses to influenza virus. Virus-induced host protein shutoff is considered to be a major factor allowing viruses to evade innate and acquired immune recognition. We provide evidence that the 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus protein PA-X plays a role in virus replication and inhibition of host antiviral response by means of its host protein synthesis shutoff activity both in vitro

  18. New insights into innate immune control of systemic candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionakis, Michail S.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic infection caused by Candida species is the fourth leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection in modern hospitals and carries high morbidity and mortality despite antifungal therapy. A recent surge of immunological studies in the mouse models of systemic candidiasis and the parallel discovery and phenotypic characterization of inherited genetic disorders in antifungal immune factors that are associated with enhanced susceptibility or resistance to the infection have provided new insights into the cellular and molecular basis of protective innate immune responses against Candida. In this review, the new developments in our understanding of how the mammalian immune system responds to systemic Candida challenge are synthesized and important future research directions are highlighted. PMID:25023483

  19. Peripheral education of the immune system by the colonic microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Kristine A; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2013-11-30

    There is growing interest in understanding the effects of host-microbial interactions on host physiologic processes. Much of the work in this arena is logically focused on the interaction at mucosal surfaces as this is a primary site of interaction. However, there is ample evidence to suggest that the effects of the microbiota have a much farther reach including the systemic immune system. While there are some similarities to effects at mucosal surfaces (i.e. reduced numbers of adaptive immune cells, diminished innate responses), there are some important differences that we highlight such as the response to immunogens and bacterial antigens. We propose that understanding the details of how specific components of the microbiota influence the systemic immune system likely will have significant impact on our understanding the pathophysiology of a variety of autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Book Review: Rediscovering the Immune System as an Integrated Organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corthay, A

    2016-07-01

    The immune system may seem incredibly complex. Researchers in immunology are amassing enormous amounts of detailed information without gaining proportional insights. Why might this be? So asks Peter Bretscher near the start of his book Rediscovering the Immune System as an Integrated Organ. He argues that contemporary immunology fails to provide understanding at the level of the system because it is dominated by molecular and cellular considerations. He reminds us of a famous quotation: Not everything that counts can be counted and not everything that can be counted counts, before stating the ambitious aim of his book: to make plausible an integrated and readily accessible view of how the immune system functions. By Peter Bretscher. FriesenPress, 2016. 288 pp. ISBN: 978-1-4602-7406-4. © 2016 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  1. Thermodynamics as the driving principle behind the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 120 years, few things contributed more to our understanding of immune system than the study of its behavior in the host/parasite relationship. Despite the advances though, a few questions remain, such as what drives the immune system? What are its guiding principles? If we ask these questions randomly, most will immediately answer "defend the body from external threats," but what exactly do we defend ourselves from? How do these threats harm us? What criteria define what constitutes a threat? On the other hand, if the immune system evolved to defend us against external threats, how does its action against "internal" processes, such as neoplasms, qualify? Why do we die from cancer? Or from infection? Or even, why do we die at all? These apparently obvious questions are nor simple neither trivial, and the difficulty answering them reveals the complex reality that the immune system handles. The objective of this article is to articulate for the reader something that he instinctively already knows: that the decisions of the immune system are thermodynamically driven. Additionally, we will discuss how this apparent change in paradigm alters concepts such as health, disease, and therapeutics.

  2. "Health system approach" for improving immunization program performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrakant Lahariya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunization programs are one of the most well-recognized and successful public health programs across the world. The immunization programs have achieved significant successes in a number of countries; however, the coverage with available vaccines remains sub-optimal in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs. This article, based upon extensive review of literature and using universal immunization program (UIP in India as a case study, summarizes the latest developments and initiatives in the area of vaccination and immunization in the last few years. The article analyzes initiatives under UIP in India from the "health system approach" and argues that it is possible to increase coverage with available vaccines and overall program performance by focused attention on various functions of health systems. It also discusses the emerging evidence that health systems could be strengthened prior to the introduction of new interventions (vaccines included and the introduction of new interventions (including vaccines could be planned in a way to strengthen the health systems. It concludes that immunization programs could be one of the entry points for strengthening health systems in the countries and lessons from vaccine introduction could pave pathway for scaling up other health interventions and therefore, could contribute to advancing Universal Health Coverage (UHC.

  3. Modulation of systemic immune responses through commensal gastrointestinal microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle M Schachtschneider

    Full Text Available Colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI tract is initiated during birth and continually seeded from the individual's environment. Gastrointestinal microorganisms play a central role in developing and modulating host immune responses and have been the subject of investigation over the last decades. Animal studies have demonstrated the impact of GI tract microbiota on local gastrointestinal immune responses; however, the full spectrum of action of early gastrointestinal tract stimulation and subsequent modulation of systemic immune responses is poorly understood. This study explored the utility of an oral microbial inoculum as a therapeutic tool to affect porcine systemic immune responses. For this study a litter of 12 pigs was split into two groups. One group of pigs was inoculated with a non-pathogenic oral inoculum (modulated, while another group (control was not. DNA extracted from nasal swabs and fecal samples collected throughout the study was sequenced to determine the effects of the oral inoculation on GI and respiratory microbial communities. The effects of GI microbial modulation on systemic immune responses were evaluated by experimentally infecting with the pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Coughing levels, pathology, toll-like receptors 2 and 6, and cytokine production were measured throughout the study. Sequencing results show a successful modulation of the GI and respiratory microbiomes through oral inoculation. Delayed type hypersensitivity responses were stronger (p = 0.07, and the average coughing levels and respiratory TNF-α variance were significantly lower in the modulated group (p<0.0001 and p = 0.0153, respectively. The M. hyopneumoniae infection study showed beneficial effects of the oral inoculum on systemic immune responses including antibody production, severity of infection and cytokine levels. These results suggest that an oral microbial inoculation can be used to modulate microbial communities, as well as

  4. Time-course investigation of infection with a low virulent Pasteurella multocida strain in normal and immune-suppressed 12-week-old free-range chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbuthia, P.G.; Njagi, L.W.; Nyaga, P.N.

    2011-01-01

    Twelve-week-old indigenous chickens, either immune-suppressed using dexamethasone (IS) or non-immune-suppressed (NIS), were challenged with a low virulent strain, Pasteurella multocida strain NCTC 10322(T), and developed clinical signs and pathological lesions typical of chronic fowl cholera. NIS...... in fowl cholera. P. multocida signals by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were observed between 1 h and 14 days in the lungs, trachea, air sacs, liver, spleen, bursa of Fabricius and caecal tonsils, while signals from other organs mostly were observed after 24 h. More organs had FISH signals...... in NIS birds than in IS birds and at higher frequency per organ. Many organs were positive by FISH even 14 days post infection, and it is suggested that these organs may be likely places for long-term carriage of P. multocida following infection. The present study has demonstrated the spread of P...

  5. The interplay between the gut microbiota and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuking, Markus B; Köller, Yasmin; Rupp, Sandra; McCoy, Kathy D

    2014-01-01

    The impact of the gut microbiota on immune homeostasis within the gut and, importantly, also at systemic sites has gained tremendous research interest over the last few years. The intestinal microbiota is an integral component of a fascinating ecosystem that interacts with and benefits its host on several complex levels to achieve a mutualistic relationship. Host-microbial homeostasis involves appropriate immune regulation within the gut mucosa to maintain a healthy gut while preventing uncontrolled immune responses against the beneficial commensal microbiota potentially leading to chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Furthermore, recent studies suggest that the microbiota composition might impact on the susceptibility to immune-mediated disorders such as autoimmunity and allergy. Understanding how the microbiota modulates susceptibility to these diseases is an important step toward better prevention or treatment options for such diseases.

  6. Programmed cell death in the plant immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, N S; Epple, P; Dangl, J L

    2011-08-01

    Cell death has a central role in innate immune responses in both plants and animals. Besides sharing striking convergences and similarities in the overall evolutionary organization of their innate immune systems, both plants and animals can respond to infection and pathogen recognition with programmed cell death. The fact that plant and animal pathogens have evolved strategies to subvert specific cell death modalities emphasizes the essential role of cell death during immune responses. The hypersensitive response (HR) cell death in plants displays morphological features, molecular architectures and mechanisms reminiscent of different inflammatory cell death types in animals (pyroptosis and necroptosis). In this review, we describe the molecular pathways leading to cell death during innate immune responses. Additionally, we present recently discovered caspase and caspase-like networks regulating cell death that have revealed fascinating analogies between cell death control across both kingdoms.

  7. The Role of the Immune System in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Amory; Van de Water, Judy

    2017-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in communication and social skills as well as repetitive and stereotypical behaviors. While much effort has focused on the identification of genes associated with autism, research emerging within the past two decades suggests that immune dysfunction is a viable risk factor contributing to the neurodevelopmental deficits observed in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Further, it is the heterogeneity within this disorder that has brought to light much of the current thinking regarding the subphenotypes within ASD and how the immune system is associated with these distinctions. This review will focus on the two main axes of immune involvement in ASD, namely dysfunction in the prenatal and postnatal periods. During gestation, prenatal insults including maternal infection and subsequent immunological activation may increase the risk of autism in the child. Similarly, the presence of maternally derived anti-brain autoantibodies found in ~20% of mothers whose children are at risk for developing autism has defined an additional subphenotype of ASD. The postnatal environment, on the other hand, is characterized by related but distinct profiles of immune dysregulation, inflammation, and endogenous autoantibodies that all persist within the affected individual. Further definition of the role of immune dysregulation in ASD thus necessitates a deeper understanding of the interaction between both maternal and child immune systems, and the role they have in diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Consumption of soy isoflavone enriched bread in men with prostate cancer is associated with reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines and immune suppressive cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesinski, Gregory B.; Reville, Patrick K.; Mace, Thomas A.; Young, Gregory S.; Ahn-Jarvis, Jennifer; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer; Vodovotz, Yael; Ameen, Zeenath; Grainger, Elizabeth; Riedl, Kenneth; Schwartz, Steven; Clinton, Steven K.

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that soy phytochemicals may have immunomodulatory properties that may impact prostate carcinogenesis and progression. A randomized, phase II trial was conducted in 32 prostate cancer patients with asymptomatic biochemical recurrence but no measurable disease on standard staging studies. Patients were randomized to 2 slices of soy bread (34 mg isoflavones/slice) or soy bread containing almond powder daily as a source of β-glucosidase. Flow cytometry and bioplex assays were used to measure cytokines or immune cell phenotype in blood at baseline (day 0) and following intervention (day 56). Adequate blood samples were available at enrollment and day 56 and evaluated. Multiple plasma cytokines and chemokines were significantly decreased on Day 56 versus baseline. Subgroup analysis indicated reduced Th1 (p=0.028) and MDSC-associated cytokines (p=0.035). Th2 and Th17 cytokines were not significantly altered. Phenotypic analysis revealed no change in CD8+ or CD4+ T cells, but showed increased CD56+ NK cells (p=0.038). The percentage of cells with a T regulatory cell phenotype (CD4+CD25+FoxP3+) were significantly decreased after 56 days of soy bread (p=0.0136). Significantly decreased monocytic (CD33+HLADRnegCD14+) MDSC were observed in patients consuming soy bread (p=0.0056). These data suggest that soy bread modulates systemic soluble and cellular biomarkers consistent with limiting inflammation and suppression of MDSCs. Additional studies to elucidate impact on the carcinogenic process or as a complement to immune-based therapy are required. PMID:26276751

  9. Immune system: a possible nexus between cannabinoids and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Pinilla, Paula; López-Gil, José; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto

    2014-08-01

    Endocannabinoid system is involved in the regulation of the brain-immune axis. Cannabis consumption is related with the development, course, and severity of psychosis. The epidemiological evidence for increased occurrence of immunological alterations in patients with psychosis has not been sufficiently addressed. The aim of this review is to establish whether there is any scientific evidence of the influence of cannabinoids on aspects of immunity that affect susceptibility to psychotic disorder induction. A comprehensive search of PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE and ISI Web of Knowledge was performed using combinations of key terms distributed into three blocks: "immune", "cannabinoid", and "endocannabinoid receptor". Studies were considered to be eligible for the review if they were original articles, they reported a quantitative or qualitative relation between cannabinoid ligands, their receptors, and immune system, and they were carried out in vitro or in mammals, included humans. All the information was systematically extracted and evaluated. We identified 122 articles from 446 references. Overall, endocannabinoids enhanced immune response, whereas exogenous cannabinoids had immunosuppressant effects. A general change in the immune response from Th1 to Th2 was also demonstrated for cannabinoid action. Endogenous and synthetic cannabinoids also modulated microglia function and neurotransmitter secretion. The actions of cannabinoids through the immune system are quite regular and predictable in the peripheral but remain fuzzy in the central nervous system. Despite this uncertainty, it may be hypothesized that exposure to exocannabinoids, in particular during adolescence might prompt immunological dysfunctions that potentially cause a latent vulnerability to psychosis. Further investigations are warranted to clarify the relationship between the immunological effects of cannabis and psychosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of peripheral blood leukocytes from cattle infected with Mycobacterium bovis reveals suppression of host immune genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Killick Kate E

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis (BTB, a pathological infection with significant economic impact. Recent studies have highlighted the role of functional genomics to better understand the molecular mechanisms governing the host immune response to M. bovis infection. Furthermore, these studies may enable the identification of novel transcriptional markers of BTB that can augment current diagnostic tests and surveillance programmes. In the present study, we have analysed the transcriptome of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL from eight M. bovis-infected and eight control non-infected age-matched and sex-matched Holstein-Friesian cattle using the Affymetrix® GeneChip® Bovine Genome Array with 24,072 gene probe sets representing more than 23,000 gene transcripts. Results Control and infected animals had similar mean white blood cell counts. However, the mean number of lymphocytes was significantly increased in the infected group relative to the control group (P = 0.001, while the mean number of monocytes was significantly decreased in the BTB group (P = 0.002. Hierarchical clustering analysis using gene expression data from all 5,388 detectable mRNA transcripts unambiguously partitioned the animals according to their disease status. In total, 2,960 gene transcripts were differentially expressed (DE between the infected and control animal groups (adjusted P-value threshold ≤ 0.05; with the number of gene transcripts showing decreased relative expression (1,563 exceeding those displaying increased relative expression (1,397. Systems analysis using the Ingenuity® Systems Pathway Analysis (IPA Knowledge Base revealed an over-representation of DE genes involved in the immune response functional category. More specifically, 64.5% of genes in the affects immune response subcategory displayed decreased relative expression levels in the infected animals compared to the control group. Conclusions This

  11. Commentary on Special Issue : CNS Diseases and the Immune System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    't Hart, Bert A.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F.

    In an increasing number of central nervous system (CNS) diseases a pathogenic contribution of the immune system is proposed. However, the exact underlying mechanisms are often poorly understood. The collection of articles in this special issue presents a state-of-the-art review of adaptive and

  12. Tuberculosis disease diagnosis using artificial immune recognition system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Hessam, Somayeh; Javidnia, Hossein; Amiribesheli, Mohsen; Vahdat, Shaghayegh; Petković, Dalibor; Gani, Abdullah; Kiah, Miss Laiha Mat

    2014-01-01

    There is a high risk of tuberculosis (TB) disease diagnosis among conventional methods. This study is aimed at diagnosing TB using hybrid machine learning approaches. Patient epicrisis reports obtained from the Pasteur Laboratory in the north of Iran were used. All 175 samples have twenty features. The features are classified based on incorporating a fuzzy logic controller and artificial immune recognition system. The features are normalized through a fuzzy rule based on a labeling system. The labeled features are categorized into normal and tuberculosis classes using the Artificial Immune Recognition Algorithm. Overall, the highest classification accuracy reached was for the 0.8 learning rate (α) values. The artificial immune recognition system (AIRS) classification approaches using fuzzy logic also yielded better diagnosis results in terms of detection accuracy compared to other empirical methods. Classification accuracy was 99.14%, sensitivity 87.00%, and specificity 86.12%.

  13. Physical activity influences the immune system of breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that physical activity in breast cancer patients can not only improve quality of life. Influences on physical and psychological levels have been evaluated, but effects on the immune system of breast cancer patients are hardly known. A PubMed search identified relevant trials and meta-analyses from 1970 to 2013. This review summarizes the results of international studies and the current discussion of effects of physical activity on the immune system of breast cancer patients. Highlighted are effects of physical activity on the immune system. Seven original articles and 14 reviews included in this review. Two original and the review articles includes other tumor entities besides breast cancer.Evaluated methods such as dose-response relationships for exercise in oncology, hardly exist. Increased immunological anti-cancer activity due to physical activity is probably mediated via an increase in number and cytotoxicity of monocytes and natural killer cells and cytokines.

  14. Keeping the immune system in check: a role for mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarou, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play a central role in many facets of cellular function including energy production, control of cell death and immune signaling. Breakdown of any of these pathways because of mitochondrial deficits or excessive reactive oxygen species production has detrimental consequences for immune system function and cell viability. Maintaining the functional integrity of mitochondria is therefore a critical challenge for the cell. Surveillance systems that monitor mitochondrial status enable the cell to identify and either repair or eliminate dysfunctional mitochondria. Mitophagy is a selective form of autophagy that eliminates dysfunctional mitochondria from the population to maintain overall mitochondrial health. This review covers the major players involved in mitophagy and explores the role mitophagy plays to support the immune system.

  15. Coinfection with human herpesvirus 8 is associated with persistent inflammation and immune activation in virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Masiá

    -media thickness were not different according to HHV-8 serostatus.In virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients, coinfection with HHV-8 is associated with increased inflammation and immune activation. This might contribute to increase the risk of non-AIDS events, including accelerated atherosclerotic disease.

  16. Systematic design and simulation of a tearing mode suppression feedback control system for the TEXTOR tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennen, B.A.; Westerhof, E.; Nuij, Pwjm; M.R. de Baar,; Steinbuch, M.

    2012-01-01

    Suppression of tearing modes is essential for the operation of tokamaks. This paper describes the design and simulation of a tearing mode suppression feedback control system for the TEXTOR tokamak. The two main control tasks of this feedback control system are the radial alignment of electron

  17. Schizophrenia and the immune system: pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Michelle D; Brahm, Nancy C

    2012-05-01

    Published evidence on established and theoretical connections between immune system dysfunction and schizophrenia is reviewed, with a discussion of developments in the search for immunologically-targeted treatments. A growing body of evidence indicates that immunologic influences may play an important role in the etiology and course of schizophrenia. A literature search identified more than 100 articles pertaining to suspected immunologic influences on schizophrenia published over the past 15 years. Schizophrenia researchers have explored a wide range of potential immune system-related causal or contributory factors, including neurobiological and neuroanatomical disorders, genetic abnormalities, and environmental influences such as maternal perinatal infection. Efforts to establish an immunologic basis for schizophrenia and identify reliable immune markers continue to be hindered by sampling challenges and methodological problems. In aggregate, the available evidence indicates that at least some cases of schizophrenia have an immunologic component, suggesting that immune-focused prevention strategies (e.g., counseling of pregnant women to avoid immune stressors) and close monitoring of at-risk children are appropriate. While antipsychotics remain the standard treatments for schizophrenia, a variety of drugs with immunologic effects have been investigated as adjunctive therapies, with variable and sometimes conflicting results; these include the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib, immune-modulating agents (e.g., azathioprine and various anticytokine agents such as atlizumab, anakinra, and tumor necrosis factor-α blockers), and an investigational anti-interferon-γ agent. The published evidence indicates that immune system dysfunction related to genetic, environmental, and neurobiological influences may play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia in a subset of patients.

  18. Increased Plasma Levels of Danger-Associated Molecular Patterns Are Associated With Immune Suppression and Postoperative Infections in Patients Undergoing Cytoreductive Surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guus P. Leijte

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionDanger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs can elicit immune responses and may subsequently induce an immune-suppressed state. Previous work showed that increased plasma levels of DAMPs are associated with immune suppression and increased susceptibility toward infections in trauma patients. Like trauma, major surgical procedures, such as cytoreductive surgery (CRS combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC, are also thought to cause profound DAMP release. Furthermore, the incidence of postoperative infections in these patients, ranging from 10 to 36%, is very high compared to that observed in patients undergoing other major surgical procedures. We hypothesized that the double hit of surgical trauma (CRS in combination with HIPEC causes excessive DAMP release, which in turn contributes to the development of immune suppression. To investigate this, we assessed DAMP release in patients undergoing CRS-HIPEC, and investigated its relationship with immune suppression and postoperative infections.MethodsIn 20 patients undergoing CRS-HIPEC, blood was obtained at five time points: just before surgery (baseline, after CRS, after HIPEC, at ICU admission, and 1 day after surgery. Circulating levels of DAMPs [heat shock protein (HSP70, high mobility group box (HMGB1, S100A12, S100A8/S100A9, nuclear (nDNA, mitochondrial (mtDNA, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, a marker of unscheduled cell death], and cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNFα, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and MCP-1] were measured. The extent of immune suppression was determined by measuring HLA-DR gene expression and ex vivo leukocytic cytokine production capacity.ResultsPlasma levels of DAMPs (maximum fold increases of HSP70: 2.1 [1.5–2.8], HMGB1: 5.9 [3.2–9.8], S100A8/S100A9: 3.6 [1.8–5.6], S100A12: 2.6 [1.8–4.3], nDNA 3.9 [1.0–10.8], LDH 1.7 [1.2–2.5], and all measured cytokines increased profoundly following

  19. Interaction of entomopathogenic fungi with the host immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shuang; Wang, Sibao

    2018-02-02

    Entomopathogenic fungi can invade wide range of insect hosts in the natural world and have been used as environmentally friendly alternatives to chemical insecticides for pest control. Studies of host-pathogen interactions provide valuable insights into the coevolutionay arms race between fungal pathogens and their hosts. Entomopathogenic fungi have evolved a series of sophisticated strategies to counter insect immune defenses. In response to fungal infection, insect hosts rely on behavior avoidance, physical barrier and innate immune defenses in the fight against invading pathogens. The insect cuticle acts as the first physical barrier against pathogens. It is an inhospitable physiological environment that contains chemicals (e.g., antimicrobial peptides and reactive oxygen species), which inhibit fungal growth. In addition, innate immune responses, including cellular immunity and humoral immunity, play critical roles in preventing fungal infection. In this review, we outline the current state of our knowledge of insect defenses to fungal infection and discuss the strategies by which entomopathogenic fungi counter the host immune system. Increased knowledge regarding the molecular interactions between entomopathogenic fungi and the insect host could provide new strategies for pest management. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Environmental pollutants as adjuvant factors of immune system derived diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Irina

    2017-06-01

    The main task of the immune system is to protect the body against invading pathogens. To be able to do so, immune cells must be able to recognize and combat exogenous challenges and at the same time tolerate body-borne structures. A complex regulatory network controls the sensitive balance between defense and tolerance. Perturbation of this network ultimately leads to the development of chronic inflammation, such as allergies, autoimmune reactions, and infections, because the immune system is no longer able to efficiently eliminate invading pathogens. Environmental pollutants can cause such perturbations by affecting the function of immune cells in such a way that they would react hypersensitively against allergens and the body's own structures, respectively, or that they would be no longer able to adequately combat pathogens. This indirect effect is also known as adjuvant effect. For pesticides, heavy metals, wood preservatives, or volatile organic compounds such adjuvant effects are well known. Examples of the mechanism by which environmental toxins contribute to chronic inflammatory diseases are manifold and will be discussed along asthma and allergies.While the immune system of healthy adults is typically well able to distinguish between foreign and endogenous substances even under adverse environmental conditions, that of children would react much more sensible upon comparable environmental challenges. To prevent priming for diseases by environmental cues during that highly sensitive period of early childhood children are to be particularly protected.

  1. A role of the adaptive immune system in glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronsart, Laura L; Contag, Christopher H

    2016-01-01

    The immune system, including the adaptive immune response, has recently been recognized as having a significant role in diet-induced insulin resistance. In this study, we aimed to determine if the adaptive immune system also functions in maintaining physiological glucose homeostasis in the absence of diet-induced disease. SCID mice and immunocompetent control animals were phenotypically assessed for variations in metabolic parameters and cytokine profiles. Additionally, the glucose tolerance of SCID and immunocompetent control animals was assessed following introduction of a high-fat diet. SCID mice on a normal chow diet were significantly insulin resistant relative to control animals despite having less fat mass. This was associated with a significant increase in the innate immunity-stimulating cytokines granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1), and MCP3. Additionally, the SCID mouse phenotype was exacerbated in response to a high-fat diet as evidenced by the further significant progression of glucose intolerance. These results support the notion that the adaptive immune system plays a fundamental biological role in glucose homeostasis, and that the absence of functional B and T cells results in disruption in the concentrations of various cytokines associated with macrophage proliferation and recruitment. Additionally, the absence of functional B and T cells is not protective against diet-induced pathology.

  2. Stochastic responses of tumor–immune system with periodic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dong-Xi; Li Ying

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the stochastic responses of a tumor–immune system competition model with environmental noise and periodic treatment. Firstly, a mathematical model describing the interaction between tumor cells and immune system under external fluctuations and periodic treatment is established based on the stochastic differential equation. Then, sufficient conditions for extinction and persistence of the tumor cells are derived by constructing Lyapunov functions and Ito’s formula. Finally, numerical simulations are introduced to illustrate and verify the results. The results of this work provide the theoretical basis for designing more effective and precise therapeutic strategies to eliminate cancer cells, especially for combining the immunotherapy and the traditional tools. (paper)

  3. Linking the microbiota, chronic disease and the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Timothy W.; Vujkovic-Cvijin, Ivan; Ridaura, Vanessa K.; Belkaid, Yasmine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are the most important causes of mortality in the world today and are on the rise. We now know that immune-driven inflammation is critical in the etiology of these diseases, though the environmental triggers and cellular mechanisms that lead to their development are still mysterious. Many chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with significant shifts in the microbiota towards inflammatory configurations, which can affect the host both by inducing local and systemic inflammation and by alterations in microbiota-derived metabolites. This review discusses recent findings suggesting that shifts in the microbiota may contribute to chronic disease via effects on the immune system. PMID:27623245

  4. Hopf bifurcation for tumor-immune competition systems with delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Bi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a immune response system with delay is considered, which consists of two-dimensional nonlinear differential equations. The main purpose of this paper is to explore the Hopf bifurcation of a immune response system with delay. The general formula of the direction, the estimation formula of period and stability of bifurcated periodic solution are also given. Especially, the conditions of the global existence of periodic solutions bifurcating from Hopf bifurcations are given. Numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate the the theoretical analysis and the obtained results.

  5. Cells of the immune system in atherosclerosis – chosen data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Niedźwiedzka-Rystwej

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Development of artherosclerosis is associated with participation of various cell types of the immune system such as: granulocytes, B and T lymphocytes, mast cells, dendritic cells and progenitor cells. Cytokines and growth factors have a great impact on activation of the atheromatous plaque. This pathological process results in increase of artery’s tunic intima thickness, leading to coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction or stroke. It is suggested that a closer look at participation of the immune system cells in artherosclerosis may contribute to a change in the profile of therapy of this disease.

  6. Toxic effects of dietary methylmercury on immune system development in nestling American kestrels (Falco sparverius)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallacara, Dawn M.; Halbrook, Richard S.; French, John B.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of dietary methylmercury (MeHg) on immune system development in captive-reared nestling American kestrels (Falco sparverius) to determine whether T cell–mediated and antibody-mediated adaptive immunity are targets for MeHg toxicity at environmentally relevant concentrations. Nestlings received various diets, including 0 (control), 0.6, and 3.9 μg/g (dry wt) MeHg for up to 18 d posthatch. Immunotoxicity endpoints included cell-mediated immunity (CMI) using the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin-swelling assay and antibody-mediated immune response via the sheep red blood cell (SRBC) hemagglutination assay. T cell– and B cell–dependent histological parameters in the spleen, thymus, and bursa of Fabricius were correlated with the functional assays. For nestlings in the 0.6 and 3.9 μg/g MeHg groups, CMI was suppressed by 73 and 62%, respectively, at 11 d of age. Results of this functional assay were correlated with T cell–dependent components of the spleen and thymus. Dose-dependent lymphoid depletion in spleen tissue directly affected the proliferation of T-lymphocyte populations, insofar as lower stimulation indexes from the PHA assay occurred in nestlings with lower proportions of splenic white pulp and higher THg concentrations. Nestlings in the 3.9 μg/g group also exhibited lymphoid depletion and a lack of macrophage activity in the thymus. Methylmercury did not have a noticeable effect on antibody-mediated immune function or B cell–dependent histological correlates. We conclude that T cell–mediated immunosuppression is the primary target of MeHg toward adaptive immunity in developing kestrels. This study provides evidence that environmentally relevant concentrations of MeHg may compromise immunocompetence in a developing terrestrial predator and raises concern regarding the long-term health effects of kestrels that were exposed to dietary MeHg during early avian development.

  7. Endocannabinoid system acts as a regulator of immune homeostasis in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Nandini; Penukonda, Sasi; Shcheglova, Tatiana; Hagymasi, Adam T; Basu, Sreyashi; Srivastava, Pramod K

    2017-05-09

    Endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids) are small molecules biosynthesized from membrane glycerophospholipid. Anandamide (AEA) is an endogenous intestinal cannabinoid that controls appetite and energy balance by engagement of the enteric nervous system through cannabinoid receptors. Here, we uncover a role for AEA and its receptor, cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), in the regulation of immune tolerance in the gut and the pancreas. This work demonstrates a major immunological role for an endocannabinoid. The pungent molecule capsaicin (CP) has a similar effect as AEA; however, CP acts by engagement of the vanilloid receptor TRPV1, causing local production of AEA, which acts through CB2. We show that the engagement of the cannabinoid/vanilloid receptors augments the number and immune suppressive function of the regulatory CX3CR1 hi macrophages (Mϕ), which express the highest levels of such receptors among the gut immune cells. Additionally, TRPV1 -/- or CB2 -/- mice have fewer CX3CR1 hi Mϕ in the gut. Treatment of mice with CP also leads to differentiation of a regulatory subset of CD4 + cells, the Tr1 cells, in an IL-27-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. In a functional demonstration, tolerance elicited by engagement of TRPV1 can be transferred to naïve nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice [model of type 1 diabetes (T1D)] by transfer of CD4 + T cells. Further, oral administration of AEA to NOD mice provides protection from T1D. Our study unveils a role for the endocannabinoid system in maintaining immune homeostasis in the gut/pancreas and reveals a conversation between the nervous and immune systems using distinct receptors.

  8. The Adaptive Immune System of Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa-Katharina Maier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To fight off invading genetic elements, prokaryotes have developed an elaborate defence system that is both adaptable and heritable—the CRISPR-Cas system (CRISPR is short for: clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and Cas: CRISPR associated. Comprised of proteins and multiple small RNAs, this prokaryotic defence system is present in 90% of archaeal and 40% of bacterial species, and enables foreign intruders to be eliminated in a sequence-specific manner. There are three major types (I–III and at least 14 subtypes of this system, with only some of the subtypes having been analysed in detail, and many aspects of the defence reaction remaining to be elucidated. Few archaeal examples have so far been analysed. Here we summarize the characteristics of the CRISPR-Cas system of Haloferax volcanii, an extremely halophilic archaeon originally isolated from the Dead Sea. It carries a single CRISPR-Cas system of type I-B, with a Cascade like complex composed of Cas proteins Cas5, Cas6b and Cas7. Cas6b is essential for CRISPR RNA (crRNA maturation but is otherwise not required for the defence reaction. A systematic search revealed that six protospacer adjacent motif (PAM sequences are recognised by the Haloferax defence system. For successful invader recognition, a non-contiguous seed sequence of 10 base-pairs between the crRNA and the invader is required.

  9. Immune system handling time may alter the outcome of competition between pathogens and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspoon, Philip B; Banton, Sydney; Mideo, Nicole

    2018-06-14

    Predators may be limited in their ability to kill prey (i.e., have type II or III functional responses), an insight that has had far-reaching consequences in the ecological literature. With few exceptions, however, this possibility has not been extended to the behaviour of immune cells, which kill pathogens much as predators kill their prey. Rather, models of the within-host environment have tended to tacitly assume that immune cells have an unlimited ability to target and kill pathogens (i.e., a type I functional response). Here we explore the effects of changing this assumption on infection outcomes (i.e., pathogen loads). We incorporate immune cell handling time into an ecological model of the within-host environment that considers both the predatory nature of the pathogen-immune cell interaction as well as competition between immune cells and pathogens for host resources. Unless pathogens can preempt immune cells for host resources, adding an immune cell handling time increases equilibrium pathogen load. We find that the shape of the relationship between energy intake and pathogen load can change: with a type I functional response, pathogen load is maximised at intermediate inputs, while for a type II or III functional response, pathogen load is solely increasing. With a type II functional response, pathogen load can fluctuate rather than settling to an equilibrium, a phenomenon unobserved with type I or III functional responses. Our work adds to a growing literature highlighting the role of resource availability in host-parasite interactions. Implications of our results for adaptive anorexia are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Complement: a key system for immune surveillance and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Daniel; Hajishengallis, George; Yang, Kun; Lambris, John D

    2010-09-01

    Nearly a century after the significance of the human complement system was recognized, we have come to realize that its functions extend far beyond the elimination of microbes. Complement acts as a rapid and efficient immune surveillance system that has distinct effects on healthy and altered host cells and foreign intruders. By eliminating cellular debris and infectious microbes, orchestrating immune responses and sending 'danger' signals, complement contributes substantially to homeostasis, but it can also take action against healthy cells if not properly controlled. This review describes our updated view of the function, structure and dynamics of the complement network, highlights its interconnection with immunity at large and with other endogenous pathways, and illustrates its multiple roles in homeostasis and disease.

  11. Gene regulation in the immune system by long noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y Grace; Satpathy, Ansuman T; Chang, Howard Y

    2017-08-22

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as critical regulators of gene expression in the immune system. Studies have shown that lncRNAs are expressed in a highly lineage-specific manner and control the differentiation and function of innate and adaptive cell types. In this Review, we focus on mechanisms used by lncRNAs to regulate genes encoding products involved in the immune response, including direct interactions with chromatin, RNA and proteins. In addition, we address new areas of lncRNA biology, such as the functions of enhancer RNAs, circular RNAs and chemical modifications to RNA in cellular processes. We emphasize critical gaps in knowledge and future prospects for the roles of lncRNAs in the immune system and autoimmune disease.

  12. Why the Immune System Should Be Concerned by Nanomaterials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc J. Pallardy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Particles possess huge specific surface area and therefore nanomaterials exhibit unique characteristics, such as special physical properties and chemical hyper-reactivity, which make them particularly attractive but also raise numerous questions concerning their safety. Interactions of nanomaterials with the immune system can potentially lead to immunosuppression, hypersensitivity (allergy, immunogenicity and autoimmunity, involving both innate and adaptive immune responses. Inherent physical and chemical NP characteristics may influence their immunotoxicity, i.e., the adverse effects that can result from exposure. This review will focus on the possible interaction of nanomaterials including protein aggregates with the innate immune system with specific emphasis on antigen-presenting cells, i.e., dendritic cells, macrophages and monocytes.

  13. Graphene and the Immune System: A Romance of Many Dimensions

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    Sourav P. Mukherjee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Graphene-based materials (GBMs are emerging as attractive materials for biomedical applications. Understanding how these materials are perceived by and interact with the immune system is of fundamental importance. Phagocytosis is a major mechanism deployed by the immune system to remove pathogens, particles, and cellular debris. Here, we discuss recent studies on the interactions of GBMs with different phagocytic cells, including macrophages, neutrophils, and dendritic cells. The importance of assessing GBMs for endotoxin contamination is discussed as this may skew results. We also explore the role of the bio-corona for interactions of GBMs with immune cells. Finally, we highlight recent evidence for direct plasma membrane interactions of GBMs.

  14. Quantifying adaptive evolution in the Drosophila immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J Obbard

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that a large proportion of amino acid substitutions in Drosophila have been fixed by natural selection, and as organisms are faced with an ever-changing array of pathogens and parasites to which they must adapt, we have investigated the role of parasite-mediated selection as a likely cause. To quantify the effect, and to identify which genes and pathways are most likely to be involved in the host-parasite arms race, we have re-sequenced population samples of 136 immunity and 287 position-matched non-immunity genes in two species of Drosophila. Using these data, and a new extension of the McDonald-Kreitman approach, we estimate that natural selection fixes advantageous amino acid changes in immunity genes at nearly double the rate of other genes. We find the rate of adaptive evolution in immunity genes is also more variable than other genes, with a small subset of immune genes evolving under intense selection. These genes, which are likely to represent hotspots of host-parasite coevolution, tend to share similar functions or belong to the same pathways, such as the antiviral RNAi pathway and the IMD signalling pathway. These patterns appear to be general features of immune system evolution in both species, as rates of adaptive evolution are correlated between the D. melanogaster and D. simulans lineages. In summary, our data provide quantitative estimates of the elevated rate of adaptive evolution in immune system genes relative to the rest of the genome, and they suggest that adaptation to parasites is an important force driving molecular evolution.

  15. Small and Long Regulatory RNAs in the Immune System and Immune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Stachurska, Anna; Zorro, Maria M.; van der Sijde, Marijke R.; Withoff, Sebo

    2014-01-01

    Cellular differentiation is regulated on the level of gene expression, and it is known that dysregulation of gene expression can lead to deficiencies in differentiation that contribute to a variety of diseases, particularly of the immune system. Until recently, it was thought that the dysregulation was governed by changes in the binding or activity of a class of proteins called transcription factors. However, the discovery of micro-RNAs and recent descriptions of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs...

  16. The contribution of the immune system to parturition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. De Jongh

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune system plays a central role before and during parturition, including the main physiological processes of parturition: uterine contractions and cervical ripening. The immune system comprises white blood cells and their secretions. Polymorphonuclear cells and macrophages invade the cervical tissue and release compounds, such as oxygen radicals and enzymes, which break down the cervical matrix to allow softening and dilatation. During this inflammatory process, white blood cells undergo chemotaxis, adherence to endothelial cells, diapedesis, migration and activation. Factors that regulate white blood cell invasion and secretion include cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor and interleukins. Glucocorticoids, sex hormones and prostaglandins, affect cytokine synthesis. They also modulate the target cells, resulting in altered responses to cytokines. On the other hand, the immune system has profound effects on the hormonal system and prostaglandin synthesis. In animals, nitric oxide has marked effects on uterine quiescence during gestation. At the same time, it plays an important role in regulating the vascular tone of uterine arteries and has anti-adhesive effects on leukocytes. Cytokines are found in amniotic fluid, and in maternal and foetal serum at term and preterm. Several intrauterine cells have been shown to produce these cytoldnes. Since neither white blood cells, cytokines nor nitric oxide seem to be the ultimate intermediate for human parturition, the immune system is an additional but obligatory and underestimated component in the physiology of delivery. Scientists, obstetricians and anaesthesiologists must thus be aware of these processes.

  17. Cardiovascular disease in haemodialysis: role of the intravascular innate immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekdahl, Kristina N; Soveri, Inga; Hilborn, Jöns; Fellström, Bengt; Nilsson, Bo

    2017-05-01

    Haemodialysis is a life-saving renal replacement modality for end-stage renal disease, but this therapy also represents a major challenge to the intravascular innate immune system, which is comprised of the complement, contact and coagulation systems. Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients on haemodialysis. Biomaterial-induced contact activation of proteins within the plasma cascade systems occurs during haemodialysis and initially leads to local generation of inflammatory mediators on the biomaterial surface. The inflammation is spread by soluble activation products and mediators that are generated during haemodialysis and transported in the extracorporeal circuit back into the patient together with activated leukocytes and platelets. The combined effect is activation of the endothelium of the cardiovascular system, which loses its anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory properties, leading to atherogenesis and arteriosclerosis. This concept suggests that maximum suppression of the intravascular innate immune system is needed to minimize the risk of CVD in patients on haemodialysis. A potential approach to achieve this goal is to treat patients with broad-specificity systemic drugs that target more than one of the intravascular cascade systems. Alternatively, 'stealth' biomaterials that cause minimal cascade system activation could be used in haemodialysis circuits.

  18. Intrathecal Fas ligand infusion strengthens immunoprivilege of central nervous system and suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bing; Luo, Liqing; Chen, Yongliang; Paty, Donald W; Cynader, Max S

    2002-08-01

    Fas ligand (FasL) is an essential molecule strongly expressed in some immunoprivileged sites, but is expressed at very low levels in normal CNS. In this study, acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in Lewis rats with guinea pig myelin basic protein. Intrathecal infusion of recombinant FasL before EAE onset dose dependently suppressed acute EAE and alleviated pathological inflammation in lumbosacral spinal cord. This treatment greatly increased apoptosis in CNS inflammatory cells, but did not inhibit systemic immune response to myelin basic protein. Systemic administration of a similar dose of rFasL was ineffective. In vitro, encephalitogenic T cells were highly sensitive to rFasL-induced cell death, and activated macrophages were also susceptible. In addition, in vitro rFasL treatment potentiated the immunosuppressive property of rat cerebrospinal fluid. We conclude that intrathecal infusion of rFasL eliminated the initial wave of infiltrating T cells and macrophages, and therefore blocked the later recruitment of inflammatory cells into CNS. Although Fas receptor expression was observed on spinal cord neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, no damage to these cells or to the myelin structure was detected after rFasL infusion.

  19. Targeting ALCAM in the cryo-treated tumour microenvironment successfully induces systemic anti-tumour immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo-Saito, Chie; Fuwa, Takafumi; Kawakami, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Cryoablative treatment has been widely used for treating cancer. However, the therapeutic efficacies are still controversial. The molecular mechanisms of the cryo-induced immune responses, particularly underlying the ineffectiveness, remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we identified a new molecular mechanism involved in the cryo failure. We used cryo-ineffective metastatic tumour models that murine melanoma B16-F10 cells were subcutaneously and intravenously implanted into C57BL/6 mice. When the subcutaneous tumours were treated cryoablation on day 7 after tumour implantation, cells expressing activated leucocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166) were significantly expanded not only locally in the treated tumours but also systemically in spleen and bone marrow of the mice. The cryo-induced ALCAM(+) cells including CD45(-) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells significantly suppressed interferon γ production and cytotoxicity of tumour-specific CD8(+) T cells via ALCAM expressed in these cells. This suggests that systemic expansion of the ALCAM(+) cells negatively switches host-immune directivity to the tumour-supportive mode. Intratumoural injection with anti-ALCAM blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) following the cryo treatment systemically induced tumour-specific CD8(+) T cells with higher cytotoxic activities, resulting in suppression of tumour growth and metastasis in the cryo-resistant tumour models. These suggest that expansion of ALCAM(+) cells is a determinant of limiting the cryo efficacy. Further combination with an immune checkpoint inhibitor anti-CTLA4 mAb optimized the anti-tumour efficacy of the dual-combination therapy. Targeting ALCAM may be a promising strategy for overcoming the cryo ineffectiveness leading to the better practical use of cryoablation in clinical treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Brief Report: Higher ART Adherence Is Associated With Lower Systemic Inflammation in Treatment-Naive Ugandans Who Achieve Virologic Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R; Morrow, Mary; Boum, Yap; Byakwaga, Helen; Haberer, Jessica E; Martin, Jeffrey N; Bangsberg, David; Mawhinney, Samantha; Musinguzi, Nicholas; Huang, Yong; Tracy, Russell P; Burdo, Tricia H; Williams, Kenneth; Muzzora, Conrad; Hunt, Peter W; Siedner, Mark J

    2018-04-15

    Residual systemic inflammation persists despite suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) and is associated with non-AIDS clinical outcomes. We aimed to evaluate the association between ART adherence and inflammation in Ugandans living with HIV who were predominantly receiving nevirapine-based ART with a thymidine analog backbone and were virologically suppressed by conventional assays. Plasma concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), D-dimer, soluble (s)CD14, sCD163, and the kynurenine/tryptophan ratio, in addition to CD8 T-cell activation, were measured at baseline and 6 months after ART initiation in treatment-naive adults who achieved an undetectable plasma HIV RNA (<400 copies/mL) at their 6-month visit. Adherence was measured through medication event monitoring system and calculated as the ratio of observed/prescribed device openings per participant. We fit adjusted linear regression models to estimate the association between ART adherence and the log-transformed plasma concentrations of inflammatory biomarkers. We evaluated 282 participants (median age, 35 years; 70% women). The median (interquartile range) adherence was 93% (84-98). In the adjusted analyses, for every 10% increase in average ART adherence, we found a 15% [P < 0.0001; 95% confidence interval (CI), -21.0 to -7.9], 11% (P = 0.017; 95% CI, -18.3 to -2.0), and 3% (P = 0.028; 95% CI, -5.0 to -0.3) decrease in IL-6, D-dimer, and sCD14, respectively. Higher ART adherence was associated with lower levels of biomarkers of inflammation, immune activation, and coagulopathy among Ugandans living with HIV who achieved viral suppression shortly after ART initiation. This suggests that ART adherence could have biological consequences beyond viral suppression. Whether ART adherence optimization in virologically suppressed individuals could reduce residual inflammation remains unknown.